WorldWideScience

Sample records for expressing serine acetyl-transferase

  1. The metal tolerance profile of Thlaspi goesingense is mimicked in Arabidopsis thaliana heterologously expressing serine acetyl-transferase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freeman John L

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Ni hyperaccumulator Thlaspi goesingense is tolerant to Ni ≅ Zn, ≅ Co and slightly resistant to > Cd. We previously observed that elevated glutathione, driven by constitutive activation of serine acetyltransferase (SAT, plays a role in the Ni tolerance of T. goesingense. Results Here we show that the elevated shoot concentration of glutathione, previously shown to cause elevated Ni tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana heterologously expressing T. goesingense mitochondrial serine acetyltransferase (SATm, also causes tolerance to Co and Zn while slightly enhancing resistance to Cd. The level of tolerance afforded to each metal is ranked Ni ≅ Co, > Zn > Cd. The Ni ≅ Co, > Zn tolerances are positively correlated with both the accumulation of glutathione (GSH and the ability to resist the oxidative damage induced by these different metals. Based on the relative concentrations of each metal used a relatively low level of resistance to Cd was observed in both T. goesingense and TgSATm expressing lines and Cd resistance was least correlated to GSH accumulation. Conclusion Such data supports the conclusion that elevated glutathione levels, driven by constitutively enhanced SAT activity in the hyperaccumulator T. goesingense, plays an important role in the Ni, Co and Zn tolerance of this and other Thlaspi species. The hyper-activation of S assimilation through SAT is an excellent strategy for engineering enhanced metal tolerance in transgenic plants potentially used for phytoremediation.

  2. Histone acetyl transferases as emerging drug targets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, Frank J.; Haisma, Hidde J.

    2009-01-01

    Post-translational modifications, such as acetylation or phosphorylation, play a crucial role in the regulation of gene transcription in eukaryotes. Different subtypes of histone acetyl transferases (HATs) catalyze the acetylation of histones on specific lysine residues. A potential role of HATs in

  3. MOF Acetyl Transferase Regulates Transcription and Respiration in Mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Aindrila; Seyfferth, Janine; Lucci, Jacopo; Gilsbach, Ralf; Preissl, Sebastian; Böttinger, Lena; Mårtensson, Christoph U; Panhale, Amol; Stehle, Thomas; Kretz, Oliver; Sahyoun, Abdullah H; Avilov, Sergiy; Eimer, Stefan; Hein, Lutz; Pfanner, Nikolaus; Becker, Thomas; Akhtar, Asifa

    2016-10-20

    A functional crosstalk between epigenetic regulators and metabolic control could provide a mechanism to adapt cellular responses to environmental cues. We report that the well-known nuclear MYST family acetyl transferase MOF and a subset of its non-specific lethal complex partners reside in mitochondria. MOF regulates oxidative phosphorylation by controlling expression of respiratory genes from both nuclear and mtDNA in aerobically respiring cells. MOF binds mtDNA, and this binding is dependent on KANSL3. The mitochondrial pool of MOF, but not a catalytically deficient mutant, rescues respiratory and mtDNA transcriptional defects triggered by the absence of MOF. Mof conditional knockout has catastrophic consequences for tissues with high-energy consumption, triggering hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and cardiac failure in murine hearts; cardiomyocytes show severe mitochondrial degeneration and deregulation of mitochondrial nutrient metabolism and oxidative phosphorylation pathways. Thus, MOF is a dual-transcriptional regulator of nuclear and mitochondrial genomes connecting epigenetics and metabolism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Inhibition of the PCAF histone acetyl transferase and cell proliferation by isothiazolones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, Frank J.; Ghizzoni, Massimo; van der Meer, Nanette; Wisastra, Rosalina; Haisma, Hidde J.

    2009-01-01

    Small molecule HAT inhibitors are useful tools to unravel the role of histone acetyl transferases (HATs) in the cell and have relevance for oncology. We present a systematic investigation of the inhibition of the HAT p300/CBP Associated Factor (PCAF) by isothiazolones with different substitutions.

  5. Meat consumption, N-acetyl transferase 1 and 2 polymorphism and risk of breast cancer, in Danish postmenopausal women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egeberg, Rikke; Olsen, Anja; Autrup, Herman

    2008-01-01

    (1993-2000). Three hundred and seventy-eight breast cancer cases were identified and matched to 378 controls. The incidence rate ratio (95% confidence interval) for breast cancer was 1.09 (1.02-1.17) for total meat, 1.15 (1.01-1.31) for red meat and 1.23 (1.04-1.45) for processed meat per 25 g daily...... total meat intake and red meat intake and breast cancer risk were confined to intermediate/fast N-acetyl transferase 2 acetylators (P-interaction=0.03 and 0.04). Our findings support an association between meat consumption and breast cancer risk and that N-acetyl transferase 2 polymorphism has......The aim of this study was to investigate whether polymorphisms in N-acetyl transferase 1 and 2 modify the association between meat consumption and risk of breast cancer. A nested case-control study was conducted among 24697 postmenopausal women included in the 'Diet, Cancer and Health' cohort study...

  6. Expression of the MAST family of serine/threonine kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garland, Patrick; Quraishe, Shmma; French, Pim; O'Connor, Vincent

    2008-02-21

    The Microtubule-Associated Serine/Threonine Kinase family (MAST1-4, and MAST-like) is characterised by the presence of a serine/threonine kinase domain and a postsynaptic density protein-95/discs large/zona occludens-1 domain (PDZ). This latter domain gives the MAST family the capacity to scaffold its own kinase activity. In the present study we have profiled the mRNA for each member of the MAST family transcripts across various tissues, with particular focus on rodent brain. Reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) has shown equivalent patterns of expression for MAST1 and 2 in multiple tissues. Both MAST3 and 4 show more distinct expression in several tissues, and MAST-like appears to be predominantly expressed in heart and testis. In situ hybridisation reveals overlapping expression of MAST1 and 2 in specific brain regions. In contrast, MAST3 shows selective expression in the striatum and cerebral cortex. MAST4 also exhibits distinct expression in oligodendrocytes of white matter containing brain regions. In keeping with previous results, this family member also shows increased expression in the hippocampus following seizure-like activity. Our analysis of MAST family expression provides support for the role of these kinases in a broad range of neural functions.

  7. Transport of d-Serine via the Amino Acid Transporter ATB0,+ Expressed in the Colon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatanaka, Takahiro; Huang, Wei; Nakanishi, Takeo; Bridges, Christy C.; Smith, Sylvia B.; Prasad, Puttur D.; Ganapathy, Malliga E.; Ganapathy, Vadivel

    2015-01-01

    d-Serine, synthesized endogenously in the brain, is an important modulator of glutamatergic neurotransmission. Since colonic bacteria produce d-serine, we asked the question whether there are transport mechanisms in the colon that might make this exogenously produced d-serine available to the host. Here we identify for the first time an amino acid transporter in the intestine for high-affinity active transport of d-serine. This transporter, called ATB0,+, is a Na+- and Cl−-coupled transporter for L-enantiomers of neutral and cationic amino acids. Here we demonstrate that ATB0,+ is also capable of mediating the Na+- and Cl−-coupled transport of d-serine. The affinity of ATB0,+ for l-serine and d-serine is similar, the Kt value for the two enantiomers being ~150 μM. In addition to d-serine, ATB0,+ transports d-alanine, d-methionine, d-leucine, and d-tryptophan. However, several other neutral and cationic amino acids that are transportable substrates for ATB0,+ as L-enantiomers are not transported when presented as D-enantiomers. ATB0,+ is expressed in the intestinal tract, interestingly not in the proximal intestine but in the distal intestine. Expression is most predominant in the colon where the transporter is localized to the luminal membrane of colonocytes, making this transporter uniquely suitable for absorption of bacteria-derived d-serine. PMID:11846403

  8. Arylamine N-acetyl Transferase (NAT) in the blue secretion of Telescopium telescopium: xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme as a biomarker for detection of environmental pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorain, Bapi; Chakraborty, Sumon; Pal, Murari Mohan; Sarkar, Ratul; Samanta, Samir Kumar; Karmakar, Sanmoy; Sen, Tuhinadri

    2014-01-01

    Telescopium telescopium, a marine mollusc collected from Sundarban mangrove, belongs to the largest mollusca phylum in the world and exudes a blue secretion when stimulated mechanically. The blue secretion was found to metabolize (preferentially) para-amino benzoic acid, a substrate for N-acetyl transferase (NAT), thereby indicating acetyl transferase like activity of the secretion. Attempts were also made to characterise bioactive fraction of the blue secretion and to further use this as a biomarker for monitoring of marine pollution. NAT like enzyme from marine mollusc is a potential candidate for detoxification of different harmful chemicals. A partially purified extract of blue secretion was obtained by fractional precipitation with (NH4)2SO4. From different fractions obtained by precipitation, the 0-30% fraction (30S) displayed NAT like activity (using para amino benzoic acid as a substrate with para nitrophenyl phosphate or acetyl coenzyme A as acetyl group donors). Maximum NAT like enzyme activity was attained at 25°C and at a pH of 6. The enzyme activity was found to be inhibited by 5 mM phenyl methyl sulfonyl fluoride. The divalent metal ions reduced NAT like activity of 30S. Moreover, Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) (at concentration of 1 mM) completely inhibited NAT activity. The thermal stability and bench-top stability studies were performed and it was found that the enzyme was stable at room temperature for more than 24 hours. Results from the present study further indicate that heavy metal content in blue secretion gradually decreased from pre-monsoon to post-monsoon season, which also corresponded to the change in NAT like activity. Therefore, this article stresses the importance of biomarker research for monitoring pollution.

  9. Expression of serine and glycine-related enzymes in phyllodes tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, J E; Kim, D H; Jung, W-H; Koo, J S

    2014-01-01

    Expression patterns of proteins involved in serine and glycine metabolism, and correlations of these patterns with clinicopathologic factors in phyllodes tumor were investigated. Tissue microarrays were prepared from 203 phyllodes tumors (PT) and stained with antibodies specific for glycine decarboxylase (GLDC), phosphoserine aminotransferase 1 (PSAT1), phosphoserine phosphatase (PSPH), phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (PHGDH), and serine hydroxymethyltransferase 1 (SHMT1). These immunohistochemical results and clinicopathologic parameters were analyzed for correlation. Numbers of benign, borderline, and malignant tumors were 155, 32, and 16, respectively. Stromal expression of PHGDH, PSAT1, PSPH, SHMT1, and GLDC increased with increasing tumor grade, and epithelial expression of SHMT1 also increased with increasing tumor grade (pphyllodes tumor. glycine, tumor grade, metabolism, phyllodes tumor, serine.

  10. Human eosinophils constitutively express a unique serine protease, PRSS33

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumika Toyama

    2017-07-01

    Conclusions: Activated eosinophils may induce fibroblast extracellular matrix protein synthesis via cell surface expression of PRSS33, which would at least partly explain eosinophils' role(s in airway remodeling.

  11. Nucleotide sequence and expression of a cDNA encoding rabbit liver cytosolic serine hydroxymethyltransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, P C; Sanders, P G; Snell, K

    1992-08-15

    A rabbit liver cDNA library in phage lambda gt10 was screened using a portion of the coding sequences for rabbit cytosolic serine hydroxymethyltransferase (amino acids 244-420) that had been amplified by PCR, with total rabbit liver RNA as a template. A clone of 2.3 kb (pUS1203) was isolated and the nucleotide sequence showed that it contained an open reading frame of 1452 bp, which coded for serine hydroxymethyltransferase and was flanked by 155 bp at the 5' end and 653 bp at the 3' end. The full-length cDNA was cloned into an expression vector and transfected into COS-1 cells. Serine hydroxymethyltransferase activity was increased by 33% in the transfected cells and a new protein band of the appropriate size was seen by SDS/PAGE analysis of proteins extracted from transfected cells. The protein sequence for rabbit cytosolic serine hydroxymethyltransferase derived from the cDNA nucleotide sequence was compared with three other derived or known prokaryotic and eukaryotic sequences. An overall sequence similarity of 34% was noted between all four sequences, whereas the similarity between the rabbit cytosolic and mitochondrial isoforms was 62%.

  12. HATL5: a cell surface serine protease differentially expressed in epithelial cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory S Miller

    Full Text Available Over the last two decades, cell surface proteases belonging to the type II transmembrane serine protease (TTSP family have emerged as important enzymes in the mammalian degradome, playing critical roles in epithelial biology, regulation of metabolic homeostasis, and cancer. Human airway trypsin-like protease 5 (HATL5 is one of the few family members that remains uncharacterized. Here we demonstrate that HATL5 is a catalytically active serine protease that is inhibited by the two Kunitz type serine protease inhibitors, hepatocyte growth factor activator inhibitor (HAI-1 and 2, as well as by serpinA1. Full-length HATL5 is localized on the cell surface of cultured mammalian cells as demonstrated by confocal microscopy. HATL5 displays a relatively restricted tissue expression profile, with both transcript and protein present in the cervix, esophagus, and oral cavity. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed an expression pattern where HATL5 is localized on the cell surface of differentiated epithelial cells in the stratified squamous epithelia of all three of these tissues. Interestingly, HATL5 is significantly decreased in cervical, esophageal, and head and neck carcinomas as compared to normal tissue. Analysis of cervical and esophageal cancer tissue arrays demonstrated that the squamous epithelial cells lose their expression of HATL5 protein upon malignant transformation.

  13. Bacillus thuringiensis Cry3Aa protoxin intoxication of Tenebrio molitor induces widespread changes in the expression of serine peptidase transcripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppert, Brenda; Martynov, Alexander G; Elpidina, Elena N

    2012-09-01

    The yellow mealworm, Tenebrio molitor, is a pest of stored grain products and is sensitive to the Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) Cry3Aa toxin. As digestive peptidases are a determining factor in Cry toxicity and resistance, we evaluated the expression of peptidase transcripts in the midgut of T. molitor larvae fed either a control or Cry3Aa protoxin diet for 24 h (RNA-Seq), or in larvae exposed to the protoxin for 6, 12, or 24 h (microarrays). Cysteine peptidase transcripts (9) were similar to cathepsins B, L, and K, and their expression did not vary more than 2.5-fold in control and Cry3Aa-treated larvae. Serine peptidase transcripts (48) included trypsin, chymotrypsin and chymotrypsin-like, elastase 1-like, and unclassified serine peptidases, as well as homologs lacking functional amino acids. Highly expressed trypsin and chymotrypsin transcripts were severely repressed, and most serine peptidase transcripts were expressed 2- to 15-fold lower in Cry3Aa-treated larvae. Many serine peptidase and homolog transcripts were found only in control larvae. However, expression of a few serine peptidase transcripts was increased or found only in Cry3Aa-treated larvae. Therefore, Bt intoxication significantly impacted the expression of serine peptidases, potentially important in protoxin processing, while the insect maintained the production of critical digestive cysteine peptidases. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Host generated siRNAs attenuate expression of serine protease gene in Myzus persicae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Varnika; Bhattacharya, Ramcharan; Uniyal, Prem L; Singh, Rajendra; Niranjan, Rampal S

    2012-01-01

    Sap sucking hemipteran aphids damage diverse crop species. Although delivery of ds-RNA or siRNA through microinjection/feeding has been demonstrated, the efficacy of host-mediated delivery of aphid-specific dsRNA in developing aphid resistance has been far from being elucidated. Transgenic Arabidopsis expressing ds-RNA of Myzus persicae serine protease (MySP) was developed that triggered the generation of corresponding siRNAs amenable for delivery to the feeding aphids. M. persicae when fed on the transgenic plants for different time intervals under controlled growth conditions resulted in a significant attenuation of the expression of MySP and a commensurate decline in gut protease activity. Although the survivability of these aphids was not affected, there was a noticeable decline in their fecundity resulting in a significant reduction in parthenogenetic population. The study highlighted the feasibility of developing host based RNAi-mediated resistance against hemipteran pest aphids.

  15. Regulation of hemolysin expression and virulence of Staphylococcus aureus by a serine/threonine kinase and phosphatase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kellie Burnside

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Exotoxins, including the hemolysins known as the alpha (alpha and beta (beta toxins, play an important role in the pathogenesis of Staphylococcus aureus infections. A random transposon library was screened for S. aureus mutants exhibiting altered hemolysin expression compared to wild type. Transposon insertions in 72 genes resulting in increased or decreased hemolysin expression were identified. Mutations inactivating a putative cyclic di-GMP synthetase and a serine/threonine phosphatase (Stp1 were found to reduce hemolysin expression, and mutations in genes encoding a two component regulator PhoR, LysR family transcriptional regulator, purine biosynthetic enzymes and a serine/threonine kinase (Stk1 increased expression. Transcription of the hla gene encoding alpha toxin was decreased in a Deltastp1 mutant strain and increased in a Deltastk1 strain. Microarray analysis of a Deltastk1 mutant revealed increased transcription of additional exotoxins. A Deltastp1 strain is severely attenuated for virulence in mice and elicits less inflammation and IL-6 production than the Deltastk1 strain. In vivo phosphopeptide enrichment and mass spectrometric analysis revealed that threonine phosphorylated peptides corresponding to Stk1, DNA binding histone like protein (HU, serine-aspartate rich fibrinogen/bone sialoprotein binding protein (SdrE and a hypothetical protein (NWMN_1123 were present in the wild type and not in the Deltastk1 mutant. Collectively, these studies suggest that Stk1 mediated phosphorylation of HU, SrdE and NWMN_1123 affects S. aureus gene expression and virulence.

  16. Regulation of hemolysin expression and virulence of Staphylococcus aureus by a serine/threonine kinase and phosphatase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnside, Kellie; Lembo, Annalisa; de Los Reyes, Melissa; Iliuk, Anton; Binhtran, Nguyen-Thao; Connelly, James E; Lin, Wan-Jung; Schmidt, Byron Z; Richardson, Anthony R; Fang, Ferric C; Tao, Weiguo Andy; Rajagopal, Lakshmi

    2010-06-11

    Exotoxins, including the hemolysins known as the alpha (alpha) and beta (beta) toxins, play an important role in the pathogenesis of Staphylococcus aureus infections. A random transposon library was screened for S. aureus mutants exhibiting altered hemolysin expression compared to wild type. Transposon insertions in 72 genes resulting in increased or decreased hemolysin expression were identified. Mutations inactivating a putative cyclic di-GMP synthetase and a serine/threonine phosphatase (Stp1) were found to reduce hemolysin expression, and mutations in genes encoding a two component regulator PhoR, LysR family transcriptional regulator, purine biosynthetic enzymes and a serine/threonine kinase (Stk1) increased expression. Transcription of the hla gene encoding alpha toxin was decreased in a Deltastp1 mutant strain and increased in a Deltastk1 strain. Microarray analysis of a Deltastk1 mutant revealed increased transcription of additional exotoxins. A Deltastp1 strain is severely attenuated for virulence in mice and elicits less inflammation and IL-6 production than the Deltastk1 strain. In vivo phosphopeptide enrichment and mass spectrometric analysis revealed that threonine phosphorylated peptides corresponding to Stk1, DNA binding histone like protein (HU), serine-aspartate rich fibrinogen/bone sialoprotein binding protein (SdrE) and a hypothetical protein (NWMN_1123) were present in the wild type and not in the Deltastk1 mutant. Collectively, these studies suggest that Stk1 mediated phosphorylation of HU, SrdE and NWMN_1123 affects S. aureus gene expression and virulence.

  17. Differential gene expression for suicide-substrate serine proteinase inhibitors (serpins) in vegetative and grain tissues of barley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roberts, T.H.; Marttila, S.; Rasmussen, S.K.

    2003-01-01

    tissues of roots, and to the phloem of coleoptiles and leaves. The identification of BSZ4 in vegetative tissues by western blotting was confirmed for the roots by purification and amino acid sequencing, and for the leaves by in vitro reactive-centre loop cleavage studies. Plant serpins are likely to use......Proteins of the serpin superfamily (similar to43 kDa) from mature cereal grains are in vitro suicide-substrate inhibitors of specific mammalian serine proteinases of the chymotrypsin family. However, unlike the 'standard-mechanism' serine proteinase inhibitors (... centres in vitro, were ubiquitous at low levels, but the protein could not be detected. EST analysis showed that expression of genes for serpins with BSZx-type reactive centres in vegetative tissues is widespread in the plant kingdom, suggesting a common regulatory function. For BSZ4 and BSZ7, expression...

  18. Nucleotide sequence and expression of a cDNA encoding rabbit liver cytosolic serine hydroxymethyltransferase.

    OpenAIRE

    Byrne, P C; Sanders, P. G.; Snell, K

    1992-01-01

    A rabbit liver cDNA library in phage lambda gt10 was screened using a portion of the coding sequences for rabbit cytosolic serine hydroxymethyltransferase (amino acids 244-420) that had been amplified by PCR, with total rabbit liver RNA as a template. A clone of 2.3 kb (pUS1203) was isolated and the nucleotide sequence showed that it contained an open reading frame of 1452 bp, which coded for serine hydroxymethyltransferase and was flanked by 155 bp at the 5' end and 653 bp at the 3' end. The...

  19. Histone acetyl transferases CBP and p300 are necessary for maintenance of renin cell identity and transformation of smooth muscle cells to the renin phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pentz, Ellen Steward; Cordaillat, Magali; Carretero, Oscar A.; Tucker, Ana E.; Sequeira Lopez, Maria Luisa S.

    2012-01-01

    In response to a homeostatic threat circulating renin increases by increasing the number of cells expressing renin by dedifferentiation and re-expression of renin in arteriolar smooth muscle cells (aSMCs) that descended from cells that expressed renin in early life. However, the mechanisms that govern the maintenance and reacquisition of the renin phenotype are not well understood. The cAMP pathway is important for renin synthesis and release: the transcriptional effects are mediated by binding of cAMP responsive element binding protein with its co-activators, CBP and p300, to the cAMP response element in the renin promoter. We have shown previously that mice with conditional deletion of CBP and p300 (cKO) in renin cells had severely reduced renin expression in adult life. In this study we investigated when the loss of renin-expressing cells in the cKO occurred and found that the loss of renin expression becomes evident after differentiation of the kidney is completed during postnatal life. To determine whether CBP/p300 is necessary for re-expression of renin we subjected cKO mice to low sodium diet + captopril to induce retransformation of aSMCs to the renin phenotype. The cKO mice did not increase circulating renin, their renin mRNA and protein expression were greatly diminished compared with controls, and only a few aSMCs re-expressed renin. These studies underline the crucial importance of the CREB/CBP/p300 complex for the ability of renin cells to retain their cellular memory and regain renin expression, a fundamental survival mechanism, in response to a threat to homeostasis. PMID:22523253

  20. Heme regulates the expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae of chimaeric genes containing 5'-flanking soybean leghemoglobin sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, E O; Marcker, K A; Villadsen, IS

    1986-01-01

    The TM1 yeast mutant was transformed with a 2 micron-derived plasmid (YEp24) which carries a chimaeric gene containing the Escherichia coli chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) gene fused to the 5'- and 3'-flanking regions of the soybean leghemoglobin (Lb) c3 gene. Expression of the chimaeric...

  1. Chronic antipsychotic treatment selectively alters nerve growth factor and neuropeptide Y immunoreactivity and the distribution of choline acetyl transferase in rat brain regions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Angelucci, F; Aloe, L; Gruber, SHM; Fiore, M; Mathe, AA

    Neuropeptides and neurotrophins play a number of roles in the central nervous system (CNS). Nerve growth factor NGF), the first characterized member of the family of neurotrophins, influences the synthesis of some neuropeptides, including neuropeptide Y (NPY), a peptide amply expressed in the CNS,

  2. Isolation, expression and characterization of a novel dual serine protease inhibitor, OH-TCI, from king cobra venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ying-Ying; Liu, Shu-Bai; Lee, Wen-Hui; Qian, Jin-Qiao; Zhang, Yun

    2008-10-01

    Snake venom Kunitz/BPTI members are good tools for understanding of structure-functional relationship between serine proteases and their inhibitors. A novel dual Kunitz/BPTI serine proteinase inhibitor named OH-TCI (trypsin- and chymotrypsin-dual inhibitor from Ophiophagus hannah) was isolated from king cobra venom by three chromatographic steps of gel filtration, trypsin affinity and reverse phase HPLC. OH-TCI is composed of 58 amino acid residues with a molecular mass of 6339Da. Successful expression of OH-TCI was performed as the maltose-binding fusion protein in E. coli DH5alpha. Much different from Oh11-1, the purified native and recombinant OH-TCI both had strong inhibitory activities against trypsin and chymotrypsin although the sequence identity (74.1%) between them is very high. The inhibitor constants (K(i)) of recombinant OH-TCI were 3.91 x 10(-7) and 8.46 x10(-8)M for trypsin and chymotrypsin, respectively. To our knowledge, it was the first report of Kunitz/BPTI serine proteinase inhibitor from snake venom that had equivalent trypsin and chymotrypsin inhibitory activities.

  3. Genome-wide identification and expression analysis of serine proteases and homologs in the silkworm Bombyx mori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Ping-Zhen

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Serine proteases (SPs and serine proteases homologs (SPHs are a large group of proteolytic enzymes, with important roles in a variety of physiological processes, such as cell signalling, defense and development. Genome-wide identification and expression analysis of serine proteases and their homologs in the silkworm might provide valuable information about their biological functions. Results In this study, 51 SP genes and 92 SPH genes were systematically identified in the genome of the silkworm Bombyx mori. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that six gene families have been amplified species-specifically in the silkworm, and the members of them showed chromosomal distribution of tandem repeats. Microarray analysis suggests that many silkworm-specific genes, such as members of SP_fam12, 13, 14 and 15, show expression patterns that are specific to tissues or developmental stages. The roles of SPs and SPHs in resisting pathogens were investigated in silkworms when they were infected by Escherichia coli, Bacillus bombysepticus, Batrytis bassiana and B. mori nucleopolyhedrovirus, respectively. Microarray experiment and real-time quantitative RT-PCR showed that 18 SP or SPH genes were significantly up-regulated after pathogen induction, suggesting that SP and SPH genes might participate in pathogenic microorganism resistance in B. mori. Conclusion Silkworm SP and SPH genes were identified. Comparative genomics showed that SP and SPH genes belong to a large family, whose members are generated mainly by tandem repeat evolution. We found that silkworm has species-specific SP and SPH genes. Phylogenetic and microarray analyses provide an overview of the silkworm SP and SPHs, and facilitate future functional studies on these enzymes.

  4. High-level expression and characterization of a novel serine protease in Pichia pastoris by multi-copy integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Min; Shen, Wei; Yang, Shihui; Wang, Xiaojuan; Wang, Fei; Wang, Yaping; Ma, Lixin

    2016-10-01

    A novel serine protease from Trichoderma koningii (SPTK) was synthesized and expressed in Pichia pastoris. The recombinant SPTK was completely inhibited by phenyl methyl sulfonyl fluoride (PMSF), suggesting that SPTK belonged to the subgroup of serine proteases. The optimum pH and temperature for the recombinant SPTK reaction were 6.0 and 55°C, respectively. SPTK performed a tolerance to most organic solvents and metal ions, and the addition of Triton X-100 exhibited an activation of SPTK up to 243% of its initial activity but SDS strongly inhibited. Moreover, our study showed that a portion of SPTK was N-glycosylated during fermentation. The activity and thermal stability of the recombinant SPTK were improved after the removal of glycosylation, and the N-glycosylation of SPTK could be efficiently removed through co-culture with P. pastoris strains expressing Endo-β-N-acetylglucosaminidase H. We constructed expression vectors harboring from one to four repeats of Sptk-expressing cassettes via an in vitro BioBrick assembly approach. And the result of quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) indicated that the tandem expression cassettes were integrated into the genome of P. pastoris through a single recombination event. These strains were used to study the correlation between the gene copy number and the expression level of SPTK. The results of qPCR and enzyme activity assays indicated that the copy number variation of Sptk gene generally had a positive effect on the expression level of SPTK, while an increase in integration of target gene did not guarantee its high expression. The maximum yield and specific activity of SPTK in P. pastoris were obtained from the recombinant yeast strain harboring two-copy tandem Sptk-expressing cassettes, the yield reached 0.48g/l after a 6-d induction using menthol in shake flasks and 3.2g/l in high-density fermentation with specific activity of 5200U/mg. In addition, the recombinant SPTK could efficiently degrade chicken

  5. Characterization of the molecular features and expression patterns of two serine proteases in Hermetia illucens (Diptera: Stratiomyidae) larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Wontae; Bae, Sungwoo; Kim, Ayoung; Park, Kwanho; Lee, Sangbeom; Choi, Youngcheol; Han, Sangmi; Park, Younghan; Koh, Youngho

    2011-06-01

    To investigate the molecular scavenging capabilities of the larvae of Hermetia illucens, two serine proteases (SPs) were cloned and characterized. Multiple sequence alignments and phylogenetic tree analysis of the deduced amino acid sequences of Hi-SP1 and Hi-SP2 were suggested that Hi-SP1 may be a chymotrypsin- and Hi-SP2 may be a trypsin-like protease. Hi-SP1 and Hi-SP2 3-D homology models revealed that a catalytic triad, three disulfide bonds, and a substrate-binding pocket were highly conserved, as would be expected of a SP. E. coli expressed Hi-SP1 and Hi-SP2 showed chymotrypsin or trypsin activities, respectively. Hi-SP2 mRNAs were consistently expressed during larval development. In contrast, the expression of Hi-SP1 mRNA fluctuated between feeding and molting stages and disappeared at the pupal stages. These expression pattern differences suggest that Hi-SP1 may be a larval specific chymotrypsin-like protease involved with food digestion, while Hi-SP2 may be a trypsin-like protease with diverse functions at different stages.

  6. Expression Analysis of cPLA2 Alpha Interacting TIP60 in Diabetic KKAy and Non-Diabetic C57BL Wild-Type Mice: No Impact of Transient and Stable TIP60 Overexpression on Glucose-Stimulated Insulin Secretion in Pancreatic Beta-Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordentoft, Iver; Jeppesen, Per B; Nielsen, Anders L

    2007-01-01

    In the present study we investigate the expression levels of cytosolic phospholipase A2 alpha (cPLA2alpha) interacting histone acetyl transferase proteins TIP60alpha and TIP60beta in non-diabetic C57BL wild-type mice and obese type 2 diabetic KKAy model mice. The aim was to test our hypothesis...

  7. The GB virus C (GBV-C NS3 serine protease inhibits HIV-1 replication in a CD4+ T lymphocyte cell line without decreasing HIV receptor expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah L George

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Persistent infection with GBV-C (GB Virus C, a non-pathogenic virus related to hepatitis C virus (HCV, prolongs survival in HIV infection. Two GBV-C proteins, NS5A and E2, have been shown previously to inhibit HIV replication in vitro. We investigated whether the GBV-C NS3 serine protease affects HIV replication. RESULTS: GBV-C NS3 protease expressed in a human CD4+ T lymphocyte cell line significantly inhibited HIV replication. Addition of NS4A or NS4A/4B coding sequence to GBV-C NS3 increased the effect on HIV replication. Inhibition of HIV replication was dose-dependent and was not mediated by increased cell toxicity. Mutation of the NS3 catalytic serine to alanine resulted in loss of both HIV inhibition and protease activity. GBV-C NS3 expression did not measurably decrease CD4 or CXCR4 expression. CONCLUSION: GBV-C NS3 serine protease significantly inhibited HIV replication without decreasing HIV receptor expression. The requirement for an intact catalytic serine at the active site indicates that inhibition was mediated by proteolytic cleavage of an unidentified target(s.

  8. The GB virus C (GBV-C) NS3 serine protease inhibits HIV-1 replication in a CD4+ T lymphocyte cell line without decreasing HIV receptor expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Sarah L; Varmaz, Dino; Tavis, John E; Chowdhury, Adnan

    2012-01-01

    Persistent infection with GBV-C (GB Virus C), a non-pathogenic virus related to hepatitis C virus (HCV), prolongs survival in HIV infection. Two GBV-C proteins, NS5A and E2, have been shown previously to inhibit HIV replication in vitro. We investigated whether the GBV-C NS3 serine protease affects HIV replication. GBV-C NS3 protease expressed in a human CD4+ T lymphocyte cell line significantly inhibited HIV replication. Addition of NS4A or NS4A/4B coding sequence to GBV-C NS3 increased the effect on HIV replication. Inhibition of HIV replication was dose-dependent and was not mediated by increased cell toxicity. Mutation of the NS3 catalytic serine to alanine resulted in loss of both HIV inhibition and protease activity. GBV-C NS3 expression did not measurably decrease CD4 or CXCR4 expression. GBV-C NS3 serine protease significantly inhibited HIV replication without decreasing HIV receptor expression. The requirement for an intact catalytic serine at the active site indicates that inhibition was mediated by proteolytic cleavage of an unidentified target(s).

  9. Cloning, expression and purification of extracellular serine protease Esp, a biofilm-degrading enzyme, from Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, S; Iwase, T; Sato, F; Tajima, A; Shinji, H; Mizunoe, Y

    2011-12-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis Esp, an extracellular serine protease, inhibits Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation and nasal colonization. To further expand the biotechnological applications of Esp, we developed a highly efficient and economic method for the purification of recombinant Esp based on a Brevibacillus choshinensis expression-secretion system. The esp gene was fused with the N-terminal Sec-dependent signal sequence of the B. choshinensis cell wall protein and a C-terminal hexa-histidine-tag gene. The recombinant Esp was expressed and secreted into the optimized medium as an immature form and subsequently activated by thermolysin. The mature Esp was easily purified by a single purification step using nickel affinity chromatography and showed proteolytic activity as well as Staph. aureus biofilm destruction activity. The purification yield of the developed extracellular production system was 5 mg recombinant mature Esp per 20-ml culture, which was much higher than that of an intracellular production system in Escherichia coli (3 mg recombinant Esp per 1-l culture). Our findings will be a powerful tool for the production and purification of recombinant Esp and also applicable to a large variety of recombinant proteins used for basic researches and biotechnological applications. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2011 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  10. TLR2 Expression Is Increased in Rosacea and Stimulates Enhanced Serine Protease Production by Keratinocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, Kenshi; Kanada, Kimberly; Macleod, Daniel T.; Borkowski, Andrew W.; Morizane, Shin; Nakatsuji, Teruaki; Cogen, Anna L.; Gallo, Richard L.

    2011-01-01

    A diverse environment challenges skin to maintain temperature, hydration, and electrolyte balance while also maintaining normal immunological function. Rosacea is a common skin disease that manifests unique inflammatory responses to normal environmental stimuli. We hypothesized that abnormal function of innate immune pattern recognition could explain the enhanced sensitivity of patients with rosacea, and observed that the epidermis of patients with rosacea expressed higher amounts of Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) than normal patients. Increased expression of TLR2 was not seen in other inflammatory skin disorders such as atopic dermatitis or psoriasis. Overexpression of TLR2 on keratinocytes, treatment with TLR2 ligands, and analysis of TLR2-deficient mice resulted in a calcium-dependent release of kallikrein 5 from keratinocytes, a critical protease involved in the pathogenesis of rosacea. These observations show that abnormal TLR2 function may explain enhanced inflammatory responses to environmental stimuli and can act as a critical element in the pathogenesis of rosacea. PMID:21107351

  11. Vacuolar proteases from Candida glabrata: Acid aspartic protease PrA, neutral serine protease PrB and serine carboxypeptidase CpY. The nitrogen source influences their level of expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepúlveda-González, M Eugenia; Parra-Ortega, Berenice; Betancourt-Cervantes, Yuliana; Hernández-Rodríguez, César; Xicohtencatl-Cortes, Juan; Villa-Tanaca, Lourdes

    2016-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae vacuole is actively involved in the mechanism of autophagy and is important in homeostasis, degradation, turnover, detoxification and protection under stressful conditions. In contrast, vacuolar proteases have not been fully studied in phylogenetically related Candida glabrata. The present paper is the first report on proteolytic activity in the C. glabrata vacuole. Biochemical studies in C. glabrata have highlighted the presence of different kinds of intracellular proteolytic activity: acid aspartyl proteinase (PrA) acts on substrates such as albumin and denatured acid hemoglobin, neutral serine protease (PrB) on collagen-type hide powder azure, and serine carboxypeptidase (CpY) on N-benzoyl-tyr-pNA. Our results showed a subcellular fraction with highly specific enzymatic activity for these three proteases, which allowed to confirm its vacuolar location. Expression analyses were performed in the genes CgPEP4 (CgAPR1), CgPRB1 and CgCPY1 (CgPRC), coding for vacuolar aspartic protease A, neutral protease B and carboxypeptidase Y, respectively. The results show a differential regulation of protease expression depending on the nitrogen source. The proteases encoded by genes CgPEP4, CgPRB1 and CgCPY1 from C. glabrata could participate in the process of autophagy and survival of this opportunistic pathogen. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Española de Micología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  12. Expression of a cGMP compatible Lucilia sericata insect serine proteinase debridement enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, David I; Telford, Gary; Diab, Miliza; Low, Walter

    2012-01-01

    Previously, we demonstrated the effectiveness of a research grade recombinant chymotrypsin, derived from the larvae of Lucilia sericata, in "debriding" slough/eschar from venous leg ulcers ex vivo. Furthermore, we were able to formulate this enzyme for successful delivery to in vitro wound healing assays, from a prototype hydrogel wound dressing, and showed that enzyme delivered in this way could degrade wound tissue ex vivo. Recently, to progress biotechnological development of the enzyme as a potential therapeutic product, we explored expression using current good manufacturing practice (cGMP) guidelines, and now report that a recombinant chymotrypsin I zymogen from L. sericata can be expressed in the cGMP acceptable strain of Escherichia coli (BLR-DE3). In addition, the conditions required for purification, refolding and activation of the chymotrypsinogen have been determined. The activated enzyme was stable, and effective in digesting wound slough/eschar tissue. To summarise, we have successfully initiated the production and characterisation of a novel cGMP compatible product for use in future clinical trials. Copyright © 2012 American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE).

  13. Enhancing production of L-serine by increasing the glyA gene expression in Methylobacterium sp. MB200.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Peihong; Chao, Hongjun; Jiang, Chengjian; Long, Zhangde; Wang, Changhao; Wu, Bo

    2010-03-01

    Microbial fermentation using methylotrophic bacteria is one of the most promising methods for L-serine production. Here we describe the metabolic engineering of a Methylobacterium strain to increase the production of L-serine. The glyA gene, encoding serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT), was isolated from the genomic DNA of Methylobacterium sp. MB200, using a DNA fragment encoding Methylobacterium extorquens AM1 SHMT as a probe, and inserted into the vector pLAFR3. The resulting construct was transformed into Methylobacterium sp. MB200 using triparental mating. The genetic-engineered strain, designated as Methylobacterium sp. MB202, was shown to produce 11.4 + or - 0.6 mg/ml serine in resting cell reactions from 30 mg/ml wet cells, 20 mg/ml glycine, and 70 mg/ml methanol in 2 days, representing a 4.4-fold increase from that of the wild strain. The results demonstrated the potential for improving L-serine production by manipulating the glyA in bacteria and should facilitate the production of L-serine using Methylobacterium sp. strains.

  14. Reduced serine racemase expression in aging rat cerebellum is associated with oxidative DNA stress and hypermethylation in the promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, He; Kuang, Xiu-Li; Chang, Yuhua; Lu, Jinfang; Jiang, Haiyan; Wu, Shengzhou

    2015-12-10

    Regulation of serine racemase (SR) occurs at transcriptional and translational levels; post-translational modification, cytosolic distribution as well as allosteric effect regulate SR activity. In this study, we report a new route of SR regulation, i.e. oxidative stress and hypermethylation of the srr (gene of SR) promoter correlate with its reduced transcription in aging rat cerebella. We first showed that the mRNA and protein level of srr were decreased in the homogenates of rat cerebellum at age 12 months compared with the counterparts from age 20 days. The reduction of SR protein level in aging cerebella was evidenced by decreased immunostaining observed in the cell body of granule cells or Purkinje cells. Staining for 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), a marker for oxidative stress to DNA, was much stronger in granule cell or Purkinje cell nuclei from rat cerebella at 12 months compared with staining at 20 days. We further detected srr promoter hypermethylation at 12 months compared with that at 20 days by use of bisulfite sequencing PCR, coinciding with elevated protein levels of DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) in homogenates of aging cerebella. In vitro, we demonstrated that chronic treatment with the oxidant, menadione (VK3), reduced srr mRNA levels, which was reversed by the DNA demethylating agent 5-Aza-dC-2'-deoxycytidine (5-Aza-dC) in primary cerebellar granule cell cultures. Together, the in vivo and ex vivo results suggest that oxidative DNA stress and srr promoter hypermethylation are associated with reduced srr gene transcription and corresponding reduced protein expression in aging cerebella. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Expression of a new serine protease from Crotalus durissus collilineatus venom in Pichia pastoris and functional comparison with the native enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boldrini-França, Johara; Santos Rodrigues, Renata; Santos-Silva, Ludier Kesser; de Souza, Dayane Lorena Naves; Gomes, Mário Sérgio Rocha; Cologna, Camila Takeno; de Pauw, Edwin; Quinton, Loïc; Henrique-Silva, Flávio; de Melo Rodrigues, Veridiana; Arantes, Eliane Candiani

    2015-12-01

    Snake venom serine proteases (SVSPs) act primarily on plasma proteins related to blood clotting and are considered promising for the treatment of several hemostatic disorders. We report the heterologous expression of a serine protease from Crotalus durissus collilineatus, named collinein-1, in Pichia pastoris, as well as the enzymatic comparative characterization of the toxin in native and recombinant forms. The complementary DNA (cDNA) encoding collinein-1 was amplified from cDNA library of C. d. collilineatus venom gland and cloned into the pPICZαA vector. The recombinant plasmid was used to transform cells of KM71H P. pastoris. Heterologous expression was induced by methanol and yielded 56 mg of recombinant collinein-1 (rCollinein-1) per liter of culture. The native collinein-1 was purified from C. d. collilineatus venom, and its identity was confirmed by amino acid sequencing. The native and recombinant enzymes showed similar effects upon bovine fibrinogen by releasing preferentially fibrinopeptide A. Although both enzymes have induced plasma coagulation, native Colinein-1 has shown higher coagulant activity. The serine proteases were able to hydrolyze the chromogenic substrates S-2222, S-2238, and S2302. Both enzymes showed high stability on different pH and temperature, and their esterase activities were inhibited in the presence of Zn2+ and Cu2+. The serine proteases showed similar k cat/K m values in enzyme kinetics assays, suggesting no significant differences in efficiency of these proteins to hydrolyze the substrate. These results demonstrated that rCollinein-1 was expressed with functional integrity on the evaluated parameters. The success in producing a functionally active recombinant SVSP may generate perspectives to their future therapeutic applications.

  16. Genetically modified microorganisms having improved tolerance towards l-serine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    The present invention generally relates to the microbiological industry, and specifically to the production of L-serine or L-serine derivatives using genetically modified bacteria. The present invention provides genetically modified microorganisms, such as bacteria, wherein the expression of genes...... tolerant towards higher concentrations of serine. The present invention also provides methods for the production of L-serine or L-serine derivative using such genetically modified microorganisms....

  17. Serine-deficiency syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Koning, Tom J; Klomp, Leo W J

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Serine-deficiency disorders comprise a new group of neurometabolic diseases and are caused by defects in the biosynthesis of the amino acid L-serine. In contrast to most neurometabolic disorders, serine-deficiency disorders are potentially treatable. Furthermore, the severe

  18. Serine/threonine acetylation of TGFβ-activated kinase (TAK1) by Yersinia pestis YopJ inhibits innate immune signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquette, Nicholas; Conlon, Joseph; Sweet, Charles; Rus, Florentina; Wilson, Lindsay; Pereira, Andrea; Rosadini, Charles V; Goutagny, Nadege; Weber, Alexander N R; Lane, William S; Shaffer, Scott A; Maniatis, Stephanie; Fitzgerald, Katherine A; Stuart, Lynda; Silverman, Neal

    2012-07-31

    The Gram-negative bacteria Yersinia pestis, causative agent of plague, is extremely virulent. One mechanism contributing to Y. pestis virulence is the presence of a type-three secretion system, which injects effector proteins, Yops, directly into immune cells of the infected host. One of these Yop proteins, YopJ, is proapoptotic and inhibits mammalian NF-κB and MAP-kinase signal transduction pathways. Although the molecular mechanism remained elusive for some time, recent work has shown that YopJ acts as a serine/threonine acetyl-transferase targeting MAP2 kinases. Using Drosophila as a model system, we find that YopJ inhibits one innate immune NF-κB signaling pathway (IMD) but not the other (Toll). In fact, we show YopJ mediated serine/threonine acetylation and inhibition of dTAK1, the critical MAP3 kinase in the IMD pathway. Acetylation of critical serine/threonine residues in the activation loop of Drosophila TAK1 blocks phosphorylation of the protein and subsequent kinase activation. In addition, studies in mammalian cells show similar modification and inhibition of hTAK1. These data present evidence that TAK1 is a target for YopJ-mediated inhibition.

  19. Expression pattern alterations of the serine protease HtrA1 in normal human placental tissues and in gestational trophoblastic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzioni, Daniela; Quaranta, Alexia; Lorenzi, Teresa; Morroni, Manrico; Crescimanno, Caterina; De Nictolis, Michele; Toti, Paolo; Muzzonigro, Giovanni; Baldi, Alfonso; De Luca, Antonio; Castellucci, Mario

    2009-10-01

    HtrA1 is a secreted protein which behaves as a molecular chaperone at low temperatures and as a serine protease at high temperatures. When the placenta escapes the normal growth control mechanisms, which are present during normal pregnancy, it may develop trophoblastic diseases, such as hydatidiform mole and choriocarcinoma. The aim of the study is to investigate the expression of HtrA1 in these gestational trophoblastic diseases and evaluate whether different HtrA1 expression might be associated with increasingly severe forms of disease. We used immunohistochemistry to assess the expression of HtrA1 in normal human placenta, hydatidiform mole (partial and complete) and choriocarcinoma. In addition to that we used the western blotting technique to quantify HtrA1 immunoreaction in normal human placentas. The most striking finding of our investigation is the decrease in immunostaining of this protease with increasing severity of gestational trophoblastic disease. For instance, in partial and complete moles HtrA1 is weakly expressed in the trophoblast. Moreover, absence of immunoreaction for HtrA1 is observable in the choriocarcinoma cells. In conclusion, we suggest that HtrA1 may play an important role in the pathogenesis and progression of hydatidiform moles and choriocarcinomas, and that HtrA1 may play an important role during the normal development of the placenta, as well as in trophoblastic diseases.

  20. Method for the production of l-serine using genetically engineered microorganisms deficient in serine degradation pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    The present invention generally relates to the microbiological industry, and specifically to the production of L-serine using genetically modified bacteria. The present invention provides genetically modified microorganisms, such as bacteria, wherein the expression of genes encoding for enzymes...... concentrations of serine. The present invention also provides methods for the production of L-serine or L-serine derivative using such genetically modified microorganisms....

  1. Correlation Between Expression of High Temperature Requirement Serine Protease A1 (HtrA1) in Nucleus Pulposus and T2 Value of Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dapeng; Yue, Jiawei; Jiang, Lu; Huang, Yonghui; Sun, Jifu; Wu, Yan

    2017-04-22

    BACKGROUND Degrading enzymes play an important role in the process of disc degeneration. The objective of this study was to investigate the correlation between the expression of high temperature requirement serine protease A1 (HtrA1) in the nucleus pulposus and the T2 value of the nucleus pulposus region in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MATERIAL AND METHODS Thirty-six patients who had undergone surgical excision of the nucleus pulposus were examined by MRI before surgery. Pfirrmann grading of the target intervertebral disc was performed according to the sagittal T2-weighted imaging, and the T2 value of the target nucleus pulposus was measured according to the median sagittal T2 mapping. The correlation between the Pfirrmann grade and the T2 value was analyzed. The expression of HtrA1 in the nucleus pulposus was analyzed by RT-PCR and Western blot. The correlation between the expression of HtrA1 and the T2 value was analyzed. RESULTS The T2 value of the nucleus pulposus region was 33.11-167.91 ms, with an average of 86.64±38.73 ms. According to Spearman correlation analysis, there was a rank correlation between T2 value and Pfirrmann grade (Pcorrelation coefficient (rs)=-0.93617. There was a linear correlation between the mRNA level of HtrA1 and T2 value in nucleus pulposus tissues (a=3.88, b=-0.019, F=112.63, Pcorrelation between the expression level of HtrA1 protein and the T2 value in the nucleus pulposus tissues (a=3.30, b=-0.016, F=93.15, P<0.0001) and normalized regression coefficient=-0.86. CONCLUSIONS The expression of HtrA1 was strongly related to the T2 value, suggesting that HtrA1 plays an important role in the pathological process of intervertebral disc degeneration.

  2. Expression of a serine protease gene prC is up-regulated by oxidative stress in the fungus Clonostachys rosea: implications for fungal survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Gang Zou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Soil fungi face a variety of environmental stresses such as UV light, high temperature, and heavy metals. Adaptation of gene expression through transcriptional regulation is a key mechanism in fungal response to environmental stress. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the transcription factors Msn2/4 induce stress-mediated gene expression by binding to the stress response element. Previous studies have demonstrated that the expression of extracellular proteases is up-regulated in response to heat shock in fungi. However, the physiological significance of regulation of these extracellular proteases by heat shock remains unclear. The nematophagous fungus Clonostachys rosea can secret an extracellular serine protease PrC during the infection of nematodes. Since the promoter of prC has three copies of the stress response element, we investigated the effect of environmental stress on the expression of prC. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Our results demonstrated that the expression of prC was up-regulated by oxidants (H(2O(2 or menadione and heat shock, most likely through the stress response element. After oxidant treatment or heat shock, the germination of conidia in the wild type strain was significantly higher than that in the prC mutant strain in the presence of nematode cuticle. Interestingly, the addition of nematode cuticle significantly attenuated the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS induced by oxidants and heat shock in the wild type strain, but not in prC mutant strain. Moreover, low molecule weight (<3 kD degradation products of nematode cuticle suppressed the inhibitory effect of conidial germination induced by oxidants and heat shock. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results indicate that PrC plays a protective role in oxidative stress in C. rosea. PrC degrades the nematode cuticle to produce degradation products, which in turn offer a protective effect against oxidative stress by scavenging ROS. Our study reveals a novel

  3. Molecular cloning and expression analysis of chymotrypsin-like serine protease from the redclaw crayfish (Cherax quadricarinatus): a possible role in the junior and adult innate immune systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Di-An; Huang, Xian-Ming; Zhang, Zhi-Qin; Xu, Dong-Po; Zhou, Yan-Feng; Zhang, Min-Ying; Liu, Kai; Duan, Jin-Rong; Shi, Wei-Gang

    2013-06-01

    A novel chymotrypsin-like serine protease (CLSP) was isolated from the hepatopancreas of the redclaw crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus (Cq-chy). The full-length cDNA of Cq-chy contains 951 nucleotides encodes a peptide of 270 amino acids. The mature peptide comprising 223 amino acids contains the conserved catalytic triad (H, D, and S). Similarity analysis showed that Cq-chy shares high identity with chymotrypsins from the fiddler crab; Uca pugilator. Cq-chy mRNA expression in C. quadricarinatus was shown to be: (a) tissue-related with the highest expression in the hepatotpancreas and widely distributed, (b) highly responsive in the hepatopancreas to White Spot Syndrome Virus (WSSV) challenge, and (c) differently regulated in immature and adult crayfish. In this study we successfully isolated Cq-chy. Our observations indicate that Cq-chy is differently involved in the immature and adult innate immune reactions, thus suggesting a role for CLSPs in the invertebrate innate immune system. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Isolation, gene cloning and expression profile of a pathogen recognition protein: a serine proteinase homolog (Sp-SPH) involved in the antibacterial response in the crab Scylla paramamosain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hai-peng; Chen, Rong-yuan; Zhang, Min; Wang, Ke-jian

    2010-07-01

    To identify the frontline defense molecules against microbial infection in the crab Scylla paramamosain, a live crab pathogenic microbe, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, was recruited as an affinity matrix to isolate innate immune factors from crab hemocytes lysate. Interestingly, a serine proteinase homolog (Sp-SPH) was obtained together with an antimicrobial peptide-antilipopolysaccharide factor (Sp-ALF). We then determined the full-length cDNA sequence of Sp-SPH, which contained 1298bp with an open reading frame of 1107bp encoding 369 amino acid residues. Multiple alignment analysis showed that the deduced amino acid sequences of Sp-SPH shared overall identity (83.8%) with those of SPH-containing proteins from other crab species. Tissue distribution analysis indicated that the Sp-SPH transcripts were present in various tissues including eye stalk, subcuticular epidermis, gill, hemocyte, stomach, thorax ganglion, brain and muscle of S. paramamosain. The Sp-SPH was highly expressed in selected different development stages including embryo (I, II, III and V), zoea (I), megalopa, and juvenile. Importantly, the prophenoloxidase was also present in the embryos, zoea, juvenile and adult crabs, but relatively lower in megalopa compared to those of other stages. Furthermore, the Sp-SPH mRNA expression showed a statistically significant increase (PSPH suggested that it might function as an innate immune recognition molecule and play a key role in host defense against microbe invasion in the crab S. paramamosain. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Molecular cloning, expression and characterization of a serine proteinase from Japanese edible mushroom, Grifola frondosa : solving the structure - function anomaly of a reported aminopeptidase

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Islam, M.M

    2009-01-01

    The N-terminal amino acid sequence of an aminopeptidase from Japanese edible mushroom, Grifola frondosa , was reported to have high similarity with that of a serine proteinase from basidiomycete, Agaricus bisporous...

  6. Molecular cloning, expression and characterization of a serine proteinase from Japanese edible mushroom, Grifola frondosa: solving the structure - function anomaly of a reported aminopeptidase

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Islam, Mohammed M

    2008-01-01

    The N-terminal amino acid sequence of an aminopeptidase from Japanese edible mushroom, Grifola frondosa, was reported to have high similarity with that of a serine proteinase from basidiomycete, Agaricus bisporous...

  7. Two variants of the major serine protease inhibitor from the sea anemone Stichodactyla helianthus, expressed in Pichia pastoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Fernández, Rossana; Ziegelmüller, Patrick; González, Lidice; Mansur, Manuel; Machado, Yoan; Redecke, Lars; Hahn, Ulrich; Betzel, Christian; Chávez, María de Los Ángeles

    2016-07-01

    The major protease inhibitor from the sea anemone Stichodactyla helianthus (ShPI-1) is a non-specific inhibitor that binds trypsin and other trypsin-like enzymes, as well as chymotrypsin, and human neutrophil elastase. We performed site-directed mutagenesis of ShPI-1 to produce two variants (rShPI-1/K13L and rShPI/Y15S) that were expressed in Pichia pastoris, purified, and characterized. After a single purification step, 65 mg and 15 mg of protein per liter of culture supernatant were obtained for rShPI-1/K13L and rShPI/Y15S, respectively. Functional studies demonstrated a 100-fold decreased trypsin inhibitory activity as result of the K13L substitution at the reactive (P1) site. This protein variant has a novel tight-binding inhibitor activity of pancreatic elastase and increased activity toward neutrophil elastase in comparison to rShPI-1A. In contrast, the substitution Y15S at P2' site did not affect the Ki value against trypsin, but did reduce activity 10-fold against chymotrypsin and neutrophil elastase. Our results provide two new ShPI-1 variants with modified inhibitory activities, one of them with increased biomedical potential. This study also offers new insight into the functional impact of the P1 and P2' sites on ShPI-1 specificity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Serine and proline-rich ligands enriched via phage-display technology show preferential binding to BCR/ABL expressing cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shires, Karen; Shankland, Iva; Mowla, Shaheen; Njikan, Samuel; Jaymacker, Jai; Novitzky, Nicolas

    2014-03-01

    Despite the use of targeted therapy, chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) currently remains incurable with drug therapy, with patients requiring life-long treatment. Developing either a vaccine to prevent the disease or another novel drug to specifically target and eradicate the CML cell will require the identification of CML-associated cell-surface markers and molecules that can bind specifically to the cell surface. In an attempt to discover peptides that bind specifically to cells in the early chronic phase of the disease, we used phage-display technology to identify heptapeptides that bind specifically to the surface of BCR/ABL-expressing fibroblasts. An in vitro system using NIH3T3 stably transfected with pGD210 (BCR/ABL) was used as a model for the chronic phase of the disease. The cells were panned using a linear heptapeptide phage library (Ph.D 7.0) in a negative/positive panning strategy with NIH3T3 containing only the plasmid vector as the wild type control. We identified four novel peptides that were enriched through this technique. These peptides contained either multiple proline residues or serine/threonine-proline pairs and showed a confirmed binding preference for BCR/ABL+ fibroblasts. The peptide Y-R-A-P-W-P-P also showed a binding affinity for granulocytes from untreated CML patients. We have identified several novel peptides that can be used in future studies to identify specific CML cell-surface antigens or provide a novel drug-delivery mechanism. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. The Rise and Fall of the d-Serine-Mediated Gliotransmission Hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolosker, Herman; Balu, Darrick T; Coyle, Joseph T

    2016-11-01

    d-Serine modulates N-methyl d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) and regulates synaptic plasticity, neurodevelopment, and learning and memory. However, the primary site of d-serine synthesis and release remains controversial, with some arguing that it is a gliotransmitter and others defining it as a neuronal cotransmitter. Results from several laboratories using different strategies now show that the biosynthetic enzyme of d-serine, serine racemase (SR), is expressed almost entirely by neurons, with few astrocytes appearing to contain d-serine. Cell-selective suppression of SR expression demonstrates that neuronal, rather than astrocytic d-serine, modulates synaptic plasticity. Here, we propose an alternative conceptualization whereby astrocytes affect d-serine levels by synthesizing l-serine that shuttles to neurons to fuel the neuronal synthesis of d-serine. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Two mannose-binding lectin homologues and an MBL-associated serine protease are expressed in the gut epithelia of the urochordate species Ciona intestinalis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjoedt, Mikkel-ole; Palarasah, Yaseelan; Rasmussen, Karina

    2010-01-01

    The lectin complement pathway has important functions in vertebrate host defence and accumulating evidence of primordial complement components trace its emergence to invertebrate phyla. We introduce two putative mannose-binding lectin homologues (CioMBLs) from the urochordate species Ciona intest...... protease in the epithelia cells lining the stomach and intestine. In conclusion we present two urochordate MBLs and identify an associated serine protease, which support the concept of an evolutionary ancient origin of the lectin complement pathway....

  11. Diversity in mRNA expression of the serine-type carboxypeptidase ocpG in Aspergillus oryzae through intron retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Ken; Kuboshima, Megumi; Morita, Hiroto; Maeda, Hiroshi; Okamoto, Ayako; Takeuchi, Michio; Yamagata, Youhei

    2014-01-01

    Alternative splicing is thought to be a means for diversification of products by mRNA modification. Although some intron retentions are predicted by transcriptome analysis in Aspergillus oryzae, its physiological significance remains unknown. We found that intron retention occurred occasionally in the serine-type carboxypeptidase gene, ocpG. Analysis under various culture conditions revealed that extracellular nitrogen conditions influence splicing patterns; this suggested that there might be a correlation between splicing efficiency and the necessity of OcpG activity for obtaining a nitrogen source. Since further analysis showed that splicing occurred independently in each intron, we constructed ocpG intron-exchanging strain by interchanging the positions of intron-1 and intron-2. The splicing pattern indicated the probability that ocpG intron retention was affected by the secondary structures of intronic mRNA.

  12. Phosphorylation of mouse serine racemase regulates D-serine synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foltyn, Veronika N; Zehl, Martin; Dikopoltsev, Elena

    2010-01-01

    Serine racemase (SR) catalyses the synthesis of the transmitter/neuromodulator D-serine, which plays a major role in synaptic plasticity and N-methyl D-aspartate receptor neurotoxicity. We now report that SR is phosphorylated at Thr71 and Thr227 as revealed by mass spectrometric analysis...

  13. Serine Proteases-Like Genes in the Asian Rice Gall Midge Show Differential Expression in Compatible and Incompatible Interactions with Rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Nair

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The Asian rice gall midge, Orseolia oryzae (Wood-Mason, is a serious pest of rice. Investigations into the gall midge-rice interaction will unveil the underlying molecular mechanisms which, in turn, can be used as a tool to assist in developing suitable integrated pest management strategies. The insect gut is known to be involved in various physiological and biological processes including digestion, detoxification and interaction with the host. We have cloned and identified two genes, OoprotI and OoprotII, homologous to serine proteases with the conserved His87, Asp136 and Ser241 residues. OoProtI shared 52.26% identity with mosquito-type trypsin from Hessian fly whereas OoProtII showed 52.49% identity to complement component activated C1s from the Hessian fly. Quantitative real time PCR analysis revealed that both the genes were significantly upregulated in larvae feeding on resistant cultivar than in those feeding on susceptible cultivar. These results provide an opportunity to understand the gut physiology of the insect under compatible or incompatible interactions with the host. Phylogenetic analysis grouped these genes in the clade containing proteases of phytophagous insects away from hematophagous insects.

  14. Serine proteases-like genes in the asian rice gall midge show differential expression in compatible and incompatible interactions with rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Deepak Kumar; Lakshmi, Mulagondla; Anuradha, Ghanta; Rahman, Shaik J; Siddiq, Ebrahimali A; Bentur, Jagadish S; Nair, Suresh

    2011-01-01

    The Asian rice gall midge, Orseolia oryzae (Wood-Mason), is a serious pest of rice. Investigations into the gall midge-rice interaction will unveil the underlying molecular mechanisms which, in turn, can be used as a tool to assist in developing suitable integrated pest management strategies. The insect gut is known to be involved in various physiological and biological processes including digestion, detoxification and interaction with the host. We have cloned and identified two genes, OoprotI and OoprotII, homologous to serine proteases with the conserved His(87), Asp(136) and Ser(241) residues. OoProtI shared 52.26% identity with mosquito-type trypsin from Hessian fly whereas OoProtII showed 52.49% identity to complement component activated C1s from the Hessian fly. Quantitative real time PCR analysis revealed that both the genes were significantly upregulated in larvae feeding on resistant cultivar than in those feeding on susceptible cultivar. These results provide an opportunity to understand the gut physiology of the insect under compatible or incompatible interactions with the host. Phylogenetic analysis grouped these genes in the clade containing proteases of phytophagous insects away from hematophagous insects.

  15. Sugarcane Serine Peptidase Inhibitors, Serine Peptidases, and Clp Protease System Subunits Associated with Sugarcane Borer (Diatraea saccharalis) Herbivory and Wounding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medeiros, Ane H; Mingossi, Fabiana B; Dias, Renata O; Franco, Flávia P; Vicentini, Renato; Mello, Marcia O; Moura, Daniel S; Silva-Filho, Marcio C

    2016-09-01

    Sugarcane's (Saccharum spp.) response to Diatraea saccharalis (F.) (Lepidoptera: (Crambidae) herbivory was investigated using a macroarray spotted with 248 sugarcane Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) encoding serine peptidase inhibitors, serine peptidases. and Clp protease system subunits. Our results showed that after nine hours of herbivory, 13 sugarcane genes were upregulated and nine were downregulated. Among the upregulated genes, nine were similar to serine peptidase inhibitors and four were similar to Bowman-Birk Inhibitors (BBIs). Phylogenetic analysis revealed that these sequences belong to a phylogenetic group of sugarcane BBIs that are potentially involved in plant defense against insect predation. The remaining four upregulated genes included serine peptidases and one homolog to the Arabidopsis AAA+ chaperone subunit ClpD, which is a member of the Clp protease system. Among the downregulated genes, five were homologous to serine peptidases and four were homologous to Arabidopsis Clp subunits (three homologous to Clp AAA+ chaperones and one to a ClpP-related ClpR subunit). Although the roles of serine peptidase inhibitors in plant defenses against herbivory have been extensively investigated, the roles of plant serine peptidases and the Clp protease system represent a new and underexplored field of study. The up- and downregulated D. saccharalis genes presented in this study may be candidate genes for the further investigation of the sugarcane response to herbivory.

  16. Involvement of the serine/threonine p70S6 kinase in TGF-beta1-induced ADAM12 expression in cultured human hepatic stellate cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le Pabic, Hélène; L'Helgoualc'h, Annie; Coutant, Alexandre

    2005-01-01

    In chronic liver injury, quiescent hepatic stellate cells change into proliferative myofibroblast-like cells, which are a main source of fibrosis. We have recently reported that these cells synthesize ADAM12, a disintegrin and metalloprotease whose expression is up-regulated by TGF-beta1 in liver...

  17. Distinct spatiotemporal expression of serine proteases Prss23 and Prss35 in periimplantation mouse uterus and dispensable function of Prss35 in fertility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honglu Diao

    Full Text Available PRSS23 and PRSS35 are homologous proteases originally identified in mouse ovaries. In the periimplantation mouse uterus, Prss23 was highly expressed in the preimplantation gestation day 3.5 (D3.5 uterine luminal epithelium (LE. It disappeared from the postimplantation LE and reappeared in the stromal compartment next to the myometrium on D6.5. It was undetectable in the embryo from D4.5 to D6.5 but highly expressed in the embryo on D7.5. Prss35 became detectable in the uterine stromal compartment surrounding the embryo on D4.5 and shifted towards the mesometrial side of the stromal compartment next to the embryo from D5.5 to D7.5. In the ovariectomized uterus, Prss23 was moderately and Prss35 was dramatically downregulated by progesterone and 17β-estradiol. Based on the expression of Prss35 in granulosa cells and corpus luteum of the ovary and the early pregnant uterus, we hypothesized that PRSS35 might play a role in female reproduction, especially in oocyte development, ovulation, implantation, and decidualization. This hypothesis was tested in Prss35((-/- mice, which proved otherwise. Between wild type (WT and Prss35((-/- mice, superovulation of immature females produced comparable numbers of cumulus-oocyte complexes; there were comparable numbers of implantation sites detected on D4.5 and D7.5; there were no obvious differences in the expression of implantation and decidualization marker genes in D4.5 or D7.5 uteri. Comparable mRNA expression levels of a few known protease-related genes in the WT and Prss35((-/- D4.5 uteri indicated no compensatory upregulation. Comparable litter sizes from WT × WT and Prss35((-/-× Prss35((-/- crosses suggested that Prss35 gene was unessential for fertility and embryo development. Prss35 gene has been linked to cleft lip/palate in humans. However, no obvious such defects were observed in Prss35((-/- mice. This study demonstrates the distinct expression of Prss23 and Prss35 in the periimplantation uterus

  18. ccrABEnt serine recombinase genes are widely distributed in the Enterococcus faecium and Enterococcus casseliflavus species groups and are expressed in E. faecium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjørkeng, Eva Katrin; Tessema, Girum Tadesse; Lundblad, Eirik Wasmuth; Butaye, Patrick; Willems, Rob; Sollid, Johanna Ericsson; Sundsfjord, Arnfinn; Hegstad, Kristin

    2010-12-01

    The presence, distribution and expression of cassette chromosome recombinase (ccr) genes, which are homologous to the staphylococcal ccrAB genes and are designated ccrAB(Ent) genes, were examined in enterococcal isolates (n=421) representing 13 different species. A total of 118 (28 %) isolates were positive for ccrAB(Ent) genes by PCR, and a number of these were confirmed by Southern hybridization with a ccrA(Ent) probe (n=76) and partial DNA sequencing of ccrA(Ent) and ccrB(Ent) genes (n=38). ccrAB(Ent) genes were present in Enterococcus faecium (58/216, 27 %), Enterococcus durans (31/38, 82 %), Enterococcus hirae (27/52, 50 %), Enterococcus casseliflavus (1/4, 25 %) and Enterococcus gallinarum (1/2, 50 %). In the eight other species tested, including Enterococcus faecalis (n=94), ccrAB(Ent) genes were not found. Thirty-eight sequenced ccrAB(Ent) genes from five different enterococcal species showed 94-100 % nucleotide sequence identity and linkage PCRs showed heterogeneity in the ccrAB(Ent) flanking chromosomal genes. Expression analysis of ccrAB(Ent) genes from the E. faecium DO strain showed constitutive expression as a bicistronic mRNA. The ccrAB(Ent) mRNA levels were lower during log phase than stationary phase in relation to total mRNA. Multilocus sequence typing was performed on 39 isolates. ccrAB(Ent) genes were detected in both hospital-related (10/29, 34 %) and non-hospital (4/10, 40 %) strains of E. faecium. Various sequence types were represented by both ccrAB(Ent) positive and negative isolates, suggesting acquisition or loss of ccrAB(Ent) in E. faecium. In summary, ccrAB(Ent) genes, potentially involved in genome plasticity, are expressed in E. faecium and are widely distributed in the E. faecium and E. casseliflavus species groups.

  19. Molecular Cloning and Optimization for High Level Expression of Cold-Adapted Serine Protease from Antarctic Yeast Glaciozyma antarctica PI12

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norsyuhada Alias

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Psychrophilic basidiomycete yeast, Glaciozyma antarctica strain PI12, was shown to be a protease-producer. Isolation of the PI12 protease gene from genomic and mRNA sequences allowed determination of 19 exons and 18 introns. Full-length cDNA of PI12 protease gene was amplified by rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE strategy with an open reading frame (ORF of 2892 bp, coded for 963 amino acids. PI12 protease showed low homology with the subtilisin-like protease from fungus Rhodosporidium toruloides (42% identity and no homology to other psychrophilic proteases. The gene encoding mature PI12 protease was cloned into Pichia pastoris expression vector, pPIC9, and positioned under the induction of methanol-alcohol oxidase (AOX promoter. The recombinant PI12 protease was efficiently secreted into the culture medium driven by the Saccharomyces cerevisiae α-factor signal sequence. The highest protease production (28.3 U/ml was obtained from P. pastoris GS115 host (GpPro2 at 20°C after 72 hours of postinduction time with 0.5% (v/v of methanol inducer. The expressed protein was detected by SDS-PAGE and activity staining with a molecular weight of 99 kDa.

  20. Molecular Cloning and Optimization for High Level Expression of Cold-Adapted Serine Protease from Antarctic Yeast Glaciozyma antarctica PI12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad Mazian, Mu'adz; Salleh, Abu Bakar; Basri, Mahiran; Rahman, Raja Noor Zaliha Raja Abd.

    2014-01-01

    Psychrophilic basidiomycete yeast, Glaciozyma antarctica strain PI12, was shown to be a protease-producer. Isolation of the PI12 protease gene from genomic and mRNA sequences allowed determination of 19 exons and 18 introns. Full-length cDNA of PI12 protease gene was amplified by rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) strategy with an open reading frame (ORF) of 2892 bp, coded for 963 amino acids. PI12 protease showed low homology with the subtilisin-like protease from fungus Rhodosporidium toruloides (42% identity) and no homology to other psychrophilic proteases. The gene encoding mature PI12 protease was cloned into Pichia pastoris expression vector, pPIC9, and positioned under the induction of methanol-alcohol oxidase (AOX) promoter. The recombinant PI12 protease was efficiently secreted into the culture medium driven by the Saccharomyces cerevisiae α-factor signal sequence. The highest protease production (28.3 U/ml) was obtained from P. pastoris GS115 host (GpPro2) at 20°C after 72 hours of postinduction time with 0.5% (v/v) of methanol inducer. The expressed protein was detected by SDS-PAGE and activity staining with a molecular weight of 99 kDa. PMID:25093119

  1. Expression of serine/threonine protein-kinases and related factors in normal monkey and human retinas: the mechanistic understanding of a CDK2 inhibitor induced retinal toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saturno, Grazia; Pesenti, Manuela; Cavazzoli, Cristiano; Rossi, Anna; Giusti, Anna M; Gierke, Berthold; Pawlak, Michael; Venturi, Miro

    2007-12-01

    Protein-kinase inhibitors are among the most advanced compounds in development using the new drug discovery paradigm of developing small-molecule drugs against specific molecular targets in cancer. After treatment with a cyclin dependent kinase CDK2 inhibitor in monkey, histopathological analysis of the eye showed specific cellular damage in the photoreceptor layer. Since this CDK2 inhibitor showed activity also on other CDKs, in order to investigate the mechanism of toxicity of this compound, we isolated cones and rods from the retina of normal monkey and humans by Laser Capture Microdissection. Using Real-Time PCR we first measured the expression of cyclin dependent protein-kinases (CDK)1, 2, 4, 5, Glycogen synthase kinase 3beta (GSK3beta) and microtubule associated protein TAU. We additionally verified the presence of these proteins in monkey eye sections by immuno-histochemistry and immunofluorescence analysis and afterwards quantified GSK3beta, phospho-GSK3beta and TAU by Reverse Phase Protein Microarrays. With this work we demonstrate how complementary gene expression and protein-based technologies constitute a powerful tool for the understanding of the molecular mechanism of a CDK2 inhibitor induced toxicity. Moreover, this investigative approach is helpful to better understand and characterize the mechanism of species-specific toxicities and further support a rational, molecular mechanism-based safety assessment in humans.

  2. The alteration of serine transporter activity in a cell line model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Na-Young; Kim, Yunha; Ryu, Hoon; Kang, Young-Sook

    2017-01-29

    The alteration of d-serine levels is associated with the pathogenesis of sporadic ALS and mutant SOD1 (G93A) animal model of ALS. However, the exact mechanism of d-serine transport is not known in ALS. To better understand the distribution of d-serine in ALS, we determined the activity and the expression of serine transporter in a motor neuronal cell line model of ALS (NSC-34/hSOD1G93A cells). The uptake of [3H]d-serine was significantly lower in NSC-34/hSOD1G93A cells than in control NSC-34 and NSC-34/hSOD1wt cells. In contrast, the uptake of [3H]l-serine, precursor of d-serine, was markedly increased in NSC-34/hSOD1G93A cells compared to control NSC-34 and NSC-34/hSOD1wt cells. Both [3H]d-serine and [3H]l-serine uptake were saturable in these cells. The estimated Michaelis-Menten constant, Km, for d-serine uptakes was higher in NSC-34/hSOD1G93A cells than in NSC-34/hSOD1wt cells while the Km for l-serine uptake was 2 fold lower in NSC-34/hSOD1G93A cells than in control cells. [3H]d-serine and [3H]l-serine uptakes took place in a Na+-dependent manner, and both uptakes were significantly inhibited by system ASC (alanine-serine-cysteine) substrates. As a result of small interfering RNA experiments, we found that ASCT2 (SLC1A5) and ASCT1 (SLC1A4) are involved in [3H]d-serine and [3H]l-serine uptake in NSC-34/hSOD1G93A cells, respectively. The level of SLC1A4 mRNA was significantly increased in NSC-34/hSOD1G93A compared to NSC-34 and NSC-34/hSOD1wt cells. In contrast, the level of SLC7A10 mRNA was relatively lower in NSC-34/hSOD1G93A cells than the control cells. Together, these data suggest that the pathological alteration of d- and l-serine uptakes in ALS is driven by the affinity change of d-and l-serine uptake system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Serine proteases of the human immune system in health and disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heutinck, Kirstin M.; ten Berge, Ineke J. M.; Hack, C. Erik; Hamann, Jörg; Rowshani, Ajda T.

    2010-01-01

    Serine proteases form a large family of protein-cleaving enzymes that play an essential role in processes like blood coagulation, apoptosis and inflammation. Immune cells express a wide variety of serine proteases such as granzymes in cytotoxic lymphocytes, neutrophil elastase, cathepsin G and

  4. An update on serine deficiency disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Crabben, S. N.; Verhoeven-Duif, N. M.; Brilstra, E. H.; Van Maldergem, L.; Coskun, T.; Rubio-Gozalbo, E.; Berger, R.; de Koning, T. J.

    Serine deficiency disorders are caused by a defect in one of the three synthesising enzymes of the L-serine biosynthesis pathway. Serine deficiency disorders give rise to a neurological phenotype with psychomotor retardation, microcephaly and seizures in newborns and children or progressive

  5. L-serine in disease and development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Koning, Tom J.; Snell, Keith; Duran, Marinus; Berger, Ruud; Poll-The, Bwee-Tien; Surtees, Robert

    2003-01-01

    The amino acid L-serine, one of the so-called non-essential amino acids, plays a central role in cellular proliferation. L-Serine is the predominant source of one-carbon groups for the de novo synthesis of purine nucleotides and deoxythymidine monophosphate. It has long been recognized that, in cell

  6. Predominance of N-acetyl transferase 2 slow acetylator alleles in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Student

    2016-06-22

    Jun 22, 2016 ... Standard nested PCR followed by restriction enzyme analysis with KpnI, TaqI, and BamHI for detection of polymorphisms in the NAT2 was performed. Allelic frequencies and acetylator phenotypes were compared between participants with or without adverse drug events. The prevalence of slow, ...

  7. Predominance of N-acetyl transferase 2 slow acetylator alleles in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Standard nested PCR followed by restriction enzyme analysis with KpnI, TaqI, and BamHI for detection of polymorphisms in the NAT2 was performed. Allelic frequencies and acetylator phenotypes were compared between participants with or without adverse drug events. The prevalence of slow, intermediate and fast ...

  8. Continuing education in neurometabolic disorders--serine deficiency disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Koning, T. J.; Poll-The, B. T.; Jaeken, J.

    1999-01-01

    Serine deficiency disorders comprise a new group of inborn errors of serine metabolism. Patients affected with these disorders present with major neurological symptoms including congenital microcephaly, seizures, psychomotor retardation or polyneuropathy. The diagnosis of serine deficiency is based

  9. The Importance of Serine Phosphorylation of Ameloblastin on Enamel Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, P.; Yan, W.; Tian, Y.; He, J.; Brookes, S.J.; Wang, X.

    2016-01-01

    FAM20C is a newly identified kinase on the secretory pathway responsible for the phosphorylation of serine residues in the Ser-x-Glu/pSer motifs in several enamel matrix proteins. Fam20C-knockout mice showed severe enamel defects very similar to those in the ameloblastin (Ambn)–knockout mice, implying that phosphoserines may have a critical role in AMBN function. To test this hypothesis, we generated amelogenin (Amel) promoter-driven Ambn-transgenic mice, in which Ser48, Ser226, and Ser227 were replaced by aspartic acid (designated as D-Tg) or alanines (designated as A-Tg). The negative charge of aspartic acid is believed to be able to mimic the phosphorylation state of serine, while alanine is a commonly used residue to substitute serine due to their similar structure. Using Western immunoblotting and quantitative polymerase chain reaction, the authors identified transgenic lines expressing transgenes somewhat higher (Tg+) or much higher (Tg++) than endogenous Ambn. The lower incisors collected from 7-d-old and 7-wk-old mice were analyzed by histology, scanning electron microscopy, immunohistochemistry, and Western immunoblotting to examine the morphology and microstructure changes in enamel, as well as the expression pattern of enamel matrix proteins. The A-Tg+ and A-Tg++ mice displayed severe enamel defects in spite of the expression level of transgenes, while the D-Tg+ and D-Tg++ mice showed minor to mild enamel defects, indicating that the D-Tg transgenes disturbed enamel formation less than the A-Tg transgenes did. Our results suggest that the phosphorylation state of serines is likely an essential component for the integrity of AMBN function. PMID:27470066

  10. The human anti-HIV antibodies 2F5, 2G12, and PG9 differ in their susceptibility to proteolytic degradation: down-regulation of endogenous serine and cysteine proteinase activities could improve antibody production in plant-based expression platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemer, Melanie; Mehofer, Ulrich; Torres Acosta, Juan Antonio; Verdianz, Maria; Henkel, Theresa; Loos, Andreas; Strasser, Richard; Maresch, Daniel; Rademacher, Thomas; Steinkellner, Herta; Mach, Lukas

    2014-04-01

    The tobacco-related species Nicotiana benthamiana has recently emerged as a promising host for the manufacturing of protein therapeutics. However, the production of recombinant proteins in N. benthamiana is frequently hampered by undesired proteolysis. Here, we show that the expression of the human anti-HIV antibodies 2F5, 2G12, and PG9 in N. benthamiana leaves leads to the accumulation of discrete heavy chain-derived degradation products of 30-40 kDa. Incubation of purified 2F5 with N. benthamiana intercellular fluid resulted in rapid conversion into the 40-kDa fragment, whereas 2G12 proved largely resistant to degradation. Such a differential susceptibility to proteolytic attack was also observed when these two antibodies were exposed to various types of proteinases in vitro. While serine and cysteine proteinases are both capable of generating the 40-kDa 2F5 fragment, the 30-kDa polypeptide is most readily obtained by treatment with the latter class of enzymes. The principal cleavage sites reside within the antigen-binding domain, the VH -CH 1 linker segment and the hinge region of the antibodies. Collectively, these results indicate that down-regulation of endogenous serine and cysteine proteinase activities could be used to improve the performance of plant-based expression platforms destined for the production of biopharmaceuticals. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Serine-rich protein is a novel positive regulator for silicon accumulation in mangrove.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahebi, Mahbod; Hanafi, Mohamed M; Siti Nor Akmar, A; Rafii, Mohd Y; Azizi, Parisa; Idris, A S

    2015-02-10

    Silicon (Si) plays an important role in reducing plant susceptibility against a variety of different biotic and abiotic stresses; and also has an important regulatory role in soil to avoid heavy metal toxicity and providing suitable growing conditions for plants. A full-length cDNAs of 696bp of serine-rich protein was cloned from mangrove plant (Rhizophora apiculata) by amplification of cDNA ends from an expressed sequence tag homologous to groundnut (Arachis hypogaea), submitted to NCBI (KF211374). This serine-rich protein gene encodes a deduced protein of 223 amino acids. The transcript titre of the serine-rich protein was found to be strongly enriched in roots compared with the leaves of two month old mangrove plants and expression level of this serine-rich protein was found to be strongly induced when the mangrove seedlings were exposed to SiO2. Expression of the serine-rich protein transgenic was detected in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana, where the amount of serine increased from 1.02 to 37.8mg/g. The same trend was also seen in Si content in the roots (14.3%) and leaves (7.4%) of the transgenic A. thaliana compared to the wild-type plants under Si treatment. The biological results demonstrated that the accumulation of the serine amino acid in the vegetative tissues of the transgenic plants enhanced their ability to absorb and accumulate more Si in the roots and leaves and suggests that the serine-rich protein gene has potential for use in genetic engineering of different stress tolerance characteristics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Androgen Receptor Phosphorylation at Serine 308 and Serine 791 Predicts Enhanced Survival in Castrate Resistant Prostate Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A. Underwood

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available We previously reported that AR phosphorylation at serine 213 was associated with poor outcome and may contribute to prostate cancer development and progression. This study investigates if specific AR phosphorylation sites have differing roles in the progression of hormone naïve prostate cancer (HNPC to castrate resistant disease (CRPC. A panel of phosphospecific antibodies were employed to study AR phosphorylation in 84 matched HNPC and CRPC tumours. Immunohistochemistry measured Androgen receptor expression phosphorylated at serine residues 94 (pAR94, 308 (pAR308, 650(pAR650 and 791 (pAR791. No correlations with clinical parameters were observed for pAR94 or pAR650 in HNPC or CRPC tumours. In contrast to our previous observation with serine 213, high pAR308 is significantly associated with a longer time to disease specific death (p = 0.011 and high pAR791 expression significantly associated with a longer time to disease recurrence (p = 0.018 in HNPC tumours and longer time to death from disease recurrence (p = 0.040 in CRPC tumours. This observation in CRPC tumours was attenuated in high apoptotic tumours (p = 0.022 and low proliferating tumours (p = 0.004. These results demonstrate that understanding the differing roles of AR phosphorylation is necessary before this can be exploited as a target for castrate resistant prostate cancer.

  13. Mechanisms of L-Serine Neuroprotection in vitro Include ER Proteostasis Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlop, R A; Powell, J; Guillemin, G J; Cox, P A

    2018-01-01

    β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (L-BMAA) is a neurotoxic non-protein amino acid produced by cyanobacteria. Recently, chronic dietary exposure to L-BMAA was shown to trigger neuropathology in nonhuman primates consistent with Guamanian ALS/PDC, a paralytic disease that afflicts Chamorro villagers who consume traditional food items contaminated with L-BMAA. However, the addition of the naturally occurring amino acid L-serine to the diet of the nonhuman primates resulted in a significant reduction in ALS/PDC neuropathology. L-serine is a dietary amino acid that plays a crucial role in central nervous system development, neuronal signaling, and synaptic plasticity and has been shown to impart neuroprotection from L-BMAA-induced neurotoxicity both in vitro and in vivo. We have previously shown that L-serine prevents the formation of autofluorescent aggregates and death by apoptosis in human cell lines and primary cells. These effects are likely imparted by L-serine blocking incorporation of L-BMAA into proteins hence preventing proteotoxic stress. However, there are likely other mechanisms for L-serine-mediated neuroprotection. Here, we explore the molecular mechanisms of L-serine neuroprotection using a human unfolded protein response real-time PCR array with genes from the ER stress and UPR pathways, and western blotting. We report that L-serine caused the differential expression of many of the same genes as L-BMAA, even though concentrations of L-serine in the culture medium were ten times lower than that of L-BMAA. We propose that L-serine may be functioning as a small proteostasis regulator, in effect altering the cells to quickly respond to a possible oxidative insult, thus favoring a return to homeostasis.

  14. Phospholipid metabolism of serine in Plasmodium-infected erythrocytes involves phosphatidylserine and direct serine decarboxylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elabbadi, N; Ancelin, M L; Vial, H J

    1997-01-01

    Erythrocytes infected with Plasmodium falciparum or Plasmodium knowlesi efficiently incorporated radioactive serine into phosphatidylserine (PtdSer), phosphatidylethanolamine (PtdEtn) and phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho). Serine was also metabolized into ethanolamine (Etn) and phosphorylethanolamine (P-Etn) via direct serine decarboxylation; this is a major phenomenon since together these metabolites represent 60% of total radioactive water-soluble metabolites. They were identified by reverse-phase HPLC and two TLC-type analyses and confirmed by alkaline phosphatase treatment, which depleted the radioactive P-Etn peak completely with a concomitant increase in that of Etn. In the presence of 5 microM labelled serine, radioactivity appeared in Etn and P-Etn after a 25 min lag period, and isotopic equilibrium was reached at 40 and 95 min respectively. There was a similar lag period for PtdEtn formation, which accumulated steadily for at least 180 min. Incorporation of serine into phospholipids and water-soluble metabolites increased in the presence of up to 500 microM external serine. An apparent plateau was then reached for all metabolites except intracellular serine and Etn. Exogenous Etn (at 20 microM) induced a concomitant dramatic decrease in serine incorporation into P-Etn and all phospholipids, but not into Etn. Increasing exogenous serine to 100 microM decreased the incorporation of radioactive Etn into PtdEtn by only 30%, and the PtdCho level was not affected. 2-Hydroxyethylhydrazine significantly decreased serine incorporation into P-Etn and PtdEtn, whereas Etn was accumulated. No concomitant inhibition of PtdSer or PtdCho labelling from serine occurred, even when PtdEtn formation was decreased by 95%. This indicates that the PtdEtn pool derived from direct serine decarboxylation differed from that derived from PtdSer decarboxylation, and the latter appeared to be preferentially used for PtdCho biosynthesis. Hydroxylamine also inhibited phosphorylation of serine

  15. D-serine increases adult hippocampal neurogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastien eSultan

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Adult hippocampal neurogenesis results in the continuous formation of new neurons and is a process of brain plasticity involved in learning and memory. The neurogenic niche regulates the stem cell proliferation and the differentiation and survival of new neurons and a major contributor to the neurogenic niche are astrocytes. Among the molecules secreted by astrocytes, D-serine is an important gliotransmitter and is a co-agonist of the glutamate, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor. D-serine has been shown to enhance the proliferation of neural stem cells in vitro, but its effect on adult neurogenesis in vivo is unknown. Here, we tested the effect of exogenous administration of D-serine on adult neurogenesis in the mouse dentate gyrus. We found that 1 week of treatment with D-serine increased cell proliferation in vivo and in vitro and increased the density of neural stem cells and transit amplifying progenitors. Furthermore, D-serine increased the survival of newborn neurons. Together, these results indicate that D-serine treatment resulted in the improvement of several steps of adult neurogenesis in vivo.

  16. Laminin Mediates Tissue-specific Gene Expression in Mammary Epithelia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Streuli, Charles H; Schmidhauser, Christian; Bailey, Nina; Yurchenco, Peter; Skubitz, Amy P. N.; Roskelley, Calvin; Bissell, Mina J

    1995-04-01

    Tissue-specific gene expression in mammary epithelium is dependent on the extracellular matrix as well as hormones. There is good evidence that the basement membrane provides signals for regulating beta-casein expression, and that integrins are involved in this process. Here, we demonstrate that in the presence of lactogenic hormones, laminin can direct expression of the beta-casein gene. Mouse mammary epithelial cells plated on gels of native laminin or laminin-entactin undergo functional differentiation. On tissue culture plastic, mammary cells respond to soluble basement membrane or purified laminin, but not other extracellular matrix components, by synthesizing beta-casein. In mammary cells transfected with chloramphenicol acetyl transferase reporter constructs, laminin activates transcription from the beta-casein promoter through a specific enhancer element. The inductive effect of laminin on casein expression was specifically blocked by the E3 fragment of the carboxy terminal region of the alpha 1 chain of laminin, by antisera raised against the E3 fragment, and by a peptide corresponding to a sequence within this region. Our results demonstrate that laminin can direct tissue-specific gene expression in epithelial cells through its globular domain.

  17. Contribution of the D-Serine-dependent pathway to the cellular mechanisms underlying cognitive aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilie Rouaud

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available An association between age-related memory impairments and changes in functional plasticity in the aging brain has been under intense study within the last decade. In this article, we show that an impaired activation of the strychnine-insensitive glycine site of N-Methyl-D-Aspartate receptors (NMDA-R by its agonist D-serine contributes to deficits of synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus of memory-impaired aged rats. Supplementation with exogenous D-serine prevents the age-related deficits of isolated NMDA-R-dependent synaptic potentials as well as those of theta-burst-induced long-term potentiation and synaptic depotentiation. Endogenous levels of D-serine are reduced in the hippocampus with aging, that correlates with a weaker expression of serine racemase synthesizing the amino acid. On the contrary, the affinity of D-serine binding to NMDA-R is not affected by aging. These results point to a critical role for the D-serine-dependent pathway in the functional alterations of the brain underlying memory impairment and provide key information in the search for new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of memory deficits in the elderly.

  18. Serine proteinase from Cucurbita ficifolia seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dryjański, M; Otlewski, J; Wilusz, T

    1990-01-01

    A new serine proteinase was isolated from Cucurbita ficifolia seeds by the purification procedure, which includes: extraction, salting out with ammonium sulphate, chromatography on CM-cellulose. Sephacryl S-300 gel filtration and h.p.l.c. on DEAE-2SW TSK column. The enzyme was homogeneous both in native and SDS PAGE. Three independent methods showed its molecular mass to be approximately 77 kDa. The enzyme was inhibited by specific serine proteinase organic inhibitors, and was active in the presence of inhibitors specific for other proteinase classes. Surprisingly, squash proteinase exhibited a very high and broad pH optimum with a maximum at 10.7. It hydrolysed many different peptide bonds in B-chain of insulin and was able to cleave four bonds in endogenous serine proteinase inhibitor (CMTI).

  19. Antimicrobial activity of a honeybee (Apis cerana) venom Kazal-type serine protease inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bo Yeon; Lee, Kwang Sik; Zou, Feng Ming; Wan, Hu; Choi, Yong Soo; Yoon, Hyung Joo; Kwon, Hyung Wook; Je, Yeon Ho; Jin, Byung Rae

    2013-12-15

    Insect-derived Kazal-type serine protease inhibitors exhibit thrombin, elastase, plasmin, proteinase K, or subtilisin A inhibition activity, but so far, no functional roles for bee-derived Kazal-type serine protease inhibitors have been identified. In this study, a bee (Apis cerana) venom Kazal-type serine protease inhibitor (AcKTSPI) that acts as a microbial serine protease inhibitor was identified. AcKTSPI contained a single Kazal domain that displayed six conserved cysteine residues and a P1 threonine residue. AcKTSPI was expressed in the venom gland and was present as a 10-kDa peptide in bee venom. Recombinant AcKTSPI Kazal domain (AcKTSPI-Kd) expressed in baculovirus-infected insect cells demonstrated inhibitory activity against subtilisin A (Ki 67.03 nM) and proteinase K (Ki 91.53 nM), but not against α-chymotrypsin or trypsin, which implies a role for AcKTSPI as a microbial serine protease inhibitor. However, AcKTSPI-Kd exhibited no detectable inhibitory effects on factor Xa, thrombin, tissue plasminogen activator, or elastase. Additionally, AcKTSPI-Kd bound directly to Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus thuringiensis, Beauveria bassiana, and Fusarium graminearum but not to Escherichia coli. Consistent with these findings, AcKTSPI-Kd showed antibacterial activity against Gram-positive bacteria and antifungal activity against both plant-pathogenic and entomopathogenic fungi. These findings constitute molecular evidence that AcKTSPI acts as an inhibitor of microbial serine proteases. This paper provides a novel view of the antimicrobial functions of a bee venom Kazal-type serine protease inhibitor. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. 21 CFR 582.5701 - Serine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Serine. 582.5701 Section 582.5701 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1...

  1. A cyclic peptidic serine protease inhibitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Baoyu; Xu, Peng; Jiang, Longguang

    2014-01-01

    Peptides are attracting increasing interest as protease inhibitors. Here, we demonstrate a new inhibitory mechanism and a new type of exosite interactions for a phage-displayed peptide library-derived competitive inhibitor, mupain-1 (CPAYSRYLDC), of the serine protease murine urokinase...

  2. Streptococcus pneumoniae serine protease HtrA, but not SFP or PrtA, is a major virulence factor in pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Stoppelaar, Sacha F.; Bootsma, Hester J.; Zomer, Aldert; Roelofs, Joris J. T. H.; Hermans, Peter W. M.; van 't Veer, Cornelis; van der Poll, Tom

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus (S.) pneumoniae is a common causative pathogen in pneumonia. Serine protease orthologs expressed by a variety of bacteria have been found of importance for virulence. Previous studies have identified two serine proteases in S. pneumoniae, HtrA (high-temperature requirement A) and PrtA

  3. Serine protease inhibitors serpina1 and serpina3 are down-regulated in bone marrow during hematopoietic progenitor mobilization

    OpenAIRE

    Winkler, Ingrid G.; Hendy, Jean; Coughlin, Paul; Horvath, Anita; Lévesque, Jean-Pierre

    2005-01-01

    Mobilization of hematopoietic progenitor cells into the blood involves a massive release of neutrophil serine proteases in the bone marrow. We hypothesize that the activity of these neutrophil serine proteases is regulated by the expression of naturally occurring inhibitors (serpina1 and serpina3) produced locally within the bone marrow. We found that serpina1 and serpina3 were transcribed in the bone marrow by many different hematopoietic cell populations and that a strong reduction in expre...

  4. Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitors in the midgut of Phlebotomus papatasi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leah Theresa Sigle

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Sandflies (Diptera: Psychodidae are important disease vectors of parasites of the genus Leishmania, as well as bacteria and viruses. Following studies of the midgut transcriptome of Phlebotomus papatasi, the principal vector of Leishmania major, two non-classical Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitors were identified (PpKzl1 and PpKzl2. Analyses of expression profiles indicated that PpKzl1 and PpKzl2 transcripts are both regulated by blood-feeding in the midgut of P. papatasi and are also expressed in males, larva and pupa. We expressed a recombinant PpKzl2 in a mammalian expression system (CHO-S free style cells that was applied to in vitro studies to assess serine proteinase inhibition. Recombinant PpKzl2 inhibited α-chymotrypsin to 9.4% residual activity and also inhibited α-thrombin and trypsin to 33.5% and 63.9% residual activity, suggesting that native PpKzl2 is an active serine proteinase inhibitor and likely involved in regulating digestive enzymes in the midgut. Early stages of Leishmania are susceptible to killing by digestive proteinases in the sandfly midgut. Thus, characterising serine proteinase inhibitors may provide new targets and strategies to prevent transmission of Leishmania.

  5. Membrane-anchored Serine Protease Matriptase Is a Trigger of Pulmonary Fibrogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bardou, Olivier; Menou, Awen; François, Charlène; Duitman, Jan Willem; von der Thüsen, Jan H.; Borie, Raphaël; Sales, Katiuchia Uzzun; Mutze, Kathrin; Castier, Yves; Sage, Edouard; Liu, Ligong; Bugge, Thomas H.; Fairlie, David P.; Königshoff, Mélanie; Crestani, Bruno; Borensztajn, Keren S.

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a devastating disease that remains refractory to current therapies. To characterize the expression and activity of the membrane-anchored serine protease matriptase in IPF in humans and unravel its potential role in human and experimental pulmonary fibrogenesis.

  6. Membrane-anchored serine protease matriptase is a trigger of pulmonary fibrogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bardou, O. (Olivier); Menou, A. (Awen); François, C. (Charlène); J.W. Duitman (Jan Willem); J. von der Thusen (Jan); Borie, R. (Raphaël); Sales, K.U. (Katiuchia Uzzun); Mutze, K. (Kathrin); Y. Castier (Yves); Sage, E. (Edouard); Liu, L. (Ligong); Bugge, T.H. (Thomas H.); Fairlie, D.P. (David P.); Königshoff, M. (Mélanie); B. Crestani (Bruno); K. Borensztajn (Keren)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractRationale: Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a devastating disease that remains refractory to current therapies. Objectives: To characterize the expression and activity of the membrane-anchored serine protease matriptase in IPF in humans and unravel its potential role in human and

  7. Studies on aerolysin and a serine protease from Aeromonas trota sp. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husslein, V; Bergbauer, H; Chakraborty, T

    1991-05-15

    Hybridization of 257 mesophilic aeromonads revealed that the aerolysin gene is present in virtually all strains irrespective of origin of isolation. A probe comprising the promotor region was specific for a species now defined as Aeromonas trota sp. nov. Finally, isolation of a serine protease that is concomitantly expressed with aerolysin is described.

  8. L-Serine-Mediated Neuroprotection Includes the Upregulation of the ER Stress Chaperone Protein Disulfide Isomerase (PDI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlop, R A; Powell, J T; Metcalf, J S; Guillemin, G J; Cox, P A

    2018-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is a highly evolutionarily conserved response to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, which functions to return cells to homeostasis or send them into apoptosis, depending on the degree of cellular damage. β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (L-BMAA) has been shown to induce ER stress in a variety of models and has been linked to several types of neurodegenerative disease including Guamanian amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/Parkinsonism dementia complex (ALS/PDC). L-Serine, an amino acid critical for cellular metabolism and neurological signaling, has been shown to be protective against L-BMAA-induced neurotoxicity in both animal and cell culture models. While the mechanisms of L-BMAA neurotoxicity have been well characterized, less is known about L-serine neuroprotection. We recently reported that L-serine and L-BMAA generate similar differential expression profiles in a human ER stress/UPR array, despite L-serine being neuroprotective and L-BMAA being linked to neurodegenerative disease. Here, we further investigate the mechanism(s) of L-serine-induced UPR dysregulation by examining key genes and proteins in the ER stress/UPR pathways. We report that L-serine selectively increased protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) protein translation, an ER chaperone involved in refolding misfolded proteins, suggesting it may be modulating the UPR to favor recovery from ER stress. This constitutes a new mechanism for L-serine-mediated neuroprotection and has implications for its use as a therapy for neurodegenerative illnesses.

  9. Phosphorylation of connexin43 on serine 306 regulates electrical coupling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Procida, Kristina; Jørgensen, Lone; Schmitt, Nicole

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Phosphorylation is a key regulatory event in controlling the function of the cardiac gap junction protein connexin43 (Cx43). Three new phosphorylation sites (S296, S297, S306) have been identified on Cx43; two of these sites (S297 and S306) are dephosphorylated during ischemia....... The functional significance of these new sites is currently unknown. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to examine the role of S296, S297, and S306 in the regulation of electrical intercellular communication. METHODS: To mimic constitutive dephosphorylation, serine was mutated to alanine at the three sites...... and expressed in HeLa cells. Electrical coupling and single channel measurements were performed by double patch clamp. Protein expression levels were assayed by western blotting, localization of Cx43, and phosphorylation of S306 by immunolabeling. Free hemichannels were assessed by biotinylation. RESULTS...

  10. Cysteine biosynthesis in Lactobacillus casei: identification and characterization of a serine acetyltransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogicevic, Biljana; Berthoud, Hélène; Portmann, Reto; Bavan, Tharmatha; Meile, Leo; Irmler, Stefan

    2016-02-01

    In bacteria, cysteine can be synthesized from serine by two steps involving an L-serine O-acetyltransferase (SAT) and a cysteine synthase (CysK). While CysK is found in the publicly available annotated genome from Lactobacillus casei ATCC 334, a gene encoding SAT (cysE) is missing. In this study, we found that various strains of L. casei grew in a chemically defined medium containing sulfide as the sole sulfur source, indicating the presence of a serine O-acetyltransferase. The gene lying upstream of cysK is predicted to encode a homoserine trans-succinylase (metA). To study the function of this gene, it was cloned from L. casei FAM18110. The purified, recombinant protein did not acylate L-homoserine in vitro. Instead, it catalyzed the formation of O-acetyl serine from L-serine and acetyl-CoA. Furthermore, the plasmid expressing the L. casei gene complemented an Escherichia coli cysE mutant strain but not an E. coli metA mutant. This clearly demonstrated that the gene annotated as metA in fact encodes the SAT function and should be annotated as cysE. © FEMS 2016.

  11. D-Serine and Glycine Differentially Control Neurotransmission during Visual Cortex Critical Period.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire N J Meunier

    Full Text Available N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs play a central role in synaptic plasticity. Their activation requires the binding of both glutamate and d-serine or glycine as co-agonist. The prevalence of either co-agonist on NMDA-receptor function differs between brain regions and remains undetermined in the visual cortex (VC at the critical period of postnatal development. Here, we therefore investigated the regulatory role that d-serine and/or glycine may exert on NMDARs function and on synaptic plasticity in the rat VC layer 5 pyramidal neurons of young rats. Using selective enzymatic depletion of d-serine or glycine, we demonstrate that d-serine and not glycine is the endogenous co-agonist of synaptic NMDARs required for the induction and expression of Long Term Potentiation (LTP at both excitatory and inhibitory synapses. Glycine on the other hand is not involved in synaptic efficacy per se but regulates excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission by activating strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors, then producing a shunting inhibition that controls neuronal gain and results in a depression of synaptic inputs at the somatic level after dendritic integration. In conclusion, we describe for the first time that in the VC both D-serine and glycine differentially regulate somatic depolarization through the activation of distinct synaptic and extrasynaptic receptors.

  12. Uteroplacental insufficiency decreases p53 serine-15 phosphorylation in term IUGR rat lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, E A; Barnes, V; Zhao, L; McKnight, R A; Yu, X; Callaway, C W; Wang, L; Sun, J C; Dahl, M J; Wint, A; Wang, Z; McIntyre, T M; Albertine, K H; Lane, R H

    2007-07-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) increases the incidence of chronic lung disease (CLD). The molecular mechanisms responsible for IUGR-induced acute lung injury that predispose the IUGR infant to CLD are unknown. p53, a transcription factor, plays a pivotal role in determining cellular response to stress by affecting apoptosis, cell cycle regulation, and angiogenesis, processes required for thinning of lung mesenchyme. Because thickened lung mesenchyme is characteristic of CLD, we hypothesized that IUGR-induced changes in lung growth are associated with alterations in p53 expression and/or modification. We induced IUGR through bilateral uterine artery ligation of pregnant rats. Uteroplacental insufficiency significantly decreased serine-15-phosphorylated (serine-15P) p53, an active form of p53, in IUGR rat lung. Moreover, we found that decreased phosphorylation of lung p53 serine-15 localized to thickened distal air space mesenchyme. We also found that IUGR significantly decreased mRNA for targets downstream of p53, specifically, proapoptotic Bax and Apaf, as well as Gadd45, involved in growth arrest, and Tsp-1, involved in angiogenesis. Furthermore, we found that IUGR significantly increased mRNA for Bcl-2, an antiapoptotic gene downregulated by p53. We conclude that in IUGR rats, uteroplacental insufficiency induces decreased lung mesenchymal p53 serine-15P in association with distal lung mesenchymal thickening. We speculate that decreased p53 serine-15P in IUGR rat lungs alters lung phenotype, making the IUGR lung more susceptible to subsequent injury.

  13. Serine, Glycine and One-carbon Metabolism in Colorectal Cancer Cell in Heterogeneous Microenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ke-Chih; Austin, Robert; Ducker, Greg; Sturm, James; Sturm, James

    The up-regulation of serine metabolism associated with one-carbon metabolism has been identified to support cellular biosynthesis and redox maintenance of tumors. The consistently over-expressed one-carbon genes have been targeted for potential drug development. To investigate the biological function of specific enzymes, we had genetic engineered HCT116 cell lines, methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase (MTHFD) and phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (PHGDH) deleted cell lines, growing in the artificial microhabitats array with serine and glycine gradient across. The impact of depletion of serine and the blocking of biosynthesis pathway will be shown in terms of cell morphology, proliferation rate, and cell motility. The evolution dynamic and migration rate can also be tracked throughout the experiments.

  14. Feedback inactivation of D-serine synthesis by NMDA receptor-elicited translocation of serine racemase to the membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balan, Livia; Foltyn, Veronika N; Zehl, Martin

    2009-01-01

    D-serine is a physiological coagonist of N-methyl D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) that plays a major role in several NMDAR-dependent events. In this study we investigate mechanisms regulating D-serine production by the enzyme serine racemase (SR). We now report that NMDAR activation promotes trans...

  15. Increased tolerance towards serine obtained by adaptive laboratory evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mundhada, Hemanshu; Seoane, Jose Miguel; Koza, Anna

    2014-01-01

    by glyA), the conversion of serine to pyruvate (encoded by sdaA, sdaB and tdcG) was also deleted. As expected, the resulting strain turned out to be susceptible to even low concentrations of serine in the media. In order to improve the tolerance of the strain towards serine, adaptive laboratory evolution...... was implemented using a state of the art robotics platform. The strain was grown under inhibiting concentrations of serine in minimal media and was periodically transferred to new media during mid log phase. After achieving a desired increase in growth rate, the concentration was serine was gradually increased...

  16. Characterization of the Usage of the Serine Metabolic Network in Human Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahya Mehrmohamadi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The serine, glycine, one-carbon (SGOC metabolic network is implicated in cancer pathogenesis, but its general functions are unknown. We carried out a computational reconstruction of the SGOC network and then characterized its expression across thousands of cancer tissues. Pathways including methylation and redox metabolism exhibited heterogeneous expression indicating a strong context dependency of their usage in tumors. From an analysis of coexpression, simultaneous up- or downregulation of nucleotide synthesis, NADPH, and glutathione synthesis was found to be a common occurrence in all cancers. Finally, we developed a method to trace the metabolic fate of serine using stable isotopes, high-resolution mass spectrometry, and a mathematical model. Although the expression of single genes didn’t appear indicative of flux, the collective expression of several genes in a given pathway allowed for successful flux prediction. Altogether, these findings identify expansive and heterogeneous functions for the SGOC metabolic network in human cancer.

  17. Low doses of neutrons induce changes in gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woloschak, G.E.; Chang-Liu, C.M. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Panozzo, J.; Libertin, C.R. (Loyola Univ., Maywood, IL (United States))

    1993-01-01

    Studies were designed to identify genes induced following low-dose neutron but not following [gamma]-ray exposure in fibroblasts. Our past work had shown differences in the expression of [beta]-protein kinase C and c-fos genes, both being induced following [gamma]-ray but not neutron exposure. We have identified two genes that are induced following neutron, but not [gamma]-ray, exposure: Rp-8 (a gene induced by apoptosis) and the long terminal repeat (LTR) of the human immunodeficiency (HIV). Rp-8 mRNA induction was demonstrated in Syrian hamster embryo fibroblasts and was found to be induced in cells exposed to neutrons administered at low (0.5 cGy/min) and at high dose rate (12 cGy/min). The induction of transcription from the LTR of HIV was demonstrated in HeLa cells bearing a transfected construct of the chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) gene driven by the HIV-LTR promoter. Measures of CAT activity and CAT transcripts following irradiation demonstrated an unresponsiveness to [gamma] rays over a broad range of doses. Twofold induction of the HIV-LTR was detected following neutron exposure (48 cGy) administered at low (0.5 cGy/min) but not high (12 cGy/min) dose rates. Ultraviolet-mediated HIV-LTR induction was inhibited by low-dose-rate neutron exposure.

  18. Low doses of neutrons induce changes in gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woloschak, G.E.; Chang-Liu, C.M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Panozzo, J.; Libertin, C.R. [Loyola Univ., Maywood, IL (United States)

    1993-06-01

    Studies were designed to identify genes induced following low-dose neutron but not following {gamma}-ray exposure in fibroblasts. Our past work had shown differences in the expression of {beta}-protein kinase C and c-fos genes, both being induced following {gamma}-ray but not neutron exposure. We have identified two genes that are induced following neutron, but not {gamma}-ray, exposure: Rp-8 (a gene induced by apoptosis) and the long terminal repeat (LTR) of the human immunodeficiency (HIV). Rp-8 mRNA induction was demonstrated in Syrian hamster embryo fibroblasts and was found to be induced in cells exposed to neutrons administered at low (0.5 cGy/min) and at high dose rate (12 cGy/min). The induction of transcription from the LTR of HIV was demonstrated in HeLa cells bearing a transfected construct of the chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) gene driven by the HIV-LTR promoter. Measures of CAT activity and CAT transcripts following irradiation demonstrated an unresponsiveness to {gamma} rays over a broad range of doses. Twofold induction of the HIV-LTR was detected following neutron exposure (48 cGy) administered at low (0.5 cGy/min) but not high (12 cGy/min) dose rates. Ultraviolet-mediated HIV-LTR induction was inhibited by low-dose-rate neutron exposure.

  19. Epigenetic Activation of ASCT2 in the Hippocampus Contributes to Depression-Like Behavior by Regulating D-Serine in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiesi Wang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The roles of D-serine in depression are raised concerned recently as an intrinsic co-agonist for the NMDA receptor. However, the mechanisms underlying its regulation are not fully elucidated. ASCT2 is a Na+-dependent D-serine transporter. We found that decreased D-serine and increased hippocampal ASCT2 levels correlated with chronic social defeat stress (CSDS in mice. Lentivirus-mediated shRNA-mediated knockdown of ASCT2 and the administration of exogenous D-serine in the hippocampus alleviated CSDS-induced social avoidance and immobility. In vivo and in vitro experiments revealed that upregulation of ASCT2 expression in CSDS was regulated through histone hyper-acetylation, not DNA methylation in its promoter region. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated the co-localization of ASCT2 and D-serine. Uptake of D-serine by ASCT2 was demonstrated by in vivo and in vitro experiments. Our results indicate that CSDS induces ASCT2 expression through epigenetic activation and decreases hippocampal D-serine levels, leading to social avoidance, and immobility. Thus, targeting D-serine transport represents an attractive new strategy for treating depression.

  20. Characterization of the in vivo sites of serine phosphorylation on Lck identifying serine 59 as a site of mitotic phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesavan, Kamala P; Isaacson, Christina C; Ashendel, Curtis L; Geahlen, Robert L; Harrison, Marietta L

    2002-04-26

    The lymphocyte-specific protein-tyrosine kinase Lck plays a critical role in T cell activation. In response to T cell antigen receptor binding Lck undergoes phosphorylation on serine residues that include serines 59 and 194. Serine 59 is phosphorylated by ERK mitogen-activated protein kinase. Recently, we showed that in mitotic T cells Lck becomes hyper-phosphorylated on serine residues. In this report, using one-dimensional phosphopeptide mapping analysis, we identify serine 59 as a site of in vivo mitotic phosphorylation in Lck. The mitotic phosphorylation of serine 59 did not require either the catalytic activity or functional SH2 or SH3 domains of Lck. In addition, the presence of ZAP-70 also was dispensable for the phosphorylation of serine 59. Although previous studies demonstrated that serine 59 is a substrate for the ERK MAPK pathway, inhibitors of this pathway did not block the mitotic phosphorylation of serine 59. These results identify serine 59 as a site of mitotic phosphorylation in Lck and suggest that a pathway distinct from that induced by antigen receptor signaling is responsible for its phosphorylation. Thus, the phosphorylation of serine 59 is the result of two distinct signaling pathways, differentially activated in response to the physiological state of the T cell.

  1. Serine dipeptide lipids of Porphyromonas gingivalis inhibit osteoblast differentiation: Relationship to Toll-like receptor 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-Hsiung; Nemati, Reza; Anstadt, Emily; Liu, Yaling; Son, Young; Zhu, Qiang; Yao, Xudong; Clark, Robert B; Rowe, David W; Nichols, Frank C

    2015-12-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a periodontal pathogen strongly associated with loss of attachment and supporting bone for teeth. We have previously shown that the total lipid extract of P. gingivalis inhibits osteoblast differentiation through engagement of Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) and that serine dipeptide lipids of P. gingivalis engage both mouse and human TLR2. The purpose of the present investigation was to determine whether these serine lipids inhibit osteoblast differentiation in vitro and in vivo and whether TLR2 engagement is involved. Osteoblasts were obtained from calvaria of wild type or TLR2 knockout mouse pups that also express the Col2.3GFP transgene. Two classes of serine dipeptide lipids, termed Lipid 654 and Lipid 430, were tested. Osteoblast differentiation was monitored by cell GFP fluorescence and osteoblast gene expression and osteoblast function was monitored as von Kossa stained mineral deposits. Osteoblast differentiation and function were evaluated in calvarial cell cultures maintained for 21 days. Lipid 654 significantly inhibited GFP expression, osteoblast gene expression and mineral nodule formation and this inhibition was dependent on TLR2 engagement. Lipid 430 also significantly inhibited GFP expression, osteoblast gene expression and mineral nodule formation but these effects were only partially attributed to engagement of TLR2. More importantly, Lipid 430 stimulated TNF-α and RANKL gene expression in wild type cells but not in TLR2 knockout cells. Finally, osteoblast cultures were observed to hydrolyze Lipid 654 to Lipid 430 and this likely occurs through elevated PLA2 activity in the cultured cells. In conclusion, our results show that serine dipeptide lipids of P. gingivalis inhibit osteoblast differentiation and function at least in part through engagement of TLR2. The Lipid 430 serine class also increased the expression of genes that could increase osteoclast activity. We conclude that Lipid 654 and Lipid 430 have the potential

  2. A cyclic peptidic serine protease inhibitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Baoyu; Xu, Peng; Jiang, Longguang

    2014-01-01

    plasminogen activator (uPA). We used X-ray crystal structure analysis, site-directed mutagenesis, liquid state NMR, surface plasmon resonance analysis, and isothermal titration calorimetry and wild type and engineered variants of murine and human uPA. We demonstrate that Arg6 inserts into the S1 specificity......Peptides are attracting increasing interest as protease inhibitors. Here, we demonstrate a new inhibitory mechanism and a new type of exosite interactions for a phage-displayed peptide library-derived competitive inhibitor, mupain-1 (CPAYSRYLDC), of the serine protease murine urokinase-type...

  3. Phosphorylation of SAF-A/hnRNP-U Serine 59 by Polo-Like Kinase 1 Is Required for Mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Pauline; Ye, Ruiqiong; Morrice, Nicholas; Britton, Sébastien; Trinkle-Mulcahy, Laura; Lees-Miller, Susan P

    2015-08-01

    Scaffold attachment factor A (SAF-A), also called heterogenous nuclear ribonuclear protein U (hnRNP-U), is phosphorylated on serine 59 by the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) in response to DNA damage. Since SAF-A, DNA-PK catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs), and protein phosphatase 6 (PP6), which interacts with DNA-PKcs, have all been shown to have roles in mitosis, we asked whether DNA-PKcs phosphorylates SAF-A in mitosis. We show that SAF-A is phosphorylated on serine 59 in mitosis, that phosphorylation requires polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) rather than DNA-PKcs, that SAF-A interacts with PLK1 in nocodazole-treated cells, and that serine 59 is dephosphorylated by protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) in mitosis. Moreover, cells expressing SAF-A in which serine 59 is mutated to alanine have multiple characteristics of aberrant mitoses, including misaligned chromosomes, lagging chromosomes, polylobed nuclei, and delayed passage through mitosis. Our findings identify serine 59 of SAF-A as a new target of both PLK1 and PP2A in mitosis and reveal that both phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of SAF-A serine 59 by PLK1 and PP2A, respectively, are required for accurate and timely exit from mitosis. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Structural and functional diversities in lepidopteran serine proteases

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Srinivasan, Ajay; Giri, Ashok P; Gupta, Vidya S

    2006-01-01

    .... Though the evolutionary significance of mutations that lead to structural diversity in serine proteases has been well characterized, detailing the resultant functional diversity has continually posed...

  5. Novel role of serine racemase in anti-apoptosis and metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talukdar, Gourango; Inoue, Ran; Yoshida, Tomoyuki; Ishimoto, Tetsuya; Yaku, Keisuke; Nakagawa, Takashi; Mori, Hisashi

    2017-01-01

    Serine racemase (SR) catalyzes the production of d-serine, a co-agonist of the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR). A previous report shows the contribution of SR in the NMDAR-mediated neuronal cell death process. To analyze the intrinsic role of SR in the cell death process, we established the epithelial human embryonic kidney 293T (HEK293T) cell lines expressing wild-type SR (SR-WT), catalytically inactive mutant SR (SR-K56G), and catalytically hyperactive mutant SR (SR-Q155D). To these cell lines, staurosporine (STS), which induces apoptosis, was introduced. The cells expressing SR-WT and SR-Q155D showed resistance to STS-induced apoptosis, compared with nontransfected HEK293T cells and cells expressing SR-K56G. The SR-WT cells also showed a significant higher viability than the SR-QD cells. Furthermore, we detected elevated phosphorylation levels of Bcl-2 at serine-70 and Akt at serine-473 and threonine-308, which are related to cell survival, in the cells expressing SR-WT and SR-Q155D. From the results of metabolite analysis, we found elevated levels of acetyl CoA and ATP in cells expressing SR-WT. Because SR has two enzymatic activities, namely, racemization and α, β-elimination, and SR-Q155D shows enhanced racemization and reduced α, β-elimination activities, we concluded that the racemization reaction catalyzed by SR may have a more protective role against apoptosis than the α, β-elimination reaction. Moreover, both of these activities are important for maximal survival and elevated levels of acetyl CoA and ATP. Our findings reveal the NMDAR-independent roles of SR in metabolism and cell survival. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Neonatal disruption of serine racemase causes schizophrenia-like behavioral abnormalities in adulthood: clinical rescue by d-serine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroko Hagiwara

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: D-Serine, an endogenous co-agonist of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor, is synthesized from L-serine by serine racemase (SRR. Given the role of D-serine in both neurodevelopment and the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, we examined whether neonatal disruption of D-serine synthesis by SRR inhibition could induce behavioral abnormalities relevant to schizophrenia, in later life. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Neonatal mice (7-9 days were injected with vehicle or phenazine methosulfate (Met-Phen: 3 mg/kg/day, an SRR inhibitor. Behavioral evaluations, such as spontaneous locomotion, novel object recognition test (NORT, and prepulse inhibition (PPI were performed at juvenile (5-6 weeks old and adult (10-12 weeks old stages. In addition, we tested the effects of D-serine on PPI deficits in adult mice after neonatal Met-Phen exposure. Finally, we assessed whether D-serine could prevent the onset of schizophrenia-like behavior in these mice. Neonatal Met-Phen treatment reduced D-serine levels in the brain, 24 hours after the final dose. Additionally, this treatment caused behavioral abnormalities relevant to prodromal symptoms in juveniles and to schizophrenia in adults. A single dose of D-serine improved PPI deficits in adult mice. Interestingly, chronic administration of D-serine (900 mg/kg/day from P35 to P70 significantly prevented the onset of PPI deficits after neonatal Met-Phen exposure. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study shows that disruption of D-serine synthesis during developmental stages leads to behavioral abnormalities relevant to prodromal symptoms and schizophrenia, in later life. Furthermore, early pharmacological intervention with D-serine may prevent the onset of psychosis in adult.

  7. The Contribution of Serine 194 Phosphorylation to Steroidogenic Acute Regulatory Protein Function

    OpenAIRE

    Sasaki, Goro; Zubair, Mohamad; Ishii, Tomohiro; Mitsui, Toshikatsu; Hasegawa, Tomonobu; Auchus, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    The steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) facilitates the delivery of cholesterol to the inner mitochondrial membrane, where the cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme catalyzes the initial step of steroid hormone biosynthesis. StAR was initially identified in adrenocortical cells as a phosphoprotein, the expression and phosphorylation of which were stimulated by corticotropin. A number of in vitro studies have implicated cAMP-dependent phosphorylation at serine 194 (S194, S195 in hum...

  8. Highly potent fibrinolytic serine protease from Streptomyces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uesugi, Yoshiko; Usuki, Hirokazu; Iwabuchi, Masaki; Hatanaka, Tadashi

    2011-01-05

    We introduce a highly potent fibrinolytic serine protease from Streptomyces omiyaensis (SOT), which belongs to the trypsin family. The fibrinolytic activity of SOT was examined using in vitro assays and was compared with those of known fibrinolytic enzymes such as plasmin, tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA), urokinase, and nattokinase. Compared to other enzymes, SOT showed remarkably higher hydrolytic activity toward mimic peptides of fibrin and plasminogen. The fibrinolytic activity of SOT is about 18-fold higher than that of plasmin, and is comparable to that of t-PA by fibrin plate assays. Furthermore, SOT had some plasminogen activator-like activity. Results show that SOT and nattokinase have very different fibrinolytic and fibrinogenolytic modes, engendering significant synergetic effects of SOT and nattokinase on fibrinolysis. These results suggest that SOT presents important possibilities for application in the therapy of thrombosis. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Serine phosphorylation of syndecan-2 proteoglycan cytoplasmic domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oh, E S; Couchman, J R; Woods, A

    1997-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) is involved in cell-matrix and cell-cell adhesion, and the cytoplasmic domain of syndecan-2 contains two serines (residues 197 and 198) which lie in a consensus sequence for phosphorylation by PKC. Other serine and threonine residues are present but not in a consensus seque...

  10. Enhancement of L-Serine Production by Corynebacterium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To improve the production of L-serine from sucrose directly by wild type Corynebacterium glutamicum SYPS-062. Methods: The culture medium for the production of L-serine was optimized using a statistical experimental design. Sucrose, ammonium sulfate ((NH4)2SO4) and biotin were the key factors, based on ...

  11. D-serine : The right or wrong isoform?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fuchs, Sabine A; Berger, Ruud; de Koning, Tom J

    2011-01-01

    Only recently, d-amino acids have been identified in mammals. Of these, d-serine has been most extensively studied. d-Serine was found to play an important role as a neurotransmitter in the human central nervous system (CNS) by binding to the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAr), similar to

  12. Crystal Structure of TDP-Fucosamine Acetyl Transferase (WECD) from Escherichia Coli, an Enzyme Required for Enterobacterial Common Antigen Synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hung,M.; Rangarajan, E.; Munger, C.; Nadeau, G.; Sulea, T.; Matte, A.

    2006-01-01

    Enterobacterial common antigen (ECA) is a polysaccharide found on the outer membrane of virtually all gram-negative enteric bacteria and consists of three sugars, N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, N-acetyl-D-mannosaminuronic acid, and 4-acetamido-4,6-dideoxy-D-galactose, organized into trisaccharide repeating units having the sequence {yields}(3)-{alpha}-D-Fuc4NAc-(1{yields}4)-{beta}-D-ManNAcA-(1{yields}4)-{alpha}-D-GlcNAc-(1{yields}). While the precise function of ECA is unknown, it has been linked to the resistance of Shiga-toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O157:H7 to organic acids and the resistance of Salmonella enterica to bile salts. The final step in the synthesis of 4-acetamido-4,6-dideoxy-D-galactose, the acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA)-dependent acetylation of the 4-amino group, is carried out by TDP-fucosamine acetyltransferase (WecD). We have determined the crystal structure of WecD in apo form at a 1.95-Angstroms resolution and bound to acetyl-CoA at a 1.66-Angstroms resolution. WecD is a dimeric enzyme, with each monomer adopting the GNAT N-acetyltransferase fold, common to a number of enzymes involved in acetylation of histones, aminoglycoside antibiotics, serotonin, and sugars. The crystal structure of WecD, however, represents the first structure of a GNAT family member that acts on nucleotide sugars. Based on this cocrystal structure, we have used flexible docking to generate a WecD-bound model of the acetyl-CoA-TDP-fucosamine tetrahedral intermediate, representing the structure during acetyl transfer. Our structural data show that WecD does not possess a residue that directly functions as a catalytic base, although Tyr208 is well positioned to function as a general acid by protonating the thiolate anion of coenzyme A.

  13. Chromatin Modulatory Proteins and Olfactory Receptor Signaling in the Refinement and Maintenance of Fruitless Expression in Olfactory Receptor Neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine E Hueston

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available During development, sensory neurons must choose identities that allow them to detect specific signals and connect with appropriate target neurons. Ultimately, these sensory neurons will successfully integrate into appropriate neural circuits to generate defined motor outputs, or behavior. This integration requires a developmental coordination between the identity of the neuron and the identity of the circuit. The mechanisms that underlie this coordination are currently unknown. Here, we describe two modes of regulation that coordinate the sensory identities of Drosophila melanogaster olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs involved in sex-specific behaviors with the sex-specific behavioral circuit identity marker fruitless (fru. The first mode involves a developmental program that coordinately restricts to appropriate ORNs the expression of fru and two olfactory receptors (Or47b and Ir84a involved in sex-specific behaviors. This regulation requires the chromatin modulatory protein Alhambra (Alh. The second mode relies on the signaling from the olfactory receptors through CamK and histone acetyl transferase p300/CBP to maintain ORN-specific fru expression. Our results highlight two feed-forward regulatory mechanisms with both developmentally hardwired and olfactory receptor activity-dependent components that establish and maintain fru expression in ORNs. Such a dual mechanism of fru regulation in ORNs might be a trait of neurons driving plastic aspects of sex-specific behaviors.

  14. Melatonin improved anthocyanin accumulation by regulating gene expressions and resulted in high reactive oxygen species scavenging capacity in cabbage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na eZhang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we found that exogenous melatonin pretreatment improved anthocyanin accumulation (1- to 2-fold in cabbage. To verify the relationship with melatonin and anthocyanin, an Arabidopsis mutant, snat, which expresses a defective form of the melatonin biosynthesis enzyme SNAT (Serotonin N-acetyl transferase, was employed. Under cold conditions, the foliage of wild-type Arabidopsis exhibited a deeper red color than the snat mutant. This finding further proved that exogenous melatonin treatment was able to affect anthocyanin accumulation. To gain a better understanding of how exogenous melatonin upregulates anthocyanin, we measured gene expression in cabbage samples treated with melatonin and untreated controls. We found that the transcript levels of anthocyanin biosynthetic genes were upregulated by melatonin treatment. Moreover, melatonin treatment increased the expression levels of the transcription factors MYB, bHLH, and WD40, which constitute the transcriptional activation complex responsible for coordinative regulation of anthocyanin biosynthetic genes. We found that free radical generation was downregulated, whereas the osmotic adjustment and antioxidant capacities were upregulated in exogenous melatonin-treated cabbage plants. We concluded that melatonin increases anthocyanin production and benefits cabbage growth.

  15. p38 MAPK regulates PKAα and CUB-serine protease in Amphibalanus amphitrite cyprids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Gen; He, Li-Sheng; Him Wong, Yue; Xu, Ying; Zhang, Yu; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2015-10-05

    The MKK3-p38 MAPK pathway has been reported to mediate larval settlement in Amphibalanus (=Balanus) amphitrite. To clarify the underlying molecular mechanism, we applied label-free proteomics to analyze changes in the proteome of cyprids treated with a p38 MAPK inhibitor. The results showed that the expression levels of 80 proteins were significantly modified (p CUB-serine protease and PKAα, were both down-regulated in expression. CUB-serine protease localized to postaxial seta 2 and 3, as well as the 4 subterminal sensilla in the antennule. Importantly, it was co-localized with the neuron transmitter serotonin in the sections, suggesting that the CUB-serine protease was present in the neural system. PKAα was highly expressed during the cyprid and juvenile stages, and it was co-localized with phospho-p38 MAPK (pp38 MAPK) to the cement gland, suggesting that PKAα might have some functions in cement glands. Overall, p38 MAPK might regulate multiple functions in A. amphitrite cyprids, including the energy supply, metamorphosis, neural system and cement glands.

  16. Crystal Structure of Serine Racemase that Produces Neurotransmitter d-Serine for Stimulation of the NMDA Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Masaru

    d-Serine is an endogenous coagonist for the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor and is involved in excitatory neurotransmission in the brain. Mammalian pyridoxal 5’-phosphate-dependent serine racemase, which is localized in the mammalian brain, catalyzes the racemization of l-serine to yield d-serine and vice versa. We have determined the structures of three forms of the mammalian enzyme homolog from Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Lys57 and Ser82 located on the protein and solvent sides, respectively, with respect to the cofactor plane, are acid-base catalysts that shuttle protons to the substrate. The modified enzyme, which has a unique lysino-d-alanyl residue at the active site, also binds the substrate serine in the active site, suggesting that the lysino-d-alanyl residue acts as a catalytic base in the same manner as Lys57 of the wild type enzyme.

  17. Serine protease inhibitors serpina1 and serpina3 are down-regulated in bone marrow during hematopoietic progenitor mobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Ingrid G; Hendy, Jean; Coughlin, Paul; Horvath, Anita; Lévesque, Jean-Pierre

    2005-04-04

    Mobilization of hematopoietic progenitor cells into the blood involves a massive release of neutrophil serine proteases in the bone marrow. We hypothesize that the activity of these neutrophil serine proteases is regulated by the expression of naturally occurring inhibitors (serpina1 and serpina3) produced locally within the bone marrow. We found that serpina1 and serpina3 were transcribed in the bone marrow by many different hematopoietic cell populations and that a strong reduction in expression occurred both at the protein and mRNA levels during mobilization induced by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor or chemotherapy. This decreased expression was restricted to the bone marrow as serpina1 expression was maintained in the liver, leading to no change in plasma concentrations during mobilization. The down-regulation of serpina1 and serpina3 during mobilization may contribute to a shift in the balance between serine proteases and their inhibitors, and an accumulation of active neutrophil serine proteases in bone marrow extravascular fluids that cleave and inactivate molecules essential to the retention of hematopoietic progenitor cells within the bone marrow. These data suggest an unexpected role for serpina1 and serpina3 in regulating the bone marrow hematopoietic microenvironment as well as influencing the migratory behavior of hematopoietic precursors.

  18. The Serine Protease Inhibitor Neuroserpin Is Required for Normal Synaptic Plasticity and Regulates Learning and Social Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reumann, Rebecca; Vierk, Ricardo; Zhou, Lepu; Gries, Frederice; Kraus, Vanessa; Mienert, Julia; Romswinkel, Eva; Morellini, Fabio; Ferrer, Isidre; Nicolini, Chiara; Fahnestock, Margaret; Rune, Gabriele; Glatzel, Markus; Galliciotti, Giovanna

    2017-01-01

    The serine protease inhibitor neuroserpin regulates the activity of tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) in the nervous system. Neuroserpin expression is particularly prominent at late stages of neuronal development in most regions of the central nervous system (CNS), whereas it is restricted to regions related to learning and memory in the…

  19. Change in activity of serine palmitoyltransferase affects sensitivity to syringomycin E in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toume, Moeko; Tani, Motohiro

    2014-09-01

    Syringomycin E is a cyclic lipodepsipeptide produced by strains of the plant bacterium Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae. Genetic studies involving the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have revealed that complex sphingolipids play important roles in the action of syringomycin E. Here, we found a novel mutation that confers resistance to syringomycin E on yeast; that is, a deletion mutant of ORM1 and ORM2, which encode negative regulators of serine palmitoyltransferase catalyzing the initial step of sphingolipid biosynthesis, exhibited resistance to syringomycin E. On the contrary, overexpression of Orm2 resulted in high sensitivity to the toxin. Moreover, overexpression of Lcb1 and Lcb2, catalytic subunits of serine palmitoyltransferase, causes resistance to the toxin, whereas partial repression of expression of Lcb1 had the opposite effect. Partial reduction of complex sphingolipids by repression of expression of Aur1, an inositol phosphorylceramide synthase, also resulted in high sensitivity to the toxin. These results suggested that an increase in sphingolipid biosynthesis caused by a change in the activity of serine palmitoyltransferase causes resistance to syringomycin E. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A Highly Conserved Bacterial D-Serine Uptake System Links Host Metabolism and Virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James P R Connolly

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The ability of any organism to sense and respond to challenges presented in the environment is critically important for promoting or restricting colonization of specific sites. Recent work has demonstrated that the host metabolite D-serine has the ability to markedly influence the outcome of infection by repressing the type III secretion system of enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC in a concentration-dependent manner. However, exactly how EHEC monitors environmental D-serine is not understood. In this work, we have identified two highly conserved members of the E. coli core genome, encoding an inner membrane transporter and a transcriptional regulator, which collectively help to "sense" levels of D-serine by regulating its uptake from the environment and in turn influencing global gene expression. Both proteins are required for full expression of the type III secretion system and diversely regulated prophage-encoded effector proteins demonstrating an important infection-relevant adaptation of the core genome. We propose that this system acts as a key safety net, sampling the environment for this metabolite, thereby promoting colonization of EHEC to favorable sites within the host.

  1. Regulation of Adrenal Aldosterone Production by Serine Protease Prostasin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takehiro Ko

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A serine protease prostasin has been demonstrated to have a pivotal role in the activation of the epithelial sodium channel. Systemic administration of adenovirus carrying human prostasin gene in rats resulted in an increase in plasma prostasin and aldosterone levels. However, the mechanism by which the elevation of prostasin levels in the systemic circulation stimulated the plasma aldosterone levels remains unknown. Therefore, we examined if prostasin increases the aldosterone synthesis in a human adrenocortical cell line (H295R cells. Luciferase assay using CYP11B2 promoter revealed that prostasin significantly increased the transcriptional activity of CYP11B2. Prostasin significantly increased both CYP11B2 mRNA expression and aldosterone production in a dose-dependent manner. Surprisingly, treatment with camostat mesilate, a potent prostasin inhibitor, had no effect on the aldosterone synthesis by prostasin and also a protease-dead mutant of prostasin significantly stimulated the aldosterone production. A T-type/L-type calcium channel blocker and a protein kinase C (PKC inhibitor significantly reduced the aldosterone synthesis by prostasin. Our findings suggest a stimulatory effect of prostasin on the aldosterone synthesis by adrenal gland through the nonproteolytic action and indicate a new role of prostasin in the systemic circulation.

  2. Purification and biochemical characterization of a serine alkaline ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-08-02

    , which sulfonated the essential serine residue in the active site and resulted in the complete loss of its activity. However, the enzyme was resistant to EDTA. The high activity of TC4 in the presence of EDTA was advantageous.

  3. Intervention with Serine Protease Activity with Small Peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Peng

    2015-01-01

    Serine proteases perform proteolytic reactions in many physiological and metabolic processes and have been certified as targets for therapeutics. Small peptides can be used as potent antagonists to target serine proteases and intervene with their activities. Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u...... before, we elucidated the binding and inhibitory mechanism by using multiple techniques, like X-ray crystallography, site-directed mutagenesis, isothermal titration calorimetry and surface plasmon resonance analysis. By studying the peptide-enzyme interaction, we discovered an unusual inhibitor-protease...... discovered that the mupain-1 scaffold is highly versatile, based on which mupain-1 is potentially able to be retargeted to other serine proteases in the trypsin-like clan. With the scaffold of mupain-1, we rationally designed three inhibitors with high affinity and specificity for another serine protease...

  4. Construction and characterization of regulated L-arabinose-inducible broad host range expression vectors in Xanthomonas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukchawalit, R; Vattanaviboon, P; Sallabhan, R; Mongkolsuk, S

    1999-12-15

    Several versions of broad host range (BHR), L-arabinose-inducible expression vectors were constructed. These expression vectors were based on a high copy number BHR pBBR1MCS-4 replicon that could replicate in both enteric and non-enteric Gram-negative bacteria. Two versions of expression cassettes containing multiple cloning sites either with or without a ribosome binding site were placed under transcriptional control of the Escherichia coli BAD promoter and araC gene. Three versions of vectors containing ampicillin or kanamycin or tetracycline resistance genes as selectable markers were constructed. In all six new L-arabinose-inducible BHR expression vectors containing many unique cloning sites, selectable markers were made to facilitate cloning and expression of genes in various Gram-negative bacteria. A Tn9 chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (cat) gene was cloned into an expression vector, resulting in pBBad18Acat that was used to establish optimal expression conditions (addition of 0.02% L-arabinose to mid-exponential phase cells for at least 1 h) in a Xanthomonas campestris pv. phaseoli. Comparison of the Cat enzyme activities between uninduced and a 180-min L-arabinose-induced culture showed a greater than 150-fold increased Cat specific activity. In addition, L-arabinose induction of exponential phase cells harboring pBBad18Acat gave a higher amount of Cat than similarly treated stationary phase cells. The usefulness of the expression vector was also demonstrated in both enteric and non-enteric Gram-negative bacteria.

  5. Expression Profiles of Neuropeptides, Neurotransmitters, and Their Receptors in Human Keratocytes In Vitro and In Situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Słoniecka, Marta; Le Roux, Sandrine; Boman, Peter; Byström, Berit; Zhou, Qingjun; Danielson, Patrik

    2015-01-01

    Keratocytes, the quiescent cells of the corneal stroma, play a crucial role in corneal wound healing. Neuropeptides and neurotransmitters are usually associated with neuronal signaling, but have recently been shown to be produced also by non-neuronal cells and to be involved in many cellular processes. The aim of this study was to assess the endogenous intracellular and secreted levels of the neuropeptides substance P (SP) and neurokinin A (NKA), and of the neurotransmitters acetylcholine (ACh), catecholamines (adrenaline, noradrenaline and dopamine), and glutamate, as well as the expression profiles of their receptors, in human primary keratocytes in vitro and in keratocytes of human corneal tissue sections in situ. Cultured keratocytes expressed genes encoding for SP and NKA, and for catecholamine and glutamate synthesizing enzymes, as well as genes for neuropeptide, adrenergic and ACh (muscarinic) receptors. Keratocytes in culture produced SP, NKA, catecholamines, ACh, and glutamate, and expressed neurokinin-1 and -2 receptors (NK-1R and NK-2R), dopamine receptor D2, muscarinic ACh receptors, and NDMAR1 glutamate receptor. Human corneal sections expressed SP, NKA, NK-1R, NK-2R, receptor D2, choline acetyl transferase (ChAT), M3, M4 and M5 muscarinic ACh receptors, glutamate, and NMDAR1, but not catecholamine synthesizing enzyme or the α1 and β2 adrenoreceptors, nor M1 receptor. In addition, expression profiles assumed significant differences between keratocytes from the peripheral cornea as compared to those from the central cornea, as well as differences between keratocytes cultured under various serum concentrations. In conclusion, human keratocytes express an array of neuropeptides and neurotransmitters. The cells furthermore express receptors for neuropeptides/neurotransmitters, which suggests that they are susceptible to stimulation by these substances in the cornea, whether of neuronal or non-neuronal origin. As it has been shown that neuropeptides

  6. Structure-Based Mechanism for Early PLP-Mediated Steps of Rabbit Cytosolic Serine Hydroxymethyltransferase Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martino L. Di Salvo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Serine hydroxymethyltransferase catalyzes the reversible interconversion of L-serine and glycine with transfer of one-carbon groups to and from tetrahydrofolate. Active site residue Thr254 is known to be involved in the transaldimination reaction, a crucial step in the catalytic mechanism of all pyridoxal 5′-phosphate- (PLP- dependent enzymes, which determines binding of substrates and release of products. In order to better understand the role of Thr254, we have expressed, characterized, and determined the crystal structures of rabbit cytosolic serine hydroxymethyltransferase T254A and T254C mutant forms, in the absence and presence of substrates. These mutants accumulate a kinetically stable gem-diamine intermediate, and their crystal structures show differences in the active site with respect to wild type. The kinetic and crystallographic data acquired with mutant enzymes permit us to infer that conversion of gem-diamine to external aldimine is significantly slowed because intermediates are trapped into an anomalous position by a misorientation of the PLP ring, and a new energy barrier hampers the transaldimination reaction. This barrier likely arises from the loss of the stabilizing hydrogen bond between the hydroxymethyl group of Thr254 and the ε-amino group of active site Lys257, which stabilizes the external aldimine intermediate in wild type SHMTs.

  7. Distribution and evolution of the serine/aspartate racemase family in invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uda, Kouji; Abe, Keita; Dehara, Yoko; Mizobata, Kiriko; Sogawa, Natsumi; Akagi, Yuki; Saigan, Mai; Radkov, Atanas D; Moe, Luke A

    2016-02-01

    Free D-amino acids have been found in various invertebrate phyla, while amino acid racemase genes have been identified in few species. The purpose of this study is to elucidate the distribution, function, and evolution of amino acid racemases in invertebrate animals. We searched the GenBank databases, and found 11 homologous serine racemase genes from eight species in eight different invertebrate phyla. The cloned genes were identified based on their maximum activity as Acropora millepora (Cnidaria) serine racemase (SerR) and aspartate racemase (AspR), Caenorhabditis elegans (Nematoda) SerR, Capitella teleta (Annelida) SerR, Crassostrea gigas (Mollusca) SerR and AspR, Dugesia japonica (Platyhelminthes) SerR, Milnesium tardigradum (Tardigrada) SerR, Penaeus monodon (Arthropoda) SerR and AspR and Strongylocentrotus purpuratus (Echinodermata) AspR. We found that Acropora, Aplysia, Capitella, Crassostrea and Penaeus had two amino acid racemase paralogous genes and these paralogous genes have evolved independently by gene duplication at their recent ancestral species. The transcriptome analyses using available SRA data and enzyme kinetic data suggested that these paralogous genes are expressed in different tissues and have different functions in vivo. Phylogenetic analyses clearly indicated that animal SerR and AspR are not separated by their particular racemase functions and form a serine/aspartate racemase family cluster. Our results revealed that SerR and AspR are more widely distributed among invertebrates than previously known. Moreover, we propose that the triple serine loop motif at amino acid positions 150-152 may be responsible for the large aspartate racemase activity and the AspR evolution from SerR.

  8. Distinct and site-specific phosphorylation of the retinoblastoma protein at serine 612 in differentiated cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takayuki Hattori

    Full Text Available The retinoblastoma susceptibility protein (pRB is a phosphoprotein that regulates cell cycle progression at the G1/S transition. In quiescent and early G1 cells, pRB predominantly exists in the active hypophosphorylated form. The cyclin/cyclin-dependent protein kinase complexes phosphorylate pRB at the late G1 phase to inactivate pRB. This event leads to the dissociation and activation of E2F family transcriptional factors. At least 12 serine/threonine residues in pRB are phosphorylated in vivo. Although there have been many reports describing bulk phosphorylation of pRB, detail research describing the function of each phosphorylation site remains unknown. Besides its G1/S inhibitory function, pRB is involved in differentiation, prevention of cell death and control of tissue fate. To uncover the function of phosphorylation of pRB in various cellular conditions, we have been investigating phosphorylation of each serine/threonine residue in pRB with site-specific phospho-serine/threonine antibodies. Here we demonstrate that pRB is specifically phosphorylated at Ser612 in differentiated cells in a known kinase-independent manner. We also found that pRB phosphorylated at Ser612 still associates with E2F-1 and tightly binds to nuclear structures including chromatin. Moreover, expression of the Ser612Ala mutant pRB failed to induce differentiation. The findings suggest that phosphorylation of Ser612 provides a distinct function that differs from the function of phosphorylation of other serine/threonine residues in pRB.

  9. Glycogen synthase kinase3 beta phosphorylates serine 33 of p53 and activates p53's transcriptional activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Price Brendan D

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The p53 protein is activated by genotoxic stress, oncogene expression and during senescence, p53 transcriptionally activates genes involved in growth arrest and apoptosis. p53 activation is regulated by post-translational modification, including phosphorylation of the N-terminal transactivation domain. Here, we have examined how Glycogen Synthase Kinase (GSK3, a protein kinase involved in tumorigenesis, differentiation and apoptosis, phosphorylates and regulates p53. Results The 2 isoforms of GSK3, GSK3α and GSK3β, phosphorylate the sequence Ser-X-X-X-Ser(P when the C-terminal serine residue is already phosphorylated. Several p53 kinases were examined for their ability to create GSK3 phosphorylation sites on the p53 protein. Our results demonstrate that phosphorylation of serine 37 of p53 by DNA-PK creates a site for GSK3β phosphorylation at serine 33 in vitro. GSK3α did not phosphorylate p53 under any condition. GSK3β increased the transcriptional activity of the p53 protein in vivo. Mutation of either serine 33 or serine 37 of p53 to alanine blocked the ability of GSK3β to regulate p53 transcriptional activity. GSK3β is therefore able to regulate p53 function in vivo. p53's transcriptional activity is commonly increased by DNA damage. However, GSK3β kinase activity was inhibited in response to DNA damage, suggesting that GSK3β regulation of p53 is not involved in the p53-DNA damage response. Conclusions GSK3β can regulate p53's transcriptional activity by phosphorylating serine 33. However, GSK3β does not appear to be part of the p53-DNA damage response pathway. Instead, GSK3β may provide the link between p53 and non-DNA damage mechanisms for p53 activation.

  10. Functional analysis of a missense mutation in the serine protease inhibitor SPINT2 associated with congenital sodium diarrhea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Faller

    Full Text Available Membrane-bound serine proteases play important roles in different biological processes. Their regulation by endogenous inhibitors is poorly understood. A Y163C mutation in the SPINT2 gene encoding the serine protease inhibitor Hepatocyte Growth Factor Inhibitor HAI-2 is associated with a congenital sodium diarrhea. The functional consequences of this mutation on HAI-2 activity and its physiological targets are unknown. We established a cellular assay in Xenopus laevis oocytes to study functional interactions between HAI-2 and candidate membrane-bound serine proteases expressed in the gastro-intestinal tract. We found that the wild-type form of HAI-2 is a potent inhibitor of nine gastro-intestinal serine proteases. The Y163C mutation in the second Kunitz domain of HAI-2 resulted in a complete loss of inhibitory activity on two intestinal proteases, prostasin and tmprss13. The effect of the mutation of the homologous Y68C in the first Kunitz domain of HAI-2 is consistent with a differential contribution of the two Kunitz domains of HAI-2 in the inhibition of serine proteases. By contrast to the Tyr to Cys, the Tyr to Ser substitution did not change the inhibitory potency of HAI-2, indicating that the thiol-group of the cysteine rather than the Tyr deletion is responsible for the HAI-2 loss of function. Our functional assay allowed us to identify membrane-bound serine proteases as cellular target for inhibition by HAI-2 wild type and mutants, and to better define the role of the Tyr in the second Kunitz domain in the inhibitory activity of HAI-2.

  11. Cross genome comparisons of serine proteases in Arabidopsis and rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sowdhamini R

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Serine proteases are one of the largest groups of proteolytic enzymes found across all kingdoms of life and are associated with several essential physiological pathways. The availability of Arabidopsis thaliana and rice (Oryza sativa genome sequences has permitted the identification and comparison of the repertoire of serine protease-like proteins in the two plant species. Results Despite the differences in genome sizes between Arabidopsis and rice, we identified a very similar number of serine protease-like proteins in the two plant species (206 and 222, respectively. Nearly 40% of the above sequences were identified as potential orthologues. Atypical members could be identified in the plant genomes for Deg, Clp, Lon, rhomboid proteases and species-specific members were observed for the highly populated subtilisin and serine carboxypeptidase families suggesting multiple lateral gene transfers. DegP proteases, prolyl oligopeptidases, Clp proteases and rhomboids share a significantly higher percentage orthology between the two genomes indicating substantial evolutionary divergence was set prior to speciation. Single domain architectures and paralogues for several putative subtilisins, serine carboxypeptidases and rhomboids suggest they may have been recruited for additional roles in secondary metabolism with spatial and temporal regulation. The analysis reveals some domain architectures unique to either or both of the plant species and some inactive proteases, like in rhomboids and Clp proteases, which could be involved in chaperone function. Conclusion The systematic analysis of the serine protease-like proteins in the two plant species has provided some insight into the possible functional associations of previously uncharacterised serine protease-like proteins. Further investigation of these aspects may prove beneficial in our understanding of similar processes in commercially significant crop plant species.

  12. Microstructure and nanomechanical properties of enamel remineralized with asparagine-serine-serine peptide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Hsiu-Ying, E-mail: hychung@mail.fcu.edu.tw; Li, Cheng Che

    2013-03-01

    A highly biocompatible peptide, triplet repeats of asparagine-serine-serine (3NSS) was designed to regulate mineral deposition from aqueous ions in saliva for the reconstruction of enamel lesions. Healthy human enamel was sectioned and acid demineralized to create lesions, then exposed to the 3NSS peptide solution, and finally immersed in artificial saliva for 24 h. The surface morphology and roughness were examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), respectively. X-ray diffraction (XRD) was used to identify the phases and crystallinity of the deposited minerals observed on the enamel surface. Attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) was used to quantitatively analyze the mineral variation by calculating the relative integrated-area of characteristic bands. Nanohardness and elastic modulus measured by nanoindentation at various treatment stages were utilized to evaluate the degree of recovery. Biomimetic effects were accessed according to the degree of nanohardness recovery and the amount of hydroxyapatite deposition. The charged segments in the 3NSS peptide greatly attracted aqueous ions from artificial saliva to form hydroxyapatite crystals to fill enamel caries, in particular the interrod areas, resulting in a slight reduction in overall surface roughness. Additionally, the deposited hydroxyapatites were of a small crystalline size in the presence of the 3NSS peptide, which effectively restrained the plastic deformations and thus resulted in greater improvements in nanohardness and elastic modulus. The degree of nanohardness recovery was 5 times greater for remineralized enamel samples treated with the 3NSS peptide compared to samples without peptide treatment. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The degree of nanohardness recovery of enamel was 4 times greater with the aid of 3NSS peptide. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 3NSS peptide promoted the formation of hydroxyapatites with

  13. Characterization of a serine proteinase homologous (SPH) in Chinese mitten crab Eriocheir sinensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Chuanjie; Chen, Liqiao; Qin, Jian G; Zhao, Daxian; Zhang, Hao; Wu, Ping; Li, Erchao

    2010-01-01

    The serine protease homologous (SPH) is an important cofactor of prophenoloxidase-activating enzyme (PPAE). The gene of SPH of Chinese mitten crab Eriocheir sinensis (EsSPH) in hemocytes was cloned and characterized using reverse transcript polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). The SPH cDNA consisted of 1386 bp with an open reading frame (ORF) encoded a protein of 378 amino acids, 154 bp 5'-untranslated region, and 95 bp 3'-untranslated region. Sequence comparisons against the GenBank database showed that EsSPH deduced amino acids had an overall identity to the gene of serine protease family from 41% to 70% of 15 invertebrate species. The protein had the structural characteristics of SPH, including the conserved six cysteine residues in the N-terminal clip domain and the functional activity (His157, Asp209, Gly311) in the C-terminal serine proteinase-like domain. To analyze the role of EsSPH in an acute infection, the temporal expression of the EsSPH gene after the Aeromonas hydrophila challenge was measured by real-time RT-PCR. The EsSPH transcripts in hemocytes significantly increased at 6 h, 12 h and 48 h over time after the A. hydrophila injection. This expression pattern shows that EsSPH has the potential to defend against invading microorganisms. The mRNA transcripts of EsSPH were detected in all tissues with the highest in the hepatopancreas. Interestingly, the mRNA transcripts of EsSPH and proPO were found in ova and expressed in oosperms, suggesting that the maternal transfer of EsSPH and proPO may exit in crab, but this warrants confirmation in further research.

  14. Inhibition of lung serine proteases in mice: a potentially new approach to control influenza infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Błazejewska Paulina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Host serine proteases are essential for the influenza virus life cycle because the viral haemagglutinin is synthesized as a precursor which requires proteolytic maturation. Therefore, we studied the activity and expression of serine proteases in lungs from mice infected with influenza and evaluated the effect of serine protease inhibitors on virus replication both in cell culture and in infected mice. Results Two different inbred mouse strains were investigated: DBA/2J as a highly susceptible and C57Bl/6J as a more resistant strain to influenza virus infection. The serine proteases from lung homogenates of mice exhibited pH optima of 10.00. Using the substrate Bz-Val-Gly-Arg-p-nitroanilide or in zymograms, the intensities of proteolysis increased in homogenates from both mouse strains with time post infection (p.i. with the mouse-adapted influenza virus A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (H1N1; PR8. In zymograms at day 7 p.i., proteolytic bands were stronger and numerous in lung homogenates from DBA/2J than C57Bl/6J mice. Real-time PCR results confirmed differential expression of several lung proteases before and after infecting mice with the H1N1 virus. The most strongly up-regulated proteases were Gzma, Tmprss4, Elane, Ctrl, Gzmc and Gzmb. Pretreatment of mouse and human lung cell lines with the serine protease inhibitors AEBSF or pAB or a cocktail of both prior to infection with the H1N1 or the A/Seal/Massachusetts/1/80 (H7N7; SC35M virus resulted in a decrease in virus replication. Pretreatment of C57Bl/6J mice with either AEBSF or a cocktail of AEBSF and pAB prior to infection with the H1N1 virus significantly reduced weight loss and led to a faster recovery of treated versus untreated mice while pAB alone exerted a very poor effect. After infection with the H7N7 virus, the most significant reduction of weight loss was obtained upon pretreatment with either the protease inhibitor cocktail or pAB. Furthermore, pretreatment of C57BL/6J

  15. The binding mechanism of a peptidic cyclic serine protease inhibitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Longguang; Svane, Anna Sigrid P.; Sørensen, Hans Peter

    2011-01-01

    Serine proteases are classical objects for studies of catalytic and inhibitory mechanisms as well as interesting as therapeutic targets. Since small-molecule serine protease inhibitors generally suffer from specificity problems, peptidic inhibitors, isolated from phage-displayed peptide libraries......, have attracted considerable attention. Here, we have investigated the mechanism of binding of peptidic inhibitors to serine protease targets. Our model is upain-1 (CSWRGLENHRMC), a disulfide-bond-constrained competitive inhibitor of human urokinase-type plasminogen activator with a noncanonical...... kinetics and thermodynamics by surface plasmon resonance and isothermal titration calorimetry. We found that upain-1 changes both main-chain conformation and side-chain orientations as it binds to the protease, in particular its Trp3 residue and the surrounding backbone. The properties of upain-1...

  16. Serum response factor MADS box serine -162 phosphorylation switches proliferation and myogenic gene programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Dinakar; Chang, David; Marx, Joe; Wei, Lei; Olson, Eric N.; Parmacek, Michael S.; Balasubramanyam, Ashok; Schwartz, Robert J.

    2006-01-01

    Phosphorylation of a cluster of amino acids in the serum response factor (SRF) “MADS box” αI coil DNA binding domain regulated the transcription of genes associated with proliferation or terminal muscle differentiation. Mimicking phosphorylation of serine-162, a target of protein kinase C-α, with an aspartic acid substitution (SRF-S162D) completely inhibited SRF–DNA binding and blocked α-actin gene transcription even in the presence of potent myogenic cofactors, while preserving c-fos promoter activity because of stabilization of the ternary complex via Elk-1. Introduction of SRF-S162D into SRF null ES cells permitted transcription of the c-fos gene but was unable to rescue expression of myogenic contractile genes. Transition of proliferating C2C12 myoblasts to postfusion myocytes after serum withdrawal was associated with a progressive decline in SRF-S162 phosphorylation and an increase in α-actin gene expression. Hence, the phosphorylation status of serine-162 in the αI coil may constitute a novel switch that directs target gene expression into proliferation or differentiation programs. PMID:16537394

  17. Heterogeneity of the serine synthetic pathway in Entamoeba species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, Yoko; Makiuchi, Takashi; Jeelani, Ghulam; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi

    2016-06-01

    Phosphoserine phosphatase (PSP) catalyzes the third step of the phosphorylated serine biosynthetic pathway, and occurred multiple times in evolution, while enzymes catalyzing the first and second steps in the pathway have single respective origins. In the present study, we examined the existence of PSP among genus Entamoeba including a human enteric parasite, Entamoeba histolytica. E. histolytica as well as majority of Entamoeba species have the first and second enzymes, but lacks PSP. In contrast, a reptilian enteric parasite, Entamoeba invadens possesses canonical PSP. Thus, there are variations in the existence of the serine biosynthetic ability among Entamoeba species. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Differential regulation of COL2A1 expression in developing and mature chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seghatoleslami, M R; Lichtler, A C; Upholt, W B; Kosher, R A; Clark, S H; Mack, K; Rowe, D W

    1995-12-01

    To investigate the regulation of type II collagen gene expression in cells undergoing chondrogenic differentiation, we have employed a 5-kbp genomic fragment of the human type II collagen gene which contains 1.8kbp of upstream sequences, the transcription start site, the first exon and 3 kbp of intronic sequences, fused to either lac Z or chloramphenicol acetyl transferase-reporter gene. Transient expression studies revealed a parallel increase in transgene activity and endogenous type II collagen mRNA levels during the onset of the cartilage differentiation of limb mesenchymal cells in high-density micromass cultures. At later periods in culture, however, the transgene activity declines, although steady-state levels of type II collagen mRNA are reported to continue to increase (Kosher et al.: J. Cell. Biol. 102: 1151-1156, 1986; Kravis and Upholt. Dev. Biol. 108: 164-172, 1985). In addition, the activity of the transgene is seven-fold higher at the onset of chondrogenic differentiation in micromass cultures that in well differentiated sternal chondrocytes, although similar levels of type II collagen transcripts are found in these cells. Furthermore, deletions of intronic segments resulted in greater drop in activity of the constructs in differentiating chondrocytes in micromass cultures than in mature sternal chondrocytes. The expression of the construct in transgenic mice is higher at the onset of chondrogenic differentiation and in newly differentiated chondrocytes than in more mature differentiated chondrocytes. Based on these observations, it appears that the mechanisms involved in the regulation of the type II collagen gene at the onset of chondrocyte differentiation are different from those resulting in the maintenance of its expression in fully differentiated chondrocytes.

  19. A Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Predicted Serine Protease Is Associated with Acid Stress and Intraphagosomal Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kugadas, Abirami; Lamont, Elise A; Bannantine, John P; Shoyama, Fernanda M; Brenner, Evan; Janagama, Harish K; Sreevatsan, Srinand

    2016-01-01

    The ability to maintain intra-cellular pH is crucial for bacteria and other microbes to survive in diverse environments, particularly those that undergo fluctuations in pH. Mechanisms of acid resistance remain poorly understood in mycobacteria. Although, studies investigating acid stress in M. tuberculosis are gaining traction, few center on Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), the etiological agent of chronic enteritis in ruminants. We identified a MAP acid stress response network involved in macrophage infection. The central node of this network was MAP0403, a predicted serine protease that shared an 86% amino acid identity with MarP in M. tuberculosis. Previous studies confirmed MarP as a serine protease integral to maintaining intra-bacterial pH and survival in acid in vitro and in vivo. We show that MAP0403 is upregulated in infected macrophages and MAC-T cells that coincided with phagosome acidification. Treatment of mammalian cells with bafilomcyin A1, a potent inhibitor of phagosomal vATPases, diminished MAP0403 transcription. MAP0403 expression was also noted in acidic medium. A surrogate host, M. smegmatis mc(2) 155, was designed to express MAP0403 and when exposed to either macrophages or in vitro acid stress had increased bacterial cell viability, which corresponds to maintenance of intra-bacterial pH in acidic (pH = 5) conditions, compared to the parent strain. These data suggest that MAP0403 may be the equivalent of MarP in MAP. Future studies confirming MAP0403 as a serine protease and exploring its structure and possible substrates are warranted.

  20. A Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis predicted serine protease is associated with acid stress and intraphagosomal survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abirami Kugadas

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe ability to maintain intra-cellular pH is crucial for bacteria and other microbes to survive in diverse environments, particularly those that undergo fluctuations in pH. Mechanisms of acid resistance remain poorly understood in mycobacteria. Although studies investigating acid stress in M. tuberculosis are gaining traction, few center on Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP, the etiological agent of chronic enteritis in ruminants. We identified a MAP acid stress response network involved in macrophage infection. The central node of this network was MAP0403, a predicted serine protease that shared an 86% amino acid identity with MarP in M. tuberculosis. Previous studies confirmed MarP as a serine protease integral to maintaining intra-bacterial pH and survival in acid in vitro and in vivo. We show that MAP0403 is upregulated in infected macrophage and MAC-T cells and coincided with phagosome acidification. Treatment of mammalian cells with bafilomcyin A1, a potent inhibitor of phagosomal vATPases, diminished MAP0403 transcription. MAP0403 expression was also noted in acidic medium. A surrogate host, M. smegmatis mc2 155, was designed to express MAP0403 and when exposed to either macrophages or in vitro acid stress had increase bacterial cell viability, which corresponds to maintenance of intra-bacterial pH in acidic (pH = 5 conditions. These data suggest that MAP0403 may be the equivalent of MarP in MAP. Future studies confirming MAP0403 as a serine protease and exploring its structure and possible substrates are warranted.

  1. Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus infection mediated by the transmembrane serine protease TMPRSS2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirato, Kazuya; Kawase, Miyuki; Matsuyama, Shutoku

    2013-12-01

    The Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) utilizes host proteases for virus entry into lung cells. In the current study, Vero cells constitutively expressing type II transmembrane serine protease (Vero-TMPRSS2 cells) showed larger syncytia at 18 h after infection with MERS-CoV than after infection with other coronaviruses. Furthermore, the susceptibility of Vero-TMPRSS2 cells to MERS-CoV was 100-fold higher than that of non-TMPRSS2-expressing parental Vero cells. The serine protease inhibitor camostat, which inhibits TMPRSS2 activity, completely blocked syncytium formation but only partially blocked virus entry into Vero-TMPRSS2 cells. Importantly, the coronavirus is thought to enter cells via two distinct pathways, one mediated by TMPRSS2 at the cell surface and the other mediated by cathepsin L in the endosome. Simultaneous treatment with inhibitors of cathepsin L and TMPRSS2 completely blocked virus entry into Vero-TMPRSS2 cells, indicating that MERS-CoV employs both the cell surface and the endosomal pathway to infect Vero-TMPRSS2 cells. In contrast, a single camostat treatment suppressed MERS-CoV entry into human bronchial submucosal gland-derived Calu-3 cells by 10-fold and virus growth by 270-fold, although treatment with both camostat and (23,25)-trans-epoxysuccinyl-L-leucylamindo-3-methylbutane ethyl ester, a cathepsin inhibitor, or treatment with leupeptin, an inhibitor of cysteine, serine, and threonine peptidases, was no more efficacious than treatment with camostat alone. Further, these inhibitors were not efficacious against MERS-CoV infection of MRC-5 and WI-38 cells, which were derived from lung, but these characters differed from those of mature pneumocytes. These results suggest that a single treatment with camostat is sufficient to block MERS-CoV entry into a well-differentiated lung-derived cell line.

  2. An Epithelial Serine Protease, AgESP, Is Required for Plasmodium Invasion in the Mosquito Anopheles gambiae

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigues, Janneth; Oliveira, Giselle A.; Kotsyfakis, Michalis; Dixit, Rajnikant; Molina-Cruz, Alvaro; Jochim, Ryan; Barillas-Mury, Carolina

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Plasmodium parasites need to cross the midgut and salivary gland epithelia to complete their life cycle in the mosquito. However, our understanding of the molecular mechanism and the mosquito genes that participate in this process is still very limited. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We identified an Anopheles gambiae epithelial serine protease (AgESP) that is constitutively expressed in the submicrovillar region of mosquito midgut epithelial cells and in the basal side of the sa...

  3. Protein kinase D regulates the human cardiac L-type voltage-gated calcium channel through serine 1884.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aita, Yusuke; Kurebayashi, Nagomi; Hirose, Shigehisa; Maturana, Andrés D

    2011-12-15

    Protein kinase D (PKD) regulates the activity of the L-type calcium channel in rat ventricular cardiomyocytes. However, the functional target residues of PKD on the L-type calcium channel remain to be identified. Our aim was to identify the functional phosphorylation sites of PKD on the human L-type calcium channel. The pore subunit of the human CaV1.2 (hCaV1.2) was stably expressed in HEK293 cells. Both the expression of a dominant-negative mutant of PKD and the mutation of serine 1884 but not serine 1930, putative targets of PKD, strongly reduced L-type calcium currents and single channel activity without affecting the channel's expression at the plasma membrane. Our results suggest that serine 1884 is essential for the regulation of hCaV1.2 by PKD. Copyright © 2011 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. A novel subtilisin-like serine protease of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis is induced by thyroid hormone and degrades antimicrobial peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thekkiniath, Jose C; Zabet-Moghaddam, Masoud; San Francisco, Susan K; San Francisco, Michael J

    2013-06-01

    Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (B. dendrobatidis), a chytrid fungus, is one of the major contributors to the global amphibian decline. The fungus infects both tadpoles and adult amphibians. Tadpoles are infected in their keratinized mouthparts, and infected adults exhibit hyperkeratosis and loss of righting reflex. Infections of adults may result in death from cardiac arrest in susceptible species. Thyroid hormone plays a key role in amphibian metamorphosis. The occurrence of B. dendrobatidis in tadpoles during metamorphosis may result in exposure of the fungus to host morphogens including TH. This exposure may induce gene expression in the fungus contributing to invasion and colonization of the host. Here, we demonstrate movement of fungal zoospores toward TH. Additionally, expression of a subtilisin-like serine protease is up-regulated in B. dendrobatidis cells exposed to TH. A gene encoding this protease was cloned from B. dendrobatidis and expressed in Escherichia coli. The protein was partially purified and characterized. The similarity between subtilases of human dermatophytes and the B. dendrobatidis subtilisin-like serine protease suggests the importance of this enzyme in B. dendrobatidis pathogenicity. Cleavage of frog skin antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) by this B. dendrobatidis subtilisin-like serine protease suggests a role for this enzyme in fungal survival and colonization. Copyright © 2013 The British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Distribution pattern of histone H3 phosphorylation at serine 10 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2013-08-06

    Aug 6, 2013 ... in chromosome distribution of H3S10ph when mitosis and meiosis were compared. ... [Paula C. M. P., Techio V. H., Sobrinho F. S. and Freitas A. S. 2013 Distribution pattern of histone H3 phosphorylation at serine 10 during mitosis and meiosis in ... RDWebster], since current knowledge about specific roles ...

  6. Structural diversity in serine derived homochiral metal organic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-09-01

    Sep 1, 2014 ... Abstract. Two new Zn(II) and Cd(II) based homochiral metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) [SerCdOAc and. Zn(Ser)2] have been synthesized using pyridyl functionalized amino acid, viz., serine, as an organic linker. The. SerCdOAc structure is three dimensional, while that of the Zn(Ser)2 is two dimensional.

  7. Enhancement of L-Serine Production by Corynebacterium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    central intermediate for a number of cellular reactions, which makes its ... This strain was further improved by reducing folate supply. [12], which might be the first report on direct fermentative production of L-serine from sugar. Recently, recombinant ... initial pH 6.8, aeration rate 0.8 vvm, and agitation speed 180 rpm.

  8. Fatal cerebral edema associated with serine deficiency in CSF

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keularts, Irene M. L. W.; Leroy, Piet L. J. M.; Rubio-Gozalbo, Estela M.; Spaapen, Leo J. M.; Weber, Biene; Dorland, Bert; de Koning, Tom J.; Verhoeven-Duif, Nanda M.

    2010-01-01

    Two young girls without a notable medical history except for asthma presented with an acute toxic encephalopathy with very low serine concentrations both in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) comparable to patients with 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (3-PGDH) deficiency. Clinical symptoms and

  9. Metabolism of serine and ethanolamine plasmalogens in Megasphaera elsdenii

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, R.A.; Akkermans-Kruyswijk, J.; Franklin-Klein, W.; Lankhorst, A.; Golde, L.M.G. van

    1974-01-01

    1. 1. Megasphaera elsdenii appears to be a very suitable organism for studies on the metabolism of plasmalogens in anaerobic bacteria due to its extremely high content of both serine and ethanolamine plasmalogen. 2. 2. Growth of this organism in the presence of either 32Pi or [2-3H]glycerol

  10. Spinal D-Serine Increases PKC-Dependent GluN1 Phosphorylation Contributing to the Sigma-1 Receptor-Induced Development of Mechanical Allodynia in a Mouse Model of Neuropathic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sheu-Ran; Moon, Ji-Young; Roh, Dae-Hyun; Yoon, Seo-Yeon; Kwon, Soon-Gu; Choi, Hoon-Seong; Kang, Suk-Yun; Han, Ho-Jae; Beitz, Alvin J; Lee, Jang-Hern

    2017-04-01

    We have recently shown that spinal sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R) activation facilitates nociception via an increase in phosphorylation of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor GluN1 subunit (pGluN1). The present study was designed to examine whether the Sig-1R-induced facilitative effect on NMDA-induced nociception is mediated by D-serine, and whether D-serine modulates spinal pGluN1 expression and the development of neuropathic pain after chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve. Intrathecal administration of the D-serine degrading enzyme, D-amino acid oxidase attenuated the facilitation of NMDA-induced nociception induced by the Sig-1R agonist, 2-(4-morpholinethyl)1-phenylcyclohexane carboxylate. Exogenous D-serine increased protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent (Ser896) pGluN1 expression and facilitated NMDA-induced nociception, which was attenuated by preteatment with the PKC inhibitor, chelerythrine. In CCI mice, administration of the serine racemase inhibitor, L-serine O-sulfate potassium salt or D-amino acid oxidase on postoperative days 0 to 3 suppressed CCI-induced mechanical allodynia (MA) and pGluN1 expression on day 3 after CCI surgery. Intrathecal administration of D-serine restored MA as well as the GluN1 phosphorylation on day 3 after surgery that was suppressed by the Sig-1R antagonist, N-[2-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)ethyl]-N-methyl-2-(dimethylamino)ethylamine dihydrobromide or the astrocyte inhibitor, fluorocitrate. In contrast, D-serine had no effect on CCI-induced thermal hyperalgesia or GluN1 expression. These results indicate that spinal D-serine: 1) mediates the facilitative effect of Sig-1R on NMDA-induced nociception, 2) modulates PKC-dependent pGluN1 expression, and 3) ultimately contributes to the induction of MA after peripheral nerve injury. This report shows that reducing D-serine suppresses central sensitization and significantly alleviates peripheral nerve injury-induced chronic neuropathic pain and that this process is modulated by

  11. Disruption of the serine/threonine protein kinase H affects phthiocerol dimycocerosates synthesis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Velasco, Anaximandro; Bach, Horacio; Rana, Amrita K.; Cox, Liam R.; Bhatt, Apoorva; Besra, Gurdyal S.

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis possesses a complex cell wall that is unique and essential for interaction of the pathogen with its human host. Emerging evidence suggests that the biosynthesis of complex cell-wall lipids is mediated by serine/threonine protein kinases (STPKs). Herein, we show, using in vivo radiolabelling, MS and immunostaining analyses, that targeted deletion of one of the STPKs, pknH, attenuates the production of phthiocerol dimycocerosates (PDIMs), a major M. tuberculosis virulence lipid. Comparative protein expression analysis revealed that proteins in the PDIM biosynthetic pathway are differentially expressed in a deleted pknH strain. Furthermore, we analysed the composition of the major lipoglycans, lipoarabinomannan (LAM) and lipomannan (LM), and found a twofold higher LAM/LM ratio in the mutant strain. Thus, we provide experimental evidence that PknH contributes to the production and synthesis of M. tuberculosis cell-wall components. PMID:23412844

  12. Phosphorylation of the leukemic oncoprotein EVI1 on serine 196 modulates DNA binding, transcriptional repression and transforming ability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J White

    Full Text Available The EVI1 (ecotropic viral integration site 1 gene at 3q26 codes for a transcriptional regulator with an essential role in haematopoiesis. Overexpression of EVI1 in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML is frequently associated with 3q26 rearrangements and confers extremely poor prognosis. EVI1 mediates transcriptional regulation, signalling, and epigenetic modifications by interacting with DNA, proteins and protein complexes. To explore to what extent protein phosphorylation impacts on EVI1 functions, we analysed endogenous EVI1 protein from a high EVI1 expressing Fanconi anaemia (FA derived AML cell line. Mass spectrometric analysis of immunoprecipitated EVI1 revealed phosphorylation at serine 196 (S196 in the sixth zinc finger of the N-terminal zinc finger domain. Mutated EVI1 with an aspartate substitution at serine 196 (S196D, which mimics serine phosphorylation of this site, exhibited reduced DNA-binding and transcriptional repression from a gene promotor selectively targeted by the N-terminal zinc finger domain. Forced expression of the S196D mutant significantly reduced EVI1 mediated transformation of Rat1 fibroblasts. While EVI1-mediated serial replating of murine haematopoietic progenitors was maintained by EVI1-S196D, this was associated with significantly higher Evi1-trancript levels compared with WT-EVI1 or EVI1-S196A, mimicking S196 non-phosphorylated EVI1. These data suggest that EVI1 function is modulated by phosphorylation of the first zinc finger domain.

  13. [Identification of a novel human MAST4 gene, a new member of the microtubule associated serine-threonine kinase family].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, L; Gu, S; Li, X; Sun, Y; Zheng, D; Yu, K; Ji, C; Tang, R; Xie, Y; Mao, Y

    2006-01-01

    Human protein kinases make up a large superfamily of homologous proteins, which are related by virtue of their kinase domains (also known as catalytic domains). Here we report the cloning and characterization of a novel human MAST4 (microtubule associated serine/threonine kinase family member 4) gene, which locates on human chromosome 5q13. The MAST4 cDNA is 7587 base pairs in length and encodes a putative protein of 2435 amino acids which contains a serine/threonine kinase domain and a PDZ domain. MAST4 protein has 64%, 63%, 59% and 39% identical aminoacid residues with MAST1, MAST2, MAST3 and MASTL respectively. RT-PCR analysis revealed relatively high expression level of MAST4 in most normal human tissues, with an exception of in testis, small intestine, colon and peripheral blood leukocyte.

  14. Distal hinge of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 involves its latency transition and specificities toward serine proteases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaltiel Shmuel

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1 spontaneously converts from an inhibitory into a latent form. Specificity of PAI-1 is mainly determined by its reactive site (Arg346-Met347, which interacts with serine residue of tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA with concomitant formation of SDS-stable complex. Other sites may also play roles in determining the specificity of PAI-1 toward serine proteases. Results To understand more about the role of distal hinge for PAI-1 specificities towards serine proteases and for its conformational transition, wild type PAI-1 and its mutants were expressed in baculovirus system. WtPAI-1 was found to be about 12 fold more active than the fibrosarcoma PAI-1. Single site mutants within the Asp355-Arg356-Pro357 segment of PAI-1 yield guanidine activatable inhibitors (a that can still form SDS stable complexes with tPA and urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA, and (b that have inhibition rate constants towards plasminogen activators which resemble those of the fibrosarcoma inhibitor. More importantly, latency conversion rate of these mutants was found to be ~3–4 fold faster than that of wtPAI-1. We also tested if Glu351 is important for serine protease specificity. The functional stability of wtPAI-1, Glu351Ala, Glu351Arg was about 18 ± 5, 90 ± 8 and 14 ± 3 minutes, respectively, which correlated well with both their corresponding specific activities (84 ± 15 U/ug, 112 ± 18 U/ug and 68 ± 9 U/ug, respectively and amount of SDS-stable complex formed with tPA after denatured by Guanidine-HCl and dialyzed against 50 mM sodium acetate at 4°C. The second-order rate constants of inhibition for uPA, plasmin and thrombin by Glu351Ala and Glu351Arg were increased about 2–10 folds compared to wtPAI-1, but there was no change for tPA. Conclusion The Asp355-Pro357 segment and Glu351 in distal hinge are involved in maintaining the inhibitory conformation of PAI-1. Glu351 is a specificity

  15. Antinociceptive Effect of Rat D-Serine Racemase Inhibitors, L-Serine-O-Sulfate, and L-Erythro-3-Hydroxyaspartate in an Arthritic Pain Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Laurido

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor (NMDAr activation requires the presence of D-serine, synthesized from L-serine by a pyridoxal 5′-phosphate-dependent serine racemase (SR. D-serine levels can be lowered by inhibiting the racemization of L-serine. L-serine-O-sulfate (LSOS and L-erythro-3-hydroxyaspartate (LEHA, among others, have proven to be effective in reducing the D-serine levels in culture cells. It is tempting then to try these compounds in their effectiveness to decrease nociceptive levels in rat arthritic pain. We measured the C-reflex paradigm and wind-up potentiation in the presence of intrathecally injected LSOS (100 μg/10 μL and LEHA (100 μg/10 μL in normal and monoarthritic rats. Both compounds decreased the wind-up activity in normal and monoarthritic rats. Accordingly, all the antinociceptive effects were abolished when 300 μg/10 μL of D-serine were injected intrathecally. Since no in vivo results have been presented so far, this constitutes the first evidence that SR inhibitions lower the D-serine levels, thus decreasing the NMDAr activity and the consequent development and maintenance of chronic pain.

  16. Ischemic acute kidney injury perturbs homeostasis of serine enantiomers in the body fluid in mice: early detection of renal dysfunction using the ratio of serine enantiomers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jumpei Sasabe

    Full Text Available The imbalance of blood and urine amino acids in renal failure has been studied mostly without chiral separation. Although a few reports have shown the presence of D-serine, an enantiomer of L-serine, in the serum of patients with severe renal failure, it has remained uncertain how serine enantiomers are deranged in the development of renal failure. In the present study, we have monitored serine enantiomers using a two-dimensional HPLC system in the serum and urine of mice after renal ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI, known as a mouse model of acute kidney injury. In the serum, the level of D-serine gradually increased after renal IRI in parallel with that of creatinine, whereas the L-serine level decreased sharply in the early phase after IRI. The increase of D-serine was suppressed in part by genetic inactivation of a D-serine-degrading enzyme, D-amino acid oxidase (DAO, but not by disruption of its synthetic enzyme, serine racemase, in mice. Renal DAO activity was detected exclusively in proximal tubules, and IRI reduced the number of DAO-positive tubules. On the other hand, in the urine, D-serine was excreted at a rate nearly triple that of L-serine in mice with sham operations, indicating that little D-serine was reabsorbed while most L-serine was reabsorbed in physiological conditions. IRI significantly reduced the ratio of urinary D-/L-serine from 2.82 ± 0.18 to 1.10 ± 0.26 in the early phase and kept the ratio lower than 0.5 thereafter. The urinary D-/L-serine ratio can detect renal ischemia earlier than kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1 or neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL in the urine, and more sensitively than creatinine, cystatin C, or the ratio of D-/L-serine in the serum. Our findings provide a novel understanding of the imbalance of amino acids in renal failure and offer a potential new biomarker for an early detection of acute kidney injury.

  17. Interaction of protein C inhibitor with the type II transmembrane serine protease enteropeptidase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas A Prohaska

    Full Text Available The serine protease inhibitor protein C inhibitor (PCI is expressed in many human tissues and exhibits broad protease reactivity. PCI binds glycosaminoglycans and certain phospholipids, which modulate its inhibitory activity. Enteropeptidase (EP is a type II transmembrane serine protease mainly found on the brush border membrane of epithelial cells in the duodenum, where it activates trypsinogen to initiate the digestion of food proteins. Some active EP is also present in duodenal fluid and has been made responsible for causing pancreatitis in case of duodeno-pancreatic reflux. Together with its substrate trypsinogen, EP is furthermore present in the epidermis and in some cancer cells. In this report, we show that PCI inhibited EP with an apparent 2nd order rate constant of 4.48 × 10(4 M(-1 s(-1. Low molecular weight (LMWH and unfractionated heparin (UFH slightly reduced the inhibitory effect of PCI. The SI (stoichiometry of inhibition value for the inhibition of EP by PCI was 10.8 in the absence and 17.9 in the presence of UFH (10 U/ml. By inhibiting trypsin, chymotrypsin, and additionally EP, PCI might play a role in the protection of the pancreas from autodigestion. Furthermore the interaction of PCI with EP may influence the regulation of epithelial differentiation.

  18. Characterization of a family of novel cysteine- serine-rich nuclear proteins (CSRNP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Gingras

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Gene array analysis has been widely used to identify genes induced during T cell activation. Our studies identified an immediate early gene that is strongly induced in response to IL-2 in mouse T cells which we named cysteine- serine-rich nuclear protein-1 (CSRNP-1. The human ortholog was previously identified as an AXIN1 induced gene (AXUD1. The protein does not contain sequence defined domains or motifs annotated in public databases, however the gene is a member of a family of three mammalian genes that share conserved regions, including cysteine- and serine-rich regions and a basic domain, they encode nuclear proteins, possess transcriptional activation domain and bind the sequence AGAGTG. Consequently we propose the nomenclature of CSRNP-1, -2 and -3 for the family. To elucidate the physiological functions of CSRNP-1, -2 and -3, we generated mice deficient for each of these genes by homologous recombination in embryonic stem cells. Although the CSRNP proteins have the hallmark of transcription factors and CSRNP-1 expression is highly induced by IL-2, deletion of the individual genes had no obvious consequences on normal mouse development, hematopoiesis or T cell functions. However, combined deficiencies cause partial neonatal lethality suggesting that the genes have redundant functions.

  19. Characterization of a chemostable serine alkaline protease from Periplaneta americana

    OpenAIRE

    Sanatan, Prashant T; Purushottam R. Lomate; Giri, Ashok P; Hivrale, Vandana K.

    2013-01-01

    Background Proteases are important enzymes involved in numerous essential physiological processes and hold a strong potential for industrial applications. The proteolytic activity of insects? gut is endowed by many isoforms with diverse properties and specificities. Thus, insect proteases can act as a tool in industrial processes. Results In the present study, purification and properties of a serine alkaline protease from Periplaneta americana and its potential application as an additive in v...

  20. Site-specific DNA Inversion by Serine Recombinases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Reversible site-specific DNA inversion reactions are widely distributed in bacteria and their viruses. They control a range of biological reactions that most often involve alterations of molecules on the surface of cells or phage. These programmed DNA rearrangements usually occur at a low frequency, thereby preadapting a small subset of the population to a change in environmental conditions, or in the case of phages, an expanded host range. A dedicated recombinase, sometimes with the aid of additional regulatory or DNA architectural proteins, catalyzes the inversion of DNA. RecA or other components of the general recombination-repair machinery are not involved. This chapter discusses site-specific DNA inversion reactions mediated by the serine recombinase family of enzymes and focuses on the extensively studied serine DNA invertases that are stringently controlled by the Fis-bound enhancer regulatory system. The first section summarizes biological features and general properties of inversion reactions by the Fis/enhancer-dependent serine invertases and the recently described serine DNA invertases in Bacteroides. Mechanistic studies of reactions catalyzed by the Hin and Gin invertases are then discussed in more depth, particularly with regards to recent advances in our understanding of the function of the Fis/enhancer regulatory system, the assembly of the active recombination complex (invertasome) containing the Fis/enhancer, and the process of DNA strand exchange by rotation of synapsed subunit pairs within the invertasome. The role of DNA topological forces that function in concert with the Fis/enhancer controlling element in specifying the overwhelming bias for DNA inversion over deletion and intermolecular recombination is emphasized. PMID:25844275

  1. Preferred stereoselective brain uptake of d-serine--a modulator of glutamatergic neurotransmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Dagmar; Hamacher, Kurt; Bröer, Stefan; Pauleit, Dirk; Palm, Christoph; Zilles, Karl; Coenen, Heinz H; Langen, Karl-Josef

    2005-11-01

    Although it has long been presumed that d-amino acids are uncommon in mammalians, substantial amounts of free d-serine have been detected in the mammalian brain. d-Serine has been demonstrated to be an important modulator of glutamatergic neurotransmission and acts as an agonist at the strychnine-insensitive glycine site of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors. The blood-to-brain transfer of d-serine is thought to be extremely low, and it is assumed that d-serine is generated by isomerization of l-serine in the brain. Stimulated by the observation of a preferred transport of the d-isomer of proline at the blood-brain barrier, we investigated the differential uptake of [3H]-d-serine and [3H]-l-serine in the rat brain 1 h after intravenous injection using quantitative autoradiography. Surprisingly, brain uptake of [3H]-d-serine was significantly higher than that of [3H]-l-serine, indicating a preferred transport of the d-enantiomer of serine at the blood-brain barrier. This finding indicates that exogenous d-serine may have a direct influence on glutamatergic neurotransmission and associated diseases.

  2. Serine racemase: a key player in apoptosis and necrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia eCanu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A fine balance between cell survival and cell death is required to sculpt the nervous system during development. However, an excess of cell death can occur following trauma, exposure to neurotoxins or alcohol, and some developmental and neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD. N-Methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs support synaptic plasticity and survival of many neuronal populations whereas inappropriate activation may promote various forms of cell death, apoptosis and necrosis representing the two extremes of a continuum of cell death processes both in vitro and in vivo. Hence, by identifying the switches controlling pro-survival vs. apoptosis and apoptosis vs. pro-excitotoxic outcome of NMDAR stimulation, NMDAR modulators could be developed that selectively block the cell death enhancing pro-survival signaling or synaptic plasticity mediated by NMDAR. Among these modulators, a role is emerging for the enzyme serine racemase (SR that synthesizes D-serine, a key co-agonist with glutamate at NMDAR. This review summarizes the experimental evidence from in vitro neuronal cultures -- with special emphasis on cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs -- and in vivo models of neurodegeneration, where the dual role of the SR/D-serine pathway as a master regulator of apoptosis and the apoptosis-necrosis shift will be discussed.

  3. Structural Basis for Catalytic Activation of a Serine Recombinase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keenholtz, Ross A.; Rowland, Sally-J.; Boocock, Martin R.; Stark, W. Marshall; Rice, Phoebe A. (Glasgow); (UC)

    2014-10-02

    Sin resolvase is a site-specific serine recombinase that is normally controlled by a complex regulatory mechanism. A single mutation, Q115R, allows the enzyme to bypass the entire regulatory apparatus, such that no accessory proteins or DNA sites are required. Here, we present a 1.86 {angstrom} crystal structure of the Sin Q115R catalytic domain, in a tetrameric arrangement stabilized by an interaction between Arg115 residues on neighboring subunits. The subunits have undergone significant conformational changes from the inactive dimeric state previously reported. The structure provides a new high-resolution view of a serine recombinase active site that is apparently fully assembled, suggesting roles for the conserved active site residues. The structure also suggests how the dimer-tetramer transition is coupled to assembly of the active site. The tetramer is captured in a different rotational substate than that seen in previous hyperactive serine recombinase structures, and unbroken crossover site DNA can be readily modeled into its active sites.

  4. Pnserpin: A Novel Serine Protease Inhibitor from Extremophile Pyrobaculum neutrophilum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Serine protease inhibitors (serpins are native inhibitors of serine proteases, constituting a large protein family with members spread over eukaryotes and prokaryotes. However, only very few prokaryotic serpins, especially from extremophiles, have been characterized to date. In this study, Pnserpin, a putative serine protease inhibitor from the thermophile Pyrobaculum neutrophilum, was overexpressed in Escherichia coli for purification and characterization. It irreversibly inhibits chymotrypsin-, trypsin-, elastase-, and subtilisin-like proteases in a temperature range from 20 to 100 °C in a concentration-dependent manner. The stoichiometry of inhibition (SI of Pnserpin for proteases decreases as the temperature increases, indicating that the inhibitory activity of Pnserpin increases with the temperature. SDS-PAGE (sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that Pnserpin inhibits proteases by forming a SDS-resistant covalent complex. Homology modeling and molecular dynamic simulations predicted that Pnserpin can form a stable common serpin fold. Results of the present work will help in understanding the structural and functional characteristics of thermophilic serpin and will broaden the current knowledge about serpins from extremophiles.

  5. Antibacterial activity of silver nanoparticles synthesized from serine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayaprakash, N. [Catalysis and Nanomaterials Research Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Loyola College, Chennai 600 034 (India); SRM Valliammai Engineering College, Department of Chemistry, Chennai 603 203 (India); Judith Vijaya, J., E-mail: jjvijayaloyola@yahoo.co.in [Catalysis and Nanomaterials Research Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Loyola College, Chennai 600 034 (India); John Kennedy, L. [Materials Division, School of Advanced Sciences, VIT University, Chennai Campus, Chennai 600 048 (India); Priadharsini, K.; Palani, P. [Department of Center for Advanced Study in Botany, University of Madras, Guindy Campus, Chennai 600 025 (India)

    2015-04-01

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) were synthesized by a simple microwave irradiation method using polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) as a capping agent and serine as a reducing agent. UV–Visible spectra were used to confirm the formation of Ag NPs by observing the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) band at 443 nm. The emission spectrum of Ag NPs showed an emission band at 484 nm. In the presence of microwave radiation, serine acts as a reducing agent, which was confirmed by Fourier transformed infrared (FT-IR) spectrum. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) and high-resolution scanning electron microscopy (HR-SEM) were used to investigate the morphology of the synthesized sample. These images showed the sphere-like morphology. The elemental composition of the sample was determined by the energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). Selected area electron diffraction (SAED) was used to find the crystalline nature of the Ag NPs. The electrochemical behavior of the synthesized Ag NPs was analyzed by the cyclic voltammetry (CV). Antibacterial experiments showed that the prepared Ag NPs showed relatively similar antibacterial activities, when compared with AgNO{sub 3} against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. - Highlights: • Microwave irradiation method is used to synthesize silver nanoparticles. • Highly stable silver nanoparticles are produced from serine. • A detailed study of antibacterial activities is discussed. • Formation mechanism of silver microspheres has been proposed.

  6. Altered CREB Binding to Activity-Dependent Genes in Serine Racemase Deficient Mice, a Mouse Model of Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balu, Darrick T; Coyle, Joseph T

    2017-11-27

    cAMP-response-element-binding protein (CREB) is a transcription factor ubiquitously expressed in the brain that regulates neuroplasticity by modulating gene expression. The influx of calcium through N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) is a well-defined mechanism that leads to the increased expression of CREB-dependent genes, including brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), microRNA-132, and activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein (Arc). These molecules are implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. We previously demonstrated that serine racemase knockout (SR-/-) mice, which exhibit NMDAR hypofunction due to a lack of the forebrain NMDAR co-agonist d-serine, also have reduced expression of CREB-dependent genes in the hippocampus. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation, we show here that, in SR-/- mice, there is less CREB bound to the promoter regions of BDNF, microRNA-132, and Arc. These data suggest that NMDAR hypofunction in SR-/- mice leads to reduced CREB binding on known activity-dependent genes, in turn contributing to their reduced expression.

  7. UTILIZATION OF AN ACTIVE SERINE 101 -] CYSTEINE MUTANT TO DEMONSTRATE THE PROXIMITY OF THE CATALYTIC SERINE 101 AND HISTIDINE 237 RESIDUES IN THIOESTERASE-II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WITKOWSKI, A; NAGGERT, J; WITKOWSKA, HE; RANDHAWA, ZI; SMITH, S

    1992-01-01

    Thioesterase II is a 29-kDa monomer which, in certain specialized tissues, acts as a chain terminator in fatty acid synthesis by hydrolyzing medium-chain fatty acids from the fatty acid synthase. As with serine proteases, hydrolysis appears to involve acylation of the active site serine residue

  8. The Effect of Serine Protease Inhibitors on Airway Inflammation in a Chronic Allergen-Induced Asthma Mouse Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Che Lin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Serine protease inhibitors reportedly attenuated airway inflammation and had antioxidant in multiorgan. However, the effects of the serine protease inhibitors nafamostat mesilate (FUT, gabexate mesilate (FOY, and ulinastatin (UTI on a long-term challenged mouse model of chronic asthma are unclear. BALB/c mice (6 mice/group were intratracheally inoculated with five doses of Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Der p; 50 μL, 1 mg/mL at one-week intervals. Therapeutic doses of FUT (0.0625 mg/kg, FOY (20 mg/kg, or UTI (10,000 U/kg were, respectively, injected intraperitoneally into these mice. Control mice received sterile PBS. At 3 days after the last challenge, mice were sacrificed to assess airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR, remodeling, and inflammation; lung histological features; and cytokine expression profiles. Compared with untreated controls, mice treated with FUT, FOY, and UTI had decreased AHR and goblet cell hyperplasia, decreased eosinophil and neutrophil infiltration, decreased Der p-induced IL-4 levels in serum and IL-5, IL-6, IL-13, and IL-17 levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and inhibited nuclear factor (NF-κB activity in lung tissues. The serine protease inhibitors FUT, FOY, and UTI have potential therapeutic benefits for treating asthma by downregulating Th2 cytokines and Th17 cell function and inhibiting NF-κB activation in lung tissue.

  9. Crystallization of a Nonclassical Kazal-type Carcinoscorpius Rotundicauda Serine Protease Inhibitor, CrSPI-1, Complexed with Subtilisin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tulsidas, S.; Thangamani, S; Ho, B; Sivaraman, J; Ding, J

    2009-01-01

    Serine proteases play a major role in host-pathogen interactions. The innate immune system is known to respond to invading pathogens in a nonspecific manner. The serine protease cascade is an essential component of the innate immune system of the horseshoe crab. The serine protease inhibitor CrSPI isoform 1 (CrSPI-1), a unique nonclassical Kazal-type inhibitor of molecular weight 9.3 kDa, was identified from the hepatopancreas of the horseshoe crab Carcinoscorpius rotundicauda. It potently inhibits subtilisin and constitutes a powerful innate immune defence against invading microbes. Here, the cloning, expression, purification and cocrystallization of CrSPI-1 with subtilisin are reported. The crystals diffracted to 2.6 {angstrom}resolution and belonged to space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 73.8, b = 65.0, c = 111.9 {angstrom}, {beta} = 95.4. The Matthews coefficient (VM = 2.64 {angstrom}3 Da-1, corresponding to 53% solvent content) and analysis of the preliminary structure solution indicated the presence of one heterotrimer (1:2 ratio of CrSPI-1:subtilisin) and one free subtilisin molecule in the asymmetric unit.

  10. Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang-Xia Wang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The miR-15/107 family comprises a group of 10 paralogous microRNAs (miRNAs, sharing a 5′ AGCAGC sequence. These miRNAs have overlapping targets. In order to characterize the expression of miR-15/107 family miRNAs, we employed customized TaqMan Low-Density micro-fluid PCR-array to investigate the expression of miR-15/107 family members, and other selected miRNAs, in 11 human tissues obtained at autopsy including the cerebral cortex, frontal cortex, primary visual cortex, thalamus, heart, lung, liver, kidney, spleen, stomach and skeletal muscle. miR-103, miR-195 and miR-497 were expressed at similar levels across various tissues, whereas miR-107 is enriched in brain samples. We also examined the expression patterns of evolutionarily conserved miR-15/107 miRNAs in three distinct primary rat brain cell preparations (enriched for cortical neurons, astrocytes and microglia, respectively. In primary cultures of rat brain cells, several members of the miR-15/107 family are enriched in neurons compared to other cell types in the central nervous system (CNS. In addition to mature miRNAs, we also examined the expression of precursors (pri-miRNAs. Our data suggested a generally poor correlation between the expression of mature miRNAs and their precursors. In summary, we provide a detailed study of the tissue and cell type-specific expression profile of this highly expressed and phylogenetically conserved family of miRNA genes.

  11. Serine Hydroxymethyltransferase Anchors de Novo Thymidylate Synthesis Pathway to Nuclear Lamina for DNA Synthesis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Donald D.; Woeller, Collynn F.; Chiang, En-Pei; Shane, Barry; Stover, Patrick J.

    2012-01-01

    The de novo thymidylate biosynthetic pathway in mammalian cells translocates to the nucleus for DNA replication and repair and consists of the enzymes serine hydroxymethyltransferase 1 and 2α (SHMT1 and SHMT2α), thymidylate synthase, and dihydrofolate reductase. In this study, we demonstrate that this pathway forms a multienzyme complex that is associated with the nuclear lamina. SHMT1 or SHMT2α is required for co-localization of dihydrofolate reductase, SHMT, and thymidylate synthase to the nuclear lamina, indicating that SHMT serves as scaffold protein that is essential for complex formation. The metabolic complex is enriched at sites of DNA replication initiation and associated with proliferating cell nuclear antigen and other components of the DNA replication machinery. These data provide a mechanism for previous studies demonstrating that SHMT expression is rate-limiting for de novo thymidylate synthesis and indicate that de novo thymidylate biosynthesis occurs at replication forks. PMID:22235121

  12. Genome-wide survey of prokaryotic serine proteases: Analysis of distribution and domain architectures of five serine protease families in prokaryotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tripathi Lokesh P

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Serine proteases are one of the most abundant groups of proteolytic enzymes found in all the kingdoms of life. While studies have established significant roles for many prokaryotic serine proteases in several physiological processes, such as those associated with metabolism, cell signalling, defense response and development, functional associations for a large number of prokaryotic serine proteases are relatively unknown. Current analysis is aimed at understanding the distribution and probable biological functions of the select serine proteases encoded in representative prokaryotic organisms. Results A total of 966 putative serine proteases, belonging to five families, were identified in the 91 prokaryotic genomes using various sensitive sequence search techniques. Phylogenetic analysis reveals several species-specific clusters of serine proteases suggesting their possible involvement in organism-specific functions. Atypical phylogenetic associations suggest an important role for lateral gene transfer events in facilitating the widespread distribution of the serine proteases in the prokaryotes. Domain organisations of the gene products were analysed, employing sensitive sequence search methods, to infer their probable biological functions. Trypsin, subtilisin and Lon protease families account for a significant proportion of the multi-domain representatives, while the D-Ala-D-Ala carboxypeptidase and the Clp protease families are mostly single-domain polypeptides in prokaryotes. Regulatory domains for protein interaction, signalling, pathogenesis, cell adhesion etc. were found tethered to the serine protease domains. Some domain combinations (such as S1-PDZ; LON-AAA-S16 etc. were found to be widespread in the prokaryotic lineages suggesting a critical role in prokaryotes. Conclusion Domain architectures of many serine proteases and their homologues identified in prokaryotes are very different from those observed in eukaryotes

  13. Characterization of a chemostable serine alkaline protease from Periplaneta americana

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Proteases are important enzymes involved in numerous essential physiological processes and hold a strong potential for industrial applications. The proteolytic activity of insects’ gut is endowed by many isoforms with diverse properties and specificities. Thus, insect proteases can act as a tool in industrial processes. Results In the present study, purification and properties of a serine alkaline protease from Periplaneta americana and its potential application as an additive in various bio-formulations are reported. The enzyme was purified near to homogeneity by using acetone precipitation and Sephadex G-100 gel filtration chromatography. Enzyme activity was increased up to 4.2 fold after gel filtration chromatography. The purified enzyme appeared as single protein-band with a molecular mass of ~ 27.8 kDa in SDS-PAGE. The optimum pH and temperature for the proteolytic activity for purified protein were found around pH 8.0 and 60°C respectively. Complete inhibition of the purified enzyme by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride confirmed that the protease was of serine-type. The purified enzyme revealed high stability and compatibility towards detergents, oxidizing, reducing, and bleaching agents. In addition, enzyme also showed stability towards organic solvents and commercial detergents. Conclusion Several important properties of a serine protease from P. Americana were revealed. Moreover, insects can serve as excellent and alternative source of industrially important proteases with unique properties, which can be utilized as additives in detergents, stain removers and other bio-formulations. Properties of the P. americana protease accounted in the present investigation can be exploited further in various industrial processes. As an industrial prospective, identification of enzymes with varying essential properties from different insect species might be good approach and bioresource. PMID:24229392

  14. An analysis of five serine transfer ribonucleic acids from Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, B N; Dunn, R; Gillam, I; Tener, G M; Armstrong, D J; Skoog, F; Frihart, C R; Leonard, N J

    1975-01-25

    Crude tRNA from adult Drosophila melanogaster was fractionated on bensoylated-diethylaminoethyl cellulose columns. The eluate was assayed for both amino acid acceptance and cytokinin activity. Most of the cytokinin activity was associated with a peak of serine acceptance. The five major serine tRNAs were purified by chromatography on benzoylated-dietyhlaminoethyl cellulose and reversed phase chromatography-5 columns. The major species, tRNA7-Ser was isolated from this tRNA and was shown to be N-6-(delta-2-isopentenyl)adenosine (i-6A) on the basis of ultraviolet and mass spectral data. The nucleoside somposition of all five serine tRNAs was determined directly and by the 3-H derivative method. They all contain pseudouridine, ribothymidine, 1-methyladenosine, 5-methylcytosine, N-2-dimethylguanosine, 5, 6-hydrouridine, and 3-methylcytosine, while two contain an unidentified nucleoside, and one containes 1-methylguanosine. These techniques also confirmed the presence of i-6A in tRNA7-Ser as well as showing its presence in tRNA6-Ser and tRNA4-Ser. These three tRNA-Ser species exhibit marked changes in elution from reversed phase chromatography-5 columns as a function of temperature and this may be related to their minor base composition. The tRNAs-Ser were bound to ribosomes in response to the following triplets: tRNA2-Ser, AGU, AGC; tRNA4-Ser, UCG; tRNA5-Ser, AGU, AGC; tRNA7-Ser, UCG.

  15. Characterization of a novel vaccine candidate and serine proteinase inhibitor from Schistosoma japonicum (Sj serpin).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yutao; Liu, Shuxian; Song, Guangcheng; Xu, Yixin; Dissous, Colette

    2005-07-15

    Serine proteinase inhibitors (serpins) represent an important superfamily of endogenous inhibitors that regulate proteolytic events active in a variety of physiological functions. Immunological screening of a Schistosoma japonicum adult worm cDNA expression library with sera of Microtus fortis, a naturally resistant vertebrate host, has identified one clone that encoded for a sequence homologous to those of the serpin superfamily. The full-length sequence encoding S. japonicum serpin (Sj serpin) was amplified from adult worm cDNA by using 5'-RACE-PCR and subsequently cloned into the prokaryotic expression vector pET28c. The full-length Sj serpin fusion-protein with his-tag was expressed in E. coli, purified by affinity chromatography and used to immunize New Zealand white rabbits. Sj serpin is located on the tegument in S. japonicum adult worms. C57BL/6 mice immunized with Sj serpin induced the production of high levels of specific IgE and IgG1 subclass antibodies as well as a marked IL-4 response. Lymphocyte surface marker analysis revealed proliferation of CD19 expressing B cells, indicating a predominant Th2-type response to Sj serpin. Immunized mice developed moderate protection against infection of S. japonicum as demonstrated by a 36 and 39% reduction in the recovery of adult worms and eggs, respectively. These data suggested a role for Sj serpin as a vaccine candidate or as a novel target for anti-schistosome drugs.

  16. Cell surface serine protease matriptase-2 suppresses fetuin-A/AHSG-mediated induction of hepcidin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stirnberg, Marit; Maurer, Eva; Arenz, Katharina; Babler, Anne; Jahnen-Dechent, Willi; Gütschow, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Matriptase-2 is a type II transmembrane serine protease controlling the expression of hepcidin, the key regulator of iron homeostasis. By cleaving hemojuvelin, matriptase-2 suppresses bone morphogenetic protein/sons of mothers against decapentaplegic signaling. So far, the only known putative substrates of matriptase-2 are hemojuvelin and matriptase-2 itself. In this study, fetuin-A (α2-Heremans-Schmid glycoprotein) was identified in vitro as a substrate of matriptase-2. The protease-substrate interaction was validated by isolating matriptase-2 via the affinity to fetuin-A. Fetuin-A is a liver-derived plasma protein with multiple functions, which is proteolytically processed to yield a disulfide-linked two-chain form. In co-transfected cells, a matriptase-2-dependent conversion of unprocessed fetuin-A into a two-chain form was detected. Conversely, downregulation of endogenously expressed matriptase-2 stabilized fetuin-A. Arg and Lys residues located within the 40 residue spanning connecting peptide of fetuin-A were identified as cleavage sites for matriptase-2. Analysis of hepcidin expression revealed an inductive effect of fetuin-A, which was abolished by matriptase-2. Fetuin-A deficiency in mice resulted in decreased hepcidin mRNA levels. These findings implicate a role of fetuin-A in iron homeostasis and provide new insights into the mechanism of how matriptase-2 might modulate hepcidin expression.

  17. Role of Corynebacterium glutamicum sprA encoding a serine protease in glxR-mediated global gene regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun-Ji Hong

    Full Text Available The global regulator glxR of Corynebacterium glutamicum is involved in many cellular activities. Considering its role, the GlxR protein likely interacts with other proteins to obtain, maintain, and control its activity. To isolate proteins interacting with GlxR, we used a two-hybrid system with GlxR as the bait. Subsequently, the partner, a subtilisin-like serine protease, was isolated from a C. glutamicum genomic library. Unlike glxR, which showed constitutive expression, the expression of sprA, encoding a serine protease, was maximal in the log phase. Purified His6-SprA protein underwent self-proteolysis and proteolyzed purified GlxR. The proteolytic action of SprA on GlxR was not observed in the presence of cyclic adenosine monophosphate, which modulates GlxR activity. The C. glutamicum sprA deletion mutant (ΔsprA and sprA-overexpressing (P180-sprA strains showed reduced growth. The activity of isocitrate dehydrogenase (a tricarboxylic acid cycle enzyme in these strains decreased to 30-50% of that in the wild-type strain. In the P180-sprA strain, proteins involved in diverse cellular functions such as energy and carbon metabolism (NCgl2809, nitrogen metabolism (NCgl0049, methylation reactions (NCgl0719, and peptidoglycan biosynthesis (NCgl1267, as well as stress, starvation, and survival (NCgl0938 were affected and showed decreased transcription. Taken together, these data suggest that SprA, as a serine protease, performs a novel regulatory role not only in glxR-mediated gene expression but also in other areas of cell physiology. In addition, the tight control of SprA and GlxR availability may indicate their importance in global gene regulation.

  18. New L-Serine Derivative Ligands as Cocatalysts for Diels-Alder Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Carlos A. D.; Rodríguez-Borges, José E.; Freire, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    New L-serine derivative ligands were prepared and tested as cocatalyst in the Diels-Alder reactions between cyclopentadiene (CPD) and methyl acrylate, in the presence of several Lewis acids. The catalytic potential of the in situ formed complexes was evaluated based on the reaction yield. Bidentate serine ligands showed good ability to coordinate medium strength Lewis acids, thus boosting their catalytic activity. The synthesis of the L-serine ligands proved to be highly efficient and straightforward. PMID:24383009

  19. Phosphorylation Drives a Dynamic Switch in Serine/Arginine-Rich Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Xiang, ShengQi; Gapsys, Vytautas; Kim, Hai-Young; Bessonov, Sergey; Hsiao, He-Hsuan; Möhlmann, Sina; Klaukien, Volker; Ficner, Ralf; Becker, Stefan; Urlaub, Henning; Lührmann, Reinhard; de Groot, Bert; Zweckstetter, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins are important players in RNA metabolism and are extensively phosphorylated at serine residues in RS repeats. Here, we show that phosphorylation switches the RS domain of the serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 1 from a fully disordered state to a partially rigidified arch-like structure. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in combination with molecular dynamics simulations revealed that the conformational switch is restricted to RS repeats, critically d...

  20. Identification and quantification of N alpha-acetylated Y. pestis fusion protein F1-V expressed in Escherichia coli using LCMS E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bariola, Pauline A; Russell, Brett A; Monahan, Steven J; Stroop, Steven D

    2007-05-31

    N-terminal acetylation in E coli is a rare event catalyzed by three known N-acetyl-transferases (NATs), each having a specific ribosomal protein substrate. Multiple, gram-scale lots of recombinant F1-V, a fusion protein constructed from Y. Pestis antigens, were expressed and purified from a single stably transformed E. coli cell bank. A variant form of F1-V with mass increased by 42-43 Da was detected in all purified lots by electrospray orthogonal acceleration time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MS). Peptide mapping LCMS localized the increased mass to an N-terminal Lys-C peptide, residues 1-24, and defined it as +42.0308+/-0.0231 Da using a LockSpray exact mass feature and a leucine enkaphalin mass standard. Sequencing of the variant 1-24 peptide by LCMS and high-energy collision induced dissociation (LCMS(E)) further localized the modification to the amino terminal tri-peptide ADL and identified the modification as N(alpha)-acetylation. The average content of N(alpha)-acetylated F1-V in five lots was 24.7+/-2.6% indicating that a stable acetylation activity for F1-V was established in the E. coli expression system. Alignment of the F1-V N-terminal sequence with those of other known N(alpha)-acetylated ectopic proteins expressed in E. coli reveals a substrate motif analogous to the eukaryote NatA' acetylation pathway and distinct from endogenous E. coli NAT substrates.

  1. Corin, a transmembrane cardiac serine protease, acts as a pro-atrial natriuretic peptide-converting enzyme

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Wei; Wu, Faye; Morser, John; Wu, Qingyu

    2000-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) is a cardiac hormone essential for the regulation of blood pressure. In cardiac myocytes, ANP is synthesized as a precursor, pro-ANP, that is converted to biologically active ANP by an unknown membrane-associated protease. Recently, we cloned a transmembrane serine protease, corin, that is highly expressed in the heart. In this study, we examine effects of corin on pro-ANP processing. Our results show that recombinant human corin converts pro-ANP to ANP and th...

  2. Engineering of High Yield Production of L-serine in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mundhada, Hemanshu; Schneider, Konstantin; Christensen, Hanne Bjerre

    2016-01-01

    L-serine is a widely used amino acid that has been proposed as a potential building block biochemical. The high theoretical yield from glucose makes a fermentation based production attractive. In order to achieve this goal, serine degradation to pyruvate and glycine in E. coli MG1655 was prevented.......3 g/L. The production strain was therefore evolved by random mutagenesis to achieve increased tolerance towards serine. Additionally, overexpression of eamA, a cysteine/homoserine transporter was demonstrated to increase serine tolerance from 1.6 g/L to 25 g/L. During fed batch fermentation...

  3. Short hydrogen bonds in the catalytic mechanism of serine proteases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VLADIMIR LESKOVAC

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The survey of crystallographic data from the Protein Data Bank for 37 structures of trypsin and other serine proteases at a resolution of 0.78–1.28 Å revealed the presence of hydrogen bonds in the active site of the enzymes, which are formed between the catalytic histidine and aspartate residues and are on average 2.7 Å long. This is the typical bond length for normal hydrogen bonds. The geometric properties of the hydrogen bonds in the active site indicate that the H atom is not centered between the heteroatoms of the catalytic histidine and aspartate residues in the active site. Taken together, these findings exclude the possibility that short “low-barrier” hydrogen bonds are formed in the ground state structure of the active sites examined in this work. Some time ago, it was suggested by Cleland that the “low-barrier hydrogen bond” hypothesis is operative in the catalytic mechanism of serine proteases, and requires the presence of short hydrogen bonds around 2.4 Å long in the active site, with the H atom centered between the catalytic heteroatoms. The conclusions drawn from this work do not exclude the validity of the “low-barrier hydrogen bond” hypothesis at all, but they merely do not support it in this particular case, with this particular class of enzymes.

  4. The histone H3 methyltransferase G9A epigenetically activates the serine-glycine synthesis pathway to sustain cancer cell survival and proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jane; Li, Tai; Wang, Xiangwei; Zhao, Erhu; Choi, Jeong-Hyeon; Yang, Liqun; Zha, Yunhong; Dong, Zheng; Huang, Shuang; Asara, John M; Cui, Hongjuan; Ding, Han-Fei

    2013-12-03

    Increased activation of the serine-glycine biosynthetic pathway is an integral part of cancer metabolism that drives macromolecule synthesis needed for cell proliferation. Whether this pathway is under epigenetic control is unknown. Here we show that the histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9) methyltransferase G9A is required for maintaining the pathway enzyme genes in an active state marked by H3K9 monomethylation and for the transcriptional activation of this pathway in response to serine deprivation. G9A inactivation depletes serine and its downstream metabolites, triggering cell death with autophagy in cancer cell lines of different tissue origins. Higher G9A expression, which is observed in various cancers and is associated with greater mortality in cancer patients, increases serine production and enhances the proliferation and tumorigenicity of cancer cells. These findings identify a G9A-dependent epigenetic program in the control of cancer metabolism, providing a rationale for G9A inhibition as a therapeutic strategy for cancer. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Application of Asian pumpkin (Cucurbita ficifolia) serine proteinase for production of biologically active peptides from casein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dąbrowska, Anna; Szołtysik, Marek; Babij, Konrad; Pokora, Marta; Zambrowicz, Aleksandra; Chrzanowska, Józefa

    2013-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to determine potential application of a serine proteinase derived from Asian pumpkin for obtaining biologically active peptides from casein. The course of casein hydrolysis by three doses of the enzyme (50, 150, 300 U/mg of protein) was monitored for 24 hours by the determinations of: hydrolysis degree DH (%), free amino group content (μmole Gly/g), RP HPLC peptide profiles and by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. In all hydrolyzates analyzed antioxidant activities were determined using three tests: the ability to reduce iron ions in FRAP test, the ability to scavenge free radicals in DPPH test, and Fe(2+) chelating activity. The antimicrobial activity of obtained peptide fractions was determined as the ability to inhibit the growth of Escherichia coli, Bacillus cereus and Pseudomonas fluorescens in a diffusion plate test. The deepest degradation, expressed as the DH [%] and the free amino group content (67% and 7528 µmole Gly/mg, respectively), was noted in samples hydrolyzed with 300 U/ml of enzyme for 24 hours, while in other samples the determined values were about three and two times lower. The results were in agreement with the peptide profiles obtained by RP HPLC. The highest antioxidative activities determined in all tests were seen for the casein hydrolysate obtained with 300 U/mg protein of serine proteinase after 24 h of reaction (2.15 µM Trolox/mg, 96.15 µg Fe(3+)/mg, 814.97 µg Fe(2+)/mg). Antimicrobial activity was presented in three preparations. In other samples no antimicrobial activity was detected.

  6. The main proteinases in Dermatobia hominis second and third instars larvae are serine-proteinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, F A; Moya-Borja, G E; Barreira, J D; Pinho, R T; Alves, C R

    2007-04-30

    We performed a combination of proteinase assay, either in solution or immobilized in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel copolymerized with gelatin, to detect and quantify proteinases of Dermatobia hominis second (L2) and third (L3) instar larvae. In the quantitative assay, we examined proteinase activity by hydrolysis of a panel of peptide bonds specific for the main proteinase classes. We verified that the pGlu-Phe-Leu p-nitroanilide substrate was hydrolyzed by crude extracts of L2 (3.0+/-0.2 nmol h(-1)mg of protein(-1)) and L3 (7.7+/-0.1 nmol h(-1)mg of protein(-1)) and that both activities were partially inhibited by trans-epoxysuccinyl-l-leucylamido-(4-guanidino)butane, 15% and 3%, respectively. Also, we demonstrated that the Nalpha-p-Tosyl-l-Arg methyl ester substrate was hydrolyzed by crude extracts of L2 (117+/-24 nmol h(-1)mg of protein(-1)) and L3 (111+/-10 nmol h(-1)mg of protein(-1)), suggesting a predominance of esterase activity in the crude larval preparation. Interestingly, the specific activity of serine-proteinases was totally inhibited by phenylmethylsulphonyl fluoride in the L3 crude extract, while only 10% of this enzyme class activity was inhibited in the L2 crude extract. The results of the qualitative assays with substrate gels suggested that L2 and L3 larvae express serine-proteinases with similar (13 and 22 kDa) and distinct (50 kDa in L2 and 30 kDa in L3) relative molecular masses. These findings contribute to the biochemical characterization of D. hominis L2 and L3 larvae.

  7. Endothelin-1 stimulates catalase activity through the PKCδ mediated phosphorylation of Serine 167

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafikov, Ruslan; Kumar, Sanjiv; Aggarwal, Saurabh; Hou, Yali; Kangath, Archana; Pardo, Daniel; Fineman, Jeffrey R.; Black, Stephen M.

    2013-01-01

    Our previous studies have shown that endothelin-1 (ET-1) stimulates catalase activity in endothelial cells and lambs with acute increases in pulmonary blood flow (PBF), without altering gene expression. The purpose of this study was to investigate the molecular mechanism by which this occurs. Exposing pulmonary arterial endothelial cells (PAEC) to ET-1 increased catalase activity and decreased cellular hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) levels. These changes correlated with an increase in serine phosphorylated catalase. Using the inhibitory peptide δV1.1, this phosphorylation was shown to be PKCδ dependent. Mass spectrometry identified serine167 as the phosphorylation site. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to generate a phospho-mimic (S167D) catalase. Activity assays using recombinant protein purified from E.coli or transiently transfected COS-7 cells, demonstrated that S167D-catalase had an increased ability to degrade H2O2 compared to the wildtype enzyme. Using a phospho-specific antibody, we were able to verify that pS167 catalase levels are modulated in lambs with acute increases in PBF in the presence and absence of the ET receptor antagonist, tezosentan. S167 is being located on the dimeric interface suggesting it could be involved in regulating the formation of catalase tetramers. To evaluate this possibility we utilized analytical gel-filtration to examine the multimeric structure of recombinant wildtype- and S167D-catalase. We found that recombinant wildtype catalase was present as a mixture of monomers and dimers while S167D catalase was primarily tetrameric. Further, the incubation of wildtype catalase with PKCδ was sufficient to convert wildtype catalase into a tetrameric structure. In conclusion, this is the first report indicating that the phosphorylation of catalase regulates its multimeric structure and activity. PMID:24211614

  8. Pest Protection Conferred by a Beta vulgaris Serine Proteinase Inhibitor Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smigocki, Ann C.; Ivic-Haymes, Snezana; Li, Haiyan; Savić, Jelena

    2013-01-01

    Proteinase inhibitors provide a means of engineering plant resistance to insect pests. A Beta vulgaris serine proteinase inhibitor gene (BvSTI) was fused to the constitutive CaMV35S promoter for over-expression in Nicotiana benthamiana plants to study its effect on lepidopteran insect pests. Independently derived BvSTI transgenic tobacco T2 homozygous progeny were shown to have relatively high BvSTI gene transcript levels. BvSTI-specific polyclonal antibodies cross-reacted with the expected 30 kDA recombinant BvSTI protein on Western blots. In gel trypsin inhibitor activity assays revealed a major clear zone that corresponded to the BvSTI proteinase inhibitor that was not detected in the untransformed control plants. BvSTI-transgenic plants were bioassayed for resistance to five lepidopteran insect pests. Spodoptera frugiperda, S. exigua and Manduca sexta larvae fed BvSTI leaves had significant reductions in larval weights as compared to larvae fed on untransformed leaves. In contrast, larval weights increased relative to the controls when Heliothis virescens and Agrotis ipsilon larvae were fed on BvSTI leaves. As the larvae entered the pupal stage, pupal sizes reflected the overall larval weights. Some developmental abnormalities of the pupae and emerging moths were noted. These findings suggest that the sugar beet BvSTI gene may prove useful for effective control of several different lepidopteran insect pests in genetically modified tobacco and other plants. The sugar beet serine proteinase inhibitor may be more effective for insect control because sugar beet is cropped in restricted geographical areas thus limiting the exposure of the insects to sugar beet proteinase inhibitors and build up of non-sensitive midgut proteases. PMID:23468963

  9. Implantation Serine Proteinases heterodimerize and are critical in hatching and implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Guoliang

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have recently reported the expression of murine Implantation Serine Proteinase genes in pre-implantation embryos (ISP1 and uterus (ISP1 and ISP2. These proteinases belong to the S1 proteinase family and are similar to mast cell tryptases, which function as multimers. Results Here, we report the purification and initial characterization of ISP1 and 2 with respect to their physico-chemical properties and physiological function. In addition to being co-expressed in uterus, we show that ISP1 and ISP2 are also co-expressed in the pre-implantation embryo. Together, they form a heterodimer with an approximate molecular weight of 63 kD. This complex is the active form of the enzyme, which we have further characterized as being trypsin-like, based on substrate and inhibitor specificities. In addition to having a role in embryo hatching and outgrowth, we demonstrate that ISP enzyme is localized to the site of embryo invasion during implantation and that its activity is important for successful implantation in vivo. Conclusion On the basis of similarities in structural, chemical, and functional properties, we suggest that this ISP enzyme complex represents the classical hatching enzyme, strypsin. Our results demonstrate a critical role for ISP in embryo hatching and implantation.

  10. Cloning and characterization of the first serine carboxypeptidase from a plant parasitic nematode, Radopholus similis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xin; Xu, Chun-Ling; Chen, Wan-Zhu; Chen, Chun; Xie, Hui

    2017-07-06

    Radopholus similis is an important parasitic nematode of plants. Serine carboxypeptidases (SCPs) are peptidases that hydrolyse peptides and proteins and play critical roles in the development, invasion, and pathogenesis of certain parasitic nematodes and other animal pathogens. In this study, we obtained the full-length sequence of the SCP gene from R. similis (Rs-scp-1), which is 1665 bp long and includes a 1461-bp open reading frames encoding 486 amino acids with an 18-aa signal peptide. This gene is a double-copy gene in R. similis. Rs-scp-1 was expressed in the procorpus, esophageal glands and intestines of females and in the esophageal glands and intestines of juveniles. Rs-scp-1 expression levels were highest in females, followed by juveniles and males, and lowest in eggs. Rs-scp-1 expression levels were significantly suppressed after R. similis was soaked in Rs-scp-1 dsRNA for 12 h. Nematodes were then inoculated into Anthurium andraeanum after RNAi treatment. Compared with water treatment, R. similis treated with RNAi were reduced in number and pathogenicity. In summary, we obtained the first SCP gene from a plant parasitic nematode and confirmed its role in the parasitic process.

  11. Anti-apoptotic Serine Protease Inhibitors contribute towards the survival of allergenic Th2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamji, Mohamed H; Temblay, Jeff N; Cheng, Wei; Byrne, Susan M; Macfarlane, Ellen; Switzer, Amy R; Francisco, Natalia D C; Olexandra, Fedina; Jacubczik, Fabian; Durham, Stephen R; Ashton-Rickardt, Philip G

    2017-10-26

    The mechanisms regulating the maintenance of persistent Th2 cells that potentiate allergic inflammation are not well understood. The function of Serine Protease Inhibitor 2A (Spi2A) was studied in mouse Th2 cells and Serine Protease Inhibitor (SERPIN) B3 and B4 genes were studied in Th2 cells from grass pollen allergic individuals. Spi2A deficient Th2 cells were studied in vitro culture or in vivo after challenge of Spi2A Knock-Out (KO) mice with ovalbumin in alum. The expression of SERPIN B3 and B4 mRNA was measured in vitro cultured Th2 cell and in ex vivo CD27(-)CD4(+) and ICL2 cells from grass pollen allergic individuals using quantitative PCR. SERPIN B3 and B4 mRNA levels were knocked down in cultured CD27(-)CD4(+) cells with shRNA. There were lower levels of in vitro polarized Th2 cells from Spi2A KO mice (Ppollen allergic individuals expressed higher levels of both SERPIN B3 and B4 (both Ppollen allergic individuals expressed higher levels of both SERPIN B3 and B4 (both P<0.0005) mRNA compared to CD27(+)CD4(+) cells. ICL2 cells expressed higher levels of both SERPIN B3 and B4 (both P<0.0005) mRNA compared to ICL1 cells. Knock-down of either SERPIN B3 or B4 (both P <0.005) mRNA levels resulted in decreased viability of CD27(-)CD4(+) compared to control transduced cells. The serpins Spi2A in mice and Serpin B3 and B4 in allergic individuals, control viability of Th2 cells. This provides proof-of-principle for a therapeutic approach for allergic disease through the ablation of allergic memory Th2 cells through mRNA SERPIN B3 and B4 down-regulation. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Histone acetyl transferase 1 is essential for mammalian development, genome stability, and the processing of newly synthesized histones H3 and H4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajan, Prabakaran; Ge, Zhongqi; Sirbu, Bianca; Doughty, Cheryl; Agudelo Garcia, Paula A; Schlederer, Michaela; Annunziato, Anthony T; Cortez, David; Kenner, Lukas; Parthun, Mark R

    2013-06-01

    Histone acetyltransferase 1 is an evolutionarily conserved type B histone acetyltransferase that is thought to be responsible for the diacetylation of newly synthesized histone H4 on lysines 5 and 12 during chromatin assembly. To understand the function of this enzyme in a complex organism, we have constructed a conditional mouse knockout model of Hat1. Murine Hat1 is essential for viability, as homozygous deletion of Hat1 results in neonatal lethality. The lungs of embryos and pups genetically deficient in Hat1 were much less mature upon histological evaluation. The neonatal lethality is due to severe defects in lung development that result in less aeration and respiratory distress. Many of the Hat1(-/-) neonates also display significant craniofacial defects with abnormalities in the bones of the skull and jaw. Hat1(-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) are defective in cell proliferation and are sensitive to DNA damaging agents. In addition, the Hat1(-/-) MEFs display a marked increase in genome instability. Analysis of histone dynamics at sites of replication-coupled chromatin assembly demonstrates that Hat1 is not only responsible for the acetylation of newly synthesized histone H4 but is also required to maintain the acetylation of histone H3 on lysines 9, 18, and 27 during replication-coupled chromatin assembly.

  13. Histone acetyl transferase 1 is essential for mammalian development, genome stability, and the processing of newly synthesized histones H3 and H4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabakaran Nagarajan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Histone acetyltransferase 1 is an evolutionarily conserved type B histone acetyltransferase that is thought to be responsible for the diacetylation of newly synthesized histone H4 on lysines 5 and 12 during chromatin assembly. To understand the function of this enzyme in a complex organism, we have constructed a conditional mouse knockout model of Hat1. Murine Hat1 is essential for viability, as homozygous deletion of Hat1 results in neonatal lethality. The lungs of embryos and pups genetically deficient in Hat1 were much less mature upon histological evaluation. The neonatal lethality is due to severe defects in lung development that result in less aeration and respiratory distress. Many of the Hat1(-/- neonates also display significant craniofacial defects with abnormalities in the bones of the skull and jaw. Hat1(-/- mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs are defective in cell proliferation and are sensitive to DNA damaging agents. In addition, the Hat1(-/- MEFs display a marked increase in genome instability. Analysis of histone dynamics at sites of replication-coupled chromatin assembly demonstrates that Hat1 is not only responsible for the acetylation of newly synthesized histone H4 but is also required to maintain the acetylation of histone H3 on lysines 9, 18, and 27 during replication-coupled chromatin assembly.

  14. Histone Acetyl Transferase 1 Is Essential for Mammalian Development, Genome Stability, and the Processing of Newly Synthesized Histones H3 and H4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajan, Prabakaran; Ge, Zhongqi; Sirbu, Bianca; Doughty, Cheryl; Agudelo Garcia, Paula A.; Schlederer, Michaela; Annunziato, Anthony T.; Cortez, David; Kenner, Lukas; Parthun, Mark R.

    2013-01-01

    Histone acetyltransferase 1 is an evolutionarily conserved type B histone acetyltransferase that is thought to be responsible for the diacetylation of newly synthesized histone H4 on lysines 5 and 12 during chromatin assembly. To understand the function of this enzyme in a complex organism, we have constructed a conditional mouse knockout model of Hat1. Murine Hat1 is essential for viability, as homozygous deletion of Hat1 results in neonatal lethality. The lungs of embryos and pups genetically deficient in Hat1 were much less mature upon histological evaluation. The neonatal lethality is due to severe defects in lung development that result in less aeration and respiratory distress. Many of the Hat1−/− neonates also display significant craniofacial defects with abnormalities in the bones of the skull and jaw. Hat1−/− mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) are defective in cell proliferation and are sensitive to DNA damaging agents. In addition, the Hat1−/− MEFs display a marked increase in genome instability. Analysis of histone dynamics at sites of replication-coupled chromatin assembly demonstrates that Hat1 is not only responsible for the acetylation of newly synthesized histone H4 but is also required to maintain the acetylation of histone H3 on lysines 9, 18, and 27 during replication-coupled chromatin assembly. PMID:23754951

  15. A Kinase-Independent Function of c-Src Mediates p130Cas Phosphorylation at the Serine-639 Site in Pressure Overloaded Myocardium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palanisamy, Arun P; Suryakumar, Geetha; Panneerselvam, Kavin; Willey, Christopher D; Kuppuswamy, Dhandapani

    2015-12-01

    Early work in pressure overloaded (PO) myocardium shows that integrins mediate focal adhesion complex formation by recruiting the adaptor protein p130Cas (Cas) and nonreceptor tyrosine kinase c-Src. To explore c-Src role in Cas-associated changes during PO, we used a feline right ventricular in vivo PO model and a three-dimensional (3D) collagen-embedded adult cardiomyocyte in vitro model that utilizes a Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser (RGD) peptide for integrin stimulation. Cas showed slow electrophoretic mobility (band-shifting), recruitment to the cytoskeleton, and tyrosine phosphorylation at 165, 249, and 410 sites in both 48 h PO myocardium and 1 h RGD-stimulated cardiomyocytes. Adenoviral mediated expression of kinase inactive (negative) c-Src mutant with intact scaffold domains (KN-Src) in cardiomyocytes did not block the RGD stimulated changes in Cas. Furthermore, expression of KN-Src or kinase active c-Src mutant with intact scaffold function (A-Src) in two-dimensionally (2D) cultured cardiomyocytes was sufficient to cause Cas band-shifting, although tyrosine phosphorylation required A-Src. These data indicate that c-Src's adaptor function, but not its kinase function, is required for a serine/threonine specific phosphorylation(s) responsible for Cas band-shifting. To explore this possibility, Chinese hamster ovary cells that stably express Cas were infected with either β-gal or KN-Src adenoviruses and used for Cas immunoprecipitation combined with mass spectrometry analysis. In the KN-Src expressing cells, Cas showed phosphorylation at the serine-639 (human numbering) site. A polyclonal antibody raised against phospho-serine-639 detected Cas phosphorylation in 24-48 h PO myocardium. Our studies indicate that c-Src's adaptor function mediates serine-639 phosphorylation of Cas during integrin activation in PO myocardium. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Vibrational analysis of amino acids: cysteine, serine, β-chloroalanine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susi, Heino; Byler, D. Michael; Gerasimowicz, Walter V.

    1983-10-01

    Normal coordinate calculations were carried out involving a total of seven isotopically substituted analogs of the amino acids cysteine, serine, and β-chloroalanine. Raman spectra were obtained for polycrystalline β-chloroalanine and the ND 3 analog. Overlay calculations were employed to obtain 55 force constants which reproduce 206 observed frequencies of seven molecules with an average error of ca. 9 cm -1. The valence force field used was based on local symmetry coordinates. Band assignments were based on the potential energy distribution. About 60% of the normal modes of the seven isotopomers can be called group vibrations by the PED criterion. Most skeletal stretching and bending vibrations are highly mixed and cannot be assigned to individual bond stretching or angle deformation modes.

  17. Increased production of L-serine in Escherichia coli through Adaptive Laboratory Evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mundhada, Hemanshu; Seoane, Jose Miguel; Schneider, Konstantin

    2017-01-01

    L-serine concentration from 3 to 100 g/L using adaptive laboratory evolution (ALE). Genome sequencing of isolated clones revealed multiplication of genetic regions, as well as mutations in thrA, thereby showing a potential mechanism of serine inhibition. Other mutations were evaluated by MAGE...... thereby highlighting the potential of ALE for industrial biotechnology....

  18. Crystallographic Refinement by Incorporation of Molecular Dynamics : Thermostable Serine Protease Thermitase Complexed with Eglin c

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gros, Piet; Fujinaga, Masao; Dijkstra, Bauke W.; Kalk, Kor H.; Hol, W G J

    1989-01-01

    In order to investigate the principles of protein thermostability, the crystal structure of thermitase from Thermoactinomyces vulgaris, a thermostable member of the subtilisin family of serine proteases, has been determined in a complex with eglin c. Eglin c is a serine protease inhibitor from the

  19. L-Serine: a Naturally-Occurring Amino Acid with Therapeutic Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalf, J S; Dunlop, R A; Powell, J T; Banack, S A; Cox, P A

    2018-01-01

    In human neuroblastoma cell cultures, non-human primates and human beings, L-serine is neuroprotective, acting through a variety of biochemical and molecular mechanisms. Although L-serine is generally classified as a non-essential amino acid, it is probably more appropriate to term it as a "conditional non-essential amino acid" since, under certain circumstances, vertebrates cannot synthesize it in sufficient quantities to meet necessary cellular demands. L-serine is biosynthesized in the mammalian central nervous system from 3-phosphoglycerate and serves as a precursor for the synthesis of the amino acids glycine and cysteine. Physiologically, it has a variety of roles, perhaps most importantly as a phosphorylation site in proteins. Mutations in the metabolic enzymes that synthesize L-serine have been implicated in various human diseases. Dosing of animals with L-serine and human clinical trials investigating the therapeutic effects of L-serine support the FDA's determination that L-serine is generally regarded as safe (GRAS); it also appears to be neuroprotective. We here consider the role of L-serine in neurological disorders and its potential as a therapeutic agent.

  20. D-serine influences synaptogenesis in a p19 cell model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fuchs, Sabine A; Roeleveld, Martin W; Klomp, Leo W J; Berger, Ruud; de Koning, Tom J

    2012-01-01

    Recently, D-serine has been identified as an important NMDA-receptor co-agonist, which might play a role in central nervous system development. We investigated this by studying rat P19 cells, an established model for neuronal and glial differentiation. Our results show that (1) the D-serine

  1. Random mutagenesis of human serine racemase reveals residues important for the enzymatic activity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hoffman, Hillary Elizabeth; Jirásková, Jana; Zvelebil, M.; Konvalinka, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 75, č. 1 (2010), s. 59-79 ISSN 0010-0765 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0508 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : D-serine * serine racemase * random mutagenesis Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 0.853, year: 2010

  2. RAF protein-serine/threonine kinases: Structure and regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roskoski, Robert, E-mail: rrj@brimr.org [Blue Ridge Institute for Medical Research, 3754 Brevard Road, Suite 116, Box 19, Horse Shoe, NC 28742 (United States)

    2010-08-27

    Research highlights: {yields} The formation of unique side-to-side RAF dimers is required for full kinase activity. {yields} RAF kinase inhibitors block MEK activation in cells containing oncogenic B-RAF. {yields} RAF kinase inhibitors can lead to the paradoxical increase in RAF kinase activity. -- Abstract: A-RAF, B-RAF, and C-RAF are a family of three protein-serine/threonine kinases that participate in the RAS-RAF-MEK-ERK signal transduction cascade. This cascade participates in the regulation of a large variety of processes including apoptosis, cell cycle progression, differentiation, proliferation, and transformation to the cancerous state. RAS mutations occur in 15-30% of all human cancers, and B-RAF mutations occur in 30-60% of melanomas, 30-50% of thyroid cancers, and 5-20% of colorectal cancers. Activation of the RAF kinases requires their interaction with RAS-GTP along with dephosphorylation and also phosphorylation by SRC family protein-tyrosine kinases and other protein-serine/threonine kinases. The formation of unique side-to-side RAF dimers is required for full kinase activity. RAF kinase inhibitors are effective in blocking MEK1/2 and ERK1/2 activation in cells containing the oncogenic B-RAF Val600Glu activating mutation. RAF kinase inhibitors lead to the paradoxical increase in RAF kinase activity in cells containing wild-type B-RAF and wild-type or activated mutant RAS. C-RAF plays a key role in this paradoxical increase in downstream MEK-ERK activation.

  3. Phosphoserine Phosphatase Is Required for Serine and One-Carbon Unit Synthesis in Hydrogenobacter thermophilus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Keugtae; Chiba, Yoko; Kobayashi, Azusa; Arai, Hiroyuki; Ishii, Masaharu

    2017-11-01

    Hydrogenobacter thermophilus is an obligate chemolithoautotrophic bacterium of the phylum Aquificae and is capable of fixing carbon dioxide through the reductive tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. The recent discovery of two novel-type phosphoserine phosphatases (PSPs) in H. thermophilus suggests the presence of a phosphorylated serine biosynthesis pathway; however, the physiological role of these novel-type metal-independent PSPs (iPSPs) in H. thermophilus has not been confirmed. In the present study, a mutant strain with a deletion of pspA, the catalytic subunit of iPSPs, was constructed and characterized. The generated mutant was a serine auxotroph, suggesting that the novel-type PSPs and phosphorylated serine synthesis pathway are essential for serine anabolism in H. thermophilus. As an autotrophic medium supplemented with glycine did not support the growth of the mutant, the reversible enzyme serine hydroxymethyltransferase does not appear to synthesize serine from glycine and may therefore generate glycine and 5,10-CH2-tetrahydrofolate (5,10-CH2-THF) from serine. This speculation is supported by the lack of glycine cleavage activity, which is needed to generate 5,10-CH2-THF, in H. thermophilus Determining the mechanism of 5,10-CH2-THF synthesis is important for understanding the fundamental anabolic pathways of organisms, because 5,10-CH2-THF is a major one-carbon donor that is used for the synthesis of various essential compounds, including nucleic and amino acids. The findings from the present experiments using a pspA deletion mutant have confirmed the physiological role of iPSPs as serine producers and show that serine is a major donor of one-carbon units in H. thermophilusIMPORTANCE Serine biosynthesis and catabolism pathways are intimately related to the metabolism of 5,10-CH2-THF, a one-carbon donor that is utilized for the biosynthesis of various essential compounds. For this reason, determining the mechanism of serine synthesis is important for

  4. Biochemical and functional characterization of phosphoserine aminotransferase from Entamoeba histolytica, which possesses both phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated serine metabolic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Vahab; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi

    2006-01-01

    The enteric protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica is a unicellular eukaryote that possesses both phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated serine metabolic pathways. In the present study, we described enzymological and functional characterization of phosphoserine aminotransferase (PSAT) from E. histolytica. E. histolytica PSAT (EhPSAT) showed maximum activity for the forward reaction at basic pH, dissimilar to mammalian PSAT, which showed sharp neutral optimum pH. EhPSAT activity was significantly inhibited by substrate analogs, O-phospho-d-serine, O-phospho-l-threonine, and O-acetylserine, suggesting possible regulation of the amoebic PSAT by these metabolic intermediates. Fractionation of the whole parasite lysate and rEhPSAT by anion exchange chromatography verified that EhPSAT represents a dominant PSAT activity. EhPSAT showed a close kinship to PSAT from bacteroides based on amino acid alignment and phylogenetic analyses, suggesting that E. histolytica gained this gene from bacteroides by lateral gene transfer. Comparisons of kinetic properties of recombinant PSAT from E. histolytica and Arabidopsis thaliana showed that EhPSAT possesses significantly higher affinity toward glutamate than the A. thaliana counterpart, which may be explained by significant differences in the isoelectric point and the substitution of arginine, which is involved the binding to the gamma-carboxylate moiety of glutamate, in Escherichia coli PSAT, to serine or threonine in E. histolytica or A. thaliana PSAT, respectively. Heterologous expression of EhPSAT successfully rescued growth defect of a serine-auxotrophic E. coli strain KL282, where serC was deleted, confirming its in vivo role in serine biosynthesis. Together with our previous demonstration of phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase, the present study reinforces physiological significance of the phosphorylated pathway in amoeba.

  5. Polo-like kinase 2-dependent phosphorylation of NPM/B23 on serine 4 triggers centriole duplication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annekatrin Krause

    Full Text Available Duplication of the centrosome is well controlled during faithful cell division while deregulation of this process leads to supernumary centrosomes, chromosome missegregation and aneuploidy, a hallmark of many cancer cells. We previously reported that Polo-like kinase 2 (Plk2 is activated near the G1/S phase transition, and regulates the reproduction of centrosomes. In search for Plk2 interacting proteins we have identified NPM/B23 (Nucleophosmin as a novel Plk2 binding partner. We find that Plk2 and NPM/B23 interact in vitro in a Polo-box dependent manner. An association between both proteins was also observed in vivo. Moreover, we show that Plk2 phosphorylates NPM/B23 on serine 4 in vivo in S-phase. Notably, expression of a non-phosphorylatable NPM/B23 S4A mutant interferes with centriole reduplication in S-phase arrested cells and leads to a dilution of centriole numbers in unperturbed U2OS cells. The corresponding phospho-mimicking mutants have the opposite effect and their expression leads to the accumulation of centrioles. These findings suggest that NPM/B23 is a direct target of Plk2 in the regulation of centriole duplication and that phosphorylation on serine 4 can trigger this process.

  6. Isolation and characterization of a Paramecium cDNA clone encoding a putative serine/threonine protein kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Satoru; Watanabe, Tsuyoshi

    2007-11-01

    Mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases, a closely related family of protein kinases, are involved in cell cycle regulation and differentiation in yeast and human cells. They have not been documented in ciliates. We used PCR to amplify DNA sequences of a ciliated protozoan--Paramecium caudatum--using primers corresponding to amino acid sequences that are common to MAP kinases. We isolated and sequenced one putative MAP kinase-like serine/threonine kinase cDNA from P. caudatum. This cDNA, called pcstk1 (Paramecium caudatum Serine/Threonine Kinase 1) shared approximately 35% amino acid identity with MAP kinases from yeast. MAP kinases are activated by phosphorylation of specific threonine and tyrosine residues. These two amino acid residues are conserved in the PCSTK1 sequence at positions Thr 159 and Tyr 161. The PSTAIRE motif, which is characteristic of the CDK2 gene family, cannot be found in ORF of PCSTK1. The highest homology score was to human STK9, which contains MAP type kinase domains. Comparisons of expression level have shown that pcstk1 is expressed equally in cells at different stages (sexual and asexual). We discussed the possibility, as in other organisms, that a family of MAP kinase genes exists in P. caudatum.

  7. Predictive mutagenesis of ligation-independent cloning (LIC) vectors for protein expression and site-specific chemical conjugation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vernet, Erik; Sauer, Jørgen; Andersen, Peter Andreas

    2011-01-01

    of expression constructs and report on the construction of expression vectors with N-terminal serine, cysteine, threonine, or tyrosine residues after tobacco etch virus (TEV) protease cleavage. In a practical application, the N-terminal serine was oxidized to an aldehyde, subsequently reacted with an amino...

  8. Serine carboxypeptidase 46 Regulates Grain Filling and Seed Germination in Rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhiyong; Tang, Liqun; Qiu, Jiehua; Zhang, Wen; Wang, Yifeng; Tong, Xiaohong; Wei, Xiangjin; Hou, Yuxuan; Zhang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Serine carboxypeptidase (SCP) is one of the largest groups of enzymes catalyzing proteolysis for functional protein maturation. To date, little is known about the function of SCPs in rice. In this study, we present a comprehensive analysis of the gene structure and expression profile of 59 rice SCPs. SCP46 is dominantly expressed in developing seeds, particularly in embryo, endosperm and aleurone layers, and could be induced by ABA. Functional characterization revealed that knock-down of SCP46 resulted in smaller grain size and enhanced seed germination. Furthermore, scp46 seed germination became less sensitive to the ABA inhibition than the Wild-type did; suggesting SCP46 is involved in ABA signaling. As indicated by RNA-seq and qRT-PCR analysis, numerous grain filling and seed dormancy related genes, such as SP, VP1 and AGPs were down-regulated in scp46. Yeast-two-hybrid assay also showed that SCP46 interacts with another ABA-inducible protein DI19-1. Taken together, we suggested that SCP46 is a master regulator of grain filling and seed germination, possibly via participating in the ABA signaling. The results of this study shed novel light into the roles of SCPs in rice.

  9. Characterization of Bactrocera dorsalis Serine Proteases and Evidence for Their Indirect Role in Insecticide Tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Zhe Hou

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The oriental fruit fly Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel causes devastating losses to agricultural crops world-wide and is considered to be an economically important pest. Little is known about the digestive enzymes such as serine proteases (SPs in B. dorsalis, which are important both for energy supply and mitigation of fitness cost associated with insecticide tolerance. In this study, we identified five SP genes in the midgut of B. dorsalis, and the alignments of their deduced amino acid sequences revealed the presence of motifs conserved in the SP superfamily. Phylogenetic analyses with known SPs from other insect species suggested that three of them were trypsin-like proteases. Analyses of the expression profiles among the different developmental stages showed that all five genes were most abundant in larvae than in other stages. When larvae were continuously fed on diet containing 0.33 μg/g β-Cypermethrin, expression of all five genes were upregulated in the midgut but the larval development was delayed. Biochemical assays were consistent with the increased protease activity exhibited by SPs in the midgut after treatment with β-Cypermethrin. Taken together, these findings provide evidence for the hypothesis that enhanced SP activity may play an indirect role in relieving the toxicity stress of insecticide in B. dorsalis.

  10. New insights into the evolution of subtilisin-like serine protease genes in Pezizomycotina

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Subtilisin-like serine proteases play an important role in pathogenic fungi during the penetration and colonization of their hosts. In this study, we perform an evolutionary analysis of the subtilisin-like serine protease genes of subphylum Pezizomycotina to find if there are similar pathogenic mechanisms among the pathogenic fungi with different life styles, which utilize subtilisin-like serine proteases as virulence factors. Within Pezizomycotina, nematode-trapping fungi are unique because they capture soil nematodes using specialized trapping devices. Increasing evidence suggests subtilisin-like serine proteases from nematode-trapping fungi are involved in the penetration and digestion of nematode cuticles. Here we also conduct positive selection analysis on the subtilisin-like serine protease genes from nematode-trapping fungi. Results Phylogenetic analysis of 189 subtilisin-like serine protease genes from Pezizomycotina suggests five strongly-supported monophyletic clades. The subtilisin-like serine protease genes previously identified or presumed as endocellular proteases were clustered into one clade and diverged the earliest in the phylogeny. In addition, the cuticle-degrading protease genes from entomopathogenic and nematode-parasitic fungi were clustered together, indicating that they might have overlapping pathogenic mechanisms against insects and nematodes. Our experimental bioassays supported this conclusion. Interestingly, although they both function as cuticle-degrading proteases, the subtilisin-like serine protease genes from nematode-trapping fungi and nematode-parasitic fungi were not grouped together in the phylogenetic tree. Our evolutionary analysis revealed evidence for positive selection on the subtilisin-like serine protease genes of the nematode-trapping fungi. Conclusions Our study provides new insights into the evolution of subtilisin-like serine protease genes in Pezizomycotina. Pezizomycotina subtilisins most likely evolved

  11. Serine / threonine protein phosphatase 5 (PP5 participates in the regulation of glucocorticoid receptor nucleocytoplasmic shuttling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bueno Manuel

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In most cells glucocorticoid receptors (GR reside predominately in the cytoplasm. Upon hormone binding, the GR translocates into the nucleus, where the hormone-activated GR-complex regulates the transcription of GR-responsive genes. Serine/threonine protein phosphatase type 5 (PP5 associates with the GR-heat-shock protein-90 complex, and the suppression of PP5 expression with ISIS 15534 stimulates the activity of GR-responsive reporter plasmids, without affecting the binding of hormone to the GR. Results To further characterize the mechanism by which PP5 affects GR-induced gene expression, we employed immunofluorescence microscopy to track the movement of a GR-green fluorescent fusion protein (GR-GFP that retained hormone binding, nuclear translocation activity and specific DNA binding activity, but is incapable of transactivation. In the absence of glucocorticoids, GR-GFP localized mainly in the cytoplasm. Treatment with dexamethasone results in the efficient translocation of GR-GFPs into the nucleus. The nuclear accumulation of GR-GFP, without the addition of glucocorticoids, was also observed when the expression of PP5 was suppressed by treatment with ISIS 15534. In contrast, ISIS 15534 treatment had no apparent effect on calcium induced nuclear translocation of NFAT-GFP. Conclusion These studies suggest that PP5 participates in the regulation of glucocorticoid receptor nucleocytoplasmic shuttling, and that the GR-induced transcriptional activity observed when the expression of PP5 is suppressed by treatment with ISIS 15534 results from the nuclear accumulation of GR in a form that is capable of binding DNA yet still requires agonist to elicit maximal transcriptional activation.

  12. Up-regulation and clinical significance of serine protease kallikrein 6 in colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong-Tae; Song, Eun Young; Chung, Kyung-Sook; Kang, Min Ah; Kim, Jae Wha; Kim, Sang Jick; Yeom, Young Il; Kim, Joo Heon; Kim, Kyo Hyun; Lee, Hee Gu

    2011-06-15

    Kallikrein-related peptidase 6 (KLK6) encodes a trypsin-like serine protease that is up-regulated in several cancers, although the putative functions of KLK6 in cancer have not been elucidated. In the current study, overexpression of KLK6 was identified in colon cancer, and the possibility that KLK6 may be a suitable candidate as a tumor marker was examined. Messenger RNA (mRNA) transcript levels and protein up-regulation of KLK6 in colon cancer tissues was examined using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, immunohistochemistry, and clinicopathologic analyses. Cell proliferation, invasiveness, and antiapoptotic activity were determined in colon cancer cells that were transfected with small-interfering RNA (siRNA) of KLK6. KLK6 mRNA was up-regulated significantly in tumor tissues compared with nontumor regions. KLK6 protein was strongly expressed in adenocarcinomas but was not expressed in normal mucosa or in premalignant dysplastic lesions. Sera from patients with colon cancer revealed an increase in KLK6 secretion (0.25 μg/mL; P = .031) compared with noncancer cells (0.19 μg/mL). Clinicopathologic and immunohistochemical studies of 143 patients with colon cancer revealed a significant correlation between KLK6 expression and Dukes disease stage (P = .005). High KLK6 expression was associated significantly with shorter overall (P = .001) and recurrence-free survival (P = .001). The rates of proliferation and invasiveness were decreased by 50% in cells that were transfected with KLK6 siRNA. The overexpression of KLK6 led to decreased activity of the E-cadherin promoter. KLK6 was up-regulated significantly in tissues and sera from patients with colon cancer and was associated closely with a poor prognosis, suggesting that KLK6 may be used as a potential biomarker and a therapeutic target for colon cancer. Copyright © 2010 American Cancer Society.

  13. Serine integrase chimeras with activity in E. coli and HeLa cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso P. Farruggio

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, application of serine integrases for genomic engineering has increased in popularity. The factor-independence and unidirectionality of these large serine recombinases makes them well suited for reactions such as site-directed vector integration and cassette exchange in a wide variety of organisms. In order to generate information that might be useful for altering the specificity of serine integrases and to improve their efficiency, we tested a hybridization strategy that has been successful with several small serine recombinases. We created chimeras derived from three characterized members of the serine integrase family, phiC31, phiBT1, and TG1 integrases, by joining their amino- and carboxy-terminal portions. We found that several phiBT1-phiC31 (BC and phiC31-TG1 (CT hybrid integrases are active in E. coli. BC chimeras function on native att-sites and on att-sites that are hybrids between those of the two donor enzymes, while CT chimeras only act on the latter att-sites. A BC hybrid, BC{−1}, was also active in human HeLa cells. Our work is the first to demonstrate chimeric serine integrase activity. This analysis sheds light on integrase structure and function, and establishes a potentially tractable means to probe the specificity of the thousands of putative large serine recombinases that have been revealed by bioinformatics studies.

  14. Enzymatic Synthesis of Galactosylated Serine/Threonine Derivatives by β-Galactosidase from Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sooyoun Seo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The transgalactosylations of serine/threonine derivatives were investigated using β-galactosidase from Escherichia coli as biocatalyst. Using ortho-nitrophenyl-β-D-galactoside as donor, the highest bioconversion yield of transgalactosylated N-carboxy benzyl L-serine benzyl ester (23.2% was achieved in heptane:buffer medium (70:30, whereas with the lactose, the highest bioconversion yield (3.94% was obtained in the buffer reaction system. The structures of most abundant galactosylated serine products were characterized by MS/MS. The molecular docking simulation revealed that the binding of serine/threonine derivatives to the enzyme’s active site was stronger (−4.6~−7.9 kcal/mol than that of the natural acceptor, glucose, and mainly occurred through interactions with aromatic residues. For N-tert-butoxycarbonyl serine methyl ester (6.8% and N-carboxybenzyl serine benzyl ester (3.4%, their binding affinities and the distances between their hydroxyl side chain and the 1′-OH group of galactose moiety were in good accordance with the quantified bioconversion yields. Despite its lower predicted bioconversion yield, the high experimental bioconversion yield obtained with N-carboxybenzyl serine methyl ester (23.2% demonstrated the importance of the thermodynamically-driven nature of the transgalactosylation reaction.

  15. Proteolytic profiling and comparative analyses of active trypsin-like serine peptidases in preimaginal stages of Culex quinquefasciatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borges-Veloso Andre

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mosquito Culex quinquefasciatu s, a widespread insect in tropical and sub-tropical regions of the world, is a vector of multiple arboviruses and parasites, and is considered an important risk to human and veterinary health. Proteolytic enzymes play crucial roles in the insect physiology including the modulation of embryonic development and food digestion. Therefore, these enzymes represent important targets for the development of new control strategies. This study presents zymographic characterization and comparative analysis of the proteolytic activity found in eggs, larval instars and pupae of Culex quinquefasciatus. Methods The proteolytic profiles of eggs, larvae and pupa of Cx. quinquefasciatus were characterized by SDS-PAGE co-polymerized with 0.1% gelatin, according to the pH, temperature and peptidase inhibitor sensitivity. In addition, the proteolytic activities were characterized in solution using 100 μM of the fluorogenic substrate Z-Phe-Arg-AMC. Results Comparison of the proteolytic profiles by substrate-SDS-PAGE from all preimaginal stages of the insect revealed qualitative and quantitative differences in the peptidase expression among eggs, larvae and pupae. Use of specific inhibitors revealed that the proteolytic activity from preimaginal stages is mostly due to trypsin-like serine peptidases that display optimal activity at alkaline pH. In-solution, proteolytic assays of the four larval instars using the fluorogenic substrate Z-Phe-Arg-AMC in the presence or absence of a trypsin-like serine peptidase inhibitor confirmed the results obtained by substrate-SDS-PAGE analysis. The trypsin-like serine peptidases of the four larval instars were functional over a wide range of temperatures, showing activities at 25°C and 65°C, with an optimal activity between 37°C and 50°C. Conclusion The combined use of zymography and in-solution assays, as performed in this study, allowed for a more detailed analysis of the

  16. Intracellular d-Serine Accumulation Promotes Genetic Diversity via Modulated Induction of RecA in Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, James P R; Roe, Andrew J

    2016-12-15

    We recently discovered that exposure of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) to d-serine resulted in accumulation of this unusual amino acid, induction of the SOS regulon, and downregulation of the type III secretion system that is essential for efficient colonization of the host. Here, we have investigated the physiological relevance of this elevated SOS response, which is of particular interest given the presence of Stx toxin-carrying lysogenic prophages on the EHEC chromosome that are activated during the SOS response. We found that RecA elevation in response to d-serine, while being significant, was heterogeneous and not capable of activating stx expression or stx phage transduction to a nonlysogenic recipient. This "SOS-like response" was, however, capable of increasing the mutation frequency associated with low-level RecA activity, thus promoting genetic diversity. Furthermore, this response was entirely dependent on RecA and enhanced in the presence of a DNA-damaging agent, indicating a functional SOS response, but did not result in observable cleavage of the LexA repressor alone, indicating a controlled mechanism of induction. This work demonstrates that environmental factors not usually associated with DNA damage are capable of promoting an SOS-like response. We propose that this modulated induction of RecA allows EHEC to adapt to environmental insults such as d-serine while avoiding unwanted phage-induced lysis. The SOS response is a global stress network that is triggered by the presence of DNA damage due to breakage or stalled replication forks. Activation of the SOS response can trigger the replication of lytic bacteriophages and promote genetic diversification through error-prone polymerases. We have demonstrated that the host-associated metabolite d-serine contributes to Escherichia coli niche specification and accumulates inside cells that cannot catabolize it. This results in a modulated activation of the SOS antirepressor RecA that is

  17. Stromal serine protein kinase activity in spinach chloroplasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortez, N.; Lucero, H.A.; Vallejos, R.H.

    1987-05-01

    At least twelve /sup 32/P-labeled stromal proteins were detected by electrophoresis under denaturing conditions when intact chloroplasts were incubated with /sup 32/Pi, in the light but only three were detected in the presence of 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU) or in the dark. Incubation of isolated stroma with (gamma-/sup 32/P)ATP resulted in the preferential phosphorylation of one of them, a 70-kDa polypeptide, in serine residues. Thylakoid membranes in the dark promoted the phosphorylation of two additional stromal polypeptides of 55 and 40 kDa. Illumination during the phosphorylation of stroma in the presence of thylakoids stimulated severalfold the labeling of the 40-kDa polypeptide but not when DCMU was added. The protein kinase activity present in isolated stroma phosphorylated exogenous substrates like histone III, phosvitin, histone II, and casein with specific activities of 3, 1.8, 0.7, and 0.2 pmol X mg-1 X min-1. Histone III polypeptides were phosphorylated differently by stroma and by thylakoids in the dark. Moreover, histone III phosphorylated by thylakoids in the dark yielded a pattern of phosphopeptides after V8 protease treatment that was different from the pattern obtained when histone III was phosphorylated by stroma.

  18. Identification of a serine proteinase homolog (Sp-SPH) involved in immune defense in the mud crab Scylla paramamosain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiu-xia; Liu, Hai-peng; Chen, Rong-yuan; Shen, Kai-li; Wang, Ke-jian

    2013-01-01

    Clip domain serine proteinase homologs are involved in many biological processes including immune response. To identify the immune function of a serine proteinase homolog (Sp-SPH), originally isolated from hemocytes of the mud crab, Scylla paramamosain, the Sp-SPH was expressed recombinantly and purified for further studies. It was found that the Sp-SPH protein could bind to a number of bacteria (including Aeromonas hydrophila, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Vibrio fluvialis, Vibrio harveyi and Vibrio parahemolyticus), bacterial cell wall components such as lipopolysaccharide or peptidoglycan (PGN), and β-1, 3-glucan of fungus. But no direct antibacterial activity of Sp-SPH protein was shown by using minimum inhibitory concentration or minimum bactericidal concentration assays. Nevertheless, the Sp-SPH protein was found to significantly enhance the crab hemocyte adhesion activity (paired t-test, PSPH protein was demonstrated to promote the survival rate of the animals after challenge with A. hydrophila or V. parahemolyticus which were both recognized by Sp-SPH protein, if pre-incubated with Sp-SPH protein, respectively. Whereas, the crabs died much faster when challenged with Vibrio alginolyiicus, a pathogenic bacterium not recognized by Sp-SPH protein, compared to those of crabs challenged with A. hydrophila or V. parahemolyticus when pre-coated with Sp-SPH protein. Taken together, these data suggested that Sp-SPH molecule might play an important role in immune defense against bacterial infection in the mud crab S. paramamosain.

  19. Role of serine proteases in the regulation of interleukin-877 during the development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia in preterm ventilated infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Mallinath; McGreal, Eamon P; Williams, Andrew; Davies, Philip L; Powell, Wendy; Abdulla, Salima; Voitenok, Nikolai N; Hogwood, John; Gray, Elaine; Spiller, Brad; Chambers, Rachel C; Kotecha, Sailesh

    2014-01-01

    The chemokine interleukin-8 is implicated in the development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia in preterm infants. The 77-amino acid isoform of interleukin-8 (interleukin-877) is a less potent chemoattractant than other shorter isoforms. Although interleukin-877 is abundant in the preterm circulation, its regulation in the preterm lung is unknown. To study expression and processing of pulmonary interleukin-877 in preterm infants who did and did not develop bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Total interleukin-8 and interleukin-877 were measured in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from preterm infants by immunoassay. Neutrophil serine proteases were used to assess processing. Neutrophil chemotaxis assays and degranulation of neutrophil matrix metalloproteinase-9 were used to assess interleukin-8 function. Peak total interleukin-8 and interleukin-877 concentrations were increased in infants who developed bronchopulmonary dysplasia compared to those who did not. Shorter forms of interleukin-8 predominated in the preterm lung (96.3% No-bronchopulmonary dysplasia vs 97.1% bronchopulmonary dysplasia, p>0.05). Preterm bronchoalveolar lavage fluid significantly converted exogenously added interleukin-877 to shorter isoforms (pbronchopulmonary dysplasia infants (pbronchopulmonary dysplasia, due to conversion of interleukin-877 by neutrophil serine proteases and thrombin. Processing of interleukin-8 provides an attractive therapeutic target to prevent development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia.

  20. Serine Hydroxymethyltransferase from the Cold Adapted Microorganism Psychromonas ingrahamii: A Low Temperature Active Enzyme with Broad Substrate Specificity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Pascarella

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Serine hydroxymethyltransferase from the psychrophilic microorganism Psychromonas ingrahamii was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified as a His-tag fusion protein. The enzyme was characterized with respect to its spectroscopic, catalytic, and thermodynamic properties. The properties of the psychrophilic enzyme have been contrasted with the characteristics of the homologous counterpart from E. coli, which has been structurally and functionally characterized in depth and with which it shares 75% sequence identity. Spectroscopic measures confirmed that the psychrophilic enzyme displays structural properties almost identical to those of the mesophilic counterpart. At variance, the P. ingrahamii enzyme showed decreased thermostability and high specific activity at low temperature, both of which are typical features of cold adapted enzymes. Furthermore, it was a more efficient biocatalyst compared to E. coli serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT particularly for side reactions. Many β-hydroxy-α-amino acids are SHMT substrates and represent important compounds in the synthesis of pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals and food additives. Thanks to these attractive properties, this enzyme could have a significant potential for biotechnological applications.

  1. Immunostaining analysis of tissue cultured cells and tissue sections using phospho-Histone H3 (Serine 10) antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padmanabhan, Jaya

    2015-01-01

    Post-translational modifications of histones play an important role in regulation of gene expression through condensation and decondensation of chromatin structure. These modifications include acetylation, methylation, phosphorylation and ubiquitination. Phosphorylation on histones is associated with cellular responses such as DNA damage, transcription, chromatin compaction and mitosis or meiosis. One of the most extensively studied modifications of histones is the Serine 10 phosphorylation on histone H3 N-terminal tail. This specific phosphorylation on Histone H3 has been associated with condensation and transcriptional inactivation of mitotic chromosomes, but recent studies have suggested a role for this specific phosphorylation in chromatin relaxation and activation of transcription in interphase cells. Co-immunostaining analysis of cells using antibodies specific to serine 10P-Histone H3 together with those to cell cycle specific markers will allow us to determine the nature of phosphorylation in a cell cycle-specific manner. In a complex system, such as tissue specimens, analysis using P-Histone H3 and a cell type specific antibody will allow identification of specific cells that are affected by this histone modification. This is of particular interest in the field of cancer biology or neurobiology where identification or quantification of the transcriptionally active or mitotic cells will enable one to evaluate the progression of the disease development. The protocol described here provides details on how co-immunostaining and analysis can be performed in tissue cultured cells or tissue sections.

  2. Intracellular serine protease inhibitor SERPINB4 inhibits granzyme M-induced cell death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pieter J A de Koning

    Full Text Available Granzyme-mediated cell death is the major pathway for cytotoxic lymphocytes to kill virus-infected and tumor cells. In humans, five different granzymes (i.e. GrA, GrB, GrH, GrK, and GrM are known that all induce cell death. Expression of intracellular serine protease inhibitors (serpins is one of the mechanisms by which tumor cells evade cytotoxic lymphocyte-mediated killing. Intracellular expression of SERPINB9 by tumor cells renders them resistant to GrB-induced apoptosis. In contrast to GrB, however, no physiological intracellular inhibitors are known for the other four human granzymes. In the present study, we show that SERPINB4 formed a typical serpin-protease SDS-stable complex with both recombinant and native human GrM. Mutation of the P2-P1-P1' triplet in the SERPINB4 reactive center loop completely abolished complex formation with GrM and N-terminal sequencing revealed that GrM cleaves SERPINB4 after P1-Leu. SERPINB4 inhibited GrM activity with a stoichiometry of inhibition of 1.6 and an apparent second order rate constant of 1.3×10(4 M(-1 s(-1. SERPINB4 abolished cleavage of the macromolecular GrM substrates α-tubulin and nucleophosmin. Overexpression of SERPINB4 in tumor cells inhibited recombinant GrM-induced as well as NK cell-mediated cell death and this inhibition depended on the reactive center loop of the serpin. As SERPINB4 is highly expressed by squamous cell carcinomas, our results may represent a novel mechanism by which these tumor cells evade cytotoxic lymphocyte-induced GrM-mediated cell death.

  3. Serine protease-mediated host invasion by the parasitic nematode Steinernema carpocapsae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toubarro, Duarte; Lucena-Robles, Miguel; Nascimento, Gisela; Santos, Romana; Montiel, Rafael; Veríssimo, Paula; Pires, Euclides; Faro, Carlos; Coelho, Ana V; Simões, Nelson

    2010-10-01

    Steinernema carpocapsae is an insect parasitic nematode used in biological control, which infects insects penetrating by mouth and anus and invading the hemocoelium through the midgut wall. Invasion has been described as a key factor in nematode virulence and suggested to be mediated by proteases. A serine protease cDNA from the parasitic stage was sequenced (sc-sp-1); the recombinant protein was produced in an Escherichia coli system, and a native protein was purified from the secreted products. Both proteins were confirmed by mass spectrometry to be encoded by the sc-sp-1 gene. Sc-SP-1 has a pI of 8.7, a molecular mass of 27.3 kDa, a catalytic efficiency of 22.2 × 10(4) s(-1) m(-1) against N-succinyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe-pNA, and is inhibited by chymostatin (IC 0.07) and PMSF (IC 0.73). Sc-SP-1 belongs to the chymotrypsin family, based on sequence and biochemical analysis. Only the nematode parasitic stage expressed sc-sp-1. These nematodes in the midgut lumen, prepared to invade the insect hemocoelium, expressed higher levels than those already in the hemocoelium. Moreover, parasitic nematode sense insect peritrophic membrane and hemolymph more quickly than they do other tissues, which initiates sc-sp-1 expression. Ex vivo, Sc-SP-1 was able to bind to insect midgut epithelium and to cause cell detachment from basal lamina. In vitro, Sc-SP-1 formed holes in an artificial membrane model (Matrigel), whereas Sc-SP-1 treated with PMSF did not, very likely because it hydrolyzes matrix glycoproteins. These findings highlight the S. carpocapsae-invasive process that is a key step in the parasitism thus opening new perspectives for improving nematode virulence to use in biological control.

  4. Insights into the serine protease mechanism based on structural observations of the conversion of a peptidyl serine protease inhibitor to a substrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Longguang; Andersen, Lisbeth Moreau; Andreasen, Peter A

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Serine proteases are one of the most studied group of enzymes. Despite the extensive mechanistic studies, some crucial details remain controversial, for example, how the cleaved product is released in the catalysis reaction. A cyclic peptidyl inhibitor (CSWRGLENHRMC, upain-1) of a ser......BACKGROUND: Serine proteases are one of the most studied group of enzymes. Despite the extensive mechanistic studies, some crucial details remain controversial, for example, how the cleaved product is released in the catalysis reaction. A cyclic peptidyl inhibitor (CSWRGLENHRMC, upain-1......) of a serine protease, urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA), was found to become a slow substrate and cleaved slowly upon the replacement of single residue (W3A). METHODS: By taking advantage of the unique property of this peptide, we report the high-resolution structures of uPA in complex with upain-1-W...

  5. Neutrophil serine proteases mediate inflammatory cell recruitment by glomerular endothelium and progression towards dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuravi, Sahithi J; Bevins, Anne; Satchell, Simon C; Harper, Lorraine; Williams, Julie M; Rainger, G Ed; Savage, Caroline O S; Tull, Samantha P

    2012-12-01

    Neutrophil recruitment into glomerular tissues and reduced capillary wall integrity has been implicated in the development of vasculitic glomerulonephritis (VGN). This study investigated the stages and mechanisms through which neutrophil serine proteases (SPs), proteinase 3 (PR3) or elastase contribute to endothelial dysfunction. Protease-induced damage to endothelium and adhesion molecule upregulation was measured by viability assays and ELISA. Neutrophil/platelet adhesion to human glomerular and umbilical vein endothelium was assessed using in vitro adhesion assays. PR3 and elastase (1 µg/mL, 2 h) significantly induced neutrophil adhesion to endothelial cells (EnC) whilst PR3 also enhanced platelet-EnC interactions. This neutrophil adhesion was associated with enhanced P-selectin expression and required CXCL8 receptor involvement, and could be inhibited by blocking the P-selectin ligand PSGL-1. SPs induced damage in a time- and dose-dependent fashion, decreasing cell monolayer integrity followed by cell membrane integrity, inducing caspase-3 activation and p21 cleavage. However, SPs caused significant EnC damage with increasing concentrations and prolonged exposures. Neutrophil SPs induce a pro-adhesive phenotype in glomerular endothelium primarily by inducing neutrophil and platelet adhesion that transits to dysfunction after high/prolonged exposures. Dysregulated release of these enzymes within glomeruli may contribute to injury during diseases such as VGN.

  6. Picornaviral 3C cysteine proteinases have a fold similar to the chymotrypsin-like serine proteinases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allaire,M.; Chernaia, M.; Malcolm, B.; James, M.

    1994-01-01

    The picornavirus family includes several pathogens such as poliovirus, rhinovirus (the major cause of the common cold), hepatitis A virus and the foot-and-mouth disease virus. Picornaviral proteins are expressed by direct translation of the genomic RNA into a single, large polyprotein precursor. Proteolysis of the viral polyprotein into the mature proteins is assured by the viral 3C enzymes, which are cysteine proteinases. Here we report the X-ray crystal structure at 2.3 {angstrom} resolution of the 3C proteinase from hepatitis A virus (HAV-3C). The overall architecture of HAV-3C reveals a fold resembling that of the chymotrypsin family of serine proteinases, which is consistent with earlier predictions. Catalytic residues include Cys 172 as nucleophile and His 44 as general base. The 3C cleavage specificity for glutamine residues is defined primarily by His 191. The overall structure suggests that an inter-molecular (trans) cleavage releases 3C and that there is an active proteinase in the polyprotein.

  7. Canine hepacivirus NS3 serine protease can cleave the human adaptor proteins MAVS and TRIF.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariona Parera

    Full Text Available Canine hepacivirus (CHV was recently identified in domestic dogs and horses. The finding that CHV is genetically the virus most closely related to hepatitis C virus (HCV has raised the question of whether HCV might have evolved as the result of close contact between dogs and/or horses and humans. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the NS3/4A serine protease of CHV specifically cleaves human mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS and Toll-IL-1 receptor domain-containing adaptor inducing interferon-beta (TRIF. The proteolytic activity of CHV NS3/4A was evaluated using a bacteriophage lambda genetic screen. Human MAVS- and TRIF-specific cleavage sites were engineered into the lambda cI repressor. Upon infection of Escherichia coli cells coexpressing these repressors and a CHV NS3/4A construct, lambda phage replicated up to 2000-fold more efficiently than in cells expressing a CHV protease variant carrying the inactivating substitution S139A. Comparable results were obtained when several HCV NS3/4A constructs of genotype 1b were assayed. This indicates that CHV can disrupt the human innate antiviral defense signaling pathway and suggests a possible evolutionary relationship between CHV and HCV.

  8. The role of Serine Proteases and Serine Protease Inhibitors in the migration of Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silverman Ann-Judith

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mechanisms regulating neuronal migration during development remain largely undefined. Extracellular matrix cues, target site released factors, and components of the migratory neurons themselves are likely all coordinated in time and space directing neurons to their appropriate locations. We have studied the effects of proteases and their inhibitors on the extracellular matrix and the consequences to the migration of gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH neurons in the embryonic chick. Chick GnRH neurons differentiate in the olfactory epithelium, migrate along the olfactory nerve and enter the forebrain. The accessibility of this coherent cell group make it amenable for studying protease/inhibitor roles in migratory processes. Results Affigel blue beads were used to deliver a serine protease inhibitor, protease nexin-1 (PN-1, and a target protease, trypsin, to the olfactory epithelium coincident with initiation of GnRH neuronal migration. PN-1 inhibited neuronal migration while trypsin accelerated their transit into the CNS. Prior to initiation of migration, neither PN-1 nor trypsin altered the timing of neuronal exit. Trypsin did, however, accelerate the timing of neuronal crossing into the nerve-forebrain junction. Conclusions These data support the hypothesis that protease activity modulates neuronal movements across barriers. Moreover, the data suggest, for the first time, that aspects of GnRH neuronal migration may be cell autonomous but modulated by ECM alterations.

  9. Synthesis of Functionalised Nucleosides for Incorporation into Nucleic Acid-Based Serine Protease Mimics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annemieke Madder

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of nucleosides modified with an extra imidazole, carboxyl and hydroxyl group is described. These nucleosides can be incorporated into an oligonucleotide duplex, thus generating a novel type of serine protease mimic.

  10. D-serine: a new word in the glutamatergic neuro-glial language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scolari, M J; Acosta, G B

    2007-11-01

    Gliotransmission is a process in which astrocytes are dynamic elements that influence synaptic transmission and synaptogenesis. The best-known gliotransmitters are glutamate and ATP. However, in the past decade, it has been demonstrated that D-serine, a D-amino acid, acts as a gliotransmitter in glutamatergic synapses. The physiological relevance of D-serine is sustained by the way in which it modulates the action of glutamatergic neurotransmission, neuronal migration and long-term potentiation (LTP). In addition, the synthesis and degradation mechanisms of D-serine have been proposed as potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia and related disorders. In the present review, detailed information is provided about the physiological and physiopathological relevance of D-serine, including metabolic and regulation aspects.

  11. Modulation of Escherichia coli serine acetyltransferase catalytic activity in the cysteine synthase complex

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Benoni, Roberto; De Bei, O.; Paredi, G.; Hayes, C. S.; Franko, N.; Mozzarelli, A.; Bettati, S.; Campanini, B.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 591, č. 9 (2017), s. 1212-1224 ISSN 0014-5793 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : cysteine synthase * protein-protein interaction * serine acetyltransferase Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.623, year: 2016

  12. Membrane-anchored serine proteases in vertebrate cell and developmental biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabo, Roman; Bugge, Thomas H

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of vertebrate genome sequences at the turn of the millennium revealed that a vastly larger repertoire of enzymes execute proteolytic cleavage reactions within the pericellular and extracellular environments than was anticipated from biochemical and molecular analysis. Most unexpected was the unveiling of an entire new family of structurally unique multidomain serine proteases that are anchored directly to the plasma membrane. Unlike secreted serine proteases, which function primarily in tissue repair, immunity, and nutrient uptake, these membrane-anchored serine proteases regulate fundamental cellular and developmental processes, including tissue morphogenesis, epithelial barrier function, ion and water transport, cellular iron export, and fertilization. Here the cellular and developmental biology of this fascinating new group of proteases is reviewed. Particularly highlighted is how the study of membrane-anchored serine proteases has expanded our knowledge of the range of physiological processes that require regulated proteolysis at the cell surface.

  13. Optical properties of D-serine doped TGS crystals for pyroelectric sensors*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurlyak V.Yu.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Refractive and birefringence indices in the range of transparency of 300 to 700 nm for triglycine sulphate crystals doped with D-serine molecules have been measured in the temperature range of 290 K to 340 K. The obtained optical properties are discussed together with characteristic electrical features of these materials used as pyroelectric sensors for measurement of temperature. The experimental results obtained in this study will be necessary as the reference data for comparison with the calculated refractive indices of TGS + D-serine on the basis of density functional theory. Determination of the proper position of D-serine, will reveal the features of TGS + D-serine crystal structure necessary to achieve stable unipolarity.

  14. PIM serine/threonine kinases in the pathogenesis and therapy of hematologic malignancies and solid cancers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Laurent Brault; Christelle Gasser; Franz Bracher; Kilian Huber; Stefan Knapp; Jürg Schwaller

    2010-01-01

    The identification as cooperating targets of Proviral Integrations of Moloney virus in murine lymphomas suggested early on that PIM serine/threonine kinases play an important role in cancer biology...

  15. Functional Characterization of the Serine-Rich Tract of Varicella-Zoster Virus IE62.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seong K; Shakya, Akhalesh K; Kim, Seongman; O'Callaghan, Dennis J

    2015-11-04

    The immediate early 62 protein (IE62) of varicella-zoster virus (VZV), a major viral trans-activator, initiates the virus life cycle and is a key component of pathogenesis. The IE62 possesses several domains essential for trans-activation, including an acidic trans-activation domain (TAD), a serine-rich tract (SRT), and binding domains for USF, TFIIB, and TATA box binding protein (TBP). Transient-transfection assays showed that the VZV IE62 lacking the SRT trans-activated the early VZV ORF61 promoter at only 16% of the level of the full-length IE62. When the SRT of IE62 was replaced with the SRT of equine herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1) IEP, its trans-activation activity was completely restored. Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) ICP4 that lacks a TAD very weakly (1.5-fold) trans-activated the ORF61 promoter. An IE62 TAD-ICP4 chimeric protein exhibited trans-activation ability (10.2-fold), indicating that the IE62 TAD functions with the SRT of HSV-1 ICP4 to trans-activate viral promoters. When the serine and acidic residues of the SRT were replaced with Ala, Leu, and Gly, trans-activation activities of the modified IE62 proteins IE62-SRTΔSe and IE62-SRTΔAc were reduced to 46% and 29% of wild-type activity, respectively. Bimolecular complementation assays showed that the TAD of IE62, EHV-1 IEP, and HSV-1 VP16 interacted with Mediator 25 in human melanoma MeWo cells. The SRT of IE62 interacted with the nucleolar-ribosomal protein EAP, which resulted in the formation of globular structures within the nucleus. These results suggest that the SRT plays an important role in VZV viral gene expression and replication. The immediate early 62 protein (IE62) of varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a major viral trans-activator and is essential for viral growth. Our data show that the serine-rich tract (SRT) of VZV IE62, which is well conserved within the alphaherpesviruses, is needed for trans-activation mediated by the acidic trans-activation domain (TAD). The TADs of IE62, EHV-1 IEP, and HSV

  16. Sustaining protein synthesis in the absence of rapid cell division: an investigation of plasmid-encoded protein expression in Escherichia coli during very slow growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flickinger, M C; Rouse, M P

    1993-01-01

    The minimum growth rate capable of supporting plasmid-encoded gene expression is determined using continuous cultures of Escherichia coli MZ9387 at dilution rates (D) as low as 5% of the maximum specific growth rate. Expression from a low copy number plasmid, pMPR166, encoding cyanase under the control of P(lac) is investigated in order to study plasmid-encoded gene expression under conditions approaching starvation. Plasmid copy number was stabilized by selection in the presence of 500 micrograms/mL chloramphenicol by constitutive expression of chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT). Plasmid retention was determined by dot-blot hybridization and chloramphenicol resistance. The contribution of plasmid maintenance and cyanase expression to the maximum cell yield (Y'x/s) and the maintenance coefficient (ms) was determined for MZ9387 and MZ9387:pMPR166 under uninduced and IPTG-induced conditions. The values of Y'x/s and ms for non-plasmid-bearing cultures were 0.56 g of cell dry mass (DCM)/g of glucose and 0.26 g of glucose/g of DCM.h, respectively. The cell yield for plasmid-bearing cultures under uninduced conditions (Y 0'x/s) was 0.28 g of DCM/g of glucose, with m0s = 0.08 g of glucose/g of DCM.h. These values decreased following induction of cyanase expression. Glucose consumption in the presence of IPTG was linearly related to the growth rate at D cyanase expression alters metabolism and glucose consumption. The fraction of plasmid-free cells decreased with decreasing Damköhler number (Da). These data confirm the usefulness of Da for predicting the relationship between plasmid-free and plasmid-bearing cells where plasmids are stabilized by concentrations of antibiotic greater than the minimum plasmid-free host cell growth inhibitory concentration. Specific cyanase expression increased as the dilution rate decreased to D = 0.15 h-1. Between D = 0.15 h-1 and D = 0.14 h-1, expression decreased 7-fold. At very low dilution rates (D < or = 0.06 h-1), nonseptated

  17. Small Subunits of Serine Palmitoyltransferase (ssSPTs) and Their Physiological Roles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-12

    Interestingly, in the absence of serine in the medium , heat shock no longer induces increased sphingolipid synthesis (16), showing that an increase in serine...knockout mutants transformed with the empty vectors (grown on medium containing PHS) were used as a control. The results show that the subunits of the two...mutant. Cells were serially transferred to YPD or SD+PHS and incubated at the indicated temperatures for 4 days.   51 Figure 3.11

  18. Structural Mechanisms of Inactivation in Scabies Mite Serine Protease Paralogues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Katja; Langendorf, Christopher G.; Irving, James A.; Reynolds, Simone; Willis, Charlene; Beckham, Simone; Law, Ruby H.P.; Yang, Sundy; Bashtannyk-Puhalovich, Tanya A.; McGowan, Sheena; Whisstock, James C.; Pike, Robert N.; Kemp, David J.; Buckle, Ashley M.; (Monash); (Queensland Inst. of Med. Rsrch.)

    2009-08-07

    The scabies mite (Sarcoptes scabiei) is a parasite responsible for major morbidity in disadvantaged communities and immuno-compromised patients worldwide. In addition to the physical discomfort caused by the disease, scabies infestations facilitate infection by Streptococcal species via skin lesions, resulting in a high prevalence of rheumatic fever/heart disease in affected communities. The scabies mite produces 33 proteins that are closely related to those in the dust mite group 3 allergen and belong to the S1-like protease family (chymotrypsin-like). However, all but one of these molecules contain mutations in the conserved active-site catalytic triad that are predicted to render them catalytically inactive. These molecules are thus termed scabies mite inactivated protease paralogues (SMIPPs). The precise function of SMIPPs is unclear; however, it has been suggested that these proteins might function by binding and protecting target substrates from cleavage by host immune proteases, thus preventing the host from mounting an effective immune challenge. In order to begin to understand the structural basis for SMIPP function, we solved the crystal structures of SMIPP-S-I1 and SMIPP-S-D1 at 1.85 {angstrom} and 2.0 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. Both structures adopt the characteristic serine protease fold, albeit with large structural variations over much of the molecule. In both structures, mutations in the catalytic triad together with occlusion of the S1 subsite by a conserved Tyr200 residue is predicted to block substrate ingress. Accordingly, we show that both proteases lack catalytic function. Attempts to restore function (via site-directed mutagenesis of catalytic residues as well as Tyr200) were unsuccessful. Taken together, these data suggest that SMIPPs have lost the ability to bind substrates in a classical 'canonical' fashion, and instead have evolved alternative functions in the lifecycle of the scabies mite.

  19. Ketamine Metabolites Enantioselectively Decrease Intracellular D-Serine Concentrations in PC-12 Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagendra S Singh

    Full Text Available D-Serine is an endogenous NMDA receptor co-agonist that activates synaptic NMDA receptors modulating neuronal networks in the cerebral cortex and plays a key role in long-term potentiation of synaptic transmission. D-serine is associated with NMDA receptor neurotoxicity and neurodegeneration and elevated D-serine concentrations have been associated with Alzheimer's and Parkinsons' diseases and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Previous studies have demonstrated that the ketamine metabolites (rac-dehydronorketamine and (2S,6S-hydroxynorketamine decrease intracellular D-serine concentrations in a concentration dependent manner in PC-12 cells. In the current study, PC-12 cells were incubated with a series of ketamine metabolites and the IC50 values associated with attenuated intracellular D-serine concentrations were determined. The results demonstrate that structural and stereochemical features of the studied compounds contribute to the magnitude of the inhibitory effect with (2S,6S-hydroxynorketamine and (2R,6R-hydroxynorketamine displaying the most potent inhibition with IC50 values of 0.18 ± 0.04 nM and 0.68 ± 0.09 nM. The data was utilized to construct a preliminary 3D-QSAR/pharmacophore model for use in the design of new and more efficient modulators of D-serine.

  20. Serine protease inhibitors to treat inflammation: a patent review (2011-2016).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soualmia, Feryel; El Amri, Chahrazade

    2018-02-01

    Inflammation is a physiological part of the complex biological response of tissues to counteract various harmful signals. This process involves diverse actors such as immune cells, blood vessels, and nerves as sources of mediators for inflammation control. Among them serine proteases are key elements in both physiological and pathological inflammation. Areas covered: Serine protease inhibitors to treat inflammatory diseases are being actively investigated by various industrial and academic institutions. The present review covers patent literature on serine protease inhibitors for the therapy of inflammatory diseases patented between 2011 and 2016. Expert opinion: Serine proteases regulating inflammation are versatile enzymes, usually involved in proinflammatory cytokine production and activation of immune cells. Their dysregulation during inflammation can have devastating consequences, promoting various diseases including skin and lung inflammation, neuroinflammation, and inflammatory arthritis. Several serine proteases were selected for their contribution to inflammatory diseases and significant efforts that are spread to develop inhibitors. Strategies developed for inhibitor identification consist on either peptide-based inhibitor derived from endogenous protein inhibitors or small-organic molecules. It is also worth noting that among the recent patents on serine protease inhibitors related to inflammation a significant number are related to retinal vascular dysfunction and skin diseases.

  1. Identification and characterization of a serine protease inhibitor with two trypsin inhibitor-like domains from the human hookworm Ancylostoma duodenale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xian; Deng, Li; Li, Hui; Zhang, Zhenlin; He, Qingfeng; Yang, Chen; Jiang, Hanguo; Zhu, Xing-Quan; Peng, Lifei

    2011-02-01

    Protease inhibitors play important roles in the parasitic nematodes' survival within their host, in the development and reproduction of the parasites. The present study described the isolation, identification, and characterization of a novel member of the Ascaris family of serine protease inhibitors, designated AduTIL-1, from the human hookworm Ancylostoma duodenale. AduTIL-1 is composed of a signal sequence and two trypsin inhibitor-like (TIL) domains, which showed the highest similarity with OdmCRP, a putative serine protease inhibitor with two TIL domains in Oesophagostomum dentatum. Each TIL domain of the AduTIL-1 was expressed in Escherichia coli, and their inhibitory activities against serine proteases from animals and human were characterized, respectively. Both of the two TIL domains inhibited human neutrophil elastase and pancreatic trypsin, but different in effectiveness. Although the first TIL domain of AduTIL-1 inhibited bovine pancreatic chymotrypsin (Ki=18.0 nM), both of the two domains showed no inhibitory activity against the human pancreatic chymotrypsin. Immunohistochemical studies demonstrated that AduTIL-1 was localized in esophagus, intestine, and cuticular surface of the adult worms. These results suggested that AduTIL-1 may be involved in the survival of A. duodenale in host by targeting related digestive enzymes and neutrophil elastase.

  2. The role of D-serine as co-agonist of NMDA receptors in the nucleus accumbens: relevance to cocaine addiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcello eD'Ascenzo

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Cocaine addiction is characterized by compulsive drug use despite adverse consequences and high rate of relapse during periods of abstinence. Increasing consensus suggests that addiction to drugs of abuse usurps learning and memory mechanisms normally related to natural rewards, ultimately producing long-lasting neuroadaptations in the mesocorticolimbic system. This system, formed in part by the ventral tegmental area and nucleus accumbens (NAc, has a central role in the development and expression of addictive behaviors. In addition to a broad spectrum of changes that affect morphology and function of NAc excitatory circuits in cocaine–treated animals, impaired N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR-dependent synaptic plasticity is a typical feature. D-serine, a D-amino acid that has been found at high levels in mammalian brain, binds with high affinity the co-agonist site of NMDAR and mediates, along with glutamate, several important processes including synaptic plasticity. Here we review recent literature focusing on cocaine-induced impairment in synaptic plasticity mechanisms in the NAc and on the fundamental role of D-serine as co-agonist of NMDAR in functional and dysfunctional synaptic plasticity within this nucleus. The emerging picture is that reduced D-serine levels play a crucial role in synaptic plasticity relevant to cocaine addiction. This finding opens new perspectives for therapeutic approaches to treat this addictive state.

  3. Mannan-binding lectin (MBL)-associated serine protease-1 (MASP-1), a serine protease associated with humoral pattern-recognition molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thiel, Steffen; Degn, Søren Egedal; Nielsen, H J

    2012-01-01

    The pattern-recognition molecules mannan-binding lectin (MBL) and the three ficolins circulate in blood in complexes with MBL-associated serine proteases (MASPs). When MBL or ficolin recognizes a microorganism, activation of the MASPs occurs leading to activation of the complement system, an impo...

  4. L-Citrulline increases hepatic sensitivity to insulin by reducing the phosphorylation of serine 1101 in insulin receptor substrate-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshitomi, Hisae; Momoo, Maki; Ma, Xiao; Huang, Yewei; Suguro, Shiori; Yamagishi, Yoshie; Gao, Ming

    2015-06-18

    Insulin resistance is characterized by deficient responses to insulin in its target tissues. In the present study, we examined the effects of L-Citrulline (L-Cit) on insulin sensitivity and signaling cascades in rat hepatoma H4IIE cells and SHRSP.Z-Leprfa/IzmDmcr rats. H4IIE cells were pretreated in the presence or absence of 250 μM L-Cit in serum-free medium and then incubated in the presence or absence of 0.1 nM insulin. Rats were allocated into 2 groups; a control group (not treated) and L-Cit group (2 g/kg/day, L-Cit) and treated for 8 weeks. L-Cit enhanced the insulin-induced phosphorylation of Akt in H4IIE cells. Moreover, the inhibited expression of Dex/cAMP-induced PEPCK mRNA by insulin was enhanced by the L-Cit treatment. The phosphorylation of tyrosine, which is upstream of Akt, in insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) was increased by the L-Cit treatment. The L-Cit-induced enhancement in insulin signaling was not related to the binding affinity of insulin to the insulin receptor or to the expression of the insulin receptor, but to a decrease in the phosphorylation of serine 1101 in IRS-1. These results were also confirmed in animal experiments. In the livers of L-Cit-treated rats, PI3K/Akt signaling was improved by decreases in the phosphorylation of serine 1101. We herein demonstrated for the first time the beneficial effects of L-Cit on improved insulin resistance associated with enhanced insulin sensitivity. These results may have clinical applications for insulin resistance and the treatment of type-2 diabetes.

  5. Functional characterization and novel rickettsiostatic effects of a Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitor from the tick Dermacentor variabilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceraul, Shane M; Dreher-Lesnick, Sheila M; Mulenga, Albert; Rahman, M Sayeedur; Azad, Abdu F

    2008-11-01

    Here we report the novel bacteriostatic function of a five-domain Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitor (KPI) from the tick Dermacentor variabilis. As ticks feed, they release anticoagulants, anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive molecules that mediate the formation of the feeding lesion on the mammalian host. A number of KPIs have been isolated and characterized from tick salivary gland extracts. Interestingly, we observe little D. variabilis KPI gene expression in the salivary gland and abundant expression in the midgut. However, our demonstration of D. variabilis KPI's anticoagulant properties indicates that D. variabilis KPI may be important for blood meal digestion in the midgut. In addition to facilitating long-term attachment and blood meal acquisition, gene expression studies of Drosophila, legumes, and ticks suggest that KPIs play some role in the response to microbial infection. Similarly, in this study, we show that challenge of D. variabilis with the spotted fever group rickettsia, Rickettsia montanensis, results in sustained D. variabilis KPI gene expression in the midgut. Furthermore, our in vitro studies show that D. variabilis KPI limits rickettsial colonization of L929 cells (mouse fibroblasts), implicating D. variabilis KPI as a bacteriostatic protein, a property that may be related to D. variabilis KPI's trypsin inhibitory capability. This work suggests that anticoagulants play some role in the midgut during feeding and that D. variabilis KPI may be involved as part of the tick's defense response to rickettsiae.

  6. Functional Characterization and Novel Rickettsiostatic Effects of a Kunitz-Type Serine Protease Inhibitor from the Tick Dermacentor variabilis▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceraul, Shane M.; Dreher-Lesnick, Sheila M.; Mulenga, Albert; Rahman, M. Sayeedur; Azad, Abdu F.

    2008-01-01

    Here we report the novel bacteriostatic function of a five-domain Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitor (KPI) from the tick Dermacentor variabilis. As ticks feed, they release anticoagulants, anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive molecules that mediate the formation of the feeding lesion on the mammalian host. A number of KPIs have been isolated and characterized from tick salivary gland extracts. Interestingly, we observe little D. variabilis KPI gene expression in the salivary gland and abundant expression in the midgut. However, our demonstration of D. variabilis KPI's anticoagulant properties indicates that D. variabilis KPI may be important for blood meal digestion in the midgut. In addition to facilitating long-term attachment and blood meal acquisition, gene expression studies of Drosophila, legumes, and ticks suggest that KPIs play some role in the response to microbial infection. Similarly, in this study, we show that challenge of D. variabilis with the spotted fever group rickettsia, Rickettsia montanensis, results in sustained D. variabilis KPI gene expression in the midgut. Furthermore, our in vitro studies show that D. variabilis KPI limits rickettsial colonization of L929 cells (mouse fibroblasts), implicating D. variabilis KPI as a bacteriostatic protein, a property that may be related to D. variabilis KPI's trypsin inhibitory capability. This work suggests that anticoagulants play some role in the midgut during feeding and that D. variabilis KPI may be involved as part of the tick's defense response to rickettsiae. PMID:18779339

  7. Cell-type specific mechanisms of D-serine uptake and release in the brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magalie eMartineau

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence during the last decade established that D-serine is a key signaling molecule utilized by neurons and astroglia in the mammalian central nervous system. D-serine is increasingly appreciated as the main physiological endogenous coagonist for synaptic NMDA receptors at central excitatory synapses; it is mandatory for long-term changes in synaptic strength, memory, learning, and social interactions. Alterations in the extracellular levels of D-serine leading to disrupted cell-cell signaling are a trademark of many chronic or acute neurological (i.e. Alzheimer disease, epilepsy, stroke and psychiatric (i.e. schizophrenia disorders, and are associated with addictive behavior (i.e. cocaine addiction. Indeed, fine tuning of the extracellular levels of D-serine, achieved by various molecular machineries and signaling pathways, is necessary for maintenance of accurate NMDA receptor functions. Here, we review the experimental data supporting the notion that astroglia and neurons use different pathways to regulate levels of extracellular D-serine.

  8. Molecular characterization of serine protease inhibitor isoform 3, SmSPI, from Schistosoma mansoni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakchotanon, Pattarakul; Molee, Patamaporn; Nuamtanong, Supaporn; Limpanont, Yanin; Chusongsang, Phiraphol; Limsomboon, Jareemate; Chusongsang, Yupa; Maneewatchararangsri, Santi; Chaisri, Urai; Adisakwattana, Poom

    2016-08-01

    Serine protease inhibitors, known as serpins, are pleiotropic regulators of endogenous and exogenous proteases, and molecule transporters. They have been documented in animals, plants, fungi, bacteria, and viruses; here, we characterize a serpin from the trematode platyhelminth Schistosoma mansoni. At least eight serpins have been found in the genome of S. mansoni, but only two have characterized molecular properties and functions. Here, the function of S. mansoni serpin isoform 3 (SmSPI) was analyzed, using both computational and molecular biological approaches. Phylogenetic analysis showed that SmSPI was closely related to Schistosoma haematobium serpin and Schistosoma japonicum serpin B10. Structure determined in silico confirmed that SmSPI belonged to the serpin superfamily, containing nine α-helices, three β-sheets, and a reactive central loop. SmSPI was highly expressed in schistosomules, predominantly in the head gland, and in adult male and female with intensive accumulation on the spines, which suggests that it may have a role in facilitating intradermal and intravenous survival. Recombinant SmSPI was overexpressed in Escherichia coli; the recombinant protein was of the same size (46 kDa) as the native protein. Immunological analysis suggested that mice infected with S. mansoni responded to rSmSPI at 8 weeks postinfection (wpi) but not earlier. The inhibitory activity of rSmSPI was specific to chymotrypsin but not trypsin, neutrophil elastase, and porcine pancreatic elastase. Elucidating the biological and physiological functions of SmSPI as well as other serpins will lead to further understanding of host-parasite interaction machinery that may provide novel strategies to prevent and control schistosomiasis in the future.

  9. Human Cystathionine-β-Synthase Phosphorylation on Serine227 Modulates Hydrogen Sulfide Production in Human Urothelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta d'Emmanuele di Villa Bianca

    Full Text Available Urothelium, the epithelial lining the inner surface of human bladder, plays a key role in bladder physiology and pathology. It responds to chemical, mechanical and thermal stimuli by releasing several factors and mediators. Recently it has been shown that hydrogen sulfide contributes to human bladder homeostasis. Hydrogen sulfide is mainly produced in human bladder by the action of cystathionine-β-synthase. Here, we demonstrate that human cystathionine-β-synthase activity is regulated in a cGMP/PKG-dependent manner through phosphorylation at serine 227. Incubation of human urothelium or T24 cell line with 8-Bromo-cyclic-guanosine monophosphate (8-Br-cGMP but not dibutyryl-cyclic-adenosine monophosphate (d-cAMP causes an increase in hydrogen sulfide production. This result is congruous with the finding that PKG is robustly expressed but PKA only weakly present in human urothelium as well as in T24 cells. The cGMP/PKG-dependent phosphorylation elicited by 8-Br-cGMP is selectively reverted by KT5823, a specific PKG inhibitor. Moreover, the silencing of cystathionine-β-synthase in T24 cells leads to a marked decrease in hydrogen sulfide production either in basal condition or following 8-Br-cGMP challenge. In order to identify the phosphorylation site, recombinant mutant proteins of cystathionine-β-synthase in which Ser32, Ser227 or Ser525 was mutated in Ala were generated. The Ser227Ala mutant cystathionine-β-synthase shows a notable reduction in basal biosynthesis of hydrogen sulfide becoming unresponsive to the 8-Br-cGMP challenge. A specific antibody that recognizes the phosphorylated form of cystathionine-β-synthase has been produced and validated by using T24 cells and human urothelium. In conclusion, human cystathionine-β-synthase can be phosphorylated in a PKG-dependent manner at Ser227 leading to an increased catalytic activity.

  10. The structure of Plasmodium falciparum serine hydroxymethyltransferase reveals a novel redox switch that regulates its activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chitnumsub, Penchit, E-mail: penchit@biotec.or.th; Ittarat, Wanwipa; Jaruwat, Aritsara; Noytanom, Krittikar [National Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, 113 Thailand Science Park, Paholyothin Road, Klong 1, Klong Luang, Pathumthani 12120 (Thailand); Amornwatcharapong, Watcharee [Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Pornthanakasem, Wichai [National Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, 113 Thailand Science Park, Paholyothin Road, Klong 1, Klong Luang, Pathumthani 12120 (Thailand); Chaiyen, Pimchai [Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Yuthavong, Yongyuth; Leartsakulpanich, Ubolsree, E-mail: penchit@biotec.or.th [National Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, 113 Thailand Science Park, Paholyothin Road, Klong 1, Klong Luang, Pathumthani 12120 (Thailand)

    2014-06-01

    The crystal structure of P. falciparum SHMT revealed snapshots of an intriguing disulfide/sulfhydryl switch controlling the functional activity. Plasmodium falciparum serine hydroxymethyltransferase (PfSHMT), an enzyme in the dTMP synthesis cycle, is an antimalarial target because inhibition of its expression or function has been shown to be lethal to the parasite. As the wild-type enzyme could not be crystallized, protein engineering of residues on the surface was carried out. The surface-engineered mutant PfSHMT-F292E was successfully crystallized and its structure was determined at 3 Å resolution. The PfSHMT-F292E structure is a good representation of PfSHMT as this variant revealed biochemical properties similar to those of the wild type. Although the overall structure of PfSHMT is similar to those of other SHMTs, unique features including the presence of two loops and a distinctive cysteine pair formed by Cys125 and Cys364 in the tetrahydrofolate (THF) substrate binding pocket were identified. These structural characteristics have never been reported in other SHMTs. Biochemical characterization and mutation analysis of these two residues confirm that they act as a disulfide/sulfhydryl switch to regulate the THF-dependent catalytic function of the enzyme. This redox switch is not present in the human enzyme, in which the cysteine pair is absent. The data reported here can be further exploited as a new strategy to specifically disrupt the activity of the parasite enzyme without interfering with the function of the human enzyme.

  11. Introduction of the Serine Green Fluorescent Protein (SGFP) Gene Into Pyricularia Grisea Race Dc4 Isolated From Digitaria Ciliaris Using Agrobacterium Tumefaciens-mediated Genetic Transformation

    OpenAIRE

    Stephanie, Stephanie; Widyastuti, Utut; Wiyono, Suryo

    2015-01-01

    Gene serin Green Fluorescent Protein (sGFP) has been used to monitor gene expression specific tagged proteins that has implication for fungal cell study. This research aimed to introduce sGFP gene into genome of P. grisea dc4 from D. ciliaris using A. tumefaciens. Plasmid sGFP was introduced into A. tumefaciens by triparental mating method (TPM). Genetic transformation was performed by co-cultivating spore P. grisea dc4 with A. tumefaciens LBA4404–pCAMB-sGFP. Pyricularia grisea dc4 transforma...

  12. Characterization of a cryptic plasmid pSM429 and its application for heterologous expression in psychrophilic Pseudoalteromonas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Bo

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pseudoalteromonas is an important genus widespread in marine environment, and a lot of psychrophilic Pseudoalteromonas strains thrive in deep sea and polar sea. By now, there are only a few genetic systems for Pseudoalteromonas reported and no commercial Pseudoalteromonas genetic system is available, which impedes the study of Pseudoalteromonas, especially for psychrophilic strains. The aim of this study is to develop a heterologous expression system for psychrophilic Pseudoalteromonas. Results A cryptic plasmid pSM429 isolated from psychrophilic Pseudoalteromonas sp. BSi20429 from the Arctic sea ice, was sequenced and characterized. The plasmid pSM429 is 3874 bp in length, with a G+C content of 28%. Four putative open reading frames (ORFs were identified on pSM429. Based on homology, the ORF4 was predicted to encode a replication initiation (Rep protein. A shuttle vector (Escherichia coli, Pseudoalteromonas, pWD, was constructed by ligating pSM429 and pUC19 and inserting a chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT cassette conferring chloramphenicol resistance. To determine the minimal replicon of pSM429 and to check the functionality of identified ORFs, various pWD derivatives were constructed. All derivatives except the two smallest ones were shown to allow replication in Pseudoalteromonas sp. SM20429, a plasmid-cured strain of Pseudoalteromonas sp. BSi20429, suggesting that the orf4 and its flanking intergenic regions are essential for plasmid replication. Although not essential, the sequence including some repeats between orf1 and orf2 plays important roles in segregational stability of the plasmid. With the aid of pWD-derived plasmid pWD2, the erythromycin resistance gene and the cd gene encoding the catalytic domain of a cold-adapted cellulase were successfully expressed in Pseudoalteromonas sp. SM20429. Conclusions Plasmid pSM429 was isolated and characterized, and the regions essential for plasmid replication and

  13. Downregulation of serine protease HTRA1 is associated with poor survival in breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Lehner

    Full Text Available HTRA1 is a highly conserved serine protease which has been implicated in suppression of epithelial-to-mesenchymal-transition (EMT and cell motility in breast cancer. Its prognostic relevance for breast cancer is unclear so far. Therefore, we evaluated the impact of HTRA1 mRNA expression on patient outcome using a cohort of 131 breast cancer patients as well as a validation cohort including 2809 publically available data sets. Additionally, we aimed at investigating for the presence of promoter hypermethylation as a mechanism for silencing the HTRA1 gene in breast tumors. HTRA1 downregulation was detected in more than 50% of the breast cancer specimens and was associated with higher tumor stage (p = 0.025. By applying Cox proportional hazard models, we observed favorable overall (OS and disease-free survival (DFS related to high HTRA1 expression (HR = 0.45 [CI 0.23-0.90], p = 0.023; HR = 0.55 [CI 0.32-0.94], p = 0.028, respectively, with even more pronounced impact in node-positive patients (HR = 0.21 [CI 0.07-0.63], p = 0.006; HR = 0.29 [CI 0.13-0.65], p = 0.002, respectively. Moreover, HTRA1 remained a statistically significant factor predicting DFS among established clinical parameters in the multivariable analysis. Its impact on patient outcome was independently confirmed in the validation set (for relapse-free survival (n = 2809: HR = 0.79 [CI 0.7-0.9], log-rank p = 0.0003; for OS (n = 971: HR = 0.63 [CI 0.48-0.83], log-rank p = 0.0009. In promoter analyses, we in fact detected methylation of HTRA1 in a small subset of breast cancer specimens (two out of a series of 12, and in MCF-7 breast cancer cells which exhibited 22-fold lower HTRA1 mRNA expression levels compared to unmethylated MDA-MB-231 cells. In conclusion, we show that downregulation of HTRA1 is associated with shorter patient survival, particularly in node-positive breast cancer. Since HTRA1 loss was demonstrated to

  14. Conservation of sequence and function in fertilization of the cortical granule serine protease in echinoderms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oulhen, Nathalie; Xu, Dongdong; Wessel, Gary M

    2014-08-01

    Conservation of the cortical granule serine protease during fertilization in echinoderms was tested both functionally in sea stars, and computationally throughout the echinoderm phylum. We find that the inhibitor of serine protease (soybean trypsin inhibitor) effectively blocks proper transition of the sea star fertilization envelope into a protective sperm repellent, whereas inhibitors of the other main types of proteases had no effect. Scanning the transcriptomes of 15 different echinoderm ovaries revealed sequences of high conservation to the originally identified sea urchin cortical serine protease, CGSP1. These conserved sequences contained the catalytic triad necessary for enzymatic activity, and the tandemly repeated LDLr-like repeats. We conclude that the protease involved in the slow block to polyspermy is an essential and conserved element of fertilization in echinoderms, and may provide an important reagent for identification and testing of the cell surface proteins in eggs necessary for sperm binding. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The role of serine proteases in the pathogenesis of bacterial infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Burchacka

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available An increasing resistance of pathogenic bacterial species has been considered as one of the major health problems worldwide. The discovery of novel protein targets and development of effective anti-bacterial therapeutics is of high need since for some extremely resistant pathogens we are simply left unarmed. One of new promising therapeutic strategy is the application of specific inhibitors targeting bacterial serine proteases. Pathogenic microorganisms secrete abroad range of hydrolases, including serine proteases which lead to activation of various virulence factors. Herein, we review the specific bacteria serine proteases which have an influence on pathogenicity of bacterial infection as well as we introduce the reader with a brief history of the subject.

  16. Serine-Dependent Sphingolipid Synthesis Is a Metabolic Liability of Aneuploid Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunyoung Hwang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Aneuploidy disrupts cellular homeostasis. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the physiological responses and adaptation to aneuploidy are not well understood. Deciphering these mechanisms is important because aneuploidy is associated with diseases, including intellectual disability and cancer. Although tumors and mammalian aneuploid cells, including several cancer cell lines, show altered levels of sphingolipids, the role of sphingolipids in aneuploidy remains unknown. Here, we show that ceramides and long-chain bases, sphingolipid molecules that slow proliferation and promote survival, are increased by aneuploidy. Sphingolipid levels are tightly linked to serine synthesis, and inhibiting either serine or sphingolipid synthesis can specifically impair the fitness of aneuploid cells. Remarkably, the fitness of aneuploid cells improves or deteriorates upon genetically decreasing or increasing ceramides, respectively. Combined targeting of serine and sphingolipid synthesis could be exploited to specifically target cancer cells, the vast majority of which are aneuploid.

  17. A tandem Kunitz protease inhibitor (KPI106)-serine carboxypeptidase (SCP1) controls mycorrhiza establishment and arbuscule development in Medicago truncatula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rech, Stefanie S; Heidt, Sven; Requena, Natalia

    2013-09-01

    Plant proteases and protease inhibitors are involved in plant developmental processes including those involving interactions with microbes. Here we show that a tandem between a Kunitz protease inhibitor (KPI106) and a serine carboxypeptidase (SCP1) controls arbuscular mycorrhiza development in the root cortex of Medicago truncatula. Both proteins are only induced during mycorrhiza formation and belong to large families whose members are also mycorrhiza-specific. Furthermore, the interaction between KPI106 and SCP1 analysed using the yeast two-hybrid system is specific, indicating that each family member might have a defined counterpart. In silico docking analysis predicted a putative P1 residue in KPI106 (Lys173) that fits into the catalytic pocket of SCP1, suggesting that KPI106 might inhibit the enzyme activity by mimicking the protease substrate. In vitro mutagenesis of the Lys173 showed that this residue is important in determining the strength and specificity of the interaction. The RNA interference (RNAi) inactivation of the serine carboxypeptidase SCP1 produces aberrant mycorrhizal development with an increased number of septated hyphae and degenerate arbuscules, a phenotype also observed when overexpressing KPI106. Protease and inhibitor are both secreted as observed when expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana epidermal cells. Taken together we envisage a model in which the protease SCP1 is secreted in the apoplast where it produces a peptide signal critical for proper fungal development within the root. KPI106 also at the apoplast would modulate the spatial and/or temporal activity of SCP1 by competing with the protease substrate. © 2013 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Re-introduction of transmembrane serine residues reduce the minimum pore diameter of channelrhodopsin-2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Richards

    Full Text Available Channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2 is a microbial-type rhodopsin found in the green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Under physiological conditions, ChR2 is an inwardly rectifying cation channel that permeates a wide range of mono- and divalent cations. Although this protein shares a high sequence homology with other microbial-type rhodopsins, which are ion pumps, ChR2 is an ion channel. A sequence alignment of ChR2 with bacteriorhodopsin, a proton pump, reveals that ChR2 lacks specific motifs and residues, such as serine and threonine, known to contribute to non-covalent interactions within transmembrane domains. We hypothesized that reintroduction of the eight transmembrane serine residues present in bacteriorhodopsin, but not in ChR2, will restrict the conformational flexibility and reduce the pore diameter of ChR2. In this work, eight single serine mutations were created at homologous positions in ChR2. Additionally, an endogenous transmembrane serine was replaced with alanine. We measured kinetics, changes in reversal potential, and permeability ratios in different alkali metal solutions using two-electrode voltage clamp. Applying excluded volume theory, we calculated the minimum pore diameter of ChR2 constructs. An analysis of the results from our experiments show that reintroducing serine residues into the transmembrane domain of ChR2 can restrict the minimum pore diameter through inter- and intrahelical hydrogen bonds while the removal of a transmembrane serine results in a larger pore diameter. Therefore, multiple positions along the intracellular side of the transmembrane domains contribute to the cation permeability of ChR2.

  19. l-Serine Enhances Light-Induced Circadian Phase Resetting in Mice and Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuo, Shinobu; Iwamoto, Ayaka; Lee, Sang-Il; Ochiai, Shotaro; Hitachi, Rina; Shibata, Satomi; Uotsu, Nobuo; Tarumizu, Chie; Matsuoka, Sayuri; Furuse, Mitsuhiro; Higuchi, Shigekazu

    2017-12-01

    Background: The circadian clock is modulated by the timing of ingestion or food composition, but the effects of specific nutrients are poorly understood.Objective: We aimed to identify the amino acids that modulate the circadian clock and reset the light-induced circadian phase in mice and humans.Methods: Male CBA/N mice were orally administered 1 of 20 l-amino acids, and the circadian and light-induced phase shifts of wheel-running activity were analyzed. Antagonists of several neurotransmitter pathways were injected before l-serine administration, and light-induced phase shifts were analyzed. In addition, the effect of l-serine on the light-induced phase advance was investigated in healthy male students (mean ± SD age 22.2 ± 1.8 y) by using dim-light melatonin onset (DLMO) determined by saliva samples as an index of the circadian phase.Results: l-Serine administration enhanced light-induced phase shifts in mice (1.86-fold; P light-dark cycle by 6 h, l-serine administration slightly accelerated re-entrainment to the shifted cycle. In humans, l-serine ingestion before bedtime induced significantly larger phase advances of DLMO after bright-light exposure during the morning (means ± SEMs-l-serine: 25.9 ± 6.6 min; placebo: 12.1 ± 7.0 min; P light-induced phase resetting in mice and humans, and it may be useful for treating circadian disturbances. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  20. A novel serine protease with caspase- and legumain-like activities from edible basidiomycete Flammulina velutipes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iketani, Aya; Nakamura, Mayumi; Suzuki, Yuya; Awai, Koichiro; Shioi, Yuzo

    2013-03-01

    A serine protease with caspase- and legumain-like activities from basidiocarps of the edible basidiomycete Flammulina velutipes was characterized. The protease was purified to near homogeneity by three steps of chromatography using acetyl-Tyr-Val-Ala-Asp-4-methylcoumaryl-7-amide (Ac-YVAD-MCA) as a substrate. The enzyme was termed FvSerP (F. velutipes serine protease). This enzyme activity was completely inhibited by the caspase-specific inhibitor, Ac-YVAD-CHO, as well as moderately inhibited by serine protease inhibitors. Based on the N-terminal sequence, the cDNA of FvSerP was identified. The deduced protease sequence was a peptide composed of 325 amino acids with a molecular mass of 34.5 kDa. The amino acid sequence of FvSerP showed similarity to neither caspases nor to the plant subtilisin-like serine protease with caspase-like activity called saspase. FvSerP shared identity to the functionally unknown genes from class of Agaricomycetes, with similarity to the peptidase S41 domain of a serine protease. It was thus concluded that this enzyme is likely a novel serine protease with caspase- and legumain-like activities belonging to the peptidase S41 family and distributed in the class Agaricomycetes. This enzyme possibly functions in autolysis, a type of programmed cell death that occurs in the later stages of development of basidiocarps with reference to their enzymatic functions. Copyright © 2013 The British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C Virus Replication Upregulates Serine Protease Inhibitor Kazal, Resulting in Cellular Resistance to Serine Protease-Dependent Apoptosis▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Lamontagne, Jason; Pinkerton, Mark; Timothy M Block; Lu, Xuanyong

    2009-01-01

    Hepatitis B and C viruses (HBV and HCV, respectively) are different and distinct viruses, but there are striking similarities in their disease potential. Infection by either virus can cause chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and ultimately, liver cancer, despite the fact that no pathogenetic mechanisms are known which are shared by the two viruses. Our recent studies have suggested that replication of either of these viruses upregulates a cellular protein called serine protease inhibitor Kaz...

  2. Serine-threonine protein kinase activation may be an effective target for reducing neuronal apoptosis after spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mu Jin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The signaling mechanisms underlying ischemia-induced nerve cell apoptosis are poorly understood. We investigated the effects of apoptosis-related signal transduction pathways following ischemic spinal cord injury, including extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK, serine-threonine protein kinase (Akt and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK signaling pathways. We established a rat model of acute spinal cord injury by inserting a catheter balloon in the left subclavian artery for 25 minutes. Rat models exhibited notable hindlimb dysfunction. Apoptotic cells were abundant in the anterior horn and central canal of the spinal cord. The number of apoptotic neurons was highest 48 hours post injury. The expression of phosphorylated Akt (p-Akt and phosphorylated ERK (p-ERK increased immediately after reperfusion, peaked at 4 hours (p-Akt or 2 hours (p-ERK, decreased at 12 hours, and then increased at 24 hours. Phosphorylated JNK expression reduced after reperfusion, increased at 12 hours to near normal levels, and then showed a downward trend at 24 hours. Pearson linear correlation analysis also demonstrated that the number of apoptotic cells negatively correlated with p-Akt expression. These findings suggest that activation of Akt may be a key contributing factor in the delay of neuronal apoptosis after spinal cord ischemia, particularly at the stage of reperfusion, and thus may be a target for neuronal protection and reduction of neuronal apoptosis after spinal cord injury.

  3. Novel compounds reducing IRS-1 serine phosphorylation for treatment of diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon-Szabó, Laura; Kokas, Márton; Greff, Zoltán; Boros, Sándor; Bánhegyi, Péter; Zsákai, Lilián; Szántai-Kis, Csaba; Vantus, Tibor; Mandl, József; Bánhegyi, Gábor; Vályi-Nagy, István; Őrfi, László; Ullrich, Axel; Csala, Miklós; Kéri, György

    2016-01-15

    Activation of various interacting stress kinases, particularly the c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK), and a concomitant phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1) at serine 307 play a central role both in insulin resistance and in β-cell dysfunction. IRS-1 phosphorylation is stimulated by elevated free fatty acid levels through different pathways in obesity. A series of novel pyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidin-7-one derivatives were synthesized as potential antidiabetic agents, preventing IRS-1 phosphorylation at serine 307 in a cellular model of lipotoxicity and type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The action of neutrophil serine proteases on elastin and its precursor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinz, Andrea; Jung, Michael C; Jahreis, Günther

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the degradation of the natural substrates tropoelastin and elastin by the neutrophil-derived serine proteases human leukocyte elastase (HLE), proteinase 3 (PR3) and cathepsin G (CG). Focus was placed on determining their cleavage site specificities using mass....... CG shows a strong preference for the charged amino acid Lys at P(1) in tropoelastin, whereas Lys was not identified at P(1) in CG digests of elastin due to extensive cross-linking at Lys residues in mature elastin. All three serine proteases showed a clear preference for Pro at P(2) and P(4...

  5. Characterisation of an extracellular serine protease gene (nasp gene) from Dermatophilus congolensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Sanchez, Alfredo; Cerrato, Rosario; Larrasa, Jose; Ambrose, Nicholas C; Parra, Alberto; Alonso, Juan M; Hermoso-de-Mendoza, Miguel; Rey, Joaquin M; Mine, Madisa O; Carnegie, Patrick R; Ellis, Trevor M; Masters, Anne M; Pemberton, Alan D; Hermoso-de-Mendoza, Javier

    2004-02-09

    A partial amino acid sequence of a serine protease from Dermatophilus congolensis allowed the design of oligonucleotide primers that were complemented with additional ones from previously published partial sequences of the gene encoding the enzyme. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR), using combinations of specific and degenerate oligonucleotide primers, allowed the amplification of a 1738-bp internal fragment of the gene, which was finally characterised by inverse PCR as the first full-length sequenced serine protease gene (nasp) from Dermatophilus congolensis. The deduced amino acid sequence of this enzyme, probably involved in the pathogenesis of dermatophilosis, links it to the subtilisin family of proteases.

  6. Characterization of a novel filarial serine protease inhibitor, Ov-SPI-1, from Onchocerca volvulus, with potential multifunctional roles during development of the parasite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Louise; Guiliano, David B; Oksov, Yelena; Debnath, Asim K; Liu, Jing; Williams, Steven A; Blaxter, Mark L; Lustigman, Sara

    2005-12-09

    A novel filarial serine protease inhibitor (SPI) from the human parasitic nematode Onchocerca volvulus, Ov-SPI-1, was identified through the analysis of a molting third-stage larvae expressed sequence tag dataset. Subsequent analysis of the expressed sequence tag datasets of O. volvulus and other filariae identified four other members of this family. These proteins are related to the low molecular weight SPIs originally isolated from Ascaris suum where they are believed to protect the parasite from host intestinal proteases. The two Ov-spi transcripts are up-regulated in the molting larvae and adult stages of the development of the parasite. Recombinant Ov-SPI-1 is an active inhibitor of serine proteases, specifically elastase, chymotrypsin, and cathepsin G. Immunolocalization of the Ov-SPI proteins demonstrates that the endogenous proteins are localized to the basal layer of the cuticle of third-stage, molting third-stage, and fourth-stage larvae, the body channels and multivesicular bodies of third-stage larvae and the processed material found between the two cuticles during molting. In O. volvulus adult worms the Ov-SPI proteins are localized to the sperm and to eggshells surrounding the developing embryos. RNA interference targeting the Ov-spi genes resulted in the specific knockdown of the transcript levels of both Ov-spi-1 and Ov-spi-2, a loss of native proteins, and a significant reduction in both molting and viability of third-stage larvae. We suggest the Ov-SPI proteins play a vital role in nematode molting by controlling the activity of an endogenous serine protease(s). The localization data in adults also indicate that these inhibitors may be involved in other processes such as embryogenesis and spermatogenesis.

  7. Copine-I: Modulator of NF-kappa B Transcription and Prostate Cancer Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    graph) or the protein level (lower panel, IB- western blot). Again, the inhibitory effects of GCN5 were synergized by concurrent expression of...were created by site directed mutagenesis (Stratagene). Synthetic siRNA oligonucleotides against Chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (a control

  8. Reprogramming One-Carbon Metabolic Pathways To Decouple l-Serine Catabolism from Cell Growth in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yun; Shang, Xiuling; Lai, Shujuan; Zhang, Yu; Hu, Qitiao; Chai, Xin; Wang, Bo; Liu, Shuwen; Wen, Tingyi

    2018-02-16

    l-Serine, the principal one-carbon source for DNA biosynthesis, is difficult for microorganisms to accumulate due to the coupling of l-serine catabolism and microbial growth. Here, we reprogrammed the one-carbon unit metabolic pathways in Corynebacterium glutamicum to decouple l-serine catabolism from cell growth. In silico model-based simulation showed a negative influence on glyA-encoding serine hydroxymethyltransferase flux with l-serine productivity. Attenuation of glyA transcription resulted in increased l-serine accumulation, and a decrease in purine pools, poor growth and longer cell shapes. The gcvTHP-encoded glycine cleavage (Gcv) system from Escherichia coli was introduced into C. glutamicum, allowing glycine-derived 13 CH 2 to be assimilated into intracellular purine synthesis, which resulted in an increased amount of one-carbon units. Gcv introduction not only restored cell viability and morphology but also increased l-serine accumulation. Moreover, comparative proteomic analysis indicated that abundance changes of the enzymes involved in one-carbon unit cycles might be responsible for maintaining one-carbon unit homeostasis. Reprogramming of the one-carbon metabolic pathways allowed cells to reach a comparable growth rate to accumulate 13.21 g/L l-serine by fed-batch fermentation in minimal medium. This novel strategy provides new insights into the regulation of cellular properties and essential metabolite accumulation by introducing an extrinsic pathway.

  9. Serine protease immunohistochemistry and lectin histochemistry in the small intestine of weaned and unweaned pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brown, P J; Poulsen, Steen Seier; Wells, M

    1991-01-01

    The distribution of goblet cells containing serine protease and of those binding the lectin Ulex europaeus agglutinin-1 (UEA-1) in the pig small intestine is altered during the period after weaning. Goblet cells exhibiting binding of other lectins were not altered. These alterations and other cha...

  10. Identification and purification of O-acetyl-L-serine sulphhydrylase in Penicillium chrysogenum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    østergaard, Simon; Theilgaard, Hanne Birgitte; Nielsen, Jens Bredal

    1998-01-01

    We have demonstrated that Penicillium chrysogenum possesses the L-cysteine biosynthetic enzyme O-acetyI-L-serine sulphhydrylase (EC 4.2.99.8) of the direct sulphhydrylation pathway. The finding of this enzyme, and thus the presence of the direct sulphhydrylation pathway in P. chrysogenum, creates...

  11. Localization of a new serine protease, ingobsin, in goblet cells in rat, pig and man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Steen Seier; Nexø, Ebba

    1985-01-01

    A serine protease, ingobsin, that cleaves Lys-x and Arg-x, has been purified from rat duodenal tissue. By immunohistochemical methods, the enzyme was localized in goblet cells in the small intestine of rat, pig, and man. The immunoreactive cells were most numerous in the proximal part of the inte...

  12. Mannan-binding lectin and MBL-associated serine protease-2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, J.; Ytting, H.; Steffensen, R.M.

    2008-01-01

    be used for detection, evaluation of prognosis, therapy selection and monitoring. The serum proteins of the innate immune system mannan-binding lectin (MBL) and MBL-associated serine protease-2 (MASP-2) are novel biomarkers under validation in CRC. Low preoperative MBL levels are predictive of pneumonia...

  13. Molecular Recognition of Cobalt(III)-ligated Peptides by Serine Proteases: The Role of Electrostatic Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Sven; Wagner, Kim

    1998-01-01

    A series of peptides with a positively charged cobalt(III)-complex group attached to the carboxylate terminal was synthesized. The behaviour of these metallopeptides as acceptor nucleophiles in acyl transfer reactions catalyzed by the three serine proteases bovine pancreatic à-chymotrypsin, porcine...

  14. Homology modelling and protein engineering strategy of subtilases, the family of subtilisin-like serine proteinases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siezen, Roland J.; Vos, Willem M. de; Leunissen, Jack A.M.; Dijkstra, Bauke W.

    1991-01-01

    Subtilases are members of the family of subtilisin-like serine proteases. Presently, >50 subtilases are known, >40 of which with their complete amino acid sequences. We have compared these sequences and the available three-dimensional structures (subtilisin BPN', subtilisin Carlsberg, thermitase and

  15. CSF d-serine concentrations are similar in Alzheimer's disease, other dementias, and elderly controls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biemans, E.A.L.M.; Verhoeven-Duif, N.M.; Gerrits, J.; Claassen, J.A.H.R.; Kuiperij, H.B.; Verbeek, M.M.

    2016-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of d-serine were recently reported as a potential new biomarker for Alzheimer's disease (AD), showing a perfect distinction between AD patients and healthy controls. In this study, we aimed to confirm these results and extend these previous findings to dementia with

  16. CSF d-serine concentrations are similar in Alzheimer's disease, other dementias, and elderly controls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biemans, Elisanne A L M; Verhoeven-Duif, Nanda M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/310926556; Gerrits, Johan; Claassen, Jurgen A H R; Kuiperij, H Bea; Verbeek, Marcel M

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of d-serine were recently reported as a potential new biomarker for Alzheimer's disease (AD), showing a perfect distinction between AD patients and healthy controls. In this study, we aimed to confirm these results and extend these previous findings to dementia with

  17. Crystal structure of the high-alkaline serine protease PB92 from Bacillus alcalophilus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Laan, J.M.; Teplyakov, A.V.; Kelders, H.; Kalk, K.H.; Misset, O.; Mulleners, L.J.S.M.; Dijkstra, B.W.

    The crystal structure of a serine protease from the alkalophilic strain Bacillus alcalophilus PB92 has been determined by X-ray diffraction at 1.75 Å resolution. The structure has been solved by molecular replacement using the atomic model of subtilisin Carlsberg. The model of the PB92 protease has

  18. HOMOLOGY MODELING AND PROTEIN ENGINEERING STRATEGY OF SUBTILASES, THE FAMILY OF SUBTILISIN-LIKE SERINE PROTEINASES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SIEZEN, RJ; DEVOS, WM; LEUNISSEN, JAM

    1991-01-01

    Subtilases are members of the family of subtilisin-like serine proteases. Presently, > 50 subtilases are known, > 40 of which with their complete amino acid sequences. We have compared these sequences and the available three-dimensional structures (subtilisin BPN', subtilisin Carlsberg, thermitase

  19. The first CUB-domain containing serine protease from Chlamys farreri which might be involved in larval development and immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chuanyan; Wang, Leilei; Zhang, Huan; Yi, Qilin; Wang, Lingling; Wang, Hao; Song, Linsheng

    2017-11-01

    Serine proteases (SPs) are one of the most well understood enzyme families, which play an important role in regulating many physiological events. In the present study, one CUB-domain containing serine protease was identified from Chlamys farreri (designated as CfCUBSP). The full-length cDNA of CfCUBSP was of 3181 bp with an open reading frame of 2688 bp encoding a polypeptide of 896 amino acids. CfCUBSP shared closer phylogenetic relationship with those multi-domain SPs which consisted of one SP domain, and different numbers of CUB domain and LDLa domain than other SPs. The mRNA transcripts of CfCUBSP were detected in all developmental stages with the highest expression level in fertilized eggs and the lowest in trochophore larvae. In adult scallop, the CfCUBSP mRNA could be detected in all examined tissues with the highest level in hepatopancreas, and CfCUBSP protein was dominantly located in the gills, hepatopancreas, gonad and kidney. The mRNA expression of CfCUBSP in hemocytes was significantly up-regulated after the stimulation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), peptidoglycan (PGN) and β-glucan (GLU) (P < 0.05). All the results collectively indicated that CfCUBSP was a primitive member of the invertebrate SPs which might be involved in larval development and immune response against Gram-negative (G-) and Gram-positive (G+) bacteria and fungus in scallop. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Distinct biochemical properties of human serine hydroxymethyltransferase compared with the Plasmodium enzyme: implications for selective inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinthong, Chatchadaporn; Maenpuen, Somchart; Amornwatcharapong, Watcharee; Yuthavong, Yongyuth; Leartsakulpanich, Ubolsree; Chaiyen, Pimchai

    2014-06-01

    Serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT) catalyzes the transfer of a hydroxymethyl group from l-serine to tetrahydrofolate to yield glycine and 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate. Our previous investigations have shown that SHMTs from Plasmodium spp. (P. falciparum, Pf; P. vivax, Pv) are different from the enzyme from rabbit liver in that Plasmodium SHMT can use d-serine as a substrate. In this report, the biochemical and biophysical properties of the Plasmodium and the human cytosolic form (hcSHMT) enzymes including ligand binding and kinetics were investigated. The data indicate that, similar to Plasmodium enzymes, hcSHMT can use d-serine as a substrate. However, hcSHMT displays many properties that are different from those of the Plasmodium enzymes. The molar absorption coefficient of hcSHMT-bound pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PLP) is much greater than PvSHMT-bound or PfSHMT-bound PLP. The binding interactions of hcSHMT and Plasmodium SHMT with d-serine are different, as only the Plasmodium enzyme undergoes formation of a quinonoid-like species upon binding to d-serine. Furthermore, it has been noted that hcSHMT displays strong substrate inhibition by tetrahydrofolate (THF) (at THF > 40 μm), compared with SHMTs from Plasmodium and other species. The pH-activity profile of hcSHMT shows higher activities at lower pH values corresponding to a pKa value of 7.8 ± 0.1. Thiosemicarbazide reacts with hcSHMT following a one-step model [k1 of 12 ± 0.6 m(-1) ·s(-1) and k-1 of (1.0 ± 0.6) × 10(-3) s(-1) ], while the same reaction with PfSHMT involves at least three steps. All data indicated that the ligand binding environment of SHMT from human and Plasmodium are different, indicating that it should be possible to develop species-selective inhibitors in future studies. serine hydroxymethyltransferase, EC 2.1.2.1; 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase, EC 1.5.1.5. © 2014 FEBS.

  1. Cathelicidin, kallikrein 5, and serine protease activity is inhibited during treatment of rosacea with azelaic acid 15% gel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coda, Alvin B.; Hata, Tissa; Miller, Jeremiah; Audish, David; Kotol, Paul; Two, Aimee; Shafiq, Faiza; Yamasaki, Kenshi; Harper, Julie C.; Del Rosso, James Q.; Gallo, Richard L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Excess cathelicidin and kallikrein 5 (KLK5) have been hypothesized to play a role in the pathophysiology of rosacea. Objective We sought to evaluate the effects of azelaic acid (AzA) on these elements of the innate immune system. Methods Gene expression and protease activity were measured in laboratory models and patients with rosacea during a 16-week multicenter, prospective, open-label study of 15% AzA gel. Results AzA directly inhibited KLK5 in cultured keratinocytes and gene expression of KLK5, Toll-like receptor-2, and cathelicidin in mouse skin. Patients with rosacea showed reduction in cathelicidin and KLK5 messenger RNA after treatment with AzA gel. Subjects without rosacea had lower serine protease activity (SPA) than patients with rosacea. Distinct subsets of patients with rosacea who had high and low baseline SPA were identified, and patients with high baseline exhibited a statistically significant reduction of SPA with 15% AzA gel treatment. Limitations Study size was insufficient to predict clinical efficacy based on the innate immune response to AzA. Conclusions These results show that cathelicidin and KLK5 decrease in association with AZA exposure. Our observations suggest a new mechanism of action for AzA and that SPA may be a useful biomarker for disease activity. PMID:23871720

  2. Detection and characterization of serine and threonine hydroxyl protons in Bacillus circulans xylanase by NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockerman, Jacob A; Okon, Mark; McIntosh, Lawrence P

    2014-01-01

    Hydroxyl protons on serine and threonine residues are not well characterized in protein structures determined by both NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography. In the case of NMR spectroscopy, this is in large part because hydroxyl proton signals are usually hidden under crowded regions of (1)H-NMR spectra and remain undetected by conventional heteronuclear correlation approaches that rely on strong one-bond (1)H-(15)N or (1)H-(13)C couplings. However, by filtering against protons directly bonded to (13)C or (15)N nuclei, signals from slowly-exchanging hydroxyls can be observed in the (1)H-NMR spectrum of a uniformly (13)C/(15)N-labeled protein. Here we demonstrate the use of a simple selective labeling scheme in combination with long-range heteronuclear scalar correlation experiments as an easy and relatively inexpensive way to detect and assign these hydroxyl proton signals. Using auxtrophic Escherichia coli strains, we produced Bacillus circulans xylanase (BcX) labeled with (13)C/(15)N-serine or (13)C/(15)N-threonine. Signals from two serine and three threonine hydroxyls in these protein samples were readily observed via (3)JC-OH couplings in long-range (13)C-HSQC spectra. These scalar couplings (~5-7 Hz) were measured in a sample of uniformly (13)C/(15)N-labeled BcX using a quantitative (13)C/(15)N-filtered spin-echo difference experiment. In a similar approach, the threonine and serine hydroxyl hydrogen exchange kinetics were measured using a (13)C/(15)N-filtered CLEANEX-PM pulse sequence. Collectively, these experiments provide insights into the structural and dynamic properties of several serine and threonine hydroxyls within this model protein.

  3. Serine/Threonine Kinase 35, a Target Gene of STAT3, Regulates the Proliferation and Apoptosis of Osteosarcoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong Wu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Serine/threonine kinase 35 (STK35 may be associated with Parkinson disease and human colorectal cancer, but there have been no reports on the expression levels or roles of STK35 in osteosarcoma. Methods: STK35 mRNA expression was determined in osteosarcoma and bone cyst tissues by real-time PCR. Cell proliferation and apoptosis were assessed by Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8 assay and flow cytometry analysis, respectively. Results: STK35 was up-regulated in osteosarcoma tissues as indicated by analyzing publicly available expression data (GEO dataset E-MEXP-3628 and real-time PCR analysis on our own cohort. We subsequently investigated the effects of STK35 knockdown on two osteosarcoma cell lines, MG63 and U2OS. STK35 knockdown inhibited the growth of osteosarcoma cells in vitro and in xenograft tumors. Meanwhile, STK35 knockdown enhanced apoptosis. Expression of the active forms and the activity of two major executioner caspases, caspase 3 and caspase 7, were also increased in osteosarcoma cells with STK35 silenced. Additionally, Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA identified that the JAK/STAT signaling pathway was positively correlated with STK35 expression. The mRNA expression of STK35 was repressed by STAT3 small interfering RNA (siRNA, but not by siRNA of STAT4, STAT5A or STAT6. A luciferase reporter assay further demonstrated that STAT3 transcriptionally regulated STK35 expression. A chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP assay confirmed the direct recruitment of STAT3 to the STK35 promoter. The promotion effects of STAT3 knockdown on cell apoptosis were partially abolished by STK35 overexpression. Furthermore, STK35 mRNA expression was positively correlated with STAT3 mRNA expression in osteosarcoma tissues by Pearson correlation analysis. Conclusions: These results collectively reveal that STAT3 regulates the transcription of STK35 in osteosarcoma. STK35 may exert an oncogenic role in osteosarcoma.

  4. Roles of serine and threonine residues of mumps virus P protein in viral transcription and replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickar, Adrian; Xu, Pei; Elson, Andrew; Li, Zhuo; Zengel, James; He, Biao

    2014-04-01

    Mumps virus (MuV), a paramyxovirus containing a negative-sense nonsegmented RNA genome, is a human pathogen that causes an acute infection with symptoms ranging from parotitis to mild meningitis and severe encephalitis. Vaccination against mumps virus has been effective in reducing mumps cases. However, recently large outbreaks have occurred in vaccinated populations. There is no anti-MuV drug. Understanding replication of MuV may lead to novel antiviral strategies. MuV RNA-dependent RNA polymerase minimally consists of the phosphoprotein (P) and the large protein (L). The P protein is heavily phosphorylated. To investigate the roles of serine (S) and threonine (T) residues of P in viral RNA transcription and replication, P was subjected to mass spectrometry and mutational analysis. P, a 392-amino acid residue protein, has 64 S and T residues. We have found that mutating nine S/T residues significantly reduced and mutating residue T at 101 to A (T101A) significantly enhanced activity in a minigenome system. A recombinant virus containing the P-T101A mutation (rMuV-P-T101A) was recovered and analyzed. rMuV-P-T101A grew to higher titers and had increased protein expression at early time points. Together, these results suggest that phosphorylation of MuV-P-T101 plays a negative role in viral RNA synthesis. This is the first time that the P protein of a paramyxovirus has been systematically analyzed for S/T residues that are critical for viral RNA synthesis. Mumps virus (MuV) is a reemerging paramyxovirus that caused large outbreaks in the United States, where vaccination coverage is very high. There is no anti-MuV drug. In this work, we have systematically analyzed roles of Ser/Thr residues of MuV P in viral RNA synthesis. We have identified S/T residues of P critical for MuV RNA synthesis and phosphorylation sites that are important for viral RNA synthesis. This work leads to a better understanding of viral RNA synthesis as well as to potential novel strategies to

  5. Amyloid precursor protein maintains constitutive and adaptive plasticity of dendritic spines in adult brain by regulating D-serine homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Chengyu; Crux, Sophie; Marinesco, Stephane; Montagna, Elena; Sgobio, Carmelo; Shi, Yuan; Shi, Song; Zhu, Kaichuan; Dorostkar, Mario M; Müller, Ulrike C; Herms, Jochen

    2016-10-17

    Dynamic synapses facilitate activity-dependent remodeling of neural circuits, thereby providing the structural substrate for adaptive behaviors. However, the mechanisms governing dynamic synapses in adult brain are still largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that in the cortex of adult amyloid precursor protein knockout (APP-KO) mice, spine formation and elimination were both reduced while overall spine density remained unaltered. When housed under environmental enrichment, APP-KO mice failed to respond with an increase in spine density. Spine morphology was also altered in the absence of APP The underlying mechanism of these spine abnormalities in APP-KO mice was ascribed to an impairment in D-serine homeostasis. Extracellular D-serine concentration was significantly reduced in APP-KO mice, coupled with an increase of total D-serine. Strikingly, chronic treatment with exogenous D-serine normalized D-serine homeostasis and restored the deficits of spine dynamics, adaptive plasticity, and morphology in APP-KO mice. The cognitive deficit observed in APP-KO mice was also rescued by D-serine treatment. These data suggest that APP regulates homeostasis of D-serine, thereby maintaining the constitutive and adaptive plasticity of dendritic spines in adult brain. © 2016 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY NC ND 4.0 license.

  6. Optimisation of freeze drying conditions for purified serine protease from mango (Mangifera indicaCv. Chokanan) peel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrnoush, Amid; Tan, Chin Ping; Hamed, Mirhosseini; Aziz, Norashikin Ab; Ling, Tau Chuan

    2011-09-01

    This study investigated the possible relationship between the encapsulation variables, namely serine protease content (9-50mg/ml, X1), Arabic gum (0.2-10%(w/w), X2), maltodextrin (2-5%(w/w), X3) and calcium chloride (1.3-5.5%(w/w), X4) on the enzymatic properties of encapsulated serine protease. The study demonstrated that Arabic gum, maltodextrin and calcium chloride, as coating agents, protected serine protease from activity loss during freeze-drying. The overall optimum region resulted in a suitable freeze drying condition with a yield of 92% for the encapsulated serine protease, were obtained using 29.5mg/ml serine protease content, 5.1%(w/w) Arabic gum, 3.5%(w/w) maltodextrin and 3.4%(w/w) calcium chloride. It was found that the interaction effect of Arabic gum and calcium chloride improved the serine protease activity, and Arabic gum was the most effective amongst the examined coating agents. Thus, Arabic gum should be considered as potential protection in freeze drying of serine protease. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Epigenetic silencing of serine protease HTRA1 drives polyploidy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Nina; Irle, Inga; Ripkens, Kamilla; Lux, Vanda; Nelles, Jasmin; Johannes, Christian; Parry, Lee; Greenow, Kirsty; Amir, Sarah; Campioni, Mara; Baldi, Alfonso; Oka, Chio; Kawaichi, Masashi; Clarke, Alan R; Ehrmann, Michael

    2016-07-07

    Increased numbers and improperly positioned centrosomes, aneuploidy or polyploidy, and chromosomal instability are frequently observed characteristics of cancer cells. While some aspects of these events and the checkpoint mechanisms are well studied, not all players have yet been identified. As the role of proteases other than the proteasome in tumorigenesis is an insufficiently addressed question, we investigated the epigenetic control of the widely conserved protease HTRA1 and the phenotypes of deregulation. Mouse embryonal fibroblasts and HCT116 and SW480 cells were used to study the mechanism of epigenetic silencing of HTRA1. In addition, using cell biological and genetic methods, the phenotypes of downregulation of HTRA1 expression were investigated. HTRA1 is epigenetically silenced in HCT116 colon carcinoma cells via the epigenetic adaptor protein MBD2. On the cellular level, HTRA1 depletion causes multiple phenotypes including acceleration of cell growth, centrosome amplification and polyploidy in SW480 colon adenocarcinoma cells as well as in primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). Downregulation of HTRA1 causes a number of phenotypes that are hallmarks of cancer cells suggesting that the methylation state of the HtrA1 promoter may be used as a biomarker for tumour cells or cells at risk of transformation.

  8. Phosphorylations of Serines 21/9 in Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3α/β Are Not Required for Cell Lineage Commitment or WNT Signaling in the Normal Mouse Intestine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiona Hey

    Full Text Available The WNT signalling pathway controls many developmental processes and plays a key role in maintenance of intestine renewal and homeostasis. Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3 (GSK3 is an important component of the WNT pathway and is involved in regulating β-catenin stability and expression of WNT target genes. The mechanisms underpinning GSK3 regulation in this context are not completely understood, with some evidence suggesting this occurs through inhibitory N-terminal serine phosphorylation in a similar way to GSK3 inactivation in insulin signaling. To investigate this in a physiologically relevant context, we have analysed the intestinal phenotype of GSK3 knockin mice in which N-terminal serines 21/9 of GSK3α/β have been mutated to non-phosphorylatable alanine residues. We show that these knockin mutations have very little effect on overall intestinal integrity, cell lineage commitment, β-catenin localization or WNT target gene expression although a small increase in apoptosis at villi tips is observed. Our results provide in vivo evidence that GSK3 is regulated through mechanisms independent of N-terminal serine phosphorylation in order for β-catenin to be stabilised.

  9. Screening of serine protease inhibitors with antimicrobial activity using iron oxide nanoparticles functionalized with dextran conjugated trypsin and in silico analyses of bacterial serine protease inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Santi M; Porto, William F; De, Debasis; Phule, Ajit; Korpole, Suresh; Ghosh, Ananta K; Roy, Sanat K; Franco, Octavio L

    2014-01-21

    Plants produce a variety of proteins and peptides which are involved in their defense against pathogens. Serine protease inhibitors are a well-established class of inhibitors correlated with plant defense. Increased levels of protease inhibitors delay cell damage and expand the cell's life-span. Recently, the rapid emergence of antibiotic-resistant microbial pathogens has prompted immense interest in purifying novel antimicrobial proteins or peptides from plant sources. Usually, the purification of protease inhibitors is accomplished by salt-extraction, ultrafiltration and affinity chromatography. Here, we developed a novel approach based on iron oxide nanoparticles conjugated to dextran functionalized with trypsin beads that accelerate the quick screening and purification of antimicrobial peptides with serine protease inhibitor activity. The method described here also works for screening other inhibitors using particular protein kinases, and it is therefore a novel tool for use as the leading method in the development of novel antimicrobial agents with protease inhibitory activity. Finally, and no less important, molecular modelling and dynamics studies of a homologous inhibitor studied here with Escherichia coli trypsin and chymotrypsin are provided in order to shed some light on inhibitor-enzyme interactions.

  10. Accumulation and Phosphorylation of RecQ-Mediated Genome Instability Protein 1 (RMI1 at Serine 284 and Serine 292 during Mitosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Xu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Chromosome instability usually leads to tumorigenesis. Bloom syndrome (BS is a genetic disease associated with chromosome instability. The BS gene product, BLM, has been reported to function in the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC to prevent chromosome instability. BTR complex, composed of BLM, topoisomerase IIIα (Topo IIIα, RMI1 (RecQ-mediated genome instability protein 1, BLAP75 and RMI2 (RecQ-mediated genome instability protein 2, BLAP18, is crucial for maintaining genome stability. Recent work has demonstrated that RMI2 also plays critical role in SAC. However, little is know about RMI1 regulation during the cell cycle. Here we present that RMI1 protein level does not change through G1, S and G2 phases, but significantly increases in M phase. Moreover, phosphorylation of RMI1 occurs in mitosis. Upon microtubule-disturbing agent, RMI1 is phosphorylated primarily at the sites of Serine 284 and Serine 292, which does not interfere with the formation of BTR complex. Additionally, this phosphorylation is partially reversed by roscovitine treatment, implying cycling-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1 might be one of the upstream kinases.

  11. Effect of the militarily-relevant heavy metals, depleted uranium and heavy metal tungsten-alloy on gene expression in human liver carcinoma cells (HepG2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Alexandra C; Brooks, Kia; Smith, Jan; Page, Natalie

    2004-01-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) and heavy-metal tungsten alloys (HMTAs) are dense heavy-metals used primarily in military applications. Chemically similar to natural uranium, but depleted of the higher activity 235U and 234U isotopes, DU is a low specific activity, high-density heavy metal. In contrast, the non-radioactive HMTAs are composed of a mixture of tungsten (91-93%), nickel (3-5%), and cobalt (2-4%) particles. The use of DU and HMTAs in military munitions could result in their internalization in humans. Limited data exist however, regarding the long-term health effects of internalized DU and HMTAs in humans. Both DU and HMTAs possess a tumorigenic transforming potential and are genotoxic and mutagenic in vitro. Using insoluble DU-UO2 and a reconstituted mixture of tungsten, nickel, cobalt (rWNiCo), we tested their ability to induce stress genes in thirteen different recombinant cell lines generated from human liver carcinoma cells (HepG2). The commercially available CAT-Tox (L) cellular assay consists of a panel of cell lines stably transfected with reporter genes consisting of a coding sequence for chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) under transcriptional control by mammalian stress gene regulatory sequences. DU, (5-50 microg/ml) produced a complex profile of activity demonstrating significant dose-dependent induction of the hMTIIA FOS, p53RE, Gadd153, Gadd45, NFkappaBRE, CRE, HSP70, RARE, and GRP78 promoters. The rWNiCo mixture (5-50 microg/ml) showed dose-related induction of the GSTYA, hMTIIA, p53RE, FOS, NFkappaBRE, HSP70, and CRE promoters. An examination of the pure metals, tungsten (W), nickel (Ni), and cobalt (Co), comprising the rWNiCo mixture, demonstrated that each metal exhibited a similar pattern of gene induction, but at a significantly decreased magnitude than that of the rWNiCo mixture. These data showed a synergistic activation of gene expression by the metals in the rWNiCo mixture. Our data show for the first time that DU and rWNiCo can

  12. Site-Specific 64Cu Labeling of the Serine Protease, Active Site Inhibited Factor Seven Azide (FVIIai-N3), Using Copper Free Click Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeppesen, Troels E; Kristensen, Lotte K; Nielsen, Carsten H; Petersen, Lars C; Kristensen, Jesper B; Behrens, Carsten; Madsen, Jacob; Kjaer, Andreas

    2018-01-17

    A method for site-specific radiolabeling of the serine protease active site inhibited factor seven (FVIIai) with 64Cu has been applied using a biorthogonal click reaction. FVIIai binds to tissue factor (TF), a trans-membrane protein involved in hemostasis, angiogenesis, proliferation, cell migration, and survival of cancer cells. First a single azide moiety was introduced in the active site of this 50 kDa protease. Then a NOTA moiety was introduced via a strain promoted azide-alkyne reaction and the corresponding conjugate was labeled with 64Cu. Binding to TF and the stability was evaluated in vitro. TF targeting capability of the radiolabeled conjugate was tested in vivo by positron emission tomography (PET) imaging in pancreatic human xenograft cancer mouse models with various TF expressions. The conjugate showed good stability (>91% at 16 h), an immunoreactivity of 93.5%, and a mean tumor uptake of 2.1 ± 0.2%ID/g at 15 h post injection. In conclusion, FVIIai was radiolabeled with 64Cu in single well-defined position of the protein. This method can be utilized to prepare conjugates from serine proteases with the label at a specific position.

  13. Phosphorylation of Rad9 at serine 328 by cyclin A-Cdk2 triggers apoptosis via interfering Bcl-xL.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuo Zhan

    Full Text Available Cyclin A-Cdk2, a cell cycle regulated Ser/Thr kinase, plays important roles in a variety of apoptoticprocesses. However, the mechanism of cyclin A-Cdk2 regulated apoptosis remains unclear. Here, we demonstrated that Rad9, a member of the BH3-only subfamily of Bcl-2 proteins, could be phosphorylated by cyclin A-Cdk2 in vitro and in vivo. Cyclin A-Cdk2 catalyzed the phosphorylation of Rad9 at serine 328 in HeLa cells during apoptosis induced by etoposide, an inhibitor of topoisomeraseII. The phosphorylation of Rad9 resulted in its translocation from the nucleus to the mitochondria and its interaction with Bcl-xL. The forced activation of cyclin A-Cdk2 in these cells by the overexpression of cyclin A,triggered Rad9 phosphorylation at serine 328 and thereby promoted the interaction of Rad9 with Bcl-xL and the subsequent initiation of the apoptotic program. The pro-apoptotic effects regulated by the cyclin A-Cdk2 complex were significantly lower in cells transfected with Rad9S328A, an expression vector that encodes a Rad9 mutant that is resistant to cyclin A-Cdk2 phosphorylation. These findings suggest that cyclin A-Cdk2 regulates apoptosis through a mechanism that involves Rad9phosphorylation.

  14. D-serine deficiency attenuates the behavioral and cellular effects induced by the hallucinogenic 5-HT2A receptor agonist DOI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santini, Martin A.; Balu, Darrick T.; Puhl, Matthew D.; Hill-Smith, Tiffany E.; Berg, Alexandra R.; Lucki, Irwin; Mikkelsen, Jens D.; Coyle, Joseph T.

    2014-01-01

    Both the serotonin and glutamate systems have been implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, as well as in the mechanism of action of antipsychotic drugs. Psychedelic drugs act through the serotonin 2A receptor (5-HT2AR), and elicit a head-twitch response (HTR) in mice, which directly correlates to 5-HT2AR activation and is absent in 5-HT2AR knockout mice. The precise mechanism of this response remains unclear, but both an intrinsic cortico-cortical pathway and a thalamo-cortical pathway involving glutamate release have been proposed. Here, we used a genetic model of NMDAR hypofunction, a serine racemase knockout (SRKO) mouse, to explore the role of glutamatergic transmission in regulating the 5-HT2AR-mediated cellular and behavioral responses. SRKO mice treated with the 5-HT2AR agonist (+/-)-2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine (DOI) showed a clearly diminished HTR and lower induction of c-fos mRNA. These altered functional responses in SRKO mice were not associated with changes in cortical or hippocampal 5-HT levels or in 5-HT2AR and metabotropic glutamate-2 receptor (mGluR2) mRNA and protein expression. Together, these findings suggest that D-serine-dependent NMDAR activity is involved in mediating the cellular and behavioral effects of 5-HT2AR activation. PMID:24269270

  15. Purification and characterization of thermostable serine proteases encoded by the genes ttha0099 and ttha01320 from Thermus thermophilus HB8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Sun, Yajie; Jiao, Xue; Wang, Honglin; Zhu, Hu

    2016-07-01

    As an important class of proteases, serine proteases are required to show high activity under diverse conditions, especially at high temperatures. In the current study, two serine proteases SP348 and SP404 were analyzed by different bioinformatics tools. Both proteins are comprised of a trypsin domain and a PDZ domain, and belong to the trypsin family of proteases. The proteins were successfully expressed with Trx-tags as soluble proteins in the specialized Escherichia coli Rosetta-gami B(DE3)pLysS strain. A simple three-step purification protocol involving heat treatment, Ni-NTA purification and gel filtration was adopted to purify SP404. The molecular weight of recombinant SP404 was about 64 kDa. According to the circular dichroism spectroscopy analysis, SP404 is thermostable at 70 °C with alpha-helix, beta-sheet and random coil contents of about 8, 22 and 70 %, respectively. Our findings may broaden the range of microorganism-derived proteases and have a wide potential for industrial and fundamental studies.

  16. Phosphorylation of the type II transmembrane serine protease, TMPRSS13, in hepatocyte growth factor activator inhibitor-1 and -2-mediated cell-surface localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Andrew S; Varela, Fausto A; Hyland, Thomas E; Schoenbeck, Andrew J; White, Jordan M; Tanabe, Lauren M; Todi, Sokol V; List, Karin

    2017-09-08

    TMPRSS13 is a member of the type II transmembrane serine protease (TTSP) family. Although various TTSPs have been characterized in detail biochemically and functionally, the basic properties of TMPRSS13 remain unclear. Here, we investigate the activation, inhibition, post-translational modification, and localization of TMPRSS13. We show that TMPRSS13 is a glycosylated, active protease and that its own proteolytic activity mediates zymogen cleavage. Full-length, active TMPRSS13 exhibits impaired cell-surface expression in the absence of the cognate Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitors, hepatocyte growth factor activator inhibitor (HAI)-1 or HAI-2. Concomitant presence of TMPRSS13 with either HAI-1 or -2 mediates phosphorylation of residues in the intracellular domain of the protease, and it coincides with efficient transport of the protease to the cell surface and its subsequent shedding. Cell-surface labeling experiments indicate that the dominant form of TMPRSS13 on the cell surface is phosphorylated, whereas intracellular TMPRSS13 is predominantly non-phosphorylated. These data provide novel insight into the cellular properties of TMPRSS13 and highlight phosphorylation of TMPRSS13 as a novel post-translational modification of this TTSP family member and potentially other members of this family of proteases. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. Inhibitors of Escherichia coli serine acetyltransferase block proliferation of Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Subhash M; Jain, Ruchi; Bhattacharya, Alok; Azam, Amir

    2008-02-01

    The protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica is the etiologic agent of amebiasis, a major global public health problem, particularly in developing countries. There is an effective anti-amoebic drug available, however its long term use produces undesirable side effects. As E. histolytica is a micro-aerophilic organism, it is sensitive to high levels of oxygen and the enzymes that are involved in protecting against oxygen-stress are crucial for its survival. Therefore serine acetyltransferase, an enzyme involved in cysteine biosynthesis, was used as a target for identifying potential inhibitors. Virtual screening with Escherichia coli serine acetyltransferase was carried out against the National Cancer Institute chemical database utilizing molecular docking tools such as GOLD and FlexX. The initial analysis yielded 11 molecules of which three compounds were procured and tested for biological activity. The results showed that these compounds partially block activity of the E. coli enzyme and the growth of E. histolytica trophozoites but not mammalian cells.

  18. Distinct kinetics of serine and threonine dephosphorylation are essential for mitosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hein, Jamin B; Hertz, Emil P T; Garvanska, Dimitriya H

    2017-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) in complex with B55 regulatory subunits reverses cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1) phosphorylations at mitotic exit. Interestingly, threonine and serine residues phosphorylated by Cdk1 display distinct phosphorylation dynamics, but the biological significance remains...... unexplored. Here we demonstrate that the phosphothreonine preference of PP2A-B55 provides an essential regulatory element of mitotic exit. To allow rapid activation of the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) co-activator Cdc20, inhibitory phosphorylation sites are conserved as threonines while...... translocation of the chromosomal passenger complex to the central spindle is prevented by mutation of a single phosphorylated threonine to serine in inner centromere protein (INCENP), leading to failure of cytokinesis. Altogether, the findings of our work reveal that the inherent residue preference of a protein...

  19. Processing of Neutrophil α-Defensins Does Not Rely on Serine Proteases In Vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glenthøj, Andreas; Nickles, Katrin; Cowland, Jack

    2015-01-01

    The α-defensins, human neutrophil peptides (HNPs) are the predominant antimicrobial peptides of neutrophil granules. They are synthesized in promyelocytes and myelocytes as proHNPs, but only processed in promyelocytes and stored as mature HNPs in azurophil granules. Despite decades of search...... lines. Subcellular fractionation of the human promyelocytic cell line PLB-985 demonstrated proHNP processing to commence in fractions containing endoplasmic reticulum. Processing of 35S-proHNP was insensitive to serine protease inhibitors. Simultaneous knockdown of NE, CG, and PR3 did not decrease pro...... of fully processed HNP in peripheral neutrophils. Contradicting earlier assumptions, our study found serine proteases dispensable for processing of proHNPs in vivo. This calls for study of other protease classes in the search for the proHNP processing protease(s)....

  20. Nucleotide sequences of three tRNA(Ser) from Drosophila melanogaster reading the six serine codons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cribbs, D L; Gillam, I C; Tener, G M

    1987-10-05

    The nucleotide sequences of three serine tRNAs from Drosophila melanogaster, together capable of decoding the six serine codons, were determined. tRNA(Ser)2b has the anticodon GCU, tRNA(Ser)4 has CGA and tRNA(Ser)7 has IGA. tRNA(Ser)2b differs from the last two by about 25%. However, tRNA(Ser)4 and tRNA(Ser)7 are 96% homologous, differing only at the first position of the anticodon and two other sites. This unusual sequence relationship suggests, together with similar pairs in the yeasts Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, that eukaryotic tRNA(Ser)UCN may be undergoing concerted evolution.

  1. The Occurrence of Type S1A Serine Proteases in Sponge and Jellyfish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Ana; Doolittle, Russell F.

    2003-01-01

    Although serine proteases are found in all kinds of cellular organisms and many viruses, the classic "chymotrypsin family" (Group S1A by th e 1998 Barrett nomenclature) has an unusual phylogenetic distribution , being especially common in animals, entirely absent from plants and protists, and rare among fungi. The distribution in Bacteria is larg ely restricted to the genus Streptomyces, although a few isolated occ urrences in other bacteria have been reported. The family may be enti rely absent from Archaea. Although more than a thousand sequences have been reported for enzymes of this type from animals, none of them ha ve been from early diverging phyla like Porifera or Cnidaria, We now report the existence of Group SlA serine proteases in a sponge (phylu m Porifera) and a jellyfish (phylum Cnidaria), making it safe to conc lude that all animal groups possess these enzymes.

  2. Effect of CO2 Concentration on Glycine and Serine Formation during Photorespiration 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, F. W.; Tolbert, N. E.

    1974-01-01

    Amount and products of photosynthesis during 10 minutes were measured at different 14CO2 concentrations in air. With tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Maryland Mammoth) leaves the percentage of 14C in glycine plus serine was highest (42%) at 0.005% CO2, and decreased with increasing CO2 concentration to 7% of the total at 1% CO2 in air. However, above 0.03% CO2 the total amount of 14C incorporated into the glycine and serine pool was about constant. At 0.005% or 0.03% CO2 the percentage and amount of 14C in sucrose was small but increased greatly at higher CO2 levels as sucrose accumulated as an end product. Relatively similar data were obtained with sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L. cv. US H20) leaves. The results suggest that photorespiration at high CO2 concentration is not inhibited but that CO2 loss from it becomes less significant. PMID:16658736

  3. Alternaria-derived serine protease activity drives IL-33-mediated asthma exacerbations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snelgrove, Robert J; Gregory, Lisa G; Peiró, Teresa; Akthar, Samia; Campbell, Gaynor A; Walker, Simone A; Lloyd, Clare M

    2014-09-01

    The fungal allergen Alternaria alternata is implicated in severe asthma and rapid onset life-threatening exacerbations of disease. However, the mechanisms that underlie this severe pathogenicity remain unclear. We sought to investigate the mechanism whereby Alternaria was capable of initiating severe, rapid onset allergic inflammation. IL-33 levels were quantified in wild-type and ST2(-/-) mice that lacked the IL-33 receptor given inhaled house dust mite, cat dander, or Alternaria, and the effect of inhibiting allergen-specific protease activities on IL-33 levels was assessed. An exacerbation model of allergic airway disease was established whereby mice were sensitized with house dust mite before subsequently being challenged with Alternaria (with or without serine protease activity), and inflammation, remodeling, and lung function assessed 24 hours later. Alternaria, but not other common aeroallergens, possessed intrinsic serine protease activity that elicited the rapid release of IL-33 into the airways of mice through a mechanism that was dependent upon the activation of protease activated receptor-2 and adenosine triphosphate signaling. The unique capacity of Alternaria to drive this early IL-33 release resulted in a greater pulmonary inflammation by 24 hours after challenge relative to the common aeroallergen house dust mite. Furthermore, this Alternaria serine protease-IL-33 axis triggered a rapid, augmented inflammation, mucus release, and loss of lung function in our exacerbation model. Alternaria-specific serine protease activity causes rapid IL-33 release, which underlies the development of a robust TH2 inflammation and exacerbation of allergic airway disease. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Alternaria-derived serine protease activity drives IL-33–mediated asthma exacerbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snelgrove, Robert J.; Gregory, Lisa G.; Peiró, Teresa; Akthar, Samia; Campbell, Gaynor A.; Walker, Simone A.; Lloyd, Clare M.

    2014-01-01

    Background The fungal allergen Alternaria alternata is implicated in severe asthma and rapid onset life-threatening exacerbations of disease. However, the mechanisms that underlie this severe pathogenicity remain unclear. Objective We sought to investigate the mechanism whereby Alternaria was capable of initiating severe, rapid onset allergic inflammation. Methods IL-33 levels were quantified in wild-type and ST2−/− mice that lacked the IL-33 receptor given inhaled house dust mite, cat dander, or Alternaria, and the effect of inhibiting allergen-specific protease activities on IL-33 levels was assessed. An exacerbation model of allergic airway disease was established whereby mice were sensitized with house dust mite before subsequently being challenged with Alternaria (with or without serine protease activity), and inflammation, remodeling, and lung function assessed 24 hours later. Results Alternaria, but not other common aeroallergens, possessed intrinsic serine protease activity that elicited the rapid release of IL-33 into the airways of mice through a mechanism that was dependent upon the activation of protease activated receptor-2 and adenosine triphosphate signaling. The unique capacity of Alternaria to drive this early IL-33 release resulted in a greater pulmonary inflammation by 24 hours after challenge relative to the common aeroallergen house dust mite. Furthermore, this Alternaria serine protease–IL-33 axis triggered a rapid, augmented inflammation, mucus release, and loss of lung function in our exacerbation model. Conclusion Alternaria-specific serine protease activity causes rapid IL-33 release, which underlies the development of a robust TH2 inflammation and exacerbation of allergic airway disease. PMID:24636086

  5. Enhanced serine production by bone metastatic breast cancer cells stimulates osteoclastogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Pollari, Sirkku; Kakonen, Sanna-Maria; Edgren, Henrik; Wolf, Maija; Kohonen, Pekka; Sara, Henri; Guise, Theresa,; Nees, Matthias; Kallioniemi, Olli

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Since bone metastatic breast cancer is an incurable disease, causing significant morbidity and mortality, an understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms would be highly valuable. Here, we describe in vitro and in vivo evidences for the importance of serine biosynthesis in the metastasis of breast cancer to bone. We first characterized the bone metastatic propensity of the MDA-MB-231(SA) cell line variant as compared to the parental MDA-MB-231 cells by radiographic...

  6. Comparative characterization of Aedes 3-hydroxykynurenine transaminase/alanine glyoxylate transaminase and Drosophila serine pyruvate aminotransferase

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Qian; Li, Jianyong

    2002-01-01

    This study describes the comparative analysis of two insect recombinant aminotransferases, Aedes aegypti 3-hy-droxykynurenine (3-HK) transaminase/alanine glyoxylate aminotransferase (Ae-HKT/AGT) and Drosophila melanogaster serine pyruvate aminotransferase (Dm-Spat), which share 52% identity in their amino acid sequences. Both enzymes showed AGT activity. In addition, Ae-HKT/AGT is also able to catalyze the transamination of 3-HK or kynurenine with glyoxylate, pyruvate or oxaloacetate as the a...

  7. C-terminal hemocyanin from hemocytes of Penaeus vannamei interacts with ERK1/2 and undergoes serine phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havanapan, Phattara-orn; Kanlaya, Rattiyaporn; Bourchookarn, Apichai; Krittanai, Chartchai; Thongboonkerd, Visith

    2009-05-01

    To understand molecular immune response of Penaeus vannamei during Taura syndrome virus (TSV) infection, expression and functional proteomics studies were performed on hemocyanin, which is a major abundant protein in shrimp hemocytes. Two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) revealed up-regulation of several C-terminal fragments of hemocyanin, whereas the N-terminal fragments were down-regulated during TSV infection. 2-D Western blot analysis showed that the C-terminal hemocyanin fragments had more acidic isoelectric points (pI), whereas the N-terminal fragments had less acidic pI. Further analysis by NetPhos showed a greater number of serine phosphorylation sites in the C-terminal hemocyanin. Additionally, motif scan using Scansite revealed ERK D-domain, which is required for activation of ERK1/2 effector kinase, as a kinase-binding site at the 527th valine in the C-terminal hemocyanin, whereas neither motif nor functional domain was found in the N-terminus. Co-immunoprecipitation confirmed the interaction between the C-terminal hemocyanin and ERK1/2. 1-D Western blot analysis showed that ERK1/2 was also up-regulated during TSV infection. Our findings demonstrate for the first time that ERK1/2 signaling pathway may play an important role in molecular immune response of P. vannamei upon TSV infection through its interaction with the C-terminal hemocyanin.

  8. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of human kallikrein 7, a serine protease of the multigene kallikrein family

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernández, Israel S. [Departamento de Ciencia de Proteínas, Centro de Investigaciones Biológicas-CSIC, Ramiro de Maeztu 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Ständker, Ludger [Departamento de Ciencia de Proteínas, Centro de Investigaciones Biológicas-CSIC, Ramiro de Maeztu 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Hannover Medical School, Center of Pharmacology, 30625 Hannover (Germany); Forssmann, Wolf-Georg [Hannover Medical School, Center of Pharmacology, 30625 Hannover (Germany); Giménez-Gallego, Guillermo; Romero, Antonio, E-mail: romero@cib.csic.es [Departamento de Ciencia de Proteínas, Centro de Investigaciones Biológicas-CSIC, Ramiro de Maeztu 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2007-08-01

    The cloning, expression, purification and crystallization of recombinant human kallikrein 7, directly synthesized in the active form in E. coli, is described. Diffraction data were collected to 2.8 Å resolution from native crystals. Human kallikreins are a group of serine proteases of high sequence homology whose genes are grouped as a single cluster at chromosome 19. Although the physiological roles of kallikreins are generally still unknown, members of the kallikrein family have been clearly implicated in pathological situations such as cancer and psoriasis. Human kallikrein 7 (hK7) has been shown to be involved in pathological keratinization, psoriasis and ovarian cancer. In order to gain insight into the molecular structure of this protein, hK7 was crystallized after recombinant production in its folded and active form using a periplasmic secretion vector in Escherichia coli. The crystals belonged to the rhombohedral space group H32 and diffracted to 2.8 Å. The phase problem was solved by molecular replacement using the mouse kallikrein-related protein neuropsin. Completion of the model and structure refinement are under way.

  9. Contribution of eukaryotic-type serine/threonine kinase to stress response and virulence of Streptococcus suis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haodan Zhu

    Full Text Available Streptococcus suis serotype 2 (SS2 is an important swine and human pathogen responsible for septicemia and meningitis. The bacterial homologues of eukaryotic-type serine/threonine kinases (ESTKs have been reported to play critical roles in various cellular processes. To investigate the role of STK in SS2, an isogenic stk mutant strain (Δstk and a complemented strain (CΔstk were constructed. The Δstk showed a significant decrease in adherence to HEp-2 cells, compared with the wild-type strain, and a reduced survival ratio in whole blood. In addition, the Δstk exhibited a notable reduced tolerance of environmental stresses including high temperature, acidic pH, oxidative stress, and high osmolarity. More importantly, the Δstk was attenuated in both the CD1 mouse and piglet models of infection. The results of quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR analysis indicated that the expressions of a few genes involving in adherence, stress response and virulence were clearly decreased in the Δstk mutant strain. Our data suggest that SsSTK is required for virulence and stress response in SS2.

  10. The FGFR4-G388R polymorphism promotes mitochondrial STAT3 serine phosphorylation to facilitate pituitary growth hormone cell tumorigenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toru Tateno

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Pituitary tumors are common intracranial neoplasms, yet few germline abnormalities have been implicated in their pathogenesis. Here we show that a single nucleotide germline polymorphism (SNP substituting an arginine (R for glycine (G in the FGFR4 transmembrane domain can alter pituitary cell growth and hormone production. Compared with FGFR4-G388 mammosomatotroph cells that support prolactin (PRL production, FGFR4-R388 cells express predominantly growth hormone (GH. Growth promoting effects of FGFR4-R388 as evidenced by enhanced colony formation was ascribed to Src activation and mitochondrial serine phosphorylation of STAT3 (pS-STAT3. In contrast, diminished pY-STAT3 mediated by FGFR4-R388 relieved GH inhibition leading to hormone excess. Using a knock-in mouse model, we demonstrate the ability of FGFR4-R385 to promote GH pituitary tumorigenesis. In patients with acromegaly, pituitary tumor size correlated with hormone excess in the presence of the FGFR4-R388 but not the FGFR4-G388 allele. Our findings establish a new role for the FGFR4-G388R polymorphism in pituitary oncogenesis, providing a rationale for targeting Src and STAT3 in the personalized treatment of associated disorders.

  11. Roles of CUB and LDL receptor class A domain repeats of a transmembrane serine protease matriptase in its zymogen activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inouye, Kuniyo; Tomoishi, Marie; Yasumoto, Makoto; Miyake, Yuka; Kojima, Kenji; Tsuzuki, Satoshi; Fushiki, Tohru

    2013-01-01

    Matriptase is a type II transmembrane serine protease containing two complement proteases C1r/C1s-urchin embryonic growth factor-bone morphogenetic protein domains (CUB repeat) and four low-density lipoprotein receptor class A domains (LDLRA repeat). The single-chain zymogen of matriptase has been found to exhibit substantial protease activity, possibly causing its own activation (i.e. conversion to a disulfide-linked two-chain fully active form), although the activation seems to be mediated predominantly by two-chain molecules. Our aim was to assess the roles of CUB and LDLRA repeats in zymogen activation. Transient expression studies of soluble truncated constructs of recombinant matriptase in COS-1 cells showed that the CUB repeat had an inhibitory effect on zymogen activation, possibly because it facilitated the interaction of two-chain molecules with a matriptase inhibitor, hepatocyte growth factor activator inhibitor type-1. By contrast, the LDLRA repeat had a promoting effect on zymogen activation. The effect of the LDLRA repeat seems to reflect its ability to increase zymogen activity. The proteolytic activities were higher in pseudozymogen forms of recombinant matriptase containing the LDLRA repeat than in a pseudozymogen without the repeat. Our findings provide new insights into the roles of these non-catalytic domains in the generation of active matriptase.

  12. The FGFR4-G388R Polymorphism Promotes Mitochondrial STAT3 Serine Phosphorylation to Facilitate Pituitary Growth Hormone Cell Tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tateno, Toru; Asa, Sylvia L.; Zheng, Lei; Mayr, Thomas; Ullrich, Axel; Ezzat, Shereen

    2011-01-01

    Pituitary tumors are common intracranial neoplasms, yet few germline abnormalities have been implicated in their pathogenesis. Here we show that a single nucleotide germline polymorphism (SNP) substituting an arginine (R) for glycine (G) in the FGFR4 transmembrane domain can alter pituitary cell growth and hormone production. Compared with FGFR4-G388 mammosomatotroph cells that support prolactin (PRL) production, FGFR4-R388 cells express predominantly growth hormone (GH). Growth promoting effects of FGFR4-R388 as evidenced by enhanced colony formation was ascribed to Src activation and mitochondrial serine phosphorylation of STAT3 (pS-STAT3). In contrast, diminished pY-STAT3 mediated by FGFR4-R388 relieved GH inhibition leading to hormone excess. Using a knock-in mouse model, we demonstrate the ability of FGFR4-R385 to promote GH pituitary tumorigenesis. In patients with acromegaly, pituitary tumor size correlated with hormone excess in the presence of the FGFR4-R388 but not the FGFR4-G388 allele. Our findings establish a new role for the FGFR4-G388R polymorphism in pituitary oncogenesis, providing a rationale for targeting Src and STAT3 in the personalized treatment of associated disorders. PMID:22174695

  13. Arginine Deprivation Inhibits the Warburg Effect and Upregulates Glutamine Anaplerosis and Serine Biosynthesis in ASS1-Deficient Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeff Charles Kremer

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Targeting defects in metabolism is an underutilized strategy for the treatment of cancer. Arginine auxotrophy resulting from the silencing of argininosuccinate synthetase 1 (ASS1 is a common metabolic alteration reported in a broad range of aggressive cancers. To assess the metabolic effects that arise from acute and chronic arginine starvation in ASS1-deficient cell lines, we performed metabolite profiling. We found that pharmacologically induced arginine depletion causes increased serine biosynthesis, glutamine anaplerosis, oxidative phosphorylation, and decreased aerobic glycolysis, effectively inhibiting the Warburg effect. The reduction of glycolysis in cells otherwise dependent on aerobic glycolysis is correlated with reduced PKM2 expression and phosphorylation and upregulation of PHGDH. Concurrent arginine deprivation and glutaminase inhibition was found to be synthetic lethal across a spectrum of ASS1-deficient tumor cell lines and is sufficient to cause in vivo tumor regression in mice. These results identify two synthetic lethal therapeutic strategies exploiting metabolic vulnerabilities of ASS1-negative cancers.

  14. Role of the serine-rich surface glycoprotein Srr1 of Streptococcus agalactiae in the pathogenesis of infective endocarditis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho Seong Seo

    Full Text Available The binding of bacteria to fibrinogen and platelets are important events in the pathogenesis of infective endocarditis. Srr1 is a serine-rich repeat glycoprotein of Streptococcus agalactiae that binds directly to the Aα chain of human fibrinogen. To assess the impact of Srr1 on the pathogenesis of endocarditis due to S. agalactiae, we first examined the binding of this organism to immobilized human platelets. Strains expressing Srr1 had significantly higher levels of binding to human platelets in vitro, as compared with isogenic Δsrr1 mutants. In addition, platelet binding was inhibited by pretreatment with anti-fibrinogen IgG or purified Srr1 binding region. To assess the contribution of Srr1 to pathogenicity, we compared the relative virulence of S. agalactiae NCTC 10/84 strain and its Δsrr1 mutant in a rat model of endocarditis, where animals were co-infected with the WT and the mutant strains at a 1:1 ratio. At 72 h post-infection, bacterial densities (CFU/g of the WT strain within vegetations, kidneys, and spleens were significantly higher, as compared with the Δsrr1 mutant. These results indicate that Srr1 contributes to the pathogenesis of endocarditis due to S. agalactiae, at least in part through its role in fibrinogen-mediated platelet binding.

  15. Carnein, a serine protease from noxious plant weed Ipomoea carnea (morning glory).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Ashok Kumar; Singh, Vijay Kumar; Jagannadham, Medicherla V

    2007-07-11

    A new serine protease from the latex of Ipomoea carnea spp. fistulosa (Morning glory), belonging to the Convolvulaceae family, was purified to homogeneity by ammonium sulfate fractionation followed by cation exchange chromatography. The enzyme, named carnein, has a molecular mass of 80.24 kDa (matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight) and an isoelectric point of pH 5.6. The pH and temperature optima for proteolytic activity were 6.5 and 65 degrees C, respectively. The extinction coefficient (epsilon2801%) of the enzyme was estimated as 37.12, and the protein molecule consists of 35 tryptophan, 76 tyrosine, and seven cysteine residues. The effect of several inhibitors such as iodoacetic acid, diisopropylfluorophosphate, phenyl-methanesulfonyl fluoride, chymostatin, soybean trypsin inhibitor, HgCl2, 3S-3-(N-{(S)-1-[N-(4-guanidinobutyl)carbamoyl]3-ethylbutyl}carbamoyl)oxirane-2-carboxylic acid, N-ethyl maleimide, ethylene glycol-bis(alpha-amino ethyl ether)tetraacetic acid, ethylenediamminetetraacetic acid, and o-phenonthroline indicates that carnein belongs to the family of serine proteases. The enzyme is not prone to autolysis even at very low concentrations. The N-terminal sequence of carnein (T-T-H-S-P-E-F-L-G-L-A-E-S-S-G-L-X-P-N-S) exhibited considerable similarity to those of other plant serine proteases; the highest similarity was with alnus AG12, one of the subtilase family endopepetidases.

  16. Serine Protease Variants Encoded by Echis ocellatus Venom Gland cDNA: Cloning and Sequencing Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Hasson

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Envenoming by Echis saw-scaled viper is the leading cause of death and morbidity in Africa due to snake bite. Despite its medical importance, there have been few investigations into the toxin composition of the venom of this viper. Here, we report the cloning of cDNA sequences encoding four groups or isoforms of the haemostasis-disruptive Serine protease proteins (SPs from the venom glands of Echis ocellatus. All these SP sequences encoded the cysteine residues scaffold that form the 6-disulphide bonds responsible for the characteristic tertiary structure of venom serine proteases. All the Echis ocellatus EoSP groups showed varying degrees of sequence similarity to published viper venom SPs. However, these groups also showed marked intercluster sequence conservation across them which were significantly different from that of previously published viper SPs. Because viper venom SPs exhibit a high degree of sequence similarity and yet exert profoundly different effects on the mammalian haemostatic system, no attempt was made to assign functionality to the new Echis ocellatus EoSPs on the basis of sequence alone. The extraordinary level of interspecific and intergeneric sequence conservation exhibited by the Echis ocellatus EoSPs and analogous serine proteases from other viper species leads us to speculate that antibodies to representative molecules should neutralise (that we will exploit, by epidermal DNA immunization the biological function of this important group of venom toxins in vipers that are distributed throughout Africa, the Middle East, and the Indian subcontinent.

  17. Control of serine integrase recombination directionality by fusion with the directionality factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olorunniji, Femi J; McPherson, Arlene L; Rosser, Susan J; Smith, Margaret C M; Colloms, Sean D; Stark, W Marshall

    2017-08-21

    Bacteriophage serine integrases are extensively used in biotechnology and synthetic biology for assembly and rearrangement of DNA sequences. Serine integrases promote recombination between two different DNA sites, attP and attB, to form recombinant attL and attR sites. The 'reverse' reaction requires another phage-encoded protein called the recombination directionality factor (RDF) in addition to integrase; RDF activates attL × attR recombination and inhibits attP × attB recombination. We show here that serine integrases can be fused to their cognate RDFs to create single proteins that catalyse efficient attL × attR recombination in vivo and in vitro, whereas attP × attB recombination efficiency is reduced. We provide evidence that activation of attL × attR recombination involves intra-subunit contacts between the integrase and RDF moieties of the fusion protein. Minor changes in the length and sequence of the integrase-RDF linker peptide did not affect fusion protein recombination activity. The efficiency and single-protein convenience of integrase-RDF fusion proteins make them potentially very advantageous for biotechnology/synthetic biology applications. Here, we demonstrate efficient gene cassette replacement in a synthetic metabolic pathway gene array as a proof of principle. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  18. Recovery of serine protease inhibitor from fish roes by polyethylene glycol precipitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Ji Lee

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The fractionation of serine protease inhibitor (SPI from fish roe extracts was carried out using polyethylene glycol-4000 (PEG4000 precipitation. The protease inhibitory activity of extracts and PEG fractions from Alaska pollock (AP, bastard halibut (BH, skipjack tuna (ST, and yellowfin tuna (YT roes were determined against target proteases. All of the roe extracts showed inhibitory activity toward bromelain (BR, chymotrypsin (CH, trypsin (TR, papain-EDTA (PED, and alcalase (AL as target proteases. PEG fractions, which have positive inhibitory activity and high recovery (%, were the PEG1 fraction (0–5 %, w/v against cysteine proteases (BR and PA and the PEG4 fraction (20–40 %, w/v against serine proteases (CH and TR. The strongest specific inhibitory activity toward CH and TR of PEG4 fractions was AP (9278 and 1170 U/mg followed by ST (6687 and 2064 U/mg, YT (3951 and 1536 U/mg, and BH (538 and 98 U/mg. The inhibitory activity of serine protease in extracts and PEG fractions from fish roe was stronger than that of cysteine protease toward common casein substrate. Therefore, SPI is mainly distributed in fish roe and PEG fractionation effectively isolated the SPI from fish roes.

  19. Histone H3 Serine 28 Is Essential for Efficient Polycomb-Mediated Gene Repression in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Yuk Kwong Yung

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Trimethylation at histone H3K27 is central to the polycomb repression system. Juxtaposed to H3K27 is a widely conserved phosphorylatable serine residue (H3S28 whose function is unclear. To assess the importance of H3S28, we generated a Drosophila H3 histone mutant with a serine-to-alanine mutation at position 28. H3S28A mutant cells lack H3S28ph on mitotic chromosomes but support normal mitosis. Strikingly, all methylation states of H3K27 drop in H3S28A cells, leading to Hox gene derepression and to homeotic transformations in adult tissues. These defects are not caused by active H3K27 demethylation nor by the loss of H3S28ph. Biochemical assays show that H3S28A nucleosomes are a suboptimal substrate for PRC2, suggesting that the unphosphorylated state of serine 28 is important for assisting in the function of polycomb complexes. Collectively, our data indicate that the conserved H3S28 residue in metazoans has a role in supporting PRC2 catalysis.

  20. Cross-phosphorylation of bacterial serine/threonine and tyrosine protein kinases on key regulatory residues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei eShi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria possess protein serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases which resemble eukaryal kinases in their capacity to phosphorylate multiple substrates. We hypothesized that the analogy might extend further, and bacterial kinases may also undergo mutual phosphorylation and activation, which is currently considered as a hallmark of eukaryal kinase networks. In order to test this hypothesis, we explored the capacity of all members of four different classes of serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases present in the firmicute model organism Bacillus subtilis to phosphorylate each other in vitro and interact with each other in vivo. The interactomics data suggested a high degree of connectivity among all types of kinases, while phosphorylation assays revealed equally wide-spread cross-phosphorylation events. Our findings suggest that the Hanks-type kinases PrkC, PrkD and YabT exhibit the highest capacity to phosphorylate other B. subtilis kinases, while the BY-kinase PtkA and the two-component-like kinases RsbW and SpoIIAB show the highest propensity to be phosphorylated by other kinases. Analysis of phosphorylated residues on several selected recipient kinases suggests that most cross-phosphorylation events concern key regulatory residues. Therefore, cross-phosphorylation events are very likely to influence the capacity of recipient kinases to phosphorylate substrates downstream in the signal transduction cascade. We therefore conclude that bacterial serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases probably engage in a network-type behavior previously described only in eukaryal cells.

  1. Structure of haptoglobin heavy chain and other serine protease homologs by comparative model building

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grer, J.

    1980-10-01

    Proteins often occur in families whose structure is closely similar, even though the proteins may come from widely different sources and have quite distinct functions. It would be useful to be able to construct the three-dimensional structure of these proteins from the known structure of one or more of them without having to solve the structure of each protein ab initio. We have been using comparative model building to derive the structure of an unusual protein of the trypsin-like serine protease family. We have recently extended this comparison to include other serine protease homologs for which a primary structure is available. To generate structures for the different members of the serine protease family, it is necessary to extract the common structural features of the molecule. Fortunately, three independently determined protein structures are available: schymotrypsin, trypsin, and elastase. These three structures were compared in detail and the structurally conserved regions in all three, mainly the BETA-sheet and the ..cap alpha..-helix, were identified. The variable portions occur in the loops on the surface of the molecule. By using these structures, the primary sequences of these three proteins were aligned. From this alignment, it is clear that sequence homology between the proteins occurs mainly in the structurally conserved regions of the molecule, while the variable portions show very little sequence homology.

  2. A 25-kDa serine peptidase with keratinolytic activity secreted by Coccidioides immitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Bárbara Gabriela Brum; Santos, André Luis Souza Dos; Bezerra, Cláudia de Carvalho Falci; Wanke, Bodo; Dos Santos Lazéra, Márcia; Nishikawa, Marília Martins; Mazotto, Ana Maria; Kussumi, Vânia Monteiro; Haido, Rosa Maria Tavares; Vermelho, Alane Beatriz

    2008-07-01

    Coccidioides immitis is the causative agent of coccidioidomycosis, a systemic mycosis that attacks humans and a wide variety of animals. In the present study, we showed that the C. immitis mycelial form is able to release proteolytic enzyme into the extracellular environment. Under chemically defined growth conditions, mycelia secreted seven distinct polypeptides ranging from 15 to 65 kDa and an extracellular peptidase of 25 kDa. This enzyme had its activity fully inhibited by phenylmethylsulphonyl fluoride, a serine peptidase inhibitor. Conversely, metallo, cysteine, and aspartyl peptidase inhibitors did not alter the 25-kDa enzyme behavior. This extracellular serine peptidase was able to degrade keratin, a fibrous protein that composes human epidermis. Additionally, this peptidase cleaved different protein substrates, including gelatin, casein, hemoglobin, and albumin. Curiously, an 18-kDa serine peptidase activity was evidenced solely when casein was used as the co-polymerized protein substrate into the gel. The existence of different secreted peptidases could be advantageous for the adaptation of C. immitis to distinct environments during its complex life cycle.

  3. Phosphorylation of serine 248 of C/EBPα is dispensable for myelopoiesis but its disruption leads to a low penetrant myeloid disorder with long latency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie S Hasemann

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Transcription factors play a key role in lineage commitment and differentiation of stem cells into distinct mature cells. In hematopoiesis, they regulate lineage-specific gene expression in a stage-specific manner through various physical and functional interactions with regulatory proteins that are simultanously recruited and activated to ensure timely gene expression. The transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer binding protein α (C/EBPα is such a factor and is essential for the development of granulocytic/monocytic cells. The activity of C/EBPα is regulated on several levels including gene expression, alternative translation, protein interactions and posttranslational modifications, such as phosphorylation. In particular, the phosphorylation of serine 248 of the transactivation domain has been shown to be of crucial importance for granulocytic differentiation of 32Dcl3 cells in vitro. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we use mouse genetics to investigate the significance of C/EBPα serine 248 in vivo through the construction and analysis of Cebpa(S248A/S248A knock-in mice. Surprisingly, 8-week old Cebpa(S248A/S248A mice display normal steady-state hematopoiesis including unaltered development of mature myeloid cells. However, over time some of the animals develop a hematopoietic disorder with accumulation of multipotent, megakaryocytic and erythroid progenitor cells and a mild impairment of differentiation along the granulocytic-monocytic lineage. Furthermore, BM cells from Cebpa(S248A/S248A animals display a competitive advantage compared to wild type cells in a transplantation assay. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Taken together, our data shows that the substitution of C/EBPα serine 248 to alanine favors the selection of the megakaryocytic/erythroid lineage over the monocytic/granulocytic compartment in old mice and suggests that S248 phosphorylation may be required to maintain proper hematopoietic homeostasis in response to

  4. Selective depletion of tumour suppressors Deleted in Colorectal Cancer (DCC) and neogenin by environmental and endogenous serine proteases: linking diet and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Caroline M; McNair, Kara; Vincenten, Maria C J; Darlington, L Gail; Stone, Trevor W

    2016-10-06

    The related tumour suppressor proteins Deleted in Colorectal Cancer (DCC) and neogenin are absent or weakly expressed in many cancers, whereas their insertion into cells suppresses oncogenic behaviour. Serine proteases influence the initiation and progression of cancers although the mechanisms are unknown. The effects of environmental (bacterial subtilisin) and endogenous mammalian (chymotrypsin) serine proteases were examined on protein expression in fresh, normal tissue and human neuroblastoma and mammary adenocarcinoma lines. Cell proliferation and migration assays (chemoattraction and wound closure) were used to examine cell function. Cells lacking DCC were transfected with an ectopic dcc plasmid. Subtilisin and chymotrypsin selectively depleted DCC and neogenin from cells at nanomolar concentrations without affecting related proteins. Cells showed reduced adherence and increased migration, but after washing they re-attached within 24 h, with recovery of protein expression. These effects are induced by chymotryptic activity as they are prevented by chymostatin and the soybean Bowman-Birk inhibitor typical of many plant protease inhibitors. Bacillus subtilis, which secretes subtilisin is widely present in soil, the environment and the intestinal contents, while subtilisin itself is used in meat processing, animal feed probiotics and many household cleaning agents. With chymotrypsin present in chyme, blood and tissues, these proteases may contribute to cancer development by depleting DCC and neogenin. Blocking their activity by Bowman-Birk inhibitors may explain the protective effects of a plant diet. Our findings identify a potential non-genetic contribution to cancer cell behaviour which may explain both the association of processed meats and other factors with cancer incidence and the protection afforded by plant-rich diets, with significant implications for cancer prevention.

  5. The receptor-like protein-tyrosine phosphatase DEP-1 is constitutively associated with a 64-kDa protein serine/threonine kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jallal, B; Mossie, K; Vasiloudis, G; Knyazev, P; Zachwieja, J; Clairvoyant, F; Schilling, J; Ullrich, A

    1997-05-02

    Protein-tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are involved in the regulation of diverse cellular processes and may function as positive effectors as well as negative regulators of intracellular signaling. Recent data demonstrate that malignant transformation of cells is frequently associated with changes in PTP expression or activity. Our analysis of PTP expression in mammary carcinoma cell lines resulted in the molecular cloning of a receptor-like PTP, also known as DEP-1. DEP-1 was found to be expressed at varying levels in mammary carcinoma cell lines and A431 cells. In all tumor cell lines analyzed, DEP-1 was constitutively phosphorylated on tyrosine residues. Phosphorylation of DEP-1 increased significantly after treatment of cells with the PTP inhibitor pervanadate. In A431 cells, tyrosine phosphorylation of DEP-1 was also observed after stimulation with epidermal growth factor, however, only after prolonged exposure of the cells to the ligand, suggesting an indirect mechanism of phosphorylation. In addition, DEP-1 coprecipitated with several tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins from pervanadate-treated cells. In vitro binding experiments using a glutathione S-transferase fusion protein containing the catalytically inactive PTP domain of DEP-1 (Gst-DEP-1-C/S) identify these proteins as potential substrates of DEP-1. In addition, we found a 64-kDa serine/threonine kinase to be constitutively associated with DEP-1 in all tumor cell lines tested. The 64-kDa kinase forms a stable complex with DEP-1 and phosphorylates DEP-1 and DEP-1-interacting proteins in vitro. These data suggest a possible mechanism of DEP-1 regulation in tumor cell lines involving serine/threonine and/or tyrosine phosphorylation.

  6. Purification and Functional Characterisation of Rhinocerase, a Novel Serine Protease from the Venom of Bitis gabonica rhinoceros

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaiyapuri, Sakthivel; Harrison, Robert A.; Bicknell, Andrew B.; Gibbins, Jonathan M.; Hutchinson, Gail

    2010-01-01

    Background Serine proteases are a major component of viper venoms and are thought to disrupt several distinct elements of the blood coagulation system of envenomed victims. A detailed understanding of the functions of these enzymes is important both for acquiring a fuller understanding of the pathology of envenoming and because these venom proteins have shown potential in treating blood coagulation disorders. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study a novel, highly abundant serine protease, which we have named rhinocerase, has been isolated and characterised from the venom of Bitis gabonica rhinoceros using liquid phase isoelectric focusing and gel filtration. Like many viper venom serine proteases, this enzyme is glycosylated; the estimated molecular mass of the native enzyme is approximately 36kDa, which reduces to 31kDa after deglycosylation. The partial amino acid sequence shows similarity to other viper venom serine proteases, but is clearly distinct from the sequence of the only other sequenced serine protease from Bitis gabonica. Other viper venom serine proteases have been shown to exert distinct biological effects, and our preliminary functional characterization of rhinocerase suggest it to be multifunctional. It is capable of degrading α and β chains of fibrinogen, dissolving plasma clots and of hydrolysing a kallikrein substrate. Conclusions/Significance A novel multifunctional viper venom serine protease has been isolated and characterised. The activities of the enzyme are consistent with the known in vivo effects of Bitis gabonica envenoming, including bleeding disorders, clotting disorders and hypotension. This study will form the basis for future research to understand the mechanisms of serine protease action, and examine the potential for rhinocerase to be used clinically to reduce the risk of human haemostatic disorders such as heart attacks and strokes. PMID:20300193

  7. Overexpression of the methanol dehydrogenase gene mxaF in Methylobacterium sp. MB200 enhances L-serine production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, H; Wu, B; Shen, P

    2015-10-01

    Increase in L-serine production is of interest for industry. Here, we describe a metabolic engineering approach to increase the production of L-serine in a methylotrophic bacterium. mxaF, the gene encoding the large subunit of a methanol dehydrogenase, was cloned from Methylobacterium sp. MB200 through transposon mutagenesis. Deletion of mxaF gene prevented the strain to grow on methanol, suggesting that mxaF is involved in methanol metabolism. Overexpression of mxaF gene in the strain MB200 resulted in a fivefold increase in methanol dehydrogenase activity compared to the wild-type. Resting cell assays showed that the recombinant strain accumulated 6·6 mg ml(-1) L-serine in 72 h with 30 mg ml(-1) wet cells from 50 mg ml(-1) glycine and 50 mg ml(-1) methanol, representing a 1·5-fold increment for L-serine production in contrast to the wild-type strain. These results demonstrate that the potential for improving the production of L-serine can be achieved by overexpressing mxaF gene in methylotrophic bacteria. The amount of L-serine produced each year worldwide is relatively small compared with the amounts of the other amino acids and hence it is in great demand. Here, we describe a metabolic engineering approach to increase the production of L-serine in a methylotrophic bacterium Methylobacterium sp. MB200. The result demonstrates that raising the output of L-serine can be achieved by overexpressing mxaF gene in methylotrophic bacteria. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  8. Fluorescently labeled inhibitors detect localized serine protease activities in Drosophila melanogaster pole cells, embryos, and ovarian egg chambers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Rasmus Kragh; Ono, S.; Powers, J. C.

    2005-01-01

    processes that they mediate. Until only recently, the tools to conveniently address the question of where and when serine proteases are active within complex tissues have been lacking. In order to detect spatially restricted serine protease activities in Drosophila embryos and ovaries we introduce...... activity localized to the oocyte-somatic follicle cell interface of the developing egg chamber. Our results suggest that this technique holds promise to identify new spatially restricted activities in adult Drosophila tissues and developing embryos....

  9. A 6-kb promoter fragment mimics in transgenic mice the prostate-specific and androgen-regulated expression of the endogenous prostate-specific antigen gene in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.B.J.M. Cleutjens (Kitty); H.A.G.M. van der Korput (Hetty); C.C.E.M. Ehren-van Eekelen (Conny); R.A. Sikes; C. Fasciana (Claudia); L.W. Chung; J. Trapman (Jan)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractProstate-specific antigen (PSA) is a kallikrein-like serine protease, which is almost exclusively synthesized in the luminal epithelial cells of the human prostate. PSA expression is androgen regulated. Previously, we characterized in vitro the proximal

  10. Involvement of a Serpin serine protease inhibitor (OoSerpin) from mollusc Octopus ocellatus in antibacterial response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiumei; Xu, Jie; Yang, Jianmin; Liu, Xiangquan; Zhang, Ranran; Wang, Weijun; Yang, Jialong

    2015-01-01

    Serpin is an important member of serine protease inhibitors (SPIs), which is capable of regulating proteolytic events and involving in a variety of physiological processes. In present study, a Serpin homolog was identified from Octopus ocellatus (designated as OoSerpin). Full-length cDNA of OoSerpin was of 1735 bp, containing a 5' untranslated region of 214 bp, a 3' UTR of 282 bp, and an open reading frame of 1239 bp. The open reading frame encoded a polypeptide of 412 amino acids which has a predicted molecular weight of 46.5 kDa and an isoelectric point of 8.52. The OoSerpin protein shares 37% sequence identity with other Serpins from Mus musculus (NP_941373) and Ixodes scapularis (XP_002407493). The existence of a conserved SERPIN domain strongly suggested that OoSerpin was a member of the Serpin subfamily. Expression patterns of OoSerpin, both in tissues and towards bacterial stimulation, were then characterized. The mRNA of OoSerpin was constitutively expressed at different levels in all tested tissues of untreated O. ocellatus, including mantle (lowest), muscle, renal sac, gill, hemocyte, gonad, systemic heart, and hepatopancreas (highest). The transcriptional level of OoSerpin was significantly up-regulated (P<0.01) in O. ocellatus upon bacterial challenges with Vibrio anguillarum and Micrococcus luteus, indicating its involvement in the antibacterial immune response. Furthermore, rOoSerpin, the recombinant protein of OoSerpin, exhibited strong abilities to inhibit proteinase activities of trypsin and chymotrypsin as well as the growth of Escherichia coli. Our results demonstrate that OoSerpin is a potential antibacterial factor involved in the immune response of O. ocellatus against bacterial infection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Phosphorylation of Serine 148 in Giardia lamblia End-binding 1 Protein is Important for Cell Division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Juri; Lee, Hye-Yeon; Lee, Kyu-Ho; Park, Soon-Jung

    2017-07-01

    Giardia lamblia is a unicellular organism, showing a polarity with two nuclei and cytoskeletal structures. Accurate positioning of these organelles is essential for division of G. lamblia, which is poorly understood. Giardia lamblia end-binding 1 (GlEB1) protein and G. lamblia aurora kinase (GlAK) have been shown to modulate microtubule (MT) distribution during cytokinesis. A direct association between GlEB1 and GlAK was demonstrated. Like GlEB1, GlAK was also found at nuclear envelopes and median bodies of G. lamblia. In vitro kinase assays using Giardia lysates immunoprecipitated with anti-GlAK antibodies or recombinant GlAK suggested that GlEB1 is a substrate of GlAK. Site-directed mutagenesis indicated that threonine-205 in GlAK was auto-phosphorylated and that GlAK phosphorylated serine (Ser)-148 in GlEB1. Ectopic expression of a mutant GlEB1 (with conversion of Ser-148 into alanine of GlEB1) resulted in an increased number of Giardia cells with division defects. Treatment of G. lamblia with an AK inhibitor triggered cytokinesis defects, and ectopic expression of a phospho-mimetic mutant GlEB1 (with conversion of Ser-148 into aspartate) rescued the defects in Giardia cell division caused by the AK inhibitor. These results suggested that phosphorylation of GlEB1 played a role in cytokinesis in G. lamblia. © 2016 The Author(s) Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology © 2016 International Society of Protistologists.

  12. Loss of heterozygosity in mammary serine protease inhibitor (maspin) and p53 at chromosome 17 and 18 in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kyu Young; Choi, Hyung-Joon; Chung, Eun-Jae; Lee, Dong Jin; Kim, Jin Hwan; Rho, Young-Soo

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in chromosomes 17p13 (p53 gene) and in 18q21 (mammary serine protease inhibitor [maspin] gene), and the expression of both genes in tissues, in patients with oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Thirty patients with oral cavity SCC have been evaluated for the presence of LOH in chromosomes 17p13 and 18q21, and the expression of p53 and maspin in tissues. Clinicopathological features and survival in these patients were also analyzed. LOH in 17p13 was more frequently identified in patients with lymph node metastasis and/or high TNM classification. LOH in 18q21 was more frequently identified in high primary T classification patients. Increased expression rate of p53 and/or decreased maspin expression rate were significantly higher in oral cavity SCC than normal tissues. LOH on chromosome 17, 18, the expression of p53, and maspin are related to the carcinogenesis of oral cavity SCC. Relationships with clinicopathological factors in oral cavity SCC were also revealed. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 37: 1239-1245, 2015. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Amyloid β oligomer-induced ERK1/2-dependent serine 636/639 phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1 impairs insulin signaling and glycogen storage in human astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qinghua; Guo, Shougang; Zhang, Xiao; Tang, Shi; Wang, Lu; Han, Xiaojuan; Shao, Wen; Cong, Lin; Du, Yifeng

    2015-04-25

    This study is to investigate the effect of amyloid β1-42 oligomers on insulin signaling in astrocytes. Synthetic Aβ1-42 oligomers were prepared and the oligomeric form of Aβ1-42 was verified by an electron microscope. Normal human astrocytes were cultured in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Medium. Western blotting was employed to measure the amount of lysate proteins. Immunofluorescence was performed to detect the distribution of phosphorylated insulin receptor substrate-1 and expression of P-GSK3β in astrocytes under confocal microscopy and fluorescent microscopy, respectively. Periodic Acid-Schiff staining was used to detect glycogen, the content of which was measured using glycogen assay. Our data showed that Aβ1-42 oligomers inhibited insulin-induced serine phosphorylation of Akt at 473 and GSK3β at serine 9, as well as glycogen storage. However, the levels of phosphorylated GSK3β at tyrosine 216 were significantly increased in the presence of Aβ1-42 oligomers. In addition, the levels of phosphorylated ERK1/2 and insulin receptor substrate-1 at serine 636/639 were significantly increased in response to treatment with Aβ1-42 oligomers. Of note, the responses and inhibitory effects of Aβ1-42 oligomers on insulin signaling were partially reversed by ERK1/2 upstream inhibitor PD98059. Our results demonstrated that Aβ1-42 oligomers impaired insulin signaling and suppressed insulin-induced glycogen storage in human astrocytes, probably due to ERK1/2-dependent serine phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1 at 636/639 induced by Aβ1-42 oligomers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Inhibition of Melanization by a Parasitoid Serine Protease Homolog Venom Protein Requires Both the Clip and the Non-Catalytic Protease-Like Domains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sassan Asgari

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Endoparasitoid wasps inject a variety of components into their host hemocoel at oviposition to facilitate successful development of their progeny. Among these are venom proteins which have been shown to play crucial roles in host regulation. A serine protease homolog (SPH-like venom protein from Cotesia rubecula was previously shown to inhibit melanization in the host hemolymph by blocking activation of prophenoloxidase to phenoloxidase, a key enzyme in melanin formation. Similar to other SPHs, Vn50 consists of a clip and a protease-like (SPL domain. Protein modeling demonstrated that Vn50 has a very similar structure to known SPHs and functional analysis of Vn50 domains expressed in insect cells indicated that neither of the domains on its own has an inhibitory effect on melanization.

  15. Enzyme specificity and effects of gyroxin, a serine protease from the venom of the South American rattlesnake Crotalus durissus terrificus, on protease-activated receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonamine, Camila M; Kondo, Marcia Y; Nering, Marcela B; Gouvêa, Iuri E; Okamoto, Débora; Andrade, Douglas; da Silva, José Alberto A; Prieto da Silva, Alvaro R B; Yamane, Tetsuo; Juliano, Maria A; Juliano, Luiz; Lapa, Antônio J; Hayashi, Mirian A F; Lima-Landman, Maria Teresa R

    2014-03-01

    Gyroxin is a serine protease displaying a thrombin-like activity found in the venom of the South American rattlesnake Crotalus durissus terrificus. Typically, intravenous injection of purified gyroxin induces a barrel rotation syndrome in mice. The serine protease thrombin activates platelets aggregation by cleaving and releasing a tethered N-terminus peptide from the G-protein-coupled receptors, known as protease-activated receptors (PARs). Gyroxin also presents pro-coagulant activity suggested to be dependent of PARs activation. In the present work, the effects of these serine proteases, namely gyroxin and thrombin, on PARs were comparatively studied by characterizing the hydrolytic specificity and kinetics using PARs-mimetic FRET peptides. We show for the first time that the short (sh) and long (lg) peptides mimetizing the PAR-1, -2, -3, and -4 activation sites are all hydrolyzed by gyroxin exclusively after the Arg residues. Thrombin also hydrolyzes PAR-1 and -4 after the Arg residue, but hydrolyzes sh and lg PAR-3 after the Lys residue. The kcat/KM values determined for gyroxin using sh and lg PAR-4 mimetic peptides were at least 2150 and 400 times smaller than those determined for thrombin, respectively. For the sh and lg PAR-2 mimetic peptides the kcat/KM values determined for gyroxin were at least 6500 and 2919 times smaller than those determined for trypsin, respectively. The kcat/KM values for gyroxin using the PAR-1 and -3 mimetic peptides could not be determined due to the extreme low hydrolysis velocity. Moreover, the functional studies of the effects of gyroxin on PARs were conducted in living cells using cultured astrocytes, which express all PARs. Despite the ability to cleavage the PAR-1, -2, -3, and -4 peptides, gyroxin was unable to activate the PARs expressed in astrocytes as determined by evaluating the cytosolic calcium mobilization. On the other hand, we also showed that gyroxin is able to interfere with the activation of PAR-1 by thrombin or

  16. Identification and characterization of human polyserase-3, a novel protein with tandem serine-protease domains in the same polypeptide chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garabaya Cecilia

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have previously described the identification and characterization of polyserase-1 and polyserase-2, two human serine proteases containing three different catalytic domains within the same polypeptide chain. Polyserase-1 shows a complex organization and it is synthesized as a membrane-bound protein which can generate three independent serine protease domains as a consequence of post-translational processing events. The two first domains are enzymatically active. By contrast, polyserase-2 is an extracellular glycosylated protein whose three protease domains remain embedded in the same chain, and only the first domain possesses catalytic activity. Results Following our interest in the study of the human degradome, we have cloned a human liver cDNA encoding polyserase-3, a new protease with tandem serine protease domains in the same polypeptide chain. Comparative analysis of polyserase-3 with the two human polyserases described to date, revealed that this novel polyprotein is more closely related to polyserase-2 than to polyserase-1. Thus, polyserase-3 is a secreted protein such as polyserase-2, but lacks additional domains like the type II transmembrane motif and the low-density lipoprotein receptor module present in the membrane-anchored polyserase-1. Moreover, analysis of post-translational mechanisms operating in polyserase-3 maturation showed that its two protease domains remain as integral parts of the same polypeptide chain. This situation is similar to that observed in polyserase-2, but distinct from polyserase-1 whose protease domains are proteolytically released from the original chain to generate independent units. Immunolocalization studies indicated that polyserase-3 is secreted as a non-glycosylated protein, thus being also distinct from polyserase-2, which is a heavily glycosylated protein. Enzymatic assays indicated that recombinant polyserase-3 degrades the α-chain of fibrinogen as well as pro

  17. Clinical and metabolic consequences of L-serine supplementation in hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type 1C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auranen, Mari; Toppila, Jussi; Suriyanarayanan, Saranya; Lone, Museer A; Paetau, Anders; Tyynismaa, Henna; Hornemann, Thorsten; Ylikallio, Emil

    2017-11-01

    Hereditary sensory neuropathy type 1 (HSAN1) may be the first genetic neuropathy amenable to a specific mechanism-based treatment, as L-serine supplementation can be used to lower the neurotoxic levels of 1-deoxysphingolipids (1-deoxySL) that cause the neurodegeneration. The treatment is so far untested in HSAN1C caused by variants in the serine palmitoyl transferase subunit 2 (SPTLC2) gene. The aim of this study was to establish whether oral L-serine lowers 1-deoxySL in a patient with HSAN1C, to perform a dose escalation to find the minimal effective dose, and to assess the safety profile and global metabolic effects of the treatment. Our patient underwent a 52-wk treatment in which the L-serine dose was titrated up to 400 mg/kg/day. She was followed up by repeated clinical examination, nerve conduction testing, and skin biopsies to document effects on small nerve fibers. Serum was assayed for 1-deoxySL and metabolomics analysis of 111 metabolites. We found a robust lowering of 1-deoxySL, which correlated in a near-linear fashion with increased serum L-serine levels. Metabolomics analysis showed a modest elevation in glycine and a marked reduction in the level of cytosine, whereas most of the other assayed metabolites did not change. There were no direct side effects from the treatment, but the patient developed a transitory toe ulceration during the course of the study. The Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy score increased by 1 point. We conclude that oral supplementation of L-serine decreases 1-deoxySL in HSAN1C without major global effects on metabolism. L-serine is therefore a potential treatment for HSAN1C. © 2017 Auranen et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  18. Efficient Reassignment of a Frequent Serine Codon in Wild-Type Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Joanne M; Reynolds, Noah M; Rivera, Keith; Connolly, Morgan; Guo, Li-Tao; Ling, Jiqiang; Pappin, Darryl J; Church, George M; Söll, Dieter

    2016-02-19

    Expansion of the genetic code through engineering the translation machinery has greatly increased the chemical repertoire of the proteome. This has been accomplished mainly by read-through of UAG or UGA stop codons by the noncanonical aminoacyl-tRNA of choice. While stop codon read-through involves competition with the translation release factors, sense codon reassignment entails competition with a large pool of endogenous tRNAs. We used an engineered pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase to incorporate 3-iodo-l-phenylalanine (3-I-Phe) at a number of different serine and leucine codons in wild-type Escherichia coli. Quantitative LC-MS/MS measurements of amino acid incorporation yields carried out in a selected reaction monitoring experiment revealed that the 3-I-Phe abundance at the Ser208AGU codon in superfolder GFP was 65 ± 17%. This method also allowed quantification of other amino acids (serine, 33 ± 17%; phenylalanine, 1 ± 1%; threonine, 1 ± 1%) that compete with 3-I-Phe at both the aminoacylation and decoding steps of translation for incorporation at the same codon position. Reassignments of different serine (AGU, AGC, UCG) and leucine (CUG) codons with the matching tRNA(Pyl) anticodon variants were met with varying success, and our findings provide a guideline for the choice of sense codons to be reassigned. Our results indicate that the 3-iodo-l-phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase (IFRS)/tRNA(Pyl) pair can efficiently outcompete the cellular machinery to reassign select sense codons in wild-type E. coli.

  19. Serine Proteolytic Pathway Activation Reveals an Expanded Ensemble of Wound Response Genes in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Rachel A.; Juarez, Michelle T.; Hermann, Anita; Sasik, Roman; Hardiman, Gary; McGinnis, William

    2013-01-01

    After injury to the animal epidermis, a variety of genes are transcriptionally activated in nearby cells to regenerate the missing cells and facilitate barrier repair. The range and types of diffusible wound signals that are produced by damaged epidermis and function to activate repair genes during epidermal regeneration remains a subject of very active study in many animals. In Drosophila embryos, we have discovered that serine protease function is locally activated around wound sites, and is also required for localized activation of epidermal repair genes. The serine protease trypsin is sufficient to induce a striking global epidermal wound response without inflicting cell death or compromising the integrity of the epithelial barrier. We developed a trypsin wounding treatment as an amplification tool to more fully understand the changes in the Drosophila transcriptome that occur after epidermal injury. By comparing our array results with similar results on mammalian skin wounding we can see which evolutionarily conserved pathways are activated after epidermal wounding in very diverse animals. Our innovative serine protease-mediated wounding protocol allowed us to identify 8 additional genes that are activated in epidermal cells in the immediate vicinity of puncture wounds, and the functions of many of these genes suggest novel genetic pathways that may control epidermal wound repair. Additionally, our data augments the evidence that clean puncture wounding can mount a powerful innate immune transcriptional response, with different innate immune genes being activated in an interesting variety of ways. These include puncture-induced activation only in epidermal cells in the immediate vicinity of wounds, or in all epidermal cells, or specifically in the fat body, or in multiple tissues. PMID:23637905

  20. D-configuration of serine is crucial in maintaining the phalloidin-like conformation of viroisin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanotti, G; Kobayashi, N; Munekata, E; Zobeley, S; Faulstich, H

    1999-08-17

    NMR studies have revealed that the conformation of the monocyclic viroisin is dissimilar to that of the corresponding monocyclic derivative of phalloidin, dethiophalloidin, but has much similarity with the conformation of the bicyclic phalloidin. Obviously, one of three structural features found exclusively in the virotoxins is able to compensate for the conformational strain that in the bicyclic phallotoxins maintains the toxic conformation. Synthetic work on virotoxin analogues has shown that both the additional hydroxy group in allo-hydroxyproline and the methylsulfonyl moiety in the 2'-position of tryptophan are unlikely to represent the structural element in question, leaving the D-serine moiety as the supposed key element. In this study we asked whether it is the hydroxy group of this amino acid or its D-configuration that is responsible for the effect. We synthesized four viroisin analogues and submitted them to conformational analysis by NMR as well as to an actin binding assay. While the rotating-frame nuclear Overhauser effect (ROESY) spectra of the analogues with L-configured amino acids showed several sets of signals, indicating the existence of conformers interconverting more slowly than the NMR time scale, the spectra of the analogues with D-configured amino acids showed only one set of signals. Remarkably, the two viroisin analogues with D-serine and D-alanine also had distinctly higher affinities for filamentous actin than their L-configured counterparts, suggesting that the high biological activity may be correlated with the absence of multiple and slowly interconverting conformers. Anyhow, D-configuration of serine is the structural element that maintains the phalloidin-like structure, while the hydroxy group does not contribute to conformational stability but is likely to be in contact with the actin surface.

  1. Serine proteolytic pathway activation reveals an expanded ensemble of wound response genes in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel A Patterson

    Full Text Available After injury to the animal epidermis, a variety of genes are transcriptionally activated in nearby cells to regenerate the missing cells and facilitate barrier repair. The range and types of diffusible wound signals that are produced by damaged epidermis and function to activate repair genes during epidermal regeneration remains a subject of very active study in many animals. In Drosophila embryos, we have discovered that serine protease function is locally activated around wound sites, and is also required for localized activation of epidermal repair genes. The serine protease trypsin is sufficient to induce a striking global epidermal wound response without inflicting cell death or compromising the integrity of the epithelial barrier. We developed a trypsin wounding treatment as an amplification tool to more fully understand the changes in the Drosophila transcriptome that occur after epidermal injury. By comparing our array results with similar results on mammalian skin wounding we can see which evolutionarily conserved pathways are activated after epidermal wounding in very diverse animals. Our innovative serine protease-mediated wounding protocol allowed us to identify 8 additional genes that are activated in epidermal cells in the immediate vicinity of puncture wounds, and the functions of many of these genes suggest novel genetic pathways that may control epidermal wound repair. Additionally, our data augments the evidence that clean puncture wounding can mount a powerful innate immune transcriptional response, with different innate immune genes being activated in an interesting variety of ways. These include puncture-induced activation only in epidermal cells in the immediate vicinity of wounds, or in all epidermal cells, or specifically in the fat body, or in multiple tissues.

  2. Biochemical and biological characterization of two serine proteinases from Colombian Crotalus durissus cumanensis snake venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patiño, Arley Camilo; Pereañez, Jaime Andrés; Gutiérrez, José María; Rucavado, Alexandra

    2013-03-01

    Two clotting serine proteinases, named Cdc SI and Cdc SII, were isolated and characterized for the first time from Colombian Crotalus durissus cumanensis snake venom. The enzymes were purified using two chromatographic steps: molecular exclusion on Sephacryl S-200 and RP-HPLC on C8 Column. The molecular masses of the proteins, determined by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, were 28,561.4 and 28,799.2 Da for Cdc SI and Cdc SII, respectively. The aim of the present study was to evaluate enzymatic, coagulant and toxic properties of the two enzymes. The serine proteinases hydrolyzed specific chromogenic substrate (BaPNA) and exhibited a Michaelis-Menten behavior. Cdc SI had V(max) of 0.038 ± 0.003 nmol/min and K(M) of 0.034 ± 0.017 mM, while Cdc SII displayed values of V(max) of 0.267 ± 0.011 nmol/min and K(M) of 0.145 ± 0.023 mM. N-terminal sequences were VIGGDEXNIN and VIGGDICNINEHNFLVALYE for Cdc SI and Cdc SII, respectively. Molecular masses, N-terminal sequences, inhibition assays, and enzymatic profile suggest that Cdc SI and Cdc SII belong to the family of snake venom thrombin-like enzymes. These serine proteinases differed in their clotting activity on human plasma, showing a minimum coagulant dose of 25 μg and 0.571 μg for Cdc SI and Cdc SII, respectively. Enzymes also showed coagulant activity on bovine fibrinogen and degraded chain α of this protein. Toxins lack hemorrhagic and myotoxic activities, but are capable to induce defibrin(ogen)ation, moderate edema, and an increase in vascular permeability. These serine proteinases may contribute indirectly to the local hemorrhage induced by metalloproteinases, by causing blood clotting disturbances, and might also contribute to cardiovascular alterations characteristic of patients envenomed by C. d. cumanensis in Colombia. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) modulates trophic signaling through interaction with serine protease HTRA1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fex Svenningsen, Åsa; Loering, Svenja; Sørensen, Anna Lahn

    2017-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), a small conserved protein, is abundant in the immune- and central nervous system (CNS). MIF has several receptors and binding partners that can modulate its action on a cel-lular level. It is upregulated in neurodegenerative diseases and cancer although...... its function is far from clear. Here, we report the finding of a new binding partner to MIF, the ser-ine protease HTRA1. This enzyme cleaves several growth factors, extracellular matrix molecules and is implicated in some of the same diseases as MIF. We show that the func-tion of the binding between...

  4. Structural, Linear, and Nonlinear Optical and Mechanical Properties of New Organic L-Serine Crystal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Rajesh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonlinear optical single crystal of organic amino acid L-Serine (LS was grown by slow evaporation technique. Solubility study of the compound was measured and metastable zone width was found. Single crystal X-ray diffraction study was carried out for the grown crystal. The linear and nonlinear optical properties of the crystal were confirmed by UV-Vis analysis and powder SHG tester. FT-IR spectrum was recorded and functional groups were analyzed. Vickers’ microhardness studies showed the mechanical strength of the grown crystal. Laser damage threshold value of the crystal was calculated. Photoconductivity studies reveal the conductivity of the crystal.

  5. Campylobacter jejuni gene cj0511 encodes a serine peptidase essential for colonisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.V. Karlyshev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available According to MEROPS peptidase database, Campylobacter species encode 64 predicted peptidases. However, proteolytic properties of only a few of these proteins have been confirmed experimentally. In this study we identified and characterised a Campylobacter jejuni gene cj0511 encoding a novel peptidase. The proteolytic activity associated with this enzyme was demonstrated in cell lysates. Moreover, enzymatic studies conducted with a purified protein confirmed a prediction of it being a serine peptidase. Furthermore, cj0511 mutant was found to be severely attenuated in chicken colonisation model, suggesting a role of the Cj0511 protein in infection.

  6. Phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1 serine 307 correlates with JNK activity in atrophic skeletal muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilder, Thomas L.; Tou, Janet C L.; Grindeland, Richard E.; Wade, Charles E.; Graves, Lee M.

    2003-01-01

    c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK) has been shown to negatively regulate insulin signaling through serine phosphorylation of residue 307 within the insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) in adipose and liver tissue. Using a rat hindlimb suspension model for muscle disuse atrophy, we found that JNK activity was significantly elevated in atrophic soleus muscle and that IRS-1 was phosphorylated on Ser(307) prior to the degradation of the IRS-1 protein. Moreover, we observed a corresponding reduction in Akt activity, providing biochemical evidence for the development of insulin resistance in atrophic skeletal muscle.

  7. Comparative characterization of Aedes 3-hydroxykynurenine transaminase/alanine glyoxylate transaminase and Drosophila serine pyruvate aminotransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Qian; Li, Jianyong

    2002-09-11

    This study describes the comparative analysis of two insect recombinant aminotransferases, Aedes aegypti 3-hydroxykynurenine (3-HK) transaminase/alanine glyoxylate aminotransferase (Ae-HKT/AGT) and Drosophila melanogaster serine pyruvate aminotransferase (Dm-Spat), which share 52% identity in their amino acid sequences. Both enzymes showed AGT activity. In addition, Ae-HKT/AGT is also able to catalyze the transamination of 3-HK or kynurenine with glyoxylate, pyruvate or oxaloacetate as the amino acceptor. Kinetic analysis and other data suggest that Ae-HKT/AGT plays a critical role in mosquito tryptophan catabolism by detoxifying 3-HK and that Dm-Spat is primarily involved in glyoxylate detoxification.

  8. Malonate-based inhibitors of mammalian serine racemase: Kinetic characterization and structure-based computational study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vorlová, Barbora; Nachtigallová, Dana; Jirásková-Vaníčková, Jana; Ajani, Haresh; Jansa, Petr; Řezáč, Jan; Fanfrlík, Jindřich; Otyepka, M.; Hobza, Pavel; Konvalinka, Jan; Lepšík, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 89, Jan 7 (2015), s. 189-197 ISSN 0223-5234 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP208/12/G016 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) ED2.1.00/03.0058 Program:ED Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : NMDA receptor * pyridoxal-5 '-phosphate-dependent enzyme * human/mouse serine racemase * malonate-based inhibitors * semiempirical quantum mechanical calculations Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.902, year: 2015

  9. Site-specific and synergistic stimulation of methylation on the bacterial chemotaxis receptor Tsr by serine and CheW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weis Robert M

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Specific glutamates in the methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins (MCPs of Escherichia coli are modified during sensory adaptation. Attractants that bind to MCPs are known to increase the rate of receptor modification, as with serine and the serine receptor (Tsr, which contributes to an increase in the steady-state (adapted methylation level. However, MCPs form ternary complexes with two cytoplasmic signaling proteins, the kinase (CheA and an adaptor protein (CheW, but their influences on receptor methylation are unknown. Here, the influence of CheW on the rate of Tsr methylation has been studied to identify contributions to the process of adaptation. Results Methyl group incorporation was measured in a series of membrane samples in which the Tsr molecules were engineered to have one available methyl-accepting glutamate residue (297, 304, 311 or 493. The relative rates at these sites (0.14, 0.05, 0.05 and 1, respectively differed from those found previously for the aspartate receptor (Tar, which was in part due to sequence differences between Tar and Tsr near site four. The addition of CheW generated unexpectedly large and site-specific rate increases, equal to or larger than the increases produced by serine. The increases produced by serine and CheW (added separately were the largest at site one, ~3 and 6-fold, respectively, and the least at site four, no change and ~2-fold, respectively. The rate increases were even larger when serine and CheW were added together, larger than the sums of the increases produced by serine and CheW added separately (except site four. This resulted in substantially larger serine-stimulated increases when CheW was present. Also, CheW enhanced methylation rates when either two or all four sites were available. Conclusion The increase in the rate of receptor methylation upon CheW binding contributes significantly to the ligand specificity and kinetics of sensory adaptation. The synergistic effect of

  10. Clozapine, but not haloperidol, enhances glial d-serine and L-glutamate release in rat frontal cortex and primary cultured astrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanahashi, Shunske; Yamamura, Satoshi; Nakagawa, Masanori; Motomura, Eishi; Okada, Motohiro

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Deficient transmission at the glutamate NMDA receptor is considered a key component of the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. However, the effects of antipsychotic drugs on the release of the endogenous NMDA receptor partial agonist, d-serine, remain to be clarified. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH We determined the interaction between antipsychotic drugs (clozapine and haloperidol) and transmission-modulating toxins (tetanus toxin, fluorocitrate, tetrodotoxin) on the release of L-glutamate and d-serine in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) of freely moving rats, using microdialysis, and primary cultures of astrocytes using extreme high-pressure liquid chromatography. KEY RESULTS Release of L-glutamate and d-serine in the mPFC and in cultured astrocytes was inhibited by tetanus toxin (a synaptobrevin inhibitor) and fluorocitrate (a glial toxin), whereas tetrodotoxin (a voltage-sensitive Na+ blocker) inhibited depolarization-induced L-glutamate release in the mPFC without affecting that of d-serine. Clozapine (1 and 5 mg·kg−1), but not haloperidol (0.5 and 1 mg·kg−1), dose-dependently increased L-glutamate and d-serine release from both astrocytes and mPFC. Clozapine-induced release of L-glutamate and d-serine was also reduced by tetanus toxin and fluorocitrate. Tetrodotoxin reduced clozapine-induced mPFC L-glutamate release but not that of d-serine. Clozapine-induced L-glutamate release preceded clozapine-induced d-serine release. MK-801 (a NMDA receptor antagonist) inhibited the delayed clozapine-induced L-glutamate release without affecting that of d-serine. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Clozapine predominantly activated glial exocytosis of d-serine, and this clozapine-induced d-serine release subsequently enhances neuronal L-glutamate release via NMDA receptor activation. The enhanced d-serine associated glial transmission seems a novel mechanism of action of clozapine but not haloperidol. PMID:21880034

  11. ‘Heat-Treatment Aqueous Two Phase System’ for Purification of Serine Protease from Kesinai (Streblus asper Leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuhaimi Mustafa

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A ‘Heat treatment aqueous two phase system’ was employed for the first time to purify serine protease from kesinai (Streblus asper leaves. In this study, introduction of heat treatment procedure in serine protease purification was investigated. In addition, the effects of different molecular weights of polyethylene glycol (PEG 4000, 6000 and 8000 at concentrations of 8, 16 and 21% (w/w as well as salts (Na-citrate, MgSO4 and K2HPO4 at concentrations of 12, 15, 18% (w/w on serine protease partition behavior were studied. Optimum conditions for serine protease purification were achieved in the PEG-rich phase with composition of 16% PEG6000-15% MgSO4. Also, thermal treatment of kesinai leaves at 55 °C for 15 min resulted in higher purity and recovery yield compared to the non-heat treatment sample. Furthermore, this study investigated the effects of various concentrations of NaCl addition (2, 4, 6 and 8% w/w and different pH (4, 7 and 9 on the optimization of the system to obtain high yields of the enzyme. The recovery of serine protease was significantly enhanced in the presence of 4% (w/w of NaCl at pH 7.0. Based on this system, the purification factor was increased 14.4 fold and achieved a high yield of 96.7%.

  12. Optimization of the Conditions for Extraction of Serine Protease from Kesinai Plant (Streblus asper Leaves Using Response Surface Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Zaidul Islam Sarker

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Response surface methodology (RSM using a central composite design (CCD was employed to optimize the conditions for extraction of serine protease from kesinai (Streblus asper leaves. The effect of independent variables, namely temperature (42.5,47.5, X1, mixing time (2–6 min, X2, buffer content (0–80 mL, X3 and buffer pH (4.5–10.5, X4 on specific activity, storage stability, temperature and oxidizing agent stability of serine protease from kesinai leaves was investigated. The study demonstrated that use of the optimum temperature, mixing time, buffer content and buffer pH conditions protected serine protease during extraction, as demonstrated by low activity loss. It was found that the interaction effect of mixing time and buffer content improved the serine protease stability, and the buffer pH had the most significant effect on the specific activity of the enzyme. The most desirable conditions of 2.5 °C temperature, 4 min mixing time, 40 mL buffer at pH 7.5 was established for serine protease extraction from kesinai leaves.

  13. Genome-Wide Identification and Immune Response Analysis of Serine Protease Inhibitor Genes in the Silkworm, Bombyx mori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Jun; Wang, Genhong; Wang, Lingyan; Li, Youshan; Xiang, Zhonghuai; Xia, Qingyou

    2012-01-01

    In most insect species, a variety of serine protease inhibitors (SPIs) have been found in multiple tissues, including integument, gonad, salivary gland, and hemolymph, and are required for preventing unwanted proteolysis. These SPIs belong to different families and have distinct inhibitory mechanisms. Herein, we predicted and characterized potential SPI genes based on the genome sequences of silkworm, Bombyx mori. As a result, a total of eighty SPI genes were identified in B. mori. These SPI genes contain 10 kinds of SPI domains, including serpin, Kunitz_BPTI, Kazal, TIL, amfpi, Bowman-Birk, Antistasin, WAP, Pacifastin, and alpha-macroglobulin. Sixty-three SPIs contain single SPI domain while the others have at least two inhibitor units. Some SPIs also contain non-inhibitor domains for protein-protein interactions, including EGF, ADAM_spacer, spondin_N, reeler, TSP_1 and other modules. Microarray analysis showed that fourteen SPI genes from lineage-specific TIL family and Group F of serpin family had enriched expression in the silk gland. The roles of SPIs in resisting pathogens were investigated in silkworms when they were infected by four pathogens. Microarray and qRT-PCR experiments revealed obvious up-regulation of 8, 4, 3 and 3 SPI genes after infection with Escherichia coli, Bacillus bombysepticus, Beauveria bassiana or B. mori nuclear polyhedrosis virus (BmNPV), respectively. On the contrary, 4, 11, 7 and 9 SPI genes were down-regulated after infection with E. coli, B. bombysepticus, B. bassiana or BmNPV, respectively. These results suggested that these SPI genes may be involved in resistance to pathogenic microorganisms. These findings may provide valuable information for further clarifying the roles of SPIs in the development, immune defence, and efficient synthesis of silk gland protein. PMID:22348050

  14. Conservative Mechanisms of Extracellular Trap Formation by Annelida Eisenia andrei: Serine Protease Activity Requirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homa, Joanna; Ortmann, Weronika; Kolaczkowska, Elzbieta

    2016-01-01

    Formation of extracellular traps (ETs) capturing and immobilizing pathogens is now a well-established defense mechanism added to the repertoire of vertebrate phagocytes. These ETs are composed of extracellular DNA (extDNA), histones and antimicrobial proteins. Formation of mouse and human ETs depends on enzymes (i) facilitating decondensation of chromatin by citrullination of histones, and (ii) serine proteases degrading histones. In invertebrates, initial reports revealed existence of ETs composed of extDNA and histones, and here we document for the first time that also coelomocytes, immunocompetent cells of an earthworm Eisenia andrei, cast ETs which successfully trap bacteria in a reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent and -independent manner. Importantly, the formation of ETs was observed not only when coelomocytes were studied ex vivo, but also in vivo, directly in the earthworm coelom. These ETs were composed of extDNA, heat shock proteins (HSP27) and H3 histones. Furthermore, the formation of E. andrei ETs depended on activity of serine proteases, including elastase-like activity. Moreover, ETs interconnected and hold together aggregating coelomocytes, a processes proceeding encapsulation. In conclusion, the study confirms ET formation by earthworms, and unravels mechanisms leading to ET formation and encapsulation in invertebrates.

  15. Conservative Mechanisms of Extracellular Trap Formation by Annelida Eisenia andrei: Serine Protease Activity Requirement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Homa

    Full Text Available Formation of extracellular traps (ETs capturing and immobilizing pathogens is now a well-established defense mechanism added to the repertoire of vertebrate phagocytes. These ETs are composed of extracellular DNA (extDNA, histones and antimicrobial proteins. Formation of mouse and human ETs depends on enzymes (i facilitating decondensation of chromatin by citrullination of histones, and (ii serine proteases degrading histones. In invertebrates, initial reports revealed existence of ETs composed of extDNA and histones, and here we document for the first time that also coelomocytes, immunocompetent cells of an earthworm Eisenia andrei, cast ETs which successfully trap bacteria in a reactive oxygen species (ROS-dependent and -independent manner. Importantly, the formation of ETs was observed not only when coelomocytes were studied ex vivo, but also in vivo, directly in the earthworm coelom. These ETs were composed of extDNA, heat shock proteins (HSP27 and H3 histones. Furthermore, the formation of E. andrei ETs depended on activity of serine proteases, including elastase-like activity. Moreover, ETs interconnected and hold together aggregating coelomocytes, a processes proceeding encapsulation. In conclusion, the study confirms ET formation by earthworms, and unravels mechanisms leading to ET formation and encapsulation in invertebrates.

  16. Insulin Induces Phosphorylation of Serine Residues of Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein in 293T Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeehye Maeng

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Insulin induces the activation of Na,K-ATPase while translationally controlled tumor protein (TCTP inhibits this enzyme and the associated pump activity. Because binding of insulin with its membrane receptor is known to mediate the phosphorylation of multiple intracellular proteins, phosphorylation of TCTP by insulin might be related to the sodium pump regulation. We therefore examined whether insulin induces TCTP phosphorylation in embryonic kidney 293T cells. Using immunoprecipitation and Western blotting, we found that insulin phosphorylates serine (Ser residues of TCTP. Following fractionation of the insulin-treated cells into cytosol and membrane fractions, phosphorylated TCTP at its Ser residue (p-Ser-TCTP was detected exclusively in the cytosolic part and not in the membrane fraction. Phosphorylation of TCTP reached maximum in about 10 min after insulin treatment in 293T cells. In studies of cell-type specificity of insulin-mediated phosphorylation of TCTP, insulin did not phosphorylate TCTP in HeLa cells. Computational prediction and immunoprecipitation using several constructs having Ser to Ala mutation at potential p-Ser sites of TCTP revealed that insulin phosphorylated the serine-9 and -15 residues of TCTP. Elucidations of how insulin-mediated TCTP phosphorylation promotes Na,K-ATPase activation, may offer potential therapeutic approaches to diseases associated with vascular activity and sodium pump dysregulation.

  17. Crystal Structure of the Catalytic Domain of a Serine Threonine Protein Phosphatase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinglel, Mark; Honkanel, Richard; Ciszak, Ewa

    2003-01-01

    Reversible phosphorylation of serine and threonine residues is a well-recognized mechanism in eukaryotic cells for the regulation of cell-cycle progression, cell growth and metabolism. Human serine/threonine phosphatases can be placed into two major families, PPP and PPM. To date the structure on one PPP family member (PPl) has been determined. Here we present the structure of a 323-residue catalytic domain of a second phosphatase belonging to the PPP family of enzyme. catalytic domain of the enzyme has been determined to 1.60Angstrom resolution and refined to R=17.5 and Rfree = 20.8%. The catalytic domain possesses a unique fold consisting of a largely monolithic structure, divisible into closely-associated helical and sheet regions. The catalytic site contains two manganese ions that are involved in substrate binding and catalysis. The enzyme crystallizes as a dimer that completely buries catalytic surfaces of both monomers, Also, the structure shows evidence of some flexibility around the active site cleft that may be related to substrate specificity of this enzyme.

  18. A novel serine protease with human fibrino(geno)lytic activities from Artocarpus heterophyllus latex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siritapetawee, Jaruwan; Thumanu, Kanjana; Sojikul, Punchapat; Thammasirirak, Sompong

    2012-07-01

    A protease was isolated and purified from Artocarpus heterophyllus (jackfruit) latex and designated as a 48-kDa antimicrobial protease (AMP48) in a previous publication. In this work, the enzyme was characterized for more biochemical and medicinal properties. Enzyme activity of AMP48 was strongly inhibited by phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride and soybean trypsin inhibitor, indicating that the enzyme was a plant serine protease. The N-terminal amino acid sequences (A-Q-E-G-G-K-D-D-D-G-G) of AMP48 had no sequence similarity matches with any sequence databases of BLAST search and other plant serine protease. The secondary structure of this enzyme was composed of high α-helix (51%) and low β-sheet (9%). AMP48 had fibrinogenolytic activity with maximal activity between 55 and 60°C at pH 8. The enzyme efficiently hydrolyzed α followed by partially hydrolyzed β and γ subunits of human fibrinogen. In addition, the fibrinolytic activity was observed through the degradation products by SDS-PAGE and emphasized its activity by monitoring the alteration of secondary structure of fibrin clot after enzyme digestion using ATR-FTIR spectroscopy. This study presented the potential role to use AMP48 as antithrombotic for treatment thromboembolic disorders such as strokes, pulmonary emboli and deep vein thrombosis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Chemical modification of serine at the active site of penicillin acylase from Kluyvera citrophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, J; Slade, A; Aitken, A; Arche, R; Virden, R

    1991-01-01

    The site of reaction of penicillin acylase from Kluyvera citrophila with the potent inhibitor phenylmethanesulphonyl fluoride was investigated by incubating the inactivated enzyme with thioacetic acid to convert the side chain of the putative active-site serine residue to that of cysteine. The protein product contained one thiol group, which was reactive towards 2,2'-dipyridyl disulphide and iodoacetic acid. Carboxymethylcysteine was identified as the N-terminal residue of the beta-subunit of the carboxy[3H]methylthiol-protein. No significant changes in tertiary structure were detected in the modified penicillin acylase using near-u.v. c.d. spectroscopy. However, the catalytic activity (kcat) with either an anilide or an ester substrate was decreased in the thiol-protein by a factor of more than 10(4). A comparison of sequences of apparently related acylases shows no other extensive regions of conserved sequence containing an invariant serine residue. The side chain of this residue is proposed as a candidate nucleophile in the formation of an acyl-enzyme during catalysis. PMID:1764029

  20. A Novel Serine Protease Secreted by Medicinal Maggots Enhances Plasminogen Activator-Induced Fibrinolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Plas, Mariena J. A.; Andersen, Anders S.; Nazir, Sheresma; van Tilburg, Nico H.; Oestergaard, Peter R.; Krogfelt, Karen A.; van Dissel, Jaap T.; Hensbergen, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    Maggots of the blowfly Lucilia sericata are used for the treatment of chronic wounds. As haemostatic processes play an important role in wound healing, this study focused on the effects of maggot secretions on coagulation and fibrinolysis. The results showed that maggot secretions enhance plasminogen activator-induced formation of plasmin and fibrinolysis in a dose- and time-dependent manner. By contrast, coagulation was not affected by secretions. Biochemical studies indicated that a novel serine protease within secretions, designated Sericase, cleaved plasminogen to several fragments. Recombinant Sericase degraded plasminogen leading amongst others to the formation of the mini-plasminogen like fragment Val454-plasminogen. In addition, the presence of a non-proteolytic cofactor in secretions was discovered, which plays a role in the enhancement of plasminogen activator-induced fibrinolysis by Sericase. We conclude from our in vitro studies that the novel serine protease Sericase, with the aid of a non-proteolytic cofactor, enhances plasminogen activator-induced fibrinolysis. PMID:24647546

  1. Structure Determination of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Serine Protease Hip1 (Rv2224c)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naffin-Olivos, Jacqueline L.; Daab, Andrew; White, Andre; Goldfarb, Nathan E.; Milne, Amy C.; Liu, Dali; Baikovitz, Jacqueline; Dunn, Ben M.; Rengarajan, Jyothi; Petsko, Gregory A.; Ringe, Dagmar

    2017-04-07

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) serine protease Hip1 (hydrolase important for pathogenesis; Rv2224c) promotes tuberculosis (TB) pathogenesis by impairing host immune responses through proteolysis of a protein substrate, Mtb GroEL2. The cell surface localization of Hip1 and its immunomodulatory functions make Hip1 a good drug target for new adjunctive immune therapies for TB. Here, we report the crystal structure of Hip1 to a resolution of 2.6 Å and the kinetic studies of the enzyme against model substrates and the protein GroEL2. The structure shows a two-domain protein, one of which contains the catalytic residues that are the signature of a serine protease. Surprisingly, a threonine is located within the active site close enough to hydrogen bond with the catalytic residues Asp463 and His490. Mutation of this residue, Thr466, to alanine established its importance for function. Our studies provide insights into the structure of a member of a novel family of proteases. Knowledge of the Hip1 structure will aid in designing inhibitors that could block Hip1 activity

  2. The conformation change and tumor suppressor role of Merlin are both independent of Serine 518 phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Wancai; Li, Meng; Zhang, Fayou; Ma, Xing; Long, Jiafu; Zhou, Hao

    2017-11-04

    Merlin functions as a tumor suppressor and suppresses malignant activity of cancer cells through multiple mechanisms. However, whether Serine 518 phosphorylation regulates the conformation of Merlin as well as the open-closed conformational changes affect Merlin's tumor inhibitory activity remain controversial. In this study, we used different mutants to mimic related conformational states of Merlin and investigated its physiological functions. Our results showed that the phosphorylation at Serine 518 has no influence on Merlin's conformation, subcellular localization, or cell proliferation inhibitory activity. As a fully closed conformational state, the A585W mutant loses the ability to recruit Lats2 to the cell membrane, but it does not affect its subcellular distribution or cell proliferation inhibitory activity. As a fully open conformational state, mimicking the conformation of Merlin isoform II, the ΔEL mutant has the same physiological function as the wild type Merlin isoform I. Collectively, we provide for the first time in vivo evidence that the function of Merlin, as a tumor suppressor is independent of its conformational change. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Midgut serine proteinases and alternative host plant utilization in Pieris brassicae L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh eKumar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Pieris brassicae L. is a serious pest of cultivated crucifers in several parts of theworld. Larvae of P. brassicae also feed prolifically on garden nasturtium (Tropaeolummajus L., of the family Tropaeolaceae. Proteolytic digestion was studied in larvaefeeding on multiple hosts. Fourth instars were collected from cauliflower fields beforetransfer onto detached, aerial tissues of selected host plants in the lab. Variable levels ofmidgut serine proteinases were detected in larvae fed on different hosts using proteinsubstrates (casein and recombinant RBCL cloned from cauliflower and diagnostic,synthetic substrates. Qualitative changes in midgut trypsin activities and quantitativechanges in midgut chymotrypsin activities were implicated in physiological adaptation oflarvae transferred to T. majus. Midgut proteolytic activities were inhibited to differentextents by serine proteinase inhibitors, including putative trypsin inhibitors isolated fromherbivore-attacked and herbivore-free leaves of cauliflower (CfTI and T. majus (TpTI.Transfer of larvae to T. majus significantly influenced feeding parameters but notnecessarily when transferred to different tissues of the same host. Results obtained arerelevant for devising sustainable pest management strategies, including transgenicapproaches using genes encoding plant protease inhibitors.

  4. Realizing Serine/Threonine Ligation: Scope and Limitations and Mechanistic Implication Thereof

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarence T. T. Wong

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Serine/Threonine ligation (STL has emerged as an alternative tool for protein chemical synthesis, bioconjugations as well as macrocyclization of peptides of various sizes. Owning to the high abundance of Ser/Thr residues in natural peptides and proteins, STL is expected to find a wide range of applications in chemical biology research. Herein, we have fully investigated the compatibility of the serine/threonine ligation strategy for X-Ser/Thr ligation sites, where X is any of the 20 naturally occurring amino acids. Our studies have shown that 17 amino acids are suitable for ligation, while Asp, Glu, and Lys are not compatible. Among the working 17 C-terminal amino acids, the retarded reaction resulted from the bulky β-branched amino acid (Thr, Val and Ile is not seen under the current ligation condition. We have also investigated the chemoselectivity involving the amino group of the internal lysine which may compete with the N-terminal Ser/Thr for reaction with the C-terminal salicylaldehyde (SAL ester aldehyde group. The result suggested that the free internal amino group does not adversely slow down the ligation rate.

  5. Stepwise Versus Concerted Mechanisms in General-Base Catalysis by Serine Proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uritsky, Neta; Shokhen, Michael; Albeck, Amnon

    2016-01-26

    General-base catalysis in serine proteases still poses mechanistic challenges despite decades of research. Whether proton transfer from the catalytic Ser to His and nucleophilic attack on the substrate are concerted or stepwise is still under debate, even for the classical Asp-His-Ser catalytic triad. To address these key catalytic steps, the transformation of the Michaelis complex to tetrahedral complex in the covalent inhibition of two prototype serine proteases was studied: chymotrypsin (with the catalytic triad) inhibition by a peptidyl trifluoromethane and GlpG rhomboid (with Ser-His dyad) inhibition by an isocoumarin derivative. The sampled MD trajectories of averaged pKa  values of catalytic residues were QM calculated by the MD-QM/SCRF(VS) method on molecular clusters simulating the active site. Differences between concerted and stepwise mechanisms are controlled by the dynamically changing pKa  values of the catalytic residues as a function of their progressively reduced water exposure, caused by the incoming ligand. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Biochemical characterization of a detergent-stable serine alkaline protease from Caldicoprobacter guelmensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouacem, Khelifa; Bouanane-Darenfed, Amel; Laribi-Habchi, Hassiba; Elhoul, Mouna Ben; Hmida-Sayari, Aïda; Hacene, Hocine; Ollivier, Bernard; Fardeau, Marie-Laure; Jaouadi, Bassem; Bejar, Samir

    2015-11-01

    Caldicoprobacter guelmensis isolated from the hydrothermal hot spring of Guelma (Algeria) produced high amounts of extracellular thermostable serine alkaline protease (called SAPCG) (23,000U/mL). The latter was purified by ammonium sulphate precipitation, UNO Q-6 FPLC and Zorbex PSM 300 HPLC, and submitted to biochemical characterization assays. Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/MS) analysis revealed that the purified enzyme was a monomer, with a molecular mass of 55,824.19Da. The 19 N-terminal residue sequence of SAPCG showed high homology with those of microbial proteases. The enzyme was completely inhibited by phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride (PMSF) and diiodopropyl fluorophosphates (DFP), which suggested its belonging to the serine protease family. It showed optimum protease activity at pH 10 and 70°C with casein as a substrate. The thermoactivity and thermostability of SAPCG were enhanced in the presence of 2mM Ca(2+). Its half-life times at 80 and 90°C were 180 and 60min, respectively. Interestingly, the SAPCG protease exhibited significant compatibility with iSiS and Persil, and wash performance analysis revealed that it could remove blood-stains effectively. Overall, SAPCG displayed a number of attractive properties that make it a promising candidate for future applications as an additive in detergent formulations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Tryptogalinin is a tick Kunitz serine protease inhibitor with a unique intrinsic disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James J Valdés

    Full Text Available A salivary proteome-transcriptome project on the hard tick Ixodes scapularis revealed that Kunitz peptides are the most abundant salivary proteins. Ticks use Kunitz peptides (among other salivary proteins to combat host defense mechanisms and to obtain a blood meal. Most of these Kunitz peptides, however, remain functionally uncharacterized, thus limiting our knowledge about their biochemical interactions.We discovered an unusual cysteine motif in a Kunitz peptide. This peptide inhibits several serine proteases with high affinity and was named tryptogalinin due to its high affinity for β-tryptase. Compared with other functionally described peptides from the Acari subclass, we showed that tryptogalinin is phylogenetically related to a Kunitz peptide from Rhipicephalus appendiculatus, also reported to have a high affinity for β-tryptase. Using homology-based modeling (and other protein prediction programs we were able to model and explain the multifaceted function of tryptogalinin. The N-terminus of the modeled tryptogalinin is detached from the rest of the peptide and exhibits intrinsic disorder allowing an increased flexibility for its high affinity with its inhibiting partners (i.e., serine proteases.By incorporating experimental and computational methods our data not only describes the function of a Kunitz peptide from Ixodes scapularis, but also allows us to hypothesize about the molecular basis of this function at the atomic level.

  8. A serine proteinase homologue, SPH-3, plays a central role in insect immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felföldi, Gabriella; Eleftherianos, Ioannis; Ffrench-Constant, Richard H; Venekei, István

    2011-04-15

    Numerous vertebrate and invertebrate genes encode serine proteinase homologues (SPHs) similar to members of the serine proteinase family, but lacking one or more residues of the catalytic triad. These SPH proteins are thought to play a role in immunity, but their precise functions are poorly understood. In this study, we show that SPH-3 (an insect non-clip domain-containing SPH) is of central importance in the immune response of a model lepidopteran, Manduca sexta. We examine M. sexta infection with a virulent, insect-specific, Gram-negative bacterium Photorhabdus luminescens. RNA interference suppression of bacteria-induced SPH-3 synthesis severely compromises the insect's ability to defend itself against infection by preventing the transcription of multiple antimicrobial effector genes, but, surprisingly, not the transcription of immune recognition genes. Upregulation of the gene encoding prophenoloxidase and the activity of the phenoloxidase enzyme are among the antimicrobial responses that are severely attenuated on SPH-3 knockdown. These findings suggest the existence of two largely independent signaling pathways controlling immune recognition by the fat body, one governing effector gene transcription, and the other regulating genes encoding pattern recognition proteins.

  9. Chlamydia Serine Protease Inhibitor, targeting HtrA, as a New Treatment for Koala Chlamydia infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Amba; Fraser, Tamieka; Gillett, Amber; Tyndall, Joel D. A.; Timms, Peter; Polkinghorne, Adam; Huston, Wilhelmina M.

    2016-01-01

    The koala, an iconic marsupial native to Australia, is a threatened species in many parts of the country. One major factor in the decline is disease caused by infection with Chlamydia. Current therapeutic strategies to treat chlamydiosis in the koala are limited. This study examines the effectiveness of an inhibitor, JO146, which targets the HtrA serine protease for treatment of C. pecorum and C. pneumoniae in vitro and ex vivo with the aim of developing a novel therapeutic for koala Chlamydia infections. Clinical isolates from koalas were examined for their susceptibility to JO146. In vitro studies demonstrated that treatment with JO146 during the mid-replicative phase of C. pecorum or C. pneumoniae infections resulted in a significant loss of infectious progeny. Ex vivo primary koala tissue cultures were used to demonstrate the efficacy of JO146 and the non-toxic nature of this compound on peripheral blood mononuclear cells and primary cell lines established from koala tissues collected at necropsy. Our results suggest that inhibition of the serine protease HtrA could be a novel treatment strategy for chlamydiosis in koalas. PMID:27530689

  10. Novel Serine 176 Phosphorylation of YBX1 Activates NF-κB in Colon Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Matthew; Hua, Laiqing; Wang, Benlian; Wei, Han; Prabhu, Lakshmi; Hartley, Antja-Voy; Jiang, Guanglong; Liu, Yunlong; Lu, Tao

    2017-02-24

    Y box protein 1 (YBX1) is a well known oncoprotein that has tumor-promoting functions. YBX1 is widely considered to be an attractive therapeutic target in cancer. To develop novel therapeutics to target YBX1, it is of great importance to understand how YBX1 is finely regulated in cancer. Previously, we have shown that YBX1 could function as a tumor promoter through phosphorylation of its Ser-165 residue, leading to the activation of the NF-κB signaling pathway (1). In this study, using mass spectrometry analysis, we discovered a distinct phosphorylation site, Ser-176, on YBX1. Overexpression of the YBX1-S176A (serine-to-alanine) mutant in either HEK293 cells or colon cancer HT29 cells showed dramatically reduced NF-κB-activating ability compared with that of WT-YBX1, confirming that Ser-176 phosphorylation is critical for the activation of NF-κB by YBX1. Importantly, the mutant of Ser-176 and the previously reported Ser-165 sites regulate distinct groups of NF-κB target genes, suggesting the unique and irreplaceable function of each of these two phosphorylated serine residues. Our important findings could provide a novel cancer therapy strategy by blocking either Ser-176 or Ser-165 phosphorylation or both of YBX1 in colon cancer. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. A novel serine protease secreted by medicinal maggots enhances plasminogen activator-induced fibrinolysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariena J A van der Plas

    Full Text Available Maggots of the blowfly Lucilia sericata are used for the treatment of chronic wounds. As haemostatic processes play an important role in wound healing, this study focused on the effects of maggot secretions on coagulation and fibrinolysis. The results showed that maggot secretions enhance plasminogen activator-induced formation of plasmin and fibrinolysis in a dose- and time-dependent manner. By contrast, coagulation was not affected by secretions. Biochemical studies indicated that a novel serine protease within secretions, designated Sericase, cleaved plasminogen to several fragments. Recombinant Sericase degraded plasminogen leading amongst others to the formation of the mini-plasminogen like fragment Val454-plasminogen. In addition, the presence of a non-proteolytic cofactor in secretions was discovered, which plays a role in the enhancement of plasminogen activator-induced fibrinolysis by Sericase. We conclude from our in vitro studies that the novel serine protease Sericase, with the aid of a non-proteolytic cofactor, enhances plasminogen activator-induced fibrinolysis.

  12. Characterization of Toxoplasma DegP, a rhoptry serine protease crucial for lethal infection in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaelle Lentini

    Full Text Available During the infection process, Apicomplexa discharge their secretory organelles called micronemes, rhoptries and dense granules to sustain host cell invasion, intracellular replication and to modulate host cell pathways and immune responses. Herein, we describe the Toxoplasma gondii Deg-like serine protein (TgDegP, a rhoptry protein homologous to High temperature requirement A (HtrA or Deg-like family of serine proteases. TgDegP undergoes processing in both types I and II strains as most of the rhoptries proteins. We show that genetic disruption of the degP gene does not impact the parasite lytic cycle in vitro but affects virulence in mice. While in a type I strain DegPI appears dispensable for the establishment of an infection, removal of DegPII in a type II strain dramatically impairs the virulence. Finally, we show that KO-DegPII parasites kill immunodeficient mice as efficiently as the wild-type strain indicating that the protease might be involved in the complex crosstalk that the parasite engaged with the host immune response. Thus, this study unravels a novel rhoptry protein in T. gondii important for the establishment of lethal infection.

  13. Purification and characterization of manganese-dependent alkaline serine protease from Bacillus pumilus TMS55.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Kalibulla Syed; Muniyandi, Jeyaraj; Karutha Pandian, Shunmugiah

    2011-01-01

    The purification and characterization of a Mn2+-dependent alkaline serine protease produced by Bacillus pumilus TMS55 were investigated. The enzyme was purified in three steps: concentrating the crude enzyme using ammonium sulfate precipitation, followed by gel filtration and cation-exchange chromatography. The purified protease had a molecular mass of approximately 35 kDa, was highly active over a broad pH range of 7.0 to 12.0, and remained stable over a pH range of 7.5 to 11.5. The optimum temperature for the enzyme activity was found to be 60 degreesC. PMSF and AEBSF (1 mM) significantly inhibited the protease activity, indicating that the protease is a serine protease. Mn2+ ions enhanced the activity and stability of the enzyme. In addition, the purified protease remained stable with oxidants (H2O2, 2%) and organic solvents (25%), such as benzene, hexane, and toluene. Therefore, these characteristics of the protease and its dehairing ability indicate its potential for a wide range of commercial applications.

  14. Purification and molecular cloning of a novel serine protease from the centipede, Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Weon-Kyoo; Sohn, Young-Doug; Kim, Ki-Yong; Park, Doo-Hong; Jang, Yangsoo; Chung, Kwang-Hoe

    2004-03-01

    A novel serine protease, named as scolonase, was purified and characterized from the tissue of the Korean centipede, Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans. Purified scolonase showed an apparent molecular weight of 25 kDa on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis and an isoelectric point of 4.8 on isoelectric focusing gel. Scolonase was able to preferentially hydrolyze arginine over lysine at the cleavage site among the several synthetic peptide substrates. Scolonase has also a potent fibrinolytic activity by converting human Glu-plasminogen to activated plasmin due to the specific cleavage of the molecule at the peptide bond Arg(561)-Val(562). The enzyme activity of scolonase was completely inhibited by phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride and difluorophosphate. The cDNA encoding scolonase was cloned from the cDNA library of the centipede constructed with oligonucleotide probe, which was designed on the basis of the N-terminal amino acid sequence of scolonase. The deduced complete amino acid sequence of scolonase demonstrated that the protein is composed of 277 amino acids including 33 amino acids as a leader sequence, and that it has significant sequence homology with other serine proteases.

  15. Suppression of collagen-induced arthritis with a serine proteinase inhibitor (serpin) derived from myxoma virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahn, Ernest; Lee, Sarah; Lucas, Alexandra; McFadden, Grant; Macaulay, Colin

    2014-08-01

    Many viruses encode virulence factors to facilitate their own survival by modulating a host's inflammatory response. One of these factors, secreted from cells infected with myxoma virus, is the serine proteinase inhibitor (serpin) Serp-1. Because Serp-1 had demonstrated anti-inflammatory properties in arterial injury models and viral infections, it was cloned and evaluated for therapeutic efficacy in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Clinical severity was significantly lower in the Serp-1 protocols (p<0.0001) and blinded radiographs indicated that the Serp-1 group had significantly less erosions than the controls (p<0.01). Delayed-type hypersensitivity was lower in the Serp-1 group but antibody titers to type II collagen were not significantly altered. Recipients had minimal histopathologic synovial changes and did not develop neutralizing antibodies to Serp-1. These results indicate that Serp-1 impedes the pathogenesis of CIA and suggests that the therapeutic potential of serine proteinase inhibitors in inflammatory joint diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, should be investigated further. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Systematic Survey of Serine Hydrolase Activity in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Defines Changes Associated with Persistence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega, Corrie; Anderson, Lindsey N.; Frando, Andrew; Sadler, Natalie C.; Brown, Robert W.; Smith, Richard D.; Wright, Aaron T.; Grundner, Christoph

    2016-02-01

    The transition between replication and non-replication underlies much of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) pathogenicity, as non- or slowly replicating Mtb are responsible for persistence and poor treatment outcomes. Therapeutic targeting of non-replicating, persistent populations is a priority for tuberculosis treatment, but only few drug targets in non-replicating Mtb are currently known. Here, we directly measure the activity of the highly diverse and druggable serine hydrolases (SHs) during active replication and non-replication by activity-based proteomics. We predict serine hydrolase activity for 78 proteins, including 27 proteins with previously unknown function, and identify 37 SHs that remain active even in the absence of replication, providing a set of candidate persistence targets. Non-replication was associated with large shifts in the activity of the majority of SHs. These activity changes were largely independent of SH abundance, indicating extensive post-translational regulation. By probing a large cross-section of druggable Mtb enzyme space during replication and non-replication, we identify new SHs and suggest new persistence targets.

  17. Conservative Mechanisms of Extracellular Trap Formation by Annelida Eisenia andrei: Serine Protease Activity Requirement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortmann, Weronika; Kolaczkowska, Elzbieta

    2016-01-01

    Formation of extracellular traps (ETs) capturing and immobilizing pathogens is now a well-established defense mechanism added to the repertoire of vertebrate phagocytes. These ETs are composed of extracellular DNA (extDNA), histones and antimicrobial proteins. Formation of mouse and human ETs depends on enzymes (i) facilitating decondensation of chromatin by citrullination of histones, and (ii) serine proteases degrading histones. In invertebrates, initial reports revealed existence of ETs composed of extDNA and histones, and here we document for the first time that also coelomocytes, immunocompetent cells of an earthworm Eisenia andrei, cast ETs which successfully trap bacteria in a reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent and -independent manner. Importantly, the formation of ETs was observed not only when coelomocytes were studied ex vivo, but also in vivo, directly in the earthworm coelom. These ETs were composed of extDNA, heat shock proteins (HSP27) and H3 histones. Furthermore, the formation of E. andrei ETs depended on activity of serine proteases, including elastase-like activity. Moreover, ETs interconnected and hold together aggregating coelomocytes, a processes proceeding encapsulation. In conclusion, the study confirms ET formation by earthworms, and unravels mechanisms leading to ET formation and encapsulation in invertebrates. PMID:27416067

  18. A secreted serine protease of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and its interactions with fungal proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soares Célia MA

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Paracoccidioides brasiliensis is a thermodimorphic fungus, the causative agent of paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM. Serine proteases are widely distributed and this class of peptidase has been related to pathogenesis and nitrogen starvation in pathogenic fungi. Results A cDNA (Pbsp encoding a secreted serine protease (PbSP, was isolated from a cDNA library constructed with RNAs of fungal yeast cells recovered from liver of infected mice. Recombinant PbSP was produced in Escherichia coli, and used to develop polyclonal antibodies that were able to detect a 66 kDa protein in the P. brasiliensis proteome. In vitro deglycosylation assays with endoglycosidase H demonstrated that PbSP is a N-glycosylated molecule. The Pbsp transcript and the protein were induced during nitrogen starvation. The Pbsp transcript was also induced in yeast cells infecting murine macrophages. Interactions of PbSP with P. brasiliensis proteins were evaluated by two-hybrid assay in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PbSP interacts with a peptidyl prolyl cis-trans isomerase, calnexin, HSP70 and a cell wall protein PWP2. Conclusions A secreted subtilisin induced during nitrogen starvation was characterized indicating the possible role of this protein in the nitrogen acquisition. PbSP interactions with other P. brasiliensis proteins were reported. Proteins interacting with PbSP are related to folding process, protein trafficking and cytoskeleton reorganization.

  19. Suppressed expression of cystathionine β-synthase and smaller cerebellum in Wistar Kyoto rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagasawa, Mao; Ikeda, Hiromi; Kawase, Takahiro; Iwamoto, Ayaka; Yasuo, Shinobu; Furuse, Mitsuiro

    2015-10-22

    We previously reported that Wistar Kyoto rats, an animal model of depression, have a characteristically abnormal serine metabolism in the brain, i.e., lower serine and cystathionine, which is a metabolite of serine, concentrations in the brain. To explore the mechanism underlying this abnormality, the expression of cystathionine β-synthase and serine racemase, which are the enzymes involved in the serine metabolism, was investigated in the cerebellum and hippocampus of Wistar and Wistar Kyoto rats. Wistar Kyoto rats exhibited a significantly lower mRNA expression of cystathionine β-synthase in the cerebellum in comparison with Wistar rats, while expression levels in the hippocampus did not differ between strains. Previous study indicated that the reduction of cystathionine β-synthase in the brain induced cerebellar aplasia in mice. Therefore, the cerebellar size was compared between Wistar rats and Wistar Kyoto rats. Wistar Kyoto rats displayed a lower ratio of cerebellum weight to whole-brain weight compared with Wistar rats of the same generation or similar body weight, suggesting that Wistar Kyoto rats exhibit smaller cerebellum. These results suggest that the lower mRNA expression of cystathionine β-synthase in the cerebellum and the smaller size of cerebellum may be related to the depression-like behavior in Wistar Kyoto rats. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Polymorphisms of clip domain serine proteinase and serine proteinase homolog in the swimming crab Portunus trituberculatus and their association with Vibrio alginolyticus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Meng; Liu, Yuan; Hui, Min; Song, Chengwen; Cui, Zhaoxia

    2017-03-01

    Clip domain serine proteases (cSPs) and their homologs (SPHs) play an important role in various biological processes that are essential components of extracellular signaling cascades, especially in the innate immune responses of invertebrates. Here, polymorphisms of PtcSP and PtSPH from the swimming crab Portunus trituberculatus were investigated to explore their association with resistance/susceptibility to Vibrio alginolyticus. Polymorphic loci were identified using Clustal X, and characterized with SPSS 16.0 software, and then the significance of genotype and allele frequencies between resistant and susceptible stocks was determined by a χ 2 test. A total of 109 and 77 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified in the genomic fragments of PtcSP and PtSPH, respectively. Notably, nearly half of PtSPH polymorphisms were found in the non-coding exon 1. Fourteen SNPs investigated were significantly associated with susceptibility/resistance to V. alginolyticus ( P <0.05). Among them, eight SNPs were observed in introns, and one synonymous, four non-synonymous SNPs and one ins-del were found in coding exons. In addition, five simple sequence repeats (SSRs) were detected in intron 3 of PtcSP. Although there was no statistically significant difference of allele frequencies, the SSRs showed different polymorphic alleles on the basis of the repeat number between resistant and susceptible stocks. After further validation, polymorphisms investigated here might be applied to select potential molecular markers of P. trituberculatus with resistance to V. alginolyticus.

  1. Inhibition of protein phosphatase 2A induces serine/threonine phosphorylation, subcellular redistribution, and functional inhibition of STAT3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woetmann, A; Nielsen, M; Christensen, S T

    1999-01-01

    STAT3. We show that an inhibitor of protein phosphatases (PPs) PP1/PP2A, calyculin A, induces (i) phosphorylation of STAT3 on serine and threonine residues, (ii) inhibition of STAT3 tyrosine phosphorylation and DNA binding activity, and (iii) relocation of STAT3 from the nucleus to the cytoplasm......, whereas inhibitors of serine/threonine kinases, such as mitogen-activated protein kinase-1 extracellular-regulated kinase-kinase, mitogen-activated protein p38 kinase, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, did not. In conclusion, we provide evidence that PP2A plays a crucial role in the regulation of STAT3....... Similar results were obtained with other PP2A inhibitors (okadaic acid, endothall thioanhydride) but not with inhibitors of PP1 (tautomycin) or PP2B (cyclosporine A). Pretreatment with the broad serine/threonine kinase inhibitor staurosporine partly blocked the calyculin A-induced STAT3 phosphorylation...

  2. Paracoccus seriniphilus sp. nov., an L-serine-dehydratase-producing coccus isolated from the marine bryozoan Bugula plumosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pukall, Rüdiger; Laroche, Marc; Kroppenstedt, Reiner M; Schumann, Peter; Stackebrandt, Erko; Ulber, Roland

    2003-03-01

    A novel marine Gram-negative, non-motile, non-spore-forming, aerobic bacterium, associated with the bryozoan Bugula plumosa, was isolated in a screening programme for strains containing enzymes able to convert the amino acid L-serine. Strain MBT-A4T produced L-serine dehydratase and was able to grow on L-serine as the sole carbon and nitrogen source. The nearest phylogenetic neighbour was Paracoccus marcusii, as determined by 16S rDNA sequence analysis (97.8% similarity). The DNA-DNA reassociation value obtained for Paracoccus marcusii DSM11574T and MBT-A4T was 32.6%. The major ubiquinone was 0-10. Based on genotypic, chemotaxonomic and physiological characteristics, a new species of the genus Paracoccus is proposed, Paracoccus seriniphilus sp. nov., the type strain being strain MBT-A4T (=DSM 14827T =CIP 107400T).

  3. CHK1-driven histone H3.3 serine 31 phosphorylation is important for chromatin maintenance and cell survival in human ALT cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Fiona T M; Chan, F Lyn; R McGhie, James D; Udugama, Maheshi; Mayne, Lynne; Collas, Philippe; Mann, Jeffrey R; Wong, Lee H

    2015-03-11

    Human ALT cancers show high mutation rates in ATRX and DAXX. Although it is well known that the absence of ATRX/DAXX disrupts H3.3 deposition at heterochromatin, its impact on H3.3 deposition and post-translational modification in the global genome remains unclear. Here, we explore the dynamics of phosphorylated H3.3 serine 31 (H3.3S31ph) in human ALT cancer cells. While H3.3S31ph is found only at pericentric satellite DNA repeats during mitosis in most somatic human cells, a high level of H3.3S31ph is detected on the entire chromosome in ALT cells, attributable to an elevated CHK1 activity in these cells. Drug inhibition of CHK1 activity during mitosis and expression of mutant H3.3S31A in these ALT cells result in a decrease in H3.3S31ph levels accompanied with increased levels of phosphorylated H2AX serine 139 on chromosome arms and at the telomeres. Furthermore, the inhibition of CHK1 activity in these cells also reduces cell viability. Our findings suggest a novel role of CHK1 as an H3.3S31 kinase, and that CHK1-mediated H3.3S31ph plays an important role in the maintenance of chromatin integrity and cell survival in ALT cancer cells. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  4. The AprV5 subtilase is required for the optimal processing of all three extracellular serine proteases from Dichelobacter nodosus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyan Han

    Full Text Available Dichelobacter nodosus is the principal causative agent of ovine footrot and its extracellular proteases are major virulence factors. Virulent isolates of D. nodosus secrete three subtilisin-like serine proteases: AprV2, AprV5 and BprV. These enzymes are each synthesized as precursor molecules that include a signal (pre- peptide, a pro-peptide and a C-terminal extension, which are processed to produce the mature active forms. The function of the C-terminal regions of these proteases and the mechanism of protease processing and secretion are unknown. AprV5 contributes to most of the protease activity secreted by D. nodosus. To understand the role of the C-terminal extension of AprV5, we constructed a series of C-terminal-deletion mutants in D. nodosus by allelic exchange. The proteases present in the resultant mutants and their complemented derivatives were examined by protease zymogram analysis, western blotting and mass spectrometry. The results showed that the C-terminal region of AprV5 is required for the normal expression of protease activity, deletion of this region led to a delay in the processing of these enzymes. D. nodosus is an unusual bacterium in that it produces three closely related extracellular serine proteases. We have now shown that one of these enzymes, AprV5, is responsible for its own maturation, and for the optimal cleavage of AprV2 and BprV, to their mature active forms. These studies have increased our understanding of how this important pathogen processes these virulence-associated extracellular proteases and secretes them into its external environment.

  5. Negative Role of RIG-I Serine 8 Phosphorylation in the Regulatin of Interferon-beta Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E Nistal-Villan; M Gack; G Martinez-Delgado; N Maharaj; K Inn; H Yang; R Wang; A Aggarwal; J Jung; A Garcia-Sastre

    2011-12-31

    RIG-I (retinoic acid-inducible gene I) and TRIM25 (tripartite motif protein 25) have emerged as key regulatory factors to induce interferon (IFN)-mediated innate immune responses to limit viral replication. Upon recognition of viral RNA, TRIM25 E3 ligase binds the first caspase recruitment domain (CARD) of RIG-I and subsequently induces lysine 172 ubiquitination of the second CARD of RIG-I, which is essential for the interaction with downstream MAVS/IPS-1/CARDIF/VISA and, thereby, IFN-beta mRNA production. Although ubiquitination has emerged as a major factor involved in RIG-I activation, the potential contribution of other post-translational modifications, such as phosphorylation, to the regulation of RIG-I activity has not been addressed. Here, we report the identification of serine 8 phosphorylation at the first CARD of RIG-I as a negative regulatory mechanism of RIG-I-mediated IFN-beta production. Immunoblot analysis with a phosphospecific antibody showed that RIG-I serine 8 phosphorylation steady-state levels were decreased upon stimulation of cells with IFN-beta or virus infection. Substitution of serine 8 in the CARD RIG-I functional domain with phosphomimetic aspartate or glutamate results in decreased TRIM25 binding, RIG-I ubiquitination, MAVS binding, and downstream signaling. Finally, sequence comparison reveals that only primate species carry serine 8, whereas other animal species carry an asparagine, indicating that serine 8 phosphorylation may represent a primate-specific regulation of RIG-I activation. Collectively, these data suggest that the phosphorylation of RIG-I serine 8 operates as a negative switch of RIG-I activation by suppressing TRIM25 interaction, further underscoring the importance of RIG-I and TRIM25 connection in type I IFN signal transduction.

  6. Pharmacological PPARα activation markedly alters plasma turnover of the amino acids glycine, serine and arginine in the rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anette Ericsson

    Full Text Available The current study extends previously reported PPARα agonist WY 14,643 (30 µmol/kg/day for 4 weeks effects on circulating amino acid concentrations in rats fed a 48% saturated fat diet. Steady-state tracer experiments were used to examine in vivo kinetic mechanisms underlying altered plasma serine, glycine and arginine levels. Urinary urea and creatinine excretion were measured to assess whole-body amino acid catabolism. WY 14,643 treated animals demonstrated reduced efficiency to convert food consumed to body weight gain while liver weight was increased compared to controls. WY 14,643 raised total amino acid concentration (38%, largely explained by glycine, serine and threonine increases. 3H-glycine, 14C-serine and 14C-arginine tracer studies revealed elevated rates of appearance (Ra for glycine (45.5 ± 5.8 versus 17.4 ± 2.7 µmol/kg/min and serine (21.0 ± 1.4 versus 12.0 ± 1.0 in WY 14,643 versus control. Arginine was substantially decreased (-62% in plasma with estimated Ra reduced from 3.1 ± 0.3 to 1.2 ± 0.2 µmol/kg/min in control versus WY 14,643. Nitrogen excretion over 24 hours was unaltered. Hepatic arginase activity was substantially decreased by WY 14,643 treatment. In conclusion, PPARα agonism potently alters metabolism of several specific amino acids in the rat. The changes in circulating levels of serine, glycine and arginine reflected altered fluxes into the plasma rather than changes in clearance or catabolism. This suggests that PPARα has an important role in modulating serine, glycine and arginine de novo synthesis.

  7. Studies of Environmental Risk Factors in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) and a Phase I Clinical Trial of L-Serine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Walter G; Miller, R X; Levine, T D; Stommel, E W; Cox, P A

    2018-01-01

    β-N-Methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) has been linked to Guam ALS/PDC and shown to produce neurodegeneration in vitro and in vivo (Drosophila, mice, rats, primates). BMAA misincorporation into neuroproteins produces protein misfolding and is inhibited by L-serine. Case-control studies in Northern New England indicate that living near to water-bodies with cyanobacterial blooms increases the risk of developing amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The distribution of addresses of ALS cases in New Hampshire, Vermont, and Florida was compared to that of controls. Areas of statistically significantly increased numbers of ALS cases were examined for sources of environmental toxins. A phase I trial of oral L-serine was performed in 20 ALS patients (0.5 to 15 g twice daily). Safety and tolerability were assessed by comparing the rate of deterioration with 430 matched placebo controls. The distribution of residential addresses of ALS cases in New England and Florida revealed many areas where the age- and gender-adjusted frequency of ALS was greater than expected (P L-serine, two patients withdrew from because of gastrointestinal side effects. Three patients died during the study, which was about the expected number. The ALSFRS-R in the L-serine-treated patients showed a dose-related decrease in the rate of progression (34% reduction in slope, P = 0.044). The non-random distribution of addresses of ALS patients suggests that residential exposure to environmental pollutants may play an important role in the etiology of ALS. L-Serine in doses up to 15 g twice daily appears to be safe in patients with ALS. Exploratory studies of efficacy suggested that L-serine might slow disease progression. A phase II trial is planned.

  8. Effects of a marine serine protease inhibitor on viability and morphology of Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of Chagas disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida Nogueira, Natália Pereira; Morgado-Díaz, José Andrés; Menna-Barreto, Rubem Figueiredo Sadok; Paes, Marcia Cristina; da Silva-López, Raquel Elisa

    2013-10-01

    It has been reported that serine peptidase activities of Trypanosoma cruzi play crucial roles in parasite dissemination and host cell invasion and therefore their inhibition could affect the progress of Chagas disease. The present study investigates the interference of the Stichodactyla helianthus Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitor (ShPI-I), a 55-amino acid peptide, in T. cruzi serine peptidase activities, parasite viability, and parasite morphology. The effect of this peptide was also studied in Leishmania amazonensis promastigotes and it was proved to be a powerful inhibitor of serine proteases activities and the parasite viability. The ultrastructural alterations caused by ShPI-I included vesiculation of the flagellar pocket membrane and the appearance of a cytoplasmic vesicle that resembles an autophagic vacuole. ShPI-I, which showed itself to be an important T. cruzi serine peptidase inhibitor, reduced the parasite viability, in a dose and time dependent manner. The maximum effect of peptide on T. cruzi viability was observed when ShPI-I at 1×10(-5)M was incubated for 24 and 48h which killed completely both metacyclic trypomastigote and epimastigote forms. At 1×10(-6)M ShPI-I, in the same periods of time, reduced parasite viability about 91-95% respectively. Ultrastructural analysis demonstrated the formation of concentric membranar structures especially in the cytosol, involving organelles and small vesicles. Profiles of endoplasmic reticulum were also detected, surrounding cytosolic vesicles that resembled autophagic vacuoles. These results suggest that serine peptidases are important in T. cruzi physiology since the inhibition of their activity killed parasites in vitro as well as inducing important morphological alterations. Protease inhibitors thus appear to have a potential role as anti-trypanosomatidal agents. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Epithelial Sodium Channel-Mediated Sodium Transport Is Not Dependent on the Membrane-Bound Serine Protease CAP2/Tmprss4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Keppner

    Full Text Available The membrane-bound serine protease CAP2/Tmprss4 has been previously identified in vitro as a positive regulator of the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC. To study its in vivo implication in ENaC-mediated sodium absorption, we generated a knockout mouse model for CAP2/Tmprss4. Mice deficient in CAP2/Tmprss4 were viable, fertile, and did not show any obvious histological abnormalities. Unexpectedly, when challenged with sodium-deficient diet, these mice did not develop any impairment in renal sodium handling as evidenced by normal plasma and urinary sodium and potassium electrolytes, as well as normal aldosterone levels. Despite minor alterations in ENaC mRNA expression, we found no evidence for altered proteolytic cleavage of ENaC subunits. In consequence, ENaC activity, as monitored by the amiloride-sensitive rectal potential difference (ΔPD, was not altered even under dietary sodium restriction. In summary, ENaC-mediated sodium balance is not affected by lack of CAP2/Tmprss4 expression and thus, does not seem to directly control ENaC expression and activity in vivo.

  10. Design and synthesis of a series of serine derivatives as small molecule inhibitors of the SARS coronavirus 3CL protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konno, Hiroyuki; Wakabayashi, Masaki; Takanuma, Daiki; Saito, Yota; Akaji, Kenichi

    2016-03-15

    Synthesis of serine derivatives having the essential functional groups for the inhibitor of SARS 3CL protease and evaluation of their inhibitory activities using SARS 3CL R188I mutant protease are described. The lead compounds, functionalized serine derivatives, were designed based on the tetrapeptide aldehyde and Bai's cinnamoly inhibitor, and additionally performed with simulation on GOLD softwear. Structure activity relationship studies of the candidate compounds were given reasonable inhibitors ent-3 and ent-7k against SARS 3CL R188I mutant protease. These inhibitors showed protease selectivity and no cytotoxicity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Biochemical and molecular characterization of a detergent-stable serine alkaline protease from Bacillus pumilus CBS with high catalytic efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaouadi, Bassem; Ellouz-Chaabouni, Semia; Rhimi, Moez; Bejar, Samir

    2008-09-01

    We have described previously the potential use of an alkaline protease from Bacillus pumilus CBS as an effective additive in laundry detergent formulations [B. Jaouadi, S. Ellouz-Chaabouni, M. Ben Ali, E. Ben Messaoud, B. Naili, A. Dhouib, S. Bejar, A novel alkaline protease from Bacillus pumilus CBS having a high compatibility with laundry detergent and a high feather-degrading activity, Process Biochem, submitted for publication]. Here, we purified this enzyme (named SAPB) and we cloned, sequenced and over-expressed the corresponding gene. The enzyme was purified to homogeneity using salt precipitation and gel filtration HPLC. The pure protease was found to be monomeric protein with a molecular mass of 34598.19Da as determined by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. The NH2-terminal sequence of first 21 amino acids (aa) of the purified SAPB was AQTVPYGIPQIKAPAVHAQGY and was completely identical to proteases from other Bacillus pumilus species. This protease is strongly inhibited by PMSF and DFP, showing that it belongs to the serine proteases superfamily. Interestingly, the optimum pH is 10.6 while the optimum temperature was determined to be 65 degrees C. The enzyme was completely stable within a wide range of pH (7.0-10.6) and temperature (30-55 degrees C). One of the distinguishing properties is its catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) calculated to be 45,265min(-1)mM(-1) and 147,000min(-1)mM(-1) using casein and AAPF as substrates, respectively, which is higher than that of Subtilisin Carlsberg, Subtilisin BPN' and Subtilisin 309 determined under the same conditions. In addition, SAPB showed remarkable stability, for 24h at 40 degrees C, in the presence of 5% Tween-80, 1% SDS, 15% urea and 10% H2O2, which comprise the common bleach-based detergent formulation. The sapB gene encoding SAPB was cloned, sequenced and over-expressed in Escherichia coli. The purified recombinant enzyme (rSAPB) has the same physicochemical and kinetic properties as the native one. SapB gene had

  12. Alteration in plasma and striatal levels of d-serine after d-serine administration with or without nicergoline: An in vivo microdialysis study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onozato, Mayu; Nakazawa, Hiromi; Ishimaru, Katsuyuki; Nagashima, Chihiro; Fukumoto, Minori; Hakariya, Hitomi; Sakamoto, Tatsuya; Ichiba, Hideaki; Fukushima, Takeshi

    2017-09-01

    d-Serine (d-Ser), a co-agonist of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR), is effective for treating schizophrenia. The present study investigated changes in plasma and striatal d-Ser levels in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats after intraperitoneal d-Ser administration alone or together with nicergoline (Nic), a commercial cerebral ameliorating drug, using in vivo microdialysis (MD) to explore the function of Nic. Phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) or Nic (0, 1.0, or 3.0 mg/kg) followed by d-Ser (5.0, 10.0, 20.0, and 50.0 mg/kg for PBS or 20.0 mg/kg for Nic) was administered intraperitoneally to male SD rats, and the profiles of d-Ser levels in plasma and striatal MD samples were examined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with fluorescence detection. The area under the curve (AUC) for the MD and plasma samples was also calculated and statistically compared among groups. AUC values of d-Ser increased in a d-Ser dose-dependent manner in plasma samples, while a proportional increase in the AUC values of striatal MD samples was only observed in d-Ser doses up to 20 mg/kg. The Nic co-administered group showed a significant increase in the AUC of plasma d-Ser in a Nic dose-dependent manner, but the AUC in striatal d-Ser significantly decreased with increasing Nic doses suggesting that Nic may prevent excess d-Ser from penetrating the central nervous system (CNS). Nic may prevent an excessive distribution of exogenous d-Ser, such as that from a dietary origin, into the CNS by suppressing excitatory neurotransmission through NMDAR.

  13. Deficiency of mannan-binding lectin associated serine protease-2 due to missense polymorphisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thiel, S; Steffensen, R; Christensen, I J

    2007-01-01

    Mannan-binding lectin (MBL) and ficolins distinguish between self, non-self and altered-self by recognizing patterns of ligands on the surface of microorganisms or aberrant cells. When this happens MBL-associated serine protease-2 (MASP-2) is activated and cleaves complement factors to start...... Caucasians (416 ng/ml). In the Chinese population, we uncovered a novel four amino-acid tandem duplication (p.156_159dupCHNH) associated with low levels of MASP-2. The frequency of this mutation as well as the SNPs p.R99C, p.R118C, p.D120G, p.P126L and p.V377A were analyzed. The p.156_159dupCHNH was only...

  14. IRS-1 serine phosphorylation and insulin resistance in skeletal muscle from pancreas tranplant recipient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouzakri, K; Karlsson, HRK; Vestergaard, Henrik

    2006-01-01

    Insulin-dependent diabetic recipients of successful pancreas allografts achieve self-regulatory insulin secretion and discontinue exogenous insulin therapy; however, chronic hyperinsulinemia and impaired insulin sensitivity generally develop. To determine whether insulin resistance is accompanied....... In conclusion, peripheral insulin resistance in pancreas-kidney transplant recipients may arise from a negative feedback regulation of the canonical insulin-signaling cascade from excessive serine phosphorylation of IRS-1, possibly as a consequence of immunosuppressive therapy and hyperinsulinemia....... insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1 Ser (312) and Ser (616) phosphorylation, IRS-1-associated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activity, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)-1/2 phosphorylation were elevated in pancreas-kidney transplant recipients, coincident with fasting hyperinsulinemia. Basal...

  15. The VA, VCD, Raman and ROA spectra of tri-L-serine in aqueous solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jürgensen, Vibeke Würtz; Jalkanen, Karl J.

    2006-01-01

    measured spectra. In addition, we compare to previously reported studies for both structural determination and spectral simulations and measurements. A comparison of the various ways to treat the effects of the environment and solvation on both the structure and the spectral properties is thoroughly...... investigated for one conformer, with the goal to determine which level of theory is appropriate to use in the systematic search of the conformational space. In addition, the effects of the counterion, here Cl- anion, are also investigated. Here we present the current state of the art in nanobiology, where...... the latest methods in experimental and theoretical vibrational spectroscopy are used to gain useful information about the coupling of the nuclear, electronic and magnetic degrees of freedom and structure of tri-L-serine and its capped peptide analog with the environment....

  16. The Membrane-anchored Serine Protease Prostasin (CAP1/PRSS8) Supports Epidermal Development and Postnatal Homeostasis Independent of Its Enzymatic Activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Diane E; Szabo, Roman; Friis, Stine

    2014-01-01

    . Prostasin null (Prss8(-/-)) mice lack barrier formation and display fatal postnatal dehydration. In sharp contrast, mice homozygous for a point mutation in the Prss8 gene, which causes the substitution of the active site serine within the catalytic histidine-aspartate-serine triad with alanine and renders...

  17. Comparative Mitogenomics of Plant Bugs (Hemiptera: Miridae): Identifying the AGG Codon Reassignments between Serine and Lysine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pei; Song, Fan; Cai, Wanzhi

    2014-01-01

    Insect mitochondrial genomes are very important to understand the molecular evolution as well as for phylogenetic and phylogeographic studies of the insects. The Miridae are the largest family of Heteroptera encompassing more than 11,000 described species and of great economic importance. For better understanding the diversity and the evolution of plant bugs, we sequence five new mitochondrial genomes and present the first comparative analysis of nine mitochondrial genomes of mirids available to date. Our result showed that gene content, gene arrangement, base composition and sequences of mitochondrial transcription termination factor were conserved in plant bugs. Intra-genus species shared more conserved genomic characteristics, such as nucleotide and amino acid composition of protein-coding genes, secondary structure and anticodon mutations of tRNAs, and non-coding sequences. Control region possessed several distinct characteristics, including: variable size, abundant tandem repetitions, and intra-genus conservation; and was useful in evolutionary and population genetic studies. The AGG codon reassignments were investigated between serine and lysine in the genera Adelphocoris and other cimicomorphans. Our analysis revealed correlated evolution between reassignments of the AGG codon and specific point mutations at the antidocons of tRNALys and tRNASer(AGN). Phylogenetic analysis indicated that mitochondrial genome sequences were useful in resolving family level relationship of Cimicomorpha. Comparative evolutionary analysis of plant bug mitochondrial genomes allowed the identification of previously neglected coding genes or non-coding regions as potential molecular markers. The finding of the AGG codon reassignments between serine and lysine indicated the parallel evolution of the genetic code in Hemiptera mitochondrial genomes. PMID:24988409

  18. Preliminary characterisation of extracellular serine proteases of Dermatophilus congolensis isolates from cattle, sheep and horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrose, N C; Mijinyawa, M S; Hermoso de Mendoza, J

    1998-08-15

    Dermatophilus congolensis is a filamentous branching actinomycete that causes dermatophilosis, an exudative dermatitis in ruminants. The pathogenesis of this disease is poorly understood and virulence factors of D. congolensis have not been characterised. Culture filtrate (CF) of 14 D. congolensis isolates from cattle, 15 from sheep and four from horses were examined for proteolytic activity using azocasein as a non-specific substrate. The isolates were from a variety of geographical locations. All the isolates examined produced extracellular proteolytic activity. CF from 24 and 48 h cultures and from first and third passages contained proteases. Proteolytic activity was greatest in neutral to alkaline pH (pH 7-10). CF of bovine isolates contained more proteolytic activity than that of ovine isolates. Furthermore, in substrate SDS-PAGE gels containing azocasein the number of proteolytic bands and their molecular weights in CF of bovine, ovine and equine isolates were different, giving distinctive band patterns for isolates from each host species. Three out of four bovine isolates from Antigua gave a fourth band pattern. Bands of equivalent molecular weights to the proteases could not be identified in silver stained SDS-PAGE gels of CF. Serine protease inhibitors had a concentration-dependent inhibitory effect on proteolytic activity in CF and inhibited activity of all proteolytic bands in substrate gels. With the exception of EDTA which had a variable-enhancing effect on activity, inhibitors of other classes of protease had no effect on activity. We conclude that D. congolensis produces a number of extracellular alkaline serine proteases, our results suggest the presence of host-specific variation between isolates and to a lesser extent between isolates from the same host species.

  19. Scabies mite inactive serine proteases are potent inhibitors of the human complement lectin pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone L Reynolds

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Scabies is an infectious skin disease caused by the mite Sarcoptes scabiei and has been classified as one of the six most prevalent epidermal parasitic skin diseases infecting populations living in poverty by the World Health Organisation. The role of the complement system, a pivotal component of human innate immunity, as an important defence against invading pathogens has been well documented and many parasites have an arsenal of anti-complement defences. We previously reported on a family of scabies mite proteolytically inactive serine protease paralogues (SMIPP-Ss thought to be implicated in host defence evasion. We have since shown that two family members, SMIPP-S D1 and I1 have the ability to bind the human complement components C1q, mannose binding lectin (MBL and properdin and are capable of inhibiting all three human complement pathways. This investigation focused on inhibition of the lectin pathway of complement activation as it is likely to be the primary pathway affecting scabies mites. Activation of the lectin pathway relies on the activation of MBL, and as SMIPP-S D1 and I1 have previously been shown to bind MBL, the nature of this interaction was examined using binding and mutagenesis studies. SMIPP-S D1 bound MBL in complex with MBL-associated serine proteases (MASPs and released the MASP-2 enzyme from the complex. SMIPP-S I1 was also able to bind MBL in complex with MASPs, but MASP-1 and MASP-2 remained in the complex. Despite these differences in mechanism, both molecules inhibited activation of complement components downstream of MBL. Mutagenesis studies revealed that both SMIPP-Ss used an alternative site of the molecule from the residual active site region to inhibit the lectin pathway. We propose that SMIPP-Ss are potent lectin pathway inhibitors and that this mechanism represents an important tool in the immune evasion repertoire of the parasitic mite and a potential target for therapeutics.

  20. LFA-1 and Mac-1 integrins bind to the serine/threonine-rich domain of thrombomodulin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawamoto, Eiji [Department of Molecular Pathobiology and Cell Adhesion Biology, Mie University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-174 Edobashi, Tsu, Mie 514-8507 (Japan); Emergency and Critical Care Center, Mie University Hospital, 2-174 Edobashi, Tsu 514-8507 (Japan); Okamoto, Takayuki, E-mail: okamotot@doc.medic.mie-u.ac.jp [Department of Molecular Pathobiology and Cell Adhesion Biology, Mie University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-174 Edobashi, Tsu, Mie 514-8507 (Japan); Takagi, Yoshimi [Department of Molecular Pathobiology and Cell Adhesion Biology, Mie University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-174 Edobashi, Tsu, Mie 514-8507 (Japan); Honda, Goichi [Medical Affairs Department, Asahi Kasei Pharma Corporation, 1-105 Kanda Jinbo-cho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-8101 (Japan); Suzuki, Koji [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Science, Suzuka University of Medical Science, 3500-3, Minamitamagaki-cho, Suzuka, Mie 513-8679 (Japan); Imai, Hiroshi [Emergency and Critical Care Center, Mie University Hospital, 2-174 Edobashi, Tsu 514-8507 (Japan); Shimaoka, Motomu, E-mail: shimaoka@doc.medic.mie-u.ac.jp [Department of Molecular Pathobiology and Cell Adhesion Biology, Mie University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-174 Edobashi, Tsu, Mie 514-8507 (Japan)

    2016-05-13

    LFA-1 (αLβ2) and Mac-1 (αMβ2) integrins regulate leukocyte trafficking in health and disease by binding primarily to IgSF ligand ICAM-1 and ICAM-2 on endothelial cells. Here we have shown that the anti-coagulant molecule thrombomodulin (TM), found on the surface of endothelial cells, functions as a potentially new ligand for leukocyte integrins. We generated a recombinant extracellular domain of human TM and Fc fusion protein (TM-domains 123-Fc), and showed that pheripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) bind to TM-domains 123-Fc dependent upon integrin activation. We then demonstrated that αL integrin-blocking mAb, αM integrin-blocking mAb, and β2 integrin-blocking mAb inhibited the binding of PBMCs to TM-domains 123-Fc. Furthermore, we show that the serine/threonine-rich domain (domain 3) of TM is required for the interaction with the LFA-1 (αLβ2) and Mac-1 (αMβ2) integrins to occur on PBMCs. These results demonstrate that the LFA-1 and Mac-1 integrins on leukocytes bind to TM, thereby establishing the molecular and structural basis underlying LFA-1 and Mac-1 integrin interaction with TM on endothelial cells. In fact, integrin-TM interactions might be involved in the dynamic regulation of leukocyte adhesion with endothelial cells. - Highlights: • LFA-1 and Mac-1 integrins bind to the anti-coagulant molecule thrombomodulin. • The serine/threonine-rich domain of thrombomodulin is essential to interact with the LFA-1 and Mac-1 integrins on PBMCs. • Integrin-TM interactions might be involved in the dynamic regulation of leukocyte adhesion with endothelial cells.

  1. Comparative mitogenomics of plant bugs (Hemiptera: Miridae: identifying the AGG codon reassignments between serine and lysine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Wang

    Full Text Available Insect mitochondrial genomes are very important to understand the molecular evolution as well as for phylogenetic and phylogeographic studies of the insects. The Miridae are the largest family of Heteroptera encompassing more than 11,000 described species and of great economic importance. For better understanding the diversity and the evolution of plant bugs, we sequence five new mitochondrial genomes and present the first comparative analysis of nine mitochondrial genomes of mirids available to date. Our result showed that gene content, gene arrangement, base composition and sequences of mitochondrial transcription termination factor were conserved in plant bugs. Intra-genus species shared more conserved genomic characteristics, such as nucleotide and amino acid composition of protein-coding genes, secondary structure and anticodon mutations of tRNAs, and non-coding sequences. Control region possessed several distinct characteristics, including: variable size, abundant tandem repetitions, and intra-genus conservation; and was useful in evolutionary and population genetic studies. The AGG codon reassignments were investigated between serine and lysine in the genera Adelphocoris and other cimicomorphans. Our analysis revealed correlated evolution between reassignments of the AGG codon and specific point mutations at the antidocons of tRNALys and tRNASer(AGN. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that mitochondrial genome sequences were useful in resolving family level relationship of Cimicomorpha. Comparative evolutionary analysis of plant bug mitochondrial genomes allowed the identification of previously neglected coding genes or non-coding regions as potential molecular markers. The finding of the AGG codon reassignments between serine and lysine indicated the parallel evolution of the genetic code in Hemiptera mitochondrial genomes.

  2. Unlike pregnant adult women, pregnant adolescent girls cannot maintain glycine flux during late pregnancy because of decreased synthesis from serine

    Science.gov (United States)

    During pregnancy, glycine and serine become more important because they are the primary suppliers of methyl groups for the synthesis of fetal DNA, and more glycine is required for fetal collagen synthesis as pregnancy progresses. In an earlier study, we reported that glycine flux decreased by 39% fr...

  3. Subcellular localization of an intracellular serine protease of 68 kDa in Leishmania (Leishmania amazonensis promastigotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Andrés Morgado-Díaz

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Here we report the subcellular localization of an intracellular serine protease of 68 kDa in axenic promastigotes of Leishmania (Leishmania amazonensis, using subcellular fractionation, enzymatic assays, immunoblotting, and immunocytochemistry. All fractions were evaluated by transmission electron microscopy and the serine protease activity was measured during the cell fractionation procedure using a-N-r-tosyl-L-arginine methyl ester (L-TAME as substrate, phenylmethylsulphone fluoride (PMSF and L-1-tosylamino-2-phenylethylchloromethylketone (TPCK as specific inhibitors. The enzymatic activity was detected mainly in a membranous vesicular fraction (6.5-fold enrichment relative to the whole homogenate, but also in a crude plasma membrane fraction (2.0-fold. Analysis by SDS-PAGE gelatin under reducing conditions demonstrated that the major proteolytic activity was found in a 68 kDa protein in all fractions studied. A protein with identical molecular weight was also recognized in immunoblots by a polyclonal antibody against serine protease (anti-SP, with higher immunoreactivity in the vesicular fraction. Electron microscopic immunolocalization using the same polyclonal antibody showed the enzyme present at the cell surface, as well as in cytoplasmic membranous compartments of the parasite. Our findings indicate that the internal location of this serine protease in L. amazonensis is mainly restricted to the membranes of intracellular compartments resembling endocytic/exocytic elements.

  4. Circulating levels of mannan-binding lectin (MBL) and MBL-associated serine protease 2 in endemic pemphigus foliaceus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Messias-Reason, I; Bosco, DG; Nisihara, RM

    2008-01-01

    Endemic pemphigus foliaceus (EPF) is an autoimmune disease, which occurs in Brazil and other regions of South America. Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) and MBL-associated serine protease (MASP-2) play a key role in innate immunity, and its deficiency has been related to increased susceptibility to in...

  5. Development of a countergradient parking system for gradient liquid chromatography with online biochemical detection of serine protease inhibitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schebb, N.H.; Heus, F.A.H.; Saenger, T.; Karst, U.; Irth, H.; Kool, J.

    2008-01-01

    A gradient HPLC approach in combination with a countergradient system for online biochemical detection (BCD) to screen for inhibitors of serine proteases is described. For gradient separations, this novel countergradient system was developed to produce a biocompatible constant solvent composition in

  6. The most abundant protease inhibitor in potato tuber (Cv. Elkana) is a serine protease inhibitor from the Kunitz Family.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pouvreau, L.A.M.; Gruppen, H.; Koningsveld, van G.A.; Broek, van den L.A.M.; Voragen, A.G.J.

    2003-01-01

    The gene of the most abundant protease inhibitor in potato cv. Elkana was isolated and sequenced. The deduced amino acid sequence of this gene showed 98% identity with potato serine protease inhibitor (PSPI), a member of the Kunitz family. Therefore, the most abundant protease inhibitor was

  7. Serum mannan-binding lectin-associated serine protease 2 levels in colorectal cancer: relation to recurrence and mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ytting, Henriette; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Thiel, Steffen

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE: Mannan-binding lectin-associated serine protease 2 (MASP-2) is a plasma protein involved in inflammatory processes. MASP-2 circulates in complex with the protein mannan-binding lectin (MBL) or ficolins, and is activated to recruit the complement system when MBL binds to its targets...

  8. Active serine involved in the stabilization of the active site loop in the Humicola lanuginosa lipase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Günther H.j.; Svendsen, A.; Langberg, H.

    1998-01-01

    reveal that the hinges of the active site lid are more flexible in the wild-type Hll than in S146A. In contrast, larger fluctuations are observed in the middle region of the active site loop in S 146A than in Hll. These findings reveal that the single mutation (S146A) of the active site serine leads...

  9. INTERLEUKIN-6-INDUCED SERINE PHOSPHORYLATION OF TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR APRF - EVIDENCE FOR A ROLE IN INTERLEUKIN-6 TARGET GENE INDUCTION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LUTTICKEN, C; COFFER, P; YUAN, JP; SCHWARTZ, C; CALDENHOVEN, E; SCHINDLER, C; KRUIJER, W; HEINRICH, PC; HORN, F

    1995-01-01

    The cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) rapidly activates a latent cytoplasmic transcription factor, acute-phase response factor (APRF), by tyrosine phosphorylation. Activation and DNA binding of APRF are inhibited by inhibitors of protein tyrosine kinases but not serine/threonine kinases. However,

  10. The plant defense and pathogen counterdefense mediated by Hevea brasiliensis serine protease HbSPA and Phytophthora palmivora extracellular protease inhibitor PpEPI10.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kitiya Ekchaweng

    Full Text Available Rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis Muell. Arg is an important economic crop in Thailand. Leaf fall and black stripe diseases caused by the aggressive oomycete pathogen Phytophthora palmivora, cause deleterious damage on rubber tree growth leading to decrease of latex production. To gain insights into the molecular function of H. brasiliensis subtilisin-like serine proteases, the HbSPA, HbSPB, and HbSPC genes were transiently expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana via agroinfiltration. A functional protease encoded by HbSPA was successfully expressed in the apoplast of N. benthamiana leaves. Transient expression of HbSPA in N. benthamiana leaves enhanced resistance to P. palmivora, suggesting that HbSPA plays an important role in plant defense. P. palmivora Kazal-like extracellular protease inhibitor 10 (PpEPI10, an apoplastic effector, has been implicated in pathogenicity through the suppression of H. brasiliensis protease. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR revealed that the PpEPI10 gene was significantly up-regulated during colonization of rubber tree by P. palmivora. Concurrently, the HbSPA gene was highly expressed during infection. To investigate a possible interaction between HbSPA and PpEPI10, the recombinant PpEPI10 protein (rPpEPI10 was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified using affinity chromatography. In-gel zymogram and co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP assays demonstrated that rPpEPI10 specifically inhibited and interacted with HbSPA. The targeting of HbSPA by PpEPI10 revealed a defense-counterdefense mechanism, which is mediated by plant protease and pathogen protease inhibitor, in H. brasiliensis-P. palmivora interactions.

  11. The Pochonia chlamydosporia serine protease gene vcp1 is subject to regulation by carbon, nitrogen and pH: implications for nematode biocontrol.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine Ward

    Full Text Available The alkaline serine protease VCP1 of the fungus Pochonia chlamydosporia belongs to a family of subtilisin-like enzymes that are involved in infection of nematode and insect hosts. It is involved early in the infection process, removing the outer proteinaceous vitelline membrane of nematode eggs. Little is known about the regulation of this gene, even though an understanding of how nutrients and other factors affect its expression is critical for ensuring its efficacy as a biocontrol agent. This paper provides new information on the regulation of vcp1 expression. Sequence analysis of the upstream regulatory region of this gene in 30 isolates revealed that it was highly conserved and contained sequence motifs characteristic of genes that are subject to carbon, nitrogen and pH-regulation. Expression studies, monitoring enzyme activity and mRNA, confirmed that these factors affect VCP1 production. As expected, glucose reduced VCP1 expression and for a few hours so did ammonium chloride. Surprisingly, however, by 24 h VCP1 levels were increased in the presence of ammonium chloride for most isolates. Ambient pH also regulated VCP1 expression, with most isolates producing more VCP1 under alkaline conditions. There were some differences in the response of one isolate with a distinctive upstream sequence including a variant regulatory-motif profile. Cryo-scanning electron microscopy studies indicated that the presence of nematode eggs stimulates VCP1 production by P. chlamydosporia, but only where the two are in close contact. Overall, the results indicate that readily-metabolisable carbon sources and unfavourable pH in the rhizosphere/egg-mass environment may compromise nematode parasitism by P. chlamydosporia. However, contrary to previous indications using other nematophagous and entomopathogenic fungi, ammonium nitrate (e.g. from fertilizers may enhance biocontrol potential in some circumstances.

  12. Inferring selection in the Anopheles gambiae species complex: an example from immune-related serine protease inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Little Tom J

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mosquitoes of the Anopheles gambiae species complex are the primary vectors of human malaria in sub-Saharan Africa. Many host genes have been shown to affect Plasmodium development in the mosquito, and so are expected to engage in an evolutionary arms race with the pathogen. However, there is little conclusive evidence that any of these mosquito genes evolve rapidly, or show other signatures of adaptive evolution. Methods Three serine protease inhibitors have previously been identified as candidate immune system genes mediating mosquito-Plasmodium interaction, and serine protease inhibitors have been identified as hot-spots of adaptive evolution in other taxa. Population-genetic tests for selection, including a recent multi-gene extension of the McDonald-Kreitman test, were applied to 16 serine protease inhibitors and 16 other genes sampled from the An. gambiae species complex in both East and West Africa. Results Serine protease inhibitors were found to show a marginally significant trend towards higher levels of amino acid diversity than other genes, and display extensive genetic structuring associated with the 2La chromosomal inversion. However, although serpins are candidate targets for strong parasite-mediated selection, no evidence was found for rapid adaptive evolution in these genes. Conclusion It is well known that phylogenetic and population history in the An. gambiae complex can present special problems for the application of standard population-genetic tests for selection, and this may explain the failure of this study to detect selection acting on serine protease inhibitors. The pitfalls of uncritically applying these tests in this species complex are highlighted, and the future prospects for detecting selection acting on the An. gambiae genome are discussed.

  13. Coupling between d-3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase and d-2-hydroxyglutarate dehydrogenase drives bacterial l-serine synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wen; Zhang, Manman; Gao, Chao; Zhang, Yipeng; Ge, Yongsheng; Guo, Shiting; Guo, Xiaoting; Zhou, Zikang; Liu, Qiuyuan; Zhang, Yingxin; Ma, Cuiqing; Tao, Fei; Xu, Ping

    2017-09-05

    l-Serine biosynthesis, a crucial metabolic process in most domains of life, is initiated by d-3-phosphoglycerate (d-3-PG) dehydrogenation, a thermodynamically unfavorable reaction catalyzed by d-3-PG dehydrogenase (SerA). d-2-Hydroxyglutarate (d-2-HG) is traditionally viewed as an abnormal metabolite associated with cancer and neurometabolic disorders. Here, we reveal that bacterial anabolism and catabolism of d-2-HG are involved in l-serine biosynthesis in Pseudomonas stutzeri A1501 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. SerA catalyzes the stereospecific reduction of 2-ketoglutarate (2-KG) to d-2-HG, responsible for the major production of d-2-HG in vivo. SerA combines the energetically favorable reaction of d-2-HG production to overcome the thermodynamic barrier of d-3-PG dehydrogenation. We identified a bacterial d-2-HG dehydrogenase (D2HGDH), a flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)-dependent enzyme, that converts d-2-HG back to 2-KG. Electron transfer flavoprotein (ETF) and ETF-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETFQO) are also essential in d-2-HG metabolism through their capacity to transfer electrons from D2HGDH. Furthermore, while the mutant with D2HGDH deletion displayed decreased growth, the defect was rescued by adding l-serine, suggesting that the D2HGDH is functionally tied to l-serine synthesis. Substantial flux flows through d-2-HG, being produced by SerA and removed by D2HGDH, ETF, and ETFQO, maintaining d-2-HG homeostasis. Overall, our results uncover that d-2-HG-mediated coupling between SerA and D2HGDH drives bacterial l-serine synthesis.

  14. The linkage between β1 integrin and the actin cytoskeleton is differentially regulated by tyrosine and serine/threonine phosphorylation of β1 integrin in normal and cancerous human breast cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahashi Kazuhide

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Structural requirements for the β1 integrin functions in cell adhesion, spreading and signaling have been well documented mainly for fibroblasts. In this study, we examined the reason for the reduced surface expression of β1 integrin in human breast cancer MCF-7 cells compared to normal human breast epithelial (HBE cells, both of which adhered to collagen type IV. Results The β1 integrin immunoprecipitates from either HBE or MCF-7 cells involved α-actinin while actin coprecipitated with β1 integrin from HBE cells but not from MCF-7 cells. Immunoblotting using the anti-phosphotyrosine (PY antibody indicated the phosphorylation of β1 integrin at least at tyrosine in both cells. Dephosphorylation of β1 integrin from HBE cells by protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP, but not by protein serine/threonine phosphatase (PP, caused dissociation of actin from β1 integrin, although dephosphorylation of it from MCF-7 cells by either PTP or PP caused association of the two proteins. In MCF-7 cells β1 integrin coprecipitated doublet of proteins having the Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMK II activity that was susceptible to KN-62, a specific inhibitor of CaMKII. Conclusion The results suggest that β1 integrin is tyrosine phosphorylated and links with actin via α-actinin in HBE cells but prevented from linking with actin in MCF-7 cells by phosphorylation at both tyrosine and serine/threonine of β1 integrin which forms a complex with α-actinin and CaMKII. Thus the linkage formation of β1 integrin with actin may be differentially regulated by its tyrosine and serine/threonine phosphorylation in normal HBE cells and breast cancer MCF-7 cells.

  15. Characterization of the serine acetyltransferase gene family of Vitis vinifera uncovers differences in regulation of OAS synthesis in woody plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares, Sílvia; Wirtz, Markus; Beier, Marcel P.; Bogs, Jochen; Hell, Rüdiger; Amâncio, Sara

    2015-01-01

    In higher plants cysteine biosynthesis is catalyzed by O-acetylserine(thiol)lyase (OASTL) and represents the last step of the assimilatory sulfate reduction pathway. It is mainly regulated by provision of O-acetylserine (OAS), the nitrogen/carbon containing backbone for fixation of reduced sulfur. OAS is synthesized by Serine acetyltransferase (SERAT), which reversibly interacts with OASTL in the cysteine synthase complex (CSC). In this study we identify and characterize the SERAT gene family of the crop plant Vitis vinifera. The identified four members of the VvSERAT protein family are assigned to three distinct groups upon their sequence similarities to Arabidopsis SERATs. Expression of fluorescently labeled VvSERAT proteins uncover that the sub-cellular localization of VvSERAT1;1 and VvSERAT3;1 is the cytosol and that VvSERAT2;1 and VvSERAT2;2 localize in addition in plastids and mitochondria, respectively. The purified VvSERATs of group 1 and 2 have higher enzymatic activity than VvSERAT3;1, which display a characteristic C-terminal extension also present in AtSERAT3;1. VvSERAT1;1 and VvSERAT2;2 are evidenced to form the CSC. CSC formation activates VvSERAT2;2, by releasing CSC-associated VvSERAT2;2 from cysteine inhibition. Thus, subcellular distribution of SERAT isoforms and CSC formation in cytosol and mitochondria is conserved between Arabidopsis and grapevine. Surprisingly, VvSERAT2;1 lack the canonical C-terminal tail of plant SERATs, does not form the CSC and is almost insensitive to cysteine inhibition (IC50 = 1.9 mM cysteine). Upon sulfate depletion VvSERAT2;1 is strongly induced at the transcriptional level, while transcription of other VvSERATs is almost unaffected in sulfate deprived grapevine cell suspension cultures. Application of abiotic stresses to soil grown grapevine plants revealed isoform-specific induction of VvSERAT2;1 in leaves upon drought, whereas high light- or temperature- stress hardly trigger VvSERAT2;1 transcription. PMID:25741355

  16. RIM1alpha phosphorylation at serine-413 by protein kinase A is not required for presynaptic long-term plasticity or learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaeser, Pascal S; Kwon, Hyung-Bae; Blundell, Jacqueline; Chevaleyre, Vivien; Morishita, Wade; Malenka, Robert C; Powell, Craig M; Castillo, Pablo E; Südhof, Thomas C

    2008-09-23

    Activation of presynaptic cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) triggers presynaptic long-term plasticity in synapses such as cerebellar parallel fiber and hippocampal mossy fiber synapses. RIM1alpha, a large multidomain protein that forms a scaffold at the presynaptic active zone, is essential for presynaptic long-term plasticity in these synapses and is phosphorylated by PKA at serine-413. Previous studies suggested that phosphorylation of RIM1alpha at serine-413 is required for presynaptic long-term potentiation in parallel fiber synapses formed in vitro by cultured cerebellar neurons and that this type of presynaptic long-term potentiation is mediated by binding of 14-3-3 proteins to phosphorylated serine-413. To test the role of serine-413 phosphorylation in vivo, we have now produced knockin mice in which serine-413 is mutated to alanine. Surprisingly, we find that in these mutant mice, three different forms of presynaptic PKA-dependent long-term plasticity are normal. Furthermore, we observed that in contrast to RIM1alpha KO mice, RIM1 knockin mice containing the serine-413 substitution exhibit normal learning capabilities. The lack of an effect of the serine-413 mutation of RIM1alpha is not due to compensation by RIM2alpha because mice carrying both the serine-413 substitution and a RIM2alpha deletion still exhibited normal long-term presynaptic plasticity. Thus, phosphorylation of serine-413 of RIM1alpha is not essential for PKA-dependent long-term presynaptic plasticity in vivo, suggesting that PKA operates by a different mechanism despite the dependence of long-term presynaptic plasticity on RIM1alpha.

  17. RIM1α phosphorylation at serine-413 by protein kinase A is not required for presynaptic long-term plasticity or learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaeser, Pascal S.; Kwon, Hyung-Bae; Blundell, Jacqueline; Chevaleyre, Vivien; Morishita, Wade; Malenka, Robert C.; Powell, Craig M.; Castillo, Pablo E.; Südhof, Thomas C.

    2008-01-01

    Activation of presynaptic cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) triggers presynaptic long-term plasticity in synapses such as cerebellar parallel fiber and hippocampal mossy fiber synapses. RIM1α, a large multidomain protein that forms a scaffold at the presynaptic active zone, is essential for presynaptic long-term plasticity in these synapses and is phosphorylated by PKA at serine-413. Previous studies suggested that phosphorylation of RIM1α at serine-413 is required for presynaptic long-term potentiation in parallel fiber synapses formed in vitro by cultured cerebellar neurons and that this type of presynaptic long-term potentiation is mediated by binding of 14-3-3 proteins to phosphorylated serine-413. To test the role of serine-413 phosphorylation in vivo, we have now produced knockin mice in which serine-413 is mutated to alanine. Surprisingly, we find that in these mutant mice, three different forms of presynaptic PKA-dependent long-term plasticity are normal. Furthermore, we observed that in contrast to RIM1α KO mice, RIM1 knockin mice containing the serine-413 substitution exhibit normal learning capabilities. The lack of an effect of the serine-413 mutation of RIM1α is not due to compensation by RIM2α because mice carrying both the serine-413 substitution and a RIM2α deletion still exhibited normal long-term presynaptic plasticity. Thus, phosphorylation of serine-413 of RIM1α is not essential for PKA-dependent long-term presynaptic plasticity in vivo, suggesting that PKA operates by a different mechanism despite the dependence of long-term presynaptic plasticity on RIM1α. PMID:18799741

  18. Clozapine, but not haloperidol, enhances glial D-serine and L-glutamate release in rat frontal cortex and primary cultured astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanahashi, Shunske; Yamamura, Satoshi; Nakagawa, Masanori; Motomura, Eishi; Okada, Motohiro

    2012-03-01

    Deficient transmission at the glutamate NMDA receptor is considered a key component of the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. However, the effects of antipsychotic drugs on the release of the endogenous NMDA receptor partial agonist, D-serine, remain to be clarified. We determined the interaction between antipsychotic drugs (clozapine and haloperidol) and transmission-modulating toxins (tetanus toxin, fluorocitrate, tetrodotoxin) on the release of L-glutamate and D-serine in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) of freely moving rats, using microdialysis, and primary cultures of astrocytes using extreme high-pressure liquid chromatography. Release of L-glutamate and D-serine in the mPFC and in cultured astrocytes was inhibited by tetanus toxin (a synaptobrevin inhibitor) and fluorocitrate (a glial toxin), whereas tetrodotoxin (a voltage-sensitive Na(+) blocker) inhibited depolarization-induced L-glutamate release in the mPFC without affecting that of D-serine. Clozapine (1 and 5 mg·kg(-1)), but not haloperidol (0.5 and 1 mg·kg(-1)), dose-dependently increased L-glutamate and D-serine release from both astrocytes and mPFC. Clozapine-induced release of L-glutamate and D-serine was also reduced by tetanus toxin and fluorocitrate. Tetrodotoxin reduced clozapine-induced mPFC L-glutamate release but not that of D-serine. Clozapine-induced L-glutamate release preceded clozapine-induced D-serine release. MK-801 (a NMDA receptor antagonist) inhibited the delayed clozapine-induced L-glutamate release without affecting that of D-serine. Clozapine predominantly activated glial exocytosis of D-serine, and this clozapine-induced D-serine release subsequently enhances neuronal L-glutamate release via NMDA receptor activation. The enhanced D-serine associated glial transmission seems a novel mechanism of action of clozapine but not haloperidol. © 2011 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2011 The British Pharmacological Society.

  19. Molecular motion regulates the activity of the Mitochondrial Serine Protease HtrA2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merski, Matthew; Moreira, Cátia; Abreu, Rui Mv; Ramos, Maria João; Fernandes, Pedro A; Martins, L Miguel; Pereira, Pedro José Barbosa; Macedo-Ribeiro, Sandra

    2017-10-12

    HtrA2 (high-temperature requirement 2) is a human mitochondrial protease that has a role in apoptosis and Parkinson's disease. The structure of HtrA2 with an intact catalytic triad was determined, revealing a conformational change in the active site loops, involving mainly the regulatory LD loop, which resulted in burial of the catalytic serine relative to the previously reported structure of the proteolytically inactive mutant. Mutations in the loops surrounding the active site that significantly restricted their mobility, reduced proteolytic activity both in vitro and in cells, suggesting that regulation of HtrA2 activity cannot be explained by a simple transition to an activated conformational state with enhanced active site accessibility. Manipulation of solvent viscosity highlighted an unusual bi-phasic behavior of the enzymatic activity, which together with MD calculations supports the importance of motion in the regulation of the activity of HtrA2. HtrA2 is an unusually thermostable enzyme (TM=97.3 °C), a trait often associated with structural rigidity, not dynamic motion. We suggest that this thermostability functions to provide a stable scaffold for the observed loop motions, allowing them a relatively free conformational search within a rather restricted volume.

  20. The serine protease Pic as a virulence factor of atypical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, Afonso G; Abe, Cecilia M; Nunes, Kamila O; Moraes, Claudia T P; Chavez-Dueñas, Lucia; Navarro-Garcia, Fernando; Barbosa, Angela S; Piazza, Roxane M F; Elias, Waldir P

    2016-01-01

    Autotransporter proteins (AT) are associated with bacterial virulence attributes. Originally identified in enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC), Shigella flexneri 2a and uropathogenic E. coli, the serine protease Pic is one of these AT. We have previously detected one atypical enteropathogenic E. coli strain (BA589) carrying the pic gene. In the present study, we characterized the biological activities of Pic produced by BA589 both in vitro and in vivo. Contrarily to other Pic-producers bacteria, pic in BA589 is located on a high molecular weight plasmid. PicBA589 was able to agglutinate rabbit erythrocytes, cleave mucin and degrade complement system molecules. BA589 was able to colonize mice intestines, and an intense mucus production was observed. The BA589Δpic mutant lost the capacity to colonize as well as the above-mentioned in vitro activities. Thus, Pic represents an additional virulence factor in aEPEC strain BA589, associated with adherence, colonization and evasion from the innate immune system.

  1. Levels of bioactive lipids in cooking oils: olive oil is the richest source of oleoyl serine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, Heather B; Leishman, Emma

    2016-05-01

    Rates of osteoporosis are significantly lower in regions of the world where olive oil consumption is a dietary cornerstone. Olive oil may represent a source of oleoyl serine (OS), which showed efficacy in animal models of osteoporosis. Here, we tested the hypothesis that OS as well as structurally analogous N-acyl amide and 2-acyl glycerol lipids are present in the following cooking oils: olive, walnut, canola, high heat canola, peanut, safflower, sesame, toasted sesame, grape seed, and smart balance omega. Methanolic lipid extracts from each of the cooking oils were partially purified on C-18 solid-phase extraction columns. Extracts were analyzed with high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, and 33 lipids were measured in each sample, including OS and bioactive analogs. Of the oils screened here, walnut oil had the highest number of lipids detected (22/33). Olive oil had the second highest number of lipids detected (20/33), whereas grape-seed and high-heat canola oil were tied for lowest number of detected lipids (6/33). OS was detected in 8 of the 10 oils tested and the levels were highest in olive oil, suggesting that there is something about the olive plant that enriches this lipid. Cooking oils contain varying levels of bioactive lipids from the N-acyl amide and 2-acyl glycerol families. Olive oil is a dietary source of OS, which may contribute to lowered prevalence of osteoporosis in countries with high consumption of this oil.

  2. The serine/arginine-rich protein SF2/ASF regulates protein sumoylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelisch, Federico; Gerez, Juan; Druker, Jimena; Schor, Ignacio E; Muñoz, Manuel J; Risso, Guillermo; Petrillo, Ezequiel; Westman, Belinda J; Lamond, Angus I; Arzt, Eduardo; Srebrow, Anabella

    2010-09-14

    Protein modification by conjugation of small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) is involved in diverse biological functions, such as transcription regulation, subcellular partitioning, stress response, DNA damage repair, and chromatin remodeling. Here, we show that the serine/arginine-rich protein SF2/ASF, a factor involved in splicing regulation and other RNA metabolism-related processes, is a regulator of the sumoylation pathway. The overexpression of this protein stimulates, but its knockdown inhibits SUMO conjugation. SF2/ASF interacts with Ubc9 and enhances sumoylation of specific substrates, sharing characteristics with already described SUMO E3 ligases. In addition, SF2/ASF interacts with the SUMO E3 ligase PIAS1 (protein inhibitor of activated STAT-1), regulating PIAS1-induced overall protein sumoylation. The RNA recognition motif 2 of SF2/ASF is necessary and sufficient for sumoylation enhancement. Moreover, SF2/ASF has a role in heat shock-induced sumoylation and promotes SUMO conjugation to RNA processing factors. These results add a component to the sumoylation pathway and a previously unexplored role for the multifunctional SR protein SF2/ASF.

  3. MST2 phosphorylation at serine 385 in mitosis inhibits its tumor suppressing activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xingcheng; Chen, Yuanhong; Dong, Jixin

    2016-12-01

    Mammalian sterile 20-like kinase 1/2 (MST1/2) are core tumor suppressors in the Hippo signaling pathway. MST1/2 have been shown to regulate mitotic progression. Here, we report a novel mechanism for phospho-regulation of MST2 in mitosis and its biological significance in cancer. We found that the mitotic kinase cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1) phosphorylates MST2 in vitro and in vivo at serine 385 during antimitotic drug-induced G2/M phase arrest. This phosphorylation occurs transiently during unperturbed mitosis. Mitotic phosphorylation of MST2 does not affect its kinase activity or Hippo-YAP signaling. We further showed that mitotic phosphorylation-deficient mutant MST2-S385A possesses higher activity in suppressing cell proliferation and anchorage-independent growth in vitro and tumorigenesis in vivo. Together, our findings reveal a novel layer of regulation for MST2 in mitosis and its role in tumorigenesis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Type II transmembrane serine proteases as potential target for anti-influenza drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Woo-Jin; Seong, Baik Lin

    2017-11-01

    The outbreak of an influenza pandemic as well as the continued circulation of seasonal influenza highlights the need for effective antiviral therapies. The emergence of drug-resistant strains further necessitates the development of novel antivirals that target the host factors crucial for viral replication. Area covered: This review summarizes the current understanding of the structural and functional properties of type II transmembrane serine proteases (TTSPs) as a proteolytic activator of influenza virus infection and discusses their potential as antiviral targets. It also explores the experimental evidence accumulated for inhibitors of TTSPs as novel, broad-spectrum antivirals against various influenza virus subtypes. The review also provides an overview of the properties of small molecules, proteins, and peptides that efficiently inhibit the proteolytic activation of the influenza virus. Expert opinion: TTSPs activate a wide range of influenza virus subtypes including avian influenza viruses, both in vitro and in vivo, via proteolytic cleavage of influenza hemagglutinin (HA) into infection-competent fusogenic conformation. Other viruses such as SARS-, MERS-coronaviruses and human metapneumoviruses may use the same host cell proteases for activation, implying that TTSP inhibition might be a novel strategy for developing broad-spectrum antiviral agents for respiratory viral infections.

  5. [Bacterial TEM-type serine beta-lactamases: structure and analysis of mutations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigorenko, V G; Rubtsova, M Yu; Uporov, I V; Ishtubaev, I V; Andreeva, I P; Shcherbinin, D S; Veselovsky, A V; Egorov, A M

    2017-11-01

    Beta-lactamases (EC 3.5.2.6) represent a superfamily containing more than 2,000 members: it includes genetically and functionally different bacterial enzymes capable to destroy the beta-lactam antibiotics. The most common are beta-lactamases of molecular class A with serine in the active center. Among them, TEM-type beta-lactamases are of particular interest from the viewpoint of studying the mechanisms of the evolution of resistance due to their broad polymorphism. To date, more than 200 sequences of TEM-type beta-lactamases have been described and more than 60 structures of different mutant forms have been presented in Protein Data Bank. We have considered the main structural features of the enzymes of this type with particular attention to the analysis of key drug resistance and the secondary mutations, their location relative to the active center and the surface of the protein globule. We have developed the BlaSIDB database (www.blasidb.org) which is an open information resource combining available data on 3D structures, amino acid sequences and nomenclature of the corresponding forms of beta-lactamases.

  6. Beyond the Dopamine Receptor: Regulation and Roles of Serine/Threonine Protein Phosphatases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven I Walaas

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Dopamine plays an important modulatory role in the central nervous system, helping to control critical aspects of motor function and reward learning. Alteration in normal dopaminergic neurotransmission underlies multiple neurological diseases including schizophrenia, Huntington's disease and Parkinson's disease. Modulation of dopamine-regulated signaling pathways is also important in the addictive actions of most drugs of abuse. Our studies over the last 30 years have focused on the molecular actions of dopamine acting on medium spiny neurons, the predominant neurons of the neostriatum. Striatum-enriched phosphoproteins, particularly DARPP-32, RCS (Regulator of Calmodulin Signaling and ARPP-16, mediate pleiotropic actions of dopamine. Notably, each of these proteins, either directly or indirectly, regulates the activity of one of the three major subclasses of serine/threonine protein phosphatases, PP1, PP2B and PP2A, respectively. For example, phosphorylation of DARPP-32 at Thr34 by protein kinase A results in potent inhibition of PP1, leading to potentiation of dopaminergic signaling at multiple steps from the dopamine receptor to the nucleus. The discovery of DARPP-32 and its emergence as a critical molecular integrator of striatal signaling will be discussed, as will more recent studies that highlight novel roles for RCS and ARPP-16 in dopamine-regulated striatal signaling pathways.

  7. Water miscible mono alcohols' effect on the proteolytic performance of Bacillus clausii serine alkaline protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duman, Yonca Avci; Kazan, Dilek; Denizci, Aziz Akin; Erarslan, Altan

    2014-01-01

    In this study, our investigations showed that the increasing concentrations of all examined mono alcohols caused a decrease in the Vm, kcat and kcat/Km values of Bacillus clausii GMBE 42 serine alkaline protease for casein hydrolysis. However, the Km value of the enzyme remained almost the same, which was an indicator of non-competitive inhibition. Whereas inhibition by methanol was partial non-competitive, inhibition by the rest of the alcohols tested was simple non-competitive. The inhibition constants (KI) were in the range of 1.32-3.10 M, and the order of the inhibitory effect was 1-propanol>2-propanol>methanol>ethanol. The ΔG(≠) and ΔG(≠)E-T values of the enzyme increased at increasing concentrations of all alcohols examined, but the ΔG(≠)ES value of the enzyme remained almost the same. The constant Km and ΔG(≠)ES values in the presence and absence of mono alcohols indicated the existence of different binding sites for mono alcohols and casein on enzyme the molecule. The kcat of the enzyme decreased linearly by increasing log P and decreasing dielectric constant (D) values, but the ΔG(≠) and ΔG(≠)E-T values of the enzyme increased by increasing log P and decreasing D values of the reaction medium containing mono alcohols.

  8. Loss of DJ-1 impairs antioxidant response by altered glutamine and serine metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiser, J; Delcambre, S; Wegner, A; Jäger, C; Ghelfi, J; d'Herouel, A Fouquier; Dong, X; Weindl, D; Stautner, C; Nonnenmacher, Y; Michelucci, A; Popp, O; Giesert, F; Schildknecht, S; Krämer, L; Schneider, J G; Woitalla, D; Wurst, W; Skupin, A; Weisenhorn, D M Vogt; Krüger, R; Leist, M; Hiller, K

    2016-05-01

    The oncogene DJ-1 has been originally identified as a suppressor of PTEN. Further on, loss-of-function mutations have been described as a causative factor in Parkinson's disease (PD). DJ-1 has an important function in cellular antioxidant responses, but its role in central metabolism of neurons is still elusive. We applied stable isotope assisted metabolic profiling to investigate the effect of a functional loss of DJ-1 and show that DJ-1 deficient neuronal cells exhibit decreased glutamine influx and reduced serine biosynthesis. By providing precursors for GSH synthesis, these two metabolic pathways are important contributors to cellular antioxidant response. Down-regulation of these pathways, as a result of loss of DJ-1 leads to an impaired antioxidant response. Furthermore, DJ-1 deficient mouse microglia showed a weak but constitutive pro-inflammatory activation. The combined effects of altered central metabolism and constitutive activation of glia cells raise the susceptibility of dopaminergic neurons towards degeneration in patients harboring mutated DJ-1. Our work reveals metabolic alterations leading to increased cellular instability and identifies potential new intervention points that can further be studied in the light of novel translational medicine approaches. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Broad spectrum activity of a lectin-like bacterial serine protease family on human leukocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Luis Ayala-Lujan

    Full Text Available The serine protease autotransporter from Enterobacteriaceae (SPATE family, which number more than 25 proteases with apparent diverse functions, have been phylogenetically divided into two distinct classes, designated 1 and 2. We recently demonstrated that Pic and Tsh, two members of the class-2 SPATE family produced by intestinal and extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli, were able to cleave a number of O-glycosylated proteins on neutrophils and lymphocytes resulting in impaired leukocyte functions. Here we show that most members of the class-2 SPATE family have lectin-like properties and exhibit differential protease activity reliant on glycoprotein type and cell lineage. Protease activity was seen in virtually all tested O-glycosylated proteins including CD34, CD55, CD164, TIM1, TIM3, TIM4 and C1-INH. We also show that although SPATE proteins bound and cleaved glycoproteins more efficiently on granulocytes and monocytes, they also targeted glycoproteins on B, T and natural killer lymphocytes. Finally, we found that the characteristic domain-2 of class-2 SPATEs is not required for glycoprotease activity, but single amino acid mutations in Pic domain-1 to those residues naturally occurring in domain-1 of SepA, were sufficient to hamper Pic glycoprotease activity. This study shows that most class-2 SPATEs have redundant activities and suggest that they may function as immunomodulators at several levels of the immune system.

  10. Ceftibuten stability to active-site serine and metallo-beta-lactamases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perilli, M; Segatore, B; Franceschini, N; Gizzi, G; Mancinelli, A; Caravelli, B; Setacci, D; del Tavio-Perez, M M; Bianchi, B; Amicosante, G

    2001-01-01

    Ceftibuten is an oral third-generation cephalosporin active against a wide range of bacteria and shows an improved stability to hydrolysis by several beta-lactamases because of the carboxyethilidine moiety at position 7 of the ss-acyl side chain. The kinetic interactions between ceftibuten and active-site serine and metallo-ss-lactamases were investigated. The activity of several TEM-derived extended spectrum beta-lactamases (ESbetaLs) against ceftibuten, cefotaxime and ceftazidime was compared using K(m), K(cat) and K(cat)/K(m). Ceftibuten behaved as a poor substrate for class A and B beta-lactamases compared with cefotaxime. The chromosomal class C beta-lactamase from Enterobacter cloacae 908R gave a high K(cat) value (21 s(-1)), whereas there was poor activity with enzymes from Acinetobacter baumannii and Morganella morganii and ceftibuten. Ceftibuten resists hydrolysis in the presence of typical respiratory or urogenital-tract pathogens producing beta-lactamases.

  11. Interactions of "bora-penicilloates" with serine β-lactamases and DD-peptidases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzhekieva, Liudmila; Adediran, S A; Pratt, R F

    2014-10-21

    Specific boronic acids are generally powerful tetrahedral intermediate/transition state analogue inhibitors of serine amidohydrolases. This group of enzymes includes bacterial β-lactamases and DD-peptidases where there has been considerable development of boronic acid inhibitors. This paper describes the synthesis, determination of the inhibitory activity, and analysis of the results from two α-(2-thiazolidinyl) boronic acids that are closer analogues of particular tetrahedral intermediates involved in β-lactamase and DD-peptidase catalysis than those previously described. One of them, 2-[1-(dihydroxyboranyl)(2-phenylacetamido)methyl]-5,5-dimethyl-1,3-thiazolidine-4-carboxylic acid, is a direct analogue of the deacylation tetrahedral intermediates of these enzymes. These compounds are micromolar inhibitors of class C β-lactamases but, very unexpectedly, not inhibitors of class A β-lactamases. We rationalize the latter result on the basis of a new mechanism of boronic acid inhibition of the class A enzymes. A stable inhibitory complex is not accessible because of the instability of an intermediate on its pathway of formation. The new boronic acids also do not inhibit bacterial DD-peptidases (penicillin-binding proteins). This result strongly supports a central feature of a previously proposed mechanism of action of β-lactam antibiotics, where deacylation of β-lactam-derived acyl-enzymes is not possible because of unfavorable steric interactions.

  12. STRUCTURAL ASPECTS OF STRONG INHIBITION AND ROLE OF SCAFFOLD FOR SERINE PROTEASE INHIBITORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jhimli Dasgupta

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Canonical serine protease inhibitors inhibit their cognate enzymes by binding tightly at the enzyme active site in a substrate-like manner, being cleaved extremely slowly compared to a true substrate. They interact with cognate enzymes through P3-P2 region of the inhibitory loop while the scaffold hardly makes any contact. Neighbouring scaffolding residues like arginine or asparagine shape-up the inhibitory loop and religate the cleaved scissile bond. The specificity of the inhibitor can be altered by mutating the hyper solvent accessible P1 residue without changing loop-scaffold interactions. To understand the loop-scaffold compatibility, we prepared three chimeric proteins ECIL-WCIS , ETIL-WCIS , and STIL-WCIS , where the inhibitory loops of ECI, ETI, and STI were placed on the scaffold of their homologue WCI. Results showed that although ECIL-WCIS and STIL-WCIS behave like inhibitors, ETIL-WCIS behaves like a substrate. Crystal structure of ETIL-WCIS and its comparison with ETI indicated that three novel scaffolding residues Trp88, Arg74, and Tyr113 in ETI act as barrier to confine the inhibitory loop to canonical conformation. Absence of this barrier in the scaffold of WCI makes the inhibitory loop flexible in ETIL-WCIS leading to a loss of canonical conformation, explaining its substrate-like behaviour. Furthermore, complex structures of the inhibitors with their cognate enzymes indicate that rigidification of the inhibitory loop at the enzyme active site is necessary for efficient inhibition.

  13. The Serine Hydrolase ABHD6 Is a Critical Regulator of the Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gwynneth Thomas

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The serine hydrolase α/β hydrolase domain 6 (ABHD6 has recently been implicated as a key lipase for the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-AG in the brain. However, the biochemical and physiological function for ABHD6 outside of the central nervous system has not been established. To address this, we utilized targeted antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs to selectively knock down ABHD6 in peripheral tissues in order to identify in vivo substrates and understand ABHD6’s role in energy metabolism. Here, we show that selective knockdown of ABHD6 in metabolic tissues protects mice from high-fat-diet-induced obesity, hepatic steatosis, and systemic insulin resistance. Using combined in vivo lipidomic identification and in vitro enzymology approaches, we show that ABHD6 can hydrolyze several lipid substrates, positioning ABHD6 at the interface of glycerophospholipid metabolism and lipid signal transduction. Collectively, these data suggest that ABHD6 inhibitors may serve as therapeutics for obesity, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and type II diabetes.

  14. The Structural Basis of [beta]-Peptide-Specific Cleavage by the Serine Protease Cyanophycinase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Law, Adrienne M.; Lai, Sandy W.S.; Tavares, John; Kimber, Matthew S.; (Guelph)

    2010-10-01

    Cyanophycin, or poly-L-Asp-multi-L-Arg, is a non-ribosomally synthesized peptidic polymer that is used for nitrogen storage by cyanobacteria and other select eubacteria. Upon synthesis, it self-associates to form insoluble granules, the degradation of which is uniquely catalyzed by a carboxy-terminal-specific protease, cyanophycinase. We have determined the structure of cyanophycinase from the freshwater cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 at 1.5-{angstrom} resolution, showing that the structure is dimeric, with individual protomers resembling aspartyl dipeptidase. Kinetic characterization of the enzyme demonstrates that the enzyme displays Michaelis-Menten kinetics with a k{sub cat} of 16.5 s{sup -1} and a k{sub cat}/K{sub M} of 7.5 x 10{sup -6} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments confirm that cyanophycinase is a serine protease and that Gln101, Asp172, Gln173, Arg178, Arg180 and Arg183, which form a conserved pocket adjacent to the catalytic Ser132, are functionally critical residues. Modeling indicates that cyanophycinase binds the {beta}-Asp-Arg dipeptide residue immediately N-terminal to the scissile bond in an extended conformation in this pocket, primarily recognizing this penultimate {beta}-Asp-Arg residue of the polymeric chain. Because binding and catalysis depend on substrate features unique to {beta}-linked aspartyl peptides, cyanophycinase is able to act within the cytosol without non-specific cleavage events disrupting essential cellular processes.

  15. Enzyme promiscuity in earthworm serine protease: substrate versatility and therapeutic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Mahendra Kumar; Pulicherla, K K

    2016-04-01

    Enzymes are the most versatile molecules in the biological world. These amazing molecules play an integral role in the regulation of various metabolic pathways and physiology subsequently. Promiscuity of an enzyme is the capacity to catalyze additional biochemical reactions besides their native one. Catalytic promiscuity has shown great impact in enzyme engineering for commercial enzyme and therapeutics with natural or engineered catalytic promiscuity. The earthworm serine protease (ESP) is a classic example of enzyme promiscuity and studied for its therapeutic potential over the last few decades. The ESP was reported for several therapeutic properties and fibrinolytic activity has been much explored. ESP, a complex enzyme exists as several isoforms of molecular weight ranging from 14 to 33 kDa. The fibrinolytic capacity of the enzyme has been studied in different species of earthworm and molecular mechanism is quite different from conventional thrombolytics. Cytotoxic and anti-tumor activities of ESP were evaluated using several cancer cell lines. Enzyme had shown tremendous scope in fighting against plant viruses and microbes. ESP is also reported for anti-inflammatory activity and anti-oxidant property. Apart from these, recently, ESP is reported for DNase activity. The daunting challenge for researchers is to understand the molecular mechanism for such diverse properties and possibility of enzyme promiscuity. This review emphasizes molecular mechanism of ESP governing various biochemical reactions. Further, the concept of enzyme promiscuity in ESP towards development of novel enzyme based drugs has been reviewed in this study.

  16. The high prevalence of serine protease autotransporters of Enterobacteriaceae (SPATEs) in Escherichia coli causing neonatal septicemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapader, R; Chatterjee, S; Singh, A K; Dayma, P; Haldar, S; Pal, A; Basu, S

    2014-11-01

    Serine protease autotransporters of Enterobacteriaceae (SPATEs) are secreted proteins demonstrating diverse virulence functions. The distribution of SPATEs is studied among diarrheagenic and extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli. However, the contribution of SPATEs to the virulence of neonatal septicemic Escherichia coli (NSEC) has not yet been elucidated. This study was undertaken to evaluate the prevalence and phylogenetic distribution of different subtypes of SPATEs among NSEC. The presence of virulence factors and subtypes of SPATEs among different E. coli isolates was determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). E. coli phylogrouping was done by triplex PCR. Clonality of the isolates was assessed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). The presence of SPATEs was significantly higher among the septicemic isolates (89 %) than the fecal (7.5 %) and environmental isolates (2.5 %). Vat (vacuolating autotransporter toxin) and Sat (secreted autotransporter toxin) were found to be the two most predominant SPATEs. The incidence of SPATEs was high in septicemic isolates of phylogroups A and B1 (87 %), lacking other virulence factors. The high prevalence of SPATEs in the non-B2 phylogroups of septicemic isolates in comparison with fecal and environmental isolates indicates an association of SPATEs with NSEC. The NSEC isolates were found to be clonally distinct, suggesting that the high prevalence of SPATEs was not due to clonal relatedness of the isolates. This study is the first to show the association of SPATEs with NSEC. The presence of SPATEs in the septicemic/NSEC isolates may be considered as the most discriminatory trait studied here.

  17. A serine-rich glycoprotein of Streptococcus sanguis mediates adhesion to platelets via GPIb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plummer, Christopher; Wu, Hui; Kerrigan, Steven W; Meade, Gerardene; Cox, Dermot; Ian Douglas, C W

    2005-04-01

    Streptococcus sanguis is the most common oral bacterium causing infective endocarditis and its ability to adhere to platelets, leading to their activation and aggregation, is thought to be an important virulent factor. Previous work has shown that S. sanguis can bind directly to platelet glycoprotein (GP) Ib but the nature of the adhesin was unknown. Here, we have shown that a high molecular weight glycoprotein of S. sanguis mediates adhesion to glycocalacin. The bacterial glycoprotein was purified from cell extracts by chromatography on GPIb- and wheatgerm agglutinin affinity matrices and its interaction with GPIb was shown to be sialic acid-dependent. We designated the glycoprotein serine-rich protein A (SrpA). An insertional inactivation mutant lacking the SrpA of S. sanguis showed significantly reduced binding to glycocalacin, reduced adherence to platelets and a prolonged lag time to platelet aggregation. In addition, under flow conditions, platelets rolled and subsequently adhered on films of wild-type S. sanguis cells at low shear (50/s) but did not bind to films of the SrpA mutant. Platelets did not bind to wild-type bacterial cells at high shear (1500/s). These findings help to understand the mechanisms by which the organism might colonize platelet-fibrin vegetations.

  18. Codon sextets with leading role of serine create "ideal" symmetry classification scheme of the genetic code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosandić, Marija; Paar, Vladimir

    2014-06-10

    The standard classification scheme of the genetic code is organized for alphabetic ordering of nucleotides. Here we introduce the new, "ideal" classification scheme in compact form, for the first time generated by codon sextets encoding Ser, Arg and Leu amino acids. The new scheme creates the known purine/pyrimidine, codon-anticodon, and amino/keto type symmetries and a novel A+U rich/C+G rich symmetry. This scheme is built from "leading" and "nonleading" groups of 32 codons each. In the ensuing 4 × 16 scheme, based on trinucleotide quadruplets, Ser has a central role as initial generator. Six codons encoding Ser and six encoding Arg extend continuously along a linear array in the "leading" group, and together with four of six Leu codons uniquely define construction of the "leading" group. The remaining two Leu codons enable construction of the "nonleading" group. The "ideal" genetic code suggests the evolution of genetic code with serine as an initiator. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Further theoretical insight into the reaction mechanism of the hepatitis C NS3/NS4A serine protease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-González, José Ángel; Rodríguez, Alex; Puyuelo, María Pilar; González, Miguel; Martínez, Rodrigo

    2015-01-01

    The main reactions of the hepatitis C virus NS3/NS4A serine protease are studied using the second-order Møller-Plesset ab initio method and rather large basis sets to correct the previously reported AM1/CHARMM22 potential energy surfaces. The reaction efficiencies measured for the different substrates are explained in terms of the tetrahedral intermediate formation step (the rate-limiting process). The energies of the barrier and the corresponding intermediate are so close that the possibility of a concerted mechanism is open (especially for the NS5A/5B substrate). This is in contrast to the suggested general reaction mechanism of serine proteases, where a two-step mechanism is postulated.

  20. Platelet content of nitric oxide synthase 3 phosphorylated at Serine 1177 is associated with the functional response of platelets to aspirin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Modrego

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To analyse if platelet responsiveness to aspirin (ASA may be associated with a different ability of platelets to generate nitric oxide (NO. PATIENTS/METHODS: Platelets were obtained from 50 patients with stable coronary ischemia and were divided into ASA-sensitive (n = 26 and ASA-resistant (n = 24 using a platelet functionality test (PFA-100. RESULTS: ASA-sensitive platelets tended to release more NO (determined as nitrite + nitrate than ASA-resistant platelets but it did not reach statistical significance. Protein expression of nitric oxide synthase 3 (NOS3 was higher in ASA-sensitive than in ASA-resistant platelets but there were no differences in the platelet expression of nitric oxide synthase 2 (NOS2 isoform. The highest NOS3 expression in ASA-sensitive platelets was independent of the presence of T-to-C mutation at nucleotide position -786 (T(-786 → C in the NOS3-coding gene. However, platelet content of phosphorylated NOS3 at Serine (Ser(1177, an active form of NOS3, was higher in ASA-sensitive than in ASA-resistant platelets. The level of platelet NOS3 Ser(1177 phosphorylation was positively associated with the closure time in the PFA-100 test. In vitro, collagen failed to stimulate the aggregation of ASA-sensitive platelets, determined by lumiaggregometry, and it was associated with a significant increase (p = 0.018 of NOS3 phosphorylation at Ser(1177. On the contrary, collagen stimulated the aggregation of ASA-resistant platelets but did not significantly modify the platelet content of phosphorylated NOS3 Ser(1177. During collagen stimulation the release of NO from ASA-sensitive platelets was significantly enhanced but it was not modified in ASA-resistant platelets. CONCLUSIONS: Functional platelet responsiveness to ASA was associated with the platelet content of phosphorylated NOS3 at Ser(1177.

  1. Plasmodium falciparum avoids change in erythrocytic surface expression of phagocytosis markers during inhibition of nitric oxide synthase activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hempel, Casper; Kohnke, Hannes; Maretty, Lasse

    2014-01-01

    inhibitors led to a decrease in intraerythrocytic NO accumulation and if this was associated with a change in surface expression of the phagocytosis markers CD47 and phosphatidyl serine. The specific inducible NOS inhibitors l-canavanine and GW274150 dose-dependently decreased intraerythrocytic NO while l...... increased the fraction of phosphatidyl serine exposing cells significantly. The infection did not change the level of expression of neither total CD47 nor its oxidized form. Unrelated to NOS inhibition, incubation with caveolin-1 scaffolding domain peptide lead to a decrease in oxidized CD47. In conclusion...

  2. Mediation of endothelial cell damage by serine proteases, but not superoxide, released from antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-stimulated neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, X; Garfield, A; Rainger, G E; Savage, C O S; Nash, G B

    2006-05-01

    To evaluate potential mediators of endothelial cell injury in systemic vasculitis associated with antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCAs), we investigated the factors controlling the neutrophil respiratory burst and endothelial release of von Willebrand factor (vWF) during neutrophil-endothelial cell interactions. Superoxide release from neutrophils binding to purified P-selectin or to tumor necrosis factor-activated endothelial cells was measured under flow or static conditions using the superoxide dismutase (SOD)-inhibitable reduction of ferricytochrome c. Neutrophils were activated with fMLP, normal IgG, or ANCA IgG. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to measure vWF. Serine protease activity was measured enzymatically. ANCA IgG or fMLP induced superoxide release when perfused over neutrophils that were rolling over P-selectin, but not those that were binding to endothelial cells. In static assays, endothelial cells inhibited superoxide production by neutrophils. Adenosine inhibited the respiratory burst, and, in cocultures, adenosine deaminase overcame the inhibitory effects of endothelial cells. Serine proteases were released during activated neutrophil-endothelial cell coculture. There was enhanced release of vWF during activated neutrophil-endothelial cell coculture; this was not inhibited by diphenyleneiodonium or by SOD plus catalase, but was inhibited by diisopropylfluorophosphate. Endothelial cells inhibit superoxide generation by fMLP and ANCA-activated neutrophils. The release of vWF occurs during coculture and is sensitive to serine protease, but not NADPH oxidase inhibition. Serine proteases may play a more important role than reactive oxygen species as mediators of endothelial injury during ANCA-associated systemic vasculitis.

  3. Structural and spectroscopic investigation on antioxidant dipeptide, L-Methionyl-L-Serine: A combined experimental and DFT study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kecel-Gunduz, Serda; Bicak, Bilge; Celik, Sefa; Akyuz, Sevim; Ozel, Aysen E.

    2017-06-01

    The focus of this study is to determine the conformational, structural and vibrational properties of Methionyl-Serine dipeptide (L-Methionyl-L-Serine, Met-Ser), a biological active molecule. To investigate their energetically preferred conformations, molecular mechanics methods were utilized to determine the optimal conformations of the 3402 different dihedral angle values of the backbone and side chains. It was found that the extended (e) backbone shape in the LB conformational range was the most stable L-Methionyl-L-Serine dipeptide conformation, with 3.12 kcal/mol of energy. Density Functional Theory (DFT) was used to determine the optimized geometry, the vibrational wavenumbers and modes of the title dipeptide values, with 6-31G (d,p) and 6-311++G (d,p) basis sets. The potential energy distribution data was used to carry out the assignment of the bands. In addition, the vibrational spectra of the most stable conformer and its dimer form were determined and the obtained results were compared with the experimental IR and Raman spectra in the solid phase. To determine the presence of intramolecular charge transfer, molecular dipole moment, polarizability and hyperpolarizability, the Natural Bond Orbital (NBO), HOMO-LUMO calculations, the linear polarizability (α) and the first order hyperpolarizability (β0) value analyses of the investigated molecule were carried out using the DFT with the B3LYP/6-31++G(d,p) basis set. This study aims to determine a relatively stable conformation of antioxidant dipeptide and to investigate the molecular geometry, molecular vibrations and hydrogen bonding interactions between monomeric and dimeric forms of Methiony-Serine dipeptide.

  4. Lysosomal Serine Protease CLN2 Regulates Tumor Necrosis Factor-α-mediated Apoptosis in a Bid-dependent Manner*

    OpenAIRE

    Autefage, Hélène; Albinet, Virginie; Garcia, Virginie; Berges, Hortense; Nicolau, Marie-Laure; Therville, Nicole; Altié, Marie-Françoise; Caillaud, Catherine; Levade, Thierry; Andrieu-Abadie, Nathalie

    2009-01-01

    Apoptosis is a highly organized, energy-dependent program by which multicellular organisms eliminate damaged, superfluous, and potentially harmful cells. Although caspases are the most prominent group of proteases involved in the apoptotic process, the role of lysosomes has only recently been unmasked. This study investigated the role of the lysosomal serine protease CLN2 in apoptosis. We report that cells isolated from patients affected with late infantile neuronal ce...

  5. An Epithelial Serine Protease, AgESP, Is Required for Plasmodium Invasion in the Mosquito Anopheles gambiae

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rodrigues, J.; Oliveira, G. A.; Kotsyfakis, Michalis; Dixit, R.; Molina-Cruz, A.; Jochim, R.; Barillas-Mury, C.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 4 (2012), e35210 E-ISSN 1932-6203 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : malaria * mosquito * serine protease * sporozoites * ookinetes * gene silencing * midgut * salivary glands * Plasmodium falciparum * Anopheles gambiae Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.730, year: 2012 http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0035210

  6. Calyculins and Related Marine Natural Products as Serine- Threonine Protein Phosphatase PP1 and PP2A Inhibitors and Total Syntheses of Calyculin A, B, and C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ari M. P. Koskinen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Calyculins, highly cytotoxic polyketides, originally isolated from the marine sponge Discodermia calyx by Fusetani and co-workers, belong to the lithistid sponges group. These molecules have become interesting targets for cell biologists and synthetic organic chemists. The serine/threonine protein phosphatases play an essential role in the cellular signalling, metabolism, and cell cycle control. Calyculins express potent protein phosphatase 1 and 2A inhibitory activity, and have therefore become valuable tools for cellular biologists studying intracellular processes and their control by reversible phosphorylation. Calyculins might also play an important role in the development of several diseases such as cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, and type 2-diabetes mellitus. The fascinating structures of calyculins have inspired various groups of synthetic organic chemists to develop total syntheses of the most abundant calyculins A and C. However, with fifteen chiral centres, a cyano-capped tetraene unit, a phosphate-bearing spiroketal, an anti, anti, anti dipropionate segment, an α-chiral oxazole, and a trihydroxylated γ-amino acid, calyculins reach versatility that only few natural products can surpass, and truly challenge modern chemists’ asymmetric synthesis skills.

  7. Differential regulation of the phosphorylation of Trimethyl-lysine27 histone H3 at serine 28 in distinct populations of striatal projection neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonito-Oliva, Alessandra; Södersten, Erik; Spigolon, Giada

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorylation of histone H3 (H3) on serine 28 (S28) at genomic regions marked by trimethylation of lysine 27 (H3K27me3) often correlates with increased expression of genes normally repressed by Polycomb group proteins (PcG). We show that amphetamine, an addictive psychostimulant, and haloperidol...... of the protein phosphatase-1 inhibitor, dopamine- and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein of 32 kDa (DARPP-32), reduces the phosphorylation of H3K27me3S28 produced by amphetamine and haloperidol. In contrast, knockout of the mitogen- and stress activated kinase 1 (MSK1), which is implicated in the phosphorylation...... of histone H3, decreases the effect of amphetamine, but not that of haloperidol. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis shows that amphetamine and haloperidol increase the phosphorylation of H3K27me3S28 at the promoter regions of Atf3, Npas4 and Lipg, three genes repressed by PcG. These results identify H3K...

  8. Regulation of the Alternative Splicing and Function of Cyclin T1 by the Serine-Arginine-Rich Protein ASF/SF2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jieqiong; Gao, Guozhen; Hou, Panpan; Li, Chun-Mei; Guo, Deyin

    2017-11-01

    Positive transcription elongation factor-b (P-TEFb) is required for the release of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) from its pause near the gene promoters and thus for efficient proceeding to the transcription elongation. It consists of two core subunits-CDK9 and one of T-typed or K-typed cyclin, of which, cyclin T1/CDK9 is the major and most studied combination. We have previously identified a novel splice variant of cyclin T1, cyclin T1b, which negatively regulates the transcription elongation of HIV-1 genes as well as several host genes. In this study, we revealed the serine-arginine-rich protein, ASF/SF2, as a regulatory factor of the alternative splicing of cyclin T1 gene. ASF/SF2 promotes the production of cyclin T1b versus cyclin T1a and regulates the expression of cyclin T1-depedent genes at the transcription level. We further found that a cis-element on exon 8 is responsible for the skipping of exon 7 mediated by ASF/SF2. Collectively, ASF/SF2 is identified as a splicing regulator of cyclin T1, which contributes to the control of the subsequent transcription events. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 4020-4032, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. The Aer protein and the serine chemoreceptor Tsr independently sense intracellular energy levels and transduce oxygen, redox, and energy signals for Escherichia coli behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebbapragada, Anuradha; Johnson, Mark S.; Harding, Gordon P.; Zuccarelli, Anthony J.; Fletcher, Hansel M.; Zhulin, Igor B.; Taylor, Barry L.

    1997-01-01

    We identified a protein, Aer, as a signal transducer that senses intracellular energy levels rather than the external environment and that transduces signals for aerotaxis (taxis to oxygen) and other energy-dependent behavioral responses in Escherichia coli. Domains in Aer are similar to the signaling domain in chemotaxis receptors and the putative oxygen-sensing domain of some transcriptional activators. A putative FAD-binding site in the N-terminal domain of Aer shares a consensus sequence with the NifL, Bat, and Wc-1 signal-transducing proteins that regulate gene expression in response to redox changes, oxygen, and blue light, respectively. A double mutant deficient in aer and tsr, which codes for the serine chemoreceptor, was negative for aerotaxis, redox taxis, and glycerol taxis, each of which requires the proton motive force and/or electron transport system for signaling. We propose that Aer and Tsr sense the proton motive force or cellular redox state and thereby integrate diverse signals that guide E. coli to environments where maximal energy is available for growth. PMID:9380671

  10. The RNA-binding protein HOS5 and serine/arginine-rich proteins RS40 and RS41 participate in miRNA biogenesis in Arabidopsis

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Tao

    2015-07-30

    MicroRNAs are a class of small regulatory RNAs that are generated from primary miRNA (pri-miRNA) transcripts with a stem-loop structure. Accuracy of the processing of pri-miRNA into mature miRNA in plants can be enhanced by SERRATE (SE) and HYPONASTIC LEAVES 1 (HYL1). HYL1 activity is regulated by the FIERY2 (FRY2)/RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain phosphatase-like 1 (CPL1). Here, we discover that HIGH OSMOTIC STRESS GENE EXPRESSION 5 (HOS5) and two serine/arginine-rich splicing factors RS40 and RS41, previously shown to be involved in pre-mRNA splicing, affect the biogenesis of a subset of miRNA. These proteins are required for correct miRNA strand selection and the maintenance of miRNA levels. FRY2 dephosphorylates HOS5 whose phosphorylation status affects its subnuclear localization. HOS5 and the RS proteins bind both intronless and intron-containing pri-miRNAs. Importantly, all of these splicing-related factors directly interact with both HYL1 and SE in nuclear splicing speckles. Our results indicate that these splicing factors are directly involved in the biogenesis of a group of miRNA.

  11. A model of tripeptidyl-peptidase I (CLN2, a ubiquitous and highly conserved member of the sedolisin family of serine-carboxyl peptidases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oyama Hiroshi

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tripeptidyl-peptidase I, also known as CLN2, is a member of the family of sedolisins (serine-carboxyl peptidases. In humans, defects in expression of this enzyme lead to a fatal neurodegenerative disease, classical late-infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis. Similar enzymes have been found in the genomic sequences of several species, but neither systematic analyses of their distribution nor modeling of their structures have been previously attempted. Results We have analyzed the presence of orthologs of human CLN2 in the genomic sequences of a number of eukaryotic species. Enzymes with sequences sharing over 80% identity have been found in the genomes of macaque, mouse, rat, dog, and cow. Closely related, although clearly distinct, enzymes are present in fish (fugu and zebra, as well as in frogs (Xenopus tropicalis. A three-dimensional model of human CLN2 was built based mainly on the homology with Pseudomonas sp. 101 sedolisin. Conclusion CLN2 is very highly conserved and widely distributed among higher organisms and may play an important role in their life cycles. The model presented here indicates a very open and accessible active site that is almost completely conserved among all known CLN2 enzymes. This result is somehow surprising for a tripeptidase where the presence of a more constrained binding pocket was anticipated. This structural model should be useful in the search for the physiological substrates of these enzymes and in the design of more specific inhibitors of CLN2.

  12. A clip-domain serine proteinase homolog (SPH) in oriental river prawn, Macrobrachium nipponense provides insights into its role in innate immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Zhili; Kong, Youqin; Chen, Liqiao; Qin, Jianguang; Sun, Shengming; Li, Ming; Du, Zhenyu; Ye, Jinyun

    2014-08-01

    In this study, a clip-domain serine proteinase homolog designated as MnSPH was cloned and characterized from a freshwater prawn Macrobrachium nipponense. The full-length cDNA of MnSPH was 1897 bp and contained a 1701 bp open reading frame (ORF) encoding a protein of 566 amino acids, a 103 bp 5'-untranslated region, and a 93 bp 3'-untranslated region. Sequence comparison showed that the deduced amino acids of MnSPH shared 30-59% identity with sequences reported in other animals. Tissue distribution analysis indicated that the MnSPH transcripts were present in all detected tissues with highest in the hepatopancreas and ovary. The MnSPH mRNA levels in the developing ovary were stable at the initial three developmental stages, then increased gradually from stage IV (later vitellogenesis), and reached a maximum at stage VI (paracmasis). Furthermore, the expression of MnSPH mRNA in hemocytes was significantly up-regulated at 1.5 h, 6 h, 12 h and 48 h post Aeromonas hydrophila injection. The increased phenoloxidase activity also demonstrated a clear time-dependent pattern after A. hydrophila challenge. These results suggest that MnSPH participates in resisting to pathogenic microorganisms and plays a pivotal role in host defense against microbe invasion in M. nipponense. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Role of a serine-type D-alanyl-D-alanine carboxypeptidase on the survival of Ochrobactrum sp. 11a under ionic and hyperosmotic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Príncipe, Analía; Jofré, Edgardo; Alvarez, Florencia; Mori, Gladys

    2009-06-01

    The plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium, Ochrobactrum sp. 11a displays a high intrinsic salinity tolerance and has been used in this work to study the molecular basis of bacterial responses to high concentrations of NaCl. A collection of Ochrobactrum sp. 11a mutants was generated by Tn5-B21 mutagenesis and screened for sensitivity to salinity. One clone, designated PBP and unable to grow on glutamate mannitol salt agar medium supplemented with 300 mM NaCl was selected and further characterized. The PBP mutant carries a single transposon insertion in a gene showing a high degree of identity to the serine-type d-alanyl-d-alanine carboxypeptidase gene of Ochrobactrum anthropi. Interestingly, the expression of this gene was shown to be upregulated by salt in the PBP mutant. Moreover, evidence is presented for the requirement of the gene product for adaptation to high-salt conditions as well as to overcome the toxicity of LiCl, KCl, sucrose, polyethylene glycol (PEG), AlCl(3), CuSO(4), and ZnSO(4). In addition to the altered tolerance to both ionic and osmotic stresses, the PBP mutant exhibited changes in colony and cell morphology, exopolysaccharide production, and an increased sensitivity to detergents.

  14. The use of serine protease from Yarrowia lipolytica yeast in the production of biopeptides from denatured egg white proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokora, Marta; Zambrowicz, Aleksandra; Zabłocka, Agnieszka; Dąbrowska, Anna; Szołtysik, Marek; Babij, Konrad; Eckert, Ewelina; Trziszka, Tadeusz; Chrzanowska, Józefa

    2017-01-01

    Deriving non-conventional enzymes from cheaper sources than those used for commercially available enzymes may result in the production of hydrolysates with beneficial features, while drastically reducing the cost of hydrolysis. This is especially significant for enzymatic hydrolysis as a method of protein waste utilization. We have previously described the ability of non-commercial serine protease from Yarrowia lipolytica yeast to produce/release bioactive peptides from egg white protein by-products (EP). The enzymatic hydrolysis of EP was carried out for 24 h using the serine protease at an enzyme: substrate ratio of 1:30 (w/w). The obtained hydrolysate was characterized by protein degradation of 38% and also exhibited an antioxidant and cytokine-inducing activity. The isolation procedure (ultrafiltration and RP-HPLC) of bioactive peptides from the EP hydrolysate provided peptide fractions with significant antioxidant and ACE inhibitory activities. Three homogeneous and three heterogeneous peptide fractions were identified using MALDI-TOF/MS and the Mascot Search Results database. The peptides, mainly derived from ovalbumin, were composed of 2-19 amino-acid residues. We have thus demonstrated a novel ability of serine protease from Y. lipolytica to release biopeptides from an EP by-product.

  15. In vivo magnetic resonance studies reveal neuroanatomical and neurochemical abnormalities in the serine racemase knockout mouse model of schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puhl, Matthew D; Mintzopoulos, Dionyssios; Jensen, J Eric; Gillis, Timothy E; Konopaske, Glenn T; Kaufman, Marc J; Coyle, Joseph T

    2015-01-01

    Decreased availability of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) co-agonist D-serine is thought to promote NMDAR hypofunction and contribute to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, including neuroanatomical abnormalities, such as cortical atrophy and ventricular enlargement, and neurochemical abnormalities, such as aberrant glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) signaling. It is thought that these abnormalities directly relate to the negative symptoms and cognitive impairments that are hallmarks of the disorder. Because of the genetic complexity of schizophrenia, animal models of the disorder are extremely valuable for the study of genetically predisposing factors. Our laboratory developed a transgenic mouse model lacking serine racemase (SR), the synthetic enzyme of d-serine, polymorphisms of which are associated with schizophrenia. Null mutants (SR-/-) exhibit NMDAR hypofunction and cognitive impairments. We used 9.4 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and proton spectroscopy (MRS) to compare in vivo brain structure and neurochemistry in wildtype (WT) and SR-/- mice. Mice were anesthetized with isoflurane for MRI and MRS scans. Compared to WT controls, SR-/- mice exhibited 23% larger ventricular volumes (pcomparable to those previously reported in humans with schizophrenia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Isolation and Biochemical Characterization of a New Thrombin-Like Serine Protease from Bothrops pirajai Snake Venom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayena D. Zaqueo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel serine protease (SP isolated from Bothrops pirajai, a venomous snake found solely in Brazil that belongs to the Viperidae family. The identified SP, named BpirSP-39, was isolated by three chromatographic steps (size exclusion, bioaffinity, and reverse phase chromatographies. The molecular mass of BpirSP-39 was estimated by SDS-PAGE and confirmed by mass spectrometry (39,408.32 Da. The protein was able to form fibrin networks, which was not observed in the presence of serine protease inhibitors, such as phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF. Furthermore, BpirSP-39 presented considerable thermal stability and was apparently able to activate factor XIII of the blood coagulation cascade, unlike most serine proteases. BpirSP-39 was capable of hydrolyzing different chromogenic substrates tested (S-2222, S-2302, and S-2238 while Cu2+ significantly diminished BspirSP-39 activity on the three tested substrates. The enzyme promoted platelet aggregation and also exhibited fibrinogenolytic, fibrinolytic, gelatinolytic, and amidolytic activities. The multiple alignment showed high sequence similarity to other thrombin-like enzymes from snake venoms. These results allow us to conclude that a new SP was isolated from Bothrops pirajai snake venom.

  17. A cyclohexanecarboxamide derivative with inhibitory effects on Schistosoma mansoni cercarial serine protease and penetration of mice skin by the parasite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahgat, Mahmoud; Aboul-Enein, Mohamed N; El Azzouny, Aida A; Maghraby, Amany; Ruppel, Andreas; Soliman, Wael M

    2009-01-01

    A cyclohexanecarboxamide derivative, N-phenyl-N-[1-(piperidine-1-carbonyl)cyclohexyl] benzamide (MNRC-5), was evaluated for its inhibitory effects on Schistosoma mansoni cercarial serine protease activity and cercarial penetration. MNRC-5 exerted an inhibitory effect on S. mansoni cercarial serine protease at serial concentrations of the specific chromogenic substrate Boc-Val-Leu-Gly-Arg-PNA for such enzyme family and the inhibitory coefficient (Ki) value was deduced. Moreover, topical treatment of mice tails with the most potent inhibitory concentration of MNRC-5 formulated in jojoba oil successfully blocked cercarial penetration as demonstrated by a significant reduction (75%; p jojoba oil base containing no MNRC-5. In addition, the IgM and IgG reactivities to crude S. mansoni cercarial, worm and egg antigens were generally lower in sera from treated infected mice than untreated infected mice. In conclusion, we report on a new serine protease inhibitor capable for blocking penetration of host skin by S. mansoni cercariae as measured by lowering worm burden and decrease in the levels of both IgM and IgG towards different bilharzial antigens upon topical treatment.

  18. D-Serine rescues the deficits of hippocampal long-term potentiation and learning and memory induced by sodium fluoroacetate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Huili; Peng, Yan; Dong, Zhifang

    2015-06-01

    It is well known that bidirectional glia-neuron interactions play important roles in the neurophysiological and neuropathological processes. It is reported that impairing glial functions with sodium fluoroacetate (FAC) impaired hippocampal long-term depression (LTD) and spatial memory retrieval. However, it remains unknown whether FAC impairs hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) and learning and/or memory, and if so, whether pharmacological treatment with exogenous d-serine can recuse the impairment. Here, we reported that systemic administration of FAC (3mg/kg, i.p.) before training resulted in dramatic impairments of spatial learning and memory in water maze and fear memory in contextual fear conditioning. Furthermore, the behavioral deficits were accompanied by impaired LTP induction in the hippocampal CA1 area of brain slices. More importantly, exogenous d-serine treatment succeeded in recusing the deficits of hippocampal LTP and learning and memory induced by FAC. Together, these results suggest that astrocytic d-serine may be essential for hippocampal synaptic plasticity and memory, and that alteration of its levels may be relevant to the induction and potentially treatment of psychiatric and neurological disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Factor Xa induces cytokine production and expression of adhesion molecules by human umbilical vein endothelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Senden, N. H.; Jeunhomme, T. M.; Heemskerk, J. W.; Wagenvoord, R.; van't Veer, C.; Hemker, H. C.; Buurman, W. A.

    1998-01-01

    Proinflammatory effects induced by the serine protease factor Xa were investigated in HUVEC. Exposure of cells to factor Xa (5-80 nM) concentration dependently stimulated the production of IL-6, IL-8, and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) and the expression of E-selectin, ICAM-1, and VCAM-1,

  20. Expression of granzyme A and B proteins by cytotoxic lymphocytes involved in acute renal allograft rejection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kummer, J. A.; Wever, P. C.; Kamp, A. M.; ten Berge, I. J.; Hack, C. E.; Weening, J. J.

    1995-01-01

    Granzymes A and B are serine-proteinases stored in the granules of activated cytotoxic T-lymphocytes and natural killer (NK) cells. Expression of granzymes in tissues can be used as an activation marker for cytotoxic cells. Using mAbs specific for human granzyme A or B in immunohistochemical

  1. [Molecular cloning and analysis of cDNA sequences encoding serine proteinase and Kunitz type inhibitor in venom gland of Vipera nikolskii viper].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramazanova, A S; Fil'kin, S Iu; Starkov, V G; Utkin, Iu N

    2011-01-01

    Serine proteinases and Kunitz type inhibitors are widely represented in venoms of snakes from different genera. During the study of the venoms from snakes inhabiting Russia we have cloned cDNAs encoding new proteins belonging to these protein families. Thus, a new serine proteinase called nikobin was identified in the venom gland of Vipera nikolskii viper. By amino acid sequence deduced from the cDNA sequence, nikobin differs from serine proteinases identified in other snake species. Nikobin amino acid sequence contains 15 unique substitutions. This is the first serine proteinase of viper from Vipera genus for which a complete amino acid sequence established. The cDNA encoding Kunitz type inhibitor was also cloned. The deduced amino acid sequence of inhibitor is homologous to those of other proteins from that snakes of Vipera genus. However there are several unusual amino acid substitutions that might result in the change of biological activity of inhibitor.

  2. A mass spectrometry-based proteomic approach for identification of serine/threonine-phosphorylated proteins by enrichment with phospho-specific antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønborg, Mads; Kristiansen, Troels Zakarias; Stensballe, Allan

    2002-01-01

    describe several antibodies that recognize phosphoserine/phosphothreonine-containing proteins by Western blotting. Importantly, these antibodies can be used to enrich for proteins phosphorylated on serine/threonine residues by immunoprecipitation, as well. Using these antibodies, we have immunoprecipitated...

  3. Over-expression, purification and characterization of an Asc-1 homologue from Gloeobacter violaceus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Xiaole; Hald, Helle; Ernst, Heidi Asschenfeldt

    2010-01-01

    The human alanine-serine-cysteine transporter 1 (Asc-1) belongs to the slc7a family of solute carrier transporters. Asc-1 mediates the uptake of D-serine in an exchanger-type fashion, coupling the process to the release of alanine and cysteine. Among the bacterial Asc-1 homologues, one transporter...... by auto-induction, and performed purification and biophysical characterization. In addition, growth studies indicate a preference for alanine as nitrogen source in cells expressing the G. violaceus transporter. It was observed that use of the auto-induction method and subsequent optimization of the length...

  4. Tumor suppressive microRNA-1 mediated novel apoptosis pathways through direct inhibition of splicing factor serine/arginine-rich 9 (SRSF9/SRp30c) in bladder cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshino, Hirofumi [Department of Urology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima (Japan); Enokida, Hideki, E-mail: enokida@m.kufm.kagoshima-u.ac.jp [Department of Urology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima (Japan); Chiyomaru, Takeshi; Tatarano, Shuichi; Hidaka, Hideo; Yamasaki, Takeshi; Gotannda, Takenari; Tachiwada, Tokushi [Department of Urology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima (Japan); Nohata, Nijiro [Department of Functional Genomics, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba (Japan); Yamane, Takashi [Department of Urology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima (Japan); Seki, Naohiko [Department of Functional Genomics, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba (Japan); Nakagawa, Masayuki [Department of Urology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima (Japan)

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tumor suppressive miRNA-1 directly inhibits splicing factor serine/arginine-rich 9 (SRSF9). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SRSF9 mRNA expression was up-regulated in bladder cancer specimens compared to normal tissues. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cell viability (proliferation, migration, and invasion) was reduced in SRSF9 knockdown cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SRSF9 knockdown by miR-1 induced cell apoptosis through caspase-3/7 activation in BC cell lines. -- Abstract: We have previously found that restoration of tumor suppressive microRNA-1 (miR-1), induced cell apoptosis in bladder cancer (BC) cell lines. However, the apoptosis mechanism induced by miR-1 was not fully elucidated. Alternative splicing of mRNA precursors provides cancer cells with opportunities to translate many oncogenic protein variants, which promote cell proliferation and survival under unpreferable condition for cancer development. Serine/arginine-rich (SR) protein family, which involved in alternative pre-mRNA splicing, plays a critical role for regulating apoptosis by splicing apoptosis-related genes. However, transcriptional regulation of SR proteins, themselves, has not been elucidated. In this study, we focused on splicing factor serine/arginine-rich 9 (SRSF9/SRp30c) on the basis of our previous genome-wide gene expression analysis using miR-1-transfected BC cell lines because putative target sites of miR-1 are existed in 3 Prime -untranslated region (UTR) of SRSF9 mRNA. The expression levels of mRNA of SRSF9 were extremely reduced in the miR-1 transfectants. A luciferase activity significantly decreased in the transfectants suggesting that actual binding occurred between miR-1 and 3 Prime UTR of SRSF9 mRNA. Loss-of-function assays demonstrated that significant inhibitions of cell proliferation, migration, and invasion were observed in the si-SRSF9 transfectants. Apoptosis assays demonstrated that cell apoptosis fraction increased and that

  5. Involvement of neuronal and glial activities in control of the extracellular d-serine concentrations by the AMPA glutamate receptor in the mouse medial prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiwata, Sayuri; Umino, Asami; Nishikawa, Toru

    2017-09-28

    It has been well accepted that d-serine may be an exclusive endogenous coagonist for the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA)-type glutamate receptor in mammalian forebrain regions. We have recently found by using an in vivo dialysis method that an intra-medial prefrontal cortex infusion of S-α-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate (S-AMPA), a selective AMPA-type glutamate receptor agonist, causes a reduction in the extracellular levels of d-serine in a calcium-permeable AMPA receptor antagonist-sensitive manner. The inhibitory influence by the AMPA receptor on the extracellular d-serine, however, contradicts the data obtained from in vitro experiments that the AMPA receptor stimulation leads to facilitation of the d-serine liberation. This discrepancy appears to be due to the different cell setups between the in vivo and in vitro preparations. From the viewpoints of the previous reports indicating (1) the neuronal presence of d-serine synthesizing enzyme, serine racemase, and d-serine-like immunoreactivity and (2) the same high tissue concentrations of d-serine in the glia-enriched white matter and in the neuron-enriched gray matter of the mammalian neocortex, we have now investigated in the mouse medial prefrontal cortex, the effects of attenuation of neuronal and glial activities, by tetrodotoxin or fluorocitrate, respectively, on the S-AMPA-induced downregulation of the extracellular d-serine contents. In vivo dialysis studies revealed that a local infusion of tetrodotoxin or fluorocitrate eliminated the ability of S-AMPA given intra-cortically to cause a significant decrease in the dialysate concentrations of d-serine without affecting the elevating effects of S-AMPA on those of glycine, another intrinsic coagonist for the NMDA receptor. These findings suggest that the control by the AMPA receptor of the extracellular d-serine levels could be modulated by the neuronal and glial activities in the prefrontal cortex. It cannot be excluded that

  6. Serine-rich Repeat Adhesin Gordonii Surface Protein B is Important for Streptococcus gordonii Biofilm Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, A Reum; Ahn, Ki Bum; Kim, Hyun Young; Seo, Ho Seong; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Han, Seung Hyun

    2016-12-01

    Streptococcus gordonii is a predominant member of the oral microflora and has been isolated from root canals of teeth with refractory apical periodontitis. Biofilm formation is important for various dental diseases, and S. gordonii is involved in dental biofilm formation as an early colonizer. Although serine-rich repeat (SRR) adhesins of S. gordonii such as gordonii surface protein B (GspB) are associated with bacterial colonization, the role of GspB in biofilm formation is not clearly understood. In the present study, we investigated the effect of S. gordonii GspB on biofilm formation using wild-type and GspB-deficient mutant S. gordonii strains. Confocal microscopy and crystal violet assay were used to determine biofilm formation. Bacterial growth was examined by measuring optical density with spectrometry. Bacterial adherence and biofilm on the culture plate and human dentin slices were visualized with a scanning electron microscope. The GspB-deficient S. gordonii mutant strain was less potent than the wild-type strain in biofilm formation. Of note, there was no difference in the bacterial growth rate between the mutant and wild-type strains. Differences in biofilm-forming ability between the wild-type and mutant strains were more distinct in the sucrose-supplemented media. Furthermore, the GspB-deficient mutant exhibited attenuated formation of aggregates on the surface of the culture plate and human dentin slices. These results suggest that GspB is important for S. gordonii biofilm formation, which may contribute to the development of dental biofilm-associated diseases. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The Serine Protease Autotransporter Pic Modulates Citrobacter rodentium Pathogenesis and Its Innate Recognition by the Host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhullar, Kirandeep; Zarepour, Maryam; Yu, Hongbing; Yang, Hong; Croxen, Matthew; Stahl, Martin; Finlay, B Brett; Turvey, Stuart E; Vallance, Bruce A

    2015-07-01

    Bacterial pathogens produce a number of autotransporters that possess diverse functions. These include the family of serine protease autotransporters of Enterobacteriaceae (SPATEs) produced by enteric pathogens such as Shigella flexneri and enteroaggregative Escherichia coli. Of these SPATEs, one termed "protein involved in colonization," or Pic, has been shown to possess mucinase activity in vitro, but to date, its role in in vivo enteric pathogenesis is unknown. Testing a pic null (ΔpicC) mutant in Citrobacter rodentium, a natural mouse pathogen, found that the C. rodentium ΔpicC strain was impaired in its ability to degrade mucin in vitro compared to the wild type. Upon infection of mice, the ΔpicC mutant exhibited a hypervirulent phenotype with dramatically heavier pathogen burdens found in intestinal crypts. ΔpicC mutant-infected mice suffered greater barrier disruption and more severe colitis and weight loss, necessitating their euthanization between 10 and 14 days postinfection. Notably, the virulence of the ΔpicC mutant was normalized when the picC gene was restored; however, a PicC point mutant causing loss of mucinase activity did not replicate the ΔpicC phenotype. Exploring other aspects of PicC function, the ΔpicC mutant was found to aggregate to higher levels in vivo than wild-type C. rodentium. Moreover, unlike the wild type, the C. rodentium ΔpicC mutant had a red, dry, and rough (RDAR) morphology in vitro and showed increased activation of the innate receptor Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2). Interestingly, the C. rodentium ΔpicC mutant caused a degree of pathology similar to that of wild-type C. rodentium when infecting TLR2-deficient mice, showing that despite its mucinase activity, PicC's major role in vivo may be to limit C. rodentium's stimulation of the host's innate immune system.

  8. The putative serine protease inhibitor Api m 6 from Apis mellifera venom: recombinant and structural evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Y; McIntyre, M; Ginglinger, H; Ollert, M; Cifuentes, L; Blank, S; Spillner, E

    2012-01-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) E-mediated reactions to honeybee venom can cause severe anaphylaxis, sometimes with fatal consequences. Detailed knowledge of the allergic potential of all venom components is necessary to ensure proper diagnosis and treatment of allergy and to gain a better understanding of the allergological mechanisms of insect venoms. Our objective was to undertake an immunochemical and structural evaluation of the putative low-molecular-weight serine protease inhibitor Api m 6, a component of honeybee venom. We recombinantly produced Api m 6 as a soluble protein in Escherichia coli and in Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) insect cells.We also assessed specific IgE reactivity of venom-sensitized patients with 2 prokaryotically produced Api m 6 variants using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Moreover, we built a structural model ofApi m 6 and compared it with other protease inhibitor structures to gain insights into the function of Api m 6. In a population of 31 honeybee venom-allergic patients, 26% showed specific IgE reactivity with prokaryotically produced Api m 6, showing it to be a minor but relevant allergen. Molecular modeling of Api m 6 revealed a typical fold of canonical protease inhibitors, supporting the putative function of this venom allergen. Although Api m 6 has a highly variant surface charge, its epitope distribution appears to be similar to that of related proteins. Api m 6 is a honeybee venom component with IgE-sensitizing potential in a fraction of venom-allergic patients. Recombinant Api m 6 can help elucidate individual component-resolved reactivity profiles and increase our understanding of immune responses to low-molecular-weight allergens

  9. Degradation of the disease-associated prion protein by a serine protease from lichens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Christopher J.; Bennett, James P.; Biro, S.M.; Duque-Velasquez, J. C.; Rodriguez, Cynthia M.; Bessen, R.A.; Rocke, Tonie E.

    2011-01-01

    The disease-associated prion protein (PrPTSE), the probable etiological agent of the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), is resistant to degradation and can persist in the environment. Lichens, mutualistic symbioses containing fungi, algae, bacteria and occasionally cyanobacteria, are ubiquitous in the environment and have evolved unique biological activities allowing their survival in challenging ecological niches. We investigated PrPTSE inactivation by lichens and found acetone extracts of three lichen species (Parmelia sulcata, Cladonia rangiferina and Lobaria pulmonaria) have the ability to degrade prion protein (PrP) from TSE-infected hamsters, mice and deer. Immunoblots measuring PrP levels and protein misfolding cyclic amplification indicated at least two logs of reductions in PrPTSE. Degradative activity was not found in closely related lichen species or in algae or a cyanobacterium that inhabit lichens. Degradation was blocked by Pefabloc SC, a serine protease inhibitor, but not inhibitors of other proteases or enzymes. Additionally, we found that PrP levels in PrPTSE-enriched preps or infected brain homogenates are also reduced following exposure to freshly-collected P. sulcata or an aqueous extract of the lichen. Our findings indicate that these lichen extracts efficiently degrade PrPTSE and suggest that some lichens could have potential to inactivate TSE infectivity on the landscape or be a source for agents to degrade prions. Further work to clone and characterize the protease, assess its effect on TSE infectivity and determine which organism or organisms present in lichens produce or influence the protease activity is warranted.

  10. Structural Basis for Calcium and Phosphatidyl Serine Regulation of PLC δ1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomasney, Jon W.; Cheng, Hwei-Fang; Kobayashi, Minae; King, Klim

    2012-01-01

    Many membrane associated enzymes including those of the phospholipase C (PLC) superfamily are regulated by specific interactions with lipids. Previously we have shown that the C2 domain of PLC δ1 is required for phosphatidyl serine (PS) dependent enzyme activation, and that activation requires the presence of Ca2+. To identify the site of interaction and the role of Ca2+ in the activation mechanism, we mutagenized three highly conserved Ca2+ binding residues (Asp 653, Asp-706 and Asp-708) to Gly in the C2 domain of PLC δ1. The PS-dependent Ca2+ binding affinities of the mutant enzymes D653G, D706G and D708G were reduced by an order of magnitude and the maximal Ca2+ binding was reduced to half of that of the native enzyme. The Ca2+ dependent PS binding was also reduced in the mutant enzymes. Under basal conditions, the Ca2+ dependence and maximal hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) was not altered in the mutants. However, the Ca2+ dependent PS stimulation was severely defective. PS reduces the Km of the native enzyme almost 20 fold, but far less for the mutants. Replacing Asp-653, Asp-706 and Asp-708 simultaneously to glycine in the C2 domain of PLC δ1, leads to a complete and selective loss of the stimulation and binding by PS. These results show that D653, 706 and 708 are required for Ca2+ binding in the C2 domain and demonstrate a mechanism by which C2 domains can mediate regulation of enzyme activity by specific lipid ligands. PMID:22385159

  11. Distribution of serine protease autotransporters of Enterobacteriaceae in typical and atypical enteroaggregative Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Fernanda B; Abreu, Afonso G; Nunes, Kamila O; Gomes, Tânia A T; Piazza, Roxane M F; Elias, Waldir P

    2017-06-01

    Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) is an agent of acute and persistent diarrhea worldwide, categorized in typical or atypical subgroups. Some EAEC virulence factors are members of the serine protease autotransporters of Enterobacteriaceae (SPATE). The presence of SPATE-encoding genes of different E. coli pathotypes was searched in a large collection of EAEC strains, and a possible association between SPATEs and E. coli phylogroups was investigated. Among 108 typical and 85 atypical EAEC, pic was the most prevalent gene, detected in 47.1% of the strains, followed by sat (24.3%), espI (21.2%), pet (19.2%), sepA (13.5%), sigA (4.1%), eatA (4.1%), vat (1.0%), espP and tsh, detected in one strain (0.5%) each; while epeA and espC were not detected. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that 39.9% of the strains belonged to group A, 23.3% to B1, 10.9% to B2, 7.8% to D, 8.8% to E and 1.5% to F. The majority of the SPATE genes were distributed in typical and atypical strains without association with any phylogroup. In addition, pic and pet were strongly associated with typical EAEC and sepA was detected in close association with atypical EAEC. Our data indicate that SPATEs may represent important virulence traits in both subgroups of EAEC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Optimization of serine protease purification from mango (Mangifera indica cv. Chokanan) peel in polyethylene glycol/dextran aqueous two phase system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrnoush, Amid; Mustafa, Shuhaimi; Sarker, Md Zaidul Islam; Yazid, Abdul Manap Mohd

    2012-01-01

    Mango peel is a good source of protease but remains an industrial waste. This study focuses on the optimization of polyethylene glycol (PEG)/dextran-based aqueous two-phase system (ATPS) to purify serine protease from mango peel. The activity of serine protease in different phase systems was studied and then the possible relationship between the purification variables, namely polyethylene glycol molecular weight (PEG, 4000-12,000 g·mol(-1)), tie line length (-3.42-35.27%), NaCl (-2.5-11.5%) and pH (4.5-10.5) on the enzymatic properties of purified enzyme was investigated. The most significant effect of PEG was on the efficiency of serine protease purification. Also, there was a significant increase in the partition coefficient with the addition of 4.5% of NaCl to the system. This could be due to the high hydrophobicity of serine protease compared to protein contaminates. The optimum conditions to achieve high partition coefficient (84.2) purification factor (14.37) and yield (97.3%) of serine protease were obtained in the presence of 8000 g·mol(-1) of PEG, 17.2% of tie line length and 4.5% of NaCl at pH 7.5. The enzymatic properties of purified serine protease using PEG/dextran ATPS showed that the enzyme could be purified at a high purification factor and yield with easy scale-up and fast processing.

  13. The role of D-serine and glycine as co-agonists of NMDA receptors in motor neurone degeneration and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praveen ePaul

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The fundamental role of D-serine as a co-agonist at the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR, mediating both physiological actions of glutamate in long term potentiation and nociception and also pathological effects mediated by excitotoxicty, are well established. More recently, a direct link to a chronic neurodegenerative disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/ motor neuron disease (ALS has been suggested by findings that D-serine levels are elevated in sporadic ALS and the G93A SOD1 model of ALS (Sasabe et al., 2007; 2012 and that a pathogenic mutation (R199W in the enzyme that degrades D-serine, D-amino acid oxidase (DAO, co-segregates with disease in familial ALS (Mitchell et al., 2010. Moreover, D-serine, its biosynthetic enzyme, serine racemase (SR and DAO are abundant in human spinal cord and severely depleted in ALS. Using cell culture models, we have defined the effects of R199W- DAO, and shown that it activates autophagy, leads to the formation of ubiquitinated aggregates and promotes apoptosis, all of which processes are attenuated by a D-serine/glycine site NMDAR antagonist. These studies provide considerable insight into the crosstalk between neurons and glia and also into potential therapeutic approaches for ALS.

  14. High-resolution ERG-expression profiling on GeneChip exon 1.0 ST arrays in primary and castration-resistant prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, F.P.; Salagierski, M.; Jannink, S.A.; Schalken, J.A.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess whether oestrogen-regulated gene (ERG) expression analysis using GeneChip arrays can predict transmembrane protease, serine 2 (TMPRSS2)-ERG fusion. The expression level of the TMPRSS2-ERG gene was studied in various histological grades of prostate cancer and castration-resistant

  15. In vitro antiviral activity of SCH446211 (SCH6), a novel inhibitor of the hepatitis C virus NS3 serine protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rong; Abid, Karim; Pichardo, John; Pazienza, Valerio; Ingravallo, Paul; Kong, Rong; Agrawal, Sony; Bogen, Stephane; Saksena, Anil; Cheng, Kuo-Chi; Prongay, Andrew; Njoroge, F George; Baroudy, Bahige M; Negro, Francesco

    2007-01-01

    Current hepatitis C virus (HCV) therapies may cure approximately 60% of infections. They are often contraindicated or poorly tolerated, underscoring the need for safer and more effective drugs. A novel, alpha-ketoamide-derived, substrate-based inhibitor of the HCV serine protease (SCH446211) was developed. Compared with earlier reported inhibitors of similar chemical class, it has a P1'-P2' extension which provides extended interaction with the protease active site. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro antiviral activity of SCH446211. Binding constant of SCH446211 to HCV NS3 protease was measured with the chromogenic substrate in vitro cleavage assay. Cell-based activity of SCH446211 was evaluated in replicon cells, which are Huh-7 hepatoma cells stably transfected with a subgenomic HCV RNA as reported previously. After 72 h of incubation with SCH446211, viral transcription and protein expression were measured by real-time RT-PCR (TaqMan), quantitative in situ hybridization, immunoblot and indirect immunofluorescence. The binding constant of SCH446211 to HCV NS3 protease was 3.8 +/- 0.4 nM. HCV replication and protein expression were inhibited by SCH446211 in replicon cells as consistently shown by four techniques. In particular, based on quantitative real-time RT-PCR measurements, the IC50 and IC90 of SCH446211 were estimated to be 40 +/- 20 and 100 +/- 20 nM (n = 17), respectively. Long-term culture of replicon cells with SCH446211 reduced replicon RNA to <0.1 copy per cell. SCH446211 did not show cellular toxicity at concentrations up to 50 microM. SCH446211 is a potent inhibitor of HCV protease in vitro. Its extended interaction with the HCV NS3 protease active site is associated with potent in vitro antiviral activity. This observation is potentially a useful guide for development of future potent inhibitors against HCV NS3 protease.

  16. Molecular characterization of two kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitor genes in the surf clam Mesodesma donacium exposed to Vibrio anguillarum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado-Aguayo, Waleska; Núñez-Acuña, Gustavo; Valenzuela-Muñoz, Valentina; Chávez-Mardones, Jacqueline; Gallardo-Escárate, Cristian

    2013-06-01

    This study reports two kazal-type serine protease inhibitors (KPI) identified in a cDNA library from the surf clam Mesodesma donacium, and characterized through Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends (RACE). The KPIs, denoted as MdSPI-1 and MdSPI-2, presented full sequences of 1139 bp and 781 bp respectively. MdSPI-1 had a 5'untranslated region (UTR) of 175 bp, a 3'UTR of 283 bp and an open reading frame (ORF) of 681 pb that encodes for 227 amino acids. MdSPI-2 showed a 5'UTR of 70 bp, a 3'UTR of 279 bp and an ORF of 432 bp that encodes for 144 amino acids. Both sequences presented two kazal-type tandem domains. Phylogenetic analysis of MdSPI-1 and MdSPI-2 shows a main clade composed by other bivalve species and closely related crustaceans. Real time PCR analysis showed that MdSPI-1 is mainly up-regulated in mantle, foot, gills and muscle tissues, while MdSPI-2 is expressed principally in foot tissue. Moreover, to evaluate the immune response of MdSPI-1 and MdSPI-2, infections with Vibrio anguillarum were performed. Herein, MdSPI-1 and MdSPI-2 transcription expression were significantly up-regulated at 2 and 8 h post-challenge. Our results suggest that MdSPI-1 and MdSPI-2 are important humoral factors of innate immunity in M. donacium. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Curcumin prevents inflammatory response, oxidative stress and insulin resistance in high fructose fed male Wistar rats: Potential role of serine kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maithilikarpagaselvi, Nachimuthu; Sridhar, Magadi Gopalakrishna; Swaminathan, Rathinam Palamalai; Zachariah, Bobby

    2016-01-25

    Emerging evidence suggests that high fructose consumption may be a potentially important factor responsible for the rising incidence of insulin resistance and diabetes worldwide. The present study investigated the preventive effect of curcumin on inflammation, oxidative stress and insulin resistance in high fructose fed male Wistar rats at the molecular level. Fructose feeding for 10 weeks caused oxidative stress, inflammation and insulin resistance. Curcumin treatment attenuated the insulin resistance by decreasing IRS-1 serine phosphorylation and increasing IRS-1 tyrosine phosphorylation in the skeletal muscle of high fructose fed rats. It also attenuated hyperinsulinemia, glucose intolerance and HOMA-IR level. Curcumin administration lowered tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), C reactive protein (CRP) levels and downregulated the protein expression of cyclo-oxygenase 2 (COX-2), protein kinase theta (PKCθ). In addition, inhibitor κB alpha (IκBα) degradation was prevented by curcumin supplementation. Treatment with curcumin inhibited the rise of malondialdehyde (MDA), total oxidant status (TOS) and suppressed the protein expression of extracellular kinase ½ (ERK ½), p38 in the skeletal muscle of fructose fed rats. Further, it enhanced Glutathione Peroxidase (GPx) activity in the muscle of fructose fed rats. At the molecular level, curcumin inhibited the activation of stress sensitive kinases and inflammatory cascades. Our findings conclude that curcumin attenuated glucose intolerance and insulin resistance through its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. Thus, we suggest the use of curcumin as a therapeutic adjuvant in the management of diabetes, obesity and their associated complications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The HtrA-like serine protease PepD interacts with and modulates the Mycobacterium tuberculosis 35-kDa antigen outer envelope protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark J White

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis remains a significant global health concern largely due to its ability to persist for extended periods within the granuloma of the host. While residing within the granuloma, the tubercle bacilli are likely to be exposed to stress that can result in formation of aberrant proteins with altered structures. Bacteria encode stress responsive determinants such as proteases and chaperones to deal with misfolded or unfolded proteins. pepD encodes an HtrA-like serine protease and is thought to process proteins altered following exposure of M. tuberculosis to extra-cytoplasmic stress. PepD functions both as a protease and chaperone in vitro, and is required for aspects of M. tuberculosis virulence in vivo. pepD is directly regulated by the stress-responsive two-component signal transduction system MprAB and indirectly by extracytoplasmic function (ECF sigma factor SigE. Loss of PepD also impacts expression of other stress-responsive determinants in M. tuberculosis. To further understand the role of PepD in stress adaptation by M. tuberculosis, a proteomics approach was taken to identify binding proteins and possible substrates of this protein. Using subcellular fractionation, the cellular localization of wild-type and PepD variants was determined. Purified fractions as well as whole cell lysates from Mycobacterium smegmatis or M. tuberculosis strains expressing a catalytically compromised PepD variant were immunoprecipitated for PepD and subjected to LC-MS/MS analyses. Using this strategy, the 35-kDa antigen encoding a homolog of the PspA phage shock protein was identified as a predominant binding partner and substrate of PepD. We postulate that proteolytic cleavage of the 35-kDa antigen by PepD helps maintain cell wall homeostasis in Mycobacterium and regulates specific stress response pathways during periods of extracytoplasmic stress.

  19. Increased phosphorylation of histone H3 at serine 10 is involved in Epstein-Barr virus latent membrane protein-1-induced carcinogenesis of nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Binbin; Huang, Guoliang; Zhang, Xiangning; Li, Rong; Wang, Jian; Dong, Ziming; He, Zhiwei

    2013-03-18

    Increased histone H3 phosphorylation is an essential regulatory mechanism for neoplastic cell transformation. We aimed to explore the role of histone H3 phosphorylation at serine10 (p-H3Ser10) in Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latent membrane protein-1 (LMP1)-induced carcinogenesis of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). The expression of p-H3Ser10 was detected by the immunohistochemical analysis in NPC, chronic nasopharyngitis and normal nasopharynx tissues, and its correlation with LMP1 was analyzed in NPC tissues and cell lines. Using the small interfering RNA (siRNA)-H3 and histone H3 mutant (S10A), the effect of histone H3 Ser10 motif on LMP1-induced CNE1 cell proliferation, transformation and activator protein-1 (AP-1) activation were evaluated by CCK-8, focus-forming and reporter gene assay respectively. Mitogen- and stress-activated kinase 1 (MSK1) kinase activity and phosphorylation were detected by in vitro kinase assay and western blot. Using MSK1 inhibitor H89 or siRNA-MSK1, the regulatory role of MSK1 on histone H3 phosphorylation and AP-1 activation were analyzed. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that the expression of p-H3Ser10 was significantly higher in the poorly differentiated NPC tissues than that in chronic nasopharyngitis (p histone H3 suppressed LMP1-induced CNE1 cell proliferation, foci formation and AP-1 activation. In addition, LMP1 could increase MSK1 kinase activity and phosphorylation. MSK1 inhibitor H89 or knockdown of MSK1 by siRNA blocked LMP1-induced phosphorylation of histone H3 at Ser10 and AP-1 activation. EBV-LMP1 can induce phosphorylation of histone H3 at Ser10 via MSK1. Increased phosphorylation of histone H3 at Ser10 is likely a crucial regulatory mechanism involved in LMP1-induced carcinogenesis of NPC.

  20. A novel family of proline/serine-rich proteins, which are phospho-targets of stress-related mitogen-activated protein kinases, differentially regulates growth and pathogen defense in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palm-Forster, Mieder Anthony Thomas; Eschen-Lippold, Lennart; Uhrig, Joachim; Scheel, Dierk; Lee, Justin

    2017-09-01

    The molecular actions of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are ultimately accomplished by the substrate proteins where phosphorylation affects their molecular properties and function(s), but knowledge regarding plant MAPK substrates is currently still fragmentary. Here, we uncovered a previously uncharacterized protein family consisting of three proline/serine-rich proteins (PRPs) that are substrates of stress-related MAPKs. We demonstrated the importance of a MAPK docking domain necessary for protein-protein interaction with MAPKs and consequently also for phosphorylation. The main phosphorylated site was mapped to a residue conserved between all three proteins, which when mutated to a non-phosphorylatable form, differentially affected their protein stability. Together with their distinct gene expression patterns, this differential accumulation of the three proteins upon phosphorylation probably contributes to their distinct function(s). Transgenic over-expression of PRP, the founding member, led to plants with enhanced resistance to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000. Older plants of the over-expressing lines have curly leaves and were generally smaller in stature. This growth phenotype was lost in plants expressing the phosphosite variant, suggesting a phosphorylation-dependent effect. Thus, this novel family of PRPs may be involved in MAPK regulation of plant development and / or pathogen resistance responses. As datamining associates PRP expression profiles with hypoxia or oxidative stress and PRP-overexpressing plants have elevated levels of reactive oxygen species, PRP may connect MAPK and oxidative stress signaling.

  1. Over activation of hippocampal serine/threonine protein phosphatases PP1 and PP2A is involved in lead-induced deficits in learning and memory in young rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Abdur; Khan, Khalid M; Al-Khaledi, Ghanim; Khan, Islam; Al-Shemary, Tahany

    2012-06-01

    Serine/threonine protein phosphatases regulate several key cellular events in the brain, including learning and memory. These enzymes, when over-activated, are known to function as a constraint on learning and memory. We investigated whether these phosphatases are implicated in lead (Pb)-induced deficits in learning and memory. Wistar rat pups were exposed to 0.2% Pb-acetate via their dams' drinking water from postnatal day (PND) 1-21 and directly in drinking water until PND 30. Pb levels in blood, brain and hippocampus were measured and expression of PP1, PP2A, PP2B and PP5 in hippocampus was analyzed. Total phosphatase activity, and PP1 and PP2A activities were determined. Tau phosphorylation at various epitopes was determined by Western blot. Spatial learning and memory was determined by Morris water maze test. Pb exposure significantly increased levels of Pb in blood, brain and hippocampus, reduced the number of synapses in hippocampus and impaired learning and long-term memory (LTM). Short-term memory (STM) was only affected in rats at PND21. Pb exposure increased the expression and activity of PP1 and decreased phosphorylation of tau at threonine-231 in hippocampus at both PND21 and PND30. Pb-induced phosphorylation of tau at serine-199/202 (AT8) paralleled with PP2A activity; at PND21 PP2A activity increased and AT8 phosphorylation decreased; at PND30 PP2A activity decreased and AT8 phosphorylation increased. Increased PP1 activity in hippocampus by Pb is associated with learning and LTM impairment, whereas, increased PP2A activity is associated with STM impairment. These findings suggest the overactivation of PP1 and PP2A, together with changes in tau phosphorylation, as a potential mechanism of lead-induced deficits in learning and memory. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Serine phosphorylation of cortactin is required for maximal host cell invasion by Campylobacter jejuni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuelson, Derrick R; Konkel, Michael E

    2013-11-04

    Campylobacter jejuni causes acute disease characterized by severe diarrhea containing blood and leukocytes, fever, and abdominal cramping. Disease caused by C. jejuni is dependent on numerous bacterial and host factors. C. jejuni invasion of the intestinal epithelial cells is seen in both clinical samples and animal models indicating that host cell invasion is, in part, necessary for disease. C. jejuni utilizes a flagellar Type III Secretion System (T3SS) to deliver the Campylobacter invasion antigens (Cia) to host cells. The Cia proteins modulate host cell signaling leading to actin cytoskeleton rearrangement necessary for C. jejuni host cell invasion, and are required for the development of disease. This study was based on the hypothesis that the C. jejuni CiaD effector protein mediates Erk 1/2 dependent cytoskeleton rearrangement. We showed that CiaD was required for the maximal phosphorylation of Erk 1/2 by performing an immunoblot with a p-Erk 1/2 specific antibody and that Erk 1/2 participates in C. jejuni invasion of host cells by performing the gentamicin protection assay in the presence and absence of the PD98059 (a potent inhibitor of Erk 1/2 activation). CiaD was also found to be required for the maximal phosphorylation of cortactin S405 and S418, as judged by immunoblot analysis. The response of human INT 407 epithelial cells to infection with C. jejuni was evaluated by confocal microscopy and scanning electron microscopy to determine the extent of membrane ruffling. This analysis revealed that CiaD, Erk 1/2, and cortactin participate in C. jejuni-induced membrane ruffling. Finally, cortactin and N-WASP were found to be involved in C. jejuni invasion of host cells using siRNA to N-WASP, and siRNA to cortactin, coupled with the gentamicin protection assay. We conclude that CiaD is involved in the activation of Erk 1/2 and that activated Erk 1/2 facilitates C. jejuni invasion by phosphorylation of cortactin on serine 405 and 418. This is the first time

  3. Neutral serine protease from Penicillium italicum. Purification, biochemical characterization, and use for antioxidative peptide preparation from Scorpaena notata muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abidi, Ferid; Aissaoui, Neyssene; Chobert, Jean-Marc; Haertlé, Thomas; Marzouki, Mohamed Nejib

    2014-09-01

    In the present study, purification and properties of an extracellular neutral serine protease from the fungus Penicillium italicum and its potential application as an antioxidant peptides producer are reported. The protease was purified to homogeneity using ammonium sulfate precipitation, Sephacryl S-200 gel filtration, diethylaminoethanol (DEAE)-Sepharose ion exchange chromatography, and TSK-HPLC gel filtration with a 10.2-fold increase in specific activity and 25.8 % recovery. The purified enzyme appeared as single protein band with a molecular mass of 24 kDa in sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The optimum pH and temperature for the proteolytic activity were pH 7.0 and 50 °C, respectively. The enzyme was stable in the pH range of 6.0-9.0. The protease was activated by divalent cations such as Ca(2+) and Mg(2+). Complete inhibition of the purified enzyme by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride confirmed that the protease was of serine-type. The purified enzyme revealed high stability and relatively broad specificity. Scorpaena notata muscle protein hydrolysates prepared using purified serine protease (protease from P. italicum (Prot-Pen)) showed good in vitro antioxidative activities. The antioxidant activities of Scorpaena muscle protein hydrolyzed by Prot-Pen (SMPH-PP) were evaluated using various antioxidant assays: 1, 1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity, reducing power, ferrous chelating activity, and DNA nicking assay. SMPH-PP showed varying degrees of antioxidant activity and almost the same strongest protection against hydroxyl radical induced DNA breakage.

  4. A novel effect of MARCKS phosphorylation by activated PKC: the dephosphorylation of its serine 25 in chick neuroblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Toledo

    Full Text Available MARCKS (Myristoylated Alanine-Rich C Kinase Substrate is a peripheral membrane protein, especially abundant in the nervous system, and functionally related to actin organization and Ca-calmodulin regulation depending on its phosphorylation by PKC. However, MARCKS is susceptible to be phosphorylated by several different kinases and the possible interactions between these phosphorylations have not been fully studied in intact cells. In differentiating neuroblasts, as well as some neurons, there is at least one cell-type specific phosphorylation site: serine 25 (S25 in the chick. We demonstrate here that S25 is included in a highly conserved protein sequence which is a Cdk phosphorylatable region, located far away from the PKC phosphorylation domain. S25 phosphorylation was inhibited by olomoucine and roscovitine in neuroblasts undergoing various states of cell differentiation in vitro. These results, considered in the known context of Cdks activity in neuroblasts, suggest that Cdk5 is the enzyme responsible for this phosphorylation. We find that the phosphorylation by PKC at the effector domain does not occur in the same molecules that are phosphorylated at serine 25. The in situ analysis of the subcellular distribution of these two phosphorylated MARCKS variants revealed that they are also segregated in different protein clusters. In addition, we find that a sustained stimulation of PKC by phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA provokes the progressive disappearance of phosphorylation at serine 25. Cells treated with PMA, but in the presence of several Ser/Thr phosphatase (PP1, PP2A and PP2B inhibitors indicated that this dephosphorylation is achieved via a phosphatase 2A (PP2A form. These results provide new evidence regarding the existence of a novel consequence of PKC stimulation upon the phosphorylated state of MARCKS in neural cells, and propose a link between PKC and PP2A activity on MARCKS.

  5. Serine protease PrtA from Streptococcus pneumoniae plays a role in the killing of S. pneumoniae by apolactoferrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, Shaper; Wilson, Landon; Benjamin, William H; Novak, Jan; Barnes, Stephen; Hollingshead, Susan K; Briles, David E

    2011-06-01

    It is known that apolactoferrin, the iron-free form of human lactoferrin, can kill many species of bacteria, including Streptococcus pneumoniae. Lactoferricin, an N-terminal peptide of apolactoferrin, and fragments of it are even more bactericidal than apolactoferrin. In this study we found that apolactoferrin must be cleaved by a serine protease in order for it to kill pneumococci. The serine protease inhibitors were able to block killing by apolactoferrin but did not block killing by a lactoferrin-derived peptide. Thus, the killing of pneumococci by apolactoferrin appears to require a protease to release a lactoferricin-like peptide(s). Incubation of apolactoferrin with growing pneumococci resulted in a 12-kDa reduction in its molecular mass, of which about 7 to 8 kDa of the reduction was protease dependent. Capsular type 2 and 19F strains with mutations in the gene encoding the major cell wall-associated serine protease, prtA, lost much of their ability to degrade apolactoferrin and were relatively resistant to killing by apolactoferrin (P mass by about 8 kDa, and greatly enhance the killing activity of the solution containing the apolactoferrin and its cleavage products. Mass spectroscopy revealed that PrtA makes a major cut between amino acids 78 and 79 of human lactoferrin, removing the N-terminal end of the molecule (about 8.6 kDa). The simplest interpretation of these data is that the mechanism by which apolactoferrin kills Streptococcus pneumoniae requires the release of a lactoferricin-like peptide(s) and that it is this peptide(s), and not the intact apolactoferrin, which kills pneumococci.

  6. Serum mannan-binding lectin-associated serine protease 2 levels in colorectal cancer: relation to recurrence and mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ytting, Henriette; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Thiel, Steffen

    2005-01-01

    . The level of MASP-2 is genetically determined, and the aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of MASP-2 levels on postoperative infection, recurrence and survival. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: MASP-2 concentrations were determined in serum from 605 patients collected before elective resection......PURPOSE: Mannan-binding lectin-associated serine protease 2 (MASP-2) is a plasma protein involved in inflammatory processes. MASP-2 circulates in complex with the protein mannan-binding lectin (MBL) or ficolins, and is activated to recruit the complement system when MBL binds to its targets...

  7. Study on interaction between salicylaldehyde l-serine schiff base and human serum albumin by fluorescence spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Yanqiu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of salicylaldehyde L-serine Schiff base (L with human serum albumin (HSA was examined by fluorescence emission spectra at the excitation wavelength 290 nm. Through fluorescence quenching experiments, it was confirmed that the combination of L with HSA was static quenching process. Thermodynamic parameters, such as ΔG, ΔH and ΔS, were calculated at different temperatures, showing that van der Waals force or hydrogen bond interaction were mostly responsible for the binding of L to HSA. The experiments results showed that the microenvironment and the conformation of HSA changed during the binding reaction.

  8. Mutation of serine residue 318 in the class C beta-lactamase of Enterobacter cloacae 908R.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, C; Dubus, A; Monnaie, D; Normark, S; Frère, J M

    1992-04-01

    The involvement of the serine residue 318 in the specificity of a class C beta-lactamase was investigated. Multiple site-directed mutants at this position were generated using a polymerase chain reaction technique. These mutants were then probed for their activity towards various beta-lactam compounds. One mutant, S318G was further purified and its physico-chemical and catalytic properties determined. It was shown that the observed minimal inhibitory concentration values of this mutant could be correlated to its kinetic properties using a 'diffusion-hydrolysis' model. However, the data showed that residue 318 has little influence on the specificity of class C beta-lactamases.

  9. Aurora-B Mediated ATM Serine 1403 Phosphorylation Is Required For Mitotic ATM Activation and the Spindle Checkpoint

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Chunying; Tang, Xi; Guo, Xiaojing; Niikura, Yohei; Kitagawa, Katsumi; Cui, Kemi; Wong, Stephen T.C.; Fu, Li; Xu, Bo

    2011-01-01

    The ATM kinase plays a critical role in the maintenance of genetic stability. ATM is activated in response to DNA damage and is essential for cell cycle checkpoints. Here, we report that ATM is activated in mitosis in the absence of DNA damage. We demonstrate that mitotic ATM activation is dependent on the Aurora-B kinase and that Aurora-B phosphorylates ATM on serine 1403. This phosphorylation event is required for mitotic ATM activation. Further, we show that loss of ATM function results in...

  10. Use of degenerate primers and heat-soaked polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to clone a serine protease antigen from Dermatophilus congolensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mine, O M; Carnegie, P R

    1997-10-01

    Serine proteases are thought to be involved in the initial attack on sheep skin by Dermatophilus congolensis and are obvious antigens for inclusion in a vaccine to prevent lumpy wool disease (dermatophilosis). Degenerate primers were designed after alignment of seven bacterial serine proteases. Inosine was incorporated into the primers at positions of three- and four-base redundancy, and this reduced the complexity of the primer mixtures from several thousand to sixteen different sequences for each primer. The primers were validated by production and sequencing of amplicons from serine protease genes in Bacillus subtilis and Serratia marcescens. The primers were used with heat-soaked polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to produce amplicons from two D. congolensis strains, AG and MB. In the amplicon codons for arginine, rather than the expected serine, were found where inosine was used for both the first and third positions for a codon in the primer. A search with the deduced amino acid sequences of the amplicons showed significant similarity to a keratinase and other serine proteases from various organisms. Similarity was most apparent around the active site residues and other essential secondary structural elements.

  11. The non-protein amino acid BMAA is misincorporated into human proteins in place of L-serine causing protein misfolding and aggregation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachael Anne Dunlop

    Full Text Available Mechanisms of protein misfolding are of increasing interest in the aetiology of neurodegenerative diseases characterized by protein aggregation and tangles including Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS, Alzheimer's disease (AD, Parkinson's disease (PD, Lewy Body Dementia (LBD, and Progressive Supranuclear Palsy (PSP. Some forms of neurodegenerative illness are associated with mutations in genes which control assembly of disease related proteins. For example, the mouse sticky mutation sti, which results in undetected mischarging of tRNA(Ala with serine resulting in the substitution of serine for alanine in proteins causes cerebellar Purkinje cell loss and ataxia in laboratory animals. Replacement of serine 422 with glutamic acid in tau increases the propensity of tau aggregation associated with neurodegeneration. However, the possibility that environmental factors can trigger abnormal folding in proteins remains relatively unexplored. We here report that a non-protein amino acid, β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA, can be misincorporated in place of L-serine into human proteins. We also report that this misincorporation can be inhibited by L-serine. Misincorporation of BMAA into human neuroproteins may shed light on putative associations between human exposure to BMAA produced by cyanobacteria and an increased incidence of ALS.

  12. Phosphorylation of epidermal growth factor receptor at serine 1047 in cultured lung alveolar epithelial cells by bradykinin B2 receptor stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Shunsuke; Higa-Nakamine, Sayomi; Nishi, Hiroyuki; Torihara, Hidetsugu; Uehara, Ayako; Sugahara, Kazuhiro; Kakinohana, Manabu; Yamamoto, Hideyuki

    2017-09-09

    Accumulating evidence indicates that epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is desensitized by phosphorylation of serine 1047 (Ser1047). We and other groups have reported that stimulation of a receptor of tumor-necrosis factor α (TNFα) and Toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5) induced the phosphorylation of Ser1047 through activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) in cultured lung alveolar epithelial A549 cells. However, phosphorylation of EGFR at Ser1047 by stimulation of any G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) has not been reported in any cultured cells. In the present study, we first confirmed that A549 cells <