WorldWideScience

Sample records for extended convection diffusion

  1. An Extended Eddy-Diffusivity Mass-Flux Scheme for Unified Representation of Subgrid-Scale Turbulence and Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Zhihong; Kaul, Colleen M.; Pressel, Kyle G.; Cohen, Yair; Schneider, Tapio; Teixeira, João.

    2018-03-01

    Large-scale weather forecasting and climate models are beginning to reach horizontal resolutions of kilometers, at which common assumptions made in existing parameterization schemes of subgrid-scale turbulence and convection—such as that they adjust instantaneously to changes in resolved-scale dynamics—cease to be justifiable. Additionally, the common practice of representing boundary-layer turbulence, shallow convection, and deep convection by discontinuously different parameterizations schemes, each with its own set of parameters, has contributed to the proliferation of adjustable parameters in large-scale models. Here we lay the theoretical foundations for an extended eddy-diffusivity mass-flux (EDMF) scheme that has explicit time-dependence and memory of subgrid-scale variables and is designed to represent all subgrid-scale turbulence and convection, from boundary layer dynamics to deep convection, in a unified manner. Coherent up and downdrafts in the scheme are represented as prognostic plumes that interact with their environment and potentially with each other through entrainment and detrainment. The more isotropic turbulence in their environment is represented through diffusive fluxes, with diffusivities obtained from a turbulence kinetic energy budget that consistently partitions turbulence kinetic energy between plumes and environment. The cross-sectional area of up and downdrafts satisfies a prognostic continuity equation, which allows the plumes to cover variable and arbitrarily large fractions of a large-scale grid box and to have life cycles governed by their own internal dynamics. Relatively simple preliminary proposals for closure parameters are presented and are shown to lead to a successful simulation of shallow convection, including a time-dependent life cycle.

  2. Effective diffusion in laminar convective flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenbluth, M.N.; Berk, H.L.; Doxas, I.; Horton, W.

    1987-03-01

    The effective diffusion coefficient D* of a passive component, such as test particles, dye, temperature, magnetic flux, etc., is derived for motion in periodic two-dimensional incompressible convective flow with characteristic velocity v and size d in the presence of an intrinsic local diffusivity D. Asymptotic solutions for effective diffusivity D*(P) in the large P limit, with P ∼ vd/D, is shown to be of the form D* = cDP/sup 1/2/ with c being a coefficient that is determined analytically. The constant c depends on the geometry of the convective cell and on an average of the flow speed along the separatrix. The asymptotic method of evaluation applies to both free boundary and rough boundary flow patterns and it is shown that the method can be extended to more complicated patterns such as the flows generated by rotating cylinders, as in the problem considered by Nadim, Cox, and Brenner [J. Fluid Mech., 164: 185 (1986)]. The diffusivity D* is readily calculated for small P, but the evaluation for arbitrary P requires numerical methods. Monte Carlo particle simulation codes are used to evaluate D* at arbitrary P, and thereby describe the transition for D* between the large and small P limits

  3. Ignition in Convective-Diffusive Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Law, Chung

    1999-01-01

    ... efficiency as well as the knock and emission characteristics. The ignition event is clearly controlled by the chemical reactions of fuel oxidation and the fluid mechanics of convective and diffusive transport...

  4. Preserving Symmetry in Convection-Diffusion Schemes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verstappen, R.W.C.P.; Veldman, A.E.P.; Drikakis, D.; Geurts, B.J.

    2002-01-01

    We propose to perform turbulent flow simulations in such manner that the difference operators do have the same symmetry properties as the corresponding differential operators. That is, the convective operator is represented by a skew-symmetric difference operator and the diffusive operator is

  5. Effects of variable thermal diffusivity on the structure of convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shcheritsa, O. V.; Getling, A. V.; Mazhorova, O. S.

    2018-03-01

    The structure of multiscale convection in a thermally stratified plane horizontal fluid layer is investigated by means of numerical simulations. The thermal diffusivity is assumed to produce a thin boundary sublayer convectively much more unstable than the bulk of the layer. The simulated flow is a superposition of cellular structures with three different characteristic scales. In contrast to the largest convection cells, the smaller ones are localised in the upper portion of the layer. The smallest cells are advected by the larger-scale convective flows. The simulated flow pattern qualitatively resembles that observed on the Sun.

  6. Arbitrary Dimension Convection-Diffusion Schemes for Space-Time Discretizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bank, Randolph E. [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States); Vassilevski, Panayot S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Zikatanov, Ludmil T. [Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2016-01-20

    This note proposes embedding a time dependent PDE into a convection-diffusion type PDE (in one space dimension higher) with singularity, for which two discretization schemes, the classical streamline-diffusion and the EAFE (edge average finite element) one, are investigated in terms of stability and error analysis. The EAFE scheme, in particular, is extended to be arbitrary order which is of interest on its own. Numerical results, in combined space-time domain demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed approach.

  7. Extended phase graphs with anisotropic diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigel, M.; Schwenk, S.; Kiselev, V. G.; Scheffler, K.; Hennig, J.

    2010-08-01

    The extended phase graph (EPG) calculus gives an elegant pictorial description of magnetization response in multi-pulse MR sequences. The use of the EPG calculus enables a high computational efficiency for the quantitation of echo intensities even for complex sequences with multiple refocusing pulses with arbitrary flip angles. In this work, the EPG concept dealing with RF pulses with arbitrary flip angles and phases is extended to account for anisotropic diffusion in the presence of arbitrary varying gradients. The diffusion effect can be expressed by specific diffusion weightings of individual magnetization pathways. This can be represented as an action of a linear operator on the magnetization state. The algorithm allows easy integration of diffusion anisotropy effects. The formalism is validated on known examples from literature and used to calculate the effective diffusion weighting in multi-echo sequences with arbitrary refocusing flip angles.

  8. Double Diffusive Natural Convection in a Nuclear Waste Repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Y. Hao; J. Nitao; T.A. Buscheck; Y. Sun

    2006-01-01

    In this study, we conduct a two-dimensional numerical analysis of double diffusive natural convection in an emplacement drift for a nuclear waste repository. In-drift heat and moisture transport is driven by combined thermal- and compositional-induced buoyancy forces. Numerical results demonstrate buoyancy-driven convective flow patterns and configurations during both repository heat-up and cool-down phases. It is also shown that boundary conditions, particularly on the drip-shield surface, have strong impacts on the in-drift convective flow and transport

  9. The numerical simulation of convection delayed dominated diffusion equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan Kumar P. Murali

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a fitted numerical method for solving convection delayed dominated diffusion equation. A fitting factor is introduced and the model equation is discretized by cubic spline method. The error analysis is analyzed for the consider problem. The numerical examples are solved using the present method and compared the result with the exact solution.

  10. Convection-diffusion lattice Boltzmann scheme for irregular lattices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sman, van der R.G.M.; Ernst, M.H.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, a lattice Boltzmann (LB) scheme for convection diffusion on irregular lattices is presented, which is free of any interpolation or coarse graining step. The scheme is derived using the axioma that the velocity moments of the equilibrium distribution equal those of the

  11. On triply diffusive convection in completely confined fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakash Jyoti

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper carries forward Prakash et al. [21] analysis for triple diffusive convection problem in completely confined fluids and derives upper bounds for the complex growth rate of an arbitrary oscillatory disturbance which may be neutral or unstable through the use of some non-trivial integral estimates obtained from the coupled system of governing equations of the problem.

  12. From convection rolls to finger convection in double-diffusive turbulence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Yantao; Verzicco, Roberto; Lohse, Detlef

    2015-01-01

    Double-diffusive convection (DDC), which is the buoyancy-driven flow with fluid density depending on two scalar components, is ubiquitous in many natural and engineering environments. Of great interests are scalars’ transfer rate and flow structures. Here we systematically investigate DDC flow

  13. Traveling wavefront solutions to nonlinear reaction-diffusion-convection equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indekeu, Joseph O; Smets, Ruben

    2017-01-01

    Physically motivated modified Fisher equations are studied in which nonlinear convection and nonlinear diffusion is allowed for besides the usual growth and spread of a population. It is pointed out that in a large variety of cases separable functions in the form of exponentially decaying sharp wavefronts solve the differential equation exactly provided a co-moving point source or sink is active at the wavefront. The velocity dispersion and front steepness may differ from those of some previously studied exact smooth traveling wave solutions. For an extension of the reaction-diffusion-convection equation, featuring a memory effect in the form of a maturity delay for growth and spread, also smooth exact wavefront solutions are obtained. The stability of the solutions is verified analytically and numerically. (paper)

  14. Traveling wavefront solutions to nonlinear reaction-diffusion-convection equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indekeu, Joseph O.; Smets, Ruben

    2017-08-01

    Physically motivated modified Fisher equations are studied in which nonlinear convection and nonlinear diffusion is allowed for besides the usual growth and spread of a population. It is pointed out that in a large variety of cases separable functions in the form of exponentially decaying sharp wavefronts solve the differential equation exactly provided a co-moving point source or sink is active at the wavefront. The velocity dispersion and front steepness may differ from those of some previously studied exact smooth traveling wave solutions. For an extension of the reaction-diffusion-convection equation, featuring a memory effect in the form of a maturity delay for growth and spread, also smooth exact wavefront solutions are obtained. The stability of the solutions is verified analytically and numerically.

  15. Transient Convection, Diffusion, and Adsorption in Surface-Based Biosensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Rasmus; Bruus, Henrik; Callisen, Thomas H.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical and computational investigation of convection, diffusion, and adsorption in surface-based biosensors. In particular, we study the transport dynamics in a model geometry of a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor. The work, however, is equally relevant for other...... microfluidic surface-based biosensors, operating under flow conditions. A widely adopted approximate quasi-steady theory to capture convective and diffusive mass transport is reviewed, and an analytical solution is presented. An expression of the Damköhler number is derived in terms of the nondimensional...... concentration to the maximum surface capacity is critical for reliable use of the quasi-steady theory. Finally, our results provide users of surface-based biosensors with a tool for correcting experimentally obtained adsorption rate constants....

  16. Convection-diffusion effects in marathon race dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, E.; Espinosa-Paredes, G.; Alvarez-Ramirez, J.

    2014-01-01

    In the face of the recent terrorist attack event on the 2013 Boston Marathon, the increasing participation of recreational runners in large marathon races has imposed important logistical and safety issues for organizers and city authorities. An accurate understanding of the dynamics of the marathon pack along the race course can provide important insights for improving safety and performance of these events. On the other hand, marathon races can be seen as a model of pedestrian movement under confined conditions. This work used data of the 2011 Chicago Marathon event for modeling the dynamics of the marathon pack from the corral zone to the finish line. By considering the marathon pack as a set of particles moving along the race course, the dynamics are modeled as a convection-diffusion partial differential equation with position-dependent mean velocity and diffusion coefficient. A least-squares problem is posed and solved with optimization techniques for fitting field data from the 2011 Chicago Marathon. It was obtained that the mean pack velocity decreases while the diffusion coefficient increases with distance. This means that the dispersion rate of the initially compact marathon pack increases as the marathon race evolves along the race course.

  17. Extended Subadiabatic Layer in Simulations of Overshooting Convection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Käpylä, Petri J.; Arlt, Rainer [Leibniz-Institut für Astrophysik, An der Sternwarte 16, D-14482 Potsdam (Germany); Rheinhardt, Matthias; Käpylä, Maarit J.; Olspert, Nigul [ReSoLVE Centre of Excellence, Department of Computer Science, P.O. Box 15400, FI-00076 Aalto (Finland); Brandenburg, Axel [NORDITA, KTH Royal Institute of Technology and Stockholm University, Roslagstullsbacken 23, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Lagg, Andreas; Warnecke, Jörn [Max-Planck-Institut für Sonnensystemforschung, Justus-von-Liebig-Weg 3, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany)

    2017-08-20

    We present numerical simulations of hydrodynamic overshooting convection in local Cartesian domains. We find that a substantial fraction of the lower part of the convection zone (CZ) is stably stratified according to the Schwarzschild criterion while the enthalpy flux is outward directed. This occurs when the heat conduction profile at the bottom of the CZ is smoothly varying, based either on a Kramers-like opacity prescription as a function of temperature and density or a static profile of a similar shape. We show that the subadiabatic layer arises due to nonlocal energy transport by buoyantly driven downflows in the upper parts of the CZ. Analysis of the force balance of the upflows and downflows confirms that convection is driven by cooling at the surface. We find that the commonly used prescription for the convective enthalpy flux being proportional to the negative entropy gradient does not hold in the stably stratified layers where the flux is positive. We demonstrate the existence of a non-gradient contribution to the enthalpy flux, which is estimated to be important throughout the convective layer. A quantitative analysis of downflows indicates a transition from a tree-like structure where smaller downdrafts merge into larger ones in the upper parts to a structure in the deeper parts where a height-independent number of strong downdrafts persist. This change of flow topology occurs when a substantial subadiabatic layer is present in the lower part of the CZ.

  18. Localized traveling pulses in natural doubly diffusive convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Jacono, D.; Bergeon, A.; Knobloch, E.

    2017-09-01

    Two-dimensional natural doubly diffusive convection in a vertical slot driven by an imposed temperature difference in the horizontal is studied using numerical continuation and direct numerical simulation. Two cases are considered and compared. In the first a concentration difference that balances thermal buoyancy is imposed in the horizontal and stationary localized structures are found to be organized in a standard snakes-and-ladders bifurcation diagram. Disconnected branches of traveling pulses TPn consisting of n ,n =1 ,2 ,⋯ , corotating cells are identified and shown to accumulate on a tertiary branch of traveling waves. With Robin or mixed concentration boundary conditions on one wall all localized states travel and the hitherto stationary localized states may connect up with the traveling pulses. The stability of the TPn states is determined and unstable TPn shown to evolve into spatio-temporal chaos. The calculations are done with no-slip boundary conditions in the horizontal and periodic boundary conditions in the vertical.

  19. Numerical approach to the inverse convection-diffusion problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, X-H; She, D-X; Li, J-Q

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, the inverse problem on source term identification in convection-diffusion equation is transformed into an optimization problem. To reduce the computational cost and improve computational accuracy for the optimization problem, a new algorithm, chaos real-coded hybrid-accelerating evolution algorithm (CRHAEA), is proposed, in which an initial population is generated by chaos mapping, and new chaos mutation and simplex evolution operation are used. With the shrinking of searching range, CRHAEA gradually directs to an optimal result with the excellent individuals obtained by real-coded evolution algorithm. Its convergence is analyzed. Its efficiency is demonstrated by 15 test functions. Numerical simulation shows that CRHAEA has some advantages over the real-coded accelerated evolution algorithm, the chaos algorithm and the pure random search algorithm

  20. Local multiplicative Schwarz algorithms for convection-diffusion equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Xiao-Chuan; Sarkis, Marcus

    1995-01-01

    We develop a new class of overlapping Schwarz type algorithms for solving scalar convection-diffusion equations discretized by finite element or finite difference methods. The preconditioners consist of two components, namely, the usual two-level additive Schwarz preconditioner and the sum of some quadratic terms constructed by using products of ordered neighboring subdomain preconditioners. The ordering of the subdomain preconditioners is determined by considering the direction of the flow. We prove that the algorithms are optimal in the sense that the convergence rates are independent of the mesh size, as well as the number of subdomains. We show by numerical examples that the new algorithms are less sensitive to the direction of the flow than either the classical multiplicative Schwarz algorithms, and converge faster than the additive Schwarz algorithms. Thus, the new algorithms are more suitable for fluid flow applications than the classical additive or multiplicative Schwarz algorithms.

  1. Carbon dioxide sequestration: Modeling the diffusive and convective transport under a CO2 cap

    KAUST Repository

    Allen, Rebecca; Sun, Shuyu

    2012-01-01

    of low permeability. CO2 from this ‘capped' region diffuses into the fluid underlying it, and the resulting CO2-fluid mixture increases in density. This increase in density leads to gravity-driven convection. Accordingly, diffusive-convective transport

  2. Estimation and prediction of convection-diffusion-reaction systems from point measurement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, D.

    2008-01-01

    Different procedures with respect to estimation and prediction of systems characterized by convection, diffusion and reactions on the basis of point measurement data, have been studied. Two applications of these convection-diffusion-reaction (CDR) systems have been used as a case study of the

  3. A perturbational h4 exponential finite difference scheme for the convective diffusion equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, G.Q.; Gao, Z.; Yang, Z.F.

    1993-01-01

    A perturbational h 4 compact exponential finite difference scheme with diagonally dominant coefficient matrix and upwind effect is developed for the convective diffusion equation. Perturbations of second order are exerted on the convective coefficients and source term of an h 2 exponential finite difference scheme proposed in this paper based on a transformation to eliminate the upwind effect of the convective diffusion equation. Four numerical examples including one- to three-dimensional model equations of fluid flow and a problem of natural convective heat transfer are given to illustrate the excellent behavior of the present exponential schemes. Besides, the h 4 accuracy of the perturbational scheme is verified using double precision arithmetic

  4. Multiscale stabilization for convection-dominated diffusion in heterogeneous media

    KAUST Repository

    Calo, Victor M.

    2016-02-23

    We develop a Petrov-Galerkin stabilization method for multiscale convection-diffusion transport systems. Existing stabilization techniques add a limited number of degrees of freedom in the form of bubble functions or a modified diffusion, which may not be sufficient to stabilize multiscale systems. We seek a local reduced-order model for this kind of multiscale transport problems and thus, develop a systematic approach for finding reduced-order approximations of the solution. We start from a Petrov-Galerkin framework using optimal weighting functions. We introduce an auxiliary variable to a mixed formulation of the problem. The auxiliary variable stands for the optimal weighting function. The problem reduces to finding a test space (a dimensionally reduced space for this auxiliary variable), which guarantees that the error in the primal variable (representing the solution) is close to the projection error of the full solution on the dimensionally reduced space that approximates the solution. To find the test space, we reformulate some recent mixed Generalized Multiscale Finite Element Methods. We introduce snapshots and local spectral problems that appropriately define local weight and trial spaces. In particular, we use energy minimizing snapshots and local spectral decompositions in the natural norm associated with the auxiliary variable. The resulting spectral decomposition adaptively identifies and builds the optimal multiscale space to stabilize the system. We discuss the stability and its relation to the approximation property of the test space. We design online basis functions, which accelerate convergence in the test space, and consequently, improve stability. We present several numerical examples and show that one needs a few test functions to achieve an error similar to the projection error in the primal variable irrespective of the Peclet number.

  5. Concentration Distribution of Chloride Ion under the Influence of the Convection-Diffusion Coupling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q. L. Zhao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The transfer process of chloride ion under the action of the convection-diffusion coupling was analyzed in order to predict the corrosion of reinforcement and the durability of structure more accurately. Considering the time-varying properties of diffusion coefficient and the space-time effect of the convection velocity, the differential equation for chloride ion transfer under the action of the convection-diffusion coupling was constructed. And then the chloride ion transfer model was validated by the existing experimental datum and the actual project datum. The results showed that when only diffusion was considered, the chlorine ion concentration increased with the time and decreased with the decay index of time. Under the action of the convection-diffusion coupling, at each point of coupling region, the chloride ion concentration first increased and then decreased and tended to stabilize, and the maximum appeared at the moment of convection velocity being 0; in the diffusion zone, the chloride ion concentration increased over time, and the chloride ion concentration of the same location increased with the depth of convection (in the later period, the velocity of convection (in the early period, and the chloride ion concentration of the surface.

  6. Stability considerations and a double-diffusive convection model for solar ponds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, E.I.H.; Sha, W.T.; Soo, S.L.

    1979-04-01

    A brief survey is made on the basic principles, current designs and economic advantages of salinity-gradient solar ponds as solar collectors and reservoirs. Solar ponds are well-suited for various AIPH (agricultural and industrial process heat) applications, and as annual storage devices for space heating and cooling. The benefit of an efficient pond is demonstrated via a preliminary economic analysis which suggests the idea of energy farming as a profitable alternative for land usage in the face of rising fuel cost. The economy and reliability of solar-pond operation depend crucially on the stability of the nonconvective gradient zone against disturbances such as generated by a severe weather condition. Attention is focused on the subject of stability, and pertinent existing results are summarized and discussed. Details of the derivation of three-dimensional stability criteria for thermohaline convection with linear gradients are presented. Ten key questions pertaining to stability are posed, whose answers must be sought through extensive analytical and numerical studies. Possible methods of approach toward enhancing solar-pond stability are also discussed. For the numerical studies of pond behavior and stability characteristics, a double-diffusive convection model is proposed. The model can be constructed by extending the three-dimensional thermohydrodynamic computer code COMMIX-SA, following the necessary steps outlined; computational plans are described. Similarities exist between the halothermocline and the thermocline storage systems, and an extended COMMIX-SA will be a valuable tool for the investigation of both.

  7. Color extended visual cryptography using error diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, InKoo; Arce, Gonzalo R; Lee, Heung-Kyu

    2011-01-01

    Color visual cryptography (VC) encrypts a color secret message into n color halftone image shares. Previous methods in the literature show good results for black and white or gray scale VC schemes, however, they are not sufficient to be applied directly to color shares due to different color structures. Some methods for color visual cryptography are not satisfactory in terms of producing either meaningless shares or meaningful shares with low visual quality, leading to suspicion of encryption. This paper introduces the concept of visual information pixel (VIP) synchronization and error diffusion to attain a color visual cryptography encryption method that produces meaningful color shares with high visual quality. VIP synchronization retains the positions of pixels carrying visual information of original images throughout the color channels and error diffusion generates shares pleasant to human eyes. Comparisons with previous approaches show the superior performance of the new method.

  8. Modifications in the Teach-C computer code for convection analysis-two-dimensional transient diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sampaio, P.A.B. de.

    1987-08-01

    Some modifications in Teach-C computer program to analyse the heat conduction with convective heat transport are presented. The utilization of the program to solve a convective - diffusion problem is studied and the results are compared with an analysis of the same problem, in steady - state conditions, by finite element method [pt

  9. Double-diffusive mixed convection in a lid-driven cavity with non ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S SIVASANKARAN

    2017-11-11

    Nov 11, 2017 ... transfer are solved using the finite-volume method. The numerical ... Keywords. Mixed convection; double diffusion; non-uniform heating; lid-driven cavity. 1. ... exhaustive research due to its importance in various engi- neering ...

  10. Stability, accuracy and numerical diffusion analysis of nodal expansion method for steady convection diffusion equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Xiafeng; Guo, Jiong; Li, Fu

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • NEMs are innovatively applied to solve convection diffusion equation. • Stability, accuracy and numerical diffusion for NEM are analyzed for the first time. • Stability and numerical diffusion depend on the NEM expansion order and its parity. • NEMs have higher accuracy than both second order upwind and QUICK scheme. • NEMs with different expansion orders are integrated into a unified discrete form. - Abstract: The traditional finite difference method or finite volume method (FDM or FVM) is used for HTGR thermal-hydraulic calculation at present. However, both FDM and FVM require the fine mesh sizes to achieve the desired precision and thus result in a limited efficiency. Therefore, a more efficient and accurate numerical method needs to be developed. Nodal expansion method (NEM) can achieve high accuracy even on the coarse meshes in the reactor physics analysis so that the number of spatial meshes and computational cost can be largely decreased. Because of higher efficiency and accuracy, NEM can be innovatively applied to thermal-hydraulic calculation. In the paper, NEMs with different orders of basis functions are successfully developed and applied to multi-dimensional steady convection diffusion equation. Numerical results show that NEMs with three or higher order basis functions can track the reference solutions very well and are superior to second order upwind scheme and QUICK scheme. However, the false diffusion and unphysical oscillation behavior are discovered for NEMs. To explain the reasons for the above-mentioned behaviors, the stability, accuracy and numerical diffusion properties of NEM are analyzed by the Fourier analysis, and by comparing with exact solutions of difference and differential equation. The theoretical analysis results show that the accuracy of NEM increases with the expansion order. However, the stability and numerical diffusion properties depend not only on the order of basis functions but also on the parity of

  11. Stability, accuracy and numerical diffusion analysis of nodal expansion method for steady convection diffusion equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Xiafeng, E-mail: zhou-xf11@mails.tsinghua.edu.cn; Guo, Jiong, E-mail: guojiong12@tsinghua.edu.cn; Li, Fu, E-mail: lifu@tsinghua.edu.cn

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • NEMs are innovatively applied to solve convection diffusion equation. • Stability, accuracy and numerical diffusion for NEM are analyzed for the first time. • Stability and numerical diffusion depend on the NEM expansion order and its parity. • NEMs have higher accuracy than both second order upwind and QUICK scheme. • NEMs with different expansion orders are integrated into a unified discrete form. - Abstract: The traditional finite difference method or finite volume method (FDM or FVM) is used for HTGR thermal-hydraulic calculation at present. However, both FDM and FVM require the fine mesh sizes to achieve the desired precision and thus result in a limited efficiency. Therefore, a more efficient and accurate numerical method needs to be developed. Nodal expansion method (NEM) can achieve high accuracy even on the coarse meshes in the reactor physics analysis so that the number of spatial meshes and computational cost can be largely decreased. Because of higher efficiency and accuracy, NEM can be innovatively applied to thermal-hydraulic calculation. In the paper, NEMs with different orders of basis functions are successfully developed and applied to multi-dimensional steady convection diffusion equation. Numerical results show that NEMs with three or higher order basis functions can track the reference solutions very well and are superior to second order upwind scheme and QUICK scheme. However, the false diffusion and unphysical oscillation behavior are discovered for NEMs. To explain the reasons for the above-mentioned behaviors, the stability, accuracy and numerical diffusion properties of NEM are analyzed by the Fourier analysis, and by comparing with exact solutions of difference and differential equation. The theoretical analysis results show that the accuracy of NEM increases with the expansion order. However, the stability and numerical diffusion properties depend not only on the order of basis functions but also on the parity of

  12. Numerical Solutions for Convection-Diffusion Equation through Non-Polynomial Spline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Kanth A.S.V.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, numerical solutions for convection-diffusion equation via non-polynomial splines are studied. We purpose an implicit method based on non-polynomial spline functions for solving the convection-diffusion equation. The method is proven to be unconditionally stable by using Von Neumann technique. Numerical results are illustrated to demonstrate the efficiency and stability of the purposed method.

  13. Convection Effects During Bulk Transparent Alloy Solidification in DECLIC-DSI and Phase-Field Simulations in Diffusive Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, F. L.; Song, Y.; Pereda, J.; Billia, B.; Tourret, D.; Debierre, J.-M.; Trivedi, R.; Karma, A.; Bergeon, N.

    2017-08-01

    To study the dynamical formation and evolution of cellular and dendritic arrays under diffusive growth conditions, three-dimensional (3D) directional solidification experiments were conducted in microgravity on a model transparent alloy onboard the International Space Station using the Directional Solidification Insert in the DEvice for the study of Critical LIquids and Crystallization. Selected experiments were repeated on Earth under gravity-driven fluid flow to evidence convection effects. Both radial and axial macrosegregation resulting from convection are observed in ground experiments, and primary spacings measured on Earth and microgravity experiments are noticeably different. The microgravity experiments provide unique benchmark data for numerical simulations of spatially extended pattern formation under diffusive growth conditions. The results of 3D phase-field simulations highlight the importance of accurately modeling thermal conditions that strongly influence the front recoil of the interface and the selection of the primary spacing. The modeling predictions are in good quantitative agreements with the microgravity experiments.

  14. Analysis and Application of High Resolution Numerical Perturbation Algorithm for Convective-Diffusion Equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Zhi; Shen Yi-Qing

    2012-01-01

    The high resolution numerical perturbation (NP) algorithm is analyzed and tested using various convective-diffusion equations. The NP algorithm is constructed by splitting the second order central difference schemes of both convective and diffusion terms of the convective-diffusion equation into upstream and downstream parts, then the perturbation reconstruction functions of the convective coefficient are determined using the power-series of grid interval and eliminating the truncated errors of the modified differential equation. The important nature, i.e. the upwind dominance nature, which is the basis to ensuring that the NP schemes are stable and essentially oscillation free, is firstly presented and verified. Various numerical cases show that the NP schemes are efficient, robust, and more accurate than the original second order central scheme

  15. Optimized waveform relaxation domain decomposition method for discrete finite volume non stationary convection diffusion equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berthe, P.M.

    2013-01-01

    In the context of nuclear waste repositories, we consider the numerical discretization of the non stationary convection diffusion equation. Discontinuous physical parameters and heterogeneous space and time scales lead us to use different space and time discretizations in different parts of the domain. In this work, we choose the discrete duality finite volume (DDFV) scheme and the discontinuous Galerkin scheme in time, coupled by an optimized Schwarz waveform relaxation (OSWR) domain decomposition method, because this allows the use of non-conforming space-time meshes. The main difficulty lies in finding an upwind discretization of the convective flux which remains local to a sub-domain and such that the multi domain scheme is equivalent to the mono domain one. These difficulties are first dealt with in the one-dimensional context, where different discretizations are studied. The chosen scheme introduces a hybrid unknown on the cell interfaces. The idea of up winding with respect to this hybrid unknown is extended to the DDFV scheme in the two-dimensional setting. The well-posedness of the scheme and of an equivalent multi domain scheme is shown. The latter is solved by an OSWR algorithm, the convergence of which is proved. The optimized parameters in the Robin transmission conditions are obtained by studying the continuous or discrete convergence rates. Several test-cases, one of which inspired by nuclear waste repositories, illustrate these results. (author) [fr

  16. Chaotic dynamics of large-scale double-diffusive convection in a porous medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Shutaro; Gotoda, Hiroshi; Miyano, Takaya; Tokuda, Isao T.

    2018-02-01

    We have studied chaotic dynamics of large-scale double-diffusive convection of a viscoelastic fluid in a porous medium from the viewpoint of dynamical systems theory. A fifth-order nonlinear dynamical system modeling the double-diffusive convection is theoretically obtained by incorporating the Darcy-Brinkman equation into transport equations through a physical dimensionless parameter representing porosity. We clearly show that the chaotic convective motion becomes much more complicated with increasing porosity. The degree of dynamic instability during chaotic convective motion is quantified by two important measures: the network entropy of the degree distribution in the horizontal visibility graph and the Kaplan-Yorke dimension in terms of Lyapunov exponents. We also present an interesting on-off intermittent phenomenon in the probability distribution of time intervals exhibiting nearly complete synchronization.

  17. Double-diffusive convection in a Darcy porous medium saturated with a couple-stress fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malashetty, M S; Kollur, Premila; Pal, Dulal

    2010-01-01

    The onset of double-diffusive convection in a couple-stress fluid-saturated horizontal porous layer is studied using linear and weak nonlinear stability analyses. The modified Darcy equation that includes the time derivative term and the inertia term is used to model the momentum equation. The expressions for stationary, oscillatory and finite-amplitude Rayleigh number are obtained as a function of the governing parameters. The effect of couple-stress parameter, solute Rayleigh number, Vadasz number and diffusivity ratio on stationary, oscillatory and finite-amplitude convection is shown graphically. It is found that the couple-stress parameter and the solute Rayleigh number have a stabilizing effect on stationary, oscillatory and finite-amplitude convection. The diffusivity ratio has a destabilizing effect in the case of stationary and finite-amplitude modes, with a dual effect in the case of oscillatory convection. The Vadasz number advances the onset of oscillatory convection. The heat and mass transfer decreases with an increase in the values of couple-stress parameter and diffusivity ratio, while both increase with an increase in the value of the solute Rayleigh number.

  18. Modeling Diffusion and Buoyancy-Driven Convection with Application to Geological CO2 Storage

    KAUST Repository

    Allen, Rebecca

    2015-04-01

    ABSTRACT Modeling Diffusion and Buoyancy-Driven Convection with Application to Geological CO2 Storage Rebecca Allen Geological CO2 storage is an engineering feat that has been undertaken around the world for more than two decades, thus accurate modeling of flow and transport behavior is of practical importance. Diffusive and convective transport are relevant processes for buoyancy-driven convection of CO2 into underlying fluid, a scenario that has received the attention of numerous modeling studies. While most studies focus on Darcy-scale modeling of this scenario, relatively little work exists at the pore-scale. In this work, properties evaluated at the pore-scale are used to investigate the transport behavior modeled at the Darcy-scale. We compute permeability and two different forms of tortuosity, namely hydraulic and diffusive. By generating various pore ge- ometries, we find hydraulic and diffusive tortuosity can be quantitatively different in the same pore geometry by up to a factor of ten. As such, we emphasize that these tortuosities should not be used interchangeably. We find pore geometries that are characterized by anisotropic permeability can also exhibit anisotropic diffusive tortuosity. This finding has important implications for buoyancy-driven convection modeling; when representing the geological formation with an anisotropic permeabil- ity, it is more realistic to also account for an anisotropic diffusivity. By implementing a non-dimensional model that includes both a vertically and horizontally orientated 5 Rayleigh number, we interpret our findings according to the combined effect of the anisotropy from permeability and diffusive tortuosity. In particular, we observe the Rayleigh ratio may either dampen or enhance the diffusing front, and our simulation data is used to express the time of convective onset as a function of the Rayleigh ratio. Also, we implement a lattice Boltzmann model for thermal convective flows, which we treat as an analog for

  19. Continuous Dependence in Front Propagation for Convective Reaction-Diffusion Models with Aggregative Movements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Malaguti

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with a degenerate reaction-diffusion equation, including aggregative movements and convective terms. The model also incorporates a real parameter causing the change from a purely diffusive to a diffusive-aggregative and to a purely aggregative regime. Existence and qualitative properties of traveling wave solutions are investigated, and estimates of their threshold speeds are furnished. Further, the continuous dependence of the threshold wave speed and of the wave profiles on a real parameter is studied, both when the process maintains its diffusion-aggregation nature and when it switches from it to another regime.

  20. Double-diffusive natural convection in an enclosure filled with nanofluid using ISPH method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelraheem M. Aly

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The double-diffusive natural convection in an enclosure filled with nanofluid is studied using ISPH method. The model used for the nanofluid incorporates the effects of Brownian motion and thermophoresis. In addition the thermal energy equations include regular diffusion and cross-diffusion terms. In ISPH algorithm, a semi implicit velocity correction procedure is utilized and the pressure is implicitly evaluated by solving pressure Poisson equation. The results are presented with flow configurations, isotherms, concentration and nanoparticle volume fraction contours and average Nusselt and Sherwood numbers for different cases. The results from this investigation are well validated and have favorable comparisons with previously published results. It is found that, among all cases, a good natural convection can be obtained by considering the double diffusive case. An increase in Soret number accompanied by a decrease in Dufour number results in an increase in average Nusselt number and a decrease in average Sherwood number.

  1. Carbon Sequestration in Saline Aquifers: Modeling Diffusive and Convective Transport Of a Carbon-­Dioxide Cap

    KAUST Repository

    Allen, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    done on the diffusive-convective transport that occurs under a cap of CO2-saturated fluid, which results after CO2 is injected into an aquifer and spreads laterally under an area of low permeability. The diffusive-convective modeling reveals an enhanced

  2. Soret-driven double diffusive magneto-convection in couple stress liquid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mishra P.

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The stability analysis of Soret driven double diffusive convection for electrically conducting couple stress liquid is investigated theoretically. The couple stress liquid is confined between two horizontal surfaces and a constant vertical magnetic field is applied across the surfaces. Linear stability analysis is used to investigate the effect of various parameters on the onset of convection. Effect of magnetic field on the onset of convection is presented by means of Chandrasekhar number. The problem is analyzed as a function of Chandrasekhar number (Q, positive and negative Soret parameter (S r and couple stress parameter (C, mainly. The results show that the Q, both positive and negative Sr and C delay the onset of convection. The effect of other parameters is also discussed in paper and shown by graphs.

  3. Control strategy on the double-diffusive convection in a nanofluid layer with internal heat generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtar, N. F. M.; Khalid, I. K.; Siri, Z.; Ibrahim, Z. B.; Gani, S. S. A.

    2017-10-01

    The influences of feedback control and internal heat source on the onset of Rayleigh-Bénard convection in a horizontal nanofluid layer is studied analytically due to Soret and Dufour parameters. The confining boundaries of the nanofluid layer (bottom boundary-top boundary) are assumed to be free-free, rigid-free, and rigid-rigid, with a source of heat from below. Linear stability theory is applied, and the eigenvalue solution is obtained numerically using the Galerkin technique. Focusing on the stationary convection, it is shown that there is a positive thermal resistance in the presence of feedback control on the onset of double-diffusive convection, while there is a positive thermal efficiency in the existence of internal heat generation. The possibilities of suppress or augment of the Rayleigh-Bénard convection in a nanofluid layer are also discussed in detail.

  4. Hydrodynamic theory of convective transport across a dynamically stabilized diffuse boundary layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerhauser, H.

    1983-09-01

    The diffuse boundary layer between miscible liquids is subject to Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities if the heavy fluid is supported by the light one. The resulting rapid interchange of the liquids can be suppressed by enforcing vertical oscillations on the whole system. This dynamic stabilization is incomplete and produces some peculiar novel transport phenomena such as decay off the density profile into several steps, periodic peeling of density sheets of the boundary layer and the appearance of steady vortex flow. The theory presented in this paper identifies the basic mechanism as formation of convective cells leading to enhanced diffusion, and explains previous experimental results with water and ZnJ 2 -solutions. A nonlinear treatment of the stationary convective flow problem gives the saturation amplitude of the ground mode and provides an upper bound for the maximum convective transport. The hydrodynamic model can be used for visualizing similar transport processes in the plasma of toroidal confinement devices such as sawtooth oscillations in soft disruptions of tokamak discharges and anomalous diffusion by excitation of convective cells. The latter process is investigated here in some detail, leading to the result that the maximum possible transport is of the order of Bohm diffusion. (orig.)

  5. A asymptotic numerical method for the steady-state convection diffusion equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Qiguang

    1988-01-01

    In this paper, A asymptotic numerical method for the steady-state Convection diffusion equation is proposed, which need not take very fine mesh size in the neighbourhood of the boundary layer. Numerical computation for model problem show that we can obtain the numerical solution in the boundary layer with moderate step size

  6. The Induced Dimension Reduction method applied to convection-diffusion-reaction problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Astudillo, R.; Van Gijzen, M.B.

    2016-01-01

    Discretization of (linearized) convection-diffusion-reaction problems yields a large and sparse non symmetric linear system of equations, Ax = b. (1) In this work, we compare the computational behavior of the Induced Dimension Reduction method (IDR(s)) [10], with other short-recurrences Krylov

  7. Fifth-order amplitude equation for traveling waves in isothermal double diffusive convection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendoza, S.; Becerril, R.

    2009-01-01

    Third-order amplitude equations for isothermal double diffusive convection are known to hold the tricritical condition all along the oscillatory branch, predicting that stable traveling waves exist Only at the onset of the instability. In order to properly describe stable traveling waves, we perform a fifth-order calculation and present explicitly the corresponding amplitude equation.

  8. Instability of traveling waves of the convective-diffusive Cahn-Hilliard equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Hongjun; Liu Changchun

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we study the instability of the traveling waves of the convective-diffusive Cahn-Hilliard equation. We prove that it is nonlinearly unstable under H 2 perturbations, for some traveling wave solution that is asymptotic to a constant as x→∞

  9. Multigrid solution of the convection-diffusion equation with high-Reynolds number

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jun [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States)

    1996-12-31

    A fourth-order compact finite difference scheme is employed with the multigrid technique to solve the variable coefficient convection-diffusion equation with high-Reynolds number. Scaled inter-grid transfer operators and potential on vectorization and parallelization are discussed. The high-order multigrid method is unconditionally stable and produces solution of 4th-order accuracy. Numerical experiments are included.

  10. Lateral convection and diffusion of sediment in straight rivers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Henrik Bo; Fredsøe, Jørgen

    1998-01-01

    and a higher level of turbulence at the channel centre, than in the near bank zones, which means that the ability to support suspended sediment will decrease from the channel centre. The two turbulence models give different estimates for the lateral transport, which mainly are caused by turbulence generated......The lateral transport of suspended sediment in a straight river cross section with a parabolic shaped bed is studied be use of a k-e and a full Reynolds stress turbulence model. Due to depth variations a lateral transport of suspended sediment is generated. This is mainly caused by the slopping bed...... secondary flow cells in the Reynolds stress model. The flow cells make zones with alternately high and low sediment concentration, and thereby much higher local gradients in the lateral direction. Both models found a net inward lateral transport. The transport by convection was found more dominant than...

  11. Numerical simulation of double-diffusive mixed convective flow in rectangular enclosure with insulated moving lid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teamah, M.A. [Faculty of Engineering, Alexandria University, Mech. Eng. Dept, Alexandria (Egypt); El-Maghlany, W.M. [Faculty of Engineering, Suez Canal University, Ismailia (Egypt)

    2010-09-15

    The present study is concerned with the mixed convection in a rectangular lid-driven cavity under the combined buoyancy effects of thermal and mass diffusion. Double-diffusive convective flow in a rectangular enclosure with moving upper surface is studied numerically. Both upper and lower surfaces are being insulated and impermeable. Constant different temperatures and concentration are imposed along the vertical walls of the enclosure, steady state laminar regime is considered. The transport equations for continuity, momentum, energy and spices transfer are solved. The numerical results are reported for the effect of Richardson number, Lewis number, and buoyancy ratio on the iso-contours of stream line, temperature, and concentration. In addition, the predicted results for both local and average Nusselt and Sherwood numbers are presented and discussed for various parametric conditions. This study was done for 0.1 <= Le <= 50 and Prandtl number Pr = 0.7. Through out the study the Grashof number and aspect ratio are kept constant at 10{sup 4} and 2 respectively and -10 <= N <= 10, while Richardson number has been varied from 0.01 to 10 to simulate forced convection dominated flow, mixed convection and natural convection dominated flow. (authors)

  12. A family of analytical solutions of a nonlinear diffusion-convection equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayek, Mohamed

    2018-01-01

    Despite its popularity in many engineering fields, the nonlinear diffusion-convection equation has no general analytical solutions. This work presents a family of closed-form analytical traveling wave solutions for the nonlinear diffusion-convection equation with power law nonlinearities. This kind of equations typically appears in nonlinear problems of flow and transport in porous media. The solutions that are addressed are simple and fully analytical. Three classes of analytical solutions are presented depending on the type of the nonlinear diffusion coefficient (increasing, decreasing or constant). It has shown that the structure of the traveling wave solution is strongly related to the diffusion term. The main advantage of the proposed solutions is that they are presented in a unified form contrary to existing solutions in the literature where the derivation of each solution depends on the specific values of the diffusion and convection parameters. The proposed closed-form solutions are simple to use, do not require any numerical implementation, and may be implemented in a simple spreadsheet. The analytical expressions are also useful to mathematically analyze the structure and properties of the solutions.

  13. Convective Diffusion from Strip-like Microprobes into Colloidal Suspensions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wein, Ondřej

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 53, 9-10 (2010), s. 1856-1867 ISSN 0017-9310 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/08/0428; GA ČR GA104/09/0972 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : electrodiffusion friction probes * microdisperse fluid flow * longitudinal diffusion Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 1.898, year: 2010

  14. Recent advances in computational-analytical integral transforms for convection-diffusion problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotta, R. M.; Naveira-Cotta, C. P.; Knupp, D. C.; Zotin, J. L. Z.; Pontes, P. C.; Almeida, A. P.

    2017-10-01

    An unifying overview of the Generalized Integral Transform Technique (GITT) as a computational-analytical approach for solving convection-diffusion problems is presented. This work is aimed at bringing together some of the most recent developments on both accuracy and convergence improvements on this well-established hybrid numerical-analytical methodology for partial differential equations. Special emphasis is given to novel algorithm implementations, all directly connected to enhancing the eigenfunction expansion basis, such as a single domain reformulation strategy for handling complex geometries, an integral balance scheme in dealing with multiscale problems, the adoption of convective eigenvalue problems in formulations with significant convection effects, and the direct integral transformation of nonlinear convection-diffusion problems based on nonlinear eigenvalue problems. Then, selected examples are presented that illustrate the improvement achieved in each class of extension, in terms of convergence acceleration and accuracy gain, which are related to conjugated heat transfer in complex or multiscale microchannel-substrate geometries, multidimensional Burgers equation model, and diffusive metal extraction through polymeric hollow fiber membranes. Numerical results are reported for each application and, where appropriate, critically compared against the traditional GITT scheme without convergence enhancement schemes and commercial or dedicated purely numerical approaches.

  15. 3-D Spherical Convection Modeling Applied to Mercury: Dislocation Versus Diffusion Rheology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, S. D.; King, S. D.

    2016-12-01

    Mercury is the smallest among the terrestrial planets and, prior to NASA's MESSENGER mission was thought to be the least tectonically and volcanically active body. Gravity and moment of inertia from MESSENGER constrain Mercury to have a thin silicate mantle shell of approximately 400 km over a massive iron core. This mantle is thinner than previously thought and the smallest end-member in comparison with the other terrestrial planets. Although Mercury currently has a stagnant lid and the present day mantle is likely not convecting, a significant proportion of Mercury's surface features could have been derived from convection in the viscous mantle. Given Mercury's small size, the amount of volcanism and tectonic activity was a surprise. We investigate the effect of dislocation creep rheology in olivine on the dynamics of Mercury. At the pressures and temperatures of Mercury's mantle, laboratory creep studies indicate that olivine deforms by dislocation creep. Previous studies using diffusion creep rheology find that the thin mantle shell of Mercury quickly becomes diffusive and, this is difficult to reconcile with the surface observations. We use the three-dimensional spherical code, CitcomS, to compare numerical models with both dislocation and diffusion creep. We compare gravity, topography, and mantle temperature as a function of time from the models with constraints on the timing of volcanic and tectonic activity on Mercury. The results show that with the dislocation creep mechanism, there is potential for convective flow in the mantle over billions of years. In contrast, models with the diffusion creep mechanism start with a convecting mantle that transitions to global diffusive cooling within 500 Myrs. Diffusion creep rheology does not adequately produce a dynamic interior that is consistent with the historical volcanic and tectonic evolution of the planet. This research is the result of participation in GLADE, a nine-week summer REU program directed by Dave

  16. Effect of natural convection in a horizontally oriented cylinder on NMR imaging of the distribution of diffusivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohoric; Stepisnik

    2000-11-01

    This paper describes the influence of natural convection on NMR measurement of a self-diffusion constant of fluid in the earth's magnetic field. To get an estimation of the effect, the Lorenz model of natural convection in a horizontally oriented cylinder, heated from below, is derived. Since the Lorenz model of natural convection is derived for the free boundary condition, its validity is of a limited value for the natural no-slip boundary condition. We point out that even a slight temperature gradient can cause significant misinterpretation of measurements. The chaotic nature of convection enhances the apparent self-diffusion constant of the liquid.

  17. A study to reduce the numerical diffusion of upwind scheme in two dimensional convection phenomena analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Goung Jin; Kim, Soong Pyung

    1990-01-01

    In solving the convection-diffusion phenomena, it is common to use central difference scheme or upwind scheme. The central difference scheme has second order accuracy, while the upwind scheme is only first order accurate. However, since the variation rising in the convection-diffusion problem is exponential, central difference scheme ceased to be a good method for anything but extremely small values of Δx. At large values of Δx, which is all one can afford in most practical problems, it is the upwind scheme that gives more reasonable results than the central scheme. But in the conventional upwind scheme, since the accuracy is only first order, false diffusion is somewhat large, and when the real diffusion is smaller than the numerical diffusion, solutions may be very errorneous. So in this paper, a method to reduce the numerical diffusion of upwind scheme is studied. Developed scheme uses same number of nodes as conventional upwind scheme, but it considers the direction of flow more sophistically. As a conclusion, the developed scheme shows very good results. It can reduce false diffusion greatly with the cost of small complexity. Also, algorithm of the developed scheme is presented at appendix. (Author)

  18. Carbon dioxide sequestration: Modeling the diffusive and convective transport under a CO2 cap

    KAUST Repository

    Allen, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    A rise in carbon dioxide levels from industrial emissions is contributing to the greenhouse effect and global warming. CO2 sequestration in saline aquifers is a strategy to reduce atmospheric CO2 levels. Scientists and researchers rely on numerical simulators to predict CO2 storage by modeling the fluid transport behaviour. Studies have shown that after CO2 is injected into a saline aquifer, undissolved CO2 rises due to buoyant forces and will spread laterally away from the injection site under an area of low permeability. CO2 from this ‘capped\\' region diffuses into the fluid underlying it, and the resulting CO2-fluid mixture increases in density. This increase in density leads to gravity-driven convection. Accordingly, diffusive-convective transport is important to model since it predicts an enhanced storage capacity of the saline aquifer. This work incorporates the diffusive and convective transport processes into the transport modeling equation, and uses a self-generated code. Discretization of the domain is done with a cell-centered finite difference method. Cases are set up using similar parameters from published literature in order to compare results. Enhanced storage capacity is predicted in this work, similar to work done by others. A difference in the onset of convective transport between this work and published results is noticed and discussed in this paper. A sensitivity analysis is performed on the density model used in this work, and on the diffusivity value assumed. The analysis shows that the density model and diffusivity value is a key component on simulation results. Also, perturbations are added to porosity and permeability in order to see the effect of perturbations on the onset of convection, and results agree with similar findings by others. This work provides a basis for studying other cases, such as the impact of heterogeneity on the diffusion-convective transport. An extension of this work may involve the use of an equation of state to

  19. INFLUENCE OF THERMOHALINE CONVECTION ON DIFFUSION-INDUCED IRON ACCUMULATION IN A STARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theado, S.; Vauclair, S.; Alecian, G.; LeBlanc, F.

    2009-01-01

    Atomic diffusion may lead to heavy-element accumulation inside stars in certain specific layers. Iron accumulation in the Z-bump opacity region has been invoked by several authors to quantitatively account for abundance anomalies observed in some stars, or to account for stellar oscillations through the induced κ-mechanism. These authors, however, never took into account the fact that such an accumulation creates an inverse μ-gradient, unstable for thermohaline convection. Here, we present results for A-F stars, where abundance variations are computed with and without this process. We show that iron accumulation is still present when thermohaline convection is taken into account, but much reduced compared to when this physical process is neglected. The consequences of thermohaline convection for A-type stars as well as for other types of stars are presented.

  20. On the Effective Thermal Conductivity of Frost Considering Mass Diffusion and Eddy Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandula, Max

    2010-01-01

    A physical model for the effective thermal conductivity of water frost is proposed for application to the full range of frost density. The proposed model builds on the Zehner-Schlunder one-dimensional formulation for porous media appropriate for solid-to-fluid thermal conductivity ratios less than about 1000. By superposing the effects of mass diffusion and eddy convection on stagnant conduction in the fluid, the total effective thermal conductivity of frost is shown to be satisfactorily described. It is shown that the effects of vapor diffusion and eddy convection on the frost conductivity are of the same order. The results also point out that idealization of the frost structure by cylindrical inclusions offers a better representation of the effective conductivity of frost as compared to spherical inclusions. Satisfactory agreement between the theory and the measurements for the effective thermal conductivity of frost is demonstrated for a wide range of frost density and frost temperature.

  1. An iterative algorithm for the finite element approximation to convection-diffusion problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buscaglia, Gustavo; Basombrio, Fernando

    1988-01-01

    An iterative algorithm for steady convection-diffusion is presented, which avoids unsymmetric matrices by means of an equivalent mixed formulation. Upwind is introduced by adding a balancing dissipation in the flow direction, but there is no dependence of the global matrix on the velocity field. Convergence is shown in habitual test cases. Advantages of its use in coupled calculation of more complex problems are discussed. (Author)

  2. Heat Transfer and Mass Diffusion in Nanofluids over a Moving Permeable Convective Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Qasim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Heat transfer and mass diffusion in nanofluid over a permeable moving surface are investigated. The surface exhibits convective boundary conditions and constant mass diffusion. Effects of Brownian motion and thermophoresis are considered. The resulting partial differential equations are reduced into coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations using suitable transformations. Shooting technique is implemented for the numerical solution. Velocity, temperature, and concentration profiles are analyzed for different key parameters entering into the problem. Performed comparative study shows an excellent agreement with the previous analysis.

  3. Operator Splitting Methods for Degenerate Convection-Diffusion Equations I: Convergence and Entropy Estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holden, Helge; Karlsen, Kenneth H.; Lie, Knut-Andreas

    1999-10-01

    We present and analyze a numerical method for the solution of a class of scalar, multi-dimensional, nonlinear degenerate convection-diffusion equations. The method is based on operator splitting to separate the convective and the diffusive terms in the governing equation. The nonlinear, convective part is solved using front tracking and dimensional splitting, while the nonlinear diffusion equation is solved by a suitable difference scheme. We verify L{sup 1} compactness of the corresponding set of approximate solutions and derive precise entropy estimates. In particular, these results allow us to pass to the limit in our approximations and recover an entropy solution of the problem in question. The theory presented covers a large class of equations. Important subclasses are hyperbolic conservation laws, porous medium type equations, two-phase reservoir flow equations, and strongly degenerate equations coming from the recent theory of sedimentation-consolidation processes. A thorough numerical investigation of the method analyzed in this paper (and similar methods) is presented in a companion paper. (author)

  4. ESTIMATION OF TURBULENT DIFFUSIVITY WITH DIRECT NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF STELLAR CONVECTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hotta, H.; Iida, Y.; Yokoyama, T., E-mail: hotta.h@eps.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2012-05-20

    We investigate the value of horizontal turbulent diffusivity {eta} by numerical calculation of thermal convection. In this study, we introduce a new method whereby the turbulent diffusivity is estimated by monitoring the time development of the passive scalar, which is initially distributed in a given Gaussian function with a spatial scale d{sub 0}. Our conclusions are as follows: (1) assuming the relation {eta} = L{sub c} v{sub rms}/3, where v{sub rms} is the root-mean-square (rms) velocity, the characteristic length L{sub c} is restricted by the shortest one among the pressure (density) scale height and the region depth. (2) The value of turbulent diffusivity becomes greater with the larger initial distribution scale d{sub 0}. (3) The approximation of turbulent diffusion holds better when the ratio of the initial distribution scale d{sub 0} to the characteristic length L{sub c} is larger.

  5. Construction and analysis of lattice Boltzmann methods applied to a 1D convection-diffusion equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dellacherie, Stephane

    2014-01-01

    To solve the 1D (linear) convection-diffusion equation, we construct and we analyze two LBM schemes built on the D1Q2 lattice. We obtain these LBM schemes by showing that the 1D convection-diffusion equation is the fluid limit of a discrete velocity kinetic system. Then, we show in the periodic case that these LBM schemes are equivalent to a finite difference type scheme named LFCCDF scheme. This allows us, firstly, to prove the convergence in L∞ of these schemes, and to obtain discrete maximum principles for any time step in the case of the 1D diffusion equation with different boundary conditions. Secondly, this allows us to obtain most of these results for the Du Fort-Frankel scheme for a particular choice of the first iterate. We also underline that these LBM schemes can be applied to the (linear) advection equation and we obtain a stability result in L∞ under a classical CFL condition. Moreover, by proposing a probabilistic interpretation of these LBM schemes, we also obtain Monte-Carlo algorithms which approach the 1D (linear) diffusion equation. At last, we present numerical applications justifying these results. (authors)

  6. Convection and reaction in a diffusive boundary layer in a porous medium: nonlinear dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andres, Jeanne Therese H; Cardoso, Silvana S S

    2012-09-01

    We study numerically the nonlinear interactions between chemical reaction and convective fingering in a diffusive boundary layer in a porous medium. The reaction enhances stability by consuming a solute that is unstably distributed in a gravitational field. We show that chemical reaction profoundly changes the dynamics of the system, by introducing a steady state, shortening the evolution time, and altering the spatial patterns of velocity and concentration of solute. In the presence of weak reaction, finger growth and merger occur effectively, driving strong convective currents in a thick layer of solute. However, as the reaction becomes stronger, finger growth is inhibited, tip-splitting is enhanced and the layer of solute becomes much thinner. Convection enhances the mass flux of solute consumed by reaction in the boundary layer but has a diminishing effect as reaction strength increases. This nonlinear behavior has striking differences to the density fingering of traveling reaction fronts, for which stronger chemical kinetics result in more effective finger merger owing to an increase in the speed of the front. In a boundary layer, a strong stabilizing effect of reaction can maintain a long-term state of convection in isolated fingers of wavelength comparable to that at onset of instability.

  7. The onset of double diffusive convection in a viscoelastic fluid-saturated porous layer with non-equilibrium model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhixin Yang

    Full Text Available The onset of double diffusive convection in a viscoelastic fluid-saturated porous layer is studied when the fluid and solid phase are not in local thermal equilibrium. The modified Darcy model is used for the momentum equation and a two-field model is used for energy equation each representing the fluid and solid phases separately. The effect of thermal non-equilibrium on the onset of double diffusive convection is discussed. The critical Rayleigh number and the corresponding wave number for the exchange of stability and over-stability are obtained, and the onset criterion for stationary and oscillatory convection is derived analytically and discussed numerically.

  8. An extended TRANSCAR model including ionospheric convection: simulation of EISCAT observations using inputs from AMIE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.-L. Blelly

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available The TRANSCAR ionospheric model was extended to account for the convection of the magnetic field lines in the auroral and polar ionosphere. A mixed Eulerian-Lagrangian 13-moment approach was used to describe the dynamics of an ionospheric plasma tube. In the present study, one focuses on large scale transports in the polar ionosphere. The model was used to simulate a 35-h period of EISCAT-UHF observations on 16-17 February 1993. The first day was magnetically quiet, and characterized by elevated electron concentrations: the diurnal F2 layer reached as much as 1012m-3, which is unusual for a winter and moderate solar activity (F10.7=130 period. An intense geomagnetic event occurred on the second day, seen in the data as a strong intensification of the ionosphere convection velocities in the early afternoon (with the northward electric field reaching 150mVm-1 and corresponding frictional heating of the ions up to 2500K. The simulation used time-dependent AMIE outputs to infer flux-tube transports in the polar region, and to provide magnetospheric particle and energy inputs to the ionosphere. The overall very good agreement, obtained between the model and the observations, demonstrates the high ability of the extended TRANSCAR model for quantitative modelling of the high-latitude ionosphere; however, some differences are found which are attributed to the precipitation of electrons with very low energy. All these results are finally discussed in the frame of modelling the auroral ionosphere with space weather applications in mind.

  9. An extended TRANSCAR model including ionospheric convection: simulation of EISCAT observations using inputs from AMIE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.-L. Blelly

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available The TRANSCAR ionospheric model was extended to account for the convection of the magnetic field lines in the auroral and polar ionosphere. A mixed Eulerian-Lagrangian 13-moment approach was used to describe the dynamics of an ionospheric plasma tube. In the present study, one focuses on large scale transports in the polar ionosphere. The model was used to simulate a 35-h period of EISCAT-UHF observations on 16-17 February 1993. The first day was magnetically quiet, and characterized by elevated electron concentrations: the diurnal F2 layer reached as much as 1012m-3, which is unusual for a winter and moderate solar activity (F10.7=130 period. An intense geomagnetic event occurred on the second day, seen in the data as a strong intensification of the ionosphere convection velocities in the early afternoon (with the northward electric field reaching 150mVm-1 and corresponding frictional heating of the ions up to 2500K. The simulation used time-dependent AMIE outputs to infer flux-tube transports in the polar region, and to provide magnetospheric particle and energy inputs to the ionosphere. The overall very good agreement, obtained between the model and the observations, demonstrates the high ability of the extended TRANSCAR model for quantitative modelling of the high-latitude ionosphere; however, some differences are found which are attributed to the precipitation of electrons with very low energy. All these results are finally discussed in the frame of modelling the auroral ionosphere with space weather applications in mind.

  10. Monte Carlo Finite Volume Element Methods for the Convection-Diffusion Equation with a Random Diffusion Coefficient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a framework for the construction of Monte Carlo finite volume element method (MCFVEM for the convection-diffusion equation with a random diffusion coefficient, which is described as a random field. We first approximate the continuous stochastic field by a finite number of random variables via the Karhunen-Loève expansion and transform the initial stochastic problem into a deterministic one with a parameter in high dimensions. Then we generate independent identically distributed approximations of the solution by sampling the coefficient of the equation and employing finite volume element variational formulation. Finally the Monte Carlo (MC method is used to compute corresponding sample averages. Statistic error is estimated analytically and experimentally. A quasi-Monte Carlo (QMC technique with Sobol sequences is also used to accelerate convergence, and experiments indicate that it can improve the efficiency of the Monte Carlo method.

  11. An extended diffusive model for calculating thermal diffusivity from single monopole tokamak heat pulse propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinak, M.

    1990-02-01

    The problem of deducing χ e from measurements of the propagation of a monopole heatpulse is considered. An extended diffusive model, which takes into account perturbed sources and sinks is extended to the case of a monopole heat input. χ e is expressed as a function of two observables, the heat pulse velocity and the radial damping rate. Two simple expressions valid for two different ranges of the radius of the poloidal waist of the beam power profile are given. The expressions are valid in the heat pulse measurement region, extending radially 0.05a beyond the beam power waist to near 0.6a. The inferred χ e is a local value, not an average value of the radial χ e profile. 7 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  12. Effects of radial distribution of entropy diffusivity on critical modes of anelastic thermal convection in rotating spherical shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Youhei; Takehiro, Shin-ichi; Ishiwatari, Masaki; Yamada, Michio

    2018-03-01

    Linear stability analysis of anelastic thermal convection in a rotating spherical shell with entropy diffusivities varying in the radial direction is performed. The structures of critical convection are obtained in the cases of four different radial distributions of entropy diffusivity; (1) κ is constant, (2) κT0 is constant, (3) κρ0 is constant, and (4) κρ0T0 is constant, where κ is the entropy diffusivity, T0 is the temperature of basic state, and ρ0 is the density of basic state, respectively. The ratio of inner and outer radii, the Prandtl number, the polytropic index, and the density ratio are 0.35, 1, 2, and 5, respectively. The value of the Ekman number is 10-3 or 10-5 . In the case of (1), where the setup is same as that of the anelastic dynamo benchmark (Jones et al., 2011), the structure of critical convection is concentrated near the outer boundary of the spherical shell around the equator. However, in the cases of (2), (3) and (4), the convection columns attach the inner boundary of the spherical shell. A rapidly rotating annulus model for anelastic systems is developed by assuming that convection structure is uniform in the axial direction taking into account the strong effect of Coriolis force. The annulus model well explains the characteristics of critical convection obtained numerically, such as critical azimuthal wavenumber, frequency, Rayleigh number, and the cylindrically radial location of convection columns. The radial distribution of entropy diffusivity, or more generally, diffusion properties in the entropy equation, is important for convection structure, because it determines the distribution of radial basic entropy gradient which is crucial for location of convection columns.

  13. Convective diffusion of nanoparticles from the epithelial barrier toward regional lymph nodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dukhin, Stanislav S; Labib, Mohamed E

    2013-11-01

    Drug delivery using nanoparticles as drug carriers has recently attracted the attention of many investigators. Targeted delivery of nanoparticles to the lymph nodes is especially important to prevent cancer metastasis or infection, and to diagnose disease stage. However, systemic injection of nanoparticles often results in organ toxicity because they reach and accumulate in all the lymph nodes in the body. An attractive strategy would be to deliver the drug-loaded nanoparticles to a subset of draining lymph nodes corresponding to a specific site or organ to minimize systemic toxicity. In this respect, mucosal delivery of nanoparticles to regional draining lymph nodes of a selected site creates a new opportunity to accomplish this task with minimal toxicity. One example is the delivery of nanoparticles from the vaginal lumen to draining lymph nodes to prevent the transmission of HIV in women. Other known examples include mucosal delivery of vaccines to induce immunity. In all cases, molecular and particle transport by means of diffusion and convective diffusion play a major role. The corresponding transport processes have common inherent regularities and are addressed in this review. Here we use nanoparticle delivery from the vaginal lumen to the lymph nodes as an example to address the many aspects of associated transport processes. In this case, nanoparticles penetrate the epithelial barrier and move through the interstitium (tissue) to the initial lymphatics until they finally reach the lymph nodes. Since the movement of interstitial liquid near the epithelial barrier is retarded, nanoparticle transport was found to take place through special foci present in the epithelium. Immediately after nanoparticles emerge from the foci, they move through the interstitium due to diffusion affected by convection (convective diffusion). Specifically, the convective transport of nanoparticles occurs due to their convection together with interstitial fluid through the

  14. Analysis of a fourth-order compact scheme for convection-diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yavneh, I.

    1997-01-01

    In, 1984 Gupta et al. introduced a compact fourth-order finite-difference convection-diffusion operator with some very favorable properties. In particular, this scheme does not seem to suffer excessively from spurious oscillatory behavior, and it converges with standard methods such as Gauss Seidel or SOR (hence, multigrid) regardless of the diffusion. This scheme has been rederived, developed (including some variations), and applied in both convection-diffusion and Navier-Stokes equations by several authors. Accurate solutions to high Reynolds-number flow problems at relatively coarse resolutions have been reported. These solutions were often compared to those obtained by lower order discretizations, such as second-order central differences and first-order upstream discretizations. The latter, it was stated, achieved far less accurate results due to the artificial viscosity, which the compact scheme did not include. We show here that, while the compact scheme indeed does not suffer from a cross-stream artificial viscosity (as does the first-order upstream scheme when the characteristic direction is not aligned with the grid), it does include a streamwise artificial viscosity that is inversely proportional to the natural viscosity. This term is not always benign. 7 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  15. An extended fractal growth regime in the diffusion limited aggregation including edge diffusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aritra Ghosh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated on-lattice diffusion limited aggregation (DLA involving edge diffusion and compared the results with the standard DLA model. For both cases, we observe the existence of a crossover from the fractal to the compact regime as a function of sticking coefficient. However, our modified DLA model including edge diffusion shows an extended fractal growth regime like an earlier theoretical result using realistic growth models and physical parameters [Zhang et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 73 (1994 1829]. While the results of Zhang et al. showed the existence of the extended fractal growth regime only on triangular but not on square lattices, we find its existence on the square lattice. There is experimental evidence of this growth regime on a square lattice. The standard DLA model cannot characterize fractal morphology as the fractal dimension (Hausdorff dimension, DH is insensitive to morphology. It also predicts DH = DP (the perimeter dimension. For the usual fractal structures, observed in growth experiments on surfaces, the perimeter dimension can differ significantly (DH ≠ DP depending on the morphology. Our modified DLA model shows minor sensitivity to this difference.

  16. Convective-diffusive transport of fission products in the gap of a failed fuel element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lian, Z.W.; Carlucci, L.N.; Arimescu, V.I.

    1995-03-01

    A model is presented to describe the transport behaviour of gaseous fission products along the axial fuel-to-sheathe gap of a failed fuel element to the coolant system. The model is applicable to an element having failed under normal operating conditions or loss-of coolant-accident conditions. Because of the large differences in operating parameters, the transport characteristics of gaseous fission products in a failed element under these two operating conditions are significantly different. However, in both cases the transport process can be described by convection-diffusion caused by the continuous release of fission products from the fuel to the gap. Under normal operating conditions, the bulk-flow velocity is found to be negligible, due to the low release rate of fission products from fuel. The process can be well approximated by the diffusion of fission products in a stagnant gas-steam mixture. The effect of convection on the fission product transport, however, becomes significant under loss-of-coolant-accident conditions, where the release rates of fission products from fuel can be several orders of magnitude higher that that under normal operating conditions. The convection of the mixture in the gap not only contributes an additional flux to the gas-mixture transport, but also increases the gradient of fission products concentration across the opening, and therefore increases the diffusion flux to the coolant. As a result of the bulk flow, the transport of fission products along the gap is accelerated and the hold-up of short-lived isotopes in the gap is significantly reduced. Steam ingress through the opening into the gap is obstructed by the bulk flow, resulting in low steam concentrations in the gap under loss-of-coolant-accident conditions. (author). 6 refs., 8 figs

  17. Numerical solution of the unsteady diffusion-convection-reaction equation based on improved spectral Galerkin method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jiaqi; Zeng, Cheng; Yuan, Yupeng; Zhang, Yuzhe; Zhang, Ye

    2018-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to present an explicit numerical algorithm based on improved spectral Galerkin method for solving the unsteady diffusion-convection-reaction equation. The principal characteristics of this approach give the explicit eigenvalues and eigenvectors based on the time-space separation method and boundary condition analysis. With the help of Fourier series and Galerkin truncation, we can obtain the finite-dimensional ordinary differential equations which facilitate the system analysis and controller design. By comparing with the finite element method, the numerical solutions are demonstrated via two examples. It is shown that the proposed method is effective.

  18. Simultaneous fingering, double-diffusive convection, and thermal plumes derived from autocatalytic exothermic reaction fronts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskew, Matthew W.; Harrison, Jason; Simoyi, Reuben H.

    2016-11-01

    Oxidation reactions of thiourea by chlorite in a Hele-Shaw cell are excitable, autocatalytic, exothermic, and generate a lateral instability upon being triggered by the autocatalyst. Reagent concentrations used to develop convective instabilities delivered a temperature jump at the wave front of 2.1 K. The reaction zone was 2 mm and due to normal cooling after the wave front, this generated a spike rather than the standard well-studied front propagation. The reaction front has solutal and thermal contributions to density changes that act in opposite directions due to the existence of a positive isothermal density change in the reaction. The competition between these effects generates thermal plumes. The fascinating feature of this system is the coexistence of plumes and fingering in the same solution which alternate in frequency as the front propagates, generating hot and cold spots within the Hele-Shaw cell, and subsequently spatiotemporal inhomogeneities. The small ΔT at the wave front generated thermocapillary convection which competed effectively with thermogravitational forces at low Eötvös Numbers. A simplified reaction-diffusion-convection model was derived for the system. Plume formation is heavily dependent on boundary effects from the cell dimensions. This work was supported by Grant No. CHE-1056366 from the NSF and a Research Professor Grant from the University of KwaZulu-Natal.

  19. Mixed, Nonsplit, Extended Stability, Stiff Integration of Reaction Diffusion Equations

    KAUST Repository

    Alzahrani, Hasnaa H.

    2016-01-01

    A tailored integration scheme is developed to treat stiff reaction-diffusion prob- lems. The construction adapts a stiff solver, namely VODE, to treat reaction im- plicitly together with explicit treatment of diffusion. The second-order Runge

  20. Diffusive and convective transport modelling from analysis of ECRH-stimulated electron heat wave propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erckmann, V.; Gasparino, U.; Giannone, L.

    1992-01-01

    ECRH power modulation experiments in toroidal devices offer the chance to analyze the electron heat transport more conclusively: the electron heat wave propagation can be observed by ECE (or SX) leading to radial profiles of electron temperature modulation amplitude and time delay (phase shift). Taking also the stationary power balance into account, the local electron heat transport can be modelled by a combination of diffusive and convective transport terms. This method is applied to ECRH discharges in the W7-AS stellarator (B=2.5T, R=2m, a≤18 cm) where the ECRH power deposition is highly localized. In W7-AS, the T e modulation profiles measured by a high resolution ECE system are the basis for the local transport analysis. As experimental errors limit the separation of diffusive and convective terms in the electron heat transport for central power deposition, also ECRH power modulation experiments with off-axis deposition and inward heat wave propagation were performed (with 70 GHz o-mode as well as with 140 GHz x-mode for increased absorption). Because collisional electron-ion coupling and radiative losses are only small, low density ECRH discharges are best candidates for estimating the electron heat flux from power balance. (author) 2 refs., 3 figs

  1. Convective and diffusive effects on particle transport in asymmetric periodic capillaries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazmul Islam

    Full Text Available We present here results of a theoretical investigation of particle transport in longitudinally asymmetric but axially symmetric capillaries, allowing for the influence of both diffusion and convection. In this study we have focused attention primarily on characterizing the influence of tube geometry and applied hydraulic pressure on the magnitude, direction and rate of transport of particles in axi-symmetric, saw-tooth shaped tubes. Three initial value problems are considered. The first involves the evolution of a fixed number of particles initially confined to a central wave-section. The second involves the evolution of the same initial state but including an ongoing production of particles in the central wave-section. The third involves the evolution of particles a fully laden tube. Based on a physical model of convective-diffusive transport, assuming an underlying oscillatory fluid velocity field that is unaffected by the presence of the particles, we find that transport rates and even net transport directions depend critically on the design specifics, such as tube geometry, flow rate, initial particle configuration and whether or not particles are continuously introduced. The second transient scenario is qualitatively independent of the details of how particles are generated. In the third scenario there is no net transport. As the study is fundamental in nature, our findings could engender greater understanding of practical systems.

  2. On a Five-Dimensional Chaotic System Arising from Double-Diffusive Convection in a Fluid Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Idris

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A chaotic system arising from double-diffusive convection in a fluid layer is investigated in this paper based on the theory of dynamical systems. A five-dimensional model of chaotic system is obtained using the Galerkin truncated approximation. The results showed that the transition from steady convection to chaos via a Hopf bifurcation produced a limit cycle which may be associated with a homoclinic explosion at a slightly subcritical value of the Rayleigh number.

  3. Model calculation of the characteristic mass for convective and diffusive vapor transport in graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bencs, László, E-mail: bencs.laszlo@wigner.mta.hu [Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Laczai, Nikoletta [Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Ajtony, Zsolt [Institute of Food Science, University of West Hungary, H-9200 Mosonmagyaróvár, Lucsony utca 15–17 (Hungary)

    2015-07-01

    A combination of former convective–diffusive vapor-transport models is described to extend the calculation scheme for sensitivity (characteristic mass — m{sub 0}) in graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). This approach encompasses the influence of forced convection of the internal furnace gas (mini-flow) combined with concentration diffusion of the analyte atoms on the residence time in a spatially isothermal furnace, i.e., the standard design of the transversely heated graphite atomizer (THGA). A couple of relationships for the diffusional and convectional residence times were studied and compared, including in factors accounting for the effects of the sample/platform dimension and the dosing hole. These model approaches were subsequently applied for the particular cases of Ag, As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mg, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se, Sn, V and Zn analytes. For the verification of the accuracy of the calculations, the experimental m{sub 0} values were determined with the application of a standard THGA furnace, operating either under stopped, or mini-flow (50 cm{sup 3} min{sup −1}) of the internal sheath gas during atomization. The theoretical and experimental ratios of m{sub 0}(mini-flow)-to-m{sub 0}(stop-flow) were closely similar for each study analyte. Likewise, the calculated m{sub 0} data gave a fairly good agreement with the corresponding experimental m{sub 0} values for stopped and mini-flow conditions, i.e., it ranged between 0.62 and 1.8 with an average of 1.05 ± 0.27. This indicates the usability of the current model calculations for checking the operation of a given GFAAS instrument and the applied methodology. - Highlights: • A calculation scheme for convective–diffusive vapor loss in GFAAS is described. • Residence time (τ) formulas were compared for sensitivity (m{sub 0}) in a THGA furnace. • Effects of the sample/platform dimension and dosing hole on τ were assessed. • Theoretical m{sub 0} of 18 analytes were

  4. Diffusion, convection, and solidification in cw-mode free electron laser nitrided titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeche, Daniel; Mueller, Sven; Shinn, Michelle; Schaaf, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Titanium sheets were irradiated by free electron laser radiation in cw mode in pure nitrogen. Due to the interaction, nitrogen diffusion occurs and titanium nitride was synthesized in the tracks. Overlapping tracks have been utilized to create coatings in order to improve the tribological properties of the sheets. Caused by the local heating and the spatial dimension of the melt pool, convection effects were observed and related to the track properties. Stress, hardness, and nitrogen content were investigated with x-ray diffraction, nanoindention, and resonant nuclear reaction analysis. The measured results were correlated with the scan parameters, especially to the lateral track shift. Cross section micrographs were prepared and investigated by means of scanning electron microscopy. They show the solidification behavior, phase formation, and the nitrogen distribution. The experiments give an insight into the possibilities of materials processing using such a unique heat source.

  5. Diffusion, convection, and solidification in cw-mode free electron laser nitrided titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höche, Daniel; Shinn, Michelle; Müller, Sven; Schaaf, Peter

    2009-04-01

    Titanium sheets were irradiated by free electron laser radiation in cw mode in pure nitrogen. Due to the interaction, nitrogen diffusion occurs and titanium nitride was synthesized in the tracks. Overlapping tracks have been utilized to create coatings in order to improve the tribological properties of the sheets. Caused by the local heating and the spatial dimension of the melt pool, convection effects were observed and related to the track properties. Stress, hardness, and nitrogen content were investigated with x-ray diffraction, nanoindention, and resonant nuclear reaction analysis. The measured results were correlated with the scan parameters, especially to the lateral track shift. Cross section micrographs were prepared and investigated by means of scanning electron microscopy. They show the solidification behavior, phase formation, and the nitrogen distribution. The experiments give an insight into the possibilities of materials processing using such a unique heat source.

  6. Nonlinear traveling waves in rotating Rayleigh-Bacute enard convection: Stability boundaries and phase diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Y.; Ecke, R.E.

    1999-01-01

    We present experimental measurements of a sidewall traveling wave in rotating Rayleigh-Bacute enard convection. The fluid, water with Prandtl number about 6.3, was confined in a 1-cm-high cylindrical cell with radius-to-height ratio Γ=5. We used simultaneous optical-shadowgraph, heat-transport, and local temperature measurements to determine the stability and characteristics of the traveling-wave state for dimensionless rotation rates 60<Ω<420. The state is well described by the one-dimensional complex Ginzburg-Landau (CGL) equation for which the linear and nonlinear coefficients were determined for Ω=274. The Eckhaus-Benjamin-Feir-stability boundary was established and the phase-diffusion coefficient and nonlinear group velocity were determined in the stable regime. Higher-order corrections to the CGL equation were also investigated. copyright 1999 The American Physical Society

  7. Effect of the Wavy permeable Interface on Double Diffusive Natural Convection in a Partially Porous Cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Mehdaoui

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Two-dimensional, double diffusion, natural convection in a partially porous cavity satured with a binary fluid is investigated numerically. Multiple motions are driven by the external temperature and concentration differences imposed across vertical walls. The wavy interface between fluid and porous layer is horizontal. The equations which describe the fluid flow and heat and mass transfer are described by the Navier-Stokes equations (fluid region, Darcy-Brinkman equation (porous region and energy and mass equations. The finite element method was applied to solve the governing equations. The fluid flow and heat and mass transfer has been investigated for different values of the amplitude and the wave number of the interface and the buoyancy ratio. The results obtained in the form of isotherms, stream lines, isoconcentrations and the Nusselt and Sherwood numbers; show that the wavy interface has a significant effect on the flow and heat and mass transfer.

  8. Explicit approximations to estimate the perturbative diffusivity in the presence of convectivity and damping. I. Semi-infinite slab approximations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkel, van M.; Zwart, Heiko J.; Tamura, N.; Hogeweij, G.M.D.; Inagaki, S.; de Baar, M.R.; Ida, K.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a number of new approximations are introduced to estimate the perturbative diffusivity (χ), convectivity (V), and damping (τ) in cylindrical geometry. For this purpose, the harmonic components of heat waves induced by localized deposition of modulated power are used. The

  9. A HIGH ORDER SOLUTION OF THREE DIMENSIONAL TIME DEPENDENT NONLINEAR CONVECTIVE-DIFFUSIVE PROBLEM USING MODIFIED VARIATIONAL ITERATION METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratibha Joshi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we have achieved high order solution of a three dimensional nonlinear diffusive-convective problem using modified variational iteration method. The efficiency of this approach has been shown by solving two examples. All computational work has been performed in MATHEMATICA.

  10. Traveling wave solutions of a biological reaction-convection-diffusion equation model by using $(G'/G$ expansion method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahnam Javadi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the $(G'/G$-expansion method is applied to solve a biological reaction-convection-diffusion model arising in mathematical biology. Exact traveling wave solutions are obtained by this method. This scheme can be applied to a wide class of nonlinear partial differential equations.

  11. Competition between convection and diffusion in a metal halide lamp, investigated by numerical simulations and imaging laser absorption spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beks, M.L.; Flikweert, A.J.; Nimalasuriya, T.; Stoffels, W.W.; Mullen, van der J.J.A.M.

    2008-01-01

    The effect of the competition between convection and diffusion on the distribution of metal halide additives in a high pressure mercury lamp has been examined by placing COST reference lamps with mercury fillings of 5 and 10 mg in a centrifuge. By subjecting them to different accelerational

  12. Mixed, Nonsplit, Extended Stability, Stiff Integration of Reaction Diffusion Equations

    KAUST Repository

    Alzahrani, Hasnaa H.

    2016-07-26

    A tailored integration scheme is developed to treat stiff reaction-diffusion prob- lems. The construction adapts a stiff solver, namely VODE, to treat reaction im- plicitly together with explicit treatment of diffusion. The second-order Runge-Kutta- Chebyshev (RKC) scheme is adjusted to integrate diffusion. Spatial operator is de- scretised by second-order finite differences on a uniform grid. The overall solution is advanced over S fractional stiff integrations, where S corresponds to the number of RKC stages. The behavior of the scheme is analyzed by applying it to three simple problems. The results show that it achieves second-order accuracy, thus, preserving the formal accuracy of the original RKC. The presented development sets the stage for future extensions, particularly, to multidimensional reacting flows with detailed chemistry.

  13. Osmotic dehydration and convective drying of coconut slices: Experimental determination and description using one-dimensional diffusion model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilton Pereira da Silva

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Mass migrations in coconut slices during osmotic dehydration and drying are described using a diffusion model with boundary condition of the third kind. The osmotic dehydration experiment was performed at 35°Brix (water and sucrose and 40 °C. The convective drying experiments were performed at 50, 60 and 70 °C. The one-dimensional solution of the diffusion equation for an infinite slab was coupled with an optimizer to determine the effective mass diffusivities D and convective mass transfer coefficients h of the five processes studied. The analyses of the obtained results indicate that there is a good agreement between each experimental dataset and the corresponding simulation using D and h determined by optimization.

  14. ADI as a preconditioning for solving the convection-diffusion equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chin, R.C.Y.; Manteuffel, T.A.; De Pillis, J.

    1984-01-01

    The authors examine a splitting of the operator obtained from a steady convection-diffusion equation with variable coefficients in which the convection term dominates. The operator is split into a dominant and subdominant parts consistent with the inherent directional property of the partial differential equation. The equations involving the dominant parts should be easily solved. The authors accelerate the convergence of this splitting or the outer iteration by a Chebyshev semi-iterative method. When the dominant part has constant coefficients, it can be easily solved using alternating direction implicit (ADI) methods. This is called the inner iteration. The optimal parameters for a stationary two-parameter ADI method are obtained when the eigenvalues become complex. This corresponds to either the horizontal or the vertical half-grid Reynolds number larger than unity. The Chebyshev semi-iterative method is used to accelerate the convergence of the inner ADI iteration. A two-fold increase in speed is obtained when the ADI iteration matrix has real eigenvalues, and the increase is less significant when the eigenvalues are complex. If either the horizontal or the vertical half-grid Reynolds number is equal to one, the spectral radius of the optimal ADI iterative matrix is zero. However, a high degree of nilpotency impairs rapid convergence. This problem is removed by introducing a more implicit iterative method called ADI/Gauss-Seidel (ADI/GS). ADI/GS resolves the nilpotency and, thus, converges more rapidly for half-grid Reynolds number near 1. Finally, these methods are compared with several well-known schemes on test problems. 23 references, 5 figures

  15. Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics (MESA): Convective Boundaries, Element Diffusion, and Massive Star Explosions

    OpenAIRE

    Paxton, Bill; Schwab, Josiah; Bauer, Evan B.; Bildsten, Lars; Blinnikov, Sergei; Duffell, Paul; Farmer, R.; Goldberg, Jared A.; Marchant, Pablo; Sorokina, Elena; Thoul, Anne; Townsend, Richard H. D.; Timmes, F. X.

    2017-01-01

    We update the capabilities of the software instrument Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics (MESA) and enhance its ease of use and availability. Our new approach to locating convective boundaries is consistent with the physics of convection, and yields reliable values of the convective core mass during both hydrogen and helium burning phases. Stars with $M

  16. An extended laser flash technique for thermal diffusivity measurement of high-temperature materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, F.; Khodadadi, J. M.

    1993-01-01

    Knowledge of thermal diffusivity data for high-temperature materials (solids and liquids) is very important in analyzing a number of processes, among them solidification, crystal growth, and welding. However, reliable thermal diffusivity versus temperature data, particularly those for high-temperature liquids, are still far from complete. The main measurement difficulties are due to the presence of convection and the requirement for a container. Fortunately, the availability of levitation techniques has made it possible to solve the containment problem. Based on the feasibility of the levitation technology, a new laser flash technique which is applicable to both levitated liquid and solid samples is being developed. At this point, the analysis for solid samples is near completion and highlights of the technique are presented here. The levitated solid sample which is assumed to be a sphere is subjected to a very short burst of high power radiant energy. The temperature of the irradiated surface area is elevated and a transient heat transfer process takes place within the sample. This containerless process is a two-dimensional unsteady heat conduction problem. Due to the nonlinearity of the radiative plus convective boundary condition, an analytic solution cannot be obtained. Two options are available at this point. Firstly, the radiation boundary condition can be linearized, which then accommodates a closed-form analytic solution. Comparison of the analytic curves for the temperature rise at different points to the experimentally-measured values will then provide the thermal diffusivity values. Secondly, one may set up an inverse conduction problem whereby experimentally obtained surface temperature history is used as the boundary conditions. The thermal diffusivity can then be elevated by minimizing the difference between the real heat flux boundary condition (radiation plus convection) and the measurements. Status of an experimental study directed at measuring the

  17. Inhibition of ordinary and diffusive convection in the water condensation zone of the ice giants and implications for their thermal evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedson, A. James; Gonzales, Erica J.

    2017-11-01

    We explore the conditions under which ordinary and double-diffusive thermal convection may be inhibited by water condensation in the hydrogen atmospheres of the ice giants and examine the consequences. The saturation of vapor in the condensation layer induces a vertical gradient in the mean molecular weight that stabilizes the layer against convective instability when the abundance of vapor exceeds a critical value. In this instance, the layer temperature gradient can become superadiabatic and heat must be transported vertically by another mechanism. On Uranus and Neptune, water is inferred to be sufficiently abundant for inhibition of ordinary convection to take place in their respective condensation zones. We find that suppression of double-diffusive convection is sensitive to the ratio of the sedimentation time scale of the condensates to the buoyancy period in the condensation layer. In the limit of rapid sedimentation, the layer is found to be stable to diffusive convection. In the opposite limit, diffusive convection can occur. However, if the fluid remains saturated, then layered convection is generally suppressed and the motion is restricted in form to weak, homogeneous, oscillatory turbulence. This form of diffusive convection is a relatively inefficient mechanism for transporting heat, characterized by low Nusselt numbers. When both ordinary and layered convection are suppressed, the condensation zone acts effectively as a thermal insulator, with the heat flux transported across it only slightly greater than the small value that can be supported by radiative diffusion. This may allow a large superadiabatic temperature gradient to develop in the layer over time. Once the layer has formed, however, it is vulnerable to persistent erosion by entrainment of fluid into the overlying convective envelope of the cooling planet, potentially leading to its collapse. We discuss the implications of our results for thermal evolution models of the ice giants, for

  18. On the implementation of an accurate and efficient solver for convection-diffusion equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chin-Tien

    In this dissertation, we examine several different aspects of computing the numerical solution of the convection-diffusion equation. The solution of this equation often exhibits sharp gradients due to Dirichlet outflow boundaries or discontinuities in boundary conditions. Because of the singular-perturbed nature of the equation, numerical solutions often have severe oscillations when grid sizes are not small enough to resolve sharp gradients. To overcome such difficulties, the streamline diffusion discretization method can be used to obtain an accurate approximate solution in regions where the solution is smooth. To increase accuracy of the solution in the regions containing layers, adaptive mesh refinement and mesh movement based on a posteriori error estimations can be employed. An error-adapted mesh refinement strategy based on a posteriori error estimations is also proposed to resolve layers. For solving the sparse linear systems that arise from discretization, goemetric multigrid (MG) and algebraic multigrid (AMG) are compared. In addition, both methods are also used as preconditioners for Krylov subspace methods. We derive some convergence results for MG with line Gauss-Seidel smoothers and bilinear interpolation. Finally, while considering adaptive mesh refinement as an integral part of the solution process, it is natural to set a stopping tolerance for the iterative linear solvers on each mesh stage so that the difference between the approximate solution obtained from iterative methods and the finite element solution is bounded by an a posteriori error bound. Here, we present two stopping criteria. The first is based on a residual-type a posteriori error estimator developed by Verfurth. The second is based on an a posteriori error estimator, using local solutions, developed by Kay and Silvester. Our numerical results show the refined mesh obtained from the iterative solution which satisfies the second criteria is similar to the refined mesh obtained from

  19. Difference scheme for a singularly perturbed parabolic convection-diffusion equation in the presence of perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishkin, G. I.

    2015-11-01

    An initial-boundary value problem is considered for a singularly perturbed parabolic convection-diffusion equation with a perturbation parameter ɛ (ɛ ∈ (0, 1]) multiplying the highest order derivative. The stability of a standard difference scheme based on monotone approximations of the problem on a uniform mesh is analyzed, and the behavior of discrete solutions in the presence of perturbations is examined. The scheme does not converge ɛ-uniformly in the maximum norm as the number of its grid nodes is increased. When the solution of the difference scheme converges, which occurs if N -1 ≪ ɛ and N -1 0 ≪ 1, where N and N 0 are the numbers of grid intervals in x and t, respectively, the scheme is not ɛ-uniformly well conditioned or stable to data perturbations in the grid problem and to computer perturbations. For the standard difference scheme in the presence of data perturbations in the grid problem and/or computer perturbations, conditions on the "parameters" of the difference scheme and of the computer (namely, on ɛ, N, N 0, admissible data perturbations in the grid problem, and admissible computer perturbations) are obtained that ensure the convergence of the perturbed solutions. Additionally, the conditions are obtained under which the perturbed numerical solution has the same order of convergence as the solution of the unperturbed standard difference scheme.

  20. A Reduced Model for Salt-Finger Convection in the Small Diffusivity Ratio Limit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Han Xie

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple model of nonlinear salt-finger convection in two dimensions is derived and studied. The model is valid in the limit of a small solute to heat diffusivity ratio and a large density ratio, which is relevant to both oceanographic and astrophysical applications. Two limits distinguished by the magnitude of the Schmidt number are found. For order one Schmidt numbers, appropriate for astrophysical applications, a modified Rayleigh–Bénard system with large-scale damping due to a stabilizing temperature is obtained. For large Schmidt numbers, appropriate for the oceanic setting, the model combines a prognostic equation for the solute field and a diagnostic equation for inertia-free momentum dynamics. Two distinct saturation regimes are identified for the second model: the weakly driven regime is characterized by a large-scale flow associated with a balance between advection and linear instability, while the strongly-driven regime produces multiscale structures, resulting in a balance between energy input through linear instability and energy transfer between scales. For both regimes, we analytically predict and numerically confirm the dependence of the kinetic energy and salinity fluxes on the ratio between solutal and thermal Rayleigh numbers. The spectra and probability density functions are also computed.

  1. Charge effects on hindrance factors for diffusion and convection of solute in pores I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O-tani, Hideyuki [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Kansai University, Yamate-cho, Suita, Osaka 564-8680 (Japan); Akinaga, Takeshi; Sugihara-Seki, Masako, E-mail: ga8d002@kansai-u.ac.jp [Department of Pure and Applied Physics, Kansai University, Yamate-cho, Suita, Osaka 564-8680 (Japan)

    2011-12-01

    The transport of a spherical solute through a long circular cylindrical pore filled with an electrolyte solution is studied numerically, in the presence of constant surface charge on the solute and the pore wall. Fluid dynamic analyses were carried out to calculate the flow field around the solute in the pore to evaluate the drag coefficients exerted on the solute. Electrical potentials around the solute in the electrolyte solution were computed based on a mean-field theory to provide the interaction energy between the charged solute and the pore wall. Combining the results of the fluid dynamic and electrostatic analyses, we estimated the rate of the diffusive and convective transport of the solute across the pore. Although the present estimates of the drag coefficients on the solute suggest more than 10% difference from existing studies, depending on the radius ratio of the solute relative to the pore and the radial position of the solute center in the pore, this difference leads to a minor effect on the hindrance factors. It was found that even at rather large ion concentrations, the repulsive electrostatic interaction between the charged solute and the pore wall of like charge could significantly reduce the transport rate of the solute.

  2. Volumetric vs Mass Velocity in Analyzing Convective-Diffusive Transport Processes in Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Howard

    2000-11-01

    Because mass rather than volume is preserved in fluid-mechanical problems involving density changes, a natural predilection exists for quantifying convective-diffusive transport phenomena in terms of a velocity field based upon mass, rather than volume. Indeed, in the classic BSL "Transport Phenomena" textbook, but a single reference exists even to the very concept of a volume velocity, and even then it is relegated to a homework assignment. However, especially when dealing with transport in fluids in which the mass density of the conserved property being transported (e.g., chemical species, internal energy, etc.) is independent of the prevailing pressure, as is largely true in the case of liquids, overwhelming advantages exist is preferring the volume velocity over the more ubiquitous and classical mass velocity. In a generalization of ideas pioneered by D. D. Joseph and co-workers, we outline the reasons for this volumetric velocity preference in a broad general context by identifying a large class of physical problems whose solutions are rendered more accessible by exploiting this unconventional velocity choice.

  3. Effect of cavity inclination on a temperature and concentration controlled double diffusive convection at ice plate melting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugawara, M.; Ishikura, T. [Akita University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Akita (Japan); Beer, H. [Technische Unversitat Darmstadt, Institut fur Technische Thermodynamik, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2005-03-01

    This paper is concerned with the double diffusive convection due to the melting of an ice plate into a calcium chloride aqueous solution inside a rectangular cavity. It is mainly considered the effect of the cavity inclination {theta} on the melting rate and the mean melting Nusselt- and Sherwood-numbers, experimentally as well as numerically. The ice plate melts spontaneously with decreasing temperature at the melting front even if initially there does not exist a temperature difference between the ice and the liquid. The concentration- and temperature-gradients near the melting front induce double diffusive convection in the liquid, which will affect the melting rate. Experiments reveal that the mean melting mass increases monotonically with increasing cavity inclination. The numerical analysis based on the laminar assumption predicts well the melting mass in the range of {theta}=0-90 , however, under-predicts the melting mass in the range of {theta}=90-180 as compared with the experimental results. (orig.)

  4. A Solution of the Convective-Diffusion Equation for Solute Mass Transfer inside a Capillary Membrane Bioreactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Godongwana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an analytical model of substrate mass transfer through the lumen of a membrane bioreactor. The model is a solution of the convective-diffusion equation in two dimensions using a regular perturbation technique. The analysis accounts for radial-convective flow as well as axial diffusion of the substrate specie. The model is applicable to the different modes of operation of membrane bioreactor (MBR systems (e.g., dead-end, open-shell, or closed-shell mode, as well as the vertical or horizontal orientation. The first-order limit of the Michaelis-Menten equation for substrate consumption was used to test the developed model against available analytical results. The results obtained from the application of this model, along with a biofilm growth kinetic model, will be useful in the derivation of an efficiency expression for enzyme production in an MBR.

  5. Formulation of Low Peclet Number Based Grid Expansion Factor for the Solution of the Convection Diffusion Equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Abdullah

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Convection-diffusion problems, due to its fundamental nature, are found in various science and engineering applications. In this research, the importance of the relationship between grid structure and flow parameters in such problems is emphasized. In particular, we propose a systematic technique in the selection of the grid expansion factor based on its logarithmic relationship with low Peclet number. Such linear mathematical connection between the two non-dimensional parameters serves as a guideline for more structured decision-making and improves the heuristic process in the determination of the computational domain grid for the numerical solution of convection-diffusion equations especially in the prediction of the concentration of the scalar. Results confirm the effectiveness of the new approach.

  6. Perturbed invariant subspaces and approximate generalized functional variable separation solution for nonlinear diffusion-convection equations with weak source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Ya-Rong; Zhang, Shun-Li; Xin, Xiang-Peng

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, we propose the concept of the perturbed invariant subspaces (PISs), and study the approximate generalized functional variable separation solution for the nonlinear diffusion-convection equation with weak source by the approximate generalized conditional symmetries (AGCSs) related to the PISs. Complete classification of the perturbed equations which admit the approximate generalized functional separable solutions (AGFSSs) is obtained. As a consequence, some AGFSSs to the resulting equations are explicitly constructed by way of examples.

  7. Anomalous convection diffusion and wave coupling transport of cells on comb frame with fractional Cattaneo-Christov flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lin; Zheng, Liancun; Liu, Fawang; Zhang, Xinxin

    2016-09-01

    An improved Cattaneo-Christov flux model is proposed which can be used to capture the effects of the time and spatial relaxations, the time and spatial inhomogeneous diffusion and the spatial transition probability of cell transport in a highly non-homogeneous medium. Solutions are obtained by numerical discretization method where the time and spatial fractional derivative are discretized by the L1-approximation and shifted Grünwald definition, respectively. The solvability, stability and convergence of the numerical method for the special case of the Cattaneo-Christov equation are proved. Results indicate that the fractional convection diffusion-wave equation is an evolution equation which displays the coexisting characteristics of parabolicity and hyperbolicity. In other words, for α in (0, 1), the cells transport occupies the characteristics of coupling convection diffusion and wave spreading. Moreover, the effects of pertinent time parameter, time and spatial fractional derivative parameters, relaxation parameter, weight coefficient and the convection velocity on the anomalous transport of cells are shown graphically and analyzed in detail.

  8. Convective drying of osmo-dehydrated apple slices: kinetics and spatial behavior of effective mass diffusivity and moisture content

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Farias Aires, Juarez Everton; da Silva, Wilton Pereira; de Almeida Farias Aires, Kalina Lígia Cavalcante; da Silva Júnior, Aluízio Freire; da Silva e Silva, Cleide Maria Diniz Pereira

    2018-04-01

    The main objective of this study is the presentation of a numerical model of liquid diffusion for the description of the convective drying of apple slices submitted to pretreatment of osmotic dehydration able of predicting the spatial distribution of effective mass diffusivity values in apple slabs. Two models that use numerical solutions of the two-dimensional diffusion equation in Cartesian coordinates with the boundary condition of third kind were proposed to describe drying. The first one does not consider the shrinkage of the product and assumes that the process parameters remain constant along the convective drying. The second one considers the shrinkage of the product and assumes that the effective mass diffusivity of water varies according to the local value of the water content in the apple samples. Process parameters were estimated from experimental data through an optimizer coupled to the numerical solutions. The osmotic pretreatment did not reduce the drying time in relation to the fresh fruits when the drying temperature was equal to 40 °C. The use of the temperature of 60 °C led to a reduction in the drying time. The model that considers the variations in the dimensions of the product and the variation in the effective mass diffusivity proved to be more adequate to describe the process.

  9. Carbon Sequestration in Saline Aquifers: Modeling Diffusive and Convective Transport Of a Carbon-­Dioxide Cap

    KAUST Repository

    Allen, Rebecca

    2011-05-01

    An increase in the earth’s surface temperature has been directly linked to the rise of carbon dioxide (CO2) levels In the atmosphere and an enhanced greenhouse effect. CO2 sequestration is one of the proposed mitigation Strategies in the effort to reduce atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Globally speaking, saline aquifers provide an adequate storage capacity for the world’s carbon emissions, and CO2 sequestration projects are currently underway in countries such as Norway, Germany, Japan, USA, and others. Numerical simulators serve as predictive tools for CO2 storage, yet must model fluid transport behavior while coupling different transport processes together accurately. With regards to CO2 sequestration, an extensive amount of research has been done on the diffusive-convective transport that occurs under a cap of CO2-saturated fluid, which results after CO2 is injected into an aquifer and spreads laterally under an area of low permeability. The diffusive-convective modeling reveals an enhanced storage capacity in saline aquifers, due to the density increase between pure fluid and CO2‐saturated fluid. This work presents the transport modeling equations that are used for diffusive- convective modeling. A cell-centered finite difference method is used, and simulations are run using MATLAB. Two cases are explored in order to compare the results from this work’s self-generated code with the results published in literature. Simulation results match relatively well, and the discrepancy for a delayed onset time of convective transport observed in this work is attributed to numerical artifacts. In fact, onset time in this work is directly attributed to the instability of the physical system: this instability arises from non-linear coupling of fluid flow, transport, and convection, but is triggered by numerical errors in these simulations. Results from this work enable the computation of a value for the numerical constant that appears in the onset time equation that

  10. Extend of magnetic field interference in the natural convection of diamagnetic nanofluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roszko, Aleksandra; Fornalik-Wajs, Elzbieta

    2017-10-01

    Main objective of the paper was to experimentally investigate the thermo-magnetic convection of diamagnetic fluids in the Rayleigh-Benard configuration. For better understanding of the magnetic field influence on the phenomena occurring in cubical enclosure the following parameters were studied: absence or presence of nanoparticles (single and two-phase fluids), thermal conditions (temperature difference range of 5-25 K) and magnetic field strength (magnetic induction range of 0-10 T). A multi-stage approach was undertaken to achieve the aim. The multi-stage approach means that the forces system, flow structure and heat transfer were considered. Without understanding the reasons (forces) and the fluid behaviour it would be impossible to analyse the exchanged heat rates through the Nusselt number distribution. The forces were determined at the starting moment, so the inertia force was not considered. The flow structure was identified due to the FFT analysis and it proved that magnetic field application changed the diamagnetic fluid behaviour, either single or two-phase. Going further, the heat transfer analysis revealed dependence of the Nusselt number on the flow structure and at the same time on the magnetic field. It can be said that imposed magnetic field changed the energy transfer within the system. In the paper, it was shown that each of presented steps were linked together and that only a comprehensive approach could lead to better understanding of magnetic field interference in the convection phenomenon.

  11. Discretization of convection-diffusion equations with finite-difference scheme derived from simplified analytical solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kriventsev, Vladimir

    2000-09-01

    Most of thermal hydraulic processes in nuclear engineering can be described by general convection-diffusion equations that are often can be simulated numerically with finite-difference method (FDM). An effective scheme for finite-difference discretization of such equations is presented in this report. The derivation of this scheme is based on analytical solutions of a simplified one-dimensional equation written for every control volume of the finite-difference mesh. These analytical solutions are constructed using linearized representations of both diffusion coefficient and source term. As a result, the Efficient Finite-Differencing (EFD) scheme makes it possible to significantly improve the accuracy of numerical method even using mesh systems with fewer grid nodes that, in turn, allows to speed-up numerical simulation. EFD has been carefully verified on the series of sample problems for which either analytical or very precise numerical solutions can be found. EFD has been compared with other popular FDM schemes including novel, accurate (as well as sophisticated) methods. Among the methods compared were well-known central difference scheme, upwind scheme, exponential differencing and hybrid schemes of Spalding. Also, newly developed finite-difference schemes, such as the the quadratic upstream (QUICK) scheme of Leonard, the locally analytic differencing (LOAD) scheme of Wong and Raithby, the flux-spline scheme proposed by Varejago and Patankar as well as the latest LENS discretization of Sakai have been compared. Detailed results of this comparison are given in this report. These tests have shown a high efficiency of the EFD scheme. For most of sample problems considered EFD has demonstrated the numerical error that appeared to be in orders of magnitude lower than that of other discretization methods. Or, in other words, EFD has predicted numerical solution with the same given numerical error but using much fewer grid nodes. In this report, the detailed

  12. Influence of convection on the diffusive transport and sieving of water and small solutes across the peritoneal membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asghar, Ramzana B; Diskin, Ann M; Spanel, Patrik; Smith, David; Davies, Simon J

    2005-02-01

    The three-pore model of peritoneal membrane physiology predicts sieving of small solutes as a result of the presence of a water-exclusive pathway. The purpose of this study was to measure the diffusive and convective components of small solute transport, including water, under differing convection. Triplicate studies were performed in eight stable individuals using 2-L exchanges of bicarbonate buffered 1.36 or 3.86% glucose and icodextrin. Diffusion of water was estimated by establishing an artificial gradient of deuterated water (HDO) between blood/body water and the dialysate. (125)RISA (radio-iodinated serum albumin) was used as an intraperitoneal volume marker to determine the net ultrafiltration and reabsorption of fluid. The mass transfer area coefficient (MTAC) for HDO and solutes was estimated using the Garred and Waniewski equations. The MTAC of HDO calculated for 1.36% glucose and icodextrin were similar (36.8 versus 39.7 ml/min; P = 0.3), whereas for other solutes, values obtained using icodextrin were consistently higher (P solutes is a reflection of their sieving. The increase in the MTAC of water and urea associated with an increase in convection is most likely due to increased mixing within the interstitium.

  13. Linear extended neutron diffusion theory for semi-in finites homogeneous means

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vazquez R, R.; Vazquez R, A.; Espinosa P, G.

    2009-10-01

    Originally developed for heterogeneous means, the linear extended neutron diffusion theory is applied to the limit case of monoenergetic neutron diffusion in a semi-infinite homogeneous mean with a neutron source, located in the coordinate origin situated in the frontier of dispersive material. The monoenergetic neutron diffusion is studied taking into account the spatial deviations in the neutron flux to the interfacial current caused by the neutron source, as well as the influence of the spatial deviations in the absorption rate. The developed pattern is an unidimensional model for an energy group obtained of application of volumetric average diffusion equation in the moderator. The obtained results are compared against the classic diffusion theory and qualitatively against the neutron transport theory. (Author)

  14. Modeling of Multicomponent Diffusions and Natural Convection in Unfractured and Fractured Media by Discontinuous Galerkin and Mixed Methods

    KAUST Repository

    Hoteit, Hussein

    2017-12-29

    Computation of the distribution of species in hydrocarbon reservoirs from diffusions (thermal, molecular, and pressure) and natural convection is an important step in reservoir initialization. Current methods, which are mainly based on the conventional finite difference approach, may not be numerically efficient in fractured and other media with complex heterogeneities. In this work, the discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method combined with the mixed finite element (MFE) method is used for the calculation of compositional variation in fractured hydrocarbon reservoirs. The use of unstructured gridding allows efficient computations for fractured media when the crossflow equilibrium concept is invoked. The DG method has less numerical dispersion than the upwind finite difference (FD) methods. The MFE method ensures continuity of fluxes at the interface of the grid elements. We also use the local discontinuous Galerkin (LDG) method instead of the MFE calculate the diffusion fluxes. Results from several numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the efficiency, robustness, and accuracy of the model. Various features of convection and diffusion in homogeneous, layered, and fractured media are also discussed.

  15. Modeling of Multicomponent Diffusions and Natural Convection in Unfractured and Fractured Media by Discontinuous Galerkin and Mixed Methods

    KAUST Repository

    Hoteit, Hussein; Firoozabadi, Abbas

    2017-01-01

    Computation of the distribution of species in hydrocarbon reservoirs from diffusions (thermal, molecular, and pressure) and natural convection is an important step in reservoir initialization. Current methods, which are mainly based on the conventional finite difference approach, may not be numerically efficient in fractured and other media with complex heterogeneities. In this work, the discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method combined with the mixed finite element (MFE) method is used for the calculation of compositional variation in fractured hydrocarbon reservoirs. The use of unstructured gridding allows efficient computations for fractured media when the crossflow equilibrium concept is invoked. The DG method has less numerical dispersion than the upwind finite difference (FD) methods. The MFE method ensures continuity of fluxes at the interface of the grid elements. We also use the local discontinuous Galerkin (LDG) method instead of the MFE calculate the diffusion fluxes. Results from several numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the efficiency, robustness, and accuracy of the model. Various features of convection and diffusion in homogeneous, layered, and fractured media are also discussed.

  16. Location-dependent coronary artery diffusive and convective mass transport properties of a lipophilic drug surrogate measured using nonlinear microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyes, Joseph T; Simon, Bruce R; Vande Geest, Jonathan P

    2013-04-01

    Arterial wall mass transport properties dictate local distribution of biomolecules or locally delivered dugs. Knowing how these properties vary between coronary artery locations could provide insight into how therapy efficacy is altered between arterial locations. We introduced an indocarbocyanine drug surrogate to the lumens of left anterior descending and right coronary (LADC; RC) arteries from pigs with or without a pressure gradient. Interstitial fluorescent intensity was measured on live samples with multiphoton microscopy. We also measured binding to porcine coronary SMCs in monoculture. Diffusive transport constants peaked in the middle sections of the LADC and RC arteries by 2.09 and 2.04 times, respectively, compared to the proximal and distal segments. There was no statistical difference between the average diffusivity value between LADC and RC arteries. The convection coefficients had an upward trend down each artery, with the RC being higher than the LADC by 3.89 times. This study demonstrates that the convective and diffusive transport of lipophilic molecules changes between the LADC and the RC arteries as well as along their length. These results may have important implications in optimizing drug delivery for the treatment of coronary artery disease.

  17. An extended five-stream model for diffusion of ion-implanted dopants in monocrystalline silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khina, B.B.

    2007-01-01

    Low-energy high-dose ion implantation of different dopants (P, Sb, As, B and others) into monocrystalline silicon with subsequent thermal annealing is used for the formation of ultra-shallow p-n junctions in modern VLSI circuit technology. During annealing, dopant activation and diffusion in silicon takes place. The experimentally observed phenomenon of transient enhanced diffusion (TED), which is typically ascribed to the interaction of diffusing species with non-equilibrium point defects accumulated in silicon due to ion damage, and formation of small clusters and extended defects, hinders further down scaling of p-n junctions in VLSI circuits. TED is currently a subject of extensive experimental and theoretical investigation in many binary and multicomponent systems. However, the state-of-the-art mathematical models of dopant diffusion, which are based on the so-called 'five-stream' approach, and modern TCAD software packages such as SUPREM-4 (by Silvaco Data Systems, Ltd.) that implement these models encounter severe difficulties in describing TED. Solving the intricate problem of TED suppression and development of novel regimes of ion implantation and rapid thermal annealing is impossible without elaboration of new mathematical models and computer simulation of this complex phenomenon. In this work, an extended five-stream model for diffusion in silicon is developed which takes into account all possible charge states of point defects (vacancies and silicon self-interstitials) and diffusing pairs 'dopant atom-vacancy' and 'dopant atom-silicon self-interstitial'. The model includes the drift terms for differently charged point defects and pairs in the internal electric field and the kinetics of interaction between unlike 'species' (generation and annihilation of pairs and annihilation of point defects). Expressions for diffusion coefficients and numerous sink/source terms that appear in the non-linear, non-steady-state reaction-diffusion equations are derived

  18. MHD heat and mass diffusion flow by natural convection past a surface embedded in a porous medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaudhary R.C.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an analytical study of the transient hydromagnetic natural convection flow past a vertical plate embedded in a porous medium, taking account of the presence of mass diffusion and fluctuating temperature about time at the plate. The governing equations are solved in closed form by the Laplace-transform technique. The results are obtained for temperature, velocity, penetration distance, Nusselt number and skin-friction. The effects of various parameters are discussed on the flow variables and presented by graphs.

  19. Numerical simulation of nonstationary dissipative structures in 3D double-diffusive convection at large Rayleigh numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozitskiy, Sergey

    2018-05-01

    Numerical simulation of nonstationary dissipative structures in 3D double-diffusive convection has been performed by using the previously derived system of complex Ginzburg-Landau type amplitude equations, valid in a neighborhood of Hopf bifurcation points. Simulation has shown that the state of spatiotemporal chaos develops in the system. It has the form of nonstationary structures that depend on the parameters of the system. The shape of structures does not depend on the initial conditions, and a limited number of spectral components participate in their formation.

  20. Hermite interpolant multiscaling functions for numerical solution of the convection diffusion equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elmira Ashpazzadeh

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available A numerical technique based on the Hermite interpolant multiscaling functions is presented for the solution of Convection-diusion equations. The operational matrices of derivative, integration and product are presented for multiscaling functions and are utilized to reduce the solution of linear Convection-diusion equation to the solution of algebraic equations. Because of sparsity of these matrices, this method is computationally very attractive and reduces the CPU time and computer memory. Illustrative examples are included to demonstrate the validity and applicability of the new technique.

  1. Double-diffusive convection and baroclinic instability in a differentially heated and initially stratified rotating system: the barostrat instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vincze, Miklos; Borcia, Ion; Harlander, Uwe [Department of Aerodynamics and Fluid Mechanics, Brandenburg University of Technology (BTU) Cottbus-Senftenberg, Siemens-Halske-Ring 14, D-03046 Cottbus (Germany); Gal, Patrice Le, E-mail: vincze.m@lecso.elte.hu [Institut de Recherche sur les Phénomènes Hors Equilibre, CNRS—Aix-Marseille University—Ecole Centrale Marseille, 49 rue F. Joliot-Curie, F-13384 Marseille (France)

    2016-12-15

    A water-filled differentially heated rotating annulus with initially prepared stable vertical salinity profiles is studied in the laboratory. Based on two-dimensional horizontal particle image velocimetry data and infrared camera visualizations, we describe the appearance and the characteristics of the baroclinic instability in this original configuration. First, we show that when the salinity profile is linear and confined between two non-stratified layers at top and bottom, only two separate shallow fluid layers can be destabilized. These unstable layers appear nearby the top and the bottom of the tank with a stratified motionless zone between them. This laboratory arrangement is thus particularly interesting to model geophysical or astrophysical situations where stratified regions are often juxtaposed to convective ones. Then, for more general but stable initial density profiles, statistical measures are introduced to quantify the extent of the baroclinic instability at given depths and to analyze the connections between this depth-dependence and the vertical salinity profiles. We find that, although the presence of stable stratification generally hinders full-depth overturning, double-diffusive convection can lead to development of multicellular sideways convection in shallow layers and subsequently to a multilayered baroclinic instability. Therefore we conclude that by decreasing the characteristic vertical scale of the flow, stratification may even enhance the formation of cyclonic and anticyclonic eddies (and thus, mixing) in a local sense. (paper)

  2. Double-diffusive convection and baroclinic instability in a differentially heated and initially stratified rotating system: the barostrat instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vincze, Miklos; Borcia, Ion; Harlander, Uwe; Gal, Patrice Le

    2016-01-01

    A water-filled differentially heated rotating annulus with initially prepared stable vertical salinity profiles is studied in the laboratory. Based on two-dimensional horizontal particle image velocimetry data and infrared camera visualizations, we describe the appearance and the characteristics of the baroclinic instability in this original configuration. First, we show that when the salinity profile is linear and confined between two non-stratified layers at top and bottom, only two separate shallow fluid layers can be destabilized. These unstable layers appear nearby the top and the bottom of the tank with a stratified motionless zone between them. This laboratory arrangement is thus particularly interesting to model geophysical or astrophysical situations where stratified regions are often juxtaposed to convective ones. Then, for more general but stable initial density profiles, statistical measures are introduced to quantify the extent of the baroclinic instability at given depths and to analyze the connections between this depth-dependence and the vertical salinity profiles. We find that, although the presence of stable stratification generally hinders full-depth overturning, double-diffusive convection can lead to development of multicellular sideways convection in shallow layers and subsequently to a multilayered baroclinic instability. Therefore we conclude that by decreasing the characteristic vertical scale of the flow, stratification may even enhance the formation of cyclonic and anticyclonic eddies (and thus, mixing) in a local sense. (paper)

  3. Finite Volume Scheme for Double Convection-Diffusion Exchange of Solutes in Bicarbonate High-Flux Hollow-Fiber Dialyzer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kodwo Annan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of a high-flux dialyzer in terms of buffering and toxic solute removal largely depends on the ability to use convection-diffusion mechanism inside the membrane. A two-dimensional transient convection-diffusion model coupled with acid-base correction term was developed. A finite volume technique was used to discretize the model and to numerically simulate it using MATLAB software tool. We observed that small solute concentration gradients peaked and were large enough to activate solute diffusion process in the membrane. While CO2 concentration gradients diminished from their maxima and shifted toward the end of the membrane, concentration gradients peaked at the same position. Also, CO2 concentration decreased rapidly within the first 47 minutes while optimal concentration was achieved within 30 minutes of the therapy. Abnormally high diffusion fluxes were observed near the blood-membrane interface that increased diffusion driving force and enhanced the overall diffusive process. While convective flux dominated total flux during the dialysis session, there was a continuous interference between convection and diffusion fluxes that call for the need to seek minimal interference between these two mechanisms. This is critical for the effective design and operation of high-flux dialyzers.

  4. A consistent formulation of the finite element method for solving diffusive-convective transport problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carmo, E.G.D. do; Galeao, A.C.N.R.

    1986-01-01

    A new method specially designed to solve highly convective transport problems is proposed. Using a variational approach it is shown that this weighted residual method belongs to a class of Petrov-Galerkin's approximation. Some examples are presented in order to demonstrate the adequacy of this method in predicting internal or external boundary layers. (Author) [pt

  5. The induced dimension reduction method applied to convection-diffusion-reaction problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Astudillo Rengifo, R.A.; van Gijzen, M.B.

    2016-01-01

    Discretization of (linearized) convection-diusion-reaction problems yields
    a large and sparse non symmetric linear system of equations,
    Ax = b: (1)
    In this work, we compare the computational behavior of the Induced Dimension
    Reduction method (IDR(s)) [10], with other

  6. Influence of drying conditions on the effective diffusivity and activation energy during convective air and vacuum drying of pumpkin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana SEREMET (CECLU

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of the work is to investigate the efficiency of convective air and vacuum processing on pumpkin drying kinetics. The pumpkin samples were of two different geometrical shapes (cylinder and cube and were dried in a laboratory scale hot air dryer using some specific parameters (constant air velocity of 1.0 m/s, three different temperatures 50, 60 and 70ºC suited to relative humidity (RH values of 9.8, 6.5, and 5.4% respectively. The vacuum drying was led at constant pressures of 5 kPa and accordance temperatures of 50, 60 and 70ºC. Moisture transfer from pumpkin slices was described by applying Fick’s diffusion model. Temperature dependence of the effective diffusivity was described by the Arrhenius-type equation. Cylindrical samples have a slightly better behaviour compared to cubic samples, due to the disposition of the tissues, and the mass and thermic transfer possibilities. Analysing the results of both drying methods, it was deduced that the most efficient method is convective air drying at 70ºC.

  7. Diffusive and convective transport modelling from analysis of ECRH-stimulated electron heat wave propagation. [ECRH (Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erckmann, V; Gasparino, U; Giannone, L. (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany)) (and others)

    1992-01-01

    ECRH power modulation experiments in toroidal devices offer the chance to analyze the electron heat transport more conclusively: the electron heat wave propagation can be observed by ECE (or SX) leading to radial profiles of electron temperature modulation amplitude and time delay (phase shift). Taking also the stationary power balance into account, the local electron heat transport can be modelled by a combination of diffusive and convective transport terms. This method is applied to ECRH discharges in the W7-AS stellarator (B=2.5T, R=2m, a[<=]18 cm) where the ECRH power deposition is highly localized. In W7-AS, the T[sub e] modulation profiles measured by a high resolution ECE system are the basis for the local transport analysis. As experimental errors limit the separation of diffusive and convective terms in the electron heat transport for central power deposition, also ECRH power modulation experiments with off-axis deposition and inward heat wave propagation were performed (with 70 GHz o-mode as well as with 140 GHz x-mode for increased absorption). Because collisional electron-ion coupling and radiative losses are only small, low density ECRH discharges are best candidates for estimating the electron heat flux from power balance. (author) 2 refs., 3 figs.

  8. The charge effect on the hindrance factors for diffusion and convection of a solute in pores: II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akinaga, Takeshi; O-tani, Hideyuki; Sugihara-Seki, Masako, E-mail: r091077@kansai-u.ac.jp [Department of Pure and Applied Physics, Kansai University, Yamate-cho, Suita, Osaka 564-8680 (Japan)

    2012-10-15

    The diffusion and convection of a solute suspended in a fluid across porous membranes are known to be reduced compared to those in a bulk solution, owing to the fluid mechanical interaction between the solute and the pore wall as well as steric restriction. If the solute and the pore wall are electrically charged, the electrostatic interaction between them could affect the hindrance to diffusion and convection. In this study, the transport of charged spherical solutes through charged circular cylindrical pores filled with an electrolyte solution containing small ions was studied numerically by using a fluid mechanical and electrostatic model. Based on a mean field theory, the electrostatic interaction energy between the solute and the pore wall was estimated from the Poisson-Boltzmann equation, and the charge effect on the solute transport was examined for the solute and pore wall of like charge. The results were compared with those obtained from the linearized form of the Poisson-Boltzmann equation, i.e. the Debye-Hueckel equation. (paper)

  9. Numerical investigation of double diffusive buoyancy forces induced natural convection in a cavity partially heated and cooled from sidewalls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasoul Nikbakhti

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with a numerical investigation of double-diffusive natural convective heat and mass transfer in a cavity filled with Newtonian fluid. The active parts of two vertical walls of the cavity are maintained at fixed but different temperatures and concentrations, while the other two walls, as well as inactive areas of the sidewalls, are considered to be adiabatic and impermeable to mass transfer. The length of the thermally active part equals half of the height. The non-dimensional forms of governing transport equations that describe double-diffusive natural convection for two-dimensional incompressible flow are functions of temperature or energy, concentration, vorticity, and stream-function. The coupled differential equations are discretized via FDM (Finite Difference Method. The Successive-Over-Relaxation (SOR method is used in the solution of the stream function equation. The analysis has been done for an enclosure with different aspect ratios ranging from 0.5 to 11 for three different combinations of partially active sections. The results are presented graphically in terms of streamlines, isotherms and isoconcentrations. In addition, the heat and mass transfer rate in the cavity is measured in terms of the average Nusselt and Sherwood numbers for various parameters including thermal Grashof number, Lewis number, buoyancy ratio and aspect ratio. It is revealed that the placement order of partially thermally active walls and the buoyancy ratio influence significantly the flow pattern and the corresponding heat and mass transfer performance in the cavity.

  10. Topology Optimisation for Coupled Convection Problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexandersen, Joe

    This thesis deals with topology optimisation for coupled convection problems. The aim is to extend and apply topology optimisation to steady-state conjugate heat transfer problems, where the heat conduction equation governs the heat transfer in a solid and is coupled to thermal transport...... in a surrounding uid, governed by a convection-diffusion equation, where the convective velocity field is found from solving the isothermal incompressible steady-state Navier-Stokes equations. Topology optimisation is also applied to steady-state natural convection problems. The modelling is done using stabilised...... finite elements, the formulation and implementation of which was done partly during a special course as prepatory work for this thesis. The formulation is extended with a Brinkman friction term in order to facilitate the topology optimisation of fluid flow and convective cooling problems. The derived...

  11. Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics (MESA): Convective Boundaries, Element Diffusion, and Massive Star Explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxton, Bill; Schwab, Josiah; Bauer, Evan B.; Bildsten, Lars; Blinnikov, Sergei; Duffell, Paul; Farmer, R.; Goldberg, Jared A.; Marchant, Pablo; Sorokina, Elena; Thoul, Anne; Townsend, Richard H. D.; Timmes, F. X.

    2018-02-01

    We update the capabilities of the software instrument Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics (MESA) and enhance its ease of use and availability. Our new approach to locating convective boundaries is consistent with the physics of convection, and yields reliable values of the convective-core mass during both hydrogen- and helium-burning phases. Stars with Meffects of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities that, in combination with the coupling to a public version of the STELLA radiation transfer instrument, creates new avenues for exploring Type II supernova properties. These capabilities are exhibited with exploratory models of pair-instability supernovae, pulsational pair-instability supernovae, and the formation of stellar-mass black holes. The applicability of MESA is now widened by the capability to import multidimensional hydrodynamic models into MESA. We close by introducing software modules for handling floating point exceptions and stellar model optimization, as well as four new software tools - MESA-Web, MESA-Docker, pyMESA, and mesastar.org - to enhance MESA's education and research impact.

  12. Statistical validation of the model of diffusion-convection (MDC) of 137Cs for the assessment of recent sedimentation rates in coastal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulo Alves de Lima Ferreira; Eduardo Siegle; Michel Michaelovitch de Mahiques; Rubens Cesar Lopes Figueira; Carlos Augusto Franca Schettini

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed the validation of the model of diffusion-convection (MDC) of 137 Cs for the calculation of recent sedimentation rates in 13 sedimentary cores of two Brazilian coastal systems, the Cananeia-Iguape and Santos-Sao Vicente estuarine systems. The MDC covers key factors responsible for 137 Cs vertical migration in sediments: its diffusion to the interstitial water and the vertical convection of this water through the sediments. This study successfully validated the MDC use to determine sedimentation rates, which was statistically validated not only with 210 Pb xs (unsupported 210 Pb) models, widely used in oceanographic studies, but also by literature values for those regions. (author)

  13. Convective cells and their relationship to vortex diffusion in the Wisconsin Levitated Octupole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrhardt, A.B.

    1978-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is two-fold: first, to present floating potential structure for different plasmas and operating parameters in the Wisconsin Levitated Octupole. Second, to show how the observed potential structure can be used, within the framework of vortex diffusion, to account for enhanced diffusion in the appropriate parameter regimes

  14. Discrete multi-physics simulations of diffusive and convective mass transfer in boundary layers containing motile cilia in lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariane, Mostapha; Kassinos, Stavros; Velaga, Sitaram; Alexiadis, Alessio

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, the mass transfer coefficient (permeability) of boundary layers containing motile cilia is investigated by means of discrete multi-physics. The idea is to understand the main mechanisms of mass transport occurring in a ciliated-layer; one specific application being inhaled drugs in the respiratory epithelium. The effect of drug diffusivity, cilia beat frequency and cilia flexibility is studied. Our results show the existence of three mass transfer regimes. A low frequency regime, which we called shielding regime, where the presence of the cilia hinders mass transport; an intermediate frequency regime, which we have called diffusive regime, where diffusion is the controlling mechanism; and a high frequency regime, which we have called convective regime, where the degree of bending of the cilia seems to be the most important factor controlling mass transfer in the ciliated-layer. Since the flexibility of the cilia and the frequency of the beat changes with age and health conditions, the knowledge of these three regimes allows prediction of how mass transfer varies with these factors. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Fem Simulation of Triple Diffusive Natural Convection Along Inclined Plate in Porous Medium: Prescribed Surface Heat, Solute and Nanoparticles Flux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goyal M.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, triple diffusive natural convection under Darcy flow over an inclined plate embedded in a porous medium saturated with a binary base fluid containing nanoparticles and two salts is studied. The model used for the nanofluid is the one which incorporates the effects of Brownian motion and thermophoresis. In addition, the thermal energy equations include regular diffusion and cross-diffusion terms. The vertical surface has the heat, mass and nanoparticle fluxes each prescribed as a power law function of the distance along the wall. The boundary layer equations are transformed into a set of ordinary differential equations with the help of group theory transformations. A wide range of parameter values are chosen to bring out the effect of buoyancy ratio, regular Lewis number and modified Dufour parameters of both salts and nanofluid parameters with varying angle of inclinations. The effects of parameters on the velocity, temperature, solutal and nanoparticles volume fraction profiles, as well as on the important parameters of heat and mass transfer, i.e., the reduced Nusselt, regular and nanofluid Sherwood numbers, are discussed. Such problems find application in extrusion of metals, polymers and ceramics, production of plastic films, insulation of wires and liquid packaging.

  16. Non-Equilibrium Thermodynamic Analysis of Double Diffusive, Nanofluid Forced Convection in Catalytic Microreactors with Radiation Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilian Govone

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a theoretical investigation of the second law performance of double diffusive forced convection in microreactors with the inclusion of nanofluid and radiation effects. The investigated microreactors consist of a single microchannel, fully filled by a porous medium. The transport of heat and mass are analysed by including the thick walls and a first order, catalytic chemical reaction on the internal surfaces of the microchannel. Two sets of thermal boundary conditions are considered on the external surfaces of the microchannel; (1 constant temperature and (2 constant heat flux boundary condition on the lower wall and convective boundary condition on the upper wall. The local thermal non-equilibrium approach is taken to thermally analyse the porous section of the system. The mass dispersion equation is coupled with the transport of heat in the nanofluid flow through consideration of Soret effect. The problem is analytically solved and illustrations of the temperature fields, Nusselt number, total entropy generation rate and performance evaluation criterion (PEC are provided. It is shown that the radiation effect tends to modify the thermal behaviour within the porous section of the system. The radiation parameter also reduces the overall temperature of the system. It is further demonstrated that, expectedly, the nanoparticles reduce the temperature of the system and increase the Nusselt number. The total entropy generation rate and consequently PEC shows a strong relation with radiation parameter and volumetric concentration of nanoparticles.

  17. Compactness result for periodic structures and its application to the homogenization of a diffusion-convection equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anvarbek M. Meirmanov

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We prove the strong compactness of the sequence ${c^{varepsilon}(mathbf{x},t}$ in $L_2(Omega_T$, $Omega_T={(mathbf{x},t:mathbf{x}inOmega subset mathbb{R}^3, tin(0,T}$, bounded in $W^{1,0}_2(Omega_T$ with the sequence of time derivative ${partial/partial tig(chi(mathbf{x}/varepsilon c^{varepsilon}ig}$ bounded in the space $L_2ig((0,T; W^{-1}_2(Omegaig$. As an application we consider the homogenization of a diffusion-convection equation with a sequence of divergence-free velocities ${mathbf{v}^{varepsilon}(mathbf{x},t}$ weakly convergent in $L_2(Omega_T$.

  18. Thermo-diffusion effect on free convection heat and mass transfer in a thermally linearly stratified non-darcy porous media

    KAUST Repository

    Murthy, P.V.S.N.

    2011-12-26

    Thermo-diffusion effect on free convection heat and mass transfer from a vertical surface embedded in a liquid saturated thermally stratified non - Darcy porous medium has been analyzed using a local non-similar procedure. The wall temperature and concentration are constant and the medium is linearly stratified in the vertical direction with respect to the thermal conditions. The fluid flow, temperature and concentration fields are affected by the complex interactions among the diffusion ratio Le, buoyancy ratio N, thermo-diffusion parameter Sr and stratification parameter ?. Non-linear interactions of all these parameters on the convective transport has been analyzed and variation of heat and mass transfer coefficients with thermo-diffusion parameter in the thermally stratified non-Darcy porous media is presented through computer generated plots.

  19. Thermo-diffusion effect on free convection heat and mass transfer in a thermally linearly stratified non-darcy porous media

    KAUST Repository

    Murthy, P.V.S.N.; El-Amin, Mohamed

    2011-01-01

    Thermo-diffusion effect on free convection heat and mass transfer from a vertical surface embedded in a liquid saturated thermally stratified non - Darcy porous medium has been analyzed using a local non-similar procedure. The wall temperature and concentration are constant and the medium is linearly stratified in the vertical direction with respect to the thermal conditions. The fluid flow, temperature and concentration fields are affected by the complex interactions among the diffusion ratio Le, buoyancy ratio N, thermo-diffusion parameter Sr and stratification parameter ?. Non-linear interactions of all these parameters on the convective transport has been analyzed and variation of heat and mass transfer coefficients with thermo-diffusion parameter in the thermally stratified non-Darcy porous media is presented through computer generated plots.

  20. Nucleation, growth and dissolution of extended defects in implanted Si: impact on dopant diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claverie, A.; Giles, L.F.; Omri, M.; Mauduit, B. de; Ben Assayag, G.; Mathiot, D.

    1999-01-01

    Transient Enhanced Diffusion (TED) of boron in silicon is driven by the large supersaturations of self-interstitial silicon atoms left after implantation which also often lead to the nucleation and subsequent growth, upon annealing, of extended defects. In this paper we review selected experimental results and concepts concerning boron diffusion and/or defect behavior which have recently emerged with the ion implantation community and briefly indicate how they are, or will be, currently used to improve 'predictive simulations' softwares aimed at predicting TED. In a first part, we focus our attention on TED and on the formation of defects in the case of 'direct' implantation of boron in silicon. In a second part, we review our current knowledge of the defects and of the diffusion behavior of boron when annealing preamorphised Si. In a last part, we try to compare these two cases and to find out what are the reasons for some similarities and many differences in defect types and thermal evolution depending on whether boron is implanted in crystalline or amorphous silicon. While rising many more questions, we propose a 'thermodynamical' vision of the nucleation and growth of clusters and extended defects and stress the interactions between these defects and the free Si self-interstitial atoms which surround them and are the source for TED in all cases. A pragmatic approach to the simulation of TED for various experimental conditions is proposed

  1. Extended period of polar cap auroral display: auroral dynamics and relation to the IMF and the ionospheric convection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. G. Vorobjev

    Full Text Available An unusually extended period (5 h of polar cap auroral display on 3 August 1986 is examined. Auroras have been investigated using ground-based data as well as measurements from the IMP-8 spacecraft in interplanetary space and simultaneous observations from the polar-orbiting satellites Viking and DE-1 in the northern and southern hemispheres, respectively. It is found that visible Sun-aligned arcs are located inside the transpolar band of the θ-aurora observed from the satellite in ultraviolet wavelengths. The transpolar band can contain several Sun-aligned arcs that move inside the band toward the morning or evening side of the auroral oval independent of the direction of the band movement. Intensifications of polar cap auroras with durations of up to about 30 min are observed. No change has been found in either IMF parameters or substorm activity that can be related to these intensifications. The θ-aurora occurred during a 2-h period when the B z-component of the IMF was negative. A tendency is noted for dawnward (duskward displacement of the transpolar band when By>0 (By<0 in the southern hemisphere. Simultaneous observations of auroral ovals during interplanetary Bz<0, By<0 and Bx>0 in both hemispheres and convection patterns for Bz<0 and By<0 have been displayed using satellite and ground-based measurements. It was found that the transpolar band of the -aurora in the sunlit hemisphere was situated in the region of large-scale downward Birkeland currents.

  2. Extended period of polar cap auroral display: auroral dynamics and relation to the IMF and the ionospheric convection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. G. Vorobjev

    1995-08-01

    Full Text Available An unusually extended period (5 h of polar cap auroral display on 3 August 1986 is examined. Auroras have been investigated using ground-based data as well as measurements from the IMP-8 spacecraft in interplanetary space and simultaneous observations from the polar-orbiting satellites Viking and DE-1 in the northern and southern hemispheres, respectively. It is found that visible Sun-aligned arcs are located inside the transpolar band of the θ-aurora observed from the satellite in ultraviolet wavelengths. The transpolar band can contain several Sun-aligned arcs that move inside the band toward the morning or evening side of the auroral oval independent of the direction of the band movement. Intensifications of polar cap auroras with durations of up to about 30 min are observed. No change has been found in either IMF parameters or substorm activity that can be related to these intensifications. The θ-aurora occurred during a 2-h period when the B z-component of the IMF was negative. A tendency is noted for dawnward (duskward displacement of the transpolar band when By>0 (By<0 in the southern hemisphere. Simultaneous observations of auroral ovals during interplanetary Bz<0, By<0 and Bx>0 in both hemispheres and convection patterns for Bz<0 and By<0 have been displayed using satellite and ground-based measurements. It was found that the transpolar band of the -aurora in the sunlit hemisphere was situated in the region of large-scale downward Birkeland currents.

  3. Extended substitution-diffusion based image cipher using chaotic standard map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anil; Ghose, M. K.

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes an extended substitution-diffusion based image cipher using chaotic standard map [1] and linear feedback shift register to overcome the weakness of previous technique by adding nonlinearity. The first stage consists of row and column rotation and permutation which is controlled by the pseudo-random sequences which is generated by standard chaotic map and linear feedback shift register, second stage further diffusion and confusion is obtained in the horizontal and vertical pixels by mixing the properties of the horizontally and vertically adjacent pixels, respectively, with the help of chaotic standard map. The number of rounds in both stage are controlled by combination of pseudo-random sequence and original image. The performance is evaluated from various types of analysis such as entropy analysis, difference analysis, statistical analysis, key sensitivity analysis, key space analysis and speed analysis. The experimental results illustrate that performance of this is highly secured and fast.

  4. Unsteady magnetohydrodynamics mixed convection flow in a rotating medium with double diffusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiann, Lim Yeou; Ismail, Zulkhibri; Khan, Ilyas; Shafie, Sharidan [Department of Mathematical Sciences, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Johor Bahru, Johor (Malaysia)

    2015-05-15

    Exact solutions of an unsteady Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) flow over an impulsively started vertical plate in a rotating medium are presented. The effects of thermal radiative and thermal diffusion on the fluid flow are also considered. The governing equations are modelled and solved for velocity, temperature and concentration using Laplace transforms technique. Expressions of velocity, temperature and concentration profiles are obtained and their numerical results are presented graphically. Skin friction, Sherwood number and Nusselt number are also computed and presented in tabular forms. The determined solutions can generate a large class of solutions as special cases corresponding to different motions with technical relevance. The results obtained herein may be used to verify the validation of obtained numerical solutions for more complicated fluid flow problems.

  5. Analysis of forced convective modified Burgers liquid flow considering Cattaneo-Christov double diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waqas, M.; Hayat, T.; Shehzad, S. A.; Alsaedi, A.

    2018-03-01

    A mathematical model is formulated to characterize the non-Fourier and Fick's double diffusive models of heat and mass in moving flow of modified Burger's liquid. Temperature-dependent conductivity of liquid is taken into account. The concept of stratification is utilized to govern the equations of energy and mass species. The idea of boundary layer theory is employed to obtain the mathematical model of considered physical problem. The obtained partial differential system is converted into ordinary ones with the help of relevant variables. The homotopic concept lead to the convergent solutions of governing expressions. Convergence is attained and acceptable values are certified by expressing the so called ℏ -curves and numerical benchmark. Several graphs are made for different values of physical constraints to explore the mechanism of heat and mass transportation. We explored that the liquid temperature and concentration are retard for the larger thermal/concentration relaxation time constraint.

  6. Modeling of Diffusive Convective and Electromechanical Processes in PEM fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Mads

    of their impact on the operational performance of the fuel cell. In the modelling work presented, the commercial CFD package CFX4.4 is used as the foundation to generate a model of a PEM fuel cell. The CFX4.4 platform provides the framework of solving the three-dimensional transport equations for mass, momentum...... as the transport of protons in the membrane phase is accounted for. This provides the possibility of predicting the threedimensional distribution of the activation overpotential in the catalyst layer. The current density's dependency on the gas concentration and activation overpotential can thereby be addressed....... The proposed model makes it possible to predict the effect of geometrical and material properties on fuel cells performance, which means that the model can predict how the gas diffusion layer (GDL) and catalyst layers physical properties affects the distribution of current density, and how this affects...

  7. eGSM: A extended Sky Model of Diffuse Radio Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Doyeon; Liu, Adrian; Switzer, Eric

    2018-01-01

    Both cosmic microwave background and 21cm cosmology observations must contend with astrophysical foreground contaminants in the form of diffuse radio emission. For precise cosmological measurements, these foregrounds must be accurately modeled over the entire sky Ideally, such full-sky models ought to be primarily motivated by observations. Yet in practice, these observations are limited, with data sets that are observed not only in a heterogenous fashion, but also over limited frequency ranges. Previously, the Global Sky Model (GSM) took some steps towards solving the problem of incomplete observational data by interpolating over multi-frequency maps using principal component analysis (PCA).In this poster, we present an extended version of GSM (called eGSM) that includes the following improvements: 1) better zero-level calibration 2) incorporation of non-uniform survey resolutions and sky coverage 3) the ability to quantify uncertainties in sky models 4) the ability to optimally select spectral models using Bayesian Evidence techniques.

  8. Double-diffusive mixed convection in the slot ventilated enclosure with different arrangements of supplying air flow ports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heng-Sheng Cheng

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Steady double-diffusive mixed convection in an enclosure with side venting and discrete heat and contaminant sources is numerically studied under supplying upside and returning downside (STRB mode and returning upside and supplying downside mode (RTSB, respectively. The parameters governing the fluid flow include the Grashof number Gr (102–106, Reynolds number Re (100–500, supplying or returning distance H 1/HT (0–2, Prandtl number Pr (0.7, buoyancy ratio N, and Schmidt number Sc. Effects of Gr, Re, and H 1/HT on the flow patterns, thermal, and species transports were numerically investigated concerning STRB and RTSB modes. Fluid flow, heat, and species transports in the enclosure are visualized and analyzed by the contours of stream function, heat function, and mass function, respectively. Air age was also presented to evaluate the freshness of the enclosed fluid. Averaged Nusselt number of the heat source and Sherwood number of the contaminant source are power-law correlated with Gr, Re, and H 1/HT for two ventilation modes, respectively. The correlations demonstrate that the ratio of averaged Nusselt number to Sherwood number was approximately approaching unity, independent of ventilation modes and values of H 1/HT . This investigation could benefit the future design of room ventilation and thermal removals from the electronic chips.

  9. Convective Drying of Osmo-Treated Abalone (Haliotis rufescens Slices: Diffusion, Modeling, and Quality Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Lemus-Mondaca

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The focus of this research was based on the application of an osmotic pretreatment (15% NaCl for drying abalone slices, and it evaluates the influence of hot-air drying temperature (40–80°C on the product quality. In addition, the mass transfer kinetics of salt and water was also studied. The optimal time of the osmotic treatment was established until reaching a pseudo equilibrium state of the water and salt content (290 min. The water effective diffusivity values during drying ranged from 3.76 to 4.75 × 10−9 m2/s for three selected temperatures (40, 60, and 80°C. In addition, experimental data were fitted by Weibull distribution model. The modified Weibull model provided good fitting of experimental data according to applied statistical tests. Regarding the evaluated quality parameters, the color of the surface showed a change more significant at high temperature (80°C, whereas the nonenzymatic browning and texture showed a decrease during drying process mainly due to changes in protein matrix and rehydration rates, respectively. In particular, working at 60°C resulted in dried samples with the highest quality parameters.

  10. The attentional drift-diffusion model extends to simple purchasing decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajbich, Ian; Lu, Dingchao; Camerer, Colin; Rangel, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    How do we make simple purchasing decisions (e.g., whether or not to buy a product at a given price)? Previous work has shown that the attentional drift-diffusion model (aDDM) can provide accurate quantitative descriptions of the psychometric data for binary and trinary value-based choices, and of how the choice process is guided by visual attention. Here we extend the aDDM to the case of purchasing decisions, and test it using an eye-tracking experiment. We find that the model also provides a reasonably accurate quantitative description of the relationship between choice, reaction time, and visual fixations using parameters that are very similar to those that best fit the previous data. The only critical difference is that the choice biases induced by the fixations are about half as big in purchasing decisions as in binary choices. This suggests that a similar computational process is used to make binary choices, trinary choices, and simple purchasing decisions.

  11. The attentional drift-diffusion model extends to simple purchasing decisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian eKrajbich

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available How do we make simple purchasing decisions (e.g., whether or not to buy a product ata given price? Previous work has shown that the Attentional-Drift-Diffusion-Model (aDDMcan provide accurate descriptions of the psychometric data for binary and trinary value-based choices, and of how the choice process is guided by visual attention. However, the computational processes used to make purchasing decisions are unknown. Here we extend the aDDM to the case of purchasing decisions, and test it using an eye-tracking experiment. We find that the model provides a quantitatively accurate description of the relationship between choice, reaction time, and visual fixations using parameters that are very similar to those that best fit the previous data. The only critical difference is that the choice biases induced by the fixations are about half as big in purchasing decisions as in binary choices.This suggests that the brain uses similar computational processes in these varied decision situations.

  12. Performance Enhancement of Pharmacokinetic Diffuse Fluorescence Tomography by Use of Adaptive Extended Kalman Filtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Wu, Linhui; Yi, Xi; Zhang, Yanqi; Zhang, Limin; Zhao, Huijuan; Gao, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Due to both the physiological and morphological differences in the vascularization between healthy and diseased tissues, pharmacokinetic diffuse fluorescence tomography (DFT) can provide contrast-enhanced and comprehensive information for tumor diagnosis and staging. In this regime, the extended Kalman filtering (EKF) based method shows numerous advantages including accurate modeling, online estimation of multiparameters, and universal applicability to any optical fluorophore. Nevertheless the performance of the conventional EKF highly hinges on the exact and inaccessible prior knowledge about the initial values. To address the above issues, an adaptive-EKF scheme is proposed based on a two-compartmental model for the enhancement, which utilizes a variable forgetting-factor to compensate the inaccuracy of the initial states and emphasize the effect of the current data. It is demonstrated using two-dimensional simulative investigations on a circular domain that the proposed adaptive-EKF can obtain preferable estimation of the pharmacokinetic-rates to the conventional-EKF and the enhanced-EKF in terms of quantitativeness, noise robustness, and initialization independence. Further three-dimensional numerical experiments on a digital mouse model validate the efficacy of the method as applied in realistic biological systems.

  13. Prediction of galactic cosmic ray intensity variation for a few (up to 10-12 years ahead on the basis of convection-diffusion and drift model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. I. Dorman

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available We determine the dimension of the Heliosphere (modulation region, radial diffusion coefficient and other parameters of convection-diffusion and drift mechanisms of cosmic ray (CR long-term variation, depending on particle energy, the level of solar activity (SA and general solar magnetic field. This important information we obtain on the basis of CR and SA data in the past, taking into account the theory of convection-diffusion and drift global modulation of galactic CR in the Heliosphere. By using these results and the predictions which are regularly published elsewhere of expected SA variation in the near future and prediction of next future SA cycle, we may make a prediction of the expected in the near future long-term cosmic ray intensity variation. We show that by this method we may make a prediction of the expected in the near future (up to 10-12 years, and may be more, in dependence for what period can be made definite prediction of SA galactic cosmic ray intensity variation in the interplanetary space on different distances from the Sun, in the Earth's magnetosphere, and in the atmosphere at different altitudes and latitudes.

  14. Lie and Q-Conditional Symmetries of Reaction-Diffusion-Convection Equations with Exponential Nonlinearities and Their Application for Finding Exact Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Cherniha

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This review is devoted to search for Lie and Q-conditional (nonclassical symmetries and exact solutions of a class of reaction-diffusion-convection equations with exponential nonlinearities. A complete Lie symmetry classification of the class is derived via two different algorithms in order to show that the result depends essentially on the type of equivalence transformations used for the classification. Moreover, a complete description of Q-conditional symmetries for PDEs from the class in question is also presented. It is shown that all the well-known results for reaction-diffusion equations with exponential nonlinearities follow as particular cases from the results derived for this class of reaction-diffusion-convection equations. The symmetries obtained for constructing exact solutions of the relevant equations are successfully applied. The exact solutions are compared with those found by means of different techniques. Finally, an application of the exact solutions for solving boundary-value problems arising in population dynamics is presented.

  15. The diffusion mechanism and convective transport in the formation of surface anomalies of RADON-222 generated at depth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, E.B.; Hamza, V.M.

    1982-01-01

    A preliminar study on the importance of a thermally-activated convective transport of radon is made in order to explain radon anomalies at surface generated at great depth. It is theoretically shown that convective currents should be of the order of 10 μm/s or larger to explain such anomalies. The influence of surface temperature changes on the convective transport is also discussed. Seasonal changes in temperature typical of climates such as that of southern Brazil can develop thermal inversion layers at depths up to 20 metres. The optimum period of the year for the employment of surface emanometric techniques is during the second and the third months after the winter peak when the thermal inversion barriers are less intense. (Author) [pt

  16. The numerical study and comparison of radial basis functions in applications of the dual reciprocity boundary element method to convection-diffusion problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanthawara, Krittidej; Kaennakham, Sayan; Toutip, Wattana

    2016-02-01

    The methodology of Dual Reciprocity Boundary Element Method (DRBEM) is applied to the convection-diffusion problems and investigating its performance is our first objective of the work. Seven types of Radial Basis Functions (RBF); Linear, Thin-plate Spline, Cubic, Compactly Supported, Inverse Multiquadric, Quadratic, and that proposed by [12], were closely investigated in order to numerically compare their effectiveness drawbacks etc. and this is taken as our second objective. A sufficient number of simulations were performed covering as many aspects as possible. Varidated against both exacts and other numerical works, the final results imply strongly that the Thin-Plate Spline and Linear type of RBF are superior to others in terms of both solutions' quality and CPU-time spent while the Inverse Multiquadric seems to poorly yield the results. It is also found that DRBEM can perform relatively well at moderate level of convective force and as anticipated becomes unstable when the problem becomes more convective-dominated, as normally found in all classical mesh-dependence methods.

  17. Extending the radial diffusion model of Falthammar to non-dipole background field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunningham, Gregory Scott [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-05-26

    A model for radial diffusion caused by electromagnetic disturbances was published by Falthammar (1965) using a two-parameter model of the disturbance perturbing a background dipole magnetic field. Schulz and Lanzerotti (1974) extended this model by recognizing the two parameter perturbation as the leading (non--dipole) terms of the Mead Williams magnetic field model. They emphasized that the magnetic perturbation in such a model induces an electric ield that can be calculated from the motion of field lines on which the particles are ‘frozen’. Roederer and Zhang (2014) describe how the field lines on which the particles are frozen can be calculated by tracing the unperturbed field lines from the minimum-B location to the ionospheric footpoint, and then tracing the perturbed field (which shares the same ionospheric footpoint due to the frozen -in condition) from the ionospheric footpoint back to a perturbed minimum B location. The instantaneous change n Roederer L*, dL*/dt, can then be computed as the product (dL*/dphi)*(dphi/dt). dL*/Dphi is linearly dependent on the perturbation parameters (to first order) and is obtained by computing the drift across L*-labeled perturbed field lines, while dphi/dt is related to the bounce-averaged gradient-curvature drift velocity. The advantage of assuming a dipole background magnetic field, as in these previous studies, is that the instantaneous dL*/dt can be computed analytically (with some approximations), as can the DLL that results from integrating dL*/dt over time and computing the expected value of (dL*)^2. The approach can also be applied to complex background magnetic field models like T89 or TS04, on top of which the small perturbations are added, but an analytical solution is not possible and so a numerical solution must be implemented. In this talk, I discuss our progress in implementing a numerical solution to the calculation of DL*L* using arbitrary background field models with simple electromagnetic

  18. The Water-Induced Linear Reduction Gas Diffusivity Model Extended to Three Pore Regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chamindu, T. K. K. Deepagoda; de Jonge, Lis Wollesen; Kawamoto, Ken

    2015-01-01

    . Characterization of soil functional pore structure is an essential prerequisite to understand key gas transport processes in variably saturated soils in relation to soil ecosystems, climate, and environmental services. In this study, the water-induced linear reduction (WLR) soil gas diffusivity model originally...... gas diffusivity from moist to dry conditions across differently structured porous media, including narrow soil size fractions, perforated plastic blocks, fractured limestone, peaty soils, aggregated volcanic ash soils, and particulate substrates for Earth- or space-based applications. The new Cip...

  19. Mothers "Google It Up:" Extending Communication Channel Behavior in Diffusion of Innovations Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundstrom, Beth

    2016-01-01

    This study employed qualitative methods, conducting 44 in-depth interviews with biological mothers of newborns to understand women's perceptions and use of new media, mass media, and interpersonal communication channels in relation to health issues. Findings contribute to theoretical and practical understandings of the role of communication channels in diffusion of innovations theory. In particular, this study provides a foundation for the use of qualitative research to advance applications of diffusion of innovations theory. Results suggest that participants resisted mass media portrayals of women's health. When faced with a health question, participants uniformly started with the Internet to "Google it up." Findings suggest new media comprise a new communication channel with new rules, serving the functions of both personal and impersonal influence. In particular, pregnancy and the postpartum period emerged as a time when campaign planners can access women in new ways online. As a result, campaign planners could benefit from introducing new ideas online and capitalizing on the strength of weak ties favored in new media. Results expand the innovativeness/needs paradox in diffusion of innovations theory by elaborating on the role of new media to reach underserved populations. These findings provide an opportunity to better understand patient information seeking through the lens of diffusion of innovations theory.

  20. Diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubaschewski, O.

    1983-01-01

    The diffusion rate values of titanium, its compounds and alloys are summarized and tabulated. The individual chemical diffusion coefficients and self-diffusion coefficients of certain isotopes are given. Experimental methods are listed which were used for the determination of diffusion coefficients. Some values have been taken over from other studies. Also given are graphs showing the temperature dependences of diffusion and changes in the diffusion coefficient with concentration changes

  1. The potential role of diffusion-induced grain-boundary migration in extended life prediction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Handwerker, C.A.; Blendell, J.E.; Interrante, C.G.; Ahn, T.M.

    1993-01-01

    The selection of materials that are suitable for various high-level waste-packaging designs must reflect the need to meet requirements for long-term performance in repository environments that change with time. With this in mind, we examine how grain boundaries in materials are induced to migrate as a result of solute diffusion even at low temperatures, how the composition of the matrix material is changed significantly by this diffusion-induced grain boundary migration (DIGM), and how the changing microstructures and compositions during DIGM lead to major changes in materials performance, such as corrosion or embrittlement. Methods are discussed for prediction of the long-term behavior of materials affected by DIGM

  2. Effect of Internal Heat Source on the Onset of Double-Diffusive Convection in a Rotating Nanofluid Layer with Feedback Control Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. K. Khalid

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A linear stability analysis has been carried out to examine the effect of internal heat source on the onset of Rayleigh–Bénard convection in a rotating nanofluid layer with double diffusive coefficients, namely, Soret and Dufour, in the presence of feedback control. The system is heated from below and the model used for the nanofluid layer incorporates the effects of thermophoresis and Brownian motion. Three types of bounding systems of the model have been considered which are as follows: both the lower and upper bounding surfaces are free, the lower is rigid and the upper is free, and both of them are rigid. The eigenvalue equations of the perturbed state were obtained from a normal mode analysis and solved using the Galerkin method. It is found that the effect of internal heat source and Soret parameter destabilizes the nanofluid layer system while increasing the Coriolis force, feedback control, and Dufour parameter helps to postpone the onset of convection. Elevating the modified density ratio hastens the instability in the system and there is no significant effect of modified particle density in a nanofluid system.

  3. Generalized modification in the lattice Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook model for incompressible Navier-Stokes equations and convection-diffusion equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xuguang; Shi, Baochang; Chai, Zhenhua

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, two modified lattice Boltzmann Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook (LBGK) models for incompressible Navier-Stokes equations and convection-diffusion equations are proposed via the addition of correction terms in the evolution equations. Utilizing this modification, the value of the dimensionless relaxation time in the LBGK model can be kept in a proper range, and thus the stability of the LBGK model can be improved. Although some gradient operators are included in the correction terms, they can be computed efficiently using local computational schemes such that the present LBGK models still retain the intrinsic parallelism characteristic of the lattice Boltzmann method. Numerical studies of the steady Poiseuille flow and unsteady Womersley flow show that the modified LBGK model has a second-order convergence rate in space, and the compressibility effect in the common LBGK model can be eliminated. In addition, to test the stability of the present models, we also performed some simulations of the natural convection in a square cavity, and we found that the results agree well with those reported in the previous work, even at a very high Rayleigh number (Ra = 10(12)).

  4. Marangoni convection in Casson liquid flow due to an infinite disk with exponential space dependent heat source and cross-diffusion effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahanthesh, B.; Gireesha, B. J.; Shashikumar, N. S.; Hayat, T.; Alsaedi, A.

    2018-06-01

    Present work aims to investigate the features of the exponential space dependent heat source (ESHS) and cross-diffusion effects in Marangoni convective heat mass transfer flow due to an infinite disk. Flow analysis is comprised with magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). The effects of Joule heating, viscous dissipation and solar radiation are also utilized. The thermal and solute field on the disk surface varies in a quadratic manner. The ordinary differential equations have been obtained by utilizing Von Kármán transformations. The resulting problem under consideration is solved numerically via Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg based shooting scheme. The effects of involved pertinent flow parameters are explored by graphical illustrations. Results point out that the ESHS effect dominates thermal dependent heat source effect on thermal boundary layer growth. The concentration and temperature distributions and their associated layer thicknesses are enhanced by Marangoni effect.

  5. Model of diffusion-convection of 137Cs in marine sediments: a mathematical approach for the assessment of recent sedimentation rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Paulo A.L.; Figueira, Rubens C.L.

    2013-01-01

    Under the perspective of knowing the results of the processes which moves the sedimentary dynamics in coastal environments and assisting works related to the historic of impacts generated in these systems by human occupation, this study shows a practical application of the mathematic-chemical model of diffusion-convection (MDC) of the radionuclide 137 Cs in sedimentary columns for the evaluation of recent sedimentation rates in a Brazilian coastal system. 137 Cs is an artificial radionuclide characterized by its high fission yield and half-life of about 30 years. It is already widely used in this kind of study by reason of its 1963's global peak. The MDC will improve the generated results as the levels of radioactivity of this nuclide are low in the Southern Hemisphere, where this element's main source is the atmospheric fallout from past nuclear explosions, and due to the fact that it is an element with non-negligible vertical mobility. (author)

  6. Modeling convection-diffusion-reaction systems for microfluidic molecular communications with surface-based receivers in Internet of Bio-Nano Things.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Kuscu

    Full Text Available We consider a microfluidic molecular communication (MC system, where the concentration-encoded molecular messages are transported via fluid flow-induced convection and diffusion, and detected by a surface-based MC receiver with ligand receptors placed at the bottom of the microfluidic channel. The overall system is a convection-diffusion-reaction system that can only be solved by numerical methods, e.g., finite element analysis (FEA. However, analytical models are key for the information and communication technology (ICT, as they enable an optimisation framework to develop advanced communication techniques, such as optimum detection methods and reliable transmission schemes. In this direction, we develop an analytical model to approximate the expected time course of bound receptor concentration, i.e., the received signal used to decode the transmitted messages. The model obviates the need for computationally expensive numerical methods by capturing the nonlinearities caused by laminar flow resulting in parabolic velocity profile, and finite number of ligand receptors leading to receiver saturation. The model also captures the effects of reactive surface depletion layer resulting from the mass transport limitations and moving reaction boundary originated from the passage of finite-duration molecular concentration pulse over the receiver surface. Based on the proposed model, we derive closed form analytical expressions that approximate the received pulse width, pulse delay and pulse amplitude, which can be used to optimize the system from an ICT perspective. We evaluate the accuracy of the proposed model by comparing model-based analytical results to the numerical results obtained by solving the exact system model with COMSOL Multiphysics.

  7. Modeling convection-diffusion-reaction systems for microfluidic molecular communications with surface-based receivers in Internet of Bio-Nano Things.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuscu, Murat; Akan, Ozgur B

    2018-01-01

    We consider a microfluidic molecular communication (MC) system, where the concentration-encoded molecular messages are transported via fluid flow-induced convection and diffusion, and detected by a surface-based MC receiver with ligand receptors placed at the bottom of the microfluidic channel. The overall system is a convection-diffusion-reaction system that can only be solved by numerical methods, e.g., finite element analysis (FEA). However, analytical models are key for the information and communication technology (ICT), as they enable an optimisation framework to develop advanced communication techniques, such as optimum detection methods and reliable transmission schemes. In this direction, we develop an analytical model to approximate the expected time course of bound receptor concentration, i.e., the received signal used to decode the transmitted messages. The model obviates the need for computationally expensive numerical methods by capturing the nonlinearities caused by laminar flow resulting in parabolic velocity profile, and finite number of ligand receptors leading to receiver saturation. The model also captures the effects of reactive surface depletion layer resulting from the mass transport limitations and moving reaction boundary originated from the passage of finite-duration molecular concentration pulse over the receiver surface. Based on the proposed model, we derive closed form analytical expressions that approximate the received pulse width, pulse delay and pulse amplitude, which can be used to optimize the system from an ICT perspective. We evaluate the accuracy of the proposed model by comparing model-based analytical results to the numerical results obtained by solving the exact system model with COMSOL Multiphysics.

  8. Modulation of the intraseasonal Indo-western Pacific convection oscillation to tropical cyclogenesis location and frequency over the Indo-western North Pacific during boreal extended summer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiuyun; Li, Jianping; Li, Yanjie; Zhang, Jingwen

    2017-04-01

    The influence of the intraseasonal Indo-western Pacific convection oscillation (IPCO) on the tropical cyclone (TC) genesis location and frequency over the Indo-western North Pacific during the boreal extended summer (May-October) is explored in this paper. Observational analysis shows that the impacts of the intraseasonal IPCO on TCs over the Indo-western North Pacific features in evident "locational phase lock of TC genesis" and distinct differences in TC frequency. In term of the WNP, when the intraseasonal IPCO is positive phase, there tends to be much more TCs, especially in the South China Sea (SCS), and more TCs generate in the west of the WNP and lower latitude (around 5°-20°N); vice versa. At the positive intraseasonal IPCO phase, the atmosphere gains heat through both sea-air interaction and the latent heat release of cumulus convective condensation, and the anomalous cyclonic circulation weakens the western Pacific subtropical high (WPSH), these conditions do favor the TC genesis. Moreover, the shrinking WPSH, the enhanced heat transfer from sea to air at the lower latitude as well as the westward shifts of heating center and anomalous cyclonic circulation lock TC genesis locations in the west of the WNP and lower latitude. The opposite situation occurs at negative phase. As for the North Indian Ocean (NIO), the TC genesis locations at the positive intraseasonal IPCO phase mainly situate in 13°-20°N and distribute closer to Indian Peninsula, particularly in the Arabian Sea (ARB), in contrast, the spatial distribution is more dispersed at the negative intraseasonal IPCO phase. However, the total TC frequencies at two intraseasonal IPCO phases are similar. These features come largely from the differences in the area featuring conditions between the northern and southern regions of 13°N in the NIO: at the positive intraseasonal IPCO phase, to the northern region of 13°N, the environmental conditions are similar to the case of the WNP except without the

  9. Entropy generation due to double diffusive convective flow of Casson fluids over nonlinearity stretching sheets with slip conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameh E. Ahmed

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The present paper deals with the effects of slip boundary conditions and chemical reaction on the heat and mass transfer by mixed convective boundary layer flow of a non-Newtonian fluid over a nonlinear stretching sheet. The Casson fluid model is used to characterize the non-Newtonian fluid behavior. First order chemical reactions are considered. Similar solutions are used to convert the partial differential equations governing the problem to ordinary differential equations. The velocity, temperature and concentration profiles are obtained, numerically, using the MATLAB function bvp4c and those are used to compute the entropy generation number. The effect of increasing values of the Casson parameter is found to suppress the velocity field and temperature distribution. But the concentration is enhanced with the increasing of Casson parameter. The viscous dissipation, temperature and concentration irreversibility are determined and discussed in details.

  10. Double diffusive unsteady convective micropolar flow past a vertical porous plate moving through binary mixture using modified Boussinesq approximation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac Lare Animasaun

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The problem of unsteady convective with thermophoresis, chemical reaction and radiative heat transfer in a micropolar fluid flow past a vertical porous surface moving through binary mixture considering temperature dependent dynamic viscosity and constant vortex viscosity has been investigated theoretically. For proper and correct analysis of fluid flow along vertical surface with a temperature lesser than that of the free stream, Boussinesq approximation and temperature dependent viscosity model were modified and incorporated into the governing equations. The governing equations are converted to systems of ordinary differential equations by applying suitable similarity transformations and solved numerically using fourth-order Runge–Kutta method along with shooting technique. The results of the numerical solution are presented graphically and in tabular forms for different values of parameters. Velocity profile increases with temperature dependent variable fluid viscosity parameter. Increase of suction parameter corresponds to an increase in both temperature and concentration within the thin boundary layer.

  11. Rhodium SPND's Error Reduction using Extended Kalman Filter combined with Time Dependent Neutron Diffusion Equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeong Hun; Park, Tong Kyu; Jeon, Seong Su

    2014-01-01

    The Rhodium SPND is accurate in steady-state conditions but responds slowly to changes in neutron flux. The slow response time of Rhodium SPND precludes its direct use for control and protection purposes specially when nuclear power plant is used for load following. To shorten the response time of Rhodium SPND, there were some acceleration methods but they could not reflect neutron flux distribution in reactor core. On the other hands, some methods for core power distribution monitoring could not consider the slow response time of Rhodium SPND and noise effect. In this paper, time dependent neutron diffusion equation is directly used to estimate reactor power distribution and extended Kalman filter method is used to correct neutron flux with Rhodium SPND's and to shorten the response time of them. Extended Kalman filter is effective tool to reduce measurement error of Rhodium SPND's and even simple FDM to solve time dependent neutron diffusion equation can be an effective measure. This method reduces random errors of detectors and can follow reactor power level without cross-section change. It means monitoring system may not calculate cross-section at every time steps and computing time will be shorten. To minimize delay of Rhodium SPND's conversion function h should be evaluated in next study. Neutron and Rh-103 reaction has several decay chains and half-lives over 40 seconds causing delay of detection. Time dependent neutron diffusion equation will be combined with decay chains. Power level and distribution change corresponding movement of control rod will be tested with more complicated reference code as well as xenon effect. With these efforts, final result is expected to be used as a powerful monitoring tool of nuclear reactor core

  12. Rhodium SPND's Error Reduction using Extended Kalman Filter combined with Time Dependent Neutron Diffusion Equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong Hun; Park, Tong Kyu; Jeon, Seong Su [FNC Technology Co., Ltd., Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The Rhodium SPND is accurate in steady-state conditions but responds slowly to changes in neutron flux. The slow response time of Rhodium SPND precludes its direct use for control and protection purposes specially when nuclear power plant is used for load following. To shorten the response time of Rhodium SPND, there were some acceleration methods but they could not reflect neutron flux distribution in reactor core. On the other hands, some methods for core power distribution monitoring could not consider the slow response time of Rhodium SPND and noise effect. In this paper, time dependent neutron diffusion equation is directly used to estimate reactor power distribution and extended Kalman filter method is used to correct neutron flux with Rhodium SPND's and to shorten the response time of them. Extended Kalman filter is effective tool to reduce measurement error of Rhodium SPND's and even simple FDM to solve time dependent neutron diffusion equation can be an effective measure. This method reduces random errors of detectors and can follow reactor power level without cross-section change. It means monitoring system may not calculate cross-section at every time steps and computing time will be shorten. To minimize delay of Rhodium SPND's conversion function h should be evaluated in next study. Neutron and Rh-103 reaction has several decay chains and half-lives over 40 seconds causing delay of detection. Time dependent neutron diffusion equation will be combined with decay chains. Power level and distribution change corresponding movement of control rod will be tested with more complicated reference code as well as xenon effect. With these efforts, final result is expected to be used as a powerful monitoring tool of nuclear reactor core.

  13. Extending the Neuroanatomic Territory of Diffuse Midline Glioma, K27M Mutant: Pineal Region Origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Andrea R; Zaky, Wafik; Gokden, Murat; Fuller, Christine E; Ocal, Eylem; Leeds, Norman E; Fuller, Gregory N

    2018-01-01

    Diffuse midline glioma, H3-K27M mutant (DMG-K27M) is a newly described, molecularly distinct infiltrative glioma that almost exclusively arises in midline CNS structures, including the brain stem, especially the pons, as well as the thalamus and spinal cord with rare examples seen in the cerebellum, third ventricle, and hypothalamus. To our knowledge, only 1 case of a molecularly confirmed DMG-K27M arising in the pineal region has been previously reported. We present the second occurrence of a tissue-confirmed DMG-K27M of the pineal region, which, to our knowledge, is the first case reported in a child and the first case with documented preoperative MRI. This case, in addition to a prior report described in an adult, defines the lower end of a broad age range of DMG-K27M onset (12-65 years) and establishes the pineal gland as a bona fide site of origin for this newly codified midline glioma. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Numerical and experimental investigation of nonsteady state, natural laminar double diffusive convection on heating surfaces of different geometry; Numerische und experimentelle Untersuchung der instationaeren, natuerlichen, laminaren doppelt diffusen Konvektion an Heizflaechen unterschiedlicher Geometrie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dosch, J

    1991-12-31

    The aim of this work is the development of a numerical process independent of the geometry of the flow space. The temperature, concentration and speed fields set up with double diffusive convection should be determined by this and their effect on heat transfer should be determined. The numerical process should be used for non-steady state double diffusive convection in various geometries. The results should be verified experimentally with the aid of holographic interferometry. (orig./IHL) [Deutsch] Ziel der vorliegenden Arbeit ist die Entwicklung eines von der Geometrie des Stroemungsraumes unabhaengigen numerischen Verfahrens. Mit ihm sollen die sich bei doppelt diffusiver Konvektion einstellenden Temperatur-, Konzentrations- und Geschwindigkeitsfelder bestimmt und deren Einfluss auf die Waermeuebertragung ermittelt werden. Das numerische Verfahren soll auf die instationaere doppelt diffusive Konvektion in verschiedenen Geometrien angewendet werden. Die Ergebnisse sollen experimentell mit Hilfe der holographischen Interferometrie verifiziert werden. (orig./IHL)

  15. Combined convective and diffusive modeling of the ring current and radiation belt electron dynamics using the VERB-4D code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aseev, N.; Shprits, Y.; Drozdov, A.; Kellerman, A. C.; Wang, D.

    2017-12-01

    Ring current and radiation belts are key elements in the global dynamics of the Earth's magnetosphere. Comprehensive mathematical models are useful tools that allow us to understand the multiscale dynamics of these charged particle populations. In this work, we present results of simulations of combined ring current - radiation belt electron dynamics using the four-dimensional Versatile Electron Radiation Belt (VERB-4D) code. The VERB-4D code solves the modified Fokker-Planck equation including convective terms and models simultaneously ring current (1 - 100 keV) and radiation belt (100 keV - several MeV) electron dynamics. We apply the code to the number of geomagnetic storms that occurred in the past, compare the results with different satellite observations, and show how low-energy particles can affect the high-energy populations. Particularly, we use data from Polar Operational Environmental Satellite (POES) mission that provides a very good MLT coverage with 1.5-hour time resolution. The POES data allow us to validate the approach of the VERB-4D code for modeling MLT-dependent processes such as electron drift, wave-particle interactions, and magnetopause shadowing. We also show how different simulation parameters and empirical models can affect the results, making a particular emphasis on the electric and magnetic field models. This work will help us reveal advantages and disadvantages of the approach behind the code and determine its prediction efficiency.

  16. Columnar to equiaxed transition in a refined Al-Cu alloy under diffusive and convective transport conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupouy, M.D.; Camel, D.; Mazille, J.E. [CEA Centre d' Etudes et de Recherches sur les Materiaux, 38 - Grenoble (France); Hugon, I. [Lab. de Metallographie, DCC/DTE/SIM, CEA Valrho (France)

    2000-07-01

    The columnar-equiaxed transition under diffusive transport conditions was studied in microgravity (EUROMIR95 and spacelab-LMS96) by solidifying four Al-4wt%Cu alloys refined at different levels, with a constant cooling rate (1 K/min), both under nearly isothermal conditions and under a decreasing temperature gradient. Isothermal samples showed a homogeneous equiaxed structure with no fading of the refiner efficiency. Gradient samples revealed a continuous transition consisting of an orientation of the microsegregation parallel to the solidification direction, without any grain selection effect. For comparison, ground samples evidence the influence of the motion of both refiner particles and growing equiaxed grains. (orig.)

  17. Computational methods and modeling. 3. Adaptive Mesh Refinement for the Nodal Integral Method and Application to the Convection-Diffusion Equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torej, Allen J.; Rizwan-Uddin

    2001-01-01

    The nodal integral method (NIM) has been developed for several problems, including the Navier-Stokes equations, the convection-diffusion equation, and the multigroup neutron diffusion equations. The coarse-mesh efficiency of the NIM is not fully realized in problems characterized by a wide range of spatial scales. However, the combination of adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) capability with the NIM can recover the coarse mesh efficiency by allowing high degrees of resolution in specific localized areas where it is needed and by using a lower resolution everywhere else. Furthermore, certain features of the NIM can be fruitfully exploited in the application of the AMR process. In this paper, we outline a general approach to couple nodal schemes with AMR and then apply it to the convection-diffusion (energy) equation. The development of the NIM with AMR capability (NIMAMR) is based on the well-known Berger-Oliger method for structured AMR. In general, the main components of all AMR schemes are 1. the solver; 2. the level-grid hierarchy; 3. the selection algorithm; 4. the communication procedures; 5. the governing algorithm. The first component, the solver, consists of the numerical scheme for the governing partial differential equations and the algorithm used to solve the resulting system of discrete algebraic equations. In the case of the NIM-AMR, the solver is the iterative approach to the solution of the set of discrete equations obtained by applying the NIM. Furthermore, in the NIM-AMR, the level-grid hierarchy (the second component) is based on the Hierarchical Adaptive Mesh Refinement (HAMR) system,6 and hence, the details of the hierarchy are omitted here. In the selection algorithm, regions of the domain that require mesh refinement are identified. The criterion to select regions for mesh refinement can be based on the magnitude of the gradient or on the Richardson truncation error estimate. Although an excellent choice for the selection criterion, the Richardson

  18. Convective cells and transport in toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassam, A.B.; Kulsrud, R.M.

    1978-12-01

    The properties of convective cells and the diffusion resulting from such cells are significantly influenced by an inhomogeneity in the extermal confining magnetic field, such as that in toroidal plasmas. The convective diffusion in the presence of a field inhomogeneity is estimated. For a thermal background, this diffusion is shown to be substantially smaller than classical collisional diffusion. For a model nonthermal background, the diffusion is estimated, for typical parameters, to be at most of the order of collisional diffusion. The model background employed is based on spectra observed in numerical simulations of drift-wave-driven convective cells

  19. Effect of Darcy, fluid Rayleigh and heat generation parameters on natural convection in a porous square enclosure: A Brinkman-extended Darcy model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, S.; Sahoo, R.K.

    1999-01-01

    Analysis of flow and convective heat transfer in volumetrically heated porous layer has become a separate topic for research in the last twenty five years in view of its importance in various engineering applications, such as heat removal from nuclear fuel debris, heat transfer associated with storage of nuclear waste, exothermic reaction in packed-bed reactors, heat recovery from geothermal systems and particularly in the field of large storage systems of agricultural products. Here, a pressure-velocity solution for natural convection for fluid saturated heat generating porous medium in a square enclosure is analyzed by finite element method. The numerical solutions obtained for wide range of fluid Rayleigh number, Ra f , Darcy number, Da, and heat generating number, Q d . The justification for taking these non-dimensional parameters independently is to establish the effect of individual parameters on flow patterns. It has been observed that peak temperature occurs at the top central part and weaker velocity prevails near the vertical walls of the enclosure due to the heat generation parameter alone. On comparison, the modified Rayleigh number used by the earlier investigators, can not explain explicitly the effect of heat generation parameter on natural convection within an enclosure having differentially heated vertical walls. At higher Darcy number, the peak temperature and peak velocity are comparatively more, resulting in better enhancement of heat transfer rate

  20. Physics of Stellar Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnett, W. David

    2009-05-01

    We review recent progress using numerical simulations as a testbed for development of a theory of stellar convection, much as envisaged by John von Newmann. Necessary features of the theory, non-locality and fluctuations, are illustrated by computer movies. It is found that the common approximation of convection as a diffusive process presents the wrong physical picture, and improvements are suggested. New observational results discussed at the conference are gratifying in their validation of some of our theoretical ideas, especially the idea that SNIb and SNIc events are related to the explosion of massive star cores which have been stripped by mass loss and binary interactions [1

  1. Convective overshooting in stars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andrássy, R.

    2015-01-01

    Numerous observations provide evidence that the standard picture, in which convective mixing is limited to the unstable layers of a star, is incomplete. The mixing layers in real stars are significantly more extended than what the standard models predict. Some of the observations require changing

  2. Instabilities in fluid layers and in reaction-diffusion systems: Steady states, time-periodic solutions, non-periodic attractors, and related convective and otherwise non-linear phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia Velarde, M

    1977-07-01

    Thermo convective instabilities in horizontal fluid layers are discussed with emphasis on the Rayleigh-Bernard model problem. Steady solutions and time-dependent phenomena (relaxation oscillations and transition to turbulence) are studied within the nonlinear Boussinesq-Oberbeck approximation. Homogeneous steady solutions, limit cycles, and inhomogeneous (ordered) spatial structures are also studied in simple reaction-diffusion systems. Lastly, the non-periodic attractor that appears at large Rayleigh numbers in the truncated Boussinesq-Oberbeck model of Lorenz, is constructed, and a discussion of turbulent behavior is given. (Author) 105 refs.

  3. Instabilities in fluid layers and in reaction-diffusion systems: Steady states, time-periodic solutions, non-periodic attractors, and related convective and otherwise non-linear phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Velarde, M.

    1977-01-01

    Thermo convective instabilities in horizontal fluid layers are discussed with emphasis on the Rayleigh-Bernard model problem. Steady solutions and time-dependent phenomena (relaxation oscillations and transition to turbulence) are studied within the nonlinear Boussinesq-Oberbeck approximation. Homogeneous steady solutions, limit cycles, and inhomogeneous (ordered) spatial structures are also studied in simple reaction-diffusion systems. Lastly, the non-periodic attractor that appears at large Rayleigh numbers in the truncated Boussinesq-Oberbeck model of Lorenz, is constructed, and a discussion of turbulent behavior is given. (Author) 105 refs

  4. Convection-enhanced water evaporation

    OpenAIRE

    B. M. Weon; J. H. Je; C. Poulard

    2011-01-01

    Water vapor is lighter than air; this can enhance water evaporation by triggering vapor convection but there is little evidence. We directly visualize evaporation of nanoliter (2 to 700 nL) water droplets resting on silicon wafer in calm air using a high-resolution dual X-ray imaging method. Temporal evolutions of contact radius and contact angle reveal that evaporation rate linearly changes with surface area, indicating convective (instead of diffusive) evaporation in nanoliter water droplet...

  5. Development of Seasonal BRDF Models to Extend the Use of Deep Convective Clouds as Invariant Targets for Satellite SWIR-Band Calibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendra Bhatt

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Tropical deep convective clouds (DCC are an excellent invariant target for vicarious calibration of satellite visible (VIS and near-infrared (NIR solar bands. The DCC technique (DCCT is a statistical approach that collectively analyzes all identified DCC pixels on a monthly basis. The DCC reflectance in VIS and NIR spectrums is mainly a function of cloud optical depth, and provides a stable monthly statistical mode. However, for absorption shortwave infrared (SWIR bands, the monthly DCC response is found to exhibit large seasonal cycles that make the implementation of the DCCT more challenging at these wavelengths. The seasonality assumption was tested using the SNPP-VIIRS SWIR bands, with up to 50% of the monthly DCC response temporal variation removed through deseasonalization. In this article, a monthly DCC bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF approach is proposed, which is found to be comparable to or can outperform the effects of deseasonalization alone. To demonstrate that the SNPP-VIIRS DCC BRDF can be applied to other JPSS VIIRS imagers in the same 13:30 sun-synchronous orbit, the VIIRS DCC BRDF was applied to Aqua-MODIS. The Aqua-MODIS SWIR band DCC reflectance natural variability is reduced by up to 45% after applying the VIIRS-based monthly DCC BRDFs.

  6. Strongly extended diffusion length for the nonequilibrium magnons in Y3F e5O12 by photoexcitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S. H.; Li, G.; Guo, E. J.; Zhao, Y.; Wang, J. Y.; Zou, L. K.; Yan, H.; Cai, J. W.; Zhang, Z. T.; Wang, M.; Tian, Y. Y.; Zheng, X. L.; Sun, J. R.; Jin, K. X.

    2018-05-01

    Y3F e5O12 (YIG) is known for its long magnon diffusion length. Although it has the known lowest damping rate, an even longer diffusion distance is still highly desired since it may lead to a much more efficient information transmission and processing. While most of previous works focused on the generation and detection of magnons in YIG, here we demonstrate how to depress the damping rate during the diffusion of magnon. By selectively exciting the spin state transition of the Fe ions in YIG, we successfully increase magnon diffusion length by one order of magnitude, i.e., from the previous reported ˜10 μm up to ˜156 μm (for the sample prepared by liquid phase epitaxy) and ˜180 μm (for the sample prepared by pulsed laser deposition) at room temperature. The diffusion length, determined by nonlocal geometry, is ˜30 μm for the magnons induced by visible light and above 150 μm for the laser of 980 nm. In addition to thermal gradient, light excitation affects the electron configuration of the F e3 + ion in YIG. Long-wavelength laser is more effective since it causes a transition of the F e3 + ions in Fe O6 octahedron from a high spin to a low spin state and thus causes a magnon softening which favors a long-distance diffusion. The present work paves the way toward an efficient tuning of magnon transport which is crucially important for magnon spintronics.

  7. Determination of the diffusion coefficient of hydrogen ion in hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuszter, Gábor; Gehér-Herczegh, Tünde; Szűcs, Árpád; Tóth, Ágota; Horváth, Dezső

    2017-05-17

    The role of diffusion in chemical pattern formation has been widely studied due to the great diversity of patterns emerging in reaction-diffusion systems, particularly in H + -autocatalytic reactions where hydrogels are applied to avoid convection. A custom-made conductometric cell is designed to measure the effective diffusion coefficient of a pair of strong electrolytes containing sodium ions or hydrogen ions with a common anion. This together with the individual diffusion coefficient for sodium ions, obtained from PFGSE-NMR spectroscopy, allows the determination of the diffusion coefficient of hydrogen ions in hydrogels. Numerical calculations are also performed to study the behavior of a diffusion-migration model describing ionic diffusion in our system. The method we present for one particular case may be extended for various hydrogels and diffusing ions (such as hydroxide) which are relevant e.g. for the development of pH-regulated self-healing mechanisms and hydrogels used for drug delivery.

  8. Heat Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiji, Latif M.

    Professor Jiji's broad teaching experience lead him to select the topics for this book to provide a firm foundation for convection heat transfer with emphasis on fundamentals, physical phenomena, and mathematical modelling of a wide range of engineering applications. Reflecting recent developments, this textbook is the first to include an introduction to the challenging topic of microchannels. The strong pedagogic potential of Heat Convection is enhanced by the follow ing ancillary materials: (1) Power Point lectures, (2) Problem Solutions, (3) Homework Facilitator, and, (4) Summary of Sections and Chapters.

  9. Analytical and Numerical Study of Soret and Dufour Effects on Double Diffusive Convection in a Shallow Horizontal Binary Fluid Layer Submitted to Uniform Fluxes of Heat and Mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Lagra

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Combined Soret and Dufour effects on thermosolutal convection induced in a horizontal layer filled with a binary fluid and subject to constant heat and mass fluxes are investigated analytically and numerically. The thresholds marking the onset of supercritical and subcritical convection are predicted analytically and explicitly versus the governing parameters. The present investigation shows that different regions exist in the N-Du plane corresponding to different parallel flow regimes. The number, the extent, and the locations of these regions depend on whether SrDu>-(1+Le2/2Le2=f(Le or SrDu<-(1+Le2/2Le2. Conjugate effects of cross-phenomena on thresholds of fluid flow and heat and mass transfer characteristics are illustrated and discussed.

  10. Determination of the diffusivity, dispersion, skewness and kurtosis in heterogeneous porous flow. Part I: Analytical solutions with the extended method of moments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginzburg, Irina; Vikhansky, Alexander

    2018-05-01

    The extended method of moments (EMM) is elaborated in recursive algorithmic form for the prediction of the effective diffusivity, the Taylor dispersion dyadic and the associated longitudinal high-order coefficients in mean-concentration profiles and residence-time distributions. The method applies in any streamwise-periodic stationary d-dimensional velocity field resolved in the piecewise continuous heterogeneous porosity field. It is demonstrated that EMM reduces to the method of moments and the volume-averaging formulation in microscopic velocity field and homogeneous soil, respectively. The EMM simultaneously constructs two systems of moments, the spatial and the temporal, without resorting to solving of the high-order upscaled PDE. At the same time, the EMM is supported with the reconstruction of distribution from its moments, allowing to visualize the deviation from the classical ADE solution. The EMM can be handled by any linear advection-diffusion solver with explicit mass-source and diffusive-flux jump condition on the solid boundary and permeable interface. The prediction of the first four moments is decisive in the optimization of the dispersion, asymmetry, peakedness and heavy-tails of the solute distributions, through an adequate design of the composite materials, wetlands, chemical devices or oil recovery. The symbolic solutions for dispersion, skewness and kurtosis are constructed in basic configurations: diffusion process and Darcy flow through two porous blocks in "series", straight and radial Poiseuille flow, porous flow governed by the Stokes-Brinkman-Darcy channel equation and a fracture surrounded by penetrable diffusive matrix or embedded in porous flow. We examine the moments dependency upon porosity contrast, aspect ratio, Péclet and Darcy numbers, but also for their response on the effective Brinkman viscosity applied in flow modeling. Two numerical Lattice Boltzmann algorithms, a direct solver of the microscopic ADE in heterogeneous

  11. Novel diffuse optics system for continuous tissue viability monitoring: extended recovery in vivo testing in a porcine flap model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Yup; Pakela, Julia M.; Hedrick, Taylor L.; Vishwanath, Karthik; Helton, Michael C.; Chung, Yooree; Kolodziejski, Noah J.; Stapels, Christopher J.; McAdams, Daniel R.; Fernandez, Daniel E.; Christian, James F.; O'Reilly, Jameson; Farkas, Dana; Ward, Brent B.; Feinberg, Stephen E.; Mycek, Mary-Ann

    2017-02-01

    In reconstructive surgery, tissue perfusion/vessel patency is critical to the success of microvascular free tissue flaps. Early detection of flap failure secondary to compromise of vascular perfusion would significantly increase the chances of flap salvage. We have developed a compact, clinically-compatible monitoring system to enable automated, minimally-invasive, continuous, and quantitative assessment of flap viability/perfusion. We tested the system's continuous monitoring capability during extended non-recovery surgery using an in vivo porcine free flap model. Initial results indicated that the system could assess flap viability/perfusion in a quantitative and continuous manner. With proven performance, the compact form constructed with cost-effective components would make this system suitable for clinical translation.

  12. Combined influence of radiation absorption and Hall current effects on MHD double-diffusive free convective flow past a stretching sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Sreedevi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available An analysis has been carried out on the influence of radiation absorption, variable viscosity, Hall current of a magnetohydrodynamic free-convective flow and heat and mass transfer over a stretching sheet in the presence of heat generation/absorption. The fluid viscosity is assumed to vary as an inverse linear function of temperature. The boundary-layer equations governing the fluid flow, heat and mass transfer under consideration have been reduced to a system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations by employing a similarity transformation. Using the finite difference scheme, numerical solutions to the transform ordinary differential equations have been obtained and the results are presented graphically. The numerical results obtained are in good agreement with the existing scientific literature.

  13. Direct simulation of turbulent Rayleigh-Benard convection in liquid sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woerner, M.

    1994-11-01

    The numerical results are analysed to investigate both the structures and mechanisms of convection and the statistical features of turbulence in natural convection of liquid metals. The simulations are performed with the finite volume code TURBIT which is extended by a semi-implicit time integration scheme for the energy equation. Due to the implicit treatment of thermal diffusion the computational time for simulation of natural convection in liquid metals is reduced by about one order of magnitude, as compared to the original fully explicit code version. Results for Rayleigh-Benard convection in liquid sodium with Prandtl number Pr=0.006 are given for four different Rayleigh numbers: Ra=3 000, Ra=6 000, Ra=12 000, and Ra=24 000. At the Rayleigh number Ra=3 000 the inertial convection is identified. It is characterized by large two-dimensional vortices, which rotate like a solid body. These vortices are also observed in the simulations for Ra=6 000, Ra=12 000 and Ra=24 000, but, they only exist in certain regions and for short time intervals. The appearance of these two-dimensional structures in three-dimensional, time-dependent and turbulent convection is explained by the relative importance of the non-linear terms in the momentum and energy equation, which is totally different in both equations, and by the coupling of these equations by the buoyancy and the convective term. In order to improve and validate statistical turbulence model for application to natural convection in liquid metals, budgets of turbulence kinetic energy, turbulent heat flux and temperature variance are calculated from the numerical results. For several unknown correlations closure assumptions used in standard turbulence models are analyzed and model coefficients are determined. (orig./HP) [de

  14. National Convective Weather Diagnostic

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current convective hazards identified by the National Convective Weather Detection algorithm. The National Convective Weather Diagnostic (NCWD) is an automatically...

  15. CRUCIB: an axisymmetric convection code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertram, L.A.

    1975-03-01

    The CRUCIB code was written in support of an experimental program aimed at measurement of thermal diffusivities of refractory liquids. Precise values of diffusivity are necessary to realistic analysis of reactor safety problems, nuclear waste disposal procedures, and fundamental metal forming processes. The code calculates the axisymmetric transient convective motions produced in a right circular cylindrical crucible, which is surface heated by an annular heat pulse. Emphasis of this report is placed on the input-output options of the CRUCIB code, which are tailored to assess the importance of the convective heat transfer in determining the surface temperature distribution. Use is limited to Prandtl numbers less than unity; larger values can be accommodated by replacement of a single block of the code, if desired. (U.S.)

  16. National Convective Weather Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NCWF is an automatically generated depiction of: (1) current convection and (2) extrapolated signficant current convection. It is a supplement to, but does NOT...

  17. Boiling Suppression in Convective Flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aounallah, Y.

    2004-01-01

    The development of convective boiling heat transfer correlations and analytical models has almost exclusively been based on measurements of the total heat flux, and therefore on the overall two-phase heat transfer coefficient, when the well-known heat transfer correlations have often assumed additive mechanisms, one for each mode of heat transfer, convection and boiling. While the global performance of such correlations can readily be assessed, the predictive capability of the individual components of the correlation has usually remained elusive. This becomes important when, for example, developing mechanistic models for subcooled void formation based on the partitioning of the wall heat flux into a boiling and a convective component, or when extending a correlation beyond its original range of applications where the preponderance of the heat transfer mechanisms involved can be significantly different. A new examination of existing experimental heat transfer data obtained under fixed hydrodynamic conditions, whereby the local flow conditions are decoupled from the local heat flux, has allowed the unequivocal isolation of the boiling contribution over a broad range of thermodynamic qualities (0 to 0.8) for water at 7 MPa. Boiling suppression, as the quality increases, has consequently been quantified, thus providing valuable new insights on the functionality and contribution of boiling in convective flows. (author)

  18. Convective heat flow probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, James C.; Hardee, Harry C.; Striker, Richard P.

    1985-01-01

    A convective heat flow probe device is provided which measures heat flow and fluid flow magnitude in the formation surrounding a borehole. The probe comprises an elongate housing adapted to be lowered down into the borehole; a plurality of heaters extending along the probe for heating the formation surrounding the borehole; a plurality of temperature sensors arranged around the periphery of the probe for measuring the temperature of the surrounding formation after heating thereof by the heater elements. The temperature sensors and heater elements are mounted in a plurality of separate heater pads which are supported by the housing and which are adapted to be radially expanded into firm engagement with the walls of the borehole. The heat supplied by the heater elements and the temperatures measured by the temperature sensors are monitored and used in providing the desired measurements. The outer peripheral surfaces of the heater pads are configured as segments of a cylinder and form a full cylinder when taken together. A plurality of temperature sensors are located on each pad so as to extend along the length and across the width thereof, with a heating element being located in each pad beneath the temperature sensors. An expansion mechanism driven by a clamping motor provides expansion and retraction of the heater pads and expandable packer-type seals are provided along the probe above and below the heater pads.

  19. Complex dynamics in double-diffusive convection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meca, Esteban; Ramirez-Piscina, Laureano [Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Departament de Fisica Aplicada, Barcelona (Spain); Mercader, Isabel; Batiste, Oriol [Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Departament de Fisica Aplicada, Barcelona (Spain)

    2004-11-01

    The dynamics of a small Prandtl number binary mixture in a laterally heated cavity is studied numerically. By combining temporal integration, steady state solving and linear stability analysis of the full PDE equations, we have been able to locate and characterize a codimension-three degenerate Takens-Bogdanov point whose unfolding describes the dynamics of the system for a certain range of Rayleigh numbers and separation ratios near S=-1. (orig.)

  20. Extended diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging with two-compartment and anomalous diffusion models for differentiation of low-grade and high-grade brain tumors in pediatric patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burrowes, Delilah; Deng, Jie [Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Medical Imaging, Chicago, IL (United States); Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Chicago, IL (United States); Fangusaro, Jason R. [Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Hematology/Oncology, Chicago, IL (United States); Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics-Hematology, Oncology, and Stem Cell Transplantation, Chicago, IL (United States); Nelson, Paige C.; Rozenfeld, Michael J. [Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Medical Imaging, Chicago, IL (United States); Zhang, Bin [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Wadhwani, Nitin R. [Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2017-08-15

    The purpose of this study was to examine advanced diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) models for differentiation of low- and high-grade tumors in the diagnosis of pediatric brain neoplasms. Sixty-two pediatric patients with various types and grades of brain tumors were evaluated in a retrospective study. Tumor type and grade were classified using the World Health Organization classification (WHO I-IV) and confirmed by pathological analysis. Patients underwent DW-MRI before treatment. Diffusion-weighted images with 16 b-values (0-3500 s/mm{sup 2}) were acquired. Averaged signal intensity decay within solid tumor regions was fitted using two-compartment and anomalous diffusion models. Intracellular and extracellular diffusion coefficients (D{sub slow} and D{sub fast}), fractional volumes (V{sub slow} and V{sub fast}), generalized diffusion coefficient (D), spatial constant (μ), heterogeneity index (β), and a diffusion index (index{sub d}iff = μ x V{sub slow}/β) were calculated. Multivariate logistic regression models with stepwise model selection algorithm and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analyses were performed to evaluate the ability of each diffusion parameter to distinguish tumor grade. Among all parameter combinations, D and index{sub d}iff jointly provided the best predictor for tumor grades, where lower D (p = 0.03) and higher index{sub d}iff (p = 0.009) were significantly associated with higher tumor grades. In ROC analyses of differentiating low-grade (I-II) and high-grade (III-IV) tumors, index{sub d}iff provided the highest specificity of 0.97 and D provided the highest sensitivity of 0.96. Multi-parametric diffusion measurements using two-compartment and anomalous diffusion models were found to be significant discriminants of tumor grading in pediatric brain neoplasms. (orig.)

  1. Neutral beam injection and plasma convection in a magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuda, H.; Hiroe, S.

    1988-06-01

    Injection of a neutral beam into a plasma in a magnetic field has been studied by means of numerical plasma simulations. It is found that, in the absence of a rotational transform, the convection electric field arising from the polarization charges at the edges of the beam is dissipated by turbulent plasma convection, leading to anomalous plasma diffusion across the magnetic field. The convection electric field increases with the beam density and beam energy. In the presence of a rotational transform, polarization charges can be neutralized by the electron motion along the magnetic field. Even in the presence of a rotational transform, a steady-state convection electric field and, hence, anomalous plasma diffusion can develop when a neutral beam is constantly injected into a plasma. Theoretical investigations on the convection electric field are described for a plasma in the presence of rotational transform. 11 refs., 19 figs

  2. Topology Optimisation for Coupled Convection Problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexandersen, Joe; Andreasen, Casper Schousboe; Aage, Niels

    stabilised finite elements implemented in a parallel multiphysics analysis and optimisation framework DFEM [1], developed and maintained in house. Focus is put on control of the temperature field within the solid structure and the problems can therefore be seen as conjugate heat transfer problems, where heat...... conduction governs in the solid parts of the design domain and couples to convection-dominated heat transfer to a surrounding fluid. Both loosely coupled and tightly coupled problems are considered. The loosely coupled problems are convection-diffusion problems, based on an advective velocity field from...

  3. Sunspots and the physics of magnetic flux tubes. VI - Convective propulsion. VII - Heat flow in a convective downdraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, E. N.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of negative aerodynamic drag in an ideal fluid subject to convective instability is considered. It is shown that a cylinder moving in such a fluid is propelled forward in its motion by the convective forces and that the characteristic acceleration time is comparable to the onset time of convective motions in the fluid. It is suggested that convective propulsion plays an important role in the dynamics of flux tubes extending through the surface of the sun. The suppression of the upward heat flow in a Boussinesq convective cell with free upper and lower boundaries by a downdraft is then analyzed. Application to the solar convection zone indicates that downdrafts of 1 to 2 km/s at depths of 1000 to 4000 km beneath the visible surface of the sun are sufficient to reduce the upward heat flux to a small fraction of the ambient value.

  4. Convective mass transfer around a dissolving bubble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duplat, Jerome; Grandemange, Mathieu; Poulain, Cedric

    2017-11-01

    Heat or mass transfer around an evaporating drop or condensing vapor bubble is a complex issue due to the interplay between the substrate properties, diffusion- and convection-driven mass transfer, and Marangoni effects, to mention but a few. In order to disentangle these mechanisms, we focus here mainly on the convective mass transfer contribution in an isothermal mass transfer problem. For this, we study the case of a millimetric carbon dioxide bubble which is suspended under a substrate and dissolved into pure liquid water. The high solubility of CO2 in water makes the liquid denser and promotes a buoyant-driven flow at a high (solutal) Rayleigh number (Ra˜104 ). The alteration of p H allows the concentration field in the liquid to be imaged by laser fluorescence enabling us to measure both the global mass flux (bubble volume, contact angle) and local mass flux around the bubble along time. After a short period of mass diffusion, where the boundary layer thickens like the square root of time, convection starts and the CO2 is carried by a plume falling at constant velocity. The boundary layer thickness then reaches a plateau which depends on the bubble cross section. Meanwhile the plume velocity scales like (dV /d t )1 /2 with V being the volume of the bubble. As for the rate of volume loss, we recover a constant mass flux in the diffusion-driven regime followed by a decrease in the volume V like V2 /3 after convection has started. We present a model which agrees well with the bubble dynamics and discuss our results in the context of droplet evaporation, as well as high Rayleigh convection.

  5. Diffusion time scales and accretion in the sun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michaud, G.

    1977-01-01

    It is thought that surface abundances in the Sun could be due largely to accretion either of comets or grains, and it has been suggested that if surface convection zones were smaller than is usually indicated by model calculations, accretion would be especially important. Unless the zone immediately below the surface convection zone is sufficiently stable for diffusion to be important, other transport processes, such as turbulence and meridional circulation, more efficient than diffusion, will tend to homogenise the Sun. Diffusion is the slowest of the transport processes and will become important when other transport processes become inoperative. Using diffusion theory the minimum mass of the convection zone can be determined in order that transport processes at the bottom of the zone are not to influence abundances in the convection zone. If diffusion time scales are shorter than the life of the star (Sun) diffusion will modify the abundances in the convection zone. The mass in the convection zone for which diffusion time scales are equal to the life of the star on the main sequence then determines the minimum mass in the convection zone that justifies neglect of transport processes at the bottom of the convection zone. It is calculated here that, for the Sun, this mass is between 3 x 10 -3 and 10 -2 solar mass, and a general explosion is derived for the diffusion time scale as a function of the mass of the convection zone. (U.K.)

  6. Observing Convective Aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Christopher E.; Wing, Allison A.; Bony, Sandrine; Muller, Caroline; Masunaga, Hirohiko; L'Ecuyer, Tristan S.; Turner, David D.; Zuidema, Paquita

    2017-11-01

    Convective self-aggregation, the spontaneous organization of initially scattered convection into isolated convective clusters despite spatially homogeneous boundary conditions and forcing, was first recognized and studied in idealized numerical simulations. While there is a rich history of observational work on convective clustering and organization, there have been only a few studies that have analyzed observations to look specifically for processes related to self-aggregation in models. Here we review observational work in both of these categories and motivate the need for more of this work. We acknowledge that self-aggregation may appear to be far-removed from observed convective organization in terms of time scales, initial conditions, initiation processes, and mean state extremes, but we argue that these differences vary greatly across the diverse range of model simulations in the literature and that these comparisons are already offering important insights into real tropical phenomena. Some preliminary new findings are presented, including results showing that a self-aggregation simulation with square geometry has too broad distribution of humidity and is too dry in the driest regions when compared with radiosonde records from Nauru, while an elongated channel simulation has realistic representations of atmospheric humidity and its variability. We discuss recent work increasing our understanding of how organized convection and climate change may interact, and how model discrepancies related to this question are prompting interest in observational comparisons. We also propose possible future directions for observational work related to convective aggregation, including novel satellite approaches and a ground-based observational network.

  7. Do tropical wetland plants possess a convective gas flow mechanism?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Dennis Konnerup; Sorrell, Brian Keith; Brix, Hans

    2011-01-01

    Internal pressurization and convective gas flow, which can aerate wetland plants more efficiently than diffusion, are common in temperate species. Here, we present the first survey of convective flow in a range of tropical plants. The occurrence of pressurization and convective flow was determined...... in 20 common wetland plants from the Mekong Delta in Vietnam. The diel variation in pressurization in culms and the convective flow and gas composition from stubbles were examined for Eleocharis dulcis, Phragmites vallatoria and Hymenachne acutigluma, and related to light, humidity and air temperature....... Nine of the 20 species studied were able to build up a static pressure of >50Pa, and eight species had convective flow rates higher than 1mlmin-1. There was a clear diel variation, with higher pressures and flows during the day than during the night, when pressures and flows were close to zero...

  8. Turbulent convection in liquid metal with and without rotation

    OpenAIRE

    King, Eric M.; Aurnou, Jonathan M.

    2013-01-01

    The magnetic fields of Earth and other planets are generated by turbulent, rotating convection in liquid metal. Liquid metals are peculiar in that they diffuse heat more readily than momentum, quantified by their small Prandtl numbers, . Most analog models of planetary dynamos, however, use moderate fluids, and the systematic influence of reducing is not well understood. We perform rotating Rayleigh–Bénard convection experiments in the liquid metal gallium over a range of nondimensional bu...

  9. Condition of damping of anomalous radial transport, determined by ordered convective electron dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maslov, V.I.; Barchuk, S.V.; Lapshin, V.I.; Volkov, E.D.; Melentsov, Yu.V.

    2006-01-01

    It is shown, that at development of instability due to a radial gradient of density in the crossed electric and magnetic fields in nuclear fusion installations ordering convective cells can be excited. It provides anomalous particle transport. The spatial structures of these convective cells have been constructed. The radial dimensions of these convective cells depend on their amplitudes and on a radial gradient of density. The convective-diffusion equation for radial dynamics of the electrons has been derived. At the certain value of the universal controlling parameter, the convective cell excitation and the anomalous radial transport are suppressed. (author)

  10. Convective heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Kakac, Sadik; Pramuanjaroenkij, Anchasa

    2014-01-01

    Intended for readers who have taken a basic heat transfer course and have a basic knowledge of thermodynamics, heat transfer, fluid mechanics, and differential equations, Convective Heat Transfer, Third Edition provides an overview of phenomenological convective heat transfer. This book combines applications of engineering with the basic concepts of convection. It offers a clear and balanced presentation of essential topics using both traditional and numerical methods. The text addresses emerging science and technology matters, and highlights biomedical applications and energy technologies. What’s New in the Third Edition: Includes updated chapters and two new chapters on heat transfer in microchannels and heat transfer with nanofluids Expands problem sets and introduces new correlations and solved examples Provides more coverage of numerical/computer methods The third edition details the new research areas of heat transfer in microchannels and the enhancement of convective heat transfer with nanofluids....

  11. Toward a Unified Representation of Atmospheric Convection in Variable-Resolution Climate Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walko, Robert [Univ. of Miami, Coral Gables, FL (United States)

    2016-11-07

    The purpose of this project was to improve the representation of convection in atmospheric weather and climate models that employ computational grids with spatially-variable resolution. Specifically, our work targeted models whose grids are fine enough over selected regions that convection is resolved explicitly, while over other regions the grid is coarser and convection is represented as a subgrid-scale process. The working criterion for a successful scheme for representing convection over this range of grid resolution was that identical convective environments must produce very similar convective responses (i.e., the same precipitation amount, rate, and timing, and the same modification of the atmospheric profile) regardless of grid scale. The need for such a convective scheme has increased in recent years as more global weather and climate models have adopted variable resolution meshes that are often extended into the range of resolving convection in selected locations.

  12. Convection in a colloidal suspension in a closed horizontal cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smorodin, B. L.; Cherepanov, I. N.

    2015-01-01

    The experimentally detected [1] oscillatory regimes of convection in a colloidal suspension of nanoparticles with a large anomalous thermal diffusivity in a closed horizontal cell heated from below have been simulated numerically. The concentration inhomogeneity near the vertical cavity boundaries arising from the interaction of thermal-diffusion separation and convective mixing has been proven to serve as a source of oscillatory regimes (traveling waves). The dependence of the Rayleigh number at the boundary of existence of the traveling-wave regime on the aspect ratio of the closed cavity has been established. The spatial characteristics of the emerging traveling waves have been determined

  13. Simulating deep convection with a shallow convection scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Hohenegger

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Convective processes profoundly affect the global water and energy balance of our planet but remain a challenge for global climate modeling. Here we develop and investigate the suitability of a unified convection scheme, capable of handling both shallow and deep convection, to simulate cases of tropical oceanic convection, mid-latitude continental convection, and maritime shallow convection. To that aim, we employ large-eddy simulations (LES as a benchmark to test and refine a unified convection scheme implemented in the Single-column Community Atmosphere Model (SCAM. Our approach is motivated by previous cloud-resolving modeling studies, which have documented the gradual transition between shallow and deep convection and its possible importance for the simulated precipitation diurnal cycle.

    Analysis of the LES reveals that differences between shallow and deep convection, regarding cloud-base properties as well as entrainment/detrainment rates, can be related to the evaporation of precipitation. Parameterizing such effects and accordingly modifying the University of Washington shallow convection scheme, it is found that the new unified scheme can represent both shallow and deep convection as well as tropical and mid-latitude continental convection. Compared to the default SCAM version, the new scheme especially improves relative humidity, cloud cover and mass flux profiles. The new unified scheme also removes the well-known too early onset and peak of convective precipitation over mid-latitude continental areas.

  14. Semi-convection in the ocean and in stars: A multi-scale analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friedrich Kupka

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Fluid stratified by gravitation can be subject to a number of instabilities which eventually lead to a flow that causes enhanced mixing and transport of heat. The special case where a destabilizing temperature gradient counteracts the action of a stabilizing gradient in molecular weight is of interest to astrophysics (inside stars and giant planets and geophysics (lakes, oceans as well as to some engineering applications. The detailed dynamics of such a system depend on the molecular diffusivities of heat, momentum, and solute as well as system parameters including the ratio of the two gradients to each other. Further important properties are the formation and merging of well-defined layers in the fluid which cannot be derived from linear stability analysis. Moreover, the physical processes operate on a vast range of length and time scales. This has made the case of semi-convection, where a mean temperature gradient destabilizes the stratification while at the same time the mean molecular gradient tends to stabilize it, a challenge to physical modelling and to numerical hydrodynamical simulation. During the MetStröm project the simulation codes ANTARES and MITgcm have been extended such that they can be used for the simulations of such flows. We present a comparison of effective diffusivities derived from direct numerical simulations. For both stars and the oceanic regimes, the Nusselt numbers (scaled diffusivities follow similar relationships. Semi-convection quickly becomes inefficient, because the formation of layers limits vertical mixing. In contrast to the complementary saltfingering, these layers tend to damp instabilities so that effective diffusivities of salinity (concentration are up to two orders of magnitudes smaller than in the former case.

  15. Convection and stellar oscillations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarslev, Magnus Johan

    2017-01-01

    for asteroseismology, because of the challenges inherent in modelling turbulent convection in 1D stellar models. As a result of oversimplifying the physics near the surface, theoretical calculations systematically overestimate the oscillation frequencies. This has become known as the asteroseismic surface effect. Due...... to lacking better options, this frequency difference is typically corrected for with ad-hoc formulae. The topic of this thesis is the improvement of 1D stellar convection models and the effects this has on asteroseismic properties. The source of improvements is 3D simulations of radiation...... atmospheres to replace the outer layers of stellar models. The additional turbulent pressure and asymmetrical opacity effects in the atmosphere model, compared to convection in stellar evolution models, serve to expand the atmosphere. The enlarged acoustic cavity lowers the pulsation frequencies bringing them...

  16. Active control of convection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bau, H.H. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Using stability theory, numerical simulations, and in some instances experiments, it is demonstrated that the critical Rayleigh number for the bifurcation (1) from the no-motion (conduction) state to the motion state and (2) from time-independent convection to time-dependent, oscillatory convection in the thermal convection loop and Rayleigh-Benard problems can be significantly increased or decreased. This is accomplished through the use of a feedback controller effectuating small perturbations in the boundary data. The controller consists of sensors which detect deviations in the fluid`s temperature from the motionless, conductive values and then direct actuators to respond to these deviations in such a way as to suppress the naturally occurring flow instabilities. Actuators which modify the boundary`s temperature/heat flux are considered. The feedback controller can also be used to control flow patterns and generate complex dynamic behavior at relatively low Rayleigh numbers.

  17. Extended objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Creutz, M.

    1976-01-01

    After some disconnected comments on the MIT bag and string models for extended hadrons, I review current understanding of extended objects in classical conventional relativistic field theories and their quantum mechanical interpretation

  18. Radiation energy devaluation in diffusion combusting flows of natural gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makhanlall, Deodat; Munda, Josiah L.; Jiang, Peixue

    2013-01-01

    Abstract: CFD (Computational fluid dynamics) is used to evaluate the thermodynamic second-law effects of thermal radiation in turbulent diffusion natural gas flames. Radiative heat transfer processes in gas and at solid walls are identified as important causes of energy devaluation in the combusting flows. The thermodynamic role of thermal radiation cannot be neglected when compared to that of heat conduction and convection, mass diffusion, chemical reactions, and viscous dissipation. An energy devaluation number is also defined, with which the optimum fuel–air equivalence for combusting flows can be determined. The optimum fuel–air equivalence ratio for a natural gas flame is determined to be 0.7. The CFD model is validated against experimental measurements. - Highlights: • Thermodynamic effects of thermal radiation in combusting flows analyzed. • General equation for second-law analyses of combusting flows extended. • Optimum fuel–air equivalence ratio determined for natural gas flame

  19. Convective transport in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Ippolito, D.A.; Myra, J.R.; Russell, D.A.; Krasheninnikov, S.I.; Pigarov, A.Yu.; Yu, G.Q.; Xu, X.Q.; Nevins, W.M.

    2005-01-01

    Scrape-off-layer (SOL) convection in fusion experiments appears to be a universal phenomenon that can 'short-circuit' the divertor in some cases. The theory of 'blob' transport provides a simple and robust physical paradigm for studying convective transport. This paper summarizes recent advances in the theory of blob transport and its comparison with 2D and 3D computer simulations. We also discuss the common physical basis relating radial transport of blobs, pellets, and ELMs and a new blob regime that may lead to a connection between blob transport and the density limit. (author)

  20. Parameterizing convective organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Earle Mapes

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Lateral mixing parameters in buoyancy-driven deep convection schemes are among the most sensitive and important unknowns in atmosphere models. Unfortunately, there is not a true optimum value for plume mixing rate, but rather a dilemma or tradeoff: Excessive dilution of updrafts leads to unstable stratification bias in the mean state, while inadequate dilution allows deep convection to occur too easily, causing poor space and time distributions and variability. In this too-small parameter space, compromises are made based on competing metrics of model performance. We attempt to escape this “entrainment dilemma” by making bulk plume parameters (chiefly entrainment rate depend on a new prognostic variable (“organization,” org meant to reflect the rectified effects of subgrid-scale structure in meteorological fields. We test an org scheme in the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5 with a new unified shallow-deep convection scheme (UW-ens, a 2-plume version of the University of Washington scheme. Since buoyant ascent involves natural selection, subgrid structure makes convection systematically deeper and stronger than the pure unorganized case: plumes of average (or randomly sampled air rising in the average environment. To reflect this, org is nonnegative, but we leave it dimensionless. A time scale characterizes its behavior (here ∼3 h for a 2o model. Currently its source is rain evaporation, but other sources can be added easily. We also let org be horizontally transported by advection, as a mass-weighted mean over the convecting layer. Linear coefficients link org to a plume ensemble, which it assists via: 1 plume base warmth above the mean temperature 2 plume radius enhancement (reduced mixing, and 3 increased probability of overlap in a multi-plume scheme, where interactions benefit later generations (this part has only been implemented in an offline toy column model. Since rain evaporation is a source for org, it functions as a time

  1. Mathematical models of convection

    CERN Document Server

    Andreev, Victor K; Goncharova, Olga N; Pukhnachev, Vladislav V

    2012-01-01

    Phenomena of convection are abundant in nature as well as in industry. This volume addresses the subject of convection from the point of view of both, theory and application. While the first three chapters provide a refresher on fluid dynamics and heat transfer theory, the rest of the book describes the modern developments in theory. Thus it brings the reader to the ""front"" of the modern research. This monograph provides the theoretical foundation on a topic relevant to metallurgy, ecology, meteorology, geo-and astrophysics, aerospace industry, chemistry, crystal physics, and many other fiel

  2. Convective aggregation in realistic convective-scale simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Holloway, Christopher E.

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the real-world relevance of idealized-model convective self-aggregation, five 15-day cases of real organized convection in the tropics are simulated. These include multiple simulations of each case to test sensitivities of the convective organization and mean states to interactive radiation, interactive surface fluxes, and evaporation of rain. These simulations are compared to self-aggregation seen in the same model configured to run in idealized radiative-convective equilibriu...

  3. Improved diffuser for augmenting a wind turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foreman, K.M.; Gilbert, B.L.

    A diffuser for augmenting a wind turbine having means for energizing the boundary layer at several locations along the diffuser walls is improved by the addition of a short collar extending radially outward from the outlet of the diffuser.

  4. Topology optimisation of natural convection problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexandersen, Joe; Aage, Niels; Andreasen, Casper Schousboe

    2014-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the application of the density-based topology optimisation approach for the design of heat sinks and micropumps based on natural convection effects. The problems are modelled under the assumptions of steady-state laminar flow using the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations...... coupled to the convection-diffusion equation through the Boussinesq approximation. In order to facilitate topology optimisation, the Brinkman approach is taken to penalise velocities inside the solid domain and the effective thermal conductivity is interpolated in order to accommodate differences...... in thermal conductivity of the solid and fluid phases. The governing equations are discretised using stabilised finite elements and topology optimisation is performed for two different problems using discrete adjoint sensitivity analysis. The study shows that topology optimisation is a viable approach...

  5. CDM Convective Forecast Planning guidance

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The CDM Convective Forecast Planning (CCFP) guidance product provides a foreast of en-route aviation convective hazards. The forecasts are updated every 2 hours and...

  6. Turbulent convection in liquid metal with and without rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Eric M; Aurnou, Jonathan M

    2013-04-23

    The magnetic fields of Earth and other planets are generated by turbulent, rotating convection in liquid metal. Liquid metals are peculiar in that they diffuse heat more readily than momentum, quantified by their small Prandtl numbers, Pr rotating Rayleigh-Bénard convection experiments in the liquid metal gallium (Pr = 0.025) over a range of nondimensional buoyancy forcing (Ra) and rotation periods (E). Our primary diagnostic is the efficiency of convective heat transfer (Nu). In general, we find that the convective behavior of liquid metal differs substantially from that of moderate Pr fluids, such as water. In particular, a transition between rotationally constrained and weakly rotating turbulent states is identified, and this transition differs substantially from that observed in moderate Pr fluids. This difference, we hypothesize, may explain the different classes of magnetic fields observed on the Gas and Ice Giant planets, whose dynamo regions consist of Pr 1 fluids, respectively.

  7. Presentation on Tropical Mesoscale convective Systems and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    Shallow convection- 70% of the storm heights are below 6 km. ♢ Deep convection ... Decay convection, the convective top is found at a higher altitude than deep .... Stratospheric Fountain – Two step process. Warm tropopause- preferable for.

  8. Nonsnaking doubly diffusive convectons and the twist instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beaume, Cédric, E-mail: ced.beaume@gmail.com; Knobloch, Edgar, E-mail: knobloch@berkeley.edu [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Bergeon, Alain, E-mail: alain.bergeon@imft.fr [Université de Toulouse, INPT, UPS, IMFT (Institut de Mécanique des Fluides de Toulouse), Allée Camille Soula, F-31400 Toulouse, France and CNRS, IMFT, F-31400 Toulouse (France)

    2013-11-15

    Doubly diffusive convection in a three-dimensional horizontally extended domain with a square cross section in the vertical is considered. The fluid motion is driven by horizontal temperature and concentration differences in the transverse direction. When the buoyancy ratio N = −1 and the Rayleigh number is increased the conduction state loses stability to a subcritical, almost two-dimensional roll structure localized in the longitudinal direction. This structure exhibits abrupt growth in length near a particular value of the Rayleigh number but does not snake. Prior to this filling transition the structure becomes unstable to a secondary twist instability generating a pair of stationary, spatially localized zigzag states. In contrast to the primary branch these states snake as they grow in extent and eventually fill the whole domain. The origin of the twist instability and the properties of the resulting localized structures are investigated for both periodic and no-slip boundary conditions in the extended direction.

  9. Convective Propagation Characteristics Using a Simple Representation of Convective Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neale, R. B.; Mapes, B. E.

    2016-12-01

    Observed equatorial wave propagation is intimately linked to convective organization and it's coupling to features of the larger-scale flow. In this talk we a use simple 4 level model to accommodate vertical modes of a mass flux convection scheme (shallow, mid-level and deep). Two paradigms of convection are used to represent convective processes. One that has only both random (unorganized) diagnosed fluctuations of convective properties and one with organized fluctuations of convective properties that are amplified by previously existing convection and has an explicit moistening impact on the local convecting environment We show a series of model simulations in single-column, 2D and 3D configurations, where the role of convective organization in wave propagation is shown to be fundamental. For the optimal choice of parameters linking organization to local atmospheric state, a broad array of convective wave propagation emerges. Interestingly the key characteristics of propagating modes are the low-level moistening followed by deep convection followed by mature 'large-scale' heating. This organization structure appears to hold firm across timescales from 5-day wave disturbances to MJO-like wave propagation.

  10. Modelling of convection during solidification of metal and alloys

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    material parameters on double-diffusive convection is illustrated through comparative study of ... In the majority of the cases, the transition from liquid to solid takes place in the ... The role of mush model on macrosegregation is examined through ..... flow field through the resistance of the mushy phase only. The specific role ...

  11. Modeling of plasma-sheet convection: implications for substorms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erickson, G.M.

    1985-01-01

    An answer is suggested to the question of why plasma and magnetic energy accumulate in the Earth's magnetotail to be released in sporadic events, namely substorms. It is shown that the idea of steady convection is inconsistent with the idea of slow, approximately lossless, plasma convection in a long, closed-field-line region that extends into a long magnetotail, such as occurs during Earthward convection in the Earth's plasma sheet. This inconsistency is argued generally and demonstrated specifically using several quantitative models of the Earth's magnetospheric magnetic field. These results suggest that plasma-sheet convection is necessarily time dependent. If flux tubes are to convect adiabatically earthward, the confining magnetic pressure in the tail lobes must increase with time, and the magnetotail must evolve into a more stretched configuration. Eventually, the magnetosphere must find some way to release plasma from inner-plasma-sheet flux tubes. This suggests an obvious role for the magnetospheric substorm in the convection process. To probe this process further, a two-dimensional, self-consistent, quasi-static convection model was developed. This model self consistently includes a dipole field and can reasonably account for the effects of inner-magnetospheric shielding

  12. Convective instabilities in SN 1987A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benz, Willy; Thielemann, Friedrich-Karl

    1990-01-01

    Following Bandiera (1984), it is shown that the relevant criterion to determine the stability of a blast wave, propagating through the layers of a massive star in a supernova explosion, is the Schwarzschild (or Ledoux) criterion rather than the Rayleigh-Taylor criterion. Both criteria coincide only in the incompressible limit. Results of a linear stability analysis are presented for a one-dimensional (spherical) explosion in a realistic model for the progenitor of SN 1987A. When applying the Schwarzschild criterion, unstable regions get extended considerably. Convection is found to develop behind the shock, with a characteristic growth rate corresponding to a time scale much smaller than the shock traversal time. This ensures that efficient mixing will take place. Since the entire ejected mass is found to be convectively unstable, Ni can be transported outward, even into the hydrogen envelope, while hydrogen can be mixed deep into the helium core.

  13. Extended Emotions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krueger, Joel; Szanto, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    beyond the neurophysiological confines of organisms; some even argue that emotions can be socially extended and shared by multiple agents. Call this the extended emotions thesis (ExE). In this article, we consider different ways of understanding ExE in philosophy, psychology, and the cognitive sciences...

  14. Lattice Boltzmann model for melting with natural convection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huber, Christian; Parmigiani, Andrea; Chopard, Bastien; Manga, Michael; Bachmann, Olivier

    2008-01-01

    We develop a lattice Boltzmann method to couple thermal convection and pure-substance melting. The transition from conduction-dominated heat transfer to fully-developed convection is analyzed and scaling laws and previous numerical results are reproduced by our numerical method. We also investigate the limit in which thermal inertia (high Stefan number) cannot be neglected. We use our results to extend the scaling relations obtained at low Stefan number and establish the correlation between the melting front propagation and the Stefan number for fully-developed convection. We conclude by showing that the model presented here is particularly well-suited to study convection melting in geometrically complex media with many applications in geosciences

  15. Convection heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Bejan, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    Written by an internationally recognized authority on heat transfer and thermodynamics, this second edition of Convection Heat Transfer contains new and updated problems and examples reflecting real-world research and applications, including heat exchanger design. Teaching not only structure but also technique, the book begins with the simplest problem solving method (scale analysis), and moves on to progressively more advanced and exact methods (integral method, self similarity, asymptotic behavior). A solutions manual is available for all problems and exercises.

  16. Concepts of magnetospheric convection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasyliunas, V.M.

    1975-01-01

    Magnetospheric physics, which grew out of attempts to understand the space environment of the Earth, is becoming increasingly applicable to other systems in the Universe. Among the planets, in addition to the Earth, Jupiter, Mercury, Mars and (in a somewhat different way) Venus are now known to have magnetospheres. The magnetospheres of pulsars have been regarded as an essential part of the pulsar phenomenon. Other astrophysical systems, such as supernova remnant shells or magnetic stars and binary star systems, may be describable as magnetospheres. The major concepts of magnetospheric physics thus need to be formulated in a general way not restricted to the geophysical context in which they may have originated. Magnetospheric convection has been one of the most important and fruitful concepts in the study of the Earth's magnetosphere. This paper describes the basic theoretical notions of convection in a manner applicable to magnetospheres generally and discusses the relative importance of convective corotational motions, with particular reference to the comparison of the Earth and Jupiter. (Auth.)

  17. Instabilities in fluid layers and in reaction-diffusion systems: Steady states, time-periodic solutions, non-periodic attractors, and related convective and otherwise non-linear phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Velarde, M.

    1977-01-01

    Thermoconvective instabilities in horizontal fluid layers are discussed with emphasis on the Rayleigh-Benard model problem. Steady solutions and time-dependent phenomena (relaxation oscillations and transition to turbulence) are studied within the nonlinear Boussinesq-Oberbeck approximation. Homogeneous steady solutions, limit cycles, and inhomogeneous (ordered) spatial structures are also studied in simple reaction-diffusion systems. Lastly, the non-periodic attractor that appears at large Rayleigh numbers in the truncated Boussinesq-Oberbeck model of Lorenz, is constructed, and a discussion of turbulent behavior is given. (author) [es

  18. Evidence of Inward Toroidal Momentum Convection in the JET Tokamak

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tala, T.; Zastrow, K.-D.; Ferreira, J.

    2009-01-01

    Experiments have been carried out on the Joint European Torus tokamak to determine the diffusive and convective momentum transport. Torque, injected by neutral beams, was modulated to create a periodic perturbation in the toroidal rotation velocity. Novel transport analysis shows the magnitude...... and profile shape of the momentum diffusivity are similar to those of the ion heat diffusivity. A significant inward momentum pinch, up to 20 m/s, has been found. Both results are consistent with gyrokinetic simulations. This evidence is complemented in plasmas with internal transport barriers....

  19. Geothermal Heating, Convective Flow and Ice Thickness on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, N. D.; Travis, B. J.; Cuzzi, J.

    2001-01-01

    Our 3D calculations suggest that hydrothermal circulation may occur in the martian regolith and may significantly thin the surface ice layer on Mars at some locations due to the upwelling of warm convecting fluids driven solely by background geothermal heating. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  20. Bidispersive-inclined convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulone, Giuseppe; Straughan, Brian

    2016-01-01

    A model is presented for thermal convection in an inclined layer of porous material when the medium has a bidispersive structure. Thus, there are the usual macropores which are full of a fluid, but there are also a system of micropores full of the same fluid. The model we employ is a modification of the one proposed by Nield & Kuznetsov (2006 Int. J. Heat Mass Transf. 49, 3068–3074. (doi:10.1016/j.ijheatmasstransfer.2006.02.008)), although we consider a single temperature field only. PMID:27616934

  1. Extended thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Müller, Ingo

    1993-01-01

    Physicists firmly believe that the differential equations of nature should be hyperbolic so as to exclude action at a distance; yet the equations of irreversible thermodynamics - those of Navier-Stokes and Fourier - are parabolic. This incompatibility between the expectation of physicists and the classical laws of thermodynamics has prompted the formulation of extended thermodynamics. After describing the motifs and early evolution of this new branch of irreversible thermodynamics, the authors apply the theory to mon-atomic gases, mixtures of gases, relativistic gases, and "gases" of phonons and photons. The discussion brings into perspective the various phenomena called second sound, such as heat propagation, propagation of shear stress and concentration, and the second sound in liquid helium. The formal mathematical structure of extended thermodynamics is exposed and the theory is shown to be fully compatible with the kinetic theory of gases. The study closes with the testing of extended thermodynamics thro...

  2. One-dimensional model of oxygen transport impedance accounting for convection perpendicular to the electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mainka, J. [Laboratorio Nacional de Computacao Cientifica (LNCC), CMC 6097, Av. Getulio Vargas 333, 25651-075 Petropolis, RJ, Caixa Postal 95113 (Brazil); Maranzana, G.; Thomas, A.; Dillet, J.; Didierjean, S.; Lottin, O. [Laboratoire d' Energetique et de Mecanique Theorique et Appliquee (LEMTA), Universite de Lorraine, 2, avenue de la Foret de Haye, 54504 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); LEMTA, CNRS, 2, avenue de la Foret de Haye, 54504 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)

    2012-10-15

    A one-dimensional (1D) model of oxygen transport in the diffusion media of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) is presented, which considers convection perpendicular to the electrode in addition to diffusion. The resulting analytical expression of the convecto-diffusive impedance is obtained using a convection-diffusion equation instead of a diffusion equation in the case of classical Warburg impedance. The main hypothesis of the model is that the convective flux is generated by the evacuation of water produced at the cathode which flows through the porous media in vapor phase. This allows the expression of the convective flux velocity as a function of the current density and of the water transport coefficient {alpha} (the fraction of water being evacuated at the cathode outlet). The resulting 1D oxygen transport impedance neglects processes occurring in the direction parallel to the electrode that could have a significant impact on the cell impedance, like gas consumption or concentration oscillations induced by the measuring signal. However, it enables us to estimate the impact of convection perpendicular to the electrode on PEMFC impedance spectra and to determine in which conditions the approximation of a purely diffusive oxygen transport is valid. Experimental observations confirm the numerical results. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  3. Anisotropy in "isotropic diffusion" measurements due to nongaussian diffusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Sune Nørhøj; Olesen, Jonas Lynge; Ianuş, Andrada

    2017-01-01

    Designing novel diffusion-weighted NMR and MRI pulse sequences aiming to probe tissue microstructure with techniques extending beyond the conventional Stejskal-Tanner family is currently of broad interest. One such technique, multidimensional diffusion MRI, has been recently proposed to afford...... model-free decomposition of diffusion signal kurtosis into terms originating from either ensemble variance of isotropic diffusivity or microscopic diffusion anisotropy. This ability rests on the assumption that diffusion can be described as a sum of multiple Gaussian compartments, but this is often...

  4. Nonlinear Convective Models of RR Lyrae Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feuchtinger, M.; Dorfi, E. A.

    The nonlinear behavior of RR Lyrae pulsations is investigated using a state-of-the-art numerical technique solving the full time-dependent system of radiation hydrodynamics. Grey radiative transfer is included by a variable Eddington-factor method and we use the time-dependent turbulent convection model according to Kuhfuss (1986, A&A 160, 116) in the version of Wuchterl (1995, Comp. Phys. Comm. 89, 19). OPAL opacities extended by the Alexander molecule opacities at temperatures below 6000 K and an equation of state according to Wuchterl (1990, A&A 238, 83) close the system. The resulting nonlinear system is discretized on an adaptive mesh developed by Dorfi & Drury (1987, J. Comp. Phys. 69, 175), which is important to provide the necessary spatial resolution in critical regions like ionization zones and shock waves. Additionally, we employ a second order advection scheme, a time centered temporal discretizaton and an artificial tensor viscosity in order to treat discontinuities. We compute fundamental as well first overtone models of RR Lyrae stars for a grid of stellar parameters both with and without convective energy transport in order to give a detailed picture of the pulsation-convection interaction. In order to investigate the influence of the different features of the convection model calculations with and without overshooting, turbulent pressure and turbulent viscosity are performed and compared with each other. A standard Fourier decomposition is used to confront the resulting light and radial velocity variations with recent observations and we show that the well known RR Lyrae phase discrepancy problem (Simon 1985, ApJ 299, 723) can be resolved with these stellar pulsation computations.

  5. Environmental Characteristics of Convective Systems During TRMM-LBA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halverson, Jeffrey B.; Rickenbach, Thomas; Roy, Biswadev; Pierce, Harold; Williams, Earle; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, data collected from 51 days of continual upper atmospheric soundings and TOGA radar at ABRACOS Hill during the TRMM-LBA experiment are used to describe the mean thermodynamic and kinematic airmass properties of wet season convection over Rondonia, Brazil. Distinct multi-day easterly and westerly lower tropospheric wind regimes occurred during the campaign with contrasting airmass characteristics. Westerly wind periods featured modest CAPE (1000 J/kg), moist conditions (>90% RH) extending through 700 mb and shallow (900 mb) speed shear on the order of 10(exp -4)/s. This combination of characteristics promoted convective systems that featured a relatively large fraction of stratiform rainfall and weak convection nearly devoid of lightning. The environment is very similar to the general airmass conditions experienced during the Darwin, Australia monsoon convective regime. In contrast, easterly regime convective systems were more strongly electrified and featured larger convective rain rates and reduced stratiform rainfall fraction. These systems formed in an environment with significantly larger CAPE (1500 J/kg), drier lower and middle level humidities (in the lowest 1-2 km, thus contributing to a more explosive growth of convection. The time series of low- and mid-level averaged humidity exhibited marked variability between westerly and easterly regimes and was characterized by low frequency (i.e., multi-day to weekly) oscillations. The synoptic scale origins of these moisture fluctuations are examined, which include the effects of variable low-level airmass trajectories and upper-level, westward migrating cyclonic vortices. The results reported herein provide an environmental context for ongoing dual Doppler analyses and numerical modeling case studies of individual TRMM-LBA convective systems.

  6. The Role of the Velocity Gradient in Laminar Convective Heat Transfer through a Tube with a Uniform Wall Heat Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liang-Bi; Zhang, Qiang; Li, Xiao-Xia

    2009-01-01

    This paper aims to contribute to a better understanding of convective heat transfer. For this purpose, the reason why thermal diffusivity should be placed before the Laplacian operator of the heat flux, and the role of the velocity gradient in convective heat transfer are analysed. The background to these analyses is that, when the energy…

  7. Diffusion of gases into the lung: How physics can help to understand ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the human lung, the gas transfer between air and blood is achieved in terminal units that are called `acini'. Whereas convection is still the predominant transport phenomenon at the acinus entrance, most of the acinar surface is in fact accessed by diffusion. The transition between convection and diffusion, and thus the ...

  8. The role of the velocity gradient in laminar convective heat transfer through a tube with a uniform wall heat flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Liangbi; Zhang Qiang; Li Xiaoxia

    2009-01-01

    This paper aims to contribute to a better understanding of convective heat transfer. For this purpose, the reason why thermal diffusivity should be placed before the Laplacian operator of the heat flux, and the role of the velocity gradient in convective heat transfer are analysed. The background to these analyses is that, when the energy conservation equation of convective heat transfer is used to explain convective heat transfer there are two points that are difficult for teachers to explain and for undergraduates to understand: thermal diffusivity is placed before the Laplacian operator of temperature; on the wall surface (the fluid side) the velocity is zero, a diffusion equation of temperature is gained from energy conservation equation, however, temperature cannot be transported. Consequently, the real physical meaning of thermal diffusivity is not clearly reflected in the energy conservation equation, and whether heat transfer occurs through a diffusion process or a convection process on the wall surface is not clear. Through a simple convective heat transfer case: laminar convective heat transfer in a tube with a uniform wall heat flux on the tube wall, this paper explains these points more clearly. The results declare that it is easier for teachers to explain and for undergraduates to understand these points when a description of heat transfer in terms of the heat flux is used. In this description, thermal diffusivity is placed before the Laplacian operator of the heat flux; the role of the velocity gradient in convective heat transfer appears, on the wall surface, the fact whether heat transfer occurs through a diffusion process or a convection process can be explained and understood easily. The results are not only essential for teachers to improve the efficiency of university-level physics education regarding heat transfer, but they also enrich the theories for understanding heat transfer

  9. The Oscillatory Nature of Rotating Convection in Liquid Metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aurnou, J. M.; Bertin, V. L.; Grannan, A. M.

    2016-12-01

    Earth's magnetic field is assumed to be generated by fluid motions in its liquid metal core. In this fluid, the heat diffuses significantly more than momentum and thus, the ratio of these two diffusivities, the Prandtl number Pr=ν/Κ, is well below unity. The convective flow dynamics of liquid metal is very different from Pr ≈ 1 fluids like water and those used in current dynamo simulations. In order to characterize rapidly rotating thermal convection in low Pr number fluids, we have performed laboratory experiments in a cylinder using liquid gallium (Pr ≈ 0.023) as the working fluid. The Ekman number, which characterizes the effect of rotation, varies from E = 4 10-5 to 4 10-6 and the dimensionless buoyancy forcing (Rayleigh number, Ra) varies from Ra =3 105 to 2 107. Using heat transfer measurements (Nusselt number, Nu) as well as temperature measurements within the fluid, we characterize the different styles of low Pr rotating convective flow. The convection threshold is first overcome in the form of a container scale inertial oscillatory mode. At stronger forcing, wall-localized modes are identified for the first time in liquid metal laboratory experiments. These wall modes coexist with the bulk inertial oscillatory modes. When the strengh of the buoyancy increases, the bulk flow becomes turbulent while the wall modes remain. Our results imply that rotating convective flows in liquid metals do not develop in the form of quasi-steady columns, as in Pr ≈ 1 dynamo models, but in the form of oscillatory motions. Therefore, the flows that drive thermally-driven dynamo action in low Pr geophysical and astrophysical fluids can differ substantively than those occuring in current-day Pr ≈ 1 numerical models. In addition, our results suggest that relatively low wavenumber, wall-attached modes may be dynamically important in rapidly-rotating convection in liquid metals.

  10. Extending Puppet

    CERN Document Server

    Franceschi, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    This book is a clear, detailed and practical guide to learn about designing and deploying you puppet architecture, with informative examples to highlight and explain concepts in a focused manner. This book is designed for users who already have good experience with Puppet, and will surprise experienced users with innovative topics that explore how to design, implement, adapt, and deploy a Puppet architecture. The key to extending Puppet is the development of types and providers, for which you must be familiar with Ruby.

  11. Convection in Porous Media

    CERN Document Server

    Nield, Donald A

    2013-01-01

    Convection in Porous Media, 4th Edition, provides a user-friendly introduction to the subject, covering a wide range of topics, such as fibrous insulation, geological strata, and catalytic reactors. The presentation is self-contained, requiring only routine mathematics and the basic elements of fluid mechanics and heat transfer. The book will be of use not only to researchers and practicing engineers as a review and reference, but also to graduate students and others entering the field. The new edition features approximately 1,750 new references and covers current research in nanofluids, cellular porous materials, strong heterogeneity, pulsating flow, and more. Recognized as the standard reference in the field Includes a comprehensive, 250-page reference list Cited over 2300 times to date in its various editions Serves as an introduction for those entering the field and as a comprehensive reference for experienced researchers Features new sections on nanofluids, carbon dioxide sequestration, and applications...

  12. Temperature-Driven Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohan, Richard J.; Vandegrift, Guy

    2003-02-01

    Warm air aloft is stable. This explains the lack of strong winds in a warm front and how nighttime radiative cooling can lead to motionless air that can trap smog. The stability of stratospheric air can be attributed to the fact that it is heated from above as ultraviolet radiation strikes the ozone layer. On the other hand, fluid heated from below is unstable and can lead to Bernard convection cells. This explains the generally turbulent nature of the troposphere, which receives a significant fraction of its heat directly from the Earth's warmer surface. The instability of cold fluid aloft explains the violent nature of a cold front, as well as the motion of Earth's magma, which is driven by radioactive heating deep within the Earth's mantle. This paper describes how both effects can be demonstrated using four standard beakers, ice, and a bit of food coloring.

  13. Convection in porous media

    CERN Document Server

    Nield, Donald A

    1992-01-01

    This book provides a user-friendly introduction to the topic of convection in porous media The authors as- sume that the reader is familiar with the basic elements of fluid mechanics and heat transfer, but otherwise the book is self-contained The book will be useful both as a review (for reference) and as a tutorial work, suitable as a textbook in a graduate course or seminar The book brings into perspective the voluminous research that has been performed during the last two decades The field has recently exploded because of worldwide concern with issues such as energy self-sufficiency and pollution of the environment Areas of application include the insulation of buildings and equipment, energy storage and recovery, geothermal reservoirs, nuclear waste disposal, chemical reactor engineering, and the storage of heat-generating materials such as grain and coal Geophysical applications range from the flow of groundwater around hot intrusions to the stability of snow against avalanches

  14. Rotating Rayleigh-Bénard convection at low Prandtl number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre Guzman, Andres; Ostilla-Monico, Rodolfo; Clercx, Herman; Kunnen, Rudie

    2017-11-01

    Most geo- and astrophysical convective flows are too remote or too complex for direct measurements of the physical quantities involved, and thus a reduced framework with the main physical constituents is beneficial. This approach is given by the problem of rotating Rayleigh-Bénard convection (RRBC). For large-scale systems, the governing parameters of RRBC take extreme values, leading to the geostrophic turbulent regime. We perform Direct Numerical Simulations to investigate the transition to this regime at low Prandtl number (Pr). In low- Pr fluids, thermal diffusivity dominates over momentum diffusivity; we use Pr = 0.1 , relevant to liquid metals. In particular, we study the convective heat transfer (Nusselt number Nu) as a function of rotation (assessed by the Ekman number Ek). The strength of the buoyant forcing (Rayleigh number Ra) is Ra = 1 ×1010 to ensure turbulent convection. Varying Ek , we observe a change of the power-law scaling Nu Ekβ that suggests a transition to geostrophic turbulence, which is likely to occur at Ek = 9 ×10-7 . The thermal boundary layer thickness, however, may suggest a transition at lower Ekman numbers, indicating that perhaps not all statistical quantities show a transitional behaviour at the same Ek .

  15. Spectrally-consistent regularization modeling of turbulent natural convection flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trias, F Xavier; Gorobets, Andrey; Oliva, Assensi; Verstappen, Roel

    2012-01-01

    The incompressible Navier-Stokes equations constitute an excellent mathematical modelization of turbulence. Unfortunately, attempts at performing direct simulations are limited to relatively low-Reynolds numbers because of the almost numberless small scales produced by the non-linear convective term. Alternatively, a dynamically less complex formulation is proposed here. Namely, regularizations of the Navier-Stokes equations that preserve the symmetry and conservation properties exactly. To do so, both convective and diffusive terms are altered in the same vein. In this way, the convective production of small scales is effectively restrained whereas the modified diffusive term introduces a hyperviscosity effect and consequently enhances the destruction of small scales. In practice, the only additional ingredient is a self-adjoint linear filter whose local filter length is determined from the requirement that vortex-stretching must stop at the smallest grid scale. In the present work, the performance of the above-mentioned recent improvements is assessed through application to turbulent natural convection flows by means of comparison with DNS reference data.

  16. Parametric modulation of thermomagnetic convection in magnetic fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engler, H; Odenbach, S

    2008-05-21

    Previous theoretical investigations on thermal flow in a horizontal fluid layer have shown that the critical temperature difference, where heat transfer changes from diffusion to convective flow, depends on the frequency of a time-modulated driving force. The driving force of thermal convection is the buoyancy force resulting from the interaction of gravity and the density gradient provided by a temperature difference in the vertical direction of a horizontal fluid layer. An experimental investigation of such phenomena fails because of technical problems arising if buoyancy is to be changed by altering the temperature difference or gravitational acceleration. The possibility of influencing convective flow in a horizontal magnetic fluid layer by magnetic forces might provide us with a means to solve the problem of a time-modulated magnetic driving force. An experimental setup to investigate the dependence of the critical temperature difference on the frequency of the driving force has been designed and implemented. First results show that the time modulation of the driving force has significant influence on the strength of the convective flow. In particular a pronounced minimum in the strength of convection has been found for a particular frequency.

  17. Bicarbonate diffusion through mucus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingston, E H; Miller, J; Engel, E

    1995-09-01

    The mucus layer overlying duodenal epithelium maintains a pH gradient against high luminal acid concentrations. Despite these adverse conditions, epithelial surface pH remains close to neutrality. The exact nature of the gradient-forming barrier remains unknown. The barrier consists of mucus into which HCO3- is secreted. Quantification of the ability of HCO3- to establish and maintain the gradient depends on accurate measurement of this ion's diffusion coefficient through mucus. We describe new experimental and mathematical methods for diffusion measurement and report diffusion coefficients for HCO3- diffusion through saline, 5% mucin solutions, and rat duodenal mucus. The diffusion coefficients were 20.2 +/- 0.10, 3.02 +/- 0.31, and 1.81 +/- 0.12 x 10(-6) cm2/s, respectively. Modeling of the mucobicarbonate layer with this latter value suggests that for conditions of high luminal acid strength the neutralization of acid by HCO3- occurs just above the epithelial surface. Under these conditions the model predicts that fluid convection toward the lumen could be important in maintaining the pH gradient. In support of this hypothesis we were able to demonstrate a net luminal fluid flux of 5 microliters.min-1.cm-2 after perfusion of 0.15 N HCl in the rat duodenum.

  18. Stellar convection and dynamo theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jennings, R L

    1989-10-01

    In considering the large scale stellar convection problem the outer layers of a star are modelled as two co-rotating plane layers coupled at a fluid/fluid interface. Heating from below causes only the upper fluid to convect, although this convection can penetrate into the lower fluid. Stability analysis is then used to find the most unstable mode of convection. With parameters appropriate to the Sun the most unstable mode is steady convection in thin cells (aspect ratio {approx equal} 0.2) filling the convection zone. There is negligible vertical motion in the lower fluid, but considerable thermal penetration, and a large jump in helicity at the interface, which has implications for dynamo theory. An {alpha}{omega} dynamo is investigated in isolation from the convection problem. Complexity is included by allowing both latitudinal and time dependence in the magnetic fields. The nonlinear dynamics of the resulting partial differential equations are analysed in considerable detail. On varying the main control parameter D (the dynamo number), many transitions of behaviour are found involving many forms of time dependence, but not chaos. Further, solutions which break equatorial symmetry are common and provide a theoretical explanation of solar observations which have this symmetry. Overall the behaviour was more complicated than expected. In particular, there were multiple stable solutions at fixed D, meaning that similar stars can have very different magnetic patterns, depending upon their history. (author).

  19. Vertical Structure of Radiation-pressure-dominated Thin Disks: Link between Vertical Advection and Convective Stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong, Hong-Yu; Gu, Wei-Min

    2017-01-01

    In the classic picture of standard thin accretion disks, viscous heating is balanced by radiative cooling through the diffusion process, and the radiation-pressure-dominated inner disk suffers convective instability. However, recent simulations have shown that, owing to the magnetic buoyancy, the vertical advection process can significantly contribute to energy transport. In addition, in comparing the simulation results with the local convective stability criterion, no convective instability has been found. In this work, following on from simulations, we revisit the vertical structure of radiation-pressure-dominated thin disks and include the vertical advection process. Our study indicates a link between the additional energy transport and the convectively stable property. Thus, the vertical advection not only significantly contributes to the energy transport, but it also plays an important role in making the disk convectively stable. Our analyses may help to explain the discrepancy between classic theory and simulations on standard thin disks.

  20. The convection patterns in microemulsions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korneta, W.; Lopez Quintela, M.A.; Fernandez Novoa, A.

    1991-07-01

    The Rayleigh-Benard convection in the microemulsion consisting of water (7.5%), cyclohexan (oil-61.7%) and diethylenglycolmonobutylether (surfactant-30.8%) is studied from the onset of convection to the phase separation. The five classes of convection patterns are observed and recorded on the video: localized travelling waves, travelling waves, travelling waves and localized steady rolls, steady rolls and steady polygons. The Fourier transforms and histograms of these patterns are presented. The origin of any pattern is discussed. The intermittent behaviour close to the phase separation was observed. Possible applications of the obtained results are suggested. (author). 6 refs, 4 figs

  1. Second Law Analysis in Convective Heat and Mass Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ben Brahim

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the numerical determination of the entropy generation due to heat transfer, mass transfer and fluid friction in steady state for laminar double diffusive convection, in an inclined enclosure with heat and mass diffusive walls, by solving numerically the mass, momentum, species conservation and energy balance equations, using a Control Volume Finite-Element Method. The influences of the inclination angle, the thermal Grashof number and the buoyancy ratio on total entropy generation were investigated. The irreversibilities localization due to heat transfer, mass transfer and fluid friction is discussed for three inclination angles at a fixed thermal Grashof number.

  2. Solutocapillary Convection Effects on Polymeric Membrane Morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krantz, William B.; Todd, Paul W.; Kinagurthu, Sanjay

    1996-01-01

    Macro voids are undesirable large pores in membranes used for purification. They form when membranes are cast as thin films on a smooth surface by evaporating solvent (acetone) from a polymer solution. There are two un-tested hypotheses explaining the growth of macro voids. One states that diffusion of the non-solvent (water) is solely responsible, while the other states that solutocapillary convection is the primary cause of macro void growth. Solutocapillary convection is flow-caused by a concentration induced surface-tension gradient. Macrovoid growth in the former hypothesis is gravity independent, while in the latter it is opposed by gravity. To distinguish between these two hypotheses, experiments were designed to cast membranes in zero-gravity. A semi-automated apparatus was designed and built for casting membranes during the 20 secs of zero-g time available in parabolic aircraft flight such as NASA's KC-135. The phase changes were monitored optically, and membrane morphology was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). These studies appear to be the first quantitative studies of membrane casting in micro-gravity which incorporate real-time data acquisition. Morphological studies of membranes cast at 0, 1, and 1.8 g revealed the presence of numerous, sparse and no macrovoids respectively. These results are consistent with the predictions of the solutocapillary hypothesis of macrovoid growth.

  3. Stochastic and collisional diffusion in two-dimensional periodic flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doxas, I.; Horton, W.; Berk, H.L.

    1990-05-01

    The global effective diffusion coefficient D* for a two-dimensional system of convective rolls with a time dependent perturbation added, is calculated. The perturbation produces a background diffusion coefficient D, which is calculated analytically using the Menlikov-Arnold integral. This intrinsic diffusion coefficient is then enhanced by the unperturbed flow, to produce the global effective diffusion coefficient D*, which we can calculate theoretically for a certain range of parameters. The theoretical value agrees well with numerical simulations. 23 refs., 4 figs

  4. Consciousness extended

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carrara-Augustenborg, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    There is no consensus yet regarding a conceptualization of consciousness able to accommodate all the features of such complex phenomenon. Different theoretical and empirical models lend strength to both the occurrence of a non-accessible informational broadcast, and to the mobilization of specific...... brain areas responsible for the emergence of the individual´s explicit and variable access to given segments of such broadcast. Rather than advocating one model over others, this chapter proposes to broaden the conceptualization of consciousness by letting it embrace both mechanisms. Within...... such extended framework, I propose conceptual and functional distinctions between consciousness (global broadcast of information), awareness (individual´s ability to access the content of such broadcast) and unconsciousness (focally isolated neural activations). My hypothesis is that a demarcation in terms...

  5. Convection in the Labrador Sea

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Davis, R

    1997-01-01

    The long-term goal of this grant was to describe the process of deep oceanic convection well enough to provide critical tests of, and guidance to, models used to predict subsurface ocean conditions...

  6. Non-Boussinesq Dissolution-Driven Convection in Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amooie, M. A.; Soltanian, M. R.; Moortgat, J.

    2017-12-01

    Geological carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration in deep saline aquifers has been increasingly recognized as a feasible technology to stabilize the atmospheric carbon concentrations and subsequently mitigate the global warming. Solubility trapping is one of the most effective storage mechanisms, which is associated initially with diffusion-driven slow dissolution of gaseous CO2 into the aqueous phase, followed by density-driven convective mixing of CO2 throughout the aquifer. The convection includes both diffusion and fast advective transport of the dissolved CO2. We study the fluid dynamics of CO2 convection in the underlying single aqueous-phase region. Two modeling approaches are employed to define the system: (i) a constant-concentration condition for CO2 in aqueous phase at the top boundary, and (ii) a sufficiently low, constant injection-rate for CO2 from top boundary. The latter allows for thermodynamically consistent evolution of the CO2 composition and the aqueous phase density against the rate at which the dissolved CO2 convects. Here we accurately model the full nonlinear phase behavior of brine-CO2 mixture in a confined domain altered by dissolution and compressibility, while relaxing the common Boussinesq approximation. We discover new flow regimes and present quantitative scaling relations for global characters of spreading, mixing, and dissolution flux in two- and three-dimensional media for the both model types. We then revisit the universal Sherwood-Rayleigh scaling that is under debate for porous media convective flows. Our findings confirm the sublinear scaling for the constant-concentration case, while reconciling the classical linear scaling for the constant-injection model problem. The results provide a detailed perspective into how the available modeling strategies affect the prediction ability for the total amount of CO2 dissolved in the long term within saline aquifers of different permeabilities.

  7. Extreme value statistics for two-dimensional convective penetration in a pre-main sequence star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, J.; Baraffe, I.; Goffrey, T.; Constantino, T.; Viallet, M.; Popov, M. V.; Walder, R.; Folini, D.

    2017-08-01

    Context. In the interior of stars, a convectively unstable zone typically borders a zone that is stable to convection. Convective motions can penetrate the boundary between these zones, creating a layer characterized by intermittent convective mixing, and gradual erosion of the density and temperature stratification. Aims: We examine a penetration layer formed between a central radiative zone and a large convection zone in the deep interior of a young low-mass star. Using the Multidimensional Stellar Implicit Code (MUSIC) to simulate two-dimensional compressible stellar convection in a spherical geometry over long times, we produce statistics that characterize the extent and impact of convective penetration in this layer. Methods: We apply extreme value theory to the maximal extent of convective penetration at any time. We compare statistical results from simulations which treat non-local convection, throughout a large portion of the stellar radius, with simulations designed to treat local convection in a small region surrounding the penetration layer. For each of these situations, we compare simulations of different resolution, which have different velocity magnitudes. We also compare statistical results between simulations that radiate energy at a constant rate to those that allow energy to radiate from the stellar surface according to the local surface temperature. Results: Based on the frequency and depth of penetrating convective structures, we observe two distinct layers that form between the convection zone and the stable radiative zone. We show that the probability density function of the maximal depth of convective penetration at any time corresponds closely in space with the radial position where internal waves are excited. We find that the maximal penetration depth can be modeled by a Weibull distribution with a small shape parameter. Using these results, and building on established scalings for diffusion enhanced by large-scale convective motions, we

  8. Diffuse Ceiling Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Chen; Yu, Tao; Heiselberg, Per Kvols

    with conventional ventilation systems (mixing or displacement ventilation), diffuse ceiling ventilation can significantly reduce or even eliminate draught risk in the occupied zone. Moreover, this ventilation system presents a promising opportunity for energy saving, because of the low pressure loss, extended free...

  9. On the Fractional Nagumo Equation with Nonlinear Diffusion and Convection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdon Atangana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We presented the Nagumo equation using the concept of fractional calculus. With the help of two analytical techniques including the homotopy decomposition method (HDM and the new development of variational iteration method (NDVIM, we derived an approximate solution. Both methods use a basic idea of integral transform and are very simple to be used.

  10. Double-diffusive convection of compressible rotating Walters' (B ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Mathematical Formulation of the Problem and Perturbation Equations ...... Rayleigh number for the onset of instability via a state of pure oscillations, it suffices to find conditions for which ..... Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK.

  11. Double-diffusive convection of compressible rotating Walters' (B ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    A great number of applications of such a flow in geophysics are found in a ... We have considered an infinite, horizontal, compressible electrically conducting Walters' (Model B′) fluid layer of .... Linearized stability theory and normal mode analysis .... boundaries the boundary conditions are (see Chandrasekhar, 1981). 2.

  12. Diapycnal Transport and Pattern Formation in Double-Diffusive Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    carried out only over the geostrophic interior. By virtue of (2.55), we further simplify (2.58) to * int 0dlw M = ∇∫ . (2.59) The final step is the...The processes discussed in this study could be affected by the nonlinearities of the equation of state (e.g., McDougall 1987). Thus, the quantitative...nonlinear equation of state given in McDougall et al. (2003). Model geometry consisted of a volume comprising 320 grid points in the zonal and 256

  13. Multiscale stabilization for convection-dominated diffusion in heterogeneous media

    KAUST Repository

    Calo, Victor M.; Chung, Eric T.; Efendiev, Yalchin R.; Leung, Wing Tat

    2016-01-01

    relation to the approximation property of the test space. We design online basis functions, which accelerate convergence in the test space, and consequently, improve stability. We present several numerical examples and show that one needs a few test

  14. Nonlinear Multiplicative Schwarz Preconditioning in Natural Convection Cavity Flow

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Lulu; Zhang, Wei; Keyes, David E.

    2017-01-01

    A natural convection cavity flow problem is solved using nonlinear multiplicative Schwarz preconditioners, as a Gauss-Seidel-like variant of additive Schwarz preconditioned inexact Newton (ASPIN). The nonlinear preconditioning extends the domain of convergence of Newton’s method to high Rayleigh numbers. Convergence performance varies widely with respect to different groupings of the fields of this multicomponent problem, and with respect to different orderings of the groupings.

  15. Nonlinear Multiplicative Schwarz Preconditioning in Natural Convection Cavity Flow

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Lulu

    2017-03-17

    A natural convection cavity flow problem is solved using nonlinear multiplicative Schwarz preconditioners, as a Gauss-Seidel-like variant of additive Schwarz preconditioned inexact Newton (ASPIN). The nonlinear preconditioning extends the domain of convergence of Newton’s method to high Rayleigh numbers. Convergence performance varies widely with respect to different groupings of the fields of this multicomponent problem, and with respect to different orderings of the groupings.

  16. Spatial model of convective solute transport in brain extracellular space does not support a "glymphatic" mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Byung-Ju; Smith, Alex J; Verkman, Alan S

    2016-12-01

    A "glymphatic system," which involves convective fluid transport from para-arterial to paravenous cerebrospinal fluid through brain extracellular space (ECS), has been proposed to account for solute clearance in brain, and aquaporin-4 water channels in astrocyte endfeet may have a role in this process. Here, we investigate the major predictions of the glymphatic mechanism by modeling diffusive and convective transport in brain ECS and by solving the Navier-Stokes and convection-diffusion equations, using realistic ECS geometry for short-range transport between para-arterial and paravenous spaces. Major model parameters include para-arterial and paravenous pressures, ECS volume fraction, solute diffusion coefficient, and astrocyte foot-process water permeability. The model predicts solute accumulation and clearance from the ECS after a step change in solute concentration in para-arterial fluid. The principal and robust conclusions of the model are as follows: (a) significant convective transport requires a sustained pressure difference of several mmHg between the para-arterial and paravenous fluid and is not affected by pulsatile pressure fluctuations; (b) astrocyte endfoot water permeability does not substantially alter the rate of convective transport in ECS as the resistance to flow across endfeet is far greater than in the gaps surrounding them; and (c) diffusion (without convection) in the ECS is adequate to account for experimental transport studies in brain parenchyma. Therefore, our modeling results do not support a physiologically important role for local parenchymal convective flow in solute transport through brain ECS. © 2016 Jin et al.

  17. Mantle Convection on Modern Supercomputers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weismüller, J.; Gmeiner, B.; Huber, M.; John, L.; Mohr, M.; Rüde, U.; Wohlmuth, B.; Bunge, H. P.

    2015-12-01

    Mantle convection is the cause for plate tectonics, the formation of mountains and oceans, and the main driving mechanism behind earthquakes. The convection process is modeled by a system of partial differential equations describing the conservation of mass, momentum and energy. Characteristic to mantle flow is the vast disparity of length scales from global to microscopic, turning mantle convection simulations into a challenging application for high-performance computing. As system size and technical complexity of the simulations continue to increase, design and implementation of simulation models for next generation large-scale architectures is handled successfully only in an interdisciplinary context. A new priority program - named SPPEXA - by the German Research Foundation (DFG) addresses this issue, and brings together computer scientists, mathematicians and application scientists around grand challenges in HPC. Here we report from the TERRA-NEO project, which is part of the high visibility SPPEXA program, and a joint effort of four research groups. TERRA-NEO develops algorithms for future HPC infrastructures, focusing on high computational efficiency and resilience in next generation mantle convection models. We present software that can resolve the Earth's mantle with up to 1012 grid points and scales efficiently to massively parallel hardware with more than 50,000 processors. We use our simulations to explore the dynamic regime of mantle convection and assess the impact of small scale processes on global mantle flow.

  18. Turbulence modeling of natural convection in enclosures: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Seok Ki; Kim, Seong O

    2012-01-01

    In this paper a review of recent developments of turbulence models for natural convection in enclosures is presented. The emphasis is placed on the effect of the treatments of Reynolds stress and turbulent heat flux on the stability and accuracy of the solution for natural convection in enclosures. The turbulence models considered in the preset study are the two-layer k -ε model, the shear stress transport (SST) model, the elliptic-relaxation (V2-f) model and the elliptic-blending second-moment closure (EBM). Three different treatments of the turbulent heat flux are the generalized gradient diffusion hypothesis (GGDH), the algebraic flux model (AFM) and the differential flux model (DFM). The mathematical formulation of the above turbulence models and their solution method are presented. Evaluation of turbulence models are performed for turbulent natural convection in a 1:5 rectangular cavity ( Ra = 4.3x10 10 ) and in a square cavity with conducting top and bottom walls ( Ra =1.58x10 9 ) and the Rayleigh-Benard convection ( Ra = 2x10 6 ∼ Ra =10 9 ). The relative performances of turbulence models are examined and their successes and shortcomings are addressed

  19. Diffusion of Zonal Variables Using Node-Centered Diffusion Solver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, T B

    2007-08-06

    Tom Kaiser [1] has done some preliminary work to use the node-centered diffusion solver (originally developed by T. Palmer [2]) in Kull for diffusion of zonal variables such as electron temperature. To avoid numerical diffusion, Tom used a scheme developed by Shestakov et al. [3] and found their scheme could, in the vicinity of steep gradients, decouple nearest-neighbor zonal sub-meshes leading to 'alternating-zone' (red-black mode) errors. Tom extended their scheme to couple the sub-meshes with appropriate chosen artificial diffusion and thereby solved the 'alternating-zone' problem. Because the choice of the artificial diffusion coefficient could be very delicate, it is desirable to use a scheme that does not require the artificial diffusion but still able to avoid both numerical diffusion and the 'alternating-zone' problem. In this document we present such a scheme.

  20. Assessing Intraseasonal Variability Produced by Several Deep Convection Schemes in the NCAR CCM3.6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, E. D.

    2001-05-01

    The Hack, Zhang/McFarlane, and McRAS convection schemes produce very different simulations of intraseasonal variability in the NCAR CCM3.6. A robust analysis of simulation performance requires an expanded set of diagnostics. The use of only one criterion to analyze model Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO) variability, such as equatorial zonal wind variability, may give a misleading impression of model performance. Schemes that produce strong variability in zonal winds may sometimes lack a corresponding coherent signal in precipitation, suggesting that model convection and the large-scale circulation are not as strongly coupled as observed. The McRAS scheme, which includes a parametrization of unsaturated convective downdrafts, produces the best simulation of intraseasonal variability of the three schemes used. Downdrafts in McRAS create a moister equatorial troposphere, which increases equatorial convection. Composite analysis indicates a strong dependence of model intraseasonal variability on the frictional convergence mechanism, which may also be important in nature. The McRAS simulation has limitations, however. Indian Ocean variability is weak, and anomalous convection extends too far east across the Pacific. The dependence of convection on surface friction is too strong, and causes enhanced MJO convection to be associated with low-level easterly wind perturbations, unlike observed MJO convection. Anomalous vertical advection associated with surface convergence influences model convection by moistening the lower troposphere. Based on the work of Hendon (2000), coupling to an interactive ocean is unlikely to change the performance of the CCM3 with McRAS, due to the phase relationship between anomalous convection and zonal winds. Use of the analysis tools presented here indicates areas for improvement in the parametrization of deep convection by atmospheric GCMs.

  1. Global anthropogenic aerosol effects on convective clouds in ECHAM5-HAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Lohmann

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Aerosols affect the climate system by changing cloud characteristics in many ways. They act as cloud condensation and ice nuclei and may have an influence on the hydrological cycle. Here we investigate aerosol effects on convective clouds by extending the double-moment cloud microphysics scheme developed for stratiform clouds, which is coupled to the HAM double-moment aerosol scheme, to convective clouds in the ECHAM5 general circulation model. This enables us to investigate whether more, and smaller cloud droplets suppress the warm rain formation in the lower parts of convective clouds and thus release more latent heat upon freezing, which would then result in more vigorous convection and more precipitation. In ECHAM5, including aerosol effects in large-scale and convective clouds (simulation ECHAM5-conv reduces the sensitivity of the liquid water path increase with increasing aerosol optical depth in better agreement with observations and large-eddy simulation studies. In simulation ECHAM5-conv with increases in greenhouse gas and aerosol emissions since pre-industrial times, the geographical distribution of the changes in precipitation better matches the observed increase in precipitation than neglecting microphysics in convective clouds. In this simulation the convective precipitation increases the most suggesting that the convection has indeed become more vigorous.

  2. Convection in a volcanic conduit recorded by bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Rebecca J.; Manga, Michael; Degruyter, Wim; Gonnermann, Helge M.; Swanson, Donald; Houghton, Bruce F.; Orr, Tim R.; Patrick, Matthew R.

    2013-01-01

    Microtextures of juvenile pyroclasts from Kīlauea’s (Hawai‘i) early A.D. 2008 explosive activity record the velocity and depth of convection within the basaltic magma-filled conduit. We use X-ray microtomography (μXRT) to document the spatial distribution of bubbles. We find small bubbles (radii from 5 μm to 70 μm) in a halo surrounding larger millimeter-size bubbles. This suggests that dissolved water was enriched around the larger bubbles—the opposite of what is expected if bubbles grow as water diffuses into the bubble. Such volatile enrichment implies that the volatiles within the large bubbles were redissolving into the melt as they descended into the conduit by the downward motion of convecting magma within the lava lake. The thickness of the small bubble halo is ∼100–150 μm, consistent with water diffusing into the melt on time scales on the order of 103 s. Eruptions, triggered by rockfall, rapidly exposed this magma to lower pressures, and the haloes of melt with re-dissolved water became sufficiently supersaturated to cause nucleation of the population of smaller bubbles. The required supersaturation pressures are consistent with a depth of a few hundred meters and convection velocities of the order of 0.1 m s−1, similar to the circulation velocity observed on the surface of the Halema‘uma‘u lava lake.

  3. Convective behaviour in severe accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clement, C.F.

    1988-01-01

    The nature and magnitude of the hazard from radioactivity posed by a possible nuclear accident depend strongly on convective behaviour within and immediately adjacent to the plant in question. This behaviour depends upon the nature of the vapour-gas-aerosol mixture concerned, and can show unusual properties such as 'upside-down' convection in which hot mixtures fall and cold mixtures rise. Predictions and criteria as to the types of behaviour which could possibly occur are summarised. Possible applications to present reactors are considered, and ways in which presently expected convection could be drastically modified are described. In some circumstances these could be used to suppress the radioactive source term or to switch its effect between distant dilute contamination and severe local contamination. (author). 8 refs, 2 figs, 2 tabs

  4. Theory of transformation thermal convection for creeping flow in porous media: Cloaking, concentrating, and camouflage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Gaole; Shang, Jin; Huang, Jiping

    2018-02-01

    Heat can transfer via thermal conduction, thermal radiation, and thermal convection. All the existing theories of transformation thermotics and optics can treat thermal conduction and thermal radiation, respectively. Unfortunately, thermal convection has seldom been touched in transformation theories due to the lack of a suitable theory, thus limiting applications associated with heat transfer through fluids (liquid or gas). Here, we develop a theory of transformation thermal convection by considering the convection-diffusion equation, the equation of continuity, and the Darcy law. By introducing porous media, we get a set of equations keeping their forms under coordinate transformation. As model applications, the theory helps to show the effects of cloaking, concentrating, and camouflage. Our finite-element simulations confirm the theoretical findings. This work offers a transformation theory for thermal convection, thus revealing novel behaviors associated with potential applications; it not only provides different hints on how to control heat transfer by combining thermal conduction, thermal convection, and thermal radiation, but also benefits mass diffusion and other related fields that contain a set of equations and need to transform velocities at the same time.

  5. Topology Optimization for Convection Problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexandersen, Joe

    2011-01-01

    This report deals with the topology optimization of convection problems.That is, the aim of the project is to develop, implement and examine topology optimization of purely thermal and coupled thermomechanical problems,when the design-dependent eects of convection are taken into consideration.......This is done by the use of a self-programmed FORTRAN-code, which builds on an existing 2D-plane thermomechanical nite element code implementing during the course `41525 FEM-Heavy'. The topology optimizationfeatures have been implemented from scratch, and allows the program to optimize elastostatic mechanical...

  6. Experimental methods in natural convection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koster, J.N.

    1982-11-01

    Some common experimental techniques to determine local velocities and to visualize temperature fields in natural convection research are discussed. First the physics and practice of anemometers are discussed with emphasis put on optical anemometers. In the second and third case the physics and practice of the most developed interferometers are discussed; namely differential interferometry for visualization of temperature gradient fields and holographic interferometry for visualization of temperature fields. At the Institut fuer Reaktorbauelemente these three measuring techniques are applied for convection and pipe flow studies. (orig.) [de

  7. CFD modelling of convective heat transfer from a window with adjacent venetian blinds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marjanovic, L. [Belgrade Univ., Belgrade (Yugoslavia). Faculty of Mechanical Engineering]|[DeMontfort Univ. (United Kingdom). Inst. of Energy and Sustainable Development; Cook, M; Hanby, V.; Rees, S. [DeMontfort Univ. (United Kingdom). Inst. of Energy and Sustainable Development

    2005-07-01

    There is a limited amount of 3-dimensional modeling information on the performance of glazing systems with blinds. Two-dimensional flow modeling has indicated that 1-dimensional heat transfer can lead to invalid results where 2- and 3-dimensional effects are present. In this study, a 3-dimensional numerical solution was obtained on the effect of a venetian blind on the conjugate heat transfer from an indoor window glazing system. The solution was obtained for the coupled laminar free convection and radiation heat transfer problem, including conduction along the blind slats. Continuity, momentum and energy equations for buoyant flow were solved using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) software. Grey diffuse radiation exchange between the window, blind and air were considered using the Monte Carlo method. All thermophysical properties of air were assumed to be constant with the exception of density, which was modeled using the Bousinesq approximation. Both winter and summer conditions were considered. In the computational domain, the window represented an isothermal type boundary condition with no slip. The height of the domain was extended beyond the blinds to allow for inflow and outflow regions. Fluid was allowed to entrain into the domain at an ambient temperature in a direction perpendicular to the window. The results indicated that heat transfer between window and indoor air is influenced both quantitatively and qualitatively by the presence of an aluminium venetian blind, and that the cellular flow between the blind slats can have a significant effect on the convective heat transfer from the window surface that is more fully recognized and analyzed in 3 dimensions. refs., 2 tabs., 13 figs.

  8. Consequences of high effective Prandtl number on solar differential rotation and convective velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karak, Bidya Binay; Miesch, Mark; Bekki, Yuto

    2018-04-01

    Observations suggest that the large-scale convective velocities obtained by solar convection simulations might be over-estimated (convective conundrum). One plausible solution to this could be the small-scale dynamo which cannot be fully resolved by global simulations. The small-scale Lorentz force suppresses the convective motions and also the turbulent mixing of entropy between upflows and downflows, leading to a large effective Prandtl number (Pr). We explore this idea in three-dimensional global rotating convection simulations at different thermal conductivity (κ), i.e., at different Pr. In agreement with previous non-rotating simulations, the convective velocity is reduced with the increase of Pr as long as the thermal conductive flux is negligible. A subadiabatic layer is formed near the base of the convection zone due to continuous deposition of low entropy plumes in low-κ simulations. The most interesting result of our low-κ simulations is that the convective motions are accompanied by a change in the convection structure that is increasingly influenced by small-scale plumes. These plumes tend to transport angular momentum radially inward and thus establish an anti-solar differential rotation, in striking contrast to the solar rotation profile. If such low diffusive plumes, driven by the radiative-surface cooling, are present in the Sun, then our results cast doubt on the idea that a high effective Pr may be a viable solution to the solar convective conundrum. Our study also emphasizes that any resolution of the conundrum that relies on the downward plumes must take into account the angular momentum transport and heat transport.

  9. Evaluation of convection-resolving models using satellite data: The diurnal cycle of summer convection over the Alps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Keller

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Diurnal moist convection is an important element of summer precipitation over Central Europe and the Alps. It is poorly represented in models using parameterized convection. In this study, we investigate the diurnal cycle of convection during 11 days in June 2007 using the COSMO model. The numerical simulations are compared with satellite measurements of GERB and SEVIRI, AVHRR satellite-based cloud properties and ground-based precipitation and temperature measurements. The simulations use horizontal resolutions of 12 km (convection-parameterizing model, CPM and 2 km (convection-resolving model, CRM and either a one-moment microphysics scheme (1M or a two-moment microphysics scheme (2M.They are conducted for a computational domain that covers an extended Alpine area from Northern Italy to Northern Germany. The CPM with 1M exhibits a significant overestimation of high cloud cover. This results in a compensation effect in the top of the atmosphere energy budget due to an underestimation of outgoing longwave radiation (OLR and an overestimation of reflected solar radiation (RSR. The CRM reduces high cloud cover and improves the OLR bias from a domain mean of −20.1 to −2.6 W/m2. When using 2M with ice sedimentation in the CRM, high cloud cover is further reduced. The stronger diurnal cycle of high cloud cover and associated convection over the Alps, compared to less mountainous regions, is well represented by the CRM but underestimated by the CPM. Despite substantial differences in high cloud cover, the use of a 2M has no significant impact on the diurnal cycle of precipitation. Furthermore, a negative mid-level cloud bias is found for all simulations.

  10. Determination of drying kinetics and convective heat transfer coefficients of ginger slices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpinar, Ebru Kavak; Toraman, Seda

    2016-10-01

    In the present work, the effects of some parametric values on convective heat transfer coefficients and the thin layer drying process of ginger slices were investigated. Drying was done in the laboratory by using cyclone type convective dryer. The drying air temperature was varied as 40, 50, 60 and 70 °C and the air velocity is 0.8, 1.5 and 3 m/s. All drying experiments had only falling rate period. The drying data were fitted to the twelve mathematical models and performance of these models was investigated by comparing the determination of coefficient ( R 2), reduced Chi-square ( χ 2) and root mean square error between the observed and predicted moisture ratios. The effective moisture diffusivity and activation energy were calculated using an infinite series solution of Fick's diffusion equation. The average effective moisture diffusivity values and activation energy values varied from 2.807 × 10-10 to 6.977 × 10-10 m2/s and 19.313-22.722 kJ/mol over the drying air temperature and velocity range, respectively. Experimental data was used to evaluate the values of constants in Nusselt number expression by using linear regression analysis and consequently, convective heat transfer coefficients were determined in forced convection mode. Convective heat transfer coefficient of ginger slices showed changes in ranges 0.33-2.11 W/m2 °C.

  11. A Generalized Evolution Criterion in Nonequilibrium Convective Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichiyanagi, Masakazu; Nisizima, Kunisuke

    1989-04-01

    A general evolution criterion, applicable to transport processes such as the conduction of heat and mass diffusion, is obtained as a direct version of the Le Chatelier-Braun principle for stationary states. The present theory is not based on any radical departure from the conventional one. The generalized theory is made determinate by proposing the balance equations for extensive thermodynamic variables which will reflect the character of convective systems under the assumption of local equilibrium. As a consequence of the introduction of source terms in the balance equations, there appear additional terms in the expression of the local entropy production, which are bilinear in terms of the intensive variables and the sources. In the present paper, we show that we can construct a dissipation function for such general cases, in which the premises of the Glansdorff-Prigogine theory are accumulated. The new dissipation function permits us to formulate a generalized evolution criterion for convective systems.

  12. Edge plasma density convection during ICRH on Tore Supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becoulet, M.; Colas, L.; Gunn, J.; Ghendrih, Ph.; Becoulet, A.; Pecoul, S.; Heuraux, S.

    2001-11-01

    The 2D edge plasma density distribution around ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) antennae is studied experimentally and numerically in the tokamak Tore Supra (TS). A local density decrease in front of the loaded ICRH antenna ('pump-out' effect) is demonstrated by Langmuir probe measurements in a low recycling regime. An up-down asymmetry in the heat-flux and in the antenna erosion is also observed, and is associated with poloidal variations of the local density. These density redistributions are ascribed to an ExB convection process linked with RF-sheaths. To assess this interpretation, the 2D transport code CELLS was developed for modeling the density distribution near an antenna. The code takes into account perpendicular diffusion, parallel transport and convection in RF-sheath-driven potentials given by the 3D-antenna code ICANT. The strong density differences obtained in simulations reproduce up-down asymmetries of the heat fluxes. (authors)

  13. Natural convection and dispersion in a tilted fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, A.W.; Linz, S.J.

    1992-01-01

    In many geophysical situations, fluid is contained in long narrow fractures embedded within an impermeable medium of different thermal conductivity; and there may be a uniform vertical temperature gradient imposed upon the system. We show that whenever the slot is tilted to the vertical, convection develops in the fluid, even if the background temperature increases with height. Using typical values for the physical properties of a water-filled fracture, we show that the Earth's geothermal gradient produces a convective flow in a fracture; this has an associated dispersion coefficient D T ∼10 2 -10 3 D in fractures about a centimetre wide. We show that this shear dispersion could transport radioactive material, of half-life 10 4 years, tens of metres along the fracture within one half-life; without this dispersion, the material would only diffuse a few metres along the fracture within one half-life. (author)

  14. Edge plasma density convection during ICRH on Tore Supra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becoulet, M.; Colas, L.; Gunn, J.; Ghendrih, Ph.; Becoulet, A. [Association Euratom-CEA Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee; Pecoul, S.; Heuraux, S. [Nancy-1 Univ., 54 (France). Lab. de Physique des Milieux Ionises

    2001-11-01

    The 2D edge plasma density distribution around ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) antennae is studied experimentally and numerically in the tokamak Tore Supra (TS). A local density decrease in front of the loaded ICRH antenna ('pump-out' effect) is demonstrated by Langmuir probe measurements in a low recycling regime. An up-down asymmetry in the heat-flux and in the antenna erosion is also observed, and is associated with poloidal variations of the local density. These density redistributions are ascribed to an ExB convection process linked with RF-sheaths. To assess this interpretation, the 2D transport code CELLS was developed for modeling the density distribution near an antenna. The code takes into account perpendicular diffusion, parallel transport and convection in RF-sheath-driven potentials given by the 3D-antenna code ICANT. The strong density differences obtained in simulations reproduce up-down asymmetries of the heat fluxes. (authors)

  15. Model of two-temperature convective transfer in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruais, Isabelle; Poliševski, Dan

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, we study the asymptotic behaviour of the solution of a convective heat transfer boundary problem in an ɛ -periodic domain which consists of two interwoven phases, solid and fluid, separated by an interface. The fluid flow and its dependence with respect to the temperature are governed by the Boussinesq approximation of the Stokes equations. The tensors of thermal diffusion of both phases are ɛ -periodic, as well as the heat transfer coefficient which is used to describe the first-order jump condition on the interface. We find by homogenization that the two-scale limits of the solutions verify the most common system used to describe local thermal non-equilibrium phenomena in porous media (see Nield and Bejan in Convection in porous media, Springer, New York, 1999; Rees and Pop in Transport phenomena in porous media III, Elsevier, Oxford, 2005). Since now, this system was justified only by volume averaging arguments.

  16. Segregation and convection in dendritic alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirier, D. R.

    1990-01-01

    Microsegregation in dentritic alloys is discussed, including solidification with and without thermal gradient, the convection of interdendritic liquid. The conservation of momentum, energy, and solute is considered. Directional solidification and thermosolutal convection are discussed.

  17. ULTRA-SHARP nonoscillatory convection schemes for high-speed steady multidimensional flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, B. P.; Mokhtari, Simin

    1990-01-01

    For convection-dominated flows, classical second-order methods are notoriously oscillatory and often unstable. For this reason, many computational fluid dynamicists have adopted various forms of (inherently stable) first-order upwinding over the past few decades. Although it is now well known that first-order convection schemes suffer from serious inaccuracies attributable to artificial viscosity or numerical diffusion under high convection conditions, these methods continue to enjoy widespread popularity for numerical heat transfer calculations, apparently due to a perceived lack of viable high accuracy alternatives. But alternatives are available. For example, nonoscillatory methods used in gasdynamics, including currently popular TVD schemes, can be easily adapted to multidimensional incompressible flow and convective transport. This, in itself, would be a major advance for numerical convective heat transfer, for example. But, as is shown, second-order TVD schemes form only a small, overly restrictive, subclass of a much more universal, and extremely simple, nonoscillatory flux-limiting strategy which can be applied to convection schemes of arbitrarily high order accuracy, while requiring only a simple tridiagonal ADI line-solver, as used in the majority of general purpose iterative codes for incompressible flow and numerical heat transfer. The new universal limiter and associated solution procedures form the so-called ULTRA-SHARP alternative for high resolution nonoscillatory multidimensional steady state high speed convective modelling.

  18. Modeling the diffusion of scientific publications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Fok (Dennis); Ph.H.B.F. Franses (Philip Hans)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractThis paper illustrates that salient features of a panel of time series of annual citations can be captured by a Bass type diffusion model. We put forward an extended version of this diffusion model, where we consider the relation between key characteristics of the diffusion process and

  19. On the Role of Convection and Turbulence for Tropospheric Ozone and its Precursors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olivie, D.J.L.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the work in this thesis is to investigate the convective and diffusive transport in the TM chemistry transport model, and to investigate some aspects of the consequences for NOx. The large inaccuracy and uncertainty in the description of processes like convection and turbulent diffusion, the strong dependence of the radiative forcing of ozone on its vertical distribution, and the strong dependence of the ozone production on the distribution of NOx, are the main motivation. The availability of the ERA-40 data, where convective data and vertical diffusion coefficients are archived, allows a study of the effect of different convective mass flux sets, and different vertical diffusion coefficients on the model-simulated distribution of tracers. In this thesis the following questions are addressed : (1) How large is the sensitivity of the (model simulated) distribution of ozone and nitrogen oxides on (the) convection (parameterisation)?; (2) What requirements should be fulfilled by diffusive transport parameterisations in order to simulate the diurnal cycle in trace gas concentrations?; (3) How large are the differences in concentrations between simulations with archived and off-line diagnosed physical parameterisations?; (4) How do the results of different parameterisations of nitrogen oxide production by lightning compare?; (5) What is the effect of an explicit description of the effect of convective redistribution on the vertical distribution of lightning produced NOx? In Chapter 2, the first question and part of the third question are addressed. Because convection can bring reactive trace gases to the upper troposphere where they can live longer, and possibly are transported to remote regions, it is important to well describe the convective transport. The archival of convective mass fluxes in the ERA-40 data set allows us to drive the convective transport in the TM model. We compare these archived fluxes with the standard off-line diagnosed fluxes used in

  20. Energy and variance budgets of a diffusive staircase with implications for heat flux scaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hieronymus, M.; Carpenter, J. R.

    2016-02-01

    Diffusive convection, the mode of double-diffusive convection that occur when both temperature and salinity increase with increasing depth, is commonplace throughout the high latitude oceans and diffusive staircases constitute an important heat transport process in the Arctic Ocean. Heat and buoyancy fluxes through these staircases are often estimated using flux laws deduced either from laboratory experiments, or from simplified energy or variance budgets. We have done direct numerical simulations of double-diffusive convection at a range of Rayleigh numbers and quantified the energy and variance budgets in detail. This allows us to compare the fluxes in our simulations to those derived using known flux laws and to quantify how well the simplified energy and variance budgets approximate the full budgets. The fluxes are found to agree well with earlier estimates at high Rayleigh numbers, but we find large deviations at low Rayleigh numbers. The close ties between the heat and buoyancy fluxes and the budgets of thermal variance and energy have been utilized to derive heat flux scaling laws in the field of thermal convection. The result is the so called GL-theory, which has been found to give accurate heat flux scaling laws in a very wide parameter range. Diffusive convection has many similarities to thermal convection and an extension of the GL-theory to diffusive convection is also presented and its predictions are compared to the results from our numerical simulations.

  1. Computational simulation of turbulent natural convection in a corium pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, Camila B.; Su, Jian; Niceno, Bojan

    2013-01-01

    After a severe accident in a nuclear power plant, the total thermal loading on the vessel of a nuclear reactor is controlled by the convective heat transfer. Taking that fact into account, this work aimed to analyze the turbulent natural convection inside a representative lower head cavity. By means of an open-source CFD code, OpenFOAM (Open Field Operation and Manipulation), numerical simulations were performed to investigate a volumetrically heated fluid (Pr = 7.0) at internal Rayleigh (Ra) numbers ranging from 10 8 to 10 15 . Bearing in mind that severe accident scenario and the physical-chemical effects are many and complex, the fluid analyzed was considered Newtonian, with constant physical properties, homogeneous and single phase. Even working with that simplifications, the modeling of turbulent natural convection has posed a considerable challenge for the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations based models, not only because of the complete unsteadiness of the flow and the strong turbulence effects in the near wall regions, but also because of the correct treatment of the turbulent heat fluxes (θu i ). So, this work outlined three approaches for treating the turbulent heat fluxes: the Simple Gradient Diffusion Hypothesis (SGDH), the Generalized Gradient Diffusion Hypothesis (GGDH) and the Algebraic Flux Model (AFM). Simulations performed at BALI test based geometry with a four equations model, k-ε-v 2 -f (commonly called as v 2 -f and V2-f), showed that despite of AFM and GGDH have provided reasonable agreement with experimental data for turbulent natural convection in a differentially heated cavity, they proved to be very unstable for buoyancy-driven flows with internal source in comparison to SGDH model. (author)

  2. Computational simulation of turbulent natural convection in a corium pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira, Camila B.; Su, Jian, E-mail: camila@lasme.coppe.ufrj.br, E-mail: sujian@lasme.coppe.ufrj.br [Coordenacao dos Cursos de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear; Niceno, Bojan, E-mail: bojan.niceno@psi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland). Nuclear Energy and Safety

    2013-07-01

    After a severe accident in a nuclear power plant, the total thermal loading on the vessel of a nuclear reactor is controlled by the convective heat transfer. Taking that fact into account, this work aimed to analyze the turbulent natural convection inside a representative lower head cavity. By means of an open-source CFD code, OpenFOAM (Open Field Operation and Manipulation), numerical simulations were performed to investigate a volumetrically heated fluid (Pr = 7.0) at internal Rayleigh (Ra) numbers ranging from 10{sup 8} to 10{sup 15}. Bearing in mind that severe accident scenario and the physical-chemical effects are many and complex, the fluid analyzed was considered Newtonian, with constant physical properties, homogeneous and single phase. Even working with that simplifications, the modeling of turbulent natural convection has posed a considerable challenge for the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations based models, not only because of the complete unsteadiness of the flow and the strong turbulence effects in the near wall regions, but also because of the correct treatment of the turbulent heat fluxes (θu{sub i}). So, this work outlined three approaches for treating the turbulent heat fluxes: the Simple Gradient Diffusion Hypothesis (SGDH), the Generalized Gradient Diffusion Hypothesis (GGDH) and the Algebraic Flux Model (AFM). Simulations performed at BALI test based geometry with a four equations model, k-ε-v{sup 2} -f (commonly called as v{sup 2}-f and V2-f), showed that despite of AFM and GGDH have provided reasonable agreement with experimental data for turbulent natural convection in a differentially heated cavity, they proved to be very unstable for buoyancy-driven flows with internal source in comparison to SGDH model. (author)

  3. Towards the ultimate variance-conserving convection scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Os, J.J.A.M. van; Uittenbogaard, R.E.

    2004-01-01

    In the past various arguments have been used for applying kinetic energy-conserving advection schemes in numerical simulations of incompressible fluid flows. One argument is obeying the programmed dissipation by viscous stresses or by sub-grid stresses in Direct Numerical Simulation and Large Eddy Simulation, see e.g. [Phys. Fluids A 3 (7) (1991) 1766]. Another argument is that, according to e.g. [J. Comput. Phys. 6 (1970) 392; 1 (1966) 119], energy-conserving convection schemes are more stable i.e. by prohibiting a spurious blow-up of volume-integrated energy in a closed volume without external energy sources. In the above-mentioned references it is stated that nonlinear instability is due to spatial truncation rather than to time truncation and therefore these papers are mainly concerned with the spatial integration. In this paper we demonstrate that discretized temporal integration of a spatially variance-conserving convection scheme can induce non-energy conserving solutions. In this paper the conservation of the variance of a scalar property is taken as a simple model for the conservation of kinetic energy. In addition, the derivation and testing of a variance-conserving scheme allows for a clear definition of kinetic energy-conserving advection schemes for solving the Navier-Stokes equations. Consequently, we first derive and test a strictly variance-conserving space-time discretization for the convection term in the convection-diffusion equation. Our starting point is the variance-conserving spatial discretization of the convection operator presented by Piacsek and Williams [J. Comput. Phys. 6 (1970) 392]. In terms of its conservation properties, our variance-conserving scheme is compared to other spatially variance-conserving schemes as well as with the non-variance-conserving schemes applied in our shallow-water solver, see e.g. [Direct and Large-eddy Simulation Workshop IV, ERCOFTAC Series, Kluwer Academic Publishers, 2001, pp. 409-287

  4. A stochastic parameterization for deep convection using cellular automata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengtsson, L.; Steinheimer, M.; Bechtold, P.; Geleyn, J.

    2012-12-01

    large-scale variables in regions where convective activity is large. A two month extended evaluation of the deterministic behaviour of the scheme indicate a neutral impact on forecast skill. References: Bengtsson, L., H. Körnich, E. Källén, and G. Svensson, 2011: Large-scale dynamical response to sub-grid scale organization provided by cellular automata. Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, 68, 3132-3144. Frenkel, Y., A. Majda, and B. Khouider, 2011: Using the stochastic multicloud model to improve tropical convective parameterization: A paradigm example. Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, doi: 10.1175/JAS-D-11-0148.1. Huang, X.-Y., 1988: The organization of moist convection by internal 365 gravity waves. Tellus A, 42, 270-285. Khouider, B., J. Biello, and A. Majda, 2010: A Stochastic Multicloud Model for Tropical Convection. Comm. Math. Sci., 8, 187-216. Palmer, T., 2011: Towards the Probabilistic Earth-System Simulator: A Vision for the Future of Climate and Weather Prediction. Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society 138 (2012) 841-861 Plant, R. and G. Craig, 2008: A stochastic parameterization for deep convection based on equilibrium statistics. J. Atmos. Sci., 65, 87-105.

  5. Prandtl-number Effects in High-Rayleigh-number Spherical Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orvedahl, Ryan J.; Calkins, Michael A.; Featherstone, Nicholas A.; Hindman, Bradley W.

    2018-03-01

    Convection is the predominant mechanism by which energy and angular momentum are transported in the outer portion of the Sun. The resulting overturning motions are also the primary energy source for the solar magnetic field. An accurate solar dynamo model therefore requires a complete description of the convective motions, but these motions remain poorly understood. Studying stellar convection numerically remains challenging; it occurs within a parameter regime that is extreme by computational standards. The fluid properties of the convection zone are characterized in part by the Prandtl number \\Pr = ν/κ, where ν is the kinematic viscosity and κ is the thermal diffusion; in stars, \\Pr is extremely low, \\Pr ≈ 10‑7. The influence of \\Pr on the convective motions at the heart of the dynamo is not well understood since most numerical studies are limited to using \\Pr ≈ 1. We systematically vary \\Pr and the degree of thermal forcing, characterized through a Rayleigh number, to explore its influence on the convective dynamics. For sufficiently large thermal driving, the simulations reach a so-called convective free-fall state where diffusion no longer plays an important role in the interior dynamics. Simulations with a lower \\Pr generate faster convective flows and broader ranges of scales for equivalent levels of thermal forcing. Characteristics of the spectral distribution of the velocity remain largely insensitive to changes in \\Pr . Importantly, we find that \\Pr plays a key role in determining when the free-fall regime is reached by controlling the thickness of the thermal boundary layer.

  6. Galilean invariant lattice Boltzmann scheme for natural convection on square and rectangular lattices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sman, van der R.G.M.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we present lattice Boltzmann (LB) schemes for convection diffusion coupled to fluid flow on two-dimensional rectangular lattices. Via inverse Chapman-Enskog analysis of LB schemes including source terms, we show that for consistency with physics it is required that the moments of the

  7. Three-dimensional doubly diffusive convectons: instability and transition to complex dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knobloch, Edgar; Beaume, Cedric; Bergeon, Alain

    2017-11-01

    Doubly diffusive convection in a closed vertically extended 3D container driven by competing horizontal temperature and concentration gradients is studied. No-slip boundary conditions are imposed. The buoyancy number N = - 1 to ensure the presence of a conduction state. The primary instability is subcritical and generates two families of spatially localised steady states known as convectons. The convectons bifurcate directly from the conduction state and are organized in a pair of primary branches that snake within a well-defined range of Rayleigh numbers as the convectons grow in length. Secondary instabilities generating twist result in secondary snaking branches of twisted convectons. These destabilize the primary convectons and are responsible for the absence of stable steady states, localized or otherwise, in the subcritical regime. As a result, once the Rayleigh number for the primary instability of the conduction state is exceeded, the system exhibits an abrupt transition to large amplitude spatio-temporal chaos that arises whenever the twist instability leading to collapse is faster than the nucleation time for new rolls. These numerical results are confirmed by determining the stability properties of all convecton states as well as spatially extended convection. Supported in part by the National Science Foundation under Grant DMS-1613132.

  8. Nonlinear equilibrium in Tokamaks including convective terms and viscosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, P.; Castro, E.; Puerta, J.

    2003-01-01

    MHD equilibrium in tokamaks becomes very complex, when the non-linear convective term and viscosity are included in the momentum equation. In order to simplify the analysis, each new term has been separated in type gradient terms and vorticity depending terms. For the special case in which the vorticity vanishes, an extended Grad-Shafranov type equation can be obtained. However now the magnetic surface is not isobars or current surfaces as in the usual Grad-Shafranov treatment. The non-linear convective terms introduces gradient of Bernoulli type kinetic terms . Montgomery and other authors have shown the importance of the viscosity terms in tokamaks [1,2], here the treatment is carried out for the equilibrium condition, including generalized tokamaks coordinates recently described [3], which simplify the equilibrium analysis. Calculation of the new isobar surfaces is difficult and some computation have been carried out elsewhere for some particular cases [3]. Here, our analysis is extended discussing how the toroidal current density, plasma pressure and toroidal field are modified across the midplane because of the new terms (convective and viscous). New calculations and computations are also presented. (Author)

  9. A transilient matrix for moist convection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romps, D.; Kuang, Z.

    2011-08-15

    A method is introduced for diagnosing a transilient matrix for moist convection. This transilient matrix quantifies the nonlocal transport of air by convective eddies: for every height z, it gives the distribution of starting heights z{prime} for the eddies that arrive at z. In a cloud-resolving simulation of deep convection, the transilient matrix shows that two-thirds of the subcloud air convecting into the free troposphere originates from within 100 m of the surface. This finding clarifies which initial height to use when calculating convective available potential energy from soundings of the tropical troposphere.

  10. Land surface sensitivity of mesoscale convective systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tournay, Robert C.

    Mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) are important contributors to the hydrologic cycle in many regions of the world as well as major sources of severe weather. MCSs continue to challenge forecasters and researchers alike, arising from difficulties in understanding system initiation, propagation, and demise. One distinct type of MCS is that formed from individual convective cells initiated primarily by daytime heating over high terrain. This work is aimed at improving our understanding of the land surface sensitivity of this class of MCS in the contiguous United States. First, a climatology of mesoscale convective systems originating in the Rocky Mountains and adjacent high plains from Wyoming southward to New Mexico is developed through a combination of objective and subjective methods. This class of MCS is most important, in terms of total warm season precipitation, in the 500 to 1300m elevations of the Great Plains (GP) to the east in eastern Colorado to central Nebraska and northwest Kansas. Examining MCSs by longevity, short lasting MCSs (15 hrs) reveals that longer lasting systems tend to form further south and have a longer track with a more southerly track. The environment into which the MCS is moving showed differences across commonly used variables in convection forecasting, with some variables showing more favorable conditions throughout (convective inhibition, 0-6 km shear and 250 hPa wind speed) ahead of longer lasting MCSs. Other variables, such as convective available potential energy, showed improving conditions through time for longer lasting MCSs. Some variables showed no difference across longevity of MCS (precipitable water and large-scale vertical motion). From subsets of this MCS climatology, three regions of origin were chosen based on the presence of ridgelines extending eastward from the Rocky Mountains known to be foci for convection initiation and subsequent MCS formation: Southern Wyoming (Cheyenne Ridge), Colorado (Palmer divide) and

  11. Passing to the limit in a Wasserstein gradient flow : from diffusion to reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arnrich, S.; Mielke, A.; Peletier, M.A.; Savaré, G.; Veneroni, M.

    2012-01-01

    We study a singular-limit problem arising in the modelling of chemical reactions. At finite e > 0, the system is described by a Fokker-Planck convection-diffusion equation with a double-well convection potential. This potential is scaled by 1 / e and in the limit e --> 0, the solution concentrates

  12. Evidence for Gravity Wave Seeding of Convective Ionosphere Storms Initiated by Deep Troposphere Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, M. C.; Pfaff, R. F., Jr.; Dao, E. V.; Holzworth, R. H., II

    2014-12-01

    With the increase in solar activity, the Communications/Outage Forecast System satellite (C/NOFS) now goes below the F peak. As such, we now can study the development of Convective Ionospheric Storms (CIS) and, most importantly, large-scale seeding of the low growth-rate Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) instability. Two mechanisms have been suggested for such seeding: the Collisional Kelvin-Helmholtz Instability (CKHI) and internal atmospheric gravity waves. A number of observations have shown that the spectrum of fully developed topside structures peaks at 600 km and extends to over 1000 km. These structures are exceedingly difficult to explain by CKHI. Here we show that sinusoidal plasma oscillations on the bottomside during daytime develop classical R-T structures on the nightside with the background 600 km structure still apparent. In two case studies, thunderstorm activity was observed east of the sinusoidal features in the two hours preceding the C/NOFS passes. Thus, we argue that convective tropospheric storms are a likely source of these sinusoidal features.

  13. Computations for nanofluid flow near a stretchable rotating disk with axial magnetic field and convective conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushtaq, A.; Mustafa, M.

    In this paper, the classical Von Kármán problem of infinite disk is extended when an electrically conducting nanofluid fills the space above the rotating disk which also stretches uniformly in the radial direction. Buongiorno model is considered in order to incorporate the novel Brownian motion and thermophoresis effects. Heat transport mechanism is modeled through more practically feasible convective conditions while Neumann type condition for nanoparticle concentration is adopted. Modified Von Kármán transformations are utilized to obtain self-similar differential system which is treated through a numerical method. Stretching phenomenon yields an additional parameter c which compares the stretch rate with the swirl rate. The effect of parameter c is to reduce the temperature and nanoparticle concentration profiles. Torque required to main steady rotation of the disk increases for increasing values of c while an improvement in cooling rate is anticipated in case of radial stretching, which is important in engineering processes. Brownian diffusion does not influence the heat flux from the stretching wall. Moreover, the wall heat flux has the maximum value for the situation in which thermoporetic force is absent.

  14. Ten Year Analysis of Tropopause-Overshooting Convection Using GridRad Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooney, John W.; Bowman, Kenneth P.; Homeyer, Cameron R.; Fenske, Tyler M.

    2018-01-01

    Convection that penetrates the tropopause (overshooting convection) rapidly transports air from the lower troposphere to the lower stratosphere, potentially mixing air between the two layers. This exchange of air can have a substantial impact on the composition, radiation, and chemistry of the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS). In order to improve our understanding of the role convection plays in the transport of trace gases across the tropopause, this study presents a 10 year analysis of overshooting convection for the eastern two thirds of the contiguous United States for March through August of 2004 to 2013 based on radar observations. Echo top altitudes are estimated at hourly intervals using high-resolution, three-dimensional, gridded, radar reflectivity fields created by merging observations from available radars in the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Next Generation Weather Radar (NEXRAD) network. Overshooting convection is identified by comparing echo top altitudes with tropopause altitudes derived from the ERA-Interim reanalysis. It is found that overshooting convection is most common in the central United States, with a weak secondary maximum along the southeast coast. The maximum number of overshooting events occur consistently between 2200 and 0200 UTC. Most overshooting events occur in May, June, and July when convection is deepest and the tropopause altitude is relatively low. Approximately 45% of the analyzed overshooting events (those with echo tops at least 1 km above the tropopause) have echo tops extending above the 380 K level into the stratospheric overworld.

  15. Convective aggregation in realistic convective-scale simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Christopher E.

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the real-world relevance of idealized-model convective self-aggregation, five 15 day cases of real organized convection in the tropics are simulated. These include multiple simulations of each case to test sensitivities of the convective organization and mean states to interactive radiation, interactive surface fluxes, and evaporation of rain. These simulations are compared to self-aggregation seen in the same model configured to run in idealized radiative-convective equilibrium. Analysis of the budget of the spatial variance of column-integrated frozen moist static energy shows that control runs have significant positive contributions to organization from radiation and negative contributions from surface fluxes and transport, similar to idealized runs once they become aggregated. Despite identical lateral boundary conditions for all experiments in each case, systematic differences in mean column water vapor (CWV), CWV distribution shape, and CWV autocorrelation length scale are found between the different sensitivity runs, particularly for those without interactive radiation, showing that there are at least some similarities in sensitivities to these feedbacks in both idealized and realistic simulations (although the organization of precipitation shows less sensitivity to interactive radiation). The magnitudes and signs of these systematic differences are consistent with a rough equilibrium between (1) equalization due to advection from the lateral boundaries and (2) disaggregation due to the absence of interactive radiation, implying disaggregation rates comparable to those in idealized runs with aggregated initial conditions and noninteractive radiation. This points to a plausible similarity in the way that radiation feedbacks maintain aggregated convection in both idealized simulations and the real world.Plain Language SummaryUnderstanding the processes that lead to the organization of tropical rainstorms is an important challenge for weather

  16. Conservative diffusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlen, E.A.

    1984-01-01

    In Nelson's stochastic mechanics, quantum phenomena are described in terms of diffusions instead of wave functions. These diffusions are formally given by stochastic differential equations with extremely singular coefficients. Using PDE methods, we prove the existence of solutions. This reult provides a rigorous basis for stochastic mechanics. (orig.)

  17. Remote sensing of severe convective storms over Qinghai-Xizang Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, R. J.; Liu, J. M.; Tsao, D. Y.; Smith, R. E.

    1984-01-01

    The American satellite, GOES-1 was moved to the Indian Ocean at 58 deg E during the First GARP Global Experiment (FGGE). The Qinghai-Xizang Plateau significantly affects the initiation and development of heavy rainfall and severe storms in China, just as the Rocky Mountains influence the local storms in the United States. Satelite remote sensing of short-lived, meso-scale convective storms is particularly important for covering a huge area of a high elevation with a low population density, such as the Qinghai-Xizang Plateau. Results of this study show that a high growth rate of the convective clouds, followed by a rapid collapse of the cloud top, is associated with heavy rainfall in the area. The tops of the convective clouds developed over the Plateau lie between the altitudes of the two tropopauses, while the tops of convective clouds associated with severe storms in the United States usually extend much above the tropopause.

  18. The excitation of solar-like oscillations in a δ Sct star by efficient envelope convection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antoci, V.; Handler, G.; Kallinger, T.

    2011-01-01

    Delta Scuti (δSct) stars are opacity-driven pulsators with masses of 1.5-2.5Msolar, their pulsations resulting from the varying ionization of helium. In less massive stars such as the Sun, convection transports mass and energy through the outer 30per cent of the star and excites a rich spectrum...... of resonant acoustic modes. Based on the solar example, with no firm theoretical basis, models predict that the convective envelope in δSct stars extends only about 1per cent of the radius, but with sufficient energy to excite solar-like oscillations. This was not observed before the Kepler mission, so...... the presence of a convective envelope in the models has been questioned. Here we report the detection of solar-like oscillations in the δSct star HD187547, implying that surface convection operates efficiently in stars about twice as massive as the Sun, as the ad hoc models predicted....

  19. Fluid convection, constraint and causation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Robert C.

    2012-01-01

    Complexity—nonlinear dynamics for my purposes in this essay—is rich with metaphysical and epistemological implications but is receiving sustained philosophical analysis only recently. I will explore some of the subtleties of causation and constraint in Rayleigh–Bénard convection as an example of a complex phenomenon, and extract some lessons for further philosophical reflection on top-down constraint and causation particularly with respect to causal foundationalism. PMID:23386955

  20. Cryogenic helium gas convection research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donnelly, R.J.

    1994-10-01

    This is a report prepared by a group interested in doing research in thermal convection using the large scale refrigeration facilities available at the SSC Laboratories (SSCL). The group preparing this report consists of Michael McAshan at SSCL, Robert Behringer at Duke University, Katepalli Sreenivasan at Yale University, Xiao-Zhong Wu at Northern Illinois University and Russell Donnelly at the University of Oregon, who served as Editor for this report. This study reports the research and development opportunities in such a project, the technical requirements and feasibility of its construction and operation, and the costs associated with the needed facilities and support activities. The facility will be a unique national resource for studies of high-Reynolds-number and high-Rayleigh-number and high Rayleigh number turbulence phenomena, and is one of the six items determined as suitable for potential funding through a screening of Expressions of Interest. The proposed facility is possible only because of the advanced cryogenic technology available at the SSCL. Typical scientific issues to be addressed in the facility will be discussed. It devolved during our study, that while the main experiment is still considered to be the thermal convection experiment discussed in our original Expression of Interest, there are now a very substantial set of other, important and fundamental experiments which can be done with the large cryostat proposed for the convection experiment. We believe the facility could provide several decades of front-line research in turbulence, and shall describe why this is so

  1. Thermosolutal convection during dendritic solidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, J. C.; Nandapurkar, P.; Poirier, D. R.; Felicelli, S.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents a mathematical model for directional solidification of a binary alloy including a dendritic region underlying an all-liquid region. It is assumed initially that there exists a nonconvecting state with planar isotherms and isoconcentrates solidifying at a constant velocity. The stability of this system has been analyzed and nonlinear calculations are performed that show the effect of convection in the solidification process when the system is unstable. Results of calculations for various cases defined by the initial temperature gradient at the dendrite tips and varying strength of the gravitational field are presented for systems involving lead-tin alloys. The results show that the systems are stable for a gravitational constant of 0.0001 g(0) and that convection can be suppressed by appropriate choice of the container's size for higher values of the gravitational constant. It is also concluded that for the lead-tin systems considered, convection in the mushy zone is not significant below the upper 20 percent of the dendritic zone, if al all.

  2. Multicomponent droplet vaporization in a convecting environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Megaridis, C.M.; Sirignano, W.A.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper a parametric study of the fundamental exchange processes for energy, mass and momentum between the liquid and gas phases of multicomponent liquid vaporizing droplets is presented. The model, which examines an isolated, vaporizing, multicomponent droplet in an axisymmetric, convecting environment, considers the different volatilities of the liquid components, the alteration of the liquid-phase properties due to the spatial/temporal variations of the species concentrations and also the effects of multicomponent diffusion. In addition, the model accounts for variable thermophysical properties, surface blowing and droplet surface regression due to vaporization, transient droplet heating with internal liquid circulation, and finally droplet deceleration with respect to the free flow due to drag. The numerical calculation employs finite-difference techniques and an iterative solution procedure that provides time-varying spatially-resolved data for both phases. The effects of initial droplet composition, ambient temperature, initial Reynolds number (based on droplet diameter), and volatility differential between the two liquid components are investigated for a liquid droplet consisting of two components with very different volatilities. It is found that mixtures with higher concentration of the less volatile substance actually vaporize faster on account of intrinsically higher liquid heating rates

  3. Modified Laser Flash Method for Thermal Properties Measurements and the Influence of Heat Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Bochuan; Zhu, Shen; Ban, Heng; Li, Chao; Scripa, Rosalia N.; Su, Ching-Hua; Lehoczky, Sandor L.

    2003-01-01

    The study examined the effect of natural convection in applying the modified laser flash method to measure thermal properties of semiconductor melts. Common laser flash method uses a laser pulse to heat one side of a thin circular sample and measures the temperature response of the other side. Thermal diffusivity can be calculations based on a heat conduction analysis. For semiconductor melt, the sample is contained in a specially designed quartz cell with optical windows on both sides. When laser heats the vertical melt surface, the resulting natural convection can introduce errors in calculation based on heat conduction model alone. The effect of natural convection was studied by CFD simulations with experimental verification by temperature measurement. The CFD results indicated that natural convection would decrease the time needed for the rear side to reach its peak temperature, and also decrease the peak temperature slightly in our experimental configuration. Using the experimental data, the calculation using only heat conduction model resulted in a thermal diffusivity value is about 7.7% lower than that from the model with natural convection. Specific heat capacity was about the same, and the difference is within 1.6%, regardless of heat transfer models.

  4. Assessment of RANS and LES Turbulence Modeling for Buoyancy-Aided/Opposed Forced and Mixed Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford, Corey; Kimber, Mark

    2017-11-01

    Over the last 30 years, an industry-wide shift within the nuclear community has led to increased utilization of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to supplement nuclear reactor safety analyses. One such area that is of particular interest to the nuclear community, specifically to those performing loss-of-flow accident (LOFA) analyses for next-generation very-high temperature reactors (VHTR), is the capacity of current computational models to predict heat transfer across a wide range of buoyancy conditions. In the present investigation, a critical evaluation of Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) and large-eddy simulation (LES) turbulence modeling techniques is conducted based on CFD validation data collected from the Rotatable Buoyancy Tunnel (RoBuT) at Utah State University. Four different experimental flow conditions are investigated: (1) buoyancy-aided forced convection; (2) buoyancy-opposed forced convection; (3) buoyancy-aided mixed convection; (4) buoyancy-opposed mixed convection. Overall, good agreement is found for both forced convection-dominated scenarios, but an overly-diffusive prediction of the normal Reynolds stress is observed for the RANS-based turbulence models. Low-Reynolds number RANS models perform adequately for mixed convection, while higher-order RANS approaches underestimate the influence of buoyancy on the production of turbulence.

  5. Modeling of extended defects in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Law, M.E.; Jones, K.S.; Earles, S.K.; Lilak, A.D.; Xu, J.W.

    1997-01-01

    Transient Enhanced Diffusion (TED) is one of the biggest modeling challenges present in predicting scaled technologies. Damage from implantation of dopant ions changes the diffusivities of the dopants and precipitates to form complex extended defects. Developing a quantitative model for the extended defect behavior during short time, low temperature anneals is a key to explaining TED. This paper reviews some of the modeling developments over the last several years, and discusses some of the challenges that remain to be addressed. Two examples of models compared to experimental work are presented and discussed

  6. Convective overshoot at the solar tachocline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Benjamin; Oishi, Jeffrey S.; Anders, Evan H.; Lecoanet, Daniel; Burns, Keaton; Vasil, Geoffrey M.

    2017-08-01

    At the base of the solar convection zone lies the solar tachocline. This internal interface is where motions from the unstable convection zone above overshoot and penetrate downward into the stiffly stable radiative zone below, driving gravity waves, mixing, and possibly pumping and storing magnetic fields. Here we study the dynamics of convective overshoot across very stiff interfaces with some properties similar to the internal boundary layer within the Sun. We use the Dedalus pseudospectral framework and study fully compressible dynamics at moderate to high Peclet number and low Mach number, probing a regime where turbulent transport is important, and where the compressible dynamics are similar to those of convective motions in the deep solar interior. We find that the depth of convective overshoot is well described by a simple buoyancy equilibration model, and we consider implications for dynamics at the solar tachocline and for the storage of magnetic fields there by overshooting convection.

  7. The convection electric field in auroral substorms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerløv, Jesper Wittendorff; Hoffman, R.A.

    2001-01-01

    Dynamics Explorer 2 (DE 2) electric field and ion drift data are used in a statistical study of the ionospheric convection electric field in bulge-type auroral substorms. Thirty-one individual DE 2 substorm crossings were carefully selected and organized by the use of global auroral images obtained...... this database enabled us to compile a model of the ionospheric convection electric field. The characteristics of the premidnight convection reversal show a pronounced local time dependency. Far west of the surge it is a fairly well defined point reversal or convection shear. Approaching the surge and within...... the surge it is a region of weak electric fields increasing in width toward midnight that separates regions of equatorward and poleward electric fields. Therefore we adopt the term Harang region rather than the Harang discontinuity for the premidnight convection reversal. A relatively narrow convection...

  8. The pattern of convection in the Sun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, N.O.

    1976-01-01

    The structure of solar magnetic fields is dominated by the effects of convection, which should be incorporated in any model of the solar cycle. Although mixing length theory is adequate for calculating the structure of main sequence stars, a better description of convection is needed for any detailed dynamo model. Recent work on nonlinear convection at low Prandt numbers is reviewed. There has been some progress towards a theory of compressible convection, though there is still no firm theoretical evidence for cells with scales less than the depth of the convecting layer. However, it remains likely that the pattern of solar convection is dominated by granules, supergranules and giant cells. The effects of rotation on these cells are briefly considered. (Auth.)

  9. Radiative mixed convection over an isothermal cone embedded in a porous medium with variable permeability

    KAUST Repository

    El-Amin, Mohamed; Ebrahiem, N.A.; Salama, Amgad; Sun, S.

    2011-01-01

    The interaction of mixed convection with thermal radiation of an optical dense viscous fluid adjacent to an isothermal cone imbedded in a porous medium with Rosseland diffusion approximation incorporating the variation of permeability and thermal conductivity is numerically investigated. The transformed conservation laws are solved numerically for the case of variable surface temperature conditions. Numerical results are given for the dimensionless temperature profiles and the local Nusselt number for various values of the mixed convection parameter , the cone angle parameter ?, the radiation-conduction parameter R d, and the surface temperature parameter H. Copyright 2011 M. F. El-Amin et al.

  10. Nonlinear simulation of electromagnetic current diffusive interchange mode turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagi, M.; Itoh, S.I.; Fukuyama, A.

    1998-01-01

    The anomalous transport in toroidal plasmas has been investigated extensively. It is pointed out that the nonlinear instability is important in driving the microturbulence[1], i.e., the self-sustained plasma turbulence. This concept is explained as follows; when the electron motion along the magnetic field line is resisted by the background turbulence, it gives rise to the effective resistivity and enhances the level of the turbulence. The nonlinear simulation of the electrostatic current diffusive interchange mode (CDIM) in the two dimensional sheared slab geometry has been performed as an example. The occurrence of the nonlinear instability and the self-sustainment of the plasma turbulence were confirmed by this simulation[2]. On the other hand, the electromagnetic turbulence is sustained in the high pressure limit. The possibility of the self-organization with more variety has been pointed out[3]. It is important to study the electromagnetic turbulence based on the nonlinear simulation. In this paper, the model equation for the electrostatic CDIM turbulence[2] is extended for both electrostatic and electromagnetic turbulence. (1) Not only E x B convective nonlinearity but also the electromagnetic nonlinearity which is related to the parallel flow are incorporated into the model equation. (2) The electron and ion pressure evolution equations are solved separately, making it possible to distinguish the electron and ion thermal diffusivities. The two dimensional nonlinear simulation of the electromagnetic CDIM is performed based on the extended fluid model. This paper is organized as follows. The model equation is explained in section II. The result of simulation is shown in section III. The conclusion and discussion are given in section IV. (author)

  11. Unsteady free convection MHD flow between two heated vertical parallel conducting plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanyal, D.C.; Adhikari, A.

    2006-01-01

    Unsteady free convection flow of a viscous incompressible electrically conducting fluid between two heated conducting vertical parallel plates subjected to a uniform transverse magnetic field is considered. The approximate analytical solutions for velocity, induced field and temperature distribution are obtained for small and large values of magnetic Reynolds number. The problem is also extended to thermometric case. (author)

  12. Rayleigh-Benard convection as a Nambu-metriplectic problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bihlo, A

    2008-01-01

    The traditional Hamiltonian structure of the equations governing conservative Rayleigh-Benard convection (RBC) is singular, i.e., its Poisson bracket possesses nontrivial Casimir functionals. We show that a special form of one of these Casimirs can be used to extend the bilinear Poisson bracket to a trilinear generalized Nambu bracket. It is further shown that the equations governing dissipative RBC can be written as the superposition of the conservative Nambu bracket with a dissipative symmetric bracket. This leads to a Nambu-metriplectic system, which completes the geometrical picture of RBC. (fast track communication)

  13. Titan Balloon Convection Model, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This innovative research effort is directed at determining, quantitatively, the convective heat transfer coefficients applicable to a Montgolfiere balloon operating...

  14. REVERSALS IN THE 6-CELLS CONVECTION DRIVEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.M. Vodinchar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We describe the large-scale model geodynamo, which based on indirect data of inhomogeneities in the density of the Earth’s core. Convection structure is associated with spherical harmonic Y24 , which defines the basic poloidal component of velocity. Coriolis drift of this mode determines the toroidal component of velocity. Thus, 6 convective cells are formed. The model takes into account the feedback effect of the magnetic field on convection. It was ascertained that the model contains stable regimes of field generation. The velocity of convection and the dipole component of the magnetic field are close to the observed ones.

  15. Scale analysis of convective clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Micha Gryschka

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The size distribution of cumulus clouds due to shallow and deep convection is analyzed using satellite pictures, LES model results and data from the German rain radar network. The size distributions found can be described by simple power laws as has also been proposed for other cloud data in the literature. As the observed precipitation at ground stations is finally determined by cloud numbers in an area and individual sizes and rain rates of single clouds, the cloud size distributions might be used for developing empirical precipitation forecasts or for validating results from cloud resolving models being introduced to routine weather forecasts.

  16. Characterizing Convection in Stellar Atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanner, Joel; Basu, Sarbani; Demarque, Pierre; Robinson, Frank

    2011-01-01

    We perform 3D radiative hydrodynamic simulations to study the properties of convection in the superadiabatic layer of stars. The simulations show differences in both the stratification and turbulent quantities for different types of stars. We extract turbulent pressure and eddy sizes, as well as the T-τ relation for different stars and find that they are sensitive to the energy flux and gravity. We also show that contrary to what is usually assumed in the field of stellar atmospheres, the structure and gas dynamics of simulations of turbulent atmospheres cannot be parameterized with T eff and log(g) alone.

  17. Problems in Microgravity Fluid Mechanics: G-Jitter Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homsy, G. M.

    2005-01-01

    This is the final report on our NASA grant, Problems in Microgravity Fluid Mechanics NAG3-2513: 12/14/2000 - 11/30/2003, extended through 11/30/2004. This grant was made to Stanford University and then transferred to the University of California at Santa Barbara when the PI relocated there in January 2001. Our main activity has been to conduct both experimental and theoretical studies of instabilities in fluids that are relevant to the microgravity environment, i.e. those that do not involve the action of buoyancy due to a steady gravitational field. Full details of the work accomplished under this grant are given below. Our work has focused on: (i) Theoretical and computational studies of the effect of g-jitter on instabilities of convective states where the convection is driven by forces other than buoyancy (ii) Experimental studies of instabilities during displacements of miscible fluid pairs in tubes, with a focus on the degree to which these mimic those found in immiscible fluids. (iii) Theoretical and experimental studies of the effect of time dependent electrohydrodynamic forces on chaotic advection in drops immersed in a second dielectric liquid. Our objectives are to acquire insight and understanding into microgravity fluid mechanics problems that bear on either fundamental issues or applications in fluid physics. We are interested in the response of fluids to either a fluctuating acceleration environment or to forces other than gravity that cause fluid mixing and convection. We have been active in several general areas.

  18. Convective thermal fluxes in unsteady non-homogeneous flows generating complex three dimensional vorticity patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellez Alvarez, Jackson David; Redondo, Jose Manuel; Sanchez, Jesu Mary

    2016-04-01

    The improvements in experimental methods and high resolution image analysis are nowadays able to detect subtle changes in the structure of the turbulence over a wide range of temporal and spatial scales [1], we compare the scaling shown by different mixing fronts driven by buoyancy that form convective driven mixing. We use PIV and density front tracking in several experimental configurations akin to geophysical overturning [2, 3]. We parametrize the role of unstable stratification by means of the Rayleigh and Atwood numbers and compare the scaling and the multifractal structure functions of the different markers used to visualize the non-homogeneous. Both reactive and passive scalar tracers are used to investigate the mixing structure and the intermittency of the flow. Different initial conditions are compared and the mixing efficiency of the overall turbulent process is evaluated [4 - 6]. Diffusion is measured in the transition from a homogeneous linearly stratified fluid to a cellular or layered structure by means of Thermoelectric generated heating and cooling [2, 4]. Patterns arise by setting up a convective flow generated by a buoyant heat flux either in the base or in a side wall of the convective enclosure [1, 6]. The experiments described here investigate high Prandtl number mixing using brine or sugar solutions and fresh water in order to form a density interface and low Prandtl number mixing with only temperature gradients [7]. The set of dimensionless parameters define conditions of numeric and small scale laboratory modeling of environmental flows. Fields of velocity, density and their gradients were computed and visualized [8, 9]. When convective heating and cooling takes place the combination of internal waves and buoyant turbulence is much more complicated if the Rayleigh and Reynolds numbers are high in order to study entrainment and mixing. The experiments described here investigate high Prandtl number mixing using salt or sugar solutions and

  19. Fractional Diffusion Equations and Anomalous Diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangelista, Luiz Roberto; Kaminski Lenzi, Ervin

    2018-01-01

    Preface; 1. Mathematical preliminaries; 2. A survey of the fractional calculus; 3. From normal to anomalous diffusion; 4. Fractional diffusion equations: elementary applications; 5. Fractional diffusion equations: surface effects; 6. Fractional nonlinear diffusion equation; 7. Anomalous diffusion: anisotropic case; 8. Fractional Schrödinger equations; 9. Anomalous diffusion and impedance spectroscopy; 10. The Poisson–Nernst–Planck anomalous (PNPA) models; References; Index.

  20. The Grell-Freitas Convective Parameterization: Recent Developments and Applications Within the NASA GEOS Global Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, S.; Grell, G. A.; Molod, A.

    2017-12-01

    We implemented and began to evaluate an alternative convection parameterization for the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) global model. The parameterization (Grell and Freitas, 2014) is based on the mass flux approach with several closures, for equilibrium and non-equilibrium convection, and includes scale and aerosol awareness functionalities. Scale dependence for deep convection is implemented either through using the method described by Arakawa et al (2011), or through lateral spreading of the subsidence terms. Aerosol effects are included though the dependence of autoconversion and evaporation on the CCN number concentration.Recently, the scheme has been extended to a tri-modal spectral size approach to simulate the transition from shallow, congestus, and deep convection regimes. In addition, the inclusion of a new closure for non-equilibrium convection resulted in a substantial gain of realism in model simulation of the diurnal cycle of convection over the land. Also, a beta-pdf is employed now to represent the normalized mass flux profile. This opens up an additional venue to apply stochasticism in the scheme.

  1. Two-dimensional turbulent convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzino, Andrea

    2017-11-01

    We present an overview of the most relevant, and sometimes contrasting, theoretical approaches to Rayleigh-Taylor and mean-gradient-forced Rayleigh-Bénard two-dimensional turbulence together with numerical and experimental evidences for their support. The main aim of this overview is to emphasize that, despite the different character of these two systems, especially in relation to their steadiness/unsteadiness, turbulent fluctuations are well described by the same scaling relationships originated from the Bolgiano balance. The latter states that inertial terms and buoyancy terms balance at small scales giving rise to an inverse kinetic energy cascade. The main difference with respect to the inverse energy cascade in hydrodynamic turbulence [R. H. Kraichnan, "Inertial ranges in two-dimensional turbulence," Phys. Fluids 10, 1417 (1967)] is that the rate of cascade of kinetic energy here is not constant along the inertial range of scales. Thanks to the absence of physical boundaries, the two systems here investigated turned out to be a natural physical realization of the Kraichnan scaling regime hitherto associated with the elusive "ultimate state of thermal convection" [R. H. Kraichnan, "Turbulent thermal convection at arbitrary Prandtl number," Phys. Fluids 5, 1374-1389 (1962)].

  2. Structure of the auroral precipitation region in the dawn sector: relationship to convection reversal boundaries and field-aligned currents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. I. Feldstein

    2001-05-01

    precipitation (AO is mapped to the dawn periphery of the Central Plasma Sheet (CPS; the soft small scale structured precipitation (SSSL is mapped to the outer magnetosphere close to the magnetopause, i.e. the Low Latitude Boundary Layer (LLBL. In the near-noon sector, earthward fluxes of soft electrons, which cause the Diffuse Red Aurora (DRA, are observed. The ion energies decrease with increasing latitude. The plasma spectra of the DRA regime are analogous to the spectra of the Plasma Mantle (PM. In the dawn sector, the large-scale field-aligned currents flow into the ionosphere at the SSSL latitudes (Region 1 and flow out at the AO or DAZ latitudes (Region 2. In the dawn and dusk sectors, the large-scale Region 1 and Region 2 FAC generation occurs in different plasma domains of the distant magnetosphere. The dawn and dusk FAC connection to the traditional Region 1 and Region 2 has only formal character, as FAC generating in various magnetospheric plasma domains integrate in the same region (Region 1 or Region 2. In the SSSL, there is anti-sunward convection; in the DAZ and the AO, there is the sunward convection. At PM latitudes, the convection is controlled by the azimuthal IMF component (By . It is suggested to extend the notation of the plasma pattern boundaries, as proposed by Newell et al. (1996, for the nightside sector of the auroral oval to the dawn sector.Key words. Magnetospheric physics (current systems; magnetospheric configuration and dynamics; plasma convection

  3. Structure of the auroral precipitation region in the dawn sector: relationship to convection reversal boundaries and field-aligned currents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. I. Feldstein

    electrons and isotropic ion precipitation (AO is mapped to the dawn periphery of the Central Plasma Sheet (CPS; the soft small scale structured precipitation (SSSL is mapped to the outer magnetosphere close to the magnetopause, i.e. the Low Latitude Boundary Layer (LLBL. In the near-noon sector, earthward fluxes of soft electrons, which cause the Diffuse Red Aurora (DRA, are observed. The ion energies decrease with increasing latitude. The plasma spectra of the DRA regime are analogous to the spectra of the Plasma Mantle (PM. In the dawn sector, the large-scale field-aligned currents flow into the ionosphere at the SSSL latitudes (Region 1 and flow out at the AO or DAZ latitudes (Region 2. In the dawn and dusk sectors, the large-scale Region 1 and Region 2 FAC generation occurs in different plasma domains of the distant magnetosphere. The dawn and dusk FAC connection to the traditional Region 1 and Region 2 has only formal character, as FAC generating in various magnetospheric plasma domains integrate in the same region (Region 1 or Region 2. In the SSSL, there is anti-sunward convection; in the DAZ and the AO, there is the sunward convection. At PM latitudes, the convection is controlled by the azimuthal IMF component (By . It is suggested to extend the notation of the plasma pattern boundaries, as proposed by Newell et al. (1996, for the nightside sector of the auroral oval to the dawn sector.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (current systems; magnetospheric configuration and dynamics; plasma convection

  4. Solar-cycle Variations of Meridional Flows in the Solar Convection Zone Using Helioseismic Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chia-Hsien; Chou, Dean-Yi

    2018-06-01

    The solar meridional flow is an axisymmetric flow in solar meridional planes, extending through the convection zone. Here we study its solar-cycle variations in the convection zone using SOHO/MDI helioseismic data from 1996 to 2010, including two solar minima and one maximum. The travel-time difference between northward and southward acoustic waves is related to the meridional flow along the wave path. Applying the ray approximation and the SOLA inversion method to the travel-time difference measured in a previous study, we obtain the meridional flow distributions in 0.67 ≤ r ≤ 0.96R ⊙ at the minimum and maximum. At the minimum, the flow has a three-layer structure: poleward in the upper convection zone, equatorward in the middle convection zone, and poleward again in the lower convection zone. The flow speed is close to zero within the error bar near the base of the convection zone. The flow distribution changes significantly from the minimum to the maximum. The change above 0.9R ⊙ shows two phenomena: first, the poleward flow speed is reduced at the maximum; second, an additional convergent flow centered at the active latitudes is generated at the maximum. These two phenomena are consistent with the surface meridional flow reported in previous studies. The change in flow extends all the way down to the base of the convection zone, and the pattern of the change below 0.9R ⊙ is more complicated. However, it is clear that the active latitudes play a role in the flow change: the changes in flow speed below and above the active latitudes have opposite signs. This suggests that magnetic fields could be responsible for the flow change.

  5. Rarefied gas flows through a curved channel: Application of a diffusion-type equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Kazuo; Takata, Shigeru; Tatsumi, Eri; Yoshida, Hiroaki

    2010-11-01

    Rarefied gas flows through a curved two-dimensional channel, caused by a pressure or a temperature gradient, are investigated numerically by using a macroscopic equation of convection-diffusion type. The equation, which was derived systematically from the Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook model of the Boltzmann equation and diffuse-reflection boundary condition in a previous paper [K. Aoki et al., "A diffusion model for rarefied flows in curved channels," Multiscale Model. Simul. 6, 1281 (2008)], is valid irrespective of the degree of gas rarefaction when the channel width is much shorter than the scale of variations of physical quantities and curvature along the channel. Attention is also paid to a variant of the Knudsen compressor that can produce a pressure raise by the effect of the change of channel curvature and periodic temperature distributions without any help of moving parts. In the process of analysis, the macroscopic equation is (partially) extended to the case of the ellipsoidal-statistical model of the Boltzmann equation.

  6. Diffusion in glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mubarak, A S

    1991-12-31

    Rutherford backscattering spectromertry technique (RBS) was used to characterize and investigate the depth distribution profiles of Ca-impurities of Ca-doped soda-time glass. The purposely added Ca-impurities were introduced inti the glass matrix by a normal ion exchange diffusion process. The measurements and analysis were performed using 2 MeV {sup 2}He{sup +} ions supplied from the University of Jordan Van de Graff acceierator (JOVAG). The normalized concetration versus depth profile distributions for the Ca-imourities were determined, both theoretically and experimentally. The theoretical treatment was carried out by setting up and soiving the diffusion equation under the conditions of the experiment. The resulting profiles are characterized by a compiementary error function. the theoretical treeatment was extended to include the various methods of enhancing the diffusion process, e.g. using an electric field. The diffusion coefficient, assumed constant, of the Ca-impurities exchanged in the soda-lime glass was determined to be 1.23 x 10{sup 13} cm{sup 2}/s. A comparison between theoretically and experimentally determined profiles is made and commented at, where several conclusions are drawn and suggestions for future work are mentioned. (author). 38 refs., 21 figs., 10 Tabs.

  7. Advectional enhancement of eddy diffusivity under parametric disorder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldobin, Denis S

    2010-01-01

    Frozen parametric disorder can lead to the appearance of sets of localized convective currents in an otherwise stable (quiescent) fluid layer heated from below. These currents significantly influence the transport of an admixture (or any other passive scalar) along the layer. When the molecular diffusivity of the admixture is small in comparison to the thermal one, which is quite typical in nature, disorder can enhance the effective (eddy) diffusivity by several orders of magnitude in comparison to the molecular diffusivity. In this paper, we study the effect of an imposed longitudinal advection on the delocalization of convective currents, both numerically and analytically, and report a subsequent drastic boost of the effective diffusivity for weak advection.

  8. Application of airborne ultrasound in the convective drying of fruits and vegetables: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Kai; Zhang, Min; Mujumdar, Arun S

    2017-11-01

    The application of airborne ultrasound is a promising technology in the drying of foods, particularly to fruits and vegetables. In this paper, designs of dryers using ultrasound to combine the convective drying process are described. The main factors affecting the drying kinetics with the ultrasound application are discussed. The results show that the ultrasound application accelerated the drying kinetics. Ultrasound application during the convective drying of fruits and vegetables shorten the drying time. Ultrasound application can produce an increase of the effective moisture diffusivity and the mass transfer coefficient. The influence of ultrasound on physical and chemical parameters evaluating the product quality is reviewed. Ultrasound application can decrease the total color change, reveal a low water activity and reduce the loss of some nutrient elements. Meanwhile, ultrasound application can also better preserve the microstructure of fruits and vegetables in comparison to convective drying. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Benard convection in gaps and cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, U.

    1981-04-01

    The article contains two parts. In the first part a condensed review of the most striking phenomena in Benard convection in laterally confined fluid layers is given. In the second part recent experimental and theoretical work on Benard convection in gaps is presented an analysed. (orig.) [de

  10. Convective mixing and accretion in white dwarfs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koester, D.

    1976-01-01

    The evolution of convection zones in cooling white dwarfs with helium envelopes and outer hydrogen layers is calculated with a complete stellar evolution code. It is shown that white dwarfs of spectral type DB cannot be formed from DA stars by convective mixing. However, for cooler temperatures (Tsub(e) [de

  11. Quasilinear diffusion in inhomogeneous plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooley, D.L.

    1975-05-01

    The problem of inhomogeneous diffusion in a plasma is considered with emphasis on its possible application to relativistic electron beams. A one-dimensional model with a background electrostatic field is used to illustrate the basic approach, which is then extended to a two-dimensional plasma with a background magnetic field. Only preliminary results are available. (U.S.)

  12. Southern Ocean Convection and tropical telleconnections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinov, I.; Cabre, A.; Gnanadesikan, A.

    2014-12-01

    We show that Southern Ocean (SO) temperatures in the latest generation of Earth System Models exhibit two major modes of variation, one driven by deep convection, the other by tropical variability. We perform a CMIP5 model intercomparison to understand why different climate models represent SO variability so differently in long, control simulations. We show that multiyear variability in Southern Ocean sea surface temperatures (SSTs) can in turn influence oceanic and atmospheric conditions in the tropics on short (atmospheric) time-scales. We argue that the strength and pattern of SO-tropical teleconnections depends on the intensity of SO deep convection. Periodic convection in the SO is a feature of most CMIP5 models under preindustrial forcing (deLavergne et al., 2014). Models show a wide distribution in the spatial extent, periodicity and intensity of their SO convection, with some models convecting most of the time, and some showing very little convection. In a highly convective coupled model, we find that multidecadal variability in SO and global SSTs, as well as SO heat storage are driven by Weddell Sea convective variability, with convective decades relatively warm due to the heat released from the deep southern ocean and non-convective decades cold due to the subsurface storage of heat. Furthermore, pulses of SO convection drive SST and sea ice variations, influencing absorbed shortwave and emitted longwave radiation, wind, cloud and precipitation patterns, with climatic implications for the low latitudes via fast atmospheric teleconnections. We suggest that these high-low latitude teleconnection mechanisms are relevant for understanding hiatus decades. Additionally, Southern Ocean deep convection varied significantly during past, natural climate changes such as during the last deglaciation. Weddell Sea open convection was recently weakened, likely as a consequence of anthropogenic forcing and the resulting surface freshening. Our study opens up the

  13. How Far Can Extended Knowledge Be Extended?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wray, K. Brad

    2018-01-01

    by an artifact, like a notebook or telescope. The chapter illustrates this by applying Pritchard’s account of extended knowledge to collaborating scientists. The beliefs acquired through collaborative research cannot satisfy both of Pritchard’s conditions of creditability. Further, there is evidence......Duncan Pritchard (2010) has developed a theory of extended knowledge based on the notion of extended cognition initially developed by Clark and Chalmers (1998). Pritchard’s account gives a central role to the notion of creditability, which requires the following two conditions to be met: (i...... that scientists are not prepared to take responsibility for the actions of the scientists with whom they collaborate....

  14. Convective penetration in a young sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, Jane; Baraffe, Isabelle; Goffrey, Tom; MUSIC developers group

    2018-01-01

    To interpret the high-quality data produced from recent space-missions it is necessary to study convection under realistic stellar conditions. We describe the multi-dimensional, time implicit, fully compressible, hydrodynamic, implicit large eddy simulation code MUSIC. We use MUSIC to study convection during an early stage in the evolution of our sun where the convection zone covers approximately half of the solar radius. This model of the young sun possesses a realistic stratification in density, temperature, and luminosity. We approach convection in a stellar context using extreme value theory and derive a new model for convective penetration, targeted for one-dimensional stellar evolution calculations. This model provides a scenario that can explain the observed lithium abundance in the sun and in solar-like stars at a range of ages.

  15. Numerical simulations of convectively excited gravity waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glatzmaier, G.A.

    1983-01-01

    Magneto-convection and gravity waves are numerically simulated with a nonlinear, three-dimensional, time-dependent model of a stratified, rotating, spherical fluid shell heated from below. A Solar-like reference state is specified while global velocity, magnetic field, and thermodynamic perturbations are computed from the anelastic magnetohydrodynamic equations. Convective overshooting from the upper (superadiabatic) part of the shell excites gravity waves in the lower (subadiabatic) part. Due to differential rotation and Coriolis forces, convective cell patterns propagate eastward with a latitudinally dependent phase velocity. The structure of the excited wave motions in the stable region is more time-dependent than that of the convective motions above. The magnetic field tends to be concentrated over giant-cell downdrafts in the convective zone but is affected very little by the wave motion in the stable region

  16. Atmosphere-ionosphere coupling from convectively generated gravity waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azeem, Irfan; Barlage, Michael

    2018-04-01

    Ionospheric variability impacts operational performances of a variety of technological systems, such as HF communication, Global Positioning System (GPS) navigation, and radar surveillance. The ionosphere is not only perturbed by geomagnetic inputs but is also influenced by atmospheric tides and other wave disturbances propagating from the troposphere to high altitudes. Atmospheric Gravity Waves (AGWs) excited by meteorological sources are one of the largest sources of mesoscale variability in the ionosphere. In this paper, Total Electron Content (TEC) data from networks of GPS receivers in the United States are analyzed to investigate AGWs in the ionosphere generated by convective thunderstorms. Two case studies of convectively generated gravity waves are presented. On April 4, 2014 two distinct large convective systems in Texas and Arkansas generated two sets of concentric AGWs that were observed in the ionosphere as Traveling Ionospheric Disturbances (TIDs). The period of the observed TIDs was 20.8 min, the horizontal wavelength was 182.4 km, and the horizontal phase speed was 146.4 m/s. The second case study shows TIDs generated from an extended squall line on December 23, 2015 stretching from the Gulf of Mexico to the Great Lakes in North America. Unlike the concentric wave features seen in the first case study, the extended squall line generated TIDs, which exhibited almost plane-parallel phase fronts. The TID period was 20.1 min, its horizontal wavelength was 209.6 km, and the horizontal phase speed was 180.1 m/s. The AGWs generated by both of these meteorological events have large vertical wavelength (>100 km), which are larger than the F2 layer thickness, thus allowing them to be discernible in the TEC dataset.

  17. Magnetic Fields in the Solar Convection Zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Yuhong

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies of the dynamic evolution of magnetic flux tubes in the solar convection zone are reviewed with focus on emerging flux tubes responsible for the formation of solar active regions. The current prevailing picture is that active regions on the solar surface originate from strong toroidal magnetic fields generated by the solar dynamo mechanism at the thin tachocline layer at the base of the solar convection zone. Thus the magnetic fields need to traverse the entire convection zone before they reach the photosphere to form the observed solar active regions. This review discusses results with regard to the following major topics: 1. the equilibrium properties of the toroidal magnetic fields stored in the stable overshoot region at the base of the convection zone, 2. the buoyancy instability associated with the toroidal magnetic fields and the formation of buoyant magnetic flux tubes, 3. the rise of emerging flux loops through the solar convective envelope as modeled by the thin flux tube calculations which infer that the field strength of the toroidal magnetic fields at the base of the solar convection zone is significantly higher than the value in equipartition with convection, 4. the minimum twist needed for maintaining cohesion of the rising flux tubes, 5. the rise of highly twisted kink unstable flux tubes as a possible origin of d -sunspots, 6. the evolution of buoyant magnetic flux tubes in 3D stratified convection, 7. turbulent pumping of magnetic flux by penetrative compressible convection, 8. an alternative mechanism for intensifying toroidal magnetic fields to significantly super-equipartition field strengths by conversion of the potential energy associated with the superadiabatic stratification of the solar convection zone, and finally 9. a brief overview of our current understanding of flux emergence at the surface and post-emergence evolution of the subsurface magnetic fields.

  18. Multicomponent diffusivities from the free volume theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wesselingh, J.A; Bollen, A.M

    In this paper the free volume theory of diffusion is extended to multicomponent mixtures. The free volume is taken to be accessible for any component according to its surface. fraction. The resulting equations predict multicomponent (Maxwell-Stefan) diffusivities in simple liquid mixtures from pure

  19. Establishing the diffuse correlation spectroscopy signal relationship with blood flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boas, David A; Sakadžić, Sava; Selb, Juliette; Farzam, Parisa; Franceschini, Maria Angela; Carp, Stefan A

    2016-07-01

    Diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) measurements of blood flow rely on the sensitivity of the temporal autocorrelation function of diffusively scattered light to red blood cell (RBC) mean square displacement (MSD). For RBCs flowing with convective velocity [Formula: see text], the autocorrelation is expected to decay exponentially with [Formula: see text], where [Formula: see text] is the delay time. RBCs also experience shear-induced diffusion with a diffusion coefficient [Formula: see text] and an MSD of [Formula: see text]. Surprisingly, experimental data primarily reflect diffusive behavior. To provide quantitative estimates of the relative contributions of convective and diffusive movements, we performed Monte Carlo simulations of light scattering through tissue of varying vessel densities. We assumed laminar vessel flow profiles and accounted for shear-induced diffusion effects. In agreement with experimental data, we found that diffusive motion dominates the correlation decay for typical DCS measurement parameters. Furthermore, our model offers a quantitative relationship between the RBC diffusion coefficient and absolute tissue blood flow. We thus offer, for the first time, theoretical support for the empirically accepted ability of the DCS blood flow index ([Formula: see text]) to quantify tissue perfusion. We find [Formula: see text] to be linearly proportional to blood flow, but with a proportionality modulated by the hemoglobin concentration and the average blood vessel diameter.

  20. Actively convected liquid metal divertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimada, Michiya; Hirooka, Yoshi

    2014-01-01

    The use of actively convected liquid metals with j × B force is proposed to facilitate heat handling by the divertor, a challenging issue associated with magnetic fusion experiments such as ITER. This issue will be aggravated even more for DEMO and power reactors because the divertor heat load will be significantly higher and yet the use of copper would not be allowed as the heat sink material. Instead, reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel alloys with heat conductivities substantially lower than that of copper, will be used as the structural materials. The present proposal is to fill the lower part of the vacuum vessel with liquid metals with relatively low melting points and low chemical activities including Ga and Sn. The divertor modules, equipped with electrodes and cooling tubes, are immersed in the liquid metal. The electrode, placed in the middle of the liquid metal, can be biased positively or negatively with respect to the module. The j × B force due to the current between the electrode and the module provides a rotating motion for the liquid metal around the electrodes. The rise in liquid temperature at the separatrix hit point can be maintained at acceptable levels from the operation point of view. As the rotation speed increases, the current in the liquid metal is expected to decrease due to the v × B electromotive force. This rotating motion in the poloidal plane will reduce the divertor heat load significantly. Another important benefit of the convected liquid metal divertor is the fast recovery from unmitigated disruptions. Also, the liquid metal divertor concept eliminates the erosion problem. (letter)

  1. Effect of Thermophysical Properties on Coupled Heat and Mass Transfer in Porous Material during Forced Convective Drying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Cai

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The convective drying kinetics of porous medium was investigated numerically. A mathematical model for forced convective drying was established to estimate the evolution of moisture content and temperature inside multilayered porous medium. The set of coupled partial differential equations with the specified boundary and initial conditions were solved numerically using a MATLAB code. An experimental setup of convective drying had been constructed and validated the theoretical model. The temperature and moisture content of the potato samples were dynamically measured and recorded during the drying process. Results indicate that thermal diffusion coefficient has significant positive impact on temperature distribution and mass diffusion coefficient might directly affect the moisture content distribution. Soret effect has a significant impact on heat flux and temperature distribution in the presence of large temperature gradient.

  2. A LES-CMC formulation for premixed flames including differential diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrace, Daniele; Chung, Kyoungseoun; Bolla, Michele; Wright, Yuri M.; Boulouchos, Konstantinos; Mastorakos, Epaminondas

    2018-05-01

    A finite volume large eddy simulation-conditional moment closure (LES-CMC) numerical framework for premixed combustion developed in a previous studyhas been extended to account for differential diffusion. The non-unity Lewis number CMC transport equation has an additional convective term in sample space proportional to the conditional diffusion of the progress variable, that in turn accounts for diffusion normal to the flame front and curvature-induced effects. Planar laminar simulations are first performed using a spatially homogeneous non-unity Lewis number CMC formulation and validated against physical-space fully resolved reference solutions. The same CMC formulation is subsequently used to numerically investigate the effects of curvature for laminar flames having different effective Lewis numbers: a lean methane-air flame with Leeff = 0.99 and a lean hydrogen-air flame with Leeff = 0.33. Results suggest that curvature does not affect the conditional heat release if the effective Lewis number tends to unity, so that curvature-induced transport may be neglected. Finally, the effect of turbulence on the flame structure is qualitatively analysed using LES-CMC simulations with and without differential diffusion for a turbulent premixed bluff body methane-air flame exhibiting local extinction behaviour. Overall, both the unity and the non-unity computations predict the characteristic M-shaped flame observed experimentally, although some minor differences are identified. The findings suggest that for the high Karlovitz number (from 1 to 10) flame considered, turbulent mixing within the flame weakens the differential transport contribution by reducing the conditional scalar dissipation rate and accordingly the conditional diffusion of the progress variable.

  3. Modelling and interpreting the isotopic composition of water vapour in convective updrafts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Bolot

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The isotopic compositions of water vapour and its condensates have long been used as tracers of the global hydrological cycle, but may also be useful for understanding processes within individual convective clouds. We review here the representation of processes that alter water isotopic compositions during processing of air in convective updrafts and present a unified model for water vapour isotopic evolution within undiluted deep convective cores, with a special focus on the out-of-equilibrium conditions of mixed-phase zones where metastable liquid water and ice coexist. We use our model to show that a combination of water isotopologue measurements can constrain critical convective parameters, including degree of supersaturation, supercooled water content and glaciation temperature. Important isotopic processes in updrafts include kinetic effects that are a consequence of diffusive growth or decay of cloud particles within a supersaturated or subsaturated environment; isotopic re-equilibration between vapour and supercooled droplets, which buffers isotopic distillation; and differing mechanisms of glaciation (droplet freezing vs. the Wegener–Bergeron–Findeisen process. As all of these processes are related to updraft strength, particle size distribution and the retention of supercooled water, isotopic measurements can serve as a probe of in-cloud conditions of importance to convective processes. We study the sensitivity of the profile of water vapour isotopic composition to differing model assumptions and show how measurements of isotopic composition at cloud base and cloud top alone may be sufficient to retrieve key cloud parameters.

  4. Modelling and interpreting the isotopic composition of water vapour in convective updrafts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolot, M.; Legras, B.; Moyer, E. J.

    2013-08-01

    The isotopic compositions of water vapour and its condensates have long been used as tracers of the global hydrological cycle, but may also be useful for understanding processes within individual convective clouds. We review here the representation of processes that alter water isotopic compositions during processing of air in convective updrafts and present a unified model for water vapour isotopic evolution within undiluted deep convective cores, with a special focus on the out-of-equilibrium conditions of mixed-phase zones where metastable liquid water and ice coexist. We use our model to show that a combination of water isotopologue measurements can constrain critical convective parameters, including degree of supersaturation, supercooled water content and glaciation temperature. Important isotopic processes in updrafts include kinetic effects that are a consequence of diffusive growth or decay of cloud particles within a supersaturated or subsaturated environment; isotopic re-equilibration between vapour and supercooled droplets, which buffers isotopic distillation; and differing mechanisms of glaciation (droplet freezing vs. the Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen process). As all of these processes are related to updraft strength, particle size distribution and the retention of supercooled water, isotopic measurements can serve as a probe of in-cloud conditions of importance to convective processes. We study the sensitivity of the profile of water vapour isotopic composition to differing model assumptions and show how measurements of isotopic composition at cloud base and cloud top alone may be sufficient to retrieve key cloud parameters.

  5. Modelling and intepreting the isotopic composition of water vapour in convective updrafts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolot, M.; Legras, B.; Moyer, E. J.

    2012-08-01

    The isotopic compositions of water vapour and its condensates have long been used as tracers of the global hydrological cycle, but may also be useful for understanding processes within individual convective clouds. We review here the representation of processes that alter water isotopic compositions during processing of air in convective updrafts and present a unified model for water vapour isotopic evolution within undiluted deep convective cores, with a special focus on the out-of-equilibrium conditions of mixed phase zones where metastable liquid water and ice coexist. We use our model to show that a combination of water isotopologue measurements can constrain critical convective parameters including degree of supersaturation, supercooled water content and glaciation temperature. Important isotopic processes in updrafts include kinetic effects that are a consequence of diffusive growth or decay of cloud particles within a supersaturated or subsaturated environment; isotopic re-equilibration between vapour and supercooled droplets, which buffers isotopic distillation; and differing mechanisms of glaciation (droplet freezing vs. the Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen process). As all of these processes are related to updraft strength, droplet size distribution and the retention of supercooled water, isotopic measurements can serve as a probe of in-cloud conditions of importance to convective processes. We study the sensitivity of the profile of water vapour isotopic composition to differing model assumptions and show how measurements of isotopic composition at cloud base and cloud top alone may be sufficient to retrieve key cloud parameters.

  6. Free Convection Personalized Ventilation (FCPV)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter V.

    Normally we supply fresh air to a room with a diffuser, and this air is distributed in the room according to different principles as: mixing ventilation, displacement ventilation etc. That means we have to supply a very large amount of air to the whole room, although a person in the room totally ...

  7. Numerical Study on the Contribution of Convective Mass Transfer Inside High-Porosity Adsorbents in the VOC Adsorption Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Ge; He, Wenna; Fang, Lei

    2013-01-01

    The transfer mechanism of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) being trapped inside the various types of adsorbents is usually regarded as mere diffusion. This paper investigated the contribution of convective mass transfer inside the adsorbents used for VOC air-cleaning. The adsorbents are typically...

  8. Extended Enterprise performance Management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bobbink, Maria Lammerdina; Hartmann, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    The allegiance of partnering organisations and their employees to an Extended Enterprise performance is its proverbial sword of Damocles. Literature on Extended Enterprises focuses on collaboration, inter-organizational integration and learning to avoid diminishing or missing allegiance becoming an

  9. Spatial model of convective solute transport in brain extracellular space does not support a “glymphatic” mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Byung-Ju; Smith, Alex J.

    2016-01-01

    A “glymphatic system,” which involves convective fluid transport from para-arterial to paravenous cerebrospinal fluid through brain extracellular space (ECS), has been proposed to account for solute clearance in brain, and aquaporin-4 water channels in astrocyte endfeet may have a role in this process. Here, we investigate the major predictions of the glymphatic mechanism by modeling diffusive and convective transport in brain ECS and by solving the Navier–Stokes and convection–diffusion equations, using realistic ECS geometry for short-range transport between para-arterial and paravenous spaces. Major model parameters include para-arterial and paravenous pressures, ECS volume fraction, solute diffusion coefficient, and astrocyte foot-process water permeability. The model predicts solute accumulation and clearance from the ECS after a step change in solute concentration in para-arterial fluid. The principal and robust conclusions of the model are as follows: (a) significant convective transport requires a sustained pressure difference of several mmHg between the para-arterial and paravenous fluid and is not affected by pulsatile pressure fluctuations; (b) astrocyte endfoot water permeability does not substantially alter the rate of convective transport in ECS as the resistance to flow across endfeet is far greater than in the gaps surrounding them; and (c) diffusion (without convection) in the ECS is adequate to account for experimental transport studies in brain parenchyma. Therefore, our modeling results do not support a physiologically important role for local parenchymal convective flow in solute transport through brain ECS. PMID:27836940

  10. A thermodynamically general theory for convective vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renno, Nilton O.

    2008-08-01

    Convective vortices are common features of atmospheres that absorb lower-entropy-energy at higher temperatures than they reject higher-entropy-energy to space. These vortices range from small to large-scale and play an important role in the vertical transport of heat, momentum, and tracer species. Thus, the development of theoretical models for convective vortices is important to our understanding of some of the basic features of planetary atmospheres. The heat engine framework is a useful tool for studying convective vortices. However, current theories assume that convective vortices are reversible heat engines. Since there are questions about how reversible real atmospheric heat engines are, their usefulness for studying real atmospheric vortices is somewhat controversial. In order to reduce this problem, a theory for convective vortices that includes irreversible processes is proposed. The paper's main result is that the proposed theory provides an expression for the pressure drop along streamlines that includes the effects of irreversible processes. It is shown that a simplified version of this expression is a generalization of Bernoulli's equation to convective circulations. It is speculated that the proposed theory not only explains the intensity, but also sheds light on other basic features of convective vortices such as their physical appearance.

  11. Diffusion bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, R.C.

    1976-01-01

    A method is described for joining beryllium to beryllium by diffusion bonding. At least one surface portion of at least two beryllium pieces is coated with nickel. A coated surface portion is positioned in a contiguous relationship with another surface portion and subjected to an environment having an atmosphere at a pressure lower than ambient pressure. A force is applied on the beryllium pieces for causing the contiguous surface portions to abut against each other. The contiguous surface portions are heated to a maximum temperature less than the melting temperature of the beryllium, and the applied force is decreased while increasing the temperature after attaining a temperature substantially above room temperature. A portion of the applied force is maintained at a temperature corresponding to about maximum temperature for a duration sufficient to effect the diffusion bond between the contiguous surface portions

  12. Perspectives on extended Deterrence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tertrais, Bruno; Yost, David S.; Bunn, Elaine; Lee, Seok-soo; Levite, Ariel e.; Russell, James A.; Hokayem, Emile; Kibaroglu, Mustafa; Schulte, Paul; Thraenert, Oliver; Kulesa, Lukasz

    2010-05-01

    In November 2009, the Foundation for Strategic Research (Fondation pour la recherche strategique, FRS) convened a workshop on 'The Future of extended Deterrence', which included the participation of some of the best experts of this topic, from the United States, Europe, the Middle East and East Asia, as well as French and NATO officials. This document brings together the papers prepared for this seminar. Several of them were updated after the publication in April 2010 of the US Nuclear Posture Review. The seminar was organized with the support of the French Atomic energy Commission (Commissariat a l'energie atomique - CEA). Content: 1 - The future of extended deterrence: a brainstorming paper (Bruno Tertrais); 2 - US extended deterrence in NATO and North-East Asia (David S. Yost); 3 - The future of US extended deterrence (Elaine Bunn); 4 - The future of extended deterrence: a South Korean perspective (Seok-soo Lee); 5 - Reflections on extended deterrence in the Middle East (Ariel e. Levite); 6 - extended deterrence, security guarantees and nuclear weapons: US strategic and policy conundrums in the Gulf (James A. Russell); 7 - extended deterrence in the Gulf: a bridge too far? (Emile Hokayem); 8 - The future of extended deterrence: the case of Turkey (Mustafa Kibaroglu); 9 - The future of extended deterrence: a UK view (Paul Schulte); 10 - NATO and extended deterrence (Oliver Thraenert); 11 - extended deterrence and assurance in Central Europe (Lukasz Kulesa)

  13. Boundary Layer Control of Rotating Convection Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, E. M.; Stellmach, S.; Noir, J.; Hansen, U.; Aurnou, J. M.

    2008-12-01

    Rotating convection is ubiquitous in the natural universe, and is likely responsible for planetary processes such magnetic field generation. Rapidly rotating convection is typically organized by the Coriolis force into tall, thin, coherent convection columns which are aligned with the axis of rotation. This organizational effect of rotation is thought to be responsible for the strength and structure of magnetic fields generated by convecting planetary interiors. As thermal forcing is increased, the relative influence of rotation weakens, and fully three-dimensional convection can exist. It has long been assumed that rotational effects will dominate convection dynamics when the ratio of buoyancy to the Coriolis force, the convective Rossby number, Roc, is less than unity. We investigate the influence of rotation on turbulent Rayleigh-Benard convection via a suite of coupled laboratory and numerical experiments over a broad parameter range: Rayleigh number, 10310; Ekman number, 10-6≤ E ≤ ∞; and Prandtl number, 1≤ Pr ≤ 100. In particular, we measure heat transfer (as characterized by the Nusselt number, Nu) as a function of the Rayleigh number for several different Ekman and Prandtl numbers. Two distinct heat transfer scaling regimes are identified: non-rotating style heat transfer, Nu ~ Ra2/7, and quasigeostrophic style heat transfer, Nu~ Ra6/5. The transition between the non-rotating regime and the rotationally dominant regime is described as a function of the Ekman number, E. We show that the regime transition depends not on the global force balance Roc, but on the relative thicknesses of the thermal and Ekman boundary layers. The transition scaling provides a predictive criterion for the applicability of convection models to natural systems such as Earth's core.

  14. Compressible convection in a rotating spherical shell. II. A linear anelastic model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glatzmaier, G.A.; Gilman, P.A.

    1981-01-01

    We study the onset of convection for a compressible fluid in a rotating spherical shell via linear anelastic fluid equations for a depth of 40% of the radius, constant kinematic viscosity and thermometric diffusivity, Taylor numbers up to 10 5 , and density stratifications up to seven e-folds across the zone. The perturbations are expanded in spherical harmonics, and the radially dependent equations are solved with a Newton-Raphson relaxation method

  15. Multipassage diffuser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lalis, A.; Rouviere, R.; Simon, G.

    1976-01-01

    A multipassage diffuser having 2p passages comprises a leak-tight cylindrical enclosure closed by a top cover and a bottom end-wall, parallel porous tubes which are rigidly assembled in sectors between tube plates and through which the gas mixture flows, the tube sectors being disposed at uniform intervals on the periphery of the enclosure. The top tube plates are rigidly fixed to an annular header having the shape of a half-torus and adapted to communicate with the tubes of the corresponding sector. Each passage is constituted by a plurality of juxtaposed sectors in which the mixture circulates in the same direction, the header being divided into p portions limited by radial partition-walls and each constituting two adjacent passages. The diffuser is provided beneath the bottom end-wall with p-1 leak-tight chambers each adapted to open into two different portions of the header, and with two collector-chambers each fitted with a nozzle for introducing the gas mixture and discharging the fraction of the undiffused mixture. By means of a central orifice formed in the bottom end-wall the enclosure communicates with a shaft for discharging the diffused fraction of the gas mixture

  16. Measuring Convective Mass Fluxes Over Tropical Oceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, David

    2017-04-01

    Deep convection forms the upward branches of all large-scale circulations in the tropics. Understanding what controls the form and intensity of vertical convective mass fluxes is thus key to understanding tropical weather and climate. These mass fluxes and the corresponding conditions supporting them have been measured by recent field programs (TPARC/TCS08, PREDICT, HS3) in tropical disturbances considered to be possible tropical storm precursors. In reality, this encompasses most strong convection in the tropics. The measurements were made with arrays of dropsondes deployed from high altitude. In some cases Doppler radar provided additional measurements. The results are in some ways surprising. Three factors were found to control the mass flux profiles, the strength of total surface heat fluxes, the column-integrated relative humidity, and the low to mid-tropospheric moist convective instability. The first two act as expected, with larger heat fluxes and higher humidity producing more precipitation and stronger lower tropospheric mass fluxes. However, unexpectedly, smaller (but still positive) convective instability produces more precipitation as well as more bottom-heavy convective mass flux profiles. Furthermore, the column humidity and the convective instability are anti-correlated, at least in the presence of strong convection. On spatial scales of a few hundred kilometers, the virtual temperature structure appears to be in dynamic balance with the pattern of potential vorticity. Since potential vorticity typically evolves on longer time scales than convection, the potential vorticity pattern plus the surface heat fluxes then become the immediate controlling factors for average convective properties. All measurements so far have taken place in regions with relatively flat sea surface temperature (SST) distributions. We are currently seeking funding for a measurement program in the tropical east Pacific, a region that exhibits strong SST gradients and

  17. Transient Mixed Convection Validation for NGNP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Barton [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States); Schultz, Richard [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-10-19

    The results of this project are best described by the papers and dissertations that resulted from the work. They are included in their entirety in this document. They are: (1) Jeff Harris PhD dissertation (focused mainly on forced convection); (2) Blake Lance PhD dissertation (focused mainly on mixed and transient convection). This dissertation is in multi-paper format and includes the article currently submitted and one to be submitted shortly; and, (3) JFE paper on CFD Validation Benchmark for Forced Convection.

  18. Transient Mixed Convection Validation for NGNP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Barton; Schultz, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The results of this project are best described by the papers and dissertations that resulted from the work. They are included in their entirety in this document. They are: (1) Jeff Harris PhD dissertation (focused mainly on forced convection); (2) Blake Lance PhD dissertation (focused mainly on mixed and transient convection). This dissertation is in multi-paper format and includes the article currently submitted and one to be submitted shortly; and, (3) JFE paper on CFD Validation Benchmark for Forced Convection.

  19. Convective and conduction heat transfer study on a mig-type electron gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patire Junior, H.; Barroso, J.J.

    1996-01-01

    A convective and conducting heat transfer study of a magnetron injection electron gun has been made to minimize the temperature distribution in the gun elements while keeping the required operating temperature at 1000 0 C of the emitter. Appropriate materials were selected to reduce thermal losses and to improve the gun design from a constructional point of view aiming at extending the capabilities of the electron gun. A thermal probe to determine the air velocity and the convective heat transfer coefficient has been constructed to determine the external boundary condition of the ceramic shell and external flanges. A study the contact resistance for all the gun elements has been made to minimize the conduction thermal losses. A software has been used to simulate a thermal model considering the three processes of thermal transfer, namely, conduction, convection and radiation and the influence of the physical properties of the materials used. (author). 7 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  20. Optimization of convective-radiative fins by using differential quadrature element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malekzadeh, P.; Rahideh, H.; Karami, G.

    2006-01-01

    A first endeavor to exploit the differential quadrature element method (DQEM) as a simple, accurate and computationally efficient numerical tool for the shape optimization of convective-radiating extended surfaces or fins is made. The formulations are general so that the spatial and spatial-temperature dependent geometrical and thermal parameters can easily be implemented. The thermal conductivity of the fin is assumed to vary as a linear function of the temperature. The effects of a convective-radiative condition at the fin tip and effective convective condition at the fin base are considered. The optimization of fins with uniform and step cross-sections is investigated. The accuracy of the method is demonstrated by comparing its results with those generated by Adomian's decomposition technique, Taylor transformation technique and finite difference method. It is shown that, using few grid points, highly accurate results are obtained. Less computational effort of the method with respect to the finite difference method is shown

  1. Heat Transfer and Flows of Thermal Convection in a Fluid-Saturated Rotating Porous Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhong Kang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal convection at the steady state for high Rayleigh number in a rotating porous half space is investigated. Taking into account the effect of rotation, Darcy equation is extended to incorporate the Coriolis force term in a rotating reference frame. The velocity and temperature fields of thermal convection are obtained by using the homotopy analysis method. The influences of Taylor number and Rayleigh number on the Nusselt number, velocity profile, and temperature distribution are discussed in detail. It is found that the Nusselt number decreases rapidly with the increase of Taylor number but tends to have an asymptotic value. Besides, the rotation can give rise to downward flow in contrast with the upward thermal convection.

  2. Hydrogen transfer in Pb–Li forced convection flow with permeable wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukada, Satoshi, E-mail: sfukada@nucl.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Muneoka, Taiki; Kinjyo, Mao; Yoshimura, Rhosuke; Katayama, Kazunari

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • The paper presents experimental and analytical results of Pb–Li eutectic alloy forced convection flow. • Analytical results are in good agreement with ones of hydrogen permeation in Pb–Li forced convection flow. • The results are useful for the design of liquid blanket of fusion reactors. - Abstract: Transient- or steady-state hydrogen permeation from a primary fluid of Li{sub 17}Pb{sub 83} (Pb–Li) through a permeable tube of Inconel-625 alloy to a secondary Ar purge is investigated experimentally under a forced convection flow in a dual cylindrical tube system. Results of the overall hydrogen permeation flux are correlated in terms of diffusivity, solubility and an average axial velocity of Pb–Li and diffusivity and solubility of the solid wall. Analytical solutions under proper assumptions are derived to simulate the transient- and steady-state rates of the overall hydrogen permeation, and close agreement is obtained between experiment and analysis. Two things are clarified from the comparison: (i) how the steady-state permeation rate is affected by the mass-transfer properties and the average velocity of Pb–Li and the properties of Inconel-625, and (ii) how its transient behavior is done by the diffusivity of the two materials. The results obtained here will give important information to estimate or to analyze the tritium transfer rate in fluidized Pb–Li blankets of DEMO or the future commercial fusion reactors.

  3. The Mechanism of First Raindrops Formation in Deep Convective Clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khain, Alexander; Prabha, Thara; Benmoshe, Nir; Pandithurai, G.; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail

    2013-08-22

    The formation of first raindrops in deep convective clouds is investigated. A combination of observational data analysis and 2-D and 3-D numerical bin microphysical simulations of deep convective clouds suggests that the first raindrops form at the top of undiluted or slightly diluted cores. It is shown that droplet size distributions in these regions are wider and contain more large droplets than in diluted volumes. The results of the study indicate that the initial raindrop formation is determined by the basic microphysical processes within ascending adiabatic volumes. It allows one to predict the height of the formation of first raindrops considering the processes of nucleation, diffusion growth and collisions. The results obtained in the study explain observational results reported by Freud and Rosenfeld (2012) according to which the height of first raindrop formation depends linearly on the droplet number concentration at cloud base. The results also explain why a simple adiabatic parcel model can reproduce this dependence. The present study provides a physical basis for retrieval algorithms of cloud microphysical properties and aerosol properties using satellites proposed by Rosenfeld et al. ( 2012). The study indicates that the role of mixing and entrainment in the formation of the first raindrops is not of crucial importance. It is also shown that low variability of effective and mean volume radii along horizontal traverses, as regularly observed by in situ measurements, can be simulated by high-resolution cloud models, in which mixing is parameterized by a traditional 1.5 order turbulence closure scheme.

  4. Numerical simulations of downward convective overshooting in giants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Chun-Lin; Deng, Li-Cai; Chan, Kwing-Lam

    2009-09-01

    An attempt at understanding downward overshooting in the convective envelopes of post-main-sequence stars has been made on the basis of three-dimensional large-eddy simulations, using artificially modified OPAL opacity and taking into account radiation and ionization in the equation of state. Two types of star, an intermediate-mass star and a massive star, were considered. To avoid a long thermal relaxation time of the intermediate-mass star, we increased the stellar energy flux artificially while trying to maintain a structure close to the one given by a 1D stellar model. A parametric study of the flux factor was performed. For the massive star, no such process was necessary. Numerical results were analysed when the system reached the statistical steady state. It was shown that the penetration distance in pressure scaleheights is of the order of unity. The scaling relations between penetration distance, input flux and vertical velocity fluctuations studied by Singh et al. were checked. The anisotropy of the turbulent convection and the diffusion models of the third-order moments representing the non-local transport were also investigated. These models are dramatically affected by the velocity fields and no universal constant parameters seem to exist. The limitations of the numerical results were also discussed.

  5. Scrape-off layer profile modifications by convective cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myra, J.R.; DIppolito, D.A.

    1996-01-01

    Convective cells (CC close-quote s) are important in understanding density profile modifications induced by ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) antennas. This has motivated the present work in which the effect of CC close-quote s on transport in the scrape-off layer is studied, in the regime where the density gradient scale length L n and the cell size L are comparable. Monte Carlo simulations show that closed cell convection acts to flatten the density profile, and that open cells enhance the particle flow to the wall, depleting the density and yielding profiles similar to those measured near ICRF antennas. A new one-dimensional, two-branch model of CC transport is shown to agree well with the simulations. The model gives rise to two characteristic scale lengths, only one of which is retained in the enhanced diffusion models that are applicable for L n >L. The two-branch model is expected to be useful in analyzing ICRF experiments. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  6. Convection in complex shaped vessel; Convection dans des enceintes de forme complexe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    The 8 november 2000, the SFT (Societe Francaise de Thermique) organized a technical day on the convection in complex shaped vessels. Nine papers have been presented in the domains of the heat transfers, the natural convection, the fluid distribution, the thermosyphon effect, the steam flow in a sterilization cycle and the transformers cooling. Eight papers are analyzed in ETDE and one paper dealing with the natural convection in spent fuels depository is analyzed in INIS. (A.L.B.)

  7. Turbulent diffusion of small particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margolin, L.G.

    1977-11-01

    The diffusion of small, spherical, rigid particles suspended in an incompressible turbulent fluid, but not interacting with each other, was studied. As a stochastic process, the turbulent fluid velocity field is assumed to be homogeneous, isotropic and stationary. Assuming the Stokes regime, a particle of equation of motion is used which includes only the effects of Stokes drag and a virtual mass force and an exact solution is found for the particle velocity correlation function, for all times and initial conditions, in terms of a fluid velocity correlation function measured along the motion of the particle. This shows that for times larger than a certain time scale, the particle velocity correlation becomes stationary. The effect of small shears in the fluid velocity was considered, under the additional restrictions of a certain high frequency regime for the turbulence. The shears convected past the particle much faster than the growth of the boundary layer. New force terms due to the presence of such shears are calculated and incorporated into the equation of motion. A perturbation solution to this equation is constructed, and the resultant particle velocity correlation function and diffusion coefficient are calculated. To lowest order, the particle diffusivity is found to be unaltered by the presence of small mean flow shears. The last model treated is one in which particles traverse a turbulent fluid with a large mean velocity. Among other restrictions, linearized form drag is assumed. The diffusion coefficient for such particles was calculated, and found to be much smaller than the passive scalar diffusion coefficient. This agrees within 5 percent with the experimental results of Snyder and Lumley

  8. Thermally driven convective cells and tokamak edge turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thayer, D.R.; Diamond, P.H.

    1987-07-01

    A unified theory for the dynamics of thermally driven convective cell turbulence is presented. The cells are excited by the combined effects of radiative cooling and resistivity gradient drive. The model also includes impurity dynamics. Parallel thermal and impurity flows enhanced by turbulent radial duffusion regulate and saturate overlapping cells, even in regimes dominated by thermal instability. Transport coefficients and fluctuation levels characteristic of the saturated turbulence are calculated. It is found that the impurity radiation increases transport coefficients for high density plasmas, while the parallel conduction damping, elevated by radial diffusion, in turn quenches the thermal instability. The enhancement due to radiative cooling provides a resolution to the dilemma of explaining the experimental observation that potential fluctuations exceed density fluctuations in the edge plasma (e PHI/T/sub e/ > n/n 0 )

  9. Convection From a Slender Cylender in a Ventilated Room

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per Kvols; Sandberg, M.

    1990-01-01

    with measurements in the boundary layer flow around a heated vertical slender cylinder in a full-scale test room with displacement ventilation. Both velocity and temperature profiles in the boundary layer flow were recorded. The room was ventilated by a low velocity diffuser, standing on the floor, from which air......The equations, based on an integral formulation, for turbulent natural boundary layer flow are solved in both the constant temperature case and in the constant heat flux case. Solutions are found. for convection along both flat plates and cylinders. Theoretical predictions are compared...... with a negative buoyancy was supplied. The vertical distribution of both temperature and contamination in the room was measured as a function of the heat load and the air flow rate. The contaminant distribution showed a clear stratification between clean and contaminated air, while the temperature was increasing...

  10. Steady, three-dimensional, internally heated convection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schubert, G.; Glatzmaier, G.A.; Travis, B.

    1993-01-01

    Numerical calculations have been carried out of steady, symmetric, three-dimensional modes of convection in internally heated, infinite Prandtl number, Boussinesq fluids at a Rayleigh number of 1.4x10 4 in a spherical shell with inner/outer radius of 0.55 and in a 3x3x1 rectangular box. Multiple patterns of convection occur in both geometries. In the Cartesian geometry the patterns are dominated by cylindrical cold downflows and a broad hot upwelling. In the spherical geometry the patterns consist of cylindrical cold downwellings centered either at the vertices of a tetrahedron or the centers of the faces of a cube. The cold downflow cylinders are immersed in a background of upwelling within which there are cylindrical hot concentrations (plumes) and hot halos around the downflows. The forced hot upflow return plumes of internally heated spherical convection are fundamentally different from the buoyancy-driven plumes of heated from below convection

  11. Convective Radio Occultations Final Campaign Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biondi, R. [Atmospheric Radiation Measurement, Washington, DC (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Deep convective systems are destructive weather phenomena that annually cause many deaths and injuries as well as much damage, thereby accounting for major economic losses in several countries. The number and intensity of such phenomena have increased over the last decades in some areas of the globe. Damage is mostly caused by strong winds and heavy rain parameters that are strongly connected to the structure of the particular storm. Convection over land is usually stronger and deeper than over the ocean and some convective systems, known as supercells, also develop tornadoes through processes that remain mostly unclear. The intensity forecast and monitoring of convective systems is one of the major challenges for meteorology because in situ measurements during extreme events are too sparse or unreliable and most ongoing satellite missions do not provide suitable time/space coverage.

  12. Understanding and controlling plasmon-induced convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roxworthy, Brian J.; Bhuiya, Abdul M.; Vanka, Surya P.; Toussaint, Kimani C.

    2014-01-01

    The heat generation and fluid convection induced by plasmonic nanostructures is attractive for optofluidic applications. However, previously published theoretical studies predict only nanometre per second fluid velocities that are inadequate for microscale mass transport. Here we show both theoretically and experimentally that an array of plasmonic nanoantennas coupled to an optically absorptive indium-tin-oxide (ITO) substrate can generate >micrometre per second fluid convection. Crucially, the ITO distributes thermal energy created by the nanoantennas generating an order of magnitude increase in convection velocities compared with nanoantennas on a SiO2 base layer. In addition, the plasmonic array alters absorption in the ITO, causing a deviation from Beer-Lambert absorption that results in an optimum ITO thickness for a given system. This work elucidates the role of convection in plasmonic optical trapping and particle assembly, and opens up new avenues for controlling fluid and mass transport on the micro- and nanoscale.

  13. What favors convective aggregation and why?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Caroline; Bony, Sandrine

    2015-07-01

    The organization of convection is ubiquitous, but its physical understanding remains limited. One particular type of organization is the spatial self-aggregation of convection, taking the form of cloud clusters, or tropical cyclones in the presence of rotation. We show that several physical processes can give rise to self-aggregation and highlight the key features responsible for it, using idealized simulations. Longwave radiative feedbacks yield a "radiative aggregation." In that case, sufficient spatial variability of radiative cooling rates yields a low-level circulation, which induces the upgradient energy transport and radiative-convective instability. Not only do vertically integrated radiative budgets matter but the vertical profile of cooling is also crucial. Convective aggregation is facilitated when downdrafts below clouds are weak ("moisture-memory aggregation"), and this is sufficient to trigger aggregation in the absence of longwave radiative feedbacks. These results shed some light on the sensitivity of self-aggregation to various parameters, including resolution or domain size.

  14. Antartic observations of plasma convection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, H.J.

    1983-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with the use of whistler duct tracking as a diagnostic for the behaviour of plasma in the plasmasphere. As a setting for the results given in the thesis, a broad review is presented which embraces pertinent aspects of previous experimental and theoretical studies of the plasmasphere. From a study of 24 hours of continuous whistler data recorded at Sanae, (L = 3,98), it is shown that associated with quiet magnetic conditions (Av Ksub(p)=1), there exists two plasmasphere bulges centred on about 1700 and 0100 UT. There is evidence that these plasmasphere bulge structures are part of a ground-state or reference base drift pattern. Electric field measurements provide some evidence that quiet time plasmasphere drift behaviour is controlled by the internal ionospheric current systems of dynamo origin, rather than being controlled by magnetospheric convection. Finally, this thesis describes an application of the whistler duct tracking technique to whistler data recorded simultaneously at two ground-based stations (Sanae (L = 3,98) and Halley (L = 4,23)). The identification of common whistler components on each station's data set provides a means of estimating the lifetimes of the associated whistler ducts. Duct lifetimes of as little as 30 minutes are found. Such short lived ducts have important implications for current theories of duct formation

  15. Size dependent diffusive parameters and tensorial diffusion equations in neutronic models for optically small nuclear systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Premuda, F.

    1983-01-01

    Two lines in improved neutron diffusion theory extending the efficiency of finite-difference diffusion codes to the field of optically small systems, are here reviewed. The firs involves the nodal solution for tensorial diffusion equation in slab geometry and tensorial formulation in parallelepiped and cylindrical gemometry; the dependence of critical eigenvalue from small slab thicknesses is also analitically investigated and finally a regularized tensorial diffusion equation is derived for slab. The other line refer to diffusion models formally unchanged with respect to the classical one, but where new size-dependent RTGB definitions for diffusion parameters are adopted, requiring that they allow to reproduce, in diffusion approach, the terms of neutron transport global balance; the trascendental equation for the buckling, arising in slab, sphere and parallelepiped geometry from the above requirement, are reported and the sizedependence of the new diffusion coefficient and extrapolated end point is investigated

  16. Dynamics of acoustic-convective drying of sunflower cake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhilin, A. A.

    2017-10-01

    The dynamics of drying sunflower cake by a new acoustic-convective method has been studied. Unlike the conventional (thermal-convective) method, the proposed method allows moisture to be extracted from porous materials without applying heat to the sample to be dried. Kinetic curves of drying by the thermal-convective and acoustic-convective methods were obtained and analyzed. The advantages of the acoustic-convective extraction of moisture over the thermal-convective method are discussed. The relaxation times of drying were determined for both drying methods. An intermittent drying mode which improves the efficiency of acoustic-convective extraction of moisture is considered.

  17. Quantum diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habib, S.

    1994-01-01

    We consider a simple quantum system subjected to a classical random force. Under certain conditions it is shown that the noise-averaged Wigner function of the system follows an integro-differential stochastic Liouville equation. In the simple case of polynomial noise-couplings this equation reduces to a generalized Fokker-Planck form. With nonlinear noise injection new ''quantum diffusion'' terms rise that have no counterpart in the classical case. Two special examples that are not of a Fokker-Planck form are discussed: the first with a localized noise source and the other with a spatially modulated noise source

  18. Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer Request Permissions Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 10/2017 What is hereditary diffuse gastric cancer? Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC) is a rare ...

  19. Test of the 'glymphatic' hypothesis demonstrates diffusive and aquaporin-4-independent solute transport in rodent brain parenchyma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Alex J; Yao, Xiaoming; Dix, James A; Jin, Byung-Ju; Verkman, Alan S

    2017-08-21

    Transport of solutes through brain involves diffusion and convection. The importance of convective flow in the subarachnoid and paravascular spaces has long been recognized; a recently proposed 'glymphatic' clearance mechanism additionally suggests that aquaporin-4 (AQP4) water channels facilitate convective transport through brain parenchyma. Here, the major experimental underpinnings of the glymphatic mechanism were re-examined by measurements of solute movement in mouse brain following intracisternal or intraparenchymal solute injection. We found that: (i) transport of fluorescent dextrans in brain parenchyma depended on dextran size in a manner consistent with diffusive rather than convective transport; (ii) transport of dextrans in the parenchymal extracellular space, measured by 2-photon fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, was not affected just after cardiorespiratory arrest; and (iii) Aqp4 gene deletion did not impair transport of fluorescent solutes from sub-arachnoid space to brain in mice or rats. Our results do not support the proposed glymphatic mechanism of convective solute transport in brain parenchyma.

  20. CONVECTION IN CONDENSIBLE-RICH ATMOSPHERES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, F. [Department of the Geophysical Sciences, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Pierrehumbert, R. T., E-mail: fding@uchicago.edu [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom)

    2016-05-01

    Condensible substances are nearly ubiquitous in planetary atmospheres. For the most familiar case—water vapor in Earth’s present climate—the condensible gas is dilute, in the sense that its concentration is everywhere small relative to the noncondensible background gases. A wide variety of important planetary climate problems involve nondilute condensible substances. These include planets near or undergoing a water vapor runaway and planets near the outer edge of the conventional habitable zone, for which CO{sub 2} is the condensible. Standard representations of convection in climate models rely on several approximations appropriate only to the dilute limit, while nondilute convection differs in fundamental ways from dilute convection. In this paper, a simple parameterization of convection valid in the nondilute as well as dilute limits is derived and used to discuss the basic character of nondilute convection. The energy conservation properties of the scheme are discussed in detail and are verified in radiative-convective simulations. As a further illustration of the behavior of the scheme, results for a runaway greenhouse atmosphere for both steady instellation and seasonally varying instellation corresponding to a highly eccentric orbit are presented. The latter case illustrates that the high thermal inertia associated with latent heat in nondilute atmospheres can damp out the effects of even extreme seasonal forcing.

  1. The double-diffusive modon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radko, Timour

    Fully developed two-dimensional salt-finger convection is characterized by the appearance of coherent dipolar eddies which carry relatively fresh and cold fluid upward and salty and warm fluid downward. Such structures are prevalent in the regime in which density stratification is close to neutral and the salt-finger instability is extremely vigorous. The structure and translation velocities of modons are discussed in terms of the asymptotic expansion in which the background density ratio approaches unity. It is argued that the vertical salt flux is driven primarily by double-diffusive modons, which makes it possible to derive explicit expressions for the mixing rates of temperature and salinity as a function of their background gradients. Predictions of the proposed mixing model are successfully tested by direct numerical simulations.

  2. Extended icosahedral structures

    CERN Document Server

    Jaric, Marko V

    1989-01-01

    Extended Icosahedral Structures discusses the concepts about crystal structures with extended icosahedral symmetry. This book is organized into six chapters that focus on actual modeling of extended icosahedral crystal structures. This text first presents a tiling approach to the modeling of icosahedral quasiperiodic crystals. It then describes the models for icosahedral alloys based on random connections between icosahedral units, with particular emphasis on diffraction properties. Other chapters examine the glassy structures with only icosahedral orientational order and the extent of tra

  3. Extending Database Integration Technology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Buneman, Peter

    1999-01-01

    Formal approaches to the semantics of databases and database languages can have immediate and practical consequences in extending database integration technologies to include a vastly greater range...

  4. Global 3D radiation-hydrodynamics models of AGB stars. Effects of convection and radial pulsations on atmospheric structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freytag, B.; Liljegren, S.; Höfner, S.

    2017-04-01

    Context. Observations of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars with increasing spatial resolution reveal new layers of complexity of atmospheric processes on a variety of scales. Aims: To analyze the physical mechanisms that cause asymmetries and surface structures in observed images, we use detailed 3D dynamical simulations of AGB stars; these simulations self-consistently describe convection and pulsations. Methods: We used the CO5BOLD radiation-hydrodynamics code to produce an exploratory grid of global "star-in-a-box" models of the outer convective envelope and the inner atmosphere of AGB stars to study convection, pulsations, and shock waves and their dependence on stellar and numerical parameters. Results: The model dynamics are governed by the interaction of long-lasting giant convection cells, short-lived surface granules, and strong, radial, fundamental-mode pulsations. Radial pulsations and shorter wavelength, traveling, acoustic waves induce shocks on various scales in the atmosphere. Convection, waves, and shocks all contribute to the dynamical pressure and, thus, to an increase of the stellar radius and to a levitation of material into layers where dust can form. Consequently, the resulting relation of pulsation period and stellar radius is shifted toward larger radii compared to that of non-linear 1D models. The dependence of pulsation period on luminosity agrees well with observed relations. The interaction of the pulsation mode with the non-stationary convective flow causes occasional amplitude changes and phase shifts. The regularity of the pulsations decreases with decreasing gravity as the relative size of convection cells increases. The model stars do not have a well-defined surface. Instead, the light is emitted from a very extended inhomogeneous atmosphere with a complex dynamic pattern of high-contrast features. Conclusions: Our models self-consistently describe convection, convectively generated acoustic noise, fundamental-mode radial

  5. Thermal convection and nonlinear effects of a superfluid 3He-4He mixture in a porous medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chien, L.C.L.

    1986-01-01

    The convective instability of one-component classical fluids in a porous medium confined between two unbounded slabs was studied. This system behaves like a high Prandtl number bulk fluid. It has boundary conditions similar to the stress-free boundary conditions of bulk one-component classical fluids. Both the amplitude expansion method and the Galerkin method were used to investigate the nonlinear steady convection. Two dimensional rolls are the only stable motion at the onset of convection. Beyond threshold, the steady convection rolls become unstable to formation of cross-roll and zigzag instabilities. Applying the phase-dynamics approach for the zigzag instability, the author obtained the diffusion coefficient D, which can signal the onset of instability. Also investigated was the convective instability of superfluid 3 He- 4 He mixtures in porous media. Assuming no interaction between the average superflow and the porous medium and treating the normal flow in the equation of motion like a classical fluid in a porous medium, it was found that the superfluid mixtures in a porous medium. To investigate the effects of a lateral boundary, the convective instability of classical one-component fluids in porous media inside a box was studied. The zigzag instability does not exist because of the boundary conditions at the side of the box

  6. Mixed convection around calandria tubes in a ¼ scale CANDU-6 moderator circulation tank

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atkins, M.D.; Rossouw, D.J.; Boer, M. [Nuclear Science Division, School of Mechanical and Aeronautical Engineering, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg (South Africa); Kim, T., E-mail: tong.kim@wits.ac.za [Nuclear Science Division, School of Mechanical and Aeronautical Engineering, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg (South Africa); Rhee, B.W.; Kim, H.T. [Severe Accident and PHWR Safety Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • A secondary jet is formed at a stagnation region and is directed towards the center of the MCT. • The secondary jet undergoes the significant dissipation and mixing due to calandria tubes (CTs). • Its cooling effectiveness is reduced on the CTs in the bottom of the MCT. • With forced convection dominance, peak heat transfer is on the upper CT surface. • With natural convection dominance, peak heat transfer is on the lower CT surface. - Abstract: This study experimentally characterizes mixed convection around calandria tubes (CTs) in a ¼ scale CANDU-6 moderator circulation tank (MCT) that uses air as the working fluid. In a full scale CANDU-6 reactor that undergoes a postulated dual failure with a loss-of-coolant accident without the emergency core cooling system available, mixed convection heat transfer occurs around the CTs. The cooling effectiveness of the moderator is diminished as an emergency heat sink if overheating eventually leads to film boiling. To prevent the onset of film boiling, local sub-cooling margins of the moderator needs to be maintained or else the critical heat flux should be increased. Circulating the moderator which interacts with the overheated CTs increases the heat transfer into the moderator which may suppress film boiling. The present experimental results demonstrate that the cooling effectiveness of the circulating moderator, in particular the secondary jet, is attenuated substantially as it is convected away from the inner wall towards the center of the MCT. The momentum of the secondary jet is diffused through the CTs. At a low jet Reynolds number, the secondary jet becomes ineffective so that some overheated CTs positioned in the other half of the MCT are cooled only by natural convection.

  7. The Impact of Reduced Gravity on Free Convective Heat Transfer from a Finite, Flat, Vertical Plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotto, Michael A.; Johnson, Kirstyn M.; Nie, Christopher W.; Klaus, David M.

    2017-10-01

    Convective heat transfer is governed by a number of factors including various fluid properties, the presence of a thermal gradient, geometric configuration, flow condition, and gravity. Empirically-derived analytical relationships can be used to estimate convection as a function of these governing parameters. Although it is relatively straightforward to experimentally quantify the contributions of the majority of these variables, it is logistically difficult to assess the influence of reduced-gravity due to practical limitations of establishing this environment. Therefore, in order to explore this regime, a series of tests was conducted to evaluate convection under reduced-gravity conditions averaging 0.45 m/sec2 (0.05 g) achieved aboard a parabolic aircraft. The results showed a reduction in net heat transfer of approximately 61% in flight relative to a 1 g terrestrial baseline using the same setup. The average experimental Nusselt Number of 19.05 ± 1.41 statistically correlated with the predicted value of 18.90 ± 0.63 (N = 13), estimated using the Churchill-Chu correlation for free convective heat transfer from a finite, flat, vertical plate. Extrapolating this to similar performance in true microgravity (10-6 g) indicates that these conditions should yield a Nusselt Number of 1.27, which is 2.6% the magnitude of free convection at 1 g, or a reduction of 97.4%. With advection essentially eliminated, heat transfer becomes limited to diffusion and radiation, which are gravity-independent and nearly equivalent in magnitude in this case. These results offer a general guideline for integrating components that utilize natural (free) convective gas cooling in a spacecraft habitat and properly sizing the thermal control system.

  8. Singularités de la rhéologie de l'air humide saturé et diffusion moléculaire dans les milieux nuageuxSingularities in the rheology of saturated humid air, and molecular diffusion in cloods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bois, Pierre-Antoine

    Under realistic assumptions, we propose a thermodynamical formalism providing, for the moist-saturated air (cloudy air), a generalized Fick's law. This Fick's law leads to a double diffusive rheology with Dufour effect. The form taken by the energy equation is slightly different from the classical form used in convection problems. We compare the equations with those of the convection in moist unsaturated air (the Dufour effect and all double diffusive effects disappear in this case). As application we demonstrate some consequences of this diffusion in cloudy convection. To cite this article: P.A. Bois, C. R. Mecanique 330 (2002) 627-632.

  9. Fluid flow and convective transport of solutes within the intervertebral disc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Stephen J; Ito, Keita; Nolte, Lutz P

    2004-02-01

    Previous experimental and analytical studies of solute transport in the intervertebral disc have demonstrated that for small molecules diffusive transport alone fulfils the nutritional needs of disc cells. It has been often suggested that fluid flow into and within the disc may enhance the transport of larger molecules. The goal of the study was to predict the influence of load-induced interstitial fluid flow on mass transport in the intervertebral disc. An iterative procedure was used to predict the convective transport of physiologically relevant molecules within the disc. An axisymmetric, poroelastic finite-element structural model of the disc was developed. The diurnal loading was divided into discrete time steps. At each time step, the fluid flow within the disc due to compression or swelling was calculated. A sequentially coupled diffusion/convection model was then employed to calculate solute transport, with a constant concentration of solute being provided at the vascularised endplates and outer annulus. Loading was simulated for a complete diurnal cycle, and the relative convective and diffusive transport was compared for solutes with molecular weights ranging from 400 Da to 40 kDa. Consistent with previous studies, fluid flow did not enhance the transport of low-weight solutes. During swelling, interstitial fluid flow increased the unidirectional penetration of large solutes by approximately 100%. Due to the bi-directional temporal nature of disc loading, however, the net effect of convective transport over a full diurnal cycle was more limited (30% increase). Further study is required to determine the significance of large solutes and the timing of their delivery for disc physiology.

  10. Tides in differentially rotating convective envelopes. II. The tidal coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scharlemann, E.T.

    1982-01-01

    The tidal coupling between a star with an extended, differentially rotating convective envelope, and its companion in a close binary system, is calculated from the tidal velocity field derived in Paper I. The derived coupling torque can be tested using observations of RS Canum Venaticorum systems, for which a photometric wave in the light curve provides an accurate stellar rotation rate, and for which observed orbital period changes require the stars in the systems to be coupled. The coupling torque is sufficient to explain the nearly synchronous rotation of the active star in RS CVn systems, despite the observed orbital period changes, but may not be able to explain the extreme tightness of the coupling implied by the very long periods for the migration of the photometric waves in the systems. This conclusion depends on the origin of the orbital period changes, but not on the nature of the wave or the wave migration. When the coupling torque vanishes, a specific latitude at the surface of the convective star will exactly corotate with the binary system: this corotation latitude is calculated. Finally, it is shown that the additional viscous terms introduced by tides should not suppress differential rotation in binary systems with RS Cvn parameters

  11. Vertical natural convection: application of the unifying theory of thermal convection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ng, C.S.; Ooi, A.; Lohse, Detlef; Chung, D.

    2015-01-01

    Results from direct numerical simulations of vertical natural convection at Rayleigh numbers 1.0×10 5 –1.0×10 9 and Prandtl number 0.709 support a generalised applicability of the Grossmann–Lohse (GL) theory, which was originally developed for horizontal natural (Rayleigh–Bénard) convection. In

  12. An optimal analysis for Darcy-Forchheimer 3D flow of Carreau nanofluid with convectively heated surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayat, Tasawar; Aziz, Arsalan; Muhammad, Taseer; Alsaedi, Ahmed

    2018-06-01

    Darcy-Forchheimer three dimensional flow of Carreau nanoliquid induced by a linearly stretchable surface with convective boundary condition has been analyzed. Buongiorno model has been employed to elaborate thermophoresis and Brownian diffusion effects. Zero nanoparticles mass flux and convective surface conditions are implemented at the boundary. The governing problems are nonlinear. Optimal homotopic procedure has been used to tackle the governing mathematical system. Graphical results clearly depict the outcome of temperature and concentration fields. Surface drag coefficients and local Nusselt number are also plotted and discussed.

  13. An analytical method for determining the temperature dependent moisture diffusivities of pumpkin seeds during drying process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Can, Ahmet [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Trakya, 22030 Edirne (Turkey)

    2007-02-15

    This paper presents an analytical method, which determines the moisture diffusion coefficients for the natural and forced convection hot air drying of pumpkin seeds and their temperature dependence. In order to obtain scientific data, the pumpkin seed drying process was investigated under both natural and forced hot air convection regimes. This paper presents the experimental results in which the drying air was heated by solar energy. (author)

  14. Extended family medicine training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slade, Steve; Ross, Shelley; Lawrence, Kathrine; Archibald, Douglas; Mackay, Maria Palacios; Oandasan, Ivy F.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To examine trends in family medicine training at a time when substantial pedagogic change is under way, focusing on factors that relate to extended family medicine training. Design Aggregate-level secondary data analysis based on the Canadian Post-MD Education Registry. Setting Canada. Participants All Canadian citizens and permanent residents who were registered in postgraduate family medicine training programs within Canadian faculties of medicine from 1995 to 2013. Main outcome measures Number and proportion of family medicine residents exiting 2-year and extended (third-year and above) family medicine training programs, as well as the types and numbers of extended training programs offered in 2015. Results The proportion of family medicine trainees pursuing extended training almost doubled during the study period, going from 10.9% in 1995 to 21.1% in 2013. Men and Canadian medical graduates were more likely to take extended family medicine training. Among the 5 most recent family medicine exit cohorts (from 2009 to 2013), 25.9% of men completed extended training programs compared with 18.3% of women, and 23.1% of Canadian medical graduates completed extended training compared with 13.6% of international medical graduates. Family medicine programs vary substantially with respect to the proportion of their trainees who undertake extended training, ranging from a low of 12.3% to a high of 35.1% among trainees exiting from 2011 to 2013. Conclusion New initiatives, such as the Triple C Competency-based Curriculum, CanMEDS–Family Medicine, and Certificates of Added Competence, have emerged as part of family medicine education and credentialing. In acknowledgment of the potential effect of these initiatives, it is important that future research examine how pedagogic change and, in particular, extended training shapes the care family physicians offer their patients. As part of that research it will be important to measure the breadth and uptake of

  15. An extended validation of the last generation of particle finite element method for free surface flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimenez, Juan M.; González, Leo M.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, a new generation of the particle method known as Particle Finite Element Method (PFEM), which combines convective particle movement and a fixed mesh resolution, is applied to free surface flows. This interesting variant, previously described in the literature as PFEM-2, is able to use larger time steps when compared to other similar numerical tools which implies shorter computational times while maintaining the accuracy of the computation. PFEM-2 has already been extended to free surface problems, being the main topic of this paper a deep validation of this methodology for a wider range of flows. To accomplish this task, different improved versions of discontinuous and continuous enriched basis functions for the pressure field have been developed to capture the free surface dynamics without artificial diffusion or undesired numerical effects when different density ratios are involved. A collection of problems has been carefully selected such that a wide variety of Froude numbers, density ratios and dominant dissipative cases are reported with the intention of presenting a general methodology, not restricted to a particular range of parameters, and capable of using large time-steps. The results of the different free-surface problems solved, which include: Rayleigh-Taylor instability, sloshing problems, viscous standing waves and the dam break problem, are compared to well validated numerical alternatives or experimental measurements obtaining accurate approximations for such complex flows.

  16. Unsteady free convection MHD flow between two heated vertical parallel plates in induced magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborty, S.; Borkakati, A.K.

    1999-01-01

    An unsteady viscous incompressible free convection flow of an electrically conducting fluid between two heated vertical parallel plates is considered in presence of a uniform magnetic field applied transversely to the flow. The approximate analytical solutions for velocity, induced field and temperature distributions are obtained for small and large magnetic Reynolds number. The skin-friction on the two plates are obtained and plotted graphically. The problem is extended for thermometric case. (author)

  17. Convective transport resistance in the vitreous humor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penkova, Anita; Sadhal, Satwindar; Ratanakijsuntorn, Komsan; Moats, Rex; Tang, Yang; Hughes, Patrick; Robinson, Michael; Lee, Susan

    2012-11-01

    It has been established by MRI visualization experiments that the convection of nanoparticles and large molecules with high rate of water flow in the vitreous humor will experience resistance, depending on the respective permeabilities of the injected solute. A set of experiments conducted with Gd-DTPA (Magnevist, Bayer AG, Leverkusen, Germany) and 30 nm gadolinium-based particles (Gado CELLTrackTM, Biopal, Worcester, MA) as MRI contrast agents showed that the degree of convective transport in this Darcy-type porous medium varies between the two solutes. These experiments consisted of injecting a mixture of the two (a 30 μl solution of 2% Magnevist and 1% nanoparticles) at the middle of the vitreous of an ex vivo whole bovine eye and subjecting the vitreous to water flow rate of 100 μl/min. The water (0.9% saline solution) was injected at the top of the eye, and was allowed to drain through small slits cut at the bottom of the eyeball. After 50 minutes of pumping, MRI images showed that the water flow carried the Gd-DTPA farther than the nanoparticles, even though the two solutes, being mixed, were subjected to the same convective flow conditions. We find that the convected solute lags the water flow, depending on the solute permeability. The usual convection term needs to be adjusted to allow for the filtration effect on the larger particles in the form (1- σ) u . ∇ c with important implications for the modeling of such systems.

  18. On interpreting studies of tracer transport by deep cumulus convection and its effects on atmospheric chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. G. Lawrence

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Global chemistry-transport models (CTMs and chemistry-GCMs (CGCMs generally simulate vertical tracer transport by deep convection separately from the advective transport by the mean winds, even though a component of the mean transport, for instance in the Hadley and Walker cells, occurs in deep convective updrafts. This split treatment of vertical transport has various implications for CTM simulations. In particular, it has led to a misinterpretation of several sensitivity simulations in previous studies in which the parameterized convective transport of one or more tracers is neglected. We describe this issue in terms of simulated fluxes and fractions of these fluxes representing various physical and non-physical processes. We then show that there is a significant overlap between the convective and large-scale mean advective vertical air mass fluxes in the CTM MATCH, and discuss the implications which this has for interpreting previous and future sensitivity simulations, as well as briefly noting other related implications such as numerical diffusion.

  19. Marangoni Convection during Free Electron Laser Nitriding of Titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höche, Daniel; Müller, Sven; Rapin, Gerd; Shinn, Michelle; Remdt, Elvira; Gubisch, Maik; Schaaf, Peter

    2009-08-01

    Pure titanium was treated by free electron laser (FEL) radiation in a nitrogen atmosphere. As a result, nitrogen diffusion occurs and a TiN coating was synthesized. Local gradients of interfacial tension due to the local heating lead to a Marangoni convection, which determines the track properties. Because of the experimental inaccessibility of time-dependent occurrences, finite element calculations were performed, to determine the physical processes such as heat transfer, melt flow, and mass transport. In order to calculate the surface deformation of the gas-liquid interface, the level set approach was used. The equations were modified and coupled with heat-transfer and diffusion equations. The process was characterized by dimensionless numbers such as the Reynolds, Peclet, and capillary numbers, to obtain more information about the acting forces and the coating development. Moreover, the nitrogen distribution was calculated using the corresponding transport equation. The simulations were compared with cross-sectional micrographs of the treated titanium sheets and checked for their validity. Finally, the process presented is discussed and compared with similar laser treatments.

  20. Temperature boundary layer profiles in turbulent Rayleigh-Benard convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ching, Emily S. C.; Emran, Mohammad S.; Horn, Susanne; Shishkina, Olga

    2017-11-01

    Classical boundary-layer theory for steady flows cannot adequately describe the boundary layer profiles in turbulent Rayleigh-Benard convection. We have developed a thermal boundary layer equation which takes into account fluctuations in terms of an eddy thermal diffusivity. Based on Prandtl's mixing length ideas, we relate the eddy thermal diffusivity to the stream function. With this proposed relation, we can solve the thermal boundary layer equation and obtain a closed-form expression for the dimensionless mean temperature profile in terms of two independent parameters: θ(ξ) =1/b∫0b ξ [ 1 +3a3/b3(η - arctan(η)) ] - c dη , where ξ is the similarity variable and the parameters a, b, and c are related by the condition θ(∞) = 1 . With a proper choice of the parameters, our predictions of the temperature profile are in excellent agreement with the results of our direct numerical simulations for a wide range of Prandtl numbers (Pr), from Pr=0.01 to Pr=2547.9. OS, ME and SH acknowledge the financial support by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) under Grants Sh405/4-2 (Heisenberg fellowship), Sh405/3-2 and Ho 5890/1-1, respectively.

  1. CONVECTIVE DRYING OF CHERRY TOMATO: STUDY OF SKIN EFFECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. KHAMA

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A whole single cherry tomato was dried in a forced convective micro-dryer. The experiments were carried out at constant air velocity and humidity and temperatures of 50, 60, 70 °C. In order to study the effect of the skin, two sets of experiments were performed using a tomato with and without skin (easily removed. Shorter drying times were obtained when increasing drying temperatures as well as when removing sample skin. X-ray microtomography, a non-destructive 3D imaging technique was used to follow shrinkage of the samples. This phenomenon was introduced in the modelling part of this study. Analytical solutions of the Fick’law were used to determine the diffusion coefficient at the three temperatures studied, and then the activation energy was obtained through fitting the Arrhenius equation. The skin effect was clearly evidenced by showing that the mass transfer parameter values of an original tomato with skin were largely smaller than the one without skin. Indeed, the moisture effective diffusivity ranged from 2.56×10-11 to 7.67×10-11 m2·s-1 with activation energy of 50430 J·mol-1 for tomato with skin an ranged from 4.59×10-10 m2·s-1 to 6.73×10-10 m2·s-1 with activation energy of 17640 J.mol-1 for tomato without skin.

  2. Modelling of intermittent microwave convective drying: parameter sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Zhijun

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The reliability of the predictions of a mathematical model is a prerequisite to its utilization. A multiphase porous media model of intermittent microwave convective drying is developed based on the literature. The model considers the liquid water, gas and solid matrix inside of food. The model is simulated by COMSOL software. Its sensitivity parameter is analysed by changing the parameter values by ±20%, with the exception of several parameters. The sensitivity analysis of the process of the microwave power level shows that each parameter: ambient temperature, effective gas diffusivity, and evaporation rate constant, has significant effects on the process. However, the surface mass, heat transfer coefficient, relative and intrinsic permeability of the gas, and capillary diffusivity of water do not have a considerable effect. The evaporation rate constant has minimal parameter sensitivity with a ±20% value change, until it is changed 10-fold. In all results, the temperature and vapour pressure curves show the same trends as the moisture content curve. However, the water saturation at the medium surface and in the centre show different results. Vapour transfer is the major mass transfer phenomenon that affects the drying process.

  3. The Extended Enterprise concept

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lars Bjørn; Vesterager, Johan; Gobbi, Chiara

    1999-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the work that has been done regarding the Extended Enterprise concept in the Common Concept team of Globeman 21 including references to results deliverables concerning the development of the Extended Enterprise concept. The first section presents the basic concept...... picture from Globeman21, which illustrates the Globeman21 way of realising the Extended Enterprise concept. The second section presents the Globeman21 EE concept in a life cycle perspective, which to a large extent is based on the thoughts and ideas behind GERAM (ISO/DIS 15704)....

  4. Performance analysis of greenhouse dryer by using insulated north-wall under natural convection mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant Singh Chauhan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A prototype north wall insulated greenhouse dryer has been fabricated and tested in no-load conditions under natural convection mode. Experimentation has been conducted in two different cases. Case-I is when solar collector placed inside the dryer and Case-II is North wall insulated greenhouse dryer without solar collector. Coefficient of performance, heat utilisation factor, convective heat transfer coefficient and coefficient of diffusivity have been evaluated in thermal performance analysis. The difference of the highest convective heat transfer coefficient of both cases is 29.094W/m2°C which is showing the effectiveness of insulated north wall and solar collector. The maximum coefficient of diffusivity (0.0827 was achieved during the third day of experiment in Case-II. The inside room temperature of wall insulated greenhouse dryer for Case-I is 4.11%, 5.08 % and 11.61 % higher than the Case-II during the day 1, day 2 and day 3 respectively. This result is also showing the effectiveness of solar collector and insulated north wall. The highest heat utilisation factor (0.616 is obtained during the second day for Case-I while for Case-II it is 0.769 during the third day of experimentation. Maximum coefficient of performance achieved is 0.892 during the third day of the experiment for Case-I whereas 0.953 is obtained on the first day of experimentation for Case-II.

  5. Convection due to an unstable density difference across a permeable membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puthenveettil, Baburaj A.; Arakeri, Jaywant H.

    We study natural convection driven by unstable concentration differences of sodium chloride (NaCl) across a horizontal permeable membrane at Rayleigh numbers (Ra) of 1010 to 1011 and Schmidt number (Sc)=600. A layer of brine lies over a layer of distilled water, separated by the membrane, in square-cross-section tanks. The membrane is permeable enough to allow a small flow across it at higher driving potentials. Based on the predominant mode of transport across the membrane, three regimes of convection, namely an advection regime, a diffusion regime and a combined regime, are identified. The near-membrane flow in all the regimes consists of sheet plumes formed from the unstable layers of fluid near the membrane. In the advection regime observed at higher concentration differences (Bb) show a common log-normal probability density function at all Ra. We propose a phenomenology which predicts /line{lambda}_b sqrt{Z_w Z_{V_i}}, where Zw and Z_{V_i} are, respectively, the near-wall length scales in Rayleighnard convection (RBC) and due to the advection velocity. In the combined regime, which occurs at intermediate values of C/2)4/3. At lower driving potentials, in the diffusion regime, the flux scaling is similar to that in turbulent RBC.

  6. Convective mixing in helium white dwarfs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vauclair, G.; Fontaine, G.

    1979-01-01

    The conditions under which convective mixing episodes take place between the helium envelopes and the underlying carbon layers in helium-rich white dwarfs are investigated. It is found that, for essentially any value of the initial helium content less than the maximum mass a helium convection zone can have, mixing does occur, and leads, in the vast majority of cases, to an almost pure carbon superficial composition. Mixing products that show only traces of carbon while retaining helium-dominated envelopes are possible only if the initial helium content is quite close to the maximum possible mass of the helium convection zone. In the presence of turbulence, this restriction could be relaxed, however, and the helium-rich lambda4670 stars may possibly be explained in this fashion

  7. Solutal convection induced by dissolution. Influence on erosion dynamics and interface shaping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berhanu, Michael; Philippi, Julien; Cohen, Caroline; Derr, Julien; Courrech du Pont, Sylvain

    2017-04-01

    Rock fractures invaded by a water flow, are often subjected to dissolution, which let grow and evolve the initial fracture network, by evacuating the eroded minerals under a solute form. In the case of fast kinetic of dissolution, local erosion rate is set by the advection of the solute. The erosion velocity decreases indeed with the solute concentration at the interface and vanishes when this concentration reaches the saturation value. Even in absence of an imposed or external flow, advection can drive the dissolution, when buoyancy effects due to gravity induce a solutal convection flow, which controls the erosive dynamics and modifies the shape of the dissolving interface. Here, we investigate using model experiments with fast dissolving materials and numerical simulations in simplified situations, solutal convection induced by dissolution. Results are interpreted regarding a linear stability analysis of the corresponding solutal Rayleigh-Benard instability. A dissolving surface is suspended above a water height, initially at rest. In a first step, solute flux is transported through a growing diffusion layer. Then after an onset time, once the layer exceeds critical width, convection flow starts under the form of falling plumes. A dynamic equilibrium results in average from births and deaths of intermittent plumes, setting the size of the solute concentration boundary layer at the interface and thus the erosion velocity. Solutal convection can also induce a pattern on the dissolving interface. We show experimentally with suspended and inclined blocks of salt and sugar, that in a linear stage, the first wavelength of the dissolution pattern corresponds to the wavelength of the convection instability. Then pattern evolves to more complex shapes due to non-linear interactions between the flow and the eroded interface. More generally, we inquire what are the conditions to observe a such solutal convection instability in geological situations and if the properties of

  8. Self-diffusion in isotopically enriched silicon carbide and its correlation with dopant diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rueschenschmidt, K.; Bracht, H.; Stolwijk, N.A.; Laube, M.; Pensl, G.; Brandes, G.R.

    2004-01-01

    Diffusion of 13 C and 30 Si in silicon carbide was performed with isotopically enriched 4H- 28 Si 12 C/ nat SiC heterostructures which were grown by chemical vapor phase epitaxy. After diffusion annealing at temperatures between 2000 deg. C and 2200 deg. C the 30 Si and 13 C profiles were measured by means of secondary ion mass spectrometry. We found that the Si and C diffusivity is of the same order of magnitude but several orders of magnitude lower than earlier data reported in the literature. Both Si and C tracer diffusion coefficients are in satisfactory agreement with the native point defect contribution to self-diffusion deduced from B diffusion in SiC. This reveals that the native defect which mediates B diffusion also controls self-diffusion. Assuming that B atoms within the extended tail region of B profiles are mainly dissolved on C sites, we propose that B diffuses via the kick-out mechanism involving C interstitials. Accordingly, C diffusion should proceed mainly via C interstitials. The mechanism of Si diffusion remains unsolved but Si may diffuse via both Si vacancies and interstitials, with the preference for either species depending on the doping level

  9. Non-kinematic Flux-transport Dynamos Including the Effects of Diffusivity Quenching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichimura, Chiaki; Yokoyama, Takaaki [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, The University of Tokyo, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2017-04-10

    Turbulent magnetic diffusivity is quenched when strong magnetic fields suppress turbulent motion in a phenomenon known as diffusivity quenching. Diffusivity quenching can provide a mechanism for amplifying magnetic field and influencing global velocity fields through Lorentz force feedback. To investigate this effect, we conducted mean field flux-transport dynamo simulations that included the effects of diffusivity quenching in a non-kinematic regime. We found that toroidal magnetic field strength is amplified by up to approximately 1.5 times in the convection zone as a result of diffusivity quenching. This amplification is much weaker than that in kinematic cases as a result of Lorentz force feedback on the system’s differential rotation. While amplified toroidal fields lead to the suppression of equatorward meridional flow locally near the base of the convection zone, large-scale equatorward transport of magnetic flux via meridional flow, which is the essential process of the flux-transport dynamo, is sustainable in our calculations.

  10. An extended technicolor model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appelquist, T.; Terning, J.

    1994-01-01

    An extended technicolor model is constructed. Quark and lepton masses, spontaneous CP violation, and precision electroweak measurements are discussed. Dynamical symmetry breaking is analyzed using the concept of the big MAC (most attractive channel)

  11. Extending mine life

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    Mine layouts, new machines and techniques, research into problem areas of ground control and so on, are highlighted in this report on extending mine life. The main resources taken into account are coal mining, uranium mining, molybdenum and gold mining

  12. Rational extended thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Müller, Ingo

    1998-01-01

    Ordinary thermodynamics provides reliable results when the thermodynamic fields are smooth, in the sense that there are no steep gradients and no rapid changes. In fluids and gases this is the domain of the equations of Navier-Stokes and Fourier. Extended thermodynamics becomes relevant for rapidly varying and strongly inhomogeneous processes. Thus the propagation of high­ frequency waves, and the shape of shock waves, and the regression of small-scale fluctuation are governed by extended thermodynamics. The field equations of ordinary thermodynamics are parabolic while extended thermodynamics is governed by hyperbolic systems. The main ingredients of extended thermodynamics are • field equations of balance type, • constitutive quantities depending on the present local state and • entropy as a concave function of the state variables. This set of assumptions leads to first order quasi-linear symmetric hyperbolic systems of field equations; it guarantees the well-posedness of initial value problems and f...

  13. On the relationship between finger width, velocity, and fluxes in thermohaline convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreenivas, K. R.; Singh, O. P.; Srinivasan, J.

    2009-02-01

    Double-diffusive finger convection occurs in many natural processes. The theories for double-diffusive phenomena that exist at present consider systems with linear stratification in temperature and salinity. The double-diffusive systems with step change in salinity and temperature are, however, not amenable to simple stability analysis. Hence factors that control the width of the finger, velocity, and fluxes in systems that have step change in temperature and salinity have not been understood so far. In this paper we provide new physical insight regarding factors that influence finger convection in two-layer double-diffusive system through two-dimensional numerical simulations. Simulations have been carried out for density stability ratios (Rρ) from 1.5 to 10. For each density stability ratio, the thermal Rayleigh number (RaT) has been systematically varied from 7×103 to 7×108. Results from these simulations show how finger width, velocity, and flux ratios in finger convection are interrelated and the influence of governing parameters such as density stability ratio and the thermal Rayleigh number. The width of the incipient fingers at the time of onset of instability has been shown to vary as RaT-1/3. Velocity in the finger varies as RaT1/3/Rρ. Results from simulation agree with the scale analysis presented in the paper. Our results demonstrate that wide fingers have lower velocities and flux ratios compared to those in narrow fingers. This result contradicts present notions about the relation between finger width and flux ratio. A counterflow heat-exchanger analogy is used in understanding the dependence of flux ratio on finger width and velocity.

  14. Diffusion archeology for diffusion progression history reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sefer, Emre; Kingsford, Carl

    2016-11-01

    Diffusion through graphs can be used to model many real-world processes, such as the spread of diseases, social network memes, computer viruses, or water contaminants. Often, a real-world diffusion cannot be directly observed while it is occurring - perhaps it is not noticed until some time has passed, continuous monitoring is too costly, or privacy concerns limit data access. This leads to the need to reconstruct how the present state of the diffusion came to be from partial diffusion data. Here, we tackle the problem of reconstructing a diffusion history from one or more snapshots of the diffusion state. This ability can be invaluable to learn when certain computer nodes are infected or which people are the initial disease spreaders to control future diffusions. We formulate this problem over discrete-time SEIRS-type diffusion models in terms of maximum likelihood. We design methods that are based on submodularity and a novel prize-collecting dominating-set vertex cover (PCDSVC) relaxation that can identify likely diffusion steps with some provable performance guarantees. Our methods are the first to be able to reconstruct complete diffusion histories accurately in real and simulated situations. As a special case, they can also identify the initial spreaders better than the existing methods for that problem. Our results for both meme and contaminant diffusion show that the partial diffusion data problem can be overcome with proper modeling and methods, and that hidden temporal characteristics of diffusion can be predicted from limited data.

  15. The dialogically extended mind

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fusaroli, Riccardo; Gangopadhyay, Nivedita; Tylén, Kristian

    2014-01-01

    A growing conceptual and empirical literature is advancing the idea that language extends our cognitive skills. One of the most influential positions holds that language – qua material symbols – facilitates individual thought processes by virtue of its material properties. Extending upon this model...... relate our approach to other ideas about collective minds and review a number of empirical studies to identify the mechanisms enabling the constitution of interpersonal cognitive systems....

  16. Extending Mondrian Memory Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    a kernel semaphore is locked or unlocked. In addition, we extended the system call interface to receive notifications about user-land locking...operations (such as calls to the mutex and semaphore code provided by the C library). By patching the dynamically loadable GLibC5, we are able to test... semaphores , and spinlocks. RTO-MP-IST-091 10- 9 Extending Mondrian Memory Protection to loading extension plugins. This prevents any untrusted code

  17. Extended Life Coolant Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-06

    number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 06-06-2016 2. REPORT TYPE Interim Report 3. DATES COVERED ... Corrosion Testing of Traditional and Extended Life Coolants 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Hansen, Gregory A. T...providing vehicle specific coolants. Several laboratory corrosion tests were performed according to ASTM D1384 and D2570, but with a 2.5x extended time

  18. Natural Convective Heat Transfer from Narrow Plates

    CERN Document Server

    Oosthuizen, Patrick H

    2013-01-01

    Natural Convective Heat Transfer from Narrow Plates deals with a heat transfer situation that is of significant practical importance but which is not adequately dealt with in any existing textbooks or in any widely available review papers. The aim of the book is to introduce the reader to recent studies of natural convection from narrow plates including the effects of plate edge conditions, plate inclination, thermal conditions at the plate surface and interaction of the flows over adjacent plates. Both numerical and experimental studies are discussed and correlation equations based on the results of these studies are reviewed.

  19. Introductory analysis of Benard-Marangoni convection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maroto, J A; Perez-Munuzuri, V; Romero-Cano, M S

    2007-01-01

    We describe experiments on Benard-Marangoni convection which permit a useful understanding of the main concepts involved in this phenomenon such as, for example, Benard cells, aspect ratio, Rayleigh and Marangoni numbers, Crispation number and critical conditions. In spite of the complexity of convection theory, we carry out a simple and introductory analysis which has the additional advantage of providing very suggestive experiments. As a consequence, we recommend our device for use as a laboratory experiment for undergraduate students of the thermodynamics of nonlinear and fluid physics

  20. Might electrical earthing affect convection of light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budrikis, Z.L.

    1982-01-01

    Partial convection of light by moving media was predicted by Fresnel and verified by Fizeau, Zeeman and others. It is accepted as an important argument in favour of the Special Theory of Relativity. The suggestion is made here that the convection is partial only when the propagating medium is moved with respect to its electrically earthed surroundings and that it would be total if an earthed shield was co-moving with the medium. This is based on a reinterpretation of Maxwell's equations wherein they are seen as macroscopic relationships that are in each case valid only in respect of a particular inertial frame of reference, the local electrical earth frame. (Auth.)

  1. Introductory analysis of Benard-Marangoni convection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maroto, J A [Group of Physics and Chemistry of Linares, Escuela Politecnica Superior, St Alfonso X El Sabio, 28, University of Jaen, E-23700 Linares, Jaen (Spain); Perez-Munuzuri, V [Group of Nonlinear Physics, University of Santiago de Compostela, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Romero-Cano, M S [Group of Complex Fluids Physics, Department of Applied Physics, University of Almeria, E-04120 Almeria (Spain)

    2007-03-15

    We describe experiments on Benard-Marangoni convection which permit a useful understanding of the main concepts involved in this phenomenon such as, for example, Benard cells, aspect ratio, Rayleigh and Marangoni numbers, Crispation number and critical conditions. In spite of the complexity of convection theory, we carry out a simple and introductory analysis which has the additional advantage of providing very suggestive experiments. As a consequence, we recommend our device for use as a laboratory experiment for undergraduate students of the thermodynamics of nonlinear and fluid physics.

  2. Lattice BGK simulation of natural convection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Yu; Ohashi, Hirotada; Akiyama, Mamoru

    1995-01-01

    Recently a new thermal lattice Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook fluid model was suggested by the authors. In this study, this new model was applied into the numerical simulation of natural convection, namely the Rayleigh Benard flow. The critical number for the onset of convective phenomenon was numerically measured and compared with that of theoretical prediction. A gravity dependent deviation was found in the numerical simulation, which is explained as an unavoidable consequence of the incorporation of gravity force in the lattice BGK system. (author)

  3. Comparing convective heat fluxes derived from thermodynamics to a radiative-convective model and GCMs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhara, Chirag; Renner, Maik; Kleidon, Axel

    2015-04-01

    The convective transport of heat and moisture plays a key role in the climate system, but the transport is typically parameterized in models. Here, we aim at the simplest possible physical representation and treat convective heat fluxes as the result of a heat engine. We combine the well-known Carnot limit of this heat engine with the energy balances of the surface-atmosphere system that describe how the temperature difference is affected by convective heat transport, yielding a maximum power limit of convection. This results in a simple analytic expression for convective strength that depends primarily on surface solar absorption. We compare this expression with an idealized grey atmosphere radiative-convective (RC) model as well as Global Circulation Model (GCM) simulations at the grid scale. We find that our simple expression as well as the RC model can explain much of the geographic variation of the GCM output, resulting in strong linear correlations among the three approaches. The RC model, however, shows a lower bias than our simple expression. We identify the use of the prescribed convective adjustment in RC-like models as the reason for the lower bias. The strength of our model lies in its ability to capture the geographic variation of convective strength with a parameter-free expression. On the other hand, the comparison with the RC model indicates a method for improving the formulation of radiative transfer in our simple approach. We also find that the latent heat fluxes compare very well among the approaches, as well as their sensitivity to surface warming. What our comparison suggests is that the strength of convection and their sensitivity in the climatic mean can be estimated relatively robustly by rather simple approaches.

  4. Advection endash diffusion around a curved obstacle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahluwalia, D.S.; Keller, J.B.; Knessl, C.

    1998-01-01

    Advection and diffusion of a substance around a curved obstacle is analyzed when the advection velocity is large compared to the diffusion velocity, i.e., when the Peclet number is large. Asymptotic expressions for the concentration are obtained by the use of boundary layer theory, matched asymptotic expansions, etc. The results supplement and extend previous ones for straight obstacles. They apply to electrophoresis, the flow of ground water, chromatography, sedimentation, etc. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  5. Correlation and prediction of gaseous diffusion coefficients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrero, T. R.; Mason, E. A.

    1973-01-01

    A new correlation method for binary gaseous diffusion coefficients from very low temperatures to 10,000 K is proposed based on an extended principle of corresponding states, and having greater range and accuracy than previous correlations. There are two correlation parameters that are related to other physical quantities and that are predictable in the absence of diffusion measurements. Quantum effects and composition dependence are included, but high-pressure effects are not. The results are directly applicable to multicomponent mixtures.

  6. Simultaneous Heat and Mass Transfer Model for Convective Drying of Building Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Ashwani; Chandramohan, V. P.

    2018-04-01

    A mathematical model of simultaneous heat and moisture transfer is developed for convective drying of building material. A rectangular brick is considered for sample object. Finite-difference method with semi-implicit scheme is used for solving the transient governing heat and mass transfer equation. Convective boundary condition is used, as the product is exposed in hot air. The heat and mass transfer equations are coupled through diffusion coefficient which is assumed as the function of temperature of the product. Set of algebraic equations are generated through space and time discretization. The discretized algebraic equations are solved by Gauss-Siedel method via iteration. Grid and time independent studies are performed for finding the optimum number of nodal points and time steps respectively. A MATLAB computer code is developed to solve the heat and mass transfer equations simultaneously. Transient heat and mass transfer simulations are performed to find the temperature and moisture distribution inside the brick.

  7. Application of vertical micro-disk MHD electrode to the analysis of heterogeneous magneto-convection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiyama, Atsushi; Hashiride, Makoto; Morimoto, Ryoichi; Nagai, Yutaka; Aogaki, Ryoichi

    2004-01-01

    With a micro-disk electrode in vertical magnetic fields, heterogeneous magneto-convection in vertical magnetic fields was quantitatively examined for the redox reaction of ferrocyanide-ferricyanide ions. It was concluded that the current density controlled by the magneto-convection is in proportion to the 1/3rd power of the product of the magnetic flux density and its gradient. Then, by using the same electrode system, the diffusion current induced by the vertical MHD (magnetohydrodynamic) flow was measured for the reduction of cuprous ions to copper atoms. The current density in this case was, as theoretically predicted, a function of the 1st power of the magnetic flux density. Finally, to visualize this characteristic flow pattern of the vertical MHD flow, copper electrodeposition onto the micro-disk electrode in a vertical magnetic field was performed; a typical morphological pattern of the deposit (single micro-mystery circle) was observed, as expected

  8. Large plasma pressure perturbations and radial convective transport in a tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasheninnikov, Sergei; Yu, Guanghui; Ryutov, Dmitri

    2004-01-01

    Strongly localized plasma structures with large pressure inhomogeneities (such as plasma blobs in the scrape-off-layer (SOL)/shadow regions, pellet clouds, Edge localized Modes (ELMs)) observed in the tokamaks, stellarators and linear plasma devices. Experimental studies of these phenomena reveal striking similarities including more convective rather than diffusive radial plasma transport. We suggest that rather simple models can describe many essentials of blobs, ELMs, and pellet clouds dynamics. The main ingredient of these models is the effective plasma gravity caused by magnetic curvature, centrifugal or friction forces effects. As a result, the equations governing plasma transport in such localized structures appear to be rather similar to that used to describe nonlinear evolution of thermal convection in the Boussinesq approximation (directly related to the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability). (author)

  9. The relative contributions of thermo-solutal Marangoni convections on flow patterns in a liquid bridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minakuchi, H.; Takagi, Y.; Okano, Y.; Gima, S.; Dost, S.

    2014-01-01

    A numerical simulation study was carried out to investigate the relative contributions of thermal and solutal Marangoni convections on transport structures in a liquid bridge under zero gravity. The liquid bridge in the model represents a three dimensional half-zone configuration of the Floating Zone (FZ) growth system. Three dimensional field equations of the liquid zone, i.e. continuity, momentum, energy, and diffusion equations, were solved by the PISO algorithm. Computations were performed using the open source software OpenFOAM. The numerical simulation results show that the flow field becomes three-dimensional and time-depended when the solutal Marangoni number is larger than the critical value. It was also shown that not only flow patterns but also the azimuthal wave number (m) changes due to the competing contributions of thermal and solutal Marangoni convective flows.

  10. Application of vertical micro-disk MHD electrode to the analysis of heterogeneous magneto-convection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugiyama, A. [Saitama Industrial Technology Center, Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, Kawaguchi (Japan). Domestic Research Fellowship; Hashiride, M.; Morimoto, R.; Nagai, Y. [Saitama Industrial Technology Center, Kawaguchi (Japan). Materials Engineering Division; Aogaki, R. [Polytechnic University, Sagamihara (Japan). Department of Product Design

    2004-11-01

    With a micro-disk electrode in vertical magnetic fields, heterogeneous magneto-convection in vertical magnetic fields was quantitatively examined for the redox reaction of ferrocyanide-ferricyanide ions. It was concluded that the current density controlled by the magneto-convection is in proportion to the 1/3rd power of the product of the magnetic flux density and its gradient. Then, by using the same electrode system, the diffusion current induced by the vertical MHD (magnetohydrodynamic) flow was measured for the reduction of cuprous ions to copper atoms. The current density in this case was, as theoretically predicted, a function of the 1st power of the magnetic flux density. Finally, to visualize this characteristic flow pattern of the vertical MHD flow, copper electrodeposition onto the micro-disk electrode in a vertical magnetic field was performed; a typical morphological pattern of the deposit (single micro-mystery circle) was observed, as expected. (author)

  11. Thermosolutal convection in saturated porous enclosure with concentrated energy and solute sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Di; Zhao, Fu-Yun; Tang, Guang-Fa [College of Civil Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha (China)

    2008-01-15

    Double diffusive natural convection within a vertical porous enclosure with localized heating and salting from one side is numerically studied by the finite element based finite volume method. In the formulation of the problem, use is made of the Darcy model, which allows the slip boundary condition on a solid wall to be satisfied. Comparisons with benchmark solutions for natural convection in fluid saturated porous enclosures are first presented to validate the code. Following that, an extensive series of numerical simulations is conducted in the range of -55 {<=} N {<=} + 55 and 0.125 {<=} L {<=} 0.875, where N and L are the buoyancy ratio and the element location, respectively. Streamlines, heatlines, masslines, isotherms and iso-concentrations in the system are produced to illustrate the flow structure transition from solutal dominated opposing to thermal dominated and solutal dominated aiding flows, respectively. The computed average Nusselt and Sherwood numbers provide guidance for locating the heating and salting element. (author)

  12. Thermosolutal convection in saturated porous enclosure with concentrated energy and solute sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Di [College of Civil Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha (China)], E-mail: liudi66@163.com; Zhao Fuyun [College of Civil Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha (China)], E-mail: zfycfdnet@163.com; Tang Guangfa [College of Civil Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha (China)], E-mail: gftangcfd@163.com

    2008-01-15

    Double diffusive natural convection within a vertical porous enclosure with localized heating and salting from one side is numerically studied by the finite element based finite volume method. In the formulation of the problem, use is made of the Darcy model, which allows the slip boundary condition on a solid wall to be satisfied. Comparisons with benchmark solutions for natural convection in fluid saturated porous enclosures are first presented to validate the code. Following that, an extensive series of numerical simulations is conducted in the range of -55 {<=} N {<=} + 55 and 0.125 {<=} L {<=} 0.875, where N and L are the buoyancy ratio and the element location, respectively. Streamlines, heatlines, masslines, isotherms and iso-concentrations in the system are produced to illustrate the flow structure transition from solutal dominated opposing to thermal dominated and solutal dominated aiding flows, respectively. The computed average Nusselt and Sherwood numbers provide guidance for locating the heating and salting element.

  13. Analytical and numerical investigation of double diffusion in thermally anisotropy multilayer porous medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennacer, R. [Neuville sur Oise, LEEVAM 5 mail Gay Lussac, Cergy-Pontoise Cedex (France); Mohamad, A.A. [CEERE University of Calgary, Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Ganaoui, M.El [Faculte des Sciences et Techniques de Limoges, Limoges (France)

    2005-02-01

    Double-diffusive natural convection within a multilayer anisotropic porous medium is studied numerically and analytically. The domain composed of two horizontal porous layers is subjected to a uniform horizontal heat flux and a vertical mass flux, where only the lower one is thermally anisotropic. Darcy model with classical Boussinesq approximation is used in formulating the mathematical model. The effect of thermal anisotropy and the relative width of the two layers on the flow and transfers is illustrated with characterising the transitions from the diffusive to the convective solution. Results were well compared with respect to a developed analytical approach, based on a parallel flow approximation for thermally anisotropic multilayer media. (orig.)

  14. High Ra, high Pr convection with viscosity gradients

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. High Ra, high Pr convection with viscosity gradients. Weak upward flow through mesh. Top fluid more viscous. Unstable layer Instability Convection.

  15. Stretched flow of Carreau nanofluid with convective boundary ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    journal of. January 2016 physics pp. 3–17. Stretched flow of Carreau nanofluid with ... fluid over a flat plate subjected to convective surface condition. ... the steady laminar boundary layer flow over a permeable plate with a convective boundary.

  16. Methods for characterizing convective cryoprobe heat transfer in ultrasound gel phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etheridge, Michael L; Choi, Jeunghwan; Ramadhyani, Satish; Bischof, John C

    2013-02-01

    While cryosurgery has proven capable in treating of a variety of conditions, it has met with some resistance among physicians, in part due to shortcomings in the ability to predict treatment outcomes. Here we attempt to address several key issues related to predictive modeling by demonstrating methods for accurately characterizing heat transfer from cryoprobes, report temperature dependent thermal properties for ultrasound gel (a convenient tissue phantom) down to cryogenic temperatures, and demonstrate the ability of convective exchange heat transfer boundary conditions to accurately describe freezing in the case of single and multiple interacting cryoprobe(s). Temperature dependent changes in the specific heat and thermal conductivity for ultrasound gel are reported down to -150 °C for the first time here and these data were used to accurately describe freezing in ultrasound gel in subsequent modeling. Freezing around a single and two interacting cryoprobe(s) was characterized in the ultrasound gel phantom by mapping the temperature in and around the "iceball" with carefully placed thermocouple arrays. These experimental data were fit with finite-element modeling in COMSOL Multiphysics, which was used to investigate the sensitivity and effectiveness of convective boundary conditions in describing heat transfer from the cryoprobes. Heat transfer at the probe tip was described in terms of a convective coefficient and the cryogen temperature. While model accuracy depended strongly on spatial (i.e., along the exchange surface) variation in the convective coefficient, it was much less sensitive to spatial and transient variations in the cryogen temperature parameter. The optimized fit, convective exchange conditions for the single-probe case also provided close agreement with the experimental data for the case of two interacting cryoprobes, suggesting that this basic characterization and modeling approach can be extended to accurately describe more complicated

  17. Experimental and numerical analyses of different extended surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diani, A; Mancin, S; Zilio, C; Rossetto, L

    2012-01-01

    Air is a cheap and safe fluid, widely used in electronic, aerospace and air conditioning applications. Because of its poor heat transfer properties, it always flows through extended surfaces, such as finned surfaces, to enhance the convective heat transfer. In this paper, experimental results are reviewed and numerical studies during air forced convection through extended surfaces are presented. The thermal and hydraulic behaviours of a reference trapezoidal finned surface, experimentally evaluated by present authors in an open-circuit wind tunnel, has been compared with numerical simulations carried out by using the commercial CFD software COMSOL Multiphysics. Once the model has been validated, numerical simulations have been extended to other rectangular finned configurations, in order to study the effects of the fin thickness, fin pitch and fin height on the thermo-hydraulic behaviour of the extended surfaces. Moreover, several pin fin surfaces have been simulated in the same range of operating conditions previously analyzed. Numerical results about heat transfer and pressure drop, for both plain finned and pin fin surfaces, have been compared with empirical correlations from the open literature, and more accurate equations have been developed, proposed, and validated.

  18. An Electrochemical Investigation of the Chemical Diffusivity in Liquid Metal Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barriga, Salvador A.

    10-5 cm2/s - (10.9 +/- 0.21 )x10-5 cm2/s at 5% Ca-Bi, (4.95 +/- 0.65)x10-5 cm2/s - (7.93 +/- 0.37)x10 -5 cm2/s at 10% Ca-Bi, and (6.22 +/- 1.2)x10 -5 cm2/s- (10.2 +/- 0.26)x10-5 cm2/s at 15% Ca-Bi which, to our knowledge, are the first successful measurements of calcium diffusivity in the liquid state. Arrhenius fits with good correlations revealed the activation energy for diffusion to be (21.4+/-1.7) kJ/mol, (23 .0+/-2.4) kJ/mol, and (17.7+/-5.9) kJ/mol as the calcium concentration increased, which are in excellent agreement with literature published values and lie in the same range of 15-30 kJ/mol that is reported for most liquid metals. The chemical diffusivity value was then used as input in finite element simulations to model how convection affects the overall transport inside a 20-Ah liquid bismuth electrode under the influence of different thermal boundary conditions. Also, a phase field model was created to simulate the motion of the two interfaces inside a liquid metal battery during operation, which to our knowledge, is the first time phase field has been extended beyond two phases. Experimental kinetic values can then be used as input in these numerical models to help characterize and optimize the entire battery. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, libraries.mit.edu/docs - docs mit.edu)

  19. Extended spider cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Japyassú, Hilton F; Laland, Kevin N

    2017-05-01

    There is a tension between the conception of cognition as a central nervous system (CNS) process and a view of cognition as extending towards the body or the contiguous environment. The centralised conception requires large or complex nervous systems to cope with complex environments. Conversely, the extended conception involves the outsourcing of information processing to the body or environment, thus making fewer demands on the processing power of the CNS. The evolution of extended cognition should be particularly favoured among small, generalist predators such as spiders, and here, we review the literature to evaluate the fit of empirical data with these contrasting models of cognition. Spiders do not seem to be cognitively limited, displaying a large diversity of learning processes, from habituation to contextual learning, including a sense of numerosity. To tease apart the central from the extended cognition, we apply the mutual manipulability criterion, testing the existence of reciprocal causal links between the putative elements of the system. We conclude that the web threads and configurations are integral parts of the cognitive systems. The extension of cognition to the web helps to explain some puzzling features of spider behaviour and seems to promote evolvability within the group, enhancing innovation through cognitive connectivity to variable habitat features. Graded changes in relative brain size could also be explained by outsourcing information processing to environmental features. More generally, niche-constructed structures emerge as prime candidates for extending animal cognition, generating the selective pressures that help to shape the evolving cognitive system.

  20. Excess Entropy and Diffusivity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Graphics. Excess Entropy and Diffusivity. Excess entropy scaling of diffusivity (Rosenfeld,1977). Analogous relationships also exist for viscosity and thermal conductivity.

  1. An infinite-dimensional model of free convection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iudovich, V.I. (Rostovskii Gosudarstvennyi Universitet, Rostov-on-Don (USSR))

    1990-12-01

    An infinite-dimensional model is derived from the equations of free convection in the Boussinesq-Oberbeck approximation. The velocity field is approximated by a single mode, while the heat-conduction equation is conserved fully. It is shown that, for all supercritical Rayleigh numbers, there exist exactly two secondary convective regimes. The case of ideal convection with zero viscosity and thermal conductivity is examined. The averaging method is used to study convection regimes at high Reynolds numbers. 10 refs.

  2. The role of convective tracer transport for the NO{sub x} content in the North Atlantic flight corridor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koehler, I; Sausen, R [Deutsche Forschungs- und Versuchsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V., Oberpfaffenhofen (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere

    1998-12-31

    The effect of convective tracer transport on the NO{sub x} distribution at cruising altitudes is studied by means of the atmosphere general circulation model ECHAM which was extended by a simplified (linear) NO{sub x} chemistry module. NO{sub x} originates from several sources including aircraft emissions. Two numerical simulations have been performed: one including convective tracer transport and one without this process. The differences in the NO{sub x} distribution of these two runs are discussed. (author) 8 refs.

  3. Onset of Vibrational Convection in a Binary Fluid Saturated Non-Darcy Porous Layer Heated from Above

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saravanan S.

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available A linear stability analysis is used to investigate the influence of mechanical vibration on the onset of thermosolutal convection in a horizontal porous layer heated and salted from above. Vibrations are considered with arbitrary amplitude and frequency. The Brinkman extended Darcy model is used to describe the flow and the Oberbeck-Boussinesq approximation is employed. Continued fraction method and Floquet theory are used to determine the convective instability threshold. It is found that the solutal Rayleigh number has the stabilizing effect. The existence of a closed disconnected loop of synchronous mode is predicted in the marginal curve for moderate values of solutal Rayleigh number and vibration amplitude.

  4. The role of convective tracer transport for the NO{sub x} content in the North Atlantic flight corridor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koehler, I.; Sausen, R. [Deutsche Forschungs- und Versuchsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V., Oberpfaffenhofen (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere

    1997-12-31

    The effect of convective tracer transport on the NO{sub x} distribution at cruising altitudes is studied by means of the atmosphere general circulation model ECHAM which was extended by a simplified (linear) NO{sub x} chemistry module. NO{sub x} originates from several sources including aircraft emissions. Two numerical simulations have been performed: one including convective tracer transport and one without this process. The differences in the NO{sub x} distribution of these two runs are discussed. (author) 8 refs.

  5. Extending quantum mechanics entails extending special relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aravinda, S; Srikanth, R

    2016-01-01

    The complementarity between signaling and randomness in any communicated resource that can simulate singlet statistics is generalized by relaxing the assumption of free will in the choice of measurement settings. We show how to construct an ontological extension for quantum mechanics (QMs) through the oblivious embedding of a sound simulation protocol in a Newtonian spacetime. Minkowski or other intermediate spacetimes are ruled out as the locus of the embedding by virtue of hidden influence inequalities. The complementarity transferred from a simulation to the extension unifies a number of results about quantum non-locality, and implies that special relativity has a different significance for the ontological model and for the operational theory it reproduces. Only the latter, being experimentally accessible, is required to be Lorentz covariant. There may be certain Lorentz non-covariant elements at the ontological level, but they will be inaccessible at the operational level in a valid extension. Certain arguments against the extendability of QM, due to Conway and Kochen (2009) and Colbeck and Renner (2012), are attributed to their assumption that the spacetime at the ontological level has Minkowski causal structure. (paper)

  6. Effects of temperature gradient induced nanoparticle motion on conduction and convection of fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Leping; Peterson, George P.; Yoda, Minani; Wang Buxuan

    2012-01-01

    The role of temperature gradient induced nanoparticle motion on conduction and convection was investigated. Possible mechanisms for variations resulting from variations in the thermophysical properties are theoretically and experimentally discussed. The effect of the nanoparticle motion on conduction is demonstrated through thermal conductivity measurement of deionized water with suspended CuO nanoparticles (50 nm in diameter) and correlated with the contributions of Brownian diffusion, thermophoresis, etc. The tendencies observed is that the magnitude of and the variation in the thermal conductivity increases with increasing volume fraction for a given temperature, which is due primarily to the Brownian diffusion of the nanoparticles. Using dimensional analysis, the thermal conductivity is correlated and both the interfacial thermal resistance and near-field radiation are found to be essentially negligible. A modification term that incorporates the contributions of Brownian motion and thermophoresis is proposed. The effect of nanoscale convection is illustrated through an experimental investigation that utilized fluorescent polystyrene nanoparticle tracers (200 nm in diameter) and multilayer nanoparticle image velocimetry. The results indicate that both the magnitude and the deviation of the fluid motion increased with increasing heat flux in the near-wall region. Meanwhile, the fluid motion tended to decrease with the off-wall distance for a given heating power. A corresponding numerical study of convection of pure deionized water shows that the velocity along the off-wall direction is several orders of magnitude lower than that of deionized water, which indicates that Brownian motion in the near-wall region is crucial for fluid with suspended nanoparticles in convection.

  7. Drying characteristics of pumpkin ( Cucurbita moschata) slices in convective and freeze dryer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caliskan, Gulsah; Dirim, Safiye Nur

    2017-06-01

    This study was intended to determine the drying and rehydration kinetics of convective and freeze dried pumpkin slices (0.5 × 3.5 × 0.5 cm). A pilot scale tray drier (at 80 ± 2 °C inlet temperature, 1 m s-1 air velocity) and freeze drier (13.33 kPa absolute pressure, condenser temperature of -48 ± 2 °C) were used for the drying experiments. Drying curves were fitted to six well-known thin layer drying models. Nonlinear regression analysis was used to evaluate the parameters of the selected models by using statistical software SPSS 16.0 (SPSS Inc., USA). For the convective and freeze drying processes of pumpkin slices, the highest R2 values, and the lowest RMSE as well as χ2 values were obtained from Page model. The effective moisture diffusivity (Deff) of the convective and freeze dried pumpkin slices were obtained from the Fick's diffusion model, and they were found to be 2.233 × 10-7 and 3.040 × 10-9 m2s-1, respectively. Specific moisture extraction rate, moisture extraction rate, and specific energy consumption values were almost twice in freeze drying process. Depending on the results, moisture contents and water activity values of pumpkin slices were in acceptable limits for safe storage of products. The rehydration behaviour of [at 18 ± 2 and 100 ± 2 °C for 1:25, 1:50, 1:75, 1:100, and 1:125 solid:liquid ratios (w:w)] dried pumpkin slices was determined by Peleg's model with the highest R2. The highest total soluble solid loss of pumpkin slices was observed for the rehydration experiment which performed at 1:25 solid: liquid ratio (w:w). Rehydration ratio of freeze dried slices was found 2-3 times higher than convective dried slices.

  8. Education: DNA replication using microscale natural convection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priye, Aashish; Hassan, Yassin A; Ugaz, Victor M

    2012-12-07

    There is a need for innovative educational experiences that unify and reinforce fundamental principles at the interface between the physical, chemical, and life sciences. These experiences empower and excite students by helping them recognize how interdisciplinary knowledge can be applied to develop new products and technologies that benefit society. Microfluidics offers an incredibly versatile tool to address this need. Here we describe our efforts to create innovative hands-on activities that introduce chemical engineering students to molecular biology by challenging them to harness microscale natural convection phenomena to perform DNA replication via the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Experimentally, we have constructed convective PCR stations incorporating a simple design for loading and mounting cylindrical microfluidic reactors between independently controlled thermal plates. A portable motion analysis microscope enables flow patterns inside the convective reactors to be directly visualized using fluorescent bead tracers. We have also developed a hands-on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) exercise based on modeling microscale thermal convection to identify optimal geometries for DNA replication. A cognitive assessment reveals that these activities strongly impact student learning in a positive way.

  9. Evolution of Excited Convective Cells in Plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pécseli, Hans; Juul Rasmussen, Jens; Sugai, H.

    1984-01-01

    Convective cells are excited externally in a fully ionized magnetized plasma and their space-time evolution is investigated by two-dimensional potential measurements. A positive cell is excited externally by control of the end losses in the 'scrape off' layer of a plasma column produced by surface...

  10. Free convection film flows and heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Shang, Deyi

    2010-01-01

    Presents development of systematic studies for hydrodynamics and heat and mass transfer in laminar free convection, accelerating film boiling and condensation of Newtonian fluids, and accelerating film flow of non-Newtonian power-law fluids. This book provides a system of analysis models with a developed velocity component method.

  11. Penetrative convection at high Rayleigh numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toppaladoddi, Srikanth; Wettlaufer, John S.

    2018-04-01

    We study penetrative convection of a fluid confined between two horizontal plates, the temperatures of which are such that a temperature of maximum density lies between them. The range of Rayleigh numbers studied is Ra=[0.01 ,4 ]106,108 and the Prandtl numbers are Pr=1 and 11.6. An evolution equation for the growth of the convecting region is obtained through an integral energy balance. We identify a new nondimensional parameter, Λ , which is the ratio of temperature difference between the stable and unstable regions of the flow; larger values of Λ denote increased stability of the upper stable layer. We study the effects of Λ on the flow field using well-resolved lattice Boltzmann simulations and show that the characteristics of the flow depend sensitively upon it. For the range Λ = , we find that for a fixed Ra the Nusselt number, Nu, increases with decreasing Λ . We also investigate the effects of Λ on the vertical variation of convective heat flux and the Brunt-Väisälä frequency. Our results clearly indicate that in the limit Λ →0 the problem reduces to that of the classical Rayleigh-Bénard convection.

  12. Radiative-convective equilibrium model intercomparison project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wing, Allison A.; Reed, Kevin A.; Satoh, Masaki; Stevens, Bjorn; Bony, Sandrine; Ohno, Tomoki

    2018-03-01

    RCEMIP, an intercomparison of multiple types of models configured in radiative-convective equilibrium (RCE), is proposed. RCE is an idealization of the climate system in which there is a balance between radiative cooling of the atmosphere and heating by convection. The scientific objectives of RCEMIP are three-fold. First, clouds and climate sensitivity will be investigated in the RCE setting. This includes determining how cloud fraction changes with warming and the role of self-aggregation of convection in climate sensitivity. Second, RCEMIP will quantify the dependence of the degree of convective aggregation and tropical circulation regimes on temperature. Finally, by providing a common baseline, RCEMIP will allow the robustness of the RCE state across the spectrum of models to be assessed, which is essential for interpreting the results found regarding clouds, climate sensitivity, and aggregation, and more generally, determining which features of tropical climate a RCE framework is useful for. A novel aspect and major advantage of RCEMIP is the accessibility of the RCE framework to a variety of models, including cloud-resolving models, general circulation models, global cloud-resolving models, single-column models, and large-eddy simulation models.

  13. Vortex statistics in turbulent rotating convection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunnen, R.P.J.; Clercx, H.J.H.; Geurts, B.J.

    2010-01-01

    The vortices emerging in rotating turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection in water at Rayleigh number Ra=6.0×108 are investigated using stereoscopic particle image velocimetry and by direct numerical simulation. The so-called Q criterion is used to detect the vortices from velocity fields. This

  14. Phenomenology of convection-parameterization closure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-I. Yano

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Closure is a problem of defining the convective intensity in a given parameterization. In spite of many years of efforts and progress, it is still considered an overall unresolved problem. The present article reviews this problem from phenomenological perspectives. The physical variables that may contribute in defining the convective intensity are listed, and their statistical significances identified by observational data analyses are reviewed. A possibility is discussed for identifying a correct closure hypothesis by performing a linear stability analysis of tropical convectively coupled waves with various different closure hypotheses. Various individual theoretical issues are considered from various different perspectives. The review also emphasizes that the dominant physical factors controlling convection differ between the tropics and extra-tropics, as well as between oceanic and land areas. Both observational as well as theoretical analyses, often focused on the tropics, do not necessarily lead to conclusions consistent with our operational experiences focused on midlatitudes. Though we emphasize the importance of the interplays between these observational, theoretical and operational perspectives, we also face challenges for establishing a solid research framework that is universally applicable. An energy cycle framework is suggested as such a candidate.

  15. Oscillatory Convection in Rotating Liquid Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertin, Vincent; Grannan, Alex; Aurnou, Jonathan

    2016-11-01

    We have performed laboratory experiments in a aspect ratio Γ = 2 cylinder using liquid gallium (Pr = 0 . 023) as the working fluid. The Ekman number varies from E = 4 ×10-5 to 4 ×10-6 and the Rayleigh number varies from Ra = 3 ×105 to 2 ×107 . Using heat transfer and temperature measurements within the fluid, we characterize the different styles of low Pr rotating convective flow. The convection threshold is first overcome in the form of a container scale inertial oscillatory mode. At stronger forcing, wall-localized modes develop, coexisting with the inertial oscillatory modes in the bulk. When the strength of the buoyancy increases further, the bulk flow becomes turbulent while the wall modes remain. Our results imply that rotating convective flows in liquid metals do not develop in the form of quasi-steady columns, as in Pr = 1 planetary and stellar dynamo models, but in the form of oscillatory motions. Therefore, convection driven dynamo action in low Pr fluids can differ substantively than that occurring in typical Pr = 1 numerical models. Our results also suggest that low wavenumber, wall modes may be dynamically and observationally important in liquid metal dynamo systems. We thank the NSF Geophysics Program for support of this project.

  16. Natural convection in horizontal fluid layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suo-Antilla, A.J.

    1977-02-01

    The experimental work includes developing and using a thermal convection cell to obtain measurements of the heat flux and turbulent core temperature of a horizontal layer of fluid heated internally and subject to both stabilizing and destabilizing temperature differences. The ranges of Rayleigh numbers tested were 10 7 equal to or less than R/sub I/ equal to or less than 10 13 and -10 10 equal to or less than R/sub E/ equal to or less than 10 10 . Power integral methods were found to be adequate for interpolating and extrapolating the data. The theoretical work consists of the derivation, solution and use of the mean field equations for study of thermally driven convection in horizontal layers of infinite extent. The equations were derived by a separation of variables technique where the horizontal directions were described by periodic structures and the vertical being some function of z. The derivation resulted in a coupled set of momentum and energy equations. The equations were simplified by using the infinite Prandtl number limit and neglecting direct intermodal interaction. Solutions to these equations are used to predict the existence of multi-wavenumber flows at all supercritical Rayleigh numbers. Subsequent inspection of existing experimental photographs of convecting fluids confirms their existence. The onset of time dependence is found to coincide with the onset of the second convective mode. Each mode is found to consist of two wavenumbers and typically the velocity and temperature fields of the right modal branch are found to be out of phase

  17. Unstable mixed convective transport in groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schincariol, R.A.; Schwartz, F.W.

    1990-01-01

    This study is an experimental investigation of variable density groundwater flow in homogeneous and lenticular porous media. A solution of 500 mg/l Rhodamine WT dye served as the carrier for various concentrations of solute (NaCl) introduced into a two-dimensional flow tank at concentrations ranging from 1000 to 100,000 mg/l. At the scale of the experiments, mass transport depends upon both forced and free convection. In addition, density differences as low as 0.008 g/cm 3 (1000 mg/l NaCl) between a plume of dense water and ambient groundwater in homogeneous medium produces gravitational instabilities at realistic groundwater velocities. These instabilities are manifest by lobe-shaped protuberances that formed first along the bottom edge of the plume and later within the plume. As the density difference increases to 0.0015 g/cm 3 (2000 mg/l NaCl), 0.0037 g/cm 3 (5000 mg/l NaCl) or higher, this unstable mixing due to convective dispersion significantly alters the spreading process, resulting in a large degree of vertical spreading of the plume. In a lenticular medium the combination of convective dispersion and nonuniform flow due to heterogeneities results in relatively large dispersion. Scale considerations indicate that convective dispersion may provide an important component of mixing at the field scale. (Author) (30 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs.)

  18. Solar Hot Water Heating by Natural Convection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Richard D.

    1983-01-01

    Presents an undergraduate laboratory experiment in which a solar collector is used to heat water for domestic use. The working fluid is moved by natural convection so no pumps are required. Experimental apparatus is simple in design and operation so that data can be collected quickly and easily. (Author/JN)

  19. A 'backward' free-convective boundary layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuiken, H.K.

    1981-01-01

    In this paper the cooling of a low-heat-resistance sheet that moves downwards is considered. The free-convective velocities are assumed to be much larger than the velocity of the sheet. As a result the motion of the fluid is mainly towards the point where the sheet enters the system and a ‘backward’

  20. Natural convection inside an irregular porous cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beltran, Jorge I. LLagostera; Trevisan, Osvair Vidal

    1990-01-01

    Natural convection flow induced by heating from below in a irregular porous cavity is investigated numerically. The influence of the modified Rayleigh number and geometric ratios on heat transfer and fluid flow is studied. Global and local Nusselt for Rayleigh numbers covering the range 0 - 1600 and for several geometric ratios. The fluid flow and the temperature field are illustrated by contour maps. (author)

  1. Convection in Slab and Spheroidal Geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, David H.; Woodward, Paul R.; Jacobs, Michael L.

    2000-01-01

    Three-dimensional numerical simulations of compressible turbulent thermally driven convection, in both slab and spheroidal geometries, are reviewed and analyzed in terms of velocity spectra and mixing-length theory. The same ideal gas model is used in both geometries, and resulting flows are compared. The piecewise-parabolic method (PPM), with either thermal conductivity or photospheric boundary conditions, is used to solve the fluid equations of motion. Fluid motions in both geometries exhibit a Kolmogorov-like k(sup -5/3) range in their velocity spectra. The longest wavelength modes are energetically dominant in both geometries, typically leading to one convection cell dominating the flow. In spheroidal geometry, a dipolar flow dominates the largest scale convective motions. Downflows are intensely turbulent and up drafts are relatively laminar in both geometries. In slab geometry, correlations between temperature and velocity fluctuations, which lead to the enthalpy flux, are fairly independent of depth. In spheroidal geometry this same correlation increases linearly with radius over the inner 70 percent by radius, in which the local pressure scale heights are a sizable fraction of the radius. The effects from the impenetrable boundary conditions in the slab geometry models are confused with the effects from non-local convection. In spheroidal geometry nonlocal effects, due to coherent plumes, are seen as far as several pressure scale heights from the lower boundary and are clearly distinguishable from boundary effects.

  2. Theories for convection in stellar atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nordlund, Aa.

    1976-02-01

    A discussion of the fundamental differences between laboratory convection in a stellar atmosphere is presented. The shortcomings of laterally homogeneous model atmospheres are analysed, and the extent to which these shortcoming are avoided in the two-component representation is discussed. Finally a qualitative discussion on the scaling properties of stellar granulation is presented. (Auth.)

  3. Terminal project heat convection in thin cylinders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales Corona, J.

    1992-01-01

    Heat convection in thin cylinders and analysis about natural convection for straight vertical plates, and straight vertical cylinders submersed in a fluid are presented some works carry out by different authors in the field of heat transfer. In the part of conduction, deduction of the equation of heat conduction in cylindrical coordinates by means of energy balance in a control volume is presented. Enthalpy and internal energy are used for the outlining of the equation and finally the equation in its vectorial form is obtained. In the convection part development to calculate the Nusselt number for a straight vertical plate by a forces analysis, an energy balance and mass conservation over a control volume is outlined. Several empiric correlations to calculate the Nusselt number and its relations with other dimensionless numbers are presented. In the experimental part the way in which a prototype rode is assembled is presented measurements of temperatures attained in steady state and in free convection for working fluids as air and water are showed in tables. Also graphs of Nusselt numbers obtained in the experimental way through some empiric correlations are showed (Author)

  4. Influence of convective conditions on three dimensional mixed convective hydromagnetic boundary layer flow of Casson nanofluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rauf, A., E-mail: raufamar@ciitsahiwal.edu.pk [Department of Mathematics, Comsats Institute of Information Technology, Sahiwal 57000 (Pakistan); Siddiq, M.K. [Centre for Advanced Studies in Pure and Applied Mathematics, Department of Mathematics, Bahauddin Zakariya University, Multan 63000 (Pakistan); Abbasi, F.M. [Department of Mathematics, Comsats Institute of Information Technology, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Meraj, M.A. [Department of Mathematics, Comsats Institute of Information Technology, Sahiwal 57000 (Pakistan); Ashraf, M. [Centre for Advanced Studies in Pure and Applied Mathematics, Department of Mathematics, Bahauddin Zakariya University, Multan 63000 (Pakistan); Shehzad, S.A. [Department of Mathematics, Comsats Institute of Information Technology, Sahiwal 57000 (Pakistan)

    2016-10-15

    The present work deals with the steady laminar three-dimensional mixed convective magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) boundary layer flow of Casson nanofluid over a bidirectional stretching surface. A uniform magnetic field is applied normal to the flow direction. Similarity variables are implemented to convert the non-linear partial differential equations into ordinary ones. Convective boundary conditions are utilized at surface of the sheet. A numerical technique of Runge–Kutta–Fehlberg (RFK45) is used to obtain the results of velocity, temperature and concentration fields. The physical dimensionless parameters are discussed through tables and graphs. - Highlights: • Mixed convective boundary layer flow of Casson nanofluid is taken into account. • Impact of magnetic field is examined. • Convective heat and mass conditions are imposed. • Numerical solutions are presented and discussed.

  5. Experimental study of diffuse auroral precipitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mouaia, K.

    1983-01-01

    First chapter is devoted to low energy electron precipitation in the evening sector of the auroral magnetosphere, during quiet and disturbed magnetic periods. Four subjects are studied in detail: the latitude distribution of the varied auroral forms and their relations to external magnetosphere; the time coefficients related to precipitations, the form and the dynamic of the diffuse precipitation equatorial frontier; the precipitation effect on the ionosphere concentration. The last part of the chapter shows that the plasma convection in the magnetosphere, associated to wave-particle interactions near the equatorial accounts for the principal characteristics of the evening sector diffuse electronic precipitations. The second chapter deals with subauroral precipitations of low energy ions, after the magnetospheric substorms, in the high latitude regions of the morning sector [fr

  6. Testing particle filters on convective scale dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslehner, Mylene; Craig, George. C.; Janjic, Tijana

    2014-05-01

    Particle filters have been developed in recent years to deal with highly nonlinear dynamics and non Gaussian error statistics that also characterize data assimilation on convective scales. In this work we explore the use of the efficient particle filter (P.v. Leeuwen, 2011) for convective scale data assimilation application. The method is tested in idealized setting, on two stochastic models. The models were designed to reproduce some of the properties of convection, for example the rapid development and decay of convective clouds. The first model is a simple one-dimensional, discrete state birth-death model of clouds (Craig and Würsch, 2012). For this model, the efficient particle filter that includes nudging the variables shows significant improvement compared to Ensemble Kalman Filter and Sequential Importance Resampling (SIR) particle filter. The success of the combination of nudging and resampling, measured as RMS error with respect to the 'true state', is proportional to the nudging intensity. Significantly, even a very weak nudging intensity brings notable improvement over SIR. The second model is a modified version of a stochastic shallow water model (Würsch and Craig 2013), which contains more realistic dynamical characteristics of convective scale phenomena. Using the efficient particle filter and different combination of observations of the three field variables (wind, water 'height' and rain) allows the particle filter to be evaluated in comparison to a regime where only nudging is used. Sensitivity to the properties of the model error covariance is also considered. Finally, criteria are identified under which the efficient particle filter outperforms nudging alone. References: Craig, G. C. and M. Würsch, 2012: The impact of localization and observation averaging for convective-scale data assimilation in a simple stochastic model. Q. J. R. Meteorol. Soc.,139, 515-523. Van Leeuwen, P. J., 2011: Efficient non-linear data assimilation in geophysical

  7. Novel Natural Convection Heat Sink Design Concepts From First Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    CONVECTION HEAT SINK DESIGN CONCEPTS FROM FIRST PRINCIPLES by Derek E. Fletcher June 2016 Thesis Advisor: Garth Hobson Second Reader...COVERED Master’s Thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE NOVEL NATURAL CONVECTION HEAT SINK DESIGN CONCEPTS FROM FIRST PRINCIPLES 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6...CONVECTION HEAT SINK DESIGN CONCEPTS FROM FIRST PRINCIPLES Derek E. Fletcher Lieutenant Commander, United States Navy B.S., Southwestern

  8. International symposium on transient convective heat transfer: book of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The international symposium on convective heat transfer was held on 19-23 August 1996, in Cesme, Izmir, Turkey. The spesialists discussed forced convection, heat exchangers, free convection and multiphase media and phase change at the meeting. Almost 53 papers were presented in the meeting

  9. Symmetries and modelling functions for diffusion processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikitin, A G; Spichak, S V; Vedula, Yu S; Naumovets, A G

    2009-01-01

    A constructive approach to the theory of diffusion processes is proposed, which is based on application of both symmetry analysis and the method of modelling functions. An algorithm for construction of the modelling functions is suggested. This algorithm is based on the error function expansion (ERFEX) of experimental concentration profiles. The high-accuracy analytical description of the profiles provided by ERFEX approximation allows a convenient extraction of the concentration dependence of diffusivity from experimental data and prediction of the diffusion process. Our analysis is exemplified by its employment in experimental results obtained for surface diffusion of lithium on the molybdenum (1 1 2) surface precovered with dysprosium. The ERFEX approximation can be directly extended to many other diffusion systems.

  10. Basal melting driven by turbulent thermal convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabbanipour Esfahani, Babak; Hirata, Silvia C.; Berti, Stefano; Calzavarini, Enrico

    2018-05-01

    Melting and, conversely, solidification processes in the presence of convection are key to many geophysical problems. An essential question related to these phenomena concerns the estimation of the (time-evolving) melting rate, which is tightly connected to the turbulent convective dynamics in the bulk of the melt fluid and the heat transfer at the liquid-solid interface. In this work, we consider a convective-melting model, constructed as a generalization of the Rayleigh-Bénard system, accounting for the basal melting of a solid. As the change of phase proceeds, a fluid layer grows at the heated bottom of the system and eventually reaches a turbulent convection state. By means of extensive lattice-Boltzmann numerical simulations employing an enthalpy formulation of the governing equations, we explore the model dynamics in two- and three-dimensional configurations. The focus of the analysis is on the scaling of global quantities like the heat flux and the kinetic energy with the Rayleigh number, as well as on the interface morphology and the effects of space dimensionality. Independently of dimensionality, we find that the convective-melting system behavior shares strong resemblances with that of the Rayleigh-Bénard one, and that the heat flux is only weakly enhanced with respect to that case. Such similarities are understood, at least to some extent, considering the resulting slow motion of the melting front (with respect to the turbulent fluid velocity fluctuations) and its generally little roughness (compared to the height of the fluid layer). Varying the Stefan number, accounting for the thermodynamical properties of the material, also seems to have only a mild effect, which implies the possibility of extrapolating results in numerically delicate low-Stefan setups from more convenient high-Stefan ones. Finally, we discuss the implications of our findings for the geophysically relevant problem of modeling Arctic ice melt ponds.

  11. A New Model Hierarchy to Understand the Impact of Radiation and Convection on the Extratropical Circulation Response to Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Z.; Shaw, T.

    2017-12-01

    State-of-the-art climate models exhibit a large spread in the magnitude of projected poleward jet shift and Hadley cell expansion in response to warming. Interestingly, some idealized gray radiation models with simplified convective schemes produce an equatorward jet shift in response to warming. In order to understand the impact of radiation and convection on the circulation response and resolve the discrepancies across the model hierarchy, we introduce a new model radiation-convection hierarchy. The hierarchy spans idealized (gray) through sophisticated (RRTMG) radiation, and idealized (Betts-Miller) through sophisticated (eddy-diffusivity mass-flux scheme) convection schemes in the same general circulation model. It is used to systematically explore the impact of radiation and convection on the extratropical circulation response to climate change independent of mean surface temperature and meridional temperature gradient responses. With a gray radiation scheme, the jet stream shift depends on the prescribed stratospheric optical depth, which controls the climatological jet regime. A large optical depth leads to a split jet and an equatorward shift. A small optical depth leads to a poleward shift. The different shifts are connected to the vertical extent of tropical long wave cooling that impacts the subtropical jet and Hadley circulation. In spite of these sensitivities, the storm track position, defined by the meridonal eddy heat flux and moist static energy flux maxima, shifts robustly poleward. In contrast to gray radiation, with a comprehensive radiation scheme, the jet and storm track shift robustly poleward irrespective of radiative assumptions (clear sky versus cloudy sky, ozone versus no ozone). This response is reproduced by adding more spectral bands and including the water vapor feedback in the gray scheme. Dynamical sensitivities to convective assumption are also explored. Overall the new hierarchy highlights the importance of radiative and

  12. Characterization of Convective Plumes Associated With Oceanic Deep Convection in the Northwestern Mediterranean From High-Resolution In Situ Data Collected by Gliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margirier, Félix; Bosse, Anthony; Testor, Pierre; L'Hévéder, Blandine; Mortier, Laurent; Smeed, David

    2017-12-01

    Numerous gliders have been deployed in the Gulf of Lions (northwestern Mediterranean Sea) and in particular during episodes of open-ocean deep convection in the winter 2012-2013. The data collected represents an unprecedented density of in situ observations providing a first in situ statistical and 3-D characterization of the important mixing agents of the deep convection phenomenon, the so-called plumes. A methodology based on a glider-static flight model was applied to infer the oceanic vertical velocity signal from the glider navigation data. We demonstrate that during the active phase of mixing, the gliders underwent significant oceanic vertical velocities up to 18 cm s-1. Focusing on the data collected by two gliders during the 2012-2013 winter, 120 small-scale convective downward plumes were detected with a mean radius of 350 m and separated by about 2 km. We estimate that the plumes cover 27% of the convection area. Gliders detected downward velocities with a magnitude larger than that of the upward ones (-6 versus +2 cm s-1 on average). Along-track recordings of temperature and salinity as well as biogeochemical properties (dissolved oxygen, fluorescence, and turbidity) allow a statistical characterization of the water masses' properties in the plumes' core with respect to the "background": the average downward signal is of colder (-1.8 × 10-3 °C), slightly saltier (+4.9 × 10-4 psu) and thus denser waters (+7.5 × 10-4 kg m-3). The plunging waters are also on average more fluorescent (+2.3 × 10-2 μg L-1). The plumes are associated with a vertical diffusion coefficient of 7.0 m2 s-1 and their vertical velocity variance scales with the ratio of the buoyancy loss over the Coriolis parameter to the power 0.86.

  13. Simulation of the steady-state energy transfer in rigid bodies, with convective-radiative boundary conditions, employing a minimum principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gama, R.M.S. da.

    1992-08-01

    The energy transfer phenomenon in a rigid and opaque body that exchanges energy, with the environment, by convection and by diffuse thermal radiation is studied. The considered phenomenon is described by a partial differential equation, subjected to (nonlinear) boundary conditions. A minimum principle, suitable for a large class of energy transfer problems is presented. Some particular cases are simulated. (author)

  14. Dynamics and mass transport of solutal convection in a closed porous media system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Baole; Akhbari, Daria; Hesse, Marc

    2016-11-01

    Most of the recent studies of CO2 sequestration are performed in open systems where the constant partial pressure of CO2 in the vapor phase results in a time-invariant saturated concentration of CO2 in the brine (Cs). However, in some closed natural CO2 reservoirs, e.g., Bravo Dome in New Mexico, the continuous dissolution of CO2 leads to a pressure drop in the gas that is accompanied by a reduction of Cs and thereby affects the dynamics and mass transport of convection in the brine. In this talk, I discuss the characteristics of convective CO2 dissolution in a closed system. The gas is assumed to be ideal and its solubility given by Henry's law. An analytical solution shows that the diffusive base state is no longer self-similar and that diffusive mass transfer declines rapidly. Scaling analysis reveals that the volume ratio of brine and gas η determines the behavior of the system. DNS show that no constant flux regime exists for η > 0 nevertheless, the quantity F /Cs2 remains constant, where F is the dissolution flux. The onset time is only affected by η when the Rayleigh number Ra is small. In this case, the drop in Cs during the initial diffusive regime significantly reduces the effective Ra and therefore delays the onset.

  15. Simulating the swelling and deformation behaviour in soft tissues using a convective thermal analogy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herzog Walter

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is generally accepted that cartilage adaptation and degeneration are mechanically mediated. Investigating the swelling behaviour of cartilage is important because the stress and strain state of cartilage is associated with the swelling and deformation behaviour. It is well accepted that the swelling of soft tissues is associated with mechanical, chemical, and electrical events. Method The purpose of the present study was to implement the triphasic theory into a commercial finite element tool (ABAQUS to solve practical problems in cartilage mechanics. Because of the mathematical identity between thermal and mass diffusion processes, the triphasic model was transferred into a convective thermal diffusion process in the commercial finite element software. The problem was solved using an iterative procedure. Results The proposed approach was validated using the one-dimensional numerical solutions and the experimental results of confined compression of articular cartilage described in the literature. The time-history of the force response of a cartilage specimen in confined compression, which was subjected to swelling caused by a sudden change of saline concentration, was predicted using the proposed approach and compared with the published experimental data. Conclusion The advantage of the proposed thermal analogy technique over previous studies is that it accounts for the convective diffusion of ion concentrations and the Donnan osmotic pressure in the interstitial fluid.

  16. A mathematical and numerical framework for the analysis of compressible thermal convection in gases at very high temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lappa, Marcello, E-mail: marcello.lappa@strath.ac.uk

    2016-05-15

    The relevance of non-equilibrium phenomena, nonlinear behavior, gravitational effects and fluid compressibility in a wide range of problems related to high-temperature gas-dynamics, especially in thermal, mechanical and nuclear engineering, calls for a concerted approach using the tools of the kinetic theory of gases, statistical physics, quantum mechanics, thermodynamics and mathematical modeling in synergy with advanced numerical strategies for the solution of the Navier–Stokes equations. The reason behind such a need is that in many instances of relevance in this field one witnesses a departure from canonical models and the resulting inadequacy of standard CFD approaches, especially those traditionally used to deal with thermal (buoyancy) convection problems. Starting from microscopic considerations and typical concepts of molecular dynamics, passing through the Boltzmann equation and its known solutions, we show how it is possible to remove past assumptions and elaborate an algorithm capable of targeting the broadest range of applications. Moving beyond the Boussinesq approximation, the Sutherland law and the principle of energy equipartition, the resulting method allows most of the fluid properties (density, viscosity, thermal conductivity, heat capacity and diffusivity, etc.) to be derived in a rational and natural way while keeping empirical contamination to the minimum. Special attention is deserved as well to the well-known pressure issue. With the application of the socalled multiple pressure variables concept and a projection-like numerical approach, difficulties with such a term in the momentum equation are circumvented by allowing the hydrodynamic pressure to decouple from its thermodynamic counterpart. The final result is a flexible and modular framework that on the one hand is able to account for all the molecule (translational, rotational and vibrational) degrees of freedom and their effective excitation, and on the other hand can guarantee

  17. Improved scheme for parametrization of convection in the Met Office's Numerical Atmospheric-dispersion Modelling Environment (NAME)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneguz, Elena; Thomson, David; Witham, Claire; Kusmierczyk-Michulec, Jolanta

    2015-04-01

    NAME is a Lagrangian atmospheric dispersion model used by the Met Office to predict the dispersion of both natural and man-made contaminants in the atmosphere, e.g. volcanic ash, radioactive particles and chemical species. Atmospheric convection is responsible for transport and mixing of air resulting in a large exchange of heat and energy above the boundary layer. Although convection can transport material through the whole troposphere, convective clouds have a small horizontal length scale (of the order of few kilometres). Therefore, for large-scale transport the horizontal scale on which the convection exists is below the global NWP resolution used as input to NAME and convection must be parametrized. Prior to the work presented here, the enhanced vertical mixing generated by non-resolved convection was reproduced by randomly redistributing Lagrangian particles between the cloud base and cloud top with probability equal to 1/25th of the NWP predicted convective cloud fraction. Such a scheme is essentially diffusive and it does not make optimal use of all the information provided by the driving meteorological model. To make up for these shortcomings and make the parametrization more physically based, the convection scheme has been recently revised. The resulting version, presented in this paper, is now based on the balance equation between upward, entrainment and detrainment fluxes. In particular, upward mass fluxes are calculated with empirical formulas derived from Cloud Resolving Models and using the NWP convective precipitation diagnostic as closure. The fluxes are used to estimate how many particles entrain, move upward and detrain. Lastly, the scheme is completed by applying a compensating subsidence flux. The performance of the updated convection scheme is benchmarked against available observational data of passive tracers. In particular, radioxenon is a noble gas that can undergo significant long range transport: this study makes use of observations of

  18. Diffuse magmatic soil degassing at Soufriere of Guadeloupe, Antilles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allard, P.; Parello, F.

    1998-01-01

    A soil gas profiling made along the southern basis of Soufriere summit lave dome, in Guadeloupe, reveals the existence of diffuse emanations of magma-derived CO 2 in coincidence with a major volcanic (Ty) fault, where CO 2 concentrations at 70 cm depth in the ground reach 35-96 % and are associated with a thermal convective cell. Outside, a few 'cold' gaseous anomalies of volcanic origin (lack of methane) provide reliable conditions for continuous radon monitoring of soil degassing. (authors)

  19. An Extended Duopoly Game.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckalbar, John C.

    2002-01-01

    Illustrates how principles and intermediate microeconomic students can gain an understanding for strategic price setting by playing a relatively large oligopoly game. Explains that the game extends to a continuous price space and outlines appropriate applications. Offers the Mathematica code to instructors so that the assumptions of the game can…

  20. Transversally extended string

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akama, Keiichi

    1988-01-01

    Starting with the space-time action of the transversally extended string, we derive its world-sheet action, which is that of a gravitational and gauge theory with matter fields on the world-sheet, with additional effects of the second fundamental quantity. (author)