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Sample records for expression thermal discomfort

  1. Quantitative measurement of productivity loss due to thermal discomfort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lan, Li; Wargocki, Pawel; Lian, Zhiwei

    2011-01-01

    discomfort caused by elevated air temperature had a negative effect on performance. A quantitative relationship was established between thermal sensation votes and task performance. It can be used for economic calculations pertaining to building design and operation when occupant productivity is considered...

  2. Trends in thermal discomfort indices over western coastal cities of India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Manasi S.; Dhorde, Amit G.

    2018-02-01

    The present research aimed at analyzing temporal trends in thermal discomfort indices for a period of 46 years from 1969 to 2014 over western coastal region of India for seven urban centers during the months of pre-monsoon and monsoon seasons. Direct thermal discomfort indices employed for this purpose were thermo-hygrometric index (THI) and heat index (HI). Statistical techniques applied for obtaining temporal trends were linear regression model and Mann-Kendall (MK) rank test. Statistical significance of the obtained trends was evaluated at 95% confidence level. Sequential MK (SQ-MK) test was used for change point detection. To investigate actual incidences of thermal discomfort, daily index values were averaged for standard meteorological weeks (SMWs) over the study period and decadal percentage of thermal discomfort during SMWs was estimated. Trend analysis of selected meteorological parameters such as dry bulb temperature (DBT), wet bulb temperature (WBT), relative humidity (RH), and wind speed (WS) were investigated, which might be responsible for variation in thermal discomfort over the period. The results obtained depicted significant increase in thermal discomfort over the cities located on the southern part of west coast, while significant increase was observed during monsoon season months compared to pre-monsoon season. Decadal variation in percentage of SMWs falling in various discomfort categories was studied. At majority of the stations, moderate and high-risk SMWs have increased over the last two decades. The results of change point detection for THI and HI denoted significant increase at most of the stations after 1990s. The study validates increase in thermal discomfort vulnerability, particularly at thriving urban centers of western coastal region of India.

  3. Thermal comfort of various building layouts with a proposed discomfort index range for tropical climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Md Din, Mohd Fadhil; Lee, Yee Yong; Ponraj, Mohanadoss; Ossen, Dilshan Remaz; Iwao, Kenzo; Chelliapan, Shreeshivadasan

    2014-04-01

    Recent years have seen issues related to thermal comfort gaining more momentum in tropical countries. The thermal adaptation and thermal comfort index play a significant role in evaluating the outdoor thermal comfort. In this study, the aim is to capture the thermal sensation of respondents at outdoor environment through questionnaire survey and to determine the discomfort index (DI) to measure the thermal discomfort level. The results indicated that most respondents had thermally accepted the existing environment conditions although they felt slightly warm and hot. A strong correlation between thermal sensation and measured DI was also identified. As a result, a new discomfort index range had been proposed in association with local climate and thermal sensation of occupants to evaluate thermal comfort. The results had proved that the respondents can adapt to a wider range of thermal conditions.Validation of the questionnaire data at Putrajaya was done to prove that the thermal sensation in both Putrajaya and UTM was almost similar since they are located in the same tropical climate region. Hence, a quantitative field study on building layouts was done to facilitate the outdoor human discomfort level based on newly proposed discomfort index range. The results showed that slightly shaded building layouts of type- A and B exhibited higher temperature and discomfort index. The resultant adaptive thermal comfort theory was incorporated into the field studies as well. Finally, the study also showed that the DI values were highly dependent on ambient temperature and relative humidity but had fewer effects for solar radiation intensity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The influence of thermal discomfort on the attention index of teenagers: an experimental evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazon, Jordi

    2014-07-01

    In order to measure the effect on the attention of teenagers of thermal discomfort due to high temperature and humidity, two experiments were conducted in two different indoor conditions of temperature and humidity in non-air-conditioned classrooms. The participants were a heterogeneous group of 117 teenagers, aged 12 to 18 years, and the experiments reproduced the actual conditions of teaching in a classroom in the Mediterranean climate. In order to measure the attention index, a standard Toulouse-Pieron psychological test was performed on the 117 teenagers in these two conditions, and the Predicted Mean Vote (PMV), the physiologically Equivalent Temperature (PET), the Standard effective Temperature (SET*) and the Universal Thermal Climate Index (UTCI) indices were calculated to estimate the grade of discomfort using the RayMan Pro model. Conditions of greater discomfort decreased the attention index in the whole group, especially in those aged 12-14, among whom the attention index dropped by around 45 % when compared to comfortable conditions. However, teenage attention at ages 17 and 18 shows little variation in discomfort in respect to thermally comfortable conditions. In addition, the attention index for boys and girls shows the same variation in discomfort conditions. However, girls have a slightly higher attention index than boys in discomfort and thermal comfort experiments.

  5. Perceived Thermal Discomfort and Stress Behaviours Affecting Students’ Learning in Lecture Theatres in the Humid Tropics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamaraukuro Tammy Amasuomo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The study investigated the relationship between students’ perceived thermal discomfort and stress behaviours affecting their learning in lecture theatres in the humid tropics. Two lecture theatres, LTH-2 and 3, at the Niger Delta University, Nigeria, were used for the study. Two groups of students from the Faculties of Agriculture and Engineering and the Department of Technology Education constituted the population. The sample size selected through random sampling for Groups A and B was 210 and 370 students, respectively. Objective and self-report instruments were used for data collection. The objective instrument involved physical measurement of the two lecture theatres and of the indoor temperature, relative humidity and air movement. The self-report instrument was a questionnaire that asked for the students perceived indoor thermal discomfort levels and the effect of indoor thermal comfort level on perceived stress behaviours affecting their learning. The objective indoor environmental data indicated thermal discomfort with an average temperature of 29–32 °C and relative humidity of 78% exceeding the ASHARE [1] and Olgyay [2].The students’ experienced a considerable level of thermal discomfort and also perceived that stress behaviours due to thermal discomfort affected their learning. Further, there were no significant differences in the perceived thermal discomfort levels of the two groups of students in LTH-2 and 3. Furthermore, stress behaviours affecting learning as perceived by the two groups of students did not differ significantly. In addition, no correlation existed between the perceived indoor thermal discomfort levels and stress behaviour levels affecting learning for students in LTH-2, because the arousal level of the students in the thermal environment was likely higher than the arousal level for optimal performance [3,4]. However, a correlation existed in the case of students in LTH-3, which was expected because it only

  6. Development of Building Thermal Load and Discomfort Degree Hour Prediction Models Using Data Mining Approaches

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    Yaolin Lin

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Thermal load and indoor comfort level are two important building performance indicators, rapid predictions of which can help significantly reduce the computation time during design optimization. In this paper, a three-step approach is used to develop and evaluate prediction models. Firstly, the Latin Hypercube Sampling Method (LHSM is used to generate a representative 19-dimensional design database and DesignBuilder is then used to obtain the thermal load and discomfort degree hours through simulation. Secondly, samples from the database are used to develop and validate seven prediction models, using data mining approaches including multilinear regression (MLR, chi-square automatic interaction detector (CHAID, exhaustive CHAID (ECHAID, back-propagation neural network (BPNN, radial basis function network (RBFN, classification and regression trees (CART, and support vector machines (SVM. It is found that the MLR and BPNN models outperform the others in the prediction of thermal load with average absolute error of less than 1.19%, and the BPNN model is the best at predicting discomfort degree hour with 0.62% average absolute error. Finally, two hybrid models—MLR (MLR + BPNN and MLR-BPNN—are developed. The MLR-BPNN models are found to be the best prediction models, with average absolute error of 0.82% in thermal load and 0.59% in discomfort degree hour.

  7. Measure the effects of thermal discomfort on the performance of office work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lan, L.; Wargocki, P.; Lian, Z.W.

    2011-01-01

    Accuracy and speed are the two distinct aspects of human performance. A method was proposed by which the speed and accuracy were integrated into one measure by designing the tasks in such a way that the participants can only proceed to the next test when the task was performed without errors....... The method was examined through a subjective experiment with thermal environment as the prototypical example. The experimental results indicate that the negative effects of thermal discomfort on human performance were evaluated well by the tasks designed with the proposed method. It provides a useful tool...... for better measurement of human performance and helps to facilitate the development of quantitative relationship between IEQ and productivity....

  8. Thermal (dis)comfort experienced from physiological movements across indoor, transitional and outdoor spaces in Singapore: A pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li Heng, Su; Chow, Winston

    2017-04-01

    Human thermal comfort research is important as climate discomfort can adversely affect both health and work productivity in cities; however, such biometeorological work in low-latitude urban areas is still relatively unstudied hitherto. In the tropical metropolis of Singapore, a suite of policies have been implemented aimed at improving environmental sustainability via increasing car-free commutes and pedestrian movement during work/school journeys, with the consequence that individuals will likely have increased personal exposure through a variety of spaces (and climates) during typical daily activities. As such, research into exploring the thermal (dis)comfort experienced during pedestrian movements across these indoor, outdoor and transitional (semi-outdoor) spaces would yield interesting applied biometerological insights. This pilot study thus investigates how pedestrian thermal comfort varies spatially across a university campus, and how the physical intensity of pedestrian travel affects thermal comfort across these spaces. Over a 10-week period, we profiled six students for both their objective and subjective pedestrian thermal comfort during traverses across different spaces. Data were obtained through use of (a.) of a heat stress sensor, (b.) a fitness tracker, and (b.) a questionnaire survey to record traverse measurements of the microclimate, their physiological data, and their perceived microclimate comfort respectively. Measured climate and physiological data were used to derive commonly-used thermal comfort indices like wet-bulb globe temperature (WBGT) and physiological equivalent temperature (PET). Further, interviews were conducted with all six subjects at the end of the fieldwork period to ascertain details on individual acclimatization behavior and adaptation strategies. The results indicate that (a.) more than 50% of the microclimatic conditions within each indoor, semi-outdoor, and outdoor space exceeded heat stress thresholds of both PET and

  9. Effects of thermal discomfort in an office on perceived air quality, SBS symptoms, physiological responses and human performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lan, Li; Wargocki, Pawel; Wyon, David Peter

    2011-01-01

    The effects of thermal discomfort on health and human performance were investigated in an office, in an attempt to elucidate the physiological mechanisms involved. Twelve subjects (six men and six women) performed neurobehavioral tests and tasks typical of office work while thermally neutral (at 22......, and were less willing to exert effort. Task performance decreased when the subjects felt warm. Their heart rate, respiratory ventilation, and end-tidal partial pressure of carbon dioxide increased significantly, and their arterial oxygen saturation decreased. Tear film quality was found to be significantly...... reduced at the higher temperature when they felt warm. No effects were observed on salivary biomarkers (alpha-amylase and cortisol). The present results imply that the negative effects on health and performance that occur when people feel thermally warm at raised temperatures are caused by physiological...

  10. Adaptive principles for thermal comfort in dwellings: From comfort temperatures to avoiding discomfort

    OpenAIRE

    Alders, E.E.; Kurvers, S.R.; Van den Ham, E.R.

    2011-01-01

    Many theories on thermal comfort exist and there are many ways to deliver this in an energy efficient way. Both aspects are often studied in a static way and most of these studies only regard one of the aspects, seldom investigating what influence the way of delivering thermal comfort has on the actual perceived thermal comfort. This paper analyses the knowledge of the different disciplines and integrates it to get a holistic image of comfort and its delivery systems as well as opportunities ...

  11. Adaptive principles for thermal comfort in dwellings : From comfort temperatures to avoiding discomfort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alders, E.E.; Kurvers, S.R.; Van den Ham, E.R.

    2011-01-01

    Many theories on thermal comfort exist and there are many ways to deliver this in an energy efficient way. Both aspects are often studied in a static way and most of these studies only regard one of the aspects, seldom investigating what influence the way of delivering thermal comfort has on the

  12. Thermal inertia and radiating average Temperature. A brief analysis of some causes of discomfort; Inercia Termica y Temperatura media radiante. Un breve analisis de algunas causas de disconfort

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arroba, M.

    2008-07-01

    Radiant average temperature in walls is as important as dry air temperature to achieve thermal comfort of users of a local. An excessive discrepancy between these levels, or an asymmetric distribution of the surface temperature of fences, may cause localized thermal discomfort, an effect impossible to compensate by rising dry air temperature. Thermal inertia and its concentration must be properly studied in order to handle this parameters, inside or outside the building, on both sides of the cladding or none depending on the weather, the bio climatic strategies used, heating and air conditioning systems and planned use of the building. (Author)

  13. Thermal discomfort with cold extremities in relation to age, gender, and body mass index in a random sample of a Swiss urban population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orgül Selim

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this epidemiological study was to investigate the relationship of thermal discomfort with cold extremities (TDCE to age, gender, and body mass index (BMI in a Swiss urban population. Methods In a random population sample of Basel city, 2,800 subjects aged 20-40 years were asked to complete a questionnaire evaluating the extent of cold extremities. Values of cold extremities were based on questionnaire-derived scores. The correlation of age, gender, and BMI to TDCE was analyzed using multiple regression analysis. Results A total of 1,001 women (72.3% response rate and 809 men (60% response rate returned a completed questionnaire. Statistical analyses revealed the following findings: Younger subjects suffered more intensely from cold extremities than the elderly, and women suffered more than men (particularly younger women. Slimmer subjects suffered significantly more often from cold extremities than subjects with higher BMIs. Conclusions Thermal discomfort with cold extremities (a relevant symptom of primary vascular dysregulation occurs at highest intensity in younger, slimmer women and at lowest intensity in elderly, stouter men.

  14. Coral thermal tolerance: tuning gene expression to resist thermal stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony J Bellantuono

    Full Text Available The acclimatization capacity of corals is a critical consideration in the persistence of coral reefs under stresses imposed by global climate change. The stress history of corals plays a role in subsequent response to heat stress, but the transcriptomic changes associated with these plastic changes have not been previously explored. In order to identify host transcriptomic changes associated with acquired thermal tolerance in the scleractinian coral Acropora millepora, corals preconditioned to a sub-lethal temperature of 3°C below bleaching threshold temperature were compared to both non-preconditioned corals and untreated controls using a cDNA microarray platform. After eight days of hyperthermal challenge, conditions under which non-preconditioned corals bleached and preconditioned corals (thermal-tolerant maintained Symbiodinium density, a clear differentiation in the transcriptional profiles was revealed among the condition examined. Among these changes, nine differentially expressed genes separated preconditioned corals from non-preconditioned corals, with 42 genes differentially expressed between control and preconditioned treatments, and 70 genes between non-preconditioned corals and controls. Differentially expressed genes included components of an apoptotic signaling cascade, which suggest the inhibition of apoptosis in preconditioned corals. Additionally, lectins and genes involved in response to oxidative stress were also detected. One dominant pattern was the apparent tuning of gene expression observed between preconditioned and non-preconditioned treatments; that is, differences in expression magnitude were more apparent than differences in the identity of genes differentially expressed. Our work revealed a transcriptomic signature underlying the tolerance associated with coral thermal history, and suggests that understanding the molecular mechanisms behind physiological acclimatization would be critical for the modeling of reefs

  15. Mammography parameters: compression, dose, and discomfort

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanco, S.; Di Risio, C.; Andisco, D.; Rojas, R.R.; Rojas, R.M.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To confirm the importance of compression in mammography and relate it to the discomfort expressed by the patients. Materials and methods: Two samples of 402 and 268 mammographies were obtained from two diagnostic centres that use the same mammographic equipment, but different compression techniques. The patient age range was from 21 to 50 years old. (authors) [es

  16. The use of language to express thermal sensation suggests heat acclimatization by Indonesian people

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tochihara, Yutaka; Lee, Joo-Young; Wakabayashi, Hitoshi; Wijayanto, Titis; Bakri, Ilham; Parsons, Ken

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore whether there is evidence of heat acclimatization in the words used to express thermal sensation. A total of 458 urban Japanese and 601 Indonesians participated in a questionnaire. In addition, in a preliminary survey, 39 native English speakers in the UK participated. Our results showed that (1) for Indonesians, the closest thermal descriptor of a feeling of thermal comfort was `cool' (75%) followed by `slightly cool' (7%), `slightly cold' (5%) and `cold' (5%), while Japanese responses were distributed uniformly among descriptors `cool', `slightly cool', `neither', `slightly warm', and `warm'; (2) the closest thermal descriptors of a feeling of discomfort for Indonesians were less affected by individual thermal susceptibility (vulnerability) than those for Japanese; (3) in the cases where `cool' and `slightly cold' were imagined in the mind, the descriptors were cognized as a thermal comfortable feeling by 97% and 57% of Indonesians, respectively; (4) the most frequently voted choice endorsing hot weather was `higher than 32°C' for Indonesians and `higher than 29°C' for Japanese respondents; for cold weather, `lower than 15°C' for Japanese and `lower than 20°C' for Indonesians. In summary, the descriptor `cool' in Indonesians connotes a thermally comfortable feeling, but the inter-zone between hot and cold weather that was judged in the mind showed a upward shift when compared to that of Japanese. It is suggested that linguistic heat acclimatization exists on a cognitive level for Indonesians and is preserved in the words of thermal descriptors.

  17. Alternative body sites for heat stress measurement in milking cows under tropical conditions and their relationship to the thermal discomfort of the animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martello, Luciane S.; Savastano Junior, Holmer; Silva, Saulo L.; Balieiro, Júlio Cesar C.

    2010-11-01

    This study was conducted to determine the relationship among temperatures measured at different anatomical sites of the animal body and their daily pattern as indicative of the thermal stress in lactating dairy cows under tropical conditions. Environmental dry bulb (DBT) and black globe (BGT) temperatures and relative humidity (RH) were recorded. Rectal temperature (RT), respiratory frequency (RF), body surface (BST), internal base of tail (TT), vulva (VT) and auricular temperatures (AT) were collected, from 37 Black and White Holstein cows at 0700, 1300 and 1800 hours. RT showed a moderately and positive correlations with all body temperatures, ranging from 0.59 with TT to 0.64 with BST. Correlations among AT, VT and TT with RF were very similar (from 0.63 to 0.64) and were greater than those observed for RF with RT (0.55) or with BST (0.54). RF and RT were positively correlated to TT (0.63 and 0.59, respectively), AT (r = 0.63 for both) and VT ( r = 0.64 and 0.63, respectively). Positive and very high correlations were observed among AT, VT and TT (from 0.94 to 0.97) indicating good association of temperatures measured in these anatomical sites. Correlations of BST with AT and VT were positive and very similar (0.71 and 0.72, respectively) and lower with TT (0.66). The AT, TT, VT and BST presented similar patterns and follow the variations of DBT through the day. Temperatures measured at different anatomical sites of the animal body have the potential to be used as indicative of the thermal stress in lactating dairy cows.

  18. Pain and discomfort during mammography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aro, A R; Absetz-Ylöstalo, P; Eerola, T

    1996-01-01

    was the most powerful factor explaining pain and discomfort among women with earlier mammography. However, it had no effect among women without earlier mammography, for whom screening-related nervousness and perceptions of staff were crucial. Suggested interventions include better information before screening......The aim of this prospective study was to investigate associations of mammography pain and discomfort with sociodemographics, personal history and psychological and situational factors. Subjects were women with a negative screening finding (n = 883) from a random sample of 50-year-old Finnish women...... attending their first breast cancer screening. Questionnaires were sent 1 month before the screening invitation and 2 months after screening. Sixty-one per cent reported painful and 59% uncomfortable mammograms (4% severely). Linear regression analyses showed that anticipation of pain and discomfort...

  19. Concerns and Discomforts of Pregnancy - Varicose Veins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concerns and Discomforts of Pregnancy - Varicose Veins Varicose veins are enlarged veins you may see on your ... Healthy Roads Media project www. healthyroadsmedia. org English - Concerns and Discomforts of Pregnancy (Varicose Veins) Last reviewed ...

  20. Mutual interaction effects between discomfort and cognitive task performance in clothing systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartog, E.A. den; Koerhuis, C.L.

    2016-01-01

    The focus of this study was to establish a relationship between physical discomfort and performance. Eleven healthy male subjects participated in this pilot study. The subjects performed a 2-h protocol without and with significant thermal and mechanical discomfort. Various cognitive tasks were

  1. Gene Expression Dynamics Accompanying the Sponge Thermal Stress Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman, Christine; Conaco, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Marine sponges are important members of coral reef ecosystems. Thus, their responses to changes in ocean chemistry and environmental conditions, particularly to higher seawater temperatures, will have potential impacts on the future of these reefs. To better understand the sponge thermal stress response, we investigated gene expression dynamics in the shallow water sponge, Haliclona tubifera (order Haplosclerida, class Demospongiae), subjected to elevated temperature. Using high-throughput transcriptome sequencing, we show that these conditions result in the activation of various processes that interact to maintain cellular homeostasis. Short-term thermal stress resulted in the induction of heat shock proteins, antioxidants, and genes involved in signal transduction and innate immunity pathways. Prolonged exposure to thermal stress affected the expression of genes involved in cellular damage repair, apoptosis, signaling and transcription. Interestingly, exposure to sublethal temperatures may improve the ability of the sponge to mitigate cellular damage under more extreme stress conditions. These insights into the potential mechanisms of adaptation and resilience of sponges contribute to a better understanding of sponge conservation status and the prediction of ecosystem trajectories under future climate conditions.

  2. Visual discomfort and depth-of-field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O'Hare, L.; Zhang, T.; Nefs, H.T.; Hibbard, P.B.

    2013-01-01

    Visual discomfort has been reported for certain visual stimuli and under particular viewing conditions, such as stereoscopic viewing. In stereoscopic viewing, visual discomfort can be caused by a conflict between accommodation and convergence cues that may specify different distances in depth.

  3. Visual Discomfort and Depth-of-Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise O'Hare

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Visual discomfort has been reported for certain visual stimuli and under particular viewing conditions, such as stereoscopic viewing. In stereoscopic viewing, visual discomfort can be caused by a conflict between accommodation and convergence cues that may specify different distances in depth. Earlier research has shown that depth-of-field, which is the distance range in depth in the scene that is perceived to be sharp, influences both the perception of egocentric distance to the focal plane, and the distance range in depth between objects in the scene. Because depth-of-field may also be in conflict with convergence and the accommodative state of the eyes, we raised the question of whether depth-of-field affects discomfort when viewing stereoscopic photographs. The first experiment assessed whether discomfort increases when depth-of-field is in conflict with coherent accommodation–convergence cues to distance in depth. The second experiment assessed whether depth-of-field influences discomfort from a pre-existing accommodation–convergence conflict. Results showed no effect of depth-of-field on visual discomfort. These results suggest therefore that depth-of-field can be used as a cue to depth without inducing discomfort in the viewer, even when cue conflicts are large.

  4. Coping with Test Pain, Discomfort, and Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Subscribe Search Coping with Test Pain, Discomfort and Anxiety Send Us Your Feedback This article was last ... can relax you. Anyone who suffers from high anxiety about medical tests should talk with a healthcare ...

  5. Measuring public discomfort at meeting people with disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConkey, Roy

    2015-01-01

    The discomfort reported by the general public at the prospect of personal contact with marginalised groups is an expression of the stigma they experience. This has been widely studied in relation to ethnic minorities and immigrants but less so for persons with disabilities. A national survey with a representative sample of over 1100 Irish adults provided an opportunity to examine reported discomfort with persons who had different impairments, including mental health conditions, with four other minority groups. Moreover, the personal and situational variables associated with expressions of discomfort were identified. Respondents were most comfortable having persons with physical and sensorial disabilities living in their neighbourhood or in their workplace but less so for persons with intellectual disabilities and even less for people with mental health conditions. They were much less comfortable with the four other social groups: gay, lesbian or bisexual people; Eastern European migrant workers; black and ethnic minority groups and least of all, travellers. Moreover, a factor analysis confirmed that the scores given to the impaired groups were significantly correlated with each other but less so with the other four social groupings, although these were significantly inter-correlated among themselves. Respondents who were more comfortable with both sets of minority groups tended to have more social connections in their personal lives and to reside in towns or villages rather than cities. They also expressed more positive attitudes to the inclusion of persons with disabilities in Irish society. The gradient in levels of public discomfort across minority groups may provide a sensitive indicator of the differential stigma experienced by persons with impairments within societies but there remains the possibility that an alliance with other minority groups would also help to promote more positive attitudes and reduce their wider social exclusion. Copyright © 2015

  6. A Wider Look at Visual Discomfort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L O'Hare

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Visual discomfort is the adverse effects reported by some on viewing certain stimuli, such as stripes and certain filtered noise patterns. Stimuli that deviate from natural image statistics might be encoded inefficiently, which could cause discomfort (Juricevic, Land, Wilkins and Webster, 2010, Perception, 39(7, 884–899, possibly through excessive cortical responses (Wilkins, 1995, Visual Stress, Oxford, Oxford University Press. A less efficient visual system might exacerbate the effects of difficult stimuli. Extreme examples are seen in epilepsy and migraines (Wilkins, Bonnanni, Prociatti, Guerrini, 2004, Epilepsia, 45, 1–7; Aurora and Wilkinson, 2007, Cephalalgia, 27(12, 1422–1435. However, similar stimuli are also seen as uncomfortable by non-clinical populations, eg, striped patterns (Wilkins et al, 1984, Brain, 107(4. We propose that oversensitivity of clinical populations may represent extreme examples of visual discomfort in the general population. To study the prevalence and impact of visual discomfort in a wider context than typically studied, an Internet-based survey was conducted, including standardised questionnaires measuring visual discomfort susceptibility (Conlon, Lovegrove, Chekaluk and Pattison, 1999, Visual Cognition, 6(6, 637–663; Evans and Stevenson, 2008, Ophthal Physiol Opt 28(4 295–309 and judgments of visual stimuli, such as striped patterns (Wilkins et al, 1984 and filtered noise patterns (Fernandez and Wilkins, 2008, Perception, 37(7 1098–1013. Results show few individuals reporting high visual discomfort, contrary to other researchers (eg, Conlon et al, 1999.

  7. Excessive Neural Responses and Visual Discomfort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L O'Hare

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Spatially and temporally periodic patterns can look aversive to some individuals (Wilkins et al, 1984, Brain, 107, 989-1017, especially clinical populations such as migraine (Marcus and Soso, 1989, Arch Neurol., 46(10, 1129-32 epilepsy (Wilkins, Darby and Binnie, 1979, Brain, 102, 1-25. It has been suggested that this might be due to excessive neural responses (Juricevic, Land, Wilkins and Webster, 2010, Perception, 39(7, 884-899. Spatial frequency content has been shown to affect both relative and absolute discomfort judgements for spatially periodic riloid stimuli (Clark, O'Hare and Hibbard, 2013, Perception, ECVP Supp.; O'Hare, Clark and Hibbard, 2013, Perception ECVP Supplement. The current study investigated the possibility of whether neural correlates of visual discomfort from periodic stimuli could be measured using EEG. Stimuli were first matched for perceived contrast using a self adjustment task. EEG measurements were then obtained, alongside subjective discomfort judgements. Subjective discomfort judgements support those found previously, under various circumstances, indicating that spatial frequency plays a role in the perceived discomfort of periodic images. However, trends in EEG responses do not appear to have a straightforward relationship to subjective discomfort judgements.

  8. Visual discomfort in stereoscopic displays : a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lambooij, M.T.M.; IJsselsteijn, W.A.; Heynderickx, I.E.J.; Woods, A.J.; Merritt, J.O.; Bolas, M.T.; McDowall, I.E.

    2007-01-01

    Visual discomfort has been the subject of considerable research in relation to stereoscopic and autostereoscopic displays, but remains an ambiguous concept used to denote a variety of subjective symptoms potentially related to different underlying processes. In this paper we clarify the importance

  9. Visual discomfort in stereoscopic dsplays : A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lambooij, M.T.M.; IJsselsteijn, W.; Heynderickx, I.

    2007-01-01

    Visual discomfort has been the subject of considerable research in relation to stereoscopic and autostereoscopic displays, but remains an ambiguous concept used to denote a variety of subjective symptoms potentially related to different underlying processes. In this paper we clarify the importance

  10. Children's self reported discomforts as participants in clinical research.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staphorst, M.S.; Hunfeld, J.A.M.; van de Vathorst, S.; Passchier, J.; van Goudoever, J.B.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: There is little empirical evidence on children's subjective experiences of discomfort during clinical research procedures. Therefore, Institutional Review Boards have limited empirical information to guide their decision-making on discomforts for children in clinical research. To get

  11. Children's self reported discomforts as participants in clinical research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staphorst, Mira S.; Hunfeld, Joke A. M.; van de Vathorst, Suzanne; Passchier, Jan; van Goudoever, Johannes B.

    2015-01-01

    There is little empirical evidence on children's subjective experiences of discomfort during clinical research procedures. Therefore, Institutional Review Boards have limited empirical information to guide their decision-making on discomforts for children in clinical research. To get more insight

  12. Expression analysis of NOS family and HSP genes during thermal stress in goat ( Capra hircus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Vijay Pratap; Dangi, Satyaveer Singh; Chouhan, Vikrant Singh; Gupta, Mahesh; Dangi, Saroj K.; Singh, Gyanendra; Maurya, Vijay Prakash; Kumar, Puneet; Sarkar, Mihir

    2016-03-01

    Approximately 50 genes other than heat shock protein (HSP) expression changes during thermal stress. These genes like nitric oxide synthase (NOS) need proper attention and investigation to find out their possible role in the adaptation to thermal stress in animals. So, the present study was undertaken to demonstrate the expressions of inducible form type II NOS (iNOS), endothelial type III NOS (eNOS), constitutively expressed enzyme NOS (cNOS), HSP70, and HSP90 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) during different seasons in Barbari goats. Real-time polymerase chain reaction, western blot, and immunocytochemistry were applied to investigate messenger RNA (mRNA) expression, protein expression, and immunolocalization of examined factors. The mRNA and protein expressions of iNOS, eNOS, cNOS, HSP70, and HSP90 were significantly higher ( P goats.

  13. [French validation of the Frustration Discomfort Scale].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamayou, J-L; Tsenova, V; Gonthier, C; Blatier, C; Yahyaoui, A

    2016-08-01

    Rational emotive behavior therapy originally considered the concept of frustration intolerance in relation to different beliefs or cognitive patterns. Psychological disorders or, to some extent, certain affects such as frustration could result from irrational beliefs. Initially regarded as a unidimensional construct, recent literature considers those irrational beliefs as a multidimensional construct; such is the case for the phenomenon of frustration. In order to measure frustration intolerance, Harrington (2005) developed and validated the Frustration Discomfort Scale. The scale includes four dimensions of beliefs: emotional intolerance includes beliefs according to which emotional distress is intolerable and must be controlled or avoided as soon as possible. The intolerance of discomfort or demand for comfort is the second dimension based on beliefs that life should be peaceful and comfortable and that any inconvenience, effort or hassle should be avoided. The third dimension is entitlement, which includes beliefs about personal goals, such as merit, fairness, respect and gratification, and that others must not frustrate those non-negotiable desires. The fourth dimension is achievement, which reflects demands for high expectations or standards. The aim of this study was to translate and validate in a French population the Frustration and Discomfort Scale developed by Harrington (2005), assess its psychometric properties, highlight the four factors structure of the scale, and examine the relationships between this concept and both emotion regulation and perceived stress. We translated the Frustration Discomfort Scale from English to French and back from French to English in order to ensure good quality of translation. We then submitted the scale to 289 students (239 females and 50 males) from the University of Savoy in addition to the Cognitive Emotional Regulation Questionnaire and the Perceived Stress Scale. The results showed satisfactory psychometric

  14. Using different methods to assess the discomfort during car driving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravnik, David; Otáhal, Stanislav; Dodic Fikfak, Metoda

    2008-03-01

    This study investigated the discomfort caused by car driving. Discomfort estimates were achieved by self-administered questionnaire, measured by different testing methods, and through the goniometry of principal angles. Data from a total of 200 non-professional drivers who fulfilled the questionnaire was analysed. 118 subjects were analysed by goniometry and 30 drivers were assessed using the OWAS (Ovaco orking Posture Analysis), RULA (Rapid Upper Limb Assessment), and CORLETT tests. The aim of this paper was to assess the appearance of the discomfort and to find some correlations between drivers' postures. Results suggest that different levels of discomfort are perceived in different body regions when driving cars. Differences appear mostly between the genders concerning the discomfort. With the questionnaire and the different estimation techniques, it is possible to identify 'at risk' drivers and ensure urgent attention when necessary. It can be concluded that the questionnare and the CORLETT test are good in predicting location of discomfort. TheB org CRI10scale is good indicator of the level of the discomfort, while OWAS and RULA can appraise the body posture to predict discomfort appearance. According to the goniometry data, the drivers posture could be one of the contributing factors in appearing of discomfort.

  15. Association Between Smartphone Use and Musculoskeletal Discomfort in Adolescent Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shang-Yu; Chen, Ming-De; Huang, Yueh-Chu; Lin, Chung-Ying; Chang, Jer-Hao

    2017-06-01

    Despite the substantial increase in the number of adolescent smartphone users, few studies have investigated the behavioural effects of smartphone use on adolescent students as it relates to musculoskeletal discomfort. The purpose of this study was to explore the association between smartphone use and musculoskeletal discomfort in students at a Taiwanese junior college. We hypothesised that the duration of smartphone use would be associated with increased instances of musculoskeletal discomfort in these students. This cross-sectional study employed a convenience sampling method to recruit students from a junior college in southern Taiwan. All the students (n = 315) were asked to answer questionnaires on smartphone use. A descriptive analysis, stepwise regression, and logistic regression were used to examine specific components of smartphone use and their relationship to musculoskeletal discomfort. Nearly half of the participants experienced neck and shoulder discomfort. The stepwise regression results indicated that the number of body parts with discomfort (F = 6.009, p smartphone functions. The logistic regression analysis showed that the students who talked on the phone >3 h/day had a higher risk of upper back discomfort than did those who talked on the phone smartphone use and musculoskeletal discomfort is related to the duration of smartphone ancillary function use. Moreover, hours spent talking on the phone was a predictor of upper back discomfort.

  16. Characterization and recognition of mixed emotional expressions in thermal face image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Priya; Bhattacharjee, Debotosh; De, Barin K.; Nasipuri, Mita

    2016-05-01

    Facial expressions in infrared imaging have been introduced to solve the problem of illumination, which is an integral constituent of visual imagery. The paper investigates facial skin temperature distribution on mixed thermal facial expressions of our created face database where six are basic expressions and rest 12 are a mixture of those basic expressions. Temperature analysis has been performed on three facial regions of interest (ROIs); periorbital, supraorbital and mouth. Temperature variability of the ROIs in different expressions has been measured using statistical parameters. The temperature variation measurement in ROIs of a particular expression corresponds to a vector, which is later used in recognition of mixed facial expressions. Investigations show that facial features in mixed facial expressions can be characterized by positive emotion induced facial features and negative emotion induced facial features. Supraorbital is a useful facial region that can differentiate basic expressions from mixed expressions. Analysis and interpretation of mixed expressions have been conducted with the help of box and whisker plot. Facial region containing mixture of two expressions is generally less temperature inducing than corresponding facial region containing basic expressions.

  17. Zeta Function Expression of Spin Partition Functions on Thermal AdS3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Floyd L.Williams

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We find a Selberg zeta function expression of certain one-loop spin partition functions on three-dimensional thermal anti-de Sitter space. Of particular interest is the partition function of higher spin fermionic particles. We also set up, in the presence of spin, a Patterson-type formula involving the logarithmic derivative of zeta.

  18. Discomfort and factual recollection in intensive care unit patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Leur, JP; van der Schans, CP; Loef, BG; Deelman, BG; Geertzen, JHB; Zwaveling, JH

    2004-01-01

    Introduction A stay in the intensive care unit (ICU), although potentially life-saving, may cause considerable discomfort to patients. However, retrospective assessment of discomfort is difficult because recollection of stressful events may be impaired by sedation and severe illness during the ICU

  19. Mammography discomfort: a holistic perspective derived from women's experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poulos, Ann; Llewellyn, Gwynnyth

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Mammography discomfort has the potential to deter women from attending for regular breast screening. Previous studies have focussed on the pain/discomfort of the mammography procedure itself. The purpose of this study was to consider discomfort from a holistic perspective of the mammography experience derived from the women themselves. Methods: Qualitative research methods were employed. Using theoretical sampling, 12 women who had recently experienced mammography were interviewed. The interview questions aimed to explore the experience of women attending for a mammogram from arrival to departure and beyond in order to identify aspects which potentially increase discomfort. Data analysis involved coding and categorisation and identification of key concepts and their relationships. Results: A conceptual framework was developed that demonstrates the contributors to mammography discomfort and the relationships between these as identified by the women. Conclusions: The conceptual framework has important implications for clinical practice and future research

  20. Reducing Visual Discomfort with HMDs Using Dynamic Depth of Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnegie, Kieran; Rhee, Taehyun

    2015-01-01

    Although head-mounted displays (HMDs) are ideal devices for personal viewing of immersive stereoscopic content, exposure to VR applications on them results in significant discomfort for the majority of people, with symptoms including eye fatigue, headaches, nausea, and sweating. A conflict between accommodation and vergence depth cues on stereoscopic displays is a significant cause of visual discomfort. This article describes the results of an evaluation used to judge the effectiveness of dynamic depth-of-field (DoF) blur in an effort to reduce discomfort caused by exposure to stereoscopic content on HMDs. Using a commercial game engine implementation, study participants report a reduction of visual discomfort on a simulator sickness questionnaire when DoF blurring is enabled. The study participants reported a decrease in symptom severity caused by HMD exposure, indicating that dynamic DoF can effectively reduce visual discomfort.

  1. Differential gene expression during thermal stress and bleaching in the Caribbean coral Montastraea faveolata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSalvo, M K; Voolstra, C R; Sunagawa, S; Schwarz, J A; Stillman, J H; Coffroth, M A; Szmant, A M; Medina, M

    2008-09-01

    The declining health of coral reefs worldwide is likely to intensify in response to continued anthropogenic disturbance from coastal development, pollution, and climate change. In response to these stresses, reef-building corals may exhibit bleaching, which marks the breakdown in symbiosis between coral and zooxanthellae. Mass coral bleaching due to elevated water temperature can devastate coral reefs on a large geographical scale. In order to understand the molecular and cellular basis of bleaching in corals, we have measured gene expression changes associated with thermal stress and bleaching using a complementary DNA microarray containing 1310 genes of the Caribbean coral Montastraea faveolata. In a first experiment, we identified differentially expressed genes by comparing experimentally bleached M. faveolata fragments to control non-heat-stressed fragments. In a second experiment, we identified differentially expressed genes during a time course experiment with four time points across 9 days. Results suggest that thermal stress and bleaching in M. faveolata affect the following processes: oxidative stress, Ca(2+) homeostasis, cytoskeletal organization, cell death, calcification, metabolism, protein synthesis, heat shock protein activity, and transposon activity. These results represent the first medium-scale transcriptomic study focused on revealing the cellular foundation of thermal stress-induced coral bleaching. We postulate that oxidative stress in thermal-stressed corals causes a disruption of Ca(2+) homeostasis, which in turn leads to cytoskeletal and cell adhesion changes, decreased calcification, and the initiation of cell death via apoptosis and necrosis.

  2. Discomfort Intolerance Scale: A Study of Reliability and Validity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadir ÖZDEL

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Discomfort Intolerance Scale was developed by Norman B. Schmidt et al. to assess the individual differences of capacity to withstand physical perturbations or uncomfortable bodily states (2006. The aim of this study is to investigate the validity and reliability of Discomfort Intolerance Scale-Turkish Version (RDÖ. Method: From two different universities, total of 225 students (male=167, female=58 were participated in this study. In order to determine the criterion validity, Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI were used. Construct validity was evaluated by factor analysis after the Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin (KMO and Barlett test had been performed. To assess the test-retest reliability the scale was re-applied to 54 participants 6 weeks later. Results: To assess construct validity of DIS, factor analyses were performed using varimax principal components analysis with varimax rotation. The factor analysis resulted in two factors named “discomfort (in tolerance” and “discomfort avoidance”. The Cronbach’s alpha coefficient for the entire scale, discomfort-(intolerance subscale, discomfortavoidance subscale were, .592, .670, .600 respectively. Correlations between two factors of DIS, discomfort intolerance and discomfort avoidance, and Trait Anxiety Inventory of STAI (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory were statistically significant at the level of 0.05. Test-retest reliability was statistically significant at the level of 0.01. Conclusion: Analysis demonstrated that DIS had a satisfactory level of reliability and validity in Turkish university students.

  3. Work-related musculoskeletal discomfort among heavy truck drivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazerian, Ramtin; Korhan, Orhan; Shakeri, Ehsan

    2018-03-13

    Heavy truck drivers are exposed to various psychological, psychosocial and physiological factors, some of which can cause musculoskeletal discomfort in different body regions. This study aims to investigate the correlation between different factors of musculoskeletal discomfort in heavy truck drivers. A cross-sectional study design was applied. A total of 384 participants were interviewed using an updated version of the Nordic musculoskeletal questionnaire. While hypothesis testing was used to assess the association of different factors in musculoskeletal discomfort, logistic regression was applied to explore different correlations among questions of the survey. The results demonstrate that hours of exposure to vibration were associated with discomfort in the neck and shoulders (p  0.05. Fifty-seven percent of the drivers were suffering from discomfort in their lower back region. Moreover, seat comfort was found to be highly correlated with discomfort in the neck, shoulder and upper back areas. Additionally, with aging the likelihood of experiencing discomfort in the neck, upper back and knees is increased.

  4. [Drug abuse and eating disorders in women: symptoms of gender discomfort?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simões-Barbosa, Regina Helena; Dantas-Berger, Sônia Maria

    2017-02-13

    The article discusses drug abuse and eating disorders from the critical gender and healthcare perspectives, postulating that subjective suffering can be expressed in the body through psychosomatic illnesses. From this perspective, craving for drugs or superfluous consumer goods, just as illness from self-imposed hunger in pursuit of an ideal of slimness, as in anorexia and bulimia, can be symptoms that expose the woman's suffering. A review in the fields of public health and feminist theories highlights the magnitude of the phenomena of medicalization and commodification of health in the psychiatrization of female discomfort. In the gender transition in capitalist societies, social demands for the performance of old and new women's roles accentuate feelings of inadequacy, expressed as the gender discomfort permeating drug abuse and eating disorders, analyzed as diseases of protest. The study proposes to reclaim the ideals of the Program for Comprehensive Women's Healthcare to deal with such challenges.

  5. Psychometric properties of Frustration Discomfort Scale in a Turkish sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozer, Bilge Uzun; Demir, Ayhan; Harrington, Neil

    2012-08-01

    The present study assessed the psychometric properties of the Frustration Discomfort Scale for Turkish college students. The Frustration Discomfort Scale (FDS), Procrastination Assessment Scale-Student, and Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale were administered to a sample of 171 (98 women, 73 men) Turkish college students. The results of the confirmatory factor analysis yielded fit index values demonstrating viability of the four-dimensional solution as in the original. Findings also revealed that, as predicted, the Discomfort Intolerance subscale of Turkish FDS was most strongly correlated with procrastination. Overall results provided evidence for the factor validity and reliability of the Turkish version of the scale for use in a Turkish population.

  6. Effect of sports bra type and gait speed on breast discomfort, bra discomfort and perceived breast movement in Chinese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaona; Gho, Sheridan A; Wang, Jianping; Steele, Julie R

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of sports bra type (encapsulation versus compression) and gait speed on perceptions of breast discomfort, bra discomfort and breast movement reported by Chinese women. Visual analogue scales were used to evaluate breast discomfort, bra component discomfort and perceived breast movement of 21 Chinese participants when they wore an encapsulation or a compression sports bra, while static and while exercising at three different gait speeds. Participants perceived less breast discomfort and breast movement when wearing a compression bra compared to an encapsulation bra at a high gait speed, suggesting that compression bras are likely to provide the most effective support for Chinese women. However, significantly higher bra discomfort was perceived in the compression bra compared to the encapsulation bra when static and at the lower gait speed, implying that ways to modify the design of sports bras, particularly the straps, should be investigated to provide adequate and comfortable breast support. The compression sports bra provided more comfortable support than the encapsulation sports bra for these Chinese women when running on a treadmill. However, these women perceived higher bra discomfort when wearing the compression bra when stationary. Further research is needed to modify the design of sports bras, particularly the straps, to provide adequate and comfortable breast support.

  7. Expression for the thermal H-mode energy confinement time under ELM-free conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryter, F.; Gruber, O.; Kardaun, O.J.W.F.; Menzler, H.P.; Wagner, F.; Schissel, D.P.; DeBoo, J.C.; Kaye, S.M.

    1992-07-01

    The design of future tokamaks, which are supposed to reach ignition with the H-mode, requires a reliable scaling expression for the H-mode energy confinement time. In the present work, an H-mode scaling expression for the thermal plasma energy confinement time has been developed by combining data from four existing divertor tokamaks, ASDEX, DIII-D, JET and PBX-M. The plasma conditions, which were as similar as possible to ensure a coherent set of data, were ELM-free deuterium discharges heated by deuterium neutral beam injection. By combining four tokamaks, the parametric dependence of the thermal energy confinement on the main plasma parameters, including the three main geometrical variables, was determined. (orig./WL)

  8. Thermal comfort following immersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guéritée, Julien; Redortier, Bernard; House, James R; Tipton, Michael J

    2015-02-01

    Unlike thermal comfort in air, little research has been undertaken exploring thermal comfort around water sports. We investigated the impact of swimming and cooling in air after swimming on thermal comfort. After 10 min of swimming-and-resting cycles in 28°C water, volunteers wearing two types of garments or in swim briefs, faced winds in 24°C air, at rest or when stepping. Thermal comfort was significantly higher during swimming than resting. Post-immersion, following maximum discomfort, in 45 of 65 tests thermal comfort improved although mean skin temperature was still cooling (0.26 [SD 0.19] °C·min(-1) - max was 0.89°C·min(-1)). When thermal comfort was re-established mean skin temperature was lower than at maximal discomfort in 39 of 54 tests (0.81 [SD 0.58] °C - max difference was 2.68°C). The reduction in thermal discomfort in this scenario could be due to the adaptation of thermoreceptors, or to reductions in cooling rates to levels where discomfort was less stimulated. The relief from the recent discomfort may explain why, later, thermal comfort returned to initial levels in spite of poorer thermal profiles. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Gender differences in chewing discomfort in older South Koreans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y-J; Kim, C-B; Ahn, Y-H; Chung, W-G; Kim, N-H

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify gender differences in chewing discomfort among elderly Koreans. This study used data from 56 616 (weighted sample: 5 638 394) subjects aged over 65 years who participated in the 2011 Community Health Survey in Korea. Of them, 23 059 (weighted sample: 2 368 200, 42.0%) were men and 33 357 (weighted sample: 3 270 194, 58.0%) were women. Data were analysed using chi-square tests and hierarchical logistic regression analyses, with SPSS 20.0. Chewing discomfort was set as the dependent variable, and independent variables were divided into socio-economic factors (place of residence, age, education, monthly household income, basic living security stipend, private insurance, economic activity, living arrangements), general health factors (hypertension, diabetes) and oral health factors (tooth defects, denture use, subjective periodontal health status). A greater proportion of women (50.2%) than men (42.6%) exhibited chewing discomfort (P chewing discomfort (P chewing discomfort (P chewing discomfort than their male counterparts. The factors associated with chewing also differ by gender. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Regulation of human heme oxygenase-1 gene expression under thermal stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okinaga, S; Takahashi, K; Takeda, K; Yoshizawa, M; Fujita, H; Sasaki, H; Shibahara, S

    1996-06-15

    Heme oxygenase-1 is an essential enzyme in heme catabolism, and its human gene promoter contains a putative heat shock element (HHO-HSE). This study was designed to analyze the regulation of human heme oxygenase-1 gene expression under thermal stress. The amounts of heme oxygenase-1 protein were not increased by heat shock (incubation at 42 degrees C) in human alveolar macrophages and in a human erythroblastic cell line, YN-1-0-A, whereas heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) was noticeably induced. However, heat shock factor does bind in vitro to HHO-HSE and the synthetic HHO-HSE by itself is sufficient to confer the increase in the transient expression of a reporter gene upon heat shock. The deletion of the sequence, located downstream from HHO-HSE, resulted in the activation of a reporter gene by heat shock. These results suggest that HHO-HSE is potentially functional but is repressed in vivo. Interestingly, heat shock abolished the remarkable increase in the levels of heme oxygenase-1 mRNA in YN-1-0-A cells treated with hemin or cadmium, in which HSP70 mRNA was noticeably induced. Furthermore, transient expression assays showed that heat shock inhibits the cadmium-mediated activation of the heme oxygenase-1 promoter, whereas the HSP70 gene promoter was activated upon heat shock. Such regulation of heme oxygenase-1 under thermal stress may be of physiologic significance in erythroid cells.

  11. Expression analysis of HSP70 in the testis of Octopus tankahkeei under thermal stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Ling-Li; Han, Ying-Li; Sheng, Zhang; Du, Chen; Wang, You-Fa; Zhu, Jun-Quan

    2015-09-01

    The gene encoding heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) was identified in Octopus tankahkeei by homologous cloning and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). The full-length cDNA (2471 bp) consists of a 5'-untranslated region (UTR) (89 bp), a 3'-UTR (426 bp), and an open reading frame (1956 bp) that encodes 651 amino acid residues with a predicted molecular mass of 71.8 kDa and an isoelectric point of 5.34. Based on the amino acid sequence analysis and multiple sequence alignment, this cDNA is a member of cytoplasmic hsp70 subfamily of the hsp70 family and was designated as ot-hsp70. Tissue expression analysis showed that HSP70 expression is highest in the testes when all examined organs were compared. Immunohistochemistry analysis, together with hematoxylin-eosin staining, revealed that the HSP70 protein was expressed in all spermatogenic cells, but not in fibroblasts. In addition, O. tankahkeei were heat challenged by exposure to 32 °C seawater for 2 h, then returned to 13 °C for various recovery time (0-24 h). Relative expression of ot-hsp70 mRNA in the testes was measured at different time points post-challenge by quantitative real-time PCR. A clear time-dependent mRNA expression of ot-hsp70 after thermal stress indicates that the HSP70 gene is inducible. Ultrastructural changes of the heat-stressed testis were observed by transmission electron microscopy. We suggest that HSP70 plays an important role in spermatogenesis and testis protection against thermal stress in O. tankahkeei. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Relationships among Constitution, Stress, and Discomfort in the First Trimester

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiao-Ling Wang

    2012-01-01

    trimester of pregnancy. We adopted a descriptive and correlational research design and collected data from 261 pregnant women during their first trimester in southern Taiwan using structured questionnaires. Results showed that (1 stress was significantly and positively correlated with Yang-Xu, Yin-Xu, and Tan-Shi-Yu-Zhi constitutions, respectively; (2 Yin-Xu and Tan-Shi-Yu-Zhi constitutions had significant correlations with all symptoms of discomfort, while Yang-Xu had significant correlations with all symptoms of discomfort except for “running nose”; (3 Tan-Shi-Yu-Zhi constitution and stress were two indicators for “fatigue”; Tan-Shi-Yu-Zhi was the indicator for “nausea”; Yang-Xu and Yin-Xu were indicators for “frequent urination.” Our findings also indicate that stress level affects constitutional changes and that stress and constitutional change affect the incidence of discomfort. This research can help healthcare professionals observe these discomforts and provide individualized care for pregnant women, to nurture pregnant women into neutral-type constitution, minimize their levels of discomfort, and promote the health of the fetus and the mother.

  13. Evaluation of the intensity and discomfort of perioperative thirst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isadora Pierotti

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To evaluate the intensity and discomfort of perioperative thirst and related factors during anesthesia recovery. Method: This is a quantitative, cross-sectional, descriptive study. Results: Of the 203 participants, 182 (89.6% reported they were thirsty. The mean intensity of thirst was 6.9 measured using a verbal numerical scale of 0 to 10 and discomfort was 7.3 on a scale of 0 to 14. All attributes evaluated by the scale were cited including dry mouth and desire to drink water (87.3%, dry lips (79.1%, thick tongue feeling (43.4%, thick saliva (56.5%, dry throat (75.2% and bad taste in the mouth (63.1%. There was a positive correlation between the intensity of thirst and discomfort assessed by the scale (Spearman coefficient: 0.474; p-value: <0.05. No correlation was found between age, length of fasting and use of opioids with the intensity of thirst and discomfort. Conclusion and implication in the clinical practice: Discomfort arising from the attributes of thirst is evidenced as the intensity of thirst increases.

  14. Comparison of physico-chemical properties of various lignites treated by mechanical thermal expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janine Hulston; Alan L. Chaffee; Christian Bergins; Karl Strauss [Monash University, Vic. (Australia). School of Chemistry and CRC for Clean Power from Lignite

    2005-12-01

    This study investigates how the Mechanical Thermal Expression (MTE) process affects the physico-chemical properties of low rank lignites sourced from Australia, Greece, and Germany. The MTE process was effective in reducing the moisture content of all three coals and resulted in significant Na reductions in both the Australian and German coals. However, the organic composition of the coals investigated remained relatively unaffected. Upon oven drying, all wet MTE products underwent significant shrinkage, the degree of which was dependent upon the temperature and pressure used during the MTE process. Upon rehydration, the oven-dried MTE products underwent significant swelling, which is most likely related to the chemical composition of the coals.

  15. Analytical expression of the thermal stresses in a vessel or pipe with cladding submitted to any thermal transient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marie, Stephane

    2004-01-01

    This article proposes an extension of the known analytical solution for the temperature and stresses in the event of a linear shock in a pipe containing a fluid. The intention is to propose a simple solution for any variation of the temperature in the fluid and to cover the influence of cladding on the inner surface. The approach consists of breaking down the fluid temperature variation into a succession of linear shocks. Using the linear shock resolution approach, it is possible to propose a simple analytical solution, using the same constant (Biot number B, etc.). The proposed solution is compared with finite element analysis: the solution is found to be reliable for any thermal shock or cyclic variation of fluid temperature, and can even replicate the transient regime. The following stage has made it possible to account for the effect of cladding on the inner surface of the piping on temperature distribution. The second part gives analytical expressions for the elastic stresses due to the temperature field alone

  16. Visual Discomfort From Flash Afterimages of Riloid Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hare, Louise

    2017-06-01

    Op-art-based stimuli have been shown to be uncomfortable, possibly due to a combination of fixational eye movements (microsaccades) and excessive cortical responses. Efforts have been made to measure illusory phenomena arising from these stimuli in the absence of microsaccades, but there has been no attempt thus far to decouple the effects of the cortical response from the effect of fixational eye movements. This study uses flash afterimages to stabilise the image on the retina and thus reduce the systematic effect of eye movements, in order to investigate the role of the brain in discomfort from op-art-based stimuli. There was a relationship between spatial frequency and the magnitude of the P300 response, showing a similar pattern to that of discomfort judgements, which suggests that there might be a role of discomfort and excessive neural responses independently from the effects of microsaccades.

  17. Differentially expressed genes associated with adaptation to different thermal environments in three sympatric Cuban Anolis lizards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akashi, Hiroshi D; Cádiz Díaz, Antonio; Shigenobu, Shuji; Makino, Takashi; Kawata, Masakado

    2016-05-01

    How animals achieve evolutionary adaptation to different thermal environments is an important issue for evolutionary biology as well as for biodiversity conservation in the context of recent global warming. In Cuba, three sympatric species of Anolis lizards (Anolis allogus, A. homolechis and A. sagrei) inhabit different thermal microhabitats, thereby providing an excellent opportunity to examine how they have adapted to different environmental temperatures. Here, we performed RNA-seq on the brain, liver and skin tissues from these three species to analyse their transcriptional responses at two different temperatures. In total, we identified 400, 816 and 781 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between the two temperatures in A. allogus, A. homolechis and A. sagrei, respectively. Only 62 of these DEGs were shared across the three species, indicating that global transcriptional responses have diverged among these species. Gene ontology (GO) analysis showed that large numbers of ribosomal protein genes were DEGs in the warm-adapted A. homolechis, suggesting that the upregulation of protein synthesis is an important physiological mechanism in the adaptation of this species to hotter environments. GO analysis also showed that GO terms associated with circadian regulation were enriched in all three species. A gene associated with circadian regulation, Nr1d1, was detected as a DEG with opposite expression patterns between the cool-adapted A. allogus and the hot-adapted A. sagrei. Because the environmental temperature fluctuates more widely in open habitats than in forests throughout the day, the circadian thermoregulation could also be important for adaptation to distinct thermal habitats. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Automatic mechanisms for measuring subjective unit of discomfort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartanto, D.; Kang, N.; Brinkman, W.P.; Kampmann, I.L.; Morina, N.; Emmelkamp, P.M.G.; Neerincx, M.A.

    2012-01-01

    Current practice in Virtual Reality Exposure Therapy (VRET) is that therapists ask patients about their anxiety level by means of the Subjective Unit of Discomfort (SUD) scale. With an aim of developing a home-based VRET system, this measurement ideally should be done using speech technology. In a

  19. The zone of comfort: Predicting visual discomfort with stereo displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Takashi; Kim, Joohwan; Hoffman, David M.; Banks, Martin S.

    2012-01-01

    Recent increased usage of stereo displays has been accompanied by public concern about potential adverse effects associated with prolonged viewing of stereo imagery. There are numerous potential sources of adverse effects, but we focused on how vergence–accommodation conflicts in stereo displays affect visual discomfort and fatigue. In one experiment, we examined the effect of viewing distance on discomfort and fatigue. We found that conflicts of a given dioptric value were slightly less comfortable at far than at near distance. In a second experiment, we examined the effect of the sign of the vergence–accommodation conflict on discomfort and fatigue. We found that negative conflicts (stereo content behind the screen) are less comfortable at far distances and that positive conflicts (content in front of screen) are less comfortable at near distances. In a third experiment, we measured phoria and the zone of clear single binocular vision, which are clinical measurements commonly associated with correcting refractive error. Those measurements predicted susceptibility to discomfort in the first two experiments. We discuss the relevance of these findings for a wide variety of situations including the viewing of mobile devices, desktop displays, television, and cinema. PMID:21778252

  20. Energy requirements and perceived body discomfort of the various ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The main aim of this preliminary study was to assess the energy cost of the various sub tasks required of workers during manual sugar cane harvesting. A secondary aim was to assess body mass changes, levels of dehydration and body discomfort. Eight workers were randomly selected to participate in this pilot study and ...

  1. PERCEIVED DISCOMFORT LEVELS IN HEALTHY CHILDREN PARTICIPATING IN VACCINE RESEARCH

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westra, Anna E.; van Gils, Elske J. M.; Aarts, Fenne; Rodenburg, Gerwin D.; Veenhoven, Reinier H.; Hak, Eelko; Scharloo, Margreet; Sukhai, Ram N.; Wit, Jan M.; de Beaufort, Inez; Sanders, Elisabeth (Lieke) A. M.

    WHEN ASSESSING THE RISKS OF A research protocol, review boards need to consider not only the possible harms but also the expected discomfort levels caused by the various study procedures. However, data on how children experience various study procedures are scarce. This study assessed perceived

  2. HAND OSTEOARTHROSIS: ON THE QUALITY OF LIFE AND AESTHETIC DISCOMFORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia Viktorovna Sarapulova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthrosis (OA is one of the most common causes of hand pains, leading to lower quality of life (QL. In addition to pain and functional impairment, the patients' aesthetic dissatisfaction that cannot be now determined or measuredis of prime importanceObjective: to assess a number of QL aspects and to measure the level of aesthetic discomfort in patients with hand OA.Subjects and methods. Sixty women aged 45–75 years with hand OA were included. The number of painful and deformed joints was determined and functional impairments were evaluated using the AUSCAN questionnaire. The patients filled out the questionnaire to determine the level of dissatisfaction with the appearance of their hands; the Ellis stress test for irrational beliefs was carried out.Results. The patients with hand OA were found to have significant aesthetic discomfort comparable with level of joint pain. Deformity phobia in the future and external discomfort because of hand deformity were most pronounced; a wish for surgical correction was less pronounced. Comparison of the results obtained in different age groups determined the highest levels of anxiety and wish for surgical correction in younger women. The patients' aesthetic dissatisfaction was also influenced by employment and internet usage.Conclusion. Aesthetic discomfort is an important component of lower QL in patients with hand OA. Further investigation of this factor and elaboration of criteria for its estimation are needed.

  3. Biopsychosocial Assessment of Pain with Thermal Imaging of Emotional Facial Expression in Breast Cancer Survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Alberto Rodríguez Medina

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recent research has evaluated psychological and biological characteristics associated with pain in survivors of breast cancer (BC. Few studies consider their relationship with inflammatory activity. Voluntary facial expressions modify the autonomic activity and this may be useful in the hospital environment for clinical biopsychosocial assessment of pain. Methods: This research compared a BC survivors group under integral treatment (Oncology, Psychology, Nutrition with a control group to assess the intensity of pain, behavioral interference, anxiety, depression, temperament-expression, anger control, social isolation, emotional regulation, and alexithymia and inflammatory activity, with salivary interleukin 6 (IL-6. Then, a psychophysiological evaluation through repeated measures of facial infrared thermal imaging (IRT and hands in baseline—positive facial expression (joy—negative facial expression (pain—relaxation (diaphragmatic breathing. Results: The results showed changes in the IRT (p < 0.05 during the execution of facial expressions in the chin, perinasal, periorbital, frontal, nose, and fingers areas in both groups. No differences were found in the IL-6 level among the aforementioned groups, but an association with baseline nasal temperature (p < 0.001 was observable. The BC group had higher alexithymia score (p < 0.01 but lower social isolation (p < 0.05, in comparison to the control group. Conclusions: In the low- and medium-concentration groups of IL-6, the psychophysiological intervention proposed in this study has a greater effect than on the high concentration group of IL-6. This will be considered in the design of psychological and psychosocial interventions for the treatment of pain.

  4. [Relationship between Occlusal Discomfort Syndrome and Occlusal Threshold].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munakata, Motohiro; Ono, Yumie; Hayama, Rika; Kataoka, Kanako; Ikuta, Ryuhei; Tamaki, Katsushi

    2016-03-01

    Occlusal dysesthesia has been defined as persistent uncomfortable feelings of intercuspal position continuing for more than 6 months without evidence of physical occlusal discrepancy. The problem often occurs after occlusal intervention by dental care. Although various dental treatments (e. g. occlusal adjustment, orthodontic treatment and prosthetic reconstruction) are attempted to solve occlusal dysesthesia, they rarely reach a satisfactory result, neither for patients nor dentists. In Japan, these symptoms are defined by the term "Occlusal discomfort syndrome" (ODS). The aim of this study was to investigate the characteristics of ODS with the simple occlusal sensory perceptive and discriminative test. Twenty-one female dental patients with ODS (mean age 55.8 ± 19.2 years) and 21 age- and gender-matched dental patients without ODS (mean age 53.1 ± 16.8 years) participated in the study. Upon grinding occlusal registration foils that were stacked to different thicknesses, participants reported the thicknesses at which they recognized the foils (recognition threshold) and felt discomfort (discomfort threshold). Although there was no significant difference in occlusal recognition thresholds between the two patient groups, the discomfort threshold was significantly smaller in the patients with ODS than in those without ODS. Moreover, the recognition threshold showed an age-dependent increase in patients without ODS, whereas it remained comparable between the younger (patient subgroups with ODS. These results suggest that occlusal discomfort threshold rather than recognition threshold is an issue in ODS. The foil grinding procedure is a simple and useful method to evaluate occlusal perceptive and discriminative abilities in patients with ODS.

  5. Transcriptome analysis and identification of significantly differentially expressed genes in Holstein calves subjected to severe thermal stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srikanth, Krishnamoorthy; Lee, Eunjin; Kwan, Anam; Lim, Youngjo; Lee, Junyep; Jang, Gulwon; Chung, Hoyoung

    2017-11-01

    RNA-Seq analysis was used to characterize transcriptome response of Holstein calves to thermal stress. A total of eight animals aged between 2 and 3 months were randomly selected and subjected to thermal stress corresponding to a temperature humidity index of 95 in an environmentally controlled house for 12 h consecutively for 3 days. A set of 15,787 unigenes were found to be expressed and after a threshold of threefold change, and a Q value physiological and metabolic processes to survive. Many of the genes identified in this study have not been previously reported to be involved in thermal stress response. The results of this study extend our understanding of the animal's response to thermal stress and some of the identified genes may prove useful in the efforts to breed Holstein cattle with superior thermotolerance, which might help in minimizing production loss due to thermal stress.

  6. Sedation as an alternative method to lessen patient discomfort due to transrectal ultrasonography-guided prostate biopsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turgut, A.T.; Ergun, E.; Kosar, U.; Kosar, P.; Ozcan, A.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Despite being highly efficient for the relief of patient discomfort due to transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guided prostate biopsy, periprostatic anesthesia is occasionally reported to be of limited use. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of conscious sedation, an accepted method for lessening patient discomfort due to interventional radiological procedures and compare it with periprostatic anesthesia. Methods: 93 candidates for biopsy were randomised to three groups: group 1 (n = 31) received intravenous midazolam, group 2 (n = 31) received periprostatic lidocaine injection, whereas group 3 (n = 31) received no anesthetic before the procedure. After the biopsy patients were asked to express discomfort by visual anologue scale (VAS). Results: The mean scores for groups 1 and 2 were significantly lower than that of group 3 (1.4 ± 1.1 and 2.0 ± 1.5 versus 4.7 ± 1.6, respectively; p < 0.05 for both). For patients with VAS scores exceeding 4 (moderate to severe discomfort), a significant difference was calculated between groups 1 and 2 (3% versus 29%, p < 0.05) and between each and group 3 (3% and 29% versus 80%, respectively; p < 0.05 for each). Conclusions: Sedation is an alternative for increasing patient comfort during TRUS-guided prostate biopsy, especially in clinical situations like patient anxiety, young age, repeat biopsies or inflammatory anal diseases

  7. An evaluation of musculoskeletal discomfort experience by radiographers performing mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gale, A.G.; May, J.

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish whether breast screening radiographers experience any problems of musculoskeletal discomfort, and if so the nature and extent of these problems. The study was then further extended to investigate and determine possible occupational, causal or contributory factors, and to suggest recommendations to help alleviate any discomfort. To investigate this problem five main approaches were undertaken. These consisted of; a national survey, an observational study, the comparison of the physical measurements of the mammography units with anthropometric data, a detailed task analysis, and a body mapping study. The national survey set out to determine if the nature and frequency of such problems were higher in mammography than in other areas of radiography or in the general population. Additionally, comparisons were made with non-radiographic staff working at the same breast screening centres. Video recordings of radiographers performing breast screening were also made and posture analysis performed on these data. A detailed task analysis was conducted to identify interaction points and possible problems between the radiographer and the equipment which she is required to use. Physical measurements of the mammography units were made and compared with anthropometric measurements and guidelines. The body mapping study measured the build up of discomfort throughout the working day on several different mammography units. The results from the survey questionnaire indicated that some breast screening radiographers do experience musculoskeletal problems, and that these are different in nature and prevalence from the musculoskeletal discomfort reported by the two control groups. The prevalence of back pain reported by radiographers undertaking mammography was higher than that present in the normal population. No comparison could be made with other body areas as data regarding other types of musculoskeletal discomfort in the general population are

  8. VIRTIS on Venus Express thermal emission spectra near 1μm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Nils; Tsang, Constantine; Helbert, Joern; Smrekar, Suzanne; Piccioni, Giuseppe; Drossart, Pierre

    2016-10-01

    Thermal emission from the surface of Venus is observable through narrow spectral windows close to 1μm. Surface temperature is strongly constrained by surface elevation, due to the thick and dense atmosphere. The data from Visible and InfraRed Thermal Imaging Spectrometer VIRTIS on Venus Express together with altimetry constrain surface emissivity. In VIRTIS observations at 1.02μm, strongly deformed highland plateaus (tesserae) appear to have a lower emissivity consistent with continental crust, an interpretation that implies existence of an early ocean. Comparison between the Magellan stereo digital elevation model (DEM) and altimetry shows that the altimetry height error in rough tesserae greatly exceeds the formal error. In the one tesserae outlier covered by altimetry, DEM, and VIRTIS, the height error could account for the observed emissivity variation. The radiances observed at 1.10 and 1.18μm have a different response to topography, mostly due to spectrally varying absorption in the overlying atmospheric column. Thus if the tesserae have the same emissivity as volcanic plains, its spectrum should be the same as that of plains of the correct surface elevation. In order to investigate this statistically, we create a database of all long exposure duration VIRTIS spectra in the range of 1 - 1.4μm. The spectra are corrected for the ubiquitous straylight from the dayside, based on analysis of spectra showing deep space. Because the 1.10 and 1.18μm peaks are narrow compared to the variation of instrument spectral registration, we fit each spectrum with a synthetic spectrum from an atmospheric radiative transfer model, using wavelength offset and bandwidths as parameters in addition to atmospheric variables. This dataset of ~28 million thermal emission spectra spans a wide range of southern latitudes and night local times, and thus may be useful for studies beyond the question of surface emissivity. A portion of this research was conducted at the Jet Propulsion

  9. An evaluation of musculoskeletal discomfort experience by radiographers performing mammography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gale, A.G.; May, J

    1997-10-01

    The aim of this study was to establish whether breast screening radiographers experience any problems of musculoskeletal discomfort, and if so the nature and extent of these problems. The study was then further extended to investigate and determine possible occupational, causal or contributory factors, and to suggest recommendations to help alleviate any discomfort. To investigate this problem five main approaches were undertaken. These consisted of; a national survey, an observational study, the comparison of the physical measurements of the mammography units with anthropometric data, a detailed task analysis, and a body mapping study. The national survey set out to determine if the nature and frequency of such problems were higher in mammography than in other areas of radiography or in the general population. Additionally, comparisons were made with non-radiographic staff working at the same breast screening centres. Video recordings of radiographers performing breast screening were also made and posture analysis performed on these data. A detailed task analysis was conducted to identify interaction points and possible problems between the radiographer and the equipment which she is required to use. Physical measurements of the mammography units were made and compared with anthropometric measurements and guidelines. The body mapping study measured the build up of discomfort throughout the working day on several different mammography units. The results from the survey questionnaire indicated that some breast screening radiographers do experience musculoskeletal problems, and that these are different in nature and prevalence from the musculoskeletal discomfort reported by the two control groups. The prevalence of back pain reported by radiographers undertaking mammography was higher than that present in the normal population. No comparison could be made with other body areas as data regarding other types of musculoskeletal discomfort in the general population are

  10. Discomforting Narratives: Teaching Eighteenth-Century Women’s Travelogues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Zold

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In this essay, I describe an undergraduate course I designed and taught on eighteenth-century women’s travelogues and advocate for more courses that explicitly focus on noncanonical genres and authors. Using student papers, I explore how students worked through their discomfort with new genre conventions and improved their overall reading and analytical skills. I hope that my outline of the course will be useful to those who teach or will be teaching women's travel literature or who wish to focus courses on noncanonical authors and genres.

  11. Oral carbohydrate supplementation reduces preoperative discomfort in laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz, Huseyin; Gunal, Solmaz Eruyar; Yilmaz, Gulsen; Yucel, Safak

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of oral carbohydrate solution (CHO) on perioperative discomfort, biochemistry, hemodynamics, and patient satisfaction in elective surgery patients under general anesthesia. Sixty cases in ASA I-II group who were planned to have operation under general anesthesia were included in the study. The cases were randomly divided into two groups having 30 subjects in each. The patients in the study group were given CHO in the evening prior to the surgery and 2-3 hr before the anesthesia while routine fasting was applied in the control group. In the study group; 2-3 hr before the surgery; malaise, thirst, hunger, and weakness; just before the surgery malaise, thirst, hunger, and fatigue; 2 hr after the operation thirst, hunger, weakness, and concentration difficulty; 24 hr after the operation malaise and weakness were found significantly lower. Fasting blood glucose (FBG) level was found to be higher in the control group at the 90th min of the operation. Gastric volumes were higher in the control group; gastric pH values were found significantly higher in the study group. The level of anxiety and depression risk rate were found lower in the study group. In conclusion, preoperative CHO reduces perioperative discomfort and improves perioperative well being when compared to overnight fasting.

  12. Contact Lens-Induced Discomfort and Protein Changes in Tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoudi, Simin; Stapleton, Fiona Jane; Willcox, Mark Duncan Perry

    2016-08-01

    Ocular discomfort is among the main causes of contact lens wear discontinuation. This study investigated the association between subjective ocular comfort ratings and diurnal changes in tear protein concentrations with and without contact lens wear. The study was a prospective, open-label, single-group two-staged investigation. Basal tears were collected from 30 experienced contact lens wearers twice a day (morning and evening) using a noninvasive method without lens wear (stage 1) and during wear of Etafilcon A contact lenses (stage 2) for 7 to 10 days. Subjects rated their ocular comfort on a scale of 1 to 100 (with 100 as extremely comfortable) at each time of tear collection. Tears were analyzed using liquid quadrupole mass spectrometry in conjunction with selected reaction monitoring (SRM) method. End-of-day comfort was reduced when wearing lenses (87.8 ± 14.3 AM vs. 79.2 ± 16.6 PM) compared to no lens wear (88.3 ± 12.6 AM vs. 84.7 ± 13.3 PM) (AM vs. PM, p tears (p < 0.05, r = -0.29). Only the absolute concentration of prolactin-induced protein correlated with subjective comfort ratings. Taking into consideration that prolactin-induced protein can be associated with disruption in water transport in lacrimal glands, our findings may indicate that changes to aqueous secretion are associated with contact lens discomfort.

  13. Ocular discomfort responses after short periods of contact lens wear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papas, Eric; Tilia, Daniel; McNally, John; de la Jara, Percy Lazon

    2015-06-01

    To investigate if contact lens-related discomfort is a function of the time of day at which lenses are worn. This was a randomized, crossover, open-label clinical trial where subjective responses, with and without contact lenses, were assessed every 2 hours during five stages (A to E). Each stage began at the time when subjects would normally have inserted their contact lenses (T0). During stage A, no lenses were worn, whereas in stage B, lenses were worn continuously for 12 hours. In stages C to E, lenses were worn for only 4 hours. Contact lenses were inserted at T0 for stage C, but for stages D and E, lenses were not inserted until T0 + 4 and T0 + 8 hours, respectively. Mixed linear models were used for statistical analysis. In the absence of contact lenses, ocular comfort and dryness remained reasonably constant throughout the observation period. Ocular comfort and dryness decreased during 12 hours of continuous lens wear and became significantly worse from the 8-hour time onward compared with insertion (p 0.05) to the first 4 hours of continuous contact lens wear. Comparing the scores of each of these stages with the no-lens response at the corresponding time showed no significant differences for comfort (p > 0.23) or dryness (p > 0.37). Short periods of wear can be experienced at any time of day without significant change in ocular discomfort and dryness. This suggests that subjective responses at the end of the day are determined by the length of time lenses are in contact with the eye, rather than the time of day at which lenses are worn.

  14. Conserved effects of salinity acclimation on thermal tolerance and hsp70 expression in divergent populations of threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, David C H; Healy, Timothy M; Schulte, Patricia M

    2016-10-01

    In natural environments, organisms must cope with complex combinations of abiotic stressors. Here, we use threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) to examine how changes in salinity affect tolerance of high temperatures. Threespine stickleback inhabit a range of environments that vary in both salinity and thermal stability making this species an excellent system for investigating interacting stressors. We examined the effects of environmental salinity on maximum thermal tolerance (CTMax) and 70 kDa heat shock protein (hsp70) gene expression using divergent stickleback ecotypes from marine and freshwater habitats. In both ecotypes, the CTMax of fish acclimated to 20 ppt was significantly higher compared to fish acclimated to 2 ppt. The effect of salinity acclimation on the expression of hsp70-1 and hsp70-2 was similar in both the marine and freshwater stickleback ecotype. There were differences in the expression profiles of hsp70-1 and hsp70-2 during heat shock, with hsp70-2 being induced earlier and to a higher level compared to hsp70-1. These data suggest that the two hsp70 isoforms may have functionally different roles in the heat shock response. Lastly, acute salinity challenge coupled with heat shock revealed that the osmoregulatory demands experienced during the heat shock response have a larger effect on the hsp70 expression profile than does the acclimation salinity.

  15. Why do children think they get discomfort related to daily activities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Jemma; Straker, Leon; Ciccarelli, Marina

    2009-01-01

    Children commonly report musculoskeletal discomfort related to different activities such as computer use, playing electronic games, watching TV, reading, and performing physical and hand intensive activities. Discomfort can result in disability and is a strong predictor of future discomfort in adulthood. Adult beliefs regarding discomfort can affect the level of disability and are modifiable. Children's beliefs regarding discomfort could potentially be modified to minimise disability related to musculoskeletal disorders. The aim of this study was to describe children's beliefs about why they experience musculoskeletal discomfort, both in general and related to specific activities. Eighty eight school children completed questionnaires on frequency and usual duration of nine activities, whether they had felt discomfort and what they believed was the cause of any discomfort in relation to those activities. The most common activity was TV watching, and most activities were performed for 1 hour or shorter. Bad posture and doing too much of a certain activity were the most common beliefs regarding reasons for discomfort. This study shows that children are developing beliefs that tend to reflect scientific knowledge about risk factors. These beliefs could be incorporated into preventative health interventions.

  16. Associations between exposure to information and communication technology (ICT) and reported discomfort among adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Kristy; Ciccarelli, Marina; Falkmer, Torbjorn; Parsons, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Use of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) are common among adolescents in their daily activities.Exposure to ICT has been associated with discomfort and musculoskeletal disorders in adults, with growing concern about the potential risks to children and adolescents' physical health. The objectives of this study were to (i) quantify self-reported discomfort and exposure to ICT among adolescents; and (ii) determine if associations exist between discomfort and levels of exposure. The participant group comprised 33 Australian adolescents aged 12-15 years. The study used self-reports by participants for a one week period. Intensity and location of discomfort was reported via a written discomfort log. ICT exposure and physical activity were reported through an electronic time-use diary. The most common ICT types reported by participants were television, mobile phones and desktop and laptop computers. Discomfort was reported by 86% of participants. The most frequently reported areas were the legs, head/neck, back and shoulders. There was no statistical association found between ICT exposure and discomfort. The majority of participants exceeded the recommended 60 minutes per day of moderate to vigorous physical activity. High exposure to ICT and high prevalence of low level discomfort was reported by the participants. Participating in regular physical activity may have some protective effect against ICT-related discomfort.

  17. Consequences of wear interruption for discomfort with contact lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papas, Eric B; Tilia, Daniel; Tomlinson, Daniel; Williams, Josh; Chan, Eddy; Chan, Jason; Golebiowski, Blanka

    2014-01-01

    To establish whether increased end-of-day discomfort during soft contact lens wear is associated with short-term changes occurring to the lens itself. Twenty-seven subjects wore hydrogel lenses (Focus Dailies; Alcon) bilaterally for 10 hours on two separate days. Comfort was reported using 1-100 numerical rating scales (1 = intolerable discomfort, 100 = lens cannot be felt). Day 1 ratings were taken before lens insertion and at 0.05, 5, and 10 hours post-insertion. Day 2 ratings occurred at similar times, but lenses were removed after the 5-hour assessment and either reinserted (n = 14) or newly replaced (n = 12). An additional rating was taken 5 minutes after re-insertion. Wear then continued to the 10-hour point. In a separate study, 24 different subjects repeated these procedures using a silicone hydrogel lens (AirOptix Aqua; Alcon) with wear taking place on 3 days to permit lens replacement to be with existing as well as new lenses in all subjects. For hydrogel lenses, comfort scores (mean ± 95% CI) reported after 10 hours were 79.4 ± 8.3 when lenses were worn un-replaced, compared with 73.2 ± 9.2 for replacement with the existing lens. When replacement was with a brand new lens, the corresponding values were 72.9 ± 10.9 (un-replaced) versus 69.2 ± 12.8 (new lens replacement). For silicone hydrogel lenses, 10-hour comfort was 90.3 ± 3.2 (un-replaced) versus 92.2 ± 2.9 (replacement with existing lens) versus 90.0 ± 3.3 (replacement with new lens). Differences between replacement conditions were not significant in any case (analysis of variance, p > 0.05). Final comfort was not influenced by replacing lenses midway through the wearing period. Comfort decrements experienced by users of these daily contact lenses towards the later part of the wearing period are not caused by changes occurring to the lenses on this time scale. Possible alternative etiological factors include a fatigue-like response in one or more ocular tissues or stimulation of ocular

  18. Developing and validating the Perioperative Thirst Discomfort Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Pamela Rafaela; Fonseca, Lígia Fahl; Rossetto, Edilaine Giovanini

    2017-07-20

    Developing and validating a scale to assess perioperative thirst discomfort. A methodological research conducted in 2014 and 2015 at the surgical center of a public hospital in the north of Paraná, Brazil. The scale was developed after literature review, followed by face and content validation, and reliability assessment through its internal consistency and inter-observer equivalence. Seven items make up the scale: dry mouth; dry lips; thick tongue; thick saliva; dry throat, bad taste and desire to drink water. The content validity index for attributes and items was 0.98, and the reliability index was 1 for the scale attributes and items. Internal consistency assessed by Cronbach's alpha was 0.91 and inter-rater equivalence was 1, as measured by weighted kappa coefficient. ThePerioperative Thirst Discomfort Scaleshowed high content and reliability indexes. Elaborar e validar uma escala para avaliação do desconforto da sede perioperatória. Pesquisa metodológica realizada em 2014 e 2015, no centro cirúrgico de um hospital público do norte do Paraná. A escala foi elaborada após revisão bibliográfica, seguida de validação aparente e de conteúdo e avaliação da fidedignidade através de sua consistência interna e da equivalência inter observadores. Sete itens compuseram a escala: boca seca; lábios ressecados; língua grossa; saliva grossa; garganta seca; gosto ruim e vontade de beber água. O índice de validade de conteúdo para atributos e itens foi de 0,98, e o índice de fidedignidade foi de 1 para os atributos e itens da escala. A consistência interna avaliada pelo alfa de Cronbach foi de 0,91, e a equivalência interobservadores foi de 1, medida pelo coeficiente de kappa ponderado. A escala de desconforto da sede perioperatóriademonstrou altos índices de validade de conteúdo e fidedignidade.

  19. University Physics Students' Ideas of Thermal Radiation Expressed in Open Laboratory Activities Using Infrared Cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haglund, Jesper; Melander, Emil; Weiszflog, Matthias; Andersson, Staffan

    2017-01-01

    Background: University physics students were engaged in open-ended thermodynamics laboratory activities with a focus on understanding a chosen phenomenon or the principle of laboratory apparatus, such as thermal radiation and a heat pump. Students had access to handheld infrared (IR) cameras for their investigations. Purpose: The purpose of the…

  20. Cytokine changes in tears and relationship to contact lens discomfort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willcox, Mark D P; Zhao, Zhenjun; Naduvilath, Thomas; Lazon de la Jara, Percy

    2015-01-01

    To determine the reproducibility of a multiplex bead assay for measuring cytokines in tears and correlations between ocular discomfort with or without contact lens wear and the concentration of cytokines in tears. Ninety participants (divided into two groups) were enrolled in this prospective study. They were asked to rate their ocular comfort and collect their tears in the morning and just before sleep for 10 days with or without contact lenses. The participants collected their tears using a glass microcapillary tube for both stages. Galyfilcon A lenses were worn on a daily disposable basis during the contact lens stage, and comfort scores and tears were collected before lens insertion and prior to lens removal at the end of the day. Tears were analyzed for cytokine concentrations using a 27-plex multibead assay. Correlations were sought between cytokine concentrations and comfort. There was a significant (p-0.5 Log pg/ml, p-0.2 Log pg/ml, ptears was correlated to ocular comfort, but this was not changed by contact lens wear. Ocular comfort during the day is magnified by contact lens wear. However, the increase in the change in comfort during lens wear was not associated with changes in 15 cytokines in the tear film.

  1. Reduction of discomfort in pushing an industrial trolley using ergonomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, M. Wilson; Vijay, S. J.; Vasudev, K. L.; Darius Gnanaraj, S.

    2017-11-01

    Poor design of industrial trolleys lead to more compressive stress on the low back of industrial workers. The research work reported in this paper recommends a handle height of an industrial trolley for use by the local population, which reduces the compressive stress on the low back. Experiments were conducted in a laboratory on five subjects of varying stature 165, 173, 174, 175 and 182 cm, with five different handle heights 90, 95, 100, 105 and 110 cm. A four wheeled trolley has been used to conduct the experiments. Caster wheels diameters of 100, 125 and 150 mm made of polyurethane were used. It is found that a handle height of 110 cm allows the users to exert minimum force during the initial pushing. A biomechanical model was employed to calculate the compressive force experienced by L5/S1 disc and it is found that the compressive load will be the least when the handle height is 110 cm. Optimization of handle height using Genetic Algorithm approach, Heart rate analysis and EMG analysis confirm that a handle height of 110 cm and a wheel diameter of 150 mm will reduce the discomfort of industry workers pushing trolleys.

  2. The self-reported seat discomfort survey on economy class aircraft passenger in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, C.F.; Chen, W.; Rauterberg, G.W.M.; Said, M.R.

    2013-01-01

    The economy class aircraft passengers who experience long hour sitting during air travel has experienced significant body discomfort at neck, shoulder, lower back, upper leg and lower leg. The questionnaire was set out to study the relationship between different body back part discomfort and travel

  3. Inviting Discomfort: Foregrounding Emotional Labour in Teaching Anthropology in Post-Apartheid South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, Helen Mary

    2013-01-01

    This article examines the potential and limitations of Megan Boler's "pedagogy of discomfort" in a post-apartheid yet heavily racialised South Africa. Taking an 'ethnographic sensibility' to anthropological teaching, this paper sketches the social and historical context of discomfort produced by everyday classroom practices at a…

  4. Prediction of musculoskeletal discomfort in a pick and place tast : a pilot

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruizinga, C.P.; Delleman, N.J.; Schellekens, J.M.H.

    1998-01-01

    A pilot study was conducted regarding the effects of working posture, handling frequency, and task duration on musculoskeletal discomfort. Participants rated their discomfort perceived while perform-ing a repetitive task at 8 different combinations of manipulations. Pauses between the work periods

  5. Exceptional thermal stability and organic solvent tolerance of an esterase expressed from a thermophilic host

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mei, Yuxia; Peng, Nan; Zhao, Shumiao

    2012-01-01

    , giving SisEstA. Upon Escherichia coli expression, only the thioredoxin-tagged EstA recombinant protein was soluble. The fusion protein was then purified, and removing the protein tag yielded EcSisEstA. Both forms of the thermophilic EstA enzyme were characterized. We found that SisEstA formed dimer...... that of EcSisEstA at 90°C. This indicated that thermophilic enzymes yielded from homologous expression should be better biocatalysts than those obtained from mesophilic expression.......A protein expression system recently developed for the thermophilic crenarchaeon Sulfolobus islandicus was employed to produce recombinant protein for EstA, a thermophilic esterase encoded in the same organism. Large amounts of protein were readily obtained by an affinity protein purification...

  6. Protein expression parallels thermal tolerance and ecologic changes in the diversification of a diving beetle species complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo-Galiana, A; Monge, M; Biron, D G; Canals, F; Ribera, I; Cieslak, A

    2016-01-01

    Physiological changes associated with evolutionary and ecological processes such as diversification, range expansion or speciation are still incompletely understood, especially for non-model species. Here we study differences in protein expression in response to temperature in a western Mediterranean diving beetle species complex, using two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis with one Moroccan and one Iberian population each of Agabus ramblae and Agabus brunneus. We identified proteins with significant expression differences after thermal treatments comparing them with a reference EST library generated from one of the species of the complex (A. ramblae). The colonisation during the Middle Pleistocene of the Iberian peninsula by A. ramblae, where maximum temperatures and seasonality are lower than in the ancestral north African range, was associated with changes in the response to 27 °C in proteins related to energy metabolism. The subsequent speciation of A. brunneus from within populations of Iberian A. ramblae was associated with changes in the expression of several stress-related proteins (mostly chaperons) when exposed to 4 °C. These changes are in agreement with the known tolerance to lower temperatures of A. brunneus, which occupies a larger geographical area with a wider range of climatic conditions. In both cases, protein expression changes paralleled the evolution of thermal tolerance and the climatic conditions experienced by the species. However, although the colonisation of the Iberian peninsula did not result in morphological change, the speciation process of A. brunneus within Iberia involved genetic isolation and substantial differences in male genitalia and body size and shape.

  7. Computer use in school: its effect on posture and discomfort in schoolchildren.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelly, Grace

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the posture and musculoskeletal discomfort of secondary school students while working at computers in school. Students (n = 40) were observed while working at a computer during their designated computer class. The Rapid Upper Limb Assessment Tool (RULA) was used to assess posture. A Body Discomfort Chart (BDC) and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) were used to record the area(s) and intensity of musculoskeletal discomfort, if any, experienced by the students at the beginning and end of the computer class. None of the students\\' posture was in the acceptable range (Action Level 1) according to RULA. The majority (65%) were in Action Level 2, 30% were in Action Level 3, and 5% were in Action Level 4. There was a statistically significant increase in reported discomfort from the beginning to the end of the computer class. Longer class length (80 minutes) did not result in greater reporting of discomfort than shorter class length (40 minutes).

  8. Thermal expression of intersubjectivity offers new possibilities to human-machine and technologically mediated interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arcangelo eMerla

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The evaluation of the psychophysiological state of the interlocutor is an important element of interpersonal relationships and communication. Thermal infrared imaging has proved to be a reliable tool for non-invasive and contact-less evaluation of vital signs, psychophysiological responses and emotional states. This technique is quickly spreading in many fields, from psychometrics to social and developmental psychology; and from the touch-less monitoring of vital signs and stress, up to the human-machine interaction. In particular, thermal IR imaging promises to be of use for gathering information about affective states in social situations. This paper presents the state of the art of thermal infrared imaging in psychophysiology and in the assessment of affective states. The goal is to provide insights about its potentialities and limits for its use in human-artificial agent interaction in order to contribute to a major issue in the field: the perception by an artificial agent of human psychophysiological and affective states.

  9. Torque, Current, and Discomfort During 3 Types of Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation of Tibialis Anterior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiest, Matheus J; Bergquist, Austin J; Collins, David F

    2017-08-01

    The benefits of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) for rehabilitation depend on the capacity to generate functionally relevant torque with minimal fatigability and discomfort. Traditionally, NMES is delivered either over a muscle belly (mNMES) or a nerve trunk (nNMES). Recently, a technique that minimizes contraction fatigability by alternating pulses between the mNMES and nNMES sites, termed "interleaved" NMES (iNMES), was developed. However, discomfort and the ability to generate large torque during iNMES have not been explored adequately. The study objective was to compare discomfort and maximal torque between mNMES, nNMES, and iNMES. Stimulation trains (12 pulses at 40 Hz) were delivered to produce dorsiflexion torque using mNMES, nNMES, and iNMES. Discomfort was assessed using a visual analogue scale for contractions that generated 5-30% of a maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC), and for the maximal tolerable torque. Discomfort scores were not different between NMES types when torque was ≤20% MVIC. At 30% MVIC, mNMES produced more discomfort than nNMES and iNMES. nNMES produced the most torque (65% MVIC), followed by iNMES (49% MVIC) and mNMES (33% MVIC); in these trials, mNMES produced more discomfort than nNMES, but not iNMES. The present results may be limited to individuals with no history of neuromusculoskeletal impairment. In terms of discomfort, there were no differences between mNMES, nNMES, or iNMES for contractions between 5-20% MVIC. However, mNMES produced more discomfort than nNMES and iNMES for contractions of 30% MVIC, while for larger contractions, mNMES only produced more discomfort than nNMES. The advantages and disadvantages of each NMES type should be considered prior to implementation in rehabilitation programs. © 2017 American Physical Therapy Association

  10. Investigating hsp Gene Expression in Liver of Channa striatus under Heat Stress for Understanding the Upper Thermal Acclimation

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    Gopal Krishna Purohit

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Changes in hsp gene expression profiles in murrel Channa striatus experimentally exposed to temperature stress (36°C for 4, 15, and 30 days were investigated; fish collected from aquaculture ponds and maintained in laboratory at the pond temperature (25 ± 1°C served as control. Channa collected from a hot spring runoff (36°C was included in the study to examine the hsp profiles beyond 30 days of exposure. Gene expression analyses of a battery of hsps in liver tissues were carried out by quantitative RT-PCR and protein expressions were analyzed by immunoblotting. hsps could be grouped into three clusters based on similarity in response to heat stress: hsp70, hsp78, and hsp60, whose transcript level continued to increase with duration of exposure; hsp90 and hsp110 that increased to a much higher level and then decreased; hsp27 and hsp47 that did not significantly vary as compared to control. The results suggest that Hsp70, Hsp78, and Hsp60 are involved in thermal acclimation and long term survival at high temperature. Fish living in the hot spring runoff appears to continuously express hsps that can be approximated by long term induction of hsps in farmed fish if temperature of their environment is raised to 36°C.

  11. Survey of discomfort glare from the headlamps of cars widely used in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehri, Ahmad; Farhang Dehghan, Somayeh; Hajizadeh, Roohalah; Zakerian, Seyed Abolfazl; Mohammadi, Hamzeh; Abbasi, Milad

    2017-10-03

    On 2-lane roads, discomfort glare can cause annoyance, discomfort, inconvenience, stress, and fatigue to drivers, posing a risk of accidents. The aim of this study is to evaluate discomfort glare from the headlamps of cars widely used in Iran. The discomfort glare of new vehicles including Pride Saba model GTX, Pride Model 131SL, Samand Soren, Peugeot 405, Megane, and Peugeot Pars was examined at distances of 5 to 100 m at a background luminance of 50 cd/m 2 (late twilight/early dawn lighting) and 1 cd/m 2 (nighttime) using Schmidt-Clausen and Bindels model and de Boer's subjective scale. According to the de Boer scale, at a background luminance of 50 cd/m 2 , the discomfort glare for all studied vehicles was between 1.98 and 4.05 in high-beam mode and between 3.5 and 5.4 in low-beam mode. At a background luminance of 1 cd/m 2 , discomfort glare was between 0.41 and 2.48 in high-beam mode and between 1.93 and 3.84 in low-beam mode. In high-beam mode, the average levels of discomfort glare of these vehicles gradually increased when the distance between cars was reduced by up to about 20 m. In low-beam mode, there was no discomfort glare up to a vehicle distance of 40 m. In addition, at an angle of 1.15°-5.73° between the line of sight and light of vehicles in high-beam mode, the level of discomfort glare was increased, but at an angle of 5.73°-22.9° the level of discomfort glare was reduced. In low-beam mode at an angle of 2.86°-22.9°, the level of discomfort glare was almost identical. The results show that in high-beam mode and with a 100-m distance between vehicles as well as in low-beam mode at intervals of less than 40 m between cars, discomfort glare is created. It can be concluded that by providing solutions such as installing road lighting system, an increase in luminance of roads, separating or widening road lanes, increasing the lateral distance between vehicles, and increasing the angle between lighted vehicles and drivers can noticeably

  12. Effect of thermal stress on HSP90 expression of Bali cattle in Barru district, South Sulawesi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aritonang, S. B.; Yuniati, R.; Abinawanto, Imron, M.; Bowolaksono, A.

    2017-07-01

    Heat shock protein 90-kDa is induced stress protein that expressed in response to stress and play crucial roles in environmental stress tolerance and adaptation. This study aimed to determine effect of environmental heat stress on the HSP90 expression of Bali cattle. Heat stress was measured by temperature humidity index in the morning and evening across 5-days on August 2016. The blood samples of Bali cattle were taken from venous jungularis. HSP90 was derived from RNA isolation of whole blood then was followed reverse transcription two steps. Reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) was performed to analyze the transcript variants of HSP90, followed by comparative ΔΔCt to determine HSP90 expression. The results of temperature and humidity index (THI) measurement indicated THI on afternoon was higher than in the morning. The difference in environmental conditions in the morning and afternoon effected changes on rectal temperature but neither did on Hsp90 expression.

  13. Exploration of the associations of touch-screen tablet computer usage and musculoskeletal discomfort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Hsin-Yu Ariel; Liu, Chien-Hsiou

    2016-03-10

    Tablet users may be at high risk of developing physical discomfort because of their usage behaviors and tablet design. Investigate the usage of tablets, variations in head and neck posture associated with different tablet tilt angles, and the association of tablet use with users' musculoskeletal discomfort. A survey of users' subjective perceptions conducted by questionnaire and measurements of users' postures by a 3D Motion analysis system was used to explore the effects of tablet use. The questionnaire results indicated that over half of the participants reported physical discomfort after using tablets, with the most prevalent discomfort in the neck and shoulders, and more intensity of discomfort for the back although only few participants experienced it. Chi-squared tests indicated that significantly more participants who tended to use tablet computers to play games reported having musculoskeletal discomfort after using a tablet. In addition, preferences for tablet tilt angles varied across tasks (reading and game playing). The results from the 3D motion analysis revealed that head and neck flexion angles were significantly reduced when the tablets were positioned at relatively steep tilt angles. Neck flexion angle was significantly higher in game playing. These data add information regarding to the usage of tablet and its associations with physical discomfort (significantly more participants who tended to use tablet computers to play games reported having musculoskeletal discomfort after using a tablet). Steep tilt angles (such as 60°) may cause tablet users to decrease their head and neck flexion angles, which could lead to a more neutral, effortless, and ergonomically correct posture. Maintaining proper neck posture during active activities such as game playing is recommended to avoid neck discomfort.

  14. Effects of thermal stress of protein synthesis and gene expression in Brassica napus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halle, J.R.; Ghosh, S.; Dumbroff, E.B.; Heikkila, J.J.

    1989-01-01

    Leaf segments of Brassica napus were exposed to 22 degrees, 35 degrees, 38 degrees or 40 degrees C for up to 4 h. Analysis of radiolabelled proteins by 2-D SDS-PAGE and fluorography revealed two major groups of heat shock proteins (HSPs). One group comprised HSPs, 70, 76 and 87, with pIs ranging from 5.7 to 6.1, whereas the second group had molecular weights ranging from 23 to 16 kD and pIs from 5.6 to 6.9. Immunoblot analysis using antibodies directed against the large (RLSU) and small (RSSU) subunits of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (RUBISCO) showed that increasing temperatures from 35 degrees to 38 degrees or 40 degrees C or the duration of thermal stress from 1 to 5 h did not affect levels of the RSSU (15 kd) whereas levels of the RLSU (52 kD) fell sharply. Nevertheless, RUBISCO activity was not adversely affected at 38 degree C for periods of up to 5 h. The increase observed in HSP 70 during heat shock was transcriptionally regulated, but the decrease in the RLSU was not accompanied by any detectable change in levels of its mRNA

  15. A renal transplant patient with abdominal discomfort, vomiting and diarrhoea for 1 week.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutwak, Nancy; Dill, Curt

    2011-08-24

    The patient is a 61-year-old diabetic male with history of renal transplant who presented to the emergency department with complaints of intermittent abdominal discomfort accompanied by multiple episodes of vomiting and diarrhoea. He had delayed seeking medical attention until his friends insisted that he come to the emergency department, since the abdominal discomfort was worsening. The patient's ECG revealed an ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction.

  16. Effect of yoga on self-rated visual discomfort in computer users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telles, Shirley; Naveen, K V; Dash, Manoj; Deginal, Rajendra; Manjunath, N K

    2006-12-03

    'Dry eye' appears to be the main contributor to the symptoms of computer vision syndrome. Regular breaks and the use of artificial tears or certain eye drops are some of the options to reduce visual discomfort. A combination of yoga practices have been shown to reduce visual strain in persons with progressive myopia. The present randomized controlled trial was planned to evaluate the effect of a combination of yoga practices on self-rated symptoms of visual discomfort in professional computer users in Bangalore. Two hundred and ninety one professional computer users were randomly assigned to two groups, yoga (YG, n = 146) and wait list control (WL, n = 145). Both groups were assessed at baseline and after sixty days for self-rated visual discomfort using a standard questionnaire. During these 60 days the YG group practiced an hour of yoga daily for five days in a week and the WL group did their usual recreational activities also for an hour daily for the same duration. At 60 days there were 62 in the YG group and 55 in the WL group. While the scores for visual discomfort of both groups were comparable at baseline, after 60 days there was a significantly decreased score in the YG group, whereas the WL group showed significantly increased scores. The results suggest that the yoga practice appeared to reduce visual discomfort, while the group who had no yoga intervention (WL) showed an increase in discomfort at the end of sixty days.

  17. Unilateral Discomfort Increases the Use of Contralateral Side during Sit-to-Stand Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simisola O. Oludare

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Individuals with unilateral impairment perform symmetrical movements asymmetrically. Restoring symmetry of movements is an important goal of rehabilitation. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of using discomfort-inducing devices on movement symmetry. Fifteen healthy individuals performed the sit-to-stand (STS maneuver using devices inducing unilateral discomfort under the left sole and left thigh or right sole and right thigh and without them. 3D body kinematics, ground reaction forces, electrical activity of muscles, and the level of perceived discomfort were recorded. The center of mass (COM, center of pressure (COP, and trunk displacements as well as the magnitude and latency of muscle activity of lower limb muscles were calculated during STS and compared to quantify the movement asymmetry. Discomfort on the left and right side of the body (thigh and feet induced statistically significant displacement of the trunk towards the opposite side. There was statistically significant asymmetry in the activity of the left and right Tibialis Anterior, Medial Gastrocnemius, and Biceps Femoris muscles when discomfort was induced underneath the left side of the body (thigh and feet. The technique was effective in causing asymmetry and promoted the use of the contralateral side. The outcome provides a foundation for future investigations of the role of discomfort-inducing devices in improving symmetry of the STS in individuals with unilateral impairment.

  18. Macular pigment and visual performance in glare: benefits for photostress recovery, disability glare, and visual discomfort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stringham, James M; Garcia, Paul V; Smith, Peter A; McLin, Leon N; Foutch, Brian K

    2011-09-22

    One theory of macular pigment's (MP) presence in the fovea is to improve visual performance in glare. This study sought to determine the effect of MP level on three aspects of visual performance in glare: photostress recovery, disability glare, and visual discomfort. Twenty-six subjects participated in the study. Spatial profiles of MP optical density were assessed with heterochromatic flicker photometry. Glare was delivered via high-bright-white LEDs. For the disability glare and photostress recovery portions of the experiment, the visual task consisted of correct identification of a 1° Gabor patch's orientation. Visual discomfort during the glare presentation was assessed with a visual discomfort rating scale. Pupil diameter was monitored with an infrared (IR) camera. MP level correlated significantly with all the outcome measures. Higher MP optical densities (MPODs) resulted in faster photostress recovery times (average P disability glare contrast thresholds (average P visual discomfort (P = 0.002). Smaller pupil diameter during glare presentation significantly correlated with higher visual discomfort ratings (P = 0.037). MP correlates with three aspects of visual performance in glare. Unlike previous studies of MP and glare, the present study used free-viewing conditions, in which effects of iris pigmentation and pupil size could be accounted for. The effects described, therefore, can be extended more confidently to real-world, practical visual performance benefits. Greater iris constriction resulted (paradoxically) in greater visual discomfort. This finding may be attributable to the neurobiologic mechanism that mediates the pain elicited by light.

  19. An ergonomic intervention to reduce musculoskeletal discomfort among semiconductor assembly workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghilinejad, Mashallah; Azar, Neda Soleimanvandy; Ghasemi, Mohammad Sadegh; Dehghan, Naser; Mokamelkhah, Elahe Kabir

    2016-06-14

    Work-related musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) and ergonomics-related injuries are the single largest category of workplace injuries and are responsible for almost 30% of all worker's compensation costs. Awkward working posture refers to positions of the body that deviate significantly from the neutral position while job tasks are being performed and it is the primary ergonomic risk factor for developing musculoskeletal discomfort. This study was conducted among assembly workers of a semiconductor in Tehran province with the objective of implementing an interventional ergonomic program to minimize musculoskeletal discomfort. This study that was conducted on 105 male assembly workers of a semiconductor industry based on a census method. The standardized Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire (NMQ) was used to determine the prevalence of MSDs. Corlett and Bishop's body part discomfort scale (BPD) was applied to evaluate body discomfort before and after the intervention (using a magnifying loupes to improve visibility of the parts). The results of NMQ showed the highest rate of MSDs were in neck, shoulder, upper arm and lower back regions (more than 75%). After ergonomic intervention, significant decrements of discomfort was observed in neck, shoulder, upper arm, elbows, lower arm, lower back and whole body discomfort (p ergonomic interventions can decrease MSDs of at risk body regions in the long term.

  20. Effect of yoga on self-rated visual discomfort in computer users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deginal Rajendra

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background 'Dry eye' appears to be the main contributor to the symptoms of computer vision syndrome. Regular breaks and the use of artificial tears or certain eye drops are some of the options to reduce visual discomfort. A combination of yoga practices have been shown to reduce visual strain in persons with progressive myopia. The present randomized controlled trial was planned to evaluate the effect of a combination of yoga practices on self-rated symptoms of visual discomfort in professional computer users in Bangalore. Methods Two hundred and ninety one professional computer users were randomly assigned to two groups, yoga (YG, n = 146 and wait list control (WL, n = 145. Both groups were assessed at baseline and after sixty days for self-rated visual discomfort using a standard questionnaire. During these 60 days the YG group practiced an hour of yoga daily for five days in a week and the WL group did their usual recreational activities also for an hour daily for the same duration. At 60 days there were 62 in the YG group and 55 in the WL group. Results While the scores for visual discomfort of both groups were comparable at baseline, after 60 days there was a significantly decreased score in the YG group, whereas the WL group showed significantly increased scores. Conclusion The results suggest that the yoga practice appeared to reduce visual discomfort, while the group who had no yoga intervention (WL showed an increase in discomfort at the end of sixty days.

  1. Investigating the molecular basis of local adaptation to thermal stress: population differences in gene expression across the transcriptome of the copepod Tigriopus californicus

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    Schoville Sean D

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Geographic variation in the thermal environment impacts a broad range of biochemical and physiological processes and can be a major selective force leading to local population adaptation. In the intertidal copepod Tigriopus californicus, populations along the coast of California show differences in thermal tolerance that are consistent with adaptation, i.e., southern populations withstand thermal stresses that are lethal to northern populations. To understand the genetic basis of these physiological differences, we use an RNA-seq approach to compare genome-wide patterns of gene expression in two populations known to differ in thermal tolerance. Results Observed differences in gene expression between the southern (San Diego and the northern (Santa Cruz populations included both the number of affected loci as well as the identity of these loci. However, the most pronounced differences concerned the amplitude of up-regulation of genes producing heat shock proteins (Hsps and genes involved in ubiquitination and proteolysis. Among the hsp genes, orthologous pairs show markedly different thermal responses as the amplitude of hsp response was greatly elevated in the San Diego population, most notably in members of the hsp70 gene family. There was no evidence of accelerated evolution at the sequence level for hsp genes. Among other sets of genes, cuticle genes were up-regulated in SD but down-regulated in SC, and mitochondrial genes were down-regulated in both populations. Conclusions Marked changes in gene expression were observed in response to acute sub-lethal thermal stress in the copepod T. californicus. Although some qualitative differences were observed between populations, the most pronounced differences involved the magnitude of induction of numerous hsp and ubiquitin genes. These differences in gene expression suggest that evolutionary divergence in the regulatory pathway(s involved in acute temperature stress may offer at

  2. Meibomian gland dysfunction and ocular discomfort in video display terminal workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenga, C; Aragona, P; Cacciola, A; Spinella, R; Di Nola, C; Ferreri, F; Rania, L

    2008-01-01

    Meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD) is one of the most common ocular disorders encountered in clinical practice. The clinical manifestations of MGD are related to the changes in the tear film and ocular surface with symptoms of ocular discomfort. In recent years, many surveys have evaluated symptoms associated with the use of Video Display Terminals (VDT), and VDT use is recognized as a risk factor for eye discomfort. The aim of the present study was to determine if the presence of MGD contributes to the signs and symptoms of ocular discomfort during the use of VDT. In course of a routine health surveillance programme, a group of 70 subjects fulfilled the inclusion criteria and responded to a questionnaire about symptoms of ocular discomfort. The following ocular tests were performed: tear break-up time, fluorescein corneal stain, and basal tear secretion test. A total of 52 subjects out of 70 (74.3%) had MGD. A statistically significant correlation between the symptoms of ocular discomfort and hours spent on VDT work was observed in the total population (r=0.358; P=0.002; 95% CI 0.13-0.54) and in the group of subjects with MGD (r=0.365; P=0.009; 95% CI 0.103-0.58). Such correlation was not shown in subjects without MGD. The high prevalence of MGD among the subjects with symptoms of ocular discomfort suggests that this diagnosis should be considered when occupational health practitioners encounter ocular complaints among VDT operators. It appears that MGD can contribute to the development of ocular discomfort in VDT operators.

  3. Thermal comfort assessment of buildings

    CERN Document Server

    Carlucci, Salvatore

    2013-01-01

    A number of metrics for assessing human thermal response to climatic conditions have been proposed in scientific literature over the last decades. They aim at describing human thermal perception of the thermal environment to which an individual or a group of people is exposed. More recently, a new type of “discomfort index” has been proposed for describing, in a synthetic way, long-term phenomena. Starting from a systematic review of a number of long-term global discomfort indices, they are then contrasted and compared on a reference case study in order to identify their similarities and differences and strengths and weaknesses. Based on this analysis, a new short-term local discomfort index is proposed for the American Adaptive comfort model. Finally, a new and reliable long-term general discomfort index is presented. It is delivered in three versions and each of them is suitable to be respectively coupled with the Fanger, the European Adaptive and the American Adaptive comfort models.

  4. Influence of thermally-oxidized vegetable oils and animal fats on growth performance, liver gene expression, and liver and serum cholesterol and triglycerides in young pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    To evaluate the effect of feeding thermally-oxidized vegetable oils and animal fats on growth performance, liver gene expression, and liver and serum fatty acid and cholesterol concentration in young pigs, 102 barrows (6.67 ± 0.03 kg BW) were divided into 3 groups and randomly assigned to dietary tr...

  5. Comparative expression profile of NOD1/2 and certain acute inflammatory cytokines in thermal-stressed cell culture model of native and crossbred cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhanuprakash, V.; Singh, Umesh; Sengar, Gyanendra Singh; Raja, T. V.; Sajjanar, Basavraj; Alex, Rani; Kumar, Sushil; Alyethodi, R. R.; Kumar, Ashish; Sharma, Ankur; Kumar, Suresh; Bhusan, Bharat; Deb, Rajib

    2017-05-01

    Thermotolerance depends mainly on the health and immune status of the animals. The variation in the immune status of the animals may alter the level of tolerance of animals exposed to heat or cold stress. The present study was conducted to investigate the expression profile of two important nucleotide binding and oligomerization domain receptors (NLRs) (NOD1 and NOD2) and their central signalling molecule RIP2 gene during in vitro thermal-stressed bovine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of native (Sahiwal) and crossbred (Sahiwal X HF) cattle. We also examined the differential expression profile of certain acute inflammatory cytokines in in vitro thermal-stressed PBMC culture among native and its crossbred counterparts. Results revealed that the expression profile of NOD1/2 positively correlates with the thermal stress, signalling molecule and cytokines. Present findings also highlighted that the expression patterns during thermal stress were comparatively superior among indigenous compared to crossbred cattle which may add references regarding the better immune adaptability of Zebu cattle.

  6. An expression for the atomic fluorescence and thermal-emission intensity under conditions of near saturation and arbitrary self-absorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Omenetto, N.; Winefordner, J.D.; Alkemade, C.T.J.

    An expression for the effect of self-absorption on the fluorescence and thermal emission intensities is derived by taking into account stimulated emission. A simple, idealized case is considered, consisting of a two level atomic system, in a flame, homogeneous with respect to temperature and

  7. Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang-Xia Wang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The miR-15/107 family comprises a group of 10 paralogous microRNAs (miRNAs, sharing a 5′ AGCAGC sequence. These miRNAs have overlapping targets. In order to characterize the expression of miR-15/107 family miRNAs, we employed customized TaqMan Low-Density micro-fluid PCR-array to investigate the expression of miR-15/107 family members, and other selected miRNAs, in 11 human tissues obtained at autopsy including the cerebral cortex, frontal cortex, primary visual cortex, thalamus, heart, lung, liver, kidney, spleen, stomach and skeletal muscle. miR-103, miR-195 and miR-497 were expressed at similar levels across various tissues, whereas miR-107 is enriched in brain samples. We also examined the expression patterns of evolutionarily conserved miR-15/107 miRNAs in three distinct primary rat brain cell preparations (enriched for cortical neurons, astrocytes and microglia, respectively. In primary cultures of rat brain cells, several members of the miR-15/107 family are enriched in neurons compared to other cell types in the central nervous system (CNS. In addition to mature miRNAs, we also examined the expression of precursors (pri-miRNAs. Our data suggested a generally poor correlation between the expression of mature miRNAs and their precursors. In summary, we provide a detailed study of the tissue and cell type-specific expression profile of this highly expressed and phylogenetically conserved family of miRNA genes.

  8. Incidence, causes, severity and treatment of throat discomfort: a four-region online questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addey, Dilys; Shephard, Adrian

    2012-08-10

    Acute sore throat is commonly associated with viral infections. Consumers typically rely on over-the-counter treatments and other remedies to treat symptoms; however, limited information is available regarding consumer perceptions of sore throat or treatment needs. The aim of this study was to investigate perceptions of throat discomfort and how these influence attitudes and consumer behaviour with regard to treatment. Online consumer surveys were completed by participants invited by email between 2003 and 2004 in four markets: the UK, France, Poland, and Malaysia. The questionnaire consisted of 24 questions that covered key issues surrounding throat discomfort including incidence in the past 12 months, causes, severity, effects on functionality and quality of life, actions taken to relieve throat discomfort, the efficacy of these approaches and the reasons behind using specific products. In total, 6465 men and women aged ≥18 years were surveyed, identifying 3514 participants who had suffered throat discomfort/irritation in the past 12 months (response rate of 54%). These participants completed the full survey. The breakdown of throat discomfort sufferers was: UK, 912; France, 899; Poland, 871; Malaysia, 832. A high proportion of respondents experienced one or more instances of throat discomfort in the previous 12 months, with an overall incidence of 54%. Infections including the common cold/influenza and other bacteria/viruses were commonly perceived causes of throat discomfort (72% and 46%, respectively). Physical and environmental factors were also perceived to be causative, including airborne pollution (28%), smoking (23%), and air conditioning (31%). Symptoms perceived to be caused by an infection were associated with a higher degree of suffering (mean degree of suffering for bacteria/virus and common cold/influenza; 3.4 and 3.0, respectively). Medicinal products were used for all perceived causes, but more commonly for sore throats thought to be caused by

  9. Incidence, causes, severity and treatment of throat discomfort: a four-region online questionnaire survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Addey Dilys

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute sore throat is commonly associated with viral infections. Consumers typically rely on over-the-counter treatments and other remedies to treat symptoms; however, limited information is available regarding consumer perceptions of sore throat or treatment needs. The aim of this study was to investigate perceptions of throat discomfort and how these influence attitudes and consumer behaviour with regard to treatment. Methods Online consumer surveys were completed by participants invited by email between 2003 and 2004 in four markets: the UK, France, Poland, and Malaysia. The questionnaire consisted of 24 questions that covered key issues surrounding throat discomfort including incidence in the past 12 months, causes, severity, effects on functionality and quality of life, actions taken to relieve throat discomfort, the efficacy of these approaches and the reasons behind using specific products. Results In total, 6465 men and women aged ≥18 years were surveyed, identifying 3514 participants who had suffered throat discomfort/irritation in the past 12 months (response rate of 54%. These participants completed the full survey. The breakdown of throat discomfort sufferers was: UK, 912; France, 899; Poland, 871; Malaysia, 832. A high proportion of respondents experienced one or more instances of throat discomfort in the previous 12 months, with an overall incidence of 54%. Infections including the common cold/influenza and other bacteria/viruses were commonly perceived causes of throat discomfort (72% and 46%, respectively. Physical and environmental factors were also perceived to be causative, including airborne pollution (28%, smoking (23%, and air conditioning (31%. Symptoms perceived to be caused by an infection were associated with a higher degree of suffering (mean degree of suffering for bacteria/virus and common cold/influenza; 3.4 and 3.0, respectively. Medicinal products were used for all perceived causes, but more

  10. [Comfort and discomfort: the role of emotions in GPs' prescription practices].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen, Kristin; Hansen, Ebba Holme

    2005-12-05

    The role of emotions in GPs' prescribing has been ignored. The present article describes 20 GPs' reflections about what precedes comfort and discomfort in prescribing situations. In-depth interviews were done with 20 GPs who contributed with examples on an open comfort-discomfort scale. Analysis of the data was inspired by grounded theory. The GPs experienced a broad spectrum of emotions when prescribing. In every prescribing situation, conditions could pull towards both comfort and discomfort. Comfort appeared when the indication was correct and the patient's condition was serious, when the patient experienced the problem as serious, when the situation was acute and the medicine effective, and when the GP experienced himself as competent. Medicines were placed between comfort and discomfort when prescribing was perceived as indifferent, unproblematic and easy, when the GP was concerned about inflicting a sick role on the patients, and when patients were not convinced about the appropriateness of the medication. Discomfort appeared when there was a great risk of dependence, when GPs experienced and gave in to pressure, when they had to convince patients, and when they prescribed addictive medicine regularly. The totality of conditions in the situation determined the emotional state in the prescribing situation. The GPs' emotions reflected how they evaluated the appropriateness of their prescribing. This should be taken advantage of in rational pharmacotherapy. Future interventions should address both the rationality of GPs and their emotions.

  11. OSAS Surgery and Postoperative Discomfort: Phase I Surgery versus Phase II Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulio Gasparini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. This study aims to investigate the reasons that discourage the patients affected by OSAS to undergo orthognathic surgery and compares the postoperative discomfort of phase I (soft tissue surgery and phase II (orthognathic surgery procedures for treatment of OSAS. Material and Methods. A pool of 46 patients affected by OSAS was divided into two groups: “surgery patients” who accepted surgical treatments of their condition and “no surgery patients” who refused surgical procedures. The “surgery patients” group was further subdivided into two arms: patients who accepted phase I procedures (IP and those who accepted phase II (IIP. To better understand the motivations behind the refusal of II phase procedures, we asked the patients belonging to both the IP group and “no surgery” group to indicate the main reason that influenced their decision to avoid II phase procedures. We also monitored and compared five parameters of postoperative discomfort: pain, painkiller assumption, length of hospitalization, foreign body sensation, and diet assumption following IP and IIP procedures. Results. The main reason to avoid IIP procedures was the concern of a more severe postoperative discomfort. Comparison of the postoperative discomfort following IP versus IIP procedures showed that the former scored worse in 4 out of 5 parameters analyzed. Conclusion. IIP procedures produce less postoperative discomfort. IIP procedures, namely, orthognathic surgery, should be the first choice intervention in patients affected by OSAS and dentoskeletal malformation.

  12. Intraoperative discomfort associated with the use of a rotary or reciprocating system: a prospective randomized clinical

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Cristine Gomes

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The aim of this randomized, controlled, prospective clinical study was to evaluate patients' intraoperative discomfort during root canal preparations in which either multi-file rotary (Mtwo or single-file reciprocating (Reciproc systems were used. Materials and Methods Fifty-five adult patients, aged between 25 and 69 years old, with irreversible pulpitis or pulp necrosis participated in this study. Either the mesiobuccal or the distobuccal canals for maxillary molars and either the mesiobuccal or the mesiolingual canals for mandibular molars were randomly chosen to be instrumented with Mtwo multi-file rotary or Reciproc single-file reciprocating systems. Immediately after each canal instrumentation under anesthesia, patient discomfort was assessed using a 1 - 10 visual analog scale (VAS, ranging from ‘least possible discomfort’ (1 to ‘greatest possible discomfort’ (10. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to determine significant differences at p< 0.05. Results Little intraoperative discomfort was found in all cases. No statistically significant differences in intraoperative discomfort between the 2 systems were found (p = 0.660. Conclusions Root canal preparation with multi-file rotary or single-file reciprocating systems had similar and minimal effects on patients' intraoperative discomfort.

  13. [Emotional well-being and discomfort at work in call center].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emanuel, Federica; Colombo, Lara; Ghislieri, Chiara

    2014-01-01

    The theme of well-being and discomfort at work has attracted increasing interest in recent years. The present study, according to Job Demands-Resources model (JD-R), inquires the effects of personal (optimism, internal locus of control) and organizational resources (job autonomy, supervisors and colleagues support) and general (work-to-family conflict, workload) and context specific demands (emotional dissonance) on emotional well-being and discomfort at work in call centre employees. This research was conducted through an online questionnaire, composed by measures present in scientific literature, filled out individually by call center agents (N = 507) of the same telecommunication firm. Data analysis (PASW 18) provides: descriptive statistics, correlations and multiple regressions. Personal and organizational resources improve emotional well-being at work, except for colleagues support. Optimism and supervisors support reduce emotional discomfort at work. Among organizational demands, work-family conflict and emotional dissonance increase emotional discomfort at work and, to a lesser extent, reduce the emotional well-being at work. The results, according to theoretical model, highlight the different role of demands and resources on emotional well-being and discomfort at work. The results suggest organizational politics and investments to promote emotional well-being at work, in particular training program to support emotional skills, training for supervisors, increasing job autonomy and support to work-family balance.

  14. Fear of eyes: triadic relation among social anxiety, trypophobia, and discomfort for eye cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaya, Kengo; Xue, Yuting; Uto, Yusuke; Yao, Qirui; Yamada, Yuki

    2016-01-01

    Imagine you are being gazed at by multiple individuals simultaneously. Is the provoked anxiety a learned social-specific response or related to a pathological disorder known as trypophobia? A previous study revealed that spectral properties of images induced aversive reactions in observers with trypophobia. However, it is not clear whether individual differences such as social anxiety traits are related to the discomfort associated with trypophobic images. To investigate this issue, we conducted two experiments with social anxiety and trypophobia and images of eyes and faces. In Experiment 1, participants completed a social anxiety scale and trypophobia questionnaire before evaluation of the discomfort experienced upon exposure to pictures of eye. The results showed that social anxiety had a significant indirect effect on the discomfort associated with the eye clusters, and that the effect was mediated by trypophobia. Experiment 2 replicated Experiment 1 using images of human face. The results showed that, as in Experiment 1, a significant mediation effect of trypophobia was obtained, although the relationship between social anxiety and the discomfort rating was stronger than in Experiment 1. Our findings suggest that both social anxiety and trypophobia contribute to the induction of discomfort when one is gazed at by many people.

  15. Fear of eyes: triadic relation among social anxiety, trypophobia, and discomfort for eye cluster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kengo Chaya

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Imagine you are being gazed at by multiple individuals simultaneously. Is the provoked anxiety a learned social-specific response or related to a pathological disorder known as trypophobia? A previous study revealed that spectral properties of images induced aversive reactions in observers with trypophobia. However, it is not clear whether individual differences such as social anxiety traits are related to the discomfort associated with trypophobic images. To investigate this issue, we conducted two experiments with social anxiety and trypophobia and images of eyes and faces. In Experiment 1, participants completed a social anxiety scale and trypophobia questionnaire before evaluation of the discomfort experienced upon exposure to pictures of eye. The results showed that social anxiety had a significant indirect effect on the discomfort associated with the eye clusters, and that the effect was mediated by trypophobia. Experiment 2 replicated Experiment 1 using images of human face. The results showed that, as in Experiment 1, a significant mediation effect of trypophobia was obtained, although the relationship between social anxiety and the discomfort rating was stronger than in Experiment 1. Our findings suggest that both social anxiety and trypophobia contribute to the induction of discomfort when one is gazed at by many people.

  16. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on Yongquan acupoint reduces CFA-induced thermal hyperalgesia of rats via down-regulation of ERK2 phosphorylation and c-Fos expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lin; Yang, Lianxue; Gao, Xiulai

    2010-07-01

    Activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1/2 (ERK1/2) and its involvement in regulating gene expression in spinal dorsal horn, cortical and subcortical neurons by peripheral noxious stimulation contribute to pain hypersensitivity. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is a treatment used in physiotherapy practice to promote analgesia in acute and chronic inflammatory conditions. In this study, a total number of 114 rats were used for three experiments. Effects of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced inflammatory pain hypersensitivity and TENS analgesia on ERK1/2 phosphorylation and c-Fos protein expression were examined by using behavioral test, Western blot, and immunostaining methods. We found that CFA injection caused an area of localized swelling, erythema, hypersensitivity to thermal stimuli, the decreased response time of hind paw licking (HPL), as well as upregulation of c-Fos protein expression and ERK2 phosphorylation in the ipsilateral spinal dorsal horn and the contralateral primary somatosensory area of cortex and the amygdala of rats. TENS on Yongquan acupoint for 20 min produced obvious analgesic effects as demonstrated with increased HPL to thermal stimuli of CFA-treated rats. In addition, TENS application suppressed the CFA-induced ERK2 activation and c-Fos protein expression. These results suggest that down-regulation of ERK2 phosphorylation and c-Fos expression were involved in TENS inhibition on CFA-induced thermal hyperalgesia of rats.

  17. Discomfort glare with complex fenestration systems and the impact on energy use when using daylighting control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, Sabine; McNeil, Andrew; Lee, Eleanor S.; Kalyanam, Raghuram

    2015-11-03

    Glare is a frequent issue in highly glazed buildings. A modelling approach is presented that uses discomfort glare probability and discomfort glare index as metrics to determine occupants’ behaviour. A glare control algorithm that actuated an interior shade for glare protection based on the predicted perception was implemented in a building simulation program. A reference case with a state-of-the-art base glazing was compared to the same glazing but with five different complex fenestration systems, i.e., exterior shades. The windows with exterior shades showed significant variations in glare frequencies. Energy use intensity in a prototypical office building with daylighting controls was greatly influenced for the systems with frequent glare occurrence. While the base glazing could benefit from glare control, some of the exterior shades showed significantly greater energy use when discomfort glare-based operation of interior shades was considered.

  18. Acclimation-dependent expression of heat shock protein 70 in Pacific abalone ( Haliotis discus hannai Ino) and its acute response to thermal exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiaqi; He, Qingguo; Sun, Hui; Liu, Xiao

    2012-01-01

    Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) is one important member of heat shock protein (Hsp) family that is responsible for various stresses, especially thermal stress. Here we examined the response of Hsp70 gene to both chronic and acute thermal exposure in Pacific abalone ( Haliotis discus hannai Ino). For the chronic exposure, abalones were maintained at 8, 12, 20, and 30°C for four months and their mRNA levels were measured. The highest mRNA level of Hsp70 gene relative to actin gene was detected in the 30°C-acclimated group, followed by the 8°C-acclimated group and then the 12°C- and 20°C-acclimated groups. After the long-term acclimation, gills from each of the above acclimation groups were dissected and exposed to different temperatures between 8°C and 38°C for 30 min. Hsp70 expression in gills acclimated to different temperatures responded differentially to the same temperature exposure. The incubation temperature that induced maximum Hsp70 mRNA expression was higher in the higher temperature acclimation groups than lower temperature groups. Pacific abalones could alter the expression pattern of Hsp70 gene according to environmental thermal conditions, through which they deal with the stress of thermal variations.

  19. The influence of stimulus phase duration on discomfort and electrically induced torque of quadriceps femoris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard E. Liebano

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although a number of studies have compared the influence of different electrical pulse parameters on maximum electrically induced torque (MEIT and discomfort, the role of phase duration has been poorly investigated. OBJECTIVE: To examine the variation in muscle torque and discomfort produced when electrically stimulating quadriceps femoris using pulsed current with three different phase durations in order to establish whether there are any advantages or disadvantages in varying the phase duration over the range examined. METHOD: This is a two repeated-measures, within-subject study conducted in a research laboratory. The study was divided into 2 parts with 19 healthy young adults in each part.In part 1, MEIT was determined for each phase duration (400, 700, and 1000 µs, using a biphasic pulsed current at a frequency of 50 Hz. In part 2, stimulus amplitude was increased until the contractions reached 40% of maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC and the associated discomfort produced by each phase duration was measured. RESULTS: In part 1 of the study, we found that the average MEITs generated with each phase duration (400, 700, and 1000 µs were 55.0, 56.3, and 58.0% of MVIC respectively, but the differences were not statistically significant (p=.45. In part 2, we found a statistically significant increase in discomfort over the same range of phase durations. The results indicate that, for a given level of torque production, discomfort increases with increasing phase duration (p=.008. CONCLUSIONS: Greater muscle torque cannot be produced by increasing the stimulus phase duration over the range examined. Greater discomfort is produced by increasing the stimulus phase duration.

  20. Workstyle and Musculoskeletal Discomfort (MSD): Exploring the Influence of Work Culture in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maakip, Ismail; Keegel, Tessa; Oakman, Jodi

    2015-12-01

    Workstyle can be defined as an individual pattern of cognitions, behaviours and physiological reactivity that can occur while performing job tasks. Workstyle has been associated with the development of musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) amongst office workers in developed countries. However, little is known about the contribution of workstyle on MSDs in developing countries such as Malaysia. The objective of this cross-sectional study was to examine the relationship between workstyle and musculoskeletal discomfort in a sample of office workers in Malaysia. Office workers (N = 417; response rate 65.5 %) from four organisations completed a survey measuring physical and psychosocial hazards, job satisfaction, work-life balance, workstyle, and MSD discomfort levels. Hierarchical regression analyses were undertaken to examine predictors associated with self-reported musculoskeletal discomfort, and more specifically the relationship between workstyle and MSD discomfort. Musculoskeletal discomfort was significantly associated with working through pain, mental health, physical demands, gender and work-life balance (R (2) = 50.2, adjusted R (2) = 0.48; F (13, 324) = 25.09, p = 0.001). Working through pain is the strongest risk factor associated with MSD discomfort (ß = 0.49, p = 0.001) compared to other potential risk factors. Working through pain is influenced by work, social culture and religious beliefs. Workplace MSDs interventions that focus on the impact of physical and psychosocial hazards with emphasis on addressing adverse workstyles should take into account aspects related to work and social culture of the target population. Changes are recommended at both employee and management levels such as better communications and understanding concerning workplace problems with regards to minimizing MSDs at work.

  1. The experience of critically ill children: A phenomenological study of discomfort and comfort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnevale, Franco A; Gaudreault, Josée

    2013-01-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that critically ill children are particularly at risk for incurring significant psychological harm. Little is known about these children's actual experiences. The aim of the study was to examine children's experience of critical illness. The research question was: What are a critically ill child's sources of discomfort and comfort? Interpretive phenomenology was selected as the study's method. Children's accounts were examined to identify what they considered meaningful, in terms of their experienced discomfort and comfort. Data sources included formal and informal interviews with child-participants, drawings provided by some participants, and field-notes documenting observed non-verbal data. Twelve children were enrolled in the study, ranging from 3 to 17years of age; including four girls and eight boys. Although all participants were able to discuss the discomfort and comfort they experienced, they reported difficulties in remembering part or most of their experience. Some participants characterized their Pediatric Intensive Care Unit stay quite favourably or as "not that bad", while some described their experience unfavourably. Diverse types of discomforts were reported, including fears and worries, hurt and pain, invasive interventions, missing significant people, noise, food or eating problems, boredom, physical symptoms, as well as four additional discomforts reported by individual participants. Several sources of comfort were described, including parents, visitors and friends, hospital staff (principally nurses), stuffed animal/favourite blanket, entertainment and play, food, selected medical interventions, thinking of going home, being able to walk or run, sleep, waking up, gifts, along with two other comforts reported by individual participants. Embodiment and a tension between aloneness and being with were identified as the principal phenomena underlying these children's experiences. The findings complement existing knowledge

  2. Effect of fabric texture and material on perceived discomfort at high humidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toftum, Jørn; Rasmussen, Leif W.; Mackeprang, Jørgen

    1999-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of material (cotton/polyester) and texture (woven/knitted) of the inner layer of a clothing ensemble on human discomfort at high skin humidity. No clear effect on discomfort of material and texture could be detected. However, acceptability of skin humidity de......-crea-sed with increasing relative skin humidity. A model was developed that predicts the percentage of persons dissatisfied due to humid skin as a function of relative skin humidity. The model applies for woven and knitted cot-ton and polyester materials and for activity levels typical for office work. Even at very high...

  3. Hoarseness and vocal tract discomfort and associated risk factors in air traffic controllers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korn, Gustavo Polacow; Villar, Anna Carolina; Azevedo, Renata Rangel

    2018-04-05

    An air traffic controller is a professional who performs air traffic control functions in air traffic control units and is responsible for controlling the various stages of a flight. To compare hoarseness and vocal tract discomfort and their risk factors among air traffic controllers in the approach control of São Paulo. In a cross-sectional survey, a voice self-evaluation adapted from to self-evaluation prepared by the Brazilian Ministry of Labor for teachers was administered to 76 air traffic controllers at approach control of São Paulo, Brazil. The percentage of hoarseness and vocal tract discomfort was 19.7% and 38.2%, respectively. In relation to air pollution, the percentages of hoarseness and vocal tract discomfort were higher among those who consider their working environment to be intolerable than among those in a comfortable or disturbing environment. The percentage of hoarseness was higher among those who seek medical advice due to vocal complaints and among those who experience difficulty using their voice at work than among those who experience mild or no difficulty. The percentage of vocal tract discomfort was higher among those in a very tense and stressful environment than among those who consider their work environment to be mild or moderately tense and stressful. The percentage of vocal tract discomfort was higher among those who describe themselves as very tense and stressed or tense and stressed than among those who describe themselves as calm. Additionally, the percentage of vocal tract discomfort was higher among those who care about their health. Among air traffic controllers, the percentage of vocal tract discomfort was almost twice that of hoarseness. Both symptoms are prevalent among air traffic controllers who considered their workplace intolerable in terms of air pollution. Vocal tract discomfort was related to a tense and stressful environment, and hoarseness was related to difficulty using the voice at work. Copyright © 2018 Associa

  4. Effects of chronic thermal stress on growth performance, carcass traits, antioxidant indices and the expression of HSP70, growth hormone and superoxide dismutase genes in two broiler strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roushdy, Elshimaa M; Zaglool, Asmaa W; El-Tarabany, Mahmoud S

    2018-05-01

    The objective was to investigate the effects of genetic type and the duration of chronic thermal stress (36 °C) on the growing efficiency, carcass traits, antioxidant status, and the expression of liver heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), growth hormone (GH) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) genes. Two hundred and seventy one-day-old chicks (135 male chicks of each breed; Ross 308 and Cobb 500) were used in this work. On the 21st day of age, birds were allocated randomly into 3 equal groups till the 42 days of age (CON:raised in a thermoneutral condition; HS 1 and HS 2 groups were subjected to 4 and 6 h of daily thermal stress, respectively). Regardless of genetic type, thermal stress decreased the dressing percentage in broilers when compared with the thermoneutral conditions (p = 0.039). In both broiler strains, thermal stress for 6 h (HS 2 ) increased the heterophil to lymphocyte ratio (p = 0.036) and the serum albumin, cholesterol and triglyceride levels (p = 0.023, 0.012 and 0.005, respectively) compared with the thermoneutral group. Under the thermonuteral and heat stress conditions, the Ross broiler chickens showed a significant lower serum triiodothyronine level compared with the Cobb boilers (p = 0.042). It is interesting to note that the expression of HSP70 in the liver of heat-stressed Ross broilers, either 4 or 6 h, was significantly (p = 0.002) higher than that reported in the heat-stressed Cobb broilers. In both broiler strains, the thermal stress for 6 h up-regulate the expression of SOD gene (p = 0.001), but down-regulate the expression of GH gene (p = 0.021) when compared with the CON group. In conclusion, chronic thermal stress down-regulate the mRNA expression of liver GH, concomitantly with an increase in the expression of HSP70 and SOD genes in both broiler strains. This could be useful in the identification of molecular genetic markers to assist in selecting broilers that are more tolerant to heat stress

  5. Characterization of heat shock cognate protein 70 gene and its differential expression in response to thermal stress between two wing morphs of Nilaparvata lugens (Stål).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Kai; Chen, Xia; Liu, Wenting; Zhou, Qiang

    2016-09-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated differences in thermotolerance between two wing morphs of Nilaparvata lugens, the most serious pest of rice across the Asia. To reveal the molecular regulatory mechanisms underlying the differential thermal resistance abilities between two wing morphs, a full-length of transcript encoding heat shock cognate protein 70 (Hsc70) was cloned, and its expression patterns across temperature gradients were analyzed. The results showed that the expression levels of NlHsc70 in macropters increased dramatically after heat shock from 32 to 38°C, while NlHsc70 transcripts in brachypters remained constant under different temperature stress conditions. In addition, NlHsc70 expression in the macropters was significantly higher than that in brachypters at 1 and 2h recovery from 40°C heat shock. There was no significant difference in NlHsc70 mRNA expression between brachypters and macropters under cold shock conditions. Therefore, NlHsc70 was indeed a constitutively expressed member of the Hsp70 family in brachypters of N. lugens, while it was heat-inducible in macropters. Furthermore, the survival rates of both morphs injected with NlHsc70 dsRNA were significantly decreased following heat shock at 40°C or cold shock at 0°C for 1h. These results suggested that the up-regulation of NlHsc70 is possibly related to the thermal resistance, and the more effective inducement expression of NlHsc70 in macropters promotes a greater thermal tolerance under temperature stress conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Gastrointestinal distress in pregnancy: prevalence, assessment, and treatment of 5 common minor discomforts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielinski, Ruth; Searing, Kimberly; Deibel, Megan

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal discomforts are a very common complaint in pregnancy. In fact, most pregnant women will experience at least one discomfort. This article focuses on 5 common conditions that occur in pregnancy: gastroesophageal reflux disease, diarrhea, constipation, hemorrhoids, and pica. While these conditions do occur in men and nonpregnant women, they occur more frequently in pregnancy because of the anatomic and physiologic changes associated with gestation. The type and severity of symptoms can vary from individual to individual, making treatment a challenge for healthcare providers, particularly when caring for pregnant women because the effects of medications and other treatments on the developing fetus are often not extensively studied. While these discomforts are rarely life-threatening, they can cause significant distress and impair quality of life. The goal of this article was to provide a summary of the anatomic and physiological changes during pregnancy that contribute to the increasing incidence of these discomforts and to provide information about each condition including prevalence, symptoms, and treatment modalities.

  7. Association between objective and subjective measurements of comfort and discomfort in hand tools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijt-Evers, L.F.M.; Bosch, T.; Huysmans, M.A.; Looze, M.P.de; Vink, P.

    2007-01-01

    In the current study, the relationship between objective measurements and subjective experienced comfort and discomfort in using handsaws was examined. Twelve carpenters evaluated five different handsaws. Objective measures of contact pressure (average pressure, pressure area and pressure-time (P-t)

  8. Reduced discomfort during High-Definition transcutaneous stimulation using 6% benzocaine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berkan eGuleyupoglu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBackground High-Definition transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (HD-tDCS allows for non-invasive neuromodulation using an array of compact (approximately 1 cm2 contact area High-Definition (HD electrodes, as compared to conventional tDCS (which uses two large pads that are approximately 35cm2. In a previous transcutaneous study, we developed and validated designs for HD electrodes that reduce discomfort over >20 min session with 2 mA electrode current.ObjectiveThe purpose of this study was to investigate the use of a chemical pretreatment with 6% benzocaine (topical numbing agent to further reduce subjective discomfort during transcutaneous stimulation and to allow for better sham controlled studies.MethodsPre-treatment with 6% benzocaine was compared with control (no pretreatment for 22 minutes 2 mA of stimulation, with either CCNY-4 or Lectron II electroconductive gel, for both cathodal and anodal transcutaneous (forearm stimulation (8 different combinations.Results Results show that for all conditions and polarities tested, stimulation with HD electrodes is safe and well tolerated and that pretreatment further reduced subjective discomfort. ConclusionPretreatment with a mild analgesic reduces discomfort during HD-tDCS.

  9. "Pedagogy of Discomfort" and Its Ethical Implications: The Tensions of Ethical Violence in Social Justice Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zembylas, Michalinos

    2015-01-01

    This essay considers the ethical implications of engaging in a pedagogy of discomfort, using as a point of departure Butler's reflections on ethical violence and norms. The author shows how this attempt is full of tensions that cannot, if ever, be easily resolved. To address these tensions, the author first offers a brief overview of the notion of…

  10. The Bahasa Melayu version of Cornell Musculoskeletal Discomfort Questionnaire (CMDQ): Reliability and validity study in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shariat, Ardalan; Tamrin, Shamsul Bahri Mohd; Arumugam, Manohar; Ramasamy, Rajesh

    2016-03-09

    The Cornell Musculoskeletal Discomfort Questionnaire (CMDQ) was developed to assess the level of musculoskeletal discomfort among office workers related to their ergonomic situation. The primary objective of this initial study is to analyze the validity and dependability of the Malay translation of the Cornell Musculoskeletal Discomfort Questionnaire. The questionnaire was self-administered two times, with an interval of two weeks in order to evaluate the accuracy of the original findings with a retest. The study involved 115 participants. The range of Cronbach Alpha coefficient showed a considerable consistency of the items for each sub-scale (Cronbach's a > 0.95). The range of Kappa coefficients was between (ICC = 0.690-0.949, p < 0.001), (ICC = 0.801-0.979, p < 0.001) and (ICC = 0.778-0.944, p < 0.001) for frequency, severity and interference scales. This research, introduced the Malay-language version of the CMDQ (CMDQ-M) as the first formal validation of the CMDQ, and confirmed a high reliability and validity for the evaluation of musculoskeletal discomfort among the study population.

  11. Effect of Age, Gender and Hearing Loss on the Degree of Discomfort Due to Tinnitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Noroozian

    2017-11-01

    Conclusion: The study findings suggests that tinnitus is not correlated with age, gender and hearing loss. Overall, tinnitus is a complicated clinical condition which its real impact and degree of discomfort are unclear. More investigation is needed to clarify the factors involving in tinnitus annoyance.

  12. Between Discomfort and Comfort: Towards Language That Creates Space for Social Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Christie

    2017-01-01

    This paper examines the potential of the term "settler ally" to create productive discomfort alongside productive comfort, thereby creating space for positive social change. The setting in which the term is examined is Canada--Alberta in particular--following the release of the recommendations of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission…

  13. Development of chair-side evaluation system of swallowing discomfort of denture wearers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Keisuke; Ikuta, Ryuhei; Kataoka, Kanako; Ono, Yumie; Tamaki, Katsushi

    2018-02-01

    We investigated the appropriate hemodynamic parameters of functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) to best differentiate the discomfort intensity related to swallowing in healthy subjects wearing different types of simulated dentures. Thirty-one subjects performed 4 sessions of water-swallowing task in a sitting position without or with wearing any one of the 3 simulated dentures under continuous fNIRS monitoring of the prefrontal cortex. The simulated dentures were consisted of a flat maxillary palatal bar and bilateral support attachment to the teeth and gum. The palatal bar positions were arranged along with the anterior, middle, or posterior areas of the upper jaw. The cumulative values of oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin concentration changes were calculated for periods of 5 - 10 s from completion of swallowing. Subjective rating of swallowing-discomfort was the lowest without wearing denture and increased along with the palatal bar position placed from anterior to posterior. Cumulated deoxyhemoglobin signals calculated for 10 s post-swallowing event in the left frontopolar prefrontal cortex showed the best correlation with the subjective rating of discomfort in swallowing with dentures. These neurological signatures would be beneficial to detect swallowing discomfort in elderly denture wearers who have difficulty in communicating with dentists.

  14. Feelings of discomfort in Ōe's “Prize Stock”

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsen Vilslev, Annette

    2017-01-01

    This article examines the feelings of discomfort in the works of Nobel Prize winner Kenzaburo Ōe. Focusing on Ōe's first short story “Prize Stock”, Shiiku (1957), the article discusses how the incredible event of a black pilot falling from the sky in the mountains near a small Japanese village...

  15. A systematic review of discomfort due to toe or ear clipping in laboratory rodents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wever, K.E.; Geessink, F.J.; Brouwer, M.A.E.; Tillema, A.; Ritskes-Hoitinga, M.

    2017-01-01

    Toe clipping and ear clipping (also ear notching or ear punching) are frequently used methods for individual identification of laboratory rodents. These procedures potentially cause severe discomfort, which can reduce animal welfare and distort experimental results. However, no systematic summary of

  16. Managing warehouse efficiency and worker discomfort through enhanced storage assignment decisions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Larco, José Antonio; De Koster, René; Roodbergen, Kees Jan; Dul, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Humans are at the heart of crucial processes in warehouses. Besides the common economic goal of minimising cycle times, we therefore add in this paper the human well-being goal of minimising workers' discomfort in the context of order picking. We propose amethodology for identifying the most

  17. Predictors of musculoskeletal discomfort: A cross-cultural comparison between Malaysian and Australian office workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maakip, Ismail; Keegel, Tessa; Oakman, Jodi

    2017-04-01

    Prevalence and predictors associated with musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) vary considerably between countries. It is plausible that socio-cultural contexts may contribute to these differences. We conducted a cross-sectional survey with 1184 Malaysian and Australian office workers with the aim to examine predictors associated with MSD discomfort. The 6-month period prevalence of self-reported MSD discomfort for Malaysian office workers was 92.8% and 71.2% among Australian workers. In Malaysia, a model regressing level of musculoskeletal discomfort against possible risk factors was significant overall (F [6, 370] = 17.35; p work-life balance (β = -0.13). In Australia, the regression model is also significant (F [6, 539] = 16.47; p importance differed. Work-life balance was significantly associated with increased MSD discomfort for the Malaysian population only. Design and implementation of MSD risk management needs to take into account the work practices and culture of the target population. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Work Safety Climate, Musculoskeletal Discomfort, Working While Injured, and Depression Among Migrant Farmworkers in North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Hara, Heather; Grzywacz, Joseph G.; Isom, Scott; Chen, Haiying; Quandt, Sara A.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. This analysis described Latino migrant farmworkers’ work safety climate and its association with musculoskeletal discomfort, working while injured or ill, and depressive symptoms. Methods. Data were from a cross-sectional survey of 300 farmworkers conducted in North Carolina in 2009. Generalized estimating equations models were used to investigate the association of work safety climate with health and safety outcomes. Results. Farmworkers perceived their work safety climate to be poor. About 40% had elevated musculoskeletal discomfort, 5.0% had worked at least 1 day while injured or ill, and 27.9% had elevated depressive symptoms. The odds of elevated musculoskeletal discomfort were 12% lower and the odds of working while injured or ill were 15% lower with each 1-unit increase in the work safety climate. Work safety climate was not associated with depressive symptoms. Conclusions. Work safety climate was important for agricultural workers. Poor work safety climate was associated with health outcomes (musculoskeletal discomfort) and safety (working while injured or ill). Interventions to improve work safety climate in agriculture are needed, with these interventions being directed to employers and workers. PMID:22401520

  19. The impact of sit-stand office workstations on worker discomfort and productivity: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakolis, Thomas; Callaghan, Jack P

    2014-05-01

    This review examines the effectiveness of sit-stand workstations at reducing worker discomfort without causing a decrease in productivity. Four databases were searched for studies on sit-stand workstations, and five selection criteria were used to identify appropriate articles. Fourteen articles were identified that met at least three of the five selection criteria. Seven of the identified studies reported either local, whole body or both local and whole body subjective discomfort scores. Six of these studies indicated implementing sit-stand workstations in an office environment led to lower levels of reported subjective discomfort (three of which were statistically significant). Therefore, this review concluded that sit-stand workstations are likely effective in reducing perceived discomfort. Eight of the identified studies reported a productivity outcome. Three of these studies reported an increase in productivity during sit-stand work, four reported no affect on productivity, and one reported mixed productivity results. Therefore, this review concluded that sit-stand workstations do not cause a decrease in productivity. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Quantitative analysis of tear film fluorescence and discomfort during tear film instability and thinning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begley, Carolyn; Simpson, Trefford; Liu, Haixia; Salvo, Eliza; Wu, Ziwei; Bradley, Arthur; Situ, Ping

    2013-04-12

    The purpose of this study was to test the association between tear film fluorescence changes during tear break-up (TBU) or thinning and the concurrent ocular sensory response. Sixteen subjects kept one eye open as long as possible (MBI), indicated their discomfort level continuously, and rated ocular sensations of irritation, stinging, burning, pricking, and cooling using visual analog scales (VAS). Fluorescence of the tear film was quantified by a pixel-based analysis of the median pixel intensity (PI), TBU, and percentage of dark pixels (DarkPix) over time. A cutoff of 5% TBU was used to divide subjects into either break-up (BU) or minimal break-up (BUmin) groups. Tear film fluorescence decreased (median PI) and the percentage of TBU and DarkPix increased in all trials, with the rate significantly greater in the BU than the BUmin group (Mann-Whitney U test, P film thinning best explains decreasing tear film fluorescence during trials. This was highly correlated with increasing ocular discomfort, suggesting that both tear film thinning and TBU stimulate underlying corneal nerves, although TBU produced more rapid stimulation. Slow increases in tear film hyperosmolarity may cause the gradual increase in discomfort during slow tear film thinning, whereas the sharp increases in discomfort during TBU suggest a more complex stimulus.

  1. Editorial: Comfort and discomfort studies demonstrate the need for a new model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vink, P.; Hallbeck, S.

    2012-01-01

    The term comfort is often seen relating to the marketing of products like chairs, cars, clothing, hand tools and even airplane tickets, while in the scientific literature, the term discomfort shows up often, since it is used in research. Few papers explain the concept of a localized comfort

  2. Discomforts of tasks video users: The case of workers of ENEA area in Bologna (Italy)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cenni, P.; Varasano, R.; Cavallaro, E.; Arduini, R.; Mattioli, S.; Tuozzi, G.

    1996-08-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the subjective musculoskeletal discomfort in a sample of 334 workers (204 males and 130 females) of the ENEA area in Bologna, using for different periods and tasks video display units (VDU). On a preliminary self report questionnaire the workers have reported: hours at VDU per day, type of task type of hardware, physical-ergonomic environmental conditions, equipment and layout of the work station. Then, on a case-history form, the researcher has recorded for each subject: anamnesis, fatigue symptoms, discomfort and pain perceived in the back, shoulder, hand and arm regions. The results have shown that, in this sample, the main cause for potential musculoskeletal problems is related to aging whereas the women mainly engaged in repetitive jobs seem to be more likely subject to these troubles. About the correlation between type of task and musculoskeletal discomfort, the females refer more complaints than the males, especially when the task is repetitive. Also the number of hours spent at VDU per day is higher in the females. Finally, about physical-ergonomic environmental conditions, most users have not referred discomforts related to lighting, noise, micro climate or to work station (equipment and layout)

  3. Decentralized planning of energy demand for the management of robustness and discomfort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pournaras, E.; Vasirani, M.; Kooij, R.E.; Aberer, K.

    2014-01-01

    The robustness of smart grids is challenged by unpredictable power peaks or temporal demand oscillations that can cause blackouts and increase supply costs. Planning of demand can mitigate these effects and increase robustness. However, the impact on consumers in regards to the discomfort they

  4. Musculoskeletal discomfort during VDU tasks; input for a smart office chair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Commissaris, D.A.C.M.; Blok, M.; Bosch, T.; Konemann, R.; Bronkhorst, R.

    2008-01-01

    TNO and BMA Ergonomics are developing a so-called smart office chair. This chair is supposed to provide feedback on postures and movements during seated office work. The feedback should enable the user (i.e. the worker doing VDU tasks) to perform his or her work with less discomfort and in a more

  5. Validation of an instrumented dummy to assess mechanical aspects of discomfort during load carriage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick D Wettenschwiler

    Full Text Available Due to the increasing load in backpacks and other load carriage systems over the last decades, load carriage system designs have to be adapted accordingly to minimize discomfort and to reduce the risk of injury. As subject studies are labor-intensive and include further challenges such as intra-subject and inter-subject variability, we aimed to validate an instrumented dummy as an objective laboratory tool to assess the mechanical aspects of discomfort. The validation of the instrumented dummy was conducted by comparison with a recent subject study. The mechanical parameters that characterize the static and dynamic interaction between backpack and body during different backpack settings were compared. The second aim was to investigate whether high predictive power (coefficient of determination R2>0.5 in assessing the discomfort of load carriage systems could be reached using the instrumented dummy. Measurements were conducted under static conditions, simulating upright standing, and dynamic conditions, simulating level walking. Twelve different configurations of a typical load carriage system, a commercially available backpack with a hip belt, were assessed. The mechanical parameters were measured in the shoulder and the hip region of the dummy and consisted of average pressure, peak pressure, strap force and relative motion between the system and the body. The twelve configurations consisted of three different weights (15kg, 20kg, and 25kg, combined with four different hip belt tensions (30N, 60N, 90N, and 120N. Through the significant (p<0.05 correlation of the mechanical parameters measured on the dummy with the corresponding values of the subject study, the dummy was validated for all static measurements and for dynamic measurements in the hip region to accurately simulate the interaction between the human body and the load carriage system. Multiple linear regressions with the mechanical parameters measured on the dummy as independent

  6. Expression of heat shock proteins (HSPs) in Aedes aegypti (L) and Aedes albopictus (Skuse) (Diptera: Culicidae) larvae in response to thermal stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivan, Arun; Shriram, Ananganallur Nagarajan; Muruganandam, Nagarajan; Thamizhmani, Ramanathan

    2017-03-01

    Climatic changes are responsible, to a certain extent for the occurrence and spread of arboviral pathogens world over. Temperature is one of the important abiotic factors influencing the physiological processes of mosquitoes. Several genes of heat shock protein (HSP) families are known to be expressed in mosquitoes, which aid in overcoming stress induced by elevated temperature. In order to understand expression of HSP family genes in the Andaman population of Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus, we used quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) to examine expression levels of HSPs in response to thermal stress under laboratory and in actual field conditions. HSP genes AeaHsp26, AeaHsp83 and AeaHsc70 were examined by comparing relative transcript expression levels at 31°C, 33°C, 34°C, 37°C and 39°C respectively. Enhanced up-regulation of HSPs was evident in third instar larvae of Ae. aegypti with rise in water temperatures (31°C, 33°C, 34°C) in the containers in the nature and thermally stressed (37°C and 39°C) in laboratory conditions. In Ae. albopictus up-regulation of HSPs was observed in field conditions at 34°C only and when thermally treated at 37°C, while down regulation was evident in larvae subjected to thermal stress in laboratory at 39°C. Data on expression levels revealed that larvae of Ae. aegypti was tolerant to thermal stress, while Ae. albopictus larvae was sensitive to heat shock treatment. Statistical analysis indicated that AeaHsp83 genes were significantly up-regulated in Ae. aegypti larvae after 360min exposure to high temperature (39°C). The difference in expression levels of AeaHsp26, AeaHsc70 and AeaHsp83 genes in Ae. albopictus larvae was statistically significant between different exposure temperatures. All of these genes were significantly up-regulated at 37°C. These results indicate that AeaHsp26, AeaHsc70 and AeaHsp83 are important markers of stress and perhaps function as proteins conferring protection and

  7. Effects of two eye drop products on computer users with subjective ocular discomfort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skilling, Francis C; Weaver, Tony A; Kato, Kenneth P; Ford, Jerry G; Dussia, Elyse M

    2005-01-01

    An increasing number of people seek medical attention for symptoms of visual discomfort due to computer vision syndrome (CVS). We compared the efficacy and adverse event rates of a new eye lubricant, OptiZen (InnoZen, Inc., polysorbate 80 0.5%) and Visine Original (Pfizer Consumer Healthcare, tetrahydrozoline HCl 0.05%). In this double-blind parallel arm trial, 50 healthy men and women, ages 18 to 65 years, with symptoms of CVS who use a video display terminal for a minimum of 4 hours per day were randomized to OptiZen (n = 25) or Visine Original (n= 25), 1 to 2 drops b.i.d. for 5 days. The primary end-points were ocular discomfort and adverse events. OptiZen and Visine Original had similar efficacy in alleviating symptoms of ocular discomfort (odds ratio of 1.23 [95% confidence interval, 0.63 to 2.42], P= 0.55). OptiZen and Visine Original were very similar with respect to odds ratios and 95% confidence interval (CI) for each of the measurement times (P= 0.72). Visine Original users reported a significantly higher incidence of temporary ocular stinging/burning immediately after drug instillation (28%, 7/25) than did OptiZen users (4%, 1/24) (P= 0.05). Patients using OptiZen were 89% less likely to have stinging/burning effects than those patients using Visine Original (95% CI: 0.01 to 0.95). OptiZen and Visine Original are effective at alleviating ocular discomfort associated with prolonged computer use. Adverse event findings suggest that OptiZen causes less ocular discomfort on instillation, potentially attributable to its milder ingredient profile.

  8. Discomfort associated with fixed orthodontic appliances: determinant factors and influence on quality of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Silva Marques

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the determinant factors of discomfort attributed to the use of fixed orthodontic appliance and the effect on the quality of life of adolescents. MATERIAL AND METHODS : Two hundred and seventy-two individuals aged between 9 and 18 years old, enrolled in public and private schools and undergoing orthodontic treatment with fixed appliance participated in this cross-sectional study. The participants were randomly selected from a sample comprising 62,496 individuals of the same age group. Data was collected by means of questionnaires and an interview. Discomfort intensity and bio-psychosocial variables were assessed using the Oral Impact on Daily Performance questionnaire. Self-esteem was determined using the Global Negative Self-Evaluation questionnaire. Statistical analysis involved the chi-square test and both simple and multiple Poisson regression analyses. RESULTS: Although most individuals did not present discomfort, there was a prevalence of 15.9% of impact on individuals' daily life exclusively due to the use of fixed orthodontic appliance . Age [PR: 3.2 (95% CI: 1.2-8.5], speech impairment [PR: 2.2 (95% CI: 1.1-4.6], poor oral hygiene [PR: 2.4 (95% CI: 1.2-4.8] and tooth mobility [PR: 3.9 (95% CI: 1.8-8.1] remained independently associated with a greater prevalence of discomfort (P ≤ 0.05. CONCLUSIONS: Discomfort associated with the use of fixed orthodontic appliances exerted a negative influence on the quality of life of the adolescents comprising the present study. The determinants of this association were age, poor oral hygiene, speech impairment and tooth mobility.

  9. Thermal Comfort Level Assessment in Urban Area of Petrolina-PE County, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Vieira de Azevedo

    Full Text Available Abstract This study evaluated the thermal conditions of urban areas in Petrolina-PE, from continuous data collected in urban and rural areas for the year of 2012. The results characterized urban heat islands (UHI with varying intensity in urban areas, especially UHI = 5.3 °C (high intensity occurred on April 28, 2012. It was evident that the constituent elements of urban areas contribute to the formation and expansion of UHI bringing thermal discomfort for its inhabitants. An adaptation to Thom’s equation for calculating the Thermal Discomfort Index (DIT, was used to obtain the maximum (DITx and minimum (DITm thermal discomfort. In the urban area, the DITm indicated thermal comfort in 23.0% of the days and partial comfort in 77.0% of days surveyed. Already, the DITx characterized 71.6% of days with partial comfort and 28.4% of days with thermal discomfort. In the rural area, The DITm indicated that 41.5% of days were thermally comfortable and 58.5% of days had partial comfort. However, the DITx pointed 87.7% of the days of this environment with partial thermal comfort and 12.3% of thermally uncomfortable days. Finally, the results showed that afforestation of urban area constitutes to an effective and efficient way to mitigate thermal discomfort.

  10. EXPRESS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ancelin, C.; Le, P.; DeSaint-Quentin, S.; Villatte, N.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents EXPRESS, an expert system developed for the automation of reliability studies. The first part consists in the description of the method for static thermohydraulic systems. In this step, the authors define the knowledge representation based on the two inference engines - ALOUETTE and LCR developed by EDF. They explain all the process to construct a fault tree from a topological and functional description of the system. Numerous examples are exhibited in illustration of the method. This is followed by the lessons derived from the studies performed on some safety systems of the PALUEL nuclear plant. The development of the same approach for electric power systems is described, insisting on the difference resulting from the sequential nature of these systems. Finally, they show the main advantages identified during the studies

  11. Effects of Thermal Stress on the mRNA Expression of SOD, HSP90, and HSP70 in the Spotted Sea Bass ( Lateolabrax maculatus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Moon-Kyeong; Park, Ho-Ra; Yeo, Won-Jun; Han, Kyung-Nam

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the thermal stress response in the spotted sea bass ( Lateolabrax maculatus). Spotted sea basses were exposed to 4 different water temperatures (20, 22, 24, and 28°C) in increasing increments of 2°C/h from 18°C (control) for different time periods (0, 6, 12, 24, 48, 72, and 96 h). Subsequently, 3 tissues (liver, muscle, and gill) were isolated, and the levels of SOD, HSP90, and HSP70 mRNA were assessed. SOD mRNA expression was maintained at baseline levels of control fish at all water temperatures in the liver, while muscle and gill tissue showed an increase followed by a decrease over each certain time with higher water temperature. HSP90 mRNA expression increased in the liver at ≤ 24°C over time, but maintained baseline expression at 28°C. In muscle, HSP90 mRNA expression gradually increased at all water temperatures, but increased and then decreased at ≥ 24°C in gill tissue. HSP70 mRNA expression exhibited an increase and then a decrease in liver tissue at 28°C, but mainly showed similar expression patterns to HSP90 in all tissues. These results suggest the activity of a defense mechanism using SOD, HSP90, and HSP70 in the spotted sea bass upon rapid increases in water temperature, where the expression of these genes indicated differences between tissues in the extent of the defense mechanisms. Also, these results indicate that high water temperature and long-term thermal stress exposure can inhibit physiological defense mechanisms.

  12. Impact of Computer Related Posture on the Occurrence of Musculoskeletal Discomfort among Secondary School Students in Lagos, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odebiyi, D O; Olawale, O A; Adeniji, Y M

    2013-01-01

    Computers have become an essential part of life particularly in industrially advanced countries of the world. Children now have greater accessibility to computers both at school and at home. Recent studies suggest that with this increased exposure, there are associated musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) in both school-aged children and adults. To assess the posture assumed by secondary school students during computer use and its impact on the occurrence and severity of reported musculoskeletal discomforts. Posture assumed during normal computer class, occurrence of discomforts, body parts involved and the intensity of discomforts were evaluated in 235 school aged children using Rapid Upper Limb Assessment (RULA) scale, Body Discomfort Chart (BDC) and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) before and after normal computer class. Inferential statistics of t-test and chi-square were used to determine significance difference between variables, with level of significant set at p Computer use produced significant discomforts on the neck, shoulder and low back. There was a significant relationship between participants height and posture assumed. Two hundred and eleven (89.8%) participants reported discomforts/pain during the use of computer. Weight and height were contributory factors to the occurrence of musculoskeletal discomfort/pain (p computer use. Weight and height were implicated as factors that influenced the form of posture and the nature of the reported discomfort. Creating awareness about the knowledge of ergonomics and safety for promotion of good posture was therefore recommended.

  13. Human Thermal Comfort In Residential House Buildings Of Jimma Town Southwest Ethiopia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chali Yadeta

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Indoor human thermal comfort is an important factor in indoor air quality assessment. Thermal comfort affects human health work efficiency and overall wellbeing. Thermal discomfort in indoors lowers the emotional and physical health of the occupants. This paper targets to explore human thermal comfort in residential house buildings of Jimma town and state some possible mechanisms to improve the existing thermal discomfort in large number the houses. For the study 303 structured questionnaires were distributed to the residential houses in thirteen places of the town based on predetermined criteria. The study reveals that human thermal discomfort in residential houses Jimma town are mainly from poor architectural design and improper use of heat generating appliances in indoors. The uses architectural design that suites the present climatic conditions and use of materials that facilitates ventilations will enhance the realization of the required human thermal comfort in residential houses of the study area.

  14. In Situ Measurement of Discomfort Curves for Seated Subjects in a Car on the Four-Post Rig

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Ibicek

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to measure and quantify perceived intensity of discomfort due to vibration in a vehicle in situ considering complete vehicle dynamic behaviour. The shaker table based discomfort curves or the road test results may not accurately and universally indicate the true level of human discomfort in a vehicle. A new experimental method, using a seated human in a car on the four-post rig simulator, is proposed to quantify discomfort. The intensity of perception to vibration decreased with decreasing input and increasing frequency; the rate of change is different from the published literature; the difference is large for angular modes of inputs. Vehicle dynamic response is used to inform and analyse the results. The repeatability of the method and the fact that they are in situ measurements may eventually help reduce reliance on the road tests. Furthermore, discomfort curves obtained, subsequently, can be used in predictive models.

  15. P1-1: The Effect of Convergence Training on Visual Discomfort in 3D TV Viewing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Min Jeon

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated whether convergence training has an effect on reducing visual discomfort in viewing a stereoscopic TV. Participants were assigned into either a training group or a control group. In the training group, one of the two different training procedures is provided: gradual change or random change in the disparities of bar stimulus which was used for convergence training. Training itself was very effective so that convergence fusional range was improved after 3 repeated trainings with intervals of two weeks. In order to evaluate the effect of convergence training on visual discomfort, the visual discomfort in 3D TV viewing was measured before and after training sessions. The results showed that a significant reduction in visual discomfort was found after training only in one training group. These results demonstrated a repeated convergence training might be helpful in reducing the visual discomfort. Further studies should be needed to set the most effective parameters of training of this pattern.

  16. Expression of genes involved in energy mobilization and osmoprotectant synthesis during thermal and dehydration stress in the Antarctic midge, Belgica antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teets, Nicholas M; Kawarasaki, Yuta; Lee, Richard E; Denlinger, David L

    2013-02-01

    The Antarctic midge, Belgica antarctica, experiences sub-zero temperatures and desiccating conditions for much of the year, and in response to these environmental insults, larvae undergo rapid shifts in metabolism, mobilizing carbohydrate energy reserves to promote synthesis of low-molecular-mass osmoprotectants. In this study, we measured the expression of 11 metabolic genes in response to thermal and dehydration stress. During both heat and cold stress, we observed upregulation of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (pepck) and glycogen phosphorylase (gp) to support rapid glucose mobilization. In contrast, there was a general downregulation of pathways related to polyol, trehalose, and proline synthesis during both high- and low-temperature stress. Pepck was likewise upregulated in response to different types of dehydration stress; however, for many of the other genes, expression patterns depended on the nature of dehydration stress. Following fast dehydration, expression patterns were similar to those observed during thermal stress, i.e., upregulation of gp accompanied by downregulation of trehalose and proline synthetic genes. In contrast, gradual, prolonged dehydration (both at a constant temperature and in conjunction with chilling) promoted marked upregulation of genes responsible for trehalose and proline synthesis. On the whole, our data agree with known metabolic adaptations to stress in B. antarctica, although a few discrepancies between gene expression patterns and downstream metabolite contents point to fluxes that are not controlled at the level of transcription.

  17. Alignment efficiency and discomfort of three orthodontic archwire sequences: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Emily; Ho, Christopher; Miles, Peter

    2011-03-01

    To compare the efficiency of orthodontic archwire sequences produced by three manufacturers. Prospective, randomized clinical trial with three parallel groups. Private orthodontic practice in Caloundra, QLD, Australia. One hundred and thirty-two consecutive patients were randomized to one of three archwire sequence groups: (i) 3M Unitek, 0·014 inch Nitinol, 0·017 inch × 0·017 inch heat activated Ni-Ti; (ii) GAC international, 0·014 inch Sentalloy, 0·016 × 0·022 inch Bioforce; and (iii) Ormco corporation, 0·014 inch Damon Copper Ni-Ti, 0·014 × 0·025 inch Damon Copper Ni-Ti. All patients received 0·018 × 0·025 inch slot Victory Series™ brackets. Mandibular impressions were taken before the insertion of each archwire. Patients completed discomfort surveys according to a seven-point Likert Scale at 4 h, 24 h, 3 days and 7 days after the insertion of each archwire. Efficiency was measured by time required to reach the working archwire, mandibular anterior alignment and level of discomfort. No significant differences were found in the reduction of irregularity between the archwire sequences at any time-point (T1: P = 0·12; T2: P = 0·06; T3: P = 0·21) or in the time to reach the working archwire (P = 0·28). No significant differences were found in the overall discomfort scores between the archwire sequences (4 h: P = 0·30; 24 h: P = 0·18; 3 days: P = 0·53; 7 days: P = 0·47). When the time-points were analysed individually, the 3M Unitek archwire sequence induced significantly less discomfort than GAC and Ormco archwires 24 h after the insertion of the third archwire (P = 0·02). This could possibly be attributed to the progression in archwire material and archform. The archwire sequences were similar in alignment efficiency and overall discomfort. Progression in archwire dimension and archform may contribute to discomfort levels. This study provides clinical justification for three common archwire sequences in 0·018 × 0·025 inch slot brackets.

  18. Assessing Thermal Comfort Due to a Ventilated Double Window

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlos, Jorge S.; Corvacho, Helena

    2017-10-01

    Building design and its components are the result of a complex process, which should provide pleasant conditions to its inhabitants. Therefore, indoor acceptable comfort is influenced by the architectural design. ISO and ASHRAE standards define thermal comfort as the condition of mind that expresses satisfaction with the thermal environment. The energy demand for heating, beside the building’s physical properties, also depend on human behaviour, like opening or closing windows. Generally, windows are the weakest façade element concerning to thermal performance. A lower thermal resistance allows higher thermal conduction through it. When a window is very hot or cold, and the occupant is very close to it, it may result in thermal discomfort. The functionality of a ventilated double window introduces new physical considerations to a traditional window. In consequence, it is necessary to study the local effect on human comfort in function of the boundary conditions. Wind, solar availability, air temperature and therefore heating and indoor air quality conditions will affect the relationship between this passive system and the indoor environment. In the present paper, the influence of thermal performance and ventilation on human comfort resulting from the construction and geometry solutions is shown, helping to choose the best solution. The presented approach shows that in order to save energy it is possible to reduce the air changes of a room to the minimum, without compromising air quality, enhancing simultaneously local thermal performance and comfort. The results of the study on the effect of two parallel windows with a ventilated channel in the same fenestration on comfort conditions for several different room dimensions, are also presented. As the room dimensions’ rate changes so does the window to floor rate; therefore, under the same climatic conditions and same construction solution, different results are obtained.

  19. Poor safety climate, long work hours, and musculoskeletal discomfort among Latino horse farm workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanberg, Jennifer; Clouser, Jessica Miller; Gan, Wenqi; Flunker, John C; Westneat, Susan; Browning, Steven R

    2017-09-03

    This study investigated the prevalence of self-reported musculoskeletal discomfort (MSD) and work-related factors associated with elevated MSD among Latino thoroughbred farm workers. Participants (N = 225) were recruited using a community-based purposive sampling approach to participate in in-person interviews. Of these workers, 85% experienced MSD. MSD was divided into tertiles; the upper tertile was defined as elevated. Multivariable Poisson regression revealed associations between any elevated MSD and longer tenure on horse farms, longer work hours, and poor safety climate. Elevated neck/back MSD was associated with longer tenure, longer work hours, and poor safety climate. Elevated upper extremity MSD was associated with age and poor safety climate. Elevated lower extremity MSD was associated with longer tenure, longer work hours, and being female. Musculoskeletal discomfort is common among these workers. Improving safety climate and minimizing long work hours is recommended.

  20. The Burden of Cystoscopic Bladder Cancer Surveillance: Anxiety, Discomfort, and Patient Preferences for Decision Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Kevin; Zubkoff, Lisa; Sirovich, Brenda E; Goodney, Philip P; Robertson, Douglas J; Seigne, John D; Schroeck, Florian R

    2017-10-01

    To examine discomfort, anxiety, and preferences for decision making in patients undergoing surveillance cystoscopy for non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). Veterans with a prior diagnosis of NMIBC completed validated survey instruments assessing procedural discomfort, worry, and satisfaction, and were invited to participate in semistructured focus groups about their experience and desire to be involved in surveillance decision making. Focus group transcripts were analyzed qualitatively, using (1) systematic iterative coding, (2) triangulation involving multiple perspectives from urologists and an implementation scientist, and (3) searching and accounting for disconfirming evidence. Twelve patients participated in 3 focus groups. Median number of lifetime cystoscopy procedures was 6.5 (interquartile range 4-10). Based on survey responses, two-thirds of participants (64%) experienced some degree of procedural discomfort or worry, and all participants reported improvement in at least 2 dimensions of overall well-being following cystoscopy. Qualitative analysis of the focus groups indicated that participants experience preprocedural anxiety and worry about their disease. Although many participants did not perceive themselves as having a defined role in decision making surrounding their surveillance care, their preferences to be involved in decision making varied widely, ranging from acceptance of the physician's recommendation, to uncertainty, to dissatisfaction with not being involved more in determining the intensity of surveillance care. Many patients with NMIBC experience discomfort, anxiety, and worry related to disease progression and not only cystoscopy. Although some patients are content to defer surveillance decisions to their physicians, others prefer to be more involved. Future work should focus on defining patient-centered approaches to surveillance decision making. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Risk Assessment: Factors Contributing to Discomfort for Menopausal Women in Workplace

    OpenAIRE

    Jafari, Mehdi; Seifi, Bahar; Heidari, Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to review the Factors contributing to discomfort for menopausal women in workplace and the perceived effects of working conditions on menopausal symptoms, and to produce recommendations for managers and women. This study was a review article. We searched PubMed and Science Direct for articles related to menopause and workplace. Keywords included: menopause AND workplace OR occupational health or menopausal women AND managers. Because we aimed to update the litera...

  2. Stretching and joint mobilization exercises reduce call-center operators' musculoskeletal discomfort and fatigue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Helena de Castro Lacaze

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available AIM: We sought to evaluate musculoskeletal discomfort and mental and physical fatigue in the call-center workers of an airline company before and after a supervised exercise program compared with rest breaks during the work shift. INTRODUCTION: This was a longitudinal pilot study conducted in a flight-booking call-center for an airline in São Paulo, Brazil. Occupational health activities are recommended to decrease the negative effects of the call-center working conditions. In practice, exercise programs are commonly recommended for computer workers, but their effects have not been studied in call-center operators. METHODS: Sixty-four call-center operators participated in this study. Thirty-two subjects were placed into the experimental group and attended a 10-min daily exercise session for 2 months. Conversely, 32 participants were placed into the control group and took a 10-min daily rest break during the same period. Each subject was evaluated once a week by means of the Corlett-Bishop body map with a visual analog discomfort scale and the Chalder fatigue questionnaire. RESULTS: Musculoskeletal discomfort decreased in both groups, but the reduction was only statistically significant for the spine and buttocks (p=0.04 and the sum of the segments (p=0.01 in the experimental group. In addition, the experimental group showed significant differences in the level of mental fatigue, especially in questions related to memory Rienzo, #181ff and tiredness (p=0.001. CONCLUSIONS: Our preliminary results demonstrate that appropriately designed and supervised exercise programs may be more efficient than rest breaks in decreasing discomfort and fatigue levels in call-center operators.

  3. The influence of sequence of impressions on children's anxiety and discomfort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaakko, Tarja; Horn, Michael T; Weinstein, Philip; Kaufman, Eliezer; Leggott, Penelope; Coldwell, Susan E

    2003-01-01

    Laboratory studies with adults and children have found lower pain reports when pain proceeds from high to low rather than from low to high. However, pediatric dentists often ease children into difficult procedures (from easiest to most difficult). This study investigated the influence of order during a clinical procedure that involved taking maxillary and mandibular alginate impressions. Subjects were 24 children aged 5 to 6 years (preoperational stage) and 24 children aged 9 to 10 years (concrete operational stage). Children were randomly assigned to either start with the mandibular (presumed to be easier) or start with the maxillary (presumed to be harder) impressions. Discomfort during the sequence of impressions was measured using the "Affective Facial Scale." A telephone interview was conducted 2 weeks later to evaluate the memory of discomfort. The results indicated that the older children who started with the mandibular (easier) impression and ended with the maxillary (more uncomfortable) impression reported significantly lower discomfort than older children who started with the maxillary impression and ended with the mandibular (Mann-Whitney U, Z = -2.08; P < .037). The same tendency was noted 2 weeks later on a telephone interview. By phone, 92% of the older children who started with the mandibular impression rated the sequence of impressions as "not at all bad," while only 58% of the older children who started with the maxillary impression rated the overall experience as "not at all bad" (chi2 = 3.56, P < .059). The younger children did not show any significant difference in their ratings of discomfort at either of the assessment periods. Consistent with clinical practice, this study observed that older children benefit from beginning an appointment with an easier procedure and working up to a more difficult one.

  4. PDYN rs2281285 Variant Association with Drinking to Avoid Emotional or Somatic Discomfort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preuss, Ulrich W.; Winham, Stacey J.; Biernacka, Joanna M.; Geske, Jennifer R.; Bakalkin, Georgy; Koller, Gabriele; Zill, Peter; Soyka, Michael; Karpyak, Victor M.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction One of the proposed psychobiological pathways of craving attributes the desire for drinking in the context of tension, discomfort or unpleasant emotions, to “negative” (or “relief”) craving. The aim of this study was to replicate a previously reported association of the PDYN rs2281285 variant with negative craving using a different phenotyping approach. Methods The TaqMan® Genotyping Assay was used to genotype the rs2281285 variant in 417 German alcohol-dependent subjects. The presence of negative/relief craving was assessed by asking if participants ever ingested alcohol to avoid unwanted emotional or somatic discomfort. Results The minor allele of rs2281285 was associated with an increased risk of drinking to avoid/escape unwanted emotional or somatic events (OR = 2.29, 95% CI = 1.08–4.85, p = 0.0298). Discussion Despite the use of a different phenotyping approach to the measurement of negative craving, our results confirm the association between negative craving and PDYN rs2281285. Genetic markers of negative craving may help to identify subgroups of alcohol-dependent individuals vulnerable to relapse in the context of negative emotions or somatic discomfort, leading to the development of specifically tailored treatment strategies. PMID:24223163

  5. PDYN rs2281285 variant association with drinking to avoid emotional or somatic discomfort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich W Preuss

    Full Text Available One of the proposed psychobiological pathways of craving attributes the desire for drinking in the context of tension, discomfort or unpleasant emotions, to "negative" (or "relief" craving. The aim of this study was to replicate a previously reported association of the PDYN rs2281285 variant with negative craving using a different phenotyping approach.The TaqMan® Genotyping Assay was used to genotype the rs2281285 variant in 417 German alcohol-dependent subjects. The presence of negative/relief craving was assessed by asking if participants ever ingested alcohol to avoid unwanted emotional or somatic discomfort.The minor allele of rs2281285 was associated with an increased risk of drinking to avoid/escape unwanted emotional or somatic events (OR=2.29, 95% CI=1.08-4.85, p=0.0298.Despite the use of a different phenotyping approach to the measurement of negative craving, our results confirm the association between negative craving and PDYN rs2281285. Genetic markers of negative craving may help to identify subgroups of alcohol-dependent individuals vulnerable to relapse in the context of negative emotions or somatic discomfort, leading to the development of specifically tailored treatment strategies.

  6. Prevalence and Risk Factors Associated with Musculoskeletal Discomfort in Spay and Neuter Veterinarians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara C. White

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available A cross-sectional study to investigate musculoskeletal discomfort (MSD surveyed 219 veterinarians who currently or previously perform spays and neuters at least 4 hours per week. Participants were asked about the presence and severity of hand and body MSD during the previous month, whether MSD interfered with work or daily activities, whether they attributed their MSD to their spay/neuter work, and whether MSD had ever necessitated absence from work. The period prevalence of MSD was 99.1%, with 76.7% experiencing hand or wrist pain and 98.2% experiencing body pain. Hand discomfort was most commonly reported in the right thumb and/or thumb base (49.8% and the right wrist (37.9%. Body discomfort was most commonly reported in the lower back (76.7%, shoulders (72.6%, and neck (71.7%. Increasing career length, increasing weekly hours in surgery and decreasing job satisfaction were the work-related factors with the greatest relative contribution accounting for variation in hand pain severity and total pain. Although 94.4% of respondents felt that posture during surgery is important, only 30.6% had received any instruction in posture and positioning for surgery. Future interventions should aim to optimize surgical efficiency, surgeon work schedules, and working environment. Analysis and intervention studies are required to determine further causes of MSD in these veterinarians and develop interventions to prevent MSD.

  7. Prevalence and Risk Factors Associated with Musculoskeletal Discomfort in Spay and Neuter Veterinarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Sara C

    2013-02-04

    A cross-sectional study to investigate musculoskeletal discomfort (MSD) surveyed 219 veterinarians who currently or previously perform spays and neuters at least 4 hours per week. Participants were asked about the presence and severity of hand and body MSD during the previous month, whether MSD interfered with work or daily activities, whether they attributed their MSD to their spay/neuter work, and whether MSD had ever necessitated absence from work. The period prevalence of MSD was 99.1%, with 76.7% experiencing hand or wrist pain and 98.2% experiencing body pain. Hand discomfort was most commonly reported in the right thumb and/or thumb base (49.8%) and the right wrist (37.9%). Body discomfort was most commonly reported in the lower back (76.7%), shoulders (72.6%), and neck (71.7%). Increasing career length, increasing weekly hours in surgery and decreasing job satisfaction were the work-related factors with the greatest relative contribution accounting for variation in hand pain severity and total pain. Although 94.4% of respondents felt that posture during surgery is important, only 30.6% had received any instruction in posture and positioning for surgery. Future interventions should aim to optimize surgical efficiency, surgeon work schedules, and working environment. Analysis and intervention studies are required to determine further causes of MSD in these veterinarians and develop interventions to prevent MSD.

  8. Keeping your distance: attentional withdrawal in individuals who show physiological signs of social discomfort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szpak, Ancret; Loetscher, Tobias; Churches, Owen; Thomas, Nicole A; Spence, Charles J; Nicholls, Michael E R

    2015-04-01

    Being in close social proximity to a stranger is generally perceived to be an uncomfortable experience, which most people seek to avoid. In circumstances where crowding is unavoidable, however, people may seek to withdraw their attention from the other person. This study examined whether social discomfort, as indexed by electrodermal activity, is related to a withdrawal of attention in 28 (m=8, f=20) university students. Students performed a radial line bisection task while alone or together with a stranger facing them. Physiological arousal was indexed by a wrist monitor, which recorded electrodermal activity. Correlational analyses showed that individuals who displayed physiological discomfort when together showed a withdrawal of the perceived midpoint of the line towards them (and away from the stranger). Conversely, individuals who showed no discomfort exhibited an expansion of the perceived midpoint away from them. We propose that participants shift their attention away from the stranger to increase interpersonal distance and reduce anxiety/arousal. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Qualitative content analysis of psychologic discomfort and coping process after needlestick injuries among health care workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Jae Sim; Son, Haeng Mi; Jeong, Ihn Sook; Son, Jun Seok; Shin, Kyong-sok; Yoonchang, Sung Won; Jin, Hye Young; Han, Si Hyeon; Han, Su Ha

    2016-02-01

    This study was designed to survey psychologic discomfort and coping processes of health care workers that suffered needlestick injuries (NSIs). This qualitative analysis was performed with 15 health care workers who experienced NSIs. Data were collected using face-to-face interviews. The study subjects were asked the following: please describe the psychologic discomfort that you experienced after the NSI incidence. Data were evaluated by qualitative content analysis. Types of psychologic discomfort after NSI among health care workers included anxiety, anger, and feelings of guilt. Some personnel adopted active coping strategies, such as seeking first aid or reporting the incident to a monitoring system, whereas others used passive coping methods, such as avoidance of reporting the incident, vague expectancy to have no problems, and reliance on religious beliefs. Recommended support strategies to improve the prevention of NSIs were augmenting employee education and increasing recognition of techniques for avoiding NSIs. Medical institutions need to provide employees with repeated education so that they are familiar with guidelines for preventing NSIs and to stimulate their alertness to the risk of injuries at any time, in any place, and to anybody. Copyright © 2016 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The rate of change of vergence-accommodation conflict affects visual discomfort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joohwan; Kane, David; Banks, Martin S

    2014-12-01

    Stereoscopic (S3D) displays create conflicts between the distance to which the eyes must converge and the distance to which the eyes must accommodate. Such conflicts require the viewer to overcome the normal coupling between vergence and accommodation, and this effort appears to cause viewer discomfort. Vergence-accommodation coupling is driven by the phasic components of the underlying control systems, and those components respond to relatively fast changes in vergence and accommodative stimuli. Given the relationship between phasic changes and vergence-accommodation coupling, we examined how the rate of change in the vergence-accommodation conflict affects viewer discomfort. We used a stereoscopic display that allows independent manipulation of the stimuli to vergence and accommodation. We presented stimuli that simulate natural viewing (i.e., vergence and accommodative stimuli changed together) and stimuli that simulate S3D viewing (i.e., vergence stimulus changes but accommodative stimulus remains fixed). The changes occurred at 0.01, 0.05, or 0.25 Hz. The lowest rate is too slow to stimulate the phasic components while the highest rate is well within the phasic range. The results were consistent with our expectation: somewhat greater discomfort was experienced when stimulus distance changed rapidly, particularly in S3D viewing when the vergence stimulus changed but the accommodative stimulus did not. These results may help in the generation of guidelines for the creation and viewing of stereo content with acceptable viewer comfort.

  11. The Effect of 2 Injection Speeds on Local Anesthetic Discomfort During Inferior Alveolar Nerve Blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza Melo, Marcelo Rodrigo; Sabey, Mark Jon Santana; Lima, Carla Juliane; de Almeida Souza, Liane Maciel; Groppo, Francisco Carlos

    2015-01-01

    This randomized double-blind crossover trial investigated the discomfort associated with 2 injection speeds, low (60 seconds) and slow (100 seconds), during inferior alveolar nerve block by using 1.8 mL of 2% lidocaine with 1 : 100,000 epinephrine. Three phases were considered: (a) mucosa perforation, (b) needle insertion, and (c) solution injection. Thirty-two healthy adult volunteers needing bilateral inferior alveolar nerve blocks at least 1 week apart were enrolled in the present study. The anesthetic procedure discomfort was recorded by volunteers on a 10-cm visual analog scale in each phase for both injection speeds. Comparison between the 2 anesthesia speeds in each phase was performed by paired t test. Results showed no statistically significant difference between injection speeds regarding perforation (P = .1016), needle placement (P = .0584), or speed injection (P = .1806). The discomfort in all phases was considered low. We concluded that the 2 injection speeds tested did not affect the volunteers' pain perception during inferior alveolar nerve blocks.

  12. Response of the seated human body to whole-body vertical vibration: discomfort caused by mechanical shocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhen; Griffin, Michael J

    2017-03-01

    The frequency dependence of discomfort caused by vertical mechanical shocks has been investigated with 20 seated males exposed to upward and downward shocks at 13 fundamental frequencies (1-16 Hz) and 18 magnitudes (±0.12 to ±8.3 ms -2 ). The rate of growth of discomfort with increasing shock magnitude depended on the fundamental frequency of the shocks, so the frequency dependence of equivalent comfort contours (for both vertical acceleration and vertical force measured at the seat) varied with shock magnitude. The rate of growth of discomfort was similar for acceleration and force, upward and downward shocks, and lower and higher magnitude shocks. The frequency dependence of discomfort from shocks differs from that of sinusoidal vibrations having the same fundamental frequencies. This arises in part from the frequency content of the shock. Frequency weighting W b in BS 6841:1987 and ISO 2631-1:1997 provided reasonable estimates of the discomfort caused by the shocks investigated in this study. Practitioner Summary: No single frequency weighting can accurately predict the discomfort caused by mechanical shocks over wide ranges of shock magnitude, but vibration dose values with frequency weighting W b provide reasonable estimates of discomfort caused by shocks similar to those investigated in this study with peak accelerations well below 1 g.

  13. High-Level Expression of a Thermally Stable Alginate Lyase Using Pichia pastoris, Characterization and Application in Producing Brown Alginate Oligosaccharide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haifeng Li

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available An alginate lyase encoding gene sagl from Flavobacterium sp. H63 was codon optimized and recombinantly expressed at high level in P.pastoris through high cell-density fermentation. The highest yield of recombinant enzyme of sagl (rSAGL in yeast culture supernatant reached 226.4 μg/mL (915.5 U/mL. This was the highest yield record of recombinant expression of alginate lyase so far. The rSAGL was confirmed as a partially glycosylated protein through EndoH digestion. The optimal reaction temperature and pH of this enzyme were 45 °C and 7.5; 80 mM K+ ions could improve the catalytic activity of the enzyme by 244% at most. rSAGL was a thermal stable enzyme with T5015 of 57–58 °C and T5030 of 53–54 °C. Its thermal stability was better than any known alginate lyase. In 100 mM phosphate buffer of pH 6.0, rSAGL could retain 98.8% of the initial activity after incubation at 50 °C for 2 h. Furthermore, it could retain 61.6% of the initial activity after 48 h. The specific activity of the purified rSAGL produced by P. pastoris attained 4044 U/mg protein, which was the second highest record of alginate lyase so far. When the crude enzyme of the rSAGL was directly used in transformation of sodium alginate with 40 g/L, 97.2% of the substrate was transformed to di, tri, tetra brown alginate oligosaccharide after 32 h of incubation at 50 °C, and the final concentration of reducing sugar in mixture reached 9.51 g/L. This is the first report of high-level expression of thermally stable alginate lyase using P. pastoris system.

  14. Percutaneous cystostomy drainage for early removing urethral catheter in robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy: Improving on patients' discomfort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Che-Jui Yang

    2015-12-01

    Conclusion: The use of a percutaneous cystostomy device is feasible and safe for the early removal of urethral Foley catheter in robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy to decrease penile pain and patient discomfort.

  15. A possible connection between thermal comfort and health

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoops, John L.

    2004-05-20

    It is a well-established fact that cardiovascular health requires periodic exercise during which the human body often experiences significant physical discomfort. It is not obvious to the exerciser that the short-term pain and discomfort has a long-term positive health impact. Many cultures have well-established practices that involve exposing the body to periodic thermal discomfort. Scandinavian saunas and American Indian sweat lodges are two examples. Both are believed to promote health and well-being. Vacations often intentionally include significant thermal discomfort as part of the experience (e.g., sunbathing, and downhill skiing). So people often intentionally make themselves thermally uncomfortable yet the entire foundation of providing the thermal environment in our buildings is done to minimize the percentage of people thermally dissatisfied. We must provide an environment that does not negatively impact short-term health and we need to consider productivity but are our current thermal comfort standards too narrowly defined and do these standards actually contribute to longer-term negative health impacts? This paper examines the possibility that the human body thermoregulatory system has a corollary relationship to the cardiovascular system. It explores the possibility that we have an inherent need to exercise our thermoregulatory system. Potential, physiological, sociological and energy ramifications of these possibilities are discussed.

  16. Characteristics of six small heat shock protein genes from Bactrocera dorsalis: Diverse expression under conditions of thermal stress and normal growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Wei; Tian, Yi; Liu, Hong; Shi, Yan; Smagghe, Guy; Wang, Jin-Jun

    2017-11-01

    To explore the functions of small heat shock proteins (sHsps) in relation to thermal stress and development in Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel), one of the most economically important pest species attacking a wide range of fruits and vegetables, six full-length cDNAs of sHsp genes (BdHsp17.7, 18.4, 20.4, 20.6, 21.6 and 23.8) were cloned, and the expression patterns in different developmental stages and tissues, as well as in response to both thermal and 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) exposures, were examined using real time quantitative PCR. The open reading frames (ORFs) of six sHsps are 453, 489, 537, 543, 567 and 630bp in length, encoding proteins with molecular weights of 17.7, 18.4, 20.4, 20.6, 21.6 and 23.8kDa, respectively. BdHsp18.4 and BdHsp20.4 maintained lower expression levels in both eggs and larvae, whereas remarkably up-regulated after the larval-pupal transformation, suggesting that these two sHsps may be involved in metamorphosis. Significant tissue specificity exists among sHsps: the highest expression of BdHsp20.6 and BdHsp23.8 in the Malpighian tubules and ovary, respectively, versus a peak in the fat body for others. BdHsp20.4 and BdHsp20.6 were significantly up-regulated by thermal stress. In contrast, BdHsp18.4 and BdHsp23.8 reacted only to heat stress. BdHsp17.7 and BdHsp21.6 were insensitive to both heat and cold stresses. The degree of sHsps response depends on intensity of 20E treatment, i.e., dose and time. These results strongly suggest functional differentiation within the sHsp subfamily in B. dorsalis. The physiological function of sHsp members under thermal stress and normal growth remains the subjects of further investigation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Baby Shampoo to Relieve the Discomfort of Tear Gas and Pepper Spray Exposure: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James E. Winslow III

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Oleoresin capsicum (OC or pepper spray, and tear gas (CS are used by police and the military and produce severe discomfort. Some have proposed that washing with baby shampoo helps reduce this discomfort. Methods: We conducted a prospective, randomized, controlled study to determine if baby shampoo is effective in reducing the severity and duration of these effects. Study subjects included volunteers undergoing OC or CS exposure as part of their police or military training. After standardized exposure to OC or CS all subjects were allowed to irrigate their eyes and skin ad lib with water. Those randomized to the intervention group were provided with baby shampoo for application to their head, neck, and face. Participants rated their subjective discomfort in two domains on a scale of 0–10 at 0, 3, 5, 10, and 15 minutes. We performed statistical analysis using a two-tailed Mann-Whitney Test. Results: There were 58 participants. Of 40 subjects in the OC arm of the study, there were no significant differences in the ocular or respiratory discomfort at any of the time points between control (n=19 and intervention (n=21 groups. Of 18 subjects in the CS arm, there were no significant differences in the ocular or skin discomfort at any of the time points between control (n=8 and intervention (n=10 groups. Conclusion: Irrigation with water and baby shampoo provides no better relief from OC- or CS-induced discomfort than irrigation with water alone.

  18. Baby Shampoo to Relieve the Discomfort of Tear Gas and Pepper Spray Exposure: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stopyra, Jason P; Winslow, James E; Johnson, James C; Hill, Keith D; Bozeman, William P

    2018-03-01

    Oleoresin capsicum (OC) or pepper spray, and tear gas (CS) are used by police and the military and produce severe discomfort. Some have proposed that washing with baby shampoo helps reduce this discomfort. We conducted a prospective, randomized, controlled study to determine if baby shampoo is effective in reducing the severity and duration of these effects. Study subjects included volunteers undergoing OC or CS exposure as part of their police or military training. After standardized exposure to OC or CS all subjects were allowed to irrigate their eyes and skin ad lib with water. Those randomized to the intervention group were provided with baby shampoo for application to their head, neck, and face. Participants rated their subjective discomfort in two domains on a scale of 0-10 at 0, 3, 5, 10, and 15 minutes. We performed statistical analysis using a two-tailed Mann-Whitney Test. There were 58 participants. Of 40 subjects in the OC arm of the study, there were no significant differences in the ocular or respiratory discomfort at any of the time points between control (n=19) and intervention (n=21) groups. Of 18 subjects in the CS arm, there were no significant differences in the ocular or skin discomfort at any of the time points between control (n=8) and intervention (n=10) groups. Irrigation with water and baby shampoo provides no better relief from OC- or CS-induced discomfort than irrigation with water alone.

  19. The dark side of photovoltaic — 3D simulation of glare assessing risk and discomfort

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, Thomas; Wollert, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) systems form an important force in the implementation of renewable energies, but as we all know, the force has always its dark side. Besides efficiency considerations and discussions about architectures of power distribution networks, the increasing numbers of installations of PV systems for implementing renewable energies have secondary effects. PV systems can generate glare due to optical reflections and hence might be a serious concern. On the one hand, glare could affect safety, e.g. regarding traffic. On the other hand, glare is a constant source of discomfort in vicinities of PV systems. Hence, assessment of glare is decisive for the success of renewable energies near municipalities and traffic zones for the success of solar power. Several courts decided on the change of PV systems and even on their de-installation because of glare effects. Thus, location-based assessments are required to limit potential reflections and to avoid risks for public infrastructure or discomfort of residents. The question arises on how to calculate reflections accurately according to the environment's topography. Our approach is founded in a 3D-based simulation methodology to calculate and visualize reflections based on the geometry of the environment of PV systems. This computational model is implemented by an interactive tool for simulation and visualization. Hence, project planners receive flexible assistance for adjusting the parameters of solar panels amid the planning process and in particular before the installation of a PV system. - Highlights: • Solar panels cause glare that impacts neighborhoods and traffic infrastructures. • Glare might cause disability and discomfort. • 3D environment for the calculation of glare • Interactive tool to simulate and visualize reflections • Impact assessment of solar power plant farms

  20. [Treatment of aerobic vaginitis and clinically uncertain causes of vulvovaginal discomfort].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cepický, P; Malina, J; Kuzelová, M

    2003-11-01

    The treatment of clinically uncertain conditions of vaginal discomforts with a mixed preparation of nifuratel + nystatin (Macmiror complex) and the relation of uncertain conditions to aerobic vaginitis. A prospective study. Gynecology-Obstetrics Outpatient Department LEVRET Ltd., AescuLab Ltd., Laboratory of Microbiology, Prague. 50 women with vaginal discomfort, causes of which had not been clarified by gynecological examination, determination of pH and the amine test, were examined by vaginal smears using microscopy. The results were evaluated in relation to aerobic vaginitis in a pure form or in combination with other nosological units. The authors also evaluated results of therapy by oral nifuratel (Macmiror tbl) 3 x 200 mg daily and a vaginal combined preparation containing nifuratel 500 mg + nystatin 200 kIU (Macmiror complex 500 glo vag) for the period of 7 days. In 50 women candida was demonstrated 24 times, presence of key cells 11 times, lactobacillus nine times with more than 50 in the field, six women were affected by aerobic vaginitis. In all these cases the pH was 4.8 or higher, leukocytes were significantly represented in all cases (> 15 in the field), as well as gram-negative bacteria and/or cocci (> 30 in the field), indicating a combined picture of mycosis, anaerobic vaginosis or lactobacillosis with aerobic vaginitis. The therapy was successful in all cases, the relapse of complaints during one month occurred in three cases. Aerobic vaginitis in a pure form or with anaerobic vaginosis, mycosis or lactobacillosis is frequently concealed under clinically uncertain pictures of vulvo-vaginal discomfort. The therapy by a combination of nifurated 3 x 200 mg orally together with the combined vaginal preparation nifuratel 500 mg + nystatin 200 kIU for the period of 7 days exerts high effect and a low number of relapses.

  1. The dark side of photovoltaic — 3D simulation of glare assessing risk and discomfort

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, Thomas; Wollert, Alexander

    2015-04-15

    Photovoltaic (PV) systems form an important force in the implementation of renewable energies, but as we all know, the force has always its dark side. Besides efficiency considerations and discussions about architectures of power distribution networks, the increasing numbers of installations of PV systems for implementing renewable energies have secondary effects. PV systems can generate glare due to optical reflections and hence might be a serious concern. On the one hand, glare could affect safety, e.g. regarding traffic. On the other hand, glare is a constant source of discomfort in vicinities of PV systems. Hence, assessment of glare is decisive for the success of renewable energies near municipalities and traffic zones for the success of solar power. Several courts decided on the change of PV systems and even on their de-installation because of glare effects. Thus, location-based assessments are required to limit potential reflections and to avoid risks for public infrastructure or discomfort of residents. The question arises on how to calculate reflections accurately according to the environment's topography. Our approach is founded in a 3D-based simulation methodology to calculate and visualize reflections based on the geometry of the environment of PV systems. This computational model is implemented by an interactive tool for simulation and visualization. Hence, project planners receive flexible assistance for adjusting the parameters of solar panels amid the planning process and in particular before the installation of a PV system. - Highlights: • Solar panels cause glare that impacts neighborhoods and traffic infrastructures. • Glare might cause disability and discomfort. • 3D environment for the calculation of glare • Interactive tool to simulate and visualize reflections • Impact assessment of solar power plant farms.

  2. A systematic review of discomfort due to toe or ear clipping in laboratory rodents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geessink, Florentine J.; Brouwer, Michelle A. E.; Tillema, Alice; Ritskes-Hoitinga, Merel

    2017-01-01

    Toe clipping and ear clipping (also ear notching or ear punching) are frequently used methods for individual identification of laboratory rodents. These procedures potentially cause severe discomfort, which can reduce animal welfare and distort experimental results. However, no systematic summary of the evidence on this topic currently exists. We conducted a systematic review of the evidence for discomfort due to toe or ear clipping in rodents. The review methodology was pre-specified in a registered review protocol. The population, intervention, control, outcome (PICO) question was: In rodents, what is the effect of toe clipping or ear clipping, compared with no clipping or sham clipping, on welfare-related outcomes? Through a systematic search in PubMed, Embase, Web of Science and grey literature, we identified seven studies on the effect of ear clipping on animal welfare, and five such studies on toe clipping. Studies were included in the review if they contained original data from an in vivo experiment in rodents, assessing the effect of toe clipping or ear clipping on a welfare-related outcome. Case studies and studies applying unsuitable co-interventions were excluded. Study quality was appraised using an extended version of SYstematic Review Centre for Laboratory animal Experimentation (SYRCLE)’s risk of bias tool for animal studies. Study characteristics and outcome measures were highly heterogeneous, and there was an unclear or high risk of bias in all studies. We therefore present a narrative synthesis of the evidence identified. None of the studies reported a sample size calculation. Out of over 60 different outcomes, we found evidence of discomfort due to ear clipping in the form of increased respiratory volume, vocalization and blood pressure. For toe clipping, increased vocalization and decreased motor activity in pups were found, as well as long-term effects in the form of reduced grip strength and swimming ability in adults. In conclusion, there

  3. Repeated forced swim stress enhances CFA-evoked thermal hyperalgesia and affects the expressions of pCREB and c-Fos in the insular cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbe, H; Kimura, A; Donishi, T; Kaneoke, Y

    2014-02-14

    Stress affects brain activity and promotes long-term changes in multiple neural systems. Exposure to stressors causes substantial effects on the perception and response to pain. In several animal models, chronic stress produces lasting hyperalgesia. The insular (IC) and anterior cingulate cortices (ACC) are the regions exhibiting most reliable pain-related activity. And the IC and ACC play an important role in pain modulation via the descending pain modulatory system. In the present study we examined the expression of phospho-cAMP response element-binding protein (pCREB) and c-Fos in the IC and ACC after forced swim stress (FS) and complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) injection to clarify changes in the cerebral cortices that affect the activity of the descending pain modulatory system in the rats with stress-induced hyperalgesia. FS (day 1, 10min; days 2-3, 20min) induced an increase in the expression of pCREB and c-Fos in the anterior IC (AIC). CFA injection into the hindpaw after the FS shows significantly enhanced thermal hyperalgesia and induced a decrease in the expression of c-Fos in the AIC and the posterior IC (PIC). Quantitative image analysis showed that the numbers of c-Fos-immunoreactive neurons in the left AIC and PIC were significantly lower in the FS+CFA group (L AIC, 95.9±6.8; L PIC, 181.9±23.1) than those in the naive group (L AIC, 151.1±19.3, pCFA-induced thermal hyperalgesia through dysfunction of the descending pain modulatory system. Copyright © 2013 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Altitudinal and thermal gradients of hepatic Cyp1A gene expression in natural populations of Salmo trutta from high mountain lakes and their correlation with organohalogen loads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarque, Sergio; Gallego, Eva [Institute of Environmental Assessment and Water Research (IDAEA-CSIC), Jordi Girona 18, 08034-Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Bartrons, Mireia; Catalan, Jordi [Center for Advanced Studies of Blanes (CEAB-CSIC), Acces Cala St. Francesc 14, 17300-Blanes, Catalonia (Spain); Grimalt, Joan O. [Institute of Environmental Assessment and Water Research (IDAEA-CSIC), Jordi Girona 18, 08034-Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Pina, Benjamin, E-mail: bpcbmc@cid.csic.e [Institute of Environmental Assessment and Water Research (IDAEA-CSIC), Jordi Girona 18, 08034-Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain)

    2010-05-15

    The biomarker of xenobiotic exposure cytochrome p450A1 (Cyp1A) was used to analyze the biological response to chemical pollution in Salmo trutta (brown trout) from nine high mountain European lakes in Norway, Tatras, Tyrol, and central Pyrenees. Hepatic Cyp1A mRNA levels correlated both with the reciprocal of absolute annual average air temperatures of the sampled lakes and with muscle concentrations of several hydrophobic organohalogen compounds (OC), including chlorinated polychlorobiphenyls (PCB), DDE, and DDT. The correlation between Cyp1A expression and OC content was observed across the whole temperature range (between -0.7 deg. C and +6.2 deg. C), but also in the absence of any thermal gradient. We concluded that airborne pollutants accumulate in high mountain lake fish at concentrations high enough to increase Cyp1A expression, among other possible effects. As geographical distribution of semi-volatile OC is strongly influenced by air temperatures, future climate modifications will potentially enhance their physiological effects in lake ecosystems. - Altitudinal gradients of hepatic Cyp1A gene expression in mountain trout correlate with geographic and individual organohalogen distribution.

  5. Human-biometeorological conditions and thermal perception in a Mediterranean coastal park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saaroni, Hadas; Pearlmutter, David; Hatuka, Tali

    2015-10-01

    This study looks at the interrelation of human-biometeorological conditions, physiological thermal stress and subjective thermal perception in the design and use of a new waterfront park in Tel-Aviv, Israel. Our initial assumption was that the park's design would embody a comprehensive response to the area's ever-increasing heat stress and water shortage. However, almost half of it is covered by grass lawns, irrigated with fresh water, while the remaining area is mainly covered with concrete paving, with minimal shading and sparse trees. We hypothesized that stressful thermal conditions would prevail in the park in the summer season and would be expressed in a high discomfort perception of its users. Thermo-physiological stress conditions in a typical summer month were compared with the subjective comfort perceptions of pedestrians surveyed in the park. It was found that even during mid-day hours, the level of thermal stress tends to be relatively mild, owing largely to the strong sea breeze and despite the high intensity of solar radiation. Moreover, it appears that the largely favorable perception of comfort among individuals may also result from socio-cultural aspects related to their satisfaction with the park's aesthetic attractiveness and in fact its very existence. Adaptive planning is proposed for such vulnerable regions, which are expected to experience further aggravation in thermal comfort due to global as well as localized warming trends.

  6. Risk Assessment: Factors Contributing to Discomfort for Menopausal Women in Workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Mehdi; Seifi, Bahar; Heidari, Mohammad

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to review the Factors contributing to discomfort for menopausal women in workplace and the perceived effects of working conditions on menopausal symptoms, and to produce recommendations for managers and women. This study was a review article. We searched PubMed and Science Direct for articles related to menopause and workplace. Keywords included: menopause AND workplace OR occupational health or menopausal women AND managers. Because we aimed to update the literature following the 2011 review of menopause and workplace, only English-language articles published between 2011 and 2017 were included. This review showed that how managers could be help and awareness and what should be done for menopausal women in workplace by risk assessment. Many risk factors are contributing to discomfort for menopausal women in workplace and managers should be assessed them. Managers should be aware that menopausal transition causes difficulty for some women at work, then occupational health and safety and health promotion policies will be increasingly important. It may help inform the development of tailored occupational health policies and programs that cater for the needs of women as they transition through menopause in the workplace.

  7. Corneal confocal microscopy and dry eye findings in contact lens discomfort patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogan, Aysun Sanal; Gurdal, Canan; Arslan, Nese

    2018-02-01

    To evaluate the corneal confocal microscopy and dry eye findings in patients with contact lens discomfort. The study included 3 groups of participants: Contact lens wearers using silicone hydrogel soft contact lenses who are symptomatic (CLD, n=15) or asymptomatic (ACL, n=11) and non-wearers as controls (n=14). Duration of contact lens wear, Ocular Surface Disease Index (OSDI) questionnaire responses, fluorescein tear break-uptime (FBUT), and corneal confocal microscopy findings were recorded. Mean age was 25.7±8.2 years and male/female ratio was 7/33. Demographic findings were similar regarding the groups. CLD patients had a longer lens use history than ACL (median 5 vs 2 years, pCLD group than ACL or controls (pCLD group, compared to controls and ACL (pCLD group compared to controls but similar to ACL (pCLD group than the ACL (p=0.014). Patients with CLD had been wearing contact lenses for longer than those without symptoms. OSDI and FBUT scores were worse in CLD patients. In contact lens discomfort patients, there were increased dendritiform cells, indicating intensified inflammatory status of the cornea. Copyright © 2017 British Contact Lens Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Work activities and musculoskeletal discomforts amongst active older Albertans on alternative employment trajectories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doan, Jon B; Copeland, Jennifer L; Brown, Lesley A; Newman, Jeff T; Hudson, D Shane

    2014-01-01

    Bridge employment (scheduled paid work after retirement age) may promote successful aging and continued health, as work can be an important component of daily physical activity. Appropriate work demands for older adults are neither well-established nor well-applied, however, and excessive loading or increased perceptions of discomfort may negate the health benefits of work activity. This study examined work status and musculoskeletal discomfort (MSD) amongst older Albertans. 1044 Albertans aged 55 years and older participating in an organized 'Games' received a research package. Enclosed in the package were an introductory letter, a return envelope, and modified versions of validated questionnaires examining leisure and work activities, activity frequency, and perceptions of musculoskeletal health. 228 respondents were classified into one of three employment trajectory groups: fully retired, fully employed, or bridge employed. Groups differed in age, and both employed groups more frequently reported MSDs in all body areas. Bridge employed reported increased 'occasional' frequency of musculoskeletal injury risk factors, while both groups reported similar overall ratings of work-related exertion. The increased MSDs reported by bridge employed adults may be the result of irregularity of work activity and soft tissue loading. Detailed examination of work demands and musculoskeletal injuries amongst bridge employed adults could help define safer levels for less regular work activity.

  9. Surgeons' physical discomfort and symptoms during robotic surgery: a comprehensive ergonomic survey study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, G I; Lee, M R; Green, I; Allaf, M; Marohn, M R

    2017-04-01

    It is commonly believed that robotic surgery systems provide surgeons with an ergonomically sound work environment; however, the actual experience of surgeons practicing robotic surgery (RS) has not been thoroughly researched. In this ergonomics survey study, we investigated surgeons' physical symptom reports and their association with factors including demographics, specialties, and robotic systems. Four hundred and thirty-two surgeons regularly practicing RS completed this comprehensive survey comprising 20 questions in four categories: demographics, systems, ergonomics, and physical symptoms. Chi-square and multinomial logistic regression analyses were used for statistical analysis. Two hundred and thirty-six surgeons (56.1 %) reported physical symptoms or discomfort. Among those symptoms, neck stiffness, finger, and eye fatigues were the most common. With the newest robot, eye symptom rate was considerably reduced, while neck and finger symptoms did not improve significantly. A high rate of lower back stiffness was correlated with higher annual robotic case volume, and eye symptoms were more common with longer years practicing robotic surgery (p ergonomic settings reported lower symptom report rates. Symptoms were not correlated with age and gender. Although RS provides relatively better ergonomics, this study demonstrates that 56.1 % of regularly practicing robotic surgeons still experience related physical symptoms or discomfort. In addition to system improvement, surgeon education in optimizing the ergonomic settings may be necessary to maximize the ergonomic benefits in RS.

  10. Evaluation of Radon Pollution in Underground Parking Lots by Discomfort Index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AH Bu-Olayan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Recent studies of public underground parking lots showed the influence of radon concentration and the probable discomfort caused by parking cars. Materials and Methods Radon concentration was measured in semi-closed public parking lots in the six governorates of Kuwait, using Durridge RAD7radon detector (USA. Results The peak radon concentration in the parking lots of Kuwait governorates was relatively higher during winter (63.15Bq/m3 compared to summer (41.73 Bq/m3. Radon in the evaluated parking lots revealed a mean annual absorbed dose (DRn: 0.02mSv/y and annual effective dose (HE: 0.06mSv/y.  Conclusion This study validated the influence of relative humidity and temperature as the major components of discomfort index (DI. The mean annual absorbed and effective dose  of radon in the evaluated parking lots were found below the permissible limits. However, high radon DRn and HE were reported when the assessment included the parking lots, the surrounding residential apartments, and office premises. Furthermore, the time-series analysis indicated significant variations of the seasonal and site-wise distribution of radon concentrations in the indoor evaluated parking lots of the six Kuwait governorates

  11. The effect of eflornithine 13.9% cream on the bother and discomfort due to hirsutism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Joseph; Caro, J Jaime; Caro, Graciela; Garfield, Frances; Huber, Ferdinand; Zhou, Wenjiong; Lin, Chen-Sheng; Shander, Douglas; Schrode, Kathy

    2007-09-01

    Although unwanted facial hair often leads to anxiety and avoidance of social situations, evaluation of treatment outcomes in clinical trials has relied largely on measures external to the patient such as the extent of hair growth or an expert physician's assessment, neglecting to include patient reported outcomes (PRO). To assess the level of bother caused by a dermatological condition (hirsutism) and changes brought on by treatment, the instrument ESTEEM was developed by expanding the Bother Assessment in Skin Conditions (BASC) scale to six questions to cover the discomfort felt in four social situations and bother due to removing facial hair. Each question elicits responses on a visual analog scale. Women participating in two randomized clinical trials evaluated a new treatment (eflornithine 13.9% cream). Analyses examined the level of bother at each visit, the changes with treatment, the correlations with the Physician's Global Assessment, and the effect size. Hirsutism bothers patients considerably. The mean for overall bother was 89% and the mean discomfort in social situations exceeded 80% in nearly all cases. Treatment led to significant reductions in bother on all six items with effect sizes ranging from 0.46 to 1.62. Eflornithine is an effective treatment for unwanted facial hair in women, as reported by the patients. ESTEEM addresses the specific concerns of women with hirsutism.

  12. Evaluation of motorcyclist's discomfort during prolonged riding process with and without lumbar support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karmegam Karuppiah

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The primary aim of this study is to examine the effects of a backrest: using a prototype of a lumbar support presented in author's earlier study on the discomfort rating of the body parts of motorcyclist. METHODS: One hundred motorcyclists participated in this study, all in good physical condition and with no immediate complaint of musculoskeletal disorders. Each participant was asked to sit for 2 hours on a motorcycle in two different sessions (with and without the lumbar support in a controlled room environment. At every 15 minutes interval the participants were required to rate their discomfort level on the Borg's CR-10 questionnaire. RESULTS: The rate of discomfort level (in all body parts decreased over time during the testing period with the prototype. In terms of the discomfort 'break point', participants identified low back and upper back as the most affected body parts prior to comfort changes during the testing period with the use of the prototype. CONCLUSIONS: The use of this prototype provides a protective mechanism for the motorcyclist's musculoskeletal system, particularly the spinal column. Therefore, this prototype is capable of providing ideal posture while simultaneously enhancing the comfortability of the motorcyclist during the riding process (by reducing discomfort.OBJETIVO: O objetivo principal deste estudo é analisar os efeitos de um encosto, usando um protótipo de um apoio lombar apresentado em estudo anterior do autor sobre a avaliação de desconforto das partes do corpo do motociclista. MÉTODOS: Cem motociclistas participaram neste estudo, todos em boas condições físicas e sem queixa imediata de lesões músculo-esqueléticas. Cada participante foi convidado a se sentar por 2 horas em uma moto em duas sessões diferentes (com e sem o apoio lombar em uma sala com ambiente controlado. A cada intervalo de 15 minutos, os participantes foram solicitados a classificar o seu nível de desconforto no question

  13. Differences between young adults and elderly in thermal comfort, productivity, and thermal physiology in response to a moderate temperature drift and a steady-state condition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellen, L.; Marken Lichtenbelt, van W.D.; Loomans, M.G.L.C.; Toftum, J.; Wit, de M.H.

    2010-01-01

    Results from naturally ventilated buildings show that allowing the indoor temperature to drift does not necessarily result in thermal discomfort and may allow for a reduction in energy use. However, for stationary conditions, several studies indicate that the thermal neutral temperature and optimum

  14. A novel thermal decomposition approach to synthesize hydroxyapatite-silver nanocomposites and their antibacterial action against GFP-expressing antibiotic resistant E. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahni, Geetika; Gopinath, P; Jeevanandam, P

    2013-03-01

    A novel thermal decomposition approach to synthesize hydroxyapatite-silver (Hap-Ag) nanocomposites has been reported. The nanocomposites were characterized by X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray analysis, transmission electron microscopy and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy techniques. Antibacterial activity studies for the nanocomposites were explored using a new rapid access method employing recombinant green fluorescent protein (GFP) expressing antibiotic resistant Escherichia coli (E. coli). The antibacterial activity was studied by visual turbidity analysis, optical density analysis, fluorescence spectroscopy and microscopy. The mechanism of bactericidal action of the nanocomposites on E. coli was investigated using atomic force microscopy, and TEM analysis. Excellent bactericidal activity at low concentration of the nanocomposites was observed which may allow their use in the production of microbial contamination free prosthetics. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Geographic variation in thermal tolerance and strategies of heat shock protein expression in the land snail Theba pisana in relation to genetic structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizrahi, Tal; Goldenberg, Shoshana; Heller, Joseph; Arad, Zeev

    2016-03-01

    Land snails are exposed to conditions of high ambient temperature and low humidity, and their survival depends on a suite of morphological, behavioral, physiological, and molecular adaptations to the specific microhabitat. We tested in six populations of the land snail Theba pisana whether adaptations to different habitats affect their ability to cope with thermal stress and their strategies of heat shock protein (HSP) expression. Levels of Hsp70 and Hsp90 in the foot tissue were measured in field-collected snails and after acclimation to laboratory conditions. Snails were also exposed to various temperatures (32 up to 54 °C) for 2 h and HSP messenger RNA (mRNA) levels were measured in the foot tissue and survival was determined. To test whether the physiological and molecular data are related to genetic parameters, we analyzed T. pisana populations using partial sequences of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA ribosomal RNA genes. We show that populations collected from warmer habitats were more thermotolerant and had higher constitutive levels of Hsp70 isoforms in the foot tissue. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis indicated that hsp70 and hsp90 mRNA levels increased significantly in response to thermal stress, although the increase in hsp70 mRNA was larger compared to hsp90 and its induction continued up to higher temperatures. Generally, warm-adapted populations had higher temperatures of maximal induction of hsp70 mRNA synthesis and higher upper thermal limits to HSP mRNA synthesis. Our study suggests that Hsp70 in the foot tissue of T. pisana snails may have important roles in determining stress resistance, while Hsp90 is more likely implicated in signal transduction processes that are activated by stress. In the phylogenetic analysis, T. pisana haplotypes were principally divided into two major clades largely corresponding to the physiological ability to withstand stress, thus pointing to genetically fixed tolerance.

  16. Heterologous expression of a plastid EF-Tu reduces protein thermal aggregation and enhances CO2 fixation in wheat (Triticum aestivum) following heat stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jianming; Momcilović, Ivana; Clemente, Thomas E; Nersesian, Natalya; Trick, Harold N; Ristic, Zoran

    2008-10-01

    Heat stress is a major constraint to wheat production and negatively impacts grain quality, causing tremendous economic losses, and may become a more troublesome factor due to global warming. At the cellular level, heat stress causes denaturation and aggregation of proteins and injury to membranes leading to alterations in metabolic fluxes. Protein aggregation is irreversible, and protection of proteins from thermal aggregation is a strategy a cell uses to tolerate heat stress. Here we report on the development of transgenic wheat (Triticum aestivum) events, expressing a maize gene coding for plastidal protein synthesis elongation factor (EF-Tu), which, compared to non-transgenic plants, display reduced thermal aggregation of leaf proteins, reduced heat injury to photosynthetic membranes (thylakoids), and enhanced rate of CO(2) fixation after exposure to heat stress. The results support the concept that EF-Tu ameliorates negative effects of heat stress by acting as a molecular chaperone. This is the first demonstration of the introduction of a plastidal EF-Tu in plants that leads to protection against heat injury and enhanced photosynthesis after heat stress. This is also the first demonstration that a gene other than HSP gene can be used for improvement of heat tolerance and that the improvement is possible in a species that has a complex genome, hexaploid wheat. The results strongly suggest that heat tolerance of wheat, and possibly other crop plants, can be improved by modulating expression of plastidal EF-Tu and/or by selection of genotypes with increased endogenous levels of this protein.

  17. The effects of a passive exoskeleton on muscle activity, discomfort and endurance time in forward bending work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, Tim; van Eck, Jennifer; Knitel, Karlijn; de Looze, Michiel

    2016-05-01

    Exoskeletons may form a new strategy to reduce the risk of developing low back pain in stressful jobs. In the present study we examined the potential of a so-called passive exoskeleton on muscle activity, discomfort and endurance time in prolonged forward-bended working postures. Eighteen subjects performed two tasks: a simulated assembly task with the trunk in a forward-bended position and static holding of the same trunk position without further activity. We measured the electromyography for muscles in the back, abdomen and legs. We also measured the perceived local discomfort. In the static holding task we determined the endurance, defined as the time that people could continue without passing a specified discomfort threshold. In the assembly task we found lower muscle activity (by 35-38%) and lower discomfort in the low back when wearing the exoskeleton. Additionally, the hip extensor activity was reduced. The exoskeleton led to more discomfort in the chest region. In the task of static holding, we observed that exoskeleton use led to an increase in endurance time from 3.2 to 9.7 min, on average. The results illustrate the good potential of this passive exoskeleton to reduce the internal muscle forces and (reactive) spinal forces in the lumbar region. However, the adoption of an over-extended knee position might be, among others, one of the concerns when using the exoskeleton. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  18. Combined esophageal intraluminal impedance, pH and skin conductance monitoring to detect discomfort in GERD infants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Cresi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The clinical significance of weakly acidic reflux in infants is unclear. Skin conductance is a novel not-invasive method to evaluate discomfort. The aim of our study was to evaluate reflux-induced discomfort in infants with gastroesophageal reflux disease using simultaneously combined skin conductance and esophageal multichannel intraluminal impedance and pH monitoring. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Infants with gastroesophageal reflux symptoms were investigated for almost 20 hours divided into 120-second intervals. Temporal relationships between refluxes and discomfort were evaluated calculating the symptom association probability. Twelve infants aged 17-45 days were studied. Out of 194.38 hours of adequate artifact-free MII/pH and skin conductance monitoring, 584 reflux events were observed; 35.78% were positive for stress, of which 16.27% were acid and 83.73% weakly acidic. A significant association between refluxes and discomfort (p<0.05 was present in all infants. The intervals with reflux events showed increased skin conductance values compared to reflux-free intervals (p<0.001; SC values were similar for acid and weakly acidic reflux events. CONCLUSION/SIGNFICANCE: Discomfort was significantly associated with reflux events and did not differ between weakly acidic and acid refluxes. Our results may raise concerns about the over-prescription use of antacid drugs in the management of gastroesophageal reflux symptoms in infancy.

  19. A Potential Animal Model of Maladaptive Palatable Food Consumption Followed by Delayed Discomfort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lital Moshe

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Binging is the consumption of larger amounts of food in a briefer period of time than would normally be consumed under similar circumstances. Binging requires palatable food (PF to trigger abnormal eating, probably reflecting gene × environment interactions. In this study we examined the impact of trait binge eating (BE and its compulsive nature on the conflict between hedonic eating of PF and anticipation of a delayed aversive effect. We used female rats as an animal model similar to other models of BE. A novel aspect of this model in this paper is the use of a delayed internal aversive effect produced by lactose ingestion. Establishing this model will allow us to better understand the nature of the conflict between immediate reward and its delayed aversive implications. We hypothesized that BE prone (BEP rats will demonstrate maladaptive decision making, presenting higher motivation toward PF even when this is associated with delayed discomfort.Method: (Phase 1 52 female adult Wistar rats were divided to two eating profiles: resistant and prone binge eaters (BER/BEP based on intake of liquid PF (Ensure. Next, all subjects underwent a Lactose Conditioning Protocol (LCP that included 4 h tests, one baseline and 3 conditioning days (Phase 2, in which solid PF (Oreo cookies was paired with glucose (control-no internal aversive effect or lactose, dissolved in liquid PF. Index for PF motivation was PF consumption during the 4 h LCP. To test for memory of lactose conditioning, we performed another LCP with glucose only (anticipation, but no actual lactose-induced discomfort, a week after the last conditioning session.Results: Lactose conditioned BEP showed higher motivation toward PF compared to lactose conditioned BER faced with delayed aversive effects. Only lactose conditioned BER rats devaluated the PF over LCP days, indicating an association between PF and abdominal discomfort. In addition, only lactose conditioned BER presented

  20. Hexavalent chromium, a lung carcinogen, confers resistance to thermal stress and interferes with heat shock protein expression in human bronchial epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, Patrícia L; Cunha-Oliveira, Teresa; Ferreira, Leonardo M R; Urbano, Ana M

    2018-03-16

    Exposure to hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)], a lung carcinogen, triggers several types of cellular stresses, namely oxidative, genotoxic and proteotoxic stresses. Given the evolutionary character of carcinogenesis, it is tempting to speculate that cells that survive the stresses produced by this carcinogen become more resistant to subsequent stresses, namely those encountered during neoplastic transformation. To test this hypothesis, we determined whether pre-incubation with Cr(VI) increased the resistance of human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B cells) to the antiproliferative action of acute thermal shock, used here as a model for stress. In line with the proposed hypothesis, it was observed that, at mildly cytotoxic concentrations, Cr(VI) attenuated the antiproliferative effects of both cold and heat shock. Mechanistically, Cr(VI) interfered with the expression of two components of the stress response pathway: heat shock proteins Hsp72 and Hsp90α. Specifically, Cr(VI) significantly depleted the mRNA levels of the former and the protein levels of the latter. Significantly, these two proteins are members of heat shock protein (Hsp) families (Hsp70 and Hsp90, respectively) that have been implicated in carcinogenesis. Thus, our results confirm and extend previous studies showing the capacity of Cr(VI) to interfere with the expression of stress response components.

  1. Evaluating visual discomfort in stereoscopic projection-based CAVE system with a close viewing distance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Weitao; Weng, Dongdong; Feng, Dan; Li, Yuqian; Liu, Yue; Wang, Yongtian

    2015-05-01

    As one of popular immersive Virtual Reality (VR) systems, stereoscopic cave automatic virtual environment (CAVE) system is typically consisted of 4 to 6 3m-by-3m sides of a room made of rear-projected screens. While many endeavors have been made to reduce the size of the projection-based CAVE system, the issue of asthenopia caused by lengthy exposure to stereoscopic images in such CAVE with a close viewing distance was seldom tangled. In this paper, we propose a light-weighted approach which utilizes a convex eyepiece to reduce visual discomfort induced by stereoscopic vision. An empirical experiment was conducted to examine the feasibility of convex eyepiece in a large depth of field (DOF) at close viewing distance both objectively and subjectively. The result shows the positive effects of convex eyepiece on the relief of eyestrain.

  2. The impact of music on the PACU patient's perception of discomfort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easter, Betty; DeBoer, Laura; Settlemyre, Gail; Starnes, Carolyn; Marlowe, Vickie; Tart, Rebecca Creech

    2010-04-01

    Pain is a normal finding in the postoperative patient, and noise can accentuate one's perception of discomfort. In this study, physiological measurements, intravenous (IV) opioid administration, length of stay, and satisfaction for postoperative patients who listened to music were compared with patients not provided music during their PACU stay. Of the 213 subjects enrolled, 163 experienced postoperative pain. The mean change in experimental subjects' respiratory rate was significantly lower than the controls. Decreases in heart rate and blood pressure from admission to discharge were similar between the two groups. On average, peripheral oxygen saturation and opioid pain control were not significantly different between control and experimental subjects. Subjects provided with music reported acceptable noise levels and increased satisfaction with their PACU experience. Music intervention is therefore a viable, minimal cost, and alternative therapy that PACU nurses can use to assist patients coping with postoperative pain. Copyright 2010 American Society of PeriAnesthesia Nurses. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Verification of simple illuminance based measures for indication of discomfort glare from windows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsen, Line Røseth; Heiselberg, Per Kvols; Bryn, Ida

    2015-01-01

    predictions of discomfort glare from windows already in the early design stage when decisions regarding the façade are taken. This study focus on verifying if simple illuminance based measures like vertical illuminance at eye level or horizontal illuminance at the desk are correlated with the perceived glare...... reported by 44 test subjects in a repeated measure design occupant survey and if the reported glare corresponds with the predictions from the simple Daylight Glare Probability (DGPs) model. Large individual variations were seen in the occupants’ assessment of glare in the present study. Yet, the results...... confirm that there is a statistically significant correlation between both vertical eye illuminance and horizontal illuminance at the desk and the occupants’ perception of glare in a perimeter zone office environment, which is promising evidence towards utilizing such simple measures for indication...

  4. (Post Secular Discomforts: Religio-Secular Disclosures in the Indian Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goldie Osuri

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The post-secular turn at the intersection of the fields of political philosophy, anthropology, religious, postcolonial and cultural studies has highlighted theological political formations which have informed differential histories of the secular. This essay examines how debates around the secular and the post-secular play out in the Indian context. Some questions that the essay addresses are: What does a reconsideration of the secular, a probing of its discomforts, offer in the Indian context? And what are the limits of a post-secular turn—in the sense of a reconsideration of spiritual belief or theological conventions as a resource for co-existence—if we think through the forms of power generated by this turn?

  5. Body Image Discomfort of Adolescent and Young Adult Hematologic Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucchetti, Giulia; Bellini, Simona; Bertolotti, Marina; Bona, Francesca; Biasin, Eleonora; Bertorello, Nicoletta; Tirtei, Elisa; Fagioli, Franca

    2017-06-01

    This study focuses on body image discomfort (BID) of 50 adolescent and young adult (AYA) hematologic cancer survivors (age range 15-23; 52% males). The study results were obtained through data from a self-report questionnaire: the Body Uneasiness Test. Findings differed according to gender: a greater proportion of females were in the Risk category of impaired body image than males (χ 2  = 5.258, p < 0.05). No significant body image differences were found according to the type of diagnosis or to the length of survival. To manage survivors' BIDs and to improve their quality of life, assessing BID in AYA cancer survivors is important for identifying those who might be in need of additional supportive care or a program.

  6. An Ethics Of Discomfort: Supplementing Ricœur On Translation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Foran

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This article compares Paul Ricoeur and Jacques Derrida on the theme of translation and in particular the ethical implications of the different ways in which they approach the untranslatable.  While Ricoeur’s account of translation as linguistic hospitality does offer a model for an ethical encounter with the other, I argue that this account does not go far enough. My central claim is that Ricoeur’s treatment of translation overemphasizes the movement of appropriation and integration.  While it may not be his intention, this emphasis could lead to a certain kind of complacency that would challenge the ethical claims Ricoeur makes in favour of translation as a paradigm.  I propose to supplement Ricoeur’s hospitality with Derrida’s untranslatable, in order to create a situation of constant discomfort thereby guarding against ethical complacency.

  7. Reducing musculoskeletal discomfort: effects of an office ergonomics workplace and training intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Michelle M; O'Neill, Michael J

    2003-01-01

    Effects of an office ergonomics workplace and training intervention on workers' knowledge and self-reported musculoskeletal pain and discomfort were investigated. An instructional systems design process was used to develop an office ergonomics training program and the evaluation tools used to measure the effectiveness of the training program on workers' office ergonomics knowledge and skills. It was hypothesized that the training and workplace intervention would allow the worker to more effectively use their workplace through increased office ergonomics knowledge and skills. Following the intervention, there was a significant increase in workers' office ergonomics knowledge and awareness. Self-reported work-related musculoskeletal disorders significantly decreased for the group who had a workplace change and received ergonomic training relative to a workplace change-only group and a no intervention control group.

  8. Older drivers with cognitive impairment: Perceived changes in driving skills, driving-related discomfort and self-regulation of driving

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meng, A.; Siren, A.; Teasdale, Thomas William

    2013-01-01

    The results of a previous study indicate that in general, older drivers who recognise cognitive problems show realistic self-assessment of changes in their driving skills and that driving-related discomfort may function as an indirect monitoring of driving ability, contributing to their safe...... drivers may recognise cognitive problems, they tend not to recognise changes to their driving, which may reflect reluctance to acknowledge the impact of cognitive impairment on their driving. Furthermore, the results suggest that driving-related discomfort plays an important role in the self......-regulation of driving among cognitively impaired older drivers. However, it is less clear what triggers driving-related discomfort among cognitively impaired older drivers indicating that it may be a less reliable aspect of their self-monitoring of driving ability....

  9. Discomfort during bronchoscopy performed after endobronchial intubation with fentanyl and midazolam: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, Daisuke; Takigawa, Nagio; Kano, Hirohisa; Ninomiya, Takashi; Kubo, Toshio; Ichihara, Eiki; Ohashi, Kadoaki; Sato, Akiko; Hotta, Katsuyuki; Tabata, Masahiro; Tanimoto, Mitsune; Kiura, Katsuyuki

    2017-05-01

    Although endobronchial intubation during a bronchoscopic examination is useful for invasive procedures, it is not routine practice in Japan. The present study evaluated discomfort due to endobronchial intubation using fentanyl and midazolam sedation during bronchoscopy. Thirty-nine patients were enrolled prospectively from November 2014 to September 2015 at Okayama University Hospital. Fentanyl (20 µg) was administered to the patients just before endobronchial intubation, and fentanyl (10 µg) and midazolam (1 mg) were added as needed during the procedure. A questionnaire survey was administered 2 h after the examination. In the questionnaire, patient satisfaction was scored using a visual analog scale as follows: excellent (1 point), good (2 points), normal (3 points), uncomfortable (4 points) and very uncomfortable (5 points). An additional question ('Do you remember the bronchoscopic examination?') was also asked. Predefined parameters (blood pressure, heart rate, oxygen saturation and complications) were recorded. The enrolled patients included 22 males and 17 females; their median age was 70 (range: 28-88) years. The patients received a mean dose of 47.9 µg of fentanyl (range: 30-90 µg) and 2.79 mg of midazolam (range: 1-7 mg). In total, 28 patients (71.7%) agreed to undergo a second bronchoscopic examination; the mean levels of discomfort and for the re-examination were 2.07 points each. About 41% of the patients remembered the bronchoscopic examination. No severe complications were reported. Endobronchial intubation using fentanyl and midazolam sedation during an invasive bronchoscopic procedure might be recommended. UMIN000015578 in the UMIN Clinical Trials Registry. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  10. Efficacy of two-month treatment with Xiloial eyedrops for discomfort from disposable soft contact lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versura, Piera; Profazio, Vincenzo; Balducci, Nicole; Campos, Emilio C

    2010-09-20

    To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of Xiloial(®) monodose eyedrops in the treatment of patients suffering from subjective symptoms of discomfort related to disposable soft contact lens (dSCL) wear. Fifteen (12 female, three male, medium age 39 ± 9 years) dSCL wearers were enrolled. Inclusion criteria were Ocular Surface Disease Index (ODSI) symptom questionnaire score >12, tear film break-up time (TFBUT) 10 mm over five minutes, mild punctuate keratopathy, and conjunctival staining (Oxford grading ≤4). Monodose Xiloial eyedrops were administered three times daily for a two-month period. Patients were evaluated at enrollment, after three days of washout (baseline), and after one and two months of treatment, by OSDI score, Schirmer test I, TFBUT, ferning test, ocular surface damage (Oxford grade), and serum albumin in tears (index of passive exudation related to serum leakage). At endpoint versus baseline, respectively, the mean ± standard deviation of all variables improved as follows: OSDI (8.5 ± 3 versus 20.2 ± 1.6); TFBUT (9.6 ± 1.1 versus 7.1 ± 1.0); Oxford grading (0.5 ± 0.1 versus 3.6 ± 0.8); ferning test (2 ± 1 versus 2.4 ± 0.5); and Schirmer test I (14.6 ± 1.1 versus 12 ± 2.1), with P < 0.05 for all variables (Friedman and Wilcoxon tests). Tolerability was high, with no adverse events noted. A two-month treatment with Xiloial showed good tolerance and appeared to reduce ocular surface damage and symptoms of discomfort.

  11. Comparison of efficacy of prophylactic ketamine and dexmedetomidine on postoperative bladder catheter-related discomfort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Başak Akça

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To compare the effects of prophylactic ketamine and dexmedetomidine on postoperative bladder catheter-related discomfort/pain in patients undergoing cystoscopy. Methods: This prospective study was conducted on 75 American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA I-II patients between 18-75 years of age and undergoing cystoscopy between November 2011 and June 2012 at Hacettepe University Hospital, Ankara, Turkey. Patients were randomly assigned to one of the 3 groups to receive 1 μ/kg dexmedetomidine, 250 μ/kg intravenous ketamine, or normal saline. All patients were questioned regarding probe-related discomfort, patient satisfaction, and pain at the end of the operation 0 (t0 and 15 (t1, 60 (t2, 120 (t3, and 360 (t4 minutes postoperatively. Evaluations were performed in person at the post-anesthesia care unit, or in ambulatory surgery rooms, or by phone calls. Results: Pain incidence in the dexmedetomidine and ketamine groups (p=0.042 was significantly lower than that in the control group (p=0.044.The sedation scores recorded at t0 in the dexmedetomidine and ketamine groups (p=0.004 were significantly higher than that of the control group (p=0.017. Patient groups were similar regarding the rate of hallucinations experienced at t1, no patients experienced hallucinations at t2, t3, or t4. Significantly more patients experienced hallucinations at t0 in the ketamine group than in the dexmedetomidine group (p=0.034 and the control group (p=0.005. Conclusion: Dexmedetomidine and ketamine had similar analgesic effects in preventing catheter-related pain; however, dexmedetomidine had a more acceptable side effect profile. To identify the optimal doses of dexmedetomidine and ketamine, more large-scale interventional studies are needed.

  12. Combined effect of whole-body vibration and ambient lighting on human discomfort, heart rate, and reaction time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monazzam, Mohammad Reza; Shoja, Esmaeil; Zakerian, Seyed Abolfazl; Foroushani, Abbas Rahimi; Shoja, Mohsen; Gharaee, Masoumeh; Asgari, Amin

    2018-03-12

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of whole-body vibration and ambient lighting, as well as their combined effect on human discomfort, heart rate, and reaction time in laboratory conditions. 44 men were recruited with an average age of 25.4 ± 1.9 years. Each participant was subjected to 12 experimental steps, each step lasting five minutes for four different vibration accelerations in X, Y, and Z axes at a fixed frequency; three different lighting intensities of 50, 500, and 1000 lx were also considered. At each step, a visual computerized reaction test was taken from subjects and their heart rate recorded by pulse oximeter. In addition, the discomfort rate of subjects was measured using Borg scale. Increasing vibration acceleration significantly increased the discomfort rate and heart beat but not the reaction time. Lack of lighting caused more discomfort in the subjects, but there was no significant correlation between lighting intensity with heart rate and reaction time. The results also showed that the combined effect of vibration and lighting had no significant effect on any of the discomfort, heart rate, and reaction time variables. Whole-body vibration is an important factor in the development of human subjective and physiological reactions compared to lighting. Therefore, consideration of the level of vibration to which an individual is exposed in workplaces subject to vibration plays an important role in reducing the level of human discomfort, but its interaction with ambient lighting does not have a significant effect on human subjective and physiological responses.

  13. Molecular characterization of three heat shock protein 70 genes and their expression profiles under thermal stress in the citrus red mite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Li-Hong; Jiang, Hong-Bo; Liu, Yong-Hua; Dou, Wei; Wang, Jin-Jun

    2012-04-01

    Three heat shock protein 70 family transcripts, named PcHsp70-1, PcHsp70-2 and PcHsp70-3, were isolated from the citrus red mite, Panonychus citri. PcHsp70-1, PcHsp70-2, and PcHsp70-3 contained an open reading frame of 1977, 1968, and 2028 nucleotides that encoded 658, 655 and 675 amino acid residues, respectively. Comparison of deduced amino acid sequences of PcHsp70-1 and PcHsp70-2 showed 86.34% identity, while the amino acid sequence of PcHsp70-3 was only 57.39 and 58.75% identical to that of PcHsp70-1 and PcHsp70-2, respectively. Sequences and phylogenetic analyses suggested that PcHsp70-1 and PcHsp70-2 were cytosolic Hsps, whereas PcHsp70-3 was located in ER (endoplasmic reticulum). To accurately validate mRNA expression profiles of the three Hsp70s under thermal stress conditions, seven housekeeping genes were evaluated. Alpha-tubulin and RpII were selected as optimal endogenous references for cold shock and heat shock conditions, respectively. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR revealed that only the mRNA expression of PcHsp70-2 was up-regulated under heat shocks, and all of the three Hsp70s were constitutively expressed under cold shocks. The results suggest that the three Hsp70s were more critical to coping with heat than cold shocks.

  14. Thermal skin damage and mobile phone use

    OpenAIRE

    Elabbassi , Elmountacer-Billah; De Seze , René

    2005-01-01

    International audience; Mobile phone "cell phone" use has dramatically increased over th last decade, but doubts remain over its safety. Epidemiological investigation of mobile phone (MP) users reported symptoms of discomfort feeling, warmth behind/around or on the ear and heat sensation of the cheek. These symptoms may be due to thermal insulation, conduction of the heat produced in the phone by the battery currents and running of the radiofrequency (RF) electronic circuits, and electromagne...

  15. Thermal comfort and the integrated design of homes for older people with dementia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Hoof, J. [Hogeschool Utrecht University of Applied Sciences, Faculty of Health Care, Research Centre for Innovation in Health Care, Bolognalaan 101, 3584 CJ Utrecht (Netherlands); Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of Architecture, Building and Planning, Den Dolech 2, 5612 AZ Eindhoven (Netherlands); Kort, H.S.M. [Hogeschool Utrecht University of Applied Sciences, Faculty of Health Care, Research Centre for Innovation in Health Care, Bolognalaan 101, 3584 CJ Utrecht (Netherlands); Vilans, Catharijnesingel 47, 3511 GC Utrecht (Netherlands); Hensen, J.L.M.; Rutten, P.G.S. [Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of Architecture, Building and Planning, Den Dolech 2, 5612 AZ Eindhoven (Netherlands); Duijnstee, M.S.H. [Hogeschool Utrecht University of Applied Sciences, Faculty of Health Care, Research Centre for Innovation in Health Care, Bolognalaan 101, 3584 CJ Utrecht (Netherlands); Academy of Health Sciences Utrecht, Universiteitsweg 98, 3584 CG Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2010-02-15

    People with dementia may have an altered sensitivity to indoor environmental conditions compared to other older adults and younger counterparts. This paper, based on literature review and qualitative research, provides an overview of needs regarding thermal comfort and the design and implementation of heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems for people with dementia and other relevant stakeholders through the combined use of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, and the Model of Integrated Building Design. In principle, older adults do not perceive thermal comfort differently from younger adults. Due to the pathology of people with dementia, as well as their altered thermoregulation, the perception of the thermal environment might be changed. Many people with dementia express their discomfort through certain behaviour that is considered a problem for both family and professional carers. Ethical concerns are raised as well in terms of who is in charge over the thermal conditions, and the protection against temperature extremes in hot summers or cold winters. When implementing heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems one should consider aspects like user-technology interaction, diverging needs and preferences within group settings, safety issues, and minimising negative behavioural reactions and draught due to suboptimal positioning of outlets. At the same time, technology puts demands on installers who need to learn how to work with customers with dementia and their family carers. (author)

  16. Cloning of three heat shock protein genes (HSP70, HSP90α and HSP90β) and their expressions in response to thermal stress in loach (Misgurnus anguillicaudatus) fed with different levels of vitamin C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jie; Liang, Xiao; Zhang, Yin; Li, Yang; Cao, Xiaojuan; Gao, Jian

    2017-07-01

    Heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) and 90 (HSP90) are the most broadly studied proteins in HSP families. They play key roles in cells as molecular chaperones, in response to stress conditions such as thermal stress. In this study, full-length cDNA sequences of HSP70, HSP90α and HSP90β from loach Misgurnus anguillicaudatus were cloned. The full-length cDNA of HSP70 in loach was 2332bp encoding 644 amino acids, while HSP90α and HSP90β were 2586bp and 2678bp in length, encoding 729 and 727 amino acids, respectively. The deduced amino acid sequences of HSP70 in loach shared the highest identity with those of Megalobrama amblycephala and Cyprinus carpio. The deduced amino acid sequences of HSP90α and HSP90β in loach both shared the highest identity with those of M. amblycephala. Their mRNA tissue expression results showed that the maximum expressions of HSP70, HSP90α and HSP90β were respectively present in the intestine, brain and kidney of loach. Quantitative real-time PCR was employed to analyze the temporal expressions of HSP70, HSP90α and HSP90β in livers of loaches fed with different levels of vitamin C under thermal stress. Expression levels of the three HSP genes in loach fed the diet without vitamin C supplemented at 0 h of thermal stress were significantly lower than those at 2 h, 6 h, 12 h and 24 h of thermal stress. It indicated that expressions of the three HSP genes were sensitive to thermal stress in loach. The three HSP genes in loaches fed with 1000 mg/kg vitamin C expressed significantly lower than other vitamin C groups at many time points of thermal stress, suggesting 1000 mg/kg dietary vitamin C might decrease the body damages caused by the thermal stress. This study will be of value for further studies into thermal stress tolerance in loach. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Use of Pre-Injection Diffusion of Local Anaesthetic as a Means of Reducing Needle Penetration Discomfort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuket Sandalli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To determine if pre-injection diffusion of local anaesthetic solution influences the discomfort of needle penetration in the palate. Methods: A placebo-controlled, randomised, doubleblind split-mouth investigation was conducted. 25 healthy adult volunteers were recruited and each received two needle penetrations in a random order during one visit. The penetration sites were 1 cm from the gingival margin of the first maxillary premolars on each side of the mouth. 30 gauge-13 mm needles which were attached to syringes that contained either 2% lidocaine with 0.125mg/ml epinephrine or physiological saline were used. For each penetration an operator encouraged a drop of solution to appear at the end of the needle and placed this drop with the bevel of the needle flat on the palate for 20 seconds. The discomfort was noted on a 100 mm visual analogue scale with end points marked “No pain” and “Unbearable pain”. Results: There was no significant difference in penetration discomfort between solutions, (mean VAS = 26.80±19.36mm for lidocaine and 26.20±18.39mm for saline however the 2nd penetration was significantly more uncomfortable than the first (mean VAS = 31.00±19.84 mm and 22.00±16.65 mm respectively. Conclusion: Pre-injection diffusion of local anaesthetic solution did not influence the discomfort of needle penetration in the palate.

  18. The effects of a passive exoskeleton on muscle activity, discomfort and endurance time in forward bending work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, T.; Eck, J. van; Knitel, K.; Looze, M.P. de

    2016-01-01

    Exoskeletons may form a new strategy to reduce the risk of developing low back pain in stressful jobs. In the present study we examined the potential of a so-called passive exoskeleton on muscle activity, discomfort and endurance time in prolonged forward-bended working postures.Eighteen subjects

  19. Effective Work Procedure design Using Discomfort and Effort Factor in Brick stacking operation-A case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rout, Biswaranjan; Dash, R. R.; Dhupal, D.

    2018-02-01

    In this work a typical planning of movement of limbs and torso of the worker to be well design to reduce fatigue and energy of the worker. A simulation model is generated to suit the procedure and comply with the constraints in the workspace. It requires verifying the capability of human postures and movements in different working conditions for the evaluation of effectiveness of the new design. In this article a simple human performance measure is introduce that enable the mathematical model for evaluation of a cost function. The basic scheme is to evaluate the performance in the form of several cost factors using AI techniques. Here two main cost factors taken in to consideration are discomfort factor and effort factor in limb movements. Discomfort factor measures the level of discomfort from the most neutral position of a given limb to the position of the corresponding limb after movement and effort factor is a measure of the displacement of the corresponding limbs from the original position. The basic aim is to optimize the movement of the limbs with the above mentioned cost functions. The effectiveness of the procedure is tested with an example of working procedure of workers used for stacking of fly ash bricks in a local fly ash bricks manufacturing unit. The objective is to find out the optimised movement of the limbs to reduce discomfort level and effort required of workers. The effectiveness of the procedure in this case study illustrated with the obtained results.

  20. Predicting Dispositions toward Inclusion of Students with Disabilities: The Role of Conservative Ideology and Discomfort with Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandes, Joyce A.; Crowson, H. Michael

    2009-01-01

    Within the published empirical record, a limited number of investigations exist that study the association between socio-political ideologies of preservice teachers and their attitudes toward disability-related matters within schools. To the extent that individual socio-political ideology and discomfort with disability remain mostly unexplored,…

  1. Does Mental Illness Stigma Contribute to Adolescent Standardized Patients' Discomfort With Simulations of Mental Illness and Adverse Psychosocial Experiences?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Mark D.; Johnson, Samantha; Niec, Anne; Pietrantonio, Anna Marie; High, Bradley; MacMillan, Harriet; Eva, Kevin W.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Adolescent mental illness stigma-related factors may contribute to adolescent standardized patients' (ASP) discomfort with simulations of psychiatric conditions/adverse psychosocial experiences. Paradoxically, however, ASP involvement may provide a stigma-reduction strategy. This article reports an investigation of this hypothetical…

  2. Computer-Related Posture and Discomfort in Primary School Children: The Effects of a School-Based Ergonomic Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dockrell, Sara; Earle, Deirdre; Galvin, Rose

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of a school-based ergonomic intervention on childrens' posture and discomfort while using computers using a pre/post test study design. The sample comprised 23 children age 9 and 10 years. Posture was assessed with Rapid Upper Limb Assessment (RULA) and a workstation assessment was completed using a Visual…

  3. Influence of unstable footwear on lower leg muscle activity, volume change and subjective discomfort during prolonged standing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Zanyar; Allahyari, Teimour; Azghani, Mahmood Reza; Khalkhali, Hamidreza

    2016-03-01

    The present study was an attempt to investigate the effect of unstable footwear on lower leg muscle activity, volume change and subjective discomfort during prolonged standing. Ten healthy subjects were recruited to stand for 2 h in three footwear conditions: barefoot, flat-bottomed shoe and unstable shoe. During standing, lower leg discomfort and EMG activity of medial gastrocnemius (MG) and tibialis anterior (TA) muscles were continuously monitored. Changes in lower leg volume over standing time also were measured. Lower leg discomfort rating reduced significantly while subjects standing on unstable shoe compared to the flat-bottomed shoe and barefoot condition. For lower leg volume, less changes also were observed with unstable shoe. The activity level and variation of right MG muscle was greater with unstable shoe compared to the other footwear conditions; however regarding the left MG muscle, significant difference was found between unstable shoe and flat-bottomed shoe only for activity level. Furthermore no significant differences were observed for the activity level and variation of TA muscles (right/left) among all footwear conditions. The findings suggested that prolonged standing with unstable footwear produces changes in lower leg muscles activity and leads to less volume changes. Perceived discomfort also was lower for this type of footwear and this might mean that unstable footwear can be used as ergonomic solution for employees whose work requires prolonged standing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  4. Inquiry of the discomfort offered for different tatamis used in the practical of the judo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastião Iberes Lopes Melo

    2007-12-01

    was fastened to the athlete, first at the wrist and then at the hip, for the respective impact measures. For the field research, 63 judo fi ghters, performing the same fall projection, who inferred in a protocol the discomfort perception about each type of material, tested the same tatamis. The data were collected through the SAD 32 program and the experimental acceleration curves were imported for the MATLAB (version 5, 1999 software, which were parameterized and derived in order to obtain the a, q and jerk calculations, respectively. The results obtained for both the subjective perception, in the parameterization of curves (a and q and for the values of jerk, ended up by classifying the tatamis with regard to the discomfort characteristic, being this classifi cation in crescent order for the wrist segment: A, B, F, G, D, C, E; and for the hip: A, F, B, C, G, D, E. It is believed that the procedures here described for the attainment of the a, q and jerk indexes will be useful for the classifi cation of discomfort provided by other materials submitted to impact such as insoles and soles of sportive shoes.

  5. Visual discomfort while watching stereoscopic three-dimensional movies at the cinema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeri, Fabrizio; Livi, Stefano

    2015-05-01

    This study investigates discomfort symptoms while watching Stereoscopic three-dimensional (S3D) movies in the 'real' condition of a cinema. In particular, it had two main objectives: to evaluate the presence and nature of visual discomfort while watching S3D movies, and to compare visual symptoms during S3D and 2D viewing. Cinema spectators of S3D or 2D films were interviewed by questionnaire at the theatre exit of different multiplex cinemas immediately after viewing a movie. A total of 854 subjects were interviewed (mean age 23.7 ± 10.9 years; range 8-81 years; 392 females and 462 males). Five hundred and ninety-nine of them viewed different S3D movies, and 255 subjects viewed a 2D version of a film seen in S3D by 251 subjects from the S3D group for a between-subjects design for that comparison. Exploratory factor analysis revealed two factors underlying symptoms: External Symptoms Factors (ESF) with a mean ± S.D. symptom score of 1.51 ± 0.58 comprised of eye burning, eye ache, eye strain, eye irritation and tearing; and Internal Symptoms Factors (ISF) with a mean ± S.D. symptom score of 1.38 ± 0.51 comprised of blur, double vision, headache, dizziness and nausea. ISF and ESF were significantly correlated (Spearman r = 0.55; p = 0.001) but with external symptoms significantly higher than internal ones (Wilcoxon Signed-ranks test; p = 0.001). The age of participants did not significantly affect symptoms. However, females had higher scores than males for both ESF and ISF, and myopes had higher ISF scores than hyperopes. Newly released movies provided lower ESF scores than older movies, while the seat position of spectators had minimal effect. Symptoms while viewing S3D movies were significantly and negatively correlated to the duration of wearing S3D glasses. Kruskal-Wallis results showed that symptoms were significantly greater for S3D compared to those of 2D movies, both for ISF (p = 0.001) and for ESF (p = 0.001). In short, the analysis of the symptoms

  6. Multi-site musculoskeletal pain in Swedish police: associations with discomfort from wearing mandatory equipment and prolonged sitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Louise Bæk; Andersson, Elisabeth Elgmark; Tranberg, Roy; Ramstrand, Nerrolyn

    2018-05-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders are considered as a major issue affecting the health and well-being of active duty police. Discomfort from wearing mandatory equipment and sitting for long periods of time in fleet vehicles are workload factors linked to musculoskeletal disorders in police. This study aims to determine the prevalence of multi-site musculoskeletal pain among Swedish police and to explore the possible association to discomfort experience when wearing mandatory equipment and sitting for long periods in fleet vehicles. In this cross-sectional study responses from 4185 police were collected through a self-administered online survey including questions about physical work environment, mandatory equipment and musculoskeletal pain. Multi-site pain was determined through summing pain sites from four body regions. Binomial logistic regression was performed to explore the association between multi-site musculoskeletal pain: (1) discomfort from wearing mandatory equipment and (2) sitting for long periods in fleet vehicles. The prevalence of multi-site musculoskeletal pain at least 1 day per week within the previous 3 months was 41.3%. A statistically significant association between discomfort from wearing mandatory equipment and multi-site musculoskeletal pain was found; duty belt [OR 5.42 (95% CI 4.56-6.43)] as well as body armour [OR 2.69 (95% CI 2.11-3.42)]. Sitting for long periods in fleet vehicles was not significantly associated to multi-site musculoskeletal pain. Multi-site musculoskeletal pain is a considerable problem among Swedish police and modifying mandatory equipment to decrease discomfort is suggested as a potential means of decreasing the musculoskeletal pain experienced by many police officers.

  7. Relationship between 24- hour Holter variables, chest discomfort and syncope: Does age matter?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir Kanti Saha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available One hundred and forty four ambulatory, non-emergent human subjects from 20-88 years of age were investigated following routine 24 hour Holter monitoring referred by primary and tertiary care centers primarily for evaluation of palpitations and syncope. The patients were grouped into 3 different age categories: A 20-59 years of age (16%, B 60-69 years of age (26.4% and C > 70 years of age (57.6%. Heart rate profile, RR intervals, symptoms, frequency of premature supra ventricular and ventricular complexes were registered. The data show that though the occurrence and frequency of premature atrial and ventricular contractions over a period of 24 hours did not differ between the groups, the younger subjects documented more subjective discomforts during the Holter monitoring. Extra-systoles in excess of 1000 beats / 24 hour occured incessantly throughout the registration. Patients with syncope and those without did not differ as regards the Holter variables. However, subjects with atrial fibrillation had acceptable rate control and had significantly lower incidence of syncope than those with sinus rhythm. The findings suggest that in a county setting, Holter monitoring for evaluation of syncope may not be the first hand mode of investigation in a non emergent setting. On the contrary, the modality appears to be valuable for monitoring patients with atrial fibrillation. Even mild symptoms in the elderly population may warrant closer clinical follow up to prevent cardiac events and/or syncope leading to serious physical injury.

  8. Discomforts occurring in the interventional therapy for diabetic foot: analysis of causes and nursing strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xue; Chen Jinhua; Wang Yi; Chen Rong

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the causes of discomfort occurring in the interventional treatment of diabetic foot, to discuss the individualized nursing measures for improving the patient's comfort and cooperation, and for increasing the successful rate of the interventional procedure. Methods: The control group included 9 patients who received conventional nursing care. The study group had 13 patients who accepted individualized nursing care and nursing intervention, which was designed according to every patient's individual conditions. Results: In the control group, one patient could not endure the surgery to the end because of the long operating time. Another two patients had to take examinations repeatedly because the imaging quality was very poor, which was caused by the body movement due to uncomfortable mechanical stimulation. Urinary retention occurred in one patient. The mean operative time of the control group was 2.8 hour per surgery. The average dosage of contrast medium used was 150-300 ml per procedure. All the subjects in the study group completed the surgery successfully, the mean operative time was 2.2 hour per surgery and the average dosage of contrast medium used was 100-200 ml per procedure. Conclusion: During the perioperative period of interventional treatment for diabetic foot, the effective individualized nursing care and nursing intervention, the measures to improve patient's comfort and the cooperation, etc. can certainly increase the successful rate, saving the operating time and reducing the contrast dosage. (authors)

  9. Potential risk factors for onset of severe neck and shoulder discomfort (Katakori) in urban Japanese workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawada, Takayuki; Matsudaira, Ko; Muto, Yumiko; Koga, Tadashi; Takahashi, Masaya

    2016-06-10

    Katakori is a Japanese word, and there is no clear English translation. Katakori consists of two terms, Kata means neck and shoulder, kori means stiffness. Consequently, Katakori is defined as neck and shoulder discomfort or dull pain. Katakori is a major somatic complaint and has a large impact on workers. To examine the association between onset of severe Katakori and potential risk factors in Japanese workers, a prospective cohort study, entitled "Cultural and Psychosocial Influence on Disability (CUPID)", was conducted. Self-administered questionnaires were distributed twice: at baseline and 1 year after baseline. Logistic regression was used to explore the risk factors of onset of severe Katakori. Of those 1,398, the incidence of severe Katakori onset after 1 year was 3.0% (42 workers). Being female (adjusted odds ratio: 2.39, 95% confidence interval: 1.18-4.86), short sleep duration (adjusted odds ratio: 2.86, 95% confidence interval: 1.20-6.82) and depressed mood with some issues at work (adjusted odds ratio: 3.11, 95% confidence interval: 1.38-7.03) were significantly associated with onset of severe Katakori. Psychosocial factors as well as gender difference were associated with onset of severe Katakori. We suggest that mental health support at the workplace is important to prevent severe Katakori.

  10. PRK and butterfly LASEK: prospective, randomized, contralateral eye comparison of epithelial healing and ocular discomfort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanem, Vinícius C; Souza, Giselle C; Souza, Denise C; Viese, Juliana M Z; Weber, Sarah L P; Kara-José, Newton

    2008-06-01

    To compare corneal reepithelialization, pain scores, ocular discomfort, and tear production after photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) and butterfly laser epithelial keratomileusis (LASEK). This prospective, randomized, double-masked study comprised 102 eyes of 51 patients who underwent laser refractive surgery. Each patient was randomized to have one eye operated on with PRK and the other with butterfly LASEK. Patients were followed for 1 year. The mean reepithelialization time in the PRK group was 4.35+/-0.48 days (range: 4 to 5 days) and 4.75+/-0.72 days (range: 4 to 6 days) in the butterfly LASEK group (PPRK was noted (3.31+/-4.09 vs 4.43+/-4.27; P=.18). Schirmer test values were significantly reduced from preoperative levels through 12 months with both PRK (23.6+/-8.1 vs 19.4+/-10.1; P<.002) and butterfly LASEK (22.4+/-8.7 vs 18.9+/-9.7; P=.01); however, no difference between groups was noted at any time. Photorefractive keratectomy showed a modest but statistically significant shorter reepithelialization time and a tendency towards lower pain scores than butterfly LASEK. The reepithelialization time was strongly associated with the duration of surgery in both techniques. A similar reduction of Schirmer test values was observed up to 1 year postoperatively in both groups.

  11. Pastry Filled With Horseradish. discomfort city – how to create it

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantin Lidin

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Huge urban agglomerations of the world become bigger and more numerous. In 2000 there were 16 giant cities with population more than 10 million people, and by 2015 their number will have grown up to 21. However the biggest share of the global urban population increase falls on relatively small places with population from 500,000 to 5 million people. Within 2000-2015 the tendencies will be similar.Global urbanization engrosses more and more countries and regions. Mankind keeps on growing irregularly – population increase is concentrated in cities.It is obvious why human masses gather in big cities: the life in such cities is more comfortable than in rural area. Of course, poverty and despondent imbecility of rural life looks less attractive than city apartment and rapid rhythm of life in a megapolis. Finally, it is desire for better comfort – accommodation, activity and reasonableness of living – that leads immigrants to the city. In some cases the number of immigrants is so big that city population increases several times within the life of one generation. In other words, there are more newcomers that the natives of the city. In this case the tendency towards «discomfortization » embraces the whole megapolis. In the urban development science such effect is called «degradation of urban environment ». Tokyo and London of the seventies-nineties of the last century can be examples of this. Vsevolod Ovchinnikov describes «the Oriental capital»: «Tokyo is a hypertrophied embodiment of the problems peculiar to megapolises in general and to an overpeopled insular country in particular. This paradoxical combination of tightness and chaos, density and dispersion… Tokyo citizens have a joke that even their dogs have to wag their tails not from side to side, but upward and downward». In addition to the problems of pure air and water, transport and noise there is a tremendous ugliness of urban development. Plenty of individual beautiful

  12. Contact Lens-Induced Discomfort and Inflammatory Mediator Changes in Tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoudi, Simin; Zhao, Zhenjun; Stapleton, Fiona; Willcox, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Studies indicate that contact lens (CL) discontinuation mostly occurs because of dryness and discomfort symptoms. This study aimed to investigate relationships between changes in the concentration of tear inflammatory mediators with subjective comfort ratings with CL wear and no contact lens wear between morning and evening. Forty-five subjects collected tears twice daily in the morning and in the evening with or without lenses. Comfort was rated subjectively on a scale from 1 to 100 (where 100 was extremely comfortable) just before each tear collection. Tear samples were assayed for complement components (C3 and C3a), leukotriene B4 (LTB4), secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2), secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA), and bradykinin using commercially available immuno-based assay kits. Comfort ratings showed a statistically significant decline from morning to evening both with CL (89.0±10.1 AM vs. 76.7±15.2 PM; P0.05). Leukotriene B4 levels were slightly higher in CL (CL 43.4±12.6 pg/ml vs. No CL 39.4±13.4 pg/mL; P=0.034), whereas the concentration of LTB4, C3, C3a, and sIgA dropped by the end of the day in the presence or absence of lens wear (Ptear levels were not correlated with comfort ratings in any of the conditions. Leukotriene B4 had a higher concentration in the evening, and when measured as a ratio to sIgA, there was a trend for increased concentration of this mediator during CL wear. Although specific mediators showed changes from morning to evening with and without lens wear, most of these were not correlated with subjective comfort ratings in lens wear. The only mediator that showed an increase in concentration during the day and during lens wear was LTB4, and further studies on this mediator are warranted.

  13. Musculoskeletal pain and discomfort and associated worker and organizational factors: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Sasha K; Rothmore, Paul R; Doda, Diana V D; Hiller, Janet E; Mahmood, M A; Pisaniello, Dino L

    2014-01-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders are a leading cause of work-related ill health, and a major cost burden for the individual, industry and the community. Despite the broad range of risk factors that have been identified, most studies have focused only on specific occupations or categories of risk factors, meaning that there is limited understanding of the relative contributions of individual and organisational, physical and psychosocial factors. This cross-sectional survey of workers in medium-to-large workplaces in South Australia sought to examine a broad range of factors within various workplaces and industries. 404 workers from 29 workgroups and 23 separate companies participated in the research. Questionnaires were administered face-to-face, assessing demographic and job characteristics, safety climate, musculoskeletal pain and discomfort (MSPD) and job satisfaction. Potential predictors were grouped in terms of personal/job and organizational characteristics and associations with MSPD examined. A considerable proportion of workers (40%) had experienced MSPD in the last 7 days and 15% had experienced severe MSPD. In a multivariate model, four variables were found to be significantly associated with MSPD, namely being aged > or =40 years (adjusted odds ratio=1.73), overall job satisfaction (negatively associated) (AOR=0.37), medium (vs. large) company size (AOR=1.80) and workgroup safety climate score (negatively associated) (AOR=0.58). The results confirm a link between non-physical factors and work-related musculoskeletal disorders, suggesting that these factors should received increased attention as part of overall health and safety strategies. Organizations should give greater consideration to both the satisfaction of their employees and organizational factors that set the tone for safety climate.

  14. [Increased self-confidence and decreased sexual discomfort after subpectoral mammaplasty].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruck, J C; Kleinschmidt, A; Ottomann, C

    2011-04-01

    The study objectively discusses the causal relationship between submuscular breast augmentation mammaplasty and improved aspects of quality of life. The goal was to assess a possible increase in certain aspects after undergoing cosmetic breast enlargement surgery under consideration of 4 different aspects. Between 2005 and 2006, a total of 65 women were given a standardised patient questionnaire (body image assessment questionnaire) preoperatively as well as 6 months postoperatively after undergoing cosmetic submuscular augmentation mammaplasty: 58 of these questionnaires could be evaluated successfully. All of the patients had undergone augmentation mammaplasty for the first time. The following criteria were assessed and evaluated using a point value system (0-100 points): attractiveness/self-confidence, insecurity/anxiety, emphasis placed on physical appearance, and sexual discomfort. With regard to the questions dealing with attractiveness/self-confidence, a highly significant improvement in the patient's self-assessment of said criteria after undergoing cosmetic submuscular augmentation mammaplasty as compared to their own preoperative assessment was apparent. In addition, a significantly improved level of sexual satisfaction after the medical procedure was also demonstrated. In the same fashion, the answers to the series of questions dealing with emphasis placed on physical appearance also exhibited a positive change. The only topic that exhibited next to no change was the series of questions dealing with insecurity/anxiety. Cosmetic augmentation mammaplasty is an available therapy that can increase a patient's own self-assessment of attractiveness and self-confidence in a significant way. In addition, this operation leads to a significant increase in sexual satisfaction, and because of this and the aforementioned change of emphasis placed on physical appearance, an overall improvement in certain aspects of the quality of life can be achieved. © Georg Thieme

  15. Clinical errors and therapist discomfort with client disclosure of troublesome pornography use: Implications for clinical practice and error reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Nathan T; Spengler, Paul M

    2016-09-01

    Mental health professionals are increasingly aware of the need for competence in the treatment of clients with pornography-related concerns. However, while researchers have recently sought to explore efficacious treatments for pornography-related concerns, few explorations of potential clinical judgment issues have occurred. Due to the sensitive, and at times uncomfortable, nature of client disclosures of sexual concerns within therapy, therapists are required to manage their own discomfort while retaining fidelity to treatment. The present paper explores clinician examples of judgment errors that may result from feelings of discomfort, and specifically from client use of pornography. Issues of potential bias, bias management techniques, and therapeutic implications are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  16. Test ifm kursus (Dorthe) - Patient discomfort and retakes in periapical examination of mandibular third molars using digital receptors and film

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matzen, Louise Hauge; Christensen, Jennifer; Wenzel, Ann

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim was to compare patient discomfort and evaluate the frequency of retakes using intraoral digital receptors and conventional film for radiographic examination of mandibular third molars. STUDY DESIGN: Both mandibular third molar regions were examined in 110 patients with 2 of 5...... digital intraoral receptors. Discomfort was scored on a visual analog scale (VAS) for each receptor and for film as a reference. If the whole tooth was not imaged on the digital image, a retake was performed using film. t Tests evaluated differences in VAS score, chi-squared tests evaluated differences...... in frequency of remakes, and logistic regression analyses evaluated factors predisposing for retake. RESULTS: No significant difference existed in VAS scores between right and left sides for film (P = .24). The digital receptors were more uncomfortable than film (P

  17. The effects of employer-provided massage therapy on job satisfaction, workplace stress, and pain and discomfort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Back, Chris; Tam, Helen; Lee, Elaine; Haraldsson, Bodhi

    2009-01-01

    Long-term care staff have high levels of musculoskeletal concerns. This research provided a pilot program to evaluate the efficacy of employer-funded on-site massage therapy on job satisfaction, workplace stress, pain, and discomfort. Twenty-minute massage therapy sessions were provided. Evaluation demonstrated possible improvements in job satisfaction, with initial benefits in pain severity, and the greatest benefit for individuals with preexisting symptoms. A long-term effect was not demonstrated.

  18. The effect of a lidocaine/prilocaine topical anesthetic on pain and discomfort associated with orthodontic elastomeric separator placement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Abu Al-Melh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The initial placement of orthodontic elastomeric separators can be uncomfortable and painful. Therefore, it is important to relieve this disturbing sensation to create a discomfort or pain-free orthodontic visit. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of a lidocaine/prilocaine topical anesthetic on pain and discomfort associated with the placement of orthodontic elastomeric separators. Methods Fifty subjects aging between 20–35 years were included in this study. In the maxillary arch, a lidocaine/prilocaine topical anesthetic was placed around the ginigval margins of the premolar and molar on side. On the other side, a placebo agent was placed around the ginigval margins of the premolar and molar. After two minutes, an elastomeric separator was placed between the premolar and molar on both sides. The subjects were then asked to report their findings on a Verbal Scale and a Visual Analogue Scale every second minute for a period of 10 min. The subjects were also given a questionnaire to evaluate the overall impression on the topical anesthetic use. Results The overall mean discomfort/pain score was found to be significantly lower (p < 0.001 with the topical anesthetic than with the placebo. Repeated measures ANOVA with a Greenhouse-Geisser correction determined that mean pain scores were statistically significantly low with the 10-min time duration (F (1.54,42.2 = 40.7, p = 0.001, with an estimated grand mean (8.37, 95% CI 6.75–9.98. The questionnaire responses revealed that 87% of the subjects reported an overall satisfaction and agreement with the topical anesthetic than with the placebo or no difference (13% after the initial separator placement. Conclusions The discomfort and pain resulting from the initial placement of orthodontic elastomeric separators can be significantly reduced with the lidocaine/prilocaine topical anesthetic.

  19. Assessment of pain and discomfort during early orthodontic treatment of skeletal Class III malocclusion using the Removable Mandibular Retractor Appliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, M; Hajeer, M Y; Al-Jundi, A

    2013-06-01

    To determine the degree of pain and discomfort during the orthodontic treatment of skeletal Class III malocclusion using the Removable Mandibular Retractor (RMR). The sample consisted of 33 skeletal Class III patients (17 males and 16 females; average age: 7.5 ± 1.33 years) who had been assigned to the RMR treatment group in a randomised controlled trial comparing this treatment versus a control group of no treatment at the Orthodontic Department, University of Al-Baath Dental School in Syria. Pain and discomfort were assessed using standardised questionnaires at the following assessment times: 7 days (T1), 14 days (T2), 6 weeks (T3), 3 months (T4) and 6 months (T5) after appliance insertion. Levels of pain and discomfort decreased gradually by time in general. No significant changes in the levels of pain, tooth sensitivity and soft tissues tension were detected, whereas a significant decrease in the levels of pressure, impaired speech, impaired swallowing and lack of confidence in public was observed two weeks following appliance insertion. Mandibular constraint feeling required three months to decrease significantly. No difference was found between males and females with regard to acceptance. The RMR is well accepted by Class III patients in the early mixed dentition.

  20. Intolerance for withdrawal discomfort and motivation predict voucher-based smoking treatment outcomes for smokers with substance use disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohsenow, Damaris J; Tidey, Jennifer W; Kahler, Christopher W; Martin, Rosemarie A; Colby, Suzanne M; Sirota, Alan D

    2015-04-01

    Identifying predictors of abstinence with voucher-based treatment is important for improving its efficacy. Smokers with substance use disorders have very low smoking cessation rates so identifying predictors of smoking treatment response is particularly important for these difficult-to-treat smokers. Intolerance for Smoking Abstinence Discomfort (IDQ-S), motivation to quit smoking, nicotine dependence severity (FTND), and cigarettes per day were examined as predictors of smoking abstinence during and after voucher-based smoking treatment with motivational counseling. We also investigated the relationship between IDQ-S and motivation to quit smoking. Smokers in residential substance treatment (n=184) were provided 14days of vouchers for complete smoking abstinence (CV) after a 5-day smoking reduction lead-in period or vouchers not contingent on abstinence. Carbon monoxide readings indicated about 25% of days abstinent during the 14days of vouchers for abstinence in the CV group; only 3-4% of all participants were abstinent at follow-ups. The IDQ-S Withdrawal Intolerance scale and FTND each significantly predicted fewer abstinent days during voucher treatment; FTND was nonsignificant when controlling for variance shared with withdrawal intolerance. The one significant predictor of 1-month abstinence was pretreatment motivation to quit smoking, becoming marginal (pmotivation to quit smoking. Implications for voucher-based treatment include the importance of focusing on reducing these expectancies of anticipated smoking withdrawal discomfort, increasing tolerance for abstinence discomfort, and increasing motivation. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Effects of absenteeism feedback and goal-setting interventions on nurses' fairness perceptions, discomfort feelings and absenteeism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudine, Alice; Saks, Alan M; Dawe, Doreen; Beaton, Marilyn

    2013-04-01

    A longitudinal field experiment was conducted to test the effects of absenteeism feedback and goal-setting interventions on nurses' (1) fairness perceptions, (2) discomfort feelings and (3) absenteeism. Nurses' obstacles to reducing absenteeism were also explored. Absenteeism is a significant issue in health care and there is a need to avoid interventions that are seen to be negative, punitive or lead to sick nurses coming to work. Sixty-nine nurses working in a hospital in Eastern Canada received either: (1) absenteeism feedback with individual goal-setting, (2) absenteeism feedback with group goal-setting, or (3) no intervention, and were asked questions about how they could reduce their absenteeism. There was a significant decrease in the total number of days absent but no decrease in absent episodes, and a significant effect on fairness perceptions and discomfort feelings for the nurses in the absenteeism feedback conditions. Six categories of obstacles to reducing absenteeism were identified. The interventions made nurses feel their absence rate was less fair and to experience greater feelings of discomfort. The study's interventions may lead to a reduction in absence without the negative outcomes of a harsh absenteeism policy. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Thermal background noise limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulkis, S.

    1982-01-01

    Modern detection systems are increasingly limited in sensitivity by the background thermal photons which enter the receiving system. Expressions for the fluctuations of detected thermal radiation are derived. Incoherent and heterodyne detection processes are considered. References to the subject of photon detection statistics are given.

  3. Reduction of self-perceived discomforts in critically ill patients in French intensive care units: study protocol for a cluster-randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalfon, Pierre; Mimoz, Olivier; Loundou, Anderson; Geantot, Marie-Agnès; Revel, Nathalie; Villard, Isabelle; Amour, Julien; Azoulay, Elie; Garrouste-Orgeas, Maïté; Martin, Claude; Sharshar, Tarek; Baumstarck, Karine; Auquier, Pascal

    2016-02-16

    It is now well documented that critically ill patients are exposed to stressful conditions and experience discomforts from multiple sources. Improved identification of the discomforts of patients in intensive care units (ICUs) may have implications for managing their care, including consideration of ethical issues, and may assist clinicians in choosing the most appropriate interventions. The primary objective of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a multicomponent program of discomfort reduction in critically ill patients. The secondary objectives were to assess the sustainability of the impact of the program and the potential seasonality effect. We conducted a multicenter, cluster-randomized, controlled, single (patient)-blind study involving 34 French adult ICUs. The experimental intervention was a 6-month period during which the multicomponent program was implemented in the ICU and included the following steps: identification of discomforts, immediate feedback to the healthcare team, and implementation of targeted interventions. The control intervention was a 6-month period during which any program was implemented. The primary endpoint was the monthly overall score of self-reported discomfort from the French questionnaire on discomforts in ICU patients (IPREA). The secondary endpoints were the scores of the discomfort items of IPREA. The sample size was 660 individuals to obtain 80% power to detect a 25% difference in the overall discomfort score of IPREA between the two groups (design effect: 2.9). The results of this cluster-randomized controlled study are expected to confirm that a multicomponent program of discomfort reduction may be a new strategy in the management of care for critically ill patients. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02442934, registered 11 May 2015.

  4. Level of Discomfort Decreases After the Administration of Continuous Palliative Sedation: A Prospective Multicenter Study in Hospices and Palliative Care Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Deijck, Rogier H P D; Hasselaar, Jeroen G J; Verhagen, Stans C A H H V M; Vissers, Kris C P; Koopmans, Raymond T C M

    2016-09-01

    A gold standard or validated tool for monitoring the level of discomfort during continuous palliative sedation (CPS) is lacking. Therefore, little is known about the course of discomfort in sedated patients, the efficacy of CPS, and the determinants of discomfort during CPS. To identify the course of discomfort in patients receiving CPS. A prospective observational multicenter study in nine hospices and palliative care units was performed. The Discomfort Scale-Dementia of Alzheimer Type (DS-DAT) was independently assessed for monitoring of patient discomfort during CPS. The DS-DAT scores range from 0 (no observed discomfort) to a maximum of 27 (high level of observed discomfort). Using a mixed model, the mean group score of discomfort between four predefined time frames of CPS was compared, correcting for confounding patient characteristics. A total of 130 patients were sedated, and the DS-DAT was completed in 106 patients at least once. The median duration of the sedation in these 106 patients was 25.5 hours (range 2-161). The mean score of the DS-DAT in the phase before sedation was 12.16 (95% CI 9.83-14.50) and decreased significantly to 8.06 (95% CI 5.53-10.58) in the titration phase of sedation. The mean score of the DS-DAT in the final phase of sedation was 7.42 (95% CI 4.90-9.94). This study shows that CPS is associated with a decrease in the level of discomfort within an acceptable time frame, although in some sedated patients higher levels of discomfort in the last hours of life occurred. Although the DS-DAT seems to be of value for monitoring the level of discomfort during CPS, the results of this study should be interpreted within the constraints of the limitations, and further research on the psychometric properties of this tool is needed before the DS-DAT can be used in clinical practice. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Multi-functional system of radiotherapy and thermal phototherapy for tumors that over-express receptors of the gastrin releasing peptide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez M, N. P.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this research was to prepare and characterize a multifunctional system of 177 Lu and 99m Tc-labelled gold nanoparticles conjugated to Tat(49 57)-Lys 3 bombesin ( 177 Lu/ 99m Tc- AuNP-Tat-Bn) and to evaluate the radiation absorbed dose in GRP receptor positive PC3 tumours induced in mice (human prostate cancer cells), as well as to evaluate the thermal effect produced by the multifunctional system in PC3 cancer cells. The preparation of the system involved the conjugation of Bn-Tat, DOTA-GGC and HYNICTOC peptides to AuNP of 20 nm or 5 nm in diameter. The radiolabeling of the system with 99m Tc was carried out through the ligand HYNIC-TOC and with the 177 Lu through DOTA-GGC. The functionalization of peptides to AuNP, was accomplished through a spontaneous reaction of thiol groups. The system was characterized by spectroscopic techniques while radiochemical purity was determined by size-exclusion molecular chromatography and ultrafiltration. Various internalization trials and non-specific binding were tested to demonstrate the affinity of the system to PC3 cells. The thermal effect was evaluated incubating the system into PC3 cells and irradiating it with a Nd:YAG pulsed laser beam and monitoring the temperature; after irradiation, cell viability was measured. In the evaluation of absorbed dose in mice with induced tumours, the system was administered intratumorally and later, mice were sacrificed, relevant organs and tumor were extracted, activity was quantified and radiopharmaceutical models were obtained for each organ and tumor to be used in the accumulated activity and absorbed dose calculation by the MIRD methodology. Finally, to establish the system location at cellular level, fluorescent images of the system incubated in PC3 cells were acquired with an epi fluorescent microscope. Tem, UV-Vis, XP S and Far-IR spectroscopy techniques demonstrated that AuNPs were functionalized with peptides through interactions with the -Sh groups. The radiochemical

  6. Evaluation of human thermal comfort ranges in urban climate of winter cities on the example of Erzurum city.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toy, Süleyman; Kántor, Noémi

    2017-01-01

    Human thermal comfort conditions can be evaluated using various indices based on simple empirical approaches or more complex and reliable human-biometeorological approaches. The latter is based on the energy balance model of the human body, and their calculation is supplemented with computer software. Facilitating the interpretation of results, the generally applied indices express the effects of thermal environment in the well-known temperature unit, just like in the case of the widely used index, the physiologically equivalent temperature (PET). Several studies adopting PET index for characterizing thermal components of climate preferred to organize the resulted PET values into thermal sensation categories in order to demonstrate the spatial and/or temporal characteristics of human thermal comfort conditions. The most general applied PET ranges were derived by Central European researchers, and they are valid for assumed values of internal heat production of light activity and thermal resistance of clothing representing a light business suit. Based on the example of Erzurum city, the present work demonstrates that in a city with harsh winter, the original PET ranges show almost purely discomfort and they seem to be less applicable regarding cold climate conditions. Taking into account 34-year climate data of Erzurum, the annual distribution of PET is presented together with the impact of application of different PET categorization systems, including 8°- and 7°-wide PET intervals. The demonstrated prior analyses lack any questionnaire filed surveys in Erzurum. Thus, as a next step, detailed field investigations would be required with the aim of definition of new PET categorization systems which are relevant for local residents who are adapted to this climatic background, and for tourists who may perform various kinds of winter activities in Erzurum and therefore may perceive the thermal environment more comfortable.

  7. Analytical and subjective interpretation of thermal comfort in hospitals: A case study in two sterilization services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalhais, Carlos; Santos, Joana; Vieira da Silva, Manuela

    2016-01-01

    Hospital facilities are normally very complex, which combined with patient requirements promote conditions for potential development of uncomfortable working conditions. Thermal discomfort is one such example. This study aimed to determine levels of thermal comfort, sensations, and preferences, from a field investigation conducted in two sterilization services (SS) of two hospitals from Porto and Aveiro, Portugal. The analytical determination and interpretation of thermal comfort was based upon assumptions of ISO 7726:1998 and ISO 7730:2005. The predicted mean vote (PMV) and predicted percentage of dissatisfaction (PPD) indices were obtained by measurement and estimation of environmental and personal variables, respectively, and calculated according to ISO 7730 equations. The subjective variables were obtained from thermal sensation (subjective PMV) and affective assessment (subjective PPD), reported by a questionnaire based upon ISO 10551:1995. Both approaches confirmed thermal discomfort in both SS (codified as SS1 and SS2). For all areas, PMV and PPD exceeded in all periods of the day the recommended range of -0.5 to +0.5 and thermal discomfort. There were no significant differences between PMV and thermal sensations, as well as between PPD and affective assessment. The PMV/PPD model was found suitable to predict thermal sensations of occupants in hospital SS located in areas with a mild climate in Portugal.

  8. Thermal comfort: research and practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoof, van J.; Mazej, M.; Hensen, J.L.M.

    2010-01-01

    Thermal comfort -the state of mind, which expresses satisfaction with the thermal environment- is an important aspect of the building design process as modern man spends most of the day indoors. This paper reviews the developments in indoor thermal comfort research and practice since the second half

  9. Thermal Adaptation Methods of Urban Plaza Users in Asia's Hot-Humid Regions: A Taiwan Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chen-Fa; Hsieh, Yen-Fen; Ou, Sheng-Jung

    2015-10-27

    Thermal adaptation studies provide researchers great insight to help understand how people respond to thermal discomfort. This research aims to assess outdoor urban plaza conditions in hot and humid regions of Asia by conducting an evaluation of thermal adaptation. We also propose that questionnaire items are appropriate for determining thermal adaptation strategies adopted by urban plaza users. A literature review was conducted and first hand data collected by field observations and interviews used to collect information on thermal adaptation strategies. Item analysis--Exploratory Factor Analysis (EFA) and Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA)--were applied to refine the questionnaire items and determine the reliability of the questionnaire evaluation procedure. The reliability and validity of items and constructing process were also analyzed. Then, researchers facilitated an evaluation procedure for assessing the thermal adaptation strategies of urban plaza users in hot and humid regions of Asia and formulated a questionnaire survey that was distributed in Taichung's Municipal Plaza in Taiwan. Results showed that most users responded with behavioral adaptation when experiencing thermal discomfort. However, if the thermal discomfort could not be alleviated, they then adopted psychological strategies. In conclusion, the evaluation procedure for assessing thermal adaptation strategies and the questionnaire developed in this study can be applied to future research on thermal adaptation strategies adopted by urban plaza users in hot and humid regions of Asia.

  10. Investigation on musculoskeletal discomfort and ergonomics risk factors among production team members at an automotive component assembly plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Fazilah Abdul; Ghazalli, Zakri; Zuki Mohamed, Nik Mohd; Isfar, Amri

    2017-10-01

    Musculoskeletal discomfort (MSD) is very common condition in automotive industry. MSD is affecting the worker’s health, well-being and lower down the productivity. Therefore, the main objective of this study was to identify the prevalence of MSD and ergonomics risk factors among the production team members at a selected automotive component manufacturer in Malaysia. MSD data were collected by conducting structure interview with all participants by referring to the Cornell Musculoskeletal Disorder Questionnaire (CMDQ). Those production team members who achieved a total discomfort score for all body regions more than 100 was selected for job task assessment. The physical exposure risk factors of work related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSD) has evaluated by using Quick Exposure Check (QEC) techniques. The results of the study identified the severe MSD associated with production assembly team members. It is expected that the prevalence of MSD for those production assembly team members was lower back (75.4%), upper back (63.2%), right shoulder (61.4%), and right wrist (60%). The QEC analysis discovered that about 70% of job tasks had very high risks for neck posture and 60% had high risks for the back (in moving condition) and shoulder/arm postures. There were 80% of respondents have produced a high score for exposure risk to vibration. As a conclusion, the main implication of the current study is that special attention should be paid to the physical and psychosocial aspects in production team members with musculoskeletal discomfort to improve their safety, health, and well-being, maintain work ability and productivity.

  11. Efficacy of two-month treatment with Xiloial® eyedrops for discomfort from disposable soft contact lenses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piera Versura

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Piera Versura, Vincenzo Profazio, Nicole Balducci, Emilio C CamposOphthalmology Unit, Alma Mater Studiorum University of Bologna, Bologna, ItalyPurpose: To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of Xiloial® monodose eyedrops in the treatment of patients suffering from subjective symptoms of discomfort related to disposable soft contact lens (dSCL wear.Methods: Fifteen (12 female, three male, medium age 39 ± 9 years dSCL wearers were enrolled. Inclusion criteria were Ocular Surface Disease Index (ODSI symptom questionnaire score >12, tear film break-up time (TFBUT <10 sec, Schirmer test I >10 mm over five minutes, mild punctuate keratopathy, and conjunctival staining (Oxford grading ≤4. Monodose Xiloial eyedrops were administered three times daily for a two-month period. Patients were evaluated at enrollment, after three days of washout (baseline, and after one and two months of treatment, by OSDI score, Schirmer test I, TFBUT, ferning test, ocular surface damage (Oxford grade, and serum albumin in tears (index of passive exudation related to serum leakage.Results: At endpoint versus baseline, respectively, the mean ± standard deviation of all variables improved as follows: OSDI (8.5 ± 3 versus 20.2 ± 1.6; TFBUT (9.6 ± 1.1 versus 7.1 ± 1.0; Oxford grading (0.5 ± 0.1 versus 3.6 ± 0.8; ferning test (2 ± 1 versus 2.4 ± 0.5; and Schirmer test I (14.6 ± 1.1 versus 12 ± 2.1, with P < 0.05 for all variables (Friedman and Wilcoxon tests. Tolerability was high, with no adverse events noted.Conclusions: A two-month treatment with Xiloial showed good tolerance and appeared to reduce ocular surface damage and symptoms of discomfort.Keywords: discomfort, dry eye, disposable contact lens, biopolymer tamarind seed polysaccharide–hyaluronic acid

  12. Epistemologies of Discomfort: What Military-Family Anti-War Activists Can Teach Us About Knoweldge of Violence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shari Stone-Mediatore

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper extends feminist critiques of epistemic authority by examining their particular relevance in contexts of institutionalized violence. By reading feminist criticism of "experts" together with theories of institutionalized violence, I argue that typical expert modes of thinking are incapable of rigorous knowledge of institutionalized violence because such knowledge requires a distinctive kind of thinking-within-discomfort for which conventionally trained experts are ill-suited. I turn to a newly active group of epistemic agents-anti-war relatives of soldiers-to examine the role that undervalued epistemic traits can play in knowledge of war and other forms of structural violence.

  13. How invasive is TMJ double-contrast arthrography in combination with cinematography? Patient discomfort versus known diagnostic gain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelke, W; Mommaerts, M

    1990-04-01

    There is no doubt that double-contrast TMJ fluoroscopic tomography enables a differential diagnosis and treatment in internal derangement pathosis. Its indication is, apart from the expected diagnostic gain, also determined by the degree of its invasiveness, and other alternative diagnostics being available (nuclear magnetic resonance). Data on patient discomfort and complications were gathered in 63 arthrotomographies; pain sensations and mandibular mobility, during and after the procedure in particular, were studied. We consider, along with Westesson, the procedure to be less invasive than commonly considered, once the surgeon-radiologist has gained enough experience.

  14. The feeling of discomfort during vaginal examination, history of abuse and sexual abuse and post-traumatic stress disorder in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güneş, Gizem; Karaçam, Zekiye

    2017-08-01

    To examine the feeling of discomfort during vaginal examinations, history of abuse and sexual abuse and post-traumatic stress disorder in women to determine the correlation between these variables. Women who have experienced abuse or sexual abuse may feel more discomfort during vaginal examinations and may perceive a sensation similar to what they experienced during sexual abuse. Cross-sectional. This study included 320 women receiving a vaginal examination. The data were collected using a questionnaire composed of items related to descriptive characteristics, vaginal examinations and violence, a visual analogue scale of discomfort, and the Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Scale-civilian version. The mean score for the feeling of discomfort during vaginal examinations was 3·92 ± 3·34; 26·3% of the women described discomfort. Thirty-eight (12%) of the 320 women had experienced emotional violence, 25 (8%) had experienced physical violence, and 25 (8%) had been forced into sexual intercourse by their spouses. Of the women, 64·7% suffered from post-traumatic stress disorder, and physical, emotional and sexual violence were found to increase the possibility of this disorder. Exposure to emotional violence increased the possibility of discomfort during vaginal examinations by 4·5 (OR = 4·482; 95% CI = 1·421-14·134). Post-traumatic stress disorder (OR = 1·038; 95% CI = 1·009-1·066) was found to increase the possibility of discomfort during vaginal examinations; however, as the number of live births increases, women reported a reduction in their discomfort with vaginal examinations. This study revealed a positive correlation between discomfort during vaginal examinations and emotional violence and post-traumatic stress disorder but a negative correlation between discomfort during vaginal examinations and the number of live births. In addition, having a history of abuse and sexual abuse was found to increase post-traumatic stress disorder. Considering

  15. Effect of wind speed on human thermal sensation and thermal comfort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Yuhan

    2018-06-01

    In this experiment, a method of questionnaire survey was adopted. By changing the air flow rate under the indoor and outdoor natural conditions, the subjective Thermal Sensation Vote (TSV) and the Thermal Comfort Vote (TCV) were recorded. The draft sensation can reduce the thermal sensation, but the draft sensation can cause discomfort, and the thermal comfort in a windy environment is lower than in a windless environment. When the temperature rises or the level of human metabolism increases, the person feels heat, the demand for draft sensation increases, and the uncomfortable feeling caused by the draft sensation may be reduced. Increasing the air flow within a certain range can be used to compensate for the increase in temperature.

  16. Posture, Musculoskeletal Activities, and Possible Musculoskeletal Discomfort Among Children Using Laptops or Tablet Computers for Educational Purposes: A Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binboğa, Elif; Korhan, Orhan

    2014-10-01

    Educational ergonomics focuses on the interaction between educational performance and educational design. By improving the design or pointing out the possible problems, educational ergonomics can be utilized to have positive impacts on the student performance and thus on education process. Laptops and tablet computers are becoming widely used by school children and beginning to be used effectively for educational purposes. As the latest generation of laptops and tablet computers are mobile and lightweight compared to conventional personal computers, they support student-centred interaction-based learning. However, these technologies have been introduced into schools with minimal adaptations to furniture or attention to ergonomics. There are increasing reports of an association between increased musculoskeletal (MSK) problems in children and use of such technologies. Although children are among the users of laptops and tablet computers both in their everyday lives and at schools, the literature investigating MSK activities and possible MSK discomfort regarding children using portable technologies is limited. This study reviews the literature to identify published studies that investigated posture, MSK activities, and possible MSK discomfort among children using mobile technologies (laptops or tablet computers) for educational purposes. An electronic search of the literature published in English between January 1994 and January 2014 was performed in several databases. The literature search terms were identified and combined to search the databases. The search results that the resources investigating MSK outcomes of laptop or tablet use of children are very scarce. This review points out the research gaps in this field, and identifying areas for future studies.

  17. Stereotactic large-core needle breast biopsy: analysis of pain and discomfort related to the biopsy procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hemmer, Judith M.; Heesewijk, Hans P.M. van; Kelder, Johannes C.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the significance of variables such as duration of the procedure, type of breast tissue, number of passes, depth of the biopsies, underlying pathology, the operator performing the procedure, and their effect on women's perception of pain and discomfort during stereotactic large-core needle breast biopsy. One hundred and fifty consecutive patients with a non-palpable suspicious mammographic lesions were included. Between three and nine 14-gauge breast passes were taken using a prone stereotactic table. Following the biopsy procedure, patients were asked to complete a questionnaire. There was no discomfort in lying on the prone table. There is no relation between type of breast lesion and pain, underlying pathology and pain and performing operator and pain. The type of breast tissue is correlated with pain experienced from biopsy (P = 0.0001). We found out that patients with dense breast tissue complain of more pain from biopsy than patients with more involution of breast tissue. The depth of the biopsy correlates with pain from biopsy (P = 0.0028). Deep lesions are more painful than superficial ones. There is a correlation between the number of passes and pain in the neck (P = 0.0188) and shoulder (P = 0.0366). The duration of the procedure is correlated with pain experienced in the neck (P = 0.0116) but not with pain experienced from biopsy. (orig.)

  18. Radiographic evaluation of foals and ponies with abdominal disorders. 2. Findings in 60 patients with acute abdominal discomfort

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerhards, H.; Klein, H.J.; Offeney, F.

    1990-01-01

    A diagnostic approach based on clinical and radiographic examinations for evaluation of young foals and small ponies with acute abdominal discomfort is presented. Standing right to left lateral abdominal radiographs were taken of 54 foals and 6 ponies using a previously described technique. Interpretation of the radiographs was in conjuction with all clinical and laboratory findings and patient management. Using this approach, the site and cause of acute abdominal discomfort could be diagnosed accurately in 55 of 60 (91%) patients as confirmed by clinical, surgical or PM findings. Typical radiographs and photographs taken at surgery or at PM examination are presented. Typical radiographic findings, their interpretation and possible underlying gastrointestinal diseases are listed. It is concluded that the incorporation of standing lateral abdominal radiography in the clinical evaluation of foals and ponies with acute abdominal diseases gives findings of high diagnostic significance and should contribute to clinical decision-making, and that abdominal radiography can replace data from rectal palpation in foals and ponies

  19. Perception of discomfort during injection and the need for supplemental anesthesia in the intraosseous technique using 4% articaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Martínez, Adel; Lujan Pardo, María Del Pilar; Harris Ricardo, Jonathan

    2016-12-01

    The authors conducted an experimental study to determine patient perception of discomfort during injection and the need for supplemental anesthesia using the intraosseous technique with 4% articaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine in patients with symptomatic pulpitis in mandibular molars. At different clinical sessions, researchers used 4% articaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine to apply intraosseous injection (Group 1) or inferior alveolar nerve block (Group 2). Each technique was applied in 35 patients. In each group, the need for additional anesthesia was determined and patient discomfort during injection was assessed with a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) test. In the intraosseous group, no supplemental technique was needed in 22 patients (62.85 %), and results were similar for the inferior alveolar technique (n: 23 65.71%). The intraosseous technique proved to be more comfortable than the mandibular technique (18 patients - 25.7%). This study found that the use of intraosseous technique with 4% articaine shows promising results regarding patient comfort and reducing the need for additional anesthesia. Sociedad Argentina de Investigación Odontológica.

  20. A power study of bivariate LOD score analysis of a complex trait and fear/discomfort with strangers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Fei; Lee, Dayoung; Mendell, Nancy Role

    2005-12-30

    Complex diseases are often reported along with disease-related traits (DRT). Sometimes investigators consider both disease and DRT phenotypes separately and sometimes they consider individuals as affected if they have either the disease or the DRT, or both. We propose instead to consider the joint distribution of the disease and the DRT and do a linkage analysis assuming a pleiotropic model. We evaluated our results through analysis of the simulated datasets provided by Genetic Analysis Workshop 14. We first conducted univariate linkage analysis of the simulated disease, Kofendrerd Personality Disorder and one of its simulated associated traits, phenotype b (fear/discomfort with strangers). Subsequently, we considered the bivariate phenotype, which combined the information on Kofendrerd Personality Disorder and fear/discomfort with strangers. We developed a program to perform bivariate linkage analysis using an extension to the Elston-Stewart peeling method of likelihood calculation. Using this program we considered the microsatellites within 30 cM of the gene pleiotropic for this simulated disease and DRT. Based on 100 simulations of 300 families we observed excellent power to detect linkage within 10 cM of the disease locus using the DRT and the bivariate trait.

  1. Differences between young adults and elderly in thermal comfort, productivity and thermal physiology in response to a moderate temperature drift

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schellen, Lisje; Lichtenbelt, Wouter van Marken; Loomans, Marcel

    2010-01-01

    thermal condition differ between young adults and elderly. There is a lack of studies that describe the effect of aging on thermal comfort and productivity during a moderate temperature drift. In this study, the effect of a moderate temperature drift on physiological responses, thermal comfort......Results from naturally ventilated buildings show that allowing the indoor temperature to drift does not necessarily result in thermal discomfort and may allow for a reduction in energy use. However, for stationary conditions, several studies indicate that the thermal neutral temperature and optimum......, temperature drift: first 4 h: +2 K/h, last 4 h: –2 K/h. The results indicate that thermal sensation of the elderly was, in general, 0.5 scale units lower in comparison with their younger counterparts. Furthermore, the elderly showed more distal vasoconstriction during both conditions. Nevertheless, TS...

  2. Thermal Diffusivity Measurements in Edible Oils using Transient Thermal Lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, R. Carbajal.; Pérez, J. L. Jiménez.; Cruz-Orea, A.; Martín-Martínez, E. San.

    2006-11-01

    Time resolved thermal lens (TL) spectrometry is applied to the study of the thermal diffusivity of edible oils such as olive, and refined and thermally treated avocado oils. A two laser mismatched-mode experimental configuration was used, with a He Ne laser as a probe beam and an Ar+ laser as the excitation one. The characteristic time constant of the transient thermal lens was obtained by fitting the experimental data to the theoretical expression for a transient thermal lens. The results showed that virgin olive oil has a higher thermal diffusivity than for refined and thermally treated avocado oils. This measured thermal property may contribute to a better understanding of the quality of edible oils, which is very important in the food industry. The thermal diffusivity results for virgin olive oil, obtained from this technique, agree with those reported in the literature.

  3. An exploration of differences between Japan and two European countries in the self-reporting and valuation of pain and discomfort on the EQ-5D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yan; Herdman, Mike; van Nooten, Floortje; Cleeland, Charles; Parkin, David; Ikeda, Shunya; Igarashi, Ataru; Devlin, Nancy J

    2017-08-01

    To investigate the systematic differences in the self-reporting and valuation of overall health and, in particular, pain/discomfort between three countries (England/UK, Japan, and Spain) on the EQ-5D. Existing datasets were used to explore differences in responses on the EQ-5D descriptive system between Japan (3L and 5L), the UK (3L), England (5L), and Spain (5L), particularly on the dimension of pain/discomfort. The role of different EQ dimensions in determining self-reported overall health scores for the EuroQol visual analog scale (EQ-VAS) was investigated using ordinary least squares regression. Time trade-off (TTO) results from Japanese and UK respondents for the EQ-5D-3L as well as Japanese and English respondents for the EQ-5D-5L were compared using t tests. For the EQ-5D-3L, a higher percentage of respondents in Japan than in the UK reported 'no pain/discomfort' (81.6 vs 67.0%, respectively); for the EQ-5D-5L, the proportions were 79.2% in Spain, 73.2% in Japan, and 63-64% in England, after adjusting for age differences in samples. The 'pain/discomfort' dimension had the largest impact on respondents' self-reported EQ-VAS only for EQ-5D-3L in Japan. Using the EQ-5D-3L, Japanese respondents were considerably less willing to trade off time to avoid pain/discomfort than the UK respondents; for example, moving from health state, 11121 (some problems with pain/discomfort) to 11131 (extreme pain/discomfort) represented a decrement of 0.65 on the observed TTO value in the UK compared with 0.15 in Japan. Using the EQ-5D-5L, Japanese respondents were also less willing to trade off time to avoid pain/discomfort than respondents in England; however, the difference in values was much smaller than that observed using EQ-5D-3L data. This study provides evidence of between-country differences in the self-reporting and valuation of health, including pain/discomfort, when using EQ-5D in general population samples. The results suggest a need for caution when comparing or

  4. Satisfaction, discomfort, obligations, and concerns in population-based breast cancer screening: cross-sectional study in a Danish population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabel, Pernille; Larsen, Mette Bach; Nielsen, Pernille Bjørnholt; Svendstrup, Dorte Brandt; Andersen, Berit

    2017-07-14

    Potential barriers to breast cancer screening adherence include patient satisfaction, as well as pain, feeling obliged to participate, and other concerns that might compromise the level of satisfaction. The present study aimed to assess the overall satisfaction of Danish citizens with their breast cancer screening experiences, as well as their level of discomfort, concerns, and feelings of obligation to participate. Furthermore, we analyzed the associations between overall satisfaction and the remaining outcomes. Questionnaires were mailed to 3000 women in the Central Denmark Region who received screening examination results in the fall of 2013. The questionnaire assessed satisfaction (overall, telephone hot-line, and web-based self-service), discomfort (pain and boundaries of modesty), concerns (at invitation, while waiting for results, and after receiving results), and feelings of obligation to participate. Background information was retrieved from Statistics Denmark. Pearson's chi-square test was used to test differences in outcomes and demographic characteristic distributions between respondents and non-respondents and highly satisfied vs. less satisfied participants. Prevalence ratios (PR) with 95% CI were assessed using Poisson regression with robust variance, to estimate associations between satisfaction and the remaining outcomes. Among the participants, 70.3% and 29.4%, respectively, reported really good and good impressions of the screening program. Lower satisfaction was associated with feeling pain (prevalence ratio (PR), 0.82), feeling that modesty boundaries were transgressed (PR, 0.79), experiencing screening-induced concerns (PR, 0.84), and feeling obliged to participate (PR, 0.96). Of the participants, 36.2% and 12.9%, respectively, felt very much and moderately obliged to participate. A total of 72.6% reported no screening-induced concerns, including 73.3% of those with negative screening results and 38.1% of those with positive screening results

  5. Epistemologies of Discomfort: What Military-Family Anti-War Activists Can Teach Us About Knoweldge of Violence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shari Stone-Mediatore

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available

    This paper extends feminist critiques of epistemic authority by examining their particular relevance in contexts of institutionalized violence. By reading feminist criticism of "experts" together with theories of institutionalized violence, I argue that typical expert modes of thinking are incapable of rigorous knowledge of institutionalized violence because such knowledge requires a distinctive kind of thinking-within-discomfort for which conventionally trained experts are ill-suited. I turn to a newly active group of epistemic agents-anti-war relatives of soldiers-to examine the role that undervalued epistemic traits can play in knowledge of war and other forms of structural violence.

  6. Cognitive problems, self-rated changes in driving skills, driving-related discomfort and self-regulation of driving in old drivers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meng, Annette; Siren, Anu Kristiina

    2012-01-01

    Ageing in general is associated with functional decline that may have an adverse effect on driving. Nevertheless, older drivers have been found to show good judgement and to self-regulate their driving, which may enable them to continue driving safely despite functional decline. The process...... of the self-monitoring of driving ability and the awareness of functional decline, and its association with the self-regulation of driving is, however, not fully understood. The aim of the present study was to examine the perceived changes in driving skills, the discomfort experienced in driving, and the self......-related discomfort is an important factor affecting the self-regulation of driving. Finally, the findings indicate that driving-related discomfort functions as an indirect self-monitoring of driving ability and may contribute to the safe driving performance of Danish older drivers....

  7. Pneumatic tool torque reaction: reaction forces, displacement, muscle activity and discomfort in the hand-arm system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kihlberg, S; Kjellberg, A; Lindbeck, L

    1993-06-01

    Reaction forces, hand-arm displacement, muscle activity and discomfort ratings were studied during the securing of threaded fasteners with three angle nutrunners with different shut-off mechanisms, but with the same spindle torque (72-74 Nm). The three tools were tested according to the method specified in ISO 6544. One of the tools had an almost instantaneous shut-off. Another had a more slowly declining torque curve. For the third tool the maximum torque was maintained for a while before shut-off. Twelve male subjects participated in the study. A force platform measured the reaction force between the subject and the floor. The option of the hand-arm system and the shoulder was measured with an optoelectronic measuring system. The muscle activity (EMG) in six muscles in the arm and shoulder was measured with surface electrodes. Significant differences in the arm movements and ground reaction forces were found between the three tools. The smallest values were found with the fast shut-off tool while the delayed shut-off tool caused the largest values. The EMG measures gave inconsistent response patterns. Discomfort ratings were highly correlated with the time for which the tool torque exceeded 90% of peak preset torque, but the time for which the tool torque exceeded 90% of peak calculated by the method specified in ISO 6544. Nutrunners with a shut-off mechanism that causes a slowly decreasing torque or a torque that is maintained for a while before shut-off should be avoided. If no substitutes are available, then a torque reaction bar should be mounted on the tool.

  8. The Effects of Industrial Protective Gloves and Hand Skin Temperatures on Hand Grip Strength and Discomfort Rating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Z. Ramadan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Daily working activities and functions require a high contribution of hand and forearm muscles in executing grip force. To study the effects of wearing different gloves on grip strength, under a variety of hand skin temperatures, an assessment of the maximum grip strength was performed with 32 healthy male workers with a mean age (standard deviation of 30.44 (5.35 years wearing five industrial gloves at three hand skin temperatures. Their ages and anthropometric characteristics including body mass index (BMI, hand length, hand width, hand depth, hand palm, and wrist circumference were measured. The hand was exposed to different bath temperatures (5 °C, 25 °C, and 45 °C and hand grip strength was measured using a Jamar hydraulic hand dynamometer with and without wearing the gloves (chemical protection glove, rubber insulating glove, anti-vibration impact glove, cotton yarn knitted glove, and RY-WG002 working glove. The data were analyzed using the Shapiro–Wilk test, Pearson correlation coefficient, Tukey test, and analysis of variance (ANOVA of the within-subject design analysis. The results showed that wearing gloves significantly affected the maximum grip strength. Wearing the RY-WG002 working glove produced a greater reduction on the maximum grip when compared with the bare hand, while low temperatures (5 °C had a significant influence on grip when compared to medium (25 °C and high (45 °C hand skin temperatures. In addition, participants felt more discomfort in both environmental extreme conditions. Furthermore, they reported more discomfort while wearing neoprene, rubber, and RY-WG002 working gloves.

  9. Medical tongue piercing – development and evaluation of a surgical protocol and the perception of procedural discomfort of the participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background A system providing disabled persons with control of various assistive devices with the tongue has been developed at Aalborg University in Denmark. The system requires an activation unit attached to the tongue with a small piercing. The aim of this study was to establish and evaluate a safe and tolerable procedure for medical tongue piercing and to evaluate the expected and perceived procedural discomfort. Methods Four tetraplegic subjects volunteered for the study. A surgical protocol for a safe insertion of a tongue barbell piercing was presented using sterilized instruments and piercing parts. Moreover, post-procedural observations of participant complications such as bleeding, edema, and infection were recorded. Finally, procedural discomforts were monitored by VAS scores of pain, changes in taste and speech as well as problems related to hitting the teeth. Results The piercings were all successfully inserted in less than 5 min and the pain level was moderate compared with oral injections. No bleeding, infection, embedding of the piercing, or tooth/gingival injuries were encountered; a moderate edema was found in one case without affecting the speech. In two cases the piercing rod later had to be replaced by a shorter rod, because participants complained that the rod hit their teeth. The replacements prevented further problems. Moreover, loosening of balls was encountered, which could be prevented with the addition of dental glue. No cases of swallowing or aspiration of the piercing parts were recorded. Conclusions The procedure proved simple, fast, and safe for insertion of tongue piercings for tetraplegic subjects in a clinical setting. The procedure represented several precautions in order to avoid risks in these susceptible participants with possible co-morbidity. No serious complications were encountered, and the procedure was found tolerable to the participants. The procedure may be used in future studies with tongue piercings being a

  10. Comparison of vocal tract discomfort scale results with objective and instrumental phoniatric parameters among teacher rehabilitees from voice disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewelina Woźnicka

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diagnostic and therapeutic procedures of occupational dysphonia play a major role in voice self-assessment, which is one of the elements of a comprehensive evaluation of voice disorders. The aim of the study was to assess the applicability of the Vocal Tract Discomfort (VTD scale to monitor the effectiveness of voice rehabilitation and compare the VTD results with objective and instrumental methods of phoniatric diagnosis. Materials and Methods: The study included 55 teachers (mean age, 47.2 with occupational dysphonia. A comprehensive diagnosis took into account self-assessment by VTD scale, phoniatric examination, including laryngovideostroboscopy (LVSS and objective measurements of the aerodynamic parameter - the maximum phonation time (MPT. After 4 months of intense rehabilitation, post-therapy examination was performed using the methods specified above. Results: After the treatment, a significant improvement was obtained in the subjective symptoms measured on a VTD scale - assessed both for the frequency (p = 0.000 and the severity (p = 0.000 subscales. Positive effects of the therapy were also observed for the parameters evaluated in the phoniatric study (p < 0.01 and laryngovideostroboscopy (p < 0.01. After voice therapy, there was also an improvement in the objective parameter MCF, which was about 5 seconds longer. Studies have shown that the VTD scale is characterized by high reliability - Cronbach's alpha coefficient in the preliminary test was as follows: for the frequency subscale symptoms - 0.826, and severity - 0.845; similarly high reliability was achieved in the control test, 0.908 and 0.923, respectively. Conclusions: Vocal Tract Discomfort scale can be a valuable tool for assessing voice, and can also be used to monitor the effectiveness of therapy of the occupational dysphonia. Med Pr 2013;64(2:199–206

  11. The Effects of Industrial Protective Gloves and Hand Skin Temperatures on Hand Grip Strength and Discomfort Rating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadan, Mohamed Z

    2017-12-04

    Daily working activities and functions require a high contribution of hand and forearm muscles in executing grip force. To study the effects of wearing different gloves on grip strength, under a variety of hand skin temperatures, an assessment of the maximum grip strength was performed with 32 healthy male workers with a mean age (standard deviation) of 30.44 (5.35) years wearing five industrial gloves at three hand skin temperatures. Their ages and anthropometric characteristics including body mass index (BMI), hand length, hand width, hand depth, hand palm, and wrist circumference were measured. The hand was exposed to different bath temperatures (5 °C, 25 °C, and 45 °C) and hand grip strength was measured using a Jamar hydraulic hand dynamometer with and without wearing the gloves (chemical protection glove, rubber insulating glove, anti-vibration impact glove, cotton yarn knitted glove, and RY-WG002 working glove). The data were analyzed using the Shapiro-Wilk test, Pearson correlation coefficient, Tukey test, and analysis of variance (ANOVA) of the within-subject design analysis. The results showed that wearing gloves significantly affected the maximum grip strength. Wearing the RY-WG002 working glove produced a greater reduction on the maximum grip when compared with the bare hand, while low temperatures (5 °C) had a significant influence on grip when compared to medium (25 °C) and high (45 °C) hand skin temperatures. In addition, participants felt more discomfort in both environmental extreme conditions. Furthermore, they reported more discomfort while wearing neoprene, rubber, and RY-WG002 working gloves.

  12. The effect of a backrest and seatpan inclination on sitting discomfort and trunk muscle activation in subjects with extension-related low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Máire; Dankaerts, Wim; O'Sullivan, Peter; O'Sullivan, Leonard; O'Sullivan, Kieran

    2014-01-01

    Few studies have demonstrated that seating modifications reduce low back pain (LBP). One recent study found that a forward-inclined seatpan reduced low back discomfort (LBD), however this was only examined in people with flexion-related LBP. No study has yet investigated its effectiveness among people with extension-related LBP. This crossover study examined 12 subjects with extension-related LBP. Sitting discomfort and surface electromyography of three trunk muscles were recorded during a 10-minute typing task while sitting with two different seatpan inclinations, both with and without a backrest. LBD (p ergonomics prescriptions according to the individual presentation of people with LBP.

  13. Passenger thermal perceptions, thermal comfort requirements, and adaptations in short- and long-haul vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tzu-Ping; Hwang, Ruey-Lung; Huang, Kuo-Tsang; Sun, Chen-Yi; Huang, Ying-Che

    2010-05-01

    While thermal comfort in mass transportation vehicles is relevant to service quality and energy consumption, benchmarks for such comfort that reflect the thermal adaptations of passengers are currently lacking. This study reports a field experiment involving simultaneous physical measurements and a questionnaire survey, collecting data from 2,129 respondents, that evaluated thermal comfort in short- and long-haul buses and trains. Experimental results indicate that high air temperature, strong solar radiation, and low air movement explain why passengers feel thermally uncomfortable. The overall insulation of clothing worn by passengers and thermal adaptive behaviour in vehicles differ from those in their living and working spaces. Passengers in short-haul vehicles habitually adjust the air outlets to increase thermal comfort, while passengers in long-haul vehicles prefer to draw the drapes to reduce discomfort from extended exposure to solar radiation. The neutral temperatures for short- and long-haul vehicles are 26.2 degrees C and 27.4 degrees C, while the comfort zones are 22.4-28.9 degrees C and 22.4-30.1 degrees C, respectively. The results of this study provide a valuable reference for practitioners involved in determining the adequate control and management of in-vehicle thermal environments, as well as facilitating design of buses and trains, ultimately contributing to efforts to achieve a balance between the thermal comfort satisfaction of passengers and energy conserving measures for air-conditioning in mass transportation vehicles.

  14. Delayed wound healing in aged skin rat models after thermal injury is associated with an increased MMP-9, K6 and CD44 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonetti, Oriana; Oriana, Simonetti; Lucarini, Guendalina; Guendalina, Lucarini; Cirioni, Oscar; Oscar, Cirioni; Zizzi, Antonio; Antonio, Zizzi; Orlando, Fiorenza; Fiorenza, Orlando; Provinciali, Mauro; Mauro, Provinciali; Di Primio, Roberto; Roberto, Di Primio; Giacometti, Andrea; Andrea, Giacometti; Offidani, Annamaria; Annamaria, Offidani

    2013-06-01

    Age-related differences in wound healing have been documented but little is known about the wound healing mechanism after burns. Our aim was to compare histological features and immunohistochemical expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), collagen IV, K6 and CD44 in the burn wound healing process in aged and young rats. Following burns the appearance of the wound bed in aged rats had progressed but slowly, resulting in a delayed healing process compared to the young rats. At 21 days after injury, epithelial K6, MMP-9 and CD44 expression was significantly increased in aged rats with respect to young rats; moreover, in the aged rat group we observed a not fully reconstituted basement membrane. K6, MMP-9 and CD44 expression was significantly increased in wounded skin compared to unwounded skin both in young and aged rats. We hypothesise that delayed burn skin wound healing process in the aged rats may represent an age dependent response to injury where K6, MMP-9 and CD44 play a key role. It is therefore possible to suggest that these factors contribute to the delayed wound healing in aged skin and that modulation could lead to a better and faster recovery of skin damage in elderly. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  15. Thermal comfort

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Osburn, L

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal comfort is influenced by environmental parameters as well as other influences including asymmetric heating and cooling conditions. Additionally, some aspects of thermal comfort may be exploited so as to enable a building to operate within a...

  16. Increasing discomfort tolerance predicts incentive senitization of exercise reinforcement: Preliminary results from a randomized controlled intervention to increase the reinforcing value of exercise in overweight to obese adu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Objective: The reinforcing (motivating) value of exercise/physical activity (RRVex) predicts usual exercise behavior and meeting of physical activity guidelines. Recent cross-sectional evidence suggests, for the first time, that greater tolerance for the discomfort experienced during exercise is ass...

  17. Integrating a hip belt with body armour reduces the magnitude and changes the location of shoulder pressure and perceived discomfort in soldiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenton, Gavin K; Doyle, Tim L A; Saxby, David J; Billing, Dan; Higgs, Jeremy; Lloyd, David G

    2018-04-01

    Soldiers carry heavy loads that may cause general discomfort, shoulder pain and injury. This study assessed if new body armour designs that incorporated a hip belt reduced shoulder pressures and improved comfort. Twenty-one Australian soldiers completed treadmill walking trials wearing six different body armours with two different loads (15 and 30 kg). Contact pressures applied to the shoulders were measured using pressure pads, and qualitative assessment of comfort and usability were acquired from questionnaires administered after walking trials. Walking with hip belt compared to no hip belt armour resulted in decreased mean and maximum shoulder pressures (p armour and backpack designs should integrate a hip belt and distribute load closer to shoulder midline to reduce load carriage discomfort and, potentially, injury risk. Practitioner Summary: Soldiers carry heavy loads that increase their risk of discomfort and injury. New body armour designs are thought to ease this burden by transferring the load to the hips. This study demonstrated that designs incorporating a hip belt reduced shoulder pressure and shoulder discomfort compared to the current armour design.

  18. A randomized controlled trial of self-perceived pain, discomfort, and impairment of jaw function in children undergoing orthodontic treatment with fixed or removable appliances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedel, Anna-Paulina; Bondemark, Lars

    2016-03-01

    To compare patients' perceptions of fixed and removable appliance therapy for correction of anterior crossbite in the mixed dentition, with special reference to perceived pain, discomfort, and impairment of jaw function. Sixty-two patients with anterior crossbite and functional shift were recruited consecutively and randomized for treatment with fixed appliances (brackets and archwires) or removable appliances (acrylic plates and protruding springs). A questionnaire, previously found to be valid and reliable, was used for evaluation at the following time points: before appliance insertion, on the evening of the day of insertion, every day/evening for 7 days after insertion, and at the first and second scheduled appointments (after 4 and 8 weeks, respectively). Pain and discomfort intensity were higher for the first 3 days for the fixed appliance. Pain and discomfort scores overall peaked on day 2. Adverse effects on school and leisure activities were reported more frequently in the removable than in the fixed appliance group. The fixed appliance group reported more difficulty eating different kinds of hard and soft food, while the removable appliance group experienced more speech difficulties. No significant intergroup difference was found for self-estimated disturbance of appearance between the appliances. The general levels of pain and discomfort were low to moderate in both groups. There were some statistically significant differences between the groups, but these were only minor and with minor clinical relevance. As both appliances were generally well accepted by the patients, either fixed or removable appliance therapy can be recommended.

  19. Effect of electroacupuncture on thermal pain threshold and expression of calcitonin-gene related peptide, substance P and γ-aminobutyric acid in the cervical dorsal root ganglion of rats with incisional neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Li-Na; Liu, Jun-Ling; Tan, Lian-Hong; Yang, Hai-Long; Zhai, Xu; Yang, Yong-Sheng

    2017-08-01

    Acupuncture therapy effectively reduces post-surgical pain, but its mechanism of action remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate whether expression of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and the neuropeptides substance P (SP) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in the primary sensory neurons of cervical dorsal root ganglia (DRG) are involved in electroacupuncture (EA)-induced analgesia in a rat model of incisional neck pain. The pain model was established by making a longitudinal midline neck incision in 60 rats. Another 15 rats underwent sham surgery (normal group). Post-incision, 15 rats remained untreated (model group) and 45 rats underwent EA (frequency 2/100 Hz, intensity 1 mA) at bilateral LI18, LI4-PC6 or ST36-GB34 (n=15 each) for 30 min at 4 hours, 24 hours, and 48 hours post-surgery, followed by thermal pain threshold (PT) measurement. 30 min later, the rats were euthanased and cervical (C3-6) DRGs removed for measurement of immunoreactivity and mRNA expression of SP/CGRP and the GABAergic neuronal marker glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 (GAD67). Thermal PT was significantly lower in the model group versus the normal group and increased in the LI18 and LI4-PC6 groups but not the ST36-GB34 group compared with the model group. Additionally, EA at LI18 and LI4-PC6 markedly suppressed neck incision-induced upregulation of mRNA/protein expression of SP/CGRP, and upregulated mRNA/protein expression of GAD67 in the DRGs of C3-6 segments. EA at LI18/LI4-PC6 increases PT in rats with incisional neck pain, which is likely related to downregulation of pronociceptive mediators SP/CGRP and upregulation of the inhibitory transmitter GABA in the primary sensory neurons of cervical DRGs. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  20. Short-term efficacy of calcium fructoborate on subjects with knee discomfort: a comparative, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietrzkowski Z

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Zbigniew Pietrzkowski,1 Michael J Phelan,2 Robert Keller,3 Cynthia Shu,1 Ruby Argumedo,1 Tania Reyes-Izquierdo11FutureCeuticals, Inc., Applied BioClinical Laboratory; 2Department of Statistics, School of Information and Computer Science, University of California at Irvine; 3NutraClinical Inc., Irvine, CA, USAAbstract: Calcium fructoborate (CFB at a dose of 110 mg twice per day was previously reported to improve knee discomfort during the first 14 days of treatment. In this study, 60 participants with self-reported knee discomfort were randomized into two groups receiving CFB or placebo. Initial levels of knee discomfort were evaluated by Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC and McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ scores at the beginning of the study and also at 7 and 14 days after treatment. Results showed that supplementation with CFB significantly improved knee discomfort in the study subjects; significant reductions of mean within-subject change in WOMAC and MPQ scores were observed for the CFB group compared to the placebo group at both 7 and 14 days after treatment. Estimated treatment differences for the MPQ score were -5.8 (P=0.0009 and -8.9 (P<0.0001 at Day 7 and 14, respectively. Estimated differences for the WOMAC score were -5.3 (P=0.06 and -13.73 (P<0.0001 at Day 7 and 14, respectively. Negative values indicate greater reductions in reported discomfort. On both Day 7 and Day 14, the trend was toward greater improvement in the CFB group. The placebo group did not exhibit any change in the WOMAC and MPQ scores. In conclusion, supplementation with 110 mg CFB twice per day was associated with improving knee discomfort during the 2 weeks of intake.Keywords: CFB, joint discomfort, WOMAC score, McGill pain score

  1. Parental supervision and discomfort with children walking to school in low-income communities in Cape Town, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Abigail; Koekemoer, Karin; Niekerk, Ashley van; Govender, Rajen

    2018-05-19

    The risk of pedestrian injury is compounded for children living in low-income communities due to factors such as poor road and pedestrian infrastructure, reliance on walking as a means of transport, and compromised supervision. Parents play an important role in child pedestrian safety. The primary objective of this study was to examine the effects of child pedestrian variables on parental discomfort with regard to letting their child walk to and from school and on the frequency of adult supervision. A cross-sectional study was conducted using a convenience sample from 3 schools participating in a pedestrian safety school initiative. The schools are situated in low-income, high-risk communities in the City of Cape Town. A parent survey form was translated into isiXhosa and sent home with learners to those parents who had consented to participate. The response rate was 70.4%, and only parents of children who walk to and from school were included in the final sample (n = 359). Child pedestrian variables include the time taken to walk to school, parental rating of the child's ability to safely cross the road, and the frequency of adult supervision. More than half of parents reported that their child walked to and from school without adult supervision. About 56% of children took less than 20 min to walk to school. Most parents (61%) were uncomfortable with their child walking to school, although the majority of parents (55.7%) rated their child's ability to cross the road safely as better or significantly better than average (compared to peers). The parents did not perceive any differences in pedestrian risk factors between boys and girls or between younger (6-9 years) and older (10-15 years) children. The time spent by a child walking to school and parents' perceptions of their child's road-crossing ability were found to be significant predictors of parental discomfort (in letting their child walk). Younger children and children who spent less time walking were more

  2. Comparison of thermal comfort and sensation scales : a case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vesely, Michal; Zeiler, Wim; Li, Rongling; Loomans, M.G.L.C.; te Kulve, M.

    2015-01-01

    Thermal sensation is a conscious feeling that grades the thermal environment, while thermal comfort expresses satisfaction with this feeling. Multiple scales to quantify thermal sensation and comfort have been developed throughout the history of research on thermal comfort. In this paper, the most

  3. Molecular cloning, characterization and expression of heat shock protein 70 gene from the oyster Crassostrea hongkongensis responding to thermal stress and exposure of Cu(2+) and malachite green.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhanhui; Zhang, Qizhong

    2012-04-15

    Heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) acts mostly as a molecular chaperone and plays a key role in the process of protecting cells by facilitating the folding of nascent peptides and the cellular stress response. The cDNA of the oyster Crassostrea hongkongensis hsp70 (designated chhsp70) was cloned with the techniques of homological cloning and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). The full-length chhsp70 cDNA was 2251bp, consisting of a 130bp 5'-UTR, 216bp 3'-UTR with a canonical polyadenylation signal sequence AATAAA and a poly (A) tail, and an open reading frame of 1905bp, which encoded a polypeptide of 634 amino acids. Three classical HSP signature motifs were detected in ChHSP70, i.e., DLGTT-S-V, IFDLGGGTFDVSIL and VVLVGGSTRIPKIQK. BLAST analysis revealed that the ChHSP70 shared high identity with other bivalve HSP70. The phylogenetic analysis indicated that the ChHSP70 was a member of the HSP70 family. The chhsp70 mRNA transcripts were quantified by fluorescent real time RT-PCR under both unstressed and stressed conditions, i. e., heat shock and exposure to Cu(2+) and malachite green. Basal expression level was similar in mantle, gill, digestive gland, and heart, but higher in muscle than that in the others. A similar trend showed that the chhsp70 mRNA expression significantly increased at 3-6h, then dropped and returned to control level at 24h in the five tissues and organs mentioned above after heat shock. A clearly time-dependent expression pattern of chhsp70 mRNA in digestive gland and gill of the oyster was observed after exposure of Cu(2+) and malachite green. In the two tissues, the chhsp70 mRNA level reached the maximum at 6h after malachite green exposure and on day 4 after Cu(2+) exposure, and then decreased progressively to the control level. The results indicated that ChHSP70 of the oyster is an inducible protein, and plays an important role in response to the Cu(2+) and malachite green polluted stress, so chhsp70 might be used as a potential molecular

  4. A Thermal Test System for Helmet Cooling Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaun Fitzgerald

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available One of the primary causes of discomfort to both irregular and elite cyclists is heat entrapment by a helmet resulting in overheating and excessive sweating of the head. To accurately assess the cooling effectiveness of bicycle helmets, a heated plastic thermal headform has been developed. The construction consists of a 3D-printed headform of low thermal conductivity with an internal layer of high thermal mass that is heated to a constant uniform temperature by an electrical heating element. Testing is conducted in a wind tunnel where the heater power remains constant and the resulting surface temperature distribution is directly measured by 36 K-type thermocouples embedded within the surface of the head in conjunction with a thermal imaging camera. Using this new test system, four bicycle helmets were studied in order to measure their cooling abilities and to identify ‘hot spots’ where cooling performance is poor.

  5. Molecular characterization of three Hsp90 from Pieris and expression patterns in response to cold and thermal stress in summer and winter diapause of Pieris melete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yue-Kun; Zou, Chao; Fu, Dao-Meng; Zhang, Wan-Na; Xiao, Hai-Jun

    2018-04-01

    Heat shock proteins (Hsps) have been linked to stresses and winter diapause in insects, but whether they are components of summer diapause is still unknown. In this study, complementary DNAs of Hsp90 from Pieris melete, Pieris rapae and Pieris canidia named PmHsp90, PrHsp90 and PcHsp90, respectively, were cloned and sequenced. The deduced amino acid sequence consisted of 718 amino acid residues with a putative molecular mass of 82.6, 82.6 and 82.7 kDa, respectively. The amino acid sequences contained all of the five conserved signature motifs in the Hsp90 family and a bHLH protein folding activity region. The differential expression pattern of PmHsp90 in response to summer diapause and winter diapause, which are related to heat/cold stress, was investigated. Cold stress induced Hsp90 up-regulation in summer and winter diapause pupae, but not in non-diapause individuals. Heat shock up-regulated PmHsp90 gradually with an increase in temperature in summer diapause, and PmHsp90 was rapidly up-regulated in winter diapause. After 30 min heat shock at 39°C, substantial up-regulation of PmHsp90 transcript levels were observed both in summer and winter diapause. However, in non-diapause a relatively stable expression was found under different durations of 39°C heat shock. Compared to the optimal treatment of 18°C for diapause development, a high temperature acclimation of 31°C induced PmHsp90 up-regulation in summer diapause, whereas a low temperature acclimation of 4°C induced up-regulation in winter diapause. The current results indicate that Hsp90 may play an important role in response to heat/cold stress both in summer and winter diapause. © 2016 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  6. [Discomfort associated with dental extraction surgery and development of a questionnaire (QCirDental). Part I: Impacts and internal consistency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortoluzzi, Marcelo Carlos; Martins, Luciana Dorochenko; Takahashi, André; Ribeiro, Bianca; Martins, Ligiane; Pinto, Marcia Helena Baldani

    2018-01-01

    The scope of this study was to develop and validate a questionnaire (QCirDental) to measure the impacts associated with dental extraction surgery. The QCirDental questionnaire was developed in two steps; (1) question and item generation and selection, and (2) pretest of the questionnaire with evaluation of the its measurement properties (internal consistency and responsiveness). The sample was composed of 123 patients. None of the patients had any difficulty in understanding the QCirDental. The instrument was found to have excellent internal consistency with Cronbach's alpha reliability coefficient of 0.83. The principal component analysis (Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin Measure of Sampling Adequacy 0,72 and Bartlett's Test of Sphericity with p < 0.001) showed six (6) dimensions explaining 67.5% of the variance. The QCirDental presented excellent internal consistency, being a questionnaire that is easy to read and understand with adequate semantic and content validity. More than 80% of the patients who underwent dental extraction reported some degree of discomfort within the perioperative period which highlights the necessity to assess the quality of care and impacts of dental extraction surgery.

  7. [Comparison of vocal tract discomfort scale results with objective and instrumental phoniatric parameters among teacher rehabilitees from voice disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woźnicka, Ewelina; Niebudek-Bogusz, Ewa; Wiktorowicz, Justyna; Sliwińska-Kowalska, Mariola

    2013-01-01

    Diagnostic and therapeutic procedures of occupational dysphonia play a major role in voice self-assessment, which is one of the elements of a comprehensive evaluation of voice disorders. The aim of the study was to assess the applicability of the Vocal Tract Discomfort (VTD) scale to monitor the effectiveness of voice rehabilitation and compare the VTD results with objective and instrumental methods of phoniatric diagnosis. The study included 55 teachers (mean age, 47.2) with occupational dysphonia. A comprehensive diagnosis took into account self-assessment by VTD scale, phoniatric examination, including laryngovideostroboscopy (LVSS) and objective measurements of the aerodynamic parameter - the maximum phonation time (MPT). After 4 months of intense rehabilitation, post-therapy examination was performed using the methods specified above. After the treatment, a significant improvement was obtained in the subjective symptoms measured on a VTD scale - assessed both for the frequency (p = 0.000) and the severity (p = 0.000) subscales. Positive effects of the therapy were also observed for the parameters evaluated in the phoniatric study (p dysphonia.

  8. Effect of tube drainage compared with conventional suturing on postoperative discomfort after extraction of impacted mandibular third molars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyuncu, B Ö; Zeytinoğlu, M; Tetik, A; Gomel, M M

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this prospective randomised study was to assess the effects of tube drainage on postoperative discomfort after the extraction of impacted mandibular third molars. We studied 40 patients (11 men and 29 women) 18 years or older (mean (SD) 21 (3), range 18-29) who required extraction of mandibular third molars. We used a randomised crossover design by which if a drain was inserted on one side, then the other side was managed without a drain on a later occasion. Pain, swelling, and mouth opening were evaluated after 48 h and 7 days postoperatively in both groups. Facial swelling (p=0.001), pain p=0.001), and trismus (p=0.001) were significantly less common in the drained group compared with those not drained. We conclude that the use a tube drain is of benefit in minimising postoperative swelling, pain, and trismus after extraction of mandibular third molars. Copyright © 2014 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of different cooling principles on thermal sensation and physiological responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schellen, Lisje; Loomans, Marcel G.L.C.; De Wit, Martin H.

    2013-01-01

    Applying low exergy cooling concepts in the built environment allows reduction of use of high quality energy sources. Non-uniform thermal conditions, which may occur due to application of lowex systems, can result in discomfort. Two different cooling principles were studied: passive (through...... by the floor and mixing ventilation, and (6) AC-R-D-F; active cooling through radiation by the floor and displacement ventilation. Though all cases were designed at PMV ≈ 0, subjective data indicate significant differences between the cases. For the prediction of thermal sensation and thermal comfort under non...

  10. Field survey of occupants thermal comfort in rooms with displacement ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pitchurov, G.; Naidenov, K.; Melikov, Arsen Krikor

    2002-01-01

    Field survey of occupants´ response to the thermal environment in eight office buildings with displacement ventilation was performed. The response of 227 occupants (94 males and 133 females) was collected and analysed. A neutral thermal sensation was reported by 37% of the occupants, and between...... slightly cool and slightly warm by more than 85% of the occupants. The occupants´ thermal sensation was close to the predictions by the PMV index. About 24% of the surveyed occupants complained that they were daily bothered by draught mainly at lower leg. Presence of draught discomfort was verified even...

  11. Thermal insulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aspden, G.J.; Howard, R.S.

    1988-01-01

    The patent concerns high temperature thermal insulation of large vessels, such as the primary vessel of a liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor. The thermal insulation consists of multilayered thermal insulation modules, and each module comprises a number of metal sheet layers sandwiched between a back and front plate. The layers are linked together by straps and clips to control the thickness of the module. (U.K.)

  12. Common Discomforts of Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Careers Archives Health Topics Pregnancy Before or between pregnancies Nutrition, weight & fitness Prenatal care Is it safe? Labor & ... Report Cards Careers Archives Pregnancy Before or between pregnancies Nutrition, weight & fitness Prenatal care Is it safe? Labor & ...

  13. Backache and Back Discomfort

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-06-01

    1967 (27), momure Ia force ventniculaire cardiaque h 1’aide do jauges do contraintes. Cette technique as hourte h des difficultda majeures d𔄀talonnage...NOGUES C., 1967 Meoures do la force ventrlculaire chez Is lapin au moyen de Jauges do contraintes. Rapport 1841/CERMA/RECH., 38 p. 28 - PANJABI N.M

  14. Body Changes and Discomforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... federal government website managed by the Office on Women's Health in the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services . 200 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20201 1-800-994- ...

  15. Summer Thermal Comfort and Self-Shading Geometries in Passivhaus Dwellings: A Pilot Study Using Future UK Climates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahya Lavafpour

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This study uses numerical thermal simulation to investigate the potential use of building geometry to eliminate or reduce current and future thermal discomfort overheating risk in UK Passivhaus dwellings. The study focused on the optimum inclination of a south façade to make use of the building shape to self-protect itself. Dynamic simulation modelling software was used to test a range of different inclined façades with regards to their effectiveness in reducing overheating risk. The research found that implementing a tilted façade could completely eliminate the risk of overheating for current UK climates, but with some consequences for natural ventilation and daylighting. Future overheating was significantly reduced by the tilted façade. However, geometric considerations could not eradicate completely the risk of thermal discomfort overheating, particularly by the 2080s.

  16. Thermal insulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinsky, G.P.

    1977-01-01

    Thermal insulation for vessels and piping within the reactor containment area of nuclear power plants is disclosed. The thermal insulation of this invention can be readily removed and replaced from the vessels and piping for inservice inspection, can withstand repeated wettings and dryings, and can resist high temperatures for long periods of time. 4 claims, 3 figures

  17. [Catheter-related bladder discomfort after urological surgery: importance of the type of surgery and efficiency of treatment by clonazepam].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maro, S; Zarattin, D; Baron, T; Bourez, S; de la Taille, A; Salomon, L

    2014-09-01

    Bladder catheter can induce a Catheter-Related Bladder Discomfort (CRBD). Antagonist of muscarinic receptor is the gold standard treatment. Clonazepam is an antimuscarinic, muscle relaxing oral drug. The aim of this study is to look for a correlation between the type of surgical procedure and the existence of CRBD and to evaluate the efficiency of clonazepam. One hundred patients needing bladder catheter were evaluated. Sexe, age, BMI, presence of diabetes, surgical procedure and existence of CRBD were noted. Pain was evaluated with analogic visual scale. Timing of pain, need for specific treatment by clonazepam and its efficiency were noted. Correlation between preoperative data, type of surgical procedure, existence of CRBD and efficiency of treatment were evaluated. There were 79 men and 21 women (age: 65.9 years, BMI: 25.4). Twelve patients presented diabetes. Surgical procedure concerned prostate in 39 cases, bladder in 19 cases (tumor resections), endo-urology in 20 cases, upper urinary tract in 12 cases (nephrectomy…) and lower urinary tract in 10 cases (sphincter, sub-uretral tape). Forty patients presented CRBD, (pain 4.5 using VAS). This pain occurred 0.6 days after surgery. No correlation was found between preoperative data and CRBD. Bladder resection and endo-urological procedures were surgical procedures which procured CRBD. Clonazepam was efficient in 30 (75 %) out of 40 patients with CRBD. However, it was less efficient in case of bladder tumor resection. CRBD is frequent and occurred immediately after surgery. Bladder resection and endo-urology were the main surgical procedures which induced CRBD. Clonazepam is efficient in 75 %. Bladder resection is the surgical procedure which is the most refractory to treatment. 5. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Applicability of the Arabic version of Vocal Tract Discomfort Scale (VTDS) with student singers as professional voice users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darawsheh, Wesam B; Natour, Yaser S; Sada, Eve G

    2018-07-01

    This pilot study aimed to evaluate the internal consistency, convergent construct validity and criterion validity of Arabic version of the Vocal Tract Discomfort Scale (VTDS), and to investigate the correlation between the scores of the VTDS, the VHI and the acoustic measures of fundamental frequency (F0), shimmer, jitter and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). A cross-sectional study where 97 participants participated (47 males and 50 females) (mean age 20.5 ± 2.1 years) (31 student singers and 66 other non-professional voice user students). Participants were without self-perceived voice disorders who completed the VTDS-Arab scale and the Voice Handicap Index (VHI-Arab), and recorded a vocal sample of/a:/at a comfortable level. A positive internal consistency that signifies reliability was confirmed by Cronbach's α = .884 and 0.874 for the VTDS-Arab frequency and severity subscales, respectively. A moderate positive correlation was found between the VTDS-Arab (frequency, severity, total) and the VHI-Arab total where values of Pearson's correlation coefficient were r= 0.459, 0.430 and 0.451, respectively. Weak correlations were found between all of the acoustic measures and the scores of the VTDS-Arab and VHI-Arab (total and subscales). The area under curve for the VTDS was AUC= 0.824, 0.804 and 0.817 for the VTDS frequency, VTDS severity and VTDS total, respectively. The VTDS-Arab is a valid and reliable tool in measuring vocal tract sensations and predicting the perception of vocal handicap in student singers and can be used to predict the vocal load among professional voice users.

  19. A brief review on the efficacy of different possible and nonpharmacological techniques in eliminating discomfort of local anesthesia injection during dental procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davoudi, Amin; Rismanchian, Mansour; Akhavan, Ali; Nosouhian, Saeid; Bajoghli, Farshad; Haghighat, Abbas; Arbabzadeh, Farahnaz; Samimi, Pouran; Fiez, Atiyeh; Shadmehr, Elham; Tabari, Kasra; Jahadi, Sanaz

    2016-01-01

    Dental anxiety and fear of needle injection is one of the most common problems encountered by dental practitioners, especially in the pediatric patient. In consequences, it might affect the patient's quality of life. Several methods are suggested to lower the discomfort of local anesthesia injection during dental procedures. Desensitization of injection site is one of the recommended strategies. Among chemical anesthetic topical agents that are effective but might have allergic side effects, using some nonpharmacological and safe techniques might be useful. This study aimed to overview the efficacy of using cooling techniques, mostly by ice or popsicles, warming or pH buffering of drug, and using modern devices to diminish the discomfort of local anesthesia injection during dental procedures. PMID:26957683

  20. A nationwide study of health-related quality of life, stress, pain or discomfort and the use of medicine among problem gamblers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekholm, Ola; Davidsen, Michael; Larsen, Christina Viskum Lytken

    2018-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between problem gambling and health-related quality of life, stress, pain or discomfort and the use of analgesics and sleeping pills. METHODS: Data derives from the Danish Health and Morbidity Survey 2010. The survey was based......, high perception of stress, headache, fatigue and sleeping problems. Furthermore, previous problem gambling was generally associated with poorer health outcomes. Thus, current and previous problem gamblers had 2.36 times (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.44-3.87) and 1.66 times (95% CI 1.07-2.55) higher...... included topics such as health-related quality of life (Short Form-12), perceived stress, pain and discomforts within the past two weeks, as well as the use of medication within the past two weeks. RESULTS: Current problem gambling was strongly associated with negative outcomes such as poor mental health...

  1. Electrical and thermal conductivities in dense plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faussurier, G., E-mail: gerald.faussurier@cea.fr; Blancard, C.; Combis, P.; Videau, L. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France)

    2014-09-15

    Expressions for the electrical and thermal conductivities in dense plasmas are derived combining the Chester-Thellung-Kubo-Greenwood approach and the Kramers approximation. The infrared divergence is removed assuming a Drude-like behaviour. An analytical expression is obtained for the Lorenz number that interpolates between the cold solid-state and the hot plasma phases. An expression for the electrical resistivity is proposed using the Ziman-Evans formula, from which the thermal conductivity can be deduced using the analytical expression for the Lorenz number. The present method can be used to estimate electrical and thermal conductivities of mixtures. Comparisons with experiment and quantum molecular dynamics simulations are done.

  2. Pain and discomfort experienced after placement of a conventional or a superelastic NiTi aligning archwire. A randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, L M; Ogaard, B; Skoglund, L

    1998-01-01

    Two nickel-titanium arch-wire types commonly used for initial tooth alignment were compared with regard to the pain/discomfort patients experience during the initial phase of tooth movement. The two arch wires used were a superelastic nickel-titanium alloy, 0.014 inch Sentalloy, Light (GAC International Inc. Central Islip, NY, USA) and a 0.014 inch Nitinol (Unitek, Monrovia, CA, USA), a conventional nickel-titanium aligning archwire. One hundred and twenty-eight consecutive patients attending an orthodontic university clinic and 2 private practices for routine placement of a fixed appliance were randomly assigned one of these 2 initial arch wires. Assessments of pain/discomfort were made daily by means of a 100 mm visual analog scale (VAS) over the first 7-day period after bonding. On the first day, recordings were made every hour for the first 11 hours. The results showed that the level of discomfort increased continuously every hour after the insertion of either a Sentalloy or a Nitinol as first arch wires, with a peak in the first night, remaining high on the second day and decreasing thereafter to baseline level after 7 days. During the first 10 hours it was apparent that the pain/discomfort experienced after placement of a Sentalloy was less than that found with the Nitinol archwire, although a significant difference could be found at 4 hours only. No significant gender-specific differences were found in either archwire group. A significant difference between the upper and lower dental arches was observed during the first 11 hours after placement of either a Sentalloy or a Nitinol arch wire, with the lower arch having the higher pain experience.

  3. How Effective Is the Use of Metaphor Therapy on Reducing Psychological Symptoms and Pain Discomfort in Patients with Non-Cardiac Chest Pain: A Randomized, Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Bahremand

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Psychological symptoms of non-cardiac chest pain (NCCP including perceptual, emotional, and behavioral problems can effect patient perception of chest pain. This study was conducted to determine the effect of metaphor therapy on mitigating depression, anxiety, stress, and pain discomfort in patients with NCCP. Materials and Methods: This randomized, controlled, trial was conducted on 28 participants, who had visited the emergency department of Kermanshah Imam Ali Heart Hospital because of experiencing NCCP during the June to September 2014. The patients were randomly assigned to metaphor therapy and control groups (n=14 for each group during a four-week period. Our data collection questionnaires included Pain Discomfort Scale (PDS and Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS. Chi-square and MANCOVA tests were run, using SPSS version 20. Results: Twenty patients (71.4% completed the trial period until the final assessment. Our findings showed that metaphor therapy couldn’t lower depression, anxiety, stress, and pain discomfort; In fact, there was not a significant difference between the metaphor therapy and control groups regarding the aforementioned variables (P>0.05. Conclusions: Although the study results did not support the effectiveness of metaphor therapy for NCCP, further studies on the potential role of metaphor therapy in attenuating NCCP symptoms seem to be necessary.

  4. Kilohertz and Low-Frequency Electrical Stimulation With the Same Pulse Duration Have Similar Efficiency for Inducing Isometric Knee Extension Torque and Discomfort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medeiros, Flávia Vanessa; Bottaro, Martim; Vieira, Amilton; Lucas, Tiago Pires; Modesto, Karenina Arrais; Bo, Antonio Padilha L; Cipriano, Gerson; Babault, Nicolas; Durigan, João Luiz Quagliotti

    2017-06-01

    To test the hypotheses that, as compared with pulsed current with the same pulse duration, kilohertz frequency alternating current would not differ in terms of evoked-torque production and perceived discomfort, and as a result, it would show the same current efficiency. A repeated-measures design with 4 stimuli presented in random order was used to test 25 women: (1) 500-microsecond pulse duration, (2) 250-microsecond pulse duration, (3) 500-microsecond pulse duration and low carrier frequency (1 kHz), (4) 250-microsecond pulse duration and high carrier frequency (4 kHz). Isometric peak torque of quadriceps muscle was measured using an isokinetic dynamometer. Discomfort was measured using a visual analog scale. Currents with long pulse durations induced approximately 21% higher evoked torque than short pulse durations. In addition, currents with 500 microseconds delivered greater amounts of charge than stimulation patterns using 250-microsecond pulse durations (P torque and discomfort. However, neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) with longer pulse duration induces higher NMES-evoked torque, regardless of the carrier frequency. Pulse duration is an important variable that should receive more attention for an optimal application of NMES in clinical settings.

  5. Seasonal differences in thermal sensation in the outdoor urban environment of Mediterranean climates - the example of Athens, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseliou, Areti; Tsiros, Ioannis X.; Nikolopoulou, Marialena

    2017-07-01

    Outdoor urban areas are very important for cities and microclimate is a critical parameter in the design process, contributing to thermal comfort which is important for urban developments. The research presented in this paper is part of extensive field surveys conducted in Athens aimed at investigating people's thermal sensation in a Mediterranean city. Based on 2313 questionnaires and microclimatic data the current work focuses on the relative frequencies of people's evaluation of the thermal along with the sun and wind sensations between two seasons trying to identify the seasonal differences in thermal sensation. The impact of basic meteorological factors on thermal discomfort with respect to season are also examined, as well as the use of the outdoor environment. Results show that psychological adaptation is an important contributing factor influencing perception of the thermal environment between seasons. In addition, the thermal sensation votes during the cool months show that individuals are satisfied to a great extend with the thermal environment whereas the combination of high air temperature, strong solar radiation and weak wind lead to thermal discomfort during summertime. As far as the appropriate urban design in the Mediterranean climate is concerned, priority should be given to the warm months of the year.

  6. The influence of local effects on thermal sensation under non-uniform environmental conditions — Gender differences in thermophysiology, thermal comfort and productivity during convective and radiant cooling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schellen, L.; Loomans, M.G.L.C.; de Wit, M.H.

    2012-01-01

    , thermal comfort and productivity in response to thermal non-uniform environmental conditions. Twenty healthy subjects (10 males and 10 females, age 20–29years) were exposed to two different experimental conditions: a convective cooling situation (CC) and a radiant cooling situation (RC). During...... the experiments physiological responses, thermal comfort and productivity were measured. The results show that under both experimental conditions the actual mean thermal sensation votes significantly differ from the PMV-index; the subjects are feeling colder than predicted. Furthermore, the females are more...... of the occupants. Non-uniform thermal conditions, which may occur due to application of high temperature cooling systems, can be responsible for discomfort. Contradictions in literature exist regarding the validity of the often used predicted mean vote (PMV) index for both genders, and the index is not intended...

  7. Thermal expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Thermal expansion of fuel pellet is an important property which limits the lifetime of the fuels in reactors, because it affects both the pellet and cladding mechanical interaction and the gap conductivity. By fitting a number of available measured data, recommended equations have been presented and successfully used to estimate thermal expansion coefficient of the nuclear fuel pellet. However, due to large scatter of the measured data, non-consensus data have been omitted in formulating the equations. Also, the equation is strongly governed by the lack of appropriate experimental data. For those reasons, it is important to develop theoretical methodologies to better describe thermal expansion behaviour of nuclear fuel. In particular, first-principles and molecular dynamics simulations have been certainly contributed to predict reliable thermal expansion without fitting the measured data. Furthermore, the two theoretical techniques have improved on understanding the change of fuel dimension by describing the atomic-scale processes associated with lattice expansion in the fuels. (author)

  8. Web-based KAP Intervention on Office Ergonomics: A Unique Technique for Prevention of Musculoskeletal Discomfort in Global Corporate Offices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhwani, Kishore P; Nag, P K

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate web-based Knowledge, Attitude and Practice (KAP) intervention on office ergonomics - a unique method for prevention of musculoskeletal discomfort (MSD) - in corporate offices that influences behavior modification. With the increasing use of computers, laptops and hand-held communication devices globally among office employees, creating awareness on office ergonomics has become a top priority. Emphasis needs to be given on maintaining ideal work postures, ergonomic arrangement of workstations, optimizing chair functions, as well as performing desk stretches to reduce MSD arising from the use of these equipment, thereby promoting safe work practices at offices and home, as in the current scenario many employees work from home with flexible work hours. Hence, this justifies the importance of our study. To promote safe working by exploring cost-effective communication methods to achieve behavior change at distant sites when an on-site visit may not be feasible. An invitation was sent by the Medical and Occupational Health Team of a multinational corporation to all employees at their offices in Sri Lanka, Singapore, and Malaysia to take up an online Nordic questionnaire, a screening tool for musculoskeletal symptoms, shared in local languages on two occasions - baseline evaluation ( n = 240) and a follow-up evaluation after 3 months ( n = 203). After completing the baseline questionnaire, employees were immediately trained on correct postures and office ergonomics with animation graphics. The same questionnaire was sent again after a 12-week gap only to those employees who responded to the baseline questionnaire on initial assessment. Data collected were analyzed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 20.0 software and variables were compared using odds ratio as well as Chi-square test. Of the 203 employees who responded, 47.35% had some musculoskeletal symptoms. Among them 58.7% had lower back pain

  9. High-Thermal-Conductivity Fabrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chibante, L. P. Felipe

    2012-01-01

    Heat management with common textiles such as nylon and spandex is hindered by the poor thermal conductivity from the skin surface to cooling surfaces. This innovation showed marked improvement in thermal conductivity of the individual fibers and tubing, as well as components assembled from them. The problem is centered on improving the heat removal of the liquid-cooled ventilation garments (LCVGs) used by astronauts. The current design uses an extensive network of water-cooling tubes that introduces bulkiness and discomfort, and increases fatigue. Range of motion and ease of movement are affected as well. The current technology is the same as developed during the Apollo program of the 1960s. Tubing material is hand-threaded through a spandex/nylon mesh layer, in a series of loops throughout the torso and limbs such that there is close, form-fitting contact with the user. Usually, there is a nylon liner layer to improve comfort. Circulating water is chilled by an external heat exchanger (sublimator). The purpose of this innovation is to produce new LCVG components with improved thermal conductivity. This was addressed using nanocomposite engineering incorporating high-thermalconductivity nanoscale fillers in the fabric and tubing components. Specifically, carbon nanotubes were added using normal processing methods such as thermoplastic melt mixing (compounding twin screw extruder) and downstream processing (fiber spinning, tubing extrusion). Fibers were produced as yarns and woven into fabric cloths. The application of isotropic nanofillers can be modeled using a modified Nielsen Model for conductive fillers in a matrix based on Einstein s viscosity model. This is a drop-in technology with no additional equipment needed. The loading is limited by the ability to maintain adequate dispersion. Undispersed materials will plug filtering screens in processing equipment. Generally, the viscosity increases were acceptable, and allowed the filled polymers to still be

  10. Thermal comfort: research and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hoof, Joost; Mazej, Mitja; Hensen, Jan L M

    2010-01-01

    Thermal comfort--the state of mind, which expresses satisfaction with the thermal environment--is an important aspect of the building design process as modern man spends most of the day indoors. This paper reviews the developments in indoor thermal comfort research and practice since the second half of the 1990s, and groups these developments around two main themes; (i) thermal comfort models and standards, and (ii) advances in computerization. Within the first theme, the PMV-model (Predicted Mean Vote), created by Fanger in the late 1960s is discussed in the light of the emergence of models of adaptive thermal comfort. The adaptive models are based on adaptive opportunities of occupants and are related to options of personal control of the indoor climate and psychology and performance. Both models have been considered in the latest round of thermal comfort standard revisions. The second theme focuses on the ever increasing role played by computerization in thermal comfort research and practice, including sophisticated multi-segmental modeling and building performance simulation, transient thermal conditions and interactions, thermal manikins.

  11. Thermal Properties and Thermal Analysis:

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasap, Safa; Tonchev, Dan

    The chapter provides a summary of the fundamental concepts that are needed to understand the heat capacity C P, thermal conductivity κ, and thermal expansion coefficient α L of materials. The C P, κ, and α of various classes of materials, namely, semiconductors, polymers, and glasses, are reviewed, and various typical characteristics are summarized. A key concept in crystalline solids is the Debye theory of the heat capacity, which has been widely used for many decades for calculating the C P of crystals. The thermal properties are interrelated through Grüneisen's theorem. Various useful empirical rules for calculating C P and κ have been used, some of which are summarized. Conventional differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) is a powerful and convenient thermal analysis technique that allows various important physical and chemical transformations, such as the glass transition, crystallization, oxidation, melting etc. to be studied. DSC can also be used to obtain information on the kinetics of the transformations, and some of these thermal analysis techniques are summarized. Temperature-modulated DSC, TMDSC, is a relatively recent innovation in which the sample temperature is ramped slowly and, at the same time, sinusoidally modulated. TMDSC has a number of distinct advantages compared with the conventional DSC since it measures the complex heat capacity. For example, the glass-transition temperature T g measured by TMDSC has almost no dependence on the thermal history, and corresponds to an almost step life change in C P. The new Tzero DSC has an additional thermocouple to calibrate better for thermal lags inherent in the DSC measurement, and allows more accurate thermal analysis.

  12. Thermal comfort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    d’Ambrosio Alfano, Francesca Romana; Olesen, Bjarne W.; Palella, Boris Igor

    2014-01-01

    Thermal comfort is one of the most important aspects of the indoor environmental quality due to its effects on well-being, people's performance and building energy requirements. Its attainment is not an easy task requiring advanced design and operation of building and HVAC systems, taking...... into account all parameters involved. Even though thermal comfort fundamentals are consolidated topics for more than forty years, often designers seem to ignore or apply them in a wrong way. Design input values from standards are often considered as universal values rather than recommended values to be used...... under specific conditions. At operation level, only few variables are taken into account with unpredictable effects on the assessment of comfort indices. In this paper, the main criteria for the design and assessment of thermal comfort are discussed in order to help building and HVAC systems designers...

  13. Perceived air quality, thermal comfort, and SBS symptoms at low air temperature and increased radiant temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toftum, Jørn; Reimann, Gregers Peter; Foldbjerg, P.

    2002-01-01

    source present at the low temperature. To maintain overall thermal neutrality, the low air temperature was partly compensated for by individually controlled radiant heating, and partly by allowing subjects to modify clothing insulation. A reduction of the air temperature from 23 deg.C to 18 deg.......C suggested an improvement of the perceived air quality, while no systematic effect on symptom intensity was observed. The overall indoor environment was evaluated equally acceptable at both temperatures due to local thermal discomfort at the low air temperature....

  14. Thermal effects on human performance in office environment measured by integrating task speed and accuracy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lan, Li; Wargocki, Pawel; Lian, Zhiwei

    2014-01-01

    We have proposed a method in which the speed and accuracy can be integrated into one metric of human performance. This was achieved by designing a performance task in which the subjects receive feedback on their performance by informing them whether they have committed errors, and if did, they can......, 12 subjects performed tasks under two thermal conditions (neutral & warm) repeatedly. The tasks were presented with and without feedback on errors committed, as outlined above. The results indicate that there was a greater decrease in task performance due to thermal discomfort when feedback was given......, compared to the performance of tasks presented without feedback....

  15. A comparison of suit dresses and summer clothes in the terms of thermal comfort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekici, Can; Atilgan, Ibrahim

    2013-12-19

    Fanger's PMV equation is the result of the combined quantitative effects of the air temperature, mean radiant temperature, relative air velocity, humidity, activity level and clothing insulation. This paper contains a comparison of suit dresses and summer clothes in terms of thermal comfort, Fanger's PMV equation. Studies were processed in the winter for an office, which locates in Ankara, Turkey. The office was partitioned to fifty square cells. Humidity, relative air velocity, air temperature and mean radiant temperature were measured on the centre points of these cells. Thermal comfort analyses were processed for suit dressing (Icl = 1 clo) and summer clothing (Icl = 0.5 clo). Discomfort/comfort in an environment for different clothing types can be seen in this study. The relationship between indoor thermal comfort distribution and clothing type was discussed. Graphics about thermal comfort were sketched according to cells. Conclusions about the thermal comfort of occupants were given by PMV graphics.

  16. Matrix thermalization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craps, Ben; Evnin, Oleg; Nguyen, Kévin

    2017-01-01

    Matrix quantum mechanics offers an attractive environment for discussing gravitational holography, in which both sides of the holographic duality are well-defined. Similarly to higher-dimensional implementations of holography, collapsing shell solutions in the gravitational bulk correspond in this setting to thermalization processes in the dual quantum mechanical theory. We construct an explicit, fully nonlinear supergravity solution describing a generic collapsing dilaton shell, specify the holographic renormalization prescriptions necessary for computing the relevant boundary observables, and apply them to evaluating thermalizing two-point correlation functions in the dual matrix theory.

  17. Matrix thermalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craps, Ben; Evnin, Oleg; Nguyen, Kévin

    2017-02-01

    Matrix quantum mechanics offers an attractive environment for discussing gravitational holography, in which both sides of the holographic duality are well-defined. Similarly to higher-dimensional implementations of holography, collapsing shell solutions in the gravitational bulk correspond in this setting to thermalization processes in the dual quantum mechanical theory. We construct an explicit, fully nonlinear supergravity solution describing a generic collapsing dilaton shell, specify the holographic renormalization prescriptions necessary for computing the relevant boundary observables, and apply them to evaluating thermalizing two-point correlation functions in the dual matrix theory.

  18. Matrix thermalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craps, Ben [Theoretische Natuurkunde, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), and International Solvay Institutes, Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Evnin, Oleg [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Thanon Phayathai, Pathumwan, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Theoretische Natuurkunde, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), and International Solvay Institutes, Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Nguyen, Kévin [Theoretische Natuurkunde, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), and International Solvay Institutes, Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2017-02-08

    Matrix quantum mechanics offers an attractive environment for discussing gravitational holography, in which both sides of the holographic duality are well-defined. Similarly to higher-dimensional implementations of holography, collapsing shell solutions in the gravitational bulk correspond in this setting to thermalization processes in the dual quantum mechanical theory. We construct an explicit, fully nonlinear supergravity solution describing a generic collapsing dilaton shell, specify the holographic renormalization prescriptions necessary for computing the relevant boundary observables, and apply them to evaluating thermalizing two-point correlation functions in the dual matrix theory.

  19. The benefits of hardware removal in patients with pain or discomfort after fracture healing of the ankle: a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thune, Alexandra; Hagelberg, Mårten; Nåsell, Hans; Sköldenberg, Olof

    2017-08-11

    For any orthopaedic surgeon working with trauma; ankle fractures are one of the most common injuries treated. The treatment of ankle fractures can be conservative, using external fixation, but more commonly the fractures are treated with open reduction and internal fixation. Residual pain and discomfort are common in patients after surgical treatment of fractures of the ankle. Sometimes it is difficult to determine whether the pain or discomfort is due to the implants left in situ or the primary injury itself. In many cases, the decision is made to remove the implants. Extraction of internal fixation material from the ankle is a common procedure in many orthopaedic clinics. There are no evidence-based guidelines or consensus regarding the effect of hardware removal from the ankle. The aim of this protocol is to describe the method that will be used to collect, describe and analyse the current evidence regarding hardware removal after fracture healing of the ankle. We will conduct a systematic review of studies that were published after 1967 regarding the benefits of hardware removal in patients with pain or discomfort after fracture healing of the ankle. Study selection will follow the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis guidelines. We will make a predefined search strategy and use it in several databases. We will include both randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and non-RCT studies. We will use descriptive statistics to summarise the studies collected. If more than one RCT is collected then a meta-analysis will be conducted. The quality of evidence will be assessed using Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation guidelines. No ethics approval is required as no primary data will be collected. Once complete, the results will be made available by peer-reviewed publication. PROSPERO registration number CRD42016039186. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article

  20. Normativity and gender discomfort: Strategies and resistances in contemporary family / Normatividad y disconfort de género: estrategias y resistencias en la familia contemporánea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Martínez

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This article is product of a research work developed between 2006 and 2009. One of its main objectives was to analyze gender norms’ representations of men and women that came from different objective conditions of existence. In the study we observed that when gender representations contrast those that are product of the objective conditions in which habitus were developed, women and men tend to manifest in their discourses a sort of “discomfort sensation” related to those gender regulations that limit their practices. In the article we advance on the explanation and systematization of such sensation called, theoretically, “gender discomfort”.

  1. Monitoring results and analysis of thermal comfort conditions in experimental buildings for different heating systems and ventilation regimes during heating and cooling seasons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gendelis, S.; Jakovičs, A.; Ratnieks, J.; Bandeniece, L.

    2017-10-01

    This paper focuses on the long-term monitoring of thermal comfort and discomfort parameters in five small test buildings equipped with different heating and cooling systems. Calculations of predicted percentage of dissatisfied people (PPD) index and discomfort factors are provided for the room in winter season running three different heating systems - electric heater, air-air heat pump and air-water heat pump, as well as for the summer cooling with split type air conditioning systems. It is shown that the type of heating/cooling system and its working regime has an important impact on thermal comfort conditions in observed room. Recommendations for the optimal operating regimes and choice of the heating system from the thermal comfort point of view are summarized.

  2. Effects of whole-body cryotherapy duration on thermal and cardio-vascular response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonda, Borut; De Nardi, Massimo; Sarabon, Nejc

    2014-05-01

    Whole-body cryotherapy (WBC) is the exposure of minimally dressed participants to very cold air, either in a specially designed chamber (cryo-chamber) or cabin (cryo-cabin), for a short period of time. Practitioners are vague when it comes to recommendations on the duration of a single session. Recommended exposure for cryo-chamber is 150s, but no empirically based recommendations are available for a cryo-cabin. Therefore the aim of this study was to examine thermal and cardio-vascular responses after 90, 120, 150 and 180s of WBC in a cryo-cabin. Our hypothesis was that skin temperature would be significantly lower after longer exposers. Twelve male participants (age 23.9±4.2 years) completed four WBC of different durations (90, 120, 150 and 180s) in a cryo-cabin. Thermal response, heart rate and blood pressure were measured prior, immediately after, 5min after and 30min after the session. Skin temperature differed significantly among different durations, except between 150 and 180s. There was no significant difference in heart rate and blood pressure. Thermal discomfort during a single session displayed a linear increase throughout the whole session. Our results indicate that practitioners and clinicians using cryo-cabin for WBC do not need to perform sessions longer than 150s. We have shown that longer sessions do not substantially affect thermal and cardio-vascular response, but do increase thermal discomfort. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Assessing the influence of a passive, upper extremity exoskeletal vest for tasks requiring arm elevation: Part I - "Expected" effects on discomfort, shoulder muscle activity, and work task performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sunwook; Nussbaum, Maury A; Mokhlespour Esfahani, Mohammad Iman; Alemi, Mohammad Mehdi; Alabdulkarim, Saad; Rashedi, Ehsan

    2018-03-07

    Use of exoskeletal vests (designed to support overhead work) can be an effective intervention approach for tasks involving arm elevation, yet little is known on the potential beneficial impacts of their use on physical demands and task performance. This laboratory study (n = 12) evaluated the effects of a prototype exoskeletal vest during simulated repetitive overhead drilling and light assembly tasks. Anticipated or expected benefits were assessed, in terms of perceived discomfort, shoulder muscle activity, and task performance. Using the exoskeletal vest did not substantially influence perceived discomfort, but did decrease normalized shoulder muscle activity levels (e.g., ≤ 45% reduction in peak activity). Drilling task completion time decreased by nearly 20% with the vest, but the number of errors increased. Overall, exoskeletal vest use has the potential to be a new intervention for work requiring arm elevation; however, additional investigations are needed regarding potential unexpected or adverse influences (see Part II). Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Thermal load at workstations in the underground coal mining: Results of research carried out in 6 coal mines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Słota

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Statistics shows that almost half of Polish extraction in underground mines takes place at workstations where temperature exceeds 28°C. The number of employees working in such conditions is gradually increasing, therefore, the problem of safety and health protection is still growing. Material and Methods: In the present study we assessed the heat load of employees at different workstations in the mining industry, taking into account current thermal conditions and work costs. The evaluation of energy cost of work was carried out in 6 coal mines. A total of 221 miners employed at different workstations were assessed. Individual groups of miners were characterized and thermal safety of the miners was assessed relying on thermal discomfort index. Results: The results of this study indicate considerable differences in the durations of analyzed work processes at individual workstations. The highest average energy cost was noted during the work performed in the forehead. The lowest value was found in the auxiliary staff. The calculated index of discomfort clearly indicated numerous situations in which the admissible range of thermal load exceeded the parameters of thermal load safe for human health. It should be noted that the values of average labor cost fall within the upper, albeit admissible, limits of thermal load. Conclusions: The results of the study indicate that in some cases work in mining is performed in conditions of thermal discomfort. Due to high variability and complexity of work conditions it becomes necessary to verify the workers’ load at different workstations, which largely depends on the environmental conditions and work organization, as well as on the performance of workers themselves. Med Pr 2016;67(4:477–498

  5. Thermal conductivity of uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pillai, C.G.S.; George, A.M.

    1993-01-01

    The thermal conductivity of uranium dioxide of composition UO 2.015 was measured from 300 to 1400 K. The phonon component of the conductivity is found to be quantitatively accounted for by the theoretical expression of Slack derived by modifying the Leibfried-Schlomann equation. (orig.)

  6. Thermal insulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durston, J.G.; Birch, W.; Facer, R.I.; Stuart, R.A.

    1977-01-01

    Reference is made to liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors. In the arrangement described the reactor vessel is clad with thermal insulation comprising a layer of insulating blocks spaced from the wall and from each other; each block is rigidly secured to the wall, and the interspaces are substantially closed against convectional flow of liquid by resilient closure members. A membrane covering is provided for the layer of blocks, with venting means to allow liquid from the reactor vessel to penetrate between the covering and the layer of blocks. The membrane covering may comprise a stainless steel sheet ribbed in orthogonal pattern to give flexibility for the accommodation of thermal strain. The insulating blocks may be comprised of stainless steel or cellular or porous material and may be hollow shells containing ceramic material or gas fillings. (U.K.)

  7. Multi-functional system of radiotherapy and thermal phototherapy for tumors that over-express receptors of the gastrin releasing peptide; Sistema multifuncional de radioterapia y fototerapia termica para tumores que sobre-expresan receptores del peptido liberador de gastrina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez M, N. P.

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this research was to prepare and characterize a multifunctional system of {sup 177}Lu and {sup 99m}Tc-labelled gold nanoparticles conjugated to Tat(49 57)-Lys{sup 3} bombesin ({sup 177}Lu/{sup 99m}Tc- AuNP-Tat-Bn) and to evaluate the radiation absorbed dose in GRP receptor positive PC3 tumours induced in mice (human prostate cancer cells), as well as to evaluate the thermal effect produced by the multifunctional system in PC3 cancer cells. The preparation of the system involved the conjugation of Bn-Tat, DOTA-GGC and HYNICTOC peptides to AuNP of 20 nm or 5 nm in diameter. The radiolabeling of the system with {sup 99m}Tc was carried out through the ligand HYNIC-TOC and with the {sup 177}Lu through DOTA-GGC. The functionalization of peptides to AuNP, was accomplished through a spontaneous reaction of thiol groups. The system was characterized by spectroscopic techniques while radiochemical purity was determined by size-exclusion molecular chromatography and ultrafiltration. Various internalization trials and non-specific binding were tested to demonstrate the affinity of the system to PC3 cells. The thermal effect was evaluated incubating the system into PC3 cells and irradiating it with a Nd:YAG pulsed laser beam and monitoring the temperature; after irradiation, cell viability was measured. In the evaluation of absorbed dose in mice with induced tumours, the system was administered intratumorally and later, mice were sacrificed, relevant organs and tumor were extracted, activity was quantified and radiopharmaceutical models were obtained for each organ and tumor to be used in the accumulated activity and absorbed dose calculation by the MIRD methodology. Finally, to establish the system location at cellular level, fluorescent images of the system incubated in PC3 cells were acquired with an epi fluorescent microscope. Tem, UV-Vis, XP S and Far-IR spectroscopy techniques demonstrated that AuNPs were functionalized with peptides through interactions with

  8. Solar thermal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, J.

    2006-01-01

    While wind power is widely acknowledged as the most developed of the 'new' renewables, the number two technology, in terms of installed capacity functioning worldwide, is solar heating, or solar thermal. The author has investigated recent industry reports on how these markets are developing. The authors of an International Energy Agency (IEA) survey studied 41 countries in depth at the end of 2004, revealing that 141 million m 3 - corresponding to an installed capacity of 98.4 GWth - were installed in the sample countries (these nations represent 3.74 billion people, about 57% of the world's population). The installed capacity within the areas studied represents approximately 85%-90% of the solar thermal market worldwide. The use of solar heating varies greatly between countries - even close neighbours - and between economic regions. Its uptake often has more to do with policy than solar resource. There is also different uptake of technology. In China, Europe and Japan, plants with flat-plate and evacuated tube collectors are used, mainly to heat water and for space heating. Unglazed plastic collectors, used mainly for swimming pool heating, meanwhile, dominate the North American markets. Though the majority of solar heating installations today are installed on domestic rooftops, the larger-scale installations should not be overlooked. One important part of the market is the hotel sector - in particular hotels in locations that serve the seasonal summer holiday market, where solar is extremely effective. Likewise hospitals and residential homes, multi-family apartment blocks and sports centres are all good examples of places where solar thermal can deliver results. There are also a growing number of industrial applications, where solar thermal can meet the hot water needs (and possibly more) of a range of industries, such as food processing and agriculture. The ability of solar to provide a heat source for cooling is expected to become increasingly important as

  9. Solar thermal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, J.

    2006-07-15

    While wind power is widely acknowledged as the most developed of the 'new' renewables, the number two technology, in terms of installed capacity functioning worldwide, is solar heating, or solar thermal. The author has investigated recent industry reports on how these markets are developing. The authors of an International Energy Agency (IEA) survey studied 41 countries in depth at the end of 2004, revealing that 141 million m{sup 3} - corresponding to an installed capacity of 98.4 GWth - were installed in the sample countries (these nations represent 3.74 billion people, about 57% of the world's population). The installed capacity within the areas studied represents approximately 85%-90% of the solar thermal market worldwide. The use of solar heating varies greatly between countries - even close neighbours - and between economic regions. Its uptake often has more to do with policy than solar resource. There is also different uptake of technology. In China, Europe and Japan, plants with flat-plate and evacuated tube collectors are used, mainly to heat water and for space heating. Unglazed plastic collectors, used mainly for swimming pool heating, meanwhile, dominate the North American markets. Though the majority of solar heating installations today are installed on domestic rooftops, the larger-scale installations should not be overlooked. One important part of the market is the hotel sector - in particular hotels in locations that serve the seasonal summer holiday market, where solar is extremely effective. Likewise hospitals and residential homes, multi-family apartment blocks and sports centres are all good examples of places where solar thermal can deliver results. There are also a growing number of industrial applications, where solar thermal can meet the hot water needs (and possibly more) of a range of industries, such as food processing and agriculture. The ability of solar to provide a heat source for cooling is expected to become

  10. [Between perception and reality: towards an assessment of socio-territorial discomfort in L'Aquila (Central Italy) after the earthquak].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calandra, Lina Maria

    2016-01-01

    to consider perceptions and narratives of the inhabitants of L'Aquila about their context of life, in order to point out what kind of relationship is present in L'Aquila, between the territory and its inhabitants after the earthquake; to evaluate how and where symptomatic attitudes about a widespread discomfort in social interactions have been generalized. since 2010, the joint work by the research team of the "Cartolab" laboratory and pedagogy area (Department of Human Studies, University of L'Aquila) has developed and applied a participatory research methodology. This methodology is both an inquiry used by experts to increase the participation of people who experience the everyday life in L'Aquila, and a tool to draw moral, ethical and political considerations in order to activate change in social and political dynamics at the urban scale. During 2013, the methodology of Participatory- Participating Research Action (PPRA) was implemented through cycles of territorial meetings involving citizens and municipal administrators. These meetings have been promoted and organized with the Office of Participation of the Municipality of L'Aquila. the PPRA aimed to assess: 1. the social, political and economic quality of the territory evaluated by people involved in the survey, with reference to life conditions, living context, and future projections of self and of the territory; 2. the perception of the security. Through a qualitative/quantitative approach, the data collected through questionnaire and public meetings have involved 309 young (16-30 years old) and 227 adults (31-85 years old) for the first aspect, and 314 citizens (16-80 years old) for the second aspect, respectively. the results highlight a socioterritorial discomfort emerging in L'Aquila for a relevant part of the population. This discomfort is shaped by a negative rating on life conditions and context: adults provide poor quality evaluations about the present and cannot figure out some kind of vision for

  11. Additive model for thermal comfort generated by matrix experiment using orthogonal array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Reuy-Lung [Department of Occupational Safety and Health, China Medical University, 91 Huseh-shin Road, Taichung 404 (China); Lin, Tzu-Ping [Department of Leisure Planning, National Formosa University, 64 Wen-hua Road, Huwei, Yunlin 632 (China); Liang, Han-Hsi [Department of Architecture, National United University, No. 1, Lien Da, Kung-Ching Li, Miaoli 360 (China); Yang, Kuan-Hsiug; Yeh, Tsung-Chyn [Department of Mechanical and Electro-Mechanical Engineering, National Sun Yet-Sen University, No. 91, Lien-hai Road, Kaohsiung (China)

    2009-08-15

    In addition to ensuring the thermal comfort of occupants, monitoring and controlling indoor thermal environments can reduce the energy consumed by air conditioning systems. This study develops an additive model for predicting thermal comfort with rapid and simple arithmetic calculations. The advantage of the additive model is its comprehensibility to administrators of air conditioning systems, who are unfamiliar with the PMV-PPD model but want to adjust an indoor environment to save energy without generating complaints of discomfort from occupants. In order to generate the additive model, a laboratory chamber experiment based on matrix experiment using orthogonal array, was performed. By applying the analysis of variance on observed thermal sensation votes and percentage of dissatisfaction, the factor effects of environmental variables that account for the additive model were determined. Additionally, the applicability of the PMV-PPD model in hot and humid climates is discussed in this study, based on experimental results. (author)

  12. Influence of the ventilation system on thermal comfort of the chilled panel system in heating mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Zhe; Ding, Yan; Wang, Shuo; Yin, Xinglei; Wang, Menglei [Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2010-12-15

    In heating mode, fresh air is still essential for a chilled panel system in order to ensure the indoor air quality. In this paper, a chilled ceiling panel system was designed and built in a typical office room. The thermal environment and thermal comfort in the room were fully measured and evaluated by using the Fanger's PMV-PPD model and the standard of ISO 7730 respectively, when room was heated in two modes, one of which is the chilled panel heating mode and the other of which is the combined heating mode of chilled panel and supply air. The research results indicate that in the combined mode, ceiling ventilation improves the general thermal comfort and reduces the risk of local discomfort. Under the condition of same general thermal comfort, the heating supply upper limit of chilled panel can be increased by 12.3% because of air mixing effect caused by introduction of air ventilation. (author)

  13. People who live in a cold climate: thermal adaptation differences based on availability of heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, J; Cao, G; Cui, W; Ouyang, Q; Zhu, Y

    2013-08-01

    Are there differences in thermal adaptation to cold indoor environments between people who are used to living in heating and non-heating regions in China? To answer this question, we measured thermal perceptions and physiological responses of young men from Beijing (where there are indoor space heating facilities in winter) and Shanghai (where there are not indoor space heating facilities in winter) during exposures to cold. Subjects were exposed to 12°C, 14°C, 16°C, 18°C, 20°C for 1 h. Subjects from Beijing complained of greater cold discomfort and demonstrated poorer physiological acclimatization to cold indoor environments than those from Shanghai. These findings indicate that people's chronic indoor thermal experience might be an important determinant of thermal adaptation. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. To compare efficacy & discomfort in posterior nasal packing with foley's catheters versus bipp gauze packing in cases of posterior epistaxis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M.A.; Ahmed, A.

    2015-01-01

    To compare efficacy and discomfort in posterior nasal packing with Foley's catheters versus BIPP gauze packing in cases of posterior epistaxis. Study Design: Randomized controlled trial. Place and Duration of Study: Combined Military Hospital (CMH) Kharian from October 2011 to October 2013. Material and Methods: A total of 206 patients of posterior epistaxis were included in the study through non-probability convenience sampling and randomly divided in two groups of 103 each. In group A patients were treated by posterior nasal packing with Foley's catheter and in group B patients were treated by posterior nasal packing with BIPP gauze and results in terms of control of epistaxis and discomfort during pack insertion, while the packs were in situ and pack removal, based on VAS (Visual Analogue Scale) were observed. Results: Average age in group A was 52.64 years (SD=9.57) and in group B it was 50.27 years (SD ± 10.13). There were 71 (68.9%) males in group A while 67 (65%) males in group B. During posterior nasal pack insertion, the mean pain score in Group A was 6.21 (SD ± I.13) and in Group B was 7.43 (SD ± 1.19). The mean pain score with the pack in situ was 4.27 (SD ± 0.08) in Group A versus 4.76 (SD ± 0.09) Group B. Similarly pack removal was also more painful in group B than group A (6.14 ± 0.91 vs 6.89 ± 1.09) (p =0.000). In the group A, 31 (30.1%) patients had rebleeding after pack removal, out of which 9 (8.7%) had significant bleeding requiring repacking. In 22 (21.4%) cases there was mild bleeding which settled without repacking. In group B 22 (21.4%) patients had rebleeding after pack removal, out of which 5 (4.7%) had significant bleeding requiring repacking. Conclusion: It is concluded that posterior nasal packing with BIPP gauze pack is effective for controlling posterior epistaxis but causes more discomfort to the patients as compared to Foley's catheter packing. (author)

  15. Efficacy of pudendal nerve block for alleviation of catheter-related bladder discomfort in male patients undergoing lower urinary tract surgeries: A randomized, controlled, double-blind trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaoqiang, Li; Xuerong, Zhang; Juan, Liu; Mathew, Bechu Shelley; Xiaorong, Yin; Qin, Wan; Lili, Luo; Yingying, Zhu; Jun, Luo

    2017-12-01

    Catheter-related bladder discomfort (CRBD) to an indwelling urinary catheter is defined as a painful urethral discomfort, resistant to conventional opioid therapy, decreasing the quality of postoperative recovery. According to anatomy, the branches of sacral somatic nerves form the afferent nerves of the urethra and bladder triangle, which deriving from the ventral rami of the second to fourth sacral spinal nerves, innervating the urethral muscles and sphincter of the perineum and pelvic floor; as well as providing sensation to the penis and clitoris in males and females, which including the urethra and bladder triangle. Based on this theoretical knowledge, we formed a hypothesis that CRBD could be prevented by pudendal nerve block. To evaluate if bilateral nerve stimulator-guided pudendal nerve block could relieve CRBD through urethra discomfort alleviation. Single-center randomized parallel controlled, double blind trial conducted at West China Hospital, Sichuan University, China. One hundred and eighty 2 male adult patients under general anesthesia undergoing elective trans-urethral resection of prostate (TURP) or trans-urethral resection of bladder tumor (TURBT). Around 4 out of 182 were excluded, 178 patients were randomly allocated into pudendal and control groups, using computer-generated randomized numbers in a sealed envelope method. A total of 175 patients completed the study. Pudendal group received general anesthesia along with nerve-stimulator-guided bilateral pudendal nerve block and control group received general anesthesia only. Incidence and severity of CRBD; and postoperative VAS score of pain. CRBD incidences were significantly lower in pudendal group at 30 minutes (63% vs 82%, P = .004), 2 hours (64% vs 90%, P < .000), 8 hours (58% vs 79%, P = .003) and 12 hours (52% vs 69%, P = .028) also significantly lower incidence of moderate to severe CRBD in pudendal group at 30 minutes (29% vs 57%, P < .001), 2 hours (22

  16. Influence of sky view factor on outdoor thermal environment and physiological equivalent temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaodong; Miao, Shiguang; Shen, Shuanghe; Li, Ju; Zhang, Benzhi; Zhang, Ziyue; Chen, Xiujie

    2015-03-01

    Sky view factor (SVF), which is an indicator of urban canyon geometry, affects the surface energy balance, local air circulation, and outdoor thermal comfort. This study focused on a continuous and long-term meteorological observation system to investigate the effects of SVF on outdoor thermal conditions and physiological equivalent temperature (PET) in the central business district (CBD) of Beijing (which is located within Chaoyang District), specifically addressed current knowledge gaps for SVF-PET relationships in cities with typical continental/microthermal climates. An urban sub-domain scale model and the RayMan model were used to diagnose wind fields and to calculate SVF and long-term PET, respectively. Analytical results show that the extent of shading contributes to variations in thermal perception distribution. Highly shaded areas (SVF 0.5), and vice versa. Because Beijing has a monsoon-influenced humid continental climate with hot summers and long, cold, windy, and dry winters, a design project that ideally provides moderate shading should be planned to balance hot discomfort in summer and cold discomfort in winter, which effectively prolongs the comfort periods in outdoor spaces throughout the entire year. This research indicate that climate zone characteristics, urban environmental conditions, and thermal comfort requirements of residents must be accounted for in local-scale scientific planning and design, i.e., for urban canyon streets and residential estates.

  17. Transverse thermal magnetoresistance of potassium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newrock, R.S.; Maxfield, B.W.

    1976-01-01

    Results are presented of extensive thermal magnetoresistance measurements on single-crystal and polycrystalline specimens of potassium having residual resistance ratios (RRR) ranging from 1100 to 5300. Measurements were made between 2 and 9 0 K for magnetic fields up to 1.8 T. The observed thermal magnetoresistance cannot be understood on the basis of either semiclassical theories or from the electrical magnetoresistance and the Wiedemann-Franz law. A number of relationships are observed between the thermal and electrical magnetoresistances, many of which are not immediately obvious when comparing direct experimental observations. The thermal magnetoresistance W(T,H) is given reasonably well by W(T,H)T = W(T,0)T + AH + BH 2 , where both A and B are temperature-dependent coefficients. Results show that A = A 0 + A 1 T 3 , while B(T) cannot be expressed as any simple power law. A 0 is dependent on the RRR, while A 1 is independent of the RRR. Two relationships are found between corresponding coefficients in the electrical and thermal magnetoresistance: (i) the Wiedmann--Franz law relates A 0 to the Kohler slope of the electrical magnetoresistance and (ii) the temperature-dependent portions of the electrical and thermal Kohler slopes are both proportional to the electron--phonon scattering contribution to the corresponding zero-field resistance. The latter provides evidence that inelastic scattering is very important in determining the temperature-dependent linear magnetoresistances. Part, but by no means all, of the quadratic thermal resistance is accounted for by lattice thermal conduction. It is concluded that at least a portion of the anomalous electrical and thermal magnetoresistances is due to intrinsic causes and not inhomogeneities or other macroscopic defects

  18. A new dimension in urban planning: the Big Data as a source for shared indicators of discomfort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Scattoni

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The web has been used for years as a means of expression for the local communities in highlighting their problems, needs and hopes, often in the form of organized group discussions and fora. The enormous amount of information currently available, Big Data, is already used for business purposes in the private sector, but has never been truly available to decision makers who operate in urban planning and would represent an invaluable help for those communities that undertake the path of selfconstruction of their Community Strategic Frameworks. This paper elaborates methodological and operational proposals to identify sequences of words and common occurrences in sets of documents that would help understanding the problems of the communities on a geographicallylocated basis, creating the search engine “Social Debate” and devising new indicators for indices of disadvantage. Such tool could drastically change the perspective of public participation and planning practice and improve the quality of local public policies and decision making processes.

  19. Protocol for CT in the position of discomfort: preoperative assessment of femoroacetabular impingement - how we do it and what the surgeon wants to know

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grabinski, Rafal; Ou, Daniel; Saunder, Kate; Rotstein, Andrew; Singh, Parminder; Pritchard, Michael; O'Donnell, John

    2014-01-01

    The use of computed tomography of the hip in a position of discomfort (CT-POD) in combination with 2D and 3D surface rendering is a technique increasingly used to aid in the assessment and confirmation of femoral and acetabular bony abnormalities related to femoroacetabular impingement. The purpose of this article is to describe this dynamic method of assessment. Patients referred by orthopaedic surgeons for assessment of femoroacetabular impingement as part of preoperative planning and patients who required postoperative assessment of residual bony abnormalities were selected. This article describes the CT-POD technique and the information required by the referring surgeon. CT-POD is a new technique that provides valuable preoperative and postoperative information to the surgeon.

  20. The CLOSER (CLarifying Vaginal Atrophy's Impact On SEx and Relationships) survey: implications of vaginal discomfort in postmenopausal women and in male partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nappi, Rossella E; Kingsberg, Sheryl; Maamari, Ricardo; Simon, James

    2013-09-01

    Postmenopausal vaginal atrophy (VA) is a chronic condition with symptoms that include vaginal dryness, soreness, itching, burning, and dyspareunia. The CLarifying Vaginal Atrophy's Impact On SEx and Relationships survey evaluated the impact of VA on the physical and emotional aspects of sexual relationships between postmenopausal women and their male partners. Four thousand one hundred females and 4,100 males representing the United Kingdom, Finland, Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Italy, France, Canada, and the United States were surveyed. Assessments included: (i) talking about VA and its symptoms; (ii) the impact of VA on intimacy, relationships, and women's self-esteem; (iii) talking about VA and erectile dysfunction (ED); and (iv) the impact of local estrogen therapy (LET) on intimacy and relationships. Descriptive data on the impact of VA. Twenty-eight percent of women did not tell their partners when they first encountered vaginal discomfort, mainly because they felt "it was just a natural part of growing older" (52%) or because of "embarrassment" (21%). Eighty-two percent of males wanted their partner to share their experiences with VA; males were also more comfortable discussing VA than females (68% vs. 58%, respectively). Having sex less often (women: 58%, men: 61%), less satisfying sex (women: 49%, men: 28%), and putting off having sex (women: 35%, men: 14%) were the main effects of VA. Intimacy avoidance was attributed to painful sex (women: 55%, men: 61%) and women's reduced sexual desire (women: 46%, men: 43%). Discussions about vaginal discomfort and ED were generally limited to partners and healthcare providers (HCPs). LET use resulted in less painful sex (women: 62%, men: 59%) and more satisfying sex (women: 47%, men: 49%). VA has an adverse emotional and physical impact on postmenopausal women and their partners. These findings may encourage more open communication about VA between couples and their HCPs. © 2013 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  1. Thermal conductivity of granular materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buyevich, Yu A

    1974-01-01

    Stationary heat transfer in a granular material consisting of a continuous medium containing spherical granules of other substances is considered under the assumption that the spatial distribution of granules is random. The effective thermal conductivity characterizing macroscopic heat transfer in such a material is expressed as a certain function of the conductivities and volume fractions of the medium and dispersed substances. For reasons of mathematical analogy, all the results obtained for the thermal conductivity are valid while computing the effective diffusivity of some admixture in granular materials as well as for evaluation of the effective electric conductivity or the mean dielectric and magnetic permeabilities of granular conductors and dielectrics. (23 refs.)

  2. A critical review of complementary and alternative medicine use by women with cyclic perimenstrual pain and discomfort: a focus upon prevalence, patterns and applications of use and users' motivations, information seeking and self-perceived efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Carole; Sibbritt, David; Hickman, Louise; Adams, Jon

    2016-08-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is used for treating cyclic perimenstrual pain and discomfort. This critical review examines women's reported CAM use, its perceived effectiveness and information relating to women's attitudes, behaviors, motivations and patterns of CAM use in its treatment. An extensive search of the main medical databases EBSCO, CINAHL, Medline, AMED and SCOPUS, as well as additional hand searches, was conducted. Papers included were confined to those that had been peer-reviewed, written in English and that contained original research into CAM use for cyclic perimenstrual pain and discomfort among adult women. CAM, particularly herbal medicine, nutritional supplements and massage, is widely used for a range of cyclic perimenstrual pain and discomfort symptoms. A large number of CAM modalities are adopted, often simultaneously and with little professional oversight. Women's assessment of efficacy of different CAM modalities is positive, though the majority of users are self-prescribing apparently without professional guidance. Although the uptake of CAM for cyclic perimenstrual pain and discomfort is widespread, few empirical data are available regarding which women are using CAM, their motivations for doing so and, importantly, the sources through which women receive information about CAM. This review highlights the extensive use of (often self-prescribed) CAM in a number of countries to alleviate the widespread symptoms of cyclic perimenstrual pain and discomfort. An understanding of all health care use by women with perimenstrual pain and discomfort is vital to help ensure safe, effective and coordinated health care that can lead to optimal patient outcomes. © 2016 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  3. Effect of low air velocities on thermal homeostasis and comfort during exercise at space station operational temperature and humidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beumer, Ronald J.

    1989-01-01

    The effectiveness of different low air velocities in maintaining thermal comfort and homeostasis during exercise at space station operational temperature and humidity was investigated. Five male subjects exercised on a treadmill for successive ten minute periods at 60, 71, and 83 percent of maximum oxygen consumption at each of four air velocities, 30, 50, 80, and 120 ft/min, at 22 C and 62 percent relative humidity. No consistent trends or statistically significant differences between air velocities were found in body weight loss, sweat accumulation, or changes in rectal, skin, and body temperatures. Occurrence of the smallest body weight loss at 120 ft/min, the largest sweat accumulation at 30 ft/min, and the smallest rise in rectal temperature and the greatest drop in skin temperature at 120 ft/min all suggested more efficient evaporative cooling at the highest velocity. Heat storage at all velocities was evidenced by increased rectal and body temperatures; skin temperatures declined or increased only slightly. Body and rectal temperature increases corresponded with increased perception of warmth and slight thermal discomfort as exercise progressed. At all air velocities, mean thermal perception never exceeded warm and mean discomfort, greatest at 30 ft/min, was categorized at worst as uncomfortable; sensation of thermal neutrality and comfort returned rapidly after cessation of exercise. Suggestions for further elucidation of the effects of low air velocities on thermal comfort and homeostasis include larger numbers of subjects, more extensive skin temperature measurements and more rigorous analysis of the data from this study.

  4. The effect of facial expressions on respirators contact pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Mang; Shen, Shengnan; Li, Hui

    2017-08-01

    This study investigated the effect of four typical facial expressions (calmness, happiness, sadness and surprise) on contact characteristics between an N95 filtering facepiece respirator and a headform. The respirator model comprised two layers (an inner layer and an outer layer) and a nose clip. The headform model was comprised of a skin layer, a fatty tissue layer embedded with eight muscles, and a skull layer. Four typical facial expressions were generated by the coordinated contraction of four facial muscles. After that, the distribution of the contact pressure on the headform, as well as the contact area, were calculated. Results demonstrated that the nasal clip could help make the respirator move closer to the nose bridge while causing facial discomfort. Moreover, contact areas varied with different facial expressions, and facial expressions significantly altered contact pressures at different key areas, which may result in leakage.

  5. Temperature profile data collected using XBTs from the RUHR EXPRESS and other platforms from the Pacific Ocean during the Thermal Structure Monitoring Program in the Pacific (TRANSPAC) project, 1984-11-16 to 1985-01-28 (NODC Accession 8500030)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using bathythermograph (BT/XBT) casts from RUHR EXPRESS and other platforms in the Pacific Ocean from November 16, 1984 to...

  6. Temperature profile data collected using XBTs from the ELBE EXPRESS and other platforms from the Pacific Ocean during the Thermal Structure Monitoring Program in the Pacific (TRANSPAC) project, 1985-01-21 to 1985-04-23 (NODC Accession 8500165)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using bathythermograph (BT/XBT) casts from ELBE EXPRESS and other platforms in the Pacific Ocean from January 21, 1985 to...

  7. Temperature profile data collected using XBTs from the ELBE EXPRESS and other platforms from the Pacific Ocean during the Thermal Structure Monitoring Program in the Pacific (TRANSPAC) project, 1983-12-03 to 1986-01-29 (NODC Accession 8600103)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using bathythermograph (BT/XBT) casts from ELBE EXPRESS and other platforms in the Pacific Ocean from December 3, 1983 to...

  8. Temperature profile data collected using XBTs from the ELBE EXPRESS and other platforms from the Pacific Ocean during the Thermal Structure Monitoring Program in the Pacific (TRANSPAC) project, 1985-02-19 to 1985-08-20 (NODC Accession 8500185)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using bathythermograph (BT/XBT) casts from ELBE EXPRESS and other platforms in the Pacific Ocean from February 19, 1985 to...

  9. Temperature profile data collected using XBTs from the ELBE EXPRESS and other platforms from the Pacific Ocean during the Thermal Structure Monitoring Program in the Pacific (TRANSPAC) project, 1985-01-02 to 1985-03-19 (NODC Accession 8500081)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using bathythermograph (BT/XBT) casts from ELBE EXPRESS and other platforms in the Pacific Ocean from January 2, 1985 to...

  10. Thermal stress mitigation by Active Thermal Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soldati, Alessandro; Dossena, Fabrizio; Pietrini, Giorgio

    2017-01-01

    This work proposes an Active Thermal Control (ATC) of power switches. Leveraging on the fact that thermal stress has wide impact on the system reliability, controlling thermal transients is supposed to lengthen the lifetime of electronic conversion systems. Indeed in some environments...... results of control schemes are presented, together with evaluation of the proposed loss models. Experimental proof of the ability of the proposed control to reduce thermal swing and related stress on the device is presented, too....

  11. Current evidence demonstrates similar effects of kilohertz-frequency and low-frequency current on quadriceps evoked torque and discomfort in healthy individuals: a systematic review with meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Vinicius Zacarias Maldaner; Durigan, João Luiz Quaglioti; Arena, Ross; de Noronha, Marcos; Gurney, Burke; Cipriano, Gerson

    2015-01-01

    Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) is widely utilized to enhance muscle performance. However, the optimal NMES waveform with respect to treatment effect has not been established. To investigate the effects of kilohertz-frequency alternating current (KFAC) and low-frequency pulsed current (PC) on quadriceps evoked torque and self-reported discomfort. PubMed, The Cochrane Library, EMBASE, MEDLINE, Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro), SinoMed, ISI Web of Knowledge, and CINAHL were searched for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-randomized controlled trials (QRCTs). Two reviewers independently selected potential studies according to the inclusion criteria, extracted data, and assessed methodological quality. Studies were eligible if they compared KFAC versus PC interventions. Studies that included outcome measures for percentage of maximal isometric voluntary contraction (%MIVC) torque and self-reported discomfort level were eligible for evaluation. Seven studies involving 127 individuals were included. The methodological quality of eligible trials was moderate, with a mean of 5 on the 10-point PEDro scale. Overall, PC was no better than KFAC in terms of evoked torque and there was no difference in self-reported discomfort level. KFAC and PC have similar effects on quadriceps evoked torque and self-reported discomfort level in healthy individuals. The small number and overall methodological quality of currently available studies included in this meta-analysis indicate that new RCTs are needed to better determine optimal NMES treatment parameters.

  12. Discomforts of tasks video users: The case of workers of ENEA area in Bologna (Italy); I disturbi da postura riferiti da utenti di videoterminale: studio di un campione ENEA dell`area di Bologna

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cenni, P; Varasano, R; Cavallaro, E [ENEA, Centro Ricerche ` ` E. Clementel` ` Bologna (Italy). Dip. Ambiente; Arduini, R; Mattioli, S [Azienda USL, Bologna (Italy). Dip. di Prevenzione, Servizio di Medicina del Lavoro; Tuozzi, G [Bologna Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Psicologia

    1996-08-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the subjective musculoskeletal discomfort in a sample of 334 workers (204 males and 130 females) of the ENEA area in Bologna, using for different periods and tasks video display units (VDU). On a preliminary self report questionnaire the workers have reported: hours at VDU per day, type of task type of hardware, physical-ergonomic environmental conditions, equipment and layout of the work station. Then, on a case-history form, the researcher has recorded for each subject: anamnesis, fatigue symptoms, discomfort and pain perceived in the back, shoulder, hand and arm regions. The results have shown that, in this sample, the main cause for potential musculoskeletal problems is related to aging whereas the women mainly engaged in repetitive jobs seem to be more likely subject to these troubles. About the correlation between type of task and musculoskeletal discomfort, the females refer more complaints than the males, especially when the task is repetitive. Also the number of hours spent at VDU per day is higher in the females. Finally, about physical-ergonomic environmental conditions, most users have not referred discomforts related to lighting, noise, micro climate or to work station (equipment and layout).

  13. of psychological stress (ID 1598, 1601), maintenance of normal sleep (ID 1222, 1737, 2004) and reduction of menstrual discomfort (ID 1599) pursuant to Article 13(1) of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    claims in relation to L-theanine from Camellia sinensis (L.) Kuntze (tea) and improvement of cognitive function, alleviation of psychological stress, maintenance of normal sleep and reduction of menstrual discomfort. The scientific substantiation is based on the information provided by the Member States...

  14. Danish national sedation strategy. Targeted therapy of discomfort associated with critical illness. Danish Society of Intensive Care Medicine (DSIT) and the Danish Society of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine (DASAIM)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fonsmark, Lise; Hein, Lars; Nibroe, Helle

    2015-01-01

    should be to focus on the reversible causes of agitation, such as: pain, anxiety, delirium, dyspnea, withdrawal symptoms, sleep or gastrointestinal symptoms. If sedation is used a validated sedation scale is recommended. On a daily basis sedation should be interrupted and only restarted after a thorough...... search for reversible causes of discomfort and stress....

  15. Experimental and CFD modelling for thermal comfort and CO2 concentration in office building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabrein, H.; Hariri, A.; Leman, A. M.; Yusof, M. Z. M.; Afandi, A.

    2017-09-01

    Computational fluid dynamic CFD was used for simulating air flow, indoor air distribution and contamination concentration. Gases pollution and thermal discomfort affected occupational health and productivity of work place. The main objectives of this study are to investigate the impact of air change rate in CO2 concentration and to estimate the profile of CO2 concentration in the offices building. The thermal comfort and gases contamination are investigated by numerical analysis CFD which was validated by experiment. Thus the air temperature, air velocity and CO2 concentration were measured at several points in the chamber with four occupants. Comparing between experimental and numerical results showed good agreement. In addition, the CO2 concentration around human recorded high, compared to the other area. Moreover, the thermal comfort in this study is within the ASHRAE standard 55-2004.

  16. Thermal comfort and ventilation effectiveness in an office room with radiant floor cooling and displacement ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krajcik, Michal; Tomasi, Roberta; Simone, Angela

    2016-01-01

    conditions, varying the nominal air change rate from 4.5h-1 down to 1.5h-1. Contaminant removal and mean-age-of-air measurements were performed to characterize the ventilation effectiveness and air velocity; air and operative temperature profiles were measured, together with thermal manikin equivalent...... temperatures, to evaluate the thermal environment. The combined system was able to achieve good ventilation effectiveness close to a heat source, so that in the occupant's breathing zone the ventilation effectiveness was significantly better than for ideal mixing, even at a nominal air change rate as low as 1......% at the highest nominal air change rate of 4.5h-1, even for an occupant sitting 1 meter in front of the supply diffuser, the local thermal discomfort occasioned by the excessive vertical temperature differences gives chilled ceilings the advantage over chilled floors for use with displacement ventilation....

  17. Outdoor human thermal perception in various climates: A comprehensive review of approaches, methods and quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potchter, Oded; Cohen, Pninit; Lin, Tzu-Ping; Matzarakis, Andreas

    2018-08-01

    Over the past century, many research studies have been conducted in an attempt to define thermal conditions for humans in the outdoor environment and to grade thermal sensation. Consequently, a large number of indices have been proposed. The examination of human thermal indices by thermal subjective perception has become recently a methodical issue to confirm the accuracy, applicability and validation of human thermal indices. The aims of this study are: (a) to review studies containing both calculated human thermal conditions and subjective thermal perception in the outdoor environment (b) to identify the most used human thermal indices for evaluating human thermal perception (c) to examine the relation between human thermal comfort range and outdoor thermal environment conditions and (d) to compare between categories of thermal sensation in different climatic zones based on subjective perception and levels of thermal strain. A comprehensive literature review identified 110 peer-reviewed articles which investigated in-situ thermal conditions versus subjective thermal perception during 2001-2017. It seems that out of 165 human thermal indices that have been developed, only 4 (PET, PMV, UTCI, SET*) are widely in use for outdoor thermal perception studies. Examination of the relation between human thermal comfort range and outdoor thermal environment conditions for selective indices in different climatic zones shows that the range of the thermal comfort or dis-comfort is affected by the outdoor thermal environment. For the PET index, the "neutral" range for hot climates of 24-26°C is agreed by 95% of the studies where for cold climate, the "neutral" range of 15-20°C is agreed by 89% of the studies. For the UTCI, the "no thermal stress" category is common to all climates. The "no stress category" of 16-23°C is agreed by 80% of the case studies, while 100% of the case studies agreed that the range is between 18 and 23°C. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  18. Evaluation of Strategies to Improve the Thermal Performance of Steel Frames in Curtain Wall Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Hyun Oh

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Recently, metal curtain wall systems have been widely used in high-rise buildings due to many advantages, including being lightweight, rapid construction, and aesthetic features. Since the metal frame may lead to lower energy performance, thermal discomfort, and condensation risk due to the high thermal conductivity, its thermal performance can be important for the improvement of the overall thermal performance of the curtain wall system, as well as the energy efficiency of the building envelope. This study aims to evaluate variety of design strategies to improve the thermal performance of steel curtain wall frames. Five base cases and three further steps were selected for two different head profile shapes based on a state-of-the art technology review, and their thermal transmittances were calculated through simulations according to the ISO 12631 standard which is an international standard for calculating thermal transmittance of curtain wall system. Measured results that were obtained from hot-box tests were compared with the calculated results to validate the simulation method of this study. The shape of the head profile did not strongly influence the overall thermal transmittance, and the choice of strategies for the rabbet space was more important. More effective strategies could be decided according to the steps for variation development. This result can serve as a guideline for the design of high-performance curtain wall frames.

  19. Does Combination Therapy with Tamsulosin and Tolterodine Improve Ureteral Stent Discomfort Compared with Tamsulosin Alone? A Double-Blind, Randomized, Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivalingam, Sri; Streeper, Necole M; Sehgal, Priyanka D; Sninsky, Brian C; Best, Sara L; Nakada, Stephen Y

    2016-02-01

    Ureteral stent discomfort is a significant postoperative problem for many patients. Despite the use of narcotics and α-blockers patients often experience bothersome lower urinary tract symptoms and pain, which impair daily activities. We compared combination therapy with an α-blocker and an anticholinergic to monotherapy with an α-blocker. A double-blind, randomized, controlled trial was performed from December 2012 to April 2014. A total of 80 patients were randomized, including 44 to the combination group (tamsulosin 0.4 mg and tolterodine early release 4 mg) and 36 to the monotherapy group (tamsulosin 0.4 mg and placebo). Patients with preexisting ureteral stent placement or current anticholinergic therapy were excluded from study. Patients completed USSQ (Urinary Stent Symptom Questionnaire) before stent placement on the day of surgery, the day after stent placement, the morning of stent removal and the day after stent removal. The questionnaire included questions regarding urinary symptoms, general health, body pain, and work and sexual history. A total of 80 patients (40 males and 40 females) were studied. Mean age was 51.5 vs 51.3 years (p = 0.95) and mean body mass index was 33.6 vs 31.9 kg/m(2) (p = 0.44) in monotherapy group 1 vs combination therapy group 2. Between the 2 groups there was no significant difference in urinary symptoms, body pain and activities of daily living from baseline to just before stent removal (p = 0.95, 0.40 and 0.95, respectively). Although there was no difference between the groups, both showed improvement in urinary symptoms from the time of initial stent insertion to just prior to stent removal (difference -0.50 for combination therapy and -0.40 for monotherapy). The mean stent indwelling time of 9.6 and 8.7 days in the combination and monotherapy groups, respectively, did not differ (p = 0.67). On ANOVA it had no significant impact on results (p = 0.64). Combination therapy with tamsulosin and tolterodine does not

  20. Neuronal representation of fabric texture for thermal microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Yuqing

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fabric, our second skin with moisture and thermal capacity for skin temperature regulation, can arouse feelings of pleasant and discomfort. To examine the neurocognitive ability and emotion of fabric tactile perception under different local temperatures, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging with the same denim fabric stimuli and forearm contact area, and found a functional dissociation: the affective regions was more involved during warm condition, the discriminative regions were more involved during neutral condition and the basis regions were significance during cool condition. The higher local skin temperature environment can result in the improvement of sensitivity and discriminability by dorsal pathway (spatial and ventral pathway (frequency for fabric perception. Our results help to explain how the brain uses internal models to interpret external fabric tactile stimuli with micro environmental changing.

  1. Anomalous origin of left coronary artery arising from the right coronary cusp presenting with chest discomfort and syncope on physical exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ran Baik

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Anomalous origins of coronary arteries are a rare type of disease among children. These anomalies can be categorized into 3 types according to the anatomical relationship of the aorta and pulmonary trunks. Among these types, the interarterial type, as observed in our case, needs early diagnosis and treatment, because it can increase the risk for the patient, causing sudden cardiac death in young individuals. Although there are controversies concerning the management of anomalous origins of the left coronary artery (LCA in children, the result can be very beneficial, if treated accurately. Three well-known methods for correction of anomalous origins of LCA are re-implantation, coronary arterial bypass grafting (CABG, and unroofing. We report on the case of a 12-year-old girl who had chest discomfort and syncope with physical exercise and was later diagnosed with an anomalous origin of LCA by transthoracic echocardiography (TTE and heart computed tomography (CT. She underwent a corrective operation by re-implantation, CABG, and unroofing.

  2. The use of complementary and alternative medicine by 7427 Australian women with cyclic perimenstrual pain and discomfort: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Carole; Adams, Jon; Hickman, Louise; Sibbritt, David

    2016-05-18

    To assess the prevalence of cyclic perimenstrual pain and discomfort and to detail the pattern of complementary and alternative (CAM) use adopted by women for the treatment of these symptoms. Data from the 2012 national Australian Longitudinal Study of Women's Health (ALSWH) cross-sectional survey of 7427 women aged 34-39 years were analysed to estimate the prevalence of endometriosis, premenstrual syndrome (PMS), irregular or heavy periods and severe dysmenorrhoea and to examine the association between their symptoms and their visits to CAM practitioners as well as their use of CAM therapies and products in the previous 12 months. The prevalence of endometriosis was 3.7 % and of the perimenstrual symptoms assessed, PMS was most prevalent at 41.2 % whilst irregular bleeding (22.2 %), heavy periods (29.8 %) and severe period pain (24.1 %) were reported at lower levels. Women with endometriosis were more likely than non-sufferers to have consulted with a massage therapist or acupuncturist and to have used vitamins/minerals, yoga/meditation or Chinese medicines (p alternative health practitioner and to have used all forms of CAM therapies except Chinese medicines than women who had infrequent PMS (all p medicines, Chinese medicines and other alternative therapies compared to non-sufferers (all p effective use and to ascertain their significance as a treatment option enabling women with menstrual problems and their care providers to improve their quality of life.

  3. Relative benefit of a stage of change approach for the prevention of musculoskeletal pain and discomfort: a cluster randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doda, Diana; Rothmore, Paul; Pisaniello, Dino; Briggs, Nancy; Stewart, Sasha; Mahmood, Mohammed; Hiller, Janet E

    2015-11-01

    To examine the benefit of a psychological Stage of Change (SOC) approach, relative to standard ergonomics advice, for the prevention of work-related musculoskeletal pain and discomfort (MSPD). A cluster randomised trial was conducted in South Australia across a broad range of workplaces. Repeated face-to-face interviews were conducted onsite to assess MSPD, safety climate, job satisfaction and other factors. Changes in MSPD across intervention groups and time were investigated using Generalised Estimating Equation (GEE) methods. 25 workgroups (involving 242 workers) were randomly allocated to either a standard intervention or an intervention tailored according to SOC. The prevalence of MSPD increased for both groups, but was only significant for the standard group, in respect of lower back MSPD. Workers receiving tailored interventions were 60% less likely to experience lower back MSPD. After adjusting for age, gender and job satisfaction, it was found that company safety climate and length of employment were significantly correlated to the time-intervention effect. There was no correlation with workload. Compared with standard ergonomics advice to management, there was evidence of a benefit of stage-matched intervention for MSPD prevention, particularly for low back pain. Organisational safety climate should be taken into account when planning prevention programmes. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  4. Comparative assessment of efficacy of two different pretreatment single oral doses of betamethasone on inter-appointment and postoperative discomfort: An in vivo clinical evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyanani, Hitesh; Chhabra, Naveen; Parmar, Ghanshyam R

    2016-01-01

    Study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of two different pretreatment single oral doses of betamethasone on the incidence of inter-appointment flare up and postoperative discomfort. Fifty-four patients aged 18-59 years requiring endodontic treatment were selected and randomly assigned to three groups; single pretreatment oral dose of placebo or betamethasone in two different oral doses of 0.5 mg and 1 mg, respectively. Endodontic therapy was completed in two visits using triple antibiotic paste as intracanal medicament. Patients were given a questionnaire to record their pain at 1, 2, 3, and 7 days after treatment. In the second visit, obturation was done, and the patients were again instructed to record their pain scores after treatment and discharged. The verbal rating scale was used for recording the pain scores. Statistical analysis was done using ANOVA and the Friedman test. 0.5 mg betamethasone group showed least mean pain scores among all experimental groups; however, there was no statistically significant difference between any of the groups ( P > 0.05). Pretreatment single oral dose of betamethasone is an effective in managing endodontic flare-ups; however, the results were statistically insignificant.

  5. Using pliers in assembly work: short and long task duration effects of gloves on hand performance capabilities and subjective assessments of discomfort and ease of tool manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dianat, Iman; Haslegrave, Christine M; Stedmon, Alex W

    2012-03-01

    The present study investigated the effects of wearing typical industrial gloves on hand performance capabilities (muscle activity, wrist posture, touch sensitivity, hand grip and forearm torque strength) and subjective assessments for an extended duration of performing a common assembly task, wire tying with pliers, which requires a combination of manipulation and force exertion. Three commercially available gloves (cotton, nylon and nitrile gloves) were tested and compared with a bare hand condition while participants performed the simulated assembly task for 2 h. The results showed that wearing gloves significantly increased the muscle activity, wrist deviation, and discomfort whilst reducing hand grip strength, forearm torque strength and touch sensitivity. The combined results showed that the length of time for which gloves are worn does affect hand performance capability and that gloves need to be evaluated in a realistic working context. The results are discussed in terms of selection of gloves for industrial assembly tasks involving pliers. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  6. Numerical analysis of passive strategies for energy retrofit of existing buildings in Mediterranean climate: thermal mass and natural ventilation combination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calcerano Filippo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The study investigates the potential of coupling natural ventilation and thermal storage systems to improve hygrothermal comfort and reduce energy consumption during summer season in an existing building in the Mediterranean. It aims at bridging the knowledge gap between designers, researchers and building scientists, fostering a multidisciplinary approach and promoting numerical simulation of the energy performance of buildings within architectural professional practice. The study analyses the interaction between six natural ventilation systems (single sided ventilation through facade openings; cross ventilation through facade openings, inlet wind tower, thermal chimney, evaporative cool tower, earth pipes and with two thermal storage typology (heavy and medium-light within four strategic Italian location (Rome, Naples, Messina and Catania. For each interaction we perform a numerical dynamic simulation of indoor comfort, indoor air quality and energy consumption during the summer period, on a reference building model corresponding to the most common Italian typology. Results show that the use of the chosen systems ensures significant reductions of discomfort hours and energy consumption in all configurations. The study also highlights the high efficiency of non invasive systems (single-sided and cross ventilation with automatic control present discomfort hours reduction and energy consumption reduction above 68% for all combinations and the significant influence of the daily thermal range value on the performance of systems without air pre-treatment.

  7. Thermalization of squeezed states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solomon, Allan I

    2005-01-01

    Starting with a thermal squeezed state defined as a conventional thermal state based on an appropriate Hamiltonian, we show how an important physical property, the signal-to-noise ratio, is degraded, and propose a simple model of thermalization (Kraus thermalization)

  8. Thermal Conductivity of the Multicomponent Neutral Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, A. V.

    2017-12-01

    Approximate expressions for the thermal conductivity coefficient of the multicomponent neutral atmosphere consisting of N2, O2, O, He, and H are analyzed and evaluated for the atmospheric conditions by comparing them with that given by the rigorous hydrodynamic theory. The new approximations of the thermal conductivity coefficients of simple gases N2, O2, O, He, and H are derived and used. It is proved that the modified Mason and Saxena approximation of the atmospheric thermal conductivity coefficient is more accurate in reproducing the atmospheric values of the rigorous hydrodynamic thermal conductivity coefficient in comparison with those that are generally accepted in atmospheric studies. This approximation of the thermal conductivity coefficient is recommended to use in calculations of the neutral temperature of the atmosphere.

  9. On the unification of thermal perception and adaptive actions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haldi, Frederic; Robinson, Darren [Solar Energy and Building Physics Laboratory (LESO-PB), Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2010-11-15

    Occupants exercise adaptive actions in response to discomforting environmental stimuli in an attempt to restore their comfort. These responses to adaptive actions are either ignored (conventional PMV models) or handled in an aggregated way (adaptive thermal comfort models). Furthermore the availability of adaptive actions and their effectiveness tends to be particular to a given building and climatic context. A good model should predict the probability with which available adaptive actions will be exercised and the feedback to occupants' perceived comfort from these specific actions. In this paper we introduce a new modelling framework which does just that. Informed by results from detailed monitoring campaigns we first present a model to predict the probability distribution of thermal sensation in non air-conditioned buildings and a new method for deducing comfort zones in such buildings. We then introduce a methodology for combining recent advances in the prediction of occupants' adaptive actions with the comfort feedback from these actions. We demonstrate how thermal sensation probability distribution may be deduced accounting for exercised adaptive actions and develop a comprehensive model for predicting comfort temperature which explicitly accounts for probable adaptive actions and their thermal feedback. We go on to describe how this modelling framework, which may be readily applied for thermal comfort prediction in specific building and climatic contexts, significantly deepens our understanding of adaptive thermal comfort mechanisms. Finally, we also describe ways of handling individuals' diversity within this new framework as well as how it may be applied to evaluate visual and olfactory comfort. (author)

  10. Thermally developing forced convection and the corresponding thermal stresses in a porous plate channel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Xiao; LIU Xuemei

    2007-01-01

    Based on the Darcy fluid model, by considering the effects of viscous dissipation due to the interaction between solid skeleton and pore fluid flow and thermal conduction in the direction of the fluid flow, the thermally developing forced convection of the local thermal equili- brium and the corresponding thermal stresses in a semi- infmite saturated porous plate channel are investigated in this paper. The expressions of temperature, local Nusselt number and corresponding thermal stresses are obtained by means of the Fourier series, and the distributions of the same are also shown. Furthermore, influences of the Péclet number (Pe) and Brinkman number (Br) on temperature, Nusselt number (Nu) and thermal stress are revealed numerically.

  11. Cryogenic cooler thermal coupler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, K.E.; Talbourdet, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    A thermal coupler assembly mounted to the coldfinger of a cryogenic cooler which provides improved thermal transfer between the coldfinger and the detector assembly mounted on the dewar endwell. The thermal coupler design comprises a stud and spring-loaded cap mounted on the coldfinger assembly. Thermal transfer is made primarily through the air space between the cap and coldwell walls along the radial surfaces. The cap is spring loaded to provide thermal contact between the cap and endwell end surfaces

  12. A decision-tree-based model for evaluating the thermal comfort of horses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula de Assis Maia

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Thermal comfort is of great importance in preserving body temperature homeostasis during thermal stress conditions. Although the thermal comfort of horses has been widely studied, there is no report of its relationship with surface temperature (T S. This study aimed to assess the potential of data mining techniques as a tool to associate surface temperature with thermal comfort of horses. T S was obtained using infrared thermography image processing. Physiological and environmental variables were used to define the predicted class, which classified thermal comfort as "comfort" and "discomfort". The variables of armpit, croup, breast and groin T S of horses and the predicted classes were then subjected to a machine learning process. All variables in the dataset were considered relevant for the classification problem and the decision-tree model yielded an accuracy rate of 74 %. The feature selection methods used to reduce computational cost and simplify predictive learning decreased model accuracy to 70 %; however, the model became simpler with easily interpretable rules. For both these selection methods and for the classification using all attributes, armpit and breast T S had a higher power rating for predicting thermal comfort. Data mining techniques show promise in the discovery of new variables associated with the thermal comfort of horses.

  13. An investigation of thermal comfort inside a bus during heating period within a climatic chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pala, Uzeyir; Oz, H Ridvan

    2015-05-01

    By this study, it was aimed to define a testing and calculation model for thermal comfort assessment of a bus HVAC design and to compare effects of changing parameters on passenger's thermal comfort. For this purpose, a combined theoretical and experimental work during heating period inside a coach was carried out. The bus was left under 20 °C for more than 7 h within a climatic chamber and all heat sources were started at the beginning of a standard test. To investigate effects of fast transient conditions on passengers' physiology and thermal comfort, temperatures, air humidity and air velocities were measured. Human body was considered as one complete piece composed of core and skin compartments and the Transient Energy Balance Model developed by Gagge et al. in 1971 was used to calculate changes in thermal parameters between passenger bodies and bus interior environment. Depending on the given initial and environmental conditions, the graphs of passengers Thermal Sensation and Thermal Discomfort Level were found. At the end, a general mathematical model supported with a related experimental procedure was developed for the use of automotive HVAC engineers and scientists working on thermal comfort as a human dimension. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  14. Breastfeeding FAQs: Pain and Discomfort

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a smaller size. Is it normal to feel pain during or after nursing? If your baby is latched on properly, you ... or a lactation consultant about ways to make nursing easier and reduce any pain. Can I still breastfeed if I have a ...

  15. Dynamic thermal environment and thermal comfort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Y; Ouyang, Q; Cao, B; Zhou, X; Yu, J

    2016-02-01

    Research has shown that a stable thermal environment with tight temperature control cannot bring occupants more thermal comfort. Instead, such an environment will incur higher energy costs and produce greater CO2 emissions. Furthermore, this may lead to the degeneration of occupants' inherent ability to combat thermal stress, thereby weakening thermal adaptability. Measured data from many field investigations have shown that the human body has a higher acceptance to the thermal environment in free-running buildings than to that in air-conditioned buildings with similar average parameters. In naturally ventilated environments, occupants have reported superior thermal comfort votes and much greater thermal comfort temperature ranges compared to air-conditioned environments. This phenomenon is an integral part of the adaptive thermal comfort model. In addition, climate chamber experiments have proven that people prefer natural wind to mechanical wind in warm conditions; in other words, dynamic airflow can provide a superior cooling effect. However, these findings also indicate that significant questions related to thermal comfort remain unanswered. For example, what is the cause of these phenomena? How we can build a comfortable and healthy indoor environment for human beings? This article summarizes a series of research achievements in recent decades, tries to address some of these unanswered questions, and attempts to summarize certain problems for future research. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Path Expressions

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-06-01

    Traditionally, synchronization of concurrent processes is coded in line by operations on semaphores or similar objects. Path expressions move the...discussion about a variety of synchronization primitives . An analysis of their relative power is found in [3]. Path expressions do not introduce yet...another synchronization primitive . A path expression relates to such primitives as a for- or while-statement of an ALGOL-like language relates to a JUMP

  17. Body actions change the appearance of facial expressions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Fantoni

    Full Text Available Perception, cognition, and emotion do not operate along segregated pathways; rather, their adaptive interaction is supported by various sources of evidence. For instance, the aesthetic appraisal of powerful mood inducers like music can bias the facial expression of emotions towards mood congruency. In four experiments we showed similar mood-congruency effects elicited by the comfort/discomfort of body actions. Using a novel Motor Action Mood Induction Procedure, we let participants perform comfortable/uncomfortable visually-guided reaches and tested them in a facial emotion identification task. Through the alleged mediation of motor action induced mood, action comfort enhanced the quality of the participant's global experience (a neutral face appeared happy and a slightly angry face neutral, while action discomfort made a neutral face appear angry and a slightly happy face neutral. Furthermore, uncomfortable (but not comfortable reaching improved the sensitivity for the identification of emotional faces and reduced the identification time of facial expressions, as a possible effect of hyper-arousal from an unpleasant bodily experience.

  18. The Vocal Tract Discomfort Scale: Validity and Reliability of the Persian Version in the Assessment of Patients With Muscle Tension Dysphonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torabi, Hadi; Khoddami, Seyyedeh Maryam; Ansari, Noureddin Nakhostin; Dabirmoghaddam, Payman

    2016-11-01

    To cross-culturally adapt of Persian Vocal Tract Discomfort (VTDp) scale and evaluate its validity and reliability in the assessment of patients with muscle tension dysphonia (MTD). A cross-sectional and prospective cohort design was used to psychometrically test the VTDp. The VTD scale was cross-culturally adapted into Persian language following standard forward-backward translations. The VTDp scale was administrated to 100 patients with MTD (54 men and 46 women; mean age: 38.05 ± 10.02 years) and 50 healthy volunteers (26 men and 24 women; mean age: 36.50 ± 12.27 years). Forty-five patients with MTD completed the VTDp 7 days later for test-retest reliability. Patients also completed the Persian Voice Handicap Index (VHIp) to assess construct validity. The results of discriminative validity demonstrated that the VTDp was able to discriminate between patients with MTD and healthy participants. The internal consistency was confirmed with Cronbach α .77 and 0.73 for VTDp frequency and severity subscales, respectively. The test-retest reliability was excellent with an intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC agreement ) of 0.93 for the frequency subscale and 0.91 for the severity subscale. Construct validity of the VTDp was shown with significant correlations between the VTDp frequency and severity subscales and the VHIp total scores (0.36 and 0.37, respectively). The standard error of measurement and smallest detectable change values for VTDp frequency (2.11 and 5.85, respectively) and severity (2.25 and 6.23, respectively) were acceptable. The Bland-Altman analysis for assessing the agreement between test and retest measurements showed no systematic bias. The VTDp is a valid and reliable self-administered scale to measure patient's vocal tract sensations in Persian-speaking population. Copyright © 2016 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The beneficial effect of alpha-blockers for ureteral stent-related discomfort: systematic review and network meta-analysis for alfuzosin versus tamsulosin versus placebo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Jong Kyou; Cho, Kang Su; Oh, Cheol Kyu; Kang, Dong Hyuk; Lee, Hyungmin; Ham, Won Sik; Choi, Young Deuk; Lee, Joo Yong

    2015-06-24

    This study was carried out a network meta-analysis of evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to evaluate stent-related discomfort in patients with alfuzosin or tamsulosin versus placebo. Relevant RCTs were identified from electronic databases. The proceedings of appropriate meetings were also searched. Seven articles on the basis of RCTs were included in our meta-analysis. Using pairwise and network meta-analyses, comparisons were made by qualitative and quantitative syntheses. Evaluation was performed with the Ureteric Stent Symptoms Questionnaire to assess the urinary symptom score (USS) and body pain score (BPS). One of the seven RCTs was at moderate risk of bias for all quality criteria; two studies had a high risk of bias. In the network meta-analysis, both alfuzosin (mean difference [MD];-4.85, 95 % confidence interval [CI];-8.53--1.33) and tamsulosin (MD;-8.84, 95 % CI;-13.08--4.31) showed lower scores compared with placebo; however, the difference in USS for alfuzosin versus tamsulosin was not significant (MD; 3.99, 95 % CI;-1.23-9.04). Alfuzosin (MD;-5.71, 95 % CI;-11.32--0.52) and tamsulosin (MD;-7.77, 95 % CI;-13.68--2.14) showed lower scores for BPS compared with placebo; however, the MD between alfuzosin and tamsulosin was not significant (MD; 2.12, 95 % CI;-4.62-8.72). In the rank-probability test, tamsulosin ranked highest for USS and BPS, and alfuzosin was second. The alpha-blockers significantly decreased USS and BPS in comparison with placebo. Tamsulosin might be more effective than alfuzosin.

  20. Evaluation of efficacy of amikacin for attenuation of catheter-related bladder discomfort in patients undergoing percutaneous nephrolithotomy: A prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Ruchi; Agarwal, Anil; Singh, Prabhat Kumar; Gupta, Devendra; Shamim, Rafat

    2016-01-01

    Catheter-related bladder discomfort (CRBD) is the most distressing symptom in patients due to intraoperative urinary catheterization. Amikacin significantly inhibits detrusor contraction evoked by prejunctional stimulation. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of amikacin in prevention of CRBD in patients undergoing percutaneous nephrolithotomy. Study areas were operation theater and postanesthesia care unit of the Department of Anesthesiology, SGPGIMS, Lucknow. One hundred adult patients of either sex were randomly assigned into two groups of fifty each. Patients in control group received normal saline whereas patients in amikacin group received amikacin 10 mg/kg just before induction. Grading of CRBD was done as none, mild, moderate, and severe by a blinded observer at 0, 1, 6, 12, and 24 h after surgery. Data were analyzed using Student's t -test and Chi-square test among groups. Incidence of CRBD was compared with Chi-square test whereas severity was analyzed by the test of proportions (Z-test). Visual analog score was compared using Mann-Whitney U-test for surgical site pain. Incidence of CRBD in control group was 66% as compared to 44% observed in amikacin group ( P < 0.05). During intergroup comparison at different time points, incidence of CRBD was reduced at 1 and 6 h in the amikacin group ( P < 0.05). Significant reduction in the severity of CRBD (moderate) was also observed at 1 h in the amikacin group ( P < 0.05). At rest of the time points, there was no significant difference. Amikacin can significantly reduce the incidence and severity of CRBD in the first few hours after surgery.

  1. Living at a residency away from home during radiotherapy as narrated by 52 patients with breast cancer: a cage of safety and discomfort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilliehorn, Sara; Salander, Pär

    2018-02-01

    In the Nordic countries many patients with cancer conclude their treatment with 5-6 weeks of radiotherapy while staying at a residency far away from home. The experience of this stay, from a rehabilitation perspective, has not previously been studied. Fifty-two women with breast cancer were followed with repeated thematic interviews from diagnosis up to 2 years. The majority of women saw both pros and cons with their stay, and overall the stay could be described as "A cage of safety and discomfort". Pros included "Safety", "Closeness and learning", and "Feeling like being on holiday", while cons included "An intruding self-image", "Isolation and increased vulnerability", and "A loss of function". Some patients supported their own rehabilitation by socializing with their "fellow sisters", while others isolated themselves and mainly found it burdensome to be there. The residence becomes an interactional field with the potential to facilitate patients in resuming a new everyday life. The women who do not interact with others and/or who are stuck with feelings of anxiety should be offered the opportunity to take part in a group exclusively for "fellow sisters" in a similar situation. Implications for Rehabilitation Staying in accommodations together with other patients receiving daily radiotherapy for cancer for 5-6 weeks lends itself to personal interactions with a rehabilitative impact. Some patients take advantage of this possibility, which might facilitate the integration of the cancer experience into a new self-image. To some more vulnerable patients the stay at the patient hotel is burdensome, and these patients represent a target group for staff interventions aiming to facilitate their stay and their resumption of a new everyday life. A suggestion is that the specialist nurses meet with every patient after about a week in order to identify women who would benefit from psychosocial interventions.

  2. Emotion Reactivity, Comfort Expressing Emotions, and Future Suicidal Ideation in Emerging Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polanco-Roman, Lillian; Moore, Alyssa; Tsypes, Aliona; Jacobson, Colleen; Miranda, Regina

    2018-01-01

    Emotion reactivity and difficulties in expressing emotions have been implicated in risk for suicidal behavior. This study examined comfort in expressing emotions (positive vs. negative) and depressive symptoms as mediators of the prospective relation between emotion reactivity and suicidal ideation. Emerging adults (N = 143; 72% female; 28% White) completed measures of emotion reactivity, comfort expressing emotions, and suicidal ideation at baseline and of depressive symptoms and suicidal ideation 12 months later. Emotion reactivity predicted suicidal ideation at follow-up through depressive symptoms. Difficulty expressing love-but not happiness, sadness, and anger-partially mediated the relationship between emotion reactivity and suicidal ideation at follow-up before but not after adjusting for baseline ideation. The relation between high emotion reactivity and suicidal ideation may be explained by discomfort in the expression of positive emotions and by depressive symptoms. Promotion of comfort in positive emotion expression may reduce vulnerability to suicidal ideation. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Neurosensory sequelae assessed by thermal and vibrotactile perception thresholds after local cold injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, Daniel; Burström, Lage; Lilliesköld, Victoria Heldestad; Nilsson, Tohr; Nordh, Erik; Wahlström, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Local freezing cold injuries are common in the north and sequelae to cold injury can persist many years. Quantitative sensory testing (QST) can be used to assess neurosensory symptoms but has previously not been used on cold injury patients. To evaluate neurosensory sequelae after local freezing cold injury by thermal and vibrotactile perception thresholds and by symptom descriptions. Fifteen patients with a local freezing cold injury in the hands or feet, acquired during military training, were studied with QST by assessment of vibrotactile (VPT), warmth (WPT) and cold (CPT) perception thresholds 4 months post-injury. In addition, a follow-up questionnaire, focusing on neurovascular symptoms, was completed 4 months and 4 years post-injury. QST demonstrated abnormal findings in one or both affected hands for VPT in 6 patients, for WPT in 4 patients and for CPT in 1 patient. In the feet, QST was abnormal for VPT in one or both affected feet in 8 patients, for WPT in 6 patients and for CPT in 4 patients. Freezing cold injury related symptoms, e.g. pain/discomfort when exposed to cold, cold sensation and white fingers were common at 4 months and persisted 4 years after the initial injury. Neurosensory sequelae after local freezing cold injury, in terms of abnormal thermal and/or vibration perception thresholds, may last at least 4 months after the initial injury. Symptoms such as pain/discomfort at cold exposure, cold sensations and white fingers may persist at least 4 years after the initial injury.

  4. Thermal analysis of epidermal electronic devices integrated with human skin considering the effects of interfacial thermal resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuhang; Zhang, Jianpeng; Xing, Yufeng; Song, Jizhou

    2018-05-01

    Epidermal electronic devices (EEDs) have similar mechanical properties as those of human skin such that they can be integrated with human skin for potential applications in monitoring of human vital signs for diagnostic, therapeutic or surgical functions. Thermal management is critical for EEDs in these applications since excessive heating may cause discomfort. Comprehensive analytical studies, finite element analysis and experiments are carried out to study the effects of interfacial thermal resistance between EEDs and human skin on thermal properties of the EED/skin system in this paper. The coupling between the Fourier heat transfer in EEDs and the bio-heat transfer in human skin is accounted in the analytical model based on the transfer matrix method to give accurate predictions on temperatures, which agree well with finite element analysis and experimental measurements. It is shown that the maximum temperature increase of the EED for the case of imperfect bonding between EED and skin is much higher than that of perfect bonding. These results may help the design of EEDs in bi-integrated applications and suggest a valuable route to evaluate the bonding condition between EEDs and biological tissues.

  5. Thermal diffusivity effect in opto-thermal skin measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, P; Imhof, R E; Cui, Y; Ciortea, L I; Berg, E P

    2010-01-01

    We present our latest study on the thermal diffusivity effect in opto-thermal skin measurements. We discuss how thermal diffusivity affects the shape of opto-thermal signal, and how to measure thermal diffusivity in opto-thermal measurements of arbitrary sample surfaces. We also present a mathematical model for a thermally gradient material, and its corresponding opto-thermal signal. Finally, we show some of our latest experimental results of this thermal diffusivity effect study.

  6. The effect of a trunk release maneuver on Peak Pressure Index, trunk displacement and perceived discomfort in older adults seated in a High Fowler's position: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Krista L; Desharnais, Guylaine; Boily, Jeanette; Miller, William C; Camp, Pat G

    2012-11-16

    Pressure ulcers pose significant negative individual consequences and financial burden on the healthcare system. Prolonged sitting in High Fowler's position (HF) is common clinical practice for older adults who spend extended periods of time in bed. While HF aids in digestion and respiration, being placed in a HF may increase perceived discomfort and risk of pressure ulcers due to increased pressure magnitude at the sacral and gluteal regions. It is likely that shearing forces could also contribute to risk of pressure ulcers in HF. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of a low-tech and time-efficient Trunk Release Manuever (TRM) on sacral and gluteal pressure, trunk displacement and perceived discomfort in ambulatory older adults. A randomized controlled trial was used. We recruited community-living adults who were 60 years of age and older using posters, newspaper advertisements and word-of-mouth. Participants were randomly allocated to either the intervention or control group. The intervention group (n = 59) received the TRM, while the control group (n = 58) maintained the standard HF position. The TRM group had significantly lower mean (SD) PPI values post-intervention compared to the control group, 59.6 (30.7) mmHg and 79.9 (36.5) mmHg respectively (p = 0.002). There was also a significant difference in trunk displacement between the TRM and control groups, +3.2 mm and -5.8 mm respectively (p = 0.005). There were no significant differences in perceived discomfort between the groups. The TRM was effective for reducing pressure in the sacral and gluteal regions and for releasing the trunk at the point of contact between the skin and the support surface, but did not have an effect on perceived discomfort. The TRM is a simple method of repositioning which may have important clinical application for the prevention of pressure ulcers that may occur as a result of HF.

  7. Optimal bus temperature for thermal comfort during a cool day.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velt, K B; Daanen, H A M

    2017-07-01

    A challenge for electric buses is to minimize heating and cooling power to maximally extend the driving range, but still provide sufficient thermal comfort for the driver and passengers. Therefore, we investigated the thermal sensation (TS) and thermal comfort (TC) of passengers in buses during a cool day (temperature 13.4 ± 0.5 °C, relative humidity (RH) 60 ± 5.8%) typical for the Dutch temperate maritime climate. 28 Males and 72 females rated TS and TC and gave information on age, stature, body weight and worn garments. The temperature in the bus of 22.5 ± 1.1 °C and RH of 59.9 ± 5.8% corresponded to a slightly warm feeling (TS = 0.85 ± 1.06) and TC of 0.39 ± 0.65. TS related significantly to bus temperature, clothing insulation and age. Linear regression based on these parameters showed that the temperature in the bus corresponding to TC = 0 and TS = 0 would have been 20.9 ± 0.6 °C. In conclusion, a 1.6 °C lower bus temperature during the investigated cool day probably would have led to less thermal discomfort and energy savings of electrical busses. The methodology to relate climatic measurements to subjective assessments is currently employed in a wider climatic range and may prove to be useful to find a better balance between thermal comfort and energy savings of the bus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The thermal Virasoro formula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujisaki, Haruo

    1991-01-01

    The thermal stability of non-planar duality is described at any finite temperature through the new-fashioned four-tachyon tree amplitude of closed bosonic thermal strings within the dispersion theoretic approach based upon the thermofield dynamics. (author)

  9. Thermal conductivity of technetium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minato, K.; Serizawa, H.; Fukuda, K.

    1998-01-01

    The thermal diffusivity of technetium was measured on a disk sample of 5 mm in diameter and 1 mm in thickness by the laser flash method from room temperature to 1173 K, and the thermal conductivity was determined by the measured thermal diffusivity and density, and the reported specific heat capacity. The thermal diffusivity of technetium decreases with increasing temperature though it is almost constant above 600 K. The thermal conductivity of technetium shows a minimum around 400 K, above which the thermal conductivity increases with temperature. The electronic and phonon components of the thermal conductivity were evaluated approximately. The increase in the thermal conductivity of technetium with temperature is due to the increase in the electronic component. (orig.)

  10. Ouellette Thermal Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Thermal Test Facility is a joint Army/Navy state-of-the-art facility (8,100 ft2) that was designed to:Evaluate and characterize the effect of flame and thermal...

  11. Optimal Sizing of Energy Storage for Community Microgrids Considering Building Thermal Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Guodong [ORNL; Li, Zhi [ORNL; Starke, Michael R. [ORNL; Ollis, Ben [ORNL; Tomsovic, Kevin [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2017-07-01

    This paper proposes an optimization model for the optimal sizing of energy storage in community microgrids considering the building thermal dynamics and customer comfort preference. The proposed model minimizes the annualized cost of the community microgrid, including energy storage investment, purchased energy cost, demand charge, energy storage degradation cost, voluntary load shedding cost and the cost associated with customer discomfort due to room temperature deviation. The decision variables are the power and energy capacity of invested energy storage. In particular, we assume the heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems can be scheduled intelligently by the microgrid central controller while maintaining the indoor temperature in the comfort range set by customers. For this purpose, the detailed thermal dynamic characteristics of buildings have been integrated into the optimization model. Numerical simulation shows significant cost reduction by the proposed model. The impacts of various costs on the optimal solution are investigated by sensitivity analysis.

  12. Novel Thermal Analysis Model of the Foot-Shoe Sole Interface during Gait Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhiro Shimazaki

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Excessive heat at the foot-shoe sole interface negatively affects a human’s thermal comfort. An understanding of the thermal behavior at this interface is important for alleviating this discomfort. During gait motion, a human’s body weight cyclically compresses a shoe sole (commonly constructed of viscoelastic materials, generating heat during loading. To evaluate the thermal effects of this internal heat generation on foot comfort, we developed and empirically validated a thermal analysis model during gait motion. A simple, one-dimensional prediction model for heat conduction with heat generation during compressive loading was used. Heat generation was estimated as a function of the shoe sole’s material properties (e.g., elastic modulus and various gait parameters. When compared with experimental results, the proposed model proved effective in predicting thermal behavior at the foot-shoe sole interface under various conditions and shows potential for improving a human’s thermal comfort during gait motion through informed footwear design.

  13. Plasma thermal energy transport: theory and experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coppi, B.

    Experiments on the transport across the magnetic field of electron thermal energy are reviewed (Alcator, Frascati Torus). In order to explain the experimental results, a transport model is described that reconfirmed the need to have an expression for the local diffusion coefficient with a negative exponent of the electron temperature

  14. Discrimination of thermal diffusivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergmann Tiest, W.M.; Kappers, A.M.L.

    2009-01-01

    Materials such as wood or metal which are at equal temperatures are perceived to be of different ‘coldness’ due to differences in thermal properties, such as the thermal diffusivity. The thermal diffusivity of a material is a parameter that controls the rate with which heat is extracted from the

  15. Electric Motor Thermal Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennion, Kevin S [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-09-01

    Thermal management enables more efficient and cost-effective motors. This Annual Merit Review presentation describes the technical accomplishments and progress in electric motor thermal management R&D over the last year. This project supports a broad industry demand for data, analysis methods, and experimental techniques to improve and better understand motor thermal management.

  16. Economically optimal thermal insulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berber, J.

    1978-10-01

    Exemplary calculations to show that exact adherence to the demands of the thermal insulation ordinance does not lead to an optimal solution with regard to economics. This is independent of the mode of financing. Optimal thermal insulation exceeds the values given in the thermal insulation ordinance.

  17. Testing thermal comfort of trekking boots: an objective and subjective evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arezes, P M; Neves, M M; Teixeira, S F; Leão, C P; Cunha, J L

    2013-07-01

    The study of the thermal comfort of the feet when using a specific type of shoe is of paramount importance, in particular if the main goal of the study is to attend to the needs of users. The main aim of this study was to propose a test battery for thermal comfort analysis and to apply it to the analysis of trekking boots. Methodologically, the project involves both objective and subjective evaluations. An objective evaluation of the thermal properties of the fabrics used in the boots was developed and applied. In addition, the thermal comfort provided when using the boots was also assessed both subjective and objectively. The evaluation of the thermal comfort during use, which was simulated in a laboratory environment, included the measurement of the temperature and moisture of the feet. The subjective assessment was performed using a questionnaire. From the results obtained, it was possible to define an optimal combination of fabrics to apply to trekking boots by considering the provided thermal insulation, air permeability and wicking. The results also revealed that the subjective perception of thermal comfort appears to be more related to the increase in temperature of the feet than to the moisture retention inside the boot. Although the evaluation of knits used in the boots indicated that a particular combination of fibres was optimal for use in the inner layer, the subjective and objective evaluation of thermal comfort revealed that the evaluation provided by users did not necessarily match the technical assessment data. No correlation was observed between the general comfort and specific thermal comfort assessments. Finally, the identification of thermal discomfort by specific foot areas would be useful in the process of designing and developing boots. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  18. Pulse laser induced change in thermal radiation from a single spherical particle on thermally bad conducting surface : an analytical solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moksin, M.M.; Grozescu, V.I.; Yunus, W.M.M.; Azmi, B.Z.; Talib, Z.A.; Wahab, Z.A.

    1996-01-01

    A relatively simple analytical expression was derived that provided a description of the radius and thermal properties of a single particle from the change in grey body radiation emission subsequent to pulse laser heating of the particle

  19. Optimal joint scheduling of electrical and thermal appliances in a smart home environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirazi, Elham; Zakariazadeh, Alireza; Jadid, Shahram

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Thermal appliances are scheduled based on desired temperature and energy prices. • A discomfort index has been introduced within the home energy scheduling model. • Appliances are scheduled based on activity probability and desired options. • Starting probability depends on the social random factor and consumption behavior. - Abstract: With the development of home area network, residents have the opportunity to schedule their power usage in the home by themselves aiming at reducing electricity expenses. Moreover, as renewable energy sources are deployed in home, a home energy management system needs to consider both energy consumption and generation simultaneously to minimize the energy cost. In this paper, a smart home energy management model has been presented in which electrical and thermal appliances are jointly scheduled. The proposed method aims at minimizing the electricity cost of a residential customer by scheduling various type of appliances considering the residents consumption behavior, seasonal probability, social random factor, discomfort index and appliances starting probability functions. In this model, the home central controller receives the electricity price information, environmental factors data as well as the resident desired options in order to optimally schedule appliances including electrical and thermal. The scheduling approach is tested on a typical home including variety of home appliances, a small wind turbine, photovoltaic panel, combined heat and power unit, boiler and electrical and thermal storages over a 24-h period. The results show that the scheduling of different appliances can be reached simultaneously by using the proposed formulation. Moreover, simulation results evidenced that the proposed home energy management model exhibits a lower cost and, therefore, is more economical.

  20. Journeys Across Difference: Pre-service Teacher Education Students’ Perceptions of a Pedagogy of Discomfort in a Digital Storytelling Project in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Gachago

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Engaging with difference is an important skill for teachers in current South Africa. Critics of the dominant approach to teaching on and with difference in pre-service teacher education argue that it mostly promotes de-contextualised celebrations of diverse cultures without addressing critical issues of power and social forces. One of the reasons that educators shy away from engaging with issues of power and privilege in the classroom is the fear of highly explosive emotions that might emerge in the process. In South Africa this is compounded by the legacy of racial discrimination, still impacting on today’s social engagements of students. However, proponents of the ‘affective turn’ (Berlant 2008; Ahmed 2004; Ahmed 2010; Clough and Halley 2007; Gregg and Seigworth 2010 in the Social Sciences argue, that it is important to work with the emotions that govern our classrooms, for social transformation in students to happen. Boler and Zembylas’ ‘pedagogy of discomfort’ (2003 for example stipulates that for social transformation to happen both students and educators have to step out of their comfort zone, to experience discomforting emotions, and recognizes the value of both cognitive and emotional labour for learning about difference. This study is piloting an innovative approach for teaching on and with difference in a South African pre-service teacher education classroom, combining a digital storytelling process with participatory learning and action techniques and a reflective essay. Framed by Boler and Zembylas’ (2003 work on the politics of emotions and feminist writings on the role of affect and public feelings, we explored how students experienced and negotiated their cognitive and emotional journey in this project. An interpretive analysis of data collected through focus groups with selected students revealed that this classroom was a highly divided, complex and contested space, in which students identified strongly along racial

  1. Postoperative discomfort and emergence delirium in children undergoing dental rehabilitation under general anesthesia: comparison of nasal tracheal intubation and laryngeal mask airway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keles S

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Sultan Keles,1 Ozlem Kocaturk2 1Department of Pediatric Dentistry, 2Deparment of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Division of Anesthesiology, Faculty of Dentistry, Adnan Menderes University, Aydin, Turkey Background: Several studies have identified side effects of general anesthesia with endotracheal intubation, such as laryngeal pain, dysphonia, and postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV. The laryngeal mask airway (LMAw is believed to decrease these side effects. The aim of this trial was to compare postoperative discomfort, emergence delirium, and recovery time of patients who received either an LMAw or nasotracheal intubation (NTI.Patients and methods: A total of 70 children were randomly assigned to the LMAw group (n=35 or the NTI group (n=35. Both groups underwent mask induction with 8% sevoflurane. The NTI group received muscle relaxant, whereas the LMAw group did not. Postoperative laryngeal pain, dental pain, dysphonia, and PONV were assessed immediately and at 1 hour and 6 hours postoperatively. The Wong–Baker Faces Scale was used to evaluate the patients’ self-reported pain. In addition, decayed, missing, and filled teeth (dft/DMFT values, dental procedure type, number of dental procedures, duration of the dental operation, duration of anesthesia, recovery time, emergence delirium, pediatric dentist’s access to the mouth, and parents’ satisfaction levels were recorded. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, chi-square tests, and two-sample t-tests.Results: The incidence of postoperative laryngeal pain was significantly higher in the NTI group immediately (97.2% vs. 8.5%, P=0.00, 1 hour (94.2% vs. 0%, P=0.00, and 6 hours postoperatively (25.7% vs. 0%, P=0.00. There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups in dental pain scores, dft/DMFT values, duration of anesthesia, duration of the dental operation, number of dental procedures, the incidence of PONV, or pediatric dentist’s access to

  2. Thermal Radiation Effects on Thermal Explosion in Polydisperse Fuel Spray-Probabilistic Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ophir Navea

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the effect of thermal radiation on the dynamics of a thermal explosion of polydisperse fuel spray with a complete description of the chemistry via a single-step two-reactant model of general order. The polydisperse spray is modeled using a Probability Density Function (PDF. The thermal radiation energy exchange between the evaporation surface of the fuel droplets and the burning gas is described using the Marshak boundary conditions. An explicit expression of the critical condition for thermal explosion limit is derived analytically and represents a generalization of the critical parameter of the classical Semenov theory. Because we investigated the model in the range where the temperature is very high, the effect of the thermal radiation is significant.

  3. The determinants of thermal comfort in cool water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guéritée, J; House, J R; Redortier, B; Tipton, M J

    2015-10-01

    Water-based activities may result in the loss of thermal comfort (TC). We hypothesized that in cooling water, the hands and feet would be responsible. Supine immersions were conducted in up to five clothing conditions (exposing various regions), as well as investigations to determine if a "reference" skin temperature (Tsk) distribution in thermoneutral air would help interpret our findings. After 10 min in 34.5 °C water, the temperature was decreased to 19.5 °C over 20 min; eight resting or exercising volunteers reported when they no longer felt comfortable and which region was responsible. TC, rectal temperature, and Tsk were measured. Rather than the extremities, the lower back and chest caused the loss of overall TC. At this point, mean (SD) chest Tsk was 3.3 (1.7) °C lower than the reference temperature (P = 0.005), and 3.8 (1.5) °C lower for the back (P = 0.002). Finger Tsk was 3.1 (2.7) °C higher than the reference temperature (P = 0.037). In cool and cooling water, hands and feet, already adapted to colder air temperatures, will not cause discomfort. Contrarily, more discomfort may arise from the chest and lower back, as these regions cool by more than normal. Thus, Tsk distribution in thermoneutral air may help understand variations in TC responses across the body. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Solar thermal barometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2004-01-01

    After the bad year of 2002, the european solar thermal market returned to double-digit growth rate in 2003: 22%. Nevertheless, the sector still has not recovered the growth rate it had in the early 2000 and European Commission targets are still far from being reached. This paper presents the thermal solar industry barometer. Data on the evolution of annually installed surfaces in the european union since 1993, the cumulated capacity of thermal collectors installed in the European Union, the estimation of the annual energy production associated to european solar thermal capacities and the main companies of the European Union thermal solar sector are presented and discussed. (A.L.B.)

  5. Thermal Management and Thermal Protection Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasnain, Aqib

    2016-01-01

    During my internship in the Thermal Design Branch (ES3), I contributed to two main projects: i) novel passive thermal management system for future human exploration, ii) AVCOAT undercut thermal analysis. i) As NASA prepares to further expand human and robotic presence in space, it is well known that spacecraft architectures will be challenged with unprecedented thermal environments. Future exploration activities will have the need of thermal management systems that can provide higher reliability, mass and power reduction and increased performance. In an effort to start addressing the current technical gaps the NASA Johnson Space Center Passive Thermal Discipline has engaged in technology development activities. One of these activities was done through an in-house Passive Thermal Management System (PTMS) design for a lunar lander. The proposed PTMS, functional in both microgravity and gravity environments, consists of three main components: a heat spreader, a novel hybrid wick Variable Conductance Heat Pipe (VCHP), and a radiator. The aim of this PTMS is to keep electronics on a vehicle within their temperature limits (0 and 50 C for the current design) during all mission phases including multiple lunar day/night cycles. The VCHP was tested to verify its thermal performance. I created a thermal math model using Thermal Desktop (TD) and analyzed it to predict the PTMS performance. After testing, the test data provided a means to correlate the thermal math model. This correlation took into account conduction and convection heat transfer, representing the actual benchtop test. Since this PTMS is proposed for space missions, a vacuum test will be taking place to provide confidence that the system is functional in space environments. Therefore, the model was modified to include a vacuum chamber with a liquid nitrogen shroud while taking into account conduction and radiation heat transfer. Infrared Lamps were modelled and introduced into the model to simulate the sun

  6. Thermal neutron moderating device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takigami, Hiroyuki.

    1995-01-01

    In a thermal neutron moderating device, superconductive coils for generating magnetic fields capable of applying magnetic fields vertical to the longitudinal direction of a thermal neutron passing tube, and superconductive coils for magnetic field gradient for causing magnetic field gradient in the longitudinal direction of the thermal neutron passing tube are disposed being stacked at the outside of the thermal neutron passing tube. When magnetic field gradient is present vertically to the direction of a magnetic moment, thermal neutrons undergo forces in the direction of the magnetic field gradient in proportion to the magnetic moment. Then, the magnetic moment of the thermal neutrons is aligned with the direction vertical to the passing direction of the thermal neutrons, to cause the magnetic field gradient in the passing direction of the thermal neutrons. The speed of the thermal neutrons can be optionally selected and the wavelength can freely be changed by applying forces to the thermal neutrons and changing the extent and direction of the magnetic field gradient. Superconductive coils are used as the coils for generating magnetic fields and the magnetic field gradient in order to change extremely high energy of the thermal neutrons. (N.H.)

  7. Thermal dynamics of bomb calorimeters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Richard E

    2015-12-01

    The thermal dynamics of bomb calorimeters are modeled using a lumped heat transfer analysis in which heat is released in a pressure vessel/bomb immersed in a stirred water bath that is surrounded by a static air space bounded by an insulated (static) jacket, a constant/controlled temperature jacket (isoperibol), or a changing temperature (adiabatic) jacket. The temperature history of the water bath for each of these boundary conditions (methods) is well described by the two-term solution for the calorimeter response to a heat impulse (combustion), allowing the heat transfer coefficients and thermal capacities of the bomb and water bath to be determined parametrically. The validated heat transfer model provides an expression for direct calculation of the heat released in an arbitrary process inside a bomb calorimeter using the temperature history of the water bath for each of the boundary conditions (methods). This result makes possible the direct calculation of the heat of combustion of a sample in an isoperibol calorimeter from the recorded temperature history without the need for semi-empirical temperature corrections to account for non-adiabatic behavior. Another useful result is that the maximum temperature rise of the water bath in the static jacket method is proportional to the total heat generated, and the empirical proportionality constant, which is determined by calibration, accounts for all of the heat losses and thermal lags of the calorimeter.

  8. [Thermal comfort and indoor air quality in some of the italian state police workplaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirico, Francesco; Rulli, Giuseppina

    2017-12-01

    Little can be found in the literature about thermal comfort and indoor air quality (IAQ) in law enforcement workplaces. This study, based on environmental surveys carried out by the Centro Sanitario Polifunzionale of Milan (Italian State Police Health Service Department), aims to assess the thermal comfort and IAQ in some of the Italian State Police workplaces. Measurements were performed in some indoor workplaces such as offices, archives, laboratories and guard-houses in various regions (Lombardia, Emilia Romagna, Liguria, Veneto, Trentino Alto-Adige) of Northern Italy. The PMV/PPD model developed by Fangar for the evaluation of the thermal comfort was used. We measured both CO2 concentration and relative humidity indoor levels for the evaluation of IAQ. We used Chi square and t Student tests to study both prevalence of thermal discomfort and low IAQ, and their differences between summer and winter. For the purposes of the present study we carried out 488 measurements in 36 buildings (260 in winter and 228 in summer). Our results showed that thermal comfort was reached in 95% and 68% of environmental measurements (in winter and summer, respectively). In summer, we measured different types of thermal discomfort. As regard to IAQ, CO2 exceeded the threshold limit value (1000 ppm) in 39% (winter) and 9% (summer) of our measurements. Chi-square test showed a statistically significant difference between summer and winter for all outcomes considered. Indeed, thermal comfort was better in winter than summer (X2 = 61.0795), while IAQ was found to be better in the summer than winter considering both the CO2 1000 ppm and 1200 ppm threshold values (X2 = 56.9004 and X2 = 8.8845 respectively). Prevalence of low relative humidity in winter was higher than in summer (X2 = 124.7764). Even though this study did not report any situation of risk to Italian police officers health and safety, it has highlighted some potential issues in some of the examined workplaces, concerning

  9. Gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hildebrand, C.E.; Crawford, B.D.; Walters, R.A.; Enger, M.D.

    1983-01-01

    We prepared probes for isolating functional pieces of the metallothionein locus. The probes enabled a variety of experiments, eventually revealing two mechanisms for metallothionein gene expression, the order of the DNA coding units at the locus, and the location of the gene site in its chromosome. Once the switch regulating metallothionein synthesis was located, it could be joined by recombinant DNA methods to other, unrelated genes, then reintroduced into cells by gene-transfer techniques. The expression of these recombinant genes could then be induced by exposing the cells to Zn 2+ or Cd 2+ . We would thus take advantage of the clearly defined switching properties of the metallothionein gene to manipulate the expression of other, perhaps normally constitutive, genes. Already, despite an incomplete understanding of how the regulatory switch of the metallothionein locus operates, such experiments have been performed successfully

  10. Effect evaluation of a heated ambulance mattress-prototype on thermal comfort and patients' temperatures in prehospital emergency care - an intervention study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aléx, Jonas; Karlsson, Stig; Björnstig, Ulf; Saveman, Britt-Inger

    2015-01-01

    Background The ambulance milieu does not offer good thermal comfort to patients during the cold Swedish winters. Patients' exposure to cold temperatures combined with a cold ambulance mattress seems to be the major factor leading to an overall sensation of discomfort. There is little research on the effect of active heat delivered from underneath in ambulance care. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of an electrically heated ambulance mattress-prototype on thermal comfort and patients' temperatures in the prehospital emergency care. Methods A quantitative intervention study on ambulance care was conducted in the north of Sweden. The ambulance used for the intervention group (n=30) was equipped with an electrically heated mattress on the regular ambulance stretcher whereas for the control group (n=30) no active heat was provided on the stretcher. Outcome variables were measured as thermal comfort on the Cold Discomfort Scale (CDS), subjective comments on cold experiences, and finger, ear and air temperatures. Results Thermal comfort, measured by CDS, improved during the ambulance transport to the emergency department in the intervention group (p=0.001) but decreased in the control group (p=0.014). A significant higher proportion (57%) of the control group rated the stretcher as cold to lie down compared to the intervention group (3%, pthermal comfort and may prevent the negative consequences of cold stress.

  11. Effect evaluation of a heated ambulance mattress-prototype on thermal comfort and patients' temperatures in prehospital emergency care--an intervention study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aléx, Jonas; Karlsson, Stig; Björnstig, Ulf; Saveman, Britt-Inger

    2015-01-01

    The ambulance milieu does not offer good thermal comfort to patients during the cold Swedish winters. Patients' exposure to cold temperatures combined with a cold ambulance mattress seems to be the major factor leading to an overall sensation of discomfort. There is little research on the effect of active heat delivered from underneath in ambulance care. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of an electrically heated ambulance mattress-prototype on thermal comfort and patients' temperatures in the prehospital emergency care. A quantitative intervention study on ambulance care was conducted in the north of Sweden. The ambulance used for the intervention group (n=30) was equipped with an electrically heated mattress on the regular ambulance stretcher whereas for the control group (n=30) no active heat was provided on the stretcher. Outcome variables were measured as thermal comfort on the Cold Discomfort Scale (CDS), subjective comments on cold experiences, and finger, ear and air temperatures. Thermal comfort, measured by CDS, improved during the ambulance transport to the emergency department in the intervention group (p=0.001) but decreased in the control group (p=0.014). A significant higher proportion (57%) of the control group rated the stretcher as cold to lie down compared to the intervention group (3%, pthermal comfort and may prevent the negative consequences of cold stress.

  12. A thermal ground cloak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Tianzhi; Wu, Qinghe; Xu, Weikai; Liu, Di; Huang, Lujun; Chen, Fei

    2016-01-01

    The thermal cloak has been a long-standing scientific dream of researchers and engineers. Recently thermal metamaterials with man-made micro-structure have been presented based on the principle of transformation optics (TO). This new concept has received considerable attention, which is a powerful tool for manipulating heat flux in thermal imaging systems. However, the inherent material singularity has long been a captivation of experimental realization. As an alternative method, the scattering-cancellation-based cloak (or bi-layer thermal cloak) has been presented to remove the singularity for achieving the same cloaking performance. Nevertheless, such strategy needs prerequisite knowledge (geometry and conductivity) of the object to be cloaked. In this paper, a new thermal ground cloak is presented to overcome the limitations. The device is designed, fabricated and measured to verify the thermal cloaking performance. We experimentally show that the remarkably low complexity of the device can fully and effectively be manipulated using realizable transformation thermal devices. More importantly, this thermal ground cloak is designed to exclude heat flux without knowing the information of the cloaked object. - Highlights: • We present the first thermal carpet cloak. • The carpet can thermally cloak any shaped object without knowing the properties of the object to be cloaked. • Excellent agreements between simulation and experiment are observed.

  13. Josephson Thermal Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarcello, Claudio; Solinas, Paolo; Braggio, Alessandro; Di Ventra, Massimiliano; Giazotto, Francesco

    2018-01-01

    We propose a superconducting thermal memory device that exploits the thermal hysteresis in a flux-controlled temperature-biased superconducting quantum-interference device (SQUID). This system reveals a flux-controllable temperature bistability, which can be used to define two well-distinguishable thermal logic states. We discuss a suitable writing-reading procedure for these memory states. The time of the memory writing operation is expected to be on the order of approximately 0.2 ns for a Nb-based SQUID in thermal contact with a phonon bath at 4.2 K. We suggest a noninvasive readout scheme for the memory states based on the measurement of the effective resonance frequency of a tank circuit inductively coupled to the SQUID. The proposed device paves the way for a practical implementation of thermal logic and computation. The advantage of this proposal is that it represents also an example of harvesting thermal energy in superconducting circuits.

  14. Negative thermal expansion materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, J.S.O.

    1997-01-01

    The recent discovery of negative thermal expansion over an unprecedented temperature range in ZrW 2 O 8 (which contracts continuously on warming from below 2 K to above 1000 K) has stimulated considerable interest in this unusual phenomenon. Negative and low thermal expansion materials have a number of important potential uses in ceramic, optical and electronic applications. We have now found negative thermal expansion in a large new family of materials with the general formula A 2 (MO 4 ) 3 . Chemical substitution dramatically influences the thermal expansion properties of these materials allowing the production of ceramics with negative, positive or zero coefficients of thermal expansion, with the potential to control other important materials properties such as refractive index and dielectric constant. The mechanism of negative thermal expansion and the phase transitions exhibited by this important new class of low-expansion materials will be discussed. (orig.)

  15. Solid state thermal rectifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    None

    2016-07-05

    Thermal rectifiers using linear nanostructures as core thermal conductors have been fabricated. A high mass density material is added preferentially to one end of the nanostructures to produce an axially non-uniform mass distribution. The resulting nanoscale system conducts heat asymmetrically with greatest heat flow in the direction of decreasing mass density. Thermal rectification has been demonstrated for linear nanostructures that are electrical insulators, such as boron nitride nanotubes, and for nanostructures that are conductive, such as carbon nanotubes.

  16. Atomic reactor thermal engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Gwang Ryong

    1983-02-01

    This book starts the introduction of atomic reactor thermal engineering including atomic reaction, chemical reaction, nuclear reaction neutron energy and soon. It explains heat transfer, heat production in the atomic reactor, heat transfer of fuel element in atomic reactor, heat transfer and flow of cooler, thermal design of atomic reactor, design of thermodynamics of atomic reactor and various. This deals with the basic knowledge of thermal engineering for atomic reactor.

  17. Theory of thermal stresses

    CERN Document Server

    Boley, Bruno A

    1997-01-01

    Highly regarded text presents detailed discussion of fundamental aspects of theory, background, problems with detailed solutions. Basics of thermoelasticity, heat transfer theory, thermal stress analysis, more. 1985 edition.

  18. Mars Thermal Inertia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    This image shows the global thermal inertia of the Martian surface as measured by the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) instrument on the Mars Global Surveyor. The data were acquired during the first 5000 orbits of the MGS mapping mission. The pattern of inertia variations observed by TES agrees well with the thermal inertia maps made by the Viking Infrared Thermal Mapper experiment, but the TES data shown here are at significantly higher spatial resolution (15 km versus 60 km).The TES instrument was built by Santa Barbara Remote Sensing and is operated by Philip R. Christensen, of Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ.

  19. Space thermal control development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, M. J.; Grodzka, P. G.; Oneill, M. J.

    1971-01-01

    The results of experimental investigations on a number of various phase change materials (PCMs) and PCMs in combination with metals and other materials are reported. The evaluations include the following PCM system performance characteristics: PCM and PCM/filler thermal diffusivities, the effects of long-term thermal cycling, PCM-container compatibility, and catalyst effectiveness and stability. Three PCMs demonstrated performance acceptable enough to be considered for use in prototype aluminum thermal control devices. These three PCMs are lithium nitrate trihydrate with zinc hydroxy nitrate catalyst, acetamide, and myristic acid. Of the fillers tested, aluminum honeycomb filler was found to offer the most increase in system thermal diffusivity.

  20. Thermal decomposition of pyrite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Music, S.; Ristic, M.; Popovic, S.

    1992-01-01

    Thermal decomposition of natural pyrite (cubic, FeS 2 ) has been investigated using X-ray diffraction and 57 Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy. X-ray diffraction analysis of pyrite ore from different sources showed the presence of associated minerals, such as quartz, szomolnokite, stilbite or stellerite, micas and hematite. Hematite, maghemite and pyrrhotite were detected as thermal decomposition products of natural pyrite. The phase composition of the thermal decomposition products depends on the terature, time of heating and starting size of pyrite chrystals. Hematite is the end product of the thermal decomposition of natural pyrite. (author) 24 refs.; 6 figs.; 2 tabs

  1. A thermal lens response of the two components liquid in a thin Him cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, V I; Ivanova, G D

    2016-01-01

    It was proposed a new thermal lens scheme with a thin layer of cell thickness which is significantly less than the size of the beam. As a result the exact analytical expression for the thermal lens response is achieved, taking into account the thermal lens in the windows of the cell. (paper)

  2. Photovoltaic. Solar thermal. Solar thermal electricity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The year 2008 was excellent for solar energy in the European Union. The growth of the installed capacity for photovoltaic was +159% (it means +4747.018 MW) to reach 9689.952 MW and that for solar thermal was +51.5% (it means +3172.5 MW) to reach 19982.7 MW. Worldwide concentrated solar thermal capacity stood at 679 MW in 2009, while this figure may seem low, the sector has a promising future ahead of it. (A.C.)

  3. The effect of a trunk release maneuver on Peak Pressure Index, trunk displacement and perceived discomfort in older adults seated in a high Fowler’s position: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Best Krista L

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pressure ulcers pose significant negative individual consequences and financial burden on the healthcare system. Prolonged sitting in High Fowler’s position (HF is common clinical practice for older adults who spend extended periods of time in bed. While HF aids in digestion and respiration, being placed in a HF may increase perceived discomfort and risk of pressure ulcers due to increased pressure magnitude at the sacral and gluteal regions. It is likely that shearing forces could also contribute to risk of pressure ulcers in HF. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of a low-tech and time-efficient Trunk Release Manuever (TRM on sacral and gluteal pressure, trunk displacement and perceived discomfort in ambulatory older adults. Method A randomized controlled trial was used. We recruited community-living adults who were 60 years of age and older using posters, newspaper advertisements and word-of-mouth. Participants were randomly allocated to either the intervention or control group. The intervention group (n = 59 received the TRM, while the control group (n = 58 maintained the standard HF position. Results The TRM group had significantly lower mean (SD PPI values post-intervention compared to the control group, 59.6 (30.7 mmHg and 79.9 (36.5 mmHg respectively (p = 0.002. There was also a significant difference in trunk displacement between the TRM and control groups, +3.2 mm and −5.8 mm respectively (p = 0.005. There were no significant differences in perceived discomfort between the groups. Conclusion The TRM was effective for reducing pressure in the sacral and gluteal regions and for releasing the trunk at the point of contact between the skin and the support surface, but did not have an effect on perceived discomfort. The TRM is a simple method of repositioning which may have important clinical application for the prevention of pressure ulcers that may occur as a result of HF.

  4. Thermal pressure and isochoric thermal conductivity of solid CO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purs'kij, O.Yi.

    2005-01-01

    The analysis of the correlation between the thermal pressure and the isochoric thermal conductivity of solid CO 2 has been carried out. The temperature dependences of the thermal pressure and isochoric thermal conductivity for samples with various molar volumes have been obtained. The isothermal pressure dependences of the thermal conductivity of solid CO 2 have been calculated. The form of the temperature dependence of the isochoric thermal conductivity taking the thermal pressure into account has been revealed. Behaviour of the isochoric thermal conductivity is explained by phonon-phonon interaction and additional influence of the thermal pressure

  5. Sprayable Phase Change Coating Thermal Protection Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Rod W.; Hayes, Paul W.; Kaul, Raj

    2005-01-01

    NASA has expressed a need for reusable, environmentally friendly, phase change coating that is capable of withstanding the heat loads that have historically required an ablative thermal insulation. The Space Shuttle Program currently relies on ablative materials for thermal protection. The problem with an ablative insulation is that, by design, the material ablates away, in fulfilling its function of cooling the underlying substrate, thus preventing the insulation from being reused from flight to flight. The present generation of environmentally friendly, sprayable, ablative thermal insulation (MCC-l); currently use on the Space Shuttle SRBs, is very close to being a reusable insulation system. In actual flight conditions, as confirmed by the post-flight inspections of the SRBs, very little of the material ablates. Multi-flight thermal insulation use has not been qualified for the Space Shuttle. The gap that would have to be overcome in order to implement a reusable Phase Change Coating (PCC) is not unmanageable. PCC could be applied robotically with a spray process utilizing phase change material as filler to yield material of even higher strength and reliability as compared to MCC-1. The PCC filled coatings have also demonstrated potential as cryogenic thermal coatings. In experimental thermal tests, a thin application of PCC has provided the same thermal protection as a much thicker and heavier application of a traditional ablative thermal insulation. In addition, tests have shown that the structural integrity of the coating has been maintained and phase change performance after several aero-thermal cycles was not affected. Experimental tests have also shown that, unlike traditional ablative thermal insulations, PCC would not require an environmental seal coat, which has historically been required to prevent moisture absorption by the thermal insulation, prevent environmental degradation, and to improve the optical and aerodynamic properties. In order to reduce

  6. Thermal flow micro sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    1999-01-01

    A review is given on sensors fabricated by silicon micromachining technology using the thermal domain for the measurement of fluid flow. Attention is paid especially to performance and geometry of the sensors. Three basic types of thermal flow sensors are discussed: anemometers, calorimetric flow

  7. Power Electronics Thermal Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno, Gilberto [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-08-07

    Thermal modeling was conducted to evaluate and develop thermal management strategies for high-temperature wide-bandgap (WBG)-based power electronics systems. WBG device temperatures of 175 degrees C to 250 degrees C were modeled under various under-hood temperature environments. Modeling result were used to identify the most effective capacitor cooling strategies under high device temperature conditions.

  8. Thermal solar energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, J.C.; Leal C, H.

    1998-01-01

    Some relative aspects to the development and current state of thermal solar energy are summarized, so much at domestic level as international. To facilitate the criteria understanding as the size of the facilities in thermal solar systems, topics as availability of the solar resource and its interactions with the matter are included. Finally, some perspectives for the development of this energetic alternative are presented

  9. Thermally exfoliated graphite oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prud'Homme, Robert K. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Abdala, Ahmed (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A modified graphite oxide material contains a thermally exfoliated graphite oxide with a surface area of from about 300 sq m/g to 2600 sq m/g, wherein the thermally exfoliated graphite oxide displays no signature of the original graphite and/or graphite oxide, as determined by X-ray diffraction.

  10. Conceptual thermal design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strijk, R.

    2008-01-01

    Present thermal design tools and methods insufficiently support the development of structural concepts engaged by typical practicing designers. Research described in this thesis identifies the main thermal design problems in practice. In addition, models and methods are developed that support an

  11. High Thermal Conductivity Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Shinde, Subhash L

    2006-01-01

    Thermal management has become a ‘hot’ field in recent years due to a need to obtain high performance levels in many devices used in such diverse areas as space science, mainframe and desktop computers, optoelectronics and even Formula One racing cars! Thermal solutions require not just taking care of very high thermal flux, but also ‘hot spots’, where the flux densities can exceed 200 W/cm2. High thermal conductivity materials play an important role in addressing thermal management issues. This volume provides readers a basic understanding of the thermal conduction mechanisms in these materials and discusses how the thermal conductivity may be related to their crystal structures as well as microstructures developed as a result of their processing history. The techniques for accurate measurement of these properties on large as well as small scales have been reviewed. Detailed information on the thermal conductivity of diverse materials including aluminum nitride (AlN), silicon carbide (SiC), diamond, a...

  12. Outdoor thermal comfort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolopoulou, Marialena

    2011-06-01

    A review of the various approaches in understanding outdoor thermal comfort is presented. The emphasis on field surveys from around the world, particularly across Europe, enables us to understand thermal perception and evaluate outdoor thermal comfort conditions. The consistent low correlations between objective microclimatic variables, subjective thermal sensation and comfort outdoors, internationally, suggest that thermophysiology alone does not adequate describe these relationships. Focusing on the concept of adaptation, it tries to explain how this influences outdoor comfort, enabling us to inhabit and get satisfaction from outdoor spaces throughout the year. Beyond acclimatization and behavioral adaptation, through adjustments in clothing and changes to the metabolic heat, psychological adaptation plays a critical role to ensure thermal comfort and satisfaction with the outdoor environment. Such parameters include recent experiences and expectations; personal choice and perceived control, more important than whether that control is actually exercised; and the need for positive environmental stimulation suggesting that thermal neutrality is not a pre-requisite for thermal comfort. Ultimately, enhancing environmental diversity can influence thermal perception and experience of open spaces.

  13. Thermal diffusion (1963)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemarechal, A.

    1963-01-01

    This report brings together the essential principles of thermal diffusion in the liquid and gaseous phases. The macroscopic and molecular aspects of the thermal diffusion constant are reviewed, as well as the various measurement method; the most important developments however concern the operation of the CLUSIUS and DICKEL thermo-gravitational column and its applications. (author) [fr

  14. Thermal Transport in Phosphorene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Guangzhao; Hu, Ming

    2018-03-01

    Phosphorene, a novel elemental 2D semiconductor, possesses fascinating chemical and physical properties which are distinctively different from other 2D materials. The rapidly growing applications of phosphorene in nano/optoelectronics and thermoelectrics call for comprehensive studies of thermal transport properties. In this Review, based on the theoretical and experimental progresses, the thermal transport properties of single-layer phosphorene, multilayer phosphorene (nanofilms), and bulk black phosphorus are summarized to give a general view of the overall thermal conductivity trend from single-layer to bulk form. The mechanism underlying the discrepancy in the reported thermal conductivity of phosphorene is discussed by reviewing the effect of different functionals and cutoff distances on the thermal transport evaluations. This Review then provides fundamental insight into the thermal transport in phosphorene by reviewing the role of resonant bonding in driving giant phonon anharmonicity and long-range interactions. In addition, the extrinsic thermal conductivity of phosphorene is reviewed by discussing the effects of strain and substrate, together with phosphorene based heterostructures and nanoribbons. This Review summarizes the progress of thermal transport in phosphorene from both theoretical calculations and experimental measurements, which would be of significance to the design and development of efficient phosphorene based nanoelectronics. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Ductile fracture estimation of reactor pressure vessel under thermal shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Jun; Sakai, Shinsuke; Okamura, Hiroyuki

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents a new scheme for the estimation of unstable ductile fracture of a reactor pressure vessel under thermal shock conditions. First, it is shown that the bending moment applied to the cracked section can be evaluated by considering the plastic deformation of the cracked section and the thermal deformation of the shell. As the contribution of the local thermal stress to the J-value is negligible, the J-value under thermal shock can be easily evaluated by using fully plastic solutions for the cracked part. Next, the phenomena of ductile fracture under thermal shock are expressed on the load-versus-displacement diagram which enables us to grasp the transient phenomena visually. In addition, several parametrical surveys are performed on the above diagram concerning the variation of (1) thermal shock conditions, (2) initial crack length, and (3) J-resistance curve (i.e. embrittlement by neutron irradiation). (author)

  16. Battery Pack Thermal Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pesaran, Ahmad

    2016-06-14

    This presentation describes the thermal design of battery packs at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. A battery thermal management system essential for xEVs for both normal operation during daily driving (achieving life and performance) and off-normal operation during abuse conditions (achieving safety). The battery thermal management system needs to be optimized with the right tools for the lowest cost. Experimental tools such as NREL's isothermal battery calorimeter, thermal imaging, and heat transfer setups are needed. Thermal models and computer-aided engineering tools are useful for robust designs. During abuse conditions, designs should prevent cell-to-cell propagation in a module/pack (i.e., keep the fire small and manageable). NREL's battery ISC device can be used for evaluating the robustness of a module/pack to cell-to-cell propagation.

  17. Solar thermal aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Charles L.

    2007-09-18

    A solar thermal powered aircraft powered by heat energy from the sun. A heat engine, such as a Stirling engine, is carried by the aircraft body for producing power for a propulsion mechanism, such as a propeller. The heat engine has a thermal battery in thermal contact with it so that heat is supplied from the thermal battery. A solar concentrator, such as reflective parabolic trough, is movably connected to an optically transparent section of the aircraft body for receiving and concentrating solar energy from within the aircraft. Concentrated solar energy is collected by a heat collection and transport conduit, and heat transported to the thermal battery. A solar tracker includes a heliostat for determining optimal alignment with the sun, and a drive motor actuating the solar concentrator into optimal alignment with the sun based on a determination by the heliostat.

  18. Tunable thermal link

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chih-Wei; Majumdar, Arunava; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2014-07-15

    Disclosed is a device whereby the thermal conductance of a multiwalled nanostructure such as a multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) can be controllably and reversibly tuned by sliding one or more outer shells with respect to the inner core. As one example, the thermal conductance of an MWCNT dropped to 15% of the original value after extending the length of the MWCNT by 190 nm. The thermal conductivity returned when the tube was contracted. The device may comprise numbers of multiwalled nanotubes or other graphitic layers connected to a heat source and a heat drain and various means for tuning the overall thermal conductance for applications in structure heat management, heat flow in nanoscale or microscale devices and thermal logic devices.

  19. Bilateral prophylactic mastectomy in women with inherited risk of breast cancer--prevalence of pain and discomfort, impact on sexuality, quality of life and feelings of regret two years after surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gahm, Jessica; Wickman, Marie; Brandberg, Yvonne

    2010-12-01

    Mastectomy due to breast cancer is associated with chronic pain and a negative impact on sexuality. The purposes of the study were to analyze the prevalence of pain and discomfort in the breasts, impact on sexuality, quality of life, and feelings of regret after bilateral prophylactic mastectomy and immediate reconstruction with implants. Fifty-nine women operated 2004-2006 were included. A questionnaire was sent out two years after the procedure. Complications and re-operations were recorded. Mean follow-up time was 29 months. 93% of patients answered the questionnaire. 69% reported pain and 71% discomfort in the breasts. Lost or much reduced sexual sensations were reported by 85% and enjoyment of sex was negatively impacted for 75% of patients. Quality of life was not affected and feelings of regret were almost non-existent. It is important to inform women approaching this prophylactic procedure about the risk of having unwanted secondary effects. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Thermal imaging in medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaka Ogorevc

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available AbstractIntroduction: Body temperature monitoring is one of the oldest and still one of the most basic diagnostic methods in medicine. In recent years thermal imaging has been increasingly used in measurements of body temperature for diagnostic purposes. Thermal imaging is non-invasive, non-contact method for measuring surface body temperature. Method is quick, painless and patient is not exposed to ionizing radiation or any other body burden.Application of thermal imaging in medicine: Pathological conditions can be indicated as hyper- or hypothermic patterns in many cases. Thermal imaging is presented as a diagnostic method, which can detect such thermal anomalies. This article provides an overview of the thermal imaging applications in various fields of medicine. Thermal imaging has proven to be a suitable method for human febrile temperature screening, for the detection of sites of fractures and infections, a reliable diagnostic tool in the detection of breast cancer and determining the type of skin cancer tumour. It is useful in monitoring the course of a therapy after spinal cord injury, in the detection of food allergies and detecting complications at hemodialysis and is also very effective at the course of treatment of breast reconstruction after mastectomy. With thermal imaging is possible to determine the degrees of burns and early detection of osteomyelitis in diabetic foot phenomenon. The most common and the oldest application of thermal imaging in medicine is the field of rheumatology.Recommendations for use and standards: Essential performance of a thermal imaging camera, measurement method, preparation of a patient and environmental conditions are very important for proper interpretation of measurement results in medical applications of thermal imaging. Standard for screening thermographs was formed for the human febrile temperature screening application.Conclusion: Based on presented examples it is shown that thermal imaging can

  1. Thermally Optimized Paradigm of Thermal Management (TOP-M)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-18

    19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER (Include area code) 18-07-2017 Final Technical Jul 2015 - Jul 2017 NICOP - Thermally Optimized Paradigm of Thermal Management ...The main goal of this research was to present a New Thermal Management Approach, which combines thermally aware Very/Ultra Large Scale Integration...SPAD) image sensors were used to demonstrate the new thermal management approach. Thermal management , integrated temperature sensors, Vt extractor

  2. Apollo telescope mount thermal systems unit thermal vacuum test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trucks, H. F.; Hueter, U.; Wise, J. H.; Bachtel, F. D.

    1971-01-01

    The Apollo Telescope Mount's thermal systems unit was utilized to conduct a full-scale thermal vacuum test to verify the thermal design and the analytical techniques used to develop the thermal mathematical models. Thermal vacuum test philosophy, test objectives configuration, test monitoring, environment simulation, vehicle test performance, and data correlation are discussed. Emphasis is placed on planning and execution of the thermal vacuum test with particular attention on problems encountered in conducting a test of this maguitude.

  3. Relationship between thermal expansion coefficient and glass transition temperature in metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, H.; Chen, H.-S.; Inoue, A.

    2008-01-01

    The thermal expansion coefficients of 13 metallic glasses were measured using a thermo-mechanical analyser. A unique correlation was found between the linear thermal expansion coefficient and the glass transition temperature-their product is nearly constant ∼8.24 x 10 -3 . If one assumes the Debye expression for thermal activation, the total linear thermal expansion up to glass transition temperature (T g ) is reduced to 6 x 10 -3 , nearly 25% of that at the fusion of pure metals

  4. Thermal preference predicts animal personality in Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerqueira, Marco; Rey, Sonia; Silva, Tome; Featherstone, Zoe; Crumlish, Margaret; MacKenzie, Simon

    2016-09-01

    Environmental temperature gradients provide habitat structure in which fish orientate and individual thermal choice may reflect an essential integrated response to the environment. The use of subtle thermal gradients likely impacts upon specific physiological and behavioural processes reflected as a suite of traits described by animal personality. In this study, we examine the relationship between thermal choice, animal personality and the impact of infection upon this interaction. We predicted that thermal choice in Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus reflects distinct personality traits and that under a challenge individuals exhibit differential thermal distribution. Nile tilapia were screened following two different protocols: 1) a suite of individual behavioural tests to screen for personality and 2) thermal choice in a custom-built tank with a thermal gradient (TCH tank) ranging from 21 to 33 °C. A first set of fish were screened for behaviour and then thermal preference, and a second set were tested in the opposite fashion: thermal then behaviour. The final thermal distribution of the fish after 48 h was assessed reflecting final thermal preferendum. Additionally, fish were then challenged using a bacterial Streptococcus iniae model infection to assess the behavioural fever response of proactive and reactive fish. Results showed that individuals with preference for higher temperatures were also classified as proactive with behavioural tests and reactive contemporaries chose significantly lower water temperatures. All groups exhibited behavioural fever recovering personality-specific thermal preferences after 5 days. Our results show that thermal preference can be used as a proxy to assess personality traits in Nile tilapia and it is a central factor to understand the adaptive meaning of animal personality within a population. Importantly, response to infection by expressing behavioural fever overrides personality-related thermal choice. © 2016 The Authors

  5. Kinetic Parameters of Thermal Degradation of Polymers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱新生; 程嘉祺

    2003-01-01

    The derivative expressions between activation energy (E) and the temperature at the maximum mass loss rate(Tmax) and between activation energy (E) and exponent (N) were deduced in the light of Arrhenius theory. It was found that the increase of activation energy results in the decrease of exponent and the increase of Tmax. The kinetic parameters were involved in the analysis of the thermal degradation of several polymers. The degradation kinetics of these polymers well complied with the prediction of the derivative expressions for the polymer degradation with single mechanism dominated.

  6. Measurement of thermal conductance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuchnir, M.

    1977-01-01

    The 6-m long, 45-kG, warm-iron superconducting magnets envisioned for the Energy Doubler stage of the Fermilab accelerator require stiff supports with minimized thermal conductances in order to keep the refrigeration power reasonable. The large number of supports involved in the system required a careful study of their heat conduction from the room temperature wall to the intercepting refrigeration at 20 0 K and to the liquid helium. For this purpose the thermal conductance of this support was measured by comparing it with the thermal conductance of a copper strap of known geometry. An association of steady-state thermal analysis and experimental thermal conductivity techniques forms the basis of this method. An important advantage is the automatic simulation of the 20 0 K refrigeration intercept by the copper strap, which simplifies the apparatus considerably. This relative resistance technique, which uses electrical analogy as a guideline, is applicable with no restrictions for materials with temperature-independent thermal conductivity. For other materials the results obtained are functions of the specific temperature interval involved in the measurements. A comprehensive review of the literature on thermal conductivity indicates that this approach has not been used before. A demonstration of its self-consistency is stressed here rather than results obtained for different supports

  7. Model calculation of thermal conductivity in antiferromagnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikhail, I.F.I., E-mail: ifi_mikhail@hotmail.com; Ismail, I.M.M.; Ameen, M.

    2015-11-01

    A theoretical study is given of thermal conductivity in antiferromagnetic materials. The study has the advantage that the three-phonon interactions as well as the magnon phonon interactions have been represented by model operators that preserve the important properties of the exact collision operators. A new expression for thermal conductivity has been derived that involves the same terms obtained in our previous work in addition to two new terms. These two terms represent the conservation and quasi-conservation of wavevector that occur in the three-phonon Normal and Umklapp processes respectively. They gave appreciable contributions to the thermal conductivity and have led to an excellent quantitative agreement with the experimental measurements of the antiferromagnet FeCl{sub 2}. - Highlights: • The Boltzmann equations of phonons and magnons in antiferromagnets have been studied. • Model operators have been used to represent the magnon–phonon and three-phonon interactions. • The models possess the same important properties as the exact operators. • A new expression for the thermal conductivity has been derived. • The results showed a good quantitative agreement with the experimental data of FeCl{sub 2}.

  8. Comparison of UTCI to selected thermal indices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazejczyk, Krzysztof; Epstein, Yoram; Jendritzky, Gerd; Staiger, Henning; Tinz, Birger

    2012-05-01

    Over the past century more than 100 indices have been developed and used to assess bioclimatic conditions for human beings. The majority of these indices are used sporadically or for specific purposes. Some are based on generalized results of measurements (wind chill, cooling power, wet bulb temperature) and some on the empirically observed reactions of the human body to thermal stress (physiological strain, effective temperature). Those indices that are based on human heat balance considerations are referred to as "rational indices". Several simple human heat balance models are known and are used in research and practice. This paper presents a comparative analysis of the newly developed Universal Thermal Climate Index (UTCI), and some of the more prevalent thermal indices. The analysis is based on three groups of data: global data-set, synoptic datasets from Europe, and local scale data from special measurement campaigns of COST Action 730. We found the present indices to express bioclimatic conditions reasonably only under specific meteorological situations, while the UTCI represents specific climates, weather, and locations much better. Furthermore, similar to the human body, the UTCI is very sensitive to changes in ambient stimuli: temperature, solar radiation, wind and humidity. UTCI depicts temporal variability of thermal conditions better than other indices. The UTCI scale is able to express even slight differences in the intensity of meteorological stimuli.

  9. Theory of thermal expansivity and bulk modulus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Munish

    2005-01-01

    The expression for thermal expansivity and bulk modulus, claimed by Shanker et al. to be new [Physica B 233 (1977) 78; 245 (1998) 190; J. Phys. Chem. Solids 59 (1998) 197] are compared with the theory of high pressure-high temperature reported by Kumar and coworkers. It is concluded that the Shanker formulation and the relations based on this are equal to the approach of Kumar et al. up to second order

  10. Thermalized axion inflation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Ricardo Z.; Notari, Alessio, E-mail: rferreira@icc.ub.edu, E-mail: notari@ub.edu [Departament de Física Quàntica i Astrofísica i Institut de Ciències del Cosmos (ICCUB), Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès, 1, E-08028, Barcelona (Spain)

    2017-09-01

    We analyze the dynamics of inflationary models with a coupling of the inflaton φ to gauge fields of the form φ F F-tilde / f , as in the case of axions. It is known that this leads to an instability, with exponential amplification of gauge fields, controlled by the parameter ξ= φ-dot /(2 fH ), which can strongly affect the generation of cosmological perturbations and even the background. We show that scattering rates involving gauge fields can become larger than the expansion rate H , due to the very large occupation numbers, and create a thermal bath of particles of temperature T during inflation. In the thermal regime, energy is transferred to smaller scales, radically modifying the predictions of this scenario. We thus argue that previous constraints on ξ are alleviated. If the gauge fields have Standard Model interactions, which naturally provides reheating, they thermalize already at ξ∼>2.9, before perturbativity constraints and also before backreaction takes place. In absence of SM interactions (i.e. for a dark photon), we find that gauge fields and inflaton perturbations thermalize if ξ∼>3.4; however, observations require ξ∼>6, which is above the perturbativity and backreaction bounds and so a dedicated study is required. After thermalization, though, the system should evolve non-trivially due to the competition between the instability and the gauge field thermal mass. If the thermal mass and the instabilities equilibrate, we expect an equilibrium temperature of T {sub eq} ≅ ξ H / g-bar where g-bar is the effective gauge coupling. Finally, we estimate the spectrum of perturbations if φ is thermal and find that the tensor to scalar ratio is suppressed by H /(2 T ), if tensors do not thermalize.

  11. Thermalized axion inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Ricardo Z.; Notari, Alessio

    2017-09-01

    We analyze the dynamics of inflationary models with a coupling of the inflaton phi to gauge fields of the form phi F tilde F/f, as in the case of axions. It is known that this leads to an instability, with exponential amplification of gauge fields, controlled by the parameter ξ= dot phi/(2fH), which can strongly affect the generation of cosmological perturbations and even the background. We show that scattering rates involving gauge fields can become larger than the expansion rate H, due to the very large occupation numbers, and create a thermal bath of particles of temperature T during inflation. In the thermal regime, energy is transferred to smaller scales, radically modifying the predictions of this scenario. We thus argue that previous constraints on ξ are alleviated. If the gauge fields have Standard Model interactions, which naturally provides reheating, they thermalize already at ξgtrsim2.9, before perturbativity constraints and also before backreaction takes place. In absence of SM interactions (i.e. for a dark photon), we find that gauge fields and inflaton perturbations thermalize if ξgtrsim3.4 however, observations require ξgtrsim6, which is above the perturbativity and backreaction bounds and so a dedicated study is required. After thermalization, though, the system should evolve non-trivially due to the competition between the instability and the gauge field thermal mass. If the thermal mass and the instabilities equilibrate, we expect an equilibrium temperature of Teq simeq ξ H/bar g where bar g is the effective gauge coupling. Finally, we estimate the spectrum of perturbations if phi is thermal and find that the tensor to scalar ratio is suppressed by H/(2T), if tensors do not thermalize.

  12. Evaluating Thermal Comfort in a Naturally Conditioned Office in a Temperate Climate Zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Gallardo

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to determine the optimal approach for evaluating thermal comfort in an office that uses natural ventilation as the main conditioning strategy; the office is located in Quito-Ecuador. The performance of the adaptive model included in CEN Standard EN15251 and the traditional PMV model are compared with reports of thermal environment satisfaction surveys presented simultaneously to all occupants of the office to determine which of the two comfort models is most suitable to evaluate the thermal environment. The results indicate that office occupants have developed some degree of adaptation to the climatic conditions of the city where the office is located (which only demands heating operation, and tend to accept and even prefer lower operative temperatures than those considered optimum by applying the PMV model. This is an indication that occupants of naturally conditioned buildings are usually able to match their comfort temperature to their normal environment. Therefore, the application of the adaptive model included in CEN Standard EN15251 seems like the optimal approach for evaluating thermal comfort in naturally conditioned buildings, because it takes into consideration the adaptive principle that indicates that if a change occurs such as to produce discomfort, people tend to react in ways which restore their comfort.

  13. Casting thermal simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shamsuddin bin Sulaiman

    1994-01-01

    The whole of this study is concerned with process simulation in casting processes. This study describes the application of the finite element method as an aid to simulating the thermal design of a high pressure die casting die by analysing the cooling transients in the casting cycle. Two types of investigation were carried out to model the linear and non-linear cooling behavior with consideration of a thermal interface effect. The simulated cooling for different stages were presented in temperature contour form. These illustrate the successful application of the Finite Element Method to model the process and they illustrate the significance of the thermal interface at low pressure

  14. Advanced thermal management materials

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Guosheng; Kuang, Ken

    2012-01-01

    ""Advanced Thermal Management Materials"" provides a comprehensive and hands-on treatise on the importance of thermal packaging in high performance systems. These systems, ranging from active electronically-scanned radar arrays to web servers, require components that can dissipate heat efficiently. This requires materials capable of dissipating heat and maintaining compatibility with the packaging and dye. Its coverage includes all aspects of thermal management materials, both traditional and non-traditional, with an emphasis on metal based materials. An in-depth discussion of properties and m

  15. Proportional and Integral Thermal Control System for Large Scale Heating Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischer, Van Tran

    2015-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration Armstrong Flight Research Center (Edwards, California) Flight Loads Laboratory is a unique national laboratory that supports thermal, mechanical, thermal/mechanical, and structural dynamics research and testing. A Proportional Integral thermal control system was designed and implemented to support thermal tests. A thermal control algorithm supporting a quartz lamp heater was developed based on the Proportional Integral control concept and a linearized heating process. The thermal control equations were derived and expressed in terms of power levels, integral gain, proportional gain, and differences between thermal setpoints and skin temperatures. Besides the derived equations, user's predefined thermal test information generated in the form of thermal maps was used to implement the thermal control system capabilities. Graphite heater closed-loop thermal control and graphite heater open-loop power level were added later to fulfill the demand for higher temperature tests. Verification and validation tests were performed to ensure that the thermal control system requirements were achieved. This thermal control system has successfully supported many milestone thermal and thermal/mechanical tests for almost a decade with temperatures ranging from 50 F to 3000 F and temperature rise rates from -10 F/s to 70 F/s for a variety of test articles having unique thermal profiles and test setups.

  16. Gene expression profiling of C. elegans under various thermal conditions

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To realistically evaluate the effects of the environment in space it is necessary to understand the effects of external factors during sample transport from Earth to...

  17. Propolis Modulates Fibronectin Expression in the Matrix of Thermal Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawel Olczyk

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to assess the propolis effect on fibronectin metabolism in the course of burn wounds healing process. A model of burn wound healing of pig skin was applied. The amount of the released glycoprotein was assessed by a surface plasmon resonance. The profile of extracted fibronectin components was also assessed by an electrophoresis in polyacrylamide gel, with a subsequent immunodetection by Western Blotting. Propolis burn treatment decreased the release of fibronectin components from healing wounds in relation to damages treated with silver sulfadiazine. The main reason of decreased extraction of fibronectin components from wounds treated with propolis was a substantial decrease of degradation product release of the mentioned glycoprotein, which was observed particularly from the 3rd to 5th day of the repair. Wounds treatment with propolis demonstrated, especially in relation to damages treated with silver sulfadiazine, the decreased release of synthesized fibronectin molecules. The obtained results suggest that propolis modifies fibronectin metabolism in the course of wound healing process. The influence of propolis is reflected in prevention of fibronectin biosynthesis as well as its degradation in the wound area. The above-mentioned metabolic changes may decrease the risk of complications in the repair wounds process.

  18. Fluctuation expressions for fast thermal transport processes: Vortex viscosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, D.J.; Hanley, H.J.M.

    1982-01-01

    The vortex viscosity of a model diatomic fluid is calculated using both equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular dynamics. The two calculations agree within statistical uncertainties. The results show that vortex viscosity does not have a conventional Kubo-Green relation. An argument as to why this is so is presented

  19. Thermal explosion models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ping, Tso Chin [Malaya Univ., Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    1984-12-01

    The phenomenon of thermal explosion arises in several important safety problems, yet scientists are still baffled by its origin. This article reviews some of the models that have been proposed to explain the phenomenon.

  20. Thermal Properties Measurement Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmack, Jon [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Braase, Lori [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Papesch, Cynthia [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hurley, David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Tonks, Michael [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Zhang, Yongfeng [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Gofryk, Krzysztof [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Harp, Jason [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Fielding, Randy [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Knight, Collin [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Meyer, Mitch [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-08-01

    The Thermal Properties Measurement Report summarizes the research, development, installation, and initial use of significant experimental thermal property characterization capabilities at the INL in FY 2015. These new capabilities were used to characterize a U3Si2 (candidate Accident Tolerant) fuel sample fabricated at the INL. The ability to perform measurements at various length scales is important and provides additional data that is not currently in the literature. However, the real value of the data will be in accomplishing a phenomenological understanding of the thermal conductivity in fuels and the ties to predictive modeling. Thus, the MARMOT advanced modeling and simulation capability was utilized to illustrate how the microstructural data can be modeled and compared with bulk characterization data. A scientific method was established for thermal property measurement capability on irradiated nuclear fuel samples, which will be installed in the Irradiated Material Characterization Laboratory (IMCL).

  1. GAPCON-THERMAL-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohr, C.L.; Lanning, D.D.; Panisko, F.E.

    1979-01-01

    The fuel performance code GAPCON-THERMAL-3 has been expanded to include recent transient material deformation constitutive relations and the FLECHT heat transfer correlation. The modifications make it possible to compute the thermal and mechanical response of nuclear fuel to postulated Loss of Coolant Accidents (LOCA). The numerical formulation has the capability of predicting both steady state and transient behavior of a fuel rod using a single analytical procedure. GAPCON-THERMAL-3 (G-T-3) uses a specialized finite element procedure for mechanics predictions and the method of weighted residuals and finite difference techniques to compute temperature and thermal behavior. Fuel behavior, gas release models, gas conductance models, and stored energy calculations are applicable to both steady state and transient conditions. The code has been used to perform scoping analysis for in-reactor LOCA simulation testing. (orig.)

  2. Thermal explosion models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tso Chin Ping

    1984-01-01

    The phenomenon of thermal explosion arises in several important safety problems, yet scientists are still baffled by its origin. This article reviews some of the models that have been proposed to explain the phenomenon. (author)

  3. Thermal Cameras and Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gade, Rikke; Moeslund, Thomas B.

    2014-01-01

    Thermal cameras are passive sensors that capture the infrared radiation emitted by all objects with a temperature above absolute zero. This type of camera was originally developed as a surveillance and night vision tool for the military, but recently the price has dropped, significantly opening up...... a broader field of applications. Deploying this type of sensor in vision systems eliminates the illumination problems of normal greyscale and RGB cameras. This survey provides an overview of the current applications of thermal cameras. Applications include animals, agriculture, buildings, gas detection......, industrial, and military applications, as well as detection, tracking, and recognition of humans. Moreover, this survey describes the nature of thermal radiation and the technology of thermal cameras....

  4. Thermal Acoustic Fatigue Apparatus

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Thermal Acoustic Fatigue Apparatus (TAFA) is a progressive wave tube test facility that is used to test structures for dynamic response and sonic fatigue due to...

  5. Compliant thermal microactuators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonsmann, Jacques; Sigmund, Ole; Bouwstra, Siebe

    1999-01-01

    Two dimensional compliant metallic thermal microactuators are designed using topology optimisation, and microfabricated using rapid prototyping techniques. Structures are characterised using advanced image analysis, yielding a very high precision. Characterised structures behave in accordance...

  6. Thermal soil remediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, D.

    1999-01-01

    The environmental properties and business aspects of thermal soil remediation are described. Thermal soil remediation is considered as being the best option in cleaning contaminated soil for reuse. The thermal desorption process can remove hydrocarbons such as gasoline, kerosene and crude oil, from contaminated soil. Nelson Environmental Remediation (NER) Ltd. uses a mobile thermal desorption unit (TDU) with high temperature capabilities. NER has successfully applied the technology to target heavy end hydrocarbon removal from Alberta's gumbo clay in all seasons. The TDU consist of a feed system, a counter flow rotary drum kiln, a baghouse particulate removal system, and a secondary combustion chamber known as an afterburner. The technology has proven to be cost effective and more efficient than bioremediation and landfarming

  7. Thermal springs of Wyoming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breckenridge, R.M.; Hinckley, B.S.

    1978-01-01

    This bulletin attempts, first, to provide a comprehensive inventory of the thermal springs of Wyoming; second, to explore the geologic and hydrologic factors producing these springs; and, third, to analyze the springs collectively as an indicator of the geothermal resources of the state. A general discussion of the state's geology and the mechanisms of thermal spring production, along with a brief comparison of Wyoming's springs with worldwide thermal features are included. A discussion of geothermal energy resources, a guide for visitors, and an analysis of the flora of Wyoming's springs follow the spring inventory. The listing and analysis of Wyoming's thermal springs are arranged alphabetically by county. Tabulated data are given on elevation, ownership, access, water temperature, and flow rate. Each spring system is described and its history, general characteristics and uses, geology, hydrology, and chemistry are discussed. (MHR)

  8. Controlled Thermal Expansion Alloys

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — There has always been a need for controlled thermal expansion alloys suitable for mounting optics and detectors in spacecraft applications.  These alloys help...

  9. Nanoscale thermal transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, David G.; Ford, Wayne K.; Goodson, Kenneth E.; Mahan, Gerald D.; Majumdar, Arun; Maris, Humphrey J.; Merlin, Roberto; Phillpot, Simon R.

    2003-01-01

    Rapid progress in the synthesis and processing of materials with structure on nanometer length scales has created a demand for greater scientific understanding of thermal transport in nanoscale devices, individual nanostructures, and nanostructured materials. This review emphasizes developments in experiment, theory, and computation that have occurred in the past ten years and summarizes the present status of the field. Interfaces between materials become increasingly important on small length scales. The thermal conductance of many solid-solid interfaces have been studied experimentally but the range of observed interface properties is much smaller than predicted by simple theory. Classical molecular dynamics simulations are emerging as a powerful tool for calculations of thermal conductance and phonon scattering, and may provide for a lively interplay of experiment and theory in the near term. Fundamental issues remain concerning the correct definitions of temperature in nonequilibrium nanoscale systems. Modern Si microelectronics are now firmly in the nanoscale regime—experiments have demonstrated that the close proximity of interfaces and the extremely small volume of heat dissipation strongly modifies thermal transport, thereby aggravating problems of thermal management. Microelectronic devices are too large to yield to atomic-level simulation in the foreseeable future and, therefore, calculations of thermal transport must rely on solutions of the Boltzmann transport equation; microscopic phonon scattering rates needed for predictive models are, even for Si, poorly known. Low-dimensional nanostructures, such as carbon nanotubes, are predicted to have novel transport properties; the first quantitative experiments of the thermal conductivity of nanotubes have recently been achieved using microfabricated measurement systems. Nanoscale porosity decreases the permittivity of amorphous dielectrics but porosity also strongly decreases the thermal conductivity. The

  10. Building automation: Photovoltaic assisted thermal comfort management system for energy saving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyasudin Basir Khan, M.; Jidin, Razali; Pasupuleti, Jagadeesh; Azwa Shaaya, Sharifah

    2013-06-01

    Building automation plays an important key role in the means to reduce building energy consumption and to provide comfort for building occupants. It is often that air conditioning system operating features ignored in building automation which can result in thermal discomfort among building occupants. Most automation system for building is expensive and incurs high maintenance cost. Such system also does not support electricity demand side management system such as load shifting. This paper discusses on centralized monitoring system for room temperature and photovoltaic (PV) output for feasibility study of PV assisted air conditioning system in small office buildings. The architecture of the system consists of PV modules and sensor nodes located at each room. Wireless sensor network technology (WSN) been used for data transmission. The data from temperature sensors and PV modules transmitted to the host personal computer (PC) wirelessly using Zigbee modules. Microcontroller based USB data acquisition device used to receive data from sensor nodes and displays the data on PC.

  11. Building automation: Photovoltaic assisted thermal comfort management system for energy saving

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M Reyasudin Basir; Jidin, Razali; Shaaya, Sharifah Azwa; Pasupuleti, Jagadeesh

    2013-01-01

    Building automation plays an important key role in the means to reduce building energy consumption and to provide comfort for building occupants. It is often that air conditioning system operating features ignored in building automation which can result in thermal discomfort among building occupants. Most automation system for building is expensive and incurs high maintenance cost. Such system also does not support electricity demand side management system such as load shifting. This paper discusses on centralized monitoring system for room temperature and photovoltaic (PV) output for feasibility study of PV assisted air conditioning system in small office buildings. The architecture of the system consists of PV modules and sensor nodes located at each room. Wireless sensor network technology (WSN) been used for data transmission. The data from temperature sensors and PV modules transmitted to the host personal computer (PC) wirelessly using Zigbee modules. Microcontroller based USB data acquisition device used to receive data from sensor nodes and displays the data on PC.

  12. ThermalTracker Software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-08-10

    The software processes recorded thermal video and detects the flight tracks of birds and bats that passed through the camera's field of view. The output is a set of images that show complete flight tracks for any detections, with the direction of travel indicated and the thermal image of the animal delineated. A report of the descriptive features of each detected track is also output in the form of a comma-separated value text file.

  13. Correlation of physical properties of ceramic materials with resistance to fracture by thermal shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidman, W G; Bobrowsky, A R

    1949-01-01

    An analysis is made to determine which properties of materials affect their resistance to fracture by thermal stresses.From this analysis, a parameter is evaluated that is correlated with the resistance of ceramic materials to fracture by thermal shock as experimentally determined. This parameter may be used to predict qualitatively the resistance of a material to fracture by thermal shock. Resistance to fracture by thermal shock is shown to be dependent upon the following material properties: thermal conductivity, tensile strength, thermal expansion, and ductility modulus. For qualitative prediction of resistance of materials to fracture by thermal shock, the parameter may be expressed as the product of thermal conductivity and tensile strength divided by the product of linear coefficient of thermal expansion and ductility modulus of the specimen.

  14. Thermal Mud Molecular Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ersin Odabasi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Thermal mud (peloids, which are frequently used for thermal therapy purposes consist of organic and inorganic (minerals compounds in general. Organic structure is formed after a variety of chemical processes occurring in decades and comprise of a very complex structure. Stagnant water environment, herbal diversity, microorganism multiplicity and time are crucial players to form the structure. Data regarding description of organic compounds are very limited. Nowadays, it was clearly understood that a variety of compounds those are neglected in daily practice are found in thermal mud after GC-MS and similar methods are being frequently used. Those compounds which are biologically active are humic compounds, carboxylic acids, terpenoids, steroids and fatty acids. By comprising the thermal mud, these different compound groups which are related to divers areas from cosmetology to inflammation, make the thermal mud very meaningful in the treatment of human disease. In this review, it was tried to put forward the effects of several molecule groups those consisting of the thermal mud structure. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2014; 13(3.000: 257-264

  15. Battery Thermal Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keyser, Matthew A [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-08-08

    The operating temperature is critical in achieving the right balance between performance, cost, and life for both Li-ion batteries and ultracapacitors. The chemistries of advanced energy-storage devices - such as lithium-based batteries - are very sensitive to operating temperature. High temperatures degrade batteries faster while low temperatures decrease their power and capacity, affecting vehicle range, performance, and cost. Understanding heat generation in battery systems - from the individual cells within a module, to the inter-connects between the cells, and across the entire battery system - is imperative for designing effective thermal-management systems and battery packs. At NREL, we have developed unique capabilities to measure the thermal properties of cells and evaluate thermal performance of battery packs (air or liquid cooled). We also use our electro-thermal finite element models to analyze the thermal performance of battery systems in order to aid battery developers with improved thermal designs. NREL's tools are used to meet the weight, life, cost, and volume goals set by the U.S. Department of Energy for electric drive vehicles.

  16. Local Thermal Insulating Materials For Thermal Energy Storage ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thermal insulation is one of the most important components of a thermal energy storage system. In this paper the thermal properties of selected potential local materials which can be used for high temperature insulation are presented. Thermal properties of seven different samples were measured. Samples consisted of: ...

  17. High thermal conductivity materials for thermal management applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broido, David A.; Reinecke, Thomas L.; Lindsay, Lucas R.

    2018-05-29

    High thermal conductivity materials and methods of their use for thermal management applications are provided. In some embodiments, a device comprises a heat generating unit (304) and a thermally conductive unit (306, 308, 310) in thermal communication with the heat generating unit (304) for conducting heat generated by the heat generating unit (304) away from the heat generating unit (304), the thermally conductive unit (306, 308, 310) comprising a thermally conductive compound, alloy or composite thereof. The thermally conductive compound may include Boron Arsenide, Boron Antimonide, Germanium Carbide and Beryllium Selenide.

  18. Microwave Thermal Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkin, Kevin L. G.; Lambot, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    We have conducted research in microwave thermal propulsion as part of the space exploration access technologies (SEAT) research program, a cooperative agreement (NNX09AF52A) between NASA and Carnegie Mellon University. The SEAT program commenced on the 19th of February 2009 and concluded on the 30th of September 2015. The DARPA/NASA Millimeter-wave Thermal Launch System (MTLS) project subsumed the SEAT program from May 2012 to March 2014 and one of us (Parkin) served as its principal investigator and chief engineer. The MTLS project had no final report of its own, so we have included the MTLS work in this report and incorporate its conclusions here. In the six years from 2009 until 2015 there has been significant progress in millimeter-wave thermal rocketry (a subset of microwave thermal rocketry), most of which has been made under the auspices of the SEAT and MTLS programs. This final report is intended for multiple audiences. For researchers, we present techniques that we have developed to simplify and quantify the performance of thermal rockets and their constituent technologies. For program managers, we detail the facilities that we have built and the outcomes of experiments that were conducted using them. We also include incomplete and unfruitful lines of research. For decision-makers, we introduce the millimeter-wave thermal rocket in historical context. Considering the economic significance of space launch, we present a brief but significant cost-benefit analysis, for the first time showing that there is a compelling economic case for replacing conventional rockets with millimeter-wave thermal rockets.

  19. Thermal fatigue. Materials modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegele, D.; Fingerhuth, J.; Mrovec, M.

    2012-01-01

    In the framework of the ongoing joint research project 'Thermal Fatigue - Basics of the system-, outflow- and material-characteristics of piping under thermal fatigue' funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) fundamental numerical and experimental investigations on the material behavior under transient thermal-mechanical stress conditions (high cycle fatigue V HCF and low cycle fatigue - LCF) are carried out. The primary objective of the research is the further development of simulation methods applied in safety evaluations of nuclear power plant components. In this context the modeling of crack initiation and growth inside the material structure induced by varying thermal loads are of particular interest. Therefore, three scientific working groups organized in three sub-projects of the joint research project are dealing with numerical modeling and simulation at different levels ranging from atomistic to micromechanics and continuum mechanics, and in addition corresponding experimental data for the validation of the numerical results and identification of the parameters of the associated material models are provided. The present contribution is focused on the development and experimental validation of material models and methods to characterize the damage evolution and the life cycle assessment as a result of thermal cyclic loading. The individual purposes of the subprojects are as following: - Material characterization, Influence of temperature and surface roughness on fatigue endurances, biaxial thermo-mechanical behavior, experiments on structural behavior of cruciform specimens and scatter band analysis (IfW Darmstadt) - Life cycle assessment with micromechanical material models (MPA Stuttgart) - Life cycle assessment with atomistic and damage-mechanical material models associated with material tests under thermal fatigue (Fraunhofer IWM, Freiburg) - Simulation of fatigue crack growth, opening and closure of a short crack under

  20. Thermal management of space stations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Thermal management aims at making full use of energy resources available in the space station to reduce energy consumption, waste heat rejection and the weight of the station. It is an extension of the thermal control. This discussion introduces the concept and development of thermal management, presents the aspects of thermal management and further extends its application to subsystems of the space station.

  1. Thermal turbulent convection: thermal plumes and fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibert, M.

    2007-10-01

    In this study we investigate the phenomenon of thermal turbulent convection in new and unprecedented ways. The first system we studied experimentally is an infinite vertical channel, where a constant vertical mean gradient of temperature exists. Inside this channel the average mass flux is null. The results obtained from our measurements reveal that the flow is mainly inertial; indeed the dissipative coefficients (here the viscosity) play a role only to define a coherence length L. This length is the distance over which the thermal plumes can be considered as 'free falling' objects. The horizontal transport, of heat and momentum, is entirely due to fluctuations. The associated 'mixing length' is small compared to the channel width. In the other hand, the vertical heat transport is due to coherent structures: the heat plumes. Those objects were also investigated in a Lagrangian study of the flow in the bulk of a Rayleigh-Benard cell. The probe, which has the same density as the fluid used in this experiment, is a sphere of 2 cm in diameter with embarked thermometers and radio-emitter. The heat plumes transport it, which allows a statistical study of such objects. (author)

  2. Robust reflective ghost imaging against different partially polarized thermal light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong-Guo; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Rui-Xue; Zhang, De-Jian; Liu, Hong-Chao; Li, Zong-Guo; Xiong, Jun

    2018-03-01

    We theoretically study the influence of degree of polarization (DOP) of thermal light on the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of the reflective ghost imaging (RGI), which is a novel and indirect imaging modality. An expression for the CNR of RGI with partially polarized thermal light is carefully derived, which suggests a weak dependence of CNR on the DOP, especially when the ratio of the object size to the speckle size of thermal light has a large value. Different from conventional imaging approaches, our work reveals that RGI is much more robust against the DOP of the light source, which thereby has advantages in practical applications, such as remote sensing.

  3. Pressurized Thermal Shock, Pts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, C.

    2008-01-01

    Pressurized Thermal Shock (Pts) refers to a condition that challenges the integrity of the reactor pressure vessel. The root cause of this problem is the radiation embrittlement of the reactor vessel. This embrittlement leads to an increase in the reference temperature for nil ductility transition (RTNDT). RTNDT can increase to the point where the reactor vessel material can loose fracture toughness during overcooling events. The analysis of the risk of having a Pts for a specific plant is a multi-disciplinary problem involving probabilistic risk analysis (PRA), thermal-hydraulic analysis, and ultimately a structural and fracture analysis of the vessel wall. The PRA effort involves the postulation of overcooling events and ultimately leads to an integrated risk analysis. The thermal-hydraulic effort involves the difficult task of predicting the system behavior during a postulated overcooling scenario with a special emphasis on predicting the thermal and mechanic loadings on the reactor pressure vessel wall. The structural and fracture analysis of the reactor vessel wall relies on the thermal-hydraulic conditions as boundary conditions. The US experience has indicated that medium and large diameter primary system breaks dominate the risk of Pts along with scenarios that involve a stuck open valve (and associated system cooldown) that recloses resulting in system re-pressurization while the vessel wall is cool.

  4. Thermal Arc Spray Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafiz Abd Malek, Muhamad; Hayati Saad, Nor; Kiyai Abas, Sunhaji; Mohd Shah, Noriyati

    2013-06-01

    Usage of protective coating for corrosion protection was on highly demand during the past decade; and thermal spray coating played a major part during that time. In recent years, the thermal arc spray coating becomes a popular coating. Many big players in oil and gas such as PETRONAS, EXXON MOBIL and SHELL in Malaysia tend to use the coating on steel structure as a corrosion protection. Further developments in coating processes, the devices, and raw materials have led to expansion of functional coatings and applications scope from conventional coating to specialized industries. It is widely used because of its ability to withstand high process temperature, offer advantages in efficiency, lower cost and acts as a corrosion protection. Previous research also indicated that the thermal arc spray offers better coating properties compared to other methods of spray. This paper reviews some critical area of thermal spray coating by discussing the process/parameter of thermal arc spray technology and quality control of coating. Coating performance against corrosion, wear and special characteristic of coating are also described. The field application of arc spray technology are demonstrated and reviewed.

  5. Thermal Arc Spray Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malek, Muhamad Hafiz Abd; Saad, Nor Hayati; Abas, Sunhaji Kiyai; Shah, Noriyati Mohd

    2013-01-01

    Usage of protective coating for corrosion protection was on highly demand during the past decade; and thermal spray coating played a major part during that time. In recent years, the thermal arc spray coating becomes a popular coating. Many big players in oil and gas such as PETRONAS, EXXON MOBIL and SHELL in Malaysia tend to use the coating on steel structure as a corrosion protection. Further developments in coating processes, the devices, and raw materials have led to expansion of functional coatings and applications scope from conventional coating to specialized industries. It is widely used because of its ability to withstand high process temperature, offer advantages in efficiency, lower cost and acts as a corrosion protection. Previous research also indicated that the thermal arc spray offers better coating properties compared to other methods of spray. This paper reviews some critical area of thermal spray coating by discussing the process/parameter of thermal arc spray technology and quality control of coating. Coating performance against corrosion, wear and special characteristic of coating are also described. The field application of arc spray technology are demonstrated and reviewed.

  6. Direct thermal dyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlinger, Edward

    1990-07-01

    Direct thermal dyes are members of a class of compounds referred to in the imaging industry as color formers or leuco dyes. The oldest members of that class have simple triarylmethane structures, and have been employed for years in various dyeing applications. More complex triarylmethane compounds, such as phthalides and fluorans, are now used in various imaging systems to produce color. Color is derived from all of these compounds via the same mechanism, on a molecular level. That is, an event of activation produces a highly resonating cationic system whose interaction with incident light produces reflected light of a specific color. The activation event in the case of a direct thermal system is the creation of a melt on the paper involving dye and an acidic developer. The three major performance parameters in a thermal system are background color, image density, and image stability. The three major dye physical parameters affecting thermal performance are chemical constituency, purity, and particle size. Those dyes having the best combination of characteristics which can also be manufactured economically dominate the marketplace. Manufacturing high performance dyes for the thermal market involves multi-step, convergent reaction sequences performed on large scale. Intermediates must be manufactured at the right time, and at the right quality to be useful.

  7. Thermal comfort in air-conditioned buildings in hot and humid climates--why are we not getting it right?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekhar, S C

    2016-02-01

    While there are plenty of anecdotal experiences of overcooled buildings in summer, evidence from field studies suggests that there is indeed an issue of overcooling in tropical buildings. The findings suggest that overcooled buildings are not a consequence of occupant preference but more like an outcome of the HVAC system design and operation. Occupants' adaptation in overcooled indoor environments through additional clothing cannot be regarded as an effective mitigating strategy for cold thermal discomfort. In the last two decades or so, several field studies and field environmental chamber studies in the tropics provided evidence for occupants' preference for a warmer temperature with adaptation methods such as elevated air speeds. It is important to bear in mind that indoor humidity levels are not compromised as they could have an impact on the inhaled air condition that could eventually affect perceived air quality. This review article has attempted to track significant developments in our understanding of the thermal comfort issues in air-conditioned office and educational buildings in hot and humid climates in the last 25 years, primarily on occupant preference for thermal comfort in such climates. The issue of overcooled buildings, by design intent or otherwise, is discussed in some detail. Finally, the article has explored some viable adaptive thermal comfort options that show considerable promise for not only improving thermal comfort in tropical buildings but are also energy efficient and could be seen as sustainable solutions. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Thermal conductivity of electron-doped CaMnO3 perovskites: Local lattice distortions and optical phonon thermal excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yang; Sui Yu; Wang Xianjie; Su Wenhui; Liu Xiaoyang; Fan, Hong Jin

    2010-01-01

    The thermal transport properties of a series of electron-doped CaMnO 3 perovskites have been investigated. Throughout the temperature range 5-300 K, phonon thermal conductivity is dominant, and both electron and spin wave contributions are negligible. The short phonon mean free paths in this system result in the relatively low thermal conductivities. The strong phonon scatterings stem from the A-site mismatch and bond-length fluctuations induced by local distortions of MnO 6 octahedra. The thermal conductivity in the magnetically ordered state is enhanced as a result of the decrease in spin-phonon scattering. The results also indicate that above the magnetic ordering temperature, observable thermal excitation of optical phonons occurs. The contribution of optical phonons to thermal conductivity becomes non-negligible and is proposed to play an important role in the glass-like thermal transport behavior (i.e. positive temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity) in the paramagnetic state. These features can be understood in terms of an expression of thermal conductivity that includes both acoustic and optical phonon terms.

  9. Thermal sensations and comfort investigations in transient conditions in tropical office.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlan, Nur Dalilah; Gital, Yakubu Yau

    2016-05-01

    The study was done to identify affective and sensory responses observed as a result of hysteresis effects in transient thermal conditions consisting of warm-neutral and neutral - warm performed in a quasi-experiment setting. Air-conditioned building interiors in hot-humid areas have resulted in thermal discomfort and health risks for people moving into and out of buildings. Reports have shown that the instantaneous change in air temperature can cause abrupt thermoregulation responses. Thermal sensation vote (TSV) and thermal comfort vote (TCV) assessments as a consequence of moving through spaces with distinct thermal conditions were conducted in an existing single-story office in a hot-humid microclimate, maintained at an air temperature 24 °C (± 0.5), relative humidity 51% (± 7), air velocity 0.5 m/s (± 0.5), and mean radiant temperature (MRT) 26.6 °C (± 1.2). The measured office is connected to a veranda that showed the following semi-outdoor temperatures: air temperature 35 °C (± 2.1), relative humidity 43% (± 7), air velocity 0.4 m/s (± 0.4), and MRT 36.4 °C (± 2.9). Subjective assessments from 36 college-aged participants consisting of thermal sensations, preferences and comfort votes were correlated against a steady state predicted mean vote (PMV) model. Local skin temperatures on the forehead and dorsal left hand were included to observe physiological responses due to thermal transition. TSV for veranda-office transition showed that no significant means difference with TSV office-veranda transition were found. However, TCV collected from warm-neutral (-0.24, ± 1.2) and neutral-warm (-0.72, ± 1.3) conditions revealed statistically significant mean differences (p thermal transition after travel from warm-neutral-warm conditions did not replicate the hysteresis effects of brief, slightly cool, thermal sensations found in previous laboratory experiments. These findings also indicate that PMV is an acceptable alternative to predict thermal

  10. Fuzzy logic-based advanced on–off control for thermal comfort in residential buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Chang-Soon; Hyun, Chang-Ho; Park, Mignon

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Fuzzy logic-based advanced on–off control is proposed. • An anticipative control mechanism is implemented by using fuzzy theory. • Novel thermal analysis program including solar irradiation as a factor is developed. • The proposed controller solves over-heating and under-heating thermal problems. • Solar energy compensation method is applied to compensate for the solar energy. - Abstract: In this paper, an advanced on–off control method based on fuzzy logic is proposed for maintaining thermal comfort in residential buildings. Due to the time-lag of the control systems and the late building thermal response, an anticipative control mechanism is required to reduce energy loss and thermal discomfort. The proposed controller is implemented based on an on–off controller combined with a fuzzy algorithm. On–off control was chosen over other conventional control methods because of its structural simplicity. However, because conventional on–off control has a fixed operating range and a limited ability for improvements in control performance, fuzzy theory can be applied to overcome these limitations. Furthermore, a fuzzy-based solar energy compensation algorithm can be applied to the proposed controller to compensate for the energy gained from solar radiation according to the time of day. Simulations were conducted to compare the proposed controller with a conventional on–off controller under identical external conditions such as outdoor temperature and solar energy; these simulations were carried out by using a previously reported thermal analysis program that was modified to consider such external conditions. In addition, experiments were conducted in a residential building called Green Home Plus, in which hydronic radiant floor heating is used; in these experiments, the proposed system performed better than a system employing conventional on–off control methods

  11. Survey of thermal insulation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinoshita, Izumi

    1983-01-01

    Better thermal insulations have been developed to meet the growing demands of industry, and studies on thermal insulation at both high temperature and low temperature have been widely performed. The purpose of this survey is to summarize data on the performances and characteristics of thermal insulation materials and thermal insulation structures (for instance, gas cooled reactors, space vehicles and LNG storage tanks), and to discuss ravious problems regarding the design of thermal insulation structures of pool-type LMFBRs. (author)

  12. Concepts in Thermal Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Blundell, Stephen J

    2006-01-01

    This modern introduction to thermal physics contains a step-by-step presentation of the key concepts. The text is copiously illustrated and each chapter contains several worked examples. - ;An understanding of thermal physics is crucial to much of modern physics, chemistry and engineering. This book provides a modern introduction to the main principles that are foundational to thermal physics, thermodynamics, and statistical mechanics. The key concepts are carefully presented in a clear way, and new ideas are illustrated with copious worked examples as well as a description of the historical background to their discovery. Applications are presented to subjects as. diverse as stellar astrophysics, information and communication theory, condensed matter physics, and climate change. Each chapter concludes with detailed exercises. -

  13. Local quantum thermal susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Pasquale, Antonella; Rossini, Davide; Fazio, Rosario; Giovannetti, Vittorio

    2016-09-01

    Thermodynamics relies on the possibility to describe systems composed of a large number of constituents in terms of few macroscopic variables. Its foundations are rooted into the paradigm of statistical mechanics, where thermal properties originate from averaging procedures which smoothen out local details. While undoubtedly successful, elegant and formally correct, this approach carries over an operational problem, namely determining the precision at which such variables are inferred, when technical/practical limitations restrict our capabilities to local probing. Here we introduce the local quantum thermal susceptibility, a quantifier for the best achievable accuracy for temperature estimation via local measurements. Our method relies on basic concepts of quantum estimation theory, providing an operative strategy to address the local thermal response of arbitrary quantum systems at equilibrium. At low temperatures, it highlights the local distinguishability of the ground state from the excited sub-manifolds, thus providing a method to locate quantum phase transitions.

  14. Thermal stress and seismogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Huilan; Wei Dongping

    1989-05-01

    In this paper, the Fourier stress method was applied to deal with the problem of plane thermal stress, and a computing formula was given. As an example, we set up a variate temperature field to describe the uplifted upper mantle in Bozhong area of China, and the computing results shows that the maximum value of thermal plane shear stress is up to nearly 7x10 7 P α in two regions of this area. Since the Bohai earthquake (18 July, 1969, M s = 7.4) occurred at the edge of one of them and Tangshan earthquake (28 July, 1976, M s = 7.8) within another, their occurrences can be related reasonably to the thermal stress. (author). 15 refs, 7 figs

  15. Thermally actuated linkage arrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, P.M.

    1981-01-01

    A reusable thermally actuated linkage arrangement includes a first link member having a longitudinal bore therein adapted to receive at least a portion of a second link member therein, the first and second members being sized to effect an interference fit preventing relative movement there-between at a temperature below a predetermined temperature. The link members have different coefficients of thermal expansion so that when the linkage is selectively heated by heating element to a temperature above the predetermined temperature, relative longitudinal and/or rotational movement between the first and second link members is enabled. Two embodiments of a thermally activated linkage are disclosed which find particular application in actuators for a grapple head positioning arm in a nuclear reactor fuel handling mechanism to facilitate back-up safety retraction of the grapple head independently from the primary fuel handling mechanism drive system. (author)

  16. Local quantum thermal susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pasquale, Antonella; Rossini, Davide; Fazio, Rosario; Giovannetti, Vittorio

    2016-01-01

    Thermodynamics relies on the possibility to describe systems composed of a large number of constituents in terms of few macroscopic variables. Its foundations are rooted into the paradigm of statistical mechanics, where thermal properties originate from averaging procedures which smoothen out local details. While undoubtedly successful, elegant and formally correct, this approach carries over an operational problem, namely determining the precision at which such variables are inferred, when technical/practical limitations restrict our capabilities to local probing. Here we introduce the local quantum thermal susceptibility, a quantifier for the best achievable accuracy for temperature estimation via local measurements. Our method relies on basic concepts of quantum estimation theory, providing an operative strategy to address the local thermal response of arbitrary quantum systems at equilibrium. At low temperatures, it highlights the local distinguishability of the ground state from the excited sub-manifolds, thus providing a method to locate quantum phase transitions. PMID:27681458

  17. of gastro-intestinal discomfort (ID 2946, 2951, 2974), decreasing potentially pathogenic gastro-intestinal microorganisms (ID 2946, 2951, 2974), improved lactose digestion (ID 2946, 2951, 2974), and reduction in numbers of circulating CD34+ cells (ID 2947, 2952, 2975) (further assessment) pursuant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    of Lactobacillus acidophilus BCCM/LMG P-18806, Lactobacillus delbrueckii BCCM/LMG P-18805 and Streptococcus thermophilus BCCM/LMG P-18807 and reduction of gastro-intestinal discomfort, decreasing potentially pathogenic gastro-intestinal microorganisms, improved lactose digestion, and reduction in numbers......, might be a beneficial physiological effect for the general population. The claimed effect, improved lactose digestion, is a beneficial physiological effect for individuals with lactose maldigestion. No human intervention studies were provided from which conclusions could be drawn for the scientific...... and reduction of gastro-intestinal discomfort, decreasing potentially pathogenic gastro-intestinal microorganisms, and improved lactose digestion....

  18. Transient thermal stresses and stress intensity factors induced by thermal stratification in feedwater lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez Sarmiento, G.; Pardo, E.

    1985-01-01

    General analytical solutions for the thermal stresses and circumferential crack propagation in piping branches of nuclear power plants, that connect two circuits of the same fluid at different temperatures, are presented in this paper. Under certain conditions, two regions of the fluid possessing both temperatures with a separating layer of small thickness are formed ('flow stratification'). Dimensionless analytical expressions for the steady state temperature distribution in the pipe wall and the corresponding thermal stress are here derived, in terms of the basic geometrical and physical parameters. The position and thickness of the separating layer are considered as data of the model. Stress intensity ranges at any point of the tube wall are then determined. Finally, thermally induced stress intensity factors are calculated for hipothetically inside surface cracks. (orig.)

  19. The Lattice and Thermal Radiation Conductivity of Thermal Barrier Coatings: Models and Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Spuckler, Charles M.

    2010-01-01

    The lattice and radiation conductivity of ZrO2-Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings was evaluated using a laser heat flux approach. A diffusion model has been established to correlate the coating apparent thermal conductivity to the lattice and radiation conductivity. The radiation conductivity component can be expressed as a function of temperature, coating material scattering, and absorption properties. High temperature scattering and absorption of the coating systems can be also derived based on the testing results using the modeling approach. A comparison has been made for the gray and nongray coating models in the plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings. The model prediction is found to have a good agreement with experimental observations.

  20. On the analysis of the thermal line shift and thermal line width of ions in solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, Brian M., E-mail: brian.m.walsh@nasa.gov [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA 23681 (United States); Di Bartolo, Baldassare, E-mail: baldassare.dibartolo@bc.edu [Boston College, Department of Physics, Chestnut Hill, MA 23667 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    A method of analysis for the thermally induced line shift and line width of spectral lines regarding the Raman process of ions in solids utilizing rational approximations for the Debye functions is presented. The {sup 2}E level unsplit R-line in V{sup 2+}:MgO is used as an example to illustrate the utility of the methods discussed here in providing a new analytical tool for researchers. - Highlights: • We use rational approximations for Debye functions. • We discuss limits and ranges of applicability of the rational approximations. • We formulate expressions for thermal shift and thermal linewidth for Raman processes using the rational approximations of the Debye functions. • We present an application of the methods to analyze the temperature dependent linewidth and lineshift in V2+:MgO.