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Sample records for extended chemical castration

  1. Treatment outcomes of chemical castration on Korean sex offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Kyo Chul; Shim, Geum Sook; Park, Hyoun Hee; Rha, Koon Ho; Choi, Young Deuk; Chung, Byung Ha; Hong, Sung Joon; Lee, Jae Woo

    2013-08-01

    After the recent enactment of the chemical castration legislation for sex offenders in Korea, we sought to report primary treatment outcomes for 38 patients at the National Forensic Hospital since 2011. After chemical castration, these patients experienced reductions in frequency and intensity of sexual drive, frequency of masturbation and sexual fantasies. The incidence of adverse effects was similar to that of previous reports. Serial hormonal evaluations showed an association between testosterone level and degree of paraphilic and non-paraphilic sexual thoughts. A notable finding was an unexpected upsurge of testosterone levels with intense sexual drive and fantasy observed during the first 2 months after cessation of treatment. This suggested the need for a temporary anti-androgen therapy or close surveillance during this period. When proper precautions are taken, chemical castration may be an effective treatment strategy for paraphilic and non-paraphilic sex offenders. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  2. Chemical castration by a single bilateral intra-testicular injection of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    Sokoto Journal of Veterinary Sciences. (P-ISSN 1595-093X/ E-ISSN 2315-6201). Mohammed & James/Sokoto Journal of Veterinary Sciences (2013) 11(1): 62-65. http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/sokjvs.v11i1.10. Chemical castration by a single bilateral intra-testicular injection of chlorhexidine gluconate and cetrimide in bucks.

  3. Chemical castration: It is an acceptable solution for preventing the commission of sex crimes against minors?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miladinović-Stefanović Dušica

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In addition to envisaging criminal offences which incriminate the different forms of sexual violence against minor and introducing stricter forms of punishment for sex offenders, the formal social reaction to sex crimes against minors often involves a series of measures aimed at monitoring the convicted offenders after they have served their sentences. These measures are basically aimed at reducing the risk of recidivism. One of these measures is a special pharmacological treatment, generally known as chemical castration, which is applied for the purpose of suppressing the offender's sexual urges and reducing sexual misconduct. In spite of being an appealing solution, chemical castration is acceptable only under specific conditions. Hence, this matter has to be regulated with exquisite caution in order to avoid the objections that this treatment constitutes a violation of the prohibition of torture, inhuman and degrading treatment and punishment, as well as a violation of the right to respect for private life and the right to establish a family.

  4. Chemical castration and anti-androgens induce differential gene expression in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmusvaara, Saara; Erkkilä, Timo; Urbanucci, Alfonso; Waltering, Kati; Seppälä, Janne; Larjo, Antti; Tuominen, Vilppu J; Isola, Jorma; Kujala, Paula; Lähdesmäki, Harri; Kaipia, Antti; Tammela, Teuvo Lj; Visakorpi, Tapio

    2012-07-01

    Endocrine therapy by castration or anti-androgens is the gold standard treatment for advanced prostate cancer. Although it has been used for decades, the molecular consequences of androgen deprivation are incompletely known and biomarkers of its resistance are lacking. In this study, we studied the molecular mechanisms of hormonal therapy by comparing the effect of bicalutamide (anti-androgen), goserelin (GnRH agonist) and no therapy, followed by radical prostatectomy. For this purpose, 28 men were randomly assigned to treatment groups. Freshly frozen specimens were used for gene expression profiling for all known protein-coding genes. An in silico Bayesian modelling tool was used to assess cancer-specific gene expression from heterogeneous tissue specimens. The expression of 128 genes was > two-fold reduced by the treatments. Only 16% of the altered genes were common in both treatment groups. Of the 128 genes, only 24 were directly androgen-regulated genes, according to re-analysis of previous data on gene expression, androgen receptor-binding sites and histone modifications in prostate cancer cell line models. The tumours containing TMPRSS2-ERG fusion showed higher gene expression of genes related to proliferation compared to the fusion-negative tumours in untreated cases. Interestingly, endocrine therapy reduced the expression of one-half of these genes and thus diminished the differences between the fusion-positive and -negative samples. This study reports the significantly different effects of an anti-androgen and a GnRH agonist on gene expression in prostate cancer cells. TMPRSS2-ERG fusion seems to bring many proliferation-related genes under androgen regulation. Copyright © 2012 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Parasitic castration: the evolution and ecology of body snatchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafferty, Kevin D.; Kuris, Armand M.

    2009-01-01

    Castration is a response to the tradeoff between consumption and longevity faced by parasites. Common parasitic castrators include larval trematodes in snails, and isopod and barnacle parasites of crustaceans. The infected host (with its many unique properties) is the extended phenotype of the parasitic castrator. Because an individual parasitic castrator can usurp all the reproductive energy from a host, and that energy is limited, intra- and interspecific competition among castrators is generally intense. These parasites can be abundant and can substantially depress host density. Host populations subject to high rates of parasitic castration appear to respond by maturing more rapidly.

  6. Nanosensors-Cellphone Integration for Extended Chemical Sensing Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing

    2011-01-01

    This poster is to present the development of a cellphone sensor network for extended chemical sensing. The nanosensors using carbon nanotubes and other nanostructures are used with low power and high sensitivity for chemical detection. The sensing module has been miniaturized to a small size that can plug in or clip on to a smartphone. The chemical information detected by the nanosensors are acquired by a smartphone and transmitted via cellphone 3g or WiFi network to an internet server. The whole integrated sensing system from sensor to cellphone to a cloud will provide an extended chemical sensing network that can cover nation wide and even cover global wide for early warning of a hazardous event.

  7. Chemical reactions modulated by mechanical stress: extended Bell theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konda, Sai Sriharsha M; Brantley, Johnathan N; Bielawski, Christopher W; Makarov, Dmitrii E

    2011-10-28

    A number of recent studies have shown that mechanical stress can significantly lower or raise the activation barrier of a chemical reaction. Within a common approximation due to Bell [Science 200, 618 (1978)], this barrier is linearly dependent on the applied force. A simple extension of Bell's theory that includes higher order corrections in the force predicts that the force-induced change in the activation energy will be given by -FΔR - ΔχF(2)∕2. Here, ΔR is the change of the distance between the atoms, at which the force F is applied, from the reactant to the transition state, and Δχ is the corresponding change in the mechanical compliance of the molecule. Application of this formula to the electrocyclic ring-opening of cis and trans 1,2-dimethylbenzocyclobutene shows that this extension of Bell's theory essentially recovers the force dependence of the barrier, while the original Bell formula exhibits significant errors. Because the extended Bell theory avoids explicit inclusion of the mechanical stress or strain in electronic structure calculations, it allows a computationally efficient characterization of the effect of mechanical forces on chemical processes. That is, the mechanical susceptibility of any reaction pathway is described in terms of two parameters, ΔR and Δχ, both readily computable at zero force.

  8. Effects of sialoadenectomy and castration in female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menéndez-Patterson, A; Velasco-Plaza, A; Marin, B

    1982-01-01

    Previous work on the role of the submaxillary glands in the control of the oestrous cycle in rats has been extended to castrated rats in order to avoid the overlapping between sexual and salivary hormones. Animals were sacrificed 30 days after sialadectomy or pseudosialadectomy. The data show that simultaneous castration and sialadectomy increases significantly the glucaemia level and decreases the weight of the adrenal glands. Non-simultaneous castration and removal of the submaxillary glands decreases the weight of the parotid glands. This effect decreases when both actions are simultaneous. On the other hand, castration produces an important decrease in QO2 uptake in tested structures. Removal of submaxillary glands produces a significant increase of QO2 in hypothalamus and thyroid glands. Simultaneous castration and sialadectomy at the anterior cortex, posterior cortex and parotid gland level shows similar results with respect to desalivated rats; other structures show results similar to the castrated group values. From these results, the role played by submaxillary glands in the control of the sexual cycle of the rat and the possible relation to other structures is discussed.

  9. Optimization of ram semen cryopreservation using a chemically defined soybean lecithin-based extender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emamverdi, M; Zhandi, M; Zare Shahneh, A; Sharafi, M; Akbari-Sharif, A

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of a chemically defined soybean lecithin-based semen extender as a substitute for egg yolk-based extenders in ram semen cryopreservation. In this study, 28 ejaculates were collected from four Zandi rams in the breeding season and then pooled together. The pooled semen was divided into six equal aliquots and diluted with six different extenders: (i) Tris-based extender (TE) containing 0.5% (w/v) soybean lecithin (SL0.5), (ii) TE containing 1% (w/v) soybean lecithin (SL1), (iii) TE containing 1.5% (w/v) soybean lecithin (SL1.5), (iv) TE containing 2% (w/v) soybean lecithin (SL2), (v) TE containing 2.5% (w/v) soybean lecithin (SL2.5) and (vi) TE containing 20% (v/v) egg yolk (EYT). After thawing, sperm motility and motion parameters, plasma membrane and acrosome integrity, apoptosis status and mitochondrial activity were evaluated. The results shown that total and progressive motility (54.43 ± 1.33% and 25.43 ± 0.96%, respectively) were significantly higher in SL1.5 when compared to other semen extenders. Sperm motion parameters (VAP, VSL, VCL, ALH and STR) were significantly higher in SL1.5 compared to other extender, with the exception of SL1 extender. Plasma membrane integrity (48.86 ± 1.38%) was significantly higher in SL1.5 when compared to other semen extenders. Also, percentage of spermatozoa with intact acrosome in SL1.5 (85.35 ± 2.19%) extender was significantly higher than that in SL0.5, SL2.5 and EYT extenders. The results showed that the proportion of live post-thawed sperm was significantly increased in SL1.5 extender compared to SL0.5, SL2 and EYT extenders. In addition, SL1, SL1.5 and SL2.5 extenders resulted in significantly lower percentage of early-apoptotic sperm than that in EYT extender. There were no significant differences in different semen extenders for percentage of post-thawed necrotic and late-apoptotic spermatozoa. Also, the results indicated that there are slight

  10. A statistical view of protein chemical synthesis using NCL and extended methodologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agouridas, Vangelis; El Mahdi, Ouafâa; Cargoët, Marine; Melnyk, Oleg

    2017-09-15

    Native chemical ligation and extended methodologies are the most popular chemoselective reactions for protein chemical synthesis. Their combination with desulfurization techniques can give access to small or challenging proteins that are exploited in a large variety of research areas. In this report, we have conducted a statistical review of their use for protein chemical synthesis in order to provide a flavor of the recent trends and identify the most popular chemical tools used by protein chemists. To this end, a protein chemical synthesis (PCS) database (http://pcs-db.fr) was created by collecting a set of relevant data from more than 450 publications covering the period 1994-2017. A preliminary account of what this database tells us is presented in this report. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. An Evaluation of Pinhole Castration as an Alternative Technique for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    -thiopental anesthesia. Castrated dogs were closely monitored for up to five days after castration. In 12 days, 278 dogs were castrated. The mean duration for pinhole procedure was 11.4 minutes. Duration of pinhole castration reduced ...

  12. Extended Functional Groups (EFG: An Efficient Set for Chemical Characterization and Structure-Activity Relationship Studies of Chemical Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena S. Salmina

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article describes a classification system termed “extended functional groups” (EFG, which are an extension of a set previously used by the CheckMol software, that covers in addition heterocyclic compound classes and periodic table groups. The functional groups are defined as SMARTS patterns and are available as part of the ToxAlerts tool (http://ochem.eu/alerts of the On-line CHEmical database and Modeling (OCHEM environment platform. The article describes the motivation and the main ideas behind this extension and demonstrates that EFG can be efficiently used to develop and interpret structure-activity relationship models.

  13. Ozone chemical equilibrium in the extended mesopause under the nighttime conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belikovich, M. V.; Kulikov, M. Yu.; Grygalashvyly, M.; Sonnemann, G. R.; Ermakova, T. S.; Nechaev, A. A.; Feigin, A. M.

    2018-01-01

    For retrieval of atomic oxygen and atomic hydrogen via ozone observations in the extended mesopause region (∼70-100 km) under nighttime conditions, an assumption on photochemical equilibrium of ozone is often used in research. In this work, an assumption on chemical equilibrium of ozone near mesopause region during nighttime is proofed. We examine 3D chemistry-transport model (CTM) annual calculations and determine the ratio between the correct (modeled) distributions of the O3 density and its equilibrium values depending on the altitude, latitude, and season. The results show that the retrieval of atomic oxygen and atomic hydrogen distributions using an assumption on ozone chemical equilibrium may lead to large errors below ∼81-87 km. We give simple and clear semi-empirical criterion for practical utilization of the lower boundary of the area with ozone's chemical equilibrium near mesopause.

  14. Quality Characteristics and Composition of the Muscle from Entire and Castrate Elk in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Woo Kim

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the research was to determine the chemical composition as well as the physicochemical properties of the longissimus muscle from Korean entire and castrate elk. Twelve elk stags were raised and fed on concentrate with ad libitum hay. All animals were equally divided into castrated and non-castrated (entire males, and slaughtered at 5 year of age. It was found that entire elk, in comparison with castrate elk, had higher content of moisture and lower content of fat (p<0.05. Compared with entire males, the castrates had lower pH and shear force values (p<0.05. However, castrates had higher L*, a*, and b* values compared with entires (p<0.05. An analysis of the fatty acid profile revealed that the muscles of entire and castrate elk had the most abundant concentrations of the following fatty acids: palmitic acid (C16:0 of the saturated fatty acid, and oleic acid (C18:1n-9 of the unsaturated fatty acid. The entire elk contains higher proportions of linoleic acid (C18:3n6, eicosenoic acid (C20:1n9, and arachidonic acid (C20:4n6 (p<0.05. Cholesterol content in elk was not affected by castration. The predominant free amino acid was glutamic acid related to umami taste. It is apparent that the castrate animals carried higher content of histidine, isoleucine, and leucine than those of the entire group (p<0.05. In this study, it was concluded that venison quality of elk is affected by castration and these results can provide fundamental information for venison production.

  15. Surgical castration, coercion and ethics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryberg, Jesper; Petersen, Thomas Søbirk

    2014-01-01

    John McMillan's detailed ethical analysis concerning the use of surgical castration of sex offenders in the Czech Republic and Germany is mainly devoted to considerations of coercion.1 This is not surprising. When castration is offered as an option to offenders and, at the same time, constitutes...... the only means by which these offenders are likely to be released from prison, it is reasonable—and close to the heart of modern medical ethics—to consider whether the offer involves some kind of coercion. However, despite McMillan's seemingly careful consideration of this question, it appears to us...

  16. Evolution of microbiological and chemical parameters during red wine making with extended post-fermentation maceration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francesca, Nicola; Romano, Raffaele; Sannino, Ciro; Le Grottaglie, Laura; Settanni, Luca; Moschetti, Giancarlo

    2014-02-03

    The aim of the present work was to investigate the microbiological, chemical, and sensory characteristics of red wine subjected to post-fermentation maceration that was extended to 90 days. For this purpose, the 'Aglianico di Taurasi' grape was used as a case study. The total yeast concentration increased until day 40 of maceration and decreased thereafter, whereas the concentration of lactic acid bacteria slightly increased. Dekkera/Brettanomyces spp. and acetic acid bacteria were not detected. The yeast community was composed of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Zygosaccharomyces bisporus, Metschnikowia pulcherrima, Hanseniaspora guilliermondii, Hanseniaspora uvarum, Pichia guilliermondii, Aureobasidium pullulans and Debaryomyces carsonii. Nine S. cerevisiae strains were detected at high levels at different times of maceration. The results of all the conventional chemical analyses of the wines were in agreement with the regulations of commercial production and, interestingly, the changes in terms of concentration demonstrated the presence of yeast and LAB populations that were not only alive but also in a metabolically active state until day 90 of maceration. The alcohol and glycerol contents slightly increased until day 90. The concentrations of malic acid decreased, whereas those of lactic acid slightly increased throughout the maceration process. Furthermore, different durations of maceration resulted in significant differences in the total polyphenol content, which was higher at 40-50 days. The main phenolic compounds were benzoic and cinnamic acids and catechins. Interestingly, the highest ratio between (+)-catechin and (-)-epicatechin was found on day 40. In addition, the highest antioxidant activity was observed between days 40 and 50. The concentration of volatile organic compounds, which were mainly represented by alcohols, increased until the end of the maceration process. Sensory analysis revealed that samples that were subjected to maceration for a long

  17. Targeted treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer with sipuleucel-T immunotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulders, P.F.; Santis, M. de; Powles, T.; Fizazi, K.

    2015-01-01

    CONTEXT: Prostate cancer remains highly prevalent and has a poor clinical outcome once metastatic. Sipuleucel-T is an autologous cellular immunotherapy approved for the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Sipuleucel-T treatment extends survival but is independent of

  18. Microelectrode voltammetry of multi-electron transfers complicated by coupled chemical equilibria: a general theory for the extended square scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laborda, Eduardo; Gómez-Gil, José María; Molina, Angela

    2017-06-28

    A very general and simple theoretical solution is presented for the current-potential-time response of reversible multi-electron transfer processes complicated by homogeneous chemical equilibria (the so-called extended square scheme). The expressions presented here are applicable regardless of the number of electrons transferred and coupled chemical processes, and they are particularized for a wide variety of microelectrode geometries. The voltammetric response of very different systems presenting multi-electron transfers is considered for the most widely-used techniques (namely, cyclic voltammetry, square wave voltammetry, differential pulse voltammetry and steady state voltammetry), studying the influence of the microelectrode geometry and the number and thermodynamics of the (electro)chemical steps. Most appropriate techniques and procedures for the determination of the 'interaction' between successive transfers are discussed. Special attention is paid to those situations where homogeneous chemical processes, such as protonation, complexation or ion association, affect the electrochemical behaviour of the system by different stabilization of the oxidation states.

  19. Nucleus-independent chemical shift criterion for aromaticity in π-extended tetraoxa[8]circulenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baryshnikov, Gleb V.; Minaev, Boris F.; Pittelkow, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Recently synthesized p-extended symmetrical tetraoxa[8]circulenes that exhibit electroluminescent properties were calculated at the density functional theory (DFT) level using the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) approach to electron density distribution analysis. Nucleus-independent ...

  20. Acute Cold / Restraint Stress in Castrated Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farideh Zafari Zangeneh

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The present study aimed to determine whether castration altered osmotically stimulated vasopressin (VP release and urinary volume and what is the role of endocrine-stress axis in this process.Materials and methods: Totally 108 mice were studied in two main groups of castrated (n=78 and control (n=30. Each group was extracted by acute cold stress (4◦C for 2h/day, restraint stress (by syringes 60cc 2h/day and cold/restraint stress. The castrated group was treated in sub groups of testosterone, control (sesame oil as vehicle of testosterone. Propranolol as blocker of sympathetic nervous system was given to both groups of castrated mice and main control.Results: Our results showed that, there is interactions between testosterone and sympathetic nervous system on vasopressin, because urine volume was decreased only in testoctomized mice with cold/restraint and cold stress (P<0.001; propranolol as the antagonist of sympathetic nervous system could block and increase urine volume in castrated mice. This increased volume of urine was due to acute cold stress, not restraint stress (p<0.001. The role of testosterone, noradrenalin (NA and Vasopressin (VP in the acute cold stress is confirmed, because testosterone could return the effect of decreased urine volume in control group (P<0.001. Conclusion: Considering the effect of cold/restraint stress on urinary volume in castrated mice shows that there is interaction between sex hormone (testosterone, vasopressin and adrenergic systems.

  1. [Combination of a universal antidote and temporary skin substitute for chemical burns: Extended case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liodaki, E; Schopp, B E; Lindert, J; Krämer, R; Kisch, T; Mailänder, P; Stang, F

    2015-09-01

    In this article we describe our experiences in the treatment of chemical burns with Diphoterine(®) solution and Suprathel(®) as a temporary skin substitute material, a treatment which in the past was not commonly used for this pattern of injuries. In the study period from October 2012 to December 2013 we treated five patients (four male and one female including two children and three adults) with chemical burns by decontamination with Diphoterine(®) and wound covering with Suprathel(®). The control group included five patients with similar injury patterns who were treated with Diphoterine(®) and occlusive wound dressings. No wound infections occurred in any of the five cases and no interactions were observed between Suprathel(®) and the chemical substance involved. In four cases the skin areas with IIa-IIb degree damage showed good wound healing and only slight scarring in the follow-up after 3 months and one of the five patients had to be treated surgically. Suprathel(®) can be used as a temporary skin substitute for the treatment of skin burns and is also available for the treatment of chemical burns.

  2. Retardation of muscle growth in castrated male mice: further ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Retardation of muscle growth in castrated male mice was studied as an evidence for the influence of hormones on the development of muscle mass. Male albino mice were castrated at 28days of age by open castration method. The weights and the muscle mass indices (mg muscle weight per gram body weight) of the ...

  3. The Effect of Castration and Testosterone Administration on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SOS

    2012-04-18

    Apr 18, 2012 ... To study the effect of castration and testosterone replacement on the testosterone level of the New. Zealand rabbit, 16 apparently ... After two weeks, the rabbits were castrated and the effect of castration and ... infiltration of the local anesthetic around the neck of scrotum (Hall,. 1979). Each testicle was then ...

  4. Improving intermolecular interactions in DFTB3 using extended polarization from chemical-potential equalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen, Anders S., E-mail: andersx@chem.wisc.edu, E-mail: cui@chem.wisc.edu; Cui, Qiang, E-mail: andersx@chem.wisc.edu, E-mail: cui@chem.wisc.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1101 University Ave., Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Elstner, Marcus [Theoretische Chemische Biologie, Universität Karlsruhe, Kaiserstr. 12, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2015-08-28

    Semi-empirical quantum mechanical methods traditionally expand the electron density in a minimal, valence-only electron basis set. The minimal-basis approximation causes molecular polarization to be underestimated, and hence intermolecular interaction energies are also underestimated, especially for intermolecular interactions involving charged species. In this work, the third-order self-consistent charge density functional tight-binding method (DFTB3) is augmented with an auxiliary response density using the chemical-potential equalization (CPE) method and an empirical dispersion correction (D3). The parameters in the CPE and D3 models are fitted to high-level CCSD(T) reference interaction energies for a broad range of chemical species, as well as dipole moments calculated at the DFT level; the impact of including polarizabilities of molecules in the parameterization is also considered. Parameters for the elements H, C, N, O, and S are presented. The Root Mean Square Deviation (RMSD) interaction energy is improved from 6.07 kcal/mol to 1.49 kcal/mol for interactions with one charged species, whereas the RMSD is improved from 5.60 kcal/mol to 1.73 for a set of 9 salt bridges, compared to uncorrected DFTB3. For large water clusters and complexes that are dominated by dispersion interactions, the already satisfactory performance of the DFTB3-D3 model is retained; polarizabilities of neutral molecules are also notably improved. Overall, the CPE extension of DFTB3-D3 provides a more balanced description of different types of non-covalent interactions than Neglect of Diatomic Differential Overlap type of semi-empirical methods (e.g., PM6-D3H4) and PBE-D3 with modest basis sets.

  5. Total antiradical activity in male castrated piglets blood: reference values

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Corino

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Blood samples from 146 male castrated piglets in the range of 10-47kg body weight were collected from the same farm and analysed for total antiradical activity in order to determine reference intervals. Data were tested for normality and then submitted to reference limit evaluation. The reference values found in piglets, expressed as half-hemolysis time (59.34 – 93.60 and 43.94 – 66.90 minutes for blood and red blood cell, respectively, are lower than those found in humans; further studies are needed to extend reference values study to female and to animals of different weight classes and different genetic type.

  6. New Therapeutics to Treat Castrate-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ömer Acar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The effective treatment of castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC has proven to be very challenging. Until recently, docetaxel was the only therapeutic demonstrated to extend overall patient survival. Yet recently, a considerable number of new therapeutics have been approved to treat CRPC patients. These remarkable advances now give new tools for the therapeutic management of late-stage prostate cancer. In this review, we will examine mechanistic and clinical data of several newly approved therapeutics including the chemotherapeutic cabazitaxel, antiandrogen enzalutamide, endocrine disruptor abiraterone acetate, immunotherapy sipuleucel-T, and bone-targeting radiopharmaceutical alpharadin. In addition, we will examine other promising therapeutics that are currently in Phase III trials.

  7. Meat quality of castrated and non-castrated Santa Ines lambs subjected to food restriction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayanne Lima de Sousa

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the quality of meat of castrated and non-castrated Santa Ines lambs submitted to food restriction. Were used 30 lambs, 15 castrated and 15 non-castrated, about two months of age and average initial body weight of 13.00 ± 1.49 kg. The lambs were distributed in a completely randomized design in a factorial arrangement 3 x 2 (restriction level x sex class, according to the amount of food provided. The duration of the experiment was determined by the time required for the animals in the one of the groups achieved 28 kg of body weight. There was interaction between food restriction levels and sex class to the variables intensity of yellow color and pH in the longissimus lumborum muscle and the shear force in the semimembranosus muscle. In non-castrated animals, the intensity of yellow color was higher in the longissimus lumborum muscle at the level of 30% of food restriction. There was no significant interaction between food restriction levels and sex class for the quality aspects related to color saturation, color tone, luminosity, red intensity, water holding capacity and cooking losses in longissimus lumborum and semimembranosus muscles. Although food restriction and sex class have influenced the variables related to the quality of meat of the animals evaluated, the mean values are considered acceptable by the literature. The feeding restriction levels and sex class influence some important features of quality of Santa Ines lamb meat.

  8. Resource efficiency and economic implications of alternatives to surgical castration without anaesthesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roest, de K.; Montanari, C.; Fowler, T.; Baltussen, W.H.M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the economic implications of alternative methods to surgical castration without anaesthesia. Detailed research results on the economic implications of four different alternatives are reported. castration with local anaesthesia, castration with general anaesthesia,

  9. Androgen deprivation therapy (castration therapy and pedophilia: What’s new

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Silvani

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Andrology is a constantly evolving discipline, embracing social problems like pedophilia and its pharmacological treatment. With regard to chemical castration, the andrologist may perform an important role as part of a team of specialists. At present, no knowledge is available regarding hormonal, chromosomal or genetic alterations involved in pedophilia. International legislation primarily aims to defend childhood, but does not provide for compulsory treatment. We reviewed international literature that, at present, only comprises a few reports on research concerning androgen deprivation. Most of these refer to the use of leuprolide acetate, rather than medroxyprogesterone and cyproterone acetate, which present a larger number of side effects. Current opinions on chemical castration for pedophilia are discordant. Some surveys confirm that therapy reduces sexual thoughts and fantasies, especially in recidivism. On the other hand, some authors report that chemical castration does not modify the pedophile’s personality. In our opinion, once existing legislation has changed, andrologists could play a significant role in the selection of patients to receive androgen deprivation therapy, due in part to their knowledge about its action and side effects.

  10. Extending the predictions of chemical mechanisms for hydrogen combustion by Comparison of predicted and measured flame temperatures in burner-stabilized, 1-D flames

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sepman, A. V.; Mokhov, A. V.; Levinsky, H. B.

    A method is presented for extending the range of conditions for which the performance of chemical mechanisms used to predict hydrogen burning velocities can be evaluated. Specifically, by comparing the computed variation of flame temperature with mass flux in burner-stabilized flat flames with those

  11. Meloxicam mediates short-term behavioral changes of castrated calves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castration may detrimentally affect the health and performance of weaned calves and painful procedures are increasingly a public concern. Therefore, practical pain mitigation is critical. The objective was to determine the effects of castration (by banding) with or without administration of meloxica...

  12. [Castration of dogs from the standpoint of behaviour therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhne, F

    2012-04-24

    The castration of dogs is an amputation covered by Section 6 (1) of the Animal Protection Law in Germany. Apart from the general indications given by veterinary medicine, castration of an animal is a potential method of animal behaviour therapy. However, the highly variable, individual effects of castration on behaviour require detailed diagnosis by the veterinarian. Castration appears to exert its strongest influence on sexually dimorphic behaviour patterns in male dogs, e.g. status- related aggression, urine marking, mounting, house-soiling problems, and roaming. An indication to castrate a bitch is maternal aggression. When evaluating the effects of castration, one should always consider individual circumstances, such as learning experience (for example in the case of "experienced copulators"), age, and pack behaviour (if there is more than one dog in the household). Additional benefits of castration include a reduction in the dog's general activity level, decreased preparatory arousal and a decline in the dog's ability to focus its attention fully on the target of attack. As a result, it is much easier for the owner to disrupt and manage or control the dog's agonistic intentions. However, castration is not the ultimate remedy in dog-handling. Any decision in this respect should be based on a precise behaviour- related indication. Otherwise, such surgery may well violate the Animal Protection Law.

  13. Practices and Concerns of Castration of Dogs in Nigeria | Ajadi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study evaluated the practices and concerns regarding castration, and level of awareness of Nigerian Veterinarians on alternatives to surgical castration in dogs. Questionnaires were distributed to one hundred veterinarians during the 2012 annual Veterinary Association Conference. The questionnaire comprised of the ...

  14. Evaluation Of Surgical Castration For Prostate Cancer At Nnewi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. To evaluate the average time of follow-up of patients with advanced prostate cancer after surgical castration and to assess the difficulties associated with follow-up of patients. Patients and Methods. 89 case notes of patients who had surgical castration for advanced prostate cancer were reviewed. Information on ...

  15. Castration of male livestock and the potential of immunocastration to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Growing consumer awareness about animal welfare has led to the assessment of the impact of common farming practices, such as physical castration, on animal well-being under production conditions. Physical castration is used in livestock industries to prevent indiscriminate breeding, control aggression, and improve ...

  16. Effect of surgical and immunological castration on haematological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Welfare concerns are growing regarding surgical castration (SC) in pets, necessitating the need for non-surgical alternatives. Administration of vaccines against gonadotropins releasing hormone (GnRH) have been reported as alternative to SC. This study determined the effect of surgical and immunological castrations (IC) ...

  17. Castration causes progressive reduction of length of the rabbit penis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Understanding of the alterations of the penile size in hypogonadism is important in clinical examination of hypogonadic patients. The aim of this study was to describe the changes in the rabbit penile length after castration. Fifteen adult male rabbits were used for the study. Nine of these were castrated under local anesthesia ...

  18. Pain behaviour after castration of piglets; effect of pain relief with lidocaine and/or meloxicam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kluivers-Poodt, M.; Zonderland, J.J.; Verbraak, J.; Lambooij, E.; Hellebrekers, L.J.

    2013-01-01

    Behavioural responses and the effect of lidocaine and meloxicam on behaviour of piglets after castration were studied. A total of 144 piglets of 2 to 5 days of age were allocated to one of six treatments: castration (CAST), castration with lidocaine (LIDO), castration with meloxicam (MELO),

  19. Proximate chemical composition and fatty acid profiles of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Proximate chemical composition and fatty acid profiles of Longissimus Proximate chemical composition and fatty acid profiles of Longissimus thoracis from pasture fed LHRH immunocastrated, castrated and intact Bos indicus bulls.

  20. The effect of mung bean powder, and/or low fat soy flour as meat extender on the chemical, physical, and sensory quality of buffalo meat product

    OpenAIRE

    Kenawi M.A.; Abdelsalam R.R.; El-Sherif S.A.

    2009-01-01

    The chemical, physical, and sensory evaluation of buffalo meat patties was evaluated in order to study the effect of adding low fat soy flour and/or mung bean powder as meat extenders. The results indicated that using low fat soy flour or mung bean powder as meat extenders at a level of 10% reduced the moisture and fat content, whereas increased the fiber and protein contents in the cooked samples. The reduction was greatest in the control (100% buffalo meat), and lowest in the sample contain...

  1. Radium 223: how can we optimize this new tool for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorff, Tanya Barauskas; Gross, Mitchell E

    2015-01-01

    Radium 223 is an alpha-emitting intravenous radiotherapy approved for the treatment of men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). The approved indication covers men with pain from bony metastatic disease and no visceral involvement; however, questions remain as to optimal patient selection and timing of this treatment relative to other life-extending therapies for mCRPC. Limited data exist to guide clinicians on how to position radium 223 in the therapeutic sequence, however, some theoretical considerations and data derived from the ALSYMPCA trial populations pre- and postdocetaxel will be outlined. Subgroup analyses may provide some insight into patient selection.

  2. TRAF4 and Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0536 TITLE: TRAF4 and Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Ping Yi CONTRACTING...Castration Resistant prostate cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-15-1-0536 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Ping Yi 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK...to be a critical player in castration-resistant prostate cancers . It was suggested that the function of AR in CRPC is not to turn on the same

  3. Assessment and management of pain associated with castration in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coetzee, Johann F

    2013-03-01

    Validated pain assessment tools are needed to support approval of analgesic compounds to alleviate pain associated with castration. Accelerometers, videography, heart rate variability, electroencephalography, thermography, and plasma neuropeptide measurement to assess behavioral, physiologic, and neuroendocrine changes associated with castration are discussed. Preemptive local and systemic analgesia are also reviewed. Previous studies found that preemptive administration of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID) and local anesthesia significantly decreased peak serum cortisol concentration after castration. Local anesthesia alone tended to decrease peak cortisol concentrations more than NSAIDs, whereas NSAIDs alone tended to decrease the area under the cortisol-time curve more than local anesthesia alone. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Inhibition of the RANK/RANKL signaling with osteoprotegerin prevents castration-induced acceleration of bone metastasis in castration-insensitive prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, Koichiro; Inoue, Takamitsu; Narita, Shintaro; Maita, Shinya; Huang, Mingguo; Numakura, Kazuyuki; Tsuruta, Hiroshi; Saito, Mitsuru; Maeno, Atsushi; Satoh, Shigeru; Tsuchiya, Norihiko; Habuchi, Tomonori

    2017-07-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for patients with metastatic or locally advanced prostate cancer reduces bone mineral density by stimulating receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B (RANK) signaling in osteoclasts. The involvement of the RANK/RANKL signaling in ADT-induced acceleration of bone metastasis in castration-insensitive prostate cancer was examined in a murine model using osteoprotegerin (OPG). Male Balb/c nude mice were divided into three groups: the non-castration, castration, and castration + OPG groups. PC-3M-luc-C6 was injected into the left ventricle of the mice. Recombinant OPG was injected intravenously twice weekly in the castration + OPG group. In-vivo imaging system (IVIS ® ) determined that the prevalence and photon counts of bone metastasis in the castration group were significantly higher than that in the non-castration and castration + OPG groups. The mean number of RANKL-positive osteoblasts and the mean serum RANKL level in the castration group were significantly higher than those in the non-castration group. RANKL-enhanced activation of osteoclasts was attenuated in the castration + OPG group. These results suggest that the mechanisms of RANK/RANKL signaling are involved in the ADT-induced acceleration of bone metastasis in castration-insensitive prostate cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Castration-resistant prostate cancer: AUA Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cookson, Michael S; Roth, Bruce J; Dahm, Philipp; Engstrom, Christine; Freedland, Stephen J; Hussain, Maha; Lin, Daniel W; Lowrance, William T; Murad, Mohammad Hassan; Oh, William K; Penson, David F; Kibel, Adam S

    2013-08-01

    This Guideline is intended to provide a rational basis for the management of patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer based on currently available published data. A systematic review and meta-analysis of the published literature was conducted using controlled vocabulary supplemented with keywords relating to the relevant concepts of prostate cancer and castration resistance. The search strategy was developed and executed by reference librarians and methodologists to create an evidence report limited to English-language, published peer-reviewed literature. This review yielded 303 articles published from 1996 through 2013 that were used to form a majority of the guideline statements. Clinical Principles and Expert Opinions were used for guideline statements lacking sufficient evidence-based data. Guideline statements were created to inform clinicians on the appropriate use of observation, androgen-deprivation and antiandrogen therapy, androgen synthesis inhibitors, immunotherapy, radionuclide therapy, systemic chemotherapy, palliative care and bone health. These were based on six index patients developed to represent the most common scenarios encountered in clinical practice. As a direct result of the significant increase in FDA-approved therapeutic agents for use in patients with metastatic CRPC, clinicians are challenged with a multitude of treatment options and potential sequencing of these agents that, consequently, make clinical decision-making more complex. Given the rapidly evolving nature of this field, this guideline should be used in conjunction with recent systematic literature reviews and an understanding of the individual patient's treatment goals. In all cases, patients' preferences and personal goals should be considered when choosing management strategies. Copyright © 2013 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Castration of a Black Rhinoceros Diceros Bicornis Minor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V de Vos

    1980-01-01

    Full Text Available A black rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis minor in the Addo Elephant National Park was castrated in order to prevent the possibility of an aotic inducing gene to be introduced into the Addo population. The classic castration technique was used. It was subsequently found that the rhino showed a drastic change in behaviour, and is at this stage predictably timid, which is not the case with his testis carrying compeers.

  7. K-targeted metabolomic analysis extends chemical subtraction to DESIGNER extracts: selective depletion of extracts of hops (Humulus lupulus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos Alvarenga, René F; Friesen, J Brent; Nikolić, Dejan; Simmler, Charlotte; Napolitano, José G; van Breemen, Richard; Lankin, David C; McAlpine, James B; Pauli, Guido F; Chen, Shao-Nong

    2014-12-26

    This study introduces a flexible and compound targeted approach to Deplete and Enrich Select Ingredients to Generate Normalized Extract Resources, generating DESIGNER extracts, by means of chemical subtraction or augmentation of metabolites. Targeting metabolites based on their liquid-liquid partition coefficients (K values), K targeting uses countercurrent separation methodology to remove single or multiple compounds from a chemically complex mixture, according to the following equation: DESIGNER extract = total extract ± target compound(s). Expanding the scope of the recently reported depletion of extracts by immunoaffinity or solid phase liquid chromatography, the present approach allows a more flexible, single- or multi-targeted removal of constituents from complex extracts such as botanicals. Chemical subtraction enables both chemical and biological characterization, including detection of synergism/antagonism by both the subtracted targets and the remaining metabolite mixture, as well as definition of the residual complexity of all fractions. The feasibility of the DESIGNER concept is shown by K-targeted subtraction of four bioactive prenylated phenols, isoxanthohumol (1), 8-prenylnaringenin (2), 6-prenylnaringenin (3), and xanthohumol (4), from a standardized hops (Humulus lupulus L.) extract using specific solvent systems. Conversely, adding K-targeted isolates allows enrichment of the original extract and hence provides an augmented DESIGNER material. Multiple countercurrent separation steps were used to purify each of the four compounds, and four DESIGNER extracts with varying depletions were prepared. The DESIGNER approach innovates the characterization of chemically complex extracts through integration of enabling technologies such as countercurrent separation, K-by-bioactivity, the residual complexity concepts, as well as quantitative analysis by (1)H NMR, LC-MS, and HiFSA-based NMR fingerprinting.

  8. A chemical sensor and biosensor based totally automated water quality monitor for extended space flight: Step 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Robert S.

    1993-01-01

    The result of a literature search to consider what technologies should be represented in a totally automated water quality monitor for extended space flight is presented. It is the result of the first summer in a three year JOVE project. The next step will be to build a test platform at the Authors' school, St. John Fisher College. This will involve undergraduates in NASA related research. The test flow injection analysis system will be used to test the detection limit of sensors and the performance of sensors in groups. Sensor companies and research groups will be encouraged to produce sensors which are not currently available and are needed for this project.

  9. Extending the molecular size in accurate quantum-chemical calculations: the equilibrium structure and spectroscopic properties of uracil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puzzarini, Cristina; Barone, Vincenzo

    2011-04-21

    The equilibrium structure of uracil has been investigated using both theoretical and experimental data. With respect to the former, quantum-chemical calculations at the coupled-cluster level in conjunction with a triple-zeta basis set have been carried out. Extrapolation to the basis set limit, performed employing the second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory, and inclusion of core-correlation and diffuse-function corrections have also been considered. Based on the available rotational constants for various isotopic species together with corresponding computed vibrational corrections, the semi-experimental equilibrium structure of uracil has been determined for the first time. Theoretical and semi-experimental structures have been found in remarkably good agreement, thus pointing out the limitations of previous experimental determinations. Molecular and spectroscopic properties of uracil have then been studied by means of the composite computational approach introduced for the molecular structure evaluation. Among the results achieved, we mention the revision of the dipole moment. On the whole, it has been proved that the computational procedure presented is able to provide parameters with the proper accuracy to support experimental investigations of large molecules of biological interest.

  10. Cholesterol biosynthesis inhibitor RO 48-8071 suppresses growth of hormone-dependent and castration-resistant prostate cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Y

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Yayun Liang,1 Benford Mafuvadze,1 Johannes D Aebi,2 Salman M Hyder1 1Dalton Cardiovascular Research Center and Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, MO, USA; 2Medicinal Chemistry, Roche Pharma Research and Early Development (pRED, Roche Innovation Center Basel, F Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd., Basel, Switzerland Abstract: Standard treatment for primary prostate cancer includes systemic exposure to chemotherapeutic drugs that target androgen receptor or antihormone therapy (chemical castration; however, drug-resistant cancer cells generally emerge during treatment, limiting the continued use of systemic chemotherapy. Patients are then treated with more toxic standard therapies. Therefore, there is an urgent need for novel and more effective treatments for prostate cancer. The cholesterol biosynthetic pathway is an attractive therapeutic target for treating endocrine-dependent cancers because cholesterol is an essential structural and functional component of cell membranes as well as the metabolic precursor of endogenous steroid hormones. In this study, we have examined the effects of RO 48-8071 (4'-[6-(allylmethylaminohexyloxy]-4-bromo-2'-fluorobenzophenone fumarate; Roche Pharmaceuticals internal reference: RO0488071 (RO, which is an inhibitor of 2, 3-oxidosqualene cyclase (a key enzyme in the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway, on prostate cancer cells. Exposure of both hormone-dependent and castration-resistant human prostate cancer cells to RO reduced prostate cancer cell viability and induced apoptosis in vitro. RO treatment reduced androgen receptor protein expression in hormone-dependent prostate cancer cells and increased estrogen receptor β (ERβ protein expression in both hormone-dependent and castration-resistant prostate cancer cell lines. Combining RO with an ERβ agonist increased its ability to reduce castration-resistant prostate cancer cell viability. In addition, RO effectively suppressed the

  11. New developments in the treatment of castration resistant prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roxanne Wadia

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In the past 5 years, the treatment and understanding of metastatic castrate resistant prostate cancer (CRPC have improved dramatically. Our understanding of the mechanisms of castration resistance has allowed for the development of new drugs to target prostate cancer, and our understanding of genetic mutations may give us new tools with which to more accurately diagnose and be able to predict the course of this heterogeneous disease. This article summarizes the recent advances in the understanding of the development of CRPC, as well as the new drugs and targets, which have evolved from this basic research.

  12. Morphologic and biochemical changes in male rat lung after surgical and pharmacological castration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.S. Ojeda

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available The morphology of the rat lung was studied by light microscopy in different situations: after surgical and pharmacological castration and after administration of testosterone to the castrated rat to determine if the androgen is required to maintain the normal morphology of the lung. We also determined the effect of flutamide on the phospholipid composition of both the surfactant and microsomes of the lung. Rats were separated into five groups: I - control non-castrated rats, II - castrated rats sacrificed 21 days after castration, III - castrated rats that received testosterone daily from day 2 to day 21 after castration, IV - castrated rats that received testosterone from day 15 to day 21 after castration, and V - control rats injected with flutamide for 7 days. The amount of different phospholipids in the surfactant and microsomes of the lung was measured in group I and V rats. At the light microscopy level, the surgical and pharmacological castration provoked alterations in the morphology of the lung, similar to that observed in human lung emphysema. The compositions of surfactant and microsomes of the lung were similar to those previously reported by us for the surgically castrated rats. These results indicate that androgens are necessary for the normal morphology as well as for some metabolic aspects of the lung.

  13. Varieties of Castration Experience: Relevance to Contemporary Psychoanalysis and Psychodynamic Psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Graeme J

    2016-03-01

    Although Freud considered castration to be one of the two major anxieties of human life, the castration complex has been relatively neglected in contemporary psychoanalytic writing and is insufficiently discussed in presentations of clinical cases. This article discusses the relevance of the concept to contemporary psychoanalysis and psychodynamic psychotherapy, in particular the important contributing role of castration conflicts in the pathogenesis of a wide range of clinical symptoms. The author begins by briefly reviewing some classical and contemporary psychoanalytic ideas about castration to show how the concept has broadened and is currently used not only to signify fear of damage to or loss of the genital, but also metaphorically to indicate a threat to or loss of any valued human characteristic or function. He outlines Brenner's distinction between castration anxiety and castration depression, and reviews the role of childhood trauma in intensifying castration conflicts. He then illustrates the clinical application of these ideas by describing aspects of his psychotherapeutic work with three male patients who presented with a variety of symptoms and distressing psychological experiences that were gradually resolved through the analysis of underlying castration anxiety and/or castration depression. Although castration anxiety is frequently intermingled with separation anxiety, the author concludes that with many traumatized patients castration conflicts are in the foreground and the therapist needs to focus on the patient's proneness to humiliation, powerlessness, and shame.

  14. Effect of Surgical and Immunological Castration on Haematological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    olayemitoyin

    Keywords: Surgical castration, immunosterilization, dogs, GnRH vaccine, Testosterone, Luteinising hormone. ©Physiological Society of Nigeria. *Address for correspondence: ayisat_ajadi@yahoo.com Tel: +234-806-956-0868. Manuscript Accepted: .......... INTRODUCTION. Dog overpopulation remains a serious problem in.

  15. Preliminary study on the effect of castration and testosterone ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To study the effect of castration and testosterone replacement on the testosterone level of the New Zealand rabbit, 16 apparently healthy adult male rabbits were used. The animals were divided into four groups with each group having four rabbits. The first group served as the control group. The rabbits in the second group ...

  16. Live and carcass measurements of steers castrated at three different ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    marbling, and fat thickness on the eye muscle between the three castrated groups. However, it was obvious that the ... Throughout the suckling period the cows remained in the same herd and after weaning the steers ... (average of three measurements across the eye muscle) was measured. Marbling of the eye muscle was ...

  17. Influenced by Castration and Diet Performance and feed Utilisation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dry:matter intake (751 vs. 744g/day) than castrates ...... FehT, P.M., Simvant; D., Delage, 1., Dumont, B.L. ... , ~ a~? Roy, .G.\\ 1976. Effect o~ feeding: .'. m{!thQds on performance of entue young .... male .goats.' Li~estock Production Science .' , .

  18. RETARDATION OF MUSCLE GROWTH IN CASTRATED MALE MICE:

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the absolute weights and the muscle mass indices of the muscles of castrated males were ... Muscles, Mice. INTRODUCTION rat levator ani muscles. It was noted that the hypertrophy of the muscle was a result. Muscles of adult male mice are invariably of increase in myofibrilar material .... (1976): Skeletal muscle cellularity.

  19. Castration for Population Control of Macaques In a Sanctuary Setting

    OpenAIRE

    Buyukmihci, NC

    2017-01-01

    This paper discusses the use of castration as a means of population control for non-human primates where other means may be inefficient, ineffective or otherwise problematic. It is anecdotal in nature, using my experience and some reference to scientific studies for support.

  20. Prostate progenitor cells proliferate in response to castration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xudong Shi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Androgen-deprivation is a mainstay of therapy for advanced prostate cancer but tumor regression is usually incomplete and temporary because of androgen-independent cells in the tumor. It has been speculated that these tumor cells resemble the stem/progenitor cells of the normal prostate. The purpose of this study was to examine the response of slow-cycling progenitor cells in the adult mouse prostate to castration. Proliferating cells in the E16 urogenital sinus were pulse labeled by BrdU administration or by doxycycline-controlled labeling of the histone-H2B GFP mouse. A small population of labeled epithelial cells in the adult prostate localized at the junction of the prostatic ducts and urethra. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS showed that GFP label-retaining cells were enriched for cells co-expressing stem cell markers Sca-1, CD133, CD44 and CD117 (4- marker cells; 60-fold enrichment. FACS showed, additionally, that 4-marker cells were androgen receptor positive. Castration induced proliferation and dispersal of E16 labeled cells into more distal ductal segments. When naïve adult mice were administered BrdU daily for 2 weeks after castration, 16% of 4-marker cells exhibited BrdU label in contrast to only 6% of all epithelial cells (P < 0.01. In sham-castrated controls less than 4% of 4-marker cells were BrdU labeled (P < 0.01. The unexpected and admittedly counter-intuitive finding that castration induced progenitor cell proliferation suggests that androgen deprivation therapy in men with advanced prostate cancer could not only exert pleiotrophic effects on tumor sub-populations but may induce inadvertent expansion of tumor stem cells.

  1. Effect of local anaesthesia and/or analgesia on pain responses induced by piglet castration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nyman Görel

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surgical castration in male piglets is painful and methods that reduce this pain are requested. This study evaluated the effect of local anaesthesia and analgesia on vocal, physiological and behavioural responses during and after castration. A second purpose was to evaluate if herdsmen can effectively administer anaesthesia. Methods Four male piglets in each of 141 litters in five herds were randomly assigned to one of four treatments: castration without local anaesthesia or analgesia (C, controls, analgesia (M, meloxicam, local anaesthesia (L, lidocaine, or both local anaesthesia and analgesia (LM. Lidocaine (L, LM was injected at least three minutes before castration and meloxicam (M, LM was injected after castration. During castration, vocalisation was measured and resistance movements judged. Behaviour observations were carried out on the castration day and the following day. The day after castration, castration wounds were ranked, ear and skin temperature was measured, and blood samples were collected for analysis of acute phase protein Serum Amyloid A concentration (SAA. Piglets were weighed on the castration day and at three weeks of age. Sickness treatments and mortality were recorded until three weeks of age. Results Piglets castrated with lidocaine produced calls with lower intensity (p p p = 0.06, n.s. and the following day (p = 0.02. Controls had less swollen wounds compared to piglets assigned to treatments M, L and LM (p p = 0.005; p = 0.05 for C + L compared to M + LM. Ear temperature was higher (p Conclusions The study concludes that lidocaine reduced pain during castration and that meloxicam reduced pain after castration. The study also concludes that the herdsmen were able to administer local anaesthesia effectively.

  2. [Alpha emitter radium-223 dichloride: new therapy in castration-resistant prostate cancer with symptomatic bone metastases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinzer, H; König, F; Klutmann, S

    2014-04-01

    Radium-223 dichloride (Ra-223) is an alpha emitter with low toxicity for the treatment of patients with castrations-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) and symptomatic bone metastases showing a 30% reduction in the risk of death, as compared to placebo. Because of the favorable physical and chemical characteristics, Ra-223 can be handled easily in daily practice based on interdisciplinary co-operation between urology and nuclear medicine. Ra-223 has been approved under the product name Xofigo® by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the European Medicines Agency (EMA).

  3. CHEMICALS

    CERN Multimedia

    Medical Service

    2002-01-01

    It is reminded that all persons who use chemicals must inform CERN's Chemistry Service (TIS-GS-GC) and the CERN Medical Service (TIS-ME). Information concerning their toxicity or other hazards as well as the necessary individual and collective protection measures will be provided by these two services. Users must be in possession of a material safety data sheet (MSDS) for each chemical used. These can be obtained by one of several means : the manufacturer of the chemical (legally obliged to supply an MSDS for each chemical delivered) ; CERN's Chemistry Service of the General Safety Group of TIS ; for chemicals and gases available in the CERN Stores the MSDS has been made available via EDH either in pdf format or else via a link to the supplier's web site. Training courses in chemical safety are available for registration via HR-TD. CERN Medical Service : TIS-ME :73186 or service.medical@cern.ch Chemistry Service : TIS-GS-GC : 78546

  4. Choline Autoradiography of Human Prostate Cancer Xenograft: Effect of Castration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Jadvar

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of castration and tracer uptake time interval on the level of radiolabeled choline accumulation in murine-implanted human prostate tumor xenografts using quantitative autoradiography. We implanted androgen-dependent (CWR22 and androgen-independent (PC3 human prostate cancer cells in castrated (n = 9 and noncastrated (n = 9 athymic male mice and allowed tumors to grow to 1 cm3. The mice were euthanized at 5, 10, and 20 minutes after injection of 5 µCi [14C]-choline. Mice were prepared for quantitative autoradiography with density light units of viable tumor sections converted to units of radioactivity (nCi/mm2 using calibration. Two-group comparisons were performed using a two-tailed Student t-test with unequal variance and with a significance probability level of less than .05. Two-group comparisons between the means of the tracer uptake level for each tumor type at each of three time points for each of two host types showed that (1 the level of tracer localization in the two tumor types was affected little in relation to the host type and (2 PC3 tumor uptake level tended to increase slowly with time only in the noncastrated host, whereas this was not observed in the castrated host or with CWR22 tumor in either host type. The uptake time interval and castration do not appear to significantly affect the level of radiolabeled choline uptake by the human prostate cancer xenograft.

  5. Overcoming Autophagy to Induce Apoptosis in Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-12-1-0529 TITLE: Overcoming Autophagy to Induce Apoptosis in Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL...survival mechanism and led cells to undergo apoptosis . Survival mechanisms elicited by CRPC C4-2B cells when treated with Enza may be blocked by...Targeting cancer cell metabolism: the combination of metformin and 2-deoxyglucose induces p53-dependent apoptosis in prostate cancer cells. Cancer

  6. Molecular Indicators of Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    testosterone (អ ng per deciliter [1.73 nmol per liter]) with continued androgen- deprivation therapy, and documented metastases, as confirmed on...clinical trials for patients with progressive prostate cancer and castrate levels of testosterone : recommendations of the Prostate Cancer Clinical... metabolism in metastatic prostate cancer tumors. Cancer Res 2012; 72:6142-52. 26. Efstathiou E, Titus M, Wen S, et al. Molecular characterization of

  7. Castration of piglets under general anaesthesia: a possible approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwan Nussbaumer

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Since January 2010 the castration of piglets without pain relief has been forbidden in Switzerland. Swiss pig farmers now have two choices, either vet-performed anaesthesia and analgesia by intramuscular injection or farmer-administered isofluran anaesthesia by an inhalation device. Many smaller pig producers, with less than 60 sows, have chosen injected anaesthesia for economic, user safety and environmental reasons.

  8. Evaluation of Pinhole castration as an alternative technique for goat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Les animaux ont été surveillés quotidiennement à travers des examens cliniques de stress et d'un dosage du cortisol plasmatique. L'efficacité de la méthode a été évaluée par l'étude des caractéristiques séminales et des changements morphologiques de testicules. Les boucs qui ont subi la castration pinhole ont montré ...

  9. Castration-resistant prostate cancer: systemic therapy in 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando C. Maluf

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the most common non-cutaneous neoplasm in the male population worldwide. It is typically diagnosed in its early stages, and the disease exhibits a relatively indolent course in most patients. Despite the curability of localized disease with prostatectomy and radiation therapy, some patients develop metastatic disease and die. Although androgen deprivation is present in the majority of patients with metastatic prostate cancer, a state of androgen resistance eventually develops. Castration-resistant prostate cancer, defined when there is progression of disease despite low levels of testosterone, requires specialized care, and improved communication between medical and urologic oncologists has been identified as a key component in delivering effective therapy. Despite being considered a chemoresistant tumor in the past, the use of a prostate-specific antigen has paved the way for a new generation of trials for castration-resistant prostate cancer. Docetaxel is a life-prolonging chemotherapy that has been established as the standard first-line agent in two phase III clinical trials. Cabazitaxel, a novel taxane with activity in cancer models resistant to paclitaxel and docetaxel, is the only agent that has been compared to a chemotherapy control in a phase III clinical trial as a second-line therapy; it was found to prolong the overall survival of patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer previously treated with docetaxel when compared to mitoxantrone. Other agents used in this setting include abiraterone and sipuleucel-T, and novel therapies are continually being investigated in an attempt to improve the outcome for patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer.

  10. Castration-resistant prostate cancer: systemic therapy in 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maluf, Fernando C.; Smaletz, Oren; Herchenhorn, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common non-cutaneous neoplasm in the male population worldwide. It is typically diagnosed in its early stages, and the disease exhibits a relatively indolent course in most patients. Despite the curability of localized disease with prostatectomy and radiation therapy, some patients develop metastatic disease and die. Although androgen deprivation is present in the majority of patients with metastatic prostate cancer, a state of androgen resistance eventually develops. Castration-resistant prostate cancer, defined when there is progression of disease despite low levels of testosterone, requires specialized care, and improved communication between medical and urologic oncologists has been identified as a key component in delivering effective therapy. Despite being considered a chemoresistant tumor in the past, the use of a prostate-specific antigen has paved the way for a new generation of trials for castration-resistant prostate cancer. Docetaxel is a life-prolonging chemotherapy that has been established as the standard first-line agent in two phase III clinical trials. Cabazitaxel, a novel taxane with activity in cancer models resistant to paclitaxel and docetaxel, is the only agent that has been compared to a chemotherapy control in a phase III clinical trial as a second-line therapy; it was found to prolong the overall survival of patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer previously treated with docetaxel when compared to mitoxantrone. Other agents used in this setting include abiraterone and sipuleucel-T, and novel therapies are continually being investigated in an attempt to improve the outcome for patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer. PMID:22522765

  11. Effect of castration technique on beef calf performance, feed efficiency, and inflammatory response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnock, T M; Thrift, T A; Irsik, M; Hersom, M J; Yelich, J V; Maddock, T D; Lamb, G C; Arthington, J D

    2012-07-01

    The objective of this experiment was to examine the effect of castration technique on daily feed intake (DFI), daily water intake (DWI), growth performance, residual feed intake (RFI), and inflammatory response in weaned beef calves. Seventy-five beef calves (214 ± 3.2 kg; 200 ± 26 d of age) were housed in a GrowSafe 4000 feed intake facility 7 d post weaning (15 calves/pen). Calves were offered a total mixed ration (TDN = 67.3% and CP = 12.2%, DM = 89%) for ad libitum consumption. On d 0, calves were assigned to 1 of 5 treatments (n = 15 calves/treatment): 1) steers castrated surgically pre-weaning (52 d of age; CON); 2) intact bulls (BULL); 3) bulls castrated by the Callicrate Bander on d 0 (No-Bull Enterprises LLC.; BAN); 4) bulls castrated by the Henderson Castrating Tool on d 0 (Stone Mfg & Supply Co.; HEN); and 5) bulls castrated surgically utilizing an emasculator on d 0 (SUR). Average daily gain, DFI, and DWI were recorded over 84 d. Blood was collected from a sub-sample of calves (n = 45) on d 0, 2, 6, 9, 12, and 15 relative to castration. Castration decreased (P = 0.06) ADG for castrates compared with CON from d 0 to 14 but not d 0 to 84. Daily feed intake and DWI were similar (P > 0.10) among treatments during d 0 to 84. Gain:feed was not affected by castration technique; however, RFI tended (P = 0.09) to be negative for CON and BULL compared with castrates on d 0 to 14 but not d 0 to 84. Acute phase protein analyses indicated that surgical castration (SUR or HEN) elicited a short-term inflammatory response in calves, whereas calves castrated with BAN elicited a delayed response. Calves castrated pre-weaning had improved d 0 to 14 ADG, feed intake, and inflammation response compared with calves castrated at weaning. Banding elicited a delayed negative response in ADG, DWI, and inflammation. In weaned calves, castration method did not affect performance, DFI, DWI, or inflammatory response during the 84-d trial.

  12. Pinhole castration technique: an alternative to orchiectomy in stray dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, M A; Fazili, M R; Athar, H; Mir, M S; Moulvi, B A; Khan, I

    2013-02-01

    The study evaluates a pinhole castration technique in male stray dogs. Animals (n=18) were randomly allotted to 2 groups: group I (n=12, pinhole castration) and group II (n=6, sham control). Percutaneous (in situ) spermatic cord ligation was performed under xylazine-ketamine anesthesia in all animals of group I. Scrotal and the testicular dimensions and testicular volume were measured on day 28 followed by bilateral orchiectomy in both the groups. Significantly lower readings were obtained from animals of group I when compared with pre-ligation readings as well as the corresponding readings from group II animals. In ligated animals volume of testicles showed a reduction by 40.57%. Histopathological examination of testicles revealed degeneration and atrophy in Group I animals. On the whole pinhole castration was found effective, minimally invasive, cheap, simple and a quick technique for male dog sterilization with potential for adoption in large-scale animal birth control programs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Emotion dysregulation and autonomic responses to film, rumination, and body awareness: Extending psychophysiological research to a naturalistic clinical setting and a chemically dependent female sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowell, Sheila E; Price, Cynthia J; Puzia, Megan E; Yaptangco, Mona; Cheng, Sunny Chieh

    2017-05-01

    Substance use is a complex clinical problem characterized by emotion dysregulation and daily challenges that can interfere with laboratory research. Thus, few psychophysiological studies examine autonomic and self-report measures of emotion dysregulation with multidiagnostic, chemically dependent samples or extend this work into naturalistic settings. In this study, we used a within-subject design to examine changes in respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA), electrodermal activity (EDA), and self-reported affect across three tasks designed to elicit distinct psychophysiological and emotional response patterns. We also examined emotion dysregulation as a moderator of psychophysiological responses. Participants include 116 women with multiple comorbid mental health conditions enrolled in substance use treatment, many of whom also reported high emotion dysregulation. Participants were assessed in the treatment setting and completed three tasks: watching a sad movie clip, rumination on a stressful event, and a mindful interoceptive awareness meditation. Multilevel models were used to examine changes from resting baselines to the tasks. During the film, results indicate a significant decrease in RSA and an increase in EDA. For the rumination task, participants showed a decrease in RSA but no EDA response. For the body awareness task, there was an increase in RSA and a decrease in EDA. Emotion dysregulation was associated with differences in baseline RSA but not with EDA or with the slope of response patterns across tasks. Self-reported affect was largely consistent with autonomic patterns. Findings add to the literature on emotion dysregulation, substance use, and the translation of psychophysiological measurements into clinical settings with complex samples. © 2017 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  14. Correlation between lipid, cholesterol and fatty acid contents in the shoulder of castrated and non-castrated Santa Inês lambs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Leal dos Santos-Cruz

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to establish a correlation between the content of total lipids, cholesterol and fatty acid profile of the edible portion of the shoulders of 12 castrated and 12 non-castrated Santa Ines lambs, slaughtered at different ages (84, 168, 210, 252 days. Shoulders and the edible portion (muscle and fat were weighed and stored at -5 °C. Castrated and uncastrated lambs increased their body weight and half carcass weight, respectively. The shoulder weight increased in the carcasses of uncastrated animals. The edible portion of the shoulders of castrated lamb has greater amount of total lipids (16.09 g/100 g. The cholesterol content was influenced by castration, reducing with age. Santa Ines castrated lambs, under semi-extensive conditions, presented larger amounts of C18:1 T11 and CLA in the edible portion of the shoulder. Castration causes no significant correlation between total lipids, cholesterol and total saturated and unsaturated fatty acids of the edible portion of Santa Ines shoulder lambs from 84 to 252 days of age.

  15. Extended Emotions

    OpenAIRE

    Krueger, Joel; Szanto, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Until recently, philosophers and psychologists conceived of emotions as brain- and body-bound affairs. But researchers have started to challenge this internalist and individualist orthodoxy. A rapidly growing body of work suggests that some emotions incorporate external resources and thus extend beyond the neurophysiological confines of organisms; some even argue that emotions can be socially extended and shared by multiple agents. Call this the extended emotions thesis (ExE). In this article...

  16. Effect of castration timing and oral meloxicam administration on growth performance, inflammation, behavior and carcass quality of beef calves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beef bull calves (n = 62) were assigned randomly, within sire breed, to 1 of 4 treatments at birth. Treatments were: 1) surgical castration near birth, 2) surgical castration near birth with oral administration of meloxicam (1 milligram/kilogram of body weight), 3) surgical castration at weaning (WN...

  17. Effect of meloxicam on gain and inflammatory response of calves castrated by banding post-weaning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castration may detrimentally affect the health and performance of weaned calves, and painful procedures are increasingly becoming a public concern. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of castration (by banding) with or without administration of meloxicam, a non-steroid anti-infl...

  18. Effects of castration on growth rate, body and visceral organ weights ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of castration on growth rate, body and visceral organ weights of pigs were investigated using data from intact males, intact females of Large White pigs full or half castrated at 2, 4, or 6 weeks of age. Body weights and feed intake were recorded to the nearest 0.1 kg at weekly intervals from birth, while weights of ...

  19. Effects of castration, level of feeding and body weight on Energy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Efects of castration, feeding level and body weight on energy partition and efficiency of energy utilisation in growing pigs were studies. Eighteen entire and 18 castrated males, fed on either high (3.34 x maintenance) or low (225 x maintenance) level of feeding in a 2x2 factorial design, with 9 pigs per treatment were used.

  20. Castration under anaesthesia and/or analgesia in commercial pig production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kluivers, M.; Hopster, H.; Spoolder, H.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    Influence of anaesthesia/analgesia during castration of piglets on welfare during and after castration, as well as on labour and costs. In addition, a pilot study was carried out to study the possibilities of the use of carbon dioxide as an anaesthetic

  1. Surgical castration efficiently delays the time of starting a systemic chemotherapy in castration-resistant prostate cancer patients refractory to initial androgen-deprivation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minyong Kang

    2015-12-01

    Conclusions: In summary, despite the limited number of cases for convincing evidence, our results shed light again on the clinical benefits of surgical castration prior to the systemic chemotherapy in some CRPC patients after initial hormone therapy.

  2. Stress responses in lambs castrated with three different methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Sandra Nicolussi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work was conducted to evaluate the animal response to stress in lambs caused by three different castration techniques. Forty-six male lambs aged 4-5 months were randomly allocated to one of four groups including Burdizzo (B, scrotal ablation (SA, orchiectomy (OR and control handling (H. Local anaesthesia (lidocaine 2% was administered in both spermatic cords and the scrotal neck of lambs before each treatment. Blood samples were collected at -30, -10, +1, +20, +40, +60, +120, and +180 minutes. Serum cortisol concentrations were determined using a competitive immunoassay and the area under the curve (AUC was calculated for each lamb. The following biochemical parameters were assayed for each animal at each time point: alanine aminotransferase (ALT, aspartate aminotransferase (AST, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, creatine kinase (CK and glucose (GLU. The time needed for total lesion resolution and weight gain of each animal was recorded. Orchiectomy elicits the greatest cortisol response, significantly greater than that seen in similarly handled controls (P≤0.01, Burdizzo and scrotal ablation groups (P≤0.05. The serum cortisol AUC was higher in the scrotal ablation group (P≤0.05 than controls, but lower than in the orchiectomy group (P≤0.05. The Burdizzo group didn’t differ from controls. Serum glucose levels of the castrated lambs differed significantly from the control group, following a trend similar to cortisol. No change was seen in ALT, AST, LDH or CK. No difference in weight gain was seen among the groups. Our results suggest that use of the Burdizzo is the preferable castration technique for adult lambs, while scrotal ablation is a valid surgical alternative to orchiectomy and permits more rapid wound healing that is ideal for extensive management where flocks are not under close observation.

  3. Castration Induced Neuroendocrine Mediated Progression of Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    lineage. In other organs, the origin of NE cells has been shown to be endodermal stem cells,9,10 and a similar model was Received 14 September 2006...Leonhardt M, Janssen M, Konrad L, Bjartell A, Abrahamsson PA. Neurogenic origin of human prostate endocrine cells. Urology 1999; 53: 1041–1048. 13 Luttrell...xenograft LuCaP 23 following castration. Int J Cancer 1996; 65: 85–89. 73 Ambrosini G, Adida C, Altieri DC. A novel anti-apoptosis gene, survivin

  4. Perspectives on Treatment of Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellmunt, Joaquim; Jenkins, Cheryl; Parker, Chris; Fitzpatrick, John M.

    2013-01-01

    The arrival of several new agents—cabazitaxel, abiraterone acetate, enzalutamide, and radium-223—is changing the treatment options and management of patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Many other novel agents are also being investigated. As new drugs become approved, new treatment strategies and markers to best select which patients will best respond to which drug are needed. This review article is a summary of a European Treatment Practices Meeting, which was convened to discuss these latest data on novel agents and current treatment strategies in the mCRPC setting. PMID:23671006

  5. Objective measures for the assessment of post-operative pain in bos indicus bull calves following castration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Musk, Gabrielle C.; Jacobsen, Stine; Hyndman, Timothy H.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess pain in Bos indicus bull calves following surgical castration. Forty-two animals were randomised to four groups: no castration (NC, n = 6); castration with pre-operative lidocaine (CL, n = 12); castration with pre-operative meloxicam (CM, n = 12); and, castration...... in the concentrations of SAA, haptoglobin, and fibrinogen in all of the groups from day 0 to 3. Iron concentrations were not different at the time points it was measured. The results of this study suggest that animals rest for longer periods after the pre-operative administration of meloxicam. The other objective...

  6. Multiple boron-boron bonds in neutral molecules: an insight from the extended transition state method and the natural orbitals for chemical valence scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitoraj, Mariusz P; Michalak, Artur

    2011-03-21

    We have analyzed the character of B═B and B≡B bonds in the neutral molecules of general form: LHB═BHL (2-L) and LB≡BL (3-L), for various ancillary ligands L attached to the boron center, based on a recently developed method that combines the extended transition state scheme with the theory of natural orbitals for chemical valence (ETS-NOCV). In the case of molecules with the B═B bond, 2-L, we have included L = PMe(3), PF(3), PCl(3), PH(3), C(3)H(4)N(2)═C(NHCH)(2), whereas for molecules containing the B≡B connection, 3-L, the following ligands were considered L = CO, PMe(3), PCl(3), (Me(2)NCH(2)CH(2)O)(2)Ge. The results led us to conclude that use of phosphorus ligands leads to strengthening of the B═B bond by 6.4 kcal/mol (for 2-PMe(3)), by 4.4 (for 2-PF(3)) and by 9.2 (for 2-PH(3)), when compared to a molecule developed on the experimental basis, 2-C(3)H(4)N(2) (ΔE(total) = -118.3 kcal/mol). The ETS scheme has shown that all contributions, that is, (i) orbital interaction ΔE(orb), (ii) Pauli repulsion ΔE(Pauli), and (iii) electrostatic stabilization ΔE(elstat), are important in determining the trend in the B═B bond energies, ΔE(total). ETS-NOCV results revealed that both σ(B═B) and π(B═B) contributions are responsible for the changes in ΔE(orb) values. All considered molecules of the type LB≡BL, 3-L, exhibit a stronger B≡B bond when compared to a double B═B connection in 2-L (|ΔE(total)| is lower by 11.8-42.5 kcal/mol, depending on the molecule). The main reason is a lower Pauli repulsion contribution noted for 3-CO, 3-PMe(3), and 3-PCl(3) molecules. In addition, in the case of 3-PMe(3) and 3-PCl(3), the orbital interaction term is more stabilizing; however, the effect is less pronounced compared to the drop in the Pauli repulsion term. In all of the systems with double and triple boron-boron bonds, the electronic factor (ΔE(orb)) dominates over the electrostatic contribution (ΔE(elstat)). Finally, the strongest B

  7. The effects of early versus delayed castration targeting androgen on prolonging survival in a mouse model of bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zaixian; Xu, Qingquan; Huang, Xiaobo; Yang, Jia; Xu, Yanhong; Zhang, Guixiang

    2015-01-01

    To compare the efficacy of early versus delayed surgical castration on prolonging survival and further to investigate the anticancer effect and potential value of targeting androgen in the therapeutic intervention of bladder cancer. N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl) nitrosamine (BBN) was used to induce bladder cancer in male mice. Mice were randomly divided into three groups: the early castration group (on which castration was perform at 4 weeks after first time of BBN administration), the delayed castration group (on which castration was perform at 20 weeks after first time of BBN administration), and the sham-castrated group. Mice were monitored daily throughout their lifespan until cancer-related death or the progress of an obviously moribund appearance, at which time the mice were killed. Androgen receptor expression and cell proliferation and apoptosis analysis were also evaluated. The average lifespan in early castration, delayed castration and sham-castrated groups were 315.8 days, 300.1 days and 254.6 days, respectively. Early castration conferred a statistically significant survival advantage when compared with the sham-castrated group (P cancer mice. This finding may enhance the feasibility of androgen ablation treatment in patients with bladder cancer.

  8. Extended Emotions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krueger, Joel; Szanto, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    beyond the neurophysiological confines of organisms; some even argue that emotions can be socially extended and shared by multiple agents. Call this the extended emotions thesis (ExE). In this article, we consider different ways of understanding ExE in philosophy, psychology, and the cognitive sciences....... First, we outline the background of the debate and discuss different argumentative strategies for ExE. In particular, we distinguish ExE from cognate but more moderate claims about the embodied and situated nature of cognition and emotion (Section 1). We then dwell upon two dimensions of ExE: emotions......Until recently, philosophers and psychologists conceived of emotions as brain- and body-bound affairs. But researchers have started to challenge this internalist and individualist orthodoxy. A rapidly growing body of work suggests that some emotions incorporate external resources and thus extend...

  9. Extended thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Müller, Ingo

    1993-01-01

    Physicists firmly believe that the differential equations of nature should be hyperbolic so as to exclude action at a distance; yet the equations of irreversible thermodynamics - those of Navier-Stokes and Fourier - are parabolic. This incompatibility between the expectation of physicists and the classical laws of thermodynamics has prompted the formulation of extended thermodynamics. After describing the motifs and early evolution of this new branch of irreversible thermodynamics, the authors apply the theory to mon-atomic gases, mixtures of gases, relativistic gases, and "gases" of phonons and photons. The discussion brings into perspective the various phenomena called second sound, such as heat propagation, propagation of shear stress and concentration, and the second sound in liquid helium. The formal mathematical structure of extended thermodynamics is exposed and the theory is shown to be fully compatible with the kinetic theory of gases. The study closes with the testing of extended thermodynamics thro...

  10. Castration modulates singing patterns and electrophysiological properties of RA projection neurons in adult male zebra finches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songhua Wang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Castration can change levels of plasma testosterone. Androgens such as testosterone play an important role in stabilizing birdsong. The robust nucleus of the arcopallium (RA is an important premotor nucleus critical for singing. In this study, we investigated the effect of castration on singing patterns and electrophysiological properties of projection neurons (PNs in the RA of adult male zebra finches. Adult male zebra finches were castrated and the changes in bird song assessed. We also recorded the electrophysiological changes from RA PNs using patch clamp recording. We found that the plasma levels of testosterone were significantly decreased, song syllable’s entropy was increased and the similarity of motif was decreased after castration. Spontaneous and evoked firing rates, membrane time constants, and membrane capacitance of RA PNs in the castration group were lower than those of the control and the sham groups. Afterhyperpolarization AHP time to peak of spontaneous action potential (AP was prolonged after castration.These findings suggest that castration decreases song stereotypy and excitability of RA PNs in male zebra finches.

  11. Effects of surgical castration, immunocastration and homeopathy on the performance, carcass characteristics and behaviour of feedlot-finished crossbred bulls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vantuil Moreira de Freitas

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate total weight gain, carcass yield, rib-eye area, marbling, subcutaneous fat thickness, frequencies of mounting, excitement, dominance behaviour and serum testosterone concentration in feedlot-finished non-castrated bulls, surgically castrated bulls, immunocastrated bulls and bulls treated with homeopathy. The study involved 52 calves, Holstein-Zebu, 20±3 months old, in a completely randomised design divided into four treatments of 13 animals: non-castrated, surgically castrated, immunocastrated and non-castrated with homeopathy. Analysis of variance was performed, and the Tukey test was applied (P<0.05. The Pearson correlation coefficient was estimated and principal components analysis was performed. The castrated animals had lower total weight gain and carcass yield than the animals in the remaining treatment groups. The immunocastrated bulls had a greater subcutaneous fat thickness than the non-castrated bulls. The castrated bulls exhibited lower frequencies of mounting, excitement and dominance behaviour than the animals in the remaining treatment groups. Testosterone levels were lower in the castrated animals. Principal components analysis revealed a moderate magnitude and sharpness in the differentiation of the castrated animals. It was concluded that the immunocastrated animals were similar in performance to the non-castrated animals, while the carcass finish characteristics of the immunocastrated animals were similar to the castrated animals. The castrated animals had lower productive performance than the animals in the remaining treatment groups. The homeopathy animals had performance and carcass finish characteristics similar to the non-castrated animals. Homeopathy and immunocastration did not reduce sodomy and dominance behaviours.

  12. Testosterone improves erectile function through inhibition of reactive oxygen species generation in castrated rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Li

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Testosterone is overwhelmingly important in regulating erectile physiology. However, the associated molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to explore the effects and mechanisms of testosterone in erectile dysfunction (ED in castrated rats. Forty male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized to four groups (control, sham-operated, castration and castration-with-testosterone-replacement. Reactive oxygen species (ROS production was measured by dihydroethidium (DHE staining. Erectile function was assessed by the recording of intracavernous pressure (ICP and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP. Protein expression levels were examined by western blotting. We found that castration reduced erectile function and that testosterone restored it. Nitric oxide synthase (NOS activity was decrease in the castrated rats, and testosterone administration attenuated this decrease (each p < 0.05. The testosterone, dihydrotestosterone, cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP concentrations were lower in the castrated rats, and testosterone restored these levels (each p < 0.05. Furthermore, the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 and prostacyclin synthase (PTGIS expression levels and phospho-endothelial nitric oxide synthase (p-eNOS, Ser1177/endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS ratio were reduced in the castrated rats compared with the controls (each p < 0.05. In addition, the p40phox and p67phox expression levels were increased in the castrated rats, and testosterone reversed these changes (each p < 0.05. Overall, our results demonstrate that testosterone ameliorates ED after castration by reducing ROS production and increasing the activity of the eNOS/cGMP and COX-2/PTGIS/cAMP signaling pathways.

  13. Long-term weight gain and economic impact in pigs castrated under local anaesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.G. Telles

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Castration is a controversial practice in swine production because in some countries is still performed without anaesthesia, and therefore causes intense suffering and stress to animals. This study investigated the effect of pre-surgical administration of local anaesthesia (LA on the growth performance of piglets until the end of the growth phase (102 days. Piglets aged 3 to 5 days were selected in pairs of similar weights and same age. They were originated from 22 litters. The groups were randomly assigned to one of two treatments. Castration was performed with (LA; n = 45 or without (NLA; n = 45 intra-testicular administration of 0.5 mL of 2% lidocaine plus adrenaline per testicle, administered by an automatic repeating vaccinator. Castration was performed 10 min later. Average daily weight gain and economic impact were evaluated between the intervals before castration until 21 (weaning phase, before castration until 60 (end of the initial nursery phase and before castration until 102 (growth phase days of age. Average daily weight gain data were analyzed by comparing the average daily weight gain between the weaning phase, 60 and 102 days of age versus the initial weight (pre-castration. At the end of the growing phase, animals treated with LA showed greater weight gain than animals castrated without anaesthesia. LA also showed improved cost:benefit ratio and theore might provide greater economic benefit under the conditions used in this study. Our findings have proved that castration with LA improves long-term weight gain of piglets.

  14. Conceptual Framework To Extend Life Cycle Assessment Using Near-Field Human Exposure Modeling and High-Throughput Tools for Chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) is a decision-making tool that accounts for multiple impacts across the life cycle of a product or service. This paper presents a conceptual framework to integrate human health impact assessment with risk screening approaches to extend LCA to include n...

  15. Near-infrared spectra of Penicillium camemberti strains separated by extended multiplicative signal correction improved prediction of physical and chemical variations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Decker, Marianne; Nielsen, Per Væggemose; Martens, Harald

    2005-01-01

    Different methods for spectral preprocessing were compared in relation to the ability to distinguish between fungal isolates and growth stages for Penicillium camemberti grown on cheese substrate. The best classification results were obtained by temperature- and wavelength-extended multivariate s...

  16. Radium-223: Insight and Perspectives in Bone-metastatic Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buroni, Federica Eleonora; Persico, Marco Giovanni; Pasi, Francesca; Lodola, Lorenzo; Nano, Rosanna; Aprile, Carlo

    2016-11-01

    (223)Ra prolongs overall survival in symptomatic patients affected by multiple bone-metastatic castration-resistant prostatic cancer, without visceral or nodal involvement. However, many questions remain about its mechanisms of action, and its use in clinical practice is still unresolved. First of all, what is the main target of alpha-particle emission, that is, in what way does it influences the tumor microenvironment? When is the best timing in the course of the disease, extending its use to asymptomatic low-volume or even to the micrometastatic phase? What are suitable biomarkers to be employed as prognostic factors and response indicators? Which associations with other drugs and their sequence can offer the best results, and is their effect additive or synergistic? Ultimately, in the current climate of spending review, what is the optimal cost and benefit ratio regarding available treatments? In this review, we tried to answer these questions by analyzing the available scientific literature. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  17. date extended

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C A L AN DER OF EVENTS. Date of issue of bid document : 2016 September 21. Extended Due date and Time for Receipt of Tender : Up to 2016 October 17, Time 13:00 Hrs. Date and Time of opening of bid : 2016 October 17, Time 15:00 Hrs. Cost of Bid Document : Rs. 100/- only (Non-refundable). Earnest Money Deposit ...

  18. Extending Puppet

    CERN Document Server

    Franceschi, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    This book is a clear, detailed and practical guide to learn about designing and deploying you puppet architecture, with informative examples to highlight and explain concepts in a focused manner. This book is designed for users who already have good experience with Puppet, and will surprise experienced users with innovative topics that explore how to design, implement, adapt, and deploy a Puppet architecture. The key to extending Puppet is the development of types and providers, for which you must be familiar with Ruby.

  19. Acute physiological responses to castration-related pain in piglets: the effect of two local anesthetics with or without meloxicam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonastre, C; Mitjana, O; Tejedor, M T; Calavia, M; Yuste, A G; Úbeda, J L; Falceto, M V

    2016-09-01

    Methods to reduce castration-related pain in piglets are still issues of concern and interest for authorities and producers. Our objectives were to estimate the effectiveness of two protocols of local anesthesia (lidocaine and the combination of lidocaine+bupivacaine) as well as the use of meloxicam as a postoperative analgesic in alleviating castration-related pain, measured by acute physiological responses. Eight groups (15 piglets/group) were included in the study: (1) castration without anesthesia or analgesia, without meloxicam (TRAD WITHOUT), (2) castration without anesthesia or analgesia, but with meloxicam (TRAD WITH), (3) handling without meloxicam (SHAM WITHOUT), (4) handling with meloxicam (SHAM WITH), (5) castration after local anesthesia with lidocaine but without meloxicam (LIDO WITHOUT), (6) castration after local anesthesia with lidocaine and meloxicam (LIDO WITH), (7) castration after local anesthesia with lidocaine+bupivacaine without meloxicam (LIDO+BUPI WITHOUT), (8) castration after local anesthesia with lidocaine+bupivacaine and meloxicam (LIDO+BUPI WITH). Acute physiological responses measured included skin surface temperature and serum glucose and cortisol concentrations. On days 4 and 11 post-castration BW was recorded and average daily gain was calculated over this period. Furthermore, piglet mortality was recorded over the 11-day post-castration period. Administration of local anesthetic or meloxicam did not prevent the decrease in skin surface temperature associated with castration. Lidocaine reduced the increase in glucose concentration associated with castration. For castrated pigs, the joint use of lidocaine and meloxicam caused a significant decrease in cortisol concentration; the combination of intratesticular lidocaine and bupivacaine did not seem to be more effective than lidocaine alone. No effect of treatments on mortality and growth were detected.

  20. Partial Hepatectomy and Castration of HBV Transgenic Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yongjun; Ou, Jing-Hsiung James

    2017-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a hepatotropic virus. Its infection can cause liver injury and regeneration, and its replication is affected by the gender. Transgenic mice that carry a 1.3-mer overlength HBV DNA genome productively replicate HBV in hepatocytes and have been very useful for studying the replication and pathogenesis of HBV in vivo. By using this mouse model, the relationship between HBV and liver injury and regeneration as well as the effect of the gender on HBV gene expression and replication has been studied. In this chapter, we describe the surgical procedures of partial hepatectomy and castration and provide examples to demonstrate how these surgical procedures may be used to study the effect of HBV on liver regeneration and the effect of androgen on HBV replication.

  1. Radium Ra 223 dichloride in castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joung, J Y; Ha, Y S; Kim, I Y

    2013-08-01

    Radium Ra 223 dichloride (Xofigo®, formerly Alpharadin) is one of the representative α-particle-emitting isotopes that delivers radiation with a higher biological effect to a more localized area. Preclinical studies in mouse, rat and canine models have demonstrated that radium Ra 223 dichloride has a definite skeletal affinity and antitumor effect with a relatively low toxicity on bone marrow. More recently, in a large randomized phase III trial (ALSYMPCA), patients with bone metastasis and castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) received six cycles of 50 kBq/kg of radium Ra 223 dichloride in 4-week intervals. In these men, radium Ra 223 dichloride improved the median overall survival by 3.6 months when compared to the placebo group. Collectively, these results suggest that radium Ra 223 dichloride is a promising candidate for managing bone metastases in patients with CRPC. Copyright 2013 Prous Science, S.A.U. or its licensors. All rights reserved.

  2. Metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: changing landscape with cabazitaxel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Ovidio; Afonso, Javier; Vázquez, Sergio; Campos, Begoña; Lázaro, Matín; León, Luis; Antón Aparicio, Luis M

    2014-03-01

    Docetaxel is the standard first-line chemotherapy for men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. Until recently, there was no standard therapy after failure of docetaxel treatment. Cabazitaxel has been shown to improve overall survival in this setting. As a result, the treatment paradigm for mCRPC is changing rapidly. The improved survival shown with cabazitaxel provides an important new opportunity to treat men with mCRPC after docetaxel treatment. Despite the toxicity recorded in the pivotal study, subsequent trials have shown that cabazitaxel is a safe drug. Patient selection and the optimal interval between prior docetaxel treatment and cabazitaxel remain the critical issues. According to a subanalysis of the various studies discussed in this review, there is a patient profile that will probably benefit from use of cabazitaxel after docetaxel failure. Cabazitaxel represents a new treatment option for patients with prostate cancer.

  3. ERG induces taxane resistance in castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galletti, Giuseppe; Matov, Alexandre; Beltran, Himisha; Fontugne, Jacqueline; Miguel Mosquera, Juan; Cheung, Cynthia; MacDonald, Theresa Y.; Sung, Matthew; O’Toole, Sandra; Kench, James G.; Suk Chae, Sung; Kimovski, Dragi; Tagawa, Scott T.; Nanus, David M.; Rubin, Mark A.; Horvath, Lisa G.; Giannakakou, Paraskevi; Rickman, David S.

    2014-01-01

    Taxanes are the only chemotherapies used to treat patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Despite the initial efficacy of taxanes in treating CRPC, all patients ultimately fail due to the development of drug resistance. In this study, we show that ERG overexpression in in vitro and in vivo models of CRPC is associated with decreased sensitivity to taxanes. ERG affects several parameters of microtubule dynamics and inhibits effective drug-target engagement of docetaxel or cabazitaxel with tubulin. Finally, analysis of a cohort of 34 men with metastatic CRPC treated with docetaxel chemotherapy reveals that ERG-overexpressing prostate cancers have twice the chance of docetaxel resistance than ERG-negative cancers. Our data suggest that ERG plays a role beyond regulating gene expression and functions outside the nucleus to cooperate with tubulin towards taxane insensitivity. Determining ERG rearrangement status may aid in patient selection for docetaxel or cabazitaxel therapy and/or influence co-targeting approaches. PMID:25420520

  4. Cabazitaxel in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Timothy A; Pezaro, Carmel J; de Bono, Johann S

    2012-09-01

    Metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) has a poor prognosis and remains a significant therapeutic challenge. Prior to 2010, docetaxel chemotherapy was the only treatment shown to improve overall survival, symptom control and quality of life in patients with CRPC. Research efforts focused on overcoming chemoresistance to taxanes eventually led to the development of multiple novel anti-tumor agents, including cabazitaxel. Cabazitaxel has recently been shown to significantly improve overall survival compared with mitoxantrone in a large multicenter Phase III study. This article details the preclinical and clinical development of cabazitaxel and discusses the importance of this novel chemotherapy in CRPC. The authors also discuss the challenges now facing the future use of cabazitaxel in CRPC, including the determination of the optimal dose of cabazitaxel in patients with advanced CRPC, the ideal sequencing of cabazitaxel relative to other anti-tumor treatments, appropriate patient selection and novel strategies for the assessment of treatment response.

  5. Experimental study of apoptosis in the prostate tissue following castration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y Doustar

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The Prostate gland is one of the accessory reproductive glands with important physiological functions necessary for successful reproduction. This gland depends on the presence of sex hormones including androgens for its natural function and normal growth and development. So in the case of hyperplasia, hypertrophy or other prostatic disease the most successful and efficient method of treatment is androgenic control that in some cases is unavoidable. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of androgenic depletion states by means of castration on the induction of apoptosis in the epithelial glandular cells of the prostate tissue. Two groups of male dogs each containing 5 animals per group were used in this study. The dogs were under observation for 1 month to detect any possible diseases or disorders. After this period the dogs in the treatment group underwent open castration to decrease the levels of the androgenic hormones in the blood while the dogs in the control group were left intact. One week after surgery, the prostate glands of control and treatment animals were collected and used to prepare microscopic sections. The sections were evaluated following staining with TUNEL (TerminaldeoxyNucleotidyl (dUTP transferase-mediated End Labeling and H&E methods. The Mann – Whitney U test was used for statistical analysis. Histopathological studies in the treatment group revealed the presence of various forms of apoptotic cells in the glandular epithelium. Average number of apoptotic cells in ten microscopic fields were significantly higher in the treatment group compared with the control group (p

  6. Mechanisms of resistance in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekar, Thenappan; Yang, Joy C; Gao, Allen C; Evans, Christopher P

    2015-06-01

    Despite advances in prostate cancer diagnosis and management, morbidity from prostate cancer remains high. Approximately 20% of men present with advanced or metastatic disease, while 29,000 men continue to die of prostate cancer each year. Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) has been the standard of care for initial management of advanced or metastatic prostate cancer since Huggins and Hodges first introduced the concept of androgen-dependence in 1972, but progression to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) occurs within 2-3 years of initiation of ADT. CRPC, previously defined as hormone-refractory prostate cancer, is now understood to still be androgen dependent. Multiple mechanisms of resistance help contribute to the progression to castration resistant disease, and the androgen receptor (AR) remains an important driver in this progression. These mechanisms include AR amplification and hypersensitivity, AR mutations leading to promiscuity, mutations in coactivators/corepressors, androgen-independent AR activation, and intratumoral and alternative androgen production. More recently, identification of AR variants (ARVs) has been established as another mechanism of progression to CRPC. Docetaxel chemotherapy has historically been the first-line treatment for CRPC, but in recent years, newer agents have been introduced that target some of these mechanisms of resistance, thereby providing additional survival benefit. These include AR signaling inhibitors such as enzalutamide (Xtandi, ENZA, MDV-3100) and CYP17A1 inhibitors such as abiraterone acetate (Zytiga). Ultimately, these agents will also fail to suppress CRPC. While some of the mechanisms by which these agents fail are unique, many share similarities to the mechanisms contributing to CRPC progression. Understanding these mechanisms of resistance to ADT and currently approved CRPC treatments will help guide future research into targeted therapies.

  7. K-Targeted Metabolomic Analysis Extends Chemical Subtraction to DESIGNER Extracts: Selective Depletion of Extracts of Hops (Humulus lupulus)⊥

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    This study introduces a flexible and compound targeted approach to Deplete and Enrich Select Ingredients to Generate Normalized Extract Resources, generating DESIGNER extracts, by means of chemical subtraction or augmentation of metabolites. Targeting metabolites based on their liquid–liquid partition coefficients (K values), K targeting uses countercurrent separation methodology to remove single or multiple compounds from a chemically complex mixture, according to the following equation: DESIGNER extract = total extract ± target compound(s). Expanding the scope of the recently reported depletion of extracts by immunoaffinity or solid phase liquid chromatography, the present approach allows a more flexible, single- or multi-targeted removal of constituents from complex extracts such as botanicals. Chemical subtraction enables both chemical and biological characterization, including detection of synergism/antagonism by both the subtracted targets and the remaining metabolite mixture, as well as definition of the residual complexity of all fractions. The feasibility of the DESIGNER concept is shown by K-targeted subtraction of four bioactive prenylated phenols, isoxanthohumol (1), 8-prenylnaringenin (2), 6-prenylnaringenin (3), and xanthohumol (4), from a standardized hops (Humulus lupulus L.) extract using specific solvent systems. Conversely, adding K-targeted isolates allows enrichment of the original extract and hence provides an augmented DESIGNER material. Multiple countercurrent separation steps were used to purify each of the four compounds, and four DESIGNER extracts with varying depletions were prepared. The DESIGNER approach innovates the characterization of chemically complex extracts through integration of enabling technologies such as countercurrent separation, K-by-bioactivity, the residual complexity concepts, as well as quantitative analysis by 1H NMR, LC-MS, and HiFSA-based NMR fingerprinting. PMID:25437744

  8. Administration of perioperative penicillin reduces postoperative serum amyloid A response in horses being castrated standing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Busk, Peter; Jacobsen, Stine; Martinussen, Torben

    2010-01-01

    SAA response, suggesting that bacteria were present in the surgical wound and contributed to inflammation after castration. Horses with elevated preoperative SAA concentrations developed infectious complications more often than horses with normal preoperative SAA concentrations. Clinical Relevance...

  9. In vivo quantitative phosphoproteomic profiling identifies novel regulators of castration-resistant prostate cancer growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Nan; Hjorth-Jensen, Kim; Hekmat, Omid

    2015-01-01

    timing. Interestingly, these phenotypic changes occur in the absence of obvious alterations in the activity of AKT, MAPK or mTORC1 pathways, suggesting that PAK2 and YAP1 may represent novel targets for the treatment of castration-resistant prostate cancer. Pharmacologic inhibitors of PAK2 (PF-3758309......Prostate cancer remains a leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide owing to our inability to treat effectively castration-resistant tumors. To understand the signaling mechanisms sustaining castration-resistant growth, we implemented a mass spectrometry-based quantitative proteomic...... approach and use it to compare protein phosphorylation in orthotopic xenograft tumors grown in either intact or castrated mice. This investigation identified changes in phosphorylation of signaling proteins such as MEK, LYN, PRAS40, YAP1 and PAK2, indicating the concomitant activation of several oncogenic...

  10. Chemical genetic screen identifies lithocholic acid as an anti-aging compound that extends yeast chronological life span in a TOR-independent manner, by modulating housekeeping longevity assurance processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Alexander A.; Richard, Vincent R.; Kyryakov, Pavlo; Bourque, Simon D.; Beach, Adam; Burstein, Michelle T.; Glebov, Anastasia; Koupaki, Olivia; Boukh-Viner, Tatiana; Gregg, Christopher; Juneau, Mylène; English, Ann M.; Thomas, David Y.; Titorenko, Vladimir I.

    2010-01-01

    In chronologically aging yeast, longevity can be extended by administering a caloric restriction (CR) diet or some small molecules. These life-extending interventions target the adaptable target of rapamycin (TOR) and cAMP/protein kinase A (cAMP/PKA) signaling pathways that are under the stringent control of calorie availability. We designed a chemical genetic screen for small molecules that increase the chronological life span of yeast under CR by targeting lipid metabolism and modulating housekeeping longevity pathways that regulate longevity irrespective of the number of available calories. Our screen identifies lithocholic acid (LCA) as one of such molecules. We reveal two mechanisms underlying the life-extending effect of LCA in chronologically aging yeast. One mechanism operates in a calorie availability-independent fashion and involves the LCA-governed modulation of housekeeping longevity assurance pathways that do not overlap with the adaptable TOR and cAMP/PKA pathways. The other mechanism extends yeast longevity under non-CR conditions and consists in LCA-driven unmasking of the previously unknown anti-aging potential of PKA. We provide evidence that LCA modulates housekeeping longevity assurance pathways by suppressing lipid-induced necrosis, attenuating mitochondrial fragmentation, altering oxidation-reduction processes in mitochondria, enhancing resistance to oxidative and thermal stresses, suppressing mitochondria-controlled apoptosis, and enhancing stability of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA. PMID:20622262

  11. Self-castration by a transsexual woman: financial and psychological costs: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Peter, Matthew; Trinidad, Anton; Irwig, Michael S

    2012-04-01

    The out-of-pocket cost for an elective orchiectomy, which is often not covered by health insurance, is a significant barrier to male-to-female transsexuals ready to proceed with their physical transition. This and other barriers (lack of access to a surgeon willing to perform the operation, waiting times, and underlying psychological and psychiatric conditions) lead a subset of transsexual women to attempt self-castration. Little information has been published on the financial costs and implications of self-castration to both patients and health care systems. We compare the financial and psychological costs of elective surgical orchiectomy vs. self-castration in the case of a transsexual woman in her 40s. We interviewed the patient and her providers and obtained financial information from local reimbursement and billing specialists. After experiencing minor hemorrhage following the self-castration, our patient presented to the emergency department and underwent a bilateral inguinal exploration, ligation and removal of bilateral spermatic cords, and complicated scrotal exploration, debridement, and closure. She was admitted to the psychiatric service for a hospital stay of three days. The total bill was U.S. $14,923, which would compare with U.S. $4,000 for an elective outpatient orchiectomy in the patient's geographical area. From a financial standpoint, an elective orchiectomy could have cost the health care system significantly less than a hospital admission with its associated additional costs. From a patient safety standpoint, elective orchiectomy is preferable to self-castration which carries significant risks such as hemorrhage, disfigurement, infection, urinary fistulae, and nerve damage. Healthcare providers of transsexual women should carefully explore patient attitudes toward self-castration and work toward improving access to elective orchiectomy to reduce the number of self-castrations and costs to the overall health care system. Further research on the

  12. The non-steroidal antiandrogen, bicalutamide ('Casodex'), may preserve bone mineral density as compared with castration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tyrrell, C J; Blake, G M; Iversen, P

    2003-01-01

    ) for a median of 287 weeks. In 38% of castration compared with 17% of bicalutamide patients, femoral neck Z-scores were risk of fracture) and T-scores were osteoporosis in white......The impact of bicalutamide (Casodex) monotherapy on bone mineral density (BMD) was investigated in patients with locally advanced prostate cancer. BMD was assessed after treatment with bicalutamide 150 mg daily ( n=21) or by medical castration (goserelin acetate 3.6 mg every 28 days) ( n=8...

  13. The non-steroidal antiandrogen, bicalutamide ('Casodex'), may preserve bone mineral density as compared with castration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tyrrell, C J; Blake, G M; Iversen, P

    2003-01-01

    The impact of bicalutamide (Casodex) monotherapy on bone mineral density (BMD) was investigated in patients with locally advanced prostate cancer. BMD was assessed after treatment with bicalutamide 150 mg daily ( n=21) or by medical castration (goserelin acetate 3.6 mg every 28 days) ( n=8......) for a median of 287 weeks. In 38% of castration compared with 17% of bicalutamide patients, femoral neck Z-scores were Health Organization definition of osteoporosis in white...

  14. Castration Therapy of Prostate Cancer Results in Downregulation of HIF-1{alpha} Levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Ubaidi, Firas L.T. [Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Toxicology, Stockholm University, Stockholm (Sweden); Department of Urology, Central Hospital, Vaesteras (Sweden); Schultz, Niklas [Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Toxicology, Stockholm University, Stockholm (Sweden); Egevad, Lars [Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Granfors, Torvald [Department of Urology, Central Hospital, Vaesteras (Sweden); Helleday, Thomas, E-mail: helleday@gmt.su.se [Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Toxicology, Stockholm University, Stockholm (Sweden); Gray Institute for Radiation Oncology and Biology, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Science for Life Laboratory, Stockholm University, Solna (Sweden)

    2012-03-01

    Background and Purpose: Neoadjuvant androgen deprivation in combination with radiotherapy of prostate cancer is used to improve radioresponsiveness and local tumor control. Currently, the underlying mechanism is not well understood. Because hypoxia causes resistance to radiotherapy, we wanted to test whether castration affects the degree of hypoxia in prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: In 14 patients with locally advanced prostate cancer, six to 12 prostatic needle core biopsy specimens were taken prior to castration therapy. Bilateral orchidectomy was performed in 7 patients, and 7 were treated with a GnRH-agonist (leuprorelin). After castrationm two to four prostatic core biopsy specimens were taken, and the level of hypoxia-inducible factor-1{alpha} (HIF-1{alpha}) in cancer was determined by immunofluorescence. Results: Among biopsy specimens taken before castration, strong HIF-1{alpha} expression (mean intensity above 30) was shown in 5 patients, weak expression (mean intensity 10-30) in 3 patients, and background levels of HIF-1{alpha} (mean intensity 0-10) in 6 patients. Downregulation of HIF-1{alpha} expression after castration was observed in all 5 patients with strong HIF-1{alpha} precastration expression. HIF-1{alpha} expression was also reduced in 2 of 3 patients with weak HIF-1{alpha} precastration expression. Conclusions: Our data suggest that neoadjuvant castration decreases tumor cell hypoxia in prostate cancer, which may explain increased radiosensitivity after castration.

  15. Extending Experiences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    A computer game's player is experiencing not only the game as a designer-made artefact, but also a multitude of social and cultural practices and contexts of both computer game play and everyday life. As a truly multidisciplinary anthology, Extending Experiences sheds new light on the mesh...... of possibilities and influences the player engages with. Part one, Experiential Structures of Play, considers some of the key concepts commonly used to address the experience of a computer game player. The second part, Bordering Play, discusses conceptual and practical overlaps of games and everyday life...... and the impacts of setting up, crossing and breaking the boundaries of game and non-game. Part three, Interfaces of Play, looks at games as technological and historical artefacts and commodities. The fourth part, Beyond Design, introduces new models for the practical and theoretical dimensions of game design....

  16. Efficacy of oral meloxicam suspension for prevention of pain and inflammation following band and surgical castration in calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, M E; Ralston, Brenda; Burwash, Les; Matheson-Bird, Heather; Allan, Nick D

    2016-06-13

    Castration is one of the most common procedures performed on beef and dairy cattle. The objective of the study was to determine the efficacy of meloxicam oral suspension in reducing pain and inflammation in calves following band or surgical castration. Two identical trials with the exception of the method of castration (Band Castration Study 1 and Surgical Castration Study 2) were conducted. Sixty (60) healthy Holstein calves 4 to 5 months of age (138-202 Kg) were used. Animals received either Meloxicam Oral Suspension at a dose of 1 mg/kg BW (n = 15 Study 1 and 15 Study 2) or Saline (n = 15 Study 1 and 15 Study 2) 2 h before castration. Physiological (Heart Rate, Plasma Cortisol and Plasma Substance P) and Behavioral (Visual Analog Scale (VAS), Accelerometers and tail Pedometers) evaluations were conducted before (day -1) and after Castration (Day 0, 1, 2, 3). Inflammation was evaluated daily by providing an individual animal score (Study1) or with a measurement of scrotal thickness (Study 2). Heart rates were significantly greater in control animals following band and surgical castration. Plasma cortisol and substance P were significantly reduced in animals receiving Meloxicam Oral Suspension. Control animals had significantly greater VAS scores. Accelerometers showed that meloxicam treated animals had a significantly greater motion index and number of steps as well as less % time lying and number of lying bouts. The scrotal inflammation (based on scrotal swelling) was significantly decreased in the meloxicam treated animals compared to the control animals on day 1, day 2 and 3. Meloxicam Oral Suspension was able to significantly reduce the display of painful behaviors and physiological responses to pain in band castrated and surgical castrated calves for up to 72 h following a single oral treatment of 1 mg/kg body weight. Meloxicam Oral Suspension was able to significantly reduce scrotal inflammation in band castrated and surgical castrated calves.

  17. Analysis of the stakeholders’ attitudes for banning of castration of male pigs in Europe: focus group methodology

    OpenAIRE

    borrisser Pairo, Francesc; Kallas, Zein; Panella-Riera, Nuria; Avena, Maria; Gil Roig, José María; Olivares, Alvaro; Olivar, Maria Angels

    2014-01-01

    Pig production is one of the major activities in Spain. Less than 20% of pigs are castrated mainly for meat quality purposes and to avoid boar taint. Due to the negative impact of castration to animal welfare European Union has planned to voluntary end surgical castration by 2018. The aim of this study was to know the attitudes of different stakeholders about this banning. Focus group methodology was used to assess it with the different stakeholders involved. Result...

  18. To what extend the dam dredging can influence the background level of metals in the Rhine River: using chemical and biological long-term monitoring to answer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lebrun Jérémie D.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Dredging generates remobilisation of sediments contaminated by non-degradable compounds such as metals, to which aquatic organisms can be exposed. This study aims at assessing the environmental impact of sediments remobilised in the Rhine River (France during the dredging of Marckolsheim dam by pumping/dilution in 2013 on metal speciation and organisms' exposure. The monitoring coupling chemical and biological tools was performed 2 years before dredging operation on 2 sampling sites, upstream and downstream from the discharge of pumping/dilution, to acquire data on the natural variability of labile (DGT as passive samplers, dissolved and particulate concentrations of Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Mn, Pb and Zn in Rhine during full hydrological cycles. In parallel, size-calibrated zebra mussels were transplanted at both sites to monitor continuously metal bioavailability from particulate and dissolved fractions. This long-term monitoring allowed the establishment of reference baselines of Rhine water and mussels' contamination levels and subsequently, the detection of averred environmental changes due to the dredging. Indeed, Co and Mn accumulations in mussels exposed to the discharge were consistent with increasing labile species in Rhine whereas ones of Cr and Pb were likely due to an enhanced particulate bioavailability. Whatever the exposure route, the mussels recovered their basal metal contents 2 weeks after the end of dredging, suggesting a transient impact of sediment remobilisation on bioaccumulation. This long-term monitoring highlights the interest of coupling chemical and biological time-integrated tools for a better assessment of environmental risks because metallic exchanges between organisms and their media are complex and metal-specific.

  19. Single-molecule conductance of a chemically modified, π-extended tetrathiafulvalene and its charge-transfer complex with F4TCNQ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl García

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We describe the synthesis and single-molecule electrical transport properties of a molecular wire containing a π-extended tetrathiafulvalene (exTTF group and its charge-transfer complex with F4TCNQ. We form single-molecule junctions using the in situ break junction technique using a homebuilt scanning tunneling microscope with a range of conductance between 10 G0 down to 10−7 G0. Within this range we do not observe a clear conductance signature of the neutral parent molecule, suggesting either that its conductance is too low or that it does not form a stable junction. Conversely, we do find a clear conductance signature in the experiments carried out on the charge-transfer complex. Due to the fact we expected this species to have a higher conductance than the neutral molecule, we believe this supports the idea that the conductance of the neutral molecule is very low, below our measurement sensitivity. This idea is further supported by theoretical calculations. To the best of our knowledge, these are the first reported single-molecule conductance measurements on a molecular charge-transfer species.

  20. Progression of metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer: impact of therapeutic intervention in the post-docetaxel space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sartor A Oliver

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Despite the proven success of hormonal therapy for prostate cancer using chemical or surgical castration, most patients eventually will progress to a phase of the disease that is metastatic and shows resistance to further hormonal manipulation. This has been termed metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC. Despite this designation, however, there is evidence that androgen receptor (AR-mediated signaling and gene expression can persist in mCRPC, even in the face of castrate levels of androgen. This may be due in part to the upregulation of enzymes involved in androgen synthesis, the overexpression of AR, or the emergence of mutant ARs with promiscuous recognition of various steroidal ligands. The therapeutic options were limited and palliative in nature until trials in 2004 demonstrated that docetaxel chemotherapy could significantly improve survival. These results established first-line docetaxel as the standard of care for mCRPC. After resistance to further docetaxel therapy develops, treatment options were once again limited. Recently reported results from phase 3 trials have shown that additional therapy with the novel taxane cabazitaxel (with prednisone, or treatment with the antiandrogen abiraterone (with prednisone could improve survival for patients with mCRPC following docetaxel therapy. Compared with mitoxantrone/prednisone, cabazitaxel/prednisone significantly improved overall survival, with a 30% reduction in rate of death, in patients with progression of mCRPC after docetaxel therapy in the TROPIC trial. Similarly, abiraterone acetate (an inhibitor of androgen biosynthesis plus prednisone significantly decreased the rate of death by 35% compared with placebo plus prednisone in mCRPC patients progressing after prior docetaxel therapy in the COU-AA-301 trial. Results of these trials have thus established two additional treatment options for mCRPC patients in the "post-docetaxel space." In view of the continued AR

  1. Healing of surgical castration wounds: a description and an evaluation of flunixin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mintline, E M; Varga, A; Banuelos, J; Walker, K A; Hoar, B; Drake, Daniel; Weary, D M; Coetzee, J F; Stock, M L; Tucker, C B

    2014-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that surgical castration wounds take between 10 and 61 d to heal. The objectives of this work were to describe healing, inflammation, lying behavior, and serum concentration of substance P after surgical castration in beef calves and to evaluate the effect of a possible intervention, a single injection of flunixin meglumine (1.1 mg/kg IV, a NSAID), on the healing process. Calves (mean±SE: 25±2.0 d of age; 54±1.4 kg BW) were surgically castrated with or without an injection of flunixin immediately before the procedure (n=24/treatment). Healing was measured with a 5-point scale (1=fresh wound, 5=no visible incision or inflammation) as well as weight gain, scrotal size, and scrotal surface temperature, on d 1, 2, 3, 7, 14, 21, 28, 35, 49, and 63 after castration. Serum concentration of substance P was recorded on all d, including d 0, but not d 63. Lying behavior was recorded with loggers from 2 d before to 29 d after castration. Inflammation, as measured by scrotal size, peaked on d 2 and 3 after the procedure (e.g., 51±1.0 mm on d 2 versus 28±1.3 mm before castration) and then declined with time (Pflunixin had more lying bouts than those that received saline (flunixin by time interaction; P=0.052), but this pattern emerged on and after d 8, well after the 3 to 8 h half-life of this NSAID. In conclusion, castration caused inflammation in the days that followed, and the wounds required a minimum of 4 wk to heal. Provision of an NSAID had no effect on these outcomes.

  2. Agricultural Chemical Concentrations and Loads in Rivers Draining the Central Valley, California, to the San Francisco Bay-Delta Estuary: Before and During an Extended Drought

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domagalski, J. L.

    2016-12-01

    Drought or near drought conditions have occurred in California since 2012. Although some parts of the State received near normal precipitation in water year 2016, other locations were still below average. Extended drought can impact aquatic organisms in a variety of ways because of decreased flows and elevated water temperature. However, lower precipitation and availability of irrigation water may limit subsequent runoff, resulting in reduced concentrations and loads of certain environmental toxicants, such as pesticides and ammonia, thereby limiting their toxic effects. In this study, funded by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Program, the occurrence of 227 pesticides and degradation products, and nutrients was assessed before and during this current drought in the two largest rivers draining to the San Francisco Bay: the Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers. The watersheds of both rivers include substantial agricultural and urban land use. Herbicides, insecticides, fungicides, and ammonia were detected throughout the study (2010 to 2016) and models of daily concentration using the seasonal wave model (rloadest) were formulated to assess the amount of time that concentrations may have exceeded benchmark levels known to be toxic to aquatic organisms. Frequently detected pesticides included the fungicide azoxystrobin, herbicides or their degradation products such as diuron, glyphosate, and metolachlor, and insecticides such as imidacloprid. Compounds that are transported primarily by surface runoff generally showed decreasing concentrations as the drought progressed, especially in the San Joaquin River. Compounds mainly transported by groundwater, as indicated by seasonal concentration profiles, had more stable concentrations in the rivers. Mass loads to the Bay all decreased, as expected, because of the lower river discharge. When compared to aquatic-life benchmarks, modeled concentrations indicated that individual compounds were not contributing to

  3. Advances in the management of castration resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritch, Chad R; Cookson, Michael S

    2016-10-17

    Docetaxel based chemotherapy showed survival benefit and emerged as the mainstay of treatment for castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) in 2004. However, therapeutic options have expanded rapidly since 2011. The spectrum of new agents is broad and includes drugs that target the androgen axis (enzalutamide, abiraterone), immunotherapy (sipuleucel-T), bone seeking radionuclides (radium-223), and second line chemotherapy (cabazitaxel). In addition, new agents have been developed to reduce skeletal related events (denosumab). Given that docetaxel was the standard first line treatment for metastatic CRPC, the newer oral agents that affect the androgen axis were initially approved in the post-docetaxel setting. However, subsequent randomized trials have led to their approval in the pre-chemotherapy setting as well. Patients with CRPC are clinically heterogeneous, ranging from patients who are asymptomatic and do not have metastases to those with substantial symptoms and both bony and visceral metastases. CRPC is a clinically challenging disease entity, therefore, with a wide array of treatment options and multiple possible sequencing combinations depending on the individual patient. This review will summarize the findings of the randomized trials that led to the approval of the therapies for CRPC. It will also discuss recent guidelines and provide suggestions for sequencing of drugs based on the best available evidence. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  4. Emerging targeted therapies for castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo eAdamo

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Until recently, few therapeutic options were available for patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC. Since 2010, four new molecules with a demonstrated benefit (sipuleucel-T, cabazitaxel, abiraterone and denosumab have been approved in this setting, and to-date several other agents are under investigation in clinical trials. The purpose of this review is to present an update of targeted therapies for CRPC. Presented data are obtained from literature and congress reports updated until December 2011. Targeted therapies in advanced phases of clinical development include novel hormone-therapeutic, intracellular molecular pathways inhibiting, anti-angiogenic, bone microenvironment targeting and immunotherapeutic agents. Radium-223 and MDV3100 demonstrated a survival advantage in phase III trials and the road for their introduction in clinical practice is rapidly ongoing. Results are also awaited for phase III studies currently underway or planned with new drugs given as monotherapy (TAK-700, cabozantinib, tasquinimod, PROSTVAC-VF, ipilimumab or in combination with docetaxel (custirsen, aflibercept, dasatinib, zibotentan. Optimal timing, right combination and/or sequencing of emerging therapies as well as use of more sensitive biological markers to individualize therapies for CRPC remain challenging and studies to investigate these aspects are needed.

  5. Radium-223 in metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuong, Winston; Sartor, Oliver; Pal, Sumanta K

    2014-01-01

    In 2004, docetaxel was approved for the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). For the next several years, there was a lull in drug approvals. However, from 2010 onwards, 5 additional therapies have been approved on the basis of showing a survival benefit in phase III studies. These agents include sipuleucel-T, cabazitaxel, abiraterone, enzalutamide and (most recently) radium-223. Amongst radiopharmaceuticals currently used for advanced prostate cancer (e.g. samarium-153 and strontium-89), radium-223 possesses several unique properties. As an alpha-emitting compound, the agent produces a high-energy output over a short range, facilitating selective destruction of tissue within the bone in the region of osteoblastic lesions while sparing surrounding normal tissue. The current review will outline biological rationale for radium-223 and also provide an overview of preclinical and clinical development of the agent. Rational sequencing of radium-223 and combinations, in the increasingly complex landscape of mCRPC will be discussed, along with factors influencing clinical implementation.

  6. A changing landscape in castration resistant prostate cancer treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra eFelici

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PC is the leading cause of cancer and the second leading cause of cancer-death among men in the Western world. About 10%-20% of men with PC present with metastatic disease at diagnosis, while 20%-30% of patients diagnosed with localized disease will eventually develop metastases. Although most respond to initial androgen deprivation therapy (ADT, progression to castration resistant PC (CRPC is universal. In 2004 the docetaxel/prednisone regimen was approved for the management of patients with metastatic CRPC, becoming the standard first-line therapy. Recent advances have now led to an unprecedented number of new drug approvals within the past years, providing many new treatment options for patients with metastatic CRPC. Four new drugs have received U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA-approval in 2010 and 2011: sipuleucel-T, an immunotherapeutic agent; cabazitaxel, a novel microtubule inhibitor; abiraterone acetate, a new androgen biosynthesis inhibitor; and denosumab, a bone-targeting agent. The data supporting the approval of each of these agents are described in this review, as are current approaches in the treatment of metastatic CRPC and ongoing clinical trials of novel treatments and strategies.

  7. Treatment sequencing in metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Sartor

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Six different treatments have demonstrated improved survival in phase III trials targeted to patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC. Front-line therapeutic options for mCRPC include docetaxel, sipuleucel-T, abiraterone and radium-223. Post-docetaxel options include cabazitaxel, abiraterone, enzalutamide and radium-223. Despite much progress in recent years, much is yet unknown and debates occur over optimal treatment choices and sequences. None of the new agents have been compared to one another, thus physicians in practice today must make choices based on non-randomized comparisons, toxicity considerations and various assumptions. Abiraterone is now moving into the front line mCRPC space given recent regulatory approvals and enzalutamide will follow soon. Both of the hormonal agents have less toxicity when compared to chemotherapeutic options and both of these hormonal agents are expected to be used in a considerable number of mCRPC patients in the years ahead. Little data are available for the post-abiraterone or post-enzalutamide setting. In this review the currently available sequencing data are summarized and interpreted. It is now clear that cross resistance is a potential issue between various treatments, especially those agents that target the androgen axis. This review highlights the need for additional studies to optimize the current treatments for these patients.

  8. Treatment sequencing in metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartor, Oliver; Gillessen, Silke

    2014-01-01

    Six different treatments have demonstrated improved survival in phase III trials targeted to patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Front-line therapeutic options for mCRPC include docetaxel, sipuleucel-T, abiraterone and radium-223. Post-docetaxel options include cabazitaxel, abiraterone, enzalutamide and radium-223. Despite much progress in recent years, much is yet unknown and debates occur over optimal treatment choices and sequences. None of the new agents have been compared to one another, thus physicians in practice today must make choices based on non-randomized comparisons, toxicity considerations and various assumptions. Abiraterone is now moving into the front line mCRPC space given recent regulatory approvals and enzalutamide will follow soon. Both of the hormonal agents have less toxicity when compared to chemotherapeutic options and both of these hormonal agents are expected to be used in a considerable number of mCRPC patients in the years ahead. Little data are available for the post-abiraterone or post-enzalutamide setting. In this review the currently available sequencing data are summarized and interpreted. It is now clear that cross resistance is a potential issue between various treatments, especially those agents that target the androgen axis. This review highlights the need for additional studies to optimize the current treatments for these patients. PMID:24675654

  9. Chemotherapy options in castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin A Teply

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The treatment landscape for patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC is evolving, with recent approvals of immune therapy, novel hormonal therapy, and bone-targeted therapy. Chemotherapy remains an essential component of the armamentarium. Herein, we review current chemotherapy options for patients with CRPC and discuss future challenges. Methods: We reviewed literature for chemotherapy agents in prostate cancer, with special attention to the evidence for efficacy of the currently approved agents. We also reviewed emerging data on biomarkers of response to chemotherapy for CRPC. Results: Taxanes, especially docetaxel and cabazitaxel, have first- and second-line indications for CRPC, respectively, with both providing a survival benefit. Multiple attempts to improve on the single agent efficacy of docetaxel with combination therapy have not generally been successful although platinum combinations are used for resistant phenotypes. Reductions in prostate-specific antigen by ≥30% and reductions in circulating tumor cells (CTCs to ≤ 5 are associated with improved survival on chemotherapy. Chemotherapy may continue to be effective therapy for patients with biomarkers that are associated with resistance to androgen-directed therapies (androgen receptor splice variant 7 positivity in CTCs or high CTC heterogeneity. Conclusions: Chemotherapy remains an essential component of CRPC therapy, and biomarkers are being identified to define clinical scenarios where chemotherapy may be the optimal therapy choice.

  10. Radium-223 in metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winston Vuong

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In 2004, docetaxel was approved for the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC. For the next several years, there was a lull in drug approvals. However, from 2010 onwards, 5 additional therapies have been approved on the basis of showing a survival benefit in phase III studies. These agents include sipuleucel-T, cabazitaxel, abiraterone, enzalutamide and (most recently radium-223. Amongst radiopharmaceuticals currently used for advanced prostate cancer (e.g. samarium-153 and strontium-89, radium-223 possesses several unique properties. As an alpha-emitting compound, the agent produces a high-energy output over a short range, facilitating selective destruction of tissue within the bone in the region of osteoblastic lesions while sparing surrounding normal tissue. The current review will outline biological rationale for radium-223 and also provide an overview of preclinical and clinical development of the agent. Rational sequencing of radium-223 and combinations, in the increasingly complex landscape of mCRPC will be discussed, along with factors influencing clinical implementation.

  11. Carcass properties, chemical content and fatty acid composition of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to examine carcass properties and variability in chemical content and fatty acid composition in the musculus longissimus lumborum et thoracis (MLLT) of different genotypes of pigs. Of 36 male castrated animals used in the trial, 24 were from two strains of Mangalitsa pigs (12 Swallow - bellied ...

  12. Canine prostate carcinoma: epidemiological evidence of an increased risk in castrated dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teske, E; Naan, E C; van Dijk, E M; Van Garderen, E; Schalken, J A

    2002-11-29

    The present retrospective study investigated the frequency of prostate carcinoma (PCA) among prostate abnormalities in dogs and determined whether castration influences the incidence of PCA in dogs. During the years 1993-1998, 15,363 male dogs were admitted to the Utrecht University Clinic of Companion Animals, and of these dogs 225 were diagnosed with prostatic disease. In addition, another 206 male dogs were diagnosed as having prostatic disease based on cytologic examination of aspiration biopsies submitted by referring veterinarians. Benign prostatic hyperplasia was diagnosed in 246 dogs (57.1%), prostatitis in 83 dogs (19.3%), and PCA in 56 dogs (13%). Dogs with PCA were significantly older (mean age=9.9 years) than dogs with other prostatic diseases (mean age=8.4 years). The Bouvier des Flandres breed had an increased risk (odds ratio (OR)=8.44; 95% CI 4.38-16.1) of having PCA. Castration (26/56) increased the risk (OR=4.34; 95% CI 2.48-7.62) of PCA. The mean age at diagnosis of PCA in castrated dogs and in intact male dogs was not significantly different. The interval between castration and onset of prostatic problems was highly variable, suggesting that castration does not initiate the development of PCA in the dog, but it does favour tumor progression.

  13. Castration resistance in human prostate cancer is conferred by a frequently occurring androgen receptor splice variant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shihua; Sprenger, Cynthia C.T.; Vessella, Robert L.; Haugk, Kathleen; Soriano, Kathryn; Mostaghel, Elahe A.; Page, Stephanie T.; Coleman, Ilsa M.; Nguyen, Holly M.; Sun, Huiying; Nelson, Peter S.; Plymate, Stephen R.

    2010-01-01

    Progression of prostate cancer following castration is associated with increased androgen receptor (AR) expression and signaling despite AR blockade. Recent studies suggest that these activities are due to the generation of constitutively active AR splice variants, but the mechanisms by which these splice variants could mediate such effects are not fully understood. Here we have identified what we believe to be a novel human AR splice variant in which exons 5, 6, and 7 are deleted (ARv567es) and demonstrated that this variant can contribute to cancer progression in human prostate cancer xenograft models in mice following castration. We determined that, in human prostate cancer cell lines, ARv567es functioned as a constitutively active receptor, increased expression of full-length AR (ARfl), and enhanced the transcriptional activity of AR. In human xenografts, human prostate cancer cells transfected with ARv567es cDNA formed tumors that were resistant to castration. Furthermore, the ratio of ARv567es to ARfl expression within the xenografts positively correlated with resistance to castration. Importantly, we also detected ARv567es frequently in human prostate cancer metastases. In summary, these data indicate that constitutively active AR splice variants can contribute to the development of castration-resistant prostate cancers and may serve as biomarkers for patients who are likely to suffer from early recurrence and are candidates for therapies directly targeting the AR rather than ligand. PMID:20644256

  14. A Novel Role for Raloxifene Nanomicelles in Management of Castrate Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastien Taurin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Of patients with castrate resistant prostate cancer (CRPC, less than 25–33% survive more than five years. Recent studies have implicated estrogen, acting either alone or synergistically with androgens in the development of castrate resistant prostate cancer. Several in vitro and in vivo studies, as well as a limited number of clinical trials, have highlighted the potential of selective estrogen receptor modulators, such as raloxifene (Ral for the treatment of castrate resistant prostate cancer. However, the poor oral bioavailability and metabolism of selective estrogen receptor modulators limit their efficiency in clinical application. To overcome these limitations, we have used styrene co-maleic acid (SMA micelle to encapsulate raloxifene. Compared to free drug, SMA-Ral micelles had 132 and 140% higher cytotoxicity against PC3 and DU 145 prostate cell lines, respectively. SMA-Ral effectively inhibits cell cycle progression, increases apoptosis, and alters the integrity of tumor spheroid models. In addition, the micellar system induced changes in expression and localization of estrogen receptors, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, and downstream effectors associated with cell proliferation and survival. Finally, SMA-Ral treatment decreased migration and invasion of castrate resistant prostate cancer cell lines. In conclusion, SMA-Ral micelles can potentially benefit new strategies for clinical management of castrate resistant prostate cancer.

  15. A novel role for raloxifene nanomicelles in management of castrate resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taurin, Sebastien; Nehoff, Hayley; van Aswegen, Thalita; Rosengren, Rhonda J; Greish, Khaled

    2014-01-01

    Of patients with castrate resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), less than 25-33% survive more than five years. Recent studies have implicated estrogen, acting either alone or synergistically with androgens in the development of castrate resistant prostate cancer. Several in vitro and in vivo studies, as well as a limited number of clinical trials, have highlighted the potential of selective estrogen receptor modulators, such as raloxifene (Ral) for the treatment of castrate resistant prostate cancer. However, the poor oral bioavailability and metabolism of selective estrogen receptor modulators limit their efficiency in clinical application. To overcome these limitations, we have used styrene co-maleic acid (SMA) micelle to encapsulate raloxifene. Compared to free drug, SMA-Ral micelles had 132 and 140% higher cytotoxicity against PC3 and DU 145 prostate cell lines, respectively. SMA-Ral effectively inhibits cell cycle progression, increases apoptosis, and alters the integrity of tumor spheroid models. In addition, the micellar system induced changes in expression and localization of estrogen receptors, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and downstream effectors associated with cell proliferation and survival. Finally, SMA-Ral treatment decreased migration and invasion of castrate resistant prostate cancer cell lines. In conclusion, SMA-Ral micelles can potentially benefit new strategies for clinical management of castrate resistant prostate cancer.

  16. Effect of exogenous testosterone, finasteride, and castration on serum level of thyroxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarei, Fatemeh; Yousofvand, Namdar; Khazaei, Mozafar; Ghanbari, Ali

    2013-01-01

    The secretion of thyroxin (T4) as the main hormone of thyroid gland is regulated by androgens. The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of testosterone and finasteride administration and castration on serum levels of T4 and to show the effect of this regulation on total body weight, weight of testis, and the weight of prostate. Male adult rats (n = 32) were divided into 4 groups (n = 8): Group 1 (control), Group 2 (castration), Group 3 (finasteride: 20 mg/kg/day) and Group 4 (testosterone: 5 mg/kg/day). At the end of the study (35 days), serum level of thyroxin, body weight, weight of testis, and prostate were determined. The data showed that the body weight increased in castrated (P = 0.04) and decreased in testosterone (P = 0.00) groups but did not differ in finasteride (P>0.05) group. There were not any differences in the weight of testis among control, finasteride, and testosterone groups but the weight of prostate increased in testosterone group (P = 0.00) and decreased in castrated (P = 0.03) and finasteride groups (P = 0.04). In addition, the serum level of T4 (nmo/ml) decreased in the three groups: finasteride (P = 0.03), testosterone (P = 0.04), and castrated (P = 0.00). Testosterone in both high and low levels decreased the amount of T4 with a time-dependent manner.

  17. Complete androgen blockade safely allows for delay of cytotoxic chemotherapy in castration refractory prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael A. Kaliks

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Complete androgen blockade (CAB does not prolong overall survival (OS in patients with castration refractory prostate cancer (CRPC. Although there is variable clinical benefit with second-line hormone manipulation, we do not know which patients might benefit the most. OBJECTIVES: To identify clinical predictors of benefit of complete androgen blockade. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We reviewed the records for 54 patients who received treatment with CAB in the setting of disease progression despite castration. We evaluated progression-free survival (PFS and OS according to PSA at diagnosis, Gleason scores, age, testosterone level, and duration of prior disease control during castration in first line treatment. RESULTS: Among 54 patients who received CAB, the median PFS was 9 months (CI 4.3-13.7 and OS was 36 months (CI 24-48. We did not find an effect of PSA at diagnosis (p = 0.32, Gleason score (p = 0.91, age (p = 0.69 or disease control during castration (p = 0.87 on PFS or OS. Thirty-four patients subsequently received chemotherapy, with a mean OS of 21 months (CI 16.4-25.5, median not reached. CONCLUSION: Age, Gleason score, PSA at diagnosis and length of disease control with castration did not affect PFS or OS. In the absence of predictors of benefit, CAB should still be considered in CRPC.

  18. A Novel Role for Raloxifene Nanomicelles in Management of Castrate Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosengren, Rhonda J.; Greish, Khaled

    2014-01-01

    Of patients with castrate resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), less than 25–33% survive more than five years. Recent studies have implicated estrogen, acting either alone or synergistically with androgens in the development of castrate resistant prostate cancer. Several in vitro and in vivo studies, as well as a limited number of clinical trials, have highlighted the potential of selective estrogen receptor modulators, such as raloxifene (Ral) for the treatment of castrate resistant prostate cancer. However, the poor oral bioavailability and metabolism of selective estrogen receptor modulators limit their efficiency in clinical application. To overcome these limitations, we have used styrene co-maleic acid (SMA) micelle to encapsulate raloxifene. Compared to free drug, SMA-Ral micelles had 132 and 140% higher cytotoxicity against PC3 and DU 145 prostate cell lines, respectively. SMA-Ral effectively inhibits cell cycle progression, increases apoptosis, and alters the integrity of tumor spheroid models. In addition, the micellar system induced changes in expression and localization of estrogen receptors, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and downstream effectors associated with cell proliferation and survival. Finally, SMA-Ral treatment decreased migration and invasion of castrate resistant prostate cancer cell lines. In conclusion, SMA-Ral micelles can potentially benefit new strategies for clinical management of castrate resistant prostate cancer. PMID:24689036

  19. Effects of a local anaesthetic and NSAID in castration of piglets, on the acute pain responses, growth and mortality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kluivers-Poodt, M.; Houx, B.B.; Robben, S.R.; Koop, G.; Lambooij, E.; Hellebrekers, L.J.

    2012-01-01

    The present study addresses the questions whether on-farm use of local anaesthesia with lidocaine leads to a reduction in pain responses during castration, and whether the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug meloxicam improves technical performance after castration of piglets. Five treatments were

  20. Effect of surgical castration with or without oral meloxicam on the acute inflammatory response in yearling beef bulls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pain management and welfare are increasingly prevalent concerns within animal agriculture. Analgesics may alleviate pain and inflammation associated with castration of beef cattle. This study was conducted to elucidate the effects of surgical castration on the acute inflammatory response and immunom...

  1. Effect of surgical castration with or without meloxicam on the acute inflammatory response in yearling beef bulls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pain management and welfare are increasingly prevalent concerns within animal agriculture and oral analgesics may alleviate the pain associated with castration. This study was conducted to elucidate the effects of surgical castration on the acute inflammatory response and immunomodulation and whethe...

  2. An application of Freud's castration concept on the perception of physical handicap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatjana Sedlar

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available To the prevailing paradigm of our understanding of a physical handicap new paradigms have been recently added, which, as well, rarely discuss the physical handicap sex specifically. The article deals with a relationship between physically handicapped women and their surroundings through psychoanalytical perspective with the main focus on one of the basic psychoanalytical concepts–castration complex. Due to the anatomical difference between female and male sexual organs and due to the sex related solution of castration complex, following types of view on a physically handicapped body are presented: a female view on her own handicapped body, a female view on a female handicapped body, a male view on a female handicapped body, and a view on a handicapped body as a sexual object. The conclusion of the author is that the conflict between the physically handicapped and their surrounding, because of castration complex and inability to eliminate a handicap, is eternal.

  3. Modified-closed castration: a novel technique for sea otter (Enhydra lutris nereis) orchiectomies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Alexa J; Clauss, Tonya; Sakals, Sherisse; Mejia, Johanna; Radlinsky, MaryAnn G

    2013-09-01

    A novel surgical technique was used in the routine castrations of two intact male southern sea otters, Enhydra lutris nereis, housed at the Georgia Aquarium (Atlanta, Georgia, USA). This technique involved incising the parietal vaginal tunic to allow placement of double ligation of the ductus deferens, testicular artery, and pampiniform plexus en masse. After ligating and transecting these structures, they were introduced back into the tunic, which was closed with a circumferential ligature. The incision site was closed in a routine manner. Both otters recovered well from the procedure. One otter had mild cutaneous dehiscence postoperatively, and the other had no obvious complications. Benefits of this procedure include reduced risk of ligature slippage or loosening and resultant hemorrhage, as provided by the traditional open portion of the castration, and decreased postoperative swelling, as provided by the closed part of the castration. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first time this technique has been described for use in sea otters.

  4. Abiraterone acetate for patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer progressing after chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sternberg, Cora N; Castellano, Daniel; Daugaard, Gedske

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In the final analysis of the phase 3 COU-AA-301 study, abiraterone acetate plus prednisone significantly prolonged overall survival compared with prednisone alone in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer progressing after chemotherapy. Here, we present the final...... analysis of an early-access protocol trial that was initiated after completion of COU-AA-301 to enable worldwide preapproval access to abiraterone acetate in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer progressing after chemotherapy. METHODS: We did a multicentre, open-label, early......-access protocol trial in 23 countries. We enrolled patients who had metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer progressing after taxane chemotherapy. Participants received oral doses of abiraterone acetate (1000 mg daily) and prednisone (5 mg twice a day) in 28-day cycles until disease progression...

  5. Current perspectives on the optimal age to spay/castrate dogs and cats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howe LM

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Lisa M HoweDepartment of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, USAAbstract: Spaying and castrating of dogs and cats has been considered for decades to be a routine standard of practice in veterinary medicine in the US for the prevention of numerous undesirable behaviors, medical conditions, and diseases. Additionally, the procedures have been promoted as a method of curbing the severe pet-overpopulation problem in the US. Recently, however, this routine practice has come under scrutiny and become a very controversial topic. The general wisdom and safety of the procedures have been questioned by those who are concerned that the procedures may have some unintended consequences that are only recently being recognized. The purpose of this paper is to critically examine the scientific literature regarding elective spay/castration procedures and present both risks and benefits of elective gonadectomy. After the literature is examined, it becomes clear that there may not be a single absolute optimal age to spay or castrate all dogs and cats, but that the optimal age may be dependent upon several factors, including species, breed, body size, and breed-specific diseases, among others. Determining the optimal age to perform elective gonadectomy is much clearer in cats, and the literature demonstrates that the procedures can typically be safely performed at any age after 6–8 weeks of age. The optimal age to spay or castrate dogs of certain breeds (rottweiler, golden retriever, Labrador retriever, and vizsla is becoming less clear as studies are being conducted as to the health benefits and risks in those breeds. This review will examine these controversies and make recommendations as to the optimal age to spay/castrate dogs based upon the scientific literature.Keywords: gonadectomy (neuter, ovariohysterectomy (spay, castration, neoplasia, longevity, orthopedic

  6. Comparison of intratesticular injection of zinc gluconate versus surgical castration to sterilize male dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Julie K; Crawford, P Cynda; Appel, Leslie D; Clifford, Emma L

    2008-01-01

    To compare castration of dogs by use of intratesticular injection of zinc gluconate with traditional surgical procedures in terms of acceptance by pet owners, ease of use, and short-term outcomes on Isabela Island of the Galápagos Islands. 161 privately owned male dogs admitted to a neuter program. Medical records of male dogs neutered during a 4-week animal control campaign were reviewed to collect information regarding signalment, method of castration, complication rate, and treatment outcomes. Of the 161 dogs admitted for castration, 58 were surgically castrated and 103 were treated with zinc gluconate. Dogs were returned to their owners for observation following castration. Wound dehiscence occurred in 2 skin incisions, representing 3.4% of the 58 dogs that underwent bilateral orchiectomy. Necrotizing zinc-gluconate injection-site reactions occurred in 4 dogs receiving injection volumes near the maximum label dose (0.8 to 1.0 mL), representing 3.9% of the zinc-gluconate procedures. Surgical wound complications were treated by superficial wound debridement and resuturing, in contrast to zinc-gluconate injection-site reactions, which all required orchiectomy and extensive surgical debridement, including scrotal ablation in 2 dogs. Low cost, ease of use, and cultural acceptance of a castration technique that does not require removal of the testes make zinc gluconate a valuable option for large-scale use in dogs, particularly in remote locations lacking sophisticated clinical facilities or skilled surgeons and staff. Further investigation is needed to identify risk factors in dogs for adverse reactions to zinc gluconate and to develop strategies for avoidance.

  7. Effects of meloxicam and flunixin on pain, stress and discomfort in male piglets during and after surgical castration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiner, Gerald; Schollasch, Frauke; Hillen, Sonja; Willems, Hermann; Piechotta, Marion; Failing, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Surgical castration of young male piglets is now a generally accepted cause of serious distress and impairment of animal welfare. Awareness of this problem has created the moral commitment to seek for practical and more humane alternatives. As one possible alternative, the application of analgesics has been installed in Germany as an interim solution by the QS system, thus mandatory for the majority of German pig producers.Two analgesics have been authorised for this purpose. Both have been shown a significant positive impact on cortisol levels if administered pre-operatively. However, their effects on pain, stress and discomfort during castration, and on the post-castration period are conflicting. Thus, the aim of the present study was to compare the effects of Meloxicam and Flunixin on cortisol levels, behavioural indices, vocalisation, and wound healing of surgical castrated piglets in the field. There was no difference in vocalisation during castration in analgesic treated and untreated piglets. Piglets castrated under analgesia still had significantly elevated serum cortisol levels 30 min post castration, when compared to the sham castrated group. Both analgesics led to a significant impairment of behavioural indices and wound healing. It is concluded that analgesics can improve the welfare of piglets during the first part of the post-castration period. However, the benefits may be considered small and may not meet the requirements of the EU. Hence it is of high importance to prevent the interim practice of surgical castration of male piglets under analgesics from becoming implemented as a permanent condition in pig production.

  8. Comparative proteomic analysis of longissimus dorsi muscle in immuno- and surgically castrated male pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xuebin; Li, Chunbao; Cao, Miaodan; Xu, Xinglian; Zhou, Guanghong; Xiong, Youling L

    2016-05-15

    We compared proteomic profiles of male pig muscles after active immunization against gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) and surgical castration. Longissimus dorsi samples were collected from immunocastration (IC) and surgical castration (SC) groups (n=15 each). Muscle proteins were extracted and then identified by data-independent label-free nano LC-MS/MS. A total of 610 proteins were identified, 50 of which were differentially expressed (Pimmunity were abundant in IC group. Several heat shock proteins (HSPs) and laminins were abundant in SC group. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Phase I/II study on docetaxel, gemcitabine and prednisone in castrate refractory metastatic prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buch-Hansen, Trine Zeeberg; Bentzen, Lise Nørgaard; Hansen, Steinbjoern

    2010-01-01

    DGP, maximum of eight courses, until progression or unacceptable toxicity. Docetaxel 75 mg/m(2) was administered intravenously day 1, gemcitabine was given day 1 and 8 in doses increasing from 600 to 1,000 mg/m(2) every third week. Patients had castrate refractory metastatic prostate cancer (CRMPC...

  10. Canine prostate carcinoma: epidemiological evidence of an increased risk in castrated dogs.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teske, E.; Naan, E.C.; Dijk, E.M. van; Garderen, E. van; Schalken, J.A.

    2002-01-01

    The present retrospective study investigated the frequency of prostate carcinoma (PCA) among prostate abnormalities in dogs and determined whether castration influences the incidence of PCA in dogs. During the years 1993-1998, 15363 male dogs were admitted to the Utrecht University Clinic of

  11. Testosterone Replacement Therapy Prevents Alterations of Coronary Vascular Reactivity Caused by Hormone Deficiency Induced by Castration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wender Nascimento Rouver

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to determine the effects of chronic treatment with different doses of testosterone on endothelium-dependent coronary vascular reactivity in male rats. Adult male rats were divided into four experimental groups: control (SHAM, castrated (CAST, castrated and immediately treated subcutaneously with a physiological dose (0.5 mg/kg/day, PHYSIO group or supraphysiological dose (2.5 mg/kg/day, SUPRA group of testosterone for 15 days. Systolic blood pressure (SBP was assessed at the end of treatment through tail plethysmography. After euthanasia, the heart was removed and coronary vascular reactivity was assessed using the Langendorff retrograde perfusion technique. A dose-response curve for bradykinin (BK was constructed, followed by inhibition with 100 μM L-NAME, 2.8 μM indomethacin (INDO, L-NAME + INDO, or L-NAME + INDO + 0.75 μM clotrimazole (CLOT. We observed significant endothelium-dependent, BK-induced coronary vasodilation, which was abolished in the castrated group and restored in the PHYSIO and SUPRA groups. Furthermore, castration modulated the lipid and hormonal profiles and decreased body weight, and testosterone therapy restored all of these parameters. Our results revealed an increase in SBP in the SUPRA group. In addition, our data led us to conclude that physiological concentrations of testosterone may play a beneficial role in the cardiovascular system by maintaining an environment that is favourable for the activity of an endothelium-dependent vasodilator without increasing SBP.

  12. Effect of castration age on carcass traits and meat quality of Simmental bulls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Andrighetto

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Italian beef management is usually based on entire males, since they show better growth rate and higher lean yield carcasses. Despite consumer’s preferences require lean meat, producers have been induced to consider the positive effect of castration especially on meat organoleptic traits.

  13. Estimation of body tissue gain of entire and castrated male pigs at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The higher feeding level resulted in greater (P < 0.001) rates of body weight gain, protein and fat deposition in all treatment combinations Castration was associated with decreased and increased potential for protein and fat deposition, respectively. Mean values of shoulder fat thickness, loin fat and subcutaneous fat (P2) ...

  14. Docetaxel rechallenge after an initial good response in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oudard, Stéphane; Kramer, Gero; Caffo, Orazio

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the benefit of docetaxel rechallenge in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) relapsing after an initial good response to first-line docetaxel. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed the records of consecutive patients with mCRPC w...

  15. Castration prevents calcium channel blocker-induced gingival hyperplasia in beagle dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayan, D; Kozlovsky, A; Tal, H; Kariv, N; Shemesh, M; Nyska, A

    1998-07-01

    1. The purpose of this study was to investigate testosterone's role on the calcium channel antagonist oxodipine-inducing gingival hyperplasia in a dog model. 2. Two experiments were conducted using castrated and intact male dogs. Oxodipine was administered orally for 90 days, at a dose of 24 mg/kg/day. In the first experiment, the occurrence of gingival hyperplasia was evaluated. In the second, the gingival index (GI) and gingival hyperplasia index (GHI) were recorded and correlated with serum levels of testosterone. 3. A significant positive correlation between GI, GHI and plasma testosterone was noted. Castrated dogs were injected with testosterone, 4 months after the start of oxodipine treatment, while in the non-castrated dogs, administration of oxodipine was stopped. Castration correlated with lack of GH, while testosterone injection to the same dogs was associated with an increase of GI and GHI. 4. Since it is known that testosterone receptors are present in the gingiva, it is proposed that oxodipine-induced gingival hyperplasia could be mediated by the calcium channel blocker on plasma testosterone levels.

  16. Enzalutamide in Men with Chemotherapy-naïve Metastatic Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beer, Tomasz M; Armstrong, Andrew J; Rathkopf, Dana

    2017-01-01

    Enzalutamide significantly improved radiographic progression-free survival (rPFS) and overall survival (OS) among men with chemotherapy-naïve metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer at the prespecified interim analysis of PREVAIL, a phase 3, double-blind, randomized study. We evaluated...

  17. An effect of castration and testosterone replacement on a circadian pacemaker in mice (Mus musculus)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daan, Serge; Damassa, David; Pittendrigh, Colin S.; Smith, Erla R.

    1975-01-01

    Castration of mice in freerunning conditions (total darkness, DD) causes a reduction of running wheel activity in the beginning of the active period (α) and stimulates activity at the end of α. Simultaneously, the period (τ) of the freerunning rhythm is increased. Both effects are abolished by

  18. Decision Making for Cryptorchid Castration; a Retrospective Analysis of 280 Cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huppes, Tsjester|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/412768755; Stout, Tom A.E.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304828831; Ensink, Jos M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/138694540

    Abstract The location of an undescended testicle influences the choice of surgical technique for efficient cryptorchid castration. We review a standardized protocol for preoperative examination to dictate surgical approach to cryptorchidism. Cases are split into two periods: 2004–2006 and 2007–2014.

  19. Stilbenes inhibit androgen receptor expression in 22Rv1 castrate-resistant prostate cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Androgen receptor (AR) signaling plays an important role in the development and progression of prostate cancer (PCa). Importantly, AR continues to be expressed in advanced stages of castrate-resistant PCa (CRPC), where it can have ligand- independent activity. Identification of naturally occurring s...

  20. New EU Policies Towards Animal Welfare: The Relative Importance of Pig Castration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kallas, Z.; Gil, J.M.; Panella-Riera, N.; Blanch, M.; Tacken, G.M.L.; Chevillon, P.; Roest, de K.; Oliver, M.A.

    2012-01-01

    Animal welfare is becoming one of the most contentious issues in animal husbandry and meat production industries. We assess the relative importance of animal welfare, with respect to pig castration and the avoidance of boar taint, alongside different attributes of pork meat, amongst consumers in six

  1. YAP1 regulates prostate cancer stem cell-like characteristics to promote castration resistant growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Ning; Ke, Binghu; Hjort-Jensen, Kim

    2017-01-01

    Castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is a stage of relapse that arises after various forms of androgen ablation therapy (ADT) and causes significant morbidity and mortality. However, the mechanism underlying progression to CRPC remains poorly understood. Here, we report that YAP1, which is...

  2. Enzalutamide: targeting the androgen signalling pathway in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schalken, J.A.; Fitzpatrick, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in the understanding of the underlying cancer biology of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) with the androgen receptor (AR) signalling pathway remaining implicated throughout the prostate cancer disease continuum. Reactivation of the AR signalling pathway

  3. Metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: new therapies, novel combination strategies and implications for immunotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drake, C.G.; Sharma, P.; Gerritsen, W.R.

    2014-01-01

    For the past decade, docetaxel has remained the global standard of care for frontline treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Until recently, there were limited options for patients with mCRPC following docetaxel failure or resistance, but now the approved treatment

  4. Improving therapy options for patients with metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wissing, Michel Daniël

    2014-01-01

    Metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) is the second deadliest cancer in men in the Western world. Therapy options are limited, but expanding. In the current thesis, various aspects of (pre)clinical research are discussed, all sharing the ultimate aim to improve therapy options for

  5. Optimal management of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: Highlights from a European Expert Consensus Panel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M. Fitzpatrick (John); J. Bellmunt (Joaquim); K. Fizazi (Karim); A. Heidenreich (Axel); C.N. Sternberg (Cora); B. Tombal (Bertrand); A. Alcaraz (Antonio); A. Bahl (Amit); S. Bracarda (Sergio); G. Di Lorenzo (Giuseppe); E. Efstathiou (Eleni); S.P. Finn (Stephen); S.D. Fossa (Sophie); S. Gillessen (Silke); P.-L. Kellokumpu-Lehtinen (Pirkko-Liisa); F.E. Lecouvet (Frédéric); S. Oudard (Stéphane); T.M. de Reijke (Theo); C.N. Robson (Craig); M. de Santis (Maria); B. Seruga (Bostjan); R. de Wit (Ronald)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractThe exponential growth of novel therapies for the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) over the last decade has created an acute need for education and guidance of clinicians regarding optimal strategies for patient management. A multidisciplinary panel of

  6. Castration-resistant prostate cancer: from new pathophysiology to new treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sridhar, S.S.; Freedland, S.J.; Gleave, M.E.; Higano, C.; Mulders, P.; Parker, C.; Sartor, O.; Saad, F.

    2014-01-01

    CONTEXT: Until recently, the only approved agent for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) was docetaxel chemotherapy. But over the last 5 years, significant advances in the field have led to the approval of five new agents, each with different mechanisms of action and

  7. B-cell-derived lymphotoxin promotes castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammirante, Massimo; Luo, Jun-Li; Grivennikov, Sergei; Nedospasov, Sergei; Karin, Michael

    2010-03-11

    Prostate cancer (CaP) progresses from prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia through locally invasive adenocarcinoma to castration-resistant metastatic carcinoma. Although radical prostatectomy, radiation and androgen ablation are effective therapies for androgen-dependent CaP, metastatic castration-resistant CaP is a major complication with high mortality. Androgens stimulate growth and survival of prostate epithelium and early CaP. Although most patients initially respond to androgen ablation, many develop castration-resistant CaP within 12-18 months. Despite extensive studies, the mechanisms underlying the emergence of castration-resistant CaP remain poorly understood and their elucidation is critical for developing improved therapies. Curiously, castration-resistant CaP remains androgen-receptor dependent, and potent androgen-receptor antagonists induce tumour regression in castrated mice. The role of inflammation in castration-resistant CaP has not been addressed, although it was reported that intrinsic NF-kappaB activation supports its growth. Inflammation is a localized protective reaction to injury or infection, but it also has a pathogenic role in many diseases, including cancer. Whereas acute inflammation is critical for host defence, chronic inflammation contributes to tumorigenesis and metastatic progression. The inflammation-responsive IkappaB kinase (IKK)-beta and its target NF-kappaB have important tumour-promoting functions within malignant cells and inflammatory cells. The latter, including macrophages and lymphocytes, are important elements of the tumour microenvironment, but the mechanisms underlying their recruitment remain obscure, although they are thought to depend on chemokine and cytokine production. We found that CaP progression is associated with inflammatory infiltration and activation of IKK-alpha, which stimulates metastasis by an NF-kappaB-independent, cell autonomous mechanism. Here we show that androgen ablation causes infiltration of

  8. Histochemical studies on genetical control of hormonal enzyme inducibility in the mouse. VI. Effects of short term castration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, K; Kirkeby, S; Blecher, S R

    1983-01-01

    to survive long-term castration. The possibility of an androgen binding protein, as described in the rat and rabbit, is suggested on morphological grounds. The epididymal body appears to contain a class of highly androgen sensitive cells that degenerate rapidly following castration and a second class......The regional histology and esterase activity of the mouse epididymis after 24, 48, and 72 hr castration is reported. Differential sensitivity to androgen deprivation among the various epithelial cell types is described, allowing of positive identification of the cell types previously observed...... that survive from which regeneration occurs on testosterone replacement....

  9. A survey of castration methods and associated livestock management practices performed by bovine veterinarians in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradburn Ryan M

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Castration of male calves destined for beef production is a common management practice performed in the United States amounting to approximately 15 million procedures per year. Societal concern about the moral and ethical treatment of animals is increasing. Therefore, production agriculture is faced with the challenge of formulating animal welfare policies relating to routine management practices such as castration. To enable the livestock industry to effectively respond to these challenges there is a need for more data on management practices that are commonly used in cattle production systems. The objective of this survey was to describe castration methods, adverse events and husbandry procedures performed by U.S. veterinarians at the time of castration. Invitations to participate in the survey were sent to email addresses of 1,669 members of the American Association of Bovine Practitioners and 303 members of the Academy of Veterinary Consultants. Results After partially completed surveys and missing data were omitted, 189 responses were included in the analysis. Surgical castration with a scalpel followed by testicular removal by twisting (calves 90 kg was the most common method of castration used. The potential risk of injury to the operator, size of the calf, handling facilities and experience with the technique were the most important considerations used to determine the method of castration used. Swelling, stiffness and increased lying time were the most prevalent adverse events observed following castration. One in five practitioners report using an analgesic or local anesthetic at the time of castration. Approximately 90% of respondents indicated that they vaccinate and dehorn calves at the time of castration. Over half the respondents use disinfectants, prophylactic antimicrobials and tetanus toxoid to reduce complications following castration. Conclusions The results of this survey describe current methods of

  10. Performance of intact and castrated beef cattle in an intensive croppasture rotation system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tercilio Turini

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This research had as objective to evaluate the performance of intact or castrated beef cattle in a croppasture rotation system. The experiment was conducted during 2004 and 2005, and carried out at the Cooperativa Agropecuária Mourãoense (COAMO Experimental Farm, in Campo Mourão city, Paraná state. It was used a completely randomized design, with two treatments, intact or castrated. Forty ½Angus+½Nelore crossbred animals, with average age of nine months, were used. Half of the animals were castrated at weaning, and the other half was kept intact. Pasture was composed of two areas. The winter field, established after soybean crop, was composed by a mixture of black oat (Avena strigosa and Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiforum. The summer field was composed by stargrass (Cynodon nlemfuensis and Mombaça grass (Panicum maximum. During the winter time it was used a continues grazing system, with regulator animals (put and take, and during the summer an intensive rotational system, with regulator animals and fixed grazing period. Intact animals presented higher average daily weight gain (0.907 vs 0.698 kg, slaughter weight (490.9 vs 442.2 kg, and hot carcass weight (250.2 vs 232.6 kg. Slaughter age was influenced by sexual condition, being lesser in the intact animals. Carcass dressing percentage was similar for the groups. Castrated animals showed better finishing fat cover and backfat thickness (3.45 vs 2.70 mm compared to intact ones. Therefore, it can be concluded that intact animals presents better performance than castrated ones when finished in an intensive crop-pasture rotation system, however, they may not present the minimum required fat cover, when slaughter at young ages.

  11. Free Testosterone During Androgen Deprivation Therapy Predicts Castration-Resistant Progression Better Than Total Testosterone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regis, Lucas; Planas, Jacques; Carles, Joan; Maldonado, Xavier; Comas, Inma; Ferrer, Roser; Morote, Juan

    2017-01-01

    The optimal degree of testosterone suppression in patients with prostate cancer undergoing androgen deprivation therapy remains in question. Furthermore, serum free testosterone, which is the active form of testosterone, seems to correlate with intraprostatic testosterone. Here we compared free and total serum testosterone as predictors of survival free of castration resistance. Total testosterone (chemiluminescent assay, lower sensitivity 10 ng/dl) and free testosterone (analogue-ligand radioimmunoassay, lower sensitivity 0.05 pg/ml) were determined at 6 months of LHRH agonist treatment in a prospective cohort of 126 patients with prostate cancer. During a mean follow-up of 67 months (9-120), 75 (59.5%) events of castration-resistant progression were identified. Multivariate analysis and survival analysis according to total testosterone cutoffs of 50, 32, and 20 ng/dl, and free testosterone cutoffs of 1.7, 1.1, and 0.7 pg/ml were performed. Metastatic spread was the most powerful predictor of castration resistance, HR: 2.09 (95%CI: 1.18-3.72), P = 0.012. Gleason score, baseline PSA and PSA at 6 months were also independents predictors, but not free and total testosterone. Stratified analysis was conducted on the basis of the status of metastatic diseases and free testosterone was found to be an independent predictor of survival free of castration resistance in the subgroup of patients without metastasis, HR: 2.12 (95%CI: 1.16-3.85), P = 0.014. The lowest threshold of free testosterone which showed significant differences was 1.7 pg/ml, P = 0.003. Free testosterone at 6 months of LHRH agonist treatment seems to be a better surrogate than total testosterone to predict castration resistance in no metastatic prostate cancer patients. Prostate 77:114-120, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Testosterone Deficiency Causes Endothelial Dysfunction via Elevation of Asymmetric Dimethylarginine and Oxidative Stress in Castrated Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, Tomoya; Hotta, Yuji; Maeda, Yasuhiro; Kimura, Kazunori

    2017-12-01

    Testosterone is believed to mediate the penile erectile response by producing adequate nitric oxide; therefore, testosterone deficiency results in erectile dysfunction through decreased nitric oxide bioavailability. However, the mechanisms underlying endothelial dysfunction in testosterone deficiency remain unclear. To investigate the mechanism of endothelial dysfunction in a rat model of testosterone deficiency. Rats were distributed into 3 groups: castrated (Cast), castrated and supplemented with testosterone (Cast + T), and sham (Sham). In the Cast + T group, castrated rats were treated daily with subcutaneous testosterone (3 mg/kg daily) for 4 weeks; Sham and Cast rats received only the vehicle. Erectile function using intracavernosal pressure and mean arterial pressure measurements after electrical stimulation of the cavernous nerve, endothelial function using isometric tension, asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) levels using ultra-performance liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry, and inflammatory biomarker expression were performed 4 weeks after the operation. In the Cast group, the ratio of intracavernosal pressure to mean arterial pressure significantly decreased, acetylcholine-induced relaxation was lower, and serum ADMA, oxidative stress, and inflammation biomarker levels were significantly increased (P Testosterone injection significantly improved each of these parameters (P testosterone deficiency on erectile function and the effect of testosterone replacement therapy. This study provides evidence of the influence of testosterone deficiency on endothelial function by investigating ADMA and oxidative stress. A major limitation of this study is the lack of a direct link of increased ADMA by oxidative stress to inflammation. Testosterone deficiency increased not only ADMA levels but also oxidative stress and inflammation in castrated rats, which can cause damage to the corpus cavernosum, resulting in erectile dysfunction. Kataoka T, Hotta Y

  13. Composição tecidual e qualidade da gordura na carne de cordeiros castrados e não castrados confinados sob dois fotoperíodos Tissue composition and fat quality of meat of intact or castrated male lambs confined under two photoperiods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.H. Klein Júnior

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Avaliaram-se os efeitos do fotoperíodo e da castração sobre a composição dos tecidos da paleta e características de qualidade da gordura do lombo e da paleta, de 20 cordeiros mestiços Ideal, distribuídos em esquema fatorial 2 x 2 (dois fotoperíodos - curto (FC, com 12 horas de luz, e longo (FL, com 18 horas de luz, e duas condições sexuais - não castrados (NC e castrados (C, com cinco repetições. Os animais foram abatidos aos 37kg de peso corporal. Maior quantidade de gordura total ocorreu nos cordeiros C e mais tecido conjuntivo nos animais NC. A castração influenciou o resíduo mineral fixo (RMF, o extrato etéreo (EE e a proteína da gordura subcutânea. O efeito da interação entre fotoperíodo longo e castração resultou em aumento do teor de umidade na gordura intermuscular da paleta. A castração elevou o teor de EE e diminuiu o percentual de RMF. Não foi evidenciado efeito do fotoperíodo no EE dos músculos da paleta, e os animais castrados apresentaram gordura intramuscular mais elevada. Os níveis de colesterol da paleta foram mais elevados que os do lombo. Na carne de animais C, verificou-se maior quantidade de ácidos graxos saturados.The effects of photoperiod and castration on tissue muscle composition, fat physical-chemical composition, and cholesterol was determined for two muscles of 20 Ideal crossbred lambs. The animals were divided into four treatments: five intact males and five castrate during a short photoperiod of 12 light hours, and five intact males and five castrated during a long photoperiod of 18 light hours. The animals were allocated in individual pens, in two identical rooms, with light intensity of 300 lux, (intact and castrated animals x short and long photoperiod. The animals were slaughtered as they reached 37kg of body weight. Castrated lambs showed a significantly higher amount of total fat tissues while intact animals showed higher connective tissue for the shoulder tissue composition

  14. Longitudinal tracking of subpopulation dynamics and molecular changes during LNCaP cell castration and identification of inhibitors that could target the PSA−/lo castration-resistant cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rycaj, Kiera; Cho, Eun Jeong; Liu, Xin; Chao, Hsueh-Ping; Liu, Bigang; Li, Qiuhui; Devkota, Ashwini K.; Zhang, Dingxiao; Chen, Xin; Moore, John; Dalby, Kevin N.; Tang, Dean G.

    2016-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated that the undifferentiated PSA−/lo prostate cancer (PCa) cell population harbors self-renewing long-term tumor-propagating cells that are refractory to castration, thus representing a therapeutic target. Our goals here are, by using the same lineage-tracing reporter system, to track the dynamic changes of PSA−/lo and PSA+ cells upon castration in vitro, investigate the molecular changes accompanying persistent castration, and develop large numbers of PSA−/lo PCa cells for drug screening. To these ends, we treated LNCaP cells infected with the PSAP-GFP reporter with three regimens of castration, i.e., CDSS, CDSS plus bicalutamide, and MDV3100 continuously for up to ~21 months. We observed that in the first ~7 months, castration led to time-dependent increases in PSA−/lo cells, loss of AR and PSA expression, increased expression of cancer stem cell markers, and many other molecular changes. Meanwhile, castrated LNCaP cells became resistant to high concentrations of MDV3100, chemotherapeutic drugs, and other agents. However, targeted and medium-throughput library screening identified several kinase (e.g., IGF-1R, AKT, PI3K/mTOR, Syk, GSK3) inhibitors as well as the BCL2 inhibitor that could effectively sensitize the LNCaP-CRPC cells to killing. Of interest, LNCaP cells castrated for >7 months showed evidence of cyclic changes in AR and the mTOR/AKT signaling pathways potentially involving epigenetic mechanisms. These observations indicate that castration elicits numerous molecular changes and leads to enrichment of PSA−/lo PCa cells. The ability to generate large numbers of PSA−/lo PCa cells should allow future high-throughput screening to identify novel therapeutics that specifically target this population. PMID:26871947

  15. Chemical castration by a single bilateral intra-testicular injection of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Six apparently healthy Borno white bucks weighing 15± 1.6 kg and aged 1.3± 0.3 years were used for this study. Two and half (2.5) ml Purit® (chlorhexidine gluconate 0.3% B.P W/V and cetrimide 3.0% B.P W/V CAPL Lagos) were injected bilaterally into the caudae of each epididymis following sedation with xylazine ...

  16. Resource efficiency and economic implications of alternatives to surgical castration without anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Roest, K; Montanari, C; Fowler, T; Baltussen, W

    2009-11-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the economic implications of alternative methods to surgical castration without anaesthesia. Detailed research results on the economic implications of four different alternatives are reported: castration with local anaesthesia, castration with general anaesthesia, immunocastration and raising entire males. The first three alternatives have been assessed for their impact on pig production costs in the most important pig-producing Member States of the EU. The findings on castration with anaesthesia show that cost differences among farms increase if the anaesthesia cannot be administered by farmers and when the veterinarian has to be called to perform it. The cost of veterinarian service largely affects the total average costs, making this solution economically less feasible in small-scale pig farms. In all other farms, the impact on production costs of local anaesthesia is however limited and does not exceed 1 €ct per kg. General anaesthesia administered by inhalation or injection of Ketamin in combination with a sedative (Azaperone, Midazolan) is more expensive. These costs depend heavily on farm size, as the inhalation equipment has to be depreciated on the largest number of pigs possible. The overall costs of immunocastration - including the cost of the work load for the farmer - has to be evaluated against the potential benefits derived from higher daily weight gain and feed efficiency in comparison with surgical castrates. The economic feasibility of this practice will finally depend on the price of the vaccine and on consumer acceptance of immunocastration. The improvement in feed efficiency may compensate almost entirely for the cost of vaccination. The main advantages linked to raising entire males are due to the higher efficiency of feed conversion, to the better growth rate and to the higher leanness of carcass. A higher risk of boar taint on the slaughter line has to be accounted for. Raising entire males should not

  17. Castration-induced changes in the expression profiles and promoter methylation of the GHR gene in Huainan male pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Chen, Junfeng; Zhang, Jiaqing; Gao, Binwen; Bai, Xianxiao; Lan, Yali; Lin, Ping; Guo, Hongxia; Gao, Yuan; Xing, Baosong

    2017-08-01

    Castration plays a regulatory role in growth and carcass traits, particularly in fat deposition, but its molecular mechanisms are still not clear. The present study showed that castration significantly reduced the serum growth hormone and the responses of the growth hormone receptor (GHR), insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-I), IGF-IR and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) to castration were similar in different adipose tissues. However, the GHR expression trends were opposite between the liver and the adipose tissues; bisulfite sequencing PCR (BSP) showed that its methylation in these two tissues was different. In particular, the GHR methylation rate in the liver of castrated and intact pigs were 93.33% and 0, respectively, which was consistent with its higher expression level in the intact group. It was predicted that there were potential binding sites for 11 transcription factors in the ninth CpG site (which was methylated and demethylated in subcutaneous adipose tissue of the intact and castrated groups, respectively), including androgen receptor (AR), CCAAT/enhancer binding protein-α (C/EBPα) and C/EBPβ, all of which are important factors in lipid metabolism. These results indicate that DNA methylation may participate in castration-induced fat deposition. © 2016 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  18. Silicone chain extender

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates to a silicone chain extender, more particularly a chain extender for silicone polymers and copolymers, to a chain extended silicone polymer or copolymer and to a functionalized chain extended silicone polymer or copolymer, to a method for the preparation thereof...

  19. Prospects of 2nd line chemotherapy personalization in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Ya. Alekseev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PC is one of the most challenging and pressing problems of modern oncourology because of high morbidity associated with the disease worldwide. About 1 100 000 new cases are diagnosed each year. The main approach to treatment of locally advanced and/or metastatic PC is hormonal therapy. Androgen deprivation therapy allows to achieve stabilization in more than 90 % of patients, but average time until progression after hormonal therapy in patients with metastatic PC is about 2 years. Then patients with tumor progression accompanied by castration level of testosterone enter the stage of so-called castration-resistant PC (CRPC. Prognosis for regional CRPC is unfavorable, and it substantially lowers patients’ quality of life. Taxane-based chemotherapy remains a standard method of treatment in this patient cohort. The article reviews studies of efficacy of different doses and regimes of 2nd line chemotherapy using cabazitaxel in patients with metastatic CRPC.

  20. Tissue culture media supplemented with 10% fetal calf serum contains a castrate level of testosterone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedelaar, J P Michiel; Isaacs, John T

    2009-12-01

    Human prostate cancer cells are routinely maintained in media supplemented with 10% Fetal Calf Serum (FCS) to provide androgen. In the present study, total and free testosterone levels in 10%FCS supplemented tissue culture media were determined and compared to levels in intact and castrated human males. Dextran-coated charcoal stripped FCS (i.e., DC-FCS) is often used instead of FCS to minimize the level of androgen provided in 10% serum supplemented media. Therefore, total and free testosterone levels in 10%DC-FCS containing media were likewise determined. Total testosterone, free testosterone, and total dihydrotestosterone (DHT) were determined on RPMI-1640 media supplemented with either 10%FCS or 10%DC-FCS by ELISA assays before and after exposure to LNCaP human prostate cancer cells in culture. The growth and PSA secretion by these cells was also determined. Ten percentage FCS supplemented media contains a castrate level of testosterone. However, even with this castrate starting level of testosterone, LNCaP cells concentrate and metabolize the testosterone to produce a physiologic (i.e., 10 nM) level of intracellular DHT which optimally stimulates the growth of these cells in vitro. The present studies document that prostate cancer cells auto-regulate their androgen metabolism so that an optimal level of DHT for growth is maintained during both up and down fluctuations in the supply of testosterone. These results have significant implications for whether exogenous androgen should be added to the 10%FCS supplemented media to grow prostate cancer cells from intact versus castrated patients. Copyright 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Effect of a gel containing pilocarpine on vaginal atrophy in castrated rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina A. de Sousa-Lages

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effect of Carbopol gel formulations containing pilocarpine on the morphology and morphometry of the vaginal epithelium of castrated rats. METHODS: Thirty-one female Wistar-Hannover rats were randomly divided into four groups: the control Groups I (n=7, rats in persistent estrus; positive controls and II (n=7, castrated rats, negative controls and the experimental Groups, III (n=8 and IV (n=9. Persistent estrus (Group I was achieved with a subcutaneous injection of testosterone propionate on the second postnatal day. At 90 days postnatal, rats in Groups II, III and IV were castrated and treated vaginally for 14 days with Carbopol gel (vehicle alone or Carbopol gel containing 5% and 15% pilocarpine, respectively. Next, all of the animals were euthanized and their vaginas were removed for histological evaluation. A non-parametric test with a weighted linear regression model was used for data analysis (p<0.05. RESULTS: The morphological evaluation showed maturation of the vaginal epithelium with keratinization in Group I, whereas signs of vaginal atrophy were present in the rats of the other groups. Morphometric examinations showed mean thickness values of the vaginal epithelium of 195.10±12.23 μm, 30.90±1.14 μm, 28.16±2.98 μm and 29.84±2.30 μm in Groups I, II, III and IV, respectively, with statistically significant differences between Group I and the other three groups (p<0.0001 and no differences between Groups II, III and IV (p=0.0809. CONCLUSION: Topical gel formulations containing pilocarpine had no effect on atrophy of the vaginal epithelium in the castrated female rats.

  2. Epithelial Plasticity in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer: Biology of the Lethal Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    research, and provides networking, clinical rotations (inpatient and outpatient), mentorship, and didactic seminars with experienced cancer researchers...treatment for men with castration-resistant prostate cancer. In: Govindan R, ed 2012 ASCO Educational Book . Alexandria, VA: American Society of...Eur Urol 2013, epub ahead of press Sept 10, 2013. Chapters in books : 1. Armstrong AJ, Carducci MA. Chemotherapy for advanced prostate cancer. In

  3. Androgen Deprivation Enhances PLZF-Repressed Cistrome that Promotes the Castration-Resistant Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    cancer [4]. Whole exome sequencing of metastatic castration resistant prostate tumors (mCRPC) from the Michigan cohort [5] and the East Coast Stand Up to...prostate cancer progression is unclear. Keyword: Whole exome sequencing , CRPC, ADT, PLZF, homozygous deletion Accomplishment: I interrogated the...Collectively, our in vitro and in vivo together with human genomic sequencing data strongly support that PLZF functions as a tumor suppressor in prostate

  4. Uncarboxylated Osteocalcin and Gprc6a Axis Produce Intratumoral Androgens in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    known to express osteocalcin. Osteocalcin undergoes carboxylation at multiple glutamic acids , the resultant gama carboxylated Osteocalcin interacts...Osteocalcin is mutated at three positions where glutamic acid residue at 17, 18 and 24 were mutated to glutamine to prevent carboxylation. Both native and...multiple pathways, despite castrate levels of testosterone. One such adaptive mechanism is the “intracrine” production of androgens in the primary

  5. CpG-STAT3siRNA for Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    target for prostate cancer therapy. Within the three years of funding, we have completed feasibility studies using CpG- siRNA strategy to target...signaling in TLR9+ MDSCs using CpG- siRNA restores T cell proliferation. Finally, we completed feasibility studies demonstrating that local intratumoral...12 4 CpG-STAT3 siRNA for Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer Therapy Revised Final Report: 28/09/2012 – 26/09/2015 Introduction

  6. Super-Penetrant Androgen Receptor: Overcoming Enzalutamide Sensitivity in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    AR, a versatile transcriptional co-activator, seems to adapt to androgen-deprived environment by distinct modifications. This proposal will use an...Chen Z, Sinha CK, Malik R, Shukla S, Kim J, Coppola D, Lawrence N and Mahajan NP. Epigenetic Reprogramming of Androgen Receptor by Histone H4 Tyr88...Prostate Cancer Research Symposium- Prostate Cancer Epigenetic Reprogramming of the Androgen Receptor in Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer, May19

  7. Oral ethinylestradiol in castration-resistant prostate cancer: a 10-year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciarra, Alessandro; Gentile, Vincenzo; Cattarino, Susanna; Gentilucci, Alessandro; Alfarone, Andrea; D'Eramo, Giuseppe; Salciccia, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    To describe our 10-year experience with the use of oral ethinylestradiol in the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. From February 2000 to April 2010, 116 patients with a metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer were prospectively submitted to oral ethinylestradiol monotherapy. Inclusion criteria were: diagnosis of castration-resistant prostate cancer after failure of at least two lines of androgen deprivation therapy and radiological evidence of metastases. Exclusion criteria were: symptomatic cases with a European Cooperative Oncology Group score >2 and severe or uncontrolled cardiovascular diseases. At inclusion in the study, all patients discontinued the previous androgen deprivation therapy and started oral ethinylestradiol at the daily dose of 1 mg. Aspirin (100 mg/daily) was concomitantly given. The median ethinylestradiol therapy duration was 15.9 months (range 8-36 months), whereas the median follow up of patients was 28 months (range 13-36 months). During ethinylestradiol therapy, a confirmed prostate-specific antigen response was found in 79 patients (70.5%). The median time to prostate-specific antigen progression was 15.10 months (95% confidence interval 13.24-18.76 months). A toxicity requiring treatment cessation was observed in 26 patients (23.2%) at a median time of 16 months (mainly thromboembolism). Our 10-year experience shows that ethinylestradiol provides a prostate-specific antigen response in a high percentage of patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. Cardiovascular toxicity can be managed through accurate patient selection, close follow up and a concomitant anticoagulation therapy. © 2014 The Japanese Urological Association.

  8. Safety of cabazitaxel in senior adults with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heidenreich, Axel; Bracarda, Sergio; Mason, Malcolm

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cabazitaxel/prednisone has been shown to prolong survival versus mitoxantrone/prednisone in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) that has progressed during or after docetaxel. Subsequently, compassionate-use programmes (CUPs) and expanded-access progra......-CSF, especially at cycle 1 and in men aged > or =75 years, is important and improves tolerability in senior adults treated with cabazitaxel....

  9. Developing Novel Therapeutics Targeting Undifferentiated and Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    main objective of this DOD-supported project is to identify and develop novel therapeutics to target the undifferentiated ( PSA -/lo), castration...resistant PCSCs. We proposed to achieve this objective with two Specific Aims: 1) To perform phage display library (PDL) screening in PSA -/lo PCa cells to...Tang, the PI of this grant, together with most lab members, moved from the M.D Anderson Cancer Center (MDACC) to Roswell Park Cancer Institute (RPCI

  10. Impact of treatment delay in Radium-223 therapy of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fosbøl, Marie Øbro; Petersen, Peter Meidahl; Daugaard, Gedske

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Radium-223-dichloride (Ra-223) is an alpha-emitting, bone seeking radionuclide therapy approved for patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). In the fall of 2014, a global temporary shortage of Ra-223 occurred for 2 months due to production irregularities...... to non-disease related reasons on OS, rPFS or number of completed treatment cycles....

  11. Abiraterone acetate: oral androgen biosynthesis inhibitor for treatment of castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosenberg JE

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Yasser Rehman1, Jonathan E Rosenberg21Division of Hospital Medicine, UMass Memorial Healthcare, Worcester, MA, USA; 2Lank Center for Genitourinary Oncology, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USAAbstract: Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in men in the US and Europe. The treatment of advanced-stage prostate cancer has been androgen deprivation. Medical castration leads to decreased production of testosterone and dihydrotestosterone by the testes, but adrenal glands and even prostate cancer tissue continue to produce androgens, which eventually leads to continued prostate cancer growth despite castrate level of androgens. This stage is known as castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC, which continues to be a challenge to treat. Addition of androgen antagonists to hormonal deprivation has been successful in lowering the prostate-specific antigen levels further, but has not actually translated into life-prolonging options. The results of several contemporary studies have continued to demonstrate activation of the androgen receptor as being the key factor in the continued growth of prostate cancer. Blockade of androgen production by nongonadal sources has led to clinical benefit in this setting. One such agent is abiraterone acetate, which significantly reduces androgen production by blocking the enzyme, cytochrome P450 17 alpha-hydroxylase (CYP17. This has provided physicians with another treatment option for patients with CRPC. The landscape for prostate cancer treatment has changed with the approval of cabazitaxel, sipuleucel-T and abiraterone. Here we provide an overview of abiraterone acetate, its mechanism of action, and its potential place for therapy in CRPC.Keywords: CRPC, abiraterone, CYP17, inhibitors, androgens, castration resistant prostate cancer

  12. Sequencing of Cabazitaxel in Metastatic Castrate-Resistant Prostate Cancer: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Donald Colbourn

    2012-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a common cancer in men; for metastatic disease, it has a 5-year survival rate of 30%. No FDA-approved therapy for castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) known to improve survival was available until 2004, when based on a significant survival benefit over mitoxantrone, docetaxel in combination with prednisone was approved. In combination with prednisone, cabazitaxel, which was approved in the United States in 2010, is indicated for patients with metastatic CRPC previously...

  13. Cabazitaxel: a novel second-line treatment for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Paller, Channing J; Antonarakis, Emmanuel S.

    2011-01-01

    Channing J Paller, Emmanuel S AntonarakisSidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins, Baltimore, MD, USAAbstract: Until recently, patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) had limited therapeutic options once they became refractory to docetaxel chemotherapy, and no treatments improved survival. This changed in June 2010 when the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved cabazitaxel as a new option for patients with CRPC whose disease progresses during or after d...

  14. Tissue fatty acid composition and estimated ∆ desaturase activity after castration in chicken broilers fed with linseed or sunflower oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mašek, T; Starčević, K; Filipović, N; Stojević, Z; Brozić, D; Gottstein, Z; Severin, K

    2014-04-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the influence of the short-term addition of sunflower and linseed oil and castration on fatty acid composition and desaturation indexes in chicken broilers. Forty-eight male Ross 308 chicken broilers were supplemented with 5% of sunflower or linseed oil. The four experimental groups were linseed oil supplementation and castration (LC), linseed oil without castration (LN), sunflower oil and castration (SC) and sunflower oil without castration (SN). There was no significant influence of castration or oil supplement on live weights, weight gain, feed intake or feed conversion. Castration resulted in an increase in polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), total n3, n6, measured desaturation indexes and a decrease in the saturated fatty acid (SFA) and monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA) content of abdominal fat. In breast muscle, castration increased PUFA and 18:3n3 values, while in the liver tissue, castration did not influence the parameters measured. Linseed oil supplementation significantly increased 18:3n3, n3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC PUFA), total n3 and decreased total n6, n6/n3 ratio, and 20:4n6 content. Values for 20:4n6 were the highest in SC and the lowest in the LC group. Linseed oil also significantly decreased ∆5 and ∆4 desaturation indexes in the thighs and ∆5 and ∆5, 6 in abdominal fat and the liver. These results suggest that short-term supplementation of basal diet with 5% of linseed oil could significantly increase n3 LC PUFA and decrease n6/n3 ratio content in the edible tissues of chicken broilers, without adverse effects on growth performance. Meanwhile, castration only improved fatty acid profile in abdominal fat, which is not nutritionally important. The interactions observed between basal diet, supplemented oil, sex hormones and other non-nutritional factors must be elucidated in future trials in order to correctly predict the nutritional value of linseed-fed poultry. Journal of Animal

  15. Analysis of the Ki-67 index in the vaginal epithelium of castrated rats treated with tamoxifen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afif Rieth Nery-Aguiar

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Vaginal atrophy and breast cancer are common conditions in postmenopausal women and tamoxifen is the standard endocrine treatment for hormone-sensitive tumors. The present study aimed to assess the effect of tamoxifen on Ki-67 protein expression in the vaginal epithelium of castrated rats. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Forty Wistar-Hannover adult, virgin, castrated rats were randomly divided into two groups, group I (control, n=20 and group II (tamoxifen, n=20, receiving 0.5 ml of propylene glycol and 250 µg of tamoxifen diluted in 0.5 ml of propylene glycol, respectively, daily by gavage for 30 days. On the 31st day, the rats were euthanized and their vaginas were removed and fixed in 10% buffered formalin for the immunohistochemical study of Ki-67 protein expression. Data were analyzed by the Levene and Student’s t tests (p<0.05. RESULTS: The mean index of Ki-67 expression in the rat vagina of groups I and II was 4.04±0.96 and 26.86±2.19, respectively (p<0.001. CONCLUSIONS: According to the results of the present study, tamoxifen, at the dose and treatment length used, induced a significant increase in the cell proliferation of the vaginal mucosa in castrated rats, as evaluated by Ki-67 protein expression.

  16. Analysis of the Ki-67 index in the vaginal epithelium of castrated rats treated with tamoxifen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nery-Aguiar, Afif Rieth; Aguiar, Yousef Qathaf; Júnior, Airton Mendes Conde; Alencar, Airlane Pereira; Tavares, Cleciton Braga; Lopes-Costa, Pedro Vitor; Nazário, Afonso Celso; da Silva, Benedito Borges

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Vaginal atrophy and breast cancer are common conditions in postmenopausal women and tamoxifen is the standard endocrine treatment for hormone-sensitive tumors. The present study aimed to assess the effect of tamoxifen on Ki-67 protein expression in the vaginal epithelium of castrated rats. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Forty Wistar-Hannover adult, virgin, castrated rats were randomly divided into two groups, group I (control, n=20) and group II (tamoxifen, n=20), receiving 0.5 ml of propylene glycol and 250 µg of tamoxifen diluted in 0.5 ml of propylene glycol, respectively, daily by gavage for 30 days. On the 31st day, the rats were euthanized and their vaginas were removed and fixed in 10% buffered formalin for the immunohistochemical study of Ki-67 protein expression. Data were analyzed by the Levene and Student's t tests (pvagina of groups I and II was 4.04±0.96 and 26.86±2.19, respectively (p<0.001). CONCLUSIONS: According to the results of the present study, tamoxifen, at the dose and treatment length used, induced a significant increase in the cell proliferation of the vaginal mucosa in castrated rats, as evaluated by Ki-67 protein expression. PMID:26934238

  17. Exogenous testosterone, finasteride and castration effects on testosterone, insulin, zinc and chromium in adult male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousofvand, Namdar; Zarei, Fatemeh; Ghanbari, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Although effects of trace elements on secretion of sex steroids and insulin have been studied, the effects of these hormones on serum level of trace elements have been rarely investigated. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of testosterone and finasteride administration and castration on serum levels of testosterone, insulin, zinc and chromium. Male adult rats (n = 32) were divided into 4 groups (n = 8). Group 1, control; Group 2, castration, castration was done at the first day of the study; Group 3, finasteride (20 mg/kg/day, dissolved in drinking water) and Group 4, testosterone (5 mg/kg/day, i.p.). At the end of the period of the study (35 days), serum testosterone, insulin, zinc and chromium levels were determined in the blood samples collected directly from the right atrium of the heart of the animals. The data indicated that the serum levels of testosterone, insulin and zinc were significantly increased (Pfinasteride groups, but the level of chromium was decreased in both groups (Pfinasteride increases insulin and zinc levels and decreases chromium levels in the serum of male adult rats. According to these data, it seems that testosterone may affect glucose cycle through effect on serum insulin levels and trace elements such as zinc and chromium.

  18. Targeting Taxanes to Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer Cells by Nanobubbles and Extracorporeal Shock Waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marano, Francesca; Rinella, Letizia; Argenziano, Monica; Cavalli, Roberta; Sassi, Francesca; D'Amelio, Patrizia; Battaglia, Antonino; Gontero, Paolo; Bosco, Ornella; Peluso, Rossella; Fortunati, Nicoletta; Frairia, Roberto; Catalano, Maria Graziella

    2016-01-01

    To target taxanes to castration-resistant prostate cancer cells, glycol-chitosan nanobubbles loaded with paclitaxel and docetaxel were constructed. The loaded nanobubbles were then combined with Extracorporeal Shock Waves, acoustic waves widely used in urology and orthopedics, with no side effects. Nanobubbles, with an average diameter of 353.3 ± 15.5 nm, entered two different castration-resistant prostate cancer cells (PC3 and DU145) as demonstrated by flow cytometry and immunofluorescence. The shock waves applied increased the amount of intracellular nanobubbles. Loading nanobubbles with paclitaxel and docetaxel and combining them with shock waves generated the highest cytotoxic effects, resulting in a paclitaxel GI50 reduction of about 55% and in a docetaxel GI50 reduction of about 45% respectively. Combined treatment also affected cell migration. Paclitaxel-loaded nanobubbles and shock waves reduced cell migration by more than 85% with respect to paclitaxel alone; whereas docetaxel-loaded nanobubbles and shock waves reduced cell migration by more than 82% with respect to docetaxel alone. The present data suggest that nanobubbles can act as a stable taxane reservoir in castration-resistant prostate cancer cells and shock waves can further increase drug release from nanobubbles leading to higher cytotoxic and anti-migration effect.

  19. Comparison of Intramuscular or Subcutaneous Injections vs. Castration in Pigs—Impacts on Behavior and Welfare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John McGlone

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Physical castration (PC is painful and stressful for nursing piglets. One alternative to PC is immunological castration (IC, but the pain and stress of handling associated with injections have not been assessed. The objectives of this study were to measure the pain and distress of subcutaneous (SQ and intramuscular (IM injections compared to PC in piglets, and to compare SQ or IM injections in finishing pigs. After farrowing, 3 to 5 d old male piglets were randomly assigned to (control no handling treatment (NO, sham-handling (SHAM, IM, SQ, or PC. Finishing pigs were assigned to NO, SHAM, IM, or SQ. Behavior was monitored for 1 h prior and 1 h post treatment in each age group. Social, feeding behaviors, and signs of pain were recorded. Finishing pigs treated with SQ injections had higher feeding behaviors pre-treatment than they did post-treatment. Overall, physical castrations caused measurable pain-like behaviors and general behavioral dysregulation at a much higher level than the other treatment groups. SQ and IM injections did not cause either significant behavioral or physiological alterations in piglets. SQ injections caused a decrease in finishing pig feed behaviors post treatment ( p = 0.02 and SHAM treated finishing pigs spent significantly more time lying than the other treatment groups. In general IM and SQ injections did not cause any other significant changes in behavior or physiology.

  20. Analysis of the Ki-67 index in the vaginal epithelium of castrated rats treated with tamoxifen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nery-Aguiar, Afif Rieth; Aguiar, Yousef Qathaf; Conde Júnior, Airton Mendes; Alencar, Airlane Pereira; Tavares, Cleciton Braga; Lopes-Costa, Pedro Vitor; Nazário, Afonso Celso; da Silva, Benedito Borges

    2016-02-01

    Vaginal atrophy and breast cancer are common conditions in postmenopausal women and tamoxifen is the standard endocrine treatment for hormone-sensitive tumors. The present study aimed to assess the effect of tamoxifen on Ki-67 protein expression in the vaginal epithelium of castrated rats. Forty Wistar-Hannover adult, virgin, castrated rats were randomly divided into two groups, group I (control, n=20) and group II (tamoxifen, n=20), receiving 0.5 ml of propylene glycol and 250 µg of tamoxifen diluted in 0.5 ml of propylene glycol, respectively, daily by gavage for 30 days. On the 31st day, the rats were euthanized and their vaginas were removed and fixed in 10% buffered formalin for the immunohistochemical study of Ki-67 protein expression. Data were analyzed by the Levene and Student's t tests (p<0.05). The mean index of Ki-67 expression in the rat vagina of groups I and II was 4.04±0.96 and 26.86±2.19, respectively (p<0.001). According to the results of the present study, tamoxifen, at the dose and treatment length used, induced a significant increase in the cell proliferation of the vaginal mucosa in castrated rats, as evaluated by Ki-67 protein expression.

  1. Evalution of the castrated male Sprague-Dawley rat as a model of the metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christoffersen, B; Raun, K; Svendsen, O; Fledelius, C; Golozoubova, V

    2006-08-01

    Low testosterone levels have been shown to be predictive for the development of the metabolic syndrome in men. The aim of this study was to describe effects of testosterone deficiency on metabolic syndrome-related parameters in male rats in order to evaluate the rat as a model for the human metabolic syndrome related to low testosterone levels. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were castrated or sham operated at 16 weeks of age and fed either a standard or a high energy diet. Measured parameters were: food intake, body weight, fat distribution, energy expenditure, physical activity and blood/plasma parameters related to glucose and lipid metabolism. Castration led to an increase in the amount of subcutaneous fat, but did not result in any changes in the visceral fat. Fasting blood glucose levels were increased and free fatty acids concentration decreased in the castrated rats from 2 weeks after castration and throughout the study, whereas no significant differences between the groups were found in any of the other parameters measured. A high-energy diet did not change the response to castration in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Compared to humans rats respond differently to testosterone deficiency. Only few of the features typical for the human metabolic syndrome were observed in castrated male Sprague-Dawley rats. Therefore, we conclude that with the present experimental setup the castrated rat is not an optimal model for studies on the influence of testosterone deficiency on body fat distribution and the development of other central components of the metabolic syndrome.

  2. Effects of estradiol benzoate injection to intact and castrated male rabbits on LH, FSH, testeosterone and prostate tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamour Elkhier

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study was conducted to investigate the effects of estradiol benzoate injection to intact and castrated male rabbits on LH, FSH, testosterone and prostate tissue. Materials and methods: A total of 72 mature male rabbits were used in this study. The rabbits were randomly divided into two groups (36 intact and 36 castrated and each group was further divided into four sub-groups. The rabbits of each subgroup were injected estradiol benzoate dosed at 0, 40, 80 and 120 and micro;gm/rabbit, through intramuscular (IM route, on each alternative day over a period of 30 days. The levels of LH, FSH, and testosterone were measured in serum samples. Prostate tissue samples were taken from each sub-groups, histological examination was done. Results: The mean serum levels of LH and FSH were not affected by injection of estradiol benzoate in all intact and castrated rabbits sub-groups (P>0.05. However, the results of testosterone levels were showed insignificant increase in all intact and castrated male rabbits sub-groups, except the intact male rabbit sub-group that received estradiol benzoate at 120 and micro;g/rabbit (P<0.05. Furthermore, the effects of estradiol benzoate in prostate tissues were ranged from hyperplasia with dysplasia or dysplasia only in intact male rabbits; hyperplasia was represented by papillary projection in castrated male rabbits. Conclusion: The present study revealed no difference in the serum levels of LH, FSH in intact or castrated male rabbits, however, testosterone hormone did not show any change except in sub-group of intact male rabbits that was injected dosed at 120 and micro;g estradiol benzoate. The effect of estradiol benzoate on prostate tissue was found to be induce hyperplasia in both intact and castrated males rabbits. [J Adv Vet Anim Res 2016; 3(4.000: 420-424

  3. Abiraterone in the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostaghel EA

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Elahe A Mostaghel Division of Clinical Research, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA, USA Abstract: Androgen deprivation therapy remains the single most effective treatment for the initial therapy of advanced prostate cancer, but is uniformly marked by progression to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC. Residual tumor androgens and androgen axis activation are now recognized to play a prominent role in mediating CRPC progression. Despite suppression of circulating testosterone to castrate levels, castration does not eliminate androgens from the prostate tumor microenvironment and residual androgen levels are well within the range capable of activating the androgen receptor (AR and AR-mediated gene expression. Accordingly, therapeutic strategies that more effectively target production of intratumoral androgens are necessary. The introduction of abiraterone, a potent suppressor of cytochrome P450 17 α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-mediated androgen production, has heralded a new era in the hormonal treatment of men with metastatic CRPC. Herein, the androgen and AR-mediated mechanisms that contribute to CRPC progression and establish cytochrome P450 17 α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase as a critical therapeutic target are briefly reviewed. The mechanism of action and pharmacokinetics of abiraterone are reviewed and its recently described activity against AR and 3-β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase is discussed. The Phase I and II data initially demonstrating the efficacy of abiraterone and Phase III data supporting its approval for patients with metastatic CRPC are reviewed. The safety and tolerability of abiraterone, including the incidence and management of side effects and potential drug interactions, are discussed. The current place of abiraterone in CRPC therapy is reviewed and early evidence regarding cross-resistance of abiraterone with taxane therapy, mechanisms of resistance to abiraterone, and observations of an

  4. Effects of local anesthesia and flunixin meglumine on the acute cortisol response, behavior, and performance of young dairy calves undergoing surgical castration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, H B; Morin, D; Jarrell, V; Shipley, C; Brown, L; Green, A; Wallace, R; Constable, P D

    2013-10-01

    This study assessed the effects of flunixin meglumine (FM) and a local anesthetic block (LA) on postcastration performance, plasma cortisol concentration, and behavior in dairy calves. Thirty 2- to 3-mo-old Holstein-Friesian bull calves were allocated to 5 treatments: castration with LA (2% lidocaine injected into the testes and subcutaneously), castration with FM (1.1mg/kg, i.v.), castration with LA+FM, castration without drugs (CC), and sham castration (SC). Castration was performed using a Newberry knife and Henderson castrating tool. Feed intake and body weight gain were recorded for 10d postcastration. Plasma cortisol concentration and behavior frequency and duration were monitored for 8h postcastration. Variables with repeated measures were analyzed using PROC MIXED (SAS Institute Inc., Cary, NC); one-way ANOVA was used for nonrepeated measures. No differences in feed intake or body weight gain were detected among groups. Calves in the CC, LA, and FM groups had transient (<60, <60, and <45 min, respectively) increases in plasma cortisol concentration after castration, with a second increase at 120 min in the LA group, whereas cortisol concentration remained at baseline in the LA+FM and SC groups. Mean cortisol concentrations were lower for calves in the LA+FM and SC groups than in the CC group. The area under the plasma cortisol concentration curve during the first 3h postcastration was greater in CC- and LA-treated calves than in SC controls. Castration without drugs was associated with higher frequencies of crouching and statue standing and less oral activity compared with SC controls. Administering LA alone before castration was associated with higher frequencies of head turning, statue standing, and postural changes, and less feeding behavior compared with SC controls. More leg lifting to groom was seen in LA+FM-treated calves than in SC controls. Calves administered FM alone before castration exhibited less crouching than CC calves, fewer postural shifts

  5. TMPRSS2- driven ERG expression in vivo increases self-renewal and maintains expression in a castration resistant subpopulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orla M Casey

    Full Text Available Genomic rearrangements commonly occur in many types of cancers and often initiate or alter the progression of disease. Here we describe an in vivo mouse model that recapitulates the most frequent rearrangement in prostate cancer, the fusion of the promoter region of TMPRSS2 with the coding region of the transcription factor, ERG. A recombinant bacterial artificial chromosome including an extended TMPRSS2 promoter driving genomic ERG was constructed and used for transgenesis in mice. TMPRSS2-ERG expression was evaluated in tissue sections and FACS-fractionated prostate cell populations. In addition to the anticipated expression in luminal cells, TMPRSS2-ERG was similarly expressed in the Sca-1(hi/EpCAM(+ basal/progenitor fraction, where expanded numbers of clonogenic self-renewing progenitors were found, as assayed by in vitro sphere formation. These clonogenic cells increased intrinsic self renewal in subsequent generations. In addition, ERG dependent self-renewal and invasion in vitro was demonstrated in prostate cell lines derived from the model. Clinical studies have suggested that the TMPRSS2-ERG translocation occurs early in prostate cancer development. In the model described here, the presence of the TMPRSS2-ERG fusion alone was not transforming but synergized with heterozygous Pten deletion to promote PIN. Taken together, these data suggest that one function of TMPRSS2-ERG is the expansion of self-renewing cells, which may serve as targets for subsequent mutations. Primary prostate epithelial cells demonstrated increased post transcriptional turnover of ERG compared to the TMPRSS2-ERG positive VCaP cell line, originally isolated from a prostate cancer metastasis. Finally, we determined that TMPRSS2-ERG expression occurred in both castration-sensitive and resistant prostate epithelial subpopulations, suggesting the existence of androgen-independent mechanisms of TMPRSS2 expression in prostate epithelium.

  6. Therapeutic options in docetaxel-refractory metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: a cost-effectiveness analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lixian Zhong

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Docetaxel is an established first-line therapy to treat metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC. Recently, abiraterone and cabazitaxel were approved for use after docetaxel failure, with improved survival. National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE preliminary recommendations were negative for both abiraterone (now positive in final recommendation and cabazitaxel (negative in final recommendation. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of abiraterone, cabazitaxel, mitoxantrone and prednisone for mCRPC treatment in US. METHODS: A decision-tree model was constructed to compare the two mCRPC treatments versus two placebos over 18 months from a societal perspective. Chance nodes include baseline pain as a severity indicator, grade III/IV side-effects, and survival at 18 months. Probabilities, survival and health utilities were from published studies. Model cost inputs included drug treatment, side-effect management and prevention, radiation for pain, and death associated costs in 2010 US dollars. RESULTS: Abiraterone is a cost-effective choice at $94K/QALY (quality adjusted life years compared to placebo in our base-case analysis. Cabazitaxel and abiraterone are the most effective, yet also most expensive agents. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICER at base-case are $101K/QALY (extended dominated for mitoxantrone vs. placebo, $91K/QALY for abiraterone vs. mitoxantrone, $956K/QALY for cabazitaxel vs. abiraterone. Abiraterone becomes less cost-effective as its AWP increases, or if the cost of mitoxantrone side-effect management decreases. Increases in the percentage of patients with baseline pain leads to an increased ICER for both mitoxantrone and abiraterone, but mitoxantrone does relatively better. Cabazitaxel remains not cost-effective. CONCLUSION: Our base case model suggests that abiraterone is a cost-effective option in docetaxel-refractory mCRPC patients. Newer treatments will also

  7. Impact of amino acid and CP restriction from 20 to 140 kg BW on performance and dynamics in empty body protein and lipid deposition of entire male, castrated and female pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Ascacibar, I; Stoll, P; Kreuzer, M; Boillat, V; Spring, P; Bee, G

    2017-03-01

    Breeding leaner pigs during the last decades may have changed pig's empty body (EB) composition, a key trait for elaborating feeding recommendations. This research aimed to provide new experimental data on changes in the chemical composition of the EB of pigs from 20 to 140 kg BW. In addition, the impact of a reduction in the dietary CP associated with lower lysine, methionine+cystine, threonine and tryptophan levels was determined. In total, 48 males, castrates and females weighing 20 kg BW were allocated either to a control grower-finisher diet formulated according to current Swiss feeding recommendations, or a low CP grower-finisher diet (80% of control). Feed intake was monitored and pigs were weighed weekly. The chemical composition of EB (blood, hairs and hoofs, offals, bile, carcass) was determined at 20, 40, 60, 80, 100, 120 and 140 kg BW on four pigs per gender and diet (eight pigs per gender at 20 kg). The five fractions were weighed and samples were analysed for dry matter, protein, fat and energy. Nutrient deposition rates and N efficiency were calculated by using the 20 kg BW category as reference. Analysis revealed an accurate feed optimisation for the aforementioned essential amino acids (EAA), whereas digestible isoleucine content in the low CP diet was at 70% of the control diet. Despite similar feed intake, daily gain and feed efficiency were impaired (PCP compared with the control pigs. In the same growth period, castrates had the greatest feed intake but, together with females, displayed the lowest (PCP diet and was lower (PCP diet and castrates. N efficiency improved (PCP diet from 100 to 140 kg. The males displayed the greatest (PCP content of finisher II diets could be reduced to 102, 102 and 104 g/kg for females, castrates and males, respectively, without a negative impact on protein deposition or growth. It remains unclear whether the negative effects found in the BW range from 20 to 100 kg on the EB deposition were due to the 20% reduction

  8. Performance and nutritional evaluation of beef cattle raised on pasture, castrated at different ages, with and without supplementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anilza Andréia da Rocha

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate performance and nutritional traits of beef cattle raised on pastures, castrated at different ages, with and without supplementation. Forty-four crossbred young bulls with predominance of Zebu breed at initial average age of 120±30 days were used in the experiment. Animals were distributed in a completely randomized design in a factorial arrangement with four ages of castration and two supplementation systems. The animals were distributed into four groups and placed on Brachiaria decumbens Stapf pastures, where they were fed concentrate supplementation or mineral salt ad libtum (control. Animals were castrated at 120, 240 and 360 days of age with average body weight of 115, 175 and 276 kg, castrated or not, in each supplementation group. Concentrate supplement composition and the amount supplied to the animals varied according to the time of the year and development phase of the animals. Trials were carried out to evaluate nutritional variables in each of the following phases: suckling, growth in the dry season and growth in the dry/rainy transition season. Concentrate supplementation improved the use of pasture, although it may have caused substitutive effect in all seasons evaluated. Castration of the animals before the dry season impaired animal development until the following dry/rainy transition season, especially when carried out during weaning. Concentrate supply may reduce some effects of this stress.

  9. Opinion of the scientific panel on animal health and welfare on a request from the commission related to welfare aspects of the castration of piglets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunn, Michael; Allen, Paul; Bonneau, Michel

    2004-01-01

    Report - Annex to the Opinion of the Scientific Panel on Animal Health and Welfare on a request from the Commission related to welfare aspects of the castration of piglets......Report - Annex to the Opinion of the Scientific Panel on Animal Health and Welfare on a request from the Commission related to welfare aspects of the castration of piglets...

  10. Estradiol treatment modulates spontaneous sleep and recovery after sleep deprivation in castrated male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibowo, Erik; Deurveilher, Samüel; Wassersug, Richard J; Semba, Kazue

    2012-01-15

    Exogenous estradiol (E) is used occasionally to treat the side effects associated with androgen-deprivation in men, but its effects on sleep patterns have received little attention. We examined whether E modulates sleep patterns and recovery from sleep loss in castrated male rats. Adult male rats were castrated and implanted subcutaneously with Silastic tubes containing either oil (Cast+Oil) or E (Cast+E). Sham-operated male rats (Intact) were implanted with oil-filled tubes. All rats were also implanted with EEG and EMG electrodes for sleep/wake recordings. After two weeks, polysomnographic recordings were made before, during, and following 6h of sleep deprivation (SD). At baseline, the Cast+Oil group showed sleep and EEG patterns similar to those in the Intact group. Compared to these groups, the Cast+E group spent more time awake during the dark (active) phase, and showed higher EEG theta power (a measure of cortical activation) during wake and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep in both the light and dark phases. Following SD, the Cast+E group showed a larger increase from baseline in REM sleep amount, compared to the Cast+Oil group. The Cast+Oil group showed prolonged rebound in non-REM sleep and EEG delta power, and reduced REM sleep rebound, compared to the other two groups. These results indicate that E treatment in castrated male rats promotes baseline wakefulness during the active phase, and facilitates recovery of REM sleep after acute sleep loss. The possible benefit of E treatment for improving sleep quality in androgen-deprived men remains to be investigated. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Evaluation of learning curves for ovariohysterectomy of dogs and cats and castration of dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Lynetta J; Ferguson, Nancy; Fellenstein, Carol; Johnson, Ron; Constable, Peter D

    2017-08-01

    OBJECTIVE To define learning curves for fourth-year veterinary students performing ovariohysterectomy procedures in dogs and cats and castration in dogs. DESIGN Retrospective study. SAMPLE 3,196 ovariohysterectomies or castrations performed in dogs and cats by 88 veterinary students during a spay-neuter surgery and animal shelter rotation (n = 3,056) or by 1 experienced general practitioner (n = 140). PROCEDURES Data collected from medical records included patient signalment, type and duration of procedure, and sequence (by date and time) of the procedure within a list of procedures of the same type generated for each student. For each procedure type, geometric mean surgery time and 95% confidence intervals were determined for each number of surgeries completed by ≥ 10 students. Median surgery times for the same procedure types were determined for the experienced practitioner. The learning curve for each procedure was modeled with nonlinear (3-factor exponential equation with a nonzero asymptote) and linear regression. For each procedure, the asymptote (optimal surgery time) for students was compared with the experienced practitioner's median surgery time. RESULTS 2,945 surgeries (mean, 33/student) performed by ≥ 10 students were analyzed. Surgery time decreased in a nonlinear manner as student experience increased for castration of adult or pediatric dogs and ovariohysterectomy of pediatric dogs and adult or pediatric cats. Surgery time decreased in a linear manner as experience increased for ovariohysterectomy of adult dogs. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE To the authors' knowledge, this was the first study to map surgery times for common surgical procedures consecutively performed by veterinary students. Results clearly indicated the value of repetition to improve surgical skills (as measured by surgery time) during a 3-week period.

  12. Guaiphenesin-ketamine-xylazine infusion to maintain anesthesia in mules undergoing field castration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vullo, Cecilia; Carluccio, Augusto; Robbe, Domenico; Meligrana, Marina; Petrucci, Linda; Catone, Giuseppe

    2017-10-11

    In order to determine whether a combination of guaiphenesin, ketamine and xylazine can induce safe and satisfactory anaesthesia in mules undergoing field castration, eight healthy adult intact male mules were employed. They were premedicated with intravenous (IV) xylazine (1.3 mg/kg); an additional dose of xylazine (0.3 mg/kg IV) was administered in case of inadequate depth of sedation. Anaesthesia was induced with IV thiopental (6 mg/kg). The quality of sedation and induction was recorded. Anaesthesia was maintained with an infusion of guaiphenesin (50 mg/mL), ketamine (2 mg/mL) and xylazine (1 mg/mL) (GKX). The spermatic cord of each testis was infiltrated with 5 mL of 2% lidocaine. During anaesthesia heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR), rectal temperature (RT) and haemoglobin oxygen saturation (SpO 2 ) were measured every 5 min. The data were analysed with simple one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). A P value anesthesia, time of surgery and time of recovery were recorded. Only one mule required an additional dose of xylazine to achieve a satisfactory depth of sedation. Thiopental at the dose of 6 mg/kg IV resulted in smooth induction and lateral recumbency in all animals. GKX provided adequate anaesthesia to perform castration in all mules. Muscle relaxation was deemed adequate and physiological variables remained stable and within references values during the anaesthesia and did not change in response to surgical stimulation. Time (mean ± standard deviation) from the end of the infusion to sternal recumbency and time from sternal recumbency to standing were 27.7 ± 4.6 and 30.1 ± 7.7 min, respectively. The combination of xylazine, thiopental and GKX provides satisfactory short-term anaesthesia in mules undergoing field castration.

  13. Effects of castration, tooth resection, or tail docking on plasma metabolites and stress hormones in young pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prunier, A; Mounier, A M; Hay, M

    2005-01-01

    Changes in the activity of the sympathetic nervous system or in the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis have been extensively used to evaluate pain induced by castration or tail docking in numerous species. Such data are missing in pigs. Therefore, three experiments were conducted to determine the effects of castration, tail docking, or tooth resection on stress hormones. Glucose and lactate also were measured because catecholamines stimulate mobilization of glycogen, which results in glucose and lactate release. In Exp.1, 18 male pigs from seven litters (two or three pigs per litter) were catheterized surgically into one jugular vein, under general anesthesia, at 5 or 6 d of age. Two days later, they were submitted either to bilateral castration, control handling, or no handling (n = 6 per group). Blood samples were collected before (- 15 and -2 min) and after (5, 15, 30, 60, 90, 180 min) the experimental treatment. In Exp. 2, 27 female pigs from 12 litters (one to four pigs per litter) were submitted either to tooth clipping with pliers, tooth resection with a grinder apparatus, control handling, or no handling (n = 6 or 7 per group) at 1 d of age. In Exp. 3, 17 female pigs from nine litters (one to three pigs per litter) were submitted to one of the following treatments: 1) tail docking with an electric-heated scissor docking iron, 2) control handling, and 3) no handling (n = 5 or 6 per group) at 1 d of age. Castration induced significant (P < 0.05) increases in adrenocorticotropin hormone (ACTH; from 5 to 60 min), cortisol (from 15 to 90 min), and lactate (from 5 to 30 min). These variations are indicative of stress and tissue damage following castration. In contrast, neither tail docking nor tooth resection had marked effects on plasma cortisol, ACTH, glucose, and lactate. Measurements of plasma cortisol, lactate, and ACTH could be useful for validating treatments designed to relieve the distress reaction induced by castration in pigs.

  14. Spontaneous electroencephalographic changes in a castration model as an indicator of nociception: a comparison between donkeys and ponies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grint, N J; Johnson, C B; Clutton, R E; Whay, H R; Murrell, J C

    2015-01-01

    Donkeys are believed to be less demonstrative of pain than ponies. Research into comparative sensory processing between these species is required to elucidate these behavioural differences. To compare changes in the electroencephalogram (EEG) recorded during castration between donkeys and ponies. Prospective clinical study. Six ponies and 6 donkeys were castrated under halothane anaesthesia after acepromazine premedication and thiopental anaesthetic induction. Markers were inserted into the EEG recording at the time of skin incision (skin) and emasculation (emasc) for both testicles (T1 and T2) during a closed castration. Raw EEG data were analysed and the EEG variables median frequency (F50 ), total power (Ptot ) and spectral edge frequency (F95 ) derived using standard techniques. Baseline values of F50 , Ptot and F95 for each animal were used to calculate the percentage change from baseline at T1skin, T2skin, T1emasc and T2emasc. Decreased F50 values relative to baseline were observed in 4 ponies and 2 donkeys across all castration time points. In the remaining animals, the F50 value increased compared with baseline. Both donkey and pony groups showed an overall decrease in Ptot values compared with baseline at T1skin, but the magnitude of the decrease was significantly less (P = 0.004) in ponies than in donkeys. Donkeys demonstrated an overall greater increase (P = 0.05) in F95 values at T1skin relative to baseline compared with ponies. Electroencephalographic responses to the noxious stimulus of castration were noted in both donkeys and ponies. Donkeys demonstrated a greater change in Ptot in response to castration than ponies; thus, donkeys appear to demonstrate a cerebral cortical response to a noxious stimulus that is similar to or greater than that in ponies, suggesting that their subtle behavioural expression of pain is not due to a difference in cortical processing of noxious sensory stimuli. © 2014 EVJ Ltd.

  15. Extended icosahedral structures

    CERN Document Server

    Jaric, Marko V

    1989-01-01

    Extended Icosahedral Structures discusses the concepts about crystal structures with extended icosahedral symmetry. This book is organized into six chapters that focus on actual modeling of extended icosahedral crystal structures. This text first presents a tiling approach to the modeling of icosahedral quasiperiodic crystals. It then describes the models for icosahedral alloys based on random connections between icosahedral units, with particular emphasis on diffraction properties. Other chapters examine the glassy structures with only icosahedral orientational order and the extent of tra

  16. Effect of band and knife castration of beef calves on welfare indicators of pain at three relevant industry ages: II. Chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marti, S; Meléndez, D M; Pajor, E A; Moya, D; Heuston, C E M; Gellatly, D; Janzen, E D; Schwartzkopf-Genswein, K S

    2017-10-01

    Three experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of band and knife castration on behavioral and physiological indicators of chronic pain in beef calves at 3 different ages (36 calves/age group): 1 wk of age (Exp. 1, 4 ± 1.1 d of age, 43 ± 1.1 kg BW), 2 mo of age (Exp. 2, 63 ± 2.3 d of age, 92 ± 1.7 kg BW), and 4 mo of age (Exp. 3, 125 ± 4.6 d of age, 160 ± 3.4 kg BW). In each experiment calves were randomly assigned to either sham (CT), band (BA) or knife (KN) castration. Experiments 1, 2, and 3 ended when the testicles of banded calves had sloughed off (68, 49, and 42 d, respectively). Animal BW and rectal temperature were recorded weekly over the experimental period. Salivary cortisol, substance P, haptoglobin, scrotal area temperature using infrared thermography, visual evaluation of swelling (5-point scale), and gait stride length were collected on d -1 and immediately before castration and weekly thereafter until the end of the study. Hair samples were collected 1 d prior to and 28 d after castration and at the end of the study for cortisol concentration. Standing and lying behaviors were recorded over a 28-d period immediately after castration. No differences ( > 0.10) were observed in salivary cortisol, substance P, haptoglobin, or hair cortisol among castration methods for any of the 3 ages. No changes in behavior were observed in calves castrated at 1 wk or 2 mo of age. In 4 mo-old-calves, BA spent less time lying ( chronic pain or distress when the procedures were performed in calves younger than 2 mo of age. Therefore, pain mitigation should be used when castrating to improve animal welfare, especially when castrations are performed in calves older than 2 mo of age independent of the method of castration.

  17. Weekly ascorbic acid infusion in castration-resistant prostate cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Torben K.; Højgaard, Martin; Andersen, Jon T.

    2017-01-01

    of this treatment.  Methods: This non-comparative, single-center, phase II trial included patients with chemotherapy-naïve, metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) from an outpatient clinic to evaluate the efficacy and safety of IV AA therapy. Patients received weekly infusions of AA (week 1, 5 g...... μg/L was recorded at week 12. Among the secondary endpoints, no signs of disease remission were observed. In total, 53 adverse events (AEs) were recorded. Eleven were graded as "serious". Three AEs were directly related to AA, and all of which were related to fluid load.  Conclusions: Infusion...

  18. Critical questions in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: Integrating emerging clinical evidence and guideline recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Ali

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC typically confers a poor prognosis, however, novel advances in treatment options, as well as biomarkers for monitoring disease response and progression, have recently helped improve survival rates. Additionally, new guidelines provide some direction on incorporating these new treatments but some confusion still exists among clinicians about best methods for initiating treatment and the optimal sequencing of agents to prolong survival. In this article, we review the literature and answer some frequently asked questions about treating men with metastatic CRPC, including choosing a first-line treatment, monitoring treatment response, and proceeding to additional lines of therapy.

  19. The tumor suppressive role of CAMK2N1 in castration-resistant prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Tao; Liu, Zhuo; Guo, ShuiMing; Wu, Licheng; Li, Mingchao; Yang, Jun; Chen, Ruibao; Xu, Hua; Cai, Shaoxin; CHEN, Hui; LI, WEIYONG; Wang, Liang; Hu, Zhiquan; Zhuang, Qianyuan; Xu, Shaohua

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer at advanced stages including metastatic and castration-resistant cancer remains incurable due to the lack of effective therapies. The CAMK2N1 gene, cloned and characterized as an inhibitor of CaMKII (calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II), has been shown to affect tumorigenesis and tumor growth. However, it is still unknown whether CAMK2N1 plays a role in prostate cancer development. We first examined the protein and mRNA levels of CAMK2N1 and observed a significant d...

  20. CURRENT POSSIBILITIES OF TREATMENT FOR VISCERAL METASTASES IN PATIENTS WITH METASTATIC CASTRATION-REFRACTORY PROSTATE CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Govorov

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Medications increasing the survival of patients with metastatic castration-refractory prostate cancer (CRPC are lacking today. In the past 3 years, in the pharmaceutical market there have been a few novel drugs to treat progressive prostate cancer. Abiraterone acetate is an androgen synthesis inhibitor, which is also used to increase the survival of patients with metastatic CRPC that progresses after chemotherapy. The results of treatment for metastatic CRPC depend on a number of factors. Visceral metastases are poor predictors of the course of the disease. The results of abiraterone acetate treatment were analyzed in CRPC patients with visceral metastases.

  1. Efeito da tibolona sobre o endométrio de ratas castradas Effect of tibolone on endometrium of castrated rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Augusto Soares Pantaleão

    2009-03-01

    sedated and sacrificed by cervical dislocation. The uterus was removed and fixated in 10% buffer formaldehyde. Both uterine horns were divided in three regions (proximal, medial and distal and processed to be included in paraffin. Histological sections, stained with hematoxylin-eosin were submitted to morphological and morphometrical analysis. The following parameters have been analyzed: thickness of the endometrial superficial epithelium, thickness of the endometrium stroma, endometrial area, absolute number of endometrial glands and number of glands/endometrial area. The data obtained were compared by the t-Student test. RESULTS: in the Tibolone Group, the uteri were well developed and there was a significant increase (p<0.01 of all the histomorphometric parameters. In some cases, the cylindrical epithelium became stratified, pavimentous and covered the internal portions of the glands, as well as of the endometrium cavity. Rats from the Control Group presented uterine atrophy. There were few tubular-like glands and scarce intercellular substance. Glands were covered by cubic epithelium which extended itself to the endometrial cavity. CONCLUSIONS: high doses of tibolone, given for long periods of time to castrated female rats, have an estrogenic effect which can be dose-dependent, causing proliferation in the endometrium and causing changes in the cell differentiation (squamous metaplasia, but do not lead to hyperplasia.

  2. Extended family medicine training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slade, Steve; Ross, Shelley; Lawrence, Kathrine; Archibald, Douglas; Mackay, Maria Palacios; Oandasan, Ivy F.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To examine trends in family medicine training at a time when substantial pedagogic change is under way, focusing on factors that relate to extended family medicine training. Design Aggregate-level secondary data analysis based on the Canadian Post-MD Education Registry. Setting Canada. Participants All Canadian citizens and permanent residents who were registered in postgraduate family medicine training programs within Canadian faculties of medicine from 1995 to 2013. Main outcome measures Number and proportion of family medicine residents exiting 2-year and extended (third-year and above) family medicine training programs, as well as the types and numbers of extended training programs offered in 2015. Results The proportion of family medicine trainees pursuing extended training almost doubled during the study period, going from 10.9% in 1995 to 21.1% in 2013. Men and Canadian medical graduates were more likely to take extended family medicine training. Among the 5 most recent family medicine exit cohorts (from 2009 to 2013), 25.9% of men completed extended training programs compared with 18.3% of women, and 23.1% of Canadian medical graduates completed extended training compared with 13.6% of international medical graduates. Family medicine programs vary substantially with respect to the proportion of their trainees who undertake extended training, ranging from a low of 12.3% to a high of 35.1% among trainees exiting from 2011 to 2013. Conclusion New initiatives, such as the Triple C Competency-based Curriculum, CanMEDS–Family Medicine, and Certificates of Added Competence, have emerged as part of family medicine education and credentialing. In acknowledgment of the potential effect of these initiatives, it is important that future research examine how pedagogic change and, in particular, extended training shapes the care family physicians offer their patients. As part of that research it will be important to measure the breadth and uptake of

  3. Randomized Phase II trial of nintedanib, afatinib and sequential combination in castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molife, L Rhoda; Omlin, Aurelius; Jones, Rob J; Karavasilis, Vasilios; Bloomfield, David; Lumsden, Graeme; Fong, Peter C; Olmos, David; O'Sullivan, Joe M; Pedley, Ian; Hickish, Tamas; Jenkins, Peter; Thompson, Emilda; Oommen, Nikhil; Wheatley, Duncan; Heath, Catherine; Temple, Graham; Pelling, Katy; de Bono, Johann S

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this article was to evaluate afatinib (BIBW 2992), an ErbB family blocker, and nintedanib (BIBF 1120), a triple angiokinase inhibitor, in castration-resistant prostate cancer patients. Patients were randomized to receive nintedanib (250 mg twice daily), afatinib (40 mg once daily [q.d.]), or alternating sequential 7-day nintedanib (250 mg twice daily) and afatinib (70 mg q.d. [Combi70]), which was reduced to 40 mg q.d. (Combi40) due to adverse events. The primary end point was progression-free rate at 12 weeks. Of the 85 patients treated 46, 20, 16 and three received nintedanib, afatinib, Combi40 and Combi70, respectively. At 12 weeks, the progression-free rate was 26% (seven out of 27 patients) for nintedanib, and 0% for afatinib and Combi40 groups. Two patients had a ≥50% decline in PSA (nintedanib and the Combi40 groups). The most common drug-related adverse events were diarrhea, nausea, vomiting and lethargy. Nintedanib and/or afatinib demonstrated limited anti-tumor activity in unselected advanced castration-resistant prostate cancer patients.

  4. Prostate Cancer Stem-like Cells Contribute to the Development of Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane Ojo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT has been the standard care for patients with advanced prostate cancer (PC since the 1940s. Although ADT shows clear benefits for many patients, castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC inevitably occurs. In fact, with the two recent FDA-approved second-generation anti-androgens abiraterone and enzalutamide, resistance develops rapidly in patients with CRPC, despite their initial effectiveness. The lack of effective therapeutic solutions towards CRPC largely reflects our limited understanding of the underlying mechanisms responsible for CRPC development. While persistent androgen receptor (AR signaling under castration levels of serum testosterone (<50 ng/mL contributes to resistance to ADT, it is also clear that CRPC evolves via complex mechanisms. Nevertheless, the physiological impact of individual mechanisms and whether these mechanisms function in a cohesive manner in promoting CRPC are elusive. In spite of these uncertainties, emerging evidence supports a critical role of prostate cancer stem-like cells (PCSLCs in stimulating CRPC evolution and resistance to abiraterone and enzalutamide. In this review, we will discuss the recent evidence supporting the involvement of PCSLC in CRPC acquisition as well as the pathways and factors contributing to PCSLC expansion in response to ADT.

  5. [Effects of extract of Buddleja officinalis on prevention of dry eye in castrated rabbits].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Qing-Hua; Yao, Xiao-lei; Wu, Quan-long; Chen, Mei

    2008-11-01

    To assess the preventive effects of extract of Buddleja officinalis on dry eye in castrated rabbits and to discuss the mechanism of these effects. It was a experimental study. Thirty male rabbits were divided equally into normal group (A), disease group (B) and treatment group (C, D, and E). The dry eye model was established with orchiectomy (ORX) in Group B, C, D and E. Group C, D and E were gastrically perfused with single-dose or double-does of Buddleja officinalis extract or genistein for 30 days. All rabbits were examined with Schirmer I test (SIT). TGF-beta1, IL-1beta, TNF-alpha, Fas, FasL, Bax and bcl-2 were detected by immunohistochemistry. Morphological and ultrastructure changes were observed by electron microscopy. The SIT value of group C, D, E was significantly greater than that of group B (P Buddleja officinalis has a significant effect on the prevention of experimental dry eye in castrated male rabbits. The main components of extract of Buddleja officinalis are the flavonoids. The flavonoids display androgen-like activity. Therefore, it can adjust gonadal hormone level in vivo. As a result, it can inhibit local inflammation in lacrimal gland and reduce apoptosis of lacrimal gland cells.

  6. [Mechanisms of resistance to CYP17A1 inhibitors in castrate resistant prostate cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripert, T; Crouzet, S; Ploussard, G; De La Taille, A; Robert, G

    2013-10-01

    Abiraterone acetate has increased the overall survival of patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. However, despite an initial response to treatment, many patients develop resistance to the drug. In this paper we present different hypotheses that may explain the emergence of resistance. This review was conducted from the PubMed database. The most relevant articles were selected and analyzed. The molecular mechanisms of resistance to abiraterone acetate remain largely elusive. We detailed some of them including the reactivation of the androgen receptor through alternative biosynthesis of androgens, over expression or mutation of the androgen receptor gene, or the action of co-activators. The over expression of CYP17A1 or the alteration of other genes' expression involved in steroidogenesis could also contribute to the resistance. Some of the molecular mechanisms involved in the resistance to abiraterone acetate were detailed. Better understanding of these mechanisms is a key step to allow the emergence of new therapeutic options and personalized treatments of castration resistant prostate cancer. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Castration-resistant prostate cancer: many treatments, many options, many challenges ahead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Jorge A; Rini, Brian I

    2012-05-15

    Although the long natural history of prostate cancer presents challenges in the development of novel therapeutics, major contributions have been observed recently. A better understanding of the long-term complications of androgen deprivation has changed the initial approach to most patients with advanced disease. Specifically, recognition of the limitations of prostate-specific antigen has driven the pursuit of new tools capable of becoming true surrogates for disease outcome. Understanding the molecular biology of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) has led to a dramatic paradigm shift in the treatment of patients with metastatic disease where the androgen receptor becomes a central therapeutic target. Specific adrenal inhibitors and engineered super androgen receptor inhibitors have become the most promising agents in the disease. Novel immune therapies have been shown to improve survival in selected patients with castration-resistant disease despite the inability to impact traditional markers of response. Similarly, agents such as cabazitaxel and abiraterone acetate have demonstrated clinical benefit are now a standard of care in docetaxel-refractory metastatic CRPC patients. All these changes have occurred in a relatively short period and are likely to change the prostate cancer treatment paradigm. This review summarizes the current management of CRPC and discusses potential future directions. Copyright © 2011 American Cancer Society.

  8. Bilateral testicular self-castration due to cannabis abuse: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuurman-Wieringa Roos E

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The self-mutilating patient is an unusual psychiatric presentation in the emergency room. Nonetheless, serious underlying psychiatric pathology and drug abuse are important background risk factors. A careful stepwise approach in the emergency room is essential, although the prognosis, follow-up, and eventual rehabilitation can be problematic. We present a unique and original case of bilateral self-castration caused by cannabis abuse. Case Presentation We report a case of a 40-year-old Berber man, who was presented to our emergency room with externalization of both testes using his long fingernails, associated with hemodynamic shock. After stabilization of his state, our patient was admitted to the operating room where hemostasis was achieved. Conclusion The clinical characteristics of self-mutilation are manifold and there is a lack of agreement about its etiology. The complex behavior associated with drug abuse may be one cause of self-mutilation. Dysfunction of the inhibitory brain circuitry caused by substance abuse could explain why this cannabis-addicted patient lost control and self-mutilated. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report which presents an association between self-castration and cannabis abuse.

  9. [Cabazitaxel after docetaxel: a new option in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lheureux, Stéphanie; Joly, Florence

    2012-09-01

    The management of patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer is a real challenge. Indeed, after a first line chemotherapy with docetaxel, there was no standard because the treatments were ineffective. Today, several therapeutic options are available with the development of new therapies. Among them, cabazitaxel, semi-synthetic derivative of a natural taxoid, has been developed to its low recognition by the MDR system and power distribution including brain. This new chemotherapy was assessed in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer whose disease has progressed during or after docetaxel-based therapy. Treatment with cabazitaxel plus prednisone has improved overall survival of 2.4 months compared to mitoxantrone in the TROPIC phase III. However, hematologic toxicity may be limiting with a risk of febrile neutropenia; hematopoietic growth factors are advised in case of significant neutropenia. The cabazitaxel, Jevtana(®), has been approved in second line after docetaxel. Its position in relation to new types of hormone therapy, as abiraterone acetate, in the same indication requires further investigations, including predictive factors of response. Studies are on going in first line indication (compared to docetaxel) and associated to other new hormone therapies.

  10. Effect of castration and slaughter age on performance, carcass, and meat quality traits of Holstein calves fed a high-concentrate diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marti, S; Realini, C E; Bach, A; Pérez-Juan, M; Devant, M

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of castration and slaughter age on performance and meat quality of Holstein bulls fed a high-concentrate diet. A total of 132 animals (116 ± 3.7 kg of BW and 97 ± 2.4 d of age) were randomly allocated in 6 pens using a 3 × 3 factorial arrangement of treatments. Three castration ages [bulls, animals castrated at 3 mo (CAS3), and animals castrated at 8 mo of age (CAS8)] and 3 slaughter ages (10, 12, and 14 mo of age) were evaluated. Feed intake was recorded daily using a computerized concentrate feeder, and BW was recorded every 14 d. The 9th to 11th rib section was removed at 24 h postmortem and dissected into lean, fat, and bone, and meat quality was evaluated on the LM. Castration, at 3 or 8 mo of age, reduced (P slaughter age increased, concentrate consumption increased linearly (P Slaughter age also affected (P slaughter ages were also observed in carcass conformation (P slaughter age, and slaughter age affects performance and meat pH independently of castration. However, in Holstein animals, castration affects several characteristics related to fat deposition differently depending on slaughter age, such as carcass fat cover and intramuscular, intermuscular, and subcutaneous fat.

  11. The behavioral assessment and alleviation of pain associated with castration in beef calves treated with flunixin meglumine and caudal lidocaine epidural anesthesia with epinephrine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currah, Jan M.; Hendrick, Steven H.; Stookey, Joseph M.

    2009-01-01

    The objectives of this study were 1) to determine the effects of flunixin megulmine in combination with caudal epidural anesthesia as a postoperative analgesic in beef calves following surgical castration, and 2) to consider stride length and pedometry as potential behavioral assessment tools for detecting postcastration pain. Surgical castration was performed in 101 beef calves randomly assigned to 3 treatment subgroups: 1) castration without anesthesia (SURG); 2) castration following lidocaine with epinephrine caudal epidural anesthesia (SURG + EPI); 3) castration following lidocaine with epinephrine caudal epidural anesthesia and flunixin meglumine (SURG + EPI + F). Several outcomes, including pedometer counts, changes in stride length, subjective visual assessment of pain, instantaneous scan sampling of the calves’ postoperative activities, and the amount of movement and vocalization during the castration procedure, were measured to identify and quantify pain. The results indicated that stride length and the number of steps taken by calves after castration appear to be good measures of pain. Significant differences found between treatment groups for stride length and visual assessments suggest that flunixin meglumine can be considered to provide visible pain relief up to 8 hours postcastration. PMID:19436444

  12. Disease Progression/Clinical Outcome Model for Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer in Patients Treated with Eribulin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Hasselt, J. G C; Gupta, A.; Hussein, Z.; Beijnen, J. H.; Schellens, J. H M; Huitema, A. D R

    2015-01-01

    Frameworks that associate cancer dynamic disease progression models with parametric survival models for clinical outcome have recently been proposed to support decision making in early clinical development. Here we developed such a disease progression clinical outcome model for castration-resistant

  13. Intratesticular and subcutaneous lidocaine alters the intraoperative haemodynamic responses and heart rate variability in male cats undergoing castration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moldal, E.R.; Eriksen, T.; Kirpensteijn, J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/189846992; Nødtvedt, A.; Kristensen, A.T.; Sparta, F.M.; Haga, H.A.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the usefulness of intratesticular and subcutaneous lidocaine in alleviating the intraoperative nociceptive response to castration, measured by pulse rate (PR) and mean arterial pressure (MAP), and to test the applicability of heart rate variability (HRV) analysis in

  14. Sipuleucel-T: Autologous Cellular Immunotherapy for Men with Asymptomatic or Minimally Symptomatic Metastatic Castrate Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert B. Sims

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Sipuleucel T is an autologous cellular immunotherapy designed to stimulate an immune response in men diagnosed with asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic metastatic castrate resistant (hormone refractory prostate cancer. Sipuleucel T improves overall survival and provides an additional treatment option for this patient population.

  15. Gender Differences in the Anatomy of the Perineal Glands in Guinea Pigs and the Effect of Castration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iburg, T. M.; Arnbjerg, J.; Ruelokke, M. L.

    2013-01-01

    Perineal glands in guinea pigs are part of the sebaceous glandular complex. Their secretions are used for scent marking. This is important for social status and can be seen in both sexes and castrated males. Discrepancy exits about the existence of these glands in female guinea pigs and knowledge...

  16. Development of a New Class of Drugs to Inhibit All Forms of Androgen Receptor in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    western blot analysis with antibodies specific to AR and histone H3 (chromatin fraction control). 10 Key...Prostate Cancers PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATORS: Paul Rennie, Vancouver Prostate Centre CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: University of British Columbia Vancouver...of Drugs to Inhibit All Forms of Androgen Receptor in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancers 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14- 1-0519 5c. PROGRAM

  17. Enzalutamide as a Fourth- or Fifth-Line Treatment Option for Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Badrising, S.K.; Noort, V van; Hamberg, P.; Coenen, J.L.; Aarts, M.J.; Oort, I.M. van; Eertwegh, A.J. van den; Los, M.; Berg, H.P. van den; Gelderblom, H.; Vrijaldenhoven, S.; Kerver, E.D.; Voorthuizen, T. van; Jong, I.J. de; Haanen, J.B.; Bergman, A.M.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the efficacy of enzalutamide (Enz) as fourth- or fifth-line treatment in men with metastasized castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), by analyzing a retrospective cohort of heavily pretreated patients. METHODS: We evaluated toxicity, overall survival (OS),

  18. Enzalutamide as a Fourth- or Fifth-Line Treatment Option for Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Badrising, Sushil K.; van der Noort, Vincent; Hamberg, Paul; Coenen, Jules L. L. M.; Aarts, Maureen J.; van Oort, Inge M.; van den Eertwegh, Alfons J. M.; Los, Maartje; van den Berg, H. Pieter; Gelderblom, Hans; Vrijaldenhoven, Suzan; Kerver, Emile D.; van Voorthuizen, Theo; de Jong, Igle J.; Haanen, John B.; Bergman, Andries M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of enzalutamide (Enz) as fourth- or fifth-line treatment in men with metastasized castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), by analyzing a retrospective cohort of heavily pretreated patients. Methods: We evaluated toxicity, overall survival (OS),

  19. Cabazitaxel in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: results of a compassionate use program in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wissing, M.D.; Oort, I.M. van; Gerritsen, W.R.; Eertwegh, A.J. van den; Coenen, J.L.; Bergman, A.M.; Gelderblom, H.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cabazitaxel has been reimbursed as a second-line therapy for patients with metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) in the Netherlands since 2011. Before reimbursement was available, cabazitaxel was provided through a Compassionate Use Program (CUP). We report the results of

  20. Cabazitaxel as second-line or third-line therapy in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsted, Per; Svane, Inge M; Lindberg, Henriette

    2016-01-01

    To compare treatment outcomes in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer treated with cabazitaxel (CA) as second-line or third-line therapy in the everyday clinical setting. Charts from 94 patients treated with CA as second-line (n=28) or third-line therapy (n=66) were evalu...

  1. Rational extended thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Müller, Ingo

    1998-01-01

    Ordinary thermodynamics provides reliable results when the thermodynamic fields are smooth, in the sense that there are no steep gradients and no rapid changes. In fluids and gases this is the domain of the equations of Navier-Stokes and Fourier. Extended thermodynamics becomes relevant for rapidly varying and strongly inhomogeneous processes. Thus the propagation of high­ frequency waves, and the shape of shock waves, and the regression of small-scale fluctuation are governed by extended thermodynamics. The field equations of ordinary thermodynamics are parabolic while extended thermodynamics is governed by hyperbolic systems. The main ingredients of extended thermodynamics are • field equations of balance type, • constitutive quantities depending on the present local state and • entropy as a concave function of the state variables. This set of assumptions leads to first order quasi-linear symmetric hyperbolic systems of field equations; it guarantees the well-posedness of initial value problems and f...

  2. Extended defects in Germanium

    CERN Document Server

    Osgood, R M

    2008-01-01

    Intends to provide a fundamental understanding of the extended-defect formation during Ge materials and device processing, providing ways to distinguish harmful from less detrimental defects and should point out ways for defect engineering and control.

  3. Review of Four Years of Literature (1985, 1986, 1987 and 1988) for the Physiological and Psychological Effects of the Nuclear/Biological/Chemical and Extended Operations on Soldier Performance Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-12-30

    APPROACH FOR THE SELECTION OF CHEMICAL WARFARE AGENT SIMULANTS DATA SOURCE NO: CRDC-TR-84044 ADB089651 AUTHOR: G.R. FAMINI , P.A. COON ORIGINATING ORG...RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT CENTER (CRDC), ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, MD, MARCH 1985 FAMINI , G.R., AND COON, P.A., A SYSTEMATIC MATHEMATICAL APPROACH FOR

  4. Photoperiodic regulation of body mass, food intake, hibernation, and reproduction in intact and castrated male European hamsters, Cricetus cricetus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canguilhem, B; Vaultier, J P; Pévet, P; Coumaros, G; Masson-Pévet, M; Bentz, I

    1988-08-01

    A group of sexually active male European hamsters were raised either in short-photoperiod conditions (SP; LD 8:16) or in long-photoperiod conditions (LP; LD 16:8) from their capture at the end of the hibernation period. Another group of hamsters was castrated in April and gonadectomized animals were maintained in SP and cold (7 degrees C) or in a succession of SP and LP plus cold. Another group, castrated in May or in September and raised in LP conditions, was transferred in September to SP conditions and cold. 1. Normal hamsters raised in continuous SP or LP apparently did not show signs of rhythmic behavior, except possibly in gonadal activity. 2. Body weight increased continuously, plasma testosterone levels oscillated between 1.5 and 2.5 ng/ml, and animals raised in SP and in cold did not enter hibernation. 3. Similar results were also found in castrated animals kept in SP conditions and cold. 4. The sequence LP-SP induced a decrease in food intake and body weight and a decrease in plasma testosterone levels and triggered entry into hibernation in both intact and castrated animals. 5. After 6 months continuously in SP and with exposure to cold spontaneous recrudescence in food intake and body weight occurred and hibernation ended in both intact and castrated animals. 6. In normal animals a spontaneous increase in plasma testosterone levels was observed. 7. In both normal and gonadectomized animals the phase of refractoriness could be broken by exposure to LP conditions. 8. The critical photoperiod lies between 15 and 15.5 h. These results demonstrate that the European hamster is a photoperiodic species.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Synergistic antitumor activities of docetaxel and octreotide associated with apoptotic-upregulation in castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sha Zhu

    Full Text Available Androgen deprivation therapy has become the fist-line treatment of metastatic prostate cancer; however, progression to castrate resistance disease occurs in the majority of patients. Thus, there is an urgent need for improvements in therapy for castration-resistant prostate cancer. The aims of the present study were to determine the efficacy somatostatin analogue octreotide (OCT combined with a low dose of docetaxel (DTX using castration resistant prostate cancer cells and to investigate the involved molecular mechanisms in vitro. The anti-proliferative and synergism potential effects were determined by MTT assay. Induction of apoptosis was analyzed employing annexing V and propidium iodide staining and flow cytometry. VEGFA, CASP9, CASP3 and ABCB1 gene expression was evaluated by RT-PCR and Q-RT-PCR analysis. OCT in combination with DTX treatments on DU145 cell migration was also evaluated. Investigation revealed that combined administration of DTX and OCT had significant, synergistically greater cytotoxicity than DTX or OCT treatment alone. The combination of the two drugs caused a more marked increase in apoptosis and resulted in greater suppression of invasive potential than either individual agent. There was obvious increase in caspase 3 expression in the OCT alone and two-drug combined treatment groups, however, VEGFA expression was markedly suppressed in them. These results support the conclusion that somatostatin analogues combined with docetaxel may enhance the chemotherapy efficacies through multiple mechanisms in castration-resistant PCa cell line. This work provides a preclinical rationale for the therapeutic strategies to improve the treatment in castrate resistance disease.

  6. Lycopene Enhances Docetaxel's Effect in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer Associated with Insulin-like Growth Factor I Receptor Levels1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yaxiong; Parmakhtiar, Basmina; Simoneau, Anne R; Xie, Jun; Fruehauf, John; Lilly, Michael; Zi, Xiaolin

    2011-01-01

    Docetaxel is currently the most effective drug for the treatment of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), but it only extends life by an average of 2 months. Lycopene, an antioxidant phytochemical, has antitumor activity against prostate cancer (PCa) in several models and is generally safe. We present data on the interaction between docetaxel and lycopene in CRPC models. The growth-inhibitory effect of lycopene on PCa cell lines was positively associated with insulin-like growth factor I receptor (IGF-IR) levels. In addition, lycopene treatment enhanced the growth-inhibitory effect of docetaxel more effectively on DU145 cells with IGF-IR high expression than on those PCa cell lines with IGF-IR low expression. In a DU145 xenograft tumor model, docetaxel plus lycopene caused tumor regression, with a 38% increase in antitumor efficacy (P = .047) when compared with docetaxel alone. Lycopene inhibited IGF-IR activation through inhibiting IGF-I stimulation and by increasing the expression and secretion of IGF-BP3. Downstream effects include inhibition of AKT kinase activity and survivin expression, followed by apoptosis. Together, the enhancement of docetaxel's antitumor efficacy by lycopene supplementation justifies further clinical investigation of lycopene and docetaxel combination for CRPC patients. CRPC patients with IGF-IR-overexpressing tumors may be most likely to benefit from this combination. PMID:21403837

  7. Alfaxalone for maintenance of anaesthesia in ponies undergoing field castration: continuous infusion compared with intravenous boluses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Julia; Ekiri, Abel; de Vries, Annemarie

    2017-07-01

    To compare alfaxalone as continuous intravenous (IV) infusion with intermittent IV injections for maintenance of anaesthesia in ponies undergoing castration. Prospective, randomized, 'blinded' clinical study. A group of 33 entire male Welsh ponies undergoing field castration. After preanaesthetic medication with IV detomidine (10 μg kg-1) and butorphanol (0.05 mg kg-1), anaesthesia was induced with IV diazepam (0.05 mg kg-1) followed by alfaxalone (1 mg kg-1). After random allocation, anaesthesia was maintained with either IV alfaxalone 2 mg kg-1 hour-1 (group A; n = 16) or saline administered at equal volume (group S; n = 17). When necessary, additional alfaxalone (0.2 mg kg-1) was administered IV. Ponies were breathing room air. Using simple descriptive scales, surgical conditions and anaesthesia recovery were scored. Total amount of alfaxalone, ponies requiring additional alfaxalone and time to administration, time from induction to end of infusion and end of infusion to standing were noted. Indirect arterial blood pressure, pulse and respiratory rates, end-expiratory carbon dioxide partial pressure and arterial haemoglobin oxygen saturation were recorded every 5 minutes. Data were analysed using Student t, Mann-Whitney U and chi-square tests, where appropriate (p < 0.05). Total amount of alfaxalone administered after induction of anaesthesia (0.75 ± 0.27 versus 0.17 ± 0.23 mg kg-1; p < 0.0001) and time to standing (14.8 ± 4 versus 11.6 ± 4 minutes; p = 0.044) were higher in group A compared to group S. Ponies requiring additional alfaxalone boluses [four (group A) versus seven (group S)] and other measured variables were similar between groups; five ponies required oxygen supplementation [three (group A) versus two (group S)]. Continuous IV infusion and intermittent administration of alfaxalone provided similar anaesthesia quality and surgical conditions in ponies undergoing field castration. Less alfaxalone is required

  8. Drug costs in the management of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragomir, Alice; Dinea, Daniela; Vanhuyse, Marie; Cury, Fabio L; Aprikian, Armen G

    2014-06-13

    For Canadian men, prostate cancer (PCa) is the most common cancer and the 3rd leading cause of cancer mortality. Men dying of PCa do so after failing castration. The management of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) is complex and the associated drug treatments are increasingly costly. The objective of this study was to estimate the cost of drug treatments over the mCRPC period, in the context of the latest evidence-based approaches. Two Markov models with Monte-Carlo microsimulations were developed in order to simulate the management of the disease and to estimate the cost of drug treatments in mCRPC, as per Quebec's public healthcare system. The models include recently approved additional lines of treatment after or before docetaxel (i.e. abiraterone and cabazitaxel). Drug exposure and survival were based on clinical trial results and clinical practice guidelines found in a literature review. All costs were assigned in 2013 Canadian dollars ($). Only direct drug costs were estimated. The mean cost of mCRPC drug treatments over an average period of 28.1 months was estimated at $48,428 per patient (95% Confidence Interval: $47,624 to $49,232). The mean cost increased to $104,071 (95% CI: $102,373 - $105,770) per patient when one includes abiraterone initiation prior to docetaxel therapy. Over the mCRPC period, luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonists (LHRHa) prescribed to maintain castrate testosterone levels accounted for 20.4% of the total medication cost, whereas denosumab prescribed to decrease bone-related events accounted for 30.5% of costs. When patients received cabazitaxel in sequence after abiraterone and docetaxel, the mCRPC medications cost per patient per month increased by 60.2%. The total cost of medications for the treatment of each annual Canadian cohort of 4,000 mCRPC patients was estimated at $ 193.6 million to $416.3 million. Our study estimates the direct drug costs associated with mCRPC treatments in the Canadian

  9. Subgroups of Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer Bone Metastases Defined Through an Inverse Relationship Between Androgen Receptor Activity and Immune Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ylitalo, Erik Bovinder; Thysell, Elin; Jernberg, Emma; Lundholm, Marie; Crnalic, Sead; Egevad, Lars; Stattin, Pär; Widmark, Anders; Bergh, Anders; Wikström, Pernilla

    2017-05-01

    Novel therapies for men with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) are needed, particularly for cancers not driven by androgen receptor (AR) activation. To identify molecular subgroups of PC bone metastases of relevance for therapy. Fresh-frozen bone metastasis samples from men with CRPC (n=40), treatment-naïve PC (n=8), or other malignancies (n=12) were characterized using whole-genome expression profiling, multivariate principal component analysis (PCA), and functional enrichment analysis. Expression profiles were verified by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in an extended set of bone metastases (n=77) and compared to levels in malignant and adjacent benign prostate tissue from patients with localized disease (n=12). Selected proteins were evaluated using immunohistochemistry. A cohort of PC patients (n=284) diagnosed at transurethral resection with long follow-up was used for prognostic evaluation. The majority of CRPC bone metastases (80%) was defined as AR-driven based on PCA analysis and high expression of the AR, AR co-regulators (FOXA1, HOXB13), and AR-regulated genes (KLK2, KLK3, NKX3.1, STEAP2, TMPRSS2); 20% were non-AR-driven. Functional enrichment analysis indicated high metabolic activity and low immune responses in AR-driven metastases. Accordingly, infiltration of CD3(+) and CD68(+) cells was lower in AR-driven than in non-AR-driven metastases, and tumor cell HLA class I ABC immunoreactivity was inversely correlated with nuclear AR immunoreactivity. RT-PCR analysis showed low MHC class I expression (HLA-A, TAP1, and PSMB9 mRNA) in PC bone metastases compared to benign and malignant prostate tissue and bone metastases of other origins. In primary PC, low HLA class I ABC immunoreactivity was associated with high Gleason score, bone metastasis, and short cancer-specific survival. Limitations include the limited number of patients studied and the single metastasis sample studied per patient. Most CRPC bone metastases show

  10. An extended day program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ševkušić-Mandić Slavica G.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of a pilot project evaluation, carried out as an action investigation whose aim was to provide a better quality extended day for primary school students. The project included the training of teachers involved in extended day program, designing of special activities performed by teachers with children once a week as well as changes and equipping of premises where children stay. The aims of the program were conception and performance of activities in a less formal way than during regular instructional days, linking of learning at school and acquired knowledge to everyday experiences, and work on contents contributing to the development of child's interests and creativity. The program was accomplished in a Belgrade primary school during the 2001/2002 academic year, comprising students of 1st and 2nd grades (N=77. The effects of the program were monitored throughout the academic year (observation and teachers' reports on accomplished workshops and at the end of the academic year (teachers and students' opinions of the program, academic achievement and creativity of students attending the extended day program compared with students not attending it. Findings about positive effects of the program on students' broadening of interests and willingness to express themselves creatively, indicate unequivocally that there is a need for developing special extended day programs. The extended day program is an opportunity for school to exert greater educational influence that has yet to be tapped.

  11. Extended spider cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Japyassú, Hilton F; Laland, Kevin N

    2017-05-01

    There is a tension between the conception of cognition as a central nervous system (CNS) process and a view of cognition as extending towards the body or the contiguous environment. The centralised conception requires large or complex nervous systems to cope with complex environments. Conversely, the extended conception involves the outsourcing of information processing to the body or environment, thus making fewer demands on the processing power of the CNS. The evolution of extended cognition should be particularly favoured among small, generalist predators such as spiders, and here, we review the literature to evaluate the fit of empirical data with these contrasting models of cognition. Spiders do not seem to be cognitively limited, displaying a large diversity of learning processes, from habituation to contextual learning, including a sense of numerosity. To tease apart the central from the extended cognition, we apply the mutual manipulability criterion, testing the existence of reciprocal causal links between the putative elements of the system. We conclude that the web threads and configurations are integral parts of the cognitive systems. The extension of cognition to the web helps to explain some puzzling features of spider behaviour and seems to promote evolvability within the group, enhancing innovation through cognitive connectivity to variable habitat features. Graded changes in relative brain size could also be explained by outsourcing information processing to environmental features. More generally, niche-constructed structures emerge as prime candidates for extending animal cognition, generating the selective pressures that help to shape the evolving cognitive system.

  12. Extending quantum mechanics entails extending special relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aravinda, S.; Srikanth, R.

    2016-05-01

    The complementarity between signaling and randomness in any communicated resource that can simulate singlet statistics is generalized by relaxing the assumption of free will in the choice of measurement settings. We show how to construct an ontological extension for quantum mechanics (QMs) through the oblivious embedding of a sound simulation protocol in a Newtonian spacetime. Minkowski or other intermediate spacetimes are ruled out as the locus of the embedding by virtue of hidden influence inequalities. The complementarity transferred from a simulation to the extension unifies a number of results about quantum non-locality, and implies that special relativity has a different significance for the ontological model and for the operational theory it reproduces. Only the latter, being experimentally accessible, is required to be Lorentz covariant. There may be certain Lorentz non-covariant elements at the ontological level, but they will be inaccessible at the operational level in a valid extension. Certain arguments against the extendability of QM, due to Conway and Kochen (2009) and Colbeck and Renner (2012), are attributed to their assumption that the spacetime at the ontological level has Minkowski causal structure.

  13. Interdisciplinary critique of sipuleucel-T as immunotherapy in castration-resistant prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huber, Marie L; Haynes, Laura; Parker, Chris

    2012-01-01

    Sipuleucel-T was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration on April 29, 2010, as an immunotherapy for late-stage prostate cancer. To manufacture sipuleucel-T, mononuclear cells harvested from the patient are incubated with a recombinant prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) antigen and reinfused....... The manufacturer proposes that antigen-presenting cells exogenously activated by PAP induce endogenous T-cells to attack PAP-bearing prostate cancer cells. However, the lack of demonstrable tumor responses has prompted calls for scrutiny of the design of the trials in which sipuleucel-T demonstrated a 4-month...... survival benefit. Previously unpublished data from the sipuleucel-T trials show worse overall survival in older vs younger patients in the placebo groups, which have not been shown previously to be prognostic for survival in castration-resistant prostate cancer patients receiving chemotherapy. Because two...

  14. Dendritic cell vaccination in combination with docetaxel for patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsted, Per; Borch, Troels Holz; Ellebaek, Eva

    2017-01-01

    Background aims  We investigated whether the addition of an autologous dendritic cell–based cancer vaccine (DCvac) induces an immune response in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer treated with docetaxel.  Methods  Forty-three patients were randomized 1:1 to receive up...... twice through treatment cycles 1–4 and once through treatment cycles 5–10. Immune cell composition and antigen-specific responses were analyzed using flow cytometry, ELISpot and delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) tests. Toxicity was graded according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events...... to local reactions. Decline in myeloid-derived suppressor cells at the third treatment cycle was found to be an independent predictor of DSS.  Conclusions  The addition of DCvac was safe. Immune responses were detected in approximately half of the patients investigated....

  15. Enzalutamide Antitumour Activity Against Metastatic Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer Previously Treated with Docetaxel and Abiraterone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brasso, Klaus; Thomsen, Frederik B; Schrader, Andres J

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The degree of antitumour activity of enzalutamide following disease progression on docetaxel and abiraterone remains controversial. OBJECTIVE: To examine the effect of enzalutamide in patients progressing following taxane-based chemotherapy and abiraterone. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTIC......BACKGROUND: The degree of antitumour activity of enzalutamide following disease progression on docetaxel and abiraterone remains controversial. OBJECTIVE: To examine the effect of enzalutamide in patients progressing following taxane-based chemotherapy and abiraterone. DESIGN, SETTING......, AND PARTICIPANTS: Metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer patients entering one of four European compassionate use programmes of enzalutamide. OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS AND STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: The primary end point was overall survival (OS). Secondary end points were association between OS and posttreatment...

  16. Intermittent docetaxel chemotherapy as first-line treatment for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffo, Orazio; Lo Re, Giovanni; Sava, Teodoro; Buti, Sebastiano; Sacco, Cosimo; Basso, Umberto; Zustovich, Fable; Lodde, Michele; Perin, Alessandra; Facchini, Gaetano; Veccia, Antonello; Maines, Francesca; Barile, Carmen; Fratino, Lucia; Gernone, Angela; De Vivo, Rocco; Pappagallo, Giovanni L; Galligioni, Enzo

    2015-01-01

    The intermittent administration of chemotherapy is a means of preserving patients' quality of life (QL). The aim of this study was to verify whether the intermittent administration of docetaxel (DOC) improves the patients' QL. All patients received DOC 70 mg/m(2) every 3 weeks for eight cycles. The patients were randomized to receive DOC continuously or with a fixed 3-month interval after the first four DOC courses. The study involved 148 patients. There was no difference in QL between the groups receiving intermittent or continuous treatment. Intermittence had no detrimental effects on disease control. Although feasible and not detrimental, our results showed that true intermittent chemotherapy in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer patients failed to improve the patients' QL.

  17. Radiographic progression with nonrising PSA in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bryce, A H; Alumkal, J J; Armstrong, A

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Advanced prostate cancer is a phenotypically diverse disease that evolves through multiple clinical courses. PSA level is the most widely used parameter for disease monitoring, but it has well-recognized limitations. Unlike in clinical trials, in practice, clinicians may rely on PSA...... monitoring alone to determine disease status on therapy. This approach has not been adequately tested. METHODS: Chemotherapy-naive asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic men (n=872) with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) who were treated with the androgen receptor inhibitor enzalutamide...... treated with enzalutamide. As restaging in advanced prostate cancer patients is often guided by increases in PSA levels, our results demonstrate that disease progression on enzalutamide can occur without rising PSA levels. Therefore, a disease monitoring strategy that includes imaging not entirely reliant...

  18. Radium-223 therapy of advanced metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fosbøl, Marie Øbro; Petersen, Peter Meidahl; Kjaer, Andreas

    2018-01-01

    ratio 2.65 [95% CI: 1.5-4.71];P= 0.001). Likewise, baseline BSI was prognostic for occurrence of hematological toxicity and patients with BSI > 5 had an odds ratio of 3.02 (95% CI: 1.2-7.8;P= 0.02) for toxicity. BSI declined during therapy in 44% of patients who completed three cycles of223RaCl2(n= 52......Aim: To investigate the prognostic value of quantitative assessment of skeletal tumor burden on bone scintigraphy (Bone Scan Index) in patients with advanced metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) receiving Radium-223-dichloride (223RaCl2). We hypothesize that Bone Scan Index (BSI...

  19. Radium-223 dichloride for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: the urologist's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shore, Neal D

    2015-04-01

    Radium-223 dichloride (radium-223) is an important therapeutic option for the treatment of patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer, symptomatic bone metastases, and no visceral disease. The unique mechanism of action of this first-in-class alpha-emitting radiopharmaceutical underlies its favorable safety profile and low incidence of myelosuppression. In the pivotal phase 3 ALpharadin in SYMptomatic Prostate CAncer Patients study, radium-223 reduced the risk of death by 30% and prolonged time to first symptomatic skeletal event by 5.8 months. This article summarizes current guidelines and clinical studies that led to the approval of radium-223 as an overall survival therapy, and discusses the urologist's perspective on using radium-223 in clinical practice. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Current paradigms and Evolving concepts in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Sumanta Kumar; Sartor, Oliver

    2011-01-01

    Until recently, docetaxel-based therapy represented the only therapy shown to prolong survival in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). The past year and a half has been marked by unprecedented progress in treatments for this disease. Three positive phase III clinical trials have emerged, each evaluating agents (sipuleucel-T, cabazitaxel and abiraterone) with distinct mechanisms of action. Herein, the three pivotal trials are described alongside both past and current large phase III studies conducted in this mCRPC. The overall survival for patients with mCRPC treated in current clinical trials is considerably longer than noted in the past. We note that more recent trials with older agents have also shown improved survival and discuss potential non-therapeutic biases that influence this critical measure of outcome. The necessity for utilizing randomized trials when evaluating new therapeutics is emphasized given the changing prognosis in this mCRPC. PMID:21602834

  1. Cabazitaxel for Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer: Retrospective Data Analysis from an Indian Centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noronha, Vanita; Joshi, Amit; Muddu, Vamshi Krishna; Maruti Patil, Vijay; Prabhash, Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the efficacy and safety of cabazitaxel in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) patients from the named patient programme (NPP) at our centre. Methods: mCRPC patients who progressed on docetaxel were given cabazitaxel intravenously every 3 weeks until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity occurred. Overall survival, progression-free survival, prostate-specific antigen response, quality of life (QOL) changes, and safety were reported. Results: Nine men received cabazitaxel (median: 7 cycles; range: 1-27) under the NPP and were followed until death. Median survival was 14.07 months (1.07-23.80) and progression-free survival was 2.67 months (1.07-20.27). QOL was stable for most patients. Common adverse events (grade ≥3) were neutropenia (n = 8), anaemia (n = 4), and leucopenia (n = 4). Conclusion: These data from 9 patients are consistent with the results reported in the TROPIC study with a manageable safety profile.

  2. CURRENT POSSIBILITIES OF DRUG THERAPY FOR CASTRATION-RESISTANT PROSTATE CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Markova

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The advent of a variety of new drugs to treat castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC, which have demonstrated their efficacy in increasing overall and progression-free survival, has considerably enhanced treatment possibilities in this category of patients. The standard treatment of metastatic CRPC (mCRPC remains to be first-line chemotherapy with docetaxel 75 mg/m2 in combination with prednisolone 10 mg/day every 3 weeks. The new drugs also available in Russia are cabazitaxel and abiraterone acetate, which are approved for second-line treatment in mCRPC patients treated with docetaxel. The optimum sequence of therapy and the time of its use in view of the heterogeneity of a CRPC patient population remain open.

  3. Recent advances in the therapy of castration-resistant prostate cancer: The price of progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasani, Dhwanishiva; Josephson, David Y.; Carmichael, Courtney; Sartor, Oliver; Pal, Sumanta Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Within the past two years, three agents have garnered approval from the US FDA for the specific treatment of metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) – (1) abiraterone, (2) cabazitaxel and (3) sipuleucel-T. In separate phase III studies, each agent led to an improvement in overall survival (OS) of 2–4 months over a suitable comparator. With these costly therapies all having potential application in the patient with mCRPC, multiple entities (industry, government, and the general public) must strategize to determine how the cost burden of these agents can be balanced with the potential gains for the individual patient. Herein, we provide a framework with which to approach this dilemma. PMID:21831545

  4. CURRENT POSSIBILITIES OF DRUG THERAPY FOR CASTRATION-RESISTANT PROSTATE CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Markova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The advent of a variety of new drugs to treat castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC, which have demonstrated their efficacy in increasing overall and progression-free survival, has considerably enhanced treatment possibilities in this category of patients. The standard treatment of metastatic CRPC (mCRPC remains to be first-line chemotherapy with docetaxel 75 mg/m2 in combination with prednisolone 10 mg/day every 3 weeks. The new drugs also available in Russia are cabazitaxel and abiraterone acetate, which are approved for second-line treatment in mCRPC patients treated with docetaxel. The optimum sequence of therapy and the time of its use in view of the heterogeneity of a CRPC patient population remain open.

  5. Cabazitaxel in the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: patient selection and special considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sheel A; Hoffman-Censits, Jean

    2017-01-01

    Cabazitaxel is an effective chemotherapeutic agent used in the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) refractory to docetaxel. With the advent of new antiandrogen therapies, immune-based treatments, and radioactive-targeted therapy, there are now multiple effective and approved agents for this disease state. The optimal sequencing of these agents is unclear as there are no large-scale head-to-head comparisons. Clinicians must familiarize themselves with the most recent studies as well as drug toxicities to determine the best treatment option for their patients. In this review, we focus on the development of cabazitaxel for mCRPC, evaluate its efficacy, and highlight key strategies for toxicity management. Additionally, we summarize the studies that address cabazitaxel treatment sequencing and optimal dosing schedule.

  6. Challenges to improved therapeutics for metastatic castrate resistant prostate cancer: from recent successes and failures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Xuan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC carry poor prognosis despite the use of docetaxel-based regimens which has modest survival benefit shown by randomized clinical trials. Significant progress in the discovery of novel therapeutic agents has been made in the past few years. While sipuleucel-T, cabazitaxel, and abiraterone gained regulatory approval in 2010 and 2011, several highly promising candidates/regimens have failed in large scale clinical trials. Challenges remain to optimize the design and interpretation of clinical trial results and develop more effective strategies for mCRPC. In this review, we examined the positive and negative clinical trials in mCRPC in the past and discussed the various aspects of clinical trial design including selection of targets and appropriate outcome measures, biomarker development and implementation, and strategies for combination therapy.

  7. Headache Caused by Brain Metastases of Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer during Cabazitaxel Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Keitaro; Kosaka, Takeo; Hongo, Hiroshi; Tamaki, Satoshi; Oya, Mototsugu

    2017-04-07

    We describe the case of a 55-year-old man who underwent four cycles of cabazitaxel therapy for castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). After the fourth cycle of cabazitaxel, the patient experienced severe headaches. Brain gadolinium (Gd) contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed multiple brain metastases. A few days later, the patient suffered impaired consciousness that progressed rapidly. The patient was treated for the symptoms of increased intracranial pressure and underwent whole-brain radiation. One month later, the patient's consciousness level and headache had improved. Although brain metastases of prostate cancer are rare, the possibility of brain metastases should be considered for prostate cancer patients, especially when a CRPC patient complains of headache. Additionally, even if major conditions such as cerebral hemorrhage are excluded by the use of non-contrast-enhanced computed tomography, brain Gd contrast-enhanced MRI should be performed in consideration of the possibility of brain metastases of prostate cancer.

  8. Beyond ten cycles of cabazitaxel for castrate-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noronha, V; Joshi, A; Prabhash, K

    2014-01-01

    Background: There are limited data regarding cabazitaxel use beyond 10 cycles. Patients and Methods: Retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data of patients with metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer who received over 10 cycles of cabazitaxel after docetaxel failure. Results: Four patients received between 14 and 27 cycles. Reasons for stopping cabazitaxel were toxicity (2), progression (1) and logistics (1). Two of the three patients with measurable disease attained a partial remission (PR). Three patients continued to have a PSA response after 10 cycles; PSA nadir occurred between 17 and 23 cycles. Other than peripheral neuropathy (PN), all the cabazitaxel-related toxicities occurred after the initial cycles and did not increase cumulatively. Clinically significant neuropathy occurred after 15-17 cycles. The cabazitaxel-induced PN was partially reversible, with improvement from grade 3 to grade 2 after a 3-5-month long drug holiday. Conclusion: Cautiously continuing cabazitaxel until progression or intolerable toxicity may maximize efficacy.

  9. [Metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer : Use of cabazitaxel taking into consideration current data].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gschwend, J E; Albers, P; Bögemann, M; Goebell, P; Heidenreich, A; Klier, J; König, F; Machtens, S; Pantel, K; Thomas, C

    2017-10-25

    At the 2016 ASCO annual meeting, new data from two randomized phase III studies concerning taxane-based chemotherapy as a treatment option for patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) were presented. The focus is on the clinical impact of these data. A group of German experts in the field of urogenital-oncologic expertise discussed the clinical impact with respect to the current data. The study results support the current clinical data. They confirm the efficacy and safety of cabazitaxel beyond first-line therapy with docetaxel for patients with mCRPC. Cabazitaxel is an important treatment option after docetaxel progression. With respect to the performance status of a patient, it is adequate to reduce the dosage to 20 mg/m2 cabazitaxel.

  10. Reactive oxygen species induction by cabazitaxel through inhibiting Sestrin-3 in castration resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosaka, Takeo; Hongo, Hiroshi; Miyazaki, Yasumasa; Nishimoto, Koshiro; Miyajima, Akira; Oya, Mototsugu

    2017-10-20

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production induced by taxanes in cancer cells may influence the taxane-induced cell death or the drug resistance. We investigated the correlation between the cytotoxic effect of taxanes and ROS production in human castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) cell lines. Three human prostate cancer cell lines were treated with increasing concentrations of docetaxel or cabazitaxel in vitro. Cabazitaxel showed significantly higher cytotoxic efficacy than docetaxel in human CRPC cells, accompanied by elevated ROS production detected by FACS analysis. To investigate whether cabazitaxel-mediated cell death was caused by the ROS generation induced by cabazitaxel, we treated CRPC cells in the presence of antioxidant NAC. NAC reduced the cytotoxic effect induced by cabazitaxel. We found that ROS elimination by Sestrin-3 (SESN3) was significantly inhibited by cabazitaxel, but not by docetaxel. These results indicate higher sensitivity of human CRPC to cabazitaxel compared to docetaxel involves ROS production through inhibiting the expression of antioxidant enzyme SESN3.

  11. Management of Docetaxel Failures in Metastatic Castrate-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Sumanta K.; Lewis, Brian; Sartor, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    SYNOPSIS The treatment of metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) has evolved markedly since the approval of docetaxel-based therapy in 2004. Since that time, 3 distinct agents have gained approval for use in the mCRPC setting, namely sipuleucel-T, cabazitaxel and abiraterone. Even more recently, phase III trials have demonstrated a survival benefit in association with the agents MDV-3100 and radium-223, and FDA approval is anticipated for both of these agents. Although these changes undoubtedly represent progress for the patient with mCRPC, for the practicing physician there is the additional challenge of determining the optimal sequencing for each of these agents. This dilemma is particularly relevant to the post-docetaxel setting, where the indication for several of these agents overlap. Herein, we provide the physician with detailed background on the efficacy and safety of these agents so as to provide a framework for their use in the clinic. PMID:23084533

  12. [Salvage therapy for castration-refractory prostate cancer resistant to docetaxel].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, Tatsuya; Sugiyama, Takayuki; Furuse, Hiroshi; Yajima, Takashi; Suzuki, Takahisa; Kai, Fumitake; Nagata, Masao; Otsuka, Atsushi; Ishii, Yasuo; Ozono, Seiichiro

    2013-11-01

    To evaluate the treatment for castration-refractory prostate cancer (CRPC) resistant to docetaxel Among 45 patients with CRPC treated with docetaxel (70-75 mg/m2) every 3 to 4 weeks at Hamamatsu University Hospital from January 2004 to July 2012, 19 patients underwent salvage treatments. We retrospectively analyzed the medical records of 14 patients except for 5 patients who were enrolled in clinical trials. The median age and serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level at starting salvage treatments was 71 years (range 45 to 79) and 241.1 ng/mL (range 3.06 to 1,643.0), respectively. All patients maintained castration status. Salvage treatments include DTX (30 mg/m2) + cisplatin (CDDP) (70 mg/m2)/carboplatin (Area under the curve = 4), etoposide + CDDP, paclitaxel + CDDP, cyclophosphamide, S-l, tegaful-uracil. The reasons why 14 patients moved to salvage treatments after DTX were progressive disease in 12 patients and adverse events in 2. Eight patients had a PSA response, 3 patients>50% and 5 patients<50%. Six patients had a PSA progression. The median overall survival was 10.4 months (range 4.1 to 27.3). All patients died of cancer, 13 patients with prostate cancer and one patient with lung adenocarcinoma. Most adverse events were mild. Transitory grade 3 leukopenia was observed in 2 patients, and grade 3 anemia in 2. No grade 4 toxicities were noted. All salvage treatments without grade 4 toxicities described in this study may be acceptable in the patients with CRPC progressing after docetaxel although the effect would be limited.

  13. The Natural History and Outcome Predictors of Metastatic Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Soest, Robert J; Efstathiou, Jason A; Sternberg, Cora N; Tombal, Bertand

    2016-12-01

    Biomarkers for the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) are urgently needed by clinicians to facilitate treatment decisions. To review current prognostic and predictive biomarkers in mCRPC. We performed a nonsystematic review of the literature from 2004 to August 2016 by searching in Medline. Cross-matching references were used to search for additional articles. We reviewed clinical research and review articles written in the English language. Nomograms of prognostic factors (eg, albumin, lactate dehydrogenase) enable clinicians to estimate the prognosis of men with mCRPC. These prognostic tools may aid with when to trigger treatment, therapeutic monitoring, and follow-up. However, validated predictive biomarkers in mCRPC are still lacking. Androgen receptor (AR) splice variants (ie, AR-V7), gene fusions, and point mutations determined using liquid biopsies such as circulating tumor cells (CTCs) or cell-free DNA (cfDNA) are promising biomarkers that are the subject of ongoing research. Patient biomarkers (eg, neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio) are readily available and come with no extra cost but need further validation before their implementation in clinical practice. Determination of AR-V7 in CTCs is a big step towards a more personalized treatment approach in mCRPC. Genomic characterization of liquid biopsies such as CTCs, cfDNA, and circulating RNA are noninvasive tools to further personalize treatment in prostate cancer. Clinical parameters are readily available, but are derived from retrospective studies and should be interpreted with care. Only by conducting biomarker-driven studies, rather than large one-size-fits-all trials, will we be able to improve prostate cancer treatment. Several biomarkers are currently under investigation that may predict which patients will respond to specific therapies in the future of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer treatment. Copyright © 2016 European Association of Urology

  14. Mechanism of action and clinical activity of tasquinimod in castrate-resistant prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta N

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Neha Gupta, Omar Al Ustwani, Li Shen, Roberto Pili Department of Medicine, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY, USA Abstract: Castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC is a disease where survival is poor and treatment is challenging. Over the past 3 years, significant advances in the field have been made with US Food and Drug Administration approval of new drugs for patients with CRPC. However, despite the presence of new approved drugs such as enzalutamide, abiraterone, sipuleucel-T, cabazitaxel, and alpharadin, there is still an unmet need for novel agents with different mechanisms of action to target CRPC. Based on earlier studies demonstrating therapeutic potential of a quinoline-3-carboxamide agent roquinimex as an anticancer drug, efforts were directed to identify other useful members in this class. Tasquinimod is a second-generation quinoline-3-carboxamide agent that is currently in final stages of clinical development as a treatment for CRPC. The preclinical studies of tasquinimod have formed the basis for its success as an antiangiogenic and immunomodulatory agent in this disease. Tasquinimod is an orally available agent that has shown efficacy and favorable safety profile as deduced by the results of Phase I and II clinical trials of this drug in prostate cancer. The place of tasquinimod in the treatment of CRPC patients is currently under examination in an ongoing Phase III clinical trial. In this review, we will discuss tasquinimod, starting from its discovery and current knowledge on potential mechanisms of action to its clinical potential in CRPC. Keywords: ABR-215050, quinoline-3-carboxamide, prostate adenocarcinoma, castration resistant

  15. Cabazitaxel: a novel second-line treatment for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Channing J Paller

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Channing J Paller, Emmanuel S AntonarakisSidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins, Baltimore, MD, USAAbstract: Until recently, patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC had limited therapeutic options once they became refractory to docetaxel chemotherapy, and no treatments improved survival. This changed in June 2010 when the Food and Drug Administration (FDA approved cabazitaxel as a new option for patients with CRPC whose disease progresses during or after docetaxel treatment. For most of these patients, cabazitaxel will now replace mitoxantrone (a drug that was FDA-approved because of its palliative effects as the treatment of choice for docetaxel-refractory disease. The approval of cabazitaxel was based primarily on the TROPIC trial, a large (n = 755 randomized Phase III study showing an overall median survival benefit of 2.4 months for men with docetaxel-pretreated metastatic CRPC receiving cabazitaxel (with prednisone compared to mitoxantrone (with prednisone. Cabazitaxel is a novel tubulin-binding taxane that differs from docetaxel because of its poor affinity for P-glycoprotein (P-gp, an ATP-dependent drug efflux pump. Cancer cells that express P-gp become resistant to taxanes, and the effectiveness of docetaxel can be limited by its high substrate affinity for P-gp. Preclinical and early clinical studies show that cabazitaxel retains activity in docetaxel-resistant tumors, and this was confirmed by the TROPIC study. Common adverse events with cabazitaxel include neutropenia (including febrile neutropenia and diarrhea, while neuropathy was rarely observed. Thus, the combination of cabazitaxel and prednisone is an important new treatment option for men with docetaxel-refractory metastatic CRPC, but this agent should be administered cautiously and with appropriate monitoring (especially in men at high risk of neutropenic complications.Keywords: cabazitaxel, castration-resistant prostate cancer, clinical trial

  16. Adaptive pathways and emerging strategies overcoming treatment resistance in castration resistant prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cameron M. Armstrong

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The therapies available for prostate cancer patients whom progress from hormone-sensitive to castration resistant prostate cancer include both systemic drugs, including docetaxel and cabazitaxel, and drugs that inhibit androgen signaling such as enzalutamide and abiraterone. Unfortunately, it is estimated that up to 30% of patients have primary resistance to these treatments and over time even those who initially respond to therapy will eventually develop resistance and their disease will continue to progress regardless of the presence of the drug. Determining the mechanisms involved in the development of resistance to these therapies has been the area of intense study and several adaptive pathways have been uncovered. Androgen receptor (AR mutations, expression of AR-V7 (or other constitutively active androgen receptor variants, intracrine androgen production and overexpression of androgen synthesis enzymes such as Aldo-Keto Reductase Family 1, Member C3 (AKR1C3 are among the many mechanisms associated with resistance to anti-androgens. In regards to the taxanes, one of the key contributors to drug resistance is increased drug efflux through ATP Binding Cassette Subfamily B Member 1 (ABCB1. Targeting these resistance mechanisms using different strategies has led to various levels of success in overcoming resistance to current therapies. For instance, targeting AR-V7 with niclosamide or AKR1C3 with indomethacin can improve enzalutamide and abiraterone treatment. ABCB1 transport activity can be inhibited by the dietary constituent apigenin and antiandrogens such as bicalutamide which in turn improves response to docetaxel. A more thorough understanding of how drug resistance develops will lead to improved treatment strategies. This review will cover the current knowledge of resistance mechanisms to castration resistant prostate cancer therapies and methods that have been identified which may improve treatment response.

  17. Automated Bone Scan Index as a quantitative imaging biomarker in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer patients being treated with enzalutamide

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Anand, Aseem; Morris, Michael J; Larson, Steven M; Minarik, David; Josefsson, Andreas; Helgstrand, John T; Oturai, Peter S; Edenbrandt, Lars; Røder, Martin Andreas; Bjartell, Anders

    2016-01-01

    ...) in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). In the present study, we retrospectively evaluated the discriminatory strength of the automated BSI in predicting overall survival (OS...

  18. Systemic treatment with Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF)but not Insulin like Growth Factor (IGF-I) decrease the involution of the Prostate in Castrated Rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tørring, Niels; Lars, Vinter-Jensen; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt

    2000-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) are strong inducers of proliferation to prostate cells cultured in serum-free medium. Accordingly we wanted to study the growth of the prostate gland in castrated rats after treatment with EGF, IGF-I and testosterone. Castrated...... Wistar rats were treated with growth factors (EGF 35 microg/rat per day; IGF-I 350 microg/rat per day) or testosterone (2 mg/rat per day) for 3 days either immediately after or 10 days after castration. Prostate tissue was examined by stereological and immunohistochemical techniques and by enzyme...... proliferation was not affected. Testosterone treatment increased the weight of the prostate, by increase of all tissue components of the prostate, and significantly increased cellular proliferation. Systemic administration of EGF but not IGF-I decreased the involution of the rat prostate induced by castration...

  19. Systemic treatment with epidermal growth factor but not insulin-like growth factor I decreases the involution of the prostate in castrated rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tørring, N; Vinter-Jensen, L; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt

    2000-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) are strong inducers of proliferation to prostate cells cultured in serum-free medium. Accordingly we wanted to study the growth of the prostate gland in castrated rats after treatment with EGF, IGF-I and testosterone. Castrated...... Wistar rats were treated with growth factors (EGF 35 microg/rat per day; IGF-I 350 microg/rat per day) or testosterone (2 mg/rat per day) for 3 days either immediately after or 10 days after castration. Prostate tissue was examined by stereological and immunohistochemical techniques and by enzyme...... proliferation was not affected. Testosterone treatment increased the weight of the prostate, by increase of all tissue components of the prostate, and significantly increased cellular proliferation. Systemic administration of EGF but not IGF-I decreased the involution of the rat prostate induced by castration...

  20. Adaptive Auto-Regulation of Androgen Receptor Provides a Paradigm Shifting Rationale for Bipolar Androgen Therapy (BAT) for Castrate Resistant Human Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Isaacs, John T.; D’Antonio, Jason M; Chen, Shuangling; Antony, Lizamma; Dalrymple, Susan P.; Ndikuyeze, Georges H.; Luo, Jun; Denmeade, Samuel R.

    2012-01-01

    Cell culture/xenograft and gene arrays of clinical material document that development of castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) cells involves acquisition of adaptive auto-regulation resulting in > 25 fold increase in Androgen Receptor (AR) protein expression in a low androgen environment. Such adaptive AR increase paradoxically is a liability in castrated hosts; however, when supraphysiologic androgen is acutely replaced. Cell synchronization/anti-androgen response document this is due ...

  1. Impact of cabazitaxel on 2-year survival and palliation of tumour-related pain in men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer treated in the TROPIC trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahl, A; Oudard, S; Tombal, B

    2013-01-01

    Cabazitaxel significantly improves overall survival (OS) versus mitoxantrone in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer after docetaxel failure. We examined patient survival at 2 years and tumour-related pain with cabazitaxel versus mitoxantrone.......Cabazitaxel significantly improves overall survival (OS) versus mitoxantrone in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer after docetaxel failure. We examined patient survival at 2 years and tumour-related pain with cabazitaxel versus mitoxantrone....

  2. Increment of late sodium currents in the left atrial myocytes and its potential contribution to increased susceptibility of atrial fibrillation in castrated male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang; Wang, Hui-Min; Wang, Ying-Zhe; Zhang, Yi-Yuan; Jin, Xue-Xin; Zhao, Yue; Wang, Jin; Sun, Yi-Lin; Xue, Gen-Long; Li, Peng-Hui; Huang, Qi-He; Yang, Bao-Feng; Pan, Zhen-Wei

    2017-07-01

    The incidence of atrial fibrillation (AF) is correlated with decreased levels of testosterone in elderly men. Late sodium current may exert a role in AF pathogenesis. The purpose of this study was to explore the effect of testosterone deficiency on AF susceptibility and the therapeutic effect of late sodium current inhibitors in mice. Male ICR mice (5 weeks old) were castrated to establish a testosterone deficiency model. One month after castration, dihydrotestosterone 5 mg/kg was administered subcutaneously for 2 months. Serum total testosterone level was assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. High-frequency electrical stimulation was used to induce atrial arrhythmias. Whole-cell patch-clamp technique was used to for single-cell electrophysiologic study. Serum dihydrotestosterone levels of castration mice declined significantly but recovered with administration of exogenous dihydrotestosterone. In comparison with sham mice, the number of AF episodes significantly increased by 13.5-fold, AF rate increased by 3.75-fold, and AF duration prolonged in castrated mice. Dihydrotestosterone administration alleviated the occurrence of AF. Action potential duration at both 50% and 90% repolarization were markedly increased in castrated mice compared to sham controls. The late sodium current was enhanced in castrated male mice. These alterations were alleviated by treatment with dihydrotestosterone. Systemic application of the INa-L inhibitors ranolazine, eleclazine, and GS967 inhibited the occurrence of AF in castrated mice. Testosterone deficiency contributed to the increased late sodium current, prolonged action potential repolarization, and increased susceptibility to AF. Blocking of late sodium current is beneficial against the occurrence of AF in castrated mice. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Poster Session- Extended Abstracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack D. Alexander III; Jean Findley; Brenda K. Kury; Jan L. Beyers; Douglas S. Cram; Terrell T. Baker; Jon C. Boren; Carl Edminster; Sue A. Ferguson; Steven McKay; David Nagel; Trent Piepho; Miriam Rorig; Casey Anderson; Jeanne Hoadley; Paulette L. Ford; Mark C. Andersen; Ed L. Fredrickson; Joe Truett; Gary W. Roemer; Brenda K. Kury; Jennifer Vollmer; Christine L. May; Danny C. Lee; James P. Menakis; Robert E. Keane; Zhi-Liang Zhu; Carol Miller; Brett Davis; Katharine Gray; Ken Mix; William P. Kuvlesky Jr.; D. Lynn Drawe; Marcia G. Narog; Roger D. Ottmar; Robert E. Vihnanek; Clinton S. Wright; Timothy E. Paysen; Burton K. Pendleton; Rosemary L. Pendleton; Carleton S. White; John Rogan; Doug Stow; Janet Franklin; Jennifer Miller; Lisa Levien; Chris Fischer; Emma Underwood; Robert Klinger; Peggy Moore; Clinton S. Wright

    2008-01-01

    Titles found within Poster Session-Extended Abstracts include:Assessment of emergency fire rehabilitation of four fires from the 2000 fire season on the Vale, Oregon, BLM district: review of the density sampling materials and methods: p. 329 Growth of regreen, seeded for erosion control, in the...

  4. Extending Critical Performativity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spicer, André; Alvesson, Mats; Kärreman, Dan

    2016-01-01

    In this article we extend the debate about critical performativity. We begin by outlining the basic tenets of critical performativity and how this has been applied in the study of management and organization. We then address recent critiques of critical performance. We note these arguments suffer...

  5. Parameterization of extended systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Hans Henrik

    2006-01-01

    The YJBK parameterization (of all stabilizing controllers) is extended to handle systems with additional sensors and/or actuators. It is shown that the closed loop transfer function is still an affine function in the YJBK parameters in the nominal case. Further, some closed-loop stability results...

  6. Shengjing Capsule Improves Erectile Function Through Regulation of Nitric Oxide-induced Relaxation in Corpus Cavernosum Smooth Muscle in a Castrated Rat Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shankun; Liu, Luhao; Kang, Ran; Li, Futian; Li, Ermao; Zhang, Tao; Luo, Jintai; Zhao, Zhigang

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate the effects of Shengjing capsule on erectile function in a castrated rat model, and further to investigate the underlying molecular mechanism. Thirty male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into six groups (n = 5 per group), including sham group, castration group, testosterone replacement group, high-dose Shengjing capsule group, medium-dose Shengjing capsule group, and low-dose Shengjing capsule group. The weight of the body and androgen-sensitive organs, and the serum level of testosterone were assessed. Erectile function was evaluated using cavernous nerve electrical stimulation after treatment. Corpus cavernosum tissue was examined by Masson's trichrome staining, immunohistochemistry, quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, and Western blot. Serum testosterone level, mean weights of body, and accessory sexual organs were not significantly different between Shengjing capsule treatment and the castration groups (P > .05 for all). Significant recovery of erectile function and the increased smooth muscle components were observed in the Shengjing capsule treatment group as compared with the castration group (P cavernous tissue in Shengjing capsule-treated rats were significantly higher than in the castration group (P < .05 for all). Phosphodiesterase type 5 messenger ribonucleic acid and protein expression in each group followed a trend similar to that of smooth muscle content. These results show that Shengjing capsule improves the erectile function by protecting the smooth muscle content and enhancing NOS activity in penile tissues of castrated male rats. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Extended Irreversible Thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Jou, David

    2010-01-01

    This is the 4th edition of the highly acclaimed monograph on Extended Irreversible Thermodynamics, a theory that goes beyond the classical theory of irreversible processes. In contrast to the classical approach, the basic variables describing the system are complemented by non-equilibrium quantities. The claims made for extended thermodynamics are confirmed by the kinetic theory of gases and statistical mechanics. The book covers a wide spectrum of applications, and also contains a thorough discussion of the foundations and the scope of the current theories on non-equilibrium thermodynamics. For this new edition, the authors critically revised existing material while taking into account the most recent developments in fast moving fields such as heat transport in micro- and nanosystems or fast solidification fronts in materials sciences. Several fundamental chapters have been revisited emphasizing physics and applications over mathematical derivations. Also, fundamental questions on the definition of non-equil...

  8. A metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer patient with multiple bone metastases has durable biochemical and radiological response to docetaxel chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daimon, Tatsuaki; Kosaka, Takeo; Oya, Mototsugu

    2016-01-01

    Docetaxel chemotherapy for metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer patients has been thought palliative because the radiological response rate is low and durable response is rare. The patient was a 64-year-old man who was diagnosed with cT3aN0M0 prostate cancer and underwent external beam radiation therapy as the initial treatment. He underwent androgen deprivation therapy and 8 cycles of docetaxel chemotherapy. His PSA level decreased and became undetectable and the disease was confirmed to be stable by radiological examination. We report a rare case that a metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer patient with multiple bone metastases has durable radiological and biochemical response. PMID:27766278

  9. Cabazitaxel: A novel taxane for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer-current implications and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abidi, Afroz

    2013-10-01

    Recent advances in the management of prostate cancer have shown considerable development with time and many novel therapeutic agents have been approved over the past years. For patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), initially docetaxel was the standard chemotherapy but once they became refractory to docetaxel, no treatment improved survival. This scenario changed in June 2010 when the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Cabazitaxel as a new therapeutic option for patients with mCRPC resistant to docetaxel. Cabazitaxel, being a novel tubulin-binding taxane with poor affinity for P-glycoprotein, decreases the chances of resistance. It has shown antitumor activity in preclinical, phase I, II and III clinical studies in docetaxel-resistant tumors. This article summarises the background, pharmacodynamic, kinetics and clinical development of cabazitaxel for the treatment of castration-resistant prostate cancer. Future development and rational use of this drug in other tumors is under therapeutic investigation.

  10. The Fly Printer - Extended

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beloff, Laura; Klaus, Malena

    2016-01-01

    Artist talk / Work-in-progress What is the purpose of a machine or an artifact, like the Fly Printer, that is dislocated, that produces images that have no meaning, no instrumentality, that depict nothing in the world? The biological and the cultural are reunited in this apparatus as a possibilit...... the results. The extended version of the Fly Printer containing the technological perception and DNNs is a collaboration between Laura Beloff and Malene Theres Klaus...

  11. The dialogically extended mind

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fusaroli, Riccardo; Gangopadhyay, Nivedita; Tylén, Kristian

    2014-01-01

    , we argue that language enhances our cognitive capabilities in a much more radical way: The skilful engagement of public material symbols facilitates evolutionarily unprecedented modes of collective perception, action and reasoning (interpersonal synergies) creating dialogically extended minds. We...... relate our approach to other ideas about collective minds and review a number of empirical studies to identify the mechanisms enabling the constitution of interpersonal cognitive systems....

  12. Extended Theories of Gravitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatibene Lorenzo

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Within the framework of extended theories of gravitation we shall discuss physical equivalences among different formalisms and classical tests. As suggested by the Ehlers-Pirani-Schild framework, the conformal invariance will be preserved and its effect on observational protocols discussed. Accordingly, we shall review standard tests showing how Palatini f(R-theories naturally passes solar system tests. Observation protocols will be discussed in this wider framework.

  13. A systematic review of methods for quantifying serum testosterone in patients with prostate cancer who underwent castration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comas, I; Ferrer, R; Planas, J; Celma, A; Regis, L; Morote, J

    2017-03-02

    The clinical practice guidelines recommend measuring serum testosterone in patients with prostate cancer (PC) who undergo castration. The serum testosterone concentration should be <50ng/dL, a level established by using a radioimmunoassay method. The use of chemiluminescent immunoassays (IA) has become widespread, although their metrological characteristics do not seem appropriate for quantifying low testosterone concentrations. The objective of this review is to analyse the methods for quantifying testosterone and to establish whether there is scientific evidence that justifies measuring it in patients with PC who undergo castration, through liquid chromatography attached to a mass spectrometry in tandem (LC-MSMS). We performed a search in PubMed with the following MeSH terms: measurement, testosterone, androgen suppression and prostate cancer. We selected 12 studies that compared the metrological characteristics of various methods for quantifying serum testosterone compared with MS detection methods. IAs are standard tools for measuring testosterone levels; however, there is evidence that IAs lack accuracy and precision for quantifying low concentrations. Most chemiluminescent IAs overestimate their concentration, especially below 100ng/dL. The procedures that use LC-MSMS have an adequate lower quantification limit and proper accuracy and precision. We found no specific evidence in patients with PC who underwent castration. LC-MSMS is the appropriate method for quantifying low serum testosterone concentrations. We need to define the level of castration with this method and the optimal level related to better progression of the disease. Copyright © 2017 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. The Stromal Contribution to the Development of Resistance to New Generation Drugs by Castrate Resistant Prostate Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    backdoor pathway , which bypasses testosterone (T) as an intermediate for dihydrotestosterone (DHT) (3, 9-11). 4 After ADT, recurrence as castration... pathway agonists. Testosterone levels were measured by ELISA, normalized to cell number, and expressed as fold change + SE. Figure 1: Effect of 1nM Ag1.5... pathway . 15. SUBJECT TERMS Prostate Cancer, Hedgehog signaling, Hormone Therapy, Intratumoral, Steroidogenesis, Androgens, Smoothened Agonists

  15. Differential effects of androgens on coronary blood flow regulation and arteriolar diameter in intact and castrated swine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O’Connor Erin K

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low endogenous testosterone levels have been shown to be a risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disease and cardiovascular benefits associated with testosterone replacement therapy are being advocated; however, the effects of endogenous testosterone levels on acute coronary vasomotor responses to androgen administration are not clear. The objective of this study was to compare the effects of acute androgen administration on in vivo coronary conductance and in vitro coronary microvascular diameter in intact and castrated male swine. Methods Pigs received intracoronary infusions of physiologic levels (1–100 nM of testosterone, the metabolite 5α-dihydrotestosterone, and the epimer epitestosterone while left anterior descending coronary blood flow and mean arterial pressure were continuously monitored. Following sacrifice, coronary arterioles were isolated, cannulated, and exposed to physiologic concentrations (1–100 nM of testosterone, 5α-dihydrotestosterone, and epitestosterone. To evaluate effects of the androgen receptor on acute androgen dilation responses, real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry for androgen receptor were performed on conduit and resistance coronary vessels. Results In vivo, testosterone and 5α-dihydrotestosterone produced greater increases in coronary conductance in the intact compared to the castrated males. In vitro, percent maximal dilation of microvessels was similar between intact and castrated males for testosterone and 5α-dihydrotestosterone. In both studies epitestosterone produced significant increases in conductance and microvessel diameter from baseline in the intact males. Androgen receptor mRNA expression and immunohistochemical staining were similar in intact and castrated males. Conclusions Acute coronary vascular responses to exogenous androgen administration are increased by endogenous testosterone, an effect unrelated to changes in androgen receptor expression.

  16. Development of a New Class of Drugs To Inhibit All Forms of Androgen Receptor in Castration Resistant Prostate Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    endocrine targeting therapies designed to block AR activity that re- emerges during castration. However, despite a growing armamentarium of drugs ...Site: The following papers are relevant to either our in silico pipeline for drug -development or to VPC-14449 as a model drug to assist on other...of computational drug design , molecular modeling and bioinformatics. Funding support b. Changes in the active other support of the PD/PI(s) or

  17. Development of the Horse Grimace Scale (HGS) as a Pain Assessment Tool in Horses Undergoing Routine Castration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalla Costa, Emanuela; Minero, Michela; Lebelt, Dirk; Stucke, Diana; Canali, Elisabetta; Leach, Matthew C.

    2014-01-01

    Background The assessment of pain is critical for the welfare of horses, in particular when pain is induced by common management procedures such as castration. Existing pain assessment methods have several limitations, which reduce the applicability in everyday life. Assessment of facial expression changes, as a novel means of pain scoring, may offer numerous advantages and overcome some of these limitations. The objective of this study was to develop and validate a standardised pain scale based on facial expressions in horses (Horse Grimace Scale [HGS]). Methodology/Principal Findings Forty stallions were assigned to one of two treatments and all animals underwent routine surgical castration under general anaesthesia. Group A (n = 19) received a single injection of Flunixin immediately before anaesthesia. Group B (n = 21) received Flunixin immediately before anaesthesia and then again, as an oral administration, six hours after the surgery. In addition, six horses were used as anaesthesia controls (C). These animals underwent non-invasive, indolent procedures, received the same treatment as group A, but did not undergo surgical procedures that could be accompanied with surgical pain. Changes in behaviour, composite pain scale (CPS) scores and horse grimace scale (HGS) scores were assessed before and 8-hours post-procedure. Only horses undergoing castration (Groups A and B) showed significantly greater HGS and CPS scores at 8-hours post compared to pre operatively. Further, maintenance behaviours such as explorative behaviour and alertness were also reduced. No difference was observed between the two analgesic treatment groups. Conclusions The Horse Grimace Scale potentially offers an effective and reliable method of assessing pain following routine castration in horses. However, auxiliary studies are required to evaluate different painful conditions and analgesic schedules. PMID:24647606

  18. Development of the Horse Grimace Scale (HGS as a pain assessment tool in horses undergoing routine castration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuela Dalla Costa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The assessment of pain is critical for the welfare of horses, in particular when pain is induced by common management procedures such as castration. Existing pain assessment methods have several limitations, which reduce the applicability in everyday life. Assessment of facial expression changes, as a novel means of pain scoring, may offer numerous advantages and overcome some of these limitations. The objective of this study was to develop and validate a standardised pain scale based on facial expressions in horses (Horse Grimace Scale [HGS]. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Forty stallions were assigned to one of two treatments and all animals underwent routine surgical castration under general anaesthesia. Group A (n = 19 received a single injection of Flunixin immediately before anaesthesia. Group B (n = 21 received Flunixin immediately before anaesthesia and then again, as an oral administration, six hours after the surgery. In addition, six horses were used as anaesthesia controls (C. These animals underwent non-invasive, indolent procedures, received the same treatment as group A, but did not undergo surgical procedures that could be accompanied with surgical pain. Changes in behaviour, composite pain scale (CPS scores and horse grimace scale (HGS scores were assessed before and 8-hours post-procedure. Only horses undergoing castration (Groups A and B showed significantly greater HGS and CPS scores at 8-hours post compared to pre operatively. Further, maintenance behaviours such as explorative behaviour and alertness were also reduced. No difference was observed between the two analgesic treatment groups. CONCLUSIONS: The Horse Grimace Scale potentially offers an effective and reliable method of assessing pain following routine castration in horses. However, auxiliary studies are required to evaluate different painful conditions and analgesic schedules.

  19. Development of a New Class of Drugs to Inhibit All Forms of Androgen Receptor in Castration Resistant Prostate Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    to AR and histone H3 (chromatin fraction control). 10 Key Outcomes for Hauptman Woodward Institute Site (Gewirth, PI) Key Outcome 1: We have...Prostate Cancers PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATORS: Dan Gewirth CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Hauptman-Woodward Institute Buffalo, NY 14203 REPORT DATE: October...of Androgen Receptor in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancers 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER

  20. Identification and Targeting of Candidate Pre-Existing Lurker Cells that Give Rise to Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    p65 (P-p65), BCL2 and Histone H3 as a loading control. (c) RNAseq analysis of genes associated with aggressive prostate cancer upregulated in CD38...Resistant Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Andrew Goldstein CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: University of California, Los Angeles Los Angeles, CA...Cells that Give Rise to 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-13-1-0470 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6

  1. Registered report: the androgen receptor induces a distinct transcriptional program in castration-resistant prostate cancer in man

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Chronscinski

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The Prostate Cancer Foundation-Movember Foundation Reproducibility Initiative (PCFMFRI seeks to address growing concerns about reproducibility in scientific research by conducting replications of recent papers in the field of prostate cancer. This Registered Report describes the proposed replication plan of key experiments from “The Androgen Receptor Induces a Distinct Transcriptional Program in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer in Man” by Sharma and colleagues (2013, published in Cancer Cell in 2013. Of thousands of targets for the androgen receptor (AR, the authors elucidated a subset of 16 core genes that were consistently downregulated with castration and re-emerged with castration resistance. These 16 AR binding sites were distinct from those observed in cells in culture. The authors suggested that cellular context can have dramatic effects on downstream transcriptional regulation of AR binding sites. The present study will attempt to replicate Fig. 7C by comparing gene expression of the 16 core genes identified by Sharma and colleagues in xenograft tumor tissue compared to androgen treated LNCaP cells in vitro. The Prostate Cancer Foundation-Movember Foundation Reproducibility Initiative is a collaboration between the Prostate Cancer Foundation, the Movember Initiative, and Science Exchange, and the results of the replications will be published by PeerJ.

  2. BISPHOSPHONATES IN PROPHYLAXIS OF SKELETAL-RELATED ADVERSE EVENTS IN PATIENTS WITH CASTRATION-REFRACTORY PROSTATE CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Yu. Safronova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PC is one of the most urgent problems of modern oncourology. Morbidity and mortality from this disease in theRussian Federationin recent years has been steadily increasing. Including the number of patients with metastatic and refractory to castration therapy forms of the disease is increasing. Currently, the main method of treatment of patients with metastatic prostate cancer is palliative hormone therapy (HT. Patients who have progression of tumor process, with lingering castration levels of testosterone, transferred to the stage of so-called castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC. The prognosis in this group of patients is extremely unfavorable, not only because of the progression of cancer, but of complications associated primarily with the presence of bone metastases. Prevention of development of serious complications such as pathological fractures, spinal cord compression is an extremely important issue. The article presents a review of studies, the sanctifying of the problem of prevention of development of bone complications in patients with CRPC. We resent the results of large studies, including those conducted in our country demonstrated the effectiveness zoedronic acid in patients with CRPC and the presence of bone metastases.

  3. Prostate radiation in non-metastatic castrate refractory prostate cancer provides an interesting insight into biology of prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascoe Abigail C

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The natural history of non-metastatic castrate refractory prostate cancer is unknown and treatment options are limited. We present a retrospective review of 13 patients with locally advanced or high risk prostate cancer, initially treated with hormone monotherapy and then treated with prostate radiation after becoming castration refractory. Findings Median PSA response following prostate radiation was 67.4%. Median time to biochemical progression following radiotherapy was 15 months and to detection of metastatic disease was 18.5 months. Median survival from castration resistance (to date of death or November 2011 was 60 months, with median survival from RT 42 months. Conclusion Prostate radiation appears to be beneficial even in patients with potential micrometastatic disease, which supports the hypothesis that the primary tumour is important in the progression of prostate cancer. These results are an interesting addition to the literature on the biology of prostate cancer especially as this data is unlikely to be available in the future due to combined prostate radiation and androgen deprivation therapy now being the standard of care.

  4. Registered report: the androgen receptor induces a distinct transcriptional program in castration-resistant prostate cancer in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronscinski, Denise; Cherukeri, Srujana; Tan, Fraser; Perfito, Nicole; Lomax, Joelle; Iorns, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    The Prostate Cancer Foundation-Movember Foundation Reproducibility Initiative (PCFMFRI) seeks to address growing concerns about reproducibility in scientific research by conducting replications of recent papers in the field of prostate cancer. This Registered Report describes the proposed replication plan of key experiments from "The Androgen Receptor Induces a Distinct Transcriptional Program in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer in Man" by Sharma and colleagues (2013), published in Cancer Cell in 2013. Of thousands of targets for the androgen receptor (AR), the authors elucidated a subset of 16 core genes that were consistently downregulated with castration and re-emerged with castration resistance. These 16 AR binding sites were distinct from those observed in cells in culture. The authors suggested that cellular context can have dramatic effects on downstream transcriptional regulation of AR binding sites. The present study will attempt to replicate Fig. 7C by comparing gene expression of the 16 core genes identified by Sharma and colleagues in xenograft tumor tissue compared to androgen treated LNCaP cells in vitro. The Prostate Cancer Foundation-Movember Foundation Reproducibility Initiative is a collaboration between the Prostate Cancer Foundation, the Movember Initiative, and Science Exchange, and the results of the replications will be published by PeerJ.

  5. The Role of Docetaxel in Non-Castrate Resistant Metastatic Prostate Cancer: An Evidence-based Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fakhri Rahman

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to learn the role of docetaxel in non-castrate resistant prostate cancer patient. Methods: literature search was conducted to find relevant study comparing the combination of docetaxel and androgen deprivation therapy (ADT to ADT alone in non-castrate resistant prostate cancer using PubMed, Cohrane Library, Proquest, EBSCO, and Scopus database. Quality assessment of studies was done using Bond University Rapid Critical Appraisal of a Systematic Review. Results: we found 494 studies from literature search, but only two studies were included in final selection. Based on validity assessment, we chose one study to be discussed further. This study showed that combination of docetaxel and ADT is better than ADT alone in regards of overall survival (HR 0.64; 95% CI 0.55, 0.75; p<0.0001; NNT=3, biochemical progression free survival (HR 0.63; 95% CI 0.57, 0.69; p<0.0001; NNT=2 and clinical progression free survival (HR 0.73; 95% CI 0.64, 0.84; p<0.0001; NNT=2. Benefit of docetaxel and ADT combination was especially seen in high volume disease (HR 0.67; 95% CI 0.54, 0.83; p=0.0003; NNT=3. Conclusion: addition of docetaxel into ADT has beneficial effects in terms of overall survival and progression free survival in patients with non-castrate resistant metastatic prostate cancer.

  6. Effect of castration at 10 months of age on growth physiology and behavior of male feral beef cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Rodríguez, Javier; Albertí, Pere; Ripoll, Guillermo; Blasco, Isabel; Sanz, Albina

    2017-07-01

    This study compared the growth performance, plasma testosterone and cortisol levels around castration at 10 months of age, and plasma insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I concentration and flight speed, in intact bulls and steers from 10 to 21 months of age in a feral Spanish breed. Fourteen bulls (366.5 ± 48.5 kg live weight) were assigned at random to one of two treatments: surgically castrated (steers) or intact (bulls), and submitted to an identical fattening period. Steers reared until heavy live weights (21 months of age) grew slowly and had lower plasma IGF-I concentrations than intact bulls. These differences were mainly highlighted the month after surgery (11 months of age) and the last part of the fattening period (from 19 to 21 months of age). After surgical castration (11 and 12 months of age), steers showed a tendency to display greater flight speed values than intact bulls but baseline plasma cortisol concentration did not differ between groups at this time. At the end, steers and bulls reached nearly similar temperament, as flight speed did not differ between them. The results confirm the role of IGF-I as a key anabolic hormone in male beef cattle and thus it may reflect growth differences due to altered sex steroids production. © 2016 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  7. Viability of Listeria monocytogenes on Boneless, Water-Added Hams, Commercially Prepared with and without Food-Grade Chemicals, during Extended Storage at 4 and/or -2.2°C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchansky, John B; Campano, Stephen G; Shoyer, Bradley A; Porto-Fett, Anna C S

    2016-04-01

    , and inclusion of antimicrobials in the formulation suppressed outgrowth of L. monocytogenes during extended cold storage.

  8. π-Extended Tetrathiafulvalenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Johannes Fabritius

    This Ph.D.-thesis focuses on the synthesis and properties of various redox-active ¼-extended tetrathiafulvalenes. One class of molecules are so-called H-cruciform shaped molecules. In these molecules the formation of a central stilbene double bond is elucidated. Here it was found that the formation...... of the stilbene bond originates from preformation of a 1,3-dioxa-2-phospholane, formed by reaction between P(OEt)3 present under the reaction conditions and two aldehydes. Under the reaction conditions this 1,3-dioxa-2-phospholane can then be converted to the stilbene. These mechanistic studies lead...

  9. Extended spider cognition

    OpenAIRE

    Japyassú, Hilton F.; Laland, Kevin Neville

    2017-01-01

    HFJ received a visiting professor fellowship from Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico (CNPq - Brazil) (PDE PDE232691/2014-2). Research supported in part by a Grant from the John Templeton Foundation to KNL. There is a tension between the conception of cognition as a central nervous system (CNS) process, and a view of cognition as extending towards the body or the contiguous environment. The centralised conception requires large or complex nervous systems to cope w...

  10. Docetaxel based chemotherapy in the treatment of patients with castration resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangir, N; Türkeri, L

    2014-10-01

    Docetaxel administered every 3- weeks is the standart treatment of castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) but it is associated with dose limiting toxicities. We analyzed the efficacy and tolerability of 3- weekly and weekly docetaxel in a Turkish cohort of CRPC patients with a special emphasis on the elderly patients. A retrospective analyses of 45 patients who received either 3- weekly or weekly docetaxel in a single urologic oncology clinic was performed. Response to therapy, toxicity and overall survival rates were evaluated. The mean age of patients was 70.0 (±8.8) years. Complete or partial PSA response was obtained in 45% of patients. The median overall survival was 20,0 months (SE 6.46; 95% CI 7,3-32,6). Absence of metastasis, time to CRPC>10 months, DP 75mg/m2 once every three weeks and PSA<50% at the end of the third cycle were associated with better overall survival. There was no significant survival difference between the patients aged 75 or older versus younger ones. The most common hematological toxicity was leukopenia which was dose limiting in only one patient. Administration of standart 3-weekly docetaxel is well tolerated in this relatively old cohort of Turkish CRPC patients and weekly administration can be a reasonable alternative in frail patients not only to prolong survival but also to palliate disease symptoms. Copyright © 2013 AEU. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  11. Predictors of Time to Metastasis in Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Daniel M; Howard, Lauren E; Sourbeer, Katharine N; Amarasekara, Hiruni S; Chow, Lydia C; Cockrell, Dillon C; Hanyok, Brian T; Aronson, William J; Kane, Christopher J; Terris, Martha K; Amling, Christopher L; Cooperberg, Matthew R; Liede, Alex; Freedland, Stephen J

    2016-10-01

    To investigate predictors of time to metastasis among men treated with androgen deprivation therapy for nonmetastatic prostate cancer who developed castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) within the Shared Equal Access Regional Cancer Hospital cohort. This is a retrospective analysis of 458 nonmetastatic CRPC men. Metastases were detected in routine bone scans or other imaging tests. Predictors of time to metastasis were analyzed using proportional hazards model with CRPC as time zero. A total of 256 (56%) men were diagnosed with metastatic disease over a median follow-up of 36 months. Metastasis-free survival was 79%, 65%, 52%, 47%, and 41% at 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 years after CRPC, respectively. In multivariable analysis, Gleason score 8-10 (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.61; P = .026), receiving primary localized treatment (HR = 1.38; P = .028), higher prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels at CRPC diagnosis (logPSA HR = 1.64; P metastasis. Race, year of CRPC, age, and time from androgen deprivation therapy to CRPC were not associated with metastasis. Among nonmetastatic CRPC men, nearly 60% developed metastatic disease during the first 5 years, with most of the metastasis occurring within the first 3 years. Higher Gleason score, receiving primary treatment, higher PSA, and shorter PSA doubling time were independently associated with shorter time to metastasis. Therefore, these variables can be used to stratify patients according to metastasis risk. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Predicting bone scan positivity in non-metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Daniel M.; Howard, Lauren E.; Sourbeer, Katie N.; Amarasekara, Hiruni S.; Chow, Lydia C.; Cockrell, Dillon C.; Hanyok, Brian T.; Pratson, Connor L.; Aronson, William J.; Kane, Christopher J.; Terris, Martha K.; Amling, Christopher L.; Cooperberg, Matthew R.; Liede, Alexander; Freedland, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate PSA levels and kinetic cutoffs to predict positive bone scans for men with non-metastatic castrate resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) from the Shared Equal Access Regional Cancer Hospital (SEARCH) cohort. Methods Retrospective analysis of 531 bone scans of 312 clinically CRPC patients with no known metastases at baseline treated with a variety of primary treatment types in the SEARCH database. The association of patients’ demographics, pathological features, PSA levels and kinetics with risk of a positive scan was tested using generalized estimating equations. Results A total of 149 (28%) scans were positive. Positive scans were associated with younger age (OR=0.98; P=0.014), higher Gleason scores (relative to Gleason 2-6, Gleason 3+4: OR=2.03, P=0.035; Gleason 4+3 and 8-10: OR=1.76, P=0.059), higher pre-scan PSA (OR=2.11; Pbone scan. Conclusions PSA levels and kinetics were associated with positive bone scans. We developed tables to predict the risk of positive bone scans by PSA and PSADT. Combining PSA levels and kinetics may help select patients with CRPC for bone scans. PMID:26171882

  13. Estimating high-risk castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) using electronic health records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Rohini K; Cetin, Karynsa; Pirolli, Melissa; Quigley, Jane; Quach, David; Smith, Paul; Stryker, Scott; Liede, Alexander

    2015-08-01

    Canadian guidelines define castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) at high risk of developing metastases using PSA doubling time (PSADT) electronic health records (EHR), covering 129 urology and 64 oncology practices across the US. We estimated the proportion of prostate cancer patients with evidence of CRPC (consecutive rising PSAs) and subsets that may be at high risk (using several PSA and PSADT cut-points). Among 3121 M0 prostate cancer patients actively treated with ADT, 1188 (38%) had evidence of CRPC. Of these, 712 (60%) qualified as high risk in 2011 based on PSADT < 8 months (equivalent to = 8 months in these data). Men = 65 years were more likely to have evidence of CRPC than younger men, although younger men were more likely to have evidence of high-risk disease. CRPC was more common among men receiving ADT in the oncology setting than the urology setting (48% versus 37%). In this large EHR study with patient-level PSA data, 38% of men with M0 prostate cancer treated with ADT had CRPC. Approximately 60% of M0 CRPC patients may experience a PSADT of < 8 months. These findings require validation in a Canadian patient population.

  14. A combination of sorafenib and nilotinib reduces the growth of castrate-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archibald, Monica; Pritchard, Tara; Nehoff, Hayley; Rosengren, Rhonda J; Greish, Khaled; Taurin, Sebastien

    2016-01-01

    Castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) remains incurable due to the lack of effective therapies. Several tyrosine kinases have been implicated in the development and growth of CRPC, as such targeting these kinases may offer an alternative therapeutic strategy. We established the combination of two tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), sorafenib and nilotinib, as the most cytotoxic. In addtion, to improve their bioavailability and reduce their metabolism, we encapsulated sorafenib and nilotinib into styrene-co-maleic acid micelles. The micelles' charge, size, and release rate were characterized. We assessed the effect of the combination on the cytotoxicity, cell cycle, apoptosis, protein expression, tumor spheroid integrity, migration, and invasion. The micelles exhibited a mean diameter of 100 nm, a neutral charge, and appeared highly stable. The micellar TKIs promoted greater cytotoxicity, decreased cell proliferation, and increased apoptosis relative to the free TKIs. In addition, the combination reduced the expression and activity of several tyrosine kinases and reduced tumor spheroid integrity and metastatic potential of CRPC cell lines more efficiently than the single treatments. The combination increased the therapeutic potential and demonstrated the relevance of a targeted combination therapy for the treatment of CRPC. In addition, the efficacy of the encapsulated drugs provides the basis for an in vivo preclinical testing.

  15. Raloxifene nanomicelles reduce the growth of castrate-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, Tara; Rosengren, Rhonda J; Greish, Khaled; Taurin, Sebastien

    2016-01-01

    Castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) patients are characterised by a 5-year relative survival rate of ∼25-33%. Recently, our laboratory encapsulated a selective oestrogen receptor modulator, raloxifene, into poly(styrene-co-maleic acid) (SMA-raloxifene), which demonstrated superior in vitro cytotoxicity compared with free drug against several CRPC cell lines. To validate SMA-raloxifene for the management of CRPC using a mouse xenograft model. The internalisation and retention of micellar and free raloxifene in vitro were measured by HPLC. A PC3-CRPC xenograft model was used to compare the biodistribution of both raloxifene formulations, as well as their effect on tumour progression where mice received free raloxifene (1 or 5 mg/kg, i.v.) or SMA-raloxifene (1 mg/kg, i.v.) weekly for 4 weeks. SMA-raloxifene exhibited 75% higher intracellular content compared to free drug after 48 h in PC3 cells. Biodistribution of raloxifene was 69% higher in tumours following SMA-raloxifene compared with free raloxifene. Weekly administration of 1 mg/kg free raloxifene reduced tumour progression by 20% after 4 weeks, whereas 1 mg/kg SMA-raloxifene and 5 mg/kg free raloxifene reduced progression by 40%. Encapsulation of raloxifene increased its therapeutic potential for the management of CRPC.

  16. Reactive oxygen species induction by cabazitaxel through inhibiting Sestrin-3 in castration resistant prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosaka, Takeo; Hongo, Hiroshi; Miyazaki, Yasumasa; Nishimoto, Koshiro; Miyajima, Akira; Oya, Mototsugu

    2017-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production induced by taxanes in cancer cells may influence the taxane-induced cell death or the drug resistance. We investigated the correlation between the cytotoxic effect of taxanes and ROS production in human castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) cell lines. Three human prostate cancer cell lines were treated with increasing concentrations of docetaxel or cabazitaxel in vitro. Cabazitaxel showed significantly higher cytotoxic efficacy than docetaxel in human CRPC cells, accompanied by elevated ROS production detected by FACS analysis. To investigate whether cabazitaxel-mediated cell death was caused by the ROS generation induced by cabazitaxel, we treated CRPC cells in the presence of antioxidant NAC. NAC reduced the cytotoxic effect induced by cabazitaxel. We found that ROS elimination by Sestrin-3 (SESN3) was significantly inhibited by cabazitaxel, but not by docetaxel. These results indicate higher sensitivity of human CRPC to cabazitaxel compared to docetaxel involves ROS production through inhibiting the expression of antioxidant enzyme SESN3. PMID:29152111

  17. Dihydrotestosterone synthesis bypasses testosterone to drive castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Kai-Hsiung; Li, Rui; Papari-Zareei, Mahboubeh; Watumull, Lori; Zhao, Yan Daniel; Auchus, Richard J; Sharifi, Nima

    2011-08-16

    In the majority of cases, advanced prostate cancer responds initially to androgen deprivation therapy by depletion of gonadal testosterone. The response is usually transient, and metastatic tumors almost invariably eventually progress as castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). The development of CRPC is dependent upon the intratumoral generation of the potent androgen, dihydrotestosterone (DHT), from adrenal precursor steroids. Progression to CRPC is accompanied by increased expression of steroid-5α-reductase isoenzyme-1 (SRD5A1) over SRD5A2, which is otherwise the dominant isoenzyme expressed in the prostate. DHT synthesis in CRPC is widely assumed to require 5α-reduction of testosterone as the obligate precursor, and the increased expression of SRD5A1 is thought to reflect its role in converting testosterone to DHT. Here, we show that the dominant route of DHT synthesis in CRPC bypasses testosterone, and instead requires 5α-reduction of androstenedione by SRD5A1 to 5α-androstanedione, which is then converted to DHT. This alternative pathway is operational and dominant in both human CRPC cell lines and fresh tissue obtained from human tumor metastases. Moreover, CRPC growth in mouse xenograft models is dependent upon this pathway, as well as expression of SRD5A1. These findings reframe the fundamental metabolic pathway that drives CRPC progression, and shed light on the development of new therapeutic strategies.

  18. Factors predicting skeletal-related events in patients with bone metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaassen, Zachary; Howard, Lauren E; de Hoedt, Amanda; Amling, Christopher L; Aronson, William J; Cooperberg, Matthew R; Kane, Christopher J; Terris, Martha K; Freedland, Stephen J

    2017-05-01

    Skeletal-related events (SREs) are common complications of bone metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). To the authors' knowledge, there are limited data regarding which factors predict SREs. The authors identified risk factors for SREs in men with bone mCRPC using characteristics commonly available in the medical record. Data from 454 patients with nonmetastatic CRPC were identified from 2 Veteran Affairs Medical Centers from 2000 through 2013. Among these men, 233 (51%) developed bone metastases during follow-up and represented the study cohort. First occurrence of an SRE was abstracted from the medical records. A stepwise multivariable Cox model was used to select the strongest predictors of time to SRE. The median age of the patients at the time of diagnosis of bone mCRPC was 75 years (interquartile range, 68-81 years), and there were 153 nonblack patients (66%). During follow-up (median, 7.8 months [interquartile range, 2.9-18.3 months]), 88 patients (38%) had an SRE. On univariable analysis, more recent year of metastasis (hazard ratio [HR], 0.91), prostate-specific antigen doubling time of ≥9 months versus Cancer 2017;123:1528-1535. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  19. Impact of castration with or without alpha-tocopherol supplementation on the urethral sphincter of rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirian Kracochansky

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To analyze the impact of low levels of testosterone induced by orchiectomy and the effect of alpha-tocopherol supplementation on oxidative stress in the urethral sphincter. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Forty male Wistar rats weighing 250-300g were divided into four groups with 10 each: Sham group; Orchiectomy group: bilateral orchiectomy; Orchiectomy-pre-Tocopherol group: bilateral orchiectomy preceded by alpha-tocopherol supplementation for four weeks; Orchiectomy-full-Tocopherol group: bilateral orchiectomy with alpha-tocopherol supplementation for four weeks preceding the procedure and for eight weeks afterwards. At the protocol end, animals were euthanized and had the sphincter analyzed stereologically focusing on collagen and muscle fibers percentage. Oxidative stress levels were determined using 8-epi-PGF2. RESULTS: The 8-epi-PGF2 levels were statistically higher (p < 0.0003 in the Orchiectomy group compared to others groups while Sham and Orchiectomy-full-Tocopherol groups presented statistically similar values (p = 0.52. Collagen volumetric densities were significantly lower in Sham and Orchiectomy-full-Tocopherol groups (p < 0.022. Sham group presented statistically greater muscle fiber percent. CONCLUSION: Castration caused oxidative stress in the urethral sphincter complex, with increased collagen deposition. Alpha-tocopherol had a protective effect and its supplementation for twelve weeks provided the greatest protection.

  20. Radium-223 in treatment of castration-resistant prostate cancer with skeletal metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. B. Matveev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available More than 90 % of patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC have radiologically confirmed skeletal metastases. Traditional treatment methods such as administration of painkillers, external beam therapy, bisphosphonates or denosumab, as well as injections of strontium-89 or samarium-153 radionuclides, have only palliative effect and in some cases can postpone development of skeletal complications. Alpha-emitter radium-223 dichloride (Ra-223; alpharadin previously is currently one of the known drugs with proven effectiveness in relation to increasing overall survival of patients with CRPC. Ra-223 was developed specifically for patients with CRPC and symptomatic skeletal metastases. The drug targets the areas of skeletal tissue remodeling. Ra-223 is the therapy of choice in patients with CRPC and skeletal metastases and without confirmed visceral metastases before and after docetaxel chemotherapy. Chemotherapy after treatment with Ra-223 is a possible and satisfactory tolerable treatment option. Combination of Ra-223 with abiraterone, enzalutamide, or denosumab is, apparently, effective and safe, but further studies are necessary.

  1. Practical recommendations for radium-223 treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Yong [The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Nuclear Medicine and PET/CT, London (United Kingdom); Carrio, Ignasi [Hospital Sant Pau, Barcelona (Spain); De Vincentis, Giuseppe [Policlinico Umberto I University Hospital Rome, Rome (Italy); Fanti, Stefano [University Hospital Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Ilhan, Harun [Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital, Munich (Germany); Mommsen, Caroline [Praxis fuer diagnostische und therapeutische Nuklearmedizin Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Nitzsche, Egbert [Canton Hospital Aarau, Aarau (Switzerland); Sundram, Francis [University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, Southampton (United Kingdom); Vogel, Wouter [The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Oyen, Wim [The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Nuclear Medicine and PET/CT, London (United Kingdom); The Institute of Cancer Research, London (United Kingdom); Lewington, Val [Guy' s and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom)

    2017-09-15

    Radium Ra 223 dichloride (radium-223, Xofigo registered) is the first targeted alpha therapy for patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer and symptomatic bone metastases. Radium-223 provides a new treatment option for this setting, but also necessitates a new treatment management approach. We provide straightforward and practical recommendations for European nuclear medicine centres to optimize radium-223 service provision. An independent research consultancy agency observed radium-223 procedures and conducted interviews with all key staff members involved in radium-223 treatment delivery in 11 nuclear medicine centres across six countries (Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Spain, Switzerland and the UK) experienced in administering radium-223. The findings were collated and discussed at a meeting of experts from these centres, during which key consensus recommendations were defined. The recommendations cover centre organization and preparation; patient referral; radium-223 ordering, preparation and disposal; radium-223 treatment delivery/administration; and patient experience. Guidance includes structured coordination and communication within centres and multidisciplinary teams, focusing on sharing best practice to provide high-quality, patient-centred care throughout the treatment pathway. These expert recommendations are intended to complement existing management guidelines. Sharing best practice and experience will help nuclear medicine centres to optimize radium-223 service provision and improve patient care. (orig.)

  2. Resistance to abiraterone in castration-resistant prostate cancer: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacinti, Silvana; Bassanelli, Maria; Aschelter, Anna Maria; Milano, Annalisa; Roberto, Michela; Marchetti, Paolo

    2014-11-01

    Persistent androgen signaling is functionally significant in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) and it is actually considered a validated therapeutic target. Residual intra-tumoral androgens compensate for the effects of androgen ablation, activating the androgen receptor (AR), AR-mediated gene expression and driving CRPC. The intra-tumoral biosynthesis of androgens takes place in different ways and cytochrome P450 17A1 (CYP17A1) has a crucial role in this context. Abiraterone, a CYP17A1 inhibitor, has shown impressive results in pre- and post-chemotherapy settings, prolonging the survival of patients with CRPC. However, not all patients respond to the treatment and most responders develop resistance, with a widely variable duration of response. Although many hypotheses are emerging, the mechanisms of resistance to abiraterone treatment have not yet been elucidated. The aim of the present review is to describe the main data currently available on resistance to abiraterone. Copyright© 2014 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  3. Lymphocyte function following radium-223 therapy in patients with metastasized, castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barsegian, Vahe; Moeckel, Daniel [Helios Kliniken, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, Schwerin (Germany); Mueller, Stefan P.; Bockisch, Andreas [University Hospital Essen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Essen (Germany); Horn, Peter A.; Lindemann, Monika [University Hospital Essen, Institute for Transfusion Medicine, Essen (Germany)

    2017-02-15

    Therapy with the alpha-emitter radium-223 chloride ({sup 223}Ra) is an innovative therapeutic option in patients with metastasized, castration-resistant prostate cancer. However, radiotherapy can lead to hematopoietic toxicity. The aim of this study was to determine if {sup 223}Ra therapy induces an impairment of cellular antimicrobial immune responses. In 11 patients receiving {sup 223}Ra treatment, lymphocyte proliferation and the production of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines (interferon-γ and interleukin-10) were determined, using lymphocyte transformation testing and ELISpot, respectively. Lymphocyte function after stimulation with mitogens and microbial antigens was assessed prior to therapy and at day 1, 7 and 28 after therapy. Lymphocyte proliferation and the production of interferon-γ and interleukin-10 towards mitogens and antigens remained unchanged after therapy. Consistent with these in vitro data, we did not observe infectious complications after treatment. The results argue against an impairment of lymphocyte function after {sup 223}Ra therapy. Thus, immune responses against pathogens should remain unaffected. (orig.)

  4. Nursing management of patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer undergoing radium-223 dichloride treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delacruz, Anthony; Arauz, Gabrielle; Curley, Tracy; Lindo, Amabella; Jensen, Trine

    2015-04-01

    Radium-223 dichloride, or radium-223, is a first-in-class alpha emitter that selectively targets bone metastases with high-energy, short-range alpha particles and is approved for the treatment of patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), symptomatic bone metastases, and no known visceral metastatic disease. Nurses are essential in educating patients about radium-223. This article provides oncology nurses with information from the randomized phase III Alpharadin in Symptomatic Prostate Cancer (ALSYMPCA) trial, as well as important handling, administration, and safety details unique to radium-223. Data from the ALSYMPCA trial and related published information on radium-223 were reviewed. Radium-223 is the only alpha-emitting radiopharmaceutical that has been shown to improve overall survival in patients with CRPC, as demonstrated in the ALSYMPCA trial. In addition, radium-223 delays time to first symptomatic skeletal event, and it is well tolerated with a low incidence of myelosuppression and gastrointestinal adverse events. Delivered on an outpatient basis, radium-223 requires universal precautions for handling and administration. Because of the potential for additive myelosuppression, the concomitant use of radium-223 with chemotherapy, other systemic radioisotopes, or hemibody external radiation therapy is not recommended.

  5. Lymphocyte function following radium-223 therapy in patients with metastasized, castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsegian, Vahé; Müller, Stefan P; Möckel, Daniel; Horn, Peter A; Bockisch, Andreas; Lindemann, Monika

    2017-02-01

    Therapy with the alpha-emitter radium-223 chloride ((223)Ra) is an innovative therapeutic option in patients with metastasized, castration-resistant prostate cancer. However, radiotherapy can lead to hematopoietic toxicity. The aim of this study was to determine if (223)Ra therapy induces an impairment of cellular antimicrobial immune responses. In 11 patients receiving (223)Ra treatment, lymphocyte proliferation and the production of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines (interferon-γ and interleukin-10) were determined, using lymphocyte transformation testing and ELISpot, respectively. Lymphocyte function after stimulation with mitogens and microbial antigens was assessed prior to therapy and at day 1, 7 and 28 after therapy. Lymphocyte proliferation and the production of interferon-γ and interleukin-10 towards mitogens and antigens remained unchanged after therapy. Consistent with these in vitro data, we did not observe infectious complications after treatment. The results argue against an impairment of lymphocyte function after (223)Ra therapy. Thus, immune responses against pathogens should remain unaffected.

  6. Radium-223 dichloride for the treatment of castration-resistant prostate cancer with symptomatic bone metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogelzang, Nicholas J

    2017-08-01

    Castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is associated with the development of bone metastases, increased mortality, and a reduction in the patient's quality of life (QOL). The management of metastatic CRPC (mCRPC) has rapidly evolved over the past decade, with a number of available therapeutic agents improving overall survival. Radium-223 dichloride (radium-223), the first targeted alpha therapy, improves survival accompanied by QOL benefits with a favorable safety profile. It is approved in over 40 countries for the treatment of patients with CRPC with symptomatic bone metastases and no known visceral metastatic disease. Areas covered: The current management of CRPC in men with bone metastases, and in particular the role of radium-223 in this setting, is reviewed and discussed. A search of bibliographic databases for peer-reviewed literature and major meetings was conducted. Expert commentary: In treating patients with mCRPC, the best sequencing and/or combination of radium-223 with other agents has yet to be fully elucidated. The role of radium-223 in treating patients with hormone-sensitive metastatic prostate cancer who are candidates for chemotherapy should also be investigated in well-designed trials. The ability to tailor radium-223 therapy to both the clinical and genetic profiles of CRPC patients would be a promising development.

  7. Fluid inhibition as a factor in estrogen-induced increase of prostatic weight in castrated rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrales, J J; Kadohama, N; Chai, L S; Hoisaeter, P A; Hampton, M T; Murphy, G P; Sandberg, A A

    1981-01-01

    The mechanism by which estrogens inhibit castration atrophy has been investigated morphologically and biochemically utilizing ventral prostate from Copenhagen rats. The suppression of weight loss and gross edematous appearance of the prostate associated with the in vivo effect of 17 beta-estradiol (E2) could not be accounted for by DNA and protein synthesis. Increase in the fluid content in the tissues was confirmed by demonstration of significant increase in the ratio of wet/dry tissue weights. Light microscopy demonstrated that the main effects were on the stroma, characterized by large interglandular areas almost totally devoid of collagen resulting in an edematous appearance. Electron microscope studies showed an abundance of fluid localized adjacent to the capillary endothelium and some red blood cells indicating disturbances in capillary permeability. The combination of a prolactin secretion inhibiting agent with E2 alone, indicating an involvement of prolactin the estrogen effect. Differences in blood prolactin concentration between the strains of rats may influence the sensitivity of the prostate to estrogens.

  8. Somatostatin analogs in the treatment of castrate-resistant prostate cancer: efficacy and tolerability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. P. Kolesnikov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC is one of the most complex and currently completely unsolved problems of oncourology. Possible novel treatment of CRPC is administration of Octreotide Long, long-acting somatostatin analogue.In this paper we have shown an experience of treatment with Octreotide Long 30 mg and dexamethasone in 69 CRPC patients from February 2014 to March 2016. We have assessed an efficacy and safety of the therapy. Age of patients ranged from 56 to 89 years, all patients had continued androgen deprivation. Response to the treatment was assessed clinically by the following factors: change in the level of prostate specific antigen (PSA in serum, dynamics of indicators of general and biochemical blood tests, the level of pain syndrome and improvement in the patient’s quality of life. Total response to reduction and stabilization of PSA level was achieved in 70.9 % of patients. In general, the best results were observed in the group of patients treated with Octreotide Long before first-line chemotherapy with docetaxel. Tolerability of Octreotide Long in combination with dexamethasone in all cases was good. No significant side effects – neither hematological, nor clinical were noted. We also did not register any cases of drug discontinuation due to its intolerance. 

  9. Drug treatment opportunities of the elderly patients with the metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Solodkiy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Oncological disease in the elderly is a serious challenge to the patients health and medical staff. This is due to two main reasons. First, it is the general patient condition which weakened by the aging process, usually with the multiple co-morbidities, the second reason is conducted with multiple drugs therapy of intercurrent diseases. Most often, oncologists do not seek to prescribe anticancer drugs, and mainly it concerns chemotherapy, to patients of advanced age, fearing the excess toxicity leading to adverse effects. The age 70 years and over is that cut-off to determine the elderly patient with malignancy. If we take the cases of the metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC many, if not the majority, are the patients older than 70 years, as well significant the number of very elderly patients aged over 80 years. The presence of the various medicinal agents in medical arsenal can significantly prolong survival, including such patients. As a rule, in randomized trials, which studied the drugs for the mCRPC treatment, the elderly patients were not actively involved and it had some reason, related to comorbidity. In this review the available data on the elderly and very elderly patients with mCRPC who received the treatment within the clinical trials are considered. 

  10. Castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC): state of the art, perspectives and new challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massari, Francesco; Maines, Francesca; Modena, Alessandra; Brunelli, Matteo; Bria, Emilio; Artibani, Walter; Martignoni, Guido; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2013-07-01

    The rapid approval of several novel agents has given prostate cancer patients and their treating physicians many new and effective therapeutic options. Four new medical therapies were recently approved on the basis of prolonged overall survival in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) patients: sipuleucel-T, cabazitaxel, abiraterone acetate and MDV3100. Additionally, there are several other promising prostate cancer agents in late-stage development, including PROSTVAC-VF, orteronel and radium-223 chloride, each with a novel mechanism of action. The treatment paradigm for these patients is rapidly evolving, with future study needed to define the optimal sequencing and potential combinations of these new agents. In this review, we discuss the recent progress in understanding the biology of this disease and examining the development of a variety of new agents with promising activity and a favorable toxicity profile, that have been investigated in the setting of hormonal, cytotoxic, immune and targeted therapy. In this new therapeutic setting of CRPC, clinicians will have an opportunity to balance benefits and harms of these new agents in an individual context.

  11. Managing side effects of the novel taxane cabazitaxel in castrate-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle-Lindrud, Susan

    2012-06-01

    Cabazitaxel, a novel taxane, was approved in June 2010 by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for treatment of metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) in men previously treated with docetaxel. In TROPIC (N = 755), an open-label, randomized, phase III trial, cabazitaxel (plus prednisone) was associated with improvement in median overall survival compared with mitoxantrone plus prednisone (15.1 versus 12.7 months, p cabazitaxel versus the mitoxantrone regimen (2.8 versus 1.4 months, p cabazitaxel were hematologic; the rates (all grade) of neutropenia, leukopenia, and anemia were greater than 90%. Diarrhea, fatigue, asthenia, and back pain were the most common grade 3 or higher nonhematologic AEs. Because expected AEs from cabazitaxel therapy can delay or even interrupt treatment, oncology nurses need to be aware of those risks and their management. This article reviews the vital role of nurses in identifying patients at high risk for AEs associated with cabazitaxel therapy and reviews strategies for prevention and management of symptoms.

  12. Predictors of overall survival in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Markova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to estimate overall survival (OS rates in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC, who have received currently available drugs and to identify the predictors of OS.Subjects and methods. The case histories of 112 patients with mCRPC treated at the N.N. Blokhin Russian Cancer Research Center in 2005 to 2014 were retrospectively analyzed. All the patients had received standard regimens based on docetaxel, cabazitaxel, abiraterone acetate in combination with prednisolone.Results. Whatever the treatment option was, three-year OS rate was 32.0 ± 5.44 %; median survival was 24.3 months. The following poor prognostic factors for OS were pain syndrome; an ECOG performance status score of 2; the levels of prostate-specific antigen ≥ 288 ng/ml, lactate dehydrogenase ≥ 450 U/l, alkaline phosphatase ≥ 250 U/l, calcium < 2.28 mmol/l, and hemoglobin < 11.5 g/dl; as well as < 24 months’ duration of a response to hormonal therapy.Conclusion. The use of standard drug treatment regimen for mCRPC may increase survival in this category of patients to achieve 3-years OV; and the identified factors of OV may aid in choosing treatment policy.

  13. Genistein enhances the efficacy of cabazitaxel chemotherapy in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shumin; Wang, Yanru; Chen, Zhengjia; Kim, Sungjin; Iqbal, Shareen; Chi, Andrew; Ritenour, Chad; Wang, Yongqiang A; Kucuk, Omer; Wu, Daqing

    2013-11-01

    Cabazitaxel (Jevtana) has been approved for the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). However, most patients progress and become chemoresistant, which remains a major challenge in the management of advanced PCa. In this study, we investigated whether genistein, an isoflavone abundant in soy products, could sensitize mCRPC cells to cabazitaxel treatment in experimental models. The in vitro and in vivo effect of genistein in enhancing the response of mCRPC cells to cabazitaxel chemotherapy was evaluated in experimental models. Genistein increases the expression of pro-apoptotic protein Bax, activates apoptotic signals, and enhances the response to cabazitaxel treatment in mCRPC cells. In a PC3-luciferase xenograft model, the combined treatment with genistein and cabazitaxel significantly retarded the growth of mCRPC when compared to vehicle control, cabazitaxel, or genistein. Tissue staining confirmed the in vivo effect of genistein on the induction of Bax and activation of apoptosis. This study provided the first preclinical evidence supporting that genistein could be beneficial in improving cabazitaxel chemotherapy in mCRPC. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Recent Progress in Pharmaceutical Therapies for Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingzhong Hu

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Since 2010, six drugs have been approved for the treatment of castration-resistant prostate cancer, i.e., CYP17 inhibitor Abiraterone, androgen receptor antagonist Enzalutamide, cytotoxic agent Cabazitaxel, vaccine Sipuleucel-T, antibody Denosumab against receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand and radiopharmaceutical Alpharadin. All these drugs demonstrate improvement on overall survival, expect for Denosumab, which increases the bone mineral density of patients under androgen deprivation therapy and prolongs bone-metastasis-free survival. Besides further CYP17 inhibitors (Orteronel, Galeterone, VT-464 and CFG920, androgen receptor antagonists (ARN-509, ODM-201, AZD-3514 and EZN-4176 and vaccine Prostvac, more drug candidates with various mechanisms or new indications of launched drugs are currently under evaluation in different stages of clinical trials, including various kinase inhibitors and platinum complexes. Some novel strategies have also been proposed aimed at further potentiation of antitumor effects or reduction of side effects and complications related to treatments. Under these flourishing circumstances, more investigations should be performed on the optimal combination or the sequence of treatments needed to delay or reverse possible resistance and thus maximize the clinical benefits for the patients.

  15. Medical strategies for treatment of castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) docetaxel resistant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altavilla, Amelia; Iacovelli, Roberto; Procopio, Giuseppe; Alesini, Daniele; Risi, Emanuela; Campennì, Giuseppe Maria; Palazzo, Antonella; Cortesi, Enrico

    2012-01-01

    Current landscape of treatment of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) has recently changed. Cabazitaxel, a new taxane with potential antineoplastic activity, has been approved by Food and Drug Administration (FDA) after docetaxel failure. In a phase III trial, cabazitaxel showed increased overall survival (OS) compared with mitoxantrone (15.1 vs. 12.7 mo, HR 0.70, 95% CI 0.59–0.83, p < 0.0001). Furthermore, chemotherapy is not the only strategy available: several studies have shown as CRPC remains dependent on androgen receptor function for growth. Abiraterone acetate, an irreversible inhibitor of CYP17, has also been approved by FDA after docetaxel failure. In a phase III trial comparing abiraterone acetate to placebo, abiraterone showed improvement in OS (14.8 vs. 10.4 mo, HR 0.65, 95% CI 0.54–0.77; p < 0.0001). This review will discuss current options and the ongoing trials for second-line treatment of CRPC including chemotherapy, hormonal therapies, antiangiogenetic and immune strategies. PMID:22825325

  16. Cabazitaxel: more than a new taxane for metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mita, Alain C; Figlin, Robert; Mita, Monica M

    2012-12-15

    The taxanes are recognized as a major class of chemotherapeutic agents; however, mechanisms of innate and acquired resistance can limit their usefulness. Cabazitaxel, a novel taxane with microtubule-stabilizing potency similar to docetaxel, exhibits activity against tumor cell lines resistant to paclitaxel and docetaxel. Cabazitaxel showed linear pharmacokinetics and a terminal elimination half-life comparable with that of docetaxel, findings which support dosing as a single infusion in three-week treatment cycles. Dose-ranging studies recommended doses of 20 or 25 mg/m(2) every three weeks. Antitumor activity was shown in patients with advanced cancer and chemotherapy failure (including taxane failure). Other early studies investigated the efficacy of cabazitaxel in pretreated metastatic breast cancer, either as a single agent or in combination with capecitabine. Objective antitumor response rates of up to 24% and sustained tumor stabilizations were also observed. The TROPIC phase III study, conducted in patients with metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer previously treated with docetaxel, established cabazitaxel as the first chemotherapeutic agent to offer a survival advantage in this patient population. Across these studies, the dose-limiting hematologic toxicity was neutropenia (including febrile neutropenia), usually controllable with colony-stimulating factor/granulocyte-colony stimulating factor support. ©2012 AACR.

  17. Recent Progress in Pharmaceutical Therapies for Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Lina; Hu, Qingzhong; Hartmann, Rolf W.

    2013-01-01

    Since 2010, six drugs have been approved for the treatment of castration-resistant prostate cancer, i.e., CYP17 inhibitor Abiraterone, androgen receptor antagonist Enzalutamide, cytotoxic agent Cabazitaxel, vaccine Sipuleucel-T, antibody Denosumab against receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand and radiopharmaceutical Alpharadin. All these drugs demonstrate improvement on overall survival, expect for Denosumab, which increases the bone mineral density of patients under androgen deprivation therapy and prolongs bone-metastasis-free survival. Besides further CYP17 inhibitors (Orteronel, Galeterone, VT-464 and CFG920), androgen receptor antagonists (ARN-509, ODM-201, AZD-3514 and EZN-4176) and vaccine Prostvac, more drug candidates with various mechanisms or new indications of launched drugs are currently under evaluation in different stages of clinical trials, including various kinase inhibitors and platinum complexes. Some novel strategies have also been proposed aimed at further potentiation of antitumor effects or reduction of side effects and complications related to treatments. Under these flourishing circumstances, more investigations should be performed on the optimal combination or the sequence of treatments needed to delay or reverse possible resistance and thus maximize the clinical benefits for the patients. PMID:23880851

  18. The role of cabazitaxel in the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, Che-Kai; Cutting, Elena; Martin, Jacob; Oh, William K

    2014-06-01

    For decades, cytotoxic therapy was considered ineffective for the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Earlier therapies such as estramustine and mitoxantrone received regulatory approval based upon improvement in palliative endpoints. In 2004, docetaxel became the first treatment to demonstrate a significant survival benefit in patients with mCRPC based on two randomized phase III studies, TAX327 and SWOG 99-16. Cabazitaxel, a third-generation taxane, was chosen for clinical development based on its decreased affinity for the drug efflux pump, p-glycoprotein, which is a frequent cause of drug resistance in docetaxel-resistant preclinical models. In 2010, cabazitaxel was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration as the first therapy to show a survival benefit for the treatment of patients with docetaxel-refractory mCRPC. This review summarizes the existing literature on the use of cabazitaxel, focusing on its efficacy and safety in combination with prednisone in the treatment of mCRPC, as well as its role in an era of new therapeutic options.

  19. Cabazitaxel in the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: patient selection and special considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel SA

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Sheel A Patel, Jean Hoffman-Censits Department of Medical Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA, USA Abstract: Cabazitaxel is an effective chemotherapeutic agent used in the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC refractory to docetaxel. With the advent of new antiandrogen therapies, immune-based treatments, and radioactive-targeted therapy, there are now multiple effective and approved agents for this disease state. The optimal sequencing of these agents is unclear as there are no large-scale head-to-head comparisons. Clinicians must familiarize themselves with the most recent studies as well as drug toxicities to determine the best treatment option for their patients. In this review, we focus on the development of cabazitaxel for mCRPC, evaluate its efficacy, and highlight key strategies for toxicity management. Additionally, we summarize the studies that address cabazitaxel treatment sequencing and optimal dosing schedule. Keywords: sequencing, clinical trials, docetaxel, abiraterone, enzalutamide, biomarkers

  20. Prolonged therapy with cabazitaxel in an octogenarian with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Sumanta K.; Stein, C. A.

    2013-01-01

    In the phase III TROPIC trial, cabazitaxel in combination with prednisone was compared to mitoxantrone with prednisone in patients with metastatic castration-resistant disease (mCRPC) that had received previous therapy with docetaxel. Cabazitaxel therapy was associated with an improvement in overall survival (the primary endpoint of the study), leading to its FDA approval for use in this setting. Although cabazitaxel was the first agent approved in the post-docetaxel space, several other agents have entered (or are probably soon to enter) the therapeutic armamentarium, including abiraterone, MDV3100, and radium-223. As such, the oncologist is faced with the issue of balancing the risks and benefits of diverse therapies in this setting in the absence of comparative data. Although the difficulties associated with cytotoxic therapy may cause both the patient and physician to delay use of cabazitaxel after docetaxel, we present a case to illustrate that the agent can be well tolerated and efficacious even in the very elderly. Our patient, an octogenarian with mCRPC and evidence of progression after 10 cycles of docetaxel, has tolerated 24 cycles of cabazitaxel to date with disease stabilization and minimal toxicity. Herein, we discuss considerations in selecting appropriate post-docetaxel therapies in an increasingly complex therapeutic landscape. PMID:22575202

  1. Cabazitaxel for Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer: Retrospective Data Analysis from an Indian Centre

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    Vanita Noronha

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the efficacy and safety of cabazitaxel in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC patients from the named patient programme (NPP at our centre. Methods: mCRPC patients who progressed on docetaxel were given cabazitaxel intravenously every 3 weeks until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity occurred. Overall survival, progression-free survival, prostate-specific antigen response, quality of life (QOL changes, and safety were reported. Results: Nine men received cabazitaxel (median: 7 cycles; range: 1–27 under the NPP and were followed until death. Median survival was 14.07 months (1.07–23.80 and progression-free survival was 2.67 months (1.07–20.27. QOL was stable for most patients. Common adverse events (grade ≥3 were neutropenia (n = 8, anaemia (n = 4, and leucopenia (n = 4. Conclusion: These data from 9 patients are consistent with the results reported in the TROPIC study with a manageable safety profile.

  2. Safety of Abiraterone Acetate in Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer Patients With Concomitant Cardiovascular Risk Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procopio, Giuseppe; Grassi, Paolo; Testa, Isabella; Verzoni, Elena; Torri, Valter; Salvioni, Roberto; Valdagni, Riccardo; de Braud, Filippo

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety profile of abiraterone acetate (AA) in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) men with cardiovascular comorbidity, as little conclusive safety data are available in this patient subset. A retrospective analysis of mCRPC patients with controlled cardiovascular comorbidities, receiving AA 1000 mg administered orally once daily and prednisone 5 mg twice daily, between April 2011 and July 2012, was performed. All clinical and instrumental variables and toxicity data were analyzed by descriptive statistics: mean, standard deviation, minimum and maximum values for continuous variables, and absolute and relative frequencies for categorical variables. A total of 51 mCRPC patients were evaluated. Metastatic sites included the bone (74%), lungs, and liver (26%). All patients were previously treated with at least 2 lines of hormone and 1 docetaxel-based chemotherapy. Preexisting cardiac risk factors included hypertension (41%), cardiac ischemia (12%), arrhythmias (6%), dislipidemia (18%), and hyperglycemia (30%). No grade 3-4 adverse events were observed. Grade 1-2 adverse events included fluid retention (18%), asthenia (15%), and hypertension (16%). Median progression-free survival was 5.1 months (95% confidence interval, 0.5-12). Prostate specific antigen assessment revealed a good overall disease control rate (64%). AA appears to be safe and well tolerated even in patients with cardiovascular comorbidities or with increased risk factors for cardiovascular diseases.

  3. Clinical Relevance of Androgen Receptor Splice Variants in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maughan, Benjamin L; Antonarakis, Emmanuel S

    2015-12-01

    Metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) currently benefits from a wealth of treatment options, yet still remains lethal in the vast majority of patients. It is becoming increasingly understood that this disease entity continues to evolve over time, acquiring additional and diverse resistance mechanisms with each subsequent therapy used. This dynamic relationship between treatment pressure and disease resistance can be challenging for the managing clinician. The recent discovery of alternate splice variants of the androgen receptor (AR) is one potential mechanism of escape in mCRPC, and recognizing this resistance mechanism might be important for optimal treatment selection for our patients. AR-V7 appears to be the most relevant AR splice variant, and early clinical data suggest that it is a negative prognostic marker in mCRPC. Emerging evidence also suggests that detection of AR-V7 may be associated with resistance to novel hormonal therapy (abiraterone and enzalutamide) but may be compatible with sensitivity to taxane chemotherapy (docetaxel and cabazitaxel). Adding to this complexity is the observation that AR-V7 is a dynamic marker whose status may change across time and depending on selective pressures induced by different therapies. Finally, it is possible that AR-V7 may represent a therapeutic target in mCRPC if drugs can be designed that degrade or inhibit AR splice variants or block their transcriptional activity. Several such agents (including galeterone, EPI-506, and bromodomain/BET inhibitors) are now in clinical development.

  4. Extending juvenility in grasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaeppler, Shawn; de Leon Gatti, Natalia; Foerster, Jillian

    2017-04-11

    The present invention relates to compositions and methods for modulating the juvenile to adult developmental growth transition in plants, such as grasses (e.g. maize). In particular, the invention provides methods for enhancing agronomic properties in plants by modulating expression of GRMZM2G362718, GRMZM2G096016, or homologs thereof. Modulation of expression of one or more additional genes which affect juvenile to adult developmental growth transition such as Glossy15 or Cg1, in conjunction with such modulation of expression is also contemplated. Nucleic acid constructs for down-regulation of GRMZM2G362718 and/or GRMZM2G096016 are also contemplated, as are transgenic plants and products produced there from, that demonstrate altered, such as extended juvenile growth, and display associated phenotypes such as enhanced yield, improved digestibility, and increased disease resistance. Plants described herein may be used, for example, as improved forage or feed crops or in biofuel production.

  5. Extended Poisson Exponential Distribution

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    Anum Fatima

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A new mixture of Modified Exponential (ME and Poisson distribution has been introduced in this paper. Taking the Maximum of Modified Exponential random variable when the sample size follows a zero truncated Poisson distribution we have derived the new distribution, named as Extended Poisson Exponential distribution. This distribution possesses increasing and decreasing failure rates. The Poisson-Exponential, Modified Exponential and Exponential distributions are special cases of this distribution. We have also investigated some mathematical properties of the distribution along with Information entropies and Order statistics of the distribution. The estimation of parameters has been obtained using the Maximum Likelihood Estimation procedure. Finally we have illustrated a real data application of our distribution.

  6. Extending rational maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Gaven J.

    We investigate when a rational endomorphism of the Riemann sphere overline{C} extends to a mapping of the upper half-space {H3 which is rational with respect to some measurable conformal structure. Such an extension has the property that it and all its iterates have uniformly bounded distortion. Such maps are called uniformly quasiregular. We show that, in the space of rational mappings of degree d , such an extension is possible in the structurally stable component where there is a single (attracting) component of the Fatou set and the Julia set is a Cantor set. We show that generally outside of this set no such extension is possible. In particular, polynomials can never admit such an extension.

  7. Reduced Extended MHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, P. J.; Abdelhamid, H. M.; Grasso, D.; Hazeltine, R. D.; Lingam, M.; Tassi, E.

    2015-11-01

    Over the years various reduced fluid models have been obtained for modeling plasmas, with the goal of capturing important physics while maintaining computability. Such models have included the physics contained in various generalizations of Ohm's law, including Hall drift and electron inertia. In a recent publication it was shown that full 3D extended MHD is a Hamiltonian system by finding its noncanonical Poisson bracket. Subsequently, this bracket was shown to be derivable from that for Hall MHD by a series of remarkable transformations, which greatly simplifies the proof of the Jacobi identity and allows one to immediately obtain generalizations of the helicity and cross helicity. In this poster we use this structure to obtain exact reduced fluid models with the effects of full two-fluid theory. Results of numerical computations of collisionless reconnection using an exact reduced 4-field model will be presented and analytical comparisons of mode structure of previous reduced models will be made.

  8. Extended Mixed Vector Equilibrium Problems

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    Mijanur Rahaman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We study extended mixed vector equilibrium problems, namely, extended weak mixed vector equilibrium problem and extended strong mixed vector equilibrium problem in Hausdorff topological vector spaces. Using generalized KKM-Fan theorem (Ben-El-Mechaiekh et al.; 2005, some existence results for both problems are proved in noncompact domain.

  9. Ganho de peso e características de carcaça de bovinos Nelore castrados ou não-castrados terminados em confinamento Weight gain and characteristics of carcass of castrated or non-castrated Nellore cattle finished in confinement

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    Fredson Vieira e Silva

    2008-12-01

    ético.The objective of this work was to evaluate weight gain and carcass characteristics Nellore cattle, castrated or non-castrated, finished in confinement. It was used Thirty six animals with 24 months old and initial 445.30 kg BW (non-castrated or 449.57 kg BW (castrated at 400 kg BW. The animals were slaughtered at 50 days of confinement, when reached 516.30 kg BW (non-castrated and 506.86 kg BW (castrated. Non-castrated animals did not have an increase in final BW, but showed higher weight gain (1.42 and 1.15 kg. Hot carcass weight (272.77 and 261.89 kg and cold carcass weight (266.13 and 258.24 kg did not differ between non-castrated and castrated animals. Non-castrated animals showed higher hot carcass yield (52.88 vs. 51.65% however, cold carcass yield was similar between groups (51.55 and 52.39%, due to smaller chilling loss in castrated animals (2.43 vs. 1.40%. Special hindquarter absolute weights (133.07 and 131.55 kg, forequarter (105.65 and 100.09 kg and spare ribs (27.41 and 26.60 kg did not differ between non-castrated and castrated animals. Forequarter relative values castrated animals were higher than the non-castrated (50.93 versus 50.00%. The striploin of non-castrated animals was heavier than that of castrated (8.41 vs. 7.90 kg. Fat thickness (2.05 vs. 2.21 mm and loin eye area (66.98 versus 67.48 cm² did not differ between non-castrated and castrated animals. Cold carcass pH in predetermined time until setting of rigor mortis is also similar between and non-castrated and castrated animals. Non-castrated and castrated animals have satisfactory carcass weight, but have not fat thickness less than 3 mm, when confined for 50 days with diet based on sugar cane and concentrate. To match the fat thickness, the diet of the animals must be balanced with higher energy level.

  10. Changes in blood testosterone concentrations after surgical and chemical sterilization of male free-roaming dogs in southern Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderstichel, R; Forzán, M J; Pérez, G E; Serpell, J A; Garde, E

    2015-04-01

    There is a growing interest in chemical sterilization as an alternative to surgical castration in large-scale sterilization campaigns to control canine populations. An important step toward understanding the short-term and long-term effects of chemical sterilants is to determine their impact on blood testosterone concentrations, particularly as these could influence dog behavior after treatment. A field trial was conducted with 118 free-roaming male dogs in the Chilean Patagonia, where 36 dogs were chemically sterilized using EsterilSol, 39 dogs were surgically castrated, and 43 dogs remained intact as controls. Blood testosterone levels were determined at four time periods: on enrollment 6 months before treatment (t-6m), at the time of treatment (t0, within one hour after surgical castration or chemical sterilization and during a concurrent 2-week period for the control group), four (t+4m), and six (t+6m) months after treatment. Intrinsic and temporal factors were evaluated; age was significantly associated with testosterone, where dogs 2- to 4-year-old had the highest testosterone concentrations (P = 0.036), whereas body weight and body condition scores were not associated with testosterone; testosterone concentration was not influenced by time of day, month, or season. After treatment (t+4m and t+6m), all of the surgically castrated dogs had testosterone concentrations below 1.0 ng/mL. On the basis of this cut point (sterilized dogs at both t+4m and t+6m; it remained low for 22% of dogs at both t+4m and t+6m; it was unchanged at t+4m but low at t+6m in 9% of dogs; and, it was low at t+4m but reverted back to unchanged at t+6m in one dog (3%). Incidentally, testosterone in chemically sterilized dogs increased dramatically within 1 hour of treatment (t0), more than doubling (131%) the concentration of control dogs at the time of treatment (t0), likely because of severe necrosis of interstitial cells. The use of EsterilSol as a method of sterilizing dogs had a

  11. Phase II trial of RAD001 and bicalutamide for castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakabayashi, Mari; Werner, Lilian; Courtney, Kevin D; Buckle, Geoffrey; Oh, William K; Bubley, Glen J; Hayes, Julia H; Weckstein, Douglas; Elfiky, Aymen; Sims, Danny M; Kantoff, Philip W; Taplin, Mary-Ellen

    2012-12-01

    Study Type--Therapy (cohort) Level of Evidence 2a. What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? Despite expanding treatment options for castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), therapies with long response duration remain intangible due to prostate cancer cells' natural ability to develop iterative resistance. Androgen receptor (AR) signaling has been shown to play a critical role in CRPC and its expression is regulated by the PI3K-Akt pathway. Thus inhibition of AR signalling and PI3K-Akt-mTOR (a downstream mediator of the PI3K-Akt pathway) pathway is a logical combination in CRPC and we report a phase II trial of RAD001 and bicalutamide. Our study is the first clinical trial report of an AR inhibitor of PI3K-Akt-mTOR. The AR pathway and the PI3K-Akt-mTOR pathway are two of the most relevant growth pathway for CRPC. Despite low efficacy results from our trial there will be significant interest in the field for these data (dose, schedule, response, toxicity, trial design) as newer generations of both AR inhibitors and PI3K-Akt-mTOR inhibitors are in development and likely will be tested in combination in CRPC. • To determine best overall response and duration of response of RAD001, a selective inhibitor of mammalian target of rapamycin, in combination with bicalutamide in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). • To characterize the toxicity profile of RAD001 in combination with bicalutamide in patients with CRPC. • A phase II study was conducted to explore the efficacy and tolerability of RAD001 (10 mg daily) in combination with bicalutamide (50 mg daily) in men with progressive CRPC. • The primary endpoint was a composite of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level and measurable disease response by standard criteria. • This single-stage trial with a sample size of 38 eligible patients provided 90% power to differentiate a response rate of ≥ 40% from a response rate of ≤ 20%, as expected for bicalutamide alone (α= 0.10, power = 0

  12. Targeting NF-kappa B Signaling by Artesunate Restores Sensitivity of Castrate-Resistant Prostate Cancer Cells to Antiandrogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica J. Nunes

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT is the most preferred treatment for men with metastatic prostate cancer (PCa. However, the disease eventually progresses and develops resistance to ADT in majority of the patients, leading to the emergence of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC. Here, we assessed artesunate (AS, an artemisinin derivative, for its anticancer properties and ability to alleviate resistance to androgen receptor (AR antagonists. We have shown AS in combination with bicalutamide (Bic attenuates the oncogenic properties of the castrate-resistant (PC3, 22RV1 and androgen-responsive (LNCaP PCa cells. Mechanistically, AS and Bic combination inhibits nuclear factor (NF-κB signaling and decreases AR and/or AR-variant 7 expression via ubiquitin-mediated proteasomal degradation. The combination induces oxidative stress and apoptosis via survivin downregulation and caspase-3 activation, resulting in poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP cleavage. Moreover, preclinical castrate-resistant PC3 xenograft studies in NOD/SCID mice (n =28, seven per group show remarkable tumor regression and significant reduction in lungs and bone metastases upon administering AS (50 mg/kg per day in two divided doses and Bic (50 mg/kg per day via oral gavage. Taken together, we for the first time provide a compelling preclinical rationale that AS could disrupt AR antagonist–mediated resistance observed in mCRPC. The current study also indicates that the therapeutic combination of Food and Drug Administration–approved AS or NF-κB inhibitors and AR antagonists may enhance the clinical efficacy in the treatment of mCRPC patients.

  13. Intensity of stromal changes is associated with tumor relapse in clinically advanced prostate cancer after castration therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jian-Ping; Huang, Wen-Bin; Zhou, Hui; Xu, Lu-Wei; Zhao, Jian-Hua; Zhu, Jia-Gen; Su, Jiang-Hao; Sun, Hong-Bin

    2014-01-01

    Reactive stromal changes in prostate cancer (PCa) are likely involved in the emergence of castration-resistant PCa (CRPC). This study was designed to investigate stromal changes in patients with clinically advanced PCa and analyze their prognostic significance. Prostate needle biopsies obtained from 148 patients before castration therapy were analyzed by Masson trichrome staining and immunohistochemical analysis of vimentin and desmin. Reactive stroma grading was inversely correlated with Gleason score. Stroma grade (Masson stain 82.8% vs 45.6%, P < 0.001) and vimentin expression (P = 0.005) were significantly higher, and desmin expression (P = 0.004) significantly lower, in reactive stroma of tumors with a Gleason score of 6-7 than in adjacent peritumoral tissue. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed a significant association between reactive stroma grade in tumors and the occurrence of CRPC in patients with a Gleason score of 6-7 (P = 0.009). Furthermore, patients with higher vimentin or lower desmin expression had a shorter disease-free period. In multivariate analysis, only vimentin expression was a significant predictor of tumor relapse (hazard ratio 1.78, 95% confidence interval 1.12-10.26, P = 0.012). These findings indicate that the intensity of reactive stroma is associated with castration responsiveness, especially in patients with a lower Gleason score where the abundant stroma component is most frequently found. High expression of vimentin in tumor stroma was independently associated with poor outcomes in patients with Gleason scores of 6-7, and may serve as a new prognostic marker in daily practice.

  14. Intensity of stromal changes is associated with tumor relapse in clinically advanced prostate cancer after castration therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Ping Wu

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Reactive stromal changes in prostate cancer (PCa are likely involved in the emergence of castration-resistant PCa (CRPC. This study was designed to investigate stromal changes in patients with clinically advanced PCa and analyze their prognostic significance. Prostate needle biopsies obtained from 148 patients before castration therapy were analyzed by Masson trichrome staining and immunohistochemical analysis of vimentin and desmin. Reactive stroma grading was inversely correlated with Gleason score. Stroma grade (Masson stain 82.8% vs 45.6%, P < 0.001 and vimentin expression (P = 0.005 were significantly higher, and desmin expression (P = 0.004 significantly lower, in reactive stroma of tumors with a Gleason score of 6-7 than in adjacent peritumoral tissue. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed a significant association between reactive stroma grade in tumors and the occurrence of CRPC in patients with a Gleason score of 6-7 (P = 0.009. Furthermore, patients with higher vimentin or lower desmin expression had a shorter disease-free period. In multivariate analysis, only vimentin expression was a significant predictor of tumor relapse (hazard ratio 1.78, 95% confidence interval 1.12-10.26, P = 0.012. These findings indicate that the intensity of reactive stroma is associated with castration responsiveness, especially in patients with a lower Gleason score where the abundant stroma component is most frequently found. High expression of vimentin in tumor stroma was independently associated with poor outcomes in patients with Gleason scores of 6-7, and may serve as a new prognostic marker in daily practice.

  15. Comparison of caudal and pre-scrotal castration for management of perineal hernia in dogs between 2004 and 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snell, W L; Orsher, R J; Larenza-Menzies, M P; Popovitch, C A

    2015-09-01

    To compare peri- and post-operative complications associated with caudal scrotal castration (CSC) and perineal hernia repair with pre-scrotal castration (PSC) in conjunction with another surgical procedure. Medical records were reviewed for 51 intact male dogs that were admitted to the Veterinary Emergency and Surgical Center, Levittown, PA, and underwent a CSC and perineal hernia repair using an internal obturator muscle flap (IOMF) between 2004 and 2014. Perioperative, and major and minor post-operative complications noted within the 2 week follow up period were reported and compared to 91 intact male dogs that underwent a PSC in conjunction with a second surgical procedure. There were no recorded perioperative or major post-operative complications in either group. There were 3/51 (6%) minor post-operative complications in the CSC group compared to 6/91 (7%) in the PSC group. There were 2/51 (4%) and 4/91 (4%) cases that developed heat, erythema and swelling associated with the incision site and 1/51 (2%) and 2/91 (2%) cases that developed scrotal swelling in the CSC and PSC groups, respectively. Overall, there was no difference in the prevalence of minor complications between the two groups (p=0.86). Caudal scrotal castration was not associated with more perioperative or postoperative complications relative to PSC. Utilising the CSC approach eliminates the need to aseptically prepare and drape a second site when carrying out perineal hernia repair, as well as the need for patient repositioning. Thus, we recommend that CSC be the preferred surgical technique when performing orchiectomy in dogs concurrent with perineal hernia repair.

  16. Sedation with Xylazine-Diazepam and Epidural Administration of Lidocaine and Xylazine for Castration and Ovariohysterectomy in Cats

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    Bizhan Ziaei

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine whether anesthesia consisting of sedation induced by intramuscular administration of xylazine-diazepam and lumbosacral analgesia induced by epidural administration of lidocaine and xylazine is satisfactory for castration and ovariohysterectomy in cats. Six adult (3 male and 3 female, 2.5 ± 0.5 years of age cats (mean body weight ± SD, 2.2 ± 0.44 kg were used in this study. Cats were sedated with xylazine (1-2 mg kg-1 IM and diazepam (0.2 mg kg-1, IM and 5 minutes later a 2% solution of lidocaine (0.5ml/4.5kg and xylazine (1 mg kg-1 were administered into the lumbosacral epidural space. Open castration technique or ventral midline routine ovariohysterectomy were performed. Time to onset, duration and cranial spread of analgesia were recorded. Heart rate, respiratory rate and rectal temperature were recorded at time 0 (prior to epidural drugs administration as a base line values and at 10, 20, 30, 45 and 60 minutes after the epidural administration. Onset time of analgesia was 4.0 ± 0.63 min (Mean ± SEM and duration of analgesia was 89.5 ± 3.0 min (Mean ± SEM. However, surgical procedures were completed within 25-37 min. There were significant decrease in heart rate and rectal temperature values and significant increase in respiratory rate (P < 0.001. Intramuscular administration of xylazine-diazepam for sedation and epidural administration of lidocaine and xylazine for analgesia provided satisfactory analgesia for castration and ovariohysterectomy in cats. Utilizing epidural anesthetic technique with this combination is most useful for spaying surgery, especially when the surgical procedure can be completed in < 40 minutes.

  17. Effect of ACTH and CRH on Plasma Levels of Cortisol and Prostaglandin F2α Metabolite in Cycling Gilts and Castrated Boars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kindahl H

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study was designed to evaluate the effects of synthetic ACTH (1–24, tetracosactid and porcine CRH on the plasma levels of cortisol and PGF2α metabolite in cycling gilts (n = 3 and castrated boars (n = 3. The experiments were designed as crossover studies for each gender separately. Each animal received, during three consecutive days; 1 ACTH (Synacthen® Depot at a dose of 10 μg/kg body weight in 5 ml physiological saline, 2 porcine CRH at a dose 0.6 μg/kg body weight in 5 ml physiological saline or 3 physiological saline (5 ml. The test substances were administered via an indwelling jugular cannula in randomized order according to a Latin square. The administration of ACTH to cycling gilts resulted in concomitant elevations of cortisol and PGF2α metabolite with peak levels reached at 70.0 ± 10.0 and 33.3 ± 6.7 min, respectively. Similarly, the administration of ACTH to castrated boars resulted in concomitant elevation of cortisol and PGF2α metabolite with peak levels reached at 60.0 ± 0.0 and 20.0 ± 0.0 min, respectively. Cortisol peaked at 20 min after administration of CRH in both cycling gilts and castrated boars with maximum levels of 149.3 ± 16.5 nmol/1 and 138.3 ± 10.1 nmol/1, respectively. It can be concluded that administration of synthetic ACTH (tetracosactid to pigs caused a concomitant elevation of cortisol and PGF2α metabolite levels in both cycling gilts as well as castrated boars. The administration of CRH to pigs resulted in an elevation of cortisol levels in both cycling gilts and castrated boars. Conversely, PGF2α metabolite levels were not influenced by the administration of CRH either in cycling gilts or in castrated boars.

  18. Effect of ACTH and CRH on Plasma Levels of Cortisol and Prostaglandin F2α Metabolite in Cycling Gilts and Castrated Boars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madej A

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study was designed to evaluate the effects of synthetic ACTH (1–24, tetracosactid and porcine CRH on the plasma levels of cortisol and PGF2α metabolite in cycling gilts (n = 3 and castrated boars (n = 3. The experiments were designed as crossover studies for each gender separately. Each animal received, during three consecutive days; 1 ACTH (Synacthen® Depot at a dose of 10 μg/kg body weight in 5 ml physiological saline, 2 porcine CRH at a dose 0.6 μg/kg body weight in 5 ml physiological saline or 3 physiological saline (5 ml. The test substances were administered via an indwelling jugular cannula in randomized order according to a Latin square. The administration of ACTH to cycling gilts resulted in concomitant elevations of cortisol and PGF2α metabolite with peak levels reached at 70.0 ± 10.0 and 33.3 ± 6.7 min, respectively. Similarly, the administration of ACTH to castrated boars resulted in concomitant elevation of cortisol and PGF2α metabolite with peak levels reached at 60.0 ± 0.0 and 20.0 ± 0.0 min, respectively. Cortisol peaked at 20 min after administration of CRH in both cycling gilts and castrated boars with maximum levels of 149.3 ± 16.5 nmol/1 and 138.3 ± 10.1 nmol/1, respectively. It can be concluded that administration of synthetic ACTH (tetracosactid to pigs caused a concomitant elevation of cortisol and PGF2α metabolite levels in both cycling gilts as well as castrated boars. The administration of CRH to pigs resulted in an elevation of cortisol levels in both cycling gilts and castrated boars. Conversely, PGF2α metabolite levels were not influenced by the administration of CRH either in cycling gilts or in castrated boars.

  19. Oral/metronomic cyclophosphamide-based chemotherapy as option for patients with castration-refractory prostate cancer: review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelius, T; Rinard, K; Filleur, S

    2011-10-01

    Castration-refractory prostate cancer remains a therapeutic challenge even after introduction of docetaxel as first-line treatment. Castration-refractory prostate cancer cannot be cured by any available therapeutic option, and chemotherapy still needs to be considered palliative. The survival benefit is modest, and treating physicians are searching for alternative treatment options. Despite new drugs currently under investigation, some conventional and well known chemotherapeutic drugs are experiencing a renaissance. The development of anti-angiogenic approaches in cancer treatment has led to the development of metronomic dosing of conventional chemotherapeutic drugs including cyclophosphamide. The intention of this review is to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of oral/metronomic cyclophosphamide in the treatment of patients with castration-refractory prostate cancer. A comprehensive literature search was performed in different databases using various key words. Relevant articles and references between 1962 and 2010 were reviewed and analyzed for data regarding the association between oral cyclophosphamide treatment and prostate cancer. Oral cyclophosphamide is active in the treatment for castration-refractory prostate cancer even in patients treated with previous chemotherapy including docetaxel. It yields symptomatic and objective remissions. The side effects are usually grade 1-2 and easy to manage. Grade three to four side effects are less common. Oral cyclophosphamide treatment for patients with castration-refractory prostate cancer deserves more attention and validation, and warrants further testing of various treatment combinations. Given the fact that castration-refractory prostate cancer includes an extremely heterogeneous group of patients with variability of tumor growth rates, the combination of cyclophosphamide with other active agents such as angiogenesis inhibitors and immunomodulatory compounds need to be explored. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd

  20. Castration impairs erectile organ structure and function by inhibiting autophagy and promoting apoptosis of corpus cavernosum smooth muscle cells in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xian-Jin; Xu, Tian-Yuan; Xia, Lei-Lei; Zhong, Shan; Zhang, Xiao-Hua; Zhu, Zhao-Wei; Chen, Dong-Rui; Liu, Yue; Fan, Yong; Xu, Chen; Zhang, Min-Guang; Shen, Zhou-Jun

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the changes and underlying mechanisms of erectile organ structure and function in castrated rats. In addition, the regulatory effects of an androgen on autophagy and apoptosis in corpus cavernosum smooth muscle cells (CCSMCs), especially the regulatory effect of androgen on the BECN 1-Bcl-2 interaction, were investigated. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups (30/group): control group, castration group, and castration with testosterone supplementation group. The erectile function was examined both in vivo and in vitro, by electric stimulation of the cavernous nerve and corpus cavernosum strip bath test, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy, TUNEL assay, Masson's trichrome staining, immunohistochemistry, and western blotting were performed to determine the levels of autophagy and apoptosis, and the structural changes in corpus cavernosum. Compared with control group, the castration group showed (1) lower erectile function: lower intracavernosal pressure/mean arterial pressure ratio, lower systolic and diastolic capability of corporal strips, and reduced expressions of eNOS and nNOS; (2) greater fibrosis: decreased smooth muscle/collagen ratio, lower expression of α-SMA, and higher expression of TGF-β1; (3) inhibited autophagy: decreased autophagosomes, lower expressions of BECN1 and LC3-II; and (4) enhanced apoptosis: higher apoptotic index and decreased Bcl-2/Bax ratio. Testosterone supplementation partially improved the effects of castration. Castration attenuates erectile function and induces corporeal fibrosis by inhibiting autophagy and promoting apoptosis of CCSMCs in rats. Therefore, our study highlights the important role of androgens in maintaining the integrity of the structure and function of corpus cavernosum in rats through counter-regulation of autophagy and apoptosis, mainly by regulating BECN 1-Bcl-2 interaction.

  1. HLA-restricted NY-ESO-1 peptide immunotherapy for metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonpavde, Guru; Wang, Mingjun; Peterson, Leif E; Wang, Helen Y; Joe, Teresa; Mims, Martha P; Kadmon, Dov; Ittmann, Michael M; Wheeler, Thomas M; Gee, Adrian P; Wang, Rong-Fu; Hayes, Teresa G

    2014-04-01

    Given the immunogenicity of NY-ESO-1 peptides in prostate cancer, a phase I clinical trial was designed to evaluate HLA class-I and class-II restricted NY-ESO-1 peptides in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Patients with progressive mCRPC, Zubrod Performance Status ≤2, PSA ≥10 ng/ml who had appropriate HLA class I (A2) and class II haplotypes (DR4, DP4) were eligible. Three groups with 3 patients each received the vaccine subcutaneously every 2 weeks for 6 doses. Group 1 received a peptide presented by an HLA class I haplotype (HLA-A2), Group 2 with a peptide presented by HLA class II haplotype (DR4, DP4), and Group 3 with peptides presented by both Class I and II haplotypes. Androgen-deprivation was continued. Owing to a myocardial infarction, the protocol was amended to omit the use of GM-CSF. Fourteen patients were evaluable for toxicities and 9 received all 6 doses and were evaluable for efficacy. One death from myocardial infarction following GM-CSF occurred in a patient with generalized myalgias. After omitting GM-CSF, no grade >2 toxicities were observed. Among 9 patients evaluable for efficacy, the median PSA doubling time pre-therapy and during therapy were 3.1 and 4.92 months, respectively. NY-ESO-1 specific T-cell response observed by ELISPOT appeared more frequent in docetaxel-naïve patients (4 of 4) than docetaxel-pretreated patients (2 of 5). In men with mCRPC, individualized HLA class-I and/or class-II restricted NY-ESO-1 peptides were tolerable, appeared to slow PSA doubling time and yielded antigen-specific T-cell responses more often in chemonaïve patients.

  2. Mode of action of interleukin-1 in suppression of pituitary LH release in castrated male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonavera, J J; Kalra, S P; Kalra, P S

    1993-05-28

    These studies were undertaken to elucidate the mechanisms whereby the cytokine, Interleukin (IL-1) suppresses pituitary LH release in orchidectomized rats. Since LH secretion is pulsatile in castrated rats, the effects of IL-1 on the components of the LH pulsatility were assessed. Intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of IL-1 alpha or IL-1 beta suppressed LH release, but IL-1 beta was relatively more effective than IL-1 alpha in terms of the onset (IL-1 beta = 30 min; IL-1 alpha = 105 min) as well as the magnitude and duration of LH suppression. Further, the marked suppression of LH secretion in IL-1 beta-treated rats was found to be due to significant reductions both in the frequency and amplitude of LH episodes. We next evaluated whether the IL-1 beta-induced suppression of LH release was mediated by either of the two inhibitory hypothalamic peptidergic systems, corticotrophin releasing hormone (CRH) and endogenous opioid peptides (EOP). Passive immunoneutralization of CRH by i.c.v. administration of a specific CRH-antibody, either once at 15 min or twice at 75 and 15 min before IL-1 beta injection, failed to block the suppressive effects of IL-1 beta on LH release. Similarly, pharmacological blockade of CRH by i.c.v. injection of the CRH receptor antagonist, alpha-helical CRH9-41 15 min before IL-1 beta was ineffective. However, i.v. infusion of the opiate receptor antagonist, naloxone, which on its own had no effect on LH secretion, counteracted the inhibitory effects of IL-1 beta. To further identify the opiate receptor subtype involved, we utilized specific opiate receptor subtype antagonists.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Perioperative mortality in cats and dogs undergoing spay or castration at a high-volume clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, J K; Bard, K M; Tucker, S J; Diskant, P D; Dingman, P A

    2017-06-01

    High volume spay-neuter (spay-castration) clinics have been established to improve population control of cats and dogs to reduce the number of animals admitted to and euthanazed in animal shelters. The rise in the number of spay-neuter clinics in the USA has been accompanied by concern about the quality of animal care provided in high volume facilities, which focus on minimally invasive, time saving techniques, high throughput and simultaneous management of multiple animals under various stages of anesthesia. The aim of this study was to determine perioperative mortality for cats and dogs in a high volume spay-neuter clinic in the USA. Electronic medical records and a written mortality log were used to collect data for 71,557 cats and 42,349 dogs undergoing spay-neuter surgery from 2010 to 2016 at a single high volume clinic in Florida. Perioperative mortality was defined as deaths occurring in the 24h period starting with the administration of the first sedation or anesthetic drugs. Perioperative mortality was reported for 34 cats and four dogs for an overall mortality of 3.3 animals/10,000 surgeries (0.03%). The risk of mortality was more than twice as high for females (0.05%) as for males (0.02%) (P=0.008) and five times as high for cats (0.05%) as for dogs (0.009%) (P=0.0007). High volume spay-neuter surgery was associated with a lower mortality rate than that previously reported in low volume clinics, approaching that achieved in human surgery. This is likely to be due to the young, healthy population of dogs and cats, and the continuous refinement of techniques based on experience and the skills and proficiency of teams that specialize in a limited spectrum of procedures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The prognostic importance of metastatic site in men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pond, Gregory R; Sonpavde, Guru; de Wit, Ronald; Eisenberger, Mario A; Tannock, Ian F; Armstrong, Andrew J

    2014-01-01

    The presence of visceral metastases is adversely prognostic in men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), but the prognostic impact of the site of visceral metastasis is unclear. Men with mCRPC in the TAX 327 phase 3 trial receiving docetaxel or mitoxantrone every 3 wk or weekly docetaxel, each with prednisone, were analyzed retrospectively to study the impact of the site of visceral metastasis on overall survival (OS). Patients were assessed for OS by site of metastases: liver with or without other sites, lung with or without bone or lymph nodes, bone plus lymph nodes, bone only, and lymph nodes only. Cox proportional hazards regression, adjusted for treatment and stratification factors, was performed. Men with liver metastases with or without other metastases had shorter median OS (10.0 mo; 95% confidence interval [CI], 5.4-11.5) than men with lung metastases with or without bone or nodal metastases (median OS: 14.4 mo; 95% CI, 11.5-22.4). Men with lymph node-only disease had the best median OS (26.7 mo; 95% CI, 22.3-34.2), followed by men with bone-only metastases (median OS: 19.0 mo; 95% CI, 18.2-20.7) and bone-plus-node disease (median OS: 15.7 mo; 95% CI, 14.4-17.2). Thus, pattern of spread including site of visceral metastasis confers a differential prognostic impact. These data require validation and may inform trial design and therapy. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. [Experience with cabazitaxel therapy for patients with metastatic castrate resistant prostate cancer in Hungary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maráz, Anikó; Boér, Katalin; Dankovics, Zsófia; Dank, Magdolna; Lahm, Erika; Petrányi, Ágota; Révész, János; Ruzsa, Ágnes; Szûcs, Miklós; Valikovics, Anikó; Vas, Mária; Küronya, Zsófia

    2017-12-18

    Our aim was to assess the efficacy and adverse effects of cabazitaxel (CBZ), a chemotherapeutic agent that can be administered to patients with metastatic castrate resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) after docetaxel (DOC) therapy. We retrospectively analyzed data of CBZ received by mCRPC patients in 12 Hungarian oncological centers between 01/2016 and 06/2017. CBZ (25 or 20 mg/m2 q3w) was administered after DOC. Physical and laboratory examinations were performed in every cycle, tumor response was evaluated in every third cycle based on PCWG2 criteria. Adverse effects were evaluated based on CTCAE 4.0. Data of 60 patients were analyzed. CBZ was administered in 2nd and 3rd lines in 31.6% and 46.6%, while in 4th and 5th lines in 15% and 6.6% patients, respectively. Its starting dose was 25 mg/m2 and 20 mg/m2 in 65% and 35% of cases, respectively. The median number of cycles was 5. Progression-free survival and overall survival were 5.52 and 15.77 months, respectively. Survival results were similar in case of DOC-CBZ-ART/alfaradin and DOC-ART/alfaradin-CBZ sequences. Adverse effects were detected in 63,3% of patients. The most common adverse effects were neutropenia, anemia, and diarrhea. Our observations suggest that CBZ, with the appropriate support and chemotherapeutic experience, is well-tolerated and effective therapy of mCRPC after DOC.

  6. Platinum-based chemotherapy for variant castrate-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparicio, Ana M; Harzstark, Andrea L; Corn, Paul G; Wen, Sijin; Araujo, John C; Tu, Shi-Ming; Pagliaro, Lance C; Kim, Jeri; Millikan, Randall E; Ryan, Charles; Tannir, Nizar M; Zurita, Amado J; Mathew, Paul; Arap, Wadih; Troncoso, Patricia; Thall, Peter F; Logothetis, Christopher J

    2013-07-01

    Clinical features characteristic of small-cell prostate carcinoma (SCPC), "anaplastic," often emerge during the progression of prostate cancer. We sought to determine the efficacy of platinum-based chemotherapy in patients meeting at least one of seven prospectively defined "anaplastic" clinical criteria, including exclusive visceral or predominantly lytic bone metastases, bulky tumor masses, low prostate-specific antigen levels relative to tumor burden, or short response to androgen deprivation therapy. A 120-patient phase II trial of first-line carboplatin and docetaxel (CD) and second-line etoposide and cisplatin (EP) was designed to provide reliable clinical response estimates under a Bayesian probability model with early stopping rules in place for futility and toxicity. Seventy-four of 113 (65.4%) and 24 of 71 (33.8%) were progression free after four cycles of CD and EP, respectively. Median overall survival (OS) was 16 months [95% confidence interval (CI), 13.6-19.0 months]. Of the seven "anaplastic" criteria, bulky tumor mass was significantly associated with poor outcome. Lactic acid dehydrogenase strongly predicted for OS and rapid progression. Serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) concentration strongly predicted OS but not rapid progression. Neuroendocrine markers did not predict outcome or response to therapy. Our findings support the hypothesis that patients with "anaplastic" prostate cancer are a recognizable subset characterized by a high response rate of short duration to platinum-containing chemotherapies, similar to SCPC. Our results suggest that CEA is useful for selecting therapy in men with castration-resistant prostate cancer and consolidative therapies to bulky high-grade tumor masses should be considered in this patient population. ©2013 AACR.

  7. Androgenic effect of honeybee drone milk in castrated rats: roles of methyl palmitate and methyl oleate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seres, A B; Ducza, E; Báthori, M; Hunyadi, A; Béni, Z; Dékány, M; Hajagos-Tóth, J; Verli, J; Gáspár, Róbert

    2014-04-28

    Numerous honeybee (Apis mellifera) products have been used in traditional medicine to treat infertility and to increase vitality in both men and women. Drone milk (DM) is a relatively little-known honeybee product with a putative sexual hormone effect. The oestrogenic effect of a fraction of DM has recently been reported in rats. However, no information is available on the androgenic effects of DM. The purpose of the present study was to determine the androgen-like effect of DM in male rats and to identify effective compounds. A modified Hershberger assay was used to investigate the androgenic effect of crude DM, and the plasma level of testosterone was measured. The prostatic mRNA and protein expression of Spot14-like androgen-inducible protein (SLAP) were also examined with real-time PCR and Western blot techniques. GC-MS and NMR spectroscopic investigations were performed to identify the active components gained by bioactivity-guided fractionation. The crude DM increased the relative weights of the androgen-dependent organs and the plasma testosterone level in castrated rats and these actions were flutamide-sensitive. DM increased the tissue mRNA and protein level of SLAP, providing further evidence of its androgen-like character. After bioactivity-guided fractionation, two fatty acid esters, methyl palmitate (MP) and methyl oleate (MO), were identified as active compounds. MP alone showed an androgenic effect, whereas MO increased the weight of androgen-sensitive tissues and the plasma testosterone level only in combination. The experimental data of DM and its active compounds (MO and MP) show androgenic activity confirming the traditional usage of DM. DM or MP or/and MO treatments may project a natural mode for the therapy of male infertility. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Effects of buddleja officinalis total flavonoids on serum testosterone level of castrated male rats with xeroma

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    Wen-Juan Li

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To observe buddleja officinalis total flavonoids' effect on the basal tear secretion amount, tear film stability, lacrimal gland histomorphology and serum testosterone level of castrated male rat model with xeroma, to study the mechanism of rat xeroma caused by buddleja officinalis total flavones' anti-sex hormones disorders.MEATHODS: A total of 150 Wistar male rats of 1 month old, weighted about 200g, were randomly divided into 5 groups with 30 rats in each group with A representing normal group; B representing sham operation group; C representing surgery control group; D representing group treated with androgen; E representing group treated with buddleja officinalis total flavonoids. For the groups C, D, E, the bilateral testicle and epididymis were excised; For group B, scrota were incised without removal of the testicles, as the sham operation group; For group A, nothing was done. One week after modeling when the wound was to be healed, drug was given to each group. Respectively at the 1st month, 3rd, and 5th months after treatment, 10 rats were randomly selected in each group, to receive Schirmer I test, tear breakup time measurement. Blood serum testosterone levels were tested in the fifth month. RESUITS: For groups D and E, the Schirmer I test measurements were significantly higher than that of group C(PPPCONCLUSION: Decreased androgen levels can lead to xeroma, and removal of bilateral testes and epididymis can successfully establish the animal models of xeroma in rats caused by decreased androgen levels. Buddleja officinalis total flavonoids have androgenic effect, which produces the similar treatment effect of xeroma with testosterone propionate. Buddleja officinalis total flavonoids may become a new treatment for xeroma.

  9. Extraction of (223)Radium by haemodialysis after treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Großer, Oliver Stephan; Wissel, Heiko; Wallbaum, Thekla; Genseke, Philipp; Kupitz, Dennis; Ricke, Jens; Ruf, Juri; Amthauer, Holger

    2017-06-13

    (223)Radium-dichloride ((223)Ra) administration is an upcoming therapeutic option in patients with castration-resistant metastatic prostate cancer (mCRPC), whose renal and faecal excretion of (223)Ra has been primarily estimated from data of a phase-I clinical trial in patients with normal renal function. In the rare case of concomitant renal insufficiency requiring haemodialysis (HD), an estimation of the contamination of dialysate would be beneficial. The excretion of (223)Ra and its concentration in the dialysate in a patient with mCRPC and end-stage renal disease was examined for six consecutive treatment cycles. Dialysate samples were measured using a commercial system with NaI-scintillation detector. HD showed a residual activity level in the remaining dialysate. The excreted activity was a median of 46.1 kBq (range = 42.0- 83.4 kBq) and 11.2 kBq (range = 8.4- 19.9 kBq) for the first (24 h post injection p.i.) and second HD (96 h p.i.), respectively. The activity concentration decreased significantly from a median of 4.18 kBq/l (range = 2.98-5.14 kBq/l) to 0.85 kBq/l (range = 0.69- 1.31 kBq/l, p handling has to be followed to fulfil the radiation protection regulations.

  10. A Study of Combination Bicalutamide and Raloxifene for Patients With Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Thai H; Nunez-Nateras, Rafael; Hou, Yue-Xian; Bryce, Alan H; Northfelt, Donald W; Dueck, Amylou C; Wong, Bryan; Stanton, Melissa L; Joseph, Richard W; Castle, Erik P

    2017-04-01

    Prostate tissue expresses 2 estrogen receptor (ER) isoforms, ER-α and ER-β, and estrogen-based therapies have shown activity in preclinical studies. Raloxifene, a selective ER modulator, has inhibited the growth of prostate cancer xenograft models and was tested in a phase II trial of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), with some patients achieving stable disease. However, no studies have examined the safety of the combination of bicalutamide plus raloxifene for CRPC. Therefore, we investigated the safety of treatment with bicalutamide plus raloxifene in patients with CRPC in an initial study. We conducted a study to evaluate the toxicity (primary endpoint) of the combination of bicalutamide (50 mg) and raloxifene (60 mg) in 28-day cycles (maximum, 6 cycles) in men with progressive CRPC. The secondary endpoint, quality of life (QOL), was assessed by patients using a 6-item linear analog self-assessment or hormonal domain scale of the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite. We enrolled 18 patients with CRPC in the study to evaluate the safety of, and patient assessment of QOL (mental, physical, social, emotional, and spiritual) with, bicalutamide plus raloxifene therapy. No grade 3 or 4 adverse events occurred. None of the 18 patients required dose reductions. The patient assessment of QOL showed no statistically significant changes after 2 treatment cycles. The median progression-free survival with bicalutamide plus raloxifene was 1.9 months (95% confidence interval, 1.8-2.8 months). The results of the present study have shown that bicalutamide/raloxifene treatment is well tolerated. However, limited clinical activity occurred in men with CRPC who had previously undergone secondary hormonal therapy or chemotherapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Cabazitaxel for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: safety data from the Spanish expanded access program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellano, Daniel; Antón Aparicio, Luis M; Esteban, Emilio; Sánchez-Hernández, Alfredo; Germà, Jose Ramón; Batista, Norberto; Maroto, Pablo; Pérez-Valderrama, Begoña; Luque, Raquel; Méndez-Vidal, María José

    2014-09-01

    Based on the TROPIC study results, cabazitaxel was approved for the management of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) progressing on or after docetaxel. This multi-centre program provided early access to cabazitaxel to patients with mCRPC before its commercialization. Safety data from 153 Spanish patients receiving cabazitaxel 25 mg/m(2) i.v. Q3W, plus oral prednisone/prednisolone 10 mg daily, are reported. Median age of patients was 70 years (26.8% ≥ 75 years), 94.1 and 26.8% had bone and visceral metastasis, respectively. Most had an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group ≤ 1 (88.9%) and had received a median of 8.0 cycles of last docetaxel treatment. The median of cabazitaxel cycles and cumulative dose were 6.0 (Interquartile range [IQR]: 4.0; 8.0) and 148.9 (IQR: 98.2; 201.4) mg/m(2), respectively. Adverse events (AEs) possibly related to cabazitaxel occurred in 143 (93.5%) patients. The most frequent grade ≥ 3 AEs were neutropenia (n = 25, 16.3%) and asthenia (n = 17, 11.1%). Febrile neutropenia and grade ≥ 3 diarrhea occurred in 5.2% of the patients each. There were five (3.3%) possibly treatment-related deaths, mainly infection-related. G-CSFs were used in 114 (74.5%) patients, generally as prophylaxis (n = 107; 69.9%). Grade ≥ 3 peripheral neuropathy and nail disorders were uncommon. Cabazitaxel administration, in a real-world setting, is tolerated by Spanish patients with mCRPC, and the AEs are manageable.

  12. Cabazitaxel: a novel second-line treatment for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paller, Channing J; Antonarakis, Emmanuel S

    2011-03-10

    Until recently, patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) had limited therapeutic options once they became refractory to docetaxel chemotherapy, and no treatments improved survival. This changed in June 2010 when the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved cabazitaxel as a new option for patients with CRPC whose disease progresses during or after docetaxel treatment. For most of these patients, cabazitaxel will now replace mitoxantrone (a drug that was FDA-approved because of its palliative effects) as the treatment of choice for docetaxel-refractory disease. The approval of cabazitaxel was based primarily on the TROPIC trial, a large (n = 755) randomized Phase III study showing an overall median survival benefit of 2.4 months for men with docetaxel-pretreated metastatic CRPC receiving cabazitaxel (with prednisone) compared to mitoxantrone (with prednisone). Cabazitaxel is a novel tubulin-binding taxane that differs from docetaxel because of its poor affinity for P-glycoprotein (P-gp), an ATP-dependent drug efflux pump. Cancer cells that express P-gp become resistant to taxanes, and the effectiveness of docetaxel can be limited by its high substrate affinity for P-gp. Preclinical and early clinical studies show that cabazitaxel retains activity in docetaxel-resistant tumors, and this was confirmed by the TROPIC study. Common adverse events with cabazitaxel include neutropenia (including febrile neutropenia) and diarrhea, while neuropathy was rarely observed. Thus, the combination of cabazitaxel and prednisone is an important new treatment option for men with docetaxel-refractory metastatic CRPC, but this agent should be administered cautiously and with appropriate monitoring (especially in men at high risk of neutropenic complications).

  13. Sequencing of Cabazitaxel in Metastatic Castrate-Resistant Prostate Cancer: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald Colbourn

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is a common cancer in men; for metastatic disease, it has a 5-year survival rate of 30%. No FDA-approved therapy for castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC known to improve survival was available until 2004, when based on a significant survival benefit over mitoxantrone, docetaxel in combination with prednisone was approved. In combination with prednisone, cabazitaxel, which was approved in the United States in 2010, is indicated for patients with metastatic CRPC previously treated with a docetaxel-containing regimen. This case report describes the treatment of a man 58 years of age who was diagnosed with advanced prostate cancer in 2006. He was initially managed with radical prostatectomy followed by androgen deprivation therapy, but a rising prostate-specific antigen (PSA level led to enrollment in a clinical trial of HE3235 for 6 months. Subsequently, with progression of disease, he was treated with docetaxel for 4 months and then palliative radiation therapy. Cabazitaxel was initiated in October 2010; his condition stabilized within weeks, and he experienced a progressive decline in his PSA level from a peak of 5,424 ng/ml. Continued treatment with cabazitaxel resulted in his being weaned off pain medications and resuming his normal activities. After 16 cycles of cabazitaxel, his PSA declined to 994 ng/ml as of January 2012. He tolerated the cabazitaxel well and occasionally received myeloid growth factors for treatment of neutropenia; otherwise, he experienced only mild diarrhea. This response to cabazitaxel is notable, particularly in light of prior failure of multiple therapies.

  14. Sequencing of cabazitaxel in metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colbourn, Donald

    2012-05-01

    Prostate cancer is a common cancer in men; for metastatic disease, it has a 5-year survival rate of 30%. No FDA-approved therapy for castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) known to improve survival was available until 2004, when based on a significant survival benefit over mitoxantrone, docetaxel in combination with prednisone was approved. In combination with prednisone, cabazitaxel, which was approved in the United States in 2010, is indicated for patients with metastatic CRPC previously treated with a docetaxel-containing regimen. This case report describes the treatment of a man 58 years of age who was diagnosed with advanced prostate cancer in 2006. He was initially managed with radical prostatectomy followed by androgen deprivation therapy, but a rising prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level led to enrollment in a clinical trial of HE3235 for 6 months. Subsequently, with progression of disease, he was treated with docetaxel for 4 months and then palliative radiation therapy. Cabazitaxel was initiated in October 2010; his condition stabilized within weeks, and he experienced a progressive decline in his PSA level from a peak of 5,424 ng/ml. Continued treatment with cabazitaxel resulted in his being weaned off pain medications and resuming his normal activities. After 16 cycles of cabazitaxel, his PSA declined to 994 ng/ml as of January 2012. He tolerated the cabazitaxel well and occasionally received myeloid growth factors for treatment of neutropenia; otherwise, he experienced only mild diarrhea. This response to cabazitaxel is notable, particularly in light of prior failure of multiple therapies.

  15. Japanese phase I study of cabazitaxel in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozawa, Masahiro; Mukai, Hirofumi; Takahashi, Shunji; Uemura, Hiroji; Kosaka, Takeo; Onozawa, Yusuke; Miyazaki, Jun; Suzuki, Kazuhiro; Okihara, Koji; Arai, Yoichi; Kamba, Tomomi; Kato, Masashi; Nakai, Yasutomo; Furuse, Hiroshi; Kume, Haruki; Ide, Hisamitsu; Kitamura, Hiroshi; Yokomizo, Akira; Kimura, Takahiro; Tomita, Yoshihiko; Ohno, Keiji; Kakehi, Yoshiyuki

    2015-10-01

    We previously reported the pharmacokinetic profile and preliminary tolerability of cabazitaxel in a phase I study in Japanese patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Here we report the final safety profile and anti-tumor activity of cabazitaxel in a larger population, including all patients enrolled in the expansion cohort of the study. Japanese patients with mCRPC previously treated with docetaxel received cabazitaxel intravenously every 3 weeks plus daily prednisolone. In patients treated with the maximum tolerated dose of 25 mg/m(2) we evaluated adverse events including treatment-related neutropenia, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) response and objective response. In total, 44 patients were treated with the maximum tolerated dose. The most frequent adverse events (any grade) were neutropenia (100 %), febrile neutropenia (54.5 %), fatigue (54.5 %), nausea (52.3 %) and diarrhea (50.0 %). There were no deaths due to treatment-related adverse events. Neutropenia with prior docetaxel did not appear to influence the probability of febrile neutropenia with cabazitaxel. Most patients received therapeutic granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF; cycle 1: 86.4 %; cycle 2 or later: 81.8 %). In the efficacy population, two of 12 patients with measurable disease had partial response (objective response rate: 16.7 %), while 10 had stable disease. PSA response rate was 29.3 % (12/41 patients). Median time to PSA progression was 3.68 months (95 % confidence interval 1.35-4.63). In this heavily pretreated Japanese population, the occurrence of neutropenia and febrile neutropenia was high, suggesting G-CSF prophylaxis may be required as part of toxicity management. However, the efficacy of cabazitaxel was consistent with global studies. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01324583.

  16. Cabazitaxel (jevtana): a novel agent for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nightingale, Ginah; Ryu, Jae

    2012-08-01

    This article presents current clinical evidence supporting the use of cabazitaxel (Jevtana) in men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). We conducted a literature search using abstracts from MEDLINE and PubMed (from January 1966 to December 2011) and the American Society of Clinical Oncology (from January 2000 to December 2011). The search included clinical studies and abstracts in the English language that described the pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, clinical activity, and safety of cabazitaxel in mCRPC. Cabazitaxel, a semisynthetic microtubule inhibitor that induces cell death by microtubule stabilization, was approved in combination with prednisone for the treatment of mCRPC in patients who had been treated with a docetaxel-(Taxotere)-containing regimen. The approval of this taxane derivative was based primarily on the results of a randomized, open-label trial in patients with mCRPC who were treated with either cabazitaxel 25 mg/m(2) or mitoxantrone (Novantrone) 12 mg/m(2) intravenously every 3 weeks, both in combination with prednisone 10 mg/day. The median survival period was 15.1 months with cabazitaxel and 12.7 months with mitoxantrone. Neither group experienced complete responses. Cabazitaxel has also shown activity in breast cancer and other malignancies. In clinical trials, common grade 3 or grade 4 adverse reactions were myelosuppression, febrile neutropenia, diarrhea, fatigue, and asthenia. Other adverse effects included abdominal pain, back pain, arthralgia, and peripheral neuropathy. Cabazitaxel appeared to be an effective second-line agent in patients with mCRPC refractory to a docetaxel-containing regimen. Studies comparing cabazitaxel with existing first-line regimens for mCRPC are under way. Until the results of these head-to-head trials are published, it remains uncertain whether cabazitaxel is more effective or more tolerable than the currently available first-line regimens.

  17. Safety and efficacy of 2-weekly cabazitaxel in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clément-Zhao, Alice; Auvray, Marie; Aboudagga, Hail; Blanc-Durand, Félix; Angelergues, Antoine; Vano, Yann Alexandre; Mercier, Florence; El Awadly, Nader; Verret, Benjamin; Thibault, Constance; Oudard, Stéphane

    2017-03-28

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of a 2-weekly cabazitaxel schedule in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). During the period October 2013 to February 2016, 43 patients with mCRPC were treated with cabazitaxel (16 mg/m2 , on days 1 and 15 of a 4-week cycle) together with prophylactic granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). The safety profile and efficacy (prostate-specific antigen [PSA] response; biological, clinical or radiological progression-free survival [PFS] and overall survival [OS]) of the treatment were analysed. All patients had received prior docetaxel and 79.1% abiraterone acetate. At inclusion, 46.5% were aged >70 years and 27.9% had an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status ≥2. Six patients stopped treatment because of toxicity. Grade ≥3 toxicities were: asthenia (16.3%); neutropenia (11.6%); thrombocytopenia (9.3%); diarrhoea (7%), anaemia (4.7%), febrile neutropenia (4.7%) and haematuria (2.3%). In all, 52.4% achieved a ≥30% PSA response and 40.5% had a ≥50% PSA response. The median OS was 15.2 months. This prospective pilot study suggests that cabazitaxel 16 mg/m² given 2-weekly has a manageable toxicity profile in docetaxel- and abiraterone acetate-pretreated patients with mCRPC. A prospective phase III trial comparing this regimen with the standard cabazitaxel regimen is planned to confirm these results. © 2017 The Authors BJU International © 2017 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Impact of transmammary-delivered meloxicam on biomarkers of pain and distress in piglets after castration and tail docking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Jessica L; Karriker, Locke A; Stock, Matthew L; Pertzborn, Kelly M; Baldwin, Luke G; Wulf, Larry W; Lee, C J; Wang, Chong; Coetzee, Johann F

    2014-01-01

    To investigate a novel route for providing analgesia to processed piglets via transmammary drug delivery, meloxicam was administered orally to sows after farrowing. The objectives of the study were to demonstrate meloxicam transfer from sows to piglets via milk and to describe the analgesic effects in piglets after processing through assessment of pain biomarkers and infrared thermography (IRT). Ten sows received either meloxicam (30 mg/kg) (n = 5) or whey protein (placebo) (n = 5) in their daily feedings, starting four days after farrowing and continuing for three consecutive days. During this period, blood and milk samples were collected at 12-hour intervals. On Day 5 after farrowing, three boars and three gilts from each litter were castrated or sham castrated, tail docked, and administered an iron injection. Piglet blood samples were collected immediately before processing and at predetermined times over an 84-hour period. IRT images were captured at each piglet blood collection point. Plasma was tested to confirm meloxicam concentrations using a validated high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method. Meloxicam was detected in all piglets nursing on medicated sows at each time point, and the mean (± standard error of the mean) meloxicam concentration at castration was 568.9±105.8 ng/mL. Furthermore, ex-vivo prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) synthesis inhibition was greater in piglets from treated sows compared to controls (p = 0.0059). There was a time-by-treatment interaction for plasma cortisol (p = 0.0009), with meloxicam-treated piglets demonstrating lower cortisol concentrations than control piglets for 10 hours after castration. No differences in mean plasma substance P concentrations between treatment groups were observed (p = 0.67). Lower cranial skin temperatures on IRT were observed in placebo compared to meloxicam-treated piglets (p = 0.015). This study demonstrates the successful transfer of meloxicam from sows to

  19. Impact of transmammary-delivered meloxicam on biomarkers of pain and distress in piglets after castration and tail docking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica L Bates

    Full Text Available To investigate a novel route for providing analgesia to processed piglets via transmammary drug delivery, meloxicam was administered orally to sows after farrowing. The objectives of the study were to demonstrate meloxicam transfer from sows to piglets via milk and to describe the analgesic effects in piglets after processing through assessment of pain biomarkers and infrared thermography (IRT. Ten sows received either meloxicam (30 mg/kg (n = 5 or whey protein (placebo (n = 5 in their daily feedings, starting four days after farrowing and continuing for three consecutive days. During this period, blood and milk samples were collected at 12-hour intervals. On Day 5 after farrowing, three boars and three gilts from each litter were castrated or sham castrated, tail docked, and administered an iron injection. Piglet blood samples were collected immediately before processing and at predetermined times over an 84-hour period. IRT images were captured at each piglet blood collection point. Plasma was tested to confirm meloxicam concentrations using a validated high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method. Meloxicam was detected in all piglets nursing on medicated sows at each time point, and the mean (± standard error of the mean meloxicam concentration at castration was 568.9±105.8 ng/mL. Furthermore, ex-vivo prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 synthesis inhibition was greater in piglets from treated sows compared to controls (p = 0.0059. There was a time-by-treatment interaction for plasma cortisol (p = 0.0009, with meloxicam-treated piglets demonstrating lower cortisol concentrations than control piglets for 10 hours after castration. No differences in mean plasma substance P concentrations between treatment groups were observed (p = 0.67. Lower cranial skin temperatures on IRT were observed in placebo compared to meloxicam-treated piglets (p = 0.015. This study demonstrates the successful transfer of meloxicam from

  20. The expression of receptors for estrogen and epithelial growth factor in the male rabbit prostate and prostatic urethra following castration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, A; Balslev, E; Iversen, H G

    1997-01-01

    were included as controls. In the control group, ERs were found in the urothelial lining and lamina propria of the prostatic urethra, and in the prostatic stroma. EGF receptors were demonstrated in the epithelial lining of the prostatic urethra and the glandular epithelium of the prostate. Following...... castration, the expression of ERs, assessed as the increase in the number of positively stained specimens, increased significantly in the lamina propria of the prostatic urethra and the prostatic stroma. EGF receptor expression increased significantly in the epithelial lining of the prostatic urethra...

  1. Effects of Supplemental Glutamine on Growth Performance, Plasma Parameters and LPS-induced Immune Response of Weaned Barrows after Castration

    OpenAIRE

    Hsu, C. B.; Lee, J. W.; Huang, H. J.; Wang, C. H.; Lee, T. T.; Yen, H. T.; Yu, B.

    2012-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of supplemental glutamine on growth performance, plasma parameters and LPS-induced immune response of weaned barrows after castration. In experiment 1, forty-eight weaned male piglets were used and fed maize and soybean meal diets supplemented with 0 (Control) or 2% L-Gln (Gln+) for 25 days. The results indicated that the Gln+ group tended to increase average daily gain compared to control in stages of days 7 to 14 and 0 to 25. The Gln...

  2. AB225. The tumor suppressive role of CAMK2N1 in castration-resistant prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, T.; Liu, Z.; Guo, S.; Wu, L.; Li, M.; Yang, J; Chen, R.; Xu, H; Cai, S.; Chen, H.; Li, W.; Hu, Z; Q. Zhuang; Xu, S; Wang, L.

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer at advanced stages including metastatic and castration-resistant cancer remains incurable due to the lack of effective therapies. The CAMK2N1 gene, cloned and characterized as an inhibitor of CaMKII (calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II), has been shown to affect tumor genesis and tumor growth. However, it is still unknown whether CAMK2N1 plays a role in prostate cancer development. We first examined the protein and mRNA levels of CAMK2N1 and observed a significant d...

  3. A case report of enzalutamide administration in a dialysis-dependent patient with castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Erica S; de Haan, Marie; Eigl, Bernhard J

    2018-03-01

    Enzalutamide, an androgen receptor signaling inhibitor, is a standard of care treatment for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. We present the first reported case of enzalutamide in a patient with end-stage renal disease, on dialysis. While there were no significant toxicities, a sustained increase in systolic blood pressure was maintained after starting enzalutamide, suggestive of a degree of drug accumulation. Further evaluation of novel hormonal agents in end-stage renal disease patients should be encouraged as this population is typically excluded from clinical trials.

  4. [Bone-specific therapy with radium-223 dichloride : Castration-resistant prostate cancer with symptomatic bone metastases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauber, R; Gschwend, J; Scheidhauer, K; Eiber, M; Krönke, M

    2017-01-01

    Radium-223 dichloride (Xofigo®, Alpharadin) is approved for the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer with symptomatic bone metastases and no known visceral metastases. As a calcium mimetic, it is integrated into osteoplastic bone lesions and emits alpha particles with high energy which leads to local destruction of tumor cells. In the 2013 published ALSYMPCA trial, a significant advantage for overall survival and quality of life in comparison to placebo was found. Recent data suggest an increased potential in combination with next generation hormonal treatment.

  5. Low-dose testosterone alleviates vascular damage caused by castration in male rats in puberty via modulation of the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing; Liu, Ge-Li; Wei, Ying; Jiang, Li-Hong; Bao, Peng-Li; Yang, Qing-Yan

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of testosterone on glucolipid metabolism and vascular injury in male rats, and examine the underlying molecular mechanisms. A total of 40 male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into a control group (n=10), high-fat-diet + castration group (n=10), high‑fat‑diet + castration + low dose testosterone group (n=10), and high-fat-diet + castration + high dose testosterone group (n=10). Hematoxylin and eosin staining was performed to evaluate the morphology of the thoracic aortic tissues. Immunohistochemical staining was used to detect biomarkers of the phosphoinositide 3‑kinase (PI3K) signaling pathway. The mRNA and protein expression levels of PI3K, AKT, insulin receptor substrate‑1 (IRS‑1), glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT‑4), nuclear factor (NF)‑κB and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)‑α in the aortas were determined using quantitative polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analyses, respectively. Apoptosis in the aortic tissues was detected using a TUNEL assay. Castration induced apoptosis in the animals fed a high‑fat‑diet, whereas low dose testosterone replacement ameliorated the apoptosis in the aorta. However, the levels of apoptosis was more severe following high‑dose testosterone treatment. Low‑dose testosterone induced upregulation in the levels of IRS‑1, AKT, GLUT‑4 protein, NF‑κB, TNF‑α and PI3K, compared with those in the animals fed a high‑fat diet following castration. A high dose of testosterone resulted in a significant decrease in the levels of IRS‑1, AKT, GLUT‑4, NF‑κB, TNF‑α and PI3K. Compared with the rats in the high‑fat diet + castration group, a low dose of testosterone induced upregulation in the mRNA levels of IRS‑1, AKT and GLUT‑4, and downregulation of the mRNA levels of NF‑κB, TNF‑α and PI3K. A high dose of testosterone resulted in a significant decrease in the levels of IRS‑1, AKT and GLUT‑4, and marked

  6. Using a Novel Transgenic Mouse Model to Study c-Myc Oncogenic Pathway in Castration Resistance and Chemoresistance of Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0162 TITLE: Using a Novel Transgenic Mouse Model to Study c-Myc Oncogenic Pathway in Castration Resistance and...TELEPHONE NUMBER (include area code) Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 Using a Novel Transgenic Mouse Model to Study c-Myc... Transgenic Mouse Model to Study c-Myc Oncogenic Pathway in Castration Resistance and Chemoresistance of Prostate Cancer Feng Yang, Ph.D. Department of

  7. Study on New Approaches for extended chemical management and REACH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Jihyun

    2014-01-01

    , additional analysis has been performed. The analysis of the current mass flow of plastics and paper in Europe shows that with the recycling of 60% of paper and 26% of plastic wastes, approximately 4% to 18% of the above mentioned phthalates are re-entering the product cycle through recycling. Moreover......, a case study on the childhood phthalate exposures from food packaging made from recycled materials, and a simulation of the flows of phthalates in 2020 - under the assumption that the recycling rate of plastic and paper products will increase with the full implementation of EU waste legislations by 2020...... - have been performed. Even under the 50% reduction of phthalates production, the increased recycling rate of plastic and paper in 2020 might lead to an increase of unwanted recycling of DEHP and BBP to 110 and 40% respectively, while recycling of DBP will decrease by 15%. The results demonstrate...

  8. Chemical Emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    When a hazardous chemical has been released, it may harm people's health. Chemical releases can be unintentional, as in the case of an ... the case of a terrorist attack with a chemical weapon. Some hazardous chemicals have been developed by ...

  9. Chemotherapy plus estramustine for management of castration-resistant prostate cancer: meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, C; Jing, T; Wang, F; Gao, X; Xu, C; Sun, Y

    2014-04-01

    Estramustine, an agent with both hormonal and non-hormonal effects in men, is supposed to be effective in treating castration-resistant prostate cancer. However, previous studies have reported conflicting results. We conducted this meta-analysis to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of additional estramustine to chemotherapy. Data sources including PubMed, Medline, EMBASE, and Cochrane Controlled Trials Register were searched to identify potentially relevant randomized controlled trials. Prostate specific antigen (PSA) response, overall survival, and grade 3 to 4 toxicity were analyzed. Seven randomized controlled trials, a total of 839 patients, were enrolled. The pooled odds ratio for PSA response was 3.02 (95% CI=1.69-5.39, P=.0002); the pooled hazard ratio for overall survival was .95 (95% CI=.80-1.14, P=.58); the pooled odds ratio for nausea/vomiting and cardiovascular toxicity were 3.90 (95% CI=1.05-14.45, P=.04) and 2.22 (95% CI=1.15-4.30, P=.02). No significant difference was detected for neutropenia, anemia, thrombocytopenia, diarrhea, fatigue, or neuropathy (P>.05). According to this meta-analysis, chemotherapy with additional estramustine increased the PSA response rate. However, it increased the risk of grade 3 or 4 adverse effects such as nausea/vomiting and cardiovascular events, and the overall survival was not improved for castration-resistant prostate cancer patients. Copyright © 2013 AEU. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  10. Androgen Receptor Phosphorylation at Serine 308 and Serine 791 Predicts Enhanced Survival in Castrate Resistant Prostate Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A. Underwood

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available We previously reported that AR phosphorylation at serine 213 was associated with poor outcome and may contribute to prostate cancer development and progression. This study investigates if specific AR phosphorylation sites have differing roles in the progression of hormone naïve prostate cancer (HNPC to castrate resistant disease (CRPC. A panel of phosphospecific antibodies were employed to study AR phosphorylation in 84 matched HNPC and CRPC tumours. Immunohistochemistry measured Androgen receptor expression phosphorylated at serine residues 94 (pAR94, 308 (pAR308, 650(pAR650 and 791 (pAR791. No correlations with clinical parameters were observed for pAR94 or pAR650 in HNPC or CRPC tumours. In contrast to our previous observation with serine 213, high pAR308 is significantly associated with a longer time to disease specific death (p = 0.011 and high pAR791 expression significantly associated with a longer time to disease recurrence (p = 0.018 in HNPC tumours and longer time to death from disease recurrence (p = 0.040 in CRPC tumours. This observation in CRPC tumours was attenuated in high apoptotic tumours (p = 0.022 and low proliferating tumours (p = 0.004. These results demonstrate that understanding the differing roles of AR phosphorylation is necessary before this can be exploited as a target for castrate resistant prostate cancer.

  11. Effects of Supplemental Glutamine on Growth Performance, Plasma Parameters and LPS-induced Immune Response of Weaned Barrows after Castration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. B. Hsu

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Two experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of supplemental glutamine on growth performance, plasma parameters and LPS-induced immune response of weaned barrows after castration. In experiment 1, forty-eight weaned male piglets were used and fed maize and soybean meal diets supplemented with 0 (Control or 2% L-Gln (Gln+ for 25 days. The results indicated that the Gln+ group tended to increase average daily gain compared to control in stages of days 7 to 14 and 0 to 25. The Gln+ had significantly better feed efficiency than the control group did during days 14 to 25 and 0 to 25. The plasma blood urea nitrogen and alkaline phosphatase contents of Gln+ group were higher than those of the control group on day 14 post-weaning. In experiment 2, sixteen weaned male piglets were injected with E. coli K88+ lipopolysaccharide (LPS on day 14 post-weaning. The results showed that the Gln+ group had lower concentrations of plasma adrenocorticotrophic hormone and cortisol than the control group on day 14 pre-LPS challenge. In addition, Gln+ group had higher plasma IgG concentration than the control group for pre- or post-LPS challenged on day 14 post-weaning. In summary, dietary supplementation of Gln was able to alleviate the stressful condition and inflammation associated with castration in weaned barrows, and to improve their immunity and growth performance in the early starter stage.

  12. Effects of supplemental glutamine on growth performance, plasma parameters and LPS-induced immune response of weaned barrows after castration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, C B; Lee, J W; Huang, H J; Wang, C H; Lee, T T; Yen, H T; Yu, B

    2012-05-01

    Two experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of supplemental glutamine on growth performance, plasma parameters and LPS-induced immune response of weaned barrows after castration. In experiment 1, forty-eight weaned male piglets were used and fed maize and soybean meal diets supplemented with 0 (Control) or 2% L-Gln (Gln+) for 25 days. The results indicated that the Gln+ group tended to increase average daily gain compared to control in stages of days 7 to 14 and 0 to 25. The Gln+ had significantly better feed efficiency than the control group did during days 14 to 25 and 0 to 25. The plasma blood urea nitrogen and alkaline phosphatase contents of Gln+ group were higher than those of the control group on day 14 post-weaning. In experiment 2, sixteen weaned male piglets were injected with E. coli K88+ lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on day 14 post-weaning. The results showed that the Gln+ group had lower concentrations of plasma adrenocorticotrophic hormone and cortisol than the control group on day 14 pre-LPS challenge. In addition, Gln+ group had higher plasma IgG concentration than the control group for pre- or post-LPS challenged on day 14 post-weaning. In summary, dietary supplementation of Gln was able to alleviate the stressful condition and inflammation associated with castration in weaned barrows, and to improve their immunity and growth performance in the early starter stage.

  13. Racemic ketamine in comparison to S-ketamine in combination with azaperone and butorphanol for castration of pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettschart-Wolfensberger, R; Stauffer, S; Hässig, M; Flaherty, D; Ringer, S K

    2013-12-01

    In this prospective blinded randomised study, 28 male 9 week old pigs of bodyweight 25 kg, were anaesthetised for castration using 5 mg/kg azaperone, 0.2 mg/kg butorphanol and 0.4 mg/kg meloxicam, in conjunction with either 15 mg/kg racemic ketamine (Keta-Race) or 9 mg/kg S-ketamine (S-Keta), all drugs being injected intramuscularly. Anaesthesia induction, maintenance and recovery were timed and scored. Insufficient anaesthesia was supplemented with ¼ the initial dose of ketamine or S-ketamine, respectively, administered intravenously. A t-test was utilised for analysis of timings, and, for repeated recovery time data, ANOVA was used. In relation to quantification and timing of supplemental drug doses, a chi square test was used and the scoring was analysed by two sample Wilcoxon rank-sum test. Ketamine re-dosing was required in 23 animals on a total of 46 occasions distributed evenly throughout both groups. The only group differences occurred during recovery, with the S-Keta group showing earlier movements, sternal recumbency and ability to stand. Three pigs in each group showed muscle fasciculations during the recovery period, while an additional two animals of the Keta-Race group exhibited marked and unacceptable paddling in recovery. In conclusion, S-ketamine at a dose rate of 60 % of that of racemic ketamine induced comparable anaesthesia for castration in pigs, but with superior recovery characteristics.

  14. An update on TroVax® for the treatment of progressive castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abern M

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Michael Abern1, Howard L Kaufman2, Kalyan Latchamsetty11Department of Urology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA; 2Department of General Surgery and Immunology and Microbiology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USAAbstract: Prostate cancer is a common human malignancy with few effective therapeutic options for treating advanced castration-resistant disease. The potential therapeutic effectiveness of immunotherapy and vaccines, in particular, has gained popularity based on the identification of prostate-associated antigens, potent expression vectors for vaccination, and data from recent clinical trials. A modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA virus expressing 5T4, a tumor-associated glycoprotein, has shown promise in preclinical studies and clinical trials in patients with colorectal and renal cell carcinoma. This review will discuss the rationale for immunotherapy in prostate cancer and describe preclinical and limited clinical data in prostate cancer for the MVA-5T4 (TroVax® vaccine.Keywords: castration resistance, prostate cancer, TroVax, vaccine

  15. Crosstalk of the Androgen Receptor with Transcriptional Collaborators: Potential Therapeutic Targets for Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Obinata

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of death from cancer among males in Western countries. It is also the most commonly diagnosed male cancer in Japan. The progression of prostate cancer is mainly influenced by androgens and the androgen receptor (AR. Androgen deprivation therapy is an established therapy for advanced prostate cancer; however, prostate cancers frequently develop resistance to low testosterone levels and progress to the fatal stage called castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC. Surprisingly, AR and the AR signaling pathway are still activated in most CRPC cases. To overcome this problem, abiraterone acetate and enzalutamide were introduced for the treatment of CRPC. Despite the impact of these drugs on prolonged survival, CRPC acquires further resistance to keep the AR pathway activated. Functional molecular studies have shown that some of the AR collaborative transcription factors (TFs, including octamer transcription factor (OCT1, GATA binding protein 2 (GATA2 and forkhead box A1 (FOXA1, still stimulate AR activity in the castration-resistant state. Therefore, elucidating the crosstalk between the AR and collaborative TFs on the AR pathway is critical for developing new strategies for the treatment of CRPC. Recently, many compounds targeting this pathway have been developed for treating CRPC. In this review, we summarize the AR signaling pathway in terms of AR collaborators and focus on pyrrole-imidazole (PI polyamide as a candidate compound for the treatment of prostate cancer.

  16. Co-introduction of a steroid with docetaxel chemotherapy for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer affects PSA flare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiota, Masaki; Yokomizo, Akira; Takeuchi, Ario; Kiyoshima, Keijiro; Inokuchi, Junichi; Tatsugami, Katsunori; Shiga, Ken-Ichiro; Koga, Hirofumi; Yamaguchi, Akito; Naito, Seiji; Eto, Masatoshi

    2016-12-01

    To investigate the potential relationship of steroid usage with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) flare as well as the prognostic impact of PSA flare, which is known to occur in 10-20% of patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer during docetaxel chemotherapy. This study included 71 patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer treated by docetaxel chemotherapy with co-introduction of a steroid. PSA flare was defined as a transient PSA increase followed by a PSA decrease. PSA flare was recognized in 7.0-23.9% of patients according to the definition used. Intriguingly, men with steroid intake before the initiation of docetaxel chemotherapy experienced significantly fewer PSA flares. The progression-free survival rate in men with PSA flare was equivalent to that of PSA responders, but significantly better than men with PSA failure. Our results suggest that de novo steroid co-introduction with docetaxel chemotherapy induces the PSA flare phenomenon. This novel finding may account for the mechanism of PSA flare as well as being valuable for distinguishing PSA elevation attributable to PSA flare from that attributable to PSA failure. © 2016 The Authors BJU International © 2016 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Effect of castration on renal glycosaminoglycans and their urinary excretion in male and female rats with chronic renal failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemos, C.C.S. [Disciplina de Nefrologia, Faculdade de Ciências Médicas, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Tovar, A.M.F. [Laboratório de Tecido Conjuntivo, Instituto de Bioquímica Médica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Guimarães, M.A.M. [Departamento de Patologia e Laboratórios, Faculdade de Ciências Médicas, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Bregman, R. [Disciplina de Nefrologia, Faculdade de Ciências Médicas, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-08-10

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) participate in a variety of processes in the kidney, and evidence suggests that gender-related hormones participate in renal function. The aim of this study was to analyze the relationship of GAGs, gender, and proteinuria in male and female rats with chronic renal failure (CRF). GAGs were analyzed in total kidney tissue and 24-h urine of castrated (c), male (M), and female (F) Wistar control (C) rats (CM, CMc, CF, CFc) and after 30 days of CRF induced by 5/6 nephrectomy (CRFM, CRFMc, CRFF, CRFFc). Total GAG quantification and composition were determined using agarose and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, respectively. Renal GAGs were higher in CF compared to CM. CRFM presented an increase in renal GAGs, heparan sulfate (HS), and proteinuria, while castration reduced these parameters. However, CRFF and CRFFc groups showed a decrease in renal GAGs concomitant with an increase in proteinuria. Our results suggest that, in CRFM, sex hormones quantitatively alter GAGs, mainly HS, and possibly the glomerular filtration barrier, leading to proteinuria. The lack of this response in CRFMc, where HS did not increase, corroborates this theory. This pattern was not observed in females. Further studies of CRF are needed to clarify gender-dependent differences in HS synthesis.

  18. Potential value of Gleason score in predicting the benefit of cabazitaxel in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buonerba, Carlo; Pond, Gregory R; Sonpavde, Guru; Federico, Piera; Rescigno, Pasquale; Puglia, Livio; Bosso, Davide; Virtuoso, Antonella; Policastro, Tania; Izzo, Michela; Vaccaro, Luca; Ferro, Matteo; Aieta, Michele; Perdonà, Sisto; Palmieri, Giovannella; De Placido, Sabino; Di Lorenzo, Giuseppe

    2013-06-01

    This study aimed to identify predictive/prognostic factors in castration-resistant prostate cancer patients treated with cabazitaxel. Patients were enrolled from March 2011 to December 2011 in an international expanded access program. In January 2012, when cabazitaxel became commercially available, a prospective study was initiated at University Federico II of Naples and at Rionero in Vulture Hospital. Forty-seven patients were enrolled in this study. Patients received a median of nine cycles of cabazitaxel. Median progression-free survival was 7.0 months (95% CI: 5.7-8.0). Seventeen patients were still alive at the time of the analysis, with a median overall survival of 14 months (95% CI: 11-16). At multivariate analysis, a higher Gleason score (≥ 8) appeared to be associated with prolonged progression-free survival (hazard ratio: 0.36; 95% CI: 0.18-0.72); however, the higher Gleason score showed no statistical impact on overall survival. We hypothesize that the Gleason score has the potential to be incorporated in the clinical decision-making process for definition of treatment strategy in docetaxel-pretreated castration-resistant prostate cancer patients. We encourage further experimentation in this setting.

  19. Radium-223 and concomitant therapies in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: an international, early access, open-label, single-arm phase 3b trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Fred; Carles, Joan; Gillessen, Silke; Heidenreich, Axel; Heinrich, Daniel; Gratt, Jeremy; Lévy, Jérémy; Miller, Kurt; Nilsson, Sten; Petrenciuc, Oana; Tucci, Marcello; Wirth, Manfred; Federhofer, Judith; O'Sullivan, Joe M

    2016-09-01

    In the previously reported ALSYMPCA trial in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer and symptomatic bone metastases, overall survival was significantly longer in patients treated with radium-223 dichloride (radium-223) than in patients treated with placebo. In this study, we investigated safety and overall survival in radium-223 treated patients in an early access programme done after the ALSYMPCA study and before regulatory approval of radium-223. We did an international, prospective, interventional, open-label, single-arm, phase 3b study. Enrolled patients were aged 18 years or older with histologically or cytologically confirmed progressive bone-predominant metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer with two or more skeletal metastases on imaging (with no restriction as to whether they were symptomatic or asymptomatic; without visceral disease but lymph node metastases were allowed). Patients received intravenous injections of radium-223, 50 kBq/kg (current recommendation 55 kBq/kg after implementation of National Institute of Standards and Technology update on April 18, 2016) every 4 weeks for up to six injections. Other concomitant anticancer therapies were allowed. Primary endpoints were safety and overall survival. The safety and efficacy analyses were done on all patients who received at least one dose of the study drug. The study has been completed, and we report the final analysis here. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01618370, and the European Union Clinical Trials Register, EudraCT number 2012-000075-16. Between July 22, 2012, and Dec 19, 2013, 839 patients were enrolled from 113 sites in 14 countries. 696 patients received one or more doses of radium-223; 403 (58%) of these patients had all six planned injections. Any-grade treatment-emergent adverse events occurred in 523 (75%) of 696 patients; any-grade treatment-emergent adverse events deemed to be related to treatment were reported in 281 (40%) patients

  20. Comparison of intramuscular alfaxalone and ketamine combined with dexmedetomidine and butorphanol for castration in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khenissi, Latifa; Nikolayenkova-Topie, Olga; Broussaud, Ségolène; Touzot-Jourde, Gwenola

    2017-08-01

    Objectives Cardiorespiratory parameters and anaesthesia quality in cats anaesthetised with either intramuscular (IM) alfaxalone or ketamine both combined with dexmedetomidine and butorphanol for castration were evaluated. Methods Thirty-two client-owned cats were randomly assigned to receive either alfaxalone (A; 3 mg/kg IM) or ketamine (K; 5 mg/kg IM), combined with dexmedetomidine (10 μg/kg) and butorphanol (0.2 mg/kg). Heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR) and rectal temperature (T°) were recorded prior to drug administration. Pulse rate (PR) and RR were recorded 10 (T10) and 15 (T15) mins after injection (T0). Cardiorespiratory values (PR, RR, SPO2, blood pressure, PE'CO2) were recorded every 5 mins for the duration of the procedure. Pain at injection, intubation and recovery were evaluated with simple descriptive scores. Feasibility of anaesthesia was evaluated by the number of top-ups of anaesthetic needed. Cat attitude, ability to walk and presence of ataxia were assessed several times after extubation (Texmin) and the time between injection and extubation recorded. Pain was assessed at Tex120 and Tex240 with the 4Avet-pain score. Results The RR was significantly lower in group K at T10 (RRK = 28 ±13.35 breaths per minute [brpm], RRA= 43.24 ±7.04 brpm) and T15 (RRK = 28 ±11.53 brpm vs RRA = 43 ±12.18 brpm). Time to extubation was significantly longer in group A (TA = 62 ±14.6 mins, TK = 45.13 ± 7.38 mins). Cats in group K needed more top-ups, were more ataxic at Tex120, had a worse recovery score at Tex60 and were less willing to walk at Tex30. Conclusions and relevance Cats receiving alfaxalone had a longer but better quality recovery. Cardiorespiratory parameters were stable and within clinically acceptable values following IM injection of either alfaxalone or ketamine in healthy cats. Intramuscular alfaxalone is a suitable alternative to ketamine for short procedures requiring anaesthesia when used in combination with dexmedetomidine and

  1. Budget Impact of Enzalutamide for Chemotherapy-Naïve Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Cat N; O'Day, Ken; Flanders, Scott; Oestreicher, Nina; Francis, Peter; Posta, Linda; Popelar, Breanna; Tang, Hong; Balk, Mark

    2016-02-01

    Prostate cancer is expected to account for approximately one quarter of all new diagnoses of cancer in American men in 2015. The cost of prostate cancer care is expected to reach $15.1 billion by the year 2020, up from $11.9 billion in 2010. Given the high burden of prostate cancer, health care payers are interested in quantifying the potential budget impact of new therapies. To estimate the budget impact of enzalutamide for the treatment of chemotherapy-naïve metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) from a U.S. payer perspective. A model was developed to assess the budget impact of enzalutamide for treatment of chemotherapy-naïve mCRPC patients in a hypothetical 1-million-member U.S. health plan over a 1-year time horizon. Comparators included abiraterone acetate, sipuleucel-T, radium Ra 223 dichloride, and docetaxel. Epidemiologic data, including National Cancer Institute Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) incidence rates, were used to estimate the number of chemotherapy-naïve mCRPC patients. Dosing, administration, duration of therapy, and adverse event rates were based on package inserts and pivotal studies. Drug costs were obtained from RED BOOK and Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) average sales price pricing files, costs of administration and monitoring from the CMS physician fee schedule, and adverse events from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project and published literature. Market shares were estimated for each comparator before and after adoption of enzalutamide. The incremental aggregate budget impact, per patient per year (PPPY), per patient per month (PPPM), and per member per month (PMPM), was calculated. One-way sensitivity analyses were performed. In a population of 115 chemotherapy-naïve mCRPC patients, adopting enzalutamide had an annual incremental budget impact of $510,641 ($4,426 PPPY, $369 PPPM, and $0.04 PMPM). Results were most sensitive to

  2. Pain in castration-resistant prostate cancer with bone metastases: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gater Adam

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bone metastases are a common painful and debilitating consequence of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CPRC. Bone pain may predict patients' prognosis and there is a need to further explore CRPC patients' experiences of bone pain in the overall context of disease pathology. Due to the subjective nature of pain, assessments of pain severity, onset and progression are reliant on patient assessment. Patient reported outcome (PRO measures, therefore, are commonly used as key endpoints for evaluating the efficacy of CRPC treatments. Evidence of the content validity of leading PRO measures of pain severity used in CRPC clinical trials is, however, limited. Methods To document patients' experience of CRPC symptoms including pain, and their impact on health-related quality of life (HRQL, semi-structured in-depth qualitative interviews were conducted with 17 patients with CRPC and bone metastases. The content validity of the Present Pain Intensity (PPI scale from the McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ, and the 'Average Pain' and 'Worst Pain' items of the Brief Pain Inventory Short-Form (BPI-SF was also assessed. Results Patients with CRPC and bone metastases present with a constellation of symptoms that can have a profound effect on HRQL. For patients in this study, bone pain was the most prominent and debilitating symptom associated with their condition. Bone pain was chronic and, despite being generally well-managed by analgesic medication, instances of breakthrough cancer pain (BTcP were common. Cognitive debriefing of the selected PRO measures of pain severity highlighted difficulties among patients in understanding the verbal response scale (VRS of the MPQ PPI scale. There were also some inconsistencies in the way in which the BPI-SF 'Average Pain' item was interpreted by patients. In contrast, the BPI-SF 'Worst Pain' item was well understood and interpreted consistently among patients. Conclusions Study findings support the

  3. Conceptual Framework To Extend Life Cycle Assessment ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) is a decision-making tool that accounts for multiple impacts across the life cycle of a product or service. This paper presents a conceptual framework to integrate human health impact assessment with risk screening approaches to extend LCA to include near-field chemical sources (e.g., those originating from consumer products and building materials) that have traditionally been excluded from LCA. A new generation of rapid human exposure modeling and high-throughput toxicity testing is transforming chemical risk prioritization and provides an opportunity for integration of screening-level risk assessment (RA) with LCA. The combined LCA and RA approach considers environmental impacts of products alongside risks to human health, which is consistent with regulatory frameworks addressing RA within a sustainability mindset. A case study is presented to juxtapose LCA and risk screening approaches for a chemical used in a consumer product. The case study demonstrates how these new risk screening tools can be used to inform toxicity impact estimates in LCA and highlights needs for future research. The framework provides a basis for developing tools and methods to support decision making on the use of chemicals in products. This paper presents a conceptual framework for including near-field exposures into Life Cycle Assessment using advanced human exposure modeling and high-throughput tools

  4. Extending cosmology: the metric approach

    OpenAIRE

    Mendoza, S.

    2012-01-01

    Comment: 2012, Extending Cosmology: The Metric Approach, Open Questions in Cosmology; Review article for an Intech "Open questions in cosmology" book chapter (19 pages, 3 figures). Available from: http://www.intechopen.com/books/open-questions-in-cosmology/extending-cosmology-the-metric-approach

  5. On core stability and extendability

    OpenAIRE

    Shellshear, Evan

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates conditions under which the core of a TU cooperative game is stable. In particular the author extends the idea of extendability to find new conditions under which the core is stable. It is also shown that these new conditions are not necessary for core stability.

  6. High-resolution ERG-expression profiling on GeneChip exon 1.0 ST arrays in primary and castration-resistant prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, F.P.; Salagierski, M.; Jannink, S.A.; Schalken, J.A.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess whether oestrogen-regulated gene (ERG) expression analysis using GeneChip arrays can predict transmembrane protease, serine 2 (TMPRSS2)-ERG fusion. The expression level of the TMPRSS2-ERG gene was studied in various histological grades of prostate cancer and castration-resistant

  7. Prednisone plus cabazitaxel or mitoxantrone for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer progressing after docetaxel treatment: a randomised open-label trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Bono, Johann Sebastian; Oudard, Stephane; Ozguroglu, Mustafa

    2010-01-01

    Cabazitaxel is a novel tubulin-binding taxane drug with antitumour activity in docetaxel-resistant cancers. We aimed to compare the efficacy and safety of cabazitaxel plus prednisone with those of mitoxantrone plus prednisone in men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer with progre...

  8. Randomized, Double-Blind, Phase III Trial of Ipilimumab Versus Placebo in Asymptomatic or Minimally Symptomatic Patients With Metastatic Chemotherapy-Naive Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beer, Tomasz M; Kwon, Eugene D; Drake, Charles G

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Ipilimumab increases antitumor T-cell responses by binding to cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4. We evaluated treatment with ipilimumab in asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic patients with chemotherapy-naive metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer without visceral metastases. Pat...

  9. Effect of surgical castration of bull calves at different stages of maturity with or without analgesia on the acute phase response (APR) and complete blood count (CBC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The study objective was to determine if surgical castration at birth or weaning impacts the acute phase response (APR) or complete blood counts (CBC) and whether concurrent administration of an oral analgesic (meloxicam) ameliorates inflammation. Bull calves (n=29) from the University of Arkansas re...

  10. Using Castration Surgery in Male Rats to Demonstrate the Physiological Effects of Testosterone on Seminal Vesicle Anatomy in an Undergraduate Laboratory Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belanger, Rachelle M.; Conant, Stephanie B.; Grabowski, Gregory M.

    2013-01-01

    Rats can be used as a model organism to teach physiological concepts in a laboratory setting. This article describes a two-part laboratory that introduces students to hypothesis testing, experimental design, the appropriate use of controls and surgical techniques. Students perform both a castration and sham-control surgery on male rats and test…

  11. Prostate-specific Antigen Decline After 4 Weeks of Treatment with Abiraterone Acetate and Overall Survival in Patients with Metastatic Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rescigno, P.; Lorente, D.; Bianchini, D.; Ferraldeschi, R.; Kolinsky, M.P.; Sideris, S.; Zafeiriou, Z.; Sumanasuriya, S.; Smith, A.D.; Mehra, N.; Jayaram, A.; Perez-Lopez, R.; Mateo, J.; Parker, C.; Dearnaley, D.P.; Tunariu, N.; Reid, A.; Attard, G.; Bono, J.S. de

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The availability of multiple new treatments for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) mandates earlier treatment switches in the absence of a response. A decline in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is widely used to monitor treatment response, but is not validated as an

  12. Automated Bone Scan Index as a quantitative imaging biomarker in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer patients being treated with enzalutamide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anand, Aseem; Morris, Michael J.; Larson, Steven M

    2016-01-01

    Background: Having performed analytical validation studies, we are now assessing the clinical utility of the upgraded automated Bone Scan Index (BSI) in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). In the present study, we retrospectively evaluated the discriminatory strength of the a...

  13. Phase I/II trial of cabazitaxel plus abiraterone in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) progressing after docetaxel and abiraterone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Massard, C.; Mateo, J.; Loriot, Y.; Pezaro, C.; Albiges, L.; Mehra, N.; Varga, A.; Bianchini, D.; Ryan, C.J.; Petrylak, D.P.; Attard, G.; Shen, L.; Fizazi, K.; Bono, J. De

    2017-01-01

    Background: Abiraterone and cabazitaxel improve survival in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). We conducted an open-label phase I/II trial of cabazitaxel plus abiraterone to assess the antitumor activity and tolerability in patients with progressive mCRPC after

  14. CAST: A retrospective analysis of cabazitaxel and abiraterone acetate sequential treatment in patients with metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer previously treated with docetaxel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wissing, M.D.; Coenen, J.L.; Berg, P. van den; Westgeest, H.M.; Eertwegh, A.J. van den; Oort, I.M. van; Bos, M.M.; Bergman, A.M.; Hamberg, P.; Tije, A.J. Ten; Los, M.; Lolkema, M.P.; Wit, R. de; Gelderblom, H.

    2015-01-01

    Cabazitaxel and abiraterone have both received approval for treating metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) patients after first-line docetaxel therapy. In the cabazitaxel and abiraterone sequential treatment (CAST) study, the clinical outcome of docetaxel-treated mCRPC patients

  15. Safety of cabazitaxel in senior adults with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: results of the European compassionate-use programme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heidenreich, A.; Bracarda, S.; Mason, M.; Ozen, H.; Sengelov, L.; Oort, I.M. van; Papandreou, C.; Fossa, S.; Hitier, S.; Climent, M.A.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cabazitaxel/prednisone has been shown to prolong survival versus mitoxantrone/prednisone in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) that has progressed during or after docetaxel. Subsequently, compassionate-use programmes (CUPs) and expanded-access

  16. Physicians' behavior influences the health and economic impact of applying circulating tumor cells as response marker in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Degeling, K; Mehra, N.; Koffijberg, H; de Bono, J.S.; Ijzerman, M J

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Treatment decisions in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) vary between physicians, even though expert opinion guidelines exist to guide the interpretation of information from multiple time-dependent imaging modalities and markers. We aimed to investigate whether

  17. Analysis of the putative Cr-Cr quintuple bond in Ar'CrCrAr' (Ar' = C6H3-2,6(C6H3-2,6-Pr(i)2)2 based on the combined natural orbitals for chemical valence and extended transition state method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndambuki, Sylvester; Ziegler, Tom

    2012-07-16

    The nature of the putative Cr-Cr quintuple bond in Ar'CrCrAr' (Ar' = C(6)H(3)-2,6(C(6)H(3)-2,6-Pr(i)(2))(2)) is investigated with the help of a newly developed energy and density decomposition scheme. The new approach combines the extended transition state (ETS) energy decomposition method with the natural orbitals for chemical valence (NOCV) density decomposition scheme within the same theoretical framework. The results show that in addition to the five bonding components (σ(2)π(2)π'(2)δ(2)δ'(2)) of the Cr-Cr bond, the quintuple bond is augmented by secondary Cr-C interactions involving the Cr-ipso-carbon of the flanking aryl rings. The presence of isopropyl groups (Pr(i)) is further shown to stabilize Ar'CrCrAr' by 20 kcal/mol compared to the two Ar'Cr monomers through stabilizing van der Waals dispersion interactions.

  18. Extended Active Disturbance Rejection Controller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhiqiang (Inventor); Tian, Gang (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Multiple designs, systems, methods and processes for controlling a system or plant using an extended active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) based controller are presented. The extended ADRC controller accepts sensor information from the plant. The sensor information is used in conjunction with an extended state observer in combination with a predictor that estimates and predicts the current state of the plant and a co-joined estimate of the system disturbances and system dynamics. The extended state observer estimates and predictions are used in conjunction with a control law that generates an input to the system based in part on the extended state observer estimates and predictions as well as a desired trajectory for the plant to follow.

  19. Rapid reduction in blood flow to the rat ventral prostate gland after castration: preliminary evidence that androgens influence prostate size by regulating blood flow to the prostate gland and prostatic endothelial cell survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabsigh, A; Chang, D T; Heitjan, D F; Kiss, A; Olsson, C A; Puchner, P J; Buttyan, R

    1998-08-01

    Androgenic steroids regulate the development and size of the mammalian prostate gland. The mechanism(s) for this growth control might involve a direct effect on prostate cell proliferation and survival as well as more complex effects on the tissue environment supporting nourishment and oxygenation. In this study, we evaluated an animal model of androgen action on the prostate, the rat ventral prostate gland, to determine whether acute androgen withdrawal, by means of castration, might alter the primary blood flow to the prostate gland and for the effects of castration on prostatic endothelial cell viability. Groups of rats studied included intact control males, males that had been surgically castrated, or males that received a sham-surgical castration. Relative blood flow (RBF) to the rat ventral prostate glands and rat bladders were measured at 18 and 24 hr after castration or sham castration using a fluorescent microsphere infusion technique. Thin sections from fixed and embedded rat ventral prostate glands obtained from unoperated or 12-hr castrated rats were analyzed by the TUNEL immunostaining technique to microscopically identify and quantify apoptotic epithelial, stromal, and endothelial cells. RBF to the rat ventral prostate was reduced by 38%, at 18 hr after castration when compared with intact or sham-operated rats and by 45% at 24 hr after castration (P=0.038 unoperated/0.025 sham operated). In contrast, RBF to the bladder was not significantly different between any of the groups in the 24-hr castrate experiment. TUNEL staining analysis of ventral prostate tissues obtained from 12-hr castrated rats showed only rare TUNEL-positive epithelial cells similar to the control tissue but significantly increased TUNEL labeling for endothelial and other ventral prostate stromal cells. Castration resulted in a rapid and significant reduction of blood flow to the mature rat ventral prostate gland that was not seen in the bladder. This reduction precedes the

  20. Topological defects in extended inflation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Copeland, E.J. (Department of Physics, University of Sussex, Brighton BN1 9QH (United Kingdom)); Kolb, E.W. (NASA/Fermilab Astrophysics Center, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL (USA) Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Enrico Fermi Institute, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (USA)); Liddle, A.R. (Astronomy Centre, Department of Physics, University of Sussex, Brighton (United Kingdom))

    1990-10-15

    We consider the production of topological defects, especially cosmic strings, in extended-inflation models. In extended inflation, the Universe passes through a first-order phase transition via bubble percolation, which naturally allows defects to form at the end of inflation. The correlation length, which determines the number density of the defects, is related to the mean size of the bubbles when they collide. This mechanism allows a natural combination of inflation and large-scale structure via cosmic strings.

  1. Topological defects in extended inflation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Copeland, E.J. (Sussex Univ., Brighton (UK). Dept. of Physics); Kolb, E.W. (Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (USA) Chicago Univ., IL (USA). Enrico Fermi Inst.); Liddle, A.R. (Sussex Univ., Brighton (UK). Astronomy Centre)

    1990-04-01

    We consider the production of topological defects, especially cosmic strings, in extended inflation models. In extended inflation, the Universe passes through a first-order phase transition via bubble percolation, which naturally allows defects to form at the end of inflation. The correlation length, which determines the number density of the defects, is related to the mean size of bubbles when they collide. This mechanism allows a natural combination of inflation and large-scale structure via cosmic strings. 18 refs.

  2. Extended lactation in dairy cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Annette; Muir, D. Donald; Knight, Christopher Harold

    2008-01-01

    of the lactation, protein and fat percentages increasing and lactose percentage decreasing, irrespective of treatment. The quality of the milk for processing into cheese, fermented products, heat-treated products and cream liqueurs was assessed by calculation of casein number (casein protein as a proportion...... interventions, the results lend support to the economic arguments in favour of extended lactation cycles. The likely welfare benefits of extended lactation are also discussed....

  3. Extender for securing a closure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, II, Patrick A.

    2012-10-02

    An apparatus for securing a closure such as door or a window that opens and closes by movement relative to a fixed structure such as a wall or a floor. Many embodiments provide a device for relocating a padlock from its normal location where it secures a fastener (such as a hasp) to a location for the padlock that is more accessible for locking and unlocking the padlock. Typically an extender is provided, where the extender has a hook at a first end that is disposed through the eye of the staple of the hasp, and at an opposing second end the extender has an annulus, such as a hole in the extender or a loop or ring affixed to the extender. The shackle of the padlock may be disposed through the annulus and may be disposed through the eye of a second staple to secure the door or window in a closed or open position. Some embodiments employ a rigid sheath to enclose at least a portion of the extender. Typically the rigid sheath has an open state where the hook is exposed outside the sheath and a closed state where the hook is disposed within the sheath.

  4. Genomic Alterations in Cell-Free DNA and Enzalutamide Resistance in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Alexander W; Azad, Arun A; Volik, Stanislav V; Annala, Matti; Beja, Kevin; McConeghy, Brian; Haegert, Anne; Warner, Evan W; Mo, Fan; Brahmbhatt, Sonal; Shukin, Robert; Le Bihan, Stephane; Gleave, Martin E; Nykter, Matti; Collins, Colin C; Chi, Kim N

    2016-12-01

    The molecular landscape underpinning response to the androgen receptor (AR) antagonist enzalutamide in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) is undefined. Consequently, there is an urgent need for practical biomarkers to guide therapy selection and elucidate resistance. Although tissue biopsies are impractical to perform routinely in the majority of patients with mCRPC, the analysis of plasma cell-free DNA (cfDNA) has recently emerged as a minimally invasive method to explore tumor characteristics. To reveal genomic characteristics from cfDNA associated with clinical outcomes during enzalutamide treatment. Plasma samples were obtained from August 4, 2013, to July 31, 2015, at a single academic institution (British Columbia Cancer Agency) from 65 patients with mCRPC. We collected temporal plasma samples (at baseline, 12 weeks, end of treatment) for circulating cfDNA and performed array comparative genomic hybridization copy number profiling and deep AR gene sequencing. Samples collected at end of treatment were also subjected to targeted sequencing of 19 prostate cancer-associated genes. Enzalutamide, 160 mg, daily orally. Prostate-specific antigen response rate (decline ≥50% from baseline confirmed ≥3 weeks later). Radiographic (as per Prostate Cancer Working Group 2 Criteria) and/or clinical progression (defined as worsening disease-related symptoms necessitating a change in anticancer therapy and/or deterioration in Eastern Cooperative Group performance status ≥2 levels). The 65 patients had a median (interquartile range) age of 74 (68-79) years. Prostate-specific antigen response rate to enzalutamide treatment was 38% (25 of 65), while median clinical/radiographic progression-free survival was 3.5 (95% CI, 2.1-5.0) months. Cell-free DNA was isolated from 122 of 125 plasma samples, and targeted sequencing was successful in 119 of 122. AR mutations and/or copy number alterations were robustly detected in 48% (31 of 65) and 60

  5. Patients' Preferences for the Treatment of Metastatic Castrate-resistant Prostate Cancer: A Discrete Choice Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliasson, Lina; de Freitas, Hayley M; Dearden, Lindsay; Calimlim, Brian; Lloyd, Andrew J

    2017-04-01

    Patient treatment preferences are increasingly being used to inform health care decision making. This discrete choice experiment assessed how men perceive the risks and benefits of hypothetical treatment options for metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Treatment attributes for inclusion were identified through a review of the literature and product labels. Expert interviews confirmed clinical appropriateness and patient relevance of the attributes, which included effectiveness (delay in months before chemotherapy), steroid use, possible drug interactions (additional hospital visits for monitoring), fogginess (effects on cognition and memory), fatigue (extreme tiredness), food restrictions, and bone pain. Following a pilot, the final discrete choice experiment included 18 choice sets presenting treatments for mCRPC and was completed by men with mCRPC in France, Germany, and the United Kingdom. Data were analyzed using a conditional logit model, with odds ratios (ORs) used to indicate preference for attributes, and tradeoff measures (TOM) were estimated using the ratio of coefficients. Within each attribute category and with all other factors being equal, participants (N = 285) indicated a strong preference for treatments that fully control bone pain (OR = 12.069 [95% CI, 10.555-13.800]) and for treatments that delay chemotherapy (OR, 1.727 [95% CI, 1.548-1.927]). They also preferred treatments that were associated with the lowest risk of fogginess (OR, 2.115 [95% CI, 1.849-2.420]), a lower risk of fatigue (OR, 1.365 [95% CI 1.219-1.528]), and fewer additional hospital visits (OR, 1.245 [95% CI 1.111-1.397]) than the respective reference categories. Participants preferred to use steroids under advice from a physician (OR, 1.275 [95% CI 1.132-1.437]). Food restrictions related to taking medication were not a significant concern for participants. TOM results indicated that large tradeoffs in effectiveness, fogginess, and fatigue are required for

  6. Optimal sequencing of docetaxel and abiraterone in men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maughan, Benjamin L; Xhou, Xian C; Suzman, Daniel L; Nadal, Rosa; Bassi, Sunakshi; Schweizer, Michael T; Antonarakis, Emmanuel S

    2015-11-01

    Recent advances have yielded multiple new life-prolonging treatments for men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) including chemotherapy, next-generation hormonal therapy, immunotherapy, and radiopharmaceutical products. However, the optimal sequencing of these agents to maximize clinical benefit remains unclear. Recent data from the CHAARTED and STAMPEDE studies suggest that early use of docetaxel in men with metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer (mHSPC) significantly improves survival, but whether early compared with delayed use of chemotherapy also provides a survival advantage in mCRPC is unknown. A retrospective analysis of consecutive mCRPC patients treated at Johns Hopkins is reported. Patients included were treated with sequential docetaxel and abiraterone, in either order. The combined progression-free survival (combined PFS: PFS1 + PFS2) of abiraterone-to-docetaxel is compared to the reverse sequence, where PFS1 and PFS2 represent progression-free survival on the first and second agents respectively. Overall survival (OS) from the start of the first therapy to death is compared between groups. Baseline characteristics are reported prior to the start of the first agent in the sequence. Propensity score-weighted multivariable models and Kaplan-Meier analysis are used for evaluation of the primary and secondary outcomes. Fifty-eight patients who began treatment for mCRPC between January 2011 (the year of abiraterone's FDA-approval) and February 2015 were identified: 26 were in the docetaxel-to-abiraterone group and 32 were in the abiraterone-to-docetaxel group. Patients in the abiraterone-to-docetaxel group had more Gleason 8-10 tumors, greater metastatic burden in bone, and higher median PSAs than those in the docetaxel-to-abiraterone group. Propensity score-weighted univariate analyses for combined PFS (HR 0.82; 95%CI 0.50-1.33; P = 0.41) and OS (HR 0.79; 95%CI 0.50-1.25; P = 0.31) do not identify any significant

  7. Budgetary Impact of Cabazitaxel Use After Docetaxel Treatment for Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flannery, Kyle; Drea, Ed; Hudspeth, Louis; Corman, Shelby; Gao, Xin; Xue, Mei; Miao, Raymond

    2017-04-01

    With the approval of several new treatments for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), budgetary impact is a concern for health plan decision makers. Budget impact models (BIMs) are becoming a requirement in many countries as part of formulary approval or reimbursement decisions. Cabazitaxel is a second-generation taxane developed to overcome resistance to docetaxel and is approved for the treatment of patients with mCRPC previously treated with a docetaxel-containing regimen. To estimate a 1-year projected budget impact of varying utilization rates of cabazitaxel as a second-line treatment for mCRPC following docetaxel, using a hypothetical U.S. private managed care plan with 1 million members. A BIM was developed to evaluate costs for currently available treatment options for patients with mCRPC previously treated with docetaxel. Treatments included in the model were cabazitaxel, abiraterone acetate, enzalutamide, and radium-223, with utilization rates derived from market research data. Medication costs were calculated according to published pricing benchmarks factored by dosing and duration of therapy as stated in the prescribing information for each agent. Published rates and costs of grade 3-4 adverse events were also factored into the model. In addition, the model reports budget impact under 2 scenarios. In the first base-case scenario, patient out-of-pocket costs were subtracted from the total cost of treatment. In the second scenario, all treatment costs were assumed to be paid by the plan. In a hypothetical 1 million-member health plan population, 100 patients were estimated to receive second-line treatment for mCRPC after treatment with docetaxel. Using current utilization rates for the 4 agents of interest, the base-case scenario estimated the cost of second-line treatment after docetaxel to be $6,331,704, or $0.528 per member per month (PMPM). In a scenario where cabazitaxel use increases from the base-rate case of 24% to a

  8. Gonadal hormone activation of male courtship ultrasonic vocalizations and male copulatory behavior in castrated male deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus bairdi).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomerantz, S M; Fox, E; Clemens, L G

    1983-06-01

    The influence of testosterone (T), a 5 alpha-reduced metabolite of T, dihydrotestosterone, and an aromatized metabolite of T, estradiol, on 35-kHz ultrasonic calling and male copulatory behavior by male deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus bairdi) was examined. Daily treatment with testosterone propionate (TP), dihydrotestosterone propionate (DHTP), or estradiol benzoate (EB) restored male ultrasonic calling in long-term castrated males. Both TP and DHTP restored male copulatory behavior, but EB was ineffective in facilitating copulation. Synergism of EB and DHTP action was observed; when subthreshold doses of EB (1 microgram/day) and DHTP (50 micrograms/day) were administered in combination, male ultrasonic calling and male copulatory behavior were activated. In relation to other comparative findings, these results indicate that the degree to which male sexual behavior is facilitated by 5 alpha-reduced androgens and/or estrogens is influenced by the species and the particular pattern of masculine behavior under consideration.

  9. Buprenorphine provides better anaesthetic conditions than butorphanol for field castration in ponies: results of a randomised clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigotti, C; De Vries, A; Taylor, P M

    A prospective, randomised, blinded, clinical trial in 47 ponies compared butorphanol and buprenorphine administered intravenously with detomidine prior to castration under anaesthesia. Detomidine 12 μg/kg intravenously was followed by butorphanol 25 μg/kg (BUT) or buprenorphine 5 μg/kg (BUP) before induction of anaesthesia with intravenous ketamine and diazepam. Quality of sedation, induction and recovery from anaesthesia, response to tactile stimulation, and surgical conditions were scored. If anaesthesia was inadequate 'rescue' was given with intravenous ketamine (maximum three doses) followed by intravenous thiopental and detomidine. Time from induction to first rescue, total ketamine dose and number of rescues were recorded. Postoperative locomotor activity was scored and abnormal behaviour noted. Simple descriptive scales were used for all scoring. Data were analysed using two-way analysis of variance, t tests, Mann-Whitney or Fisher's exact tests as appropriate; Pbuprenorphine appeared to provide better intraoperative analgesia. British Veterinary Association.

  10. Enzalutamide treatment in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer progressing after chemotherapy and abiraterone acetate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Frederik Birkebaek; Røder, Martin Andreas; Rathenborg, Per

    2014-01-01

    %). Forty-six percent had a greater than 30% decrease in PSA. The PSA response to enzalutamide did not correlate with the number of prior cancer treatments (p = 0.57), time from diagnosis to mCRPC (p = 0.11) or prior response to docetaxel (p = 0.67). However, patients treated with second line cabazitaxel......OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to record prostate-specific antigen (PSA) response and overall survival (OS) for a group of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) patients treated with enzalutamide following progression after abiraterone treatment in the post......-chemotherapy setting. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Twenty-four mCRPC patients with progression after abiraterone treatment following primary docetaxel therapy received enzalutamide 160 mg/day. The percentage PSA response was recorded following first line docetaxel, abiraterone and enzalutamide treatment. Fischer's exact test...

  11. Understanding prostate-specific antigen dynamics in monitoring metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: implications for clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Mizokami

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Availability of novel hormonal therapies as well as docetaxel and cabazitaxel treatment for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC has changed the outlook for this group of patients with improvements in progression-free survival and overall survival. Physicians often diagnose the progression of prostate cancer using serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA. However, serum PSA is not always correlated with the clinical status in CRPC. To evaluate the PSA dynamics with greater precision, understanding of the control of PSA and of the mechanisms of development of CRPC is needed. Moreover, it is necessary to use new hormonal therapies with an appropriate timing to optimally improve the prognosis and the QOL of the patients. In the present review, we ascertain the PSA dynamics and the mechanisms of the development of CRPC to assist in optimal utilization of the new treatments for mCRPC.

  12. Physical nature of interactions in Zn(II) complexes with 2,2'-bipyridyl: quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM), interacting quantum atoms (IQA), noncovalent interactions (NCI), and extended transition state coupled with natural orbitals for chemical valence (ETS-NOCV) comparative studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cukrowski, Ignacy; de Lange, Jurgens H; Mitoraj, Mariusz

    2014-01-23

    In the present account factors determining the stability of ZnL, ZnL2, and ZnL3 complexes (L = bpy, 2,2′-bipyridyl) were characterized on the basis of various techniques: the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM), energy decomposition schemes based on interacting quantum atoms (IQA), and extended transition state coupled with natural orbitals for chemical valence (ETS-NOCV). Finally, the noncovalent interactions (NCI) index was also applied. All methods consistently indicated that the strength of the coordination bonds, Zn–O and Zn–N, decreases from ZnL to ZnL3. Importantly, it has been identified that the strength of secondary intramolecular heteropolar hydrogen bonding interactions, CH···O and CH···N, increases when going from ZnL to ZnL3. A similar trend appeared to be valid for the π-bonding as well as electrostatic stabilization. In addition to the above leading bonding contributions, all techniques suggested the existence of very subtle, but non-negligible additional stabilization from the CH···HC electronic exchange channel; these interactions are the weakest among all considered here. From IQA it was found that the local diatomic interaction energy, Eint(H,H), amounts at HF to −2.5, −2.7, and −2.9 kcal mol(–1) for ZnL, ZnL2, and ZnL3, respectively (−2.1 kcal mol(–1) for ZnL at MP2). NOCV-based deformation density channels showed that formation of CH--HC contacts in Zn complexes causes significant polarization of σ(C–H) bonds, which accordingly leads to charge accumulation in the CH···HC bay region. Charge depletion from σ(C–H) bonds was also reflected in the calculated spin–spin (1)J(C–H) coupling constants, which decrease from 177.06 Hz (ZnL) to 173.87 Hz (ZnL3). This last result supports our findings of an increase in the local electronic CH···HC stabilization from ZnL to ZnL3 found from QTAIM, IQA, and ETS-NOCV. Finally, this work unites for the first time the results from four methods that are widely

  13. Extended structures of two coordination polymers based on 1, 10 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 128; Issue 3. Extended structures of two coordination polymers based on 1,10-phenanthroline derivatives:Preparation, structural characterization and properties. Yan-Ju Huang Ya-Ru Pan Gang Du Yi-Xin Cao. Regular Articles Volume 128 Issue 3 March 2016 pp 459- ...

  14. Radium-223 chloride: a potential new treatment for castration-resistant prostate cancer patients with metastatic bone disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harrison MR

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Michael R Harrison, Terence Z Wong, Andrew J Armstrong, Daniel J GeorgeDuke Cancer Institute, Durham, NC, USABackground: Radium-223 chloride (223Ra; Alpharadin is an alpha-emitting radioisotope that targets areas of osteoblastic metastasis and is excreted by the small intestine. When compared with beta-emitters (eg, strontium-89, samarium-153, 223Ra delivers a high quantity of energy per track length with short tissue penetration.Objective: This review describes the mechanism, radiobiology, and preclinical development of 223Ra and discusses the clinical data currently available regarding its safety and efficacy profile.Methods: Data from clinical trials including abstracts were collected and reviewed using the PubMed Database, as well as the American Society of Clinical Oncology abstract database.Conclusion: Current bone-targeted therapies fall into two main categories: antiresorptive agents (eg, zoledronic acid, denosumab, which have been shown to delay skeletal-related events, and radiopharmaceuticals (eg, samarium-153, which may have a role in pain palliation. Historically, neither antiresorptive agents nor radiopharmaceuticals have shown definitive evidence of improved overall survival or other antitumor effects in metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC. Radiopharmaceuticals are limited by myelosuppresion, thrombocytopenia, and renal excretion. In a recently reported randomized Phase III trial in men with symptomatic bone-metastatic CRPC who had received or were ineligible for docetaxel chemotherapy, 223Ra treatment resulted in improved overall survival and delayed skeletal-related events. Toxicity consisted of minor gastrointestinal side effects and mild neutropenia and thrombocytopenia that were rarely severe. Pending regulatory approval, 223Ra may represent a unique and distinct option for an important subgroup of patients with mCRPC; future trials should address its use in combination or in sequence with existing and novel

  15. Radium-223 dichloride: a novel treatment option for castration-resistant prostate cancer patients with symptomatic bone metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGann, Shane; Horton, Evan R

    2015-04-01

    To review and evaluate the clinical trial efficacy and safety of radium 223 ((223)Ra) along with its place in therapy in men with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). A literature search in PubMed/MEDLINE (up to October 2014) was performed using various combinations of the terms radium, hormone-refractory prostate cancer, and castration-resistant prostate cancer. The New Drug Application Medical, Pharmacology, and Clinical Pharmacology and Biopharmaceutics Reviews for radium (223)Ra dichloride were also utilized. The bibliographies of articles were reviewed to identify additional references. Phase 1, 2, and 3 studies that assessed the safety and/or efficacy of (223)Ra in patients with CRPC were reviewed. Peer-reviewed articles with clinically relevant information were reviewed for background information. In May 2013, the Food and Drug Administration approved intravenous use of (223)Ra for the treatment of patients with CRPC, symptomatic bone metastases, and no known visceral metastatic disease. In a phase 3 study comparing (223)Ra and the best standard of care (SOC) versus the best SOC plus placebo, (223)Ra was shown to increase survival. The most commonly seen adverse drug reactions and hematological laboratory abnormalities with (223)Ra include nausea, diarrhea, vomiting, peripheral edema, anemia, lymphocytopenia, leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, and neutropenia. (223)Ra is a first-in-class α-particle-emitting radioactive agent that is first-line therapy, providing an extra option for men suffering from CRPC with symptomatic bone metastases and no known visceral metastases. (223)Ra has also been shown to be relatively well tolerated when up to 6 injections are given. Further studies are needed to evaluate whether (223)Ra is safe and effective for more than 6 doses and if it can be used concomitantly with chemotherapy. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. Analgesic effects of butorphanol tartrate and phenylbutazone administered alone and in combination in young horses undergoing routine castration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz, Macarena G; Sellon, Debra C; Cary, Julie A; Hines, Melissa T; Farnsworth, Kelly D

    2009-11-15

    To compare the analgesic efficacy of administration of butorphanol tartrate, phenylbutazone, or both drugs in combination in colts undergoing routine castration. Randomized controlled clinical trial. 36 client-owned colts. Horses received treatment with butorphanol alone (0.05 mg/kg [0.023 mg/lb], IM, prior to surgery and then q 4 h for 24 hours), phenylbutazone alone (4.4 mg/kg [2.0 mg/lb], IV, prior to surgery and then 2.2 mg/kg [1.0 mg/lb], PO, q 12 h for 3 days), or butorphanol and phenylbutazone at the aforementioned dosages (12 horses/group). For single-drug-treated horses, appropriate placebos were administered to balance treatment protocols among groups. All horses were anesthetized, and lidocaine hydrochloride was injected into each testis. Physical and physiological variables, plasma cortisol concentration, body weight, and water consumption were assessed before and at intervals after surgery, and induction of and recovery from anesthesia were subjectively characterized. Observers assessed signs of pain by use of a visual analogue scale and a numerical rating scale. Significant changes in gastrointestinal sounds, fecal output, and plasma cortisol concentrations were evident in each treatment group over time, compared with preoperative values. At any time point, assessed variables and signs of pain did not differ significantly among groups, although the duration of recumbency after surgery was longest for the butorphanol-phenylbutazone-treated horses. With intratesticular injections of lidocaine, administration of butorphanol to anesthetized young horses undergoing routine castration had the same apparent analgesic effect as phenylbutazone treatment. Combined butorphanolphenylbutazone treatment was not apparently superior to either drug used alone.

  17. Cabazitaxel as second-line or third-line therapy in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongsted, Per; Svane, Inge M; Lindberg, Henriette; Bisbjerg, Rasmus; Daugaard, Gedske; Sengeløv, Lisa

    2016-08-01

    To compare treatment outcomes in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer treated with cabazitaxel (CA) as second-line or third-line therapy in the everyday clinical setting. Charts from 94 patients treated with CA as second-line (n=28) or third-line therapy (n=66) were evaluated. Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events were used to register grade 3-4 nonhematological toxicity during treatment with CA. Baseline metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer-related prognostic factors, duration of therapy, and maximum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) percentage change were registered during treatment with CA and previous/subsequent novel androgen receptor targeting therapies. Progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. A median of 6 versus 5 treatment cycles was administered in patients treated with second-line and third-line CA (P=0.483). Events with grade 3-4 nonhematological toxicity were equally distributed in the two groups (32 vs. 35%, P=0.80). PSA responses were observed in 46 and 17% of patients treated with second-line and third-line CA (P=0.002). PFS (5.5 vs. 3.3 months, P=0.087, log rank) and OS (18.3 vs. 11.4 months, P=0.003, log rank) was longer in patients treated with second-line CA. OS measured from second-line abiraterone acetate/enzalutamide was similar (18.0 months) to second-line CA (P=0.883, log rank). Treatment-related toxicity was independent of CA being administered as second-line or third-line therapy. Although PFS and the frequency of PSA responders favored patients treated with second-line CA, one treatment sequence could not be considered superior to the other in this study.

  18. Radium-223 chloride: Extending life in prostate cancer patients by treating bone metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wissing, Michel D; van Leeuwen, Fijs W B; van der Pluijm, Gabri; Gelderblom, Hans

    2013-11-01

    The treatment scope for patients with metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) is rapidly expanding. On May 15, 2013, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved radium-223 chloride ((223)RaCl2) for the treatment of mCRPC patients whose metastases are limited to the bones. Radium-223 is an α-emitting alkaline earth metal ion, which, similar to calcium ions, accumulates in the bone. In a phase III study (ALSYMPCA), mCRPC patients with bone metastases received best standard-of-care treatment with placebo or (223)RaCl2. At a prespecified interim analysis, the primary endpoint of median overall survival was significantly extended by 3.6 months in patients treated with radium-223 compared with placebo (P < 0.001). The radioisotope was well tolerated and gave limited bone marrow suppression. (223)RaCl2 is the first bone-targeting antitumor therapy that received FDA approval based on a significant extended median overall survival. Further studies are required to optimize its dosing and to confirm its efficacy and safety in cancer patients.

  19. Space allowance influences individually housed Holstein bull calf innate immune measures and standing behaviors after castration at 3 weeks of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo-Lorenzo, M S; Hulbert, L E; Ballou, M A; Fowler, A L; Luo, Y; Klasing, K C; Mitloehner, F M

    2017-03-01

    Dairy calves in the Southwest regions of the United States are typically raised individually in wooden hutches with 1.23 m2 of space. The objective of the study was to determine if increased space allowance in wooden hutches influences measures of innate immunity and behaviors of Holstein bull calves pre- and postcastration. Calves were randomly assigned at 4 d of age to conventional (CONV; 1.23 m2 of space; n = 18), moderate (MOD; 1.85 m2 space; n = 17), or maximized space allowance (MAX; 3.71 m2 space; n = 19) in hutches. Calves were surgically castrated at 24 d of age. Peripheral whole blood samples were collected at -1, +1, +5, and +12 d of castration. Accelerometer loggers (n = 16 calves per treatment) were used from -3 to +5 d of castration to assess standing behaviors. All calves decreased total standing duration the day of castration versus precastration. Overall, MAX spent the most time in the stand position postcastration versus CONV and MOD. Within treatments, MOD and MAX had increased plasma cortisol 1 d postcastration versus precastration. A treatment × time tendency was observed for cortisol at 12 d postcastration; MAX had the least circulating cortisol. A treatment × time tendency for circulating haptoglobin (Hp) was observed and Hp was greatest among CONV 1 d pre- and 12 d postcastration. Compared with precastration, CONV had increased Hp at 1, 5, and 12 d, whereas MOD had increased Hp at 5 d, and Hp remained similar within MAX. A treatment × time tendency for tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) from lipopolysaccharide-stimulated whole blood was observed; at 1 d postcastration, MOD had the most TNF-α, whereas MAX had the least. Within MAX, calves had increased TNF-α from precastration to 5 d postcastration. A treatment × time interaction was observed for whole blood bactericidal activity against Escherichia coli (WB anti-E). The CONV tended to have the greatest WB anti-E at d -1, but at d 1 and 5 postcastration, CONV had the least WB anti

  20. Viability of bull semen extended with commercial semen extender ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Andrea Raseona

    Abstract. The aim of this study was to evaluate the viability of bull spermatozoa diluted with commercial semen extender and two culture media stored at controlled room temperature (24 °C) for 72 hours. Two Nguni bulls were used for semen collection with the aid of an electro-ejaculator. After macroscopic evaluation ...

  1. Extended cognition in science communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, David

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this article is to propose a methodological externalism that takes knowledge about science to be partly constituted by the environment. My starting point is the debate about extended cognition in contemporary philosophy and cognitive science. Externalists claim that human cognition extends beyond the brain and can be partly constituted by external devices. First, I show that most studies of public knowledge about science are based on an internalist framework that excludes the environment we usually utilize to make sense of science and does not allow the possibility of extended knowledge. In a second step, I argue that science communication studies should adopt a methodological externalism and accept that knowledge about science can be partly realized by external information resources such as Wikipedia. © The Author(s) 2013.

  2. Exclusion Bounds for Extended Anyons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Simon; Lundholm, Douglas

    2017-08-01

    We introduce a rigorous approach to the many-body spectral theory of extended anyons, that is quantum particles confined to two dimensions that interact via attached magnetic fluxes of finite extent. Our main results are many-body magnetic Hardy inequalities and local exclusion principles for these particles, leading to estimates for the ground-state energy of the anyon gas over the full range of the parameters. This brings out further non-trivial aspects in the dependence on the anyonic statistics parameter, and also gives improvements in the ideal (non-extended) case.

  3. Properties of sulfur-extended asphalt concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gladkikh Vitaliy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, increased functional reliability of asphalt concrete coatings associated with various modifying additives that improve the durability of pavements. Promising builder is a technical sulfur. Asphalt concrete, made using a complex binder consisting of petroleum bitumen and technical sulfur, were calledsSulfur-Extended Asphalt Concrete. Such asphalt concrete, due to changes in the chemical composition of particulate and bitumen, changes the intensity of the interaction at the interface have increased rates of physical and mechanical properties. There was a lack of essential knowledge concerning mechanical properties of the sulfur-bituminous concrete with such an admixture; therefore, we had carried out the necessary examination. It is revealed that a new material satisfies local regulations in terms of compressive and tensile strength, shear resistance, and internal friction.

  4. C-terminally truncated constitutively active androgen receptor variants and their biologic and clinical significance in castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azoitei, Anca; Merseburger, Axel S; Godau, Beate; Hoda, M Raschid; Schmid, Evi; Cronauer, Marcus V

    2017-02-01

    A mechanism allowing castration resistant prostate cancer cells to escape the effects of conventional anti-hormonal treatments is the synthesis of constitutively active, C-terminally truncated androgen receptor (AR)-variants. Lacking the entire or vast parts of the ligand binding domain, the intended target of traditional endocrine therapies, these AR-variants (termed ARΔLBD) are insensitive to all traditional treatments including second generation compounds like abiraterone, enzalutamide or ARN-509. Although ARΔLBD are predominantly products of alternative splicing, they can also be products of nonsense mutations or proteolytic cleavage. In this review, we will discuss the etiology and function of c-terminally truncated AR-variants and their clinical significance as markers/targets for the treatment of castration resistant prostate cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Pain, PSA flare, and bone scan response in a patient with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer treated with radium-223, a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Megan A; George, Daniel J

    2015-05-07

    Radium-223 has been shown to improve overall survival in men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer with symptomatic bone metastases. The bone scan response to radium-223 has only been described in one single center trial of 14 patients, none of whom achieved the outstanding bone scan response presented in the current case. In this case report, we describe a 75 year-old white man with extensively pre-treated metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer and symptomatic bone metastases who experienced a flare in pain and prostate-specific antigen, followed by dramatic clinical (pain), biochemical (prostate-specific antigen), and imaging (bone scan) response. The flare phenomena and bone scan response we observed have not previously been described with radium-223. This case suggests that the degree and duration of bone scan response may be predictive of overall survival benefit.

  6. Clinical Impact of the Number of Treatment Cycles in First-Line Docetaxel for Patients With Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsted, Per; Svane, Inge Marie; Lindberg, Henriette

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We investigated the impact of the number of docetaxel cycles administered in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) treated with first-line chemotherapy. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Charts from 421 consecutive patients who initiated standard treatment with doc......BACKGROUND: We investigated the impact of the number of docetaxel cycles administered in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) treated with first-line chemotherapy. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Charts from 421 consecutive patients who initiated standard treatment......, respectively). Reasons for treatment discontinuation and postdocetaxel treatments were registered. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) responses were defined as a confirmed ≥ 50% decrease in baseline PSA levels. Overall survival (OS) was calculated from start of therapy using the Kaplan-Meier method. Cox...

  7. Evaluation of Ki-67 antigen expression in the vaginal epithelium of castrated female rats treated with raloxifene and tamoxifen: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Moura-Leal, Adinaide C; de Sousa, João Macedo; de Moura-Leal, Heyder; de Sousa, Gabriela V; Alencar, Airlane P; Borges, Umbelina Soares; Pinto, Giovanny R; da Silva, Benedito B

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of raloxifene and tamoxifen on Ki-67 antigen expression in the vaginal epithelium of castrated rats. Thirty-nine virgin, adult, castrated female Wistar-Hannover rats were randomly divided into three groups: Group I (control, n = 13), Group II (raloxifene, n  = 13) and Group III (tamoxifen, n = 13). After confirmation of their hypoestrogenic state, the rats were given 0.5 ml of propylene glycol (vehicle), 750 μg of raloxifene or 250 μg of tamoxifen, respectively, by gavage, for 30 days. On the 31st day, the rats were euthanized and their vaginas removed and fixed in 10% buffered formalin for of Ki-67 immunohistochemical evaluation. Data were analyzed using Levene's test and Tukey's method (p raloxifene and control groups.

  8. Castration attenuates myelin repair following lysolecithin induced demyelination in rat optic chiasm: an evaluation using visual evoked potential, marker genes expression and myelin staining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherafat, Mohammad Amin; Javan, Mohammad; Mozafari, Sabah; Mirnajafi-Zadeh, Javad; Motamedi, Fereshteh

    2011-10-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a demyelinating disease that affects the central nervous system. MS is the most common neurological disorder in young adults with a greater incidence among females. Male gonadal hormones have a protective effect on neural system development and myelin maturation. In this study, we investigate the effect of castration on lysolecithin-induced demyelination and remyelination processes using visual evoked potentials, in addition to measuring the expressions of Olig2, MBP, Nogo-A and GFAP mRNAs as oligodendrocyte or astrocyte markers; and histological assessments by myelin-specific staining. We observed more expanded demyelination with delayed repair process in castrated rats. Expression levels of the aforementioned marker genes confirmed histological and electrophysiological observations. Our results showed a pivotal role for endogenous male hormones in the context of demyelinating insults. It may also account for the different prognosis of MS between male and female genders and provide new insights for therapeutic treatments.

  9. Chemical use

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is a summary of research and activities related to chemical use on Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge between 1992 and 2009. The chemicals used on the Refuge...

  10. Extended memory management under RTOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plummer, M.

    1981-01-01

    A technique for extended memory management in ROLM 1666 computers using FORTRAN is presented. A general software system is described for which the technique can be ideally applied. The memory manager interface with the system is described. The protocols by which the manager is invoked are presented, as well as the methods used by the manager.

  11. Extended time-interval analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fynbo, Hans Otto Uldall; Riisager, Karsten

    2014-01-01

    Several extensions of the halflife analysis method recently suggested by Horvat and Hardy are put forward. Goodness-of-fit testing is included, and the method is extended to cases where more information is available for each decay event which allows applications also for e.g. γ decay data. The re...

  12. Extended duration orbiter (EDO) insignia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    Extended duration orbiter (EDO) insignia incorporates a space shuttle orbiter with payload bay doors (PLBDs) open and a spacelab module inside. Trailing the orbiter are the initials EDO. The EDO-modified Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, will be flown for the first EDO mission, STS-50.

  13. Extended Duration Orbiter Medical Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, C. S.; Pool, S. L.; Sawin, C. F.; Nicogossian, A. E.

    1990-01-01

    The Extended Duration Orbiter (EDO) program addresses a need for more time to perform experiments and other tasks during Space Shuttle missions. As a part of this program, the Extended Duration Orbiter Medical Project (EDOMP) has been instituted to obtain information about physiologic effects of extending mission duration and the effectiveness of countermeasures against factors that might compromise crew health, safety, or performance on extended-duration missions. Only those investigations that address and characterize operational problems, develop countermeasures, or evaluate the effectiveness of countermeasures will be pursued. The EDOMP investigations will include flight-associated Detailed Supplementary Objectives as well as ground-based studies simulating the influence of microgravity. Investigator teams have been formed in the following areas: biomedical physiology, cardiovascular and fluid/electrolyte physiology, environmental health, muscle and exercise physiology, and neurophysiology. Major operational questions must be answered in each of these areas, and investigations have been designed to answer them. The EDO program will proceed only after countermeasures have been shown to be effective in preventing or mitigating the adverse changes they have been designed to attenuate. The program is underway and will continue on each Shuttle flight as the manifest builds toward a 16-day orbital flight.

  14. Applying and extending Oracle Spatial

    CERN Document Server

    Simon Gerard Greener, Siva Ravada

    2013-01-01

    This book is an advanced practical guide to applying and extending Oracle Spatial.This book is for existing users of Oracle and Oracle Spatial who have, at a minimum, basic operational experience of using Oracle or an equivalent database. Advanced skills are not required.

  15. Phase I, Dose-Escalation Study of the Targeted Cytotoxic LHRH Analog AEZS-108 in Patients with Castration- and Taxane-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Stephen V.; Tsao-Wei, Denice D.; Xiong, Shigann; Groshen, Susan; Dorff, Tanya B.; Quinn, David I.; Tai, Yu-Chong; Engel, Juergen; Hawes, Debra; Schally, Andrew V.; Pinski, Jacek K.

    2014-01-01

    Background: AEZS-108, formerly AN-152, is a cytotoxic hybrid molecule consisting of an LHRH agonist moiety covalently coupled to doxorubicin, allowing it to deliver doxorubicin selectively to cells expressing LHRH receptors. LHRH receptors are expressed on the cell membrane of many tumors, including prostate cancer (PC). This Phase I study determined the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of AEZS-108 in men with taxane- and castration-resistant PC (CRPC) while providing additional information on th...

  16. The impact of the sensory experience on scale and preference heterogeneity: The GMNL model approach applied to pig castration and meat quality

    OpenAIRE

    Kallas, Zein; Borrisser-Pairó,, Francesc; Martínez, Beatriz; Vieira, Ceferina; Rubio, Begonia; Panella, Nuria; Gil, Marta; Linares, Belén; Garrido, María Dolores; Olivares, Álvaro; Ibañez, Miguel; Oliver, M. Angels; Gil Roig, José María

    2015-01-01

    The EU is considering a future ban on surgical pig castration by 2018 which may affect markets and consumers preferences. This study analysed consumers’ expected preference toward a masking strategy obtained from a mixture of spices and smoking of high level boar taint frankfurter sausages. In addition, we analysed the impact of the sensory experience on the nonobserved heterogeneity both at the scale and mean preferences. We carried out two Non-Hypothetical Discrete Choice Experiments ...

  17. Effects of castration age, dietary protein level and lysine/methionine ratio on animal performance, carcass and meat quality of Friesian steers intensively reared.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado, I N; Campo, M M; Muela, E; Valero, M V; Catalan, O; Olleta, J L; Sañudo, C

    2014-09-01

    The effects of castration age, dietary protein level and the dietary lysine/methionine (lys/met) ratio on animal performance, carcass characteristics and meat quality were studied in 64 intensively reared Friesian steers. Animals underwent castration procedures at 15 days old or at 5 months old. Dietary treatments started at 90 days old, with eight animals from each castration age randomly allocated to each treatment: 14.6% v. 16.8% CP (DM basis), and 3.0 v. 3.4 lys/met, on a 2×2×2 design. The recommended ratio of 3.0 was reached with supplementation of protected methionine. Steers were slaughtered at 443.5±26.2 kg live weight when they reached 12 months old approximately. Average daily gain, cold carcass weight or carcass classification were not affected by any studied effect. Muscle moisture (P=0.024), C18:2n-6 percentage (P=0.047), polyunsaturated fatty acid/saturated fatty acid (P=0.049) and n-6/n-3 (P=0.003) were higher in late castrated animals. Both high levels of dietary protein (P=0.008) and lys/met ratio (P=0.048) increased the percentage of muscle in the carcass. A level of 16.8% of CP in the diet also increased the percentage of monounsaturated fatty acids in the intramuscular fat (P=0.032), whereas a ratio lys/met of 3.4 decreased the percentage of saturated fatty acids (P=0.028). Thus, it is recommended using diets with a high protein level (16.8%) and a high lys/met ratio (3.4) in animals slaughtered at a young age, in order to obtain carcasses with high muscle content without negatively affecting productive traits or intramuscular fat composition.

  18. Targeting Hsp27/eIF4E interaction with phenazine compound: a promising alternative for castration-resistant prostate cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajer, Ziouziou; Claudia, Andrieu; Erik, Laurini; Sara, Karaki; Maurizio, Fermeglia; Ridha, Oueslati; David, Taieb; Michel, Camplo; Olivier, Siri; Sabrina, Pricl; Maria, Katsogiannou; Palma, Rocchi

    2017-09-29

    The actual strategy to improve current therapies in advanced prostate cancer involves targeting genes activated by androgen withdrawal, either to delay or prevent the emergence of the castration-refractory phenotype. However, these genes are often implicated in several physiological processes, and long-term inhibition of survival proteins might be accompanied with cytotoxic effects. To avoid this problem, an alternative therapeutic strategy relies on the identification and use of compounds that disrupt specific protein-protein interactions involved in androgen withdrawal. Specifically, the interaction of the chaperone protein Hsp27 with the initiation factor eIF4E leads to the protection of protein synthesis initiation process and enhances cell survival during cell stress induced by castration or chemotherapy. Thus, in this work we aimed at i) identifying the interaction site of the Hsp27/eIF4E complex and ii) interfere with the relevant protein/protein association mechanism involved in castration-resistant progression of prostate cancer. By a combination of experimental and modeling techniques, we proved that eIF4E interacts with the C-terminal part of Hsp27, preferentially when Hsp27 is phosphorylated. We also observed that the loss of this interaction increased cell chemo-and hormone-sensitivity. In order to find a potential inhibitor of Hsp27/eIF4E interaction, BRET assays in combination with molecular simulations identified the phenazine derivative 14 as the compound able to efficiently interfere with this protein/protein interaction, thereby inhibiting cell viability and increasing cell death in chemo- and castration-resistant prostate cancer models in vitro and in vivo.

  19. Prediction of overall survival for patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: development of a prognostic model through a crowdsourced challenge with open clinical trial data

    OpenAIRE

    Guinney, Justin; Tao WANG; Laajala, Teemu D; Winner, Kimberly Kanigel; Bare, J. Christopher; Neto, Elias Chaibub; Khan, Suleiman A.; Peddinti, Gopal; Airola, Antti; Pahikkala, Tapio; Mirtti, Tuomas; Yu, Thomas; Bot, Brian M.; Shen, Liji; Abdallah, Kald

    2017-01-01

    Background: Improvements to prognostic models in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer have the potential to augment clinical trial design and guide treatment strategies. In partnership with Project Data Sphere, a not-for-profit initiative allowing data from cancer clinical trials to be shared broadly with researchers, we designed an open-data, crowdsourced, DREAM (Dialogue for Reverse Engineering Assessments and Methods) challenge to not only identify a better prognostic model for ...

  20. Reversible lysine-specific demethylase 1 antagonist HCI-2509 inhibits growth and decreases c-MYC in castration- and docetaxel-resistant prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, S; Weston, A; Bearrs, J; Thode, T; Neiss, A; Soldi, R; Sharma, S

    2016-12-01

    Lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1 or KDM1A) overexpression correlates with poor survival and castration resistance in prostate cancer. LSD1 is a coregulator of ligand-independent androgen receptor signaling promoting c-MYC expression. We examined the antitumor efficacy of LSD1 inhibition with HCI-2509 in advanced stages of prostate cancer. Cell survival, colony formation, histone methylation, c-MYC level, c-MYC expression, cell cycle changes and in vivo efficacy were studied in castration-resistant prostate cancer cells upon treatment with HCI-2509. In vitro combination studies, using HCI-2509 and docetaxel, were performed to assess the synergy. Cell survival, colony formation, histone methylation and c-myc levels were studied in docetaxel-resistant prostate cancer cells treated with HCI-2509. HCI-2509 is cytotoxic and inhibits colony formation in castration-resistant prostate cancer cells. HCI-2509 treatment causes a dose-dependent increase in H3K9me2 (histone H3lysine 9) levels, a decrease in c-MYC protein, inhibition of c-MYC expression and accumulation in the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle in these cells. PC3 xenografts in mice have a significant reduction in tumor burden upon treatment with HCI-2509 with no associated myelotoxicity or weight loss. More synergy is noted at sub-IC50 (half-maximal inhibitory concentration) doses of docetaxel and HCI-2509 in PC3 cells than in DU145 cells. HCI-2509 has growth-inhibitory efficacy and decreases the c-myc level in docetaxel-resistant prostate cancer cells. LSD1 inhibition with HCI-2509 decreases the c-MYC level in poorly differentiated prostate cancer cell lines and has a therapeutic potential in castration- and docetaxel-resistant prostate cancer.

  1. Effects of feeding ractopamine hydrochloride (Paylean) to physical and immunological castrates (Improvest) in a commercial setting on carcass cutting yields and loin quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, B K; Gerlemann, G D; Carr, S N; Rincker, P J; Schroeder, A L; Petry, D B; McKeith, F K; Allee, G L; Dilger, A C

    2014-08-01

    Effects of feeding ractopamine (RAC; 5 mg/kg) to physically castrated (PC) and immunologically castrated (IC) pigs on carcass characteristics, cutting yields, and loin quality were evaluated using 285 carcasses. Male pigs were randomly assigned to sex treatments (PC and IC) at birth and fed the same nursery diets before allotment into 32 pens with 22 pigs per pen in a grow-finish barn. Pigs in the PC group were physically castrated at approximately 5 d of age, and pigs in the IC group were administered Improvest at 11 and 18 wk of age. Diet treatments (control or RAC) were initiated on study d 87. Pigs were marketed at 12 d (4.5 wk post-second Improvest dose), 19 d (5.5 wk post-second Improvest dose), and 33 d (7.5 wk post-second Improvest dose) following the start of final diet treatments. Three carcasses per pen were selected for evaluation of cutting yields and loin quality. Data were analyzed using PROC MIXED in SAS with fixed effects of sex, diet, market group, and their interaction; carcass (N = 285) was the experimental unit. Carcasses from RAC-fed pigs were heavier (P cutting yields, RAC-fed carcasses had greater (P ≤ 0.03) bone-in lean and total carcass cutting yields than control-fed carcasses while there were no differences (P > 0.05) between RAC-fed and control-fed carcasses when evaluating LM color, marbling, firmness, pH, drip loss, and tenderness. Carcasses from IC pigs had greater (P cutting yields than PC carcasses. There were minimal differences (P cutting yields, LM color, marbling and firmness scores, pH, purge loss, composition, and tenderness. The results from this study indicated RAC and immunological castration were additive in terms of improving carcass cutting yields while having minimal effects on pork quality.

  2. Stage-dependent behavioural changes but early castration induced by the acanthocephalan parasite Polymorphus minutus in its Gammarus pulex intermediate host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailly, Yann; Cézilly, Frank; Rigaud, Thierry

    2018-03-01

    Multidimensionality in parasite-induced phenotypic alterations (PIPA) has been observed in a large number of host-parasite associations, particularly in parasites with complex life cycles. However, it is still unclear whether such a syndrome is due to the successive activation of independent PIPAs, or results from the synchronous disruption of a single mechanism. The aim of the present study was to investigate the onset and progression of two PIPAs (a behavioural alteration: reversion of geotaxis, and castration) occurring in the crustacean amphipod Gammarus pulex infected with the acanthocephalan Polymorphus minutus, at different parasite developmental stages. Modifications of geotaxis in hosts differed according to the parasite developmental stage. Whereas the cystacanth stage induced a negative geotaxis (exposing the gammarid to predation by birds, the definitive hosts), the acanthella stage, not yet infective for the definitive host, induced a stronger positive geotaxis (presumably protecting gammarids from bird predation). In contrast, castration was almost total at the acanthella stage, with no significant variation in the intensity according to parasite maturation. Finally, no significant correlation was found between the intensity of behavioural changes and the intensity of castration. We discuss our results in relation with current views on the evolution of multidimensionality in PIPA.

  3. Consumer response to the possible use of a vaccine method to control boar taint v. physical piglet castration with anaesthesia: a quantitative study in four European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanhonacker, F; Verbeke, W

    2011-05-01

    In most European countries, male piglets being reared for meat are physically castrated without anaesthesia in order to avoid boar taint and to safeguard sensory meat quality. This method is increasingly criticised for its violation of piglet welfare. Alternative methods are being researched and castration with anaesthesia or analgesia and vaccination (immunisation) against gonadotropin-releasing hormone (using Improvac®, Pfizer GmbH) have been proposed as possible solutions. In addition to efficacy, the successful introduction and adoption of the vaccine method by stakeholders in pig supply chains are expected to depend on a favourable reception by consumers. This large-scale quantitative cross-country study (n = 4031) involving representative samples of consumers in France, Germany, the Netherlands and Belgium does not support the reserved attitude of stakeholders who fear potential low market acceptance. The vaccine method was actually preferred by the majority of consumers surveyed (69.6% of the participants) and it was perceived as equally effective in terms of avoiding boar taint; 43.8% of the consumers reported an intention to seek out pork from pigs where the vaccine had been used to control boar taint, whereas 33.7% reported an intention to avoid pork from pigs physically castrated with anaesthesia. Consumers' favourable dispositions to the vaccine method were independent of dominant ethical, health or price orientations when purchasing pork.

  4. Synthesis and Applications of π-Extended Naphthalene Diimides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cheng; Lin, Zhi; Li, Yan; Wang, Zhaohui

    2016-04-01

    Naphthalene diimides have received much attention due to their high electron affinities, high electron mobility, and good thermal and oxidative stability, therefore making them promising candidates for a variety of organic electronic applications. However, π-extended naphthalene diimides with lower HOMO-LUMO gaps and higher stability have only been developed recently because of the synthetic difficulties. This account describes recent developments in the structures, synthesis, properties, and applications of π-extended naphthalene diimides, including pure-carbon and heterocyclic acene diimides, from our research group. © 2016 The Chemical Society of Japan & Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Evaluate extended surface exchangers carefully

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganapathy, V. (ABCO Industries, Inc., Abilene, TX (US))

    1990-10-01

    Various types of fins, such as circumferential, rectangular, pegs and rods are used in heat transfer equipment. Fins can be used inside as well as on the outside of tubes. However, to illustrate the basic facts of heat transfer and how one should evaluate fins, these discussions pertain to circumferential solid or serrated fins used widely in the energy equipment industry. Extended surfaces have the advantage of reducing the size and weight of heat transfer equipment. In addition they can result in lower gas pressure drop, thus reducing the operating costs. This article compares the performance of an evaporator for a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) using bare and finned tubes. The fact this article brings out is that extended surfaces should be evaluated and purchased based on performance and not based on surface area alone.

  6. Extended Supersymmetries in One Dimension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Toppan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This work covers part of the material presented at the Advanced Summer School in Prague. It is mostly devoted to the structural properties of Extended Supersymmetries in One Dimension. Several results are presented on the classification of linear, irreducible representations realized on a finite number of time-dependent fields. The connections between supersymmetry transformations, Clifford algebras and division algebras are discussed. A manifestly supersymmetric framework for constructing invariants without using the notion of superfields is presented. A few examples of one-dimensional, N-extended, off-shell invariant sigma models are computed. The relation between supersymmetry transformations and graph theory is outlined. The notion of the fusion algebra of irreps tensor products is presented. The relevance of one-dimensional Supersymmetric Quantum Mechanics as a way to extract information on higher dimensional supersymmetric field theories is discussed. 

  7. Economic burden of the management of metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer in Italy: a cost of illness study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Restelli U

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Umberto Restelli,1,2 Giovanni Luca Ceresoli,3 Davide Croce,1,2 Laura Evangelista,4 Lorenzo Stefano Maffioli,5 Letizia Gianoncelli,3 Emilio Bombardieri6 1Center for Health Economics, Social and Health Care Management, LIUC – Università Cattaneo, Castellanza, Italy; 2School of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa; 3Medical Oncology Department, Thoracic and Urologic Oncology Unit, Cliniche Humanitas Gavazzeni, Bergamo, 4Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Unit, Veneto Institute of Oncology IOV – IRCCS, Padova, 5Nuclear Medicine Department, Cancer Centre – ASST Ovest Milanese, Legnano, 6Nuclear Medicine Department, Cliniche Humanitas Gavazzeni, Bergamo, Italy Background: Prostate cancer (PCa accounts for 20% of all cancers in subjects over 50 years in Italy. The majority of patients with PCa present with localized disease at the time of diagnosis, but many patients develop recurrent metastatic disease after treatment with curative intent. Androgen deprivation therapy is the standard of care for metastatic PCa patients; unfortunately, most of them progress to castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC within 5 years. Metastatic CRPC (mCRPC heavily affects patients in terms of quality of life, side effects, and survival, and greatly impacts economic costs. The approval of new effective agents in recent years, including cabazitaxel, abiraterone acetate, enzalutamide, and radium-223, has dramatically changed patient management.Materials and methods: Here, we aimed to estimate the current costs of illness of mCRPC in Italy. All patients affected by mCRPC and treated with a single agent in an annual time horizon were considered. Therefore, the analysis was not focused on the management pathway of single patients through different lines of treatment. Direct medical costs referred to therapy, adverse event management, and skeletal-related event management were analyzed. A bottom

  8. Extending a browser C++ simulator

    OpenAIRE

    Segarra Roca, Albert

    2017-01-01

    Getting started in computer programming involves using a number of tools such as editors, compilers, debuggers, and terminals. Learning how to use them can be challenging for programming begginers, and installing them may be demanding for certain organizations such as high schools. C– is a project that aims to bridge this gap by providing an educational C++ development environment that runs in a web browser. The goal of this thesis is to extend and improve the current implement...

  9. Locating and extending livelihoods research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prowse, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Much poverty and development research is not explicit about its methodology or philosophical foundations. Based on the extended case method of Burawoy and the epistemological standpoint of critical realism, this paper discusses a methodological approach for reflexive inductive livelihoods research...... that overcomes the unproductive social science dualism of positivism and social constructivism. The approach is linked to a conceptual framework and a menu of research methods that can be sequenced and iterated in light of research questions....

  10. Evolving extended naive Bayes classifiers

    OpenAIRE

    Klawonn, Frank; Angelov, Plamen

    2006-01-01

    Naive Bayes classifiers are a very simple, but often effective tool for classification problems, although they are based on independence assumptions that do not hold in most cases. Extended naive Bayes classifiers also rely on independence assumptions, but break them down to artificial subclasses, in this way becoming more powerful than ordinary naive Bayes classifiers. Since the involved computations for Bayes classifiers are basically generalised mean value calculations, they easily render ...

  11. [Chemical weapons and chemical terrorism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Katsumi

    2005-10-01

    Chemical Weapons are kind of Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD). They were used large quantities in WWI. Historically, large quantities usage like WWI was not recorded, but small usage has appeared now and then. Chemical weapons are so called "Nuclear weapon for poor countrys" because it's very easy to produce/possession being possible. They are categorized (1) Nerve Agents, (2) Blister Agents, (3) Cyanide (blood) Agents, (4) Pulmonary Agents, (5) Incapacitating Agents (6) Tear Agents from the viewpoint of human body interaction. In 1997 the Chemical Weapons Convention has taken effect. It prohibits chemical weapons development/production, and Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) verification regime contributes to the chemical weapons disposal. But possibility of possession/use of weapons of mass destruction by terrorist group represented in one by Matsumoto and Tokyo Subway Sarin Attack, So new chemical terrorism countermeasures are necessary.

  12. Chemical Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Willie; Cavanagh, Richard; Turk, Gregory; Winchester, Michael; Travis, John; Smith, Melody; Derose, Paul; Choquette, Steven; Kramer, Gary; Sieber, John; Greenberg, Robert; Lindstrom, Richard; Lamaze, George; Zeisler, Rolf; Schantz, Michele; Sander, Lane; Phinney, Karen; Welch, Michael; Vetter, Thomas; Pratt, Kenneth; Scott, John; Small, John; Wight, Scott; Stranick, Stephan

    Measurements of the chemical compositions of materials and the levels of certain substances in them are vital when assessing and improving public health, safety and the environment, are necessary to ensure trade equity, and are required when monitoring and improving industrial products and services. Chemical measurements play a crucial role in most areas of the economy, including healthcare, food and nutrition, agriculture, environmental technologies, chemicals and materials, instrumentation, electronics, forensics, energy, and transportation.

  13. The extended growth of graphene oxide flakes using ethanol CVD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jingfeng; Larisika, Melanie; Fam, W H Derrick; He, Qiyuan; Nimmo, Myra A; Nowak, Christoph; Tok, I Y Alfred

    2013-04-07

    We report the extended growth of Graphene Oxide (GO) flakes using atmospheric pressure ethanol Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD). GO was used to catalyze the deposition of carbon on a substrate in the ethanol CVD with Ar and H2 as carrier gases. Raman, SEM, XPS and AFM characterized the growth to be a reduced GO (RGO) of layers. This newly grown RGO possesses lower defect density with larger and increased distribution of sp(2) domains than chemically reduced RGO. Furthermore this method without optimization reduces the relative standard deviation of electrical conductivity between chips, from 80.5% to 16.5%, enabling RGO to be used in practical electronic devices.

  14. Chemical oceanography

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Millero, F.J

    1996-01-01

    Chemical Oceanography presents a comprehensive examination of the chemistry of oceans through discussions of such topics as descriptive physical oceanography, the composition of seawater and the major...

  15. Uroncor consensus statement: Management of biochemical recurrence after radical radiotherapy for prostate cancer: From biochemical failure to castration resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Torrecilla, José; Hervás, Asunción; Zapatero, Almudena; Gómez Caamaño, Antonio; Macías, Victor; Herruzo, Ismael; Maldonado, Xavier; Gómez Iturriaga, Alfonso; Casas, Francesc; González San Segundo, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Management of patients who experience biochemical failure after radical radiotherapy with or without hormonal therapy is highly challenging. The clinician must not only choose the type of treatment, but also the timing and optimal sequence of treatment administration. When biochemical failure occurs, numerous treatment scenarios are possible, thus making it more difficult to select the optimal approach. Moreover, rapid and ongoing advances in treatment options require that physicians make decisions that could impact both survival and quality of life. The aim of the present consensus statement, developed by the Urological Tumour Working Group (URONCOR) of the Spanish Society of Radiation Oncology (SEOR), is to provide cancer specialists with the latest, evidence-based information needed to make the best decisions for the patient under all possible treatment scenarios. The structure of this consensus statement follows the typical development of disease progression after biochemical failure, with the most appropriate treatment recommendations given for each stage. The consensus statement is organized into three separate chapters, as follows: biochemical failure with or without local recurrence and/or metastasis; progression after salvage therapy; and treatment of castration-resistant patients.

  16. Evaluating Metformin as a Potential Chemosensitizing Agent when Combined with Docetaxel Chemotherapy in Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Michelle J; Klotz, Laurence H; Venkateswaran, Vasundara

    2017-12-01

    Docetaxel, the first-line chemotherapy for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), provides certain survival benefits, but is associated with significant toxicity. A novel therapeutic approach for mCRPC is combining docetaxel with a chemosensitizing agent. We hypothesized that metformin, a potential chemosensitizer, would improve docetaxel efficacy in CRPC cells. MTS assays were used to determine the effect of metformin-docetaxel treatment on PC3 and DU145 cell viability. Wound-healing and ATP concentration assays were used to evaluate cell migration and intracellular ATP levels following metformin-docetaxel treatment. Western blotting was used for mechanistic evaluation. Metformin-docetaxel treatment significantly reduced PC3 cell viability. Metformin-docetaxel treatment did not significantly affect cell migration or intracellular ATP levels. Western blotting revealed metformin-docetaxel treatment did not significantly change AMPK or P-AMPK expression patterns. Metformin may be an effective chemosensitizer for certain types of CRPC cells, but further investigation is needed. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  17. Should We Try Antiandrogen Withdrawal in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer Patients? Insights From a Retrospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongo, Hiroshi; Kosaka, Takeo; Mizuno, Ryuichi; Ezaki, Taisuke; Matsumoto, Kazuhiro; Morita, Shinya; Shinoda, Kazunobu; Shinojima, Toshiaki; Kikuchi, Eiji; Miyajima, Akira; Oya, Mototsugu

    2016-12-01

    It remains uncertain whether those with response to antiandrogen withdrawal (AAW) have a better prognosis. We investigated the predictors of a better response to AAW and overall survival after acquiring resistance to first-line androgen deprivation therapy inpatients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 87 CRPC patients treated at Keio University Hospital. Sixty-seven of 87 CRPC patients underwent AAW. We analyzed clinicopathologic parameters to identify predictors of survival in CRPC patients and investigated predictors of good response to AAW. Younger age, longer duration of androgen deprivation therapy before CRPC development, and better response to AAW were independent favorable prognostic factors for overall survival. Although better response to AAW was a favorable prognostic factor in this study, trying AAW was not significantly related to overall survival. Duration of hormone therapy was significantly longer in those whose disease responded to AAW (69.9 ± 11.0 months) than those with no response (45.3 ± 5.2 months). The prognostic benefit of AAW was not clearly determined in this study. However, AAW might be beneficial in patients who have favorable prognostic factors for a response to AAW-that is, those who have received hormone therapy for a long period. However, AAW should not be done in patients who do not have favorable factors and who had a high prostate-specific antigen level at the time of their prostate cancer diagnosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Complete response to ethnylestradiol prolonged for almost two years in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongo, Hiroshi; Kosaka, Takeo; Oya, Mototsugu

    2014-11-01

    An 80-year-old man with an elevated prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level of 120 ng/mL) presented to the hospital in February 2011. A prostate needle biopsy was performed, and pathological examination revealed prostatic adenocarcinoma. The Gleason score was 4+5=9. Computed tomography revealed metastases of the pelvic lymph nodes. Combined androgen blockade was started. The PSA concentration decreased to 1.68 ng/mL, but started increasing again in August 2012 to 6.08 ng/mL. Although bicalutamide was discontinued due to antiandrogen withdrawal syndrome, the PSA concentration increased even more. The PSA concentration reached 21.62 ng/mL in September 2012, at which time ethnylestradiol was started. The PSA concentration decreased again and has remained below the limit of sensitivity for almost 2 years. To our knowledge, this is first case report describing a complete response to ethnylestradiol that lasted for almost 2 years in a patient with castration-resistant prostate cancer.

  19. The Influence of Prednisone on the Efficacy of Cabazitaxel in Men with Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buonerba, Carlo; Sonpavde, Guru; Vitrone, Francesca; Bosso, Davide; Puglia, Livio; Izzo, Michela; Iaccarino, Simona; Scafuri, Luca; Muratore, Margherita; Foschini, Francesca; Mucci, Brigitta; Tortora, Vincenzo; Pagliuca, Martina; Ribera, Dario; Riccio, Vittorio; Morra, Rocco; Mosca, Mirta; Cesarano, Nicola; Di Costanzo, Ileana; De Placido, Sabino; Di Lorenzo, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    Background: Cabazitaxel is a second-generation taxane that is approved for use with concomitant low dose daily prednisone in metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) after docetaxel failure. Since the role of daily corticosteroids in improving cabazitaxel efficacy or ameliorating its safety profile has not been adequately investigated so far, we compared outcomes of patients receiving cabazitaxel with or without daily corticosteroids in a retrospective single-Institution cohort of mCRPC patients. Patients and methods: Medical records of deceased patients with documented mCRPC treated with cabazitaxel following prior docetaxel between January, 2011 and January, 2017 were reviewed at the single participating center. Patients who were receiving daily doses of systemic corticosteroids other than low dose daily prednisone or prednisolone (30% PSA decline at 12 weeks. Prednisone use was not significantly prognostic for overall survival or PSA decline ≥30% rates on regression analyses. Importantly, a >30% PSA decline at 12, but not at 3, 6, 9 weeks, was prognostic for improved survival at multivariate analysis Conclusions: The data presented here support the hypothesis that omitting daily corticosteroids in cabazitaxel-treated patients has no negative impact on either survival or safety profile. In the large prospective trial CABACARE, cabazitaxel-treated patients will be randomized to receive or not receive daily prednisone. The CABACARE (EudraCT n. 2016-003646-81) study is currently ongoing at University Federico II of Naples and at other multiple participating centers in Italy. PMID:28928853

  20. Impact of abiraterone on patient-related outcomes in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: current perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Amm, Joelle; Nassabein, Rami; Aragon-Ching, Jeanny B

    2017-01-01

    Abiraterone acetate has established a major role in the treatment paradigm of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer ever since pivotal trials, COU-AA-301 and COU-AA-302, have shown benefit in both the second-line and first-line (post- and pre-chemotherapy) setting, respectively, with improvement in overall survival as well as secondary end points such as prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and radiographic response rates, time to PSA progression, and progression-free survival. There has been a lot of interest and emphasis in the evaluation of patient-related outcomes (PROs) as it relates to quality of life, pain, adverse events, fatigue, and among others, in the use of different agents that have been shown to improve survival. This review examines the companion PROs in conjunction with abiraterone acetate use. This is particularly relevant since PROs are increasingly viewed as a key metric for drug label claims in granting approval across regulatory agencies, including the US Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency.

  1. Inhibition of Androgen Receptor Nuclear Localization and Castration-Resistant Prostate Tumor Growth by Pyrroloimidazole-based Small Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoodi, Khalid Z; Xu, Yadong; Dar, Javid A; Eisermann, Kurtis; Pascal, Laura E; Parrinello, Erica; Ai, Junkui; Johnston, Paul A; Nelson, Joel B; Wipf, Peter; Wang, Zhou

    2017-10-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) is a ligand-dependent transcription factor that controls the expression of androgen-responsive genes. A key step in androgen action, which is amplified in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), is AR nuclear translocation. Small molecules capable of inhibiting AR nuclear localization could be developed as novel therapeutics for CRPC. We developed a high-throughput screen and identified two structurally-related pyrroloimidazoles that could block AR nuclear localization in CRPC cells. We show that these two small molecules, 3-(4-ethoxyphenyl)-6,7-dihydro-5H-pyrrolo[1,2-a]imidazole (EPPI) and 3-(4-chlorophenyl)-6,7-dihydro-5H-pyrrolo[1,2-a]imidazole (CPPI) can inhibit the nuclear localization and transcriptional activity of AR and reduce the proliferation of AR-positive but not AR-negative prostate cancer cell lines. EPPI and CPPI did not inhibit nuclear localization of the glucocorticoid receptor or the estrogen receptor, suggesting they selectively target AR. In LNCaP tumor xenografts, CPPI inhibited the proliferation of relapsed LNCaP tumors. These findings suggest that EPPI and CPPI could serve as lead structures for the development of therapeutic agents for CRPC. Mol Cancer Ther; 16(10); 2120-9. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  2. ROR-γ drives androgen receptor expression and represents a therapeutic target in castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junjian; Zou, June X; Xue, Xiaoqian; Cai, Demin; Zhang, Yan; Duan, Zhijian; Xiang, Qiuping; Yang, Joy C; Louie, Maggie C; Borowsky, Alexander D; Gao, Allen C; Evans, Christopher P; Lam, Kit S; Xu, Jianzhen; Kung, Hsing-Jien; Evans, Ronald M; Xu, Yong; Chen, Hong-Wu

    2016-05-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) is overexpressed and hyperactivated in human castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). However, the determinants of AR overexpression in CRPC are poorly defined. Here we show that retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor γ (ROR-γ) is overexpressed and amplified in metastatic CRPC tumors, and that ROR-γ drives AR expression in the tumors. ROR-γ recruits nuclear receptor coactivator 1 and 3 (NCOA1 and NCOA3, also known as SRC-1 and SRC-3) to an AR-ROR response element (RORE) to stimulate AR gene transcription. ROR-γ antagonists suppress the expression of both AR and its variant AR-V7 in prostate cancer (PCa) cell lines and tumors. ROR-γ antagonists also markedly diminish genome-wide AR binding, H3K27ac abundance and expression of the AR target gene network. Finally, ROR-γ antagonists suppressed tumor growth in multiple AR-expressing, but not AR-negative, xenograft PCa models, and they effectively sensitized CRPC tumors to enzalutamide, without overt toxicity, in mice. Taken together, these results establish ROR-γ as a key player in CRPC by acting upstream of AR and as a potential therapeutic target for advanced PCa.

  3. Overexpression of hepatocyte growth factor in SBMA model mice has an additive effect on combination therapy with castration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Ying [Department of Neurology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, 65 Tsurumai-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Adachi, Hiroaki, E-mail: hadachi-ns@umin.org [Department of Neurology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, 65 Tsurumai-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Department of Neurology, University of Occupational and Environmental Health School of Medicine, 1-1 Iseigaoka, Yahata-nishi-ku, Kitakyushu 807-8555 (Japan); Katsuno, Masahisa [Department of Neurology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, 65 Tsurumai-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Huang, Zhe [Department of Neurology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, 65 Tsurumai-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Department of Neurology, University of Occupational and Environmental Health School of Medicine, 1-1 Iseigaoka, Yahata-nishi-ku, Kitakyushu 807-8555 (Japan); Jiang, Yue-Mei; Kondo, Naohide; Iida, Madoka; Tohnai, Genki; Nakatsuji, Hideaki [Department of Neurology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, 65 Tsurumai-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Funakoshi, Hiroshi [Center for Advanced Research and Education, Asahikawa Medical University, 1-1-1- Higashinijo Midorigaoka, Asahikawa 078-8510 (Japan); Nakamura, Toshikazu [Neurogen Inc., 1-1-52-201 Nakahozumi, Ibaraki 567-0034 (Japan); Sobue, Gen, E-mail: sobueg@med.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Neurology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, 65 Tsurumai-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Research Division of Dementia and Neurodegenerative Disease, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, 65 Tsurumai-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan)

    2015-12-25

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is an inherited motor neuron disease caused by the expansion of a polyglutamine (polyQ)-encoding tract within the androgen receptor (AR) gene. The pathologic features of SBMA are motor neuron loss in the spinal cord and brainstem and diffuse nuclear accumulation and nuclear inclusions of mutant AR in residual motor neurons and certain visceral organs. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is a polypeptide growth factor which has neuroprotective properties. To investigate whether HGF overexpression can affect disease progression in a mouse model of SBMA, we crossed SBMA transgenic model mice expressing an AR gene with an expanded CAG repeat with mice overexpressing HGF. Here, we report that high expression of HGF induces Akt phosphorylation and modestly ameliorated motor symptoms in an SBMA transgenic mouse model treated with or without castration. These findings suggest that HGF overexpression can provide a potential therapeutic avenue as a combination therapy with disease-modifying therapies in SBMA. - Highlights: • HGF overexpression ameliorates the motor phenotypes of the SBMA mouse model. • HGF overexpression induces Akt phosphorylation in the SBMA mouse model. • This is the first report of combination therapy in a mouse model of polyQ diseases.

  4. Ractopamine hydrochloride and immunological castration in pigs. Part 1: fresh belly characteristics for bacon processing and quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letícia Cristina COSTA E SILVA

    Full Text Available Abstract The effects of ractopamine and immunological castration on belly characteristics, processing yield, physicochemical and sensory quality of bacon were investigated from two crossbred pigs under different conditions of animal production, diet, management and slaughter arranged in factorial design using 2 ractopamine levels (0 and 7.5 ppm and 3 genders (barrows, immunocastrated and gilts. Before processing, belly firmness, weight, length, width and thickness were measured, and then, bacon processing yield evaluated. After processing, bacon slices were digitally imaged and analyzed for lean meat and fat areas, pH, instrumental color of meat and fat, cooking loss and sensory quality. The ractopamine did not alter belly characteristics, but significantly increased the process yield and decreased cooking loss. Barrows and immunocastrated pigs showed firmer bellies, which could be advantageous for bacon processing and slicing. Barrows presented the highest total area of bacon slices. The results of this study indicate that both techniques ractopamine in the finishing diets and immunocastration of pigs can be combined with no further consequences for belly processing and to bacon quality and with some advantages.

  5. Association of Biomarkers with Serious Cardiac Adverse Events during Abiraterone Acetate Treatment in Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer

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    Sara Campora

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Abiraterone acetate is an effective drug for castration-resistant prostate cancer, but cardiac serious adverse events (SAEs may occur. We studied their association with N-terminal pro–brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP and troponin T (TnT during abiraterone therapy. PATIENTS AND METHODS: In a single institution, 17 patients were treated with abiraterone acetate 1 g daily with concomitant prednisone and then switched to dexametasone plus canrenone. Blood samples for PSA, NT-proBNP, and TnT were obtained at baseline and after 1, 3, and 6 months. RESULTS: Five patients (29.4% experienced G3 to 4 cardiac SAEs after a median of 13 weeks (range, 9-32, including pulmonary edema, heart failure, acute coronary syndrome, sinus bradycardia with syncope, and pulmonary edema. At baseline, 4 weeks, and 3 months, median NT-proBNP and TnT levels were higher in patients with subsequent cardiac SAEs (P= .03 and P= .04 for NT-proBNP and TnT at 3 months, respectively. After switching to dexametasone and introducing canrenone, no additional cardiac SAEs were noted. Overall response rate was 67%. CONCLUSIONS: Our study suggests a higher than expected risk of cardiac SAEs during abiraterone treatment which may well be due to the small sample size and the unrestricted entry criteria. However, baseline and frequent NT-proBNP and TnT monitoring predicted a higher risk for cardiac SAE. Larger studies should confirm our findings.

  6. Effects of extract of Buddleja officinalis on partial inflammation of lacrimal gland in castrated rabbits with dry eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Xiao-Lei; Peng, Qing-Hua; Peng, Jun; Tan, Han-Yu; Wu, Quan-Long; Wu, Da-Li; Chen, Mei; Li, Chuan-Ke; Li, Dian; Zhu, Hui-An

    2010-01-01

    To assess the effects of extract of Buddleja officinalis on tear secretion volume, tear film stability, expressions of TGF-β1, IL-1β, TNF-α in lacrimal gland of castrated rabbits with dry eye. A total of 30 victory rabbits were divided averagely into normal group(A), model group(B), therapy group with low dose extract of Buddleja officinalis (C), therapy group with high dose extract of Buddleja officinalis (D) and therapy group with genistein (E). The dry eye model was established with orchiectomy on Group B, C, D, E. Group C, D, E were administered intragastrically with corresponding dose extract of Buddleja officinalis or genistein for 30 days. All rabbits were detected with SIT. TGF-β1, IL-1β, TNF-α were detected with immunohistochemistry and the ultrastructure of lacrimal gland was observed under transmission electron microscope. The SIT value of group C, D, E were respectively 13.167±4.957, 14.667±5.279, 8.667±0.516, obviously higher than that of group B 5.667±2.338 (PBuddleja officinalis can adjust lacrimal gland partial inflammation of dry eye.

  7. Effects of eye drops of Buddleja officinalis Maxim. extract on lacrimal gland cell apoptosis in castrated rats with dry eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Qing-hua; Yao, Xiao-lei; Wu, Quan-long; Tan, Han-yu; Zhang, Jing-rong

    2010-03-01

    To explore the possible mechanism of eye drops of Buddleja officinalis extract in treating dry eye of castrated rats by analyzing the expressions of Bax and Bcl-2 proteins. Forty-five Wistar male rats were randomly divided into sham-operated group, untreated group and eye drops of Buddleja officinalis Maxim. extract (treatment) group. The dry eye model was established with orchiectomy in the untreated group and treatment group. Rats in the treatment group were treated with eye drops of Buddleja officinalis Maxim. extract, one drop once, three times daily. Eyes of rats in the sham-operated group and untreated group were instilled with normal saline. After one-, two-, or three-month treatment, five rats in each group were scarified respectively. Then samples were taken to detect related indices. Expressions of Bax and Bcl-2 of lacrimal gland were checked by immunohistochemical method and quantity of apoptotic cells was counted. After one-, two- or three-month treatment, the quantities of expressions of Bax in acinar epithelial cells and glandular tube cells were significantly lower, and those of Bcl-2 were significantly higher in the treatment group than in the untreated group, and the quantities of apoptotic cells of the treatment group were significantly lower than those of the untreated group (PBuddleja officinalis Maxim. are flavonoids, which can significantly inhibit cell apoptosis in lacrimal gland.

  8. One-Year Postapproval Clinical Experience with Radium-223 Dichloride in Patients with Metastatic Castrate-Resistant Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadvar, Hossein; Challa, Sudha; Quinn, David I; Conti, Peter S

    2015-06-01

    We report our 1-year postapproval clinical experience with Radium-223 dichloride for treatment of castrate-resistant prostate cancer with bone metastases. The clinical courses of the first 25 patients treated were reviewed retrospectively. Incidence of hematologic, gastrointestinal, and other adverse events were identified, including those events that led to cessation or delay in treatment. Alterations in bone pain and serum alkaline phosphatase and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels were evaluated. Six patients received all 6 scheduled doses of Radium-223 dichloride, 2 completed 5 doses, 6 received 4 doses, 2 completed 3 doses, 6 patients had 2 doses, and 3 patients received one dose, for a total of 91 doses administered. Nine patients discontinued treatment after receiving at least one dose due to progressive disease, 5 required blood transfusions, 5 developed gastrointestinal symptoms, 4 reported worsening bone pain, and 1 developed dermatitis. Downward trends in serum alkaline phosphatase and PSA were seen in 11 and 5 patients, respectively. About one-quarter of cohort completed the entire six-dose treatment. Advancing soft tissue disease was the primary reason for cessation of therapy. The adverse events were mild and manageable. A decline in serum alkaline phosphatase was more common than a decline in PSA.

  9. Radium-223 dichloride: a review of its use in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer with symptomatic bone metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirley, Matt; McCormack, Paul L

    2014-04-01

    Radium-223 dichloride (Xofigo®; formerly Alpharadin™) [hereafter referred to as radium-223] is a first-in-class alpha particle-emitting radiopharmaceutical that has recently been approved for the treatment of patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) with symptomatic bone metastases and no known visceral metastatic disease. Radium-223 is a calcium mimetic, which targets bone, delivering cytotoxic radiation to the sites of bone metastases. In the recently reported Alpharadin™ in Symptomatic Prostate Cancer (ALSYMPCA) phase III study, radium-223 was associated with significantly improved overall survival compared with placebo, making it the first bone-targeted CRPC therapy for which an overall survival benefit has been demonstrated. The ALSYMPCA study also demonstrated the beneficial effects of radium-223 on disease-related symptomatic skeletal events, pain and health-related quality of life. Radium-223 was generally well tolerated, being associated with low rates of myelosuppression and generally mild gastrointestinal adverse events. Thus, radium-223 is a valuable addition to the treatment options for this poor-prognosis population.

  10. Emerging role of Radium-223 in the growing therapeutic armamentarium of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picciotto, Maria; Franchina, Tindara; Russo, Alessandro; Ricciardi, Giuseppina Rosaria Rita; Provazza, Giusy; Sava, Serena; Baldari, Sergio; Caffo, Orazio; Adamo, Vincenzo

    2017-06-01

    During the last few years, the therapeutic armamentarium of castration resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) has been enriched with the introduction of new effective therapies with proved survival benefit and quality of life gain, including cabazitaxel, abiraterone, enzalutamide, and Radium-223. Areas covered: Bone metastases represent a substantial cause of morbidity in mCRPC with a high rate of related skeletal events (SREs). In case of multifocal pain due to diffuse osteoblastic metastases, treatment with bone-targeting radiopharmaceutical agents can provide palliation from pain. Radium-223, a calcium-mimetic, is the first α-particle emitting radiopharmaceutical that prolonged overall survival, delayed symptomatic skeletal events and improved quality of life in mCRPC. Expert opinion: In this therapeutic scenario, no clear evidences support the best way to sequence these available agents and there is an urgent need for prospective studies to define it. 223Ra is a firmly established therapeutic option in CRPC with symptomatic bone metastases and no visceral/bulky nodal involvement, with an undeniable advantage over new hormonal agents, given its peculiar mechanism of action. Current ongoing randomized clinical trials will clarify the optimal use of this effective therapy in the therapeutic armamentarium of CRPC either alone or combined with other new approved agents and whether there is a role in patients with asymptomatic disease.

  11. Radium-223 Therapy for Patients with Metastatic Castrate-Resistant Prostate Cancer: An Update on Literature with Case Presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleman, Leonard J.; Mountz, James M.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose. Radium-223 dichloride (Xofigo®, Bayer HealthCare Pharmaceuticals Inc.) is the first α-particle emitter therapeutic agent approved by the FDA, with benefits in overall survival and delay in symptomatic skeletal event for patients with metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Recent post hoc analyses of the phase III ALSYMPCA trial support the previously established safety profile as well as therapeutic effect and clinical outcome of Radium-223. Currently, Radium-223 is approved as a single agent therapy for metastatic CRPC. Clinical trials are currently investigating Radium-223 in additional clinical settings such as earlier asymptomatic disease and in combination with other agents including hormonal therapeutic agents and immunotherapeutic as well as chemotherapeutic agents. Trials are also ongoing in patients with other primary cancers such as breast cancer, thyroid cancer, and renal cancer metastatic to bone. In this article, the physics and radiobiology, as well as a literature update on the use of Radium-223, are provided along with case presentations, aiming at a better appreciation of research data as well as the assimilation of research data into clinical practice. PMID:27774318

  12. Radium-223 dichloride for the treatment of bone metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: an evaluation of its safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Sten

    2015-07-01

    Approximately 10 - 20% of prostate cancer cases ultimately progress to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), for which there is a poor prognosis and a therapeutic need. Radium-223 dichloride (radium-223 [Xofigo]) is a first-in-class α-emitting radiopharmaceutical shown to significantly prolong overall survival in patients with CRPC with symptomatic bone metastases and no visceral metastases. Current treatment guidelines recommended it in both pre- and post-docetaxel settings. Radium-223 mechanism of action, pharmacokinetics and key efficacy and safety data are reviewed. The evaluation of adverse events reported in the Phase III ALSYMPCA trial is summarized for the overall population and patient subpopulations (prior docetaxel, concomitant external beam radiation therapy and baseline opioid use). An evaluation of how radium-223 is being incorporated into the CRPC treatment paradigm and the implications of its safety profile for future use are provided. The pronounced efficacy and safety profile of radium-223 positions it as a valuable new therapeutic tool in the CRPC armamentarium. Its novel mechanism of action underlies low rates of hematologic adverse events. Radium-223 treatment will become common in the majority of pre-docetaxel symptomatic CRPC cases, as it has proved to be highly efficient with few safety concerns earlier in the course of disease.

  13. Parasitic castration, growth, and sex steroids in the freshwater bonefish Cyphocharax gilbert (Curimatidae infested by Riggia paranensis (Cymothoidea

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    Neuza R. W. Lima

    Full Text Available Cyphocharax gilbert shows parasitic castration when infested by the crustacean Riggia paranensis, being unable to reproduce. Fish were sampled in the middle rio Itabapoana, Brazil, to study the prevalence of parasitism, growth, and sex steroid concentrations, considering the body size, sex, and reproductive condition of specimens. Most of the fish analyzed were infested (56.0%. The presence of two lines on the scales was more frequent among infested fish (22.0% than among fish without parasites (12.0% for females and 10.0% for males. The occurrence of three lines on the scales was rare (3.5% among infested and 2.0% among females without parasites. These results suggest that growth of the host is faster than that of non infested fish. The serum concentrations of sex steroids from fish without parasites varied at different gonadal development stages (17 beta-estradiol: 60.0 to 976.7 pg/ml; total testosterone: 220.0 to 3,887.7 pg/ml. All infested fish had lower levels of the two sex steroids and undeveloped gonads. Sex steroids levels in infested females were close to those in females at post-spawning stages. Total testosterone concentrations of infested males were below those of males at early gonadal maturation stage. These results suggest that R. paranensis reduces the reproductive capacity of C. gilbert by affecting the host endocrine system.

  14. Long-Term PSA Control with Repeated Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy in a Patient with Oligometastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasqualetti, Francesco; Cocuzza, Paola; Coraggio, Gabriele; Ferrazza, Patrizia; Derosa, Lisa; Galli, Luca; Pasqualetti, Giuseppe; Locantore, Luisa; Boni, Roberto; Fabrini, Maria G; Erba, Paola A

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is one of the most common malignancies and main causes of cancer death in Western countries. In the presence of metastatic disease, systemic treatment remains the main clinical option. However, since the introduction of highly sensitive imaging techniques, a new clinical 'entity' of metastatic patients with a limited number of lesions has been defined: oligometastatic patients. In this patient group, the use of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) or other local therapies against all active sites of disease revealed by 18F-choline positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) could achieve sufficient prostate-specific antigen (PSA) control. However, a clear benefit of this procedure in terms of significant endpoints is yet to be demonstrated. This case report describes our experience with treating a castration-resistant PCa patient with 18F-choline PET/CT-guided SBRT. Because of the occurrence of 5 metachronous lesions over 4 years, the pattern of recurrence was defined by the local multidisciplinary team as oligometastatic disease, and the patient was treated with 5 courses of SBRT which yielded good PSA control. He started systemic therapy with abiraterone acetate almost 5 years after the diagnosis of recurrent PCa. © 2016 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg.

  15. Multiplexed quantum dot labeling of activated c-Met signaling in castration-resistant human prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peizhen Hu

    Full Text Available The potential application of multiplexed quantum dot labeling (MQDL for cancer detection and prognosis and monitoring therapeutic responses has attracted the interests of bioengineers, pathologists and cancer biologists. Many published studies claim that MQDL is effective for cancer biomarker detection and useful in cancer diagnosis and prognosis, these studies have not been standardized against quantitative biochemical and molecular determinations. In the present study, we used a molecularly characterized human prostate cancer cell model exhibiting activated c-Met signaling with epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT and lethal metastatic progression to bone and soft tissues as the gold standard, and compared the c-Met cell signaling network in this model, in clinical human prostate cancer tissue specimens and in a castration-resistant human prostate cancer xenograft model. We observed c-Met signaling network activation, manifested by increased phosphorylated c-Met in all three. The downstream survival signaling network was mediated by NF-κB and Mcl-1 and EMT was driven by receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL, at the single cell level in clinical prostate cancer specimens and the xenograft model. Results were confirmed by real-time RT-PCR and western blots in a human prostate cancer cell model. MQDL is a powerful tool for assessing biomarker expression and it offers molecular insights into cancer progression at both the cell and tissue level with high degree of sensitivity.

  16. [Cabazitaxel for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer progressing after docetaxel treatment: the TROPIC study in France].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouessel, Damien; Oudard, Stéphane; Gravis, Gwenaëlle; Priou, Frank; Shen, Liji; Culine, Stéphane

    2012-01-01

    In 2010, results of the TROPIC study demonstrated that, when compared to mitxantrone, the novel taxane cabazitaxel improved median overall survival of patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer who progressed on or after docetaxel treatment. We report the data on efficacy and toxicity observed in the subgroup of patients included in the French centers. In this phase III randomized international trial, patients received prednisone and were treated with either 25 mg/m(2) cabazitaxel or 12 mg/m(2) mitoxantrone intravenously every three weeks. The primary endpoint was overall survival. The secondary endpoints included progression-free survival (PFS) and safety. Analyses were performed on the intention-to-treat population. Among the 90 patients enrolled in France, the median overall survival was 18 months for the cabazitaxel arm versus 14.3 months for the mitoxantrone arm. An improvement in PFS was also observed, with a median of 1.4 months for the mitoxatrone arm compared to a median of 2.5 months for the cabazitaxel arm. The most common grade ≥ 3 adverse events were hematologic with neutropenia, usually afebrile and digestive with 4 % of patients reporting diarrhea. These results are comparable to those reported for the overall population and the safety profile remains favorable without any toxic death related to cabazitaxel.

  17. Real-world cabazitaxel safety: the Italian early-access program in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracarda, Sergio; Gernone, Angela; Gasparro, Donatello; Marchetti, Paolo; Ronzoni, Monica; Bortolus, Roberto; Fratino, Lucia; Basso, Umberto; Mazzanti, Roberto; Messina, Caterina; Tucci, Marcello; Boccardo, Francesco; Cartenì, Giacomo; Pinto, Carmine; Fornarini, Giuseppe; Mattioli, Rodolfo; Procopio, Giuseppe; Chiuri, Vincenzo; Scotto, Tiziana; Dondi, Davide; Di Lorenzo, Giuseppe

    2014-05-01

    Cabazitaxel is a novel taxane that is approved for use in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer based on the Phase III TROPIC study, which showed improved overall survival with cabazitaxel/prednisone versus mitoxantrone/prednisone. A global early-access program was initiated in order to provide early access to cabazitaxel in docetaxel-pretreated patients and to obtain real-world data. We report interim safety results from an Italian prospective, single-arm, multicenter, open-label trial of 218 patients receiving cabazitaxel 25 mg/m2 every 3 weeks plus prednisolone 10 mg/day, until disease progression, unacceptable toxicity, investigator's decision or death. Patients completing treatment received a median of six cabazitaxel cycles. The most common grade 3/4 adverse events were neutropenia (33.9%), leukopenia (15.6%), anemia (6%) and asthenia (6%). No peripheral neuropathy or nail disorders were observed. These results confirm that cabazitaxel has a manageable safety profile in daily clinical practice and support its use in patients with prostate cancer who progress during or after a docetaxel-based therapy.

  18. Neutrophil-to-Lymphocyte Ratio Predicts Prognosis in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer Patients Who Received Cabazitaxel Chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichi Uemura

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and Objectives. An elevated neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR has been suggested to be associated with a poor prognosis in several cancers. We evaluated the utility of an elevated NLR as a biomarker to predict the prognosis of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC patients treated with cabazitaxel (CBZ. Methods. We analyzed 47 patients who received CBZ chemotherapy for mCRPC in our institutions. The NLR was calculated using the neutrophil and lymphocyte counts before CBZ chemotherapy. We determined the NLR cut-off value based on the sensitivity and specificity levels derived from area under the receiver operator characteristic curves for death. A multivariate analysis was performed to investigate the association between the NLR and the prognosis. Results. The median overall survival (OS after CBZ was 10.0 months (range: 6.3–13.2. The median OS was shorter in patients with a high NLR (≥3.83 than in those with a low NLR (<3.83 (5.8 versus 13.2 months, p=0.018. In the multivariate analysis, the NLR, patient age, and lymph node (LN metastasis were independent predictors of the OS (hazard ratio 3.01, p=0.030; hazard ratio 3.10, p=0.029; hazard ratio 12.38, p=0.001, resp.. Conclusions. NLR might be a useful prognostic biomarker in mCRPC patients treated with CBZ.

  19. Bioclinical Parameters Driving Decision-Making of Subsequent Lines of Treatment in Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Irelli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Different options are available as second-line treatment of metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer: cabazitaxel, abiraterone, and enzalutamide. Phase III studies evaluating cabazitaxel and the two hormonal agents have been shown to significantly prolong overall survival compared to mitoxantrone and placebo, respectively. Several studies have also demonstrated feasibility and activity of docetaxel rechallenge in case of a sufficient progression-free interval (3–6 months, good performance status, and previous acceptable safety profile, thus providing an additional treatment option in clinical practice. Clinical and biological parameters should be considered to tailor II line treatment. In clinical practice, we can primarily evaluate patients’ fitness according to age, performance status, symptomatic disease, comorbidities, and expected safety profile of each drug. Different prognostic/predictive factors may be considered, such as presence of bone-limited or visceral metastases, length of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT before chemotherapy, time to progression after docetaxel, Gleason score, PSA doubling time, and serum testosterone, even if their clinical relevance is still debated. This review will discuss current options of innovative drugs sequencing and selection according to bioclinical parameters.

  20. Evolving treatment approaches for the management of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer – role of radium-223

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    Mukherji D

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Deborah Mukherji,1 Imane El Dika,1 Sally Temraz,1 Mohammed Haidar,2 Ali Shamseddine11Department of Hematology/Oncology, 2Department of Nuclear Medicine, American University of Beirut Medical Center, Beirut, LebanonAbstract: Radium-223 is a first-in-class alpha particle-emitting radiopharmaceutical approved for the treatment of bone metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. Radium-223 is administered intravenously with no requirement for complex shielding and specifically targets areas of bone metastasis. In a randomized placebo-controlled Phase III study, treatment with radium-223 was shown to improve overall survival, time to skeletal-related events, and health-related quality of life. Apart from radium-223, the cytotoxic chemotherapy agents docetaxel and cabazitaxel, androgen biosynthesis inhibitor abiraterone acetate, novel anti-androgen enzalutamide, and immunotherapy sipuleucel-T have also been shown to improve survival of men with advanced prostate cancer in Phase III trials. This review will outline current treatment approaches for advanced prostate cancer with a focus on the role of radium-223 in changing treatment paradigms.Keywords: Alpharadin, alpha-emitting radionuclide, bone metastasis