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Sample records for expressing murine cd40

  1. Involvement of mitogen-activated protein kinases and NFκB in LPS-induced CD40 expression on human monocytic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Weidong; Alexis, Neil E.; Chen Xian; Bromberg, Philip A.; Peden, David B.

    2008-01-01

    CD40 is a costimulatory molecule linking innate and adaptive immune responses to bacterial stimuli, as well as a critical regulator of functions of other costimulatory molecules. The mechanisms regulating lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced CD40 expression have not been adequately characterized in human monocytic cells. In this study we used a human monocytic cell line, THP-1, to investigate the possible mechanisms of CD40 expression following LPS exposure. Exposure to LPS resulted in a dose- and time-dependent increase in CD40 expression. Further studies using immunoblotting and pharmacological inhibitors revealed that mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and NFκB were activated by LPS exposure and involved in LPS-induced CD40 expression. Activation of MAPKs was not responsible for LPS-induced NFκB activation. TLR4 was expressed on THP-1 cells and pretreatment of cells with a Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) neutralizing antibody (HTA125) significantly blunted LPS-induced MAPK and NFκB activation and ensuing CD40 expression. Additional studies with murine macrophages expressing wild type and mutated TLR4 showed that TLR4 was implicated in LPS-induced ERK and NFκB activation, and CD40 expression. Moreover, blockage of MAPK and NFκB activation inhibited LPS-induced TLR4 expression. In summary, LPS-induced CD40 expression in monocytic cells involves MAPKs and NFκB

  2. CD40 expression in Wehi-164 cell line.

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    Karimi, Mohammad Hossein; Ebadi, Padideh; Pourfathollah, Ali Akbar; Soheili, Zahra Soheila; Moazzeni, Seyed Mohammad

    2010-07-01

    CD40-CD154 interaction is an important process for cellular and humoral immunity regulation and can be effective in the body's defense against tumors. In the present study, we evaluated the expression of CD40 in Wehi-164 cell line. CD40 expressions on the cell surface and in the cytoplasm were assessed by flow cytometry and intracellular staining assay, respectively. Also, the mRNA expression was identified by real time-PCR. The obtained results showed the high mRNA and cytoplasmic protein expression of CD40 but no surface expression. These results suggest that the Wehi-164 cell line down regulates expression of CD40 on the surface for evasion of immune system.

  3. CD40-mediated apoptosis in murine B-lymphoma lines containing mutated p53

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hollmann, Annette C; Gong, Qiaoke; Owens, Trevor

    2002-01-01

    Crosslinking CD40 induces normal B-cells to proliferate and differentiate but causes many tumor cell lines to undergo apoptosis. As p53 is required for many apoptotic pathways, we analyzed the effects of CD40 ligation and their correlation with p53 function in four murine B-lymphoma lines. A20...... of detectable p21 mRNA in A20 and M12 cells. P21 mRNA was increased to detectable levels in M12 cells upon CD40 ligation; however, blocking this effect with the p53 inhibitor pifithrin had no effect on CD40-mediated apoptosis. Sequencing showed that p53 in A20 and M12 cells contained point mutations leading...... to amino acid substitutions in DNA binding regions, but was unmutated in WEHI231 and WEHI 279. These results suggest that CD40-mediated apoptosis can occur in the absence of functional p53....

  4. CD40 expression in Wehi-164 cell line

    OpenAIRE

    Karimi, Mohammad Hossein; Ebadi, Padideh; Pourfathollah, Ali Akbar; Soheili, Zahra Soheila; Moazzeni, Seyed Mohammad

    2010-01-01

    CD40-CD154 interaction is an important process for cellular and humoral immunity regulation and can be effective in the body’s defense against tumors. In the present study, we evaluated the expression of CD40 in Wehi-164 cell line. CD40 expressions on the cell surface and in the cytoplasm were assessed by flow cytometry and intracellular staining assay, respectively. Also, the mRNA expression was identified by real time-PCR. The obtained results showed the high mRNA and cytoplasmic protein ex...

  5. Increased T cell expression of CD154 (CD40-ligand) in multiple sclerosis

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    Jensen, J; Krakauer, M; Sellebjerg, F

    2001-01-01

    CD154 (CD40-ligand, gp39), expressed on activated T cells, is crucial in T cell-dependent immune responses and may be involved in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS). We studied cerebro-spinal fluid and peripheral blood T cell expression of CD154 in MS by flow cytometry. Patients with sec......CD154 (CD40-ligand, gp39), expressed on activated T cells, is crucial in T cell-dependent immune responses and may be involved in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS). We studied cerebro-spinal fluid and peripheral blood T cell expression of CD154 in MS by flow cytometry. Patients...

  6. Properties of mouse CD40: differential expression of CD40 epitopes on dendritic cells and epithelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, T. K.; Hasbold, J.; Renardel de Lavalette, C.; Döpp, E. A.; Dijkstra, C. D.; Klaus, G. G.

    1996-01-01

    In this study we describe the tissue distribution of mouse CD40 using two monoclonal antibodies (mAb) against different epitopes of the molecule. In lymphoid tissues CD40 was expressed by B lymphocytes. Most B cells in typical B-cell compartments were CD40-positive, including germinal centre B

  7. Luteolin, a flavonoid, inhibits CD40 ligand expression by activated human basophils.

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    Hirano, Toru; Arimitsu, Junsuke; Higa, Shinji; Naka, Tetsuji; Ogata, Atsushi; Shima, Yoshihito; Fujimoto, Minoru; Yamadori, Tomoki; Ohkawara, Tomoharu; Kuwabara, Yusuke; Kawai, Mari; Kawase, Ichiro; Tanaka, Toshio

    2006-01-01

    We have previously shown that flavonoids such as luteolin, apigenin and fisetin inhibit interleukin 4 and interleukin 13 production. In this study, we investigated whether luteolin can suppress CD40 ligand expression by basophils. A human basophilic cell line, KU812, was stimulated with A23187 and phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) with or without various concentrations of luteolin or other flavonoids for 12 h, and CD40 ligand expression was analyzed by FACS. The effect of luteolin on CD40 ligand mRNA expression was studied by semiquantitative reverse transcription PCR analysis. In addition, CD40 ligand expression was also measured in purified basophils that had been stimulated for 12 h with A23187 plus PMA with or without various concentrations of luteolin. CD40 ligand expression by KU812 cells was enhanced noticeably in response to A23187 and even more strikingly augmented by A23187 plus PMA. The expression was significantly suppressed by 10 or 30 microM of luteolin, whereas myricetin failed to inhibit. Reverse transcription PCR analyses demonstrated that luteolin inhibited CD40 ligand mRNA expression by stimulated KU812 cells. Of the six flavonoids examined, luteolin, apigenin, fisetin and quercetin at 30 microM showed a significant inhibitory effect on CD40 ligand expression. The incubation of purified basophils with A23187 plus PMA significantly enhanced CD40 ligand expression, and the presence of luteolin again had an inhibitory effect. Luteolin inhibits CD40 ligand expression by activated basophils.

  8. CD40L Expression Allows CD8+ T Cells to Promote Their Own Expansion and Differentiation through Dendritic Cells

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    Neil Q. Tay

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available CD8+ T cells play an important role in providing protective immunity against a wide range of pathogens, and a number of different factors control their activation. Although CD40L-mediated CD40 licensing of dendritic cells (DCs by CD4+ T cells is known to be necessary for the generation of a robust CD8+ T cell response, the contribution of CD8+ T cell-expressed CD40L on DC licensing is less clear. We have previously shown that CD8+ T cells are able to induce the production of IL-12 p70 by DCs in a CD40L-dependent manner, providing some evidence that CD8+ T cell-mediated activation of DCs is possible. To better understand the role of CD40L on CD8+ T cell responses, we generated and characterized CD40L-expressing CD8+ T cells both in vitro and in vivo. We found that CD40L was expressed on 30–50% of effector CD8+ T cells when stimulated and that this expression was transient. The expression of CD40L on CD8+ T cells promoted the proliferation and differentiation of both the CD40L-expressing CD8+ T cells and the bystander effector CD8+ T cells. This process occurred via a cell-extrinsic manner and was mediated by DCs. These data demonstrate the existence of a mechanism where CD8+ T cells and DCs cooperate to maximize CD8+ T cell responses.

  9. IL-12-mediated STAT4 signaling and TCR signal strength cooperate in the induction of CD40L in human and mouse CD8+ T cells.

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    Stark, Regina; Hartung, Anett; Zehn, Dietmar; Frentsch, Marco; Thiel, Andreas

    2013-06-01

    CD40L is one of the key molecules bridging the activation of specific T cells and the maturation of professional and nonprofessional antigen-presenting cells including B cells. CD4(+) T cells have been regarded as the major T-cell subset that expresses CD40L upon cognate activation; however, we demonstrate here that a putative CD8(+) helper T-cell subset expressing CD40L is induced in human and murine CD8(+) T cells in vitro and in mice immunized with antigen-pulsed dendritic cells. IL-12 and STAT4-mediated signaling was the major instructive cytokine signal boosting the ability of CD8(+) T cells to express CD40L both in vitro and in vivo. Additionally, TCR signaling strength modulated CD40L expression in CD8(+) T cells after primary differentiation in vitro as well as in vivo. The induction of CD40L in CD8(+) T cells regulated by IL-12 and TCR signaling may enable CD8(+) T cells to respond autonomously of CD4(+) T cells. Thus, we propose that under proinflammatory conditions, a self-sustaining positive feedback loop could facilitate the efficient priming of T cells stimulated by high affinity peptide displaying APCs. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. A viral long terminal repeat expressed in CD4+CD8+ precursors is downregulated in mature peripheral CD4-CD8+ or CD4+CD8- T cells.

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    Paquette, Y; Doyon, L; Laperrière, A; Hanna, Z; Ball, J; Sekaly, R P; Jolicoeur, P

    1992-01-01

    The long terminal repeat from a thymotropic mouse mammary tumor virus variant, DMBA-LV, was used to drive the expression of two reporter genes, murine c-myc and human CD4, in transgenic mice. Expression was observed specifically in thymic immature cells. Expression of c-myc in these cells induced oligoclonal CD4+ CD8+ T-cell thymomas. Expression of human CD4 was restricted to thymic progenitor CD4- CD8- and CD4+ CD8+ T cells and was shut off in mature CD4+ CD8- and CD4- CD8+ T cells, known to...

  11. The role of CD40 expression in dendritic cells in cancer biology; a systematic review.

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    Lee, Gui Han; Askari, Alan; Malietzis, George; Bernardo, David; Clark, Susan K; Knight, Stella C; Al-Hassi, Hafid Omar

    2014-01-01

    CD40 is a co-stimulatory molecule belonging to the tumor necrosis factor superfamily and is essential in activation of dendritic cells. Dendritic cells (DCs) are antigen-presenting cells capable of initiating cytotoxic T-lymphocyte immune response against cancer cells. However, there are few studies on the characterization of DCs in cancer, specifically their expression of CD40, despite its implication in cancer immunotherapy. We reviewed available data on the expression of CD40 on DCs in various cancers, and its implications for cancer immunotherapy. A systematic review on CD40 expression on DCs in cancer was performed with reference to preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses (PRISMA). Studies that satisfied the inclusion and exclusion criteria were 21 out of 927. Variations in type and status of the cancers, source of DCs and methodology for detecting CD40 expression amongst the studies resulted in contrasting results. DCs generally expressed low CD40 in tumor infiltrating DCs (tiDCs), in DCs derived by in vitro culture from blood monocytes using cytokine stimulation (MoDCs) and in DCs exposed in vitro to tumor cells lines; the studies suggested that CD40 expression in DCs is impaired in cancer particularly in metastatic disease. However, DCs identified in fresh peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) expressed higher numbers of CD40 positive cells in some cancer patients, which could be due to tumor-derived factors leading to partially-stimulated DCs. The results provide evidence that some cancer patients may show partial systemic DC activation and expression of increased CD40 in response to the presence of tumor but that such activity may become abortive in the presence of factors produced by the tumor. This review has thus identified key papers on CD40 expression on DCs in various cancers and discusses the limitations and contrasting results of these studies in relation to variations in methodology. The results highlight the need

  12. Murine bone marrow Lin⁻Sca⁻1⁺CD45⁻ very small embryonic-like (VSEL cells are heterogeneous population lacking Oct-4A expression.

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    Krzysztof Szade

    Full Text Available Murine very small embryonic-like (VSEL cells, defined by the Lin(-Sca-1(+CD45(- phenotype and small size, were described as pluripotent cells and proposed to be the most primitive hematopoietic precursors in adult bone marrow. Although their isolation and potential application rely entirely on flow cytometry, the immunophenotype of VSELs has not been extensively characterized. Our aim was to analyze the possible heterogeneity of Lin(-Sca(+CD45(- population and investigate the extent to which VSELs characteristics may overlap with that of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs or endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs. The study evidenced that murine Lin(-Sca-1(+CD45(- population was heterogeneous in terms of c-Kit and KDR expression. Accordingly, the c-Kit(+KDR(-, c-Kit(-KDR(+, and c-Kit(-KDR(- subpopulations could be distinguished, while c-Kit(+KDR(+ events were very rare. The c-Kit(+KDR(- subset contained almost solely small cells, meeting the size criterion of VSELs, in contrast to relatively bigger c-Kit(-KDR(+ cells. The c-Kit(-KDR(-FSC(low subset was highly enriched in Annexin V-positive, apoptotic cells, hence omitted from further analysis. Importantly, using qRT-PCR, we evidenced lack of Oct-4A and Oct-4B mRNA expression either in whole adult murine bone marrow or in the sorted of Lin(-Sca-1(+CD45(-FSC(low population, even by single-cell qRT-PCR. We also found that the Lin(-Sca-1(+CD45(-c-Kit(+ subset did not exhibit hematopoietic potential in a single cell-derived colony in vitro assay, although it comprised the Sca-1(+c-Kit(+Lin(- (SKL CD34(-CD45(-CD105(+ cells, expressing particular HSC markers. Co-culture of Lin(-Sca-1(+CD45(-FSC(low with OP9 cells did not induce hematopoietic potential. Further investigation revealed that SKL CD45(-CD105(+ subset consisted of early apoptotic cells with fragmented chromatin, and could be contaminated with nuclei expelled from erythroblasts. Concluding, murine bone marrow Lin(-Sca-1(+CD45(-FSC(low cells are

  13. Systemic agonistic anti-CD40 treatment of tumor bearing mice modulates hepatic myeloid suppressive cells and causes immune-mediated liver damage

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    Medina-Echeverz, José; Ma, Chi; Duffy, Austin; Eggert, Tobias; Hawk, Nga; Kleiner, David E.; Korangy, Firouzeh; Greten, Tim F.

    2015-01-01

    Immune stimulatory monoclonal antibodies are currently evaluated as anti tumor agents. Although overall toxicity appears to be moderate, liver toxicities have been reported and are not completely understood. We studied the effect of systemic CD40 antibody treatment on myeloid cells in spleen and liver. Naïve and tumor-bearing mice were treated systemically with agonistic anti-CD40 antibody. Immune cell subsets in liver and spleen, serum transaminases and liver histologies were analyzed after antibody administration. Nox2−/−, Cd40−/− as well as bone marrow chimeric mice were used to study the mechanism by which agonistic anti-CD40 mediates its effects in vivo. Suppressor function of murine and human tumor-induced myeloid derived suppressive cells was studied upon CD40 ligation. Agonistic CD40 antibody caused liver damage within 24 hours after injection in two unrelated tumor models and mice strains. Using bone marrow chimeras we demonstrated that CD40 antibody-induced hepatitis in tumor-bearing mice was dependent on the presence of CD40-expressing hematopoietic cells. Agonistic CD40 ligation-dependent liver damage was induced by the generation of reactive oxygen species. Furthermore, agonistic CD40 antibody resulted in increased CD80 and CD40 positive liver CD11b+Gr-1+ immature myeloid cells. CD40 ligation on tumor-induced murine and human CD14+HLA-DRlow PBMC from cancer patients reduced their immune suppressor function. Collectively, agonistic CD40 antibody treatment activated tumor-induced, myeloid cells, caused myeloid dependent hepatotoxicity and ameliorated the suppressor function of murine and human MDSC. Collectively, our data suggests that CD40 may mature immunosuppressive myeloid cells and thereby cause liver damage in mice with an accumulation of tumor-induced hepatic MDSC. PMID:25637366

  14. Anti-tumour therapeutic efficacy of OX40L in murine tumour model.

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    Ali, Selman A; Ahmad, Murrium; Lynam, June; McLean, Cornelia S; Entwisle, Claire; Loudon, Peter; Choolun, Esther; McArdle, Stephanie E B; Li, Geng; Mian, Shahid; Rees, Robert C

    2004-09-09

    OX40 ligand (OX40L), a member of TNF superfamily, is a co-stimulatory molecule involved in T cell activation. Systemic administration of mOX40L fusion protein significantly inhibited the growth of experimental lung metastasis and subcutaneous (s.c.) established colon (CT26) and breast (4T1) carcinomas. Vaccination with OX40L was significantly enhanced by combination treatment with intra-tumour injection of a disabled infectious single cycle-herpes simplex virus (DISC-HSV) vector encoding murine granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (mGM-CSF). Tumour rejection in response to OX40L therapy required functional CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and correlated with splenocyte cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) activity against the AH-1 gp70 peptide of the tumour associated antigen expressed by CT26 cells. These results demonstrate the potential role of the OX40L in cancer immunotherapy.

  15. Blood Mixing Upregulates Platelet Membrane-Bound CD40 Ligand Expression in vitro Independent of Abo Compatibility.

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    Huang, Go-Shine; Hu, Mei-Hua; Lin, Tso-Chou; Lin, Yi-Chang; Tsai, Yi-Ting; Lin, Chih-Yuan; Ke, Hung-Yen; Zheng, Xu-Zhi; Tsai, Chien-Sung

    2017-11-30

    Platelets play a central role in the inflammation response via CD40 ligand (CD40L) expression, which may lead to transfusion reactions. The precise role of platelet CD40L-mediated inflammation in transfusion reactions is unclear. Therefore, we assessed the effects of in vitro blood mixing on platelet CD40L expression. In addition, we examined the effect of ABO compatibility on CD40L expression. Donor packed red blood cells were acquired from a blood bank, and recipient blood was obtained from patients undergoing cardiac surgery and prepared as washed platelets. Donor blood was mixed with suspended, washed recipient platelets to obtain a final mixing ratio of 1%, 5%, or 10% (vol/vol). The blood mixtures were divided into three groups: Group M, cross-matched blood-type mixing (n = 20); Group S, ABO type-specific uncross-matched blood (n = 20); and Group I, ABO incompatibility (not ABO type-specific blood and not process cross-matched) mixing (n = 20). The blood mixtures were used to detect platelet membrane-bound CD40L expression by flow cytometry. Blood mixing resulted in an increase in CD40L expression in Group M (P role in the induction of CD40L expression.

  16. Identification and characterization of a silencer regulatory element in the 3'-flanking region of the murine CD46 gene.

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    Nomura, M; Tsujimura, A; Begum, N A; Matsumoto, M; Wabiko, H; Toyoshima, K; Seya, T

    2000-01-01

    The murine membrane cofactor protein (CD46) gene is expressed exclusively in testis, in contrast to human CD46, which is expressed ubiquitously. To elucidate the mechanism of differential CD46 gene expression among species, we cloned entire murine CD46 genomic DNA and possible regulatory regions were placed in the flanking region of the luciferase reporter gene. The reporter gene assay revealed a silencing activity not in the promoter, but in the 3'-flanking region of the gene and the silencer-like element was identified within a 0.2-kb region between 0.6 and 0.8 kb downstream of the stop codon. This silencer-like element was highly similar to that of the pig MHC class-I gene. The introduction of a mutation into this putative silencer element of murine CD46 resulted in an abrogation of the silencing effect. Electrophoretic mobility-shift assay indicated the presence of the binding molecule(s) for this silencer sequence in murine cell lines and tissues. A size difference of the protein-silencer-element complex was observed depending upon the solubilizers used for preparation of the nuclear extracts. A mutated silencer sequence failed to interact with the binding molecules. The level of the binding factor was lower in the testicular germ cells compared with other organs. Thus the silencer element and its binding factor may play a role in transcriptional regulation of murine CD46 gene expression. These results imply that the effects of the CD46 silencer element encompass the innate immune and reproductive systems, and in mice may determine the testicular germ-cell-dominant expression of CD46. PMID:11023821

  17. The regulation of CD5 expression in murine T cells

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    Herzenberg Leonard A

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CD5 is a pan-T cell surface marker that is also present on a subset of B cells, B-1a cells.Functional and developmental subsets of T cells express characteristic CD5 levels that vary over roughly a 30-fold range. Previous investigators have cloned a 1.7 Kb fragment containing the CD5 promoter and showed that it can confer similar lymphocyte-specific expression pattern as observed for endogenous CD5 expression. Results We further characterize the CD5 promoter and identify minimal and regulatory regions on the CD5 promoter. Using a luciferase reporter system, we show that a 43 bp region on the CD5 promoter regulates CD5 expression in resting mouse thymoma EL4 T cells and that an Ets binding site within the 43 bp region mediates the CD5 expression. In addition, we show that Ets-1, a member of the Ets family of transcription factors, recognizes the Ets binding site in the electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA. This Ets binding site is directly responsible for the increase in reporter activity when co-transfected with increasing amounts of Ets-1 expression plasmid. We also identify two additional evolutionarily-conserved regions in the CD5 promoter (CD5X and CD5Y and demonstrate the respective roles of the each region in the regulation of CD5 transcription. Conclusion Our studies define a minimal and regulatory promoter for CD5 and show that the CD5 expression level in T cells is at least partially dependent on the level of Ets-1 protein. Based on the findings in this report, we propose a model of CD5 transcriptional regulation in T cells.

  18. Immune regulation by CD40-CD40-l interactions - 2; Y2K update.

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    van Kooten, C

    2000-11-01

    CD40 is a cell surface receptor, which belongs to the TNF-R family, and which was first identified and functionally characterized on B lymphocytes. However, in recent years it has become clear that CD40 is expressed much broader, including expression on monocytes, dendritic cells, endothelial cells and epithelial cells. Therefore it is now thought that CD40 plays a more general role in immune regulation. The present paper reviews recent developments in this field of research, with main emphasis on CD40 signal transduction and on in vivo functions of CD40/CD40-L interactions.

  19. Establishment and Identification of Chinese Hamster Ovary Cell Lines with Stable Expression of Soluble CD40 Ligands

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    JIANG Hua-wei

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To establish the Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO cell lines with stable expression of soluble CD40 ligands (sCD40L. Methods: Recombinant plasmid pIRES2-EGFP-sCD40L, enzyme digestion and sequencing identification were obtained by cloning sCD40L coding sequences into eukaryotic expression vector pIRES2-EGFP from carrier pDC316-sCD40 containing sCD40L. CHO cells were transfected by electroporation, followed by screening of resistant clones with G418, after which monoclones were obtained by limited dilution assay and multiply cultured. Flow cytometer and reverted fluorescence microscope were applied to observe the expression of green fluorescent protein, while sCD40L expression was detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA from aspects of deoxyribose nucleic acid (DNA, messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA and protein, respectively. CHO-sCD40L was cultured together with MDA-MB-231 cells to compare the expression changes of surface molecule fatty acid synthase (Fas by flow cytometer and observe the apoptosis of MDA-MB-231 cells after Fas activated antibodies (CH-11 were added 24 h later. Results: Plasmid pIRES2-EGFP-sCD40L was successfully established, and cell lines with stable expression of sCD40L were obtained with cloned culture after CHO cell transfection, which was named as B11. Flow cytometer and reverted fluorescence microscope showed >90% expression of green fluorescent protein, while PCR, RT-PCR and ELISA suggested integration of sCD40L genes into cell genome DNA, transcription of sCD40L mRNA and sCD40L protein expression being (4.5±2.1 ng/mL in the supernatant of cell culture, respectively. After co-culture of B11 and MDA-MB-231 cells, the surface Fas expression of MDA-MB-231 cells was increased from (3±1.02 % to (34.8±8.75%, while the apoptosis rate 24 h after addition of CH11 from (5.4±1.32% to (20.7±5.24%, and the differences

  20. Modulation of neuronal differentiation by CD40 isoforms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou Huayu; Obregon, Demian; Lou, Deyan; Ehrhart, Jared; Fernandez, Frank; Silver, Archie; Tan Jun

    2008-01-01

    Neuron differentiation is a complex process involving various cell-cell interactions, and multiple signaling pathways. We showed previously that CD40 is expressed and functional on mouse and human neurons. In neurons, ligation of CD40 protects against serum withdrawal-induced injury and plays a role in survival and differentiation. CD40 deficient mice display neuron dysfunction, aberrant neuron morphologic changes, and associated gross brain abnormalities. Previous studies by Tone and colleagues suggested that five isoforms of CD40 exist with two predominant isoforms expressed in humans: signal-transducible CD40 type I and a C-terminal truncated, non-signal-transducible CD40 type II. We hypothesized that differential expression of CD40 isoform type I and type II in neurons may modulate neuron differentiation. Results show that adult wild-type, and CD40 -/- deficient mice predominantly express CD40 type I and II isoforms. Whereas adult wild-type mice express mostly CD40 type I in cerebral tissues at relatively high levels, in age and gender-matched CD40 -/- mice CD40 type I expression was almost completely absent; suggesting a predominance of the non-signal-transducible CD40 type II isoform. Younger, 1 day old wild-type mice displayed less CD40 type I, and more CD40 type II, as well as, greater expression of soluble CD40 (CD40L/CD40 signal inhibitor), compared with 1 month old mice. Neuron-like N2a cells express CD40 type I and type II isoforms while in an undifferentiated state, however once induced to differentiate, CD40 type I predominates. Further, differentiated N2a cells treated with CD40 ligand express high levels of neuron specific nuclear protein (NeuN); an effect reduced by anti-CD40 type I siRNA, but not by control (non-targeting) siRNA. Altogether these data suggest that CD40 isoforms may act in a temporal fashion to modulate neuron differentiation during brain development. Thus, modulation of neuronal CD40 isoforms and CD40 signaling may represent

  1. Molecular mechanism and function of CD40/CD40L engagement in the immune system.

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    Elgueta, Raul; Benson, Micah J; de Vries, Victor C; Wasiuk, Anna; Guo, Yanxia; Noelle, Randolph J

    2009-05-01

    During the generation of a successful adaptive immune response, multiple molecular signals are required. A primary signal is the binding of cognate antigen to an antigen receptor expressed by T and B lymphocytes. Multiple secondary signals involve the engagement of costimulatory molecules expressed by T and B lymphocytes with their respective ligands. Because of its essential role in immunity, one of the best characterized of the costimulatory molecules is the receptor CD40. This receptor, a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor family, is expressed by B cells, professional antigen-presenting cells, as well as non-immune cells and tumors. CD40 binds its ligand CD40L, which is transiently expressed on T cells and other non-immune cells under inflammatory conditions. A wide spectrum of molecular and cellular processes is regulated by CD40 engagement including the initiation and progression of cellular and humoral adaptive immunity. In this review, we describe the downstream signaling pathways initiated by CD40 and overview how CD40 engagement or antagonism modulates humoral and cellular immunity. Lastly, we discuss the role of CD40 as a target in harnessing anti-tumor immunity. This review underscores the essential role CD40 plays in adaptive immunity.

  2. CD44 antibodies and immune thrombocytopenia in the amelioration of murine inflammatory arthritis.

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    Patrick J Mott

    Full Text Available Antibodies to CD44 have been used to successfully ameliorate murine models of autoimmune disease. The most often studied disease model has been murine inflammatory arthritis, where a clear mechanism for the efficacy of CD44 antibodies has not been established. We have recently shown in a murine passive-model of the autoimmune disease immune thrombocytopenia (ITP that some CD44 antibodies themselves can induce thrombocytopenia in mice, and the CD44 antibody causing the most severe thrombocytopenia (IM7, also is known to be highly effective in ameliorating murine models of arthritis. Recent work in the K/BxN serum-induced model of arthritis demonstrated that antibody-induced thrombocytopenia reduced arthritis, causing us to question whether CD44 antibodies might primarily ameliorate arthritis through their thrombocytopenic effect. We evaluated IM7, IRAWB14.4, 5035-41.1D, KM201, KM114, and KM81, and found that while all could induce thrombocytopenia, the degree of protection against serum-induced arthritis was not closely related to the length or severity of the thrombocytopenia. CD44 antibody treatment was also able to reverse established inflammation, while thrombocytopenia induced by an anti-platelet antibody targeting the GPIIbIIIa platelet antigen, could not mediate this effect. While CD44 antibody-induced thrombocytopenia may contribute to some of its therapeutic effect against the initiation of arthritis, for established disease there are likely other mechanisms contributing to its efficacy. Humans are not known to express CD44 on platelets, and are therefore unlikely to develop thrombocytopenia after CD44 antibody treatment. An understanding of the relationship between arthritis, thrombocytopenia, and CD44 antibody treatment remains critical for continued development of CD44 antibody therapeutics.

  3. Atomic structure of the murine norovirus protruding domain and sCD300lf receptor complex.

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    Kilic, Turgay; Koromyslova, Anna; Malak, Virginie; Hansman, Grant S

    2018-03-21

    , recent work has shown that expression of the protein CD300lf is both necessary and sufficient for murine norovirus infection of mice and binding of the virus to permissive cells. Importantly, the expression of this murine protein by human cells renders them fully permissive for murine norovirus infection, indicating that at least in this case host-range restriction is determined by molecular events that control receptor binding and entry. Defining the atomic-resolution interactions between the norovirus capsid protein and its cognate receptor is essential for a molecular understanding of host-range restriction and norovirus tropism. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  4. Per a 10 protease activity modulates CD40 expression on dendritic cell surface by nuclear factor-kappaB pathway.

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    Goel, C; Kalra, N; Dwarakanath, B S; Gaur, S N; Arora, N

    2015-05-01

    Serine protease activity of Per a 10 from Periplaneta americana modulates dendritic cell (DC) functions by a mechanism(s) that remains unclear. In the present study, Per a 10 protease activity on CD40 expression and downstream signalling was evaluated in DCs. Monocyte-derived DCs from cockroach-allergic patients were treated with proteolytically active/heat-inactivated Per a 10. Stimulation with active Per a 10 demonstrated low CD40 expression on DCs surface (P Per a 10, suggesting cleavage of CD40. Per a 10 activity reduced the interleukin (IL)-12 and interferon (IFN)-γ secretion by DCs (P Per a 10, indicating that low CD40 expression is associated with low levels of IL-12 secretion. Active Per a 10 stimulation caused low nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation in DCs compared to heat-inactivated Per a 10. Inhibition of the NF-κB pathway suppressed the CD40 expression and IL-12 secretion by DCs, further indicating that NF-κB is required for CD40 up-regulation. CD40 expression activated the tumour necrosis factor (TNF) receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6), thereby suggesting its involvement in NF-κB activation. Protease activity of Per a 10 induced p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation that showed no significant effect on CD40 expression by DCs. However, inhibiting p38 MAPK or NF-κB suppressed the secretion of IL-12, IFN-γ, IL-6 and TNF-α by DCs. Such DCs further reduced the secretion of IL-4, IL-6, IL-12 and TNF-α by CD4(+) T cells. In conclusion, protease activity of Per a 10 reduces CD40 expression on DCs. CD40 down-regulation leads to low NF-κB levels, thereby modulating DC-mediated immune responses. © 2014 British Society for Immunology.

  5. Analysis of the association between CD40 and CD40 ligand polymorphisms and systemic sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Teruel, María; Simeón Aznar, Carmen Pilar; Broen, Jasper C.; Vonk, Madelon C.; Carreira, Patricia; Camps García, María Teresa; García-Portales, Rosa; Delgado-Frías, Esmeralda; Gallego, Maria; Espinosa Garriga, Gerard; Spanish Scleroderma Group; Beretta, Lorenzo; Airó, Paolo; Lunardi, Claudio; Riemekasten, Gabriela

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of the present study was to investigate the possible role of CD40 and CD40 ligand (CD40LG) genes in the susceptibility and phenotype expression of systemic sclerosis (SSc). Methods: In total, 2,670 SSc patients and 3,245 healthy individuals from four European populations (Spain, Germany, The Netherlands, and Italy) were included in the study. Five single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of CD40 (rs1883832, rs4810485, rs1535045) and CD40LG (rs3092952, rs3092920) were genot...

  6. Impaired NFAT and NFκB activation are involved in suppression of CD40 ligand expression by Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol in human CD4+ T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngaotepprutaram, Thitirat; Kaplan, Barbara L.F.; Kaminski, Norbert E.

    2013-01-01

    We have previously reported that Δ 9 -tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ 9 -THC), the main psychoactive cannabinoid in marijuana, suppresses CD40 ligand (CD40L) expression by activated mouse CD4 + T cells. CD40L is involved in pathogenesis of many autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. In the present study, we investigated the molecular mechanism of Δ 9 -THC-mediated suppression of CD40L expression using peripheral blood human T cells. Pretreatment with Δ 9 -THC attenuated CD40L expression in human CD4 + T cells activated by anti-CD3/CD28 at both the protein and mRNA level, as determined by flow cytometry and quantitative real-time PCR, respectively. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays revealed that Δ 9 -THC suppressed the DNA-binding activity of both NFAT and NFκB to their respective response elements within the CD40L promoter. An assessment of the effect of Δ 9 -THC on proximal T cell-receptor (TCR) signaling induced by anti-CD3/CD28 showed significant impairment in the rise of intracellular calcium, but no significant effect on the phosphorylation of ZAP70, PLCγ1/2, Akt, and GSK3β. Collectively, these findings identify perturbation of the calcium-NFAT and NFκB signaling cascade as a key mechanistic event by which Δ 9 -THC suppresses human T cell function. - Highlights: • Δ 9 -THC attenuated CD40L expression in activated human CD4+ T cells. • Δ 9 -THC suppressed DNA-binding activity of NFAT and NFκB. • Δ 9 -THC impaired elevation of intracellular Ca2+. • Δ 9 -THC did not affect phosphorylation of ZAP70, PLCγ1/2, Akt, and GSK3β

  7. Genetic adjuvantation of recombinant MVA with CD40L potentiates CD8 T cell mediated immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henning eLauterbach

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA is a safe and promising viral vaccine vector that is currently investigated in several clinical and pre-clinical trials. In contrast to inactivated or sub-unit vaccines, MVA is able to induce strong humoral as well as cellular immune responses. In order to further improve its CD8 T cell inducing capacity, we genetically adjuvanted MVA with the coding sequence of murine CD40L, a member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF superfamily. Immunization of mice with this new vector led to strongly enhanced primary and memory CD8 T cell responses. Concordant with the enhanced CD8 T cell response, we could detect stronger activation of dendritic cells and higher systemic levels of innate cytokines (including IL-12p70 early after immunization. Interestingly, acquisition of memory characteristics (i.e., IL-7R expression was accelerated after immunization with MVA-CD40L in comparison to non-adjuvanted MVA. Furthermore, the generated CTLs also showed improved functionality as demonstrated by intracellular cytokine staining and in vivo killing activity. Importantly, the superior CTL response after a single MVA-CD40L immunization was able to protect B cell deficient mice against a fatal infection with ectromelia virus. Taken together, we show that genetic adjuvantation of MVA can change strength, quality and functionality of innate and adaptive immune responses. These data should facilitate a rational vaccine design with a focus on rapid induction of large numbers of CD8 T cells able to protect against specific diseases.

  8. Mouse CD23 regulates monocyte activation through an interaction with the adhesion molecule CD11b/CD18.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecoanet-Henchoz, S; Plater-Zyberk, C; Graber, P; Gretener, D; Aubry, J P; Conrad, D H; Bonnefoy, J Y

    1997-09-01

    CD23 is expressed on a variety of hemopoietic cells. Recently, we have reported that blocking CD23 interactions in a murine model of arthritis resulted in a marked improvement of disease severity. Here, we demonstrate that CD11b, the alpha chain of the beta 2 integrin adhesion molecule complex CD11b/CD18 expressed on monocytes interacts with CD23. Using a recombinant fusion protein (ZZ-CD23), murine CD23 was shown to bind to peritoneal macrophages and peripheral blood cells isolated from mice as well as the murine macrophage cell line, RAW. The interactions between mouse ZZ-CD23 and CD11b/CD18-expressing cells were significantly inhibited by anti-CD11b monoclonal antibodies. A functional consequence was then demonstrated by inducing an up-regulation of interleukin-6 (IL-6) production following ZZ-CD23 incubation with monocytes. The addition of Fab fragments generated from the monoclonal antibody CD11b impaired this cytokine production by 50%. Interestingly, a positive autocrine loop was identified as IL-6 was shown to increase CD23 binding to macrophages. These results demonstrate that similar to findings using human cells, murine CD23 binds to the surface adhesion molecule, CD11b, and these interactions regulate biological activities of murine myeloid cells.

  9. IL-2 and IL-15 regulate CD154 expression on activated CD4 T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, S; Bonyhadi, M; Odum, Niels

    2000-01-01

    The cellular and humoral immune system is critically dependent upon CD40-CD154 (CD40 ligand) interactions between CD40 expressed on B cells, macrophages, and dendritic cells, and CD154 expressed primarily on CD4 T cells. Previous studies have shown that CD154 is transiently expressed on CD4 T cells...... after T cell receptor engagement in vitro. However, we found that stimulation of PBLs with maximal CD28 costimulation, using beads coupled to Abs against CD3 and CD28, led to a very prolonged expression of CD154 on CD4 cells (>4 days) that was dependent upon autocrine IL-2 production. Previously...... activated CD4 T cells could respond to IL-2, or the related cytokine IL-15, by de novo CD154 production and expression without requiring an additional signal from CD3 and CD28. These results provide evidence that CD28 costimulation of CD4 T cells, through autocrine IL-2 production, maintains high levels...

  10. [Evaluation of percentage of lymphocytes B with expression of co-receptors CD 40, CD22 and CD72 in hypertrophied adenoid at children with otitis media with effusion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysocka, Jolanta; Zelazowska-Rutkowska, Beata; Ratomski, Karol; Skotnicka, Bozena; Hassmann-Poznańska, Elzbieta

    2009-01-01

    In hypertrophied adenoid lymphocytes B make up about 60% all lymphocytes. When the lymphocytes B come in interaction with antigens this membranes signal be passed through their receptor (BCR) to interior of cell. This signal affect modulation on gene expression, activation from which depends activation, anergy or apoptosis of lymphocyte B. Accompany BCR co-receptors regulate his functions influence stimulate or inhibitive. To the most important co-receptors stepping out on lymphocyte B belong: CD40, CD22, CD72. The aim of study was evaluation of lymphocytes B (CD19) with co-expression with CD72 and CD40 receptors in hypertrophied adenoid with at children with otitis media with effusion. An investigation was executed in hypertrophied adenoids with or without otitis media with effusion. By flow cytometry percentage of lymphocytes B with co-receptors CD 40, CD22 and CD72 in was analyzed. The percentages of CD19+CD72+ lymphocytes in the group of children with adenoid hypertrophy and exudative otitis media were lower as compared to the reference group. However, the percentages of CD19+CD22+, CD19+CD40+ in the study group was approximate to the reference group. The lower percentage of lymphocytes B CD72 + near approximate percentages of lymphocytes B CD40+ and BCD22+ at children with otitis media with effusion can be the cause of incorrect humoral response in hypertrophied adenoid at children. Maybe it is cause reduced spontaneous production IgA and IgG through lymphocyte at children with otitis media with effusion.

  11. CD73 expression identifies a subset of IgM+ antigen-experienced cells with memory attributes that is T cell and CD40 signalling dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, Lucas; Gupta, Sneh Lata; Bal, Vineeta; Rath, Satyajit; George, Anna

    2017-12-01

    B-cell memory was long characterized as isotype-switched, somatically mutated and germinal centre (GC)-derived. However, it is now clear that the memory pool is a complex mixture that includes unswitched and unmutated cells. Further, expression of CD73, CD80 and CD273 has allowed the categorization of B-cell memory into multiple subsets, with combinatorial expression of the markers increasing with GC progression, isotype-switching and acquisition of somatic mutations. We have extended these findings to determine whether these markers can be used to identify IgM memory phenotypically as arising from T-dependent versus T-independent responses. We report that CD73 expression identifies a subset of antigen-experienced IgM + cells that share attributes of functional B-cell memory. This subset is reduced in the spleens of T-cell-deficient and CD40-deficient mice and in mixed marrow chimeras made with mutant and wild-type marrow, the proportion of CD73 + IgM memory is restored in the T-cell-deficient donor compartment but not in the CD40-deficient donor compartment, indicating that CD40 ligation is involved in its generation. We also report that CD40 signalling supports optimal expression of CD73 on splenic T cells and age-associated B cells (ABCs), but not on other immune cells such as neutrophils, marginal zone B cells, peritoneal cavity B-1 B cells and regulatory T and B cells. Our data indicate that in addition to promoting GC-associated memory generation during B-cell differentiation, CD40-signalling can influence the composition of the unswitched memory B-cell pool. They also raise the possibility that a fraction of ABCs may represent T-cell-dependent IgM memory. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Impaired NFAT and NFκB activation are involved in suppression of CD40 ligand expression by Δ{sup 9}-tetrahydrocannabinol in human CD4{sup +} T cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ngaotepprutaram, Thitirat [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Michigan State University (United States); Center for Integrative Toxicology, Michigan State University (United States); Kaplan, Barbara L.F. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Michigan State University (United States); Center for Integrative Toxicology, Michigan State University (United States); Neuroscience Program, Michigan State University (United States); Kaminski, Norbert E., E-mail: kamins11@msu.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Michigan State University (United States); Center for Integrative Toxicology, Michigan State University (United States)

    2013-11-15

    We have previously reported that Δ{sup 9}-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ{sup 9}-THC), the main psychoactive cannabinoid in marijuana, suppresses CD40 ligand (CD40L) expression by activated mouse CD4{sup +} T cells. CD40L is involved in pathogenesis of many autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. In the present study, we investigated the molecular mechanism of Δ{sup 9}-THC-mediated suppression of CD40L expression using peripheral blood human T cells. Pretreatment with Δ{sup 9}-THC attenuated CD40L expression in human CD4{sup +} T cells activated by anti-CD3/CD28 at both the protein and mRNA level, as determined by flow cytometry and quantitative real-time PCR, respectively. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays revealed that Δ{sup 9}-THC suppressed the DNA-binding activity of both NFAT and NFκB to their respective response elements within the CD40L promoter. An assessment of the effect of Δ{sup 9}-THC on proximal T cell-receptor (TCR) signaling induced by anti-CD3/CD28 showed significant impairment in the rise of intracellular calcium, but no significant effect on the phosphorylation of ZAP70, PLCγ1/2, Akt, and GSK3β. Collectively, these findings identify perturbation of the calcium-NFAT and NFκB signaling cascade as a key mechanistic event by which Δ{sup 9}-THC suppresses human T cell function. - Highlights: • Δ{sup 9}-THC attenuated CD40L expression in activated human CD4+ T cells. • Δ{sup 9}-THC suppressed DNA-binding activity of NFAT and NFκB. • Δ{sup 9}-THC impaired elevation of intracellular Ca2+. • Δ{sup 9}-THC did not affect phosphorylation of ZAP70, PLCγ1/2, Akt, and GSK3β.

  13. Platelet CD40L mediates thrombotic and inflammatory processes in atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lievens, Dirk; Zernecke, Alma; Seijkens, Tom; Soehnlein, Oliver; Beckers, Linda; Munnix, Imke C. A.; Wijnands, Erwin; Goossens, Pieter; van Kruchten, Roger; Thevissen, Larissa; Boon, Louis; Flavell, Richard A.; Noelle, Randolph J.; Gerdes, Norbert; Biessen, Erik A.; Daemen, Mat J. A. P.; Heemskerk, Johan W. M.; Weber, Christian; Lutgens, Esther

    2010-01-01

    CD40 ligand (CD40L), identified as a costimulatory molecule expressed on T cells, is also expressed and functional on platelets. We investigated the thrombotic and inflammatory contributions of platelet CD40L in atherosclerosis. Although CD40L-deficient (Cd40l(-/-)) platelets exhibited impaired

  14. The murine Cd48 gene: allelic polymorphism in the IgV-like region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrero, J G; Freeman, G J; Reiser, H

    1998-12-01

    The murine CD48 molecule is a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily which regulates the activation of T lymphocytes. prior cloning experiments using mRNA from two different mouse strains had yielded discrepant sequences within the IgV-like domain of murine CD48. To resolve this issue, we have directly sequenced genomic DNA of 10 laboratory strains and two inbred strains of wild origin. The results of our analysis reveal an allelic polymorphism within the IgV-like domain of murine CD48.

  15. Functional Heterogeneity in the CD4+ T Cell Response to Murine γ-Herpesvirus 68

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhuting; Blackman, Marcia A.; Kaye, Kenneth M.; Usherwood, Edward J.

    2015-01-01

    CD4+ T cells are critical for the control of virus infections, T cell memory and immune surveillance. Here we studied the differentiation and function of murine γ-herpesvirus 68 (MHV-68)-specific CD4+ T cells using gp150-specific TCR transgenic mice. This allowed a more detailed study of the characteristics of the CD4+ T cell response than previously available approaches for this virus. Most gp150-specific CD4+ T cells expressed T-bet and produced IFN-γ, indicating MHV-68 infection triggered differentiation of CD4+ T cells largely into the Th1 subset, whereas some became TFH and Foxp3+ regulatory T cells. These CD4+ T cells were protective against MHV-68 infection, in the absence of CD8+ T cells and B cells, and protection depended on IFN-γ secretion. Marked heterogeneity was observed in the CD4+ T cells, based on Ly6C expression. Ly6C expression positively correlated with IFN-γ, TNF-α and granzyme B production, T-bet and KLRG1 expression, proliferation and CD4+ T cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Ly6C expression inversely correlated with survival, CCR7 expression and secondary expansion potential. Ly6C+ and Ly6C− gp150-specific CD4+ T cells were able to interconvert in a bidirectional manner upon secondary antigen exposure in vivo. These results indicate that Ly6C expression is closely associated with antiviral activity in effector CD4+ T cells, but inversely correlated with memory potential. Interconversion between Ly6C+ and Ly6C− cells may maintain a balance between the two antigen-specific CD4+ T cell populations during MHV-68 infection. These findings have significant implications for Ly6C as a surface marker to distinguish functionally distinct CD4+ T cells during persistent virus infection. PMID:25662997

  16. Optimization of Ex Vivo Murine Bone Marrow Derived Immature Dendritic Cells: A Comparative Analysis of Flask Culture Method and Mouse CD11c Positive Selection Kit Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Ashok Gosavi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available 12–14 days of culturing of bone marrow (BM cells containing various growth factors is widely used method for generating dendritic cells (DCs from suspended cell population. Here we compared flask culture method and commercially available CD11c Positive Selection kit method. Immature BMDCs’ purity of adherent as well as suspended cell population was generated in the decreasing concentration of recombinant-murine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rmGM-CSF in nontreated tissue culture flasks. The expression of CD11c, MHCII, CD40, and CD86 was measured by flow cytometry. We found significant difference (P<0.05 between the two methods in the adherent cells population but no significant difference was observed between the suspended cell populations with respect to CD11c+ count. However, CD11c+ was significantly higher in both adhered and suspended cell population by culture method but kit method gave more CD11c+ from suspended cells population only. On the other hand, using both methods, immature DC expressed moderate level of MHC class II molecules as well as low levels of CD40 and CD86. Our findings suggest that widely used culture method gives the best results in terms of yield, viability, and purity of BMDCs from both adherent and suspended cell population whereas kit method works well for suspended cell population.

  17. A novel monoclonal antibody, C41, reveals IL-13Ralpha1 expression by murine germinal center B cells and follicular dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poudrier, J; Graber, P; Herren, S; Berney, C; Gretener, D; Kosco-Vilbois, M H; Gauchat, J F

    2000-11-01

    Responsiveness to IL-13 involves at least two chains, IL-4Ralpha and IL-13Ralpha1. Although mouse B cells express IL-4Ralpha, little is known about their expression of IL-13Ralpha chains. To investigate this topic further, we have generated a monoclonal antibody (C41) specific for murine IL-13Ralpha1. Using C41, IL-13Ralpha1 expression was detected on germinal center (GC) B cells by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. In addition, IL-13Ralpha1 was observed on follicular dendritic cells, but not interdigitating dendritic cells in the T cell areas. Furthermore, resting B cells also expressed IL-13Ralpha1, and in the presence of IL-13 produced increased amounts of IgM in response to in vitro CD40 stimulation. However, C41 was unable to neutralize this bioactivity. The distribution of IL-13Ralpha1 on murine B cells and during GC reactions suggests a role for IL-13 during B cell differentiation.

  18. Mechanisms of Nifedipine-Downregulated CD40L/sCD40L Signaling in Collagen Stimulated Human Platelets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tso-Hsiao Chen

    Full Text Available The platelet-derived soluble CD40L (sCD40L release plays a critical role in the development of atherosclerosis. Nifedipine, a dihydropyridine-based L-type calcium channel blocker (CCB, has been reported to have an anti-atherosclerotic effect beyond its blood pressure-lowering effect, but the molecular mechanisms remain unclear. The present study was designed to investigate whether nifedipine affects sCD40L release from collagen-stimulated human platelets and to determine the potential role of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-β/-γ (PPAR-β/-γ. We found that treatment with nifedipine significantly inhibited the platelet surface CD40L expression and sCD40L release in response to collagen, while the inhibition was markedly reversed by blocking PPAR-β/-γ activity with specific antagonist such as GSK0660 and GW9662. Meanwhile, nifedipine also enhanced nitric oxide (NO and cyclic GMP formation in a PPAR-β/-γ-dependent manner. When the NO/cyclic GMP pathway was suppressed, nifedipine-mediated inhibition of sCD40L release was abolished significantly. Collagen-induced phosphorylation of p38MAPK, ERK1/2 and HSP27, matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2 expression/activity and reactive oxygen species (ROS formation were significantly inhibited by nifedipine, whereas these alterations were all attenuated by co-treatment with PPAR-β/-γ antagonists. Collectively, these results demonstrate that PPAR-β/-γ-dependent pathways contribute to nifedipine-mediated downregulation of CD40L/sCD40L signaling in activated platelets through regulation of NO/ p38MAPK/ERK1/2/HSP27/MMP-2 signalings and provide a novel mechanism regarding the anti-atherosclerotic effect of nifedipine.

  19. Interleukin 21 Controls mRNA and MicroRNA Expression in CD40-Activated Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loris De Cecco

    Full Text Available Several factors support CLL cell survival in the microenvironment. Under different experimental conditions, IL21 can either induce apoptosis or promote CLL cell survival. To investigate mechanisms involved in the effects of IL21, we studied the ability of IL21 to modulate gene and miRNA expressions in CD40-activated CLL cells. IL21 was a major regulator of chemokine production in CLL cells and it modulated the expression of genes involved in cell movement, metabolism, survival and apoptosis. In particular, IL21 down-regulated the expression of the chemokine genes CCL4, CCL3, CCL3L1, CCL17, and CCL2, while it up-regulated the Th1-related CXCL9 and CXCL10. In addition, IL21 down-regulated the expression of genes encoding signaling molecules, such as CD40, DDR1 and PIK3CD. IL21 modulated a similar set of genes in CLL and normal B-cells (e.g. chemokine genes, whereas other genes, including MYC, TNF, E2F1, EGR2 and GAS-6, were regulated only in CLL cells. An integrated analysis of the miRNome and gene expression indicated that several miRNAs were under IL21 control and these could, in turn, influence the expression of potential target genes. We focused on hsa-miR-663b predicted to down-regulate several relevant genes. Transfection of hsa-miR-663b or its specific antagonist showed that this miRNA regulated CCL17, DDR1, PIK3CD and CD40 gene expression. Our data indicated that IL21 modulates the expression of genes mediating the crosstalk between CLL cells and their microenvironment and miRNAs may take part in this process.

  20. Freeze and Thaw of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Regulatory T Cells Results in Loss of CD62L Expression and a Reduced Capacity to Protect against Graft-versus-Host Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mareike Florek

    Full Text Available The adoptive transfer of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs in murine models of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT has been shown to protect recipient mice from lethal acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD and this approach is being actively investigated in human clinical trials. Here, we examined the effects of cryopreservation on Tregs. We found that freeze and thaw of murine and human Tregs is associated with reduced expression of L-selectin (CD62L, which was previously established to be an important factor that contributes to the in vivo protective effects of Tregs. Frozen and thawed murine Tregs showed a reduced capacity to bind to the CD62L binding partner MADCAM1 in vitro as well as an impaired homing to secondary lymphoid organs in vivo. Upon adoptive transfer frozen and thawed Tregs failed to protect against lethal GVHD compared with fresh Tregs in a murine model of allogeneic HCT across major histocompatibility barriers. In summary, the direct administration of adoptively transferred frozen and thawed Tregs adversely affects their immunosuppressive potential which is an important factor to consider in the clinical implementation of Treg immunotherapies.

  1. Effect of bleaching agent extracts on murine macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Aletéia M M; Vilela, Polyana G F; Valera, Marcia C; Bolay, Carola; Hiller, Karl Anton; Schweikl, Helmut; Schmalz, Gottfried

    2018-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the cytotoxicity and the influence of bleaching agents on immunologically cell surface antigens of murine macrophages in vitro. RAW 264.7 cells were exposed to bleaching gel extracts (40% hydrogen peroxide or 20% carbamide peroxide) and different H 2 O 2 concentrations after 1 and 24-h exposure periods and 1-h exposure and 23-h recovery. Tests were performed with and without N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) and buthionine sulfoximine (BSO). Cell viability was determined by MTT assay. The expression of surface markers CD14, CD40, and CD54 with and without LPS stimulation was detected by flow cytometry, while the production of TNF-α was measured by ELISA. Statistical analysis was performed using the Mann-Whitney U test (α = 0.05). Extracts of bleaching agents were cytotoxic for cells after a 1-h exposure; cells could not recover after 24 h. This effect can be mitigated by the antioxidant NAC and increased by BSO, an inhibitor of glutathione (GSH) synthesis. LPS stimulated expression of all surface markers and TNF-α production. Exposure to bleaching agent extracts and H 2 O 2 leads to a reduction of TNF-α, CD14, and CD40 expression, while the expression of CD54 was upregulated at non-cytotoxic concentrations. Whereas NAC reduced this effect, it was increased in the presence of BSO. Extracts of bleaching agents were irreversibly cytotoxic to macrophages after a 1-h exposure. Only the expression of CD54 was upregulated. The reactions are mediated by the non-enzymatic antioxidant GSH. The addition of an antioxidant can downregulate unfavorable effects of dental bleaching.

  2. CD54/intercellular adhesion molecule 1 and major histocompatibility complex II signaling induces B cells to express interleukin 2 receptors and complements help provided through CD40 ligation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poudrier, J; Owens, T

    1994-01-01

    We have examined signaling roles for CD54 intercellular adhesion molecule 1 and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) II as contact ligands during T help for B cell activation. We used a T helper 1 (Th1)-dependent helper system that was previously shown to be contact as well as interleukin 2 (IL-2......) dependent to demonstrate the relative roles of CD54, MHC II, and CD40 signaling in the events leading to the induction of B cell proliferation and responsiveness to IL-2. Paraformaldehyde-fixed activated Th1-induced expression of IL-2R alpha, IL-2R beta, and B7, and upregulated MHC II and CD54 on B cells...... resulted in the upregulated expression of MHC II and of CD54 and B7, respectively, analogous to the effect of fixed activated Th1 cells. B7 expression was further enhanced by co-cross-linking CD54 and MHC II. Cross-linking of CD40 achieved comparable effects. Strikingly, cross-linking ligation of CD54...

  3. CD4 Depletion or CD40L Blockade Results in Antigen-Specific Tolerance in a Red Blood Cell Alloimmunization Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabitha Natarajan

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 3–10% of human red blood cell (RBC transfusion recipients form alloantibodies to non-self, non-ABO blood group antigens expressed on donor RBCs, with these alloantibodies having the potential to be clinically significant in transfusion and pregnancy settings. However, the majority of transfused individuals never form detectable alloantibodies. Expanding upon observations that children initially transfused with RBCs at a young age are less likely to form alloantibodies throughout their lives, we hypothesized that “non-responders” may not only be ignorant of antigens on RBCs but instead tolerized. We investigated this question in a reductionist murine model, in which transgenic donors express the human glycophorin A (hGPA antigen in an RBC-specific manner. Although wild-type mice treated with poly IC and transfused with hGPA RBCs generated robust anti-hGPA IgG alloantibodies that led to rapid clearance of incompatible RBCs, those transfused in the absence of an adjuvant failed to become alloimmunized. Animals depleted of CD4+ cells or treated with CD40L blockade prior to initial hGPA RBC exposure, in the presence of poly IC, failed to generate detectable anti-hGPA IgG alloantibodies. These non-responders to a primary transfusion remained unable to generate anti-hGPA IgG alloantibodies upon secondary hGPA exposure and did not prematurely clear transfused hGPA RBCs even after their CD4 cells had returned or their CD40L blockade had resolved. This observed tolerance was antigen (hGPA specific, as robust IgG responses to transfused RBCs expressing a third-party antigen occurred in all studied groups. Experiments completed in an RBC alloimmunization model that allowed evaluation of antigen-specific CD4+ T-cells (HOD (hen egg lysozyme, ovalbumin, and human duffyb demonstrated that CD40L blockade prevented the expansion of ovalbumin 323-339 specific T-cells after HOD RBC transfusion and also prevented germinal center formation. Taken

  4. Expression of CD40 is a positive prognostic factor of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma treated with R-CHOP (rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song G

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Guoqi Song,1 Huiyun Ni,1 Linqing Zou,2 Shukui Wang,3 Fuliang Tian,4 Hong Liu,1 William C Cho5 1Department of Hematology, Affiliated Hospital of Nantong University, Nantong, 2Department of Human Anatomy, Nantong University, Nantong, 3Central Laboratory of Nanjing First Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, 4Maternal and Child Health Hospital of Lianyungang, Lianyungang, Jiangsu, People’s Republic of China; 5Department of Clinical Oncology, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Kowloon, Hong Kong Objectives: The objective of this study was to investigate the expression level of CD40 and its role in the prognosis of patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL who were treated with rituximab-CHOP (rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone.Design and methods: The immunohistochemical expressions of CD40 in 186 well-characterized DLBCL patients were evaluated by tissue microarrays, thereby revealing the relationship of the molecule CD40 with known tumor, patient-related variables, and survival rates.Results: The results showed that CD40 expressions were not statistically different between the germinal center B-cell-like (GCB type and the non-GCB type. We also analyzed the relationships of CD40 expression with overall survival (OS and progression-free survival (PFS in DLBCL patients who were uniformly treated with R-CHOP. A low expression of CD40 compared to high expression is related to poor OS and PFS. Conclusion: Our findings indicate that the CD40 level at onset acts as an independent prognostic predictor of DLBCL patients treated with R-CHOP. Keywords: CD40, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, R-CHOP, prognostic factor

  5. A bioengineered murine model using CD24+CD44+ pancreatic cancer stem cells for chemotherapy study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, Shengqi; Li, Jianshe; Zhang, Zhongtao; Deng, Yiming

    2015-01-01

    In this work we first developed a murine pancreatic tumor model using CD24 + CD44 + pancreatic cancer stem cells (CSC) supported by an electrospun scaffold. Unlike conventional models, the use of CSC and the scaffold, which were biologically and chemically defined, afforded scientists a reliable platform to evaluate novel chemotherapy regimens. CD24 + CD44 + CSC successfully initiated tumorigenesis in vitro on the scaffold without suffering apoptosis, evidencing the lack of cytotoxicity of scaffolding materials. Also, the scaffold contributed to the acceleration of in vivo tumorigenesis and increased the likelihood of tumor formation. Using this model, we set out to explore the effectiveness of irinotecan/gemcitabine (IRIN-GEM), a chemotherapy regimen, for pancreatic cancer. Our study showed that IRIN-GEM induced a tumor regression whereas gemcitabine alone could only arrest the tumor growth. Further study suggested that the superior performance of IRIN-GEM could be attributed to its capacity to demolish the CD24 + CD44 + CSC sub-population by inducing a large-scale apoptosis. The use of highly proliferative yet homogenous CD24 + CD44 + CSC along with a chemically defined scaffold accelerated the tumor formation and significantly reduced the variability associated with conventional murine models. Armed with this new model, we discovered that IRIN-GEM would be a promising chemotherapy candidate for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. (paper)

  6. Metabolically active CD4+ T cells expressing Glut1 and OX40 preferentially harbor HIV during in vitro infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Clovis S; Duette, Gabriel A; Wagner, Marc C E; Henstridge, Darren C; Saleh, Suah; Pereira, Candida; Zhou, Jingling; Simar, David; Lewin, Sharon R; Ostrowski, Matias; McCune, Joseph M; Crowe, Suzanne M

    2017-10-01

    High glucose transporter 1 (Glut1) surface expression is associated with increased glycolytic activity in activated CD4+ T cells. Phosphatidylinositide 3-kinases (PI3K) activation measured by p-Akt and OX40 is elevated in CD4+Glut1+ T cells from HIV+ subjects. TCR engagement of CD4+Glut1+ T cells from HIV+ subjects demonstrates hyperresponsive PI3K-mammalian target of rapamycin signaling. High basal Glut1 and OX40 on CD4+ T cells from combination antiretroviral therapy (cART)-treated HIV+ patients represent a sufficiently metabolically active state permissive for HIV infection in vitro without external stimuli. The majority of CD4+OX40+ T cells express Glut1, thus OX40 rather than Glut1 itself may facilitate HIV infection. Furthermore, infection of CD4+ T cells is limited by p110γ PI3K inhibition. Modulating glucose metabolism may limit cellular activation and prevent residual HIV replication in 'virologically suppressed' cART-treated HIV+ persons. © 2017 The Authors. FEBS Letters published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  7. Impaired CD40L signaling is a cause of defective IL-12 and TNF-alpha production in Sézary syndrome: circumvention by hexameric soluble CD40L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Lars E; Huard, Bertrand; Wysocka, Maria; Shane, Ryan; Contassot, Emmanuel; Arrighi, Jean-François; Piguet, Vincent; Calderara, Silvio; Rook, Alain H

    2005-01-01

    Sézary syndrome (SzS) is an advanced form of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma characterized by peripheral blood involvement, impaired cell-mediated immunity, and T-helper 1 (TH1) cytokine production. To understand the mechanism of these defects, we studied the expression and function of CD40L in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of patients with SzS. We found that PBMCs of patients with SzS have a defect in interleukin-12 (IL-12) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) production upon anti-CD3 stimulation and that tumor CD4+ T lymphocytes have a specific defect in CD40L induction after anti-CD3 ligation in vitro. This defect may explain the poor IL-12 production, because IL-12 production by anti-CD3-stimulated PBMCs was dependent on CD40L in healthy donors. The observed defect in tumor cell CD40L expression appears to be due to inappropriate T-cell signaling upon CD3 ligation, because expression of other T-cell activation antigens such as CD25, and to a lesser extent CD69, are also impaired on tumor cells. Importantly however, the inability of SzS PBMCs to appropriately produce IL-12 and TNF-alpha could be restored by recombinant hexameric CD40L. Taken together, our results demonstrate that impaired IL-12 and TNF-alpha production in SzS is associated with defective CD4+ T lymphocyte CD40L induction and indicate that CD40L may have therapeutic potential in SzS.

  8. CD40 in clinical inflammation: From multiple sclerosis to atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laman, J.D.; Boer, M. de; Hart, B.A. 't

    1998-01-01

    The interactions of CD40 and CD40L have been known for some time to critically regulate B-cell responses with respect to proliferation, isotype switching, antibody production, and memory formation. More recent findings demonstrated that CD40 can be expressed on several other antigen-presenting cell

  9. Scaffold protein JLP mediates TCR-initiated CD4+T cell activation and CD154 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Qi; Yang, Cheng; Fu, Qiang; Chen, Zhaowei; Liu, Shan; Fu, Dou; Rahman, Rahmat N; Nakazato, Ryota; Yoshioka, Katsuji; Kung, Sam K P; Ding, Guohua; Wang, Huiming

    2017-07-01

    CD4 + T-cell activation and its subsequent induction of CD154 (CD40 ligand, CD40L) expression are pivotal in shaping both the humoral and cellular immune responses. Scaffold protein JLP regulates signal transduction pathways and molecular trafficking inside cells, thus represents a critical component in maintaining cellular functions. Its role in regulating CD4 + T-cell activation and CD154 expression, however, is unclear. Here, we demonstrated expression of JLP in mouse tissues of lymph nodes, thymus, spleen, and also CD4 + T cells. Using CD4+ T cells from jlp-deficient and jlp-wild-type mice, we demonstrated that JLP-deficiency impaired T-cell proliferation, IL-2 production, and CD154 induction upon TCR stimulations, but had no impacts on the expression of other surface molecules such as CD25, CD69, and TCR. These observed impaired T-cell functions in the jlp-/- CD4 + T cells were associated with defective NF-AT activation and Ca 2 + influx, but not the MAPK, NF-κB, as well as AP-1 signaling pathways. Our findings indicated that, for the first time, JLP plays a critical role in regulating CD4 + T cells response to TCR stimulation partly by mediating the activation of TCR-initiated Ca 2+ /NF-AT. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Human glioblastoma-associated microglia/monocytes express a distinct RNA profile compared to human control and murine samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szulzewsky, Frank; Arora, Sonali; de Witte, Lot; Ulas, Thomas; Markovic, Darko; Schultze, Joachim L; Holland, Eric C; Synowitz, Michael; Wolf, Susanne A; Kettenmann, Helmut

    2016-08-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most aggressive brain tumor in adults. It is strongly infiltrated by microglia and peripheral monocytes that support tumor growth. In the present study we used RNA sequencing to compare the expression profile of CD11b(+) human glioblastoma-associated microglia/monocytes (hGAMs) to CD11b(+) microglia isolated from non-tumor samples. Hierarchical clustering and principal component analysis showed a clear separation of the two sample groups and we identified 334 significantly regulated genes in hGAMs. In comparison to human control microglia hGAMs upregulated genes associated with mitotic cell cycle, cell migration, cell adhesion, and extracellular matrix organization. We validated the expression of several genes associated with extracellular matrix organization in samples of human control microglia, hGAMs, and the hGAMs-depleted fraction via qPCR. The comparison to murine GAMs (mGAMs) showed that both cell populations share a significant fraction of upregulated transcripts compared with their respective controls. These genes were mostly related to mitotic cell cycle. However, in contrast to murine cells, human GAMs did not upregulate genes associated to immune activation. Comparison of human and murine GAMs expression data to several data sets of in vitro-activated human macrophages and murine microglia showed that, in contrast to mGAMs, hGAMs share a smaller overlap to these data sets in general and in particular to cells activated by proinflammatory stimulation with LPS + INFγ or TNFα. Our findings provide new insights into the biology of human glioblastoma-associated microglia/monocytes and give detailed information about the validity of murine experimental models. GLIA 2016 GLIA 2016;64:1416-1436. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Vav-1 expression correlates with NFkappaB activation and CD40-mediated cell death in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hollmann, Annette; Aloyz, Raquel; Baker, Kristi

    2010-01-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is an aggressive malignancy with a variable response to therapy. We have previously shown that DLBCL cell lines differ in their susceptibility to CD40-mediated cell death, and that resistance to CD40-targeted antibodies correlated with increased expression...... as a potential marker to identify tumours likely to respond to CD40-targeted therapies. Copyright (c) 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd....

  12. The early activation marker CD69 regulates the expression of chemokines and CD4 T cell accumulation in intestine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarina Radulovic

    Full Text Available Migration of naïve and activated lymphocytes is regulated by the expression of various molecules such as chemokine receptors and ligands. CD69, the early activation marker of C-type lectin domain family, is also shown to regulate the lymphocyte migration by affecting their egress from the thymus and secondary lymphoid organs. Here, we aimed to investigate the role of CD69 in accumulation of CD4 T cells in intestine using murine models of inflammatory bowel disease. We found that genetic deletion of CD69 in mice increases the expression of the chemokines CCL-1, CXCL-10 and CCL-19 in CD4(+ T cells and/or CD4(- cells. Efficient in vitro migration of CD69-deficient CD4 T cells toward the chemokine stimuli was the result of increased expression and/or affinity of chemokine receptors. In vivo CD69(-/- CD4 T cells accumulate in the intestine in higher numbers than B6 CD4 T cells as observed in competitive homing assay, dextran sodium sulphate (DSS-induced colitis and antigen-specific transfer colitis. In DSS colitis CD69(-/- CD4 T cell accumulation in colonic lamina propria (cLP was associated with increased expression of CCL-1, CXCL-10 and CCL-19 genes. Furthermore, treatment of DSS-administrated CD69(-/- mice with the mixture of CCL-1, CXCL-10 and CCL-19 neutralizing Abs significantly decreased the histopathological signs of colitis. Transfer of OT-II×CD69(-/- CD45RB(high CD4 T cells into RAG(-/- hosts induced CD4 T cell accumulation in cLP. This study showed CD69 as negative regulator of inflammatory responses in intestine as it decreases the expression of chemotactic receptors and ligands and reduces the accumulation of CD4 T cells in cLP during colitis.

  13. Inhibition of CD200R1 expression by C/EBP beta in reactive microglial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dentesano Guido

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In physiological conditions, it is postulated that neurons control microglial reactivity through a series of inhibitory mechanisms, involving either cell contact-dependent, soluble-factor-dependent or neurotransmitter-associated pathways. In the current study, we focus on CD200R1, a microglial receptor involved in one of these cell contact-dependent mechanisms. CD200R1 activation by its ligand, CD200 (mainly expressed by neurons in the central nervous system,is postulated to inhibit the pro-inflammatory phenotype of microglial cells, while alterations in CD200-CD200R1 signalling potentiate this phenotype. Little is known about the regulation of CD200R1 expression in microglia or possible alterations in the presence of pro-inflammatory stimuli. Methods Murine primary microglial cultures, mixed glial cultures from wild-type and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein β (C/EBPβ-deficient mice, and the BV2 murine cell line overexpressing C/EBPβ were used to study the involvement of C/EBPβ transcription factor in the regulation of CD200R1 expression in response to a proinflammatory stimulus (lipopolysaccharide (LPS. Binding of C/EBPβ to the CD200R1 promoter was determined by quantitative chromatin immunoprecipitation (qChIP. The involvement of histone deacetylase 1 in the control of CD200R1 expression by C/EBPβ was also determined by co-immunoprecipitation and qChIP. Results LPS treatment induced a decrease in CD200R1 mRNA and protein expression in microglial cells, an effect that was not observed in the absence of C/EBPβ. C/EBPβ overexpression in BV2 cells resulted in a decrease in basal CD200R1 mRNA and protein expression. In addition, C/EBPβ binding to the CD200R1 promoter was observed in LPS-treated but not in control glial cells, and also in control BV2 cells overexpressing C/EBPβ. Finally, we observed that histone deacetylase 1 co-immunoprecipitated with C/EBPβ and showed binding to a C/EBPβ consensus sequence of the CD

  14. A novel combination treatment of armed oncolytic adenovirus expressing IL-12 and GM-CSF with radiotherapy in murine hepatocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Wonwoo; Seong, Jinsil; Oh, Hae-Jin; Koom, Woong-Sub; Choi, Kyung-Joo; Yun, Chae-Ok

    2011-01-01

    In this study, a novel combination treatment of armed oncolytic adenovirus expressing interleukin 12 (IL-12) and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) with radiation was investigated for antitumor and antimetastatic effect in a murine hepatic cancer (HCa-I) model. Tumor bearing syngeneic mice were treated with radiation, armed oncolytic virus Ad-ΔE1Bmt7 (dB7) expressing both IL-12 and GM-CSF (armed dB7), or a combination of both. The adenovirus was administered by intratumoral injection 1 x 10 8 plaque forming units (PFU) per tumor in 50 μl of phosphate buffered saline (PBS) four times every other day. Tumor response to treatment was determined by a tumor growth delay assay. Metastatic potential was evaluated by a lung metastasis model. To understand the underlying mechanism, the level of apoptosis was examined as well as the change in microvessel density and expression of immunological markers: CD4+, CD8+ and Cd11c. The combination of armed dB7 and radiation resulted in significant growth delay of murine hepatic cancer, HCa-1, with an enhancement factor of 4.3. The combination treatment also resulted in significant suppression of lung metastasis. Increase of apoptosis level as well as decrease of microvessel density was shown in the combination treatment, suggesting an underlying mechanism for the enhancement of antitumor effect. Expression of immunological markers: CD4+, CD8+ and Cd11c also increased in the combination treatment. This study showed that a novel combination treatment of radiotherapy with armed oncolytic adenovirus expressing IL-12 and GM-CSF was effective in suppressing primary tumor growth. (author)

  15. An age-related numerical and functional deficit in CD19(+) CD24(hi) CD38(hi) B cells is associated with an increase in systemic autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duggal, Niharika A; Upton, Jane; Phillips, Anna C; Sapey, Elizabeth; Lord, Janet M

    2013-10-01

    Autoimmunity increases with aging indicative of reduced immune tolerance, but the mechanisms involved are poorly defined. In recent years, subsets of B cells with immunoregulatory properties have been identified in murine models of autoimmune disorders, and these cells downregulate immune responses via secretion of IL10. In humans, immature transitional B cells with a CD19(+) CD24(hi) CD38(hi) phenotype have been reported to regulate immune responses via IL10 production. We found the frequency and numbers of CD19(+) CD24(hi) CD38(hi) cells were reduced in the PBMC pool with age. IL10 expression and secretion following activation via either CD40, or Toll-like receptors was also impaired in CD19(+) CD24(hi) CD38(hi) B cells from healthy older donors. When investigating the mechanisms involved, we found that CD19(+) CD24(hi) CD38(hi) B-cell function was compromised by age-related effects on both T cells and B cells: specifically, CD40 ligand expression was lower in CD4 T cells from older donors following CD3 stimulation, and signalling through CD40 was impaired in CD19(+) CD24(hi) CD38(hi) B cells from elders as evidenced by reduced phosphorylation (Y705) and activation of STAT3. However, there was no age-associated change in expression of costimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86 on CD19(+) CD24(hi) CD38(hi) cells, suggesting IL10-dependent immune suppression is impaired, but contact-dependent suppressive capacity is intact with age. Finally, we found a negative correlation between CD19(+) CD24(hi) CD38(hi) B-cell IL10 production and autoantibody (Rheumatoid factor) levels in older adults. We therefore propose that an age-related decline in CD19(+) CD24(hi) CD38(hi) B cell number and function may contribute towards the increased autoimmunity and reduced immune tolerance seen with aging. © 2013 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Sequence-specific interaction between the disintegrin domain of mouse ADAM 3 and murine eggs: role of beta1 integrin-associated proteins CD9, CD81, and CD98.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Y; Bigler, D; Ito, Y; White, J M

    2001-04-01

    ADAM 3 is a sperm surface glycoprotein that has been implicated in sperm-egg adhesion. Because little is known about the adhesive activity of ADAMs, we investigated the interaction of ADAM 3 disintegrin domains, made in bacteria and in insect cells, with murine eggs. Both recombinant proteins inhibited sperm-egg binding and fusion with potencies similar to that which we recently reported for the ADAM 2 disintegrin domain. Alanine scanning mutagenesis revealed a critical importance for the glutamine at position 7 of the disintegrin loop. Fluorescent beads coated with the ADAM 3 disintegrin domain bound to the egg surface. Bead binding was inhibited by an authentic, but not by a scrambled, peptide analog of the disintegrin loop. Bead binding was also inhibited by the function-blocking anti-alpha6 monoclonal antibody (mAb) GoH3, but not by a nonfunction blocking anti-alpha6 mAb, or by mAbs against either the alphav or beta3 integrin subunits. We also present evidence that in addition to the tetraspanin CD9, two other beta1-integrin-associated proteins, the tetraspanin CD81 as well as the single pass transmembrane protein CD98 are expressed on murine eggs. Antibodies to CD9 and CD98 inhibited in vitro fertilization and binding of the ADAM 3 disintegrin domain. Our findings are discussed in terms of the involvement of multiple sperm ADAMs and multiple egg beta1 integrin-associated proteins in sperm-egg binding and fusion. We propose that an egg surface "tetraspan web" facilitates fertilization and that it may do so by fostering ADAM-integrin interactions.

  17. Sequence-Specific Interaction between the Disintegrin Domain of Mouse ADAM 3 and Murine Eggs: Role of β1 Integrin-associated Proteins CD9, CD81, and CD98

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Yuji; Bigler, Dora; Ito, Yasuhiko; White, Judith M.

    2001-01-01

    ADAM 3 is a sperm surface glycoprotein that has been implicated in sperm-egg adhesion. Because little is known about the adhesive activity of ADAMs, we investigated the interaction of ADAM 3 disintegrin domains, made in bacteria and in insect cells, with murine eggs. Both recombinant proteins inhibited sperm-egg binding and fusion with potencies similar to that which we recently reported for the ADAM 2 disintegrin domain. Alanine scanning mutagenesis revealed a critical importance for the glutamine at position 7 of the disintegrin loop. Fluorescent beads coated with the ADAM 3 disintegrin domain bound to the egg surface. Bead binding was inhibited by an authentic, but not by a scrambled, peptide analog of the disintegrin loop. Bead binding was also inhibited by the function-blocking anti-α6 monoclonal antibody (mAb) GoH3, but not by a nonfunction blocking anti-α6 mAb, or by mAbs against either the αv or β3 integrin subunits. We also present evidence that in addition to the tetraspanin CD9, two other β1-integrin-associated proteins, the tetraspanin CD81 as well as the single pass transmembrane protein CD98 are expressed on murine eggs. Antibodies to CD9 and CD98 inhibited in vitro fertilization and binding of the ADAM 3 disintegrin domain. Our findings are discussed in terms of the involvement of multiple sperm ADAMs and multiple egg β1 integrin-associated proteins in sperm-egg binding and fusion. We propose that an egg surface “tetraspan web” facilitates fertilization and that it may do so by fostering ADAM–integrin interactions. PMID:11294888

  18. [Regulatory B cells activated by CpG-ODN combined with anti-CD40 monoclonal antibody inhibit CD4(+)T cell proliferation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Keng; Tao, Lei; Su, Jianbing; Zhang, Yueyang; Zou, Binhua; Wang, Yiyuan; Li, Xiaojuan

    2016-09-01

    Objective To observe the immunosuppressive function of regulatory B cells (Bregs) in vitro after activated by CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (CpG-ODN) and anti-CD40 mAb. Methods Mice splenic CD5(+)CD1d(high)B cells and CD5(-)CD1d(low)B cells were sorted by flow cytometry. These B cells were first stimulated with CpG-ODN combined with anti-CD40 mAb for 24 hours, and then co-cultured with purified CD4(+)T cells. The interleukin 10 (IL-10) expression in the activated Bregs and other B cell subset, as well as the proliferation and interferon γ (IFN-γ) expression in the CD4(+) T cells activated by anti-CD3 mAb plus anti-CD28 mAb were determined by flow cytometry. Results CD5(+)CD1d(high) B cells activated by CpG-ODN plus anti-CD40 mAb blocked the up-regulated CD4(+)T proliferation and significantly reduced the IFN-γ level. At the same time, activated CD5(-)CD1d(low)B cells showed no inhibitory effect on CD4(+)T cells. Further study revealed that IL-10 expression in the CD5(+)CD1d(high) B cells were much higher than that in the CD5(-)CD1d(low)B cells after stimulated with CpG-ODN combined with anti-CD40 mAb for 24 hours. Conclusion CD5(+)CD1d(high) B cells activated by CpG-ODN combined with anti-CD40 mAb have immune inhibitory effects on CD4(+)T cell activation in vitro , which possibly due to IL-10 secretion.

  19. CD40 dependent exacerbation of immune mediated hepatitis by hepatic CD11b+ Gr-1+ myeloid derived suppressor cells in tumor bearing mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapanadze, Tamar; Medina-Echeverz, José; Gamrekelashvili, Jaba; Weiss, Jonathan M.; Wiltrout, Robert H.; Kapoor, Veena; Hawk, Nga; Terabe, Masaki; Berzofsky, Jay A.; Manns, Michael P.; Wang, Ena; Marincola, Francesco M.; Korangy, Firouzeh; Greten, Tim F.

    2015-01-01

    Immunosuppressive CD11b+Gr-1+ myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) accumulate in the livers of tumor-bearing mice. We studied hepatic MDSC in two murine models of immune mediated hepatitis. Unexpectedly, treatment of tumor bearing mice with Concanavalin A or α-Galactosylceramide resulted in increased ALT and AST serum levels in comparison to tumor free mice. Adoptive transfer of hepatic MDSC into naïve mice exacerbated Concanavalin A induced liver damage. Hepatic CD11b+Gr-1+ cells revealed a polarized pro-inflammatory gene signature after Concanavalin A treatment. An interferon gamma- dependent up-regulation of CD40 on hepatic CD11b+Gr-1+ cells along with an up-regulation of CD80, CD86, and CD1d after Concanavalin A treatment was observed. Concanavalin A treatment resulted in a loss of suppressor function by tumor-induced CD11b+Gr-1+ MDSC as well as enhanced reactive oxygen species-mediated hepatotoxicity. CD40 knockdown in hepatic MDSC led to increased arginase activity upon Concanavalin A treatment and lower ALT/AST serum levels. Finally, blockade of arginase activity in Cd40−/− tumor-induced myeloid cells resulted in exacerbation of hepatitis and increased reactive oxygen species production in vivo. Our findings indicate that in a setting of acute hepatitis, tumor-induced hepatic MDSC act as pro-inflammatory immune effector cells capable of killing hepatocytes in a CD40-dependent manner. PMID:25616156

  20. Phenotyping and Target Expression Profiling of CD34+/CD38− and CD34+/CD38+ Stem- and Progenitor cells in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina Blatt

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Leukemic stem cells (LSCs are an emerging target of curative anti-leukemia therapy. In acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL, LSCs frequently express CD34 and often lack CD38. However, little is known about markers and targets expressed in ALL LSCs. We have examined marker- and target expression profiles in CD34+/CD38− LSCs in patients with Ph+ ALL (n = 22 and Ph− ALL (n = 27 by multi-color flow cytometry and qPCR. ALL LSCs expressed CD19 (B4, CD44 (Pgp-1, CD123 (IL-3RA, and CD184 (CXCR4 in all patients tested. Moreover, in various subgroups of patients, LSCs also displayed CD20 (MS4A1 (10/41 = 24%, CD22 (12/20 = 60%, CD33 (Siglec-3 (20/48 = 42%, CD52 (CAMPATH-1 (17/40 = 43%, IL-1RAP (13/29 = 45%, and/or CD135 (FLT3 (4/20 = 20%. CD25 (IL-2RA and CD26 (DPPIV were expressed on LSCs in Ph+ ALL exhibiting BCR/ABL1p210, whereas in Ph+ ALL with BCR/ABL1p190, LSCs variably expressed CD25 but did not express CD26. In Ph− ALL, CD34+/CD38− LSCs expressed IL-1RAP in 6/18 patients (33%, but did not express CD25 or CD26. Normal stem cells stained negative for CD25, CD26 and IL-1RAP, and expressed only low amounts of CD52. In xenotransplantation experiments, CD34+/CD38− and CD34+/CD38+ cells engrafted NSG mice after 12–20 weeks, and targeting with antibodies against CD33 and CD52 resulted in reduced engraftment. Together, LSCs in Ph+ and Ph− ALL display unique marker- and target expression profiles. In Ph+ ALL with BCR/ABL1p210, the LSC-phenotype closely resembles the marker-profile of CD34+/CD38− LSCs in chronic myeloid leukemia, confirming the close biologic relationship of these neoplasms. Targeting of LSCs with specific antibodies or related immunotherapies may facilitate LSC eradication in ALL.

  1. Heterogeneity of functional properties of Clone 66 murine breast cancer cells expressing various stem cell phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Farrell, Tracy; Sharma, Gayatri; McGuire, Timothy R; O'Kane, Barbara; Sharp, J Graham

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer grows, metastasizes and relapses from rare, therapy resistant cells with a stem cell phenotype (cancer stem cells/CSCs). However, there is a lack of studies comparing the functions of CSCs isolated using different phenotypes in order to determine if CSCs are homogeneous or heterogeneous. Cells with various stem cell phenotypes were isolated by sorting from Clone 66 murine breast cancer cells that grow orthotopically in immune intact syngeneic mice. These populations were compared by in vitro functional assays for proliferation, growth, sphere and colony formation; and in vivo limiting dilution analysis of tumorigenesis. The proportion of cells expressing CD44(high)CD24(low/neg), side population (SP) cells, ALDH1(+), CD49f(high), CD133(high), and CD34(high) differed, suggesting heterogeneity. Differences in frequency and size of tumor spheres from these populations were observed. Higher rates of proliferation of non-SP, ALDH1(+), CD34(low), and CD49f(high) suggested properties of transit amplifying cells. Colony formation was higher from ALDH1(-) and non-SP cells than ALDH1(+) and SP cells suggesting a progenitor phenotype. The frequency of clonal colonies that grew in agar varied and was differentially altered by the presence of Matrigel™. In vivo, fewer cells with a stem cell phenotype were needed for tumor formation than "non-stem" cells. Fewer SP cells were needed to form tumors than ALDH1(+) cells suggesting further heterogeneities of cells with stem phenotypes. Different levels of cytokines/chemokines were produced by Clone 66 with RANTES being the highest. Whether the heterogeneity reflects soluble factor production remains to be determined. These data demonstrate that Clone 66 murine breast cancer cells that express stem cell phenotypes are heterogeneous and exhibit different functional properties, and this may also be the case for human breast cancer stem cells.

  2. Cytomegalovirus vector expressing RAE-1γ induces enhanced anti-tumor capacity of murine CD8+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tršan, Tihana; Vuković, Kristina; Filipović, Petra; Brizić, Ana Lesac; Lemmermann, Niels A W; Schober, Kilian; Busch, Dirk H; Britt, William J; Messerle, Martin; Krmpotić, Astrid; Jonjić, Stipan

    2017-08-01

    Designing CD8 + T-cell vaccines, which would provide protection against tumors is still considered a great challenge in immunotherapy. Here we show the robust potential of cytomegalovirus (CMV) vector expressing the NKG2D ligand RAE-1γ as CD8 + T cell-based vaccine against malignant tumors. Immunization with the CMV vector expressing RAE-1γ, delayed tumor growth or even provided complete protection against tumor challenge in both prophylactic and therapeutic settings. Moreover, a potent tumor control in mice vaccinated with this vector can be further enhanced by blocking the immune checkpoints TIGIT and PD-1. CMV vector expressing RAE-1γ potentiated expansion of KLRG1 + CD8 + T cells with enhanced effector properties. This vaccination was even more efficient in neonatal mice, resulting in the expansion and long-term maintenance of epitope-specific CD8 + T cells conferring robust resistance against tumor challenge. Our data show that immunomodulation of CD8 + T-cell responses promoted by herpesvirus expressing a ligand for NKG2D receptor can provide a powerful platform for the prevention and treatment of CD8 + T-cell sensitive tumors. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. The multi-functionality of CD40L and its receptor CD40 in atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lievens, Dirk; Eijgelaar, Wouter J.; Biessen, Erik A. L.; Daemen, Mat J. A. P.; Lutgens, Esther

    2009-01-01

    Disrupting the CD40-CD40L co-stimulatory pathway reduces atherosclerosis and induces a stable atherosclerotic plaque phenotype that is low in inflammation and high in fibrosis. Therefore, inhibition of the CD40-CD40L pathway is an attractive therapeutic target to reduce clinical complications of

  4. Cysteine protease antigens cleave CD123, the α subunit of murine IL-3 receptor, on basophils and suppress IL-3-mediated basophil expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishikado, Hideto; Fujimura, Tsutomu; Taka, Hikari; Mineki, Reiko; Ogawa, Hideoki; Okumura, Ko; Takai, Toshiro

    2015-01-01

    Th2 type immune responses are essential for protective immunity against parasites and play crucial roles in allergic disorders. Helminth parasites secrete a variety of proteases for their infectious cycles including for host entry, tissue migration, and suppression of host immune effector cell function. Furthermore, a number of pathogen-derived antigens, as well as allergens such as papain, belong to the family of cysteine proteases. Although the link between protease activity and Th2 type immunity is well documented, the mechanisms by which proteases regulate host immune responses are largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that the cysteine proteases papain and bromelain selectively cleave the α subunit of the IL-3 receptor (IL-3Rα/CD123) on the surface of murine basophils. The decrease in CD123 expression on the cell surface, and the degradation of the extracellular domain of recombinant CD123 were dependent on the protease activity of papain and bromelain. Pre-treatment of murine basophils with papain resulted in inhibition of IL-3-IL-3R signaling and suppressed IL-3- but not thymic stromal lymphopoietin-induced expansion of basophils in vitro. Our unexpected findings illuminate a novel mechanism for the regulation of basophil functions by protease antigens. Because IL-3 plays pivotal roles in the activation and proliferation of basophils and in protective immunity against helminth parasites, pathogen-derived proteases might contribute to the pathogenesis of infections by regulating IL-3-mediated functions in basophils. - Highlights: • We identified the murine IL3R as a novel target of papain-family cysteine proteases. • Papain-family cysteine proteases cleaved IL3Rα/CD123 on murine basophils. • Papain suppressed IL3- but not TSLP-induced expansion of murine basophils. • The inactivation of IL3R might be a strategy for pathogens to suppress host immunity

  5. Cysteine protease antigens cleave CD123, the α subunit of murine IL-3 receptor, on basophils and suppress IL-3-mediated basophil expansion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishikado, Hideto [Atopy (Allergy) Research Center, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Fujimura, Tsutomu; Taka, Hikari; Mineki, Reiko [Laboratory of Proteomics and Biomolecular Science, BioMedical Research Center, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Ogawa, Hideoki; Okumura, Ko [Atopy (Allergy) Research Center, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Takai, Toshiro, E-mail: t-takai@juntendo.ac.jp [Atopy (Allergy) Research Center, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan)

    2015-05-01

    Th2 type immune responses are essential for protective immunity against parasites and play crucial roles in allergic disorders. Helminth parasites secrete a variety of proteases for their infectious cycles including for host entry, tissue migration, and suppression of host immune effector cell function. Furthermore, a number of pathogen-derived antigens, as well as allergens such as papain, belong to the family of cysteine proteases. Although the link between protease activity and Th2 type immunity is well documented, the mechanisms by which proteases regulate host immune responses are largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that the cysteine proteases papain and bromelain selectively cleave the α subunit of the IL-3 receptor (IL-3Rα/CD123) on the surface of murine basophils. The decrease in CD123 expression on the cell surface, and the degradation of the extracellular domain of recombinant CD123 were dependent on the protease activity of papain and bromelain. Pre-treatment of murine basophils with papain resulted in inhibition of IL-3-IL-3R signaling and suppressed IL-3- but not thymic stromal lymphopoietin-induced expansion of basophils in vitro. Our unexpected findings illuminate a novel mechanism for the regulation of basophil functions by protease antigens. Because IL-3 plays pivotal roles in the activation and proliferation of basophils and in protective immunity against helminth parasites, pathogen-derived proteases might contribute to the pathogenesis of infections by regulating IL-3-mediated functions in basophils. - Highlights: • We identified the murine IL3R as a novel target of papain-family cysteine proteases. • Papain-family cysteine proteases cleaved IL3Rα/CD123 on murine basophils. • Papain suppressed IL3- but not TSLP-induced expansion of murine basophils. • The inactivation of IL3R might be a strategy for pathogens to suppress host immunity.

  6. Highly efficient gene transfer using a retroviral vector into murine T cells for preclinical chimeric antigen receptor-expressing T cell therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusabuka, Hotaka; Fujiwara, Kento; Tokunaga, Yusuke; Hirobe, Sachiko; Nakagawa, Shinsaku; Okada, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy using chimeric antigen receptor-expressing T (CAR-T) cells has attracted attention as an efficacious strategy for cancer treatment. To prove the efficacy and safety of CAR-T cell therapy, the elucidation of immunological mechanisms underlying it in mice is required. Although a retroviral vector (Rv) is mainly used for the introduction of CAR to murine T cells, gene transduction efficiency is generally less than 50%. The low transduction efficiency causes poor precision in the functional analysis of CAR-T cells. We attempted to improve the Rv gene transduction protocol to more efficiently generate functional CAR-T cells by optimizing the period of pre-cultivation and antibody stimulation. In the improved protocol, gene transduction efficiency to murine T cells was more than 90%. In addition, almost all of the prepared murine T cells expressed CAR after puromycin selection. These CAR-T cells had antigen-specific cytotoxic activity and secreted multiple cytokines by antigen stimulation. We believe that our optimized gene transduction protocol for murine T cells contributes to the advancement of T cell biology and development of immunotherapy using genetically engineered T cells. - Highlights: • We established highly efficient gene transduction protocols for murine T cells. • CD8"+ CAR-T cells had antigen-specific cytotoxic activity. • CD4"+ CAR-T cells secreted multiple cytokines by antigen stimulation. • This finding can contribute to the development of T-cell biology and immunotherapy.

  7. Highly efficient gene transfer using a retroviral vector into murine T cells for preclinical chimeric antigen receptor-expressing T cell therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusabuka, Hotaka; Fujiwara, Kento; Tokunaga, Yusuke; Hirobe, Sachiko; Nakagawa, Shinsaku, E-mail: nakagawa@phs.osaka-u.ac.jp; Okada, Naoki, E-mail: okada@phs.osaka-u.ac.jp

    2016-04-22

    Adoptive immunotherapy using chimeric antigen receptor-expressing T (CAR-T) cells has attracted attention as an efficacious strategy for cancer treatment. To prove the efficacy and safety of CAR-T cell therapy, the elucidation of immunological mechanisms underlying it in mice is required. Although a retroviral vector (Rv) is mainly used for the introduction of CAR to murine T cells, gene transduction efficiency is generally less than 50%. The low transduction efficiency causes poor precision in the functional analysis of CAR-T cells. We attempted to improve the Rv gene transduction protocol to more efficiently generate functional CAR-T cells by optimizing the period of pre-cultivation and antibody stimulation. In the improved protocol, gene transduction efficiency to murine T cells was more than 90%. In addition, almost all of the prepared murine T cells expressed CAR after puromycin selection. These CAR-T cells had antigen-specific cytotoxic activity and secreted multiple cytokines by antigen stimulation. We believe that our optimized gene transduction protocol for murine T cells contributes to the advancement of T cell biology and development of immunotherapy using genetically engineered T cells. - Highlights: • We established highly efficient gene transduction protocols for murine T cells. • CD8{sup +} CAR-T cells had antigen-specific cytotoxic activity. • CD4{sup +} CAR-T cells secreted multiple cytokines by antigen stimulation. • This finding can contribute to the development of T-cell biology and immunotherapy.

  8. CD40 in Retinal Müller Cells Induces P2X7-Dependent Cytokine Expression in Macrophages/Microglia in Diabetic Mice and Development of Early Experimental Diabetic Retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portillo, Jose-Andres C; Lopez Corcino, Yalitza; Miao, Yanling; Tang, Jie; Sheibani, Nader; Kern, Timothy S; Dubyak, George R; Subauste, Carlos S

    2017-02-01

    Müller cells and macrophages/microglia are likely important for the development of diabetic retinopathy; however, the interplay between these cells in this disease is not well understood. An inflammatory process is linked to the onset of experimental diabetic retinopathy. CD40 deficiency impairs this process and prevents diabetic retinopathy. Using mice with CD40 expression restricted to Müller cells, we identified a mechanism by which Müller cells trigger proinflammatory cytokine expression in myeloid cells. During diabetes, mice with CD40 expressed in Müller cells upregulated retinal tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin 1β (IL-1β), intracellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), and nitric oxide synthase (NOS2), developed leukostasis and capillary degeneration. However, CD40 did not cause TNF-α or IL-1β secretion in Müller cells. TNF-α was not detected in Müller cells from diabetic mice with CD40 + Müller cells. Rather, TNF-α was upregulated in macrophages/microglia. CD40 ligation in Müller cells triggered phospholipase C-dependent ATP release that caused P2X 7 -dependent production of TNF-α and IL-1β by macrophages. P2X 7 -/- mice and mice treated with a P2X 7 inhibitor were protected from diabetes-induced TNF-α, IL-1β, ICAM-1, and NOS2 upregulation. Our studies indicate that CD40 in Müller cells is sufficient to upregulate retinal inflammatory markers and appears to promote experimental diabetic retinopathy and that Müller cells orchestrate inflammatory responses in myeloid cells through a CD40-ATP-P2X 7 pathway. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  9. Human CD40 ligand-expressing type 3 innate lymphoid cells induce IL-10-producing immature transitional regulatory B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komlósi, Zsolt I; Kovács, Nóra; van de Veen, Willem; Kirsch, Anna Isabella; Fahrner, Heinz Benedikt; Wawrzyniak, Marcin; Rebane, Ana; Stanic, Barbara; Palomares, Oscar; Rückert, Beate; Menz, Günter; Akdis, Mübeccel; Losonczy, György; Akdis, Cezmi A

    2017-09-20

    Type 3 innate lymphoid cells (ILC3s) are involved in maintenance of mucosal homeostasis; however, their role in immunoregulation has been unknown. Immature transitional regulatory B (itBreg) cells are innate-like B cells with immunosuppressive properties, and the in vivo mechanisms by which they are induced have not been fully clarified. We aimed to investigate the ILC3-B-cell interaction that probably takes place in human tonsils. ILC3s were isolated from peripheral blood and palatine tonsils, expanded, and cocultured with naive B cells. Tonsillar ILC3s and regulatory B cells were visualized with immunofluorescence histology. ILC3 frequencies were measured in tonsil tissue of allergic and nonallergic patients and in peripheral blood of allergic asthmatic patients and healthy control subjects. A mutually beneficial relationship was revealed between ILC3s and B cells: ILC3s induced IL-15 production in B cells through B cell-activating factor receptor, whereas IL-15, a potent growth factor for ILC3s, induced CD40 ligand (CD40L) expression on circulating and tonsillar ILC3s. IL-15-activated CD40L + ILC3s helped B-cell survival, proliferation, and differentiation of IL-10-secreting, PD-L1-expressing functional itBreg cells in a CD40L- and B cell-activating factor receptor-dependent manner. ILC3s and regulatory B cells were in close connection with each other in palatine tonsils. ILC3 frequency was reduced in tonsil tissue of allergic patients and in peripheral blood of allergic asthmatic patients. Human CD40L + ILC3s provide innate B-cell help and are involved in an innate immunoregulatory mechanism through induction of itBreg cell differentiation, which takes place in palatine tonsils in vivo. This mechanism, which can contribute to maintenance of immune tolerance, becomes insufficient in allergic diseases. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Forming a complex with MHC class I molecules interferes with mouse CD1d functional expression.

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    Renukaradhya J Gourapura

    Full Text Available CD1d molecules are structurally similar to MHC class I, but present lipid antigens as opposed to peptides. Here, we show that MHC class I molecules physically associate with (and regulate the functional expression of mouse CD1d on the surface of cells. Low pH (3.0 acid stripping of MHC class I molecules resulted in increased surface expression of murine CD1d on antigen presenting cells as well as augmented CD1d-mediated antigen presentation to NKT cells. Consistent with the above results, TAP1-/- mice were found to have a higher percentage of type I NKT cells as compared to wild type mice. Moreover, bone marrow-derived dendritic cells from TAP1-/- mice showed increased antigen presentation by CD1d compared to wild type mice. Together, these results suggest that MHC class I molecules can regulate NKT cell function, in part, by masking CD1d.

  11. Structural Basis for Species Selectivity in the HIV-1 gp120-CD4 Interaction: Restoring Affinity to gp120 in Murine CD4 Mimetic Peptides

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    Kristin Kassler

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The first step of HIV-1 infection involves interaction between the viral glycoprotein gp120 and the human cellular receptor CD4. Inhibition of the gp120-CD4 interaction represents an attractive strategy to block HIV-1 infection. In an attempt to explore the known lack of affinity of murine CD4 to gp120, we have investigated peptides presenting the putative gp120-binding site of murine CD4 (mCD4. Molecular modeling indicates that mCD4 protein cannot bind gp120 due to steric clashes, while the larger conformational flexibility of mCD4 peptides allows an interaction. This finding is confirmed by experimental binding assays, which also evidenced specificity of the peptide-gp120 interaction. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the mCD4-peptide stably interacts with gp120 via an intermolecular β-sheet, while an important salt-bridge formed by a C-terminal lysine is lost. Fixation of the C-terminus by introducing a disulfide bridge between the N- and C-termini of the peptide significantly enhanced the affinity to gp120.

  12. Specific blockade by CD54 and MHC II of CD40-mediated signaling for B cell proliferation and survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doyle, I S; Hollmann, C A; Crispe, I N

    2001-01-01

    Regulation of B lymphocyte proliferation is critical to maintenance of self-tolerance, and intercellular interactions are likely to signal such regulation. Here, we show that coligation of either the adhesion molecule ICAM-1/CD54 or MHC II with CD40 inhibited cell cycle progression and promoted...... these effects. Addition of BCR or IL-4 signals did not overcome the effect of ICAM-1 or MHC II on CD40-induced proliferation. FasL expression was not detected in B cell populations. These results show that MHC II and ICAM-1 specifically modulate CD40-mediated signaling, so inhibiting proliferation...

  13. Angiogenesis gene expression in murine endothelial cells during post-pneumonectomy lung growth

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    Konerding Moritz A

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Although blood vessel growth occurs readily in the systemic bronchial circulation, angiogenesis in the pulmonary circulation is rare. Compensatory lung growth after pneumonectomy is an experimental model with presumed alveolar capillary angiogenesis. To investigate the genes participating in murine neoalveolarization, we studied the expression of angiogenesis genes in lung endothelial cells. After left pneumonectomy, the remaining right lung was examined on days 3, 6, 14 and 21days after surgery and compared to both no surgery and sham thoracotomy controls. The lungs were enzymatically digested and CD31+ endothelial cells were isolated using flow cytometry cell sorting. The transcriptional profile of the CD31+ endothelial cells was assessed using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR arrays. Focusing on 84 angiogenesis-associated genes, we identified 22 genes with greater than 4-fold regulation and significantly enhanced transcription (p

  14. CD56 Expression in Odontogenic Cysts and Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaafari-Ashkavandi, Zohreh; Dehghani-Nazhvani, Ali; Razmjouyi, Faranak

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. Odontogenic cysts and tumors have a wide spectrum of clinical characteristics that lead to the different management strategies. Since definite diagnosis is difficult in some cases, it has been suggested that CD56 may be a candidate marker for definitive diagnosis of some odontogenic tumors. The present study was designed to examine CD56 expression in lesions with histopathological similarities. Materials and methods. In this cross-sectional, analytical study the subjects were 22 ameloblastomas, 13 dentigerous cysts, 10 keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOT), 4 adenomatoid odontogenic tumors (AOT), 3 orthokeratinized odonto-genic cysts, 3 calcifying odontogenic cysts (COC) and one glandular odontogenic cyst (GOC). All the samples were examined for CD56 immunoreactivity. Data were analyzed using chi-square test. Results. Twenty cases (91%) of ameloblastomas, 3 (75%) AOT, 4 (40%) KCOT and one case of GOC were positive for CD56. None of the dentigerous cysts, COC and orthokeratinized odontogenic cysts was CD56-positive. There was a significant difference in the CD56 expression between ameloblastoma and dentigerous cyst, as well as COC. Also, KCOT showed significantly higher expression than orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst. Conclusion. In this study CD56 expression was limited to the odontogenic tumors and more aggressive cystic lesions. This marker can be a useful aid for distinguishing cysts and tumors from similar lesions.

  15. Evaluation of CD40 and CD80 receptors in the colonic mucosal membrane of children with inflammatory bowel disease

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    Barbara Kamińska

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available [b][/b][b]Introduction. [/b]The most prevalent inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD include ulcerative colitis (UC and Crohn’s disease (CD. Immune processes play a vital role in the etiopathogenesis of these conditions, involving both cellular and humoral response mechanisms. The aim of this study was to quantify CD40- and CD80-positive cells in the biopsy specimens of large intestinal mucosa from children with IBD. [b]Materials and method. [/b]The study comprised 38 children aged between 3–17 years (mean 11.5±3.7 years – 20 boys (52.6 % and 18 girls (47.4%. Eighteen patients were diagnosed with UC on the basis of clinical manifestation, endoscopic and histopathological findings. Mean age of this subgroup was 11.55±4.07 years. A group of 10 children (mean age 12.30±2.83 diagnosed with CD was also included. The control group comprised 10 IBD-free children (mean age 10.28±4.07 years. The surface expressions of CD40 and CD80 were analyzed in large intestine mucosa biopsy specimens, fixed in formaldehyde, embedded in paraffin, and cut with a microtome into 4 µm slices. [b]Results. [/b]The number of CD40- and CD80-positive cells in the large intestinal mucosa of children with Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis was significantly higher than in the controls. The highest number of CD40+ and CD80+ cells was observed in the caecal mucosal membrane of Crohn’s disease patients and in the rectal mucosa of individuals with ulcerative colitis. [b]Conclusion.[/b] IBD is characterized by elevated, segment-specific, expression of CD40 and CD80.

  16. Human endothelial precursor cells express tumor endothelial marker 1/endosialin/CD248.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagley, Rebecca G; Rouleau, Cecile; St Martin, Thia; Boutin, Paula; Weber, William; Ruzek, Melanie; Honma, Nakayuki; Nacht, Mariana; Shankara, Srinivas; Kataoka, Shiro; Ishida, Isao; Roberts, Bruce L; Teicher, Beverly A

    2008-08-01

    Angiogenesis occurs during normal physiologic processes as well as under pathologic conditions such as tumor growth. Serial analysis of gene expression profiling revealed genes [tumor endothelial markers (TEM)] that are overexpressed in tumor endothelial cells compared with normal adult endothelial cells. Because blood vessel development of malignant tumors under certain conditions may include endothelial precursor cells (EPC) recruited from bone marrow, we investigated TEM expression in EPC. The expression of TEM1 or endosialin (CD248) and other TEM has been discovered in a population of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2+/CD31+/CD45-/VE-cadherin+ EPC derived from human CD133+/CD34+ cells. EPC share some properties with fully differentiated endothelial cells from normal tissue, yet reverse transcription-PCR and flow cytometry reveal that EPC express higher levels of endosialin at the molecular and protein levels. The elevated expression of endosialin in EPC versus mature endothelial cells suggests that endosialin is involved in the earlier stages of tumor angiogenesis. Anti-endosialin antibodies inhibited EPC migration and tube formation in vitro. In vivo, immunohistochemistry indicated that human EPC continued to express endosialin protein in a Matrigel plug angiogenesis assay established in nude mice. Anti-endosialin antibodies delivered systemically at 25 mg/kg were also able to inhibit circulating murine EPC in nude mice bearing s.c. SKNAS tumors. EPC and bone marrow-derived cells have been shown previously to incorporate into malignant blood vessels in some instances, yet they remain controversial in the field. The data presented here on endothelial genes that are up-regulated in tumor vasculature and in EPC support the hypothesis that the angiogenesis process in cancer can involve EPC.

  17. Amelioration of murine passive immune thrombocytopenia by IVIg and a therapeutic monoclonal CD44 antibody does not require the Myd88 signaling pathway.

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    Andrew R Crow

    Full Text Available Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP is an autoimmune bleeding disorder characterized by a low platelet count and the production of anti-platelet antibodies. The majority of ITP patients have antibodies to platelet integrin α(IIbβ₃ (GPIIbIIIa which can direct platelet phagocytosis by macrophages. One effective treatment for patients with ITP is intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg which rapidly reverses thrombocytopenia. The exact mechanism of IVIg action in human patients is unclear, although in mouse models of passive ITP, IVIg can rapidly increase platelet counts in the absence of adaptive immunity. Another antibody therapeutic that can similarly increase platelet counts independent of adaptive immunity are CD44 antibodies. Toll-like receptors (TLRs are pattern recognition receptors which play a central role in helping direct the innate immune system. Dendritic cells, which are notable for their expression of TLRs, have been directly implicated in IVIg function as an initiator cell, while CD44 can associate with TLR2 and TLR4. We therefore questioned whether IVIg, or the therapeutic CD44 antibody KM114, mediate their ameliorative effects in a manner dependent upon normal TLR function. Here, we demonstrate that the TLR4 agonist LPS does not inhibit IVIg or KM114 amelioration of antibody-induced thrombocytopenia, and that these therapeutics do not ameliorate LPS-induced thrombocytopenia. IVIg was able to significantly ameliorate murine ITP in C3H/HeJ mice which have defective TLR4. All known murine TLRs except TLR3 utilize the Myd88 adapter protein to drive TLR signaling. Employing Myd88 deficient mice, we found that both IVIg and KM114 ameliorate murine ITP in Myd88 deficient mice to the same extent as normal mice. Thus both IVIg and anti-CD44 antibody can mediate their ameliorative effects in murine passive ITP independent of the Myd88 signaling pathway. These data help shed light on the mechanism of action of IVIg and KM114 in the amelioration of

  18. Reactive glia promote development of CD103+ CD69+ CD8+ T-cells through programmed cell death-ligand 1 (PD-L1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Sujata; Hu, Shuxian; Sheng, Wen S; Chauhan, Priyanka; Lokensgard, James R

    2018-06-01

    Previous work from our laboratory has demonstrated in vivo persistence of CD103 + CD69 + brain resident memory CD8 + T-cells (bT RM ) following viral infection, and that the PD-1: PD-L1 pathway promotes development of these T RM cells within the brain. Although glial cells express low basal levels of PD-L1, its expression is upregulated upon IFN-γ-treatment, and they have been shown to modulate antiviral T-cell effector responses through the PD-1: PD-L1 pathway. We performed flow cytometric analysis of cells from co-cultures of mixed glia and CD8 + T-cells obtained from wild type mice to investigate the role of glial cells in the development of bT RM . In this study, we show that interactions between reactive glia and anti-CD3 Ab-stimulated CD8 + T-cells promote development of CD103 + CD69 + CD8 + T-cells through engagement of the PD-1: PD-L1 pathway. These studies used co-cultures of primary murine glial cells obtained from WT animals along with CD8 + T-cells obtained from either WT or PD-1 KO mice. We found that αCD3 Ab-stimulated CD8 + T-cells from WT animals increased expression of CD103 and CD69 when co-cultured with primary murine glial cells. In contrast, significantly reduced expression of CD103 and CD69 was observed using CD8 + T-cells from PD-1 KO mice. We also observed that reactive glia promoted high levels of CD127, a marker of memory precursor effector cells (MPEC), on CD69 + CD8 + T-cells, which promotes development of T RM cells. Interestingly, results obtained using T-cells from PD-1 KO animals showed significantly reduced expression of CD127 on CD69 + CD8 + cells. Additionally, blocking of glial PD-L1 resulted in decreased expression of CD103, along with reduced CD127 on CD69 + CD8 + T-cells. Taken together, these results demonstrate a role for activated glia in promoting development of bT RM through the PD-1: PD-L1 pathway. © 2018 The Authors. Immunity, Inflammation and Disease Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. CD4 expression on EL4 cells as an epiphenomenon of retroviral transduction and selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Grant J; Spinoulas, Afroditi; Alexander, Stephen I; Smythe, Jason A; Alexander, Ian E

    2004-04-01

    The EL4 murine tumour cell line, isolated from a chemically induced lymphoma over 50 years ago, has been extensively exploited in immunological research. The conclusions drawn from many of these studies have been based on the presumption that EL4 cells maintain a stable phenotype during experimental manipulation. To the contrary, we have observed 100-fold greater expression of cell surface CD4 (CD4(high)) on a subpopulation of EL4 cells following retroviral transduction and G418 selection when compared with unmodified populations. Although the mechanism responsible for this effect remains to be elucidated, the unexpected expression of CD4, a molecule that functions as both a coreceptor with the T-cell receptor and ligand for the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-16, has the potential to influence experimental outcomes. Upregulation of CD4 should be excluded when EL4 cells are utilized in experiments requiring a consistent immuno-phenotype.

  20. Diminished CD103 (aEb7 Expression on Resident T cells from the Female Genital Tract of HIV-positive women

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    David C. Moylan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background:Tissue resident memory T cells (TrM provide an enhanced response against infection at mucosal surfaces, yet their function has not been extensively studied in humans, including the female genital tract (FGT. Methods: Using polychromatic flow cytometry, we studied TrM cells, defined as CD62L-CCR7-CD103+CD69+ CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in mucosa-derived T cells from healthy and HIV-positive women. Results: We demonstrate that TrM are present in the FGT of healthy and HIV-positive women. The expression of the mucosal retention receptor, CD103, from HIV-positive women was reduced compared to healthy women and was lowest in women with CD4 counts < 500 cells/mm3. Furthermore, CD103 expression on mucosa-derived CD8+ T cells correlated with antigen-specific IFN-γ production by mucosal CD4+ T cells and was inversely correlated with T-bet from CD8+CD103+ mucosa-derived T cells. Conclusions: These data suggest that CD4+ T cells, known to be impaired during HIV-1 infection and necessary for the expression of CD103 in murine models, may play a role in the expression of CD103 on resident T cells from the human FGT.

  1. CD8αα expression marks terminally differentiated human CD8+ T cells expanded in chronic viral infection

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    Lucy Jane Walker

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The T cell co-receptor CD8αβ enhances T cell sensitivity to antigen, however studies indicate CD8αα has the converse effect and acts as a co-repressor. Using a combination of Thymic Leukaemia antigen (TL tetramer, which directly binds CD8αα, anti-CD161 and anti-Vα7.2 antibodies we have been able for the first time to clearly define CD8αα expression on human CD8 T cells subsets. In healthy controls CD8αα is most highly expressed by CD161 bright (CD161++ mucosal associated invariant T (MAIT cells, with CD8αα expression highly restricted to the TCR Vα7.2+ cells of this subset. We also identified CD8αα-expressing populations within the CD161 mid (CD161+ and negative (CD161- non-MAIT CD8 T cell subsets and show TL-tetramer binding to correlate with expression of CD8β at low levels in the context of maintained CDexpression (CD8α+CD8βlow. In addition, we found CD161-CD8α+CD8βlow populations to be significantly expanded in the peripheral blood of HIV-1 and hepatitis B (mean of 47% and 40% of CD161- T cells respectively infected individuals. Such CD8αα expressing T cells are an effector-memory population (CD45RA-, CCR7-, CD62L- that express markers of activation and maturation (HLA-DR+, CD28-, CD27-, CD57+ and are functionally distinct, expressing greater levels of TNF-α and IFN-γ on stimulation and perforin at rest than their CD8α+CD8βhigh counterparts. Antigen-specific T cells in HLA-B*4201+HIV-1 infected patients are found within both the CD161-CD8α+CD8βhigh and CD161-CD8α+CD8βlow populations. Overall we have clearly defined CD8αα expressing human T cell subsets using the TL-tetramer, and have demonstrated CD161-CD8α+CD8βlow populations, highly expanded in disease settings, to co-express CD8αβ and CD8αα. Co-expression of CD8αα on CD8αβ T cells may impact on their overall function in-vivo and contribute to the distinctive phenotype of highly differentiated populations in HBV and HIV-1 infection.

  2. Noncanonical Expression of a Murine Cytomegalovirus Early Protein CD8 T-Cell Epitope as an Immediate Early Epitope Based on Transcription from an Upstream Gene

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    Annette Fink

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Viral CD8 T-cell epitopes, represented by viral peptides bound to major histocompatibility complex class-I (MHC-I glycoproteins, are often identified by “reverse immunology”, a strategy not requiring biochemical and structural knowledge of the actual viral protein from which they are derived by antigen processing. Instead, bioinformatic algorithms predicting the probability of C-terminal cleavage in the proteasome, as well as binding affinity to the presenting MHC-I molecules, are applied to amino acid sequences deduced from predicted open reading frames (ORFs based on the genomic sequence. If the protein corresponding to an antigenic ORF is known, it is usually inferred that the kinetic class of the protein also defines the phase in the viral replicative cycle during which the respective antigenic peptide is presented for recognition by CD8 T cells. We have previously identified a nonapeptide from the predicted ORFm164 of murine cytomegalovirus that is presented by the MHC-I allomorph H-2 Dd and that is immunodominant in BALB/c (H-2d haplotype mice. Surprisingly, although the ORFm164 protein gp36.5 is expressed as an Early (E phase protein, the m164 epitope is presented already during the Immediate Early (IE phase, based on the expression of an upstream mRNA starting within ORFm167 and encompassing ORFm164.

  3. Maturation and upregulation of functions of murine dendritic cells (DCs) under the influence of purified aromatic-turmerone (AR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonggang, Tan; Yiming, Meng; Heying, Zhang; Cheng, Sun; Qiushi, Wang; Xianghong, Yang; Wei, Zheng; Huawei, Zhou; Shan, Fengping

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this work is to evaluate the effects of purified aromatic-turmerone (ar-turmerione, AR) on murine dendritic cells (DCs). These impacts of AR on DCs from bone marrow derived DCs(BMDCs) were assessed with use of conventional scanning electron microscopy (SEM), fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), cytochemistry assay, FITC-dextran, bio-assay and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). We found that AR induced phenotypic maturation as evidenced by increased expression of CD86, CD40, CD83, CD80 and major histocompatibility complex II (MHC II). The functional tests showed the activity of acidic phosphatase (ACP) inside the DCs were downregulated after treatment with AR (which occurs when phagocytosis of DCs were decreased). Finally, we proved that AR increased the production of IL-12 and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α). These data suggested that AR could promote phenotypic and functional maturation of DCs and this adjuvant-like activity may have potential therapeutic value. It is therefore concluded that AR could exert positive modulation on murine DCs.

  4. Porcine, murine and human sialoadhesin (Sn/Siglec-1/CD169): portals for porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus entry into target cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Breedam, Wander; Verbeeck, Mieke; Christiaens, Isaura; Van Gorp, Hanne; Nauwynck, Hans J

    2013-09-01

    Porcine sialoadhesin (pSn; a sialic acid-binding lectin) and porcine CD163 (pCD163) are molecules that facilitate infectious entry of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) into alveolar macrophages. In this study, it was shown that murine Sn (mSn) and human Sn (hSn), like pSn, can promote PRRSV infection of pCD163-expressing cells. Intact sialic acid-binding domains are crucial, since non-sialic acid-binding mutants of pSn, mSn and hSn did not promote infection. Endodomain-deletion mutants of pSn, mSn and hSn promoted PRRSV infection less efficiently, but also showed markedly reduced expression levels, making further research into the potential role of the Sn endodomain in PRRSV receptor activity necessary. These data further complement our knowledge on Sn as an important PRRSV receptor, and suggest - in combination with other published data - that species differences in the main PRRSV entry mediators Sn and CD163 do not account for the strict host species specificity displayed by the virus.

  5. TLR5 signaling enhances the proliferation of human allogeneic CD40-activated B cell induced CD4hiCD25+ regulatory T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping-Lung Chan

    Full Text Available Although diverse functions of different toll-like receptors (TLR on human natural regulatory T cells have been demonstrated recently, the role of TLR-related signals on human induced regulatory T cells remain elusive. Previously our group developed an ex vivo high-efficient system in generating human alloantigen-specific CD4(hiCD25(+ regulatory T cells from naïve CD4(+CD25(- T cells using allogeneic CD40-activated B cells as stimulators. In this study, we investigated the role of TLR5-related signals on the generation and function of these novel CD4(hiCD25(+ regulatory T cells. It was found that induced CD4(hiCD25(+ regulatory T cells expressed an up-regulated level of TLR5 compared to their precursors. The blockade of TLR5 using anti-TLR5 antibodies during the co-culture decreased CD4(hiCD25(+ regulatory T cells proliferation by induction of S phase arrest. The S phase arrest was associated with reduced ERK1/2 phosphorylation. However, TLR5 blockade did not decrease the CTLA-4, GITR and FOXP3 expressions, and the suppressive function of CD4(hiCD25(+ regulatory T cells. In conclusion, we discovered a novel function of TLR5-related signaling in enhancing the proliferation of CD4(hiCD25(+ regulatory T cells by promoting S phase progress but not involved in the suppressive function of human CD40-activated B cell-induced CD4(hiCD25(+ regulatory T cells, suggesting a novel role of TLR5-related signals in the generation of induced regulatory T cells.

  6. CD137 is induced by the CD40 signal on chronic lymphocytic leukemia B cells and transduces the survival signal via NF-κB activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukana Nakaima

    Full Text Available CD137 is a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor family that is expressed on activated T cells. This molecule provides a co-stimulatory signal that enhances the survival, and differentiation of cells, and has a crucial role in the development of CD8 cytotoxic T cells and anti-tumor immunity. Here we report that CD137 expression is also induced on normal or malignant human B cells by CD40 ligation by its ligand CD154. This CD137 induction was more prominent in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL cells than in other types of B cells. CD137 stimulation on B cells by its ligand induced the nuclear translocation of p52 (a non-canonical NF-κB factor. In agreement with this finding, expression of the survival factor BCL-XL was upregulated. Consequently, the CD137 signal augmented the survival of CD154-stimulated CLL B cells in vitro. This unexpected induction of CD137 on B cells by CD40 signal may influence the clinical course of CLL.

  7. The Signaling Role of CD40 Ligand in Platelet Biology and in Platelet Component Transfusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoui, Chaker; Prigent, Antoine; Sut, Caroline; Tariket, Sofiane; Hamzeh-Cognasse, Hind; Pozzetto, Bruno; Richard, Yolande; Cognasse, Fabrice; Laradi, Sandrine; Garraud, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    The CD40 ligand (CD40L) is a transmembrane molecule of crucial interest in cell signaling in innate and adaptive immunity. It is expressed by a variety of cells, but mainly by activated T-lymphocytes and platelets. CD40L may be cleaved into a soluble form (sCD40L) that has a cytokine-like activity. Both forms bind to several receptors, including CD40. This interaction is necessary for the antigen specific immune response. Furthermore, CD40L and sCD40L are involved in inflammation and a panoply of immune related and vascular pathologies. Soluble CD40L is primarily produced by platelets after activation, degranulation and cleavage, which may present a problem for transfusion. Soluble CD40L is involved in adverse transfusion events including transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI). Although platelet storage designed for transfusion occurs in sterile conditions, platelets are activated and release sCD40L without known agonists. Recently, proteomic studies identified signaling pathways activated in platelet concentrates. Soluble CD40L is a good candidate for platelet activation in an auto-amplification loop. In this review, we describe the immunomodulatory role of CD40L in physiological and pathological conditions. We will focus on the main signaling pathways activated by CD40L after binding to its different receptors. PMID:25479079

  8. Flt3 ligand-eGFP-reporter expression characterizes functionally distinct subpopulations of CD150+ long-term repopulating murine hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tornack, Julia; Kawano, Yohei; Garbi, Natalio; Hämmerling, Günter J; Melchers, Fritz; Tsuneto, Motokazu

    2017-09-01

    The pool of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in the bone marrow is a mixture of resting, proliferating, and differentiating cells. Long-term repopulating HSCs (LT-HSC) are routinely enriched as Lin - Sca1 + c-Kit + CD34 - Flt3 - CD150 + CD48 - cells. The Flt3 ligand (Flt3L) and its receptor Flt3 are important regulators of HSC maintenance, expansion and differentiation. Using Flt3L-eGFP reporter mice, we show that endogenous Flt3L-eGFP-reporter RNA expression correlates with eGFP-protein expression. This Flt3L-eGFP-reporter expression distinguishes two LT-HSC populations with differences in gene expressions and reconstituting potential. Thus, Flt3L-eGFP-reporter low cells are identified as predominantly resting HSCs with long-term repopulating capacities. In contrast, Flt3L-eGFP-reporter high cells are in majority proliferating HSCs with only short-term repopulating capacities. Flt3L-eGFP-reporter low cells express hypoxia, autophagy-inducing, and the LT-HSC-associated genes HoxB5 and Fgd5, while Flt3L-eGFP-reporter high HSCs upregulate genes involved in HSC differentiation. Flt3L-eGFP-reporter low cells develop to Flt3L-eGFP-reporter high cells in vitro, although Flt3L-eGFP-reporter high cells remain Flt3L-eGFP-reporter high . CD150 + Flt3L-eGFP-reporter low cells express either endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR) or CD41, while Flt3L-eGFP-reporter high cells do express EPCR but not CD41. Thus, FACS-enrichment of Flt3/ Flt3L-eGFP-reporter negative, Lin - CD150 + CD48 - EPCR + CD41 + HSCs allows a further 5-fold enrichment of functional LT-HSCs. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Soluble CD40 ligand directly alters glomerular permeability and may act as a circulating permeability factor in FSGS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doublier, Sophie; Zennaro, Cristina; Musante, Luca; Spatola, Tiziana; Candiano, Giovanni; Bruschi, Maurizio; Besso, Luca; Cedrino, Massimo; Carraro, Michele; Ghiggeri, Gian Marco; Camussi, Giovanni; Lupia, Enrico

    2017-01-01

    CD40/CD40 ligand (CD40L) dyad, a co-stimulatory bi-molecular complex involved in the adaptive immune response, has also potent pro-inflammatory actions in haematopoietic and non-haematopoietic cells. We describe here a novel role for soluble CD40L (sCD40L) as modifier of glomerular permselectivity directly acting on glomerular epithelial cells (GECs). We found that stimulation of CD40, constitutively expressed on GEC cell membrane, by the sCD40L rapidly induced redistribution and loss of nephrin in GECs, and increased albumin permeability in isolated rat glomeruli. Pre-treatment with inhibitors of CD40-CD40L interaction completely prevented these effects. Furthermore, in vivo injection of sCD40L induced a significant reduction of nephrin and podocin expression in mouse glomeruli, although no significant increase of urine protein/creatinine ratio was observed after in vivo injection. The same effects were induced by plasma factors partially purified from post-transplant plasma exchange eluates of patients with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS), and were blocked by CD40-CD40L inhibitors. Moreover, 17 and 34 kDa sCD40L isoforms were detected in the same plasmapheresis eluates by Western blotting. Finally, the levels of sCD40Lwere significantly increased in serum of children both with steroid-sensitive and steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome (NS), and in adult patients with biopsy-proven FSGS, compared to healthy subjects, but neither in children with congenital NS nor in patients with membranous nephropathy. Our results demonstrate that sCD40L directly modifies nephrin and podocin distribution in GECs. Moreover, they suggest that sCD40L contained in plasmapheresis eluates from FSGS patients with post-transplant recurrence may contribute, presumably cooperating with other mediators, to FSGS pathogenesis by modulating glomerular permeability.

  10. Soluble CD40 ligand directly alters glomerular permeability and may act as a circulating permeability factor in FSGS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Doublier

    Full Text Available CD40/CD40 ligand (CD40L dyad, a co-stimulatory bi-molecular complex involved in the adaptive immune response, has also potent pro-inflammatory actions in haematopoietic and non-haematopoietic cells. We describe here a novel role for soluble CD40L (sCD40L as modifier of glomerular permselectivity directly acting on glomerular epithelial cells (GECs. We found that stimulation of CD40, constitutively expressed on GEC cell membrane, by the sCD40L rapidly induced redistribution and loss of nephrin in GECs, and increased albumin permeability in isolated rat glomeruli. Pre-treatment with inhibitors of CD40-CD40L interaction completely prevented these effects. Furthermore, in vivo injection of sCD40L induced a significant reduction of nephrin and podocin expression in mouse glomeruli, although no significant increase of urine protein/creatinine ratio was observed after in vivo injection. The same effects were induced by plasma factors partially purified from post-transplant plasma exchange eluates of patients with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS, and were blocked by CD40-CD40L inhibitors. Moreover, 17 and 34 kDa sCD40L isoforms were detected in the same plasmapheresis eluates by Western blotting. Finally, the levels of sCD40Lwere significantly increased in serum of children both with steroid-sensitive and steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome (NS, and in adult patients with biopsy-proven FSGS, compared to healthy subjects, but neither in children with congenital NS nor in patients with membranous nephropathy. Our results demonstrate that sCD40L directly modifies nephrin and podocin distribution in GECs. Moreover, they suggest that sCD40L contained in plasmapheresis eluates from FSGS patients with post-transplant recurrence may contribute, presumably cooperating with other mediators, to FSGS pathogenesis by modulating glomerular permeability.

  11. Gut memories do not fade: epigenetic regulation of lasting gut homing receptor expression in CD4+ memory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szilagyi, B A; Triebus, J; Kressler, C; de Almeida, M; Tierling, S; Durek, P; Mardahl, M; Szilagyi, A; Floess, S; Huehn, J; Syrbe, U; Walter, J; Polansky, J K; Hamann, A

    2017-11-01

    The concept of a "topographical memory" in lymphocytes implies a stable expression of homing receptors mediating trafficking of lymphocytes back to the tissue of initial activation. However, a significant plasticity of the gut-homing receptor α 4 β 7 was found in CD8 + T cells, questioning the concept. We now demonstrate that α 4 β 7 expression in murine CD4 + memory T cells is, in contrast, imprinted and remains stable in the absence of the inducing factor retinoic acid (RA) or other stimuli from mucosal environments. Repetitive rounds of RA treatment enhanced the stability of de novo induced α 4 β 7 . A novel enhancer element in the murine Itga4 locus was identified that showed, correlating to stability, selective DNA demethylation in mucosa-seeking memory cells and methylation-dependent transcriptional activity in a reporter gene assay. This implies that epigenetic mechanisms contribute to the stabilization of α 4 β 7 expression. Analogous DNA methylation patterns could be observed in the human ITGA4 locus, suggesting that its epigenetic regulation is conserved between mice and men. These data prove that mucosa-specific homing mediated by α 4 β 7 is imprinted in CD4 + memory T cells, reinstating the validity of the concept of "topographical memory" for mucosal tissues, and imply a critical role of epigenetic mechanisms.

  12. TIM-3 Suppresses Anti-CD3/CD28-Induced TCR Activation and IL-2 Expression through the NFAT Signaling Pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Tomkowicz

    Full Text Available TIM-3 (T cell immunoglobulin and mucin-domain containing protein 3 is a member of the TIM family of proteins that is preferentially expressed on Th1 polarized CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Recent studies indicate that TIM-3 serves as a negative regulator of T cell function (i.e. T cell dependent immune responses, proliferation, tolerance, and exhaustion. Despite having no recognizable inhibitory signaling motifs, the intracellular tail of TIM-3 is apparently indispensable for function. Specifically, the conserved residues Y265/Y272 and surrounding amino acids appear to be critical for function. Mechanistically, several studies suggest that TIM-3 can associate with interleukin inducible T cell kinase (ITK, the Src kinases Fyn and Lck, and the p85 phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K adaptor protein to positively or negatively regulate IL-2 production via NF-κB/NFAT signaling pathways. To begin to address this discrepancy, we examined the effect of TIM-3 in two model systems. First, we generated several Jurkat T cell lines stably expressing human TIM-3 or murine CD28-ECD/human TIM-3 intracellular tail chimeras and examined the effects that TIM-3 exerts on T cell Receptor (TCR-mediated activation, cytokine secretion, promoter activity, and protein kinase association. In this model, our results demonstrate that TIM-3 inhibits several TCR-mediated phenotypes: i NF-kB/NFAT activation, ii CD69 expression, and iii suppression of IL-2 secretion. To confirm our Jurkat cell observations we developed a primary human CD8+ cell system that expresses endogenous levels of TIM-3. Upon TCR ligation, we observed the loss of NFAT reporter activity and IL-2 secretion, and identified the association of Src kinase Lck, and PLC-γ with TIM-3. Taken together, our results support the conclusion that TIM-3 is a negative regulator of TCR-function by attenuating activation signals mediated by CD3/CD28 co-stimulation.

  13. Immune modulation through RNA interference-mediated silencing of CD40 in dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Mohammad Hossein; Ebadi, Padideh; Pourfathollah, Ali Akbar; Soheili, Zahra Soheila; Samiee, Shahram; Ataee, Zahra; Tabei, Seyyed Ziyaoddin; Moazzeni, Seyed Mohammad

    2009-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is an exciting mechanism for knocking down any target gene in transcriptional level. It is now clear that small interfering RNA (siRNA), a 19-21nt long dsRNA, can trigger a degradation process (RNAi) that specifically silences the expression of a cognate mRNA. Our findings in this study showed that down regulation of CD40 gene expression in dendritic cells (DCs) by RNAi culminated to immune modulation. Effective delivery of siRNA into DCs would be a reasonable method for the blocking of CD40 gene expression at the cell surface without any effect on other genes and cell cytotoxicity. The effects of siRNA against CD40 mRNA on the function and phenotype of DCs were investigated. The DCs were separated from the mice spleen and then cultured in vitro. By the means of Lipofectamine2000, siRNA was delivered to the cells and the efficacy of transfection was estimated by flow cytometry. By Annexine V and Propidium Iodide staining, we could evaluate the transfected cells viability. Also, the mRNA expression and protein synthesis were assessed by real-time PCR and flow cytometry, respectively. Knocking down the CD40 gene in the DCs caused an increase in IL-4 production, decrease in IL-12 production and allostimulation activity. All together, these effects would stimulate Th2 cytokines production from allogenic T-cells in vitro.

  14. Expression of CD133 in acute leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolba, Fetnat M; Foda, Mona E; Kamal, Howyda M; Elshabrawy, Deena A

    2013-06-01

    There have been conflicting results regarding a correlation between CD133 expression and disease outcome. To assess CD133 expression in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and to evaluate its correlation with the different clinical and laboratory data as well as its relation to disease outcome, the present study included 60 newly diagnosed acute leukemic patients; 30 ALL patients with a male to female ratio of 1.5:1 and their ages ranged from 9 months to 48 years, and 30 AML patients with a male to female ratio of 1:1 and their ages ranged from 17 to 66 years. Flow cytometric assessment of CD133 expression was performed on blast cells. In ALL, no correlations were elicited between CD133 expression and some monoclonal antibodies, but in AML group, there was a significant positive correlation between CD133 and HLA-DR, CD3, CD7 and TDT, CD13 and CD34. In ALL group, patients with negative CD133 expression achieved complete remission more than patients with positive CD133 expression. In AML group, there was no statistically significant association found between positive CD133 expression and treatment outcome. The Kaplan-Meier curve illustrated a high significant negative correlation between CD133 expression and the overall survival of the AML patients. CD133 expression is an independent prognostic factor in acute leukemia, especially ALL patients and its expression could characterize a group of acute leukemic patients with higher resistance to standard chemotherapy and relapse. CD133 expression was highly associated with poor prognosis in acute leukemic patients.

  15. CD34 immunoreactivity and interstitial cells of Cajal in the human and mouse gastrointestinal tract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vanderwinden, J M; Rumessen, J J; De Laet, M H

    2000-01-01

    , we observed that CD34-ir labeled Kit-negative fibroblast-like cells, closely adjacent to, but distinct from, the Kit-ir ICC. The existence of cells expressing both CD34-ir and Kit-ir remains controversial. CD34-ir and Kit-ir were studied by high-resolution confocal microscopy on cryostat sections...... of human and murine gut as well as murine whole-mounts, using specific antibodies raised to human and murine CD34, respectively. CD34-ir labeled numerous cells in all parts of the gut, in man and in mouse. CD34-ir was consistently observed in Kit-negative cells, distinct from the closely adjacent Kit......-ir ICC. Thin processes of both cell types intermingled extensively, often at the limit of resolution for light microscopy. CD34-ir was also observed in Kit-negative mesenchymal cells in the submucosa, in capillaries and in mesothelial cells. CD34-ir is not a marker for Kit-ir ICC in the human and murine...

  16. Murine CMV Expressing the High Affinity NKG2D Ligand MULT-1: A Model for the Development of Cytomegalovirus-Based Vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lea Hiršl

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The development of a vaccine against human cytomegalovirus (CMV has been a subject of long-term medical interest. The research during recent years identified CMV as an attractive vaccine vector against infectious diseases and tumors. The immune response to CMV persists over a lifetime and its unique feature is the inflationary T cell response to certain viral epitopes. CMV encodes numerous genes involved in immunoevasion, which are non-essential for virus growth in vitro. The deletion of those genes results in virus attenuation in vivo, which enables us to dramatically manipulate its virulence and the immune response. We have previously shown that the murine CMV (MCMV expressing RAE-1γ, one of the cellular ligands for the NKG2D receptor, is highly attenuated in vivo but retains the ability to induce a strong CD8+ T cell response. Here, we demonstrate that recombinant MCMV expressing high affinity NKG2D ligand murine UL16 binding protein-like transcript (MULT-1 (MULT-1MCMV inserted in the place of its viral inhibitor is dramatically attenuated in vivo in a NK cell-dependent manner, both in immunocompetent adult mice and in immunologically immature newborns. MULT-1MCMV was more attenuated than the recombinant virus expressing RAE-1γ. Despite the drastic sensitivity to innate immune control, MULT-1MCMV induced an efficient CD8+ T cell response to viral and vectored antigens. By using in vitro assay, we showed that similar to RAE-1γMCMV, MULT-1 expressing virus provided strong priming of CD8+ T cells. Moreover, MULT-1MCMV was able to induce anti-viral antibodies, which after passing the transplacental barrier protect offspring of immunized mothers from challenge infection. Altogether, this study further supports the concept that CMV expressing NKG2D ligand possesses excellent characteristics to serve as a vaccine or vaccine vector.

  17. Evaluation of Microvascularity by CD34 Expression in Esophagus and Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahsavari, Fatemeh; Farhadi, Sareh; Sadri, Donia; Sedehi, Marzieh

    2015-06-01

    The present study was scheduled to evaluate microvascularity by CD34 expression in esophagus and oral squamous cell carcinoma. This study was scheduled using 40 paraffin blocked samples including 20 of oral SCC and 20 of esophagus ones and Immunohistochemical staining was conducted using CD34 monoclonal antibody. Exact fisher test was used to evaluate frequency of expression between two studied groups. There was significant correlation between age and tumor size with CD34 expression in oral SCC samples (p 0.05). Also, there was no significant correlation between age, sex, tumor size and tumor differentiation level (grading) with CD34 expression in esophagus SCC samples (p > 0.05). There was no significant difference of CD34 expression frequency in oral and esophagus SCC (p = 0/583). Finally, CD34 expression was reported 'high' for major cases of esophagus and oral SCCs. It seems, other angiogenetic or nonangiogenetic factors except CD34 may play more important role and explain the different clinical behavior of SCC at recent different locations. Other factors would be considered along with CD34 expression to interpret different clinical behavior of SCC at recent different locations.

  18. Infection Rate and Tissue Localization of Murine IL-12p40-Producing Monocyte-Derived CD103+ Lung Dendritic Cells during Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leepiyasakulchai, Chaniya; Taher, Chato; Chuquimia, Olga D.; Mazurek, Jolanta; Söderberg-Naucler, Cecilia; Fernández, Carmen; Sköld, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Non-hematopoietic cells, including lung epithelial cells, influence host immune responses. By co-culturing primary alveolar epithelial cells and monocytes from naïve donor mice, we show that alveolar epithelial cells support monocyte survival and differentiation in vitro, suggesting a role for non-hematopoietic cells in monocyte differentiation during the steady state in vivo. CD103+ dendritic cells (αE-DC) are present at mucosal surfaces. Using a murine primary monocyte adoptive transfer model, we demonstrate that αE-DC in the lungs and pulmonary lymph nodes are monocyte-derived during pulmonary tuberculosis. The tissue localization may influence the functional potential of αE-DC that accumulate in Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected lungs. Here, we confirm the localization of αE-DC in uninfected mice beneath the bronchial epithelial cell layer and near the vascular wall, and show that αE-DC have a similar distribution in the lungs during pulmonary tuberculosis and are detected in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from infected mice. Lung DC can be targeted by M. tuberculosis in vivo and play a role in bacterial dissemination to the draining lymph node. In contrast to other DC subsets, only a fraction of lung αE-DC are infected with the bacterium. We also show that virulent M. tuberculosis does not significantly alter cell surface expression levels of MHC class II on infected cells in vivo and that αE-DC contain the highest frequency of IL-12p40+ cells among the myeloid cell subsets in infected lungs. Our results support a model in which inflammatory monocytes are recruited into the M. tuberculosis-infected lung tissue and, depending on which non-hematopoietic cells they interact with, differentiate along different paths to give rise to multiple monocyte-derived cells, including DC with a distinctive αE-DC phenotype. PMID:23861965

  19. Infection rate and tissue localization of murine IL-12p40-producing monocyte-derived CD103(+) lung dendritic cells during pulmonary tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leepiyasakulchai, Chaniya; Taher, Chato; Chuquimia, Olga D; Mazurek, Jolanta; Söderberg-Naucler, Cecilia; Fernández, Carmen; Sköld, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Non-hematopoietic cells, including lung epithelial cells, influence host immune responses. By co-culturing primary alveolar epithelial cells and monocytes from naïve donor mice, we show that alveolar epithelial cells support monocyte survival and differentiation in vitro, suggesting a role for non-hematopoietic cells in monocyte differentiation during the steady state in vivo. CD103(+) dendritic cells (αE-DC) are present at mucosal surfaces. Using a murine primary monocyte adoptive transfer model, we demonstrate that αE-DC in the lungs and pulmonary lymph nodes are monocyte-derived during pulmonary tuberculosis. The tissue localization may influence the functional potential of αE-DC that accumulate in Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected lungs. Here, we confirm the localization of αE-DC in uninfected mice beneath the bronchial epithelial cell layer and near the vascular wall, and show that αE-DC have a similar distribution in the lungs during pulmonary tuberculosis and are detected in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from infected mice. Lung DC can be targeted by M. tuberculosis in vivo and play a role in bacterial dissemination to the draining lymph node. In contrast to other DC subsets, only a fraction of lung αE-DC are infected with the bacterium. We also show that virulent M. tuberculosis does not significantly alter cell surface expression levels of MHC class II on infected cells in vivo and that αE-DC contain the highest frequency of IL-12p40(+) cells among the myeloid cell subsets in infected lungs. Our results support a model in which inflammatory monocytes are recruited into the M. tuberculosis-infected lung tissue and, depending on which non-hematopoietic cells they interact with, differentiate along different paths to give rise to multiple monocyte-derived cells, including DC with a distinctive αE-DC phenotype.

  20. Effects of anti-CD40 mAb on inducing malignant B cells proliferation arrest and apoptosis and its mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Lin; Zhuang Yumei; Zhou Zhaohua; Yu Gehua; Pan Jianzhong; Zhang Xueguang

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study the expression of CD 40 molecule and the biological effects mediated by CD 40 molecules on malignant B cells. Methods: Agonistic anti-human CD 40 monoclonal antibody (clone 5C11) was added to cell culture system. Cell counting, PI staining, Annexin-V staining and flow cytometric analysis were used to study the behavior of malignant B cell lines after treatment with mAb clone 5C11. Results: 5C11 induced homotypic aggregation and proliferation arrest and mediated apoptosis in multiple myeloma cell line XG2 that expressed CD 40 strongly; 5C11 induced B lymphoma cell line Daudi homotypic aggregation and proliferation arrest and apoptosis, the apoptosis of XG2 and Daudi by CD40 activation was not mediated by TNF. Conclusion: Agonistic anti-CD 40 mAb 5C11 can inhibit the proliferation of malignant B cells by inducing them to die apoplectically

  1. CD19 CAR T Cells Expressing IL-12 Eradicate Lymphoma in Fully Lymphoreplete Mice through Induction of Host Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gray Kueberuwa

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR T cell therapy represents a significant advancement in cancer therapy. Larger studies have shown ∼90% complete remission rates against chemoresistant and/or refractory CD19+ leukemia or lymphoma. Effective CAR T cell therapy is highly dependent on lymphodepleting preconditioning, which is achieved through chemotherapy or radiotherapy that carries with it significant toxicities. These can exclude patients of low performance status. In order to overcome the need for preconditioning, we constructed fully mouse first and second generation anti-murine CD19 CARs with or without interleukin-12 (IL-12 secretion. To test these CARs, we established a mouse model to reflect the human situation without preconditioning. Murine second generation CAR T cells expressing IL-12 were capable of eradicating established B cell lymphoma with a long-term survival rate of ∼25%. We believe this to be the first study in a truly lymphoreplete model. We provide evidence that IL-12-expressing CAR T cells not only directly kill target CD19+ cells, but also recruit host immune cells to an anti-cancer immune response. This finding is critical because lymphodepletion regimens required for the success of current CAR T cell technology eliminate host immune cells whose anti-cancer activity could otherwise be harnessed by strategies such as IL-12-secreting CAR T cells. Keywords: CD19 CAR T cells, IL-12, immunotherapy, chimeric antigen receptor, adoptive cellular therapy, lymphoma, B cell malignancies, TRUCKs, pre-conditioning

  2. Role of T-bet, the master regulator of Th1 cells, in the cytotoxicity of murine CD4+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshima, Koji; Misawa, Kana; Ohashi, Chihiro; Iwabuchi, Kazuya

    2018-05-01

    Although CD4 + T cells are generally regarded as helper T cells, some activated CD4 + T cells have cytotoxic properties. Given that CD4 + cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) often secrete IFN-γ, CTL activity among CD4 + T cells may be attributable to Th1 cells, where a T-box family molecule, T-bet serves as the "master regulator". However, although the essential contribution of T-bet to expression of IFN-γ has been well-documented, it remains unclear whether T-bet is involved in CD4 + T cell-mediated cytotoxicity. In this study, to investigate the ability of T-bet to confer cytolytic activity on CD4 + T cells, the T-bet gene (Tbx21) was introduced into non-cytocidal CD4 + T cell lines and their cytolytic function analyzed. Up-regulation of FasL (CD178), which provided the transfectant with cytotoxicity, was observed in Tbx21transfected CD4 + T cells but not in untransfected parental cells. In one cell line, T-bet transduction also induced perforin gene (Prf1) expression and Tbx21 transfectants efficiently killed Fas - target cells. Although T-bet was found to repress up-regulation of CD40L (CD154), which controls FasL-mediated cytolysis, the extent of CD40L up-regulation on in vitro-differentiated Th1 cells was similar to that on Th2 cells, suggesting the existence of a compensatory mechanism. These results collectively indicate that T-bet may be involved in the expression of genes, such as FasL and Prf1, which confer cytotoxicity on Th1 cells. © 2018 The Societies and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  3. Anti-CD40-mediated cancer immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassan, Sufia Butt; Sørensen, Jesper Freddie; Olsen, Barbara Nicola

    2014-01-01

    activation and thus enhancement of immune responses. Treatment with anti-CD40 monoclonal antibodies has been exploited in several cancer immunotherapy studies in mice and led to the development of anti-CD40 antibodies for clinical use. Here, Dacetuzumab and Lucatumumab are in the most advanced stage...... with other cancer immunotherapies, in particular interleukin (IL)-2. An in-depth analysis of this immunotherapy is provided elsewhere. In the present review, we provide an update of the most recent clinical trials with anti-CD40 antibodies. We present and discuss recent and ongoing clinical trials...... in this field, including clinical studies which combine anti-CD40 treatment with other cancer-treatments, such as Rituximab and Tremelimumab....

  4. Cyclosporine-resistant, Rab27a-independent Mobilization of Intracellular Preformed CD40L Mediates Antigen-specific T Cell Help In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koguchi, Yoshinobu; Gardell, Jennifer L.; Thauland, Timothy J.; Parker, David C.

    2011-01-01

    CD40L is critically important for the initiation and maintenance of adaptive immune responses. It is generally thought that CD40L expression in CD4+ T cells is regulated transcriptionally and made from new mRNA following antigen recognition. However, recent studies with two-photon microscopy revealed that the majority of cognate interactions between effector CD4+ T cells and APCs are too short for de novo synthesis of CD40L. Given that effector and memory CD4+ T cells store preformed CD40L (pCD40L) in lysosomal compartments and that pCD40L comes to the cell surface within minutes of antigenic stimulation, we and others have proposed that pCD40L might mediate T cell-dependent activation of cognate APCs during brief encounters in vivo. However, it has not been shown that this relatively small amount of pCD40L is sufficient to activate APCs, owing to the difficulty of separating the effects of pCD40L from those of de novo CD40L and other cytokines in vitro. Here we show that pCD40L surface mobilization is resistant to cyclosporine or FK506 treatment, while de novo CD40L and cytokine expression are completely inhibited. These drugs thus provide a tool to dissect the role of pCD40L in APC activation. We find that pCD40L mediates selective activation of cognate but not bystander APCs in vitro and that mobilization of pCD40L does not depend on Rab27a, which is required for mobilization of lytic granules. Therefore, effector CD4+ T cells deliver pCD40L specifically to APCs on the same time scale as the lethal hit of CTLs but with distinct molecular machinery. PMID:21677130

  5. Hyperbaric environment up-regulates CD15s expression on leukocytes, down-regulates CD77 expression on renal cells and up-regulates CD34 expression on pulmonary and cardiac cells in rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danka Đevenica

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: The aim of this study was to estimate effects of hyperbaric (HB treatment by determination of CD15s and CD11b leukocyte proinflammatory markers expression.  In addition, this study describes changes in CD77 and CD34 expression on rat endothelial cells in renal, pulmonary and cardiac tissue following exposure to hyperbaric pressure. Materials and Methods:Expression of CD11b and CD15s on leukocytes, as well as CD77 and CD34 expression on endothelial cells in cell suspensions of renal, pulmonary and cardiac tissue in rats after hyperbaric treatment and in control rats were determined by flow cytometry. Results: Hyperbaric treatment significantly increased percentage of leukocytes expressing CD15s+CD11b- (from 1.71±1.11 to 23.42±2.85, P

  6. Expression of YKL-40 by peritumoral macrophages in human small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Junker, Nanna; Johansen, Julia S; Andersen, Claus B

    2005-01-01

    YKL-40 is a 40 kDa protein with possible involvement in tissue remodeling, cell proliferation and angiogenesis. Elevated serum YKL-40 levels in patients with metastatic cancers (including small cell lung cancer (SCLC)) are associated with poor prognosis. The aim of this study was to identify...... the cellular source of YKL-40 in SCLC patient biopsies and in a panel of 20 human SCLC lines cultured in vitro and in vivo in nude mice. In general, the SCLC cell lines had no or very limited (human) YKL-40 expression, whereas, by RT-PCR a pronounced murine (i.e., stromal) YKL-40 expression was present in all...

  7. CD38 gene-modified dendritic cells inhibit murine asthma development by increasing IL-12 production and promoting Th1 cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiaoli; Zhu, Weiguo; Chen, Yinghu; Lin, Zhendong; Ma, Shenglin

    2016-11-01

    Predominant T helper (Th)2 and impaired Th1 cell polarization has a crucial role in the development of asthma. Cluster of differentiation (CD)38 is associated with the increased release of interleukin (IL)‑12 from dendritic cells (DCs) and DC‑induced Th1 cell polarization. However, whether CD38 expression affects DC function in asthma development remains unknown. In the current study, adenoviruses were constructed containing the murine CD38 gene. Overexpression of CD38 protein level in DCs induced from bone‑marrow derived DCs (BMDCs) by recombinant mouse granulocyte macrophage colony‑stimulating factor and IL‑4 was achieved through 24 h adenovirus infection. The results demonstrated that BMDCs with CD38 overexpression exhibited no phenotypic change; however, following stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), maturation and IL‑12 secretion were increased. In addition, CD38‑overexpressing BMDCs stimulated with LPS exhibited more effective Th1 cell differentiation. Mice that were administered CD38‑overexpressing BMDCs exhibited milder symptoms of asthma. Furthermore, decreased IL‑4, IL‑5 and IL‑13 levels were detected in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), reduced immunoglobulin E levels were measured in the sera, and increased interferon‑γ was detected in BALF from the recipients of CD38‑overexpressing BMDCs. Increased phosphorylated‑p38 expression was also detected in LPS-stimulated CD38-overexpressing BMDCs, whereas pretreatment with a p38‑specific inhibitor was able to abolish the effects of LPS stimulation and CD38 overexpression on IL‑12 release and Th1 cell differentiation in BMDCs. These results suggested that CD38 may be involved in the DC function of alleviating asthma via restoration of the Th1/Th2 balance, thus providing a novel strategy for asthma therapy.

  8. CD40-CD40 Ligand Pathway is a Major Component of Acute Neuroinflammation and Contributes to Long-term Cognitive Dysfunction after Sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michels, Monique; Danieslki, Lucinéia Gainski; Vieira, Andriele; Florentino, Drielly; Dall'Igna, Dhébora; Galant, Letícia; Sonai, Beatriz; Vuolo, Francieli; Mina, Franciele; Pescador, Bruna; Dominguini, Diogo; Barichello, Tatiana; Quevedo, João; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe; Petronilho, Fabrícia

    2015-03-26

    Sepsis-associated encephalopathy (SAE) is associated with an increased rate of morbidity and mortality. It is not understood what the exact mechanism is for the brain dysfunction that occurs in septic patients, but brain inflammation and oxidative stress are a possible theory. Such events can occur through the alteration of molecules that perpetuate the inflammatory response. Thus, it is possible to postulate that CD40 may be involved in this process. The aim of this work is to evaluate the role of CD40-CD40L pathway activation in brain dysfunction associated with sepsis in an animal model. Microglia activation induces the upregulation of CD40-CD40L, both in vitro and in vivo. The inhibition of microglia activation decreases levels of CD40-CD40L in the brain and decreases brain inflammation, oxidative damage and blood brain barrier dysfunction. Despite this, anti-CD40 treatment does not improve mortality in this model. However, it is able to improve long-term cognitive impairment in sepsis survivors. In conclusion, there is a major involvement of the CD40-CD40L signaling pathway in long-term brain dysfunction in an animal model of sepsis.

  9. Human CD134 (OX40) expressed on T cells plays a key role for human herpesvirus 6B replication after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagamata, Satoshi; Nagasaka, Miwako; Kawabata, Akiko; Kishimoto, Kenji; Hasegawa, Daiichiro; Kosaka, Yoshiyuki; Mori, Takeshi; Morioka, Ichiro; Nishimura, Noriyuki; Iijima, Kazumoto; Yamada, Hideto; Kawamoto, Shinichiro; Yakushijin, Kimikazu; Matsuoka, Hiroshi; Mori, Yasuko

    2018-05-01

    CD134 (OX40), which is a cellular receptor for human herpesvirus-6B (HHV-6B) and expresses on activated T cells, may play a key role for HHV-6B replication after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). Therefore, we examined the CD134 expression on T cells and HHV-6B replication after allo-HSCT, and analyzed the correlation between them. Twenty-three patients after allo-HSCT were enrolled. The percentages of CD134-positive cells within the CD4 + and CD8 + cell populations were measured by flow cytometry, and the viral copy number of HHV-6B was simultaneously quantified by real-time PCR. The correlation between CD134 and HHV-6B viral load was then statistically analyzed. HHV-6B reactivation occurred in 11 of 23 patients (47.8%). CD134 expression was seen on T cells and was coincident with the time of peak viral load. The percentage of CD134-positive cells decreased significantly when HHV-6B DNA disappeared (p = .005 in CD4 + T cells, p = .02 in CD8 + T cells). In the 4 patients who underwent umbilical cord blood transplantation (UCBT), the viral load varied with the percentage of CD134-positive cells. In the comparison between the HHV-6B reactivation group and non-reactivation group, maximum percentages of CD134-positive cells among CD4 + T cells in reactivation group were significantly higher than those in non-reactivation group (p = .04). This is the first study to show that a correlation of CD134 expression on T cells with HHV-6B replication after allo-HSCT, especially in UCBT. The results possibly indicate that CD134 on T cells plays a key role for HHV-6B replication after allo-HSCT. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Positron emission tomography imaging of CD105 expression during tumor angiogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Hao [University of Wisconsin - Madison, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); Yang, Yunan [University of Wisconsin - Madison, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); Third Military Medical University, Department of Ultrasound, Xinqiao Hospital, Chongqing (China); Zhang, Yin; Engle, Jonathan W.; Barnhart, Todd E.; Nickles, Robert J. [University of Wisconsin - Madison, Department of Medical Physics, Madison, WI (United States); Leigh, Bryan R. [TRACON Pharmaceuticals, Inc., San Diego, CA (United States); Cai, Weibo [University of Wisconsin - Madison, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin - Madison, Department of Medical Physics, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin - Madison, Departments of Radiology and Medical Physics, School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI (United States)

    2011-07-15

    Overexpression of CD105 (endoglin) correlates with poor prognosis in many solid tumor types. Tumor microvessel density (MVD) assessed by CD105 staining is the current gold standard for evaluating tumor angiogenesis in the clinic. The goal of this study was to develop a positron emission tomography (PET) tracer for imaging CD105 expression. TRC105, a chimeric anti-CD105 monoclonal antibody, was conjugated to 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) and labeled with {sup 64}Cu. FACS analysis and microscopy studies were performed to compare the CD105 binding affinity of TRC105 and DOTA-TRC105. PET imaging, biodistribution, blocking, and ex vivo histology studies were performed on 4T1 murine breast tumor-bearing mice to evaluate the ability of {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-TRC105 to target tumor angiogenesis. Another chimeric antibody, cetuximab, was used as an isotype-matched control. FACS analysis of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) revealed no difference in CD105 binding affinity between TRC105 and DOTA-TRC105, which was further validated by fluorescence microscopy. {sup 64}Cu labeling was achieved with high yield and specific activity. Serial PET imaging revealed that the 4T1 tumor uptake of the tracer was 8.0 {+-} 0.5, 10.4 {+-} 2.8, and 9.7 {+-} 1.8%ID/g at 4, 24, and 48 h post-injection, respectively (n = 3), higher than most organs at late time points which provided excellent tumor contrast. Biodistribution data as measured by gamma counting were consistent with the PET findings. Blocking experiments, control studies with {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-cetuximab, as well as ex vivo histology all confirmed the in vivo target specificity of {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-TRC105. This is the first successful PET imaging study of CD105 expression. Fast, prominent, persistent, and CD105-specific uptake of the tracer in the 4T1 tumor was observed. Further studies are warranted and currently underway. (orig.)

  11. Characterization of a Broadly Reactive Anti-CD40 Agonistic Monoclonal Antibody for Potential Use as an Adjuvant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cameron Martin

    Full Text Available Lack of safe and effective adjuvants is a major hindrance to the development of efficacious vaccines. Signaling via CD40 pathway leads to enhanced antigen processing and presentation, nitric oxide expression, pro-inflammatory cytokine expression by antigen presenting cells, and stimulation of B-cells to undergo somatic hypermutation, immunoglobulin class switching, and proliferation. Agonistic anti-CD40 antibodies have shown promising adjuvant qualities in human and mouse vaccine studies. An anti-CD40 monoclonal antibody (mAb, designated 2E4E4, was identified and shown to have strong agonistic effects on primary cells from multiple livestock species. The mAb recognize swine, bovine, caprine, and ovine CD40, and evoked 25-fold or greater proliferation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs from these species relative to cells incubated with an isotype control (p<0.001. In addition, the mAb induced significant nitric oxide (p<0.0001 release by bovine macrophages. Furthermore, the mAb upregulated the expression of MHC-II by PBMCs, and stimulated significant (p<0.0001 IL-1α, IL6, IL-8, and TNF-α expression by PBMCs. These results suggest that the mAb 2E4E4 can target and stimulate cells from multiple livestock species and thus, it is a potential candidate for adjuvant development. This is the first study to report an anti-swine CD40 agonistic mAb that is also broadly reactive against multiple species.

  12. CD8+ T Cells Contribute to the Development of Coronary Arteritis in the Lactobacillus casei Cell Wall Extract-Induced Murine Model of Kawasaki Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noval Rivas, Magali; Lee, Youngho; Wakita, Daiko; Chiba, Norika; Dagvadorj, Jargalsaikhan; Shimada, Kenichi; Chen, Shuang; Fishbein, Michael C; Lehman, Thomas J A; Crother, Timothy R; Arditi, Moshe

    2017-02-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is the leading cause of acquired heart disease among children in developed countries. Coronary lesions in KD in humans are characterized by an increased presence of infiltrating CD3+ T cells; however, the specific contributions of the different T cell subpopulations in coronary arteritis development remain unknown. Therefore, we sought to investigate the function of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, Treg cells, and natural killer (NK) T cells in the pathogenesis of KD. We addressed the function of T cell subsets in KD development by using a well-established murine model of Lactobacillus casei cell wall extract (LCWE)-induced KD vasculitis. We determined which T cell subsets were required for development of KD vasculitis by using several knockout murine strains and depleting monoclonal antibodies. LCWE-injected mice developed coronary lesions characterized by the presence of inflammatory cell infiltrates. Frequently, this chronic inflammation resulted in complete occlusion of the coronary arteries due to luminal myofibroblast proliferation (LMP) as well as the development of coronary arteritis and aortitis. We found that CD8+ T cells, but not CD4+ T cells, NK T cells, or Treg cells, were required for development of KD vasculitis. The LCWE-induced murine model of KD vasculitis mimics many histologic features of the disease in humans, such as the presence of CD8+ T cells and LMP in coronary artery lesions as well as epicardial coronary arteritis. Moreover, CD8+ T cells functionally contribute to the development of KD vasculitis in this murine model. Therapeutic strategies targeting infiltrating CD8+ T cells might be useful in the management of KD in humans. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  13. CXCR4 blockade decreases CD4+ T cell exhaustion and improves survival in a murine model of polymicrobial sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramonell, Kimberly M; Zhang, Wenxiao; Hadley, Annette; Chen, Ching-Wen; Fay, Katherine T; Lyons, John D; Klingensmith, Nathan J; McConnell, Kevin W; Coopersmith, Craig M; Ford, Mandy L

    2017-01-01

    Sepsis is a dysregulated systemic response to infection involving many inflammatory pathways and the induction of counter-regulatory anti-inflammatory processes that results in a state of immune incompetence and can lead to multi-organ failure. CXCR4 is a chemokine receptor that, following ligation by CXCL12, directs cells to bone marrow niches and also plays an important role in T cell cosignaling and formation of the immunological synapse. Here, we investigated the expression and function of CXCR4 in a murine model of polymicrobial sepsis. Results indicate that CXCR4 is selectively upregulated on naïve CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and CD4+ central memory T cells following the induction of sepsis, and that CXCR4 antagonism resulted in a significant decrease in sepsis-induced mortality. We probed the mechanistic basis for these findings and found that CXCR4 antagonism significantly increased the number of peripheral CD4+ and CD8+ T cells following sepsis. Moreover, mice treated with the CXCR4 antagonist contained fewer PD-1+ LAG-3+ 2B4+ cells, suggesting that blockade of CXCR4 mitigates CD4+ T cell exhaustion during sepsis. Taken together, these results characterize CXCR4 as an important pathway that modulates immune dysfunction and mortality following sepsis, which may hold promise as a target for future therapeutic intervention in septic patients.

  14. CXCR4 blockade decreases CD4+ T cell exhaustion and improves survival in a murine model of polymicrobial sepsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly M Ramonell

    Full Text Available Sepsis is a dysregulated systemic response to infection involving many inflammatory pathways and the induction of counter-regulatory anti-inflammatory processes that results in a state of immune incompetence and can lead to multi-organ failure. CXCR4 is a chemokine receptor that, following ligation by CXCL12, directs cells to bone marrow niches and also plays an important role in T cell cosignaling and formation of the immunological synapse. Here, we investigated the expression and function of CXCR4 in a murine model of polymicrobial sepsis. Results indicate that CXCR4 is selectively upregulated on naïve CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and CD4+ central memory T cells following the induction of sepsis, and that CXCR4 antagonism resulted in a significant decrease in sepsis-induced mortality. We probed the mechanistic basis for these findings and found that CXCR4 antagonism significantly increased the number of peripheral CD4+ and CD8+ T cells following sepsis. Moreover, mice treated with the CXCR4 antagonist contained fewer PD-1+ LAG-3+ 2B4+ cells, suggesting that blockade of CXCR4 mitigates CD4+ T cell exhaustion during sepsis. Taken together, these results characterize CXCR4 as an important pathway that modulates immune dysfunction and mortality following sepsis, which may hold promise as a target for future therapeutic intervention in septic patients.

  15. Murine polyomavirus virus-like particles carrying full-length human PSA protect BALB/c mice from outgrowth of a PSA expressing tumor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathilda Eriksson

    Full Text Available Virus-like particles (VLPs consist of capsid proteins from viruses and have been shown to be usable as carriers of protein and peptide antigens for immune therapy. In this study, we have produced and assayed murine polyomavirus (MPyV VLPs carrying the entire human Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA (PSA-MPyVLPs for their potential use for immune therapy in a mouse model system. BALB/c mice immunized with PSA-MPyVLPs were only marginally protected against outgrowth of a PSA-expressing tumor. To improve protection, PSA-MPyVLPs were co-injected with adjuvant CpG, either alone or loaded onto murine dendritic cells (DCs. Immunization with PSA-MPyVLPs loaded onto DCs in the presence of CpG was shown to efficiently protect mice from tumor outgrowth. In addition, cellular and humoral immune responses after immunization were examined. PSA-specific CD4(+ and CD8(+ cells were demonstrated, but no PSA-specific IgG antibodies. Vaccination with DCs loaded with PSA-MPyVLPs induced an eight-fold lower titre of anti-VLP antibodies than vaccination with PSA-MPyVLPs alone. In conclusion, immunization of BALB/c mice with PSA-MPyVLPs, loaded onto DCs and co-injected with CpG, induces an efficient PSA-specific tumor protective immune response, including both CD4(+ and CD8(+ cells with a low induction of anti-VLP antibodies.

  16. Murine Polyomavirus Virus-Like Particles Carrying Full-Length Human PSA Protect BALB/c Mice from Outgrowth of a PSA Expressing Tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Mathilda; Andreasson, Kalle; Weidmann, Joachim; Lundberg, Kajsa; Tegerstedt, Karin

    2011-01-01

    Virus-like particles (VLPs) consist of capsid proteins from viruses and have been shown to be usable as carriers of protein and peptide antigens for immune therapy. In this study, we have produced and assayed murine polyomavirus (MPyV) VLPs carrying the entire human Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) (PSA-MPyVLPs) for their potential use for immune therapy in a mouse model system. BALB/c mice immunized with PSA-MPyVLPs were only marginally protected against outgrowth of a PSA-expressing tumor. To improve protection, PSA-MPyVLPs were co-injected with adjuvant CpG, either alone or loaded onto murine dendritic cells (DCs). Immunization with PSA-MPyVLPs loaded onto DCs in the presence of CpG was shown to efficiently protect mice from tumor outgrowth. In addition, cellular and humoral immune responses after immunization were examined. PSA-specific CD4+ and CD8+ cells were demonstrated, but no PSA-specific IgG antibodies. Vaccination with DCs loaded with PSA-MPyVLPs induced an eight-fold lower titre of anti-VLP antibodies than vaccination with PSA-MPyVLPs alone. In conclusion, immunization of BALB/c mice with PSA-MPyVLPs, loaded onto DCs and co-injected with CpG, induces an efficient PSA-specific tumor protective immune response, including both CD4+ and CD8+ cells with a low induction of anti-VLP antibodies. PMID:21858228

  17. Determination of normal expression patterns of CD86, CD210a, CD261, CD262, CD264, CD358, and CD361 in peripheral blood and bone marrow cells by flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolf-Oliveira, Renata Cristina Messores; Auat, Mariangeles; Cardoso, Chandra Chiappin; Santos-Pirath, Iris Mattos; Lange, Barbara Gil; Pires-Silva, Jéssica; Moraes, Ana Carolina Rabello de; Dametto, Gisele Cristina; Pirolli, Mayara Marin; Colombo, Maria Daniela Holthausen Périco; Santos-Silva, Maria Claudia

    2018-02-01

    In 2010, new monoclonal antibodies were submitted to the 9th International Workshop on Human Leukocyte Differentiation Antigens, and there are few studies demonstrating normal expression patterns of these markers. Thus, the objective of this study was to determine the normal patterns of cell expression of CD86, CD210a, CD261, CD262, CD264, CD358, and CD361 in peripheral blood (PB) and bone marrow (BM) samples by flow cytometry. In the present study, CD86 was expressed only in monocytes and B lymphocytes in PB and in monocytes and plasma cells in BM. Regarding CD210a expression, in PB samples, monocytes and NK cells showed weak expression, while neutrophils, B and T lymphocytes, and basophils showed weak and partial expression. In BM samples, expression of CD210a was observed in eosinophils, monocytes, and B and T/NK lymphocytes. Weak expression of CD210a was also observed in neutrophilic cells and plasma cells. All B cell maturation stages had weak expression of CD210a except for immature B cells, which did not express this marker. In the present study, no cell type in PB samples showed positivity for CD261 and, in BM samples, there was very weak expression in neutrophilic series, monocytes, and B lymphocytes. Conversely, plasma cells showed positivity for CD261 with a homogeneous expression. For CD262, there was weak expression in monocytes, neutrophils, and B lymphocytes in PB samples and weak expression in monocytes, B lymphocytes, and plasma cells in BM samples. The evaluation of CD264 showed very weak expression in B cells in PB samples and no expression in BM cells. Very weak expression of CD358 was observed in neutrophils, monocytes, and B lymphocytes in PB and BM samples. In addition, in BM samples, plasma cells and T lymphocytes showed weak expression of CD358. In relation to the maturation stages of B cells, there was weak expression in pro-B cel, pre-B cell, and mature B cell. In the present study, it was possible to observe expression of CD361 in all

  18. Localized CD47 blockade enhances immunotherapy for murine melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, Jessica R; Blomberg, Olga S; Sockolosky, Jonathan T; Ali, Lestat; Schmidt, Florian I; Pishesha, Novalia; Espinosa, Camilo; Dougan, Stephanie K; Garcia, K Christopher; Ploegh, Hidde L; Dougan, Michael

    2017-09-19

    CD47 is an antiphagocytic ligand broadly expressed on normal and malignant tissues that delivers an inhibitory signal through the receptor signal regulatory protein alpha (SIRPα). Inhibitors of the CD47-SIRPα interaction improve antitumor antibody responses by enhancing antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP) in xenograft models. Endogenous expression of CD47 on a variety of cell types, including erythrocytes, creates a formidable antigen sink that may limit the efficacy of CD47-targeting therapies. We generated a nanobody, A4, that blocks the CD47-SIRPα interaction. A4 synergizes with anti-PD-L1, but not anti-CTLA4, therapy in the syngeneic B16F10 melanoma model. Neither increased dosing nor half-life extension by fusion of A4 to IgG2a Fc (A4Fc) overcame the issue of an antigen sink or, in the case of A4Fc, systemic toxicity. Generation of a B16F10 cell line that secretes the A4 nanobody showed that an enhanced response to several immune therapies requires near-complete blockade of CD47 in the tumor microenvironment. Thus, strategies to localize CD47 blockade to tumors may be particularly valuable for immune therapy.

  19. DNA vaccines expressing soluble CD4-envelope proteins fused to C3d elicit cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies to HIV-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bower, Joseph F.; Green, Thomas D.; Ross, Ted M.

    2004-01-01

    DNA vaccines expressing the envelope (Env) of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) have been relatively ineffective at generating high-titer, long-lasting, neutralizing antibodies in a variety of animal models. In this study, DNA vaccines were constructed to express a fusion protein of the soluble human CD4 (sCD4) and the gp120 subunit of the HIV-1 envelope. To enhance the immunogenicity of the expressed fusion protein, three copies of the murine C3d (mC3d 3 ) were added to the carboxyl terminus of the complex. Monoclonal antibodies that recognize CD4-induced epitopes on gp120 efficiently bound to sCD4-gp120 or sCD4-gp120-mC3d 3 . In addition, both sCD4-gp120 and sCD4-gp120-mC3d 3 bound to cells expressing appropriate coreceptors in the absence of cell surface hCD4. Mice (BALB/c) vaccinated with DNA vaccines expressing either gp120-mC3d 3 or sCD4-gp120-mC3d 3 elicited antibodies that neutralized homologous virus infection. However, the use of sCD4-gp120-mC3d 3 -DNA elicited the highest titers of neutralizing antibodies that persisted after depletion of anti-hCD4 antibodies. Interestingly, only mice vaccinated with DNA expressing sCD4-gp120-mC3d 3 had antibodies that elicited cross-protective neutralizing antibodies. The fusion of sCD4 to the HIV-1 envelope exposes neutralizing epitopes that elicit broad protective immunity when the fusion complex is coupled with the molecular adjuvant, C3d

  20. Functional Analysis of CD28/B7 and CD40/CD40L Costimulation During the in vivo Type 2 Immune Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-10-06

    Fay, T.M., Masters, S.R, Laman , J.D., and Noelle, R.J. (1994b). The role of CD40 in the regulation ofhumoral and cell-mediated immunity. Immuno...1567-1575. 187 Foy, T.M., Laman , J.D., Ledbetter, J.A., Aruff’o, A., Claassen, E., and Noelle, R.J. (1994). gp39-CD40 interaction are essential for...cystine knot motif. Cell 73,421-424. Mohan, C., Shi, Y., Laman , J.D., and Datta, S.K. (1995). Interaction between CD40 and its ligand gp39 in the

  1. Generation of functional scFv intrabody to abate the expression of CD147 surface molecule of 293A cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mai Sabine

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Expression of intracellular antibodies (intrabodies has become a broadly applicable technology for generation of phenotypic knockouts in vivo. The method uses surface depletion of cellular membrane proteins to examine their biological function. In this study, we used this strategy to block the transport of cell surface molecule CD147 to the cell membrane. Phage display technology was introduced to generate the functional antibody fragment to CD147, and we subsequently constructed a CD147-specific scFv that was expressed intracellularly and retained in the endoplasmic reticulum by adenoviral gene transfer. Results The recombinant antibody fragments, Fab and scFv, of the murine monoclonal antibody (clone M6-1B9 reacted specifically to CD147 by indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA using a recombinant CD147-BCCP as a target. This indicated that the Fab- and scFv-M6-1B9 displaying on phage surfaces were correctly folded and functionally active. We subsequently constructed a CD147-specific scFv, scFv-M6-1B9-intrabody, in 293A cells. The expression of CD147 on 293A cell surface was monitored at 36 h after transduction by flow cytometry and demonstrated remarkable reduction. Colocalization of scFv-M6-1B9 intrabody with CD147 in the ER network was depicted using a 3D deconvolution microscopy system. Conclusion The results suggest that our approach can generate antibody fragments suitable for decreasing the expression of CD147 on 293A cells. This study represents a step toward understanding the role of the cell surface protein, CD147.

  2. Expression of biologically active murine interleukin-18 in Lactococcus lactis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feizollahzadeh, Sadegh; Khanahmad, Hossein; Rahimmanesh, Ilnaz; Ganjalikhani-Hakemi, Mazdak; Andalib, Alireza; Sanei, Mohammad Hossein; Rezaei, Abbas

    2016-11-01

    The food-grade bacterium Lactococcus lactis is increasingly used for heterologous protein expression in therapeutic and industrial applications. The ability of L. lactis to secrete biologically active cytokines may be used for the generation of therapeutic cytokines. Interleukin (IL)-18 enhances the immune response, especially on mucosal surfaces, emphasizing its therapeutic potential. However, it is produced as an inactive precursor and has to be enzymatically cleaved for maturation. We genetically manipulated L. lactis to secrete murine IL-18. The mature murine IL-18 gene was inserted downstream of a nisin promoter in pNZ8149 plasmid and the construct was used to transform L. lactis NZ3900. The transformants were selected on Elliker agar and confirmed by restriction enzyme digestion and sequencing. The expression and secretion of IL-18 protein was verified by SDS-PAGE, western blotting and ELISA. The biological activity of recombinant IL-18 was determined by its ability to induce interferon (IFN)-γ production in L. lactis co-cultured with murine splenic T cells. The amounts of IL-18 in bacterial lysates and supernatants were 3-4 μg mL -1 and 0.6-0.7 ng mL -1 , respectively. The successfully generated L. lactis strain that expressed biologically active murine IL-18 can be used to evaluate the possible therapeutic effects of IL-18 on mucosal surfaces. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. CD40CD40 Ligand Pathway Is a Major Component of Acute Neuroinflammation and Contributes to Long-term Cognitive Dysfunction after Sepsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michels, Monique; Danieslki, Lucinéia Gainski; Vieira, Andriele; Florentino, Drielly; Dall’Igna, Dhébora; Galant, Letícia; Sonai, Beatriz; Vuolo, Francieli; Mina, Franciele; Pescador, Bruna; Dominguini, Diogo; Barichello, Tatiana; Quevedo, João; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe; Petronilho, Fabrícia

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis-associated encephalopathy (SAE) is associated with an increased rate of morbidity and mortality. It is not understood what the exact mechanism is for the brain dysfunction that occurs in septic patients, but brain inflammation and oxidative stress are a possible theory. Such events can occur through the alteration of molecules that perpetuate the inflammatory response. Thus, it is possible to postulate that CD40 may be involved in this process. The aim of this work is to evaluate the role of CD40CD40L pathway activation in brain dysfunction associated with sepsis in an animal model. Microglia activation induces the upregulation of CD40CD40L, both in vitro and in vivo. The inhibition of microglia activation decreases levels of CD40CD40L in the brain and decreases brain inflammation, oxidative damage and blood brain barrier dysfunction. Despite this, anti-CD40 treatment does not improve mortality in this model. However, it is able to improve long-term cognitive impairment in sepsis survivors. In conclusion, there is a major involvement of the CD40CD40L signaling pathway in long-term brain dysfunction in an animal model of sepsis. PMID:25822797

  4. CD73 Is Critical for the Resolution of Murine Colonic Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret S. Bynoe

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available CD73 is a glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-(GPI- linked membrane protein that catalyzes the extracellular dephosphorylation of adenosine monophosphate (AMP to adenosine. Adenosine is a negative regulator of inflammation and prevents excessive cellular damage. We investigated the role of extracellular adenosine in the intestinal mucosa during the development of Dextran-Sulfate-Sodium-(DSS-salt-induced colitis in mice that lack CD73 (CD73−/− and are unable to synthesize extracellular adenosine. We have found that, compared to wild-type (WT mice, CD73−/− mice are highly susceptible to DSS-induced colitis. CD73−/− mice exhibit pronounced weight loss, slower weight recovery, an increase in gut permeability, a decrease in expression of tight junctional adhesion molecules, as well as unresolved inflammation following the removal of DSS. Moreover, colonic epithelia in CD73−/− mice exhibited increased TLR9 expression, high levels of IL-1β and TNF-α, and constitutive activation of NF-κB. We conclude that CD73 expression in the colon is critical for regulating the magnitude and the resolution of colonic immune responses.

  5. Clinical Value of CD24 Expression in Retinoblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The expression of CD24 has been detected in a wide variety of human malignancies. Downregulation of CD24 inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis in tumor cells, whereas its upregulation increases tumor growth and metastasis. However, no data on CD24 protein levels in retinoblastoma are available, and the mechanism of CD24 involvement in retinoblastoma progress has not been elucidated. The aim of this study was to explore the expression profile of CD24 in the retinoblastoma tumor samples and to correlate with clinicopathological parameters. Methods. Immunohistochemistry was performed for CD24 on the archival paraffin sections of retinoblastoma and correlated with clinicopathological features. Western blotting was performed to confirm immunoreactivity results. Results. CD24 immunoreactivity was observed in 72.0% (36/50 of the retinoblastoma specimens. Among the 35 low-risk tumors, CD24 was expressed in 62.9% (22/35 tumors and among the 15 high-risk tumors, CD24 was expressed in 93.3% (14/15 tumors. High-risk tumors showed significantly increased expression of CD24 compared to tumors with low-risk (<0.05. Conclusions. This is the first correlation between CD24 expression and histopathology in human retinoblastoma. Our study showed increased expression of CD24 in high risk tumors compared to low risk tumors. Further functional studies are required to explore the role of CD24 in retinoblastoma.

  6. Anti-CD45 radioimmunotherapy with 90Y but not 177Lu is effective treatment in a syngeneic murine leukemia model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnnie J Orozco

    Full Text Available Radioimmunotherapy (RIT for treatment of hematologic malignancies has primarily employed monoclonal antibodies (Ab labeled with 131I or 90Y which have limitations, and alternative radionuclides are needed to facilitate wider adoption of RIT. We therefore compared the relative therapeutic efficacy and toxicity of anti-CD45 RIT employing 90Y and 177Lu in a syngeneic, disseminated murine myeloid leukemia (B6SJLF1/J model. Biodistribution studies showed that both 90Y- and 177Lu-anti-murine CD45 Ab conjugates (DOTA-30F11 targeted hematologic tissues, as at 24 hours 48.8 ± 21.2 and 156 ± 14.6% injected dose per gram of tissue (% ID/g of 90Y-DOTA-30F11 and 54.2 ± 9.5 and 199 ± 11.7% ID/g of 177Lu-DOTA-30F11 accumulated in bone marrow (BM and spleen, respectively. However, 90Y-DOTA-30F11 RIT demonstrated a dose-dependent survival benefit: 60% of mice treated with 300 µCi 90Y-DOTA-30F11 lived over 180 days after therapy, and mice treated with 100 µCi 90Y-DOTA-30F11 had a median survival 66 days. 90Y-anti-CD45 RIT was associated with transient, mild myelotoxicity without hepatic or renal toxicity. Conversely, 177Lu- anti-CD45 RIT yielded no long-term survivors. Thus, 90Y was more effective than 177Lu for anti-CD45 RIT of AML in this murine leukemia model.

  7. Tumor necrosis factor alpha blockade exacerbates murine psoriasis-like disease by enhancing Th17 function and decreasing expansion of Treg cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hak-Ling; Napierata, Lee; Stedman, Nancy; Benoit, Stephen; Collins, Mary; Nickerson-Nutter, Cheryl; Young, Deborah A

    2010-02-01

    Patients with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis respond well to tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) blockers in general; however, there is now mounting evidence that a small cohort of patients with rheumatoid arthritis who receive TNFalpha blockers develop psoriasis. This study was undertaken to explore the mechanisms underlying TNFalpha blockade-induced exacerbation of skin inflammation in murine psoriasis-like skin disease. Skin inflammation was induced in BALB/c scid/scid mice after they received CD4+CD45RB(high)CD25- (naive CD4) T cells from donor mice. These mice were treated with either anti-interleukin-12 (anti-IL-12)/23p40 antibody or murine TNFRII-Fc fusion protein and were examined for signs of disease, including histologic features, various cytokine levels in the serum, and cytokine or FoxP3 transcripts in the affected skin and draining lymph node (LN) cells. In a separate study, naive CD4+ T cells were differentiated into Th1 or Th17 lineages with anti-CD3/28 magnetic beads and appropriate cytokines in the presence or absence of TNFalpha. Cytokine gene expression from these differentiated cells was also determined. Neutralization of TNFalpha exacerbated skin inflammation and markedly enhanced the expression of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1beta, IL-6, IL-17, IL-21, and IL-22 but suppressed FoxP3 expression in the skin and reduced the number of FoxP3-positive Treg cells in the draining LNs. TNFalpha also demonstrated a divergent role during priming and reactivation of naive T cells. These results reveal a novel immunoregulatory role of TNFalpha on Th17 and Treg cells in some individuals, which may account for the exacerbation of skin inflammation in some patients who receive anti-TNF treatments.

  8. 1.8 Å structure of murine GITR ligand dimer expressed in Drosophila melanogaster S2 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chattopadhyay, Kausik; Ramagopal, Udupi A.; Nathenson, Stanley G.; Almo, Steven C.

    2009-01-01

    1.8 Å X-ray crystal structure of mouse GITRL expressed in D. melanogaster S2 cells shows an identical ‘strand-exchanged’ dimeric assembly similar to that observed previously for the E. coli-expressed protein. Glucocorticoid-induced TNF receptor ligand (GITRL), a prominent member of the TNF superfamily, activates its receptor on both effector and regulatory T cells to generate critical costimulatory signals that have been implicated in a wide range of T-cell immune functions. The crystal structures of murine and human orthologs of GITRL recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli have previously been determined. In contrast to all classical TNF structures, including the human GITRL structure, murine GITRL demonstrated a unique ‘strand-exchanged’ dimeric organization. Such a novel assembly behavior indicated a dramatic impact on receptor activation as well as on the signaling mechanism associated with the murine GITRL costimulatory system. In this present work, the 1.8 Å resolution crystal structure of murine GITRL expressed in Drosophila melanogaster S2 cells is reported. The eukaryotic protein-expression system allows transport of the recombinant protein into the extracellular culture medium, thus maximizing the possibility of obtaining correctly folded material devoid of any folding/assembly artifacts that are often suspected with E. coli-expressed proteins. The S2 cell-expressed murine GITRL adopts an identical ‘strand-exchanged’ dimeric structure to that observed for the E. coli-expressed protein, thus conclusively demonstrating the novel quaternary structure assembly behavior of murine GITRL

  9. 1.8 Å structure of murine GITR ligand dimer expressed in Drosophila melanogaster S2 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chattopadhyay, Kausik [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York 10461 (United States); Ramagopal, Udupi A. [Department of Biochemistry, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York 10461 (United States); Nathenson, Stanley G., E-mail: nathenso@aecom.yu.edu [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York 10461 (United States); Department of Cell Biology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York 10461 (United States); Almo, Steven C., E-mail: nathenso@aecom.yu.edu [Department of Biochemistry, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York 10461 (United States); Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York 10461 (United States); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York 10461 (United States)

    2009-05-01

    1.8 Å X-ray crystal structure of mouse GITRL expressed in D. melanogaster S2 cells shows an identical ‘strand-exchanged’ dimeric assembly similar to that observed previously for the E. coli-expressed protein. Glucocorticoid-induced TNF receptor ligand (GITRL), a prominent member of the TNF superfamily, activates its receptor on both effector and regulatory T cells to generate critical costimulatory signals that have been implicated in a wide range of T-cell immune functions. The crystal structures of murine and human orthologs of GITRL recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli have previously been determined. In contrast to all classical TNF structures, including the human GITRL structure, murine GITRL demonstrated a unique ‘strand-exchanged’ dimeric organization. Such a novel assembly behavior indicated a dramatic impact on receptor activation as well as on the signaling mechanism associated with the murine GITRL costimulatory system. In this present work, the 1.8 Å resolution crystal structure of murine GITRL expressed in Drosophila melanogaster S2 cells is reported. The eukaryotic protein-expression system allows transport of the recombinant protein into the extracellular culture medium, thus maximizing the possibility of obtaining correctly folded material devoid of any folding/assembly artifacts that are often suspected with E. coli-expressed proteins. The S2 cell-expressed murine GITRL adopts an identical ‘strand-exchanged’ dimeric structure to that observed for the E. coli-expressed protein, thus conclusively demonstrating the novel quaternary structure assembly behavior of murine GITRL.

  10. ImmunoPET Imaging of Murine CD4+ T Cells Using Anti-CD4 Cys-Diabody: Effects of Protein Dose on T Cell Function and Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freise, Amanda C; Zettlitz, Kirstin A; Salazar, Felix B; Lu, Xiang; Tavaré, Richard; Wu, Anna M

    2017-08-01

    Molecular imaging of CD4 + T cells throughout the body has implications for monitoring autoimmune disease and immunotherapy of cancer. Given the key role of these cells in regulating immunity, it is important to develop a biologically inert probe. GK1.5 cys-diabody (cDb), a previously developed anti-mouse CD4 antibody fragment, was tested at different doses to assess its effects on positron emission tomography (PET) imaging and CD4 + T cell viability, proliferation, CD4 expression, and function. The effect of protein dose on image contrast (lymphoid tissue-to-muscle ratio) was assessed by administering different amounts of 89 Zr-labeled GK1.5 cDb to mice followed by PET imaging and ex vivo biodistribution analysis. To assess impact of GK1.5 cDb on T cell biology, GK1.5 cDb was incubated with T cells in vitro or administered intravenously to C57BL/6 mice at multiple protein doses. CD4 expression and T cell proliferation were analyzed with flow cytometry and cytokines were assayed. For immunoPET imaging, the lowest protein dose of 2 μg of 89 Zr-labeled GK1.5 cDb resulted in significantly higher % injected dose/g in inguinal lymph nodes (ILN) and spleen compared to the 12-μg protein dose. In vivo administration of GK1.5 cDb at the high dose of 40 μg caused a transient decrease in CD4 expression in spleen, blood, lymph nodes, and thymus, which recovered within 3 days postinjection; this effect was reduced, although not abrogated, when 2 μg was administered. Proliferation was inhibited in vivo in ILN but not the spleen by injection of 40 μg GK1.5 cDb. Concentrations of GK1.5 cDb in excess of 25 nM significantly inhibited CD4 + T cell proliferation and interferon-γ production in vitro. Overall, using low-dose GK1.5 cDb minimized biological effects on CD4 + T cells. Low-dose GK1.5 cDb yields high-contrast immunoPET images with minimal effects on T cell biology in vitro and in vivo and may be a useful tool for investigating CD4 + T cells in the context of

  11. Adenoviral vaccination combined with CD40 stimulation and CTLA-4 blockage can lead to complete tumor regression in a murine melanoma model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Maria Rathmann; Holst, Peter J; Steffensen, Maria Abildgaard

    2010-01-01

    that the delay in tumor growth can be converted to complete regression and long-term survival in 30-40% of the mice by a booster vaccination plus combinational treatment with agonistic anti-CD40 monoclonal antibodies (mAb) and anti-CTLA-4 mAb. Regarding the mechanism underlying the improved clinical effect......, analysis of the tumor-specific response revealed a significantly prolonged tumor-specific CD8 T cell response in spleens of the mice receiving the combinational treatment compared with mice receiving either treatment individually. Matching this, CD8 T cell depletion completely prevented tumor control...

  12. Involvement of nuclear factor κB in platelet CD40 signaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hachem, Ahmed; Yacoub, Daniel; Zaid, Younes; Mourad, Walid; Merhi, Yahye

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► sCD40L induces TRAF2 association to CD40 and NF-κB activation in platelets. ► IκBα phosphorylation downstream of CD40L/CD40 signaling is independent of p38 MAPK phosphorylation. ► IκBα is required for sCD40L-induced platelet activation and potentiation of aggregation. -- Abstract: CD40 ligand (CD40L) is a thrombo-inflammatory molecule that predicts cardiovascular events. Platelets constitute the major source of soluble CD40L (sCD40L), which has been shown to potentiate platelet activation and aggregation, in a CD40-dependent manner, via p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) and Rac1 signaling. In many cells, the CD40L/CD40 dyad also induces activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB). Given that platelets contain NF-κB, we hypothesized that it may be involved in platelet CD40 signaling and function. In human platelets, sCD40L induces association of CD40 with its adaptor protein the tumor necrosis factor receptor associated factor 2 and triggers phosphorylation of IκBα, which are abolished by CD40L blockade. Inhibition of IκBα phosphorylation reverses sCD40L-induced IκBα phosphorylation without affecting p38 MAPK phosphorylation. On the other hand, inhibition of p38 MAPK phosphorylation has no effect on IκBα phosphorylation, indicating a divergence in the signaling pathway originating from CD40 upon its ligation. In functional studies, inhibition of IκBα phosphorylation reverses sCD40L-induced platelet activation and potentiation of platelet aggregation in response to a sub-threshold concentration of collagen. This study demonstrates that the sCD40L/CD40 axis triggers NF-κB activation in platelets. This signaling pathway plays a critical role in platelet activation and aggregation upon sCD40L stimulation and may represent an important target against thrombo-inflammatory disorders.

  13. Gradual Increase of FcγRIIIa/CD16a Expression and Shift toward IFN-γ Secretion during Differentiation of CD56dim Natural Killer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurie Lajoie

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cell effector functions include cytotoxicity and secretion of cytokines such as interferon-γ (IFN-γ. The immature CD56bright subset of human NK cells lacks expression of FcγRIIIa/CD16a, one of the low-affinity immunoglobulin G receptors, or exhibits low-density expression (CD56brightCD16−/dim and produces IFN-γ in response to cytokine stimulation, whereas the mature CD56dimCD16+ subset is the most cytotoxic one. A further differentiation/maturation of the latter subset according to the gradual loss of NKG2A and/or gain of KIR2DL (CD158a and CD158b has been demonstrated and the ability to produce IFN-γ in response to activating receptor (AR co-engagement is gradually acquired during terminal differentiation. In the course of flow cytometry analysis of CD56dim NK cells, we noted a substantial intraindividual heterogeneity of expression of FcγRIIIa. FcγRIIIa is unique among ARs: it does not require the co-engagement of other ARs to induce substantial cytotoxicity or cytokine synthesis in CD56dim cells. We, therefore, investigated whether individual differentiation/maturation of polyclonal CD56dim NK cells defined by expression of NKG2A/KIR2DL is related to FcγRIIIa expression and to the heterogeneity of NK cell responses upon FcγRIIIa engagement. When we analyzed unstimulated CD56dim cells by increasing level of FcγRIIIa expression, we found that the proportion of the more differentiated CD158a,h+ and/or CD158b,j+ cells and that of the less differentiated NKG2A+ cells gradually increased and decreased, respectively. FcγRIIIa engagement by using plate-bound murine anti-CD16 monoclonal antibody (mAb or rituximab or trastuzumab (two therapeutic mAbs, resulted in donor-dependent partial segregation of IFN-γ-producing and/or degranulating CD56dim cells. Importantly, the proportion of CD158a,h/b,j+ cells and that of NKG2A+ cells was increased and decreased, respectively, IFN-γ-producing cells, whereas these proportions

  14. CD52 expression on CD4+ T cells in HIV-positive individuals on cART

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vojdeman, Fie Juhl; Gaardbo, Julie Christine; Hartling, Hans Jakob

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Human immune defect virus (HIV) persists in a latent state in quiescent CD4+ T cells preventing eradication of HIV. CD52 is a surface molecule modulated by HIV. We aimed at examining factors related to CD52 expression on CD4+ T cells in HIV-positive individuals and the impact...... of initiation of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). METHODS: Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from 18 HIV-positive individuals and 10 uninfected age and gender matched controls were examined by flow cytometry for CD38 and CD52 expression on CD4+ T cells. Stimulation assays were performed on 8...... healthy blood donors to determine a cut-off for CD52 expression. RESULTS: All examined CD4+ T cells expressed CD52. However, both CD4+ T cells with higher (CD52++) and with lower CD52 expression (CD52dim) were found in HIV-positive individuals compared to uninfected controls. Two % CD52dim cells defined...

  15. Involvement of nuclear factor {kappa}B in platelet CD40 signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hachem, Ahmed [Laboratory of Thrombosis and Hemostasis, Montreal Heart Institute, 5000 Belanger, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H1T 1C8 (Canada); Yacoub, Daniel [Laboratory of Thrombosis and Hemostasis, Montreal Heart Institute, 5000 Belanger, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H1T 1C8 (Canada); Centre Hospitalier Universite de Montreal, 264 boul. Rene-Levesque est, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H2X 1P1 (Canada); Zaid, Younes [Laboratory of Thrombosis and Hemostasis, Montreal Heart Institute, 5000 Belanger, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H1T 1C8 (Canada); Mourad, Walid [Universite de Montreal, Department of Medicine, 2900 boul. Edouard-Montpetit, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3T 1J4 (Canada); Centre Hospitalier Universite de Montreal, 264 boul. Rene-Levesque est, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H2X 1P1 (Canada); Merhi, Yahye, E-mail: yahye.merhi@icm-mhi.org [Laboratory of Thrombosis and Hemostasis, Montreal Heart Institute, 5000 Belanger, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H1T 1C8 (Canada); Universite de Montreal, Department of Medicine, 2900 boul. Edouard-Montpetit, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3T 1J4 (Canada)

    2012-08-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer sCD40L induces TRAF2 association to CD40 and NF-{kappa}B activation in platelets. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer I{kappa}B{alpha} phosphorylation downstream of CD40L/CD40 signaling is independent of p38 MAPK phosphorylation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer I{kappa}B{alpha} is required for sCD40L-induced platelet activation and potentiation of aggregation. -- Abstract: CD40 ligand (CD40L) is a thrombo-inflammatory molecule that predicts cardiovascular events. Platelets constitute the major source of soluble CD40L (sCD40L), which has been shown to potentiate platelet activation and aggregation, in a CD40-dependent manner, via p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) and Rac1 signaling. In many cells, the CD40L/CD40 dyad also induces activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-{kappa}B). Given that platelets contain NF-{kappa}B, we hypothesized that it may be involved in platelet CD40 signaling and function. In human platelets, sCD40L induces association of CD40 with its adaptor protein the tumor necrosis factor receptor associated factor 2 and triggers phosphorylation of I{kappa}B{alpha}, which are abolished by CD40L blockade. Inhibition of I{kappa}B{alpha} phosphorylation reverses sCD40L-induced I{kappa}B{alpha} phosphorylation without affecting p38 MAPK phosphorylation. On the other hand, inhibition of p38 MAPK phosphorylation has no effect on I{kappa}B{alpha} phosphorylation, indicating a divergence in the signaling pathway originating from CD40 upon its ligation. In functional studies, inhibition of I{kappa}B{alpha} phosphorylation reverses sCD40L-induced platelet activation and potentiation of platelet aggregation in response to a sub-threshold concentration of collagen. This study demonstrates that the sCD40L/CD40 axis triggers NF-{kappa}B activation in platelets. This signaling pathway plays a critical role in platelet activation and aggregation upon sCD40L stimulation and may represent an important target against thrombo

  16. Nanoparticles containing siRNA to silence CD4 and CCR5 reduce expression of these receptors and inhibit HIV-1 infection in human female reproductive tract tissue explants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan K. Eszterhas

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Human Immunodeficiency Virus-type 1 (HIV- 1 binds to CD4 and CCR5 receptors on target cells in the human female reproductive tract. We sought to determine whether reducing levels of messenger RNA (mRNA transcripts that encode these receptors in female reproductive tract cells could protect mucosal tissue explants from HIV- 1 infection. Explants prepared from the endometrium, endocervix, and ectocervix of hysterectomy tissues from HIV-1 sero-negative women were exposed to nanoparticles containing CD4- and CCR5-specific short-interfering RNA (siRNA sequences. Explants were then exposed two days later to HIV-1, and HIV-1 reverse transcripts were measured five days post-infection. Explants treated with nanoparticles containing CD4- and CCR5-specific siRNA showed reduced levels of CD4 and CCR5 transcripts, and significantly lower levels of HIV-1 reverse transcripts compared to those treated with an irrelevant siRNA. In female reproductive tract explants and in peripheral blood cell cultures, siRNA transfection induced the secretion of IFN-alpha (IFN-α, a potent antiviral cytokine. In female mice, murine-specific Cd4-siRNA nanoparticles instilled within the uterus significantly reduced murine Cd4 transcripts by day 3. Our findings demonstrate that siRNA nanoparticles reduce expression of HIV-1 infectivity receptors in human female reproductive tract tissues and also inhibit HIV-1 infection. Murine studies demonstrate that nanoparticles can penetrate the reproductive tract tissues in vivo and silence gene expression. The induction of IFN-α after siRNA transfection can potentially contribute to the antiviral effect. These findings support the therapeutic development of nanoparticles to deliver siRNA molecules to silence host cell receptors in the female reproductive tract as a novel microbicide to inhibit mucosal HIV-1 transmission.

  17. CD34 Antigen and the MPL Receptor Expression Defines a Novel Class of Human Cord Blood-Derived Primitive Hematopoietic Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Yoshikazu; Takahashi, Masaya; Sumide, Keisuke; Kawamura, Hiroshi; Nakatsuka, Ryusuke; Fujioka, Tatsuya; Sonoda, Yoshiaki

    2017-06-09

    In the murine hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) compartment, thrombopoietin (THPO)/MPL (THPO receptor) signaling plays an important role in the maintenance of adult quiescent HSCs. However, the role of THPO/MPL signaling in the human primitive HSC compartment has not yet been elucidated. We have identified very primitive human cord blood (CB)-derived CD34- severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID)-repopulating cells (SRCs) using the intra-bone marrow injection method. In this study, we investigated the roles of the MPL expression in the human primitive HSC compartment. The SRC activities of the highly purified CB-derived 18Lin-CD34+/-MPL+/- cells were analyzed using NOG mice. In the primary recipient mice, nearly all mice that received CD34+/-MPL+/- cells were repopulated with human CD45+ cells. Nearly all of these mice that received CD34+MPL+/- and CD34-MPL- cells showed a secondary repopulation. Interestingly, the secondary recipient mice that received CD34+/-MPL- cells showed a distinct tertiary repopulation. These results clearly indicate that the CD34+/- SRCs not expressing MPL sustain a long-term (LT) (>1 year) human cell repopulation in NOG mice. Moreover, CD34- SRCs generate CD34+CD38-CD90+ SRCs in vitro and in vivo. These findings provide a new concept that CD34-MPL- SRCs reside at the apex of the human HSC hierarchy.

  18. Loss of CD34 expression in aging human choriocapillaris endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elliott H Sohn

    Full Text Available Structural and gene expression changes in the microvasculature of the human choroid occur during normal aging and age-related macular degeneration (AMD. In this study, we sought to determine the impact of aging and AMD on expression of the endothelial cell glycoprotein CD34. Sections from 58 human donor eyes were categorized as either young (under age 40, age-matched controls (> age 60 without AMD, or AMD affected (>age 60 with early AMD, geographic atrophy, or choroidal neovascularization. Dual labeling of sections with Ulex europaeus agglutinin-I lectin (UEA-I and CD34 antibodies was performed, and the percentage of capillaries labeled with UEA-I but negative for anti-CD34 was determined. In addition, published databases of mouse and human retinal pigment epithelium-choroid were evaluated and CD34 expression compared between young and old eyes. Immunohistochemical studies revealed that while CD34 and UEA-I were colocalized in young eyes, there was variable loss of CD34 immunoreactivity in older donor eyes. While differences between normal aging and AMD were not significant, the percentage of CD34 negative capillaries in old eyes, compared to young eyes, was highly significant (p = 3.8×10(-6. Endothelial cells in neovascular membranes were invariably CD34 positive. Published databases show either a significant decrease in Cd34 (mouse or a trend toward decreased CD34 (human in aging. These findings suggest that UEA-I and endogenous alkaline phosphatase activity are more consistent markers of aging endothelial cells in the choroid, and suggest a possible mechanism for the increased inflammatory milieu in the aging choroid.

  19. GPBAR1/TGR5 mediates bile acid-induced cytokine expression in murine Kupffer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guiyu Lou

    Full Text Available GPBAR1/TGR5 is a novel plasma membrane-bound G protein-coupled bile acid (BA receptor. BAs are known to induce the expression of inflammatory cytokines in the liver with unknown mechanism. Here we show that without other external stimuli, TGR5 activation alone induced the expression of interleukin 1β (IL-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α in murine macrophage cell line RAW264.7 or murine Kupffer cells. The TGR5-mediated increase of pro-inflammatory cytokine expression was suppressed by JNK inhibition. Moreover, the induced pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in mouse liver by 1% cholic acid (CA diet was blunted in JNK-/- mice. TGR5 activation by its ligands enhanced the phosphorylation levels, DNA-binding and trans-activities of c-Jun and ATF2 transcription factors. Finally, the induced pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in Kupffer cells by TGR5 activation correlated with the suppression of Cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (Cyp7a1 expression in murine hepatocytes. These results suggest that TGR5 mediates the BA-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine production in murine Kupffer cells through JNK-dependent pathway. This novel role of TGR5 may correlate to the suppression of Cyp7a1 expression in hepatocytes and contribute to the delicate BA feedback regulation.

  20. Human CD4 restores normal T cell development and function in mice deficient in murine CD4

    OpenAIRE

    1994-01-01

    The ability of a human coreceptor to function in mice was investigated by generating human CD4 (hCD4)-expressing transgenic mice on a mouse CD4-deficient (mCD4-/-) background. From developing thymocyte to matured T lymphocyte functions, hCD4 was shown to be physiologically active. By examining the expansion and deletion of specific V beta T cell families in mutated mice with and without hCD4, it was found that hCD4 can participate in positive and negative selection. Mature hCD4 single positiv...

  1. IL-10-produced by human transitional B-cells down-regulates CD86 expression on B-cells leading to inhibition of CD4+T-cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nova-Lamperti, Estefania; Fanelli, Giorgia; Becker, Pablo D; Chana, Prabhjoat; Elgueta, Raul; Dodd, Philippa C; Lord, Graham M; Lombardi, Giovanna; Hernandez-Fuentes, Maria P

    2016-01-22

    A novel subset of human regulatory B-cells has recently been described. They arise from within the transitional B-cell subpopulation and are characterised by the production of IL-10. They appear to be of significant importance in regulating T-cell immunity in vivo. Despite this important function, the molecular mechanisms by which they control T-cell activation are incompletely defined. Here we show that transitional B-cells produced more IL-10 and expressed higher levels of IL-10 receptor after CD40 engagement compared to other B-cell subsets. Furthermore, under this stimulatory condition, CD86 expressed by transitional B-cells was down regulated and T-cell proliferation was reduced. We provide evidence to demonstrate that the down-regulation of CD86 expression by transitional B-cells was due to the autocrine effect of IL-10, which in turn leads to decreased T-cell proliferation and TNF-α production. This analysis was further extended to peripheral B-cells in kidney transplant recipients. We observed that B-cells from patients tolerant to the graft maintained higher IL-10 production after CD40 ligation, which correlates with lower CD86 expression compared to patients with chronic rejection. Hence, the results obtained in this study shed light on a new alternative mechanism by which transitional B-cells inhibit T-cell proliferation and cytokine production.

  2. IL-10-produced by human transitional B-cells down-regulates CD86 expression on B-cells leading to inhibition of CD4+T-cell responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nova-Lamperti, Estefania; Fanelli, Giorgia; Becker, Pablo D.; Chana, Prabhjoat; Elgueta, Raul; Dodd, Philippa C.; Lord, Graham M.; Lombardi, Giovanna; Hernandez-Fuentes, Maria P.

    2016-01-01

    A novel subset of human regulatory B-cells has recently been described. They arise from within the transitional B-cell subpopulation and are characterised by the production of IL-10. They appear to be of significant importance in regulating T-cell immunity in vivo. Despite this important function, the molecular mechanisms by which they control T-cell activation are incompletely defined. Here we show that transitional B-cells produced more IL-10 and expressed higher levels of IL-10 receptor after CD40 engagement compared to other B-cell subsets. Furthermore, under this stimulatory condition, CD86 expressed by transitional B-cells was down regulated and T-cell proliferation was reduced. We provide evidence to demonstrate that the down-regulation of CD86 expression by transitional B-cells was due to the autocrine effect of IL-10, which in turn leads to decreased T-cell proliferation and TNF-α production. This analysis was further extended to peripheral B-cells in kidney transplant recipients. We observed that B-cells from patients tolerant to the graft maintained higher IL-10 production after CD40 ligation, which correlates with lower CD86 expression compared to patients with chronic rejection. Hence, the results obtained in this study shed light on a new alternative mechanism by which transitional B-cells inhibit T-cell proliferation and cytokine production. PMID:26795594

  3. Bone marrow-derived CD13+ cells sustain tumor progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dondossola, Eleonora; Corti, Angelo; Sidman, Richard L; Arap, Wadih; Pasqualini, Renata

    2014-01-01

    Non-malignant cells found within neoplastic lesions express alanyl (membrane) aminopeptidase (ANPEP, best known as CD13), and CD13-null mice exhibit limited tumor growth and angiogenesis. We have recently demonstrated that a subset of bone marrow-derived CD11b+CD13+ myeloid cells accumulate within neoplastic lesions in several murine models of transplantable cancer to promote angiogenesis. If these findings were confirmed in clinical settings, CD11b+CD13+ myeloid cells could become a non-malignant target for the development of novel anticancer regimens. PMID:25339996

  4. Expression of KAI1/CD82 and MRP-1/CD9 in transitional cell carcinoma of bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Xing; Zhang, Xu; Wu, Zhun; Ma, Xin; Ju, Zhenghua; Wang, Baojun; Shi, Taoping

    2007-02-01

    The expression of KAI1/CD82 and MRP-1/CD9 in transitional cell carcinoma of bladder (TCCB) and its clinical significance were investigated. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect KAI1/CD82 and MRP-1/CD9 protein expression in 52 TCCB specimens. Correlation between the expression of KAI1/CD82 and MRP-1/CD9 to clinicopathologic factors was statistically analyzed. The results showed that the positive rate of KAI1/CD82 and MRP-1/CD9 in TCCB was 50% and 61.5%, respectively. The MRP-1/CD9 and KAI1/CD82 expression was significantly associated with grade of TCCB (PMRP-1/CD9 or KAI1/CD82 expression and clinical stage of TCCB (P>0.05). The expression level of MRP-1/CD9 and KAI1/CD82 in recurrent TCCB samples was lower than that in non-recurrent samples (PMRP-1/CD9 expression was statistically significant (r=0.316, PMRP-1/CD9 expression may be important prognostic indicators and potentially useful for assessing the biological behavior of TCCB.

  5. Expression of COX-2, CD44v6 and CD147 and relationship with invasion and lymph node metastasis in hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Yang

    Full Text Available To assess the expression of COX-2,CD44v6 and CD147 in hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas and the three biomarkers correlation with tumor invasion and lymph node metastasis of Chinese people. 101 cases of surgically excised primary tumor were included in this study, and 40 tissues of epithelium adjacent to carcinoma were used as controls. We characterized the immunohistochemical expression of COX-2, CD44v6, and CD147 in 141 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues, and measured the mean optical density (OD of the positive area to identify the expression of the three bio-markers and relationship with tumor invasion and lymph node metastasis. Our study demonstrates that the expression of the COX-2 and CD147 were significantly increased in carcinoma tissues compared to the epithelium adjacent to carcinoma. We also observed that the expression of COX-2, CD44v6, and CD147 were significantly associated with T classification, lymph node metastasis and clinical stage. There was strong significant correlation among the three biomarkers as well. Additionally, we indicated that recurrence and ≥ P50 level of COX-2 expression had an independent prognostic effect on prognosis. In conclusion, the three biomarkers play important roles in tumor invasion and lymph node metastases and might be valuable indicators of tumor metastasis in hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

  6. Hesperidin Inhibits Inflammatory Response Induced by Aeromonas hydrophila Infection and Alters CD4+/CD8+ T Cell Ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelaziz S. A. Abuelsaad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Aeromonas hydrophila is an opportunistic bacterial pathogen that is associated with a number of human diseases. Hesperidin (HES has been reported to exert antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. Objectives. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential effect of HES treatment on inflammatory response induced by A. hydrophila infection in murine. Methods. A. hydrophila-infected mice were treated with HES at 250 mg/kg b.wt./week for 4 consecutive weeks. Phagocytosis, reactive oxygen species production, CD4+/CD8+ T cell ratio, and CD14 expression on intestinal infiltrating monocytes were evaluated. The expression of E-selectin and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 on stimulated HUVECs and RAW macrophage was evaluated. Results. Percentage of CD4+ T cells in the intestinal tissues of infected treated mice was highly significantly increased; however, phagocytic index, ROS production, CD8+ T cells percentage, and CD14 expression on monocytes were significantly reduced. On the other hand, HES significantly inhibited A-LPS- and A-ECP-induced E-selectin and ICAM-1 expression on HUVECs and ICAM-1 expression on RAW macrophage. Conclusion. Present data indicated that HES has a potential role in the suppression of inflammatory response induced by A. hydrophila toxins through downmodulation of ROS production and CD14 and adhesion molecules expression, as well as increase of CD4+/CD8+ cell ratio.

  7. Changes in Soluble CD18 in Murine Autoimmune Arthritis and Rheumatoid Arthritis Reflect Disease Establishment and Treatment Response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragstrup, Tue Wenzel; Jalilian, Babak; Keller, Kresten Krarup

    2016-01-01

    in murine models of rheumatoid arthritis. Methods The level of sCD18 was analyzed with a time-resolved immunoflourometric assay in 1) plasma from early treatment naïve RA patients during a treat-to-target strategy (the OPERA cohort), 2) plasma from chronic RA patients, 3) serum from SKG and CIA mice...... associated with radiographic progression. Correspondingly, the serum level of sCD18 was decreased in SKG mice 6 weeks after arthritis induction compared with healthy littermates. The sCD18 levels in both SKG and CIA mice exhibited a biphasic course after arthritis induction with an initial increase above...

  8. MAP kinase pathways and calcitonin influence CD44 alternate isoform expression in prostate cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robbins, Eric W; Travanty, Emily A; Yang, Kui; Iczkowski, Kenneth A

    2008-01-01

    Dysregulated expression and splicing of cell adhesion marker CD44 is found in many types of cancer. In prostate cancer (PC) specifically, the standard isoform (CD44s) has been found to be downregulated compared with benign tissue whereas predominant variant isoform CD44v7-10 is upregulated. Mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways and paracrine calcitonin are two common factors linked to dysregulated expression and splicing of CD44 in cancer. Calcitonin has been found to increase proliferation and invasion in PC acting through the protein kinase A pathway. In androgen-independent PC with known high CD44v7-10 expression, CD44 total and CD44v7-10 RNA or protein were assessed in response to exogenous and endogenous calcitonin and to inhibitors of protein kinase A, MEK, JNK, or p38 kinase. Benign cells and calcitonin receptor-negative PC cells were also tested. MEK or p38 but not JNK reduced CD44 total RNA by 40%–65% in cancer and benign cells. Inhibition of protein kinase A reduced CD44 total and v7-10 protein expression. In calcitonin receptor-positive cells only, calcitonin increased CD44 variant RNA and protein by 3 h and persisting to 48 h, apparently dependent on an uninhibited p38 pathway. Cells with constitutive CT expression showed an increase in CD44v7-10 mRNA but a decrease in CD44 total RNA. The MEK pathway increases CD44 RNA, while calcitonin, acting through the protein kinase A and p38 pathway, facilitates variant splicing. These findings could be used in the formulation of therapeutic methods for PC targeting CD44 alternate splicing

  9. Expression and prognostic value of putative cancer stem cell markers CD117 and CD15 in choroidal and ciliary body melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukenda, Adrian; Dotlic, Snjezana; Vukojevic, Nenad; Saric, Borna; Vranic, Semir; Zarkovic, Kamelija

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to immunohistochemically investigate the expression and prognostic significance of putative cancer stem cell markers CD117 (c-kit), CD34, CD20 and CD15 in a cohort of patients with primary choroidal and ciliary body melanoma. The immunohistochemical expression of these markers was evaluated using 3,3'-diaminobenzidine tetrahydrochloride (DAB) and 3-amino-9-ethylcarbazole (AEC) chromogens on paraffin-embedded tissue samples from 40 patients who underwent enucleation in the period from 1985 through 2000. Thirty-one patients had adequate tissue specimens for the analysis. CD117 overexpression was observed in 12 of the 31 samples (39%) when AEC chromogen was used and in 14 of 26 (54%) samples when DAB was used. CD15 positivity was seen in three out of 30 (10%) samples with AEC and in six out of 26 (23%) samples with DAB. CD20 and CD34 exhibited no positivity in the tested samples. During the average follow-up time of 8.7 years (range 0.5-22 years), 17 patients (55%) died due to metastatic disease. The Kaplan-Meier plots showed a significantly shorter overall and disease-free survival in CD117-positive patients when the AEC chromogen was used. CD15 expression was not associated with patients' survival. In multivariate analysis, patients expressing the CD117 AEC had 4.13 times higher risk of lethal outcome in comparison with CD117 AEC negative patients. Our retrospective cohort study has for the first time demonstrated a small proportion of CD15-positive uveal melanomas. CD117 AEC overexpression was associated with a worse outcome in patients with choroidal and ciliary body melanoma. Further studies should confirm the validity of these observations and their potential for targeted treatment modalities. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  10. CD40-CD40L interactions partly participate in the endothelial cel

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-10-17

    Oct 17, 2011 ... therapies for its advantages, for instance they can carry. *Corresponding author. ... Vascular endothelial cells (ECs) represent the natural barrier between the blood ..... the kinetics of CD40L-, interleukin 1-, or tumor necrosis.

  11. Dendritic cell based PSMA immunotherapy for prostate cancer using a CD40-targeted adenovirus vector.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Briana Jill Williams

    Full Text Available Human prostate tumor vaccine and gene therapy trials using ex vivo methods to prime dendritic cells (DCs with prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA have been somewhat successful, but to date the lengthy ex vivo manipulation of DCs has limited the widespread clinical utility of this approach. Our goal was to improve upon cancer vaccination with tumor antigens by delivering PSMA via a CD40-targeted adenovirus vector directly to DCs as an efficient means for activation and antigen presentation to T-cells. To test this approach, we developed a mouse model of prostate cancer by generating clonal derivatives of the mouse RM-1 prostate cancer cell line expressing human PSMA (RM-1-PSMA cells. To maximize antigen presentation in target cells, both MHC class I and TAP protein expression was induced in RM-1 cells by transduction with an Ad vector expressing interferon-gamma (Ad5-IFNγ. Administering DCs infected ex vivo with CD40-targeted Ad5-huPSMA, as well as direct intraperitoneal injection of the vector, resulted in high levels of tumor-specific CTL responses against RM-1-PSMA cells pretreated with Ad5-IFNγ as target cells. CD40 targeting significantly improved the therapeutic antitumor efficacy of Ad5-huPSMA encoding PSMA when combined with Ad5-IFNγ in the RM-1-PSMA model. These results suggest that a CD-targeted adenovirus delivering PSMA may be effective clinically for prostate cancer immunotherapy.

  12. CD133 expression is not restricted to stem cells, and both CD133+ and CD133– metastatic colon cancer cells initiate tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shmelkov, Sergey V.; Butler, Jason M.; Hooper, Andrea T.; Hormigo, Adilia; Kushner, Jared; Milde, Till; St. Clair, Ryan; Baljevic, Muhamed; White, Ian; Jin, David K.; Chadburn, Amy; Murphy, Andrew J.; Valenzuela, David M.; Gale, Nicholas W.; Thurston, Gavin; Yancopoulos, George D.; D’Angelica, Michael; Kemeny, Nancy; Lyden, David; Rafii, Shahin

    2008-01-01

    Colon cancer stem cells are believed to originate from a rare population of putative CD133+ intestinal stem cells. Recent publications suggest that a small subset of colon cancer cells expresses CD133, and that only these CD133+ cancer cells are capable of tumor initiation. However, the precise contribution of CD133+ tumor-initiating cells in mediating colon cancer metastasis remains unknown. Therefore, to temporally and spatially track the expression of CD133 in adult mice and during tumorigenesis, we generated a knockin lacZ reporter mouse (CD133lacZ/+), in which the expression of lacZ is driven by the endogenous CD133 promoters. Using this model and immunostaining, we discovered that CD133 expression in colon is not restricted to stem cells; on the contrary, CD133 is ubiquitously expressed on differentiated colonic epithelium in both adult mice and humans. Using Il10–/–CD133lacZ mice, in which chronic inflammation in colon leads to adenocarcinomas, we demonstrated that CD133 is expressed on a full gamut of colonic tumor cells, which express epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM). Similarly, CD133 is widely expressed by human primary colon cancer epithelial cells, whereas the CD133– population is composed mostly of stromal and inflammatory cells. Conversely, CD133 expression does not identify the entire population of epithelial and tumor-initiating cells in human metastatic colon cancer. Indeed, both CD133+ and CD133– metastatic tumor subpopulations formed colonospheres in in vitro cultures and were capable of long-term tumorigenesis in a NOD/SCID serial xenotransplantation model. Moreover, metastatic CD133– cells form more aggressive tumors and express typical phenotypic markers of cancer-initiating cells, including CD44 (CD44+CD24–), whereas the CD133+ fraction is composed of CD44lowCD24+ cells. Collectively, our data suggest that CD133 expression is not restricted to intestinal stem or cancer-initiating cells, and during the metastatic

  13. Murine cell glycolipids customization by modular expression of glycosyltransferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cid, Emili; Yamamoto, Miyako; Buschbeck, Marcus; Yamamoto, Fumiichiro

    2013-01-01

    Functional analysis of glycolipids has been hampered by their complex nature and combinatorial expression in cells and tissues. We report an efficient and easy method to generate cells with specific glycolipids. In our proof of principle experiments we have demonstrated the customized expression of two relevant glycosphingolipids on murine fibroblasts, stage-specific embryonic antigen 3 (SSEA-3), a marker for stem cells, and Forssman glycolipid, a xenoantigen. Sets of genes encoding glycosyltansferases were transduced by viral infection followed by multi-color cell sorting based on coupled expression of fluorescent proteins.

  14. CD133 expression in osteosarcoma and derivation of CD133⁺ cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ji; Zhong, Xiao-Yan; Li, Zong-Yu; Cai, Jin-Fang; Zou, Lin; Li, Jian-Min; Yang, Tao; Liu, Wei

    2013-02-01

    Cluster of differentiation 133 (CD133) is recognized as a stem cell marker for normal and cancerous tissues. Using cell culture and real‑time fluorescent polymerase chain reaction, CD133 expression was analyzed in osteosarcoma tissue and Saos‑2 cell lines. In addition, cancer stem cell‑related gene expression in the Saos‑2 cell line was determined to explore the mechanisms underlying tumorigenesis and high drug resistance in osteosarcoma. CD133+ cells were found to be widely distributed in various types of osteosarcoma tissue. Following cell culture, cells entered the G2/M and S cell cycle stages from G0/G1. Levels of CD133+ cells decreased to normal levels rapidly over the course of cell culture. Colony forming efficiency was higher in the CD133+ compared with the CD133‑ subpopulation of Saos‑2 cells. Expression levels of stem cell‑related genes, including multidrug resistance protein 1 (MDR1) and sex determining region Y‑box 2 (Sox2) in the CD133+ subpopulation of cells were found to be significantly higher compared with the CD133‑ subpopulation. These observations indicate that CD133+ Saos‑2 cells exhibit stem cell characteristics, including low abundance, quiescence and a high potential to undergo differentiation, as well as expression of key stem cell regulatory and drug resistance genes, which may cause osteosarcoma and high drug resistance.

  15. Expression of CD56 in patients with adenomyosis and its correlation with dysmenorrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fei; Shi, Xixi; Qin, Xiaoyan; Wen, ZeQing; Zhao, Xingbo; Li, Changzhong

    2015-11-01

    To investigate the expression of CD56 in endometrial samples from patients with adenomyosis and its relationship with menstrual cycle phase and severity of dysmenorrhea. 40 patients with histologically proved adenomyosis (proliferative n=20; secretory n=20) and dysmenorrhea were examined in this study, control groups includes 20 patients with adenomyosis without dysmenorrhea (main complaint: menorrhagia) and 20 patients without adenomyosis who had undergone hysterectomy for non-endometrial pathology (no dysmenorrhea medical history). Immunohistochemical staining against CD56 was performed for the eutopic and ectopic endometrium from patients with adenomyosis and the control samples. The expression of CD56 was determined by calculating the H-score and the severity of dysmenorrhea was determined using the visual analogue scale. The menstrual cycle status and the disease severity were compared to the levels of staining. CD56 was expressed mainly in the endometrial glandular epithelium in patients with adenomyosis and normal endometrium. The epithelial staining intensity of CD56 in ectopic lesions of adenomyosis with dysmenorrhea was obviously higher than in the corresponding eutopic endometrium and control groups (Pdysmenorrhea and adenomyostic samples without dysmenorrhea. For eutopic endometrium in adenomyosis with dysmenorrhea, expression was higher in the secretory phases than in the proliferative phase (Pdysmenorrhea (spearman rho=0.84, Pdysmenorrhea. Endometrial glandular epithelium is likely to secrete more CD56 and stimulating nerve growth in the stroma, which could then play a role in the pathogenesis of adenomoysis-related dysmenorrhea. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Differential expression of granulopoiesis related genes in neutrophil subsets distinguished by membrane expression of CD177

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Nan; Mora-Jensen, Helena; Theilgaard-Mønch, Kim

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Differential gene expression in CD177+ and CD177- neutrophils was investigated, in order to detect possible differences in neutrophil function which could be related to the pathogenesis of ANCA-associated Vasculitides (AAV). METHODS: Neutrophils were isolated from healthy controls (HC......) with high, negative or bimodal CD177 expression, and sorted into CD177+ and CD177- subpopulations. Total RNA was screened for expression of 24,000 probes with Illumina Ref-8 Beadchips. Genes showing differential expression between CD177+ and CD177- subsets in microarray analysis were re-assessed using...... quantitative-PCR. CD177 expression on neutrophil precursors in bone marrow was analyzed using quantitative PCR and flowcytometry. RESULTS: The proportion of CD177+ cells increased during neutrophil maturation in bone marrow. Fold change analysis of gene expression profile of sorted CD177+ and CD177...

  17. IL-15 augments TCR-induced CD4+ T cell expansion in vitro by inhibiting the suppressive function of CD25 High CD4+ T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom L Van Belle

    Full Text Available Due to its critical role in NK cell differentiation and CD8(+ T cell homeostasis, the importance of IL-15 is more firmly established for cytolytic effectors of the immune system than for CD4(+ T cells. The increased levels of IL-15 found in several CD4(+ T cell-driven (auto- immune diseases prompted us to examine how IL-15 influences murine CD4(+ T cell responses to low dose TCR-stimulation in vitro. We show that IL-15 exerts growth factor activity on both CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells in a TCR-dependent and Cyclosporin A-sensitive manner. In CD4(+ T cells, IL-15 augmented initial IL-2-dependent expansion and once IL-15Rα was upregulated, IL-15 sustained the TCR-induced expression of IL-2/15Rβ, supporting proliferation independently of secreted IL-2. Moreover, IL-15 counteracts CD4(+ T cell suppression by a gradually expanding CD25(HighCD4(+ T cell subset that expresses Foxp3 and originates from CD4(+CD25(+ Tregs. These in vitro data suggest that IL-15 may dramatically strengthen the T cell response to suboptimal TCR-triggering by overcoming an activation threshold set by Treg that might create a risk for autoimmune pathology.

  18. Homocysteine elicits an M1 phenotype in murine macrophages through an EMMPRIN-mediated pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winchester, Lee J; Veeranki, Sudhakar; Givvimani, Srikanth; Tyagi, Suresh C

    2015-07-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) is associated with inflammatory diseases and is known to increase the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, and inducible nitric oxide synthase, and to decrease endothelial nitric oxide production. However, the impact of HHcy on macrophage phenotype differentiation is not well-established. It has been documented that macrophages have 2 distinct phenotypes: the "classically activated/destructive" (M1), and the "alternatively activated/constructive" (M2) subtypes. We hypothesize that HHcy increases M1 macrophage differentiation through extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN), a known inducer of matrix metalloproteinases. murine J774A.1 and Raw 264.7 macrophages were treated with 100 and 500 μmol/L Hcy, respectively, for 24 h. Samples were analyzed using Western blotting and immunocytochemistry. Homocysteine treatment increased cluster of differentiation 40 (CD40; M1 marker) in J774A.1 and Raw 264.7 macrophages. MMP-9 was induced in both cell lines. EMMPRIN protein expression was also increased in both cell lines. Blocking EMMPRIN function by pre-treating cells with anti-EMMPRIN antibody, with or without Hcy, resulted in significantly lower expression of CD40 in both cell lines by comparison with the controls. A DCFDA assay demonstrated increased ROS production in both cell lines with Hcy treatment when compared with the controls. Our results suggest that HHcy results in an increase of the M1 macrophage phenotype. This effect seems to be at least partially mediated by EMMPRIN induction.

  19. Prognostic impact of CD168 expression in gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishigami, Sumiya; Yoshiaki, Kita; Kijima, Yuko; Kitazono, Masaki; Natsugoe, Shoji; Ueno, Shinichi; Nishizono, Yuka; Matsumoto, Masataka; Kurahara, Hiroshi; Arigami, Takaaki; Uchikado, Yasuto; Setoyama, Tetsuro; Arima, Hideo

    2011-01-01

    Interactions of stromal hyaluronic acid (HA) with its binding protein RHAMM (receptor for HA-mediated motility) (CD168) have been reported to affect tumor extension and the migration of crucial molecules to promote tumor progression and metastases. Cancerous CD168 expression is correlated with aggressive biological features in several cancers. However, the clinical implications of CD168 positivity in gastric cancer have remained unclear. We examined the CD168 expression of 196 consecutive gastric cancer patients by immunohistochemistry. According to CD168 positivity, the 196 gastric cancer patients were divided into two groups (57 CD168-positive and 139 CD168-negative patients). The correlation between CD168 expression and clinicopathological factors (age, sex, histology, tumor depth, lymph node status, and vessel invasion) was evaluated according to the Japanese Classification of Gastric Carcinoma. Cancerous CD168 expression was detectable in 57 of the 196 tumors (29%). CD168 positivity was significantly correlated with the depth of invasion, nodal involvement, and vessel invasion (p < 0.01). Survival analysis of the 196 gastric cancer patients showed that the CD168-positive group had a significantly higher mortality than the CD168-negative group (p < 0.01). In terms of a correlation with CD168 positivity at separate clinical stages, a significance difference was only found in stages II and III. Multivariate analysis revealed that CD168 expression was a significant independent prognostic marker (p = 0.013) after depth of invasion (p < 0.005) and nodal involvement (p < 0.01). Our results suggest that cancerous CD168 positivity is strongly related to the invasion and metastasis of gastric cancer tumors. These results suggest that cancerous CD168 expression can be used as a prognostic marker of gastric cancer owing to its interactions with stromal hyaluronic acid

  20. Lineage determination of CD7+ CD5- CD2- and CD7+ CD5+ CD2- lymphoblasts: studies on phenotype, genotype, and gene expression of myeloperoxidase, CD3 epsilon, and CD3 delta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneda, N; Tatsumi, E; Teshigawara, K; Nagata, S; Nagano, T; Kishimoto, Y; Kimura, T; Yasunaga, K; Yamaguchi, N

    1994-04-01

    The gene expression of myeloperoxidase (MPO), CD3 epsilon, and CD3 delta molecules, the gene rearrangement of T-cell receptor (TCR) delta, gamma, and beta and immunoglobulin heavy (IgH) chain, and the expression of cell-surface antigens were investigated in seven cases of CD7+ CD5- CD2- and four cases of CD7+ CD5+ CD2- acute lymphoblastic leukemia or lymphoblastic lymphoma (ALL/LBL) blasts, which were negative for cytochemical myeloperoxidase (cyMPO). More mature T-lineage blasts were also investigated in a comparative manner. In conclusion, the CD7+ CD5- CD2- blasts included four categories: undifferentiated blasts without lineage commitment, T-lineage blasts, T-/myeloid lineage blasts, and cyMPO-negative myeloblasts. The CD7+ CD5+ CD2- blasts included two categories; T-lineage and T-/myeloid lineage blasts. The 11 cases were of the germ-line gene (G) for TCR beta and IgH. Four cases were G for TCR delta and TCR gamma. The others were of the monoclonally rearranged gene (R) for TCR delta and G for TCR gamma or R for both TCR delta and TCR gamma. The expression or in vitro induction of CD13 and/or CD33 antigens correlated with the immaturity of these neoplastic T cells, since it was observed in all 11 CD7+ CD5- CD2- and CD7+ CD5+ CD2-, and some CD7+ CD5+ CD2+ (CD3- CD4- CD8-) cases, but not in CD3 +/- CD4+ CD8+ or CD3+ CD4+ CD8- cases. CD3 epsilon mRNA, but not CD3 delta mRNA, was detected in two CD7+ CD5- CD2- cases, while mRNA of neither of the two CD3 molecules was detected in the other tested CD7+ CD5- CD2- cases. In contrast, mRNA of both CD3 epsilon and CD3 delta were detected in all CD7+ CD5+ CD2- cases, indicating that CD7+ CD5- CD2- blasts at least belong to T-lineage. The blasts of two CD7+ CD5- CD2- cases with entire germ-line genes and without mRNA of the three molecules (MPO, CD3 epsilon, and CD3 delta) were regarded as being at an undifferentiated stage prior to their commitment to either T- or myeloid-lineage. The co-expression of the genes of MPO

  1. Chondroitin sulfate addition to CD44H negatively regulates hyaluronan binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruffell, Brian; Johnson, Pauline

    2005-01-01

    CD44 is a widely expressed cell adhesion molecule that binds hyaluronan, an extracellular matrix glycosaminoglycan, in a tightly regulated manner. This regulated interaction has been implicated in inflammation and tumor metastasis. CD44 exists in the standard form, CD44H, or as higher molecular mass isoforms due to alternative splicing. Here, we identify serine 180 in human CD44H as the site of chondroitin sulfate addition and show that lack of chondroitin sulfate addition at this site enhances hyaluronan binding by CD44. A CD44H-immunoglobulin fusion protein expressed in HEK293 cells, and CD44H expressed in murine L fibroblast cells were modified by chondroitin sulfate, as determined by reduced sulfate incorporation after chondroitinase ABC treatment. Mutation of serine 180 or glycine 181 in CD44H reduced chondroitin sulfate addition and increased hyaluronan binding, indicating that serine 180 is the site for chondroitin sulfate addition in CD44H and that this negatively regulates hyaluronan binding

  2. Expression of LLT1 and its receptor CD161 in lung cancer is associated with better clinical outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braud, Véronique M; Biton, Jérôme; Becht, Etienne; Knockaert, Samantha; Mansuet-Lupo, Audrey; Cosson, Estelle; Damotte, Diane; Alifano, Marco; Validire, Pierre; Anjuère, Fabienne; Cremer, Isabelle; Girard, Nicolas; Gossot, Dominique; Seguin-Givelet, Agathe; Dieu-Nosjean, Marie-Caroline; Germain, Claire

    2018-01-01

    Co-stimulatory and inhibitory receptors expressed by immune cells in the tumor microenvironment modulate the immune response and cancer progression. Their expression and regulation are still not fully characterized and a better understanding of these mechanisms is needed to improve current immunotherapies. Our previous work has identified a novel ligand/receptor pair, LLT1/CD161, that modulates immune responses. Here, we extensively characterize its expression in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We show that LLT1 expression is restricted to germinal center (GC) B cells within tertiary lymphoid structures (TLS), representing a new hallmark of the presence of active TLS in the tumor microenvironment. CD161-expressing immune cells are found at the vicinity of these structures, with a global enrichment of NSCLC tumors in CD161 + CD4 + and CD8 + T cells as compared to normal distant lung and peripheral blood. CD161 + CD4 + T cells are more activated and produce Th1-cytokines at a higher frequency than their matched CD161-negative counterparts. Interestingly, CD161 + CD4 + T cells highly express OX40 co-stimulatory receptor, less frequently 4-1BB, and display an activated but not completely exhausted PD-1-positive Tim-3-negative phenotype. Finally, a meta-analysis revealed a positive association of CLEC2D (coding for LLT1) and KLRB1 (coding for CD161) gene expression with favorable outcome in NSCLC, independently of the size of T and B cell infiltrates. These data are consistent with a positive impact of LLT1/CD161 on NSCLC patient survival, and make CD161-expressing CD4 + T cells ideal candidates for efficient anti-tumor recall responses.

  3. Characterization, expression and complex formation of the murine Fanconi anaemia gene product Fancg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Vrugt, Henri J; Koomen, Mireille; Berns, Mariska A D; de Vries, Yne; Rooimans, Martin A; van der Weel, Laura; Blom, Eric; de Groot, Jan; Schepers, Rik J; Stone, Stacie; Hoatlin, Maureen E; Cheng, Ngan Ching; Joenje, Hans; Arwert, Fré

    2002-03-01

    Fanconi anaemia (FA) is an autosomal recessive chromosomal instability disorder. Six distinct FA disease genes have been identified, the products of which function in an integrated pathway that is thought to support a nuclear caretaker function. Comparison of FA gene characteristics in different species may help to unravel the molecular function of the FA pathway. We have cloned the murine homologue of the Fanconi anaemia complementation group G gene, FANCG/XRCC9. The murine Fancg protein shows an 83% similarity to the human protein sequence, and has a predicted molecular weight of 68.5 kDa. Expression of mouse Fancg in human FA-G lymphoblasts fully corrects their cross-linker hypersensitivity. At mRNA and protein levels we detected the co-expression of Fancg and Fanca in murine tissues. In addition, mouse Fancg and Fanca proteins co-purify by immunoprecipitation. Upon transfection into Fanca-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts EGFP-Fancg chimeric protein was detectable in the nucleus. We identified a murine cDNA, Fancg, which cross-complements the cellular defect of human FA-G cells and thus represents a true homologue of human FANCG. Spleen, thymus and testis showed the highest Fancg expression levels. Although Fancg and Fanca are able to form a complex, this interaction is not required for Fancg to accumulate in the nuclear compartment.

  4. IL-17-Expressing CD4+ and CD8+ T Lymphocytes in Human Toxoplasmosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jéssica Líver Alves Silva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to measure the synthesis of Th1 and Th2 cytokines by mononuclear cells after culture with live T. gondii and identified Th17 (CD4+ and Tc17 (CD8+ cells in toxoplasma-seronegative and toxoplasma-seropositive parturient and nonpregnant women. Cytometric bead arrays were used to measure cytokine levels (IL-2, TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-4, IL-5, and IL-10; immunophenotyping was used to characterize Th17 and Tc17 cells, and the cells were stained with antibodies against CD4+ and CD8+ T cells expressing IL-17. The addition of tachyzoites to cell cultures induced the synthesis of IL-5, IL-10, and TNF-α by cells from seronegative parturient women and of IL-5 and IL-10 by cells from seropositive, nonpregnant women. We observed a lower level of IL-17-expressing CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes in cultures of cells from seronegative and seropositive parturient and nonpregnant women that were stimulated with tachyzoites, whereas analysis of the CD4+ and CD8+ T cell populations showed a higher level of CD4+ T cells compared with CD8+ T cells. These results suggest that the cytokine pattern and IL-17-expressing CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes may have important roles in the inflammatory response to T. gondii, thus contributing to the maintenance of pregnancy and control of parasite invasion and replication.

  5. Relationship between cyclin D1 expression and poor radioresponse of murine carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milas, Luka; Akimoto, Tetsuo; Hunter, Nancy R.; Mason, Kathyrn A.; Buchmiller, Lara; Yamakawa, Michitaka; Muramatsu, Hiroyuki; Ang, K. Kian

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: We recently reported that overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) positively correlated with radioresistance of murine carcinomas. Because cyclin D1 is a downstream sensor of EGFR activation, the present study investigated whether a relationship exists between the extent of cyclin D1 expression and in vivo radiocurability of murine tumors. We further investigated the influence of radiation on cyclin D1 expression and the expression of p27, an inhibitor of the cyclin D1 downstream pathway, as well as the relationship of these molecular determinants to cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in tumors exposed to radiation. Methods and Materials: Cyclin D1 expression was assayed in nine carcinomas syngeneic to C3Hf/Kam mice using Western blot analysis. These tumors greatly differed in their radioresponse as assessed by TCD 50 . The expression of cyclin D1 and p27 proteins was determined by Western blotting. Cell proliferative activity in tumors was determined by proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) immunochemistry. The effect of irradiation on the expression of cyclin D1 or p27 proteins and on PCNA positivity was determined in the radiosensitive OCa-I and in the radioresistant SCC-VII tumors. Results: Cyclin D1 expression varied among tumors by 40-fold, and its magnitude positively correlated with poorer tumor radioresponse (higher TCD 50 values). The level of cyclin D1 expression paralleled that of EGFR. A 15-Gy dose reduced constitutive expression of cyclin D1 in the radiosensitive OCa-I tumors, but had no influence on expression of cyclin D1 in the radioresistant SCC-VII tumors. In contrast, 15 Gy increased the expression of p27 in radiosensitive tumors and reduced it in radioresistant tumors. Radiation induced no significant apoptosis or change in the percentage of PCNA-positive (proliferating) cells in SCC-VII tumors with high cyclin D1 levels, but it induced significant apoptosis and a decrease in the percentage of proliferating

  6. CD133 expression in chemo-resistant Ewing sarcoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovar Heinrich

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Some human cancers demonstrate cellular hierarchies in which tumor-initiating cancer stem cells generate progeny cells with reduced tumorigenic potential. This cancer stem cell population is proposed to be a source of therapy-resistant and recurrent disease. Ewing sarcoma family tumors (ESFT are highly aggressive cancers in which drug-resistant, relapsed disease remains a significant clinical problem. Recently, the cell surface protein CD133 was identified as a putative marker of tumor-initiating cells in ESFT. We evaluated ESFT tumors and cell lines to determine if high levels of CD133 are associated with drug resistance. Methods Expression of the CD133-encoding PROM1 gene was determined by RT-PCR in ESFT tumors and cell lines. CD133 protein expression was assessed by western blot, FACS and/or immunostaining. Cell lines were FACS-sorted into CD133+ and CD133- fractions and proliferation, colony formation in soft agar, and in vivo tumorigenicity compared. Chemosensitivity was measured using MTS (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-5-(3-carboxy-methoxyphenyl-2-(4-sulfophenyl-2H-tetrazolium assays. Results PROM1 expression was either absent or extremely low in most tumors. However, PROM1 was highly over-expressed in 4 of 48 cases. Two of the 4 patients with PROM1 over-expressing tumors rapidly succumbed to primary drug-resistant disease and two are long-term, event-free survivors. The expression of PROM1 in ESFT cell lines was similarly heterogeneous. The frequency of CD133+ cells ranged from 2-99% and, with one exception, no differences in the chemoresistance or tumorigenicity of CD133+ and CD133- cell fractions were detected. Importantly, however, the STA-ET-8.2 cell line was found to retain a cellular hierarchy in which relatively chemo-resistant, tumorigenic CD133+ cells gave rise to relatively chemo-sensitive, less tumorigenic, CD133- progeny. Conclusions Up to 10% of ESFT express high levels of PROM1. In some tumors and cell

  7. CD117 expression on blast cells in acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goryainova N.V.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present work was to analyze the frequency of CD117 (c-KIT antigen expression on the blast cells in acute myeloid leukemia (AML, evaluation of the presence of the relationship between the expression of the c-KIT and leukemia according to the FAB classification and definition of co-expression of the antigen CD117, antigens CD33 and CD34. The data of 47 patients with AML were diagnosed. M0 AML variant was established in 3 (6% patients, M1 – in 2 (4%, M2 – in 9 (20%, M4 – in 22 (47% and M5 – in 11 (23%. For immunophenotypic stu¬dies monoclonal antibodies (mAb that detect antigens of anti-CD34, anti-CD33 and anti-CD117 (Becton Dickinson, USA were used. The presence of the antigen CD117 was detected in 39 people, accounting for 83% of all surveyed. Antigen c-KIT was present in 48.117.0% cells on average: in all 3 cases – AML M0, in2 cases of AML M1, in 6 cases – AML M2, 20 of 22 cases – AML M4 and in 8 of 11 AML M5 cases. Average levels of CD117 in investigated leukemia cases statistically differed significantly (p=0.0067. Among 39 CD117- positive patients in 25 (53% co-expression of CD117+/CD34+ was revealed. Expression of CD117+/CD34- was observed in 14 cases (30%, CD117-/CD34+ – in 4 cases (8,5%, CD117-/CD34- – in 4 cases (8.5%. CD34 had of 64% of cells of myeloid origin. A high positive cor¬relation between expression of CD117 and CD34 (r=+0,5169 was determined, being statistically significant (p0,0067.

  8. CD25, CD28 and CD38 expression in peripheral blood lymphocytes as a tool to predict acute rejection after liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boleslawski, Emmanuel; BenOthman, Samia; Grabar, Sophie; Correia, Leonor; Podevin, Philippe; Chouzenoux, Sandrine; Soubrane, Olivier; Calmus, Yvon; Conti, Filomena

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether the expression of CD25, CD28 and CD38 (which reflects the degree of T-cell activation) by peripheral blood mononuclear cells constitutes a useful means of measuring the immune status of liver transplant recipients. Fifty-two patients enrolled in a prospective randomized study comparing cyclosporine and tacrolimus as the principal immunosuppressive drugs were monitored prospectively. The expression of CD25, CD28 and CD38 was analyzed on CD3-, CD4- and CD8-positive cells from whole blood using flow cytometry. The prognostic value of baseline and day 14 measurements regarding acute rejection was examined using Kaplan-Meier estimates for univariate analyses and the Cox model for multivariate analyses. The mean frequencies of CD28 and CD38-expressing T cells were significantly higher in patients with acute rejection (p = 0.01 and p = 0.001, respectively), whereas the frequency CD25-expressing T cells did not differ significantly. Under univariate analysis, baseline CD25 levels, the type of calcineurin inhibitor, as well as the CD28 and CD38 frequencies obtained at day 14 were associated with the subsequent development of acute rejection. Under multivariate analysis, only CD28 and CD38 frequencies obtained at day 14 were independently associated with acute rejection. The evaluation of CD28 and CD38 expression in peripheral blood lymphocytes is a simple marker that could be used routinely in clinical practice to assess the level of immunosuppression.

  9. Chemotherapeutic Effect of CD147 Antibody-labeled Micelles Encapsulating Doxorubicin Conjugate Targeting CD147-Expressing Carcinoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakura, Tadashi; Yokoyama, Masayuki; Shiraishi, Koichi; Aoki, Katsuhiko; Ohkawa, Kiyoshi

    2018-03-01

    CD147 (basigin/emmprin) is expressed on the surface of carcinoma cells. For studying the efficacy of CD147-targeting medicine on CD147-expressing cells, we studied the effect of anti-CD147-labeled polymeric micelles (CD147ab micelles) that encapsulated a conjugate of doxorubicin with glutathione (GSH-DXR), with specific accumulation and cytotoxicity against CD147-expressing A431 human epidermoid carcinoma cells, Ishikawa human endometrial adenocarcinoma cells, and PC3 human prostate carcinoma cells. By treatment of each cell type with CD147ab micelles for 1 h, a specific accumulation of CD147ab micelles in CD147-expressing cells was observed. In addition, the cytotoxicity of GSH-DXR-encapsulated micelles against each cell type was measured by treatment of the micelles for 1 h. The cytotoxic effect of CD147ab micelles carrying GSH-DXR was 3- to 10-fold higher for these cells than that of micelles without GSH-DXR. These results suggest that GSH-DXR-encapsulated CD147ab micelles could serve as an effective drug delivery system to CD147-expressing carcinoma cells. Copyright© 2018, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  10. Requirement for CD40 ligand, CD4(+) T cells, and B cells in an infectious mononucleosis-like syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brooks, J W; Hamilton-Easton, A M; Christensen, J P

    1999-01-01

    (+) CD8(+) population that is found in mice with different major histocompatibility complex (MHC) haplotypes. Aspects of the CD8(+)-T-cell response are substantially modified in mice that lack B cells, CD4(+) T cells, or the CD40 ligand (CD40L). The B-cell-deficient mice show no increase in Vbeta4(+) CD8......(+) T cells. Similar abrogation of the Vbeta4(+) CD8(+) response is seen following antibody-mediated depletion of the CD4(+) subset, through the numbers of CD8(+) CD62L(lo) cells are still significantly elevated. Virus-specific CD4(+)-T-cell frequencies are minimal in the CD40L(-/-) mice, and the Vbeta4......(+) CD8(+) population remains unexpanded. Apparently B-cell-CD4(+)-T-cell interactions play a part in the gammaHV-68 induction of both splenomegaly and non-MHC-restricted Vbeta4(+) CD8(+)-T-cell expansion....

  11. Induction of IL-12 Production in Human Peripheral Monocytes by Trypanosoma cruzi Is Mediated by Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-Anchored Mucin-Like Glycoproteins and Potentiated by IFN-γ and CD40-CD40L Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lúcia Cristina Jamli Abel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease, caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi, is characterized by immunopathology driven by IFN-γ secreting Th1-like T cells. T. cruzi has a thick coat of mucin-like glycoproteins covering its surface, which plays an important role in parasite invasion and host immunomodulation. It has been extensively described that T. cruzi or its products—like GPI anchors isolated from GPI-anchored mucins from the trypomastigote life cycle stage (tGPI-mucins—are potent inducers of proinflammatory responses (i.e., cytokines and NO production by IFN-γ primed murine macrophages. However, little is known about whether T. cruzi or GPI-mucins exert a similar action in human cells. We therefore decided to further investigate the in vitro cytokine production profile from human mononuclear cells from uninfected donors exposed to T. cruzi as well as tGPI-mucins. We observed that both living T. cruzi trypomastigotes and tGPI-mucins are potent inducers of IL-12 by human peripheral blood monocytes and this effect depends on CD40-CD40L interaction and IFN-γ. Our findings suggest that the polarized T1-type cytokine profile seen in T. cruzi infected patients might be a long-term effect of IL-12 production induced by lifelong exposure to T. cruzi tGPI-mucins.

  12. D2-40/podoplanin expression in the human placenta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuping; Sun, Jingxia; Gu, Yang; Zhao, Shuang; Groome, Lynn J.; Alexander, J. Steven

    2011-01-01

    Placental tissue expresses many lymphatic markers. The current study was undertaken to examine if D2-40/podoplanin, a lymphatic endothelial marker, was expressed in the human placentas, and how it is altered developmentally and pathologically. We studied D2-40/podoplanin and VEGFR-3 expressions in placentas from normotensive pregnancies at different gestational ages and in placentas from women with clinically defined preeclampsia. D2-40 expression in systemic lymphatic vessel endothelium served as a positive control. Protein expression for D2-40, VEGFR-3, and β-actin were determined by Western blot in placentas from normotensive (n=6) and preeclamptic (n=5) pregnancies. Our results show that D2-40/podoplanin was strongly expressed in the placenta, mainly as a network plexus pattern in the villous stroma throughout gestation. CD31 was limited to villous core fetal vessel endothelium and VEGFR-3 was found in both villous core fetal vessel endothelium and trophoblasts. D2-40/podoplanin expression was significantly decreased, and VEGFR-3 significantly increased in preeclamptic placental tissues compared to normotensive placental controls. Placental villous stroma is a reticular-like structure, and the localization of D2-40 to the stroma suggests that a lymphatic-like conductive network may exist in the human placenta. D2-40/podoplanin is an O-linked sialoglycoprotein. Although little is known regarding biological functions of sialylated glycoproteins within the placenta, placental D2-40/podoplanin may support fetal vessel angiogenesis during placenta development and reduced D2-40/podoplanin expression in preeclamptic placenta may contribute to altered interstitial fluid homeostasis and impaired angiogenesis in this pregnancy disorder. PMID:21095001

  13. Expression of CD80 and CD86 costimulatory molecules are potential markers for better survival in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Cheng-Shyong; Chang, Julia H; Hsu, Nicholas C; Lin, Hsuan-Yu; Chung, Chih-Yuan

    2007-01-01

    B7 Costimulatory signal is essential to trigger T-cell activation upon the recognition of tumor antigens. This study examined the expression of B7-1 (CD80) and B7-2 (CD86) costimulatory molecules along with HLA-DR and the presence of infiltrating lymphocytes and dendritic cells to assess their significance in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Expression of CD80, CD86, HLA-DR, S-100 protein and the presence of infiltrating lymphocytes and follicular dendritic reticulum cells were immunohistochemically examined on the paraffin-embedded tissue blocks from newly diagnosed NPC patients (n = 50). The results were correlated with clinical outcome of patients. CD80 and CD86 were each expressed in 10 of 50 cases in which they co-expressed in 9 cases. Univariate analysis revealed that patients with CD80/CD86 expression had significantly better overall survival than those without it (P = 0.017), but after adjustment for stage, nodal status, and treatment, the expression of CD80/CD86 did not significantly correlate with overall survival. Expression of HLA-DR and the presence of infiltrating lymphocytes and dendritic cells did not appear to have impact on the survival of patients. Expression of CD80 and CD86 costimulatory molecules appears to be a marker of better survival in patient with NPC

  14. CD146 Expression Influences Periapical Cyst Mesenchymal Stem Cell Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paduano, Francesco; Marrelli, Massimo; Palmieri, Francesca; Tatullo, Marco

    2016-10-01

    Recent studies have identified a new human dental derived progenitor cell population with multi-lineage differentiation potential referred to as human periapical cyst mesenchymal stem cells (hPCy-MSCs). In the present study, we compared two subpopulations of hPCy-MSCs characterised by the low or high expression of CD146 to establish whether this expression can regulate their stem cell properties. Using flow cytometry, we evaluated the stem cell marker profile of hPCy-MSCs during passaging. Furthermore, CD146 Low and CD146 High cells were sorted by magnetic beads and subsequently both cell populations were evaluated for differences in their proliferation, self-renewal, stem cell surface markers, stemness genes expression and osteogenic differentiation potential.We found that hPCy-MSCs possessed a stable expression of several mesenchymal stem cell surface markers, whereas CD146 expression declined during passaging.In addition, sorted CD146 Low cells proliferated significantly faster, displayed higher colony-forming unit-fibroblast capacity and showed higher expression of Klf4 when compared to the CD146 High subset. Significantly, the osteogenic potential of hPCy-MSCs was greater in the CD146 Low than in CD146 High population. These results demonstrate that CD146 is spontaneously downregulated with passaging at both mRNA and protein levels and that the high expression of CD146 reduces the proliferative, self-renewal and osteogenic differentiation potential of hPCy-MSCs. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that changes in the expression of CD146 can influence the stem cell properties of hPCy-MSCs.

  15. Lipopolysaccharide-Elicited TSLPR Expression Enriches a Functionally Discrete Subset of Human CD14+ CD1c+ Monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borriello, Francesco; Iannone, Raffaella; Di Somma, Sarah; Vastolo, Viviana; Petrosino, Giuseppe; Visconte, Feliciano; Raia, Maddalena; Scalia, Giulia; Loffredo, Stefania; Varricchi, Gilda; Galdiero, Maria Rosaria; Granata, Francescopaolo; Del Vecchio, Luigi; Portella, Giuseppe; Marone, Gianni

    2017-05-01

    Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) is a cytokine produced mainly by epithelial cells in response to inflammatory or microbial stimuli and binds to the TSLP receptor (TSLPR) complex, a heterodimer composed of TSLPR and IL-7 receptor α (CD127). TSLP activates multiple immune cell subsets expressing the TSLPR complex and plays a role in several models of disease. Although human monocytes express TSLPR and CD127 mRNAs in response to the TLR4 agonist LPS, their responsiveness to TSLP is poorly defined. We demonstrate that TSLP enhances human CD14 + monocyte CCL17 production in response to LPS and IL-4. Surprisingly, only a subset of CD14 + CD16 - monocytes, TSLPR + monocytes (TSLPR + mono), expresses TSLPR complex upon LPS stimulation in an NF-κB- and p38-dependent manner. Phenotypic, functional, and transcriptomic analysis revealed specific features of TSLPR + mono, including higher CCL17 and IL-10 production and increased expression of genes with important immune functions (i.e., GAS6 , ALOX15B , FCGR2B , LAIR1 ). Strikingly, TSLPR + mono express higher levels of the dendritic cell marker CD1c. This evidence led us to identify a subset of peripheral blood CD14 + CD1c + cells that expresses the highest levels of TSLPR upon LPS stimulation. The translational relevance of these findings is highlighted by the higher expression of TSLPR and CD127 mRNAs in monocytes isolated from patients with Gram-negative sepsis compared with healthy control subjects. Our results emphasize a phenotypic and functional heterogeneity in an apparently homogeneous population of human CD14 + CD16 - monocytes and prompt further ontogenetic and functional analysis of CD14 + CD1c + and LPS-activated CD14 + CD1c + TSLPR + mono. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  16. Expression and significance of VEGF, CD34, Ki-67 and p21 in pterygium

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    Li-Bo Wang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate the expression of VEGF, CD34, Ki-67 and p21 in pterygium as well as the correlation between their expression and clinical pathological characteristics; explore its pathogenesis. METHODS: Immunohistochemical S-P staining method was adopted in detecting the expression of VEGF, CD34, Ki-67 and p21 in 62 cases of pterygia and 20 cases of normal conjunctival tissues. Relationship between these markers and clinical pathological characteristics was analyzed. RESULTS:(1The positive expression of VEGF, CD34, Ki-67 and p21 in 62 cases of pterygia was 74.2%(46/62, 77.4%(48/62, 66.1%(41/62and 40.3%(25/62respectively. The differences were statistically significant compared with normal conjunctival tissues(PPP>0.05; the expression of Ki-67 was correlated with clinical stages(PP>0.05; the expression of p21 was correlated with clinical stages and pterygium characters(PP>0.05.(3Spearman correlation showed that there was a positive correlation between VEGF and Ki-67(r=0.279, Pr=0.299, Pr=-0.267, PP>0.05.CONCLUSION:(1Overexpression of VEGF, Ki-67, CD34 and low expression of p21 suggest that these markers are concerned with the development and progression of pterygium.(2Expression of VEGF and CD34 increases along with the increase of clinical types and stages, expression of Ki-67 increases along with the increase of clinical stages, and expression of p21 decreases along with the improvement of clinical types or stages; they suggest that these markers may play important roles in the development and recurrence of pterygium.(3There is positive correlation between VEGF and Ki-67, VEGF and CD34 as well as negative correlation between VEGF and p21. They suggest that there may be synergistic action between two factors during the development and progression of pterygium.

  17. Positron emission tomography imaging of CD105 expression with {sup 89}Zr-Df-TRC105

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Hao; Yang, Yunan [University of Wisconsin - Madison, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); Severin, Gregory W.; Engle, Jonathan W.; Zhang, Yin; Barnhart, Todd E.; Nickles, Robert J. [University of Wisconsin - Madison, Department of Medical Physics, Madison, WI (United States); Liu, Glenn [University of Wisconsin - Madison, Department of Medicine, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center, Madison, WI (United States); Leigh, Bryan R. [TRACON Pharmaceuticals, Inc, San Diego, CA (United States); Cai, Weibo [University of Wisconsin - Madison, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin - Madison, Department of Medical Physics, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center, Madison, WI (United States)

    2012-01-15

    High tumor microvessel density correlates with a poor prognosis in multiple solid tumor types. The clinical gold standard for assessing microvessel density is CD105 immunohistochemistry on paraffin-embedded tumor specimens. The goal of this study was to develop an {sup 89}Zr-based PET tracer for noninvasive imaging of CD105 expression. TRC105, a chimeric anti-CD105 monoclonal antibody, was conjugated to p-isothiocyanatobenzyl-desferrioxamine (Df-Bz-NCS) and labeled with {sup 89}Zr. FACS analysis and microscopy studies were performed to compare the CD105 binding affinity of TRC105 and Df-TRC105. PET imaging, biodistribution, blocking, and ex-vivo histology studies were performed on 4T1 murine breast tumor-bearing mice to evaluate the pharmacokinetics and tumor-targeting of {sup 89}Zr-Df-TRC105. Another chimeric antibody, cetuximab, was used as an isotype-matched control. FACS analysis of HUVECs revealed no difference in CD105 binding affinity between TRC105 and Df-TRC105, which was further validated by fluorescence microscopy. {sup 89}Zr labeling was achieved with high yield and specific activity. Serial PET imaging revealed that the 4T1 tumor uptake of {sup 89}Zr-Df-TRC105 was 6.1 {+-} 1.2, 14.3 {+-} 1.2, 12.4 {+-} 1.5, 7.1 {+-} 0.9, and 5.2 {+-} 0.3 %ID/g at 5, 24, 48, 72, and 96 h after injection, respectively (n = 4), higher than all organs starting from 24 h after injection, which provided excellent tumor contrast. Biodistribution data as measured by gamma counting were consistent with the PET findings. Blocking experiments, control studies with {sup 89}Zr-Df-cetuximab, and ex-vivo histology all confirmed the in vivo target specificity of {sup 89}Zr-Df-TRC105. We report here the first successful PET imaging of CD105 expression with {sup 89}Zr as the radiolabel. Rapid, persistent, CD105-specific uptake of {sup 89}Zr-Df-TRC105 in the 4T1 tumor was observed. (orig.)

  18. The expression of CD56 antigen is associated with poor prognosis in patients with acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Alegretti

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The expression of CD56 is considered a bad prognostic factor for overall survival, lower rates or short complete remission and extramedullary invasion but the results are controversial. The importance of validating new prognostic parameters in acute leukemias was the reason to investigate the CD56 expression in blast cells of patients with acute myeloid leukemia. METHODS: A cohort of 48 patients treated at Hospital de Clinicas de Porto Alegre and diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia as classified by the French-American-British group (FAB criteria using cell morphology, cytochemistry and flow cytometry were evaluated. RESULTS: Eight cases (16.7% were CD56 positive without correlation to age or gender. The highest incidence of CD56 positivity was in FAB subtypes M4 and M5. The death rate during induction was not significantly different between patients with and without CD56 expression (62.5% vs. 27.5%; p-value = 0.097. However, patients that expressed CD56 had significantly lower overall survival than those who did not (mean 4.0 months vs. 14.5 months; p-value = 0.03. CONCLUSIONS: The data suggest that expression of CD56 in acute myeloid leukemia may be indicative of poor prognosis because it is associated with a shorter overall survival. The death rate during induction was not significantly different despite an apparent difference in proportions between groups.

  19. Haemopedia: An Expression Atlas of Murine Hematopoietic Cells

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    Carolyn A. de Graaf

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoiesis is a multistage process involving the differentiation of stem and progenitor cells into distinct mature cell lineages. Here we present Haemopedia, an atlas of murine gene-expression data containing 54 hematopoietic cell types, covering all the mature lineages in hematopoiesis. We include rare cell populations such as eosinophils, mast cells, basophils, and megakaryocytes, and a broad collection of progenitor and stem cells. We show that lineage branching and maturation during hematopoiesis can be reconstructed using the expression patterns of small sets of genes. We also have identified genes with enriched expression in each of the mature blood cell lineages, many of which show conserved lineage-enriched expression in human hematopoiesis. We have created an online web portal called Haemosphere to make analyses of Haemopedia and other blood cell transcriptional datasets easier. This resource provides simple tools to interrogate gene-expression-based relationships between hematopoietic cell types and genes of interest.

  20. [The expression and significance of CD(276) and CD(133) in colorectal cancer and precancerous lesions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, G F; Huang, L N; Ren, J L; Hu, G M; Zheng, Z H; Wu, J X; Zhu, Y P; Tang, F A

    2018-06-01

    In order to study the significance of CD(276) and CD(133) in the development and progression of colorectal cancer (CRC), the expression of CD(276) and CD(133) was detected by immunohistochemistry in CRC and precancerous lesions. The results showed that the intensity of CD(276) and CD(133) in CRC samples was higher than that in adenoma group and non-adenoma group. CD(276) and CD(133) single and double positive expression were significantly correlated with CRC lymph node metastasis, distant metastasis and survival. CD(276) and CD(133) are significantly correlated to the development and progression of CRC and associated with poor prognosis.

  1. Infiltração cutânea na leucemia megacariocítica aguda com expressão de CD56 Cutaneous infiltration in acute megakaryocytic leukemia with CD56 expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariela G. Farias

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available A LMA-M7 é um subtipo raro de leucemia mielóide aguda (LMA. Está freqüentemente associada a mielofibrose e representa um subtipo de mau prognóstico. Raramente apresenta infiltração em sítios extramedulares. O aspirado de medula óssea ou biópsia mostra uma população de células pleomórficas e basofílicas, que podem apresentar projeções citoplasmáticas. A utilização da imunofenotipagem é essencial para o diagnóstico de LMA-M7. O imunofenótipo característico apresenta uma população de células leucêmicas com ausência da maioria dos marcadores linfóides e mielóides de superfície, porém com expressão para os antígenos da linhagem megacariocítica: CD41a (complexo glicoprotéico IIb/IIIa, CD42b (glicoproteína Ib e/ou CD61 (glicoproteína IIIa, ou antígeno relacionado ao fator VIII. Freqüentemente, a coloração citoquímica Sudan Black para os blastos megacariocíticos é negativa; neste caso, foi positiva para 40% das células analisadas. A presença de CD56, cuja expressão aberrante em algumas leucemias mielóides é indicativo de mau prognóstico, pode estar associada à infiltração da pele.AML-M7 is a rare subtype of acute myeloid leukemia (AML. It is frequently associated with myelofibrosis and corresponds to a poor prognosis subtype. It rarely presents with infiltration at extramedullary sites. The bone marrow aspirate or biopsy identifies pleomorphic and basophilic cell populations that may present with cytoplasmatic projections. The use of immunophenotyping is essential for the diagnosis of AML-M7. The characteristic immunophenotype presents a leukemic cell population without most lymphoid and myeloid surface markers, but with an expression of the megakaryocytic antigens: CD41a (glycoprotein complex IIb/IIIa, CD42b (glycoprotein Ib and/or CD61 (glycoprotein IIIa, or the factor VIII-related antigen. The cytochemical stain Sudan Black is frequently negative for megakaryocytic blasts; in this case, it was

  2. Differential gene expression in the murine gastric fundus lacking interstitial cells of Cajal

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    Ward Sean M

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The muscle layers of murine gastric fundus have no interstitial cells of Cajal at the level of the myenteric plexus and only possess intramuscular interstitial cells and this tissue does not generate electric slow waves. The absence of intramuscular interstitial cells in W/WV mutants provides a unique opportunity to study the molecular changes that are associated with the loss of these intercalating cells. Method The gene expression profile of the gastric fundus of wild type and W/WV mice was assayed by murine microarray analysis displaying a total of 8734 elements. Queried genes from the microarray analysis were confirmed by semi-quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Results Twenty-one genes were differentially expressed in wild type and W/WV mice. Eleven transcripts had 2.0–2.5 fold higher mRNA expression in W/WV gastric fundus when compared to wild type tissues. Ten transcripts had 2.1–3.9 fold lower expression in W/WV mutants in comparison with wild type animals. None of these genes have ever been implicated in any bowel motility function. Conclusions These data provides evidence that several important genes have significantly changed in the murine fundus of W/WV mutants that lack intramuscular interstitial cells of Cajal and have reduced enteric motor neurotransmission.

  3. Comparison of Adipose-Derived and Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in a Murine Model of Crohn's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Minghao; Qin, Huabo; Luo, Qianxin; He, Xiaosheng; He, Xiaowen; Lan, Ping; Lian, Lei

    2017-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have been used in the treatment of Crohn's disease (CD) because of the immunomodulatory ability. The aim of this study was to investigate the therapeutic effect of adipose-derived MSCs (AD-MSCs) and to compare the therapeutic effect of AD-MSCs with that of bone marrow MSCs (BM-MSCs) in a murine model of CD. Murine colitis model of CD was created by trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS). Twelve hours after treatment with TNBS, the mouse model was injected with MSCs intraperitoneally. Real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry staining were used to measure the expression levels of inflammatory cytokines in colonic tissues to investigate the therapeutic effect of AD-MSCs. The ten-day survival was recorded after infusion of MSCs. Intraperitoneal injection of MSCs alleviated the clinical and histopathologic severity of intestinal inflammation, and improved the survival of the TNBS-induced mouse model of CD. AD-MSCs could effectively increase the expression of interleukin-10 and reduce the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines including tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-12, and vascular endothelial growth factor. The mucosal injury was repaired by AD-MSCs. These effects were comparable between AD-MSCs and BM-MSCs. The therapeutic effect appears similar between AD-MSCs and BM-MSCs in treating CD. AD-MSCs may be a potential alternative of cell-based therapy for CD.

  4. [Expression and clinical significance of CD147 in parathyroid carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, X M; Wang, L L; Chang, H; Meng, W; Zhang, J Y; Shen, B

    2016-06-08

    To study the expression and clinical significance of CD147 in the patients of parathyroid carcinoma. Fourteen cases of parathyroid carcinoma encountered during the period from 2012 to 2015 were enrolled. Thirty three cases of parathyroid adenoma encountered during the same period were enrolled. The expression of CD147 in parathyroid carcinoma and parathyroid adenoma was studied by means of immunohistochemistry (EnVision method). CD147 positive color was brown and yellow, and positive position was located mainly in the cytomembrane, and a small amount of cytoplasm was appeared. Among 14 cases of parathyroid carcinoma, 11 cases of CD147 positive score was 3+ , 3 cases of CD147 positive score was 2+ ; Among 33 cases of parathyroid adenoma , 8 cases of CD147 positive score was 2+ , 15 cases of it was 1+ , 10 cases of it was negative. CD147 was highly expressed in parathyroid carcinoma tissues, and the expression of CD147 was significantly different from the expression of parathyroid adenoma(PCD147 immunohistochemical staining can help to diagnose parathyroid carcinoma.

  5. Aging Converts Innate B1a Cells into Potent CD8+ T Cell Inducers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee-Chang, Catalina; Bodogai, Monica; Moritoh, Kanako; Chen, Xin; Wersto, Robert; Sen, Ranjan; Young, Howard A; Croft, Michael; Ferrucci, Luigi; Biragyn, Arya

    2016-04-15

    B cell dysregulation in aging is thought to mostly occur in conventional B2 cells without affecting innate B1 cells. Elderly humans and mice also accumulate 4-1BBL(+)MHC class-I(Hi)CD86(Hi)B cells of unknown origin. In this article, we report that these cells, termed 4BL cells, are activated murine and possibly human B1a cells. The activation is mediated by aging human monocytes and murine peritoneal macrophages. They induce expression and activation of 4-1BBL and IFN-γR1 on B1a cells to subsequently upregulate membrane TNF-α and CD86. As a result, activated B1a/4BL cells induce expression of granzyme B in CD8(+)T cells by targeting TNFR2 via membrane TNF-α and providing costimulation with CD86. Thus, for the first time, to our knowledge, these results indicate that aging affects the function of B1a cells. Upon aging, these cells lose their tumor-supporting activity and become inducers of potentially antitumor and autoimmune CD8(+)T cells. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  6. Acidic conditions induce the suppression of CD86 and CD54 expression in THP-1 cells.

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    Mitachi, Takafumi; Mezaki, Minori; Yamashita, Kunihiko; Itagaki, Hiroshi

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the sensitization potential of chemicals in cosmetics, using non-animal methods, a number of in vitro safety tests have been designed. Current assays are based on the expression of cell surface markers, such as CD86 and CD54, which are associated with the activation of dendritic cells, in skin sensitization tests. However, these markers are influenced by culture conditions through activating danger signals. In this study, we investigated the relationship between extracellular pH and the expression of the skin sensitization test human cell line activation test (h-CLAT) markers CD86 and CD54. We measured expression levels after THP-1 cells were exposed to representative contact allergens, i.e., 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene and imidazolidinyl urea, under acidic conditions. These conditions were set by exposure to hydrochloric acid, lactic acid, and citric acid. An acidic extracellular pH (6-7) suppressed the augmentation of CD86 and CD54 levels by the sensitizer. Additionally, when the CD86/CD54 expression levels were suppressed, a reduction in the intracellular pH was confirmed. Furthermore, we observed that Na + /H + exchanger 1 (NHE-1), a protein that contributes to the regulation of extracellular/intracellular pH, is involved in CD86 and CD54 expression. These findings suggest that the extracellular/intracellular pH has substantial effects on in vitro skin sensitization markers and should be considered in evaluations of the safety of mixtures and commercial products in the future.

  7. Differential Effect of Cytomegalovirus Infection with Age on the Expression of CD57, CD300a, and CD161 on T-Cell Subpopulations

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    Fakhri Hassouneh

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Immunosenescence is a progressive deterioration of the immune system with aging. It affects both innate and adaptive immunity limiting the response to pathogens and to vaccines. As chronic cytomegalovirus (CMV infection is probably one of the major driving forces of immunosenescence, and its persistent infection results in functional and phenotypic changes to the T-cell repertoire, the aim of this study was to analyze the effect of CMV-seropositivity and aging on the expression of CD300a and CD161 inhibitory receptors, along with the expression of CD57 marker on CD4+, CD8+, CD8+CD56+ (NKT-Like and CD4−CD8− (DN T-cell subsets. Our results showed that, regardless of the T-cell subset, CD57−CD161−CD300a+ T-cells expand with age in CMV-seropositive individuals, whereas CD57−CD161+CD300a+ T-cells decrease. Similarly, CD57+CD161−CD300a+ T-cells expand with age in CMV-seropositive individuals in all subsets except in DN cells and CD57−CD161+CD300a− T-cells decrease in all T-cell subsets except in CD4+ T-cells. Besides, in young individuals, CMV latent infection associates with the expansion of CD57+CD161−CD300a+CD4+, CD57−CD161−CD300a+CD4+, CD57+CD161−CD300a+CD8+, CD57−CD161−CD300a+CD8+, CD57+CD161−CD300a+NKT-like, and CD57+CD161−CD300a+DN T-cells. Moreover, in young individuals, CD161 expression on T-cells is not affected by CMV infection. Changes of CD161 expression were only associated with age in the context of CMV latent infection. Besides, CD300a+CD57+CD161+ and CD300a−CD57+CD161+ phenotypes were not found in any of the T-cell subsets studied except in the DN subpopulation, indicating that in the majority of T-cells, CD161 and CD57 do not co-express. Thus, our results show that CMV latent infection impact on the immune system depends on the age of the individual, highlighting the importance of including CMV serology in any study regarding immunosenescence.

  8. Soluble CD40 ligand stimulates CD40-dependent activation of the β2 integrin Mac-1 and protein kinase C zeda (PKCζ in neutrophils: implications for neutrophil-platelet interactions and neutrophil oxidative burst.

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    Rong Jin

    Full Text Available Recent work has revealed an essential involvement of soluble CD40L (sCD40L in inflammation and vascular disease. Activated platelets are the major source of sCD40L, which has been implicated in platelet and leukocyte activation, although its exact functional impact on leukocyte-platelet interactions and the underlying mechanisms remain undefined. We aimed to determine the impact and the mechanisms of sCD40L on neutrophils. We studied neutrophil interactions with activated, surface-adherent platelets as a model for leukocyte recruitment to the sites of injury. Our data show that CD40L contributes to neutrophil firm adhesion to and transmigration across activated surface-adherent platelets, possibly through two potential mechanisms. One involves the direct interaction of ligand-receptor (CD40L-CD40, i.e., platelet surface CD40L interaction with neutrophil CD40; another involves an indirect mechanism, i.e. soluble CD40L stimulates activation of the leukocyte-specific β2 integrin Mac-1 in neutrophils and thereby further promotes neutrophil adhesion and migration. Activation of the integrin Mac-1 is known to be critical for mediating neutrophil adhesion and migration. sCD40L activated Mac-1 in neutrophils and enhanced neutrophil-platelet interactions in wild-type neutrophils, but failed to elicit such responses in CD40-deficient neutrophils. Furthermore, our data show that the protein kinase C zeta (PKCζ is critically required for sCD40L-induced Mac-1 activation and neutrophil adhesive function. sCD40L strongly stimulated the focal clustering of Mac-1 (CD11b and the colocalization of Mac-1 with PKCζ in wild-type neutrophils, but had minimal effect in CD40-deficient neutrophils. Blocking PKCζ completely inhibited sCD40L-induced neutrophil firm adhesion. Moreover, sCD40L strongly stimulates neutrophil oxidative burst via CD40-dependent activation of PI3K/NF-KB, but independent of Mac-1 and PKCζ. These findings may contribute to a better

  9. Study of association of CD40-CD154 gene polymorphisms with disease susceptibility and cardiovascular risk in Spanish rheumatoid arthritis patients.

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    Mercedes García-Bermúdez

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic inflammatory disease associated with increased cardiovascular (CV mortality. Since CD40-CD154 binding has direct consequences on inflammation process initiation, we aimed to replicate previous findings related to disease susceptibility in Spanish RA population. Furthermore, as the major complication in RA disease patients is the development of CV events due to accelerated atherosclerosis, and elevated levels of CD40L/CD154 are present in patients with acute myocardial infarction, we assessed the potential association of CD40 and CD154/CD40L gene variants with CV risk in Spanish RA patients.One thousand five hundred and seventy-five patients fulfilling the 1987 ACR classification criteria for RA and 1600 matched controls were genotyped for the CD40 rs1883832, rs4810485 and rs1535045 and CD154 rs3092952 and rs3092920 gene polymorphisms, using predesigned TaqMan single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping assays. Afterwards, we investigated the influence of CD40-CD154 gene variants in the development of CV events. Also, in a subgroup of 273 patients without history of CV events, we assessed the influence of these polymorphisms in the risk of subclinical atherosclerosis determined by carotid ultrasonography.Nominally significant differences in the allele frequencies for the rs1883832 CD40 gene polymorphism between RA patients and controls were found (p=0.038. Although we did not observe a significant association of CD40-CD154 gene variants with the development of CV events, an ANCOVA model adjusted for sex, age at the time of the ultrasonography assessment, follow-up time, traditional CV risk factors and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies disclosed a significant association (p=0.0047 between CD40 rs1535045 polymorphism and carotid intima media thickness, a surrogate marker of atherosclerosis.Data from our pilot study indicate a potential association of rs1883832 CD40 gene polymorphism with susceptibility

  10. Dynamic analysis of CD127 expression on memory CD8 T cells from patients with chronic hepatitis B during telbivudine treatment

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    Lv Guocai

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accumulating evidence supports the theory that expression of CD127 on CD8 T cells during the process of antiviral immune response indicates a subset of effect CD8 T cells that successfully develop into fully protective memory. CD8 T cells expression of CD127 may be used as a predictor to evaluate disease status in chronic viral infection. The aim of this study was to investigate the CD127 expression level on different subsets of CD8 T cell and explore the relationship between CD127 expression on CD8 memory T cells and serum hepatitis B virus (HBV DNA and hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg levels in patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB. We also aimed to investigate the CD127 expression pattern on CD8 memory T cells of CHB patients who were treated with Telbivudine. Methods/Results Twenty HBeAg-positive CHB patients were selected and treated with telbivudine 600 mg/day for 48 weeks. The memory CD8 T cells were characterized by expression of CD45RA and CD27 markers. CD127 expression on the CD8 T-cell surface was measured by four-colour flow cytometry. Our results showed that CD127 expression on memory CD8 T cells was reduced in CHB patients. There was a strong negative correlation between CD127 expression on memory CD8 T cells and serum HBV DNA and HBeAg levels in CHB patients. Moreover, successful antiviral therapy increased CD127 expression on CD8 memory T cells as well as on HBV-specific CD8 T cells in CHB patients. Conclusion These results suggest that diminished CD127 expression on CD8 memory T cells of CHB patients is a potential mechanism explaining cellular immune function impairment in CHB infection, and that CD127 expression on CD8 memory T cells is a useful indicator for evaluating the effects of anti-HBV therapy.

  11. Immunomodulatory Effects of Deokgu Thermomineral Water Balneotherapy on Oxazolone-Induced Atopic Dermatitis Murine Model.

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    Lee, Young Bok; Kim, Su Jin; Park, Sae Mi; Lee, Kyung Ho; Han, Hyung Jin; Yu, Dong Soo; Woo, So Youn; Yun, Seong Taek; Hamm, Se-Yeong; Kim, Hong Jig; Kim, Jin-Wou

    2016-04-01

    Although the therapeutic mechanism of balneotherapy for atopic dermatitis has not been clarified, many atopic patients who visit thermomineral springs have shown clinical improvements. This study was aimed to evaluate the immunomodulatory effect of thermomineral water balneotherapy on the atopic dermatitis murine model. The oxazolone-induced atopic dermatitis murine model was used to evaluate the therapeutic effect of balneotherapy with Deokgu thermomineral water compared with distilled water. Histologic evaluation and confocal microscopic imaging were performed to analyze the lesional expression of cluster-of-differentiation (CD)4 and forkhead box p3 (Foxp3). Lesional mRNA expression of interleukin (IL) 33, thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP), and Foxp3 was evaluated by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Compared with the distilled water bath group, confocal microscopic evaluation of CD4 and Foxp3 merged images showed increased expression of regulatory T cells in the thermomineral balneotherapy group. The lesional mRNA level of IL-33 showed a reduced trend in the thermomineral balneotherapy group, whereas the level of mRNA of Foxp3 was increased. TSLP showed a decreased trend in both distilled water and thermomineral water bath groups. There was a trend of reduced expression in lesional IL-33 mRNA but increased cell count of CD4(+) Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells in thermomineral balneotherapy compared with distilled water bath. Therefore, thermomineral balneotherapy can be an effective and safe adjuvant therapeutic option for atopic dermatitis.

  12. Immunohistochemical Expression of MCAM/CD146 in Canine Melanoma.

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    Abou Asa, S

    2017-07-01

    MCAM/CD146 (melanoma cell adhesion molecule/CD146) is a transmembrane immunoglobulin superfamily cell adhesion molecule involved in transendothelial migration and signal transduction. It is expressed in melanoma, squamous cell carcinoma, prostatic, ovarian, cervical and endometrial cancers and promotes tumour growth, angiogenesis and metastasis. Melanoma is the most common malignant oral tumour of dogs and also arises in the skin, nail bed and footpad. The aim of this study was to investigate the immunohistochemical expression of MCAM/CD146 in 51 canine melanomas, including oral, cutaneous and ocular tumours. Seventeen of the 51 (33.3%) cases were negative, eight (15.7%) were weakly positive, seven (13.7%) were moderately positive and 19 (37.3%) were strongly positive. MCAM/CD146 was expressed by both oral and cutaneous melanomas; however, the intensity and the extent of the immunoreactivity was higher in oral (P = 0.009) than in cutaneous tumours (P = 0.058). Most ocular melanomas did not express MCAM/CD146 (P = 0.256). Expression of MCAM/CD146 by canine melanomas may suggest the molecule as a target for treatment, especially in oral melanomas. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Daoy medulloblastoma cells that express CD133 are radioresistant relative to CD133- cells, and the CD133+ sector is enlarged by hypoxia

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    Blazek, Ed R.; Foutch, Jennifer L.; Maki, Guitta

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Primary medulloblastoma and glioblastoma multiforme tumor cells that express the surface marker CD133 are believed to be enriched for brain tumor stem cells because of their unique ability to initiate or reconstitute tumors in immunodeficient mice. This study sought to characterize the radiobiological properties and marker expression changes of CD133+ vs. CD133- cells of an established medulloblastoma cell line. Methods and Materials: Daoy and D283 Med cell lines were stained with fluorescently labeled anti-CD133 antibody and sorted into CD133+ and CD133- populations. The effect of oxygen (2% vs. 20%) on CD133 expression was measured. Both populations were analyzed for marker stability, cell cycle distribution, and radiosensitivity. Results: CD133+ Daoy cells restored nearly native CD133+ and CD133- populations within 18 days, whereas CD133- cells remained overwhelmingly CD133-. Culturing Daoy cells in 2% oxygen rather than the standard 20% oxygen increased their CD133 expression 1.6-fold. CD133+ Daoy cells were radioresistant via the β-parameter of the linear-quadratic model relative to CD133- Daoy cells, although their α-parameters and cell cycle distributions were identical. Conclusions: Restoration of the original CD133+ and CD133- populations from CD133+ Daoy cells in serum is further evidence that CD133+ cells are functionally distinct from CD133- cells. The radioresistance of CD133+ compared with CD133- Daoy cells is consistent with better repair of sublethal damage. Enlargement of the CD133+ sector is a new feature of the hypoxic response

  14. Differential expression of the costimulatory molecules CD86, CD28, CD152 and PD-1 correlates with the host-parasite outcome in leprosy

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    Maria de Lourdes Palermo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Leprosy is a spectral disease exhibiting two polar sides, namely, lepromatous leprosy (LL characterised by impaired T-cell responses and tuberculoid leprosy in which T-cell responses are strong. Proper T-cell activation requires signalling through costimulatory molecules expressed by antigen presenting cells and their ligands on T-cells. We studied the influence of costimulatory molecules on the immune responses of subjects along the leprosy spectrum. The expression of the costimulatory molecules was evaluated in in vitro-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells of lepromatous and tuberculoid patients and healthy exposed individuals (contacts. We show that LL patients have defective monocyte CD86 expression, which likely contributes to the impairment of the antigen presentation process and to patients anergy. Accordingly, CD86 but not CD80 blockade inhibited the lymphoproliferative response to Mycobacterium leprae. Consistent with the LL anergy, there was reduced expression of the positive signalling costimulatory molecules CD28 and CD86 on the T-cells in these patients. In contrast, tuberculoid leprosy patients displayed increased expression of the negative signalling molecules CD152 and programmed death-1 (PD-1, which represents a probable means of modulating an exacerbated immune response and avoiding immunopathology. Notably, the contacts exhibited proper CD86 and CD28 expression but not exacerbated CD152 or PD-1 expression, suggesting that they tend to develop a balanced immunity without requiring immunosuppressive costimulatory signalling.

  15. CD70 reverse signaling enhances NK cell function and immunosurveillance in CD27-expressing B-cell malignancies.

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    Al Sayed, Mohamad F; Ruckstuhl, Carla A; Hilmenyuk, Tamara; Claus, Christina; Bourquin, Jean-Pierre; Bornhauser, Beat C; Radpour, Ramin; Riether, Carsten; Ochsenbein, Adrian F

    2017-07-20

    The interaction of the tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) CD27 with its ligand CD70 is an emerging target to treat cancer. CD27 signaling provides costimulatory signals to cytotoxic T cells but also increases the frequency of regulatory T cells. Similar to other TNFR ligands, CD70 has been shown to initiate intracellular signaling pathways (CD70 reverse signaling). CD27 is expressed on a majority of B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma, but its role in the immune control of lymphoma and leukemia is unknown. We therefore generated a cytoplasmic deletion mutant of CD27 (CD27-trunc) to study the role of CD70 reverse signaling in the immunosurveillance of B-cell malignancies in vivo. Expression of CD27-trunc on malignant cells increased the number of tumor-infiltrating interferon γ-producing natural killer (NK) cells. In contrast, the antitumoral T-cell response remained largely unchanged. CD70 reverse signaling in NK cells was mediated via the AKT signaling pathway and increased NK cell survival and effector function. The improved immune control by activated NK cells prolonged survival of CD27-trunc-expressing lymphoma-bearing mice. Finally, CD70 reverse signaling enhanced survival and effector function of human NK cells in a B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia xenotransplants model. Therefore, CD70 reverse signaling in NK cells contributes to the immune control of CD27-expressing B-cell lymphoma and leukemia. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  16. Differential expression and function of breast regression protein 39 (BRP-39 in murine models of subacute cigarette smoke exposure and allergic airway inflammation

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    Coyle Anthony J

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While the presence of the chitinase-like molecule YKL40 has been reported in COPD and asthma, its relevance to inflammatory processes elicited by cigarette smoke and common environmental allergens, such as house dust mite (HDM, is not well understood. The objective of the current study was to assess expression and function of BRP-39, the murine equivalent of YKL40 in a murine model of cigarette smoke-induced inflammation and contrast expression and function to a model of HDM-induced allergic airway inflammation. Methods CD1, C57BL/6, and BALB/c mice were room air- or cigarette smoke-exposed for 4 days in a whole-body exposure system. In separate experiments, BALB/c mice were challenged with HDM extract once a day for 10 days. BRP-39 was assessed by ELISA and immunohistochemistry. IL-13, IL-1R1, IL-18, and BRP-39 knock out (KO mice were utilized to assess the mechanism and relevance of BRP-39 in cigarette smoke- and HDM-induced airway inflammation. Results Cigarette smoke exposure elicited a robust induction of BRP-39 but not the catalytically active chitinase, AMCase, in lung epithelial cells and alveolar macrophages of all mouse strains tested. Both BRP-39 and AMCase were increased in lung tissue after HDM exposure. Examining smoke-exposed IL-1R1, IL-18, and IL-13 deficient mice, BRP-39 induction was found to be IL-1 and not IL-18 or IL-13 dependent, while induction of BRP-39 by HDM was independent of IL-1 and IL-13. Despite the importance of BRP-39 in cellular inflammation in HDM-induced airway inflammation, BRP-39 was found to be redundant for cigarette smoke-induced airway inflammation and the adjuvant properties of cigarette smoke. Conclusions These data highlight the contrast between the importance of BRP-39 in HDM- and cigarette smoke-induced inflammation. While functionally important in HDM-induced inflammation, BRP-39 is a biomarker of cigarette smoke induced inflammation which is the byproduct of an IL-1

  17. Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma with Aberrant Expression of CD19, CD20, and CD79a: Case Report and Literature Review

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    Matnani, Rahul G.; Stewart, Rachel L.; Pulliam, Joseph; Jennings, Chester D.; Kesler, Melissa

    2013-01-01

    A case of lymphoma of T-cell derivation with aberrant expression of three B-cell lineage markers (CD19, CD20, and CD79a), which was diagnosed on a left axillary excision, is described. Immunohistochemical studies and flow cytometry analysis demonstrated neoplastic cells expressing CD3, CD19, CD20, and CD79a with absence of CD4, CD8, CD10, CD30, CD34, CD56, CD68, TDT, MPO, PAX-5, and surface immunoglobulin. Gene rearrangement studies performed on paraffin blocks demonstrated monoclonal T-cell receptor gamma chain rearrangement with no evidence of clonal heavy chain rearrangement. The neoplastic cells were negative for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) or Human Herpes Virus 8 (HHV-8). At the time of diagnosis, the PET scan demonstrated hypermetabolic neoplastic cells involving the left axilla, bilateral internal jugular areas, mediastinum, right hilum, bilateral lungs, and spleen. However, bone marrow biopsy performed for hemolytic anemia revealed normocellular bone marrow with trilineage maturation. The patient had no evidence of immunodeficiency or infection with EBV or HHV-8. This is the first reported case of a mature T-cell lymphoma with aberrant expression of three B-cell lineage markers. The current report also highlights the need for molecular gene rearrangement studies to determine the precise lineage of ambiguous neoplastic clones. PMID:24066244

  18. Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma with Aberrant Expression of CD19, CD20, and CD79a: Case Report and Literature Review

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    Rahul G. Matnani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of lymphoma of T-cell derivation with aberrant expression of three B-cell lineage markers (CD19, CD20, and CD79a, which was diagnosed on a left axillary excision, is described. Immunohistochemical studies and flow cytometry analysis demonstrated neoplastic cells expressing CD3, CD19, CD20, and CD79a with absence of CD4, CD8, CD10, CD30, CD34, CD56, CD68, TDT, MPO, PAX-5, and surface immunoglobulin. Gene rearrangement studies performed on paraffin blocks demonstrated monoclonal T-cell receptor gamma chain rearrangement with no evidence of clonal heavy chain rearrangement. The neoplastic cells were negative for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV or Human Herpes Virus 8 (HHV-8. At the time of diagnosis, the PET scan demonstrated hypermetabolic neoplastic cells involving the left axilla, bilateral internal jugular areas, mediastinum, right hilum, bilateral lungs, and spleen. However, bone marrow biopsy performed for hemolytic anemia revealed normocellular bone marrow with trilineage maturation. The patient had no evidence of immunodeficiency or infection with EBV or HHV-8. This is the first reported case of a mature T-cell lymphoma with aberrant expression of three B-cell lineage markers. The current report also highlights the need for molecular gene rearrangement studies to determine the precise lineage of ambiguous neoplastic clones.

  19. Giant omental lipoblastoma and CD56 expression

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    Go Miyano

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of giant omental lipoblastoma in a 13-month-old boy, which was treated successfully by total excision. Tumor cells were positive for S100, CD34 and CD56. This is the first report of lipoblastoma expressing CD56, a fact that could be used to differentiate lipoblastoma from liposarcoma.

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Atherosclerosis Using CD81-Targeted Microparticles of Iron Oxide in Mice

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    Fei Yan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study is to investigate the feasibility of using CD81- (Cluster of Differentiation 81 protein- targeted microparticles of iron oxide (CD81-MPIO for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the murine atherosclerosis. CD81-MPIO and IgG- (Immunoglobulin G- MPIO were prepared by covalently conjugating, respectively, with anti-CD81 monoclonal and IgG antibodies to the surface of the tosyl activated MPIO. The relevant binding capability of the MPIO was examined by incubating them with murine bEnd.3 cells stimulated with phenazine methosulfate (PMS and its effect in shortening T2 relaxation time was also examined. MRI in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice was studied in vivo. Our results show that CD81-MPIO, but not IgG-MPIO, can bind to the PMS-stimulated bEnd.3 cells. The T2 relaxation time was significantly shortened for stimulated bEnd.3 cells when compared with IgG-MPIO. In vivo MRI in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice showed highly conspicuous areas of low signal after CD81-MPIO injection. Quantitative analysis of the area of CD81-MPIO contrast effects showed 8.96- and 6.98-fold increase in comparison with IgG-MPIO or plain MPIO, respectively (P<0.01. Histological assay confirmed the expression of CD81 and CD81-MPIO binding onto atherosclerotic lesions. In conclusion, CD81-MPIO allows molecular assessment of murine atherosclerotic lesions by magnetic resonance imaging.

  1. Comparision of Immunohistochemical Expression of CD10 in Odontogenic Cysts

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    Munisekhar, M.S.; Suri, Charu; Rajalbandi, Santosh Kumar; M.R., Pradeep; Gothe, Pavan

    2014-01-01

    Background: Expression of CD10 has been documented in various tumors like nasopharyngeal carcinoma, gastric carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, odontogenic tumors. Aim: To evaluate and compare CD10 expression in odontogenic cysts like radicular cyst, dentigerous cyst and odontogenic keratocyst (OKC). Materials and Methods: Total 60 cases were included in the study, comprising 20 cases each of radicular, dentigerous and odontogenic keratocyst. Each case was evaluated and compared for immunohistochemical expression of CD10. Results obtained were statistically analysed using ANOVA test followed by post hoc test Tukey-Kramer Multiple Comparisons Test for continuous variable and Chi-square test for discrete variable. Results: More number of cases showing sub-epithelial stromal CD10 expression were found in OKC among the cysts. Conclusion: CD10 expression was more in OKC compared to radicular and dentigerous cysts. PMID:25584313

  2. MHC Class II and CD9 in Human Eosinophils Localize to Detergent-Resistant Membrane Microdomains

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    Akuthota, Praveen; Melo, Rossana C. N.; Spencer, Lisa A.

    2012-01-01

    Eosinophils function in murine allergic airways inflammation as professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs). In murine professional APC cell types, optimal functioning of MHC Class II depends on its lateral association in plasma membranes and colocalization with the tetraspanin CD9 into detergent-resistant membrane microdomains (DRMs). With human eosinophils, we evaluated the localization of MHC Class II (HLA-DR) to DRMs and the functional significance of such localization. In granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor–stimulated human eosinophils, antibody cross-linked HLA-DR colocalized by immunofluorescence microscopy focally on plasma membranes with CD9 and the DRM marker ganglioside GM1. In addition, HLA-DR coimmunoprecipitates with CD9 after chemical cross-linking of CD9. HLA-DR and CD9 were localized by Western blotting in eosinophil DRM subcellular fractions. DRM disruption with the cholesterol-depleting agent methyl-β-cyclodextrin decreased eosinophil surface expression of HLA-DR and CD9. We show that CD9 is abundant on the surface of eosinophils, presenting the first electron microscopy data of the ultrastructural immunolocalization of CD9 in human eosinophils. Disruption of HLA-DR–containing DRMs decreased the ability of superantigen-loaded human eosinophils to stimulate CD4+ T-cell activation (CD69 expression), proliferation, and cytokine production. Our results, which demonstrate that eosinophil MHC Class II localizes to DRMs in association with CD9 in a functionally significant manner, represent a novel insight into the organization of the antigen presentation complex of human eosinophils. PMID:21885678

  3. MHC Class II and CD9 in human eosinophils localize to detergent-resistant membrane microdomains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akuthota, Praveen; Melo, Rossana C N; Spencer, Lisa A; Weller, Peter F

    2012-02-01

    Eosinophils function in murine allergic airways inflammation as professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs). In murine professional APC cell types, optimal functioning of MHC Class II depends on its lateral association in plasma membranes and colocalization with the tetraspanin CD9 into detergent-resistant membrane microdomains (DRMs). With human eosinophils, we evaluated the localization of MHC Class II (HLA-DR) to DRMs and the functional significance of such localization. In granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor-stimulated human eosinophils, antibody cross-linked HLA-DR colocalized by immunofluorescence microscopy focally on plasma membranes with CD9 and the DRM marker ganglioside GM1. In addition, HLA-DR coimmunoprecipitates with CD9 after chemical cross-linking of CD9. HLA-DR and CD9 were localized by Western blotting in eosinophil DRM subcellular fractions. DRM disruption with the cholesterol-depleting agent methyl-β-cyclodextrin decreased eosinophil surface expression of HLA-DR and CD9. We show that CD9 is abundant on the surface of eosinophils, presenting the first electron microscopy data of the ultrastructural immunolocalization of CD9 in human eosinophils. Disruption of HLA-DR-containing DRMs decreased the ability of superantigen-loaded human eosinophils to stimulate CD4(+) T-cell activation (CD69 expression), proliferation, and cytokine production. Our results, which demonstrate that eosinophil MHC Class II localizes to DRMs in association with CD9 in a functionally significant manner, represent a novel insight into the organization of the antigen presentation complex of human eosinophils.

  4. Increased Cerebral Tff1 Expression in Two Murine Models of Neuroinflammation

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    Eva B Znalesniak

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The trefoil factor family (TFF peptide TFF1 is a typical secretory product of the gastric mucosa and a very low level of expression occurs in nearly all regions of the murine brain. TFF1 possesses a lectin activity and binding to a plethora of transmembrane glycoproteins could explain the diverse biological effects of TFF1 (e.g., anti-apoptotic effect. It was the aim to test whether TFF expression is changed during neuroinflammation. Methods: Expression profiling was performed using semi-quantitative RT-PCR analyses in two murine models of neuroinflammation, i.e. Toxoplasma gondii-induced encephalitis and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, the latter being the most common animal model of multiple sclerosis. Tff1 expression was also localized using RNA in situ hybridization histochemistry. Results: We report for the first time on a significant transcriptional induction in cerebral Tff1 expression in both T. gondii-induced encephalitis and EAE. In contrast, Tff2 and Tff3 expression were not altered. Tff1 transcripts were predominantly localized in the internal granular layer of the cerebellum indicating neuronal expression. Furthermore, also glial cells are expected to express Tff1. Characterization of both experimental models by expression profiling (e.g., inflammasome sensors, inflammatory cytokines, microglial marker Iba1, ependymin related protein 1 revealed differences concerning the expression of the inflammasome sensor Nlrp1 and interleukin 17a. Conclusion: The up-regulated expression of Tff1 is probably the result of a complex inflammatory process as its expression is induced by tumor necrosis factor α as well as interleukins 1β and 17. However on the transcript level, Tff1KO mice did not show any significant signs of an altered immune response after infection with T. gondii in comparison with the wild type animals.

  5. Critical role for thymic CD19+CD5+CD1dhiIL-10+ regulatory B cells in immune homeostasis.

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    Xing, Chen; Ma, Ning; Xiao, He; Wang, Xiaoqian; Zheng, Mingke; Han, Gencheng; Chen, Guojiang; Hou, Chunmei; Shen, Beifen; Li, Yan; Wang, Renxi

    2015-03-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that besides the spleen, LNs, peripheral blood, and thymus contain a regulatory IL-10-producing CD19(+)CD5(+)CD1d(high) B cell subset that may play a critical role in the maintenance of immune homeostasis. Indeed, this population was identified in the murine thymus, and furthermore, when cocultured with CD4(+) T cells, this population of B cells supported the maintenance of CD4(+)Foxp3(+) Tregs in vitro, in part, via the CD5-CD72 interaction. Mice homozygous for Cd19(Cre) (CD19(-/-)) express B cells with impaired signaling and humoral responses. Strikingly, CD19(-/-) mice produce fewer CD4(+)Foxp3(+) Tregs and a greater percentage of CD4(+)CD8(-) and CD4(-)CD8(+) T cells. Consistent with these results, transfer of thymic CD19(+)CD5(+)CD1d(hi) B cells into CD19(-/-) mice resulted in significantly up-regulated numbers of CD4(+)Foxp3(+) Tregs with a concomitant reduction in CD4(+)CD8(-) and CD4(-)CD8(+) T cell populations in the thymus, spleen, and LNs but not in the BM of recipient mice. In addition, thymic CD19(+)CD5(+)CD1d(hi) B cells significantly suppressed autoimmune responses in lupus-like mice via up-regulation of CD4(+)Foxp3(+) Tregs and IL-10-producing Bregs. This study suggests that thymic CD19(+)CD5(+)CD1d(hi)IL-10(+) Bregs play a critical role in the maintenance of immune homeostasis. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  6. Increased plasma levels of microparticles expressing CD39 and CD133 in acute liver injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmelzle, Moritz; Splith, Katrin; Wiuff Andersen, Lars

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We have previously demonstrated that CD133 and CD39 are expressed by hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), which are mobilized after liver injury and target sites of injury, limit vascular inflammation, and boost hepatic regeneration. Plasma microparticles (MP) expressing CD39 can block...... sacrificed and plasma MP were isolated by ultracentrifugation. HSC and CD133 MP levels were analyzed by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Patients were enrolled with acute (n=5) and acute on chronic (n=5) liver injury with matched controls (n=7). Blood was collected at admission and plasma CD133 and CD39...... MP subsets were analyzed by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. RESULTS: HSC and CD133 MP levels were significantly increased only in the plasma of wild-type mice with acetaminophen hepatotoxicity (P

  7. Expressão citofotométrica do marcador CD34 no carcinoma epidermóide de esôfago Citophotometric expression of CD34 in squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olímpia Alves Teixeira Lima

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available RACIONAL: O câncer de esôfago está entre as seis neoplasias malignas mais comuns do mundo. Devido à sua grande agressividade clínica, o subtipo carcinoma epidermóide constitui um dos tumores de pior prognóstico, com alto índice de morbi-mortalidade. Marcadores de biologia molecular tem sido apontados como forte coadjuvante no diagnóstico e graduação de tumores. A angiogênese, evento essencial para a progressão tumoral, pode ser estudada pelo marcador CD34. OBJETIVO: Determinar por citofotometria, usando o sistema SAMBA 4000, a expressão do marcador CD34 no carcinoma epidermóide de esôfago e, correlacioná-los com dados clínico-patológicos (idade, sexo, grau de diferenciação do tumor, estadio, tamanho, localização, profundidade e acometimento de linfonodos. MÉTODOS: Avaliaram-se 29 amostras teciduais de carcinoma epidermóide de esôfago utilizando-se coloração imunoistoquímica com marcador anti-CD34. A quantificação da expressão deste marcador foi realizada por citometria de imagem, pelo sistema SAMBA 4000 nas variáveis índice de marcagem e densidade óptica. A correlação entre subgrupos e análise estatística dos resultados foi realizada com o programa SPSS. RESULTADOS: A expressão média do marcador CD34 foi de 73,40% + 15,20 no índice de marcagem e 56,10 + 23,54 na densidae óptica. O CD34 não apresenta correlação estatisticamente significativa com as características clínico-histopatológicas estudadas (idade, sexo, grau de diferenciação do tumor, estadio, tamanho, localização, profundidade e acometimento de linfonodos. CONCLUSÃO: O marcador CD34 apresenta expressão no carcinoma epidermóide de esôfago, com maior valor no índice de marcagem em relação à densidade óptica. Ele4 não apresenta correlação com as características clínico-histopatológicas estudadas.BACKGROUND: Esophagus carcinoma is rated among the six more common malignant neoplasias in the world. Due to its aggressive

  8. Adoptive transfer of murine T cells expressing a chimeric-PD1-Dap10 receptor as an immunotherapy for lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Adam; Hawk, William; Nylen, Emily; Ober, Sean; Autin, Pierre; Barber, Amorette

    2017-11-01

    Adoptive transfer of T cells is a promising cancer therapy and expression of chimeric antigen receptors can enhance tumour recognition and T-cell effector functions. The programmed death protein 1 (PD1) receptor is a prospective target for a chimeric antigen receptor because PD1 ligands are expressed on many cancer types, including lymphoma. Therefore, we developed a murine chimeric PD1 receptor (chPD1) consisting of the PD1 extracellular domain fused to the cytoplasmic domain of CD3ζ. Additionally, chimeric antigen receptor therapies use various co-stimulatory domains to enhance efficacy. Hence, the inclusion of a Dap10 or CD28 co-stimulatory domain in the chPD1 receptor was compared to determine which domain induced optimal anti-tumour immunity in a mouse model of lymphoma. The chPD1 T cells secreted pro-inflammatory cytokines and lysed RMA lymphoma cells. Adoptive transfer of chPD1 T cells significantly reduced established tumours and led to tumour-free survival in lymphoma-bearing mice. When comparing chPD1 receptors containing a Dap10 or CD28 domain, both receptors induced secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines; however, chPD1-CD28 T cells also secreted anti-inflammatory cytokines whereas chPD1-Dap10 T cells did not. Additionally, chPD1-Dap10 induced a central memory T-cell phenotype compared with chPD1-CD28, which induced an effector memory phenotype. The chPD1-Dap10 T cells also had enhanced in vivo persistence and anti-tumour efficacy compared with chPD1-CD28 T cells. Therefore, adoptive transfer of chPD1 T cells could be a novel therapy for lymphoma and inclusion of the Dap10 co-stimulatory domain in chimeric antigen receptors may induce a preferential cytokine profile and T-cell differentiation phenotype for anti-tumour therapies. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Heterogeneity of Human Neutrophil CD177 Expression Results from CD177P1 Pseudogene Conversion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuopeng Wu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Most humans harbor both CD177neg and CD177pos neutrophils but 1-10% of people are CD177null, placing them at risk for formation of anti-neutrophil antibodies that can cause transfusion-related acute lung injury and neonatal alloimmune neutropenia. By deep sequencing the CD177 locus, we catalogued CD177 single nucleotide variants and identified a novel stop codon in CD177null individuals arising from a single base substitution in exon 7. This is not a mutation in CD177 itself, rather the CD177null phenotype arises when exon 7 of CD177 is supplied entirely by the CD177 pseudogene (CD177P1, which appears to have resulted from allelic gene conversion. In CD177 expressing individuals the CD177 locus contains both CD177P1 and CD177 sequences. The proportion of CD177hi neutrophils in the blood is a heritable trait. Abundance of CD177hi neutrophils correlates with homozygosity for CD177 reference allele, while heterozygosity for ectopic CD177P1 gene conversion correlates with increased CD177neg neutrophils, in which both CD177P1 partially incorporated allele and paired intact CD177 allele are transcribed. Human neutrophil heterogeneity for CD177 expression arises by ectopic allelic conversion. Resolution of the genetic basis of CD177null phenotype identifies a method for screening for individuals at risk of CD177 isoimmunisation.

  10. Anthocyanin prevents CD40-activated proinflammatory signaling in endothelial cells by regulating cholesterol distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Min; Ling, Wenhua; Zhu, Huilian; Wang, Qing; Ma, Jing; Hou, Mengjun; Tang, Zhihong; Li, Lan; Ye, Qinyuan

    2007-03-01

    Intracellular tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factors (TRAFs) translocation to lipid rafts is a key element in CD40-induced signaling. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of anthocyanin on CD40-mediated proinflammatory events in human endothelial cells and the underlying possible molecular mechanism. Treatment of endothelial cells with anthocyanin prevented from CD40-induced proinflammatory status, measured by production of IL-6, IL-8, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 through inhibiting CD40-induced nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) activation. TRAF-2 played pivotal role in CD40-NF-kappaB pathway as TRAF-2 small interference RNA (siRNA) diminished CD40-induced NF-kappaB activation and inflammation. TRAF-2 overexpression increased CD40-mediated NF-kappaB activation. Moreover, TRAF-2 almost totally recruited to lipid rafts after stimulation by CD40 ligand and depletion of cholesterol diminished CD40-mediated NF-kappaB activation. Exposure to anthocyanin not only interrupted TRAF-2 recruitment to lipid rafts but also decreased cholesterol content in Triton X-100 insoluble lipid rafts. However, anthocyanin did not influence the interaction between CD40 ligand and CD40 receptor. Our findings suggest that anthocyanin protects from CD40-induced proinflammatory signaling by preventing TRAF-2 translocation to lipid rafts through regulation of cholesterol distribution, which thereby may represent a mechanism that would explain the anti-inflammatory response of anthocyanin.

  11. Human Uterine Leiomyoma Stem/Progenitor Cells Expressing CD34 and CD49b Initiate Tumors In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Masanori; Moravek, Molly B.; Coon, John S.; Navarro, Antonia; Monsivais, Diana; Dyson, Matthew T.; Druschitz, Stacy A.; Malpani, Saurabh S.; Serna, Vanida A.; Qiang, Wenan; Chakravarti, Debabrata; Kim, J. Julie; Bulun, Serdar E.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Uterine leiomyoma is the most common benign tumor in reproductive-age women. Using a dye-exclusion technique, we previously identified a side population of leiomyoma cells exhibiting stem cell characteristics. However, unless mixed with mature myometrial cells, these leiomyoma side population cells did not survive or grow well in vitro or in vivo. Objective: The objective of this study was to identify cell surface markers to isolate leiomyoma stem/progenitor cells. Design: Real-time PCR screening was used to identify cell surface markers preferentially expressed in leiomyoma side population cells. In vitro colony-formation assay and in vivo tumor-regeneration assay were used to demonstrate functions of leiomyoma stem/progenitor cells. Results: We found significantly elevated CD49b and CD34 gene expression in side population cells compared with main population cells. Leiomyoma cells were sorted into three populations based on the expression of CD34 and CD49b: CD34+/CD49b+, CD34+/CD49b−, and CD34−/CD49b− cells, with the majority of the side population cells residing in the CD34+/CD49b+ fraction. Of these populations, CD34+/CD49b+ cells expressed the lowest levels of estrogen receptor-α, progesterone receptor, and α-smooth muscle actin, but the highest levels of KLF4, NANOG, SOX2, and OCT4, confirming their more undifferentiated status. The stemness of CD34+/CD49b+ cells was also demonstrated by their strongest in vitro colony-formation capacity and in vivo tumor-regeneration ability. Conclusions: CD34 and CD49b are cell surface markers that can be used to enrich a subpopulation of leiomyoma cells possessing stem/progenitor cell properties; this technique will accelerate efforts to develop new therapies for uterine leiomyoma. PMID:25658015

  12. Oxidized LDL Induces Alternative Macrophage Phenotype through Activation of CD36 and PAFR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco J. Rios

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available OxLDL is recognized by macrophage scavenger receptors, including CD36; we have recently found that Platelet-Activating Factor Receptor (PAFR is also involved. Since PAFR in macrophages is associated with suppressor function, we examined the effect of oxLDL on macrophage phenotype. It was found that the presence of oxLDL during macrophage differentiation induced high mRNA levels to IL-10, mannose receptor, PPARγ and arginase-1 and low levels of IL-12 and iNOS. When human THP-1 macrophages were pre-treated with oxLDL then stimulated with LPS, the production of IL-10 and TGF-β significantly increased, whereas that of IL-6 and IL-8 decreased. In murine TG-elicited macrophages, this protocol significantly reduced NO, iNOS and COX2 expression. Thus, oxLDL induced macrophage differentiation and activation towards the alternatively activated M2-phenotype. In murine macrophages, oxLDL induced TGF-β, arginase-1 and IL-10 mRNA expression, which were significantly reduced by pre-treatment with PAFR antagonists (WEB and CV or with antibodies to CD36. The mRNA expression of IL-12, RANTES and CXCL2 were not affected. We showed that this profile of macrophage activation is dependent on the engagement of both CD36 and PAFR. We conclude that oxLDL induces alternative macrophage activation by mechanisms involving CD36 and PAFR.

  13. The effect of lidocaine on neutrophil CD11b/CD18 and endothelial ICAM-1 expression and IL-1beta concentrations induced by hypoxia-reoxygenation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lan, W

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Lidocaine has actions potentially of benefit during ischaemia-reperfusion. Neutrophils and endothelial cells have an important role in ischaemia-reperfusion injury. METHODS: Isolated human neutrophil CD11b and CD18, and human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) ICAM-1 expression and supernatant IL-1beta concentrations in response to hypoxia-reoxygenation were studied in the presence or absence of different concentrations of lidocaine (0.005, 0.05 and 0.5 mg mL(-1)). Adhesion molecule expression was quantified by flow cytometry and IL- 1beta concentrations by ELISA. Differences were assessed with analysis of variance and Student-Newman-Keuls as appropriate. Data are presented as mean+\\/-SD. RESULTS: Exposure to hypoxia-reoxygenation increased neutrophil CD11b (94.33+\\/-40.65 vs. 34.32+\\/-6.83 mean channel fluorescence (MCF), P = 0.02), CD18 (109.84+\\/-35.44 vs. 59.05+\\/-6.71 MCF, P = 0.03) and endothelial ICAM-1 (146.62+\\/-16.78 vs. 47.29+\\/-9.85 MCF, P < 0.001) expression compared to normoxia. Neutrophil CD18 expression on exposure to hypoxia-reoxygenation was less in lidocaine (0.005 mg mL(-1)) treated cells compared to control (71.07+\\/-10.14 vs. 109.84+\\/-35.44 MCF, P = 0.03). Endothelial ICAM-1 expression on exposure to hypoxia-reoxygenation was less in lidocaine (0.005 mg mL(-1)) treated cells compared to control (133.25+\\/-16.05 vs. 146.62+\\/-16.78 MCF, P = 0.03). Hypoxia-reoxygenation increased HUVEC supernatant IL-1beta concentrations compared to normoxia (3.41+\\/-0.36 vs. 2.65+\\/-0.21 pg mL(-1), P = 0.02). Endothelial supernatant IL-1beta concentrations in lidocaine-treated HUVECs were similar to controls. CONCLUSIONS: Lidocaine at clinically relevant concentrations decreased neutrophil CD18 and endothelial ICAM-1 expression but not endothelial IL-1beta concentrations.

  14. Endothelial cell-driven regulation of CD9 or motility-related protein-1 expression in multiple myeloma cells within the murine 5T33MM model and myeloma patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Bruyne, E; Levin Andersen, Thomas; De Raeve, H

    2006-01-01

    The cell surface expression of CD9, a glycoprotein of the tetraspanin family influencing several processes including cell motility and metastasis, inversely correlates with progression in several solid tumors. In the present work, we studied the expression and role of CD9 in multiple myeloma (MM...... interaction of the cells with BMEC and that CD9 is involved in transendothelial invasion, thus possibly mediating homing and/or spreading of the MM cells....

  15. CD147 Promotes CXCL1 Expression and Modulates Liver Fibrogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Pu Shi

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs release pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrogenic factors. CXC chemokine-ligand-1 (CXCL1 is expressed on HSCs. We previously found that the CD147 is overexpressed in activated HSCs. In this study, we showed an important role of CD147 in promoting liver fibrosis by activating HSCs and upregulating expression of chemokines. Specifically, we found that CD147 specific deletion in HSCs mice alleviated CCl4-induced liver fibrosis and inhibited HSCs activation. Overexpression of CD147 upregulated the secretion of CXCL1. Meanwhile, CXCL1 promoted HSCs activation through autocrine. Treating with PI3K/AKT inhibitor could effectively suppress CD147-induced CXCL1 expression. Taken together, these findings suggest that CD147 regulates CXCL1 release in HSCs by PI3K/AKT signaling. Inhibition of CD147 attenuates CCl4-induced liver fibrosis and inflammation. Therefore, administration of targeting CD147 could be a promising therapeutic strategy in liver fibrosis.

  16. Behavior of a cloned murine interferon alpha/beta receptor expressed in homospecific or heterospecific background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzé, G; Lutfalla, G; Bandu, M T; Proudhon, D; Mogensen, K E

    1992-05-15

    A murine interferon (IFN) alpha/beta receptor was cloned from the IFN-sensitive L1210 cell line on the basis of its homology with the human receptor. A combination of methods that includes the screening of random-primed and oligo(dT)-primed cDNA libraries and polymerase chain reactions with a single-side specificity was used. At the amino acid level, the murine IFN-alpha/beta shows 46% identity with its human counterpart. Both human WISH cells presenting a low sensitivity to mouse IFN and a murine L1210 mutant subline that does not express the receptor have been stably transfected with the murine IFN-alpha/beta receptor. Whereas transfected human cells became sensitive to a limited number of mouse IFN-alpha/beta subtypes, the transfected murine L1210 mutant was found to be fully complemented and became sensitive to all mouse IFN-alpha/beta subtypes tested, including those that were not active on transfected human cells. These results strongly suggest that the receptor described here is implicated in the mediation of the activities of all murine IFN-alpha/beta subtypes.

  17. Expression of CD44 splice variants in human primary brain tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaaijk, P.; Troost, D.; Morsink, F.; Keehnen, R. M.; Leenstra, S.; Bosch, D. A.; Pals, S. T.

    1995-01-01

    Expression of CD44, particularly of certain splice variants, has been linked to tumor progression and metastatic potential in a number of different animal and human cancers. Although differential expression of CD44 standard epitopes (CD44s) in human brain tumors has been reported, the expression of

  18. Induction of CD69 expression by cagPAI-positive Helicobacter pylori infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Naoki Mori; Chie Ishikawa; Masachika Senba

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate and elucidate the molecular mech-anism that regulates inducible expression of CD69 by Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori ) infection.METHODS: The expression levels of CD69 in a T-cell line, Jurkat, primary human peripheral blood mononu-clear cells (PBMCs), and CD4+T cells, were assessed by immunohistochemistry, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, and flow cytometry. Activation of CD69 promoter was detected by reporter gene. Nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation in Jurkat cells infected with H. pylori was evaluated by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. The role of NF-κB signaling in H. pylori -induced CD69 expression was analyzed using inhibitors of NF-κB and dominant-negative mutants. The isogenic mutants with disrupted cag pathogenicity island ( cagPAI) and virD4 were used to elucidate the role of cagPAI-encoding type Ⅳ secretion system and CagA in CD69 expression.RESULTS: CD69 staining was detected in mucosal lymphocytes and macrophages in specimens of pa-tients with H. pylori -positive gastritis. Although cagPAI-positive H. pylori and an isogenic mutant of virD4 induced CD69 expression, an isogenic mutant of cag-PAI failed to induce this in Jurkat cells. H. pylori also induced CD69 expression in PBMCs and CD4+T cells. The activation of the CD69 promoter by H. pylori was mediated through NF-κB. Transfection of dominant-negative mutants of IκBs, IκB kinases, and NF-κB-inducing kinase inhibited H. pylori -induced CD69 activation. Inhibitors of NF-κB suppressed H. pylori -induced CD69 mRNA expression.CONCLUSION: The results suggest that H. pylori in-duces CD69 expression through the activation of NF-κB. cagPAI might be relevant in the induction of CD69 expression in T cells. CD69 in T cells may play a role in H. pylori -induced gastritis.

  19. CD70-expressing CD4 T cells produce IFN-γ and IL-17 in rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Park, Jin Kyun; Han, Bobby Kwanghoon; Park, Ji Ah; Woo, Youn Jung; Kim, So Young; Lee, Eun Young; Lee, Eun Bong; Chalan, Paulina; Boots, Annemieke M.; Song, Yeong Wook

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: CD70-expressing CD4 T cells are enriched in RA and promote autoimmunity via co-stimulatory CD70-CD27 interaction. This study aimed to explore the phenotype and cytokine production of CD70(+) CD4 T cells in RA. METHODS: Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 32 RA patients were isolated

  20. Modulation of phenotypic and functional maturation of murine dendritic cells (DCs) by purified Achyranthes bidentata polysaccharide (ABP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Yaxuan; Meng, Jingjuan; Chen, Wenna; Liu, Jingling; Li, Xuan; Li, Weiwei; Lu, Changlong; Shan, Fengping

    2011-08-01

    There are a large number of interactions at molecular and cellular levels between the plant polysaccharides and immune system. Plant polysaccharides present an interesting effects as immunomodulators, particularly in the induction of the cells both in innate and adaptive immune systems. Activation of DCs could improve antitumoral responses usually diminished in cancer patients, and natural adjuvants provide a possibility of inducing this activation. ABP is a purified polysaccharide isolated from Achyranthes bidentata, a traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). The aim of this study is to investigate modulation of phenotypic and functional maturation of murine DCs by ABP. Both phenotypic and functional activities were assessed with use of conventional scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) for the morphology of the DC, transmitted electron microscopy (TEM) for intracellular lysosomes inside the DC, cellular immunohistochemistry for phagocytosis by the DCs, flow cytometry (FCM) for the changes in key surface molecules, bio-assay for the activity of acidic phosphatases (ACP), and ELISA for the production of pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-12. In fact, we found that purified ABP induced phenotypic maturation revealed by increased expression of CD86, CD40, and MHC II. Functional experiments showed the down-regulation of ACP inside DCs (which occurs when phagocytosis of DCs is decreased, and antigen presentation increased with maturation). Finally, ABP increased the production of IL-12. These data reveal that ABP promotes effective activation of murine DCs. This adjuvant-like activity may have therapeutic applications in clinical settings where immune responses need boosting. It is therefore concluded that ABP can exert positive modulation to murine DCs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Bone marrow-derived CD13+ cells sustain tumor progression: A potential non-malignant target for anticancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dondossola, Eleonora; Corti, Angelo; Sidman, Richard L; Arap, Wadih; Pasqualini, Renata

    2014-01-01

    Non-malignant cells found within neoplastic lesions express alanyl (membrane) aminopeptidase (ANPEP, best known as CD13), and CD13-null mice exhibit limited tumor growth and angiogenesis. We have recently demonstrated that a subset of bone marrow-derived CD11b + CD13 + myeloid cells accumulate within neoplastic lesions in several murine models of transplantable cancer to promote angiogenesis. If these findings were confirmed in clinical settings, CD11b + CD13 + myeloid cells could become a non-malignant target for the development of novel anticancer regimens.

  2. Blockade of OX40/OX40 ligand to decrease cytokine messenger RNA expression in acute renal allograft rejection in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y-L; Li, G; Fu, Y-X; Wang, H; Shen, Z-Y

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate cytokine messenger RNA (mRNA) expression by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from renal recipients experiencing acute rejection by blocking OX40-OX40L interactions with recombinant human OX40-Fc fusion protein (rhOX40Fc) in vitro. PBMCs were isolated from 20 recipients experiencing acute rejection episodes (rejection group) and 20 recipients with stable graft function (stable group). Levels of Th1 (interferon [IFN]-γ) and Th2 (interleukin [IL]-4) mRNA expressions by PBMCs were measured using real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reactions. IFN-γ mRNA expression levels were significantly higher in the rejection than the stable group (P rejection group, rhOX40Fc reduced significantly the expression of IFN-γ and IL-4 mRNA by anti-CD3-monoclonal antibody stimulated PBMCs (P type cytokines. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. CD4+ and CD8+ T cells can act separately in tumour rejection after immunization with murine pneumotropic virus chimeric Her2/neu virus-like particles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalle Andreasson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Immunization with murine pneumotropic virus virus-like particles carrying Her2/neu (Her2MPtVLPs prevents tumour outgrowth in mice when given prophylactically, and therapeutically if combined with the adjuvant CpG. We investigated which components of the immune system are involved in tumour rejection, and whether long-term immunological memory can be obtained. METHODOLOGY AND RESULTS: During the effector phase in BALB/c mice, only depletion of CD4+ and CD8+ in combination, with or without NK cells, completely abrogated tumour protection. Depletion of single CD4+, CD8+ or NK cell populations only had minor effects. During the immunization/induction phase, combined depletion of CD4+ and CD8+ cells abolished protection, while depletion of each individual subset had no or negligible effect. When tumour rejection was studied in knock-out mice with a C57Bl/6 background, protection was lost in CD4-/-CD8-/- and CD4-/-, but not in CD8-/- mice. In contrast, when normal C57Bl/6 mice were depleted of different cell types, protection was lost irrespective of whether only CD4+, only CD8+, or CD4+ and CD8+ cells in combination were eradicated. No anti-Her2/neu antibodies were detected but a Her2/neu-specific IFNgamma response was seen. Studies of long-term memory showed that BALB/c mice could be protected against tumour development when immunized together with CpG as long as ten weeks before challenge. CONCLUSION: Her2MPtVLP immunization is efficient in stimulating several compartments of the immune system, and induces an efficient immune response including long-term memory. In addition, when depleting mice of isolated cellular compartments, tumour protection is not as efficiently abolished as when depleting several immune compartments together.

  4. Molecular cloning and expression of the human homologue of the murine gene encoding myeloid leukemia-inhibitory factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gough, N.M.; Gearing, D.P.; King, J.A.; Willson, T.A.; Hilton, D.J.; Nicola, N.A.; Metcalf, D.

    1988-01-01

    A human homologue of the recently cloned murine leukemia-inhibitory factor (LIF) gene was isolated from a genomic library by using the marine cDNA as a hybridization probe. The nucleotide sequence of the human gene indicated that human LIF has 78% amino acid sequence identity with murine LIF, with no insertions or deletions, and that the region of the human gene encoding the mature protein has one intervening sequence. After oligonucleotide-mediated mutagenesis, the mature protein-coding region of the LIF gene was introduced into the yeast expression vector YEpsec1. Yeast cells transformed with the resulting recombinant could be induced with galactose to produce high levels of a factor that induced the differentiation of murine M1 leukemic cells in a manner analogous to murine LIF. This factor competed with 125 I-labeled native murine LIF for binding to specific cellular receptors on murine cells, compatible with a high degree of structural similarity between the murine and human factors

  5. Preparation of Proper Immunogen by Cloning and Stable Expression of cDNA coding for Human Hematopoietic Stem Cell Marker CD34 in NIH-3T3 Mouse Fibroblast Cell Line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafaghat, Farzaneh; Abbasi-Kenarsari, Hajar; Majidi, Jafar; Movassaghpour, Ali Akbar; Shanehbandi, Dariush; Kazemi, Tohid

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Transmembrane CD34 glycoprotein is the most important marker for identification, isolation and enumeration of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). We aimed in this study to clone the cDNA coding for human CD34 from KG1a cell line and stably express in mouse fibroblast cell line NIH-3T3. Such artificial cell line could be useful as proper immunogen for production of mouse monoclonal antibodies. Methods: CD34 cDNA was cloned from KG1a cell line after total RNA extraction and cDNA synthesis. Pfu DNA polymerase-amplified specific band was ligated to pGEMT-easy TA-cloning vector and sub-cloned in pCMV6-Neo expression vector. After transfection of NIH-3T3 cells using 3 μg of recombinant construct and 6 μl of JetPEI transfection reagent, stable expression was obtained by selection of cells by G418 antibiotic and confirmed by surface flow cytometry. Results: 1158 bp specific band was aligned completely to reference sequence in NCBI database corresponding to long isoform of human CD34. Transient and stable expression of human CD34 on transfected NIH-3T3 mouse fibroblast cells was achieved (25% and 95%, respectively) as shown by flow cytometry. Conclusion: Cloning and stable expression of human CD34 cDNA was successfully performed and validated by standard flow cytometric analysis. Due to murine origin of NIH-3T3 cell line, CD34-expressing NIH-3T3 cells could be useful as immunogen in production of diagnostic monoclonal antibodies against human CD34. This approach could bypass the need for purification of recombinant proteins produced in eukaryotic expression systems. PMID:25789221

  6. [Cloning of human CD45 gene and its expression in Hela cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Xu, Tianyu; Wu, Lulin; Zhang, Liyun; Lu, Xiao; Zuo, Daming; Chen, Zhengliang

    2015-11-01

    To clone human CD45 gene PTPRC and establish Hela cells overexpressing recombinant human CD45 protein. The intact cDNA encoding human CD45 amplified using RT-PCR from the total RNA extracted from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of a healthy donor was cloned into pMD-18T vector. The CD45 cDNA fragment amplified from the pMD-18T-CD45 by PCR was inserted to the coding region of the PcDNA3.1-3xflag vector, and the resultant recombinant expression vector PcDNA3.1-3xflag-CD45 was transfected into Hela cells. The expression of CD45 in Hela cells was detected by flow cytometry and Western blotting, and the phosphastase activity of CD45 was quantified using an alkaline phosphatase assay kit. The cDNA fragment of about 3 900 bp was amplified from human PBMCs and cloned into pMD-18T vector. The recombinant expression vector PcDNA3.1-3xflag-CD45 was constructed, whose restriction maps and sequence were consistent with those expected. The expression of CD45 in transfected Hela cells was detected by flow cytometry and Western blotting, and the expressed recombinant CD45 protein in Hela cells showed a phosphastase activity. The cDNA of human CD45 was successfully cloned and effectively expressed in Hela cells, which provides a basis for further exploration of the functions of CD45.

  7. Transcriptome Analysis of Mycobacteria-Specific CD4+ T Cells Identified by Activation-Induced Expression of CD154.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunnath-Velayudhan, Shajo; Goldberg, Michael F; Saini, Neeraj K; Johndrow, Christopher T; Ng, Tony W; Johnson, Alison J; Xu, Jiayong; Chan, John; Jacobs, William R; Porcelli, Steven A

    2017-10-01

    Analysis of Ag-specific CD4 + T cells in mycobacterial infections at the transcriptome level is informative but technically challenging. Although several methods exist for identifying Ag-specific T cells, including intracellular cytokine staining, cell surface cytokine-capture assays, and staining with peptide:MHC class II multimers, all of these have significant technical constraints that limit their usefulness. Measurement of activation-induced expression of CD154 has been reported to detect live Ag-specific CD4 + T cells, but this approach remains underexplored and, to our knowledge, has not previously been applied in mycobacteria-infected animals. In this article, we show that CD154 expression identifies adoptively transferred or endogenous Ag-specific CD4 + T cells induced by Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccination. We confirmed that Ag-specific cytokine production was positively correlated with CD154 expression by CD4 + T cells from bacillus Calmette-Guérin-vaccinated mice and show that high-quality microarrays can be performed from RNA isolated from CD154 + cells purified by cell sorting. Analysis of microarray data demonstrated that the transcriptome of CD4 + CD154 + cells was distinct from that of CD154 - cells and showed major enrichment of transcripts encoding multiple cytokines and pathways of cellular activation. One notable finding was the identification of a previously unrecognized subset of mycobacteria-specific CD4 + T cells that is characterized by the production of IL-3. Our results support the use of CD154 expression as a practical and reliable method to isolate live Ag-specific CD4 + T cells for transcriptomic analysis and potentially for a range of other studies in infected or previously immunized hosts. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  8. A Novel de Novo Mutation in the CD40 Ligand Gene in a Patient With a Mild X-Linked Hyper-IgM Phenotype Initially Diagnosed as CVID: New Aspects of Old Diseases

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    Tábata T. França

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the CD40 ligand (CD40L gene (CD40LG lead to X-linked hyper-IgM syndrome (X-HIGM, which is a primary immunodeficiency (PID characterized by decreased serum levels of IgG and IgA and normal or elevated IgM levels. Although most X-HIGM patients become symptomatic during the first or second year of life, during which they exhibit recurrent infections, some patients exhibit mild phenotypes, which are usually associated with hypomorphic mutations that do not abrogate protein expression or function. Here, we describe a 28-year-old man who initially presented with recurrent infections since the age of 7 years, when he exhibited meningitis caused by Cryptococcus neoformans. The patient had no family history of immunodeficiency, and based on clinical and laboratory presentation, he was initially diagnosed with common variable immunodeficiency (CVID. In subsequent years, he displayed several sporadic episodes of infection, including pneumonia, pharyngotonsillitis, acute otitis media, rhinosinusitis, fungal dermatosis, and intestinal helminthiasis. The evaluation of CD40L expression on the surface of activated CD3+CD4+ T cells from the patient showed decreased expression of CD40L. Genetic analysis revealed a novel de novo mutation consisting of a 6-nucleotide insertion in exon 1 of CD40LG, which confirmed the diagnosis of X-HIGM. In this report, we describe a novel mutation in the CD40L gene and highlight the complexities of PID diagnosis in light of atypical phenotypes and hypomorphic mutations as well as the importance of the differential diagnosis of PIDs.

  9. Microarray evaluation of gene expression profiles in inflamed and healthy human dental pulp: the role of IL1beta and CD40 in pulp inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatta, V; Zizzari, V L; Dd ' Amico, V; Salini, L; D' Aurora, M; Franchi, S; Antonucci, I; Sberna, M T; Gherlone, E; Stuppia, L; Tetè, S

    2012-01-01

    Dental pulp undergoes a number of changes passing from healthy status to inflammation due to deep decay. These changes are regulated by several genes resulting differently expressed in inflamed and healthy dental pulp, and the knowledge of the processes underlying this differential expression is of great relevance in the identification of the pathogenesis of the disease. In this study, the gene expression profile of inflamed and healthy dental pulps were compared by microarray analysis, and data obtained were analyzed by Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) software. This analysis allows to focus on a variety of genes, typically expressed in inflamed tissues. The comparison analysis showed an increased expression of several genes in inflamed pulp, among which IL1β and CD40 resulted of particular interest. These results indicate that gene expression profile of human dental pulp in different physiological and pathological conditions may become an useful tool for improving our knowledge about processes regulating pulp inflammation.

  10. Inhibition of Allograft Inflammatory Factor-1 in Dendritic Cells Restrains CD4+ T Cell Effector Responses and Induces CD25+Foxp3+ T Regulatory Subsets

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    Diana M. Elizondo

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Allograft inflammatory factor-1 (AIF1 is a cytoplasmic scaffold protein shown to influence immune responses in macrophages and microglial cells. The protein contains Ca2+ binding EF-hand and PDZ interaction domains important for mediating intracellular signaling complexes. This study now reports that AIF1 is expressed in CD11c+ dendritic cells (DC and silencing of expression restrains induction of antigen-specific CD4+ T cell effector responses. AIF1 knockdown in murine DC resulted in impaired T cell proliferation and skewed polarization away from T helper type 1 and 17 fates. In turn, there was a parallel expansion of IL-10-producing and CD25+Foxp3+ T regulatory subsets. These studies are the first to demonstrate that AIF1 expression in DC serves as a potent governor of cognate T cell responses and presents a novel target for engineering tolerogenic DC-based immunotherapies.

  11. CD4+ Primary T Cells Expressing HCV-Core Protein Upregulate Foxp3 and IL-10, Suppressing CD4 and CD8 T Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguado, Enrique; Garcia-Cozar, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Adaptive T cell responses are critical for controlling HCV infection. While there is clinical evidence of a relevant role for regulatory T cells in chronic HCV-infected patients, based on their increased number and function; mechanisms underlying such a phenomena are still poorly understood. Accumulating evidence suggests that proteins from Hepatitis C virus can suppress host immune responses. We and others have shown that HCV is present in CD4+ lymphocytes from chronically infected patients and that HCV-core protein induces a state of unresponsiveness in the CD4+ tumor cell line Jurkat. Here we show that CD4+ primary T cells lentivirally transduced with HCV-core, not only acquire an anergic phenotype but also inhibit IL-2 production and proliferation of bystander CD4+ or CD8+ T cells in response to anti-CD3 plus anti-CD28 stimulation. Core-transduced CD4+ T cells show a phenotype characterized by an increased basal secretion of the regulatory cytokine IL-10, a decreased IFN-γ production upon stimulation, as well as expression of regulatory T cell markers, CTLA-4, and Foxp3. A significant induction of CD4+CD25+CD127lowPD-1highTIM-3high regulatory T cells with an exhausted phenotype was also observed. Moreover, CCR7 expression decreased in HCV-core expressing CD4+ T cells explaining their sequestration in inflamed tissues such as the infected liver. This work provides a new perspective on de novo generation of regulatory CD4+ T cells in the periphery, induced by the expression of a single viral protein. PMID:24465502

  12. CD4+ primary T cells expressing HCV-core protein upregulate Foxp3 and IL-10, suppressing CD4 and CD8 T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Fernandez-Ponce

    Full Text Available Adaptive T cell responses are critical for controlling HCV infection. While there is clinical evidence of a relevant role for regulatory T cells in chronic HCV-infected patients, based on their increased number and function; mechanisms underlying such a phenomena are still poorly understood. Accumulating evidence suggests that proteins from Hepatitis C virus can suppress host immune responses. We and others have shown that HCV is present in CD4+ lymphocytes from chronically infected patients and that HCV-core protein induces a state of unresponsiveness in the CD4+ tumor cell line Jurkat. Here we show that CD4+ primary T cells lentivirally transduced with HCV-core, not only acquire an anergic phenotype but also inhibit IL-2 production and proliferation of bystander CD4+ or CD8+ T cells in response to anti-CD3 plus anti-CD28 stimulation. Core-transduced CD4+ T cells show a phenotype characterized by an increased basal secretion of the regulatory cytokine IL-10, a decreased IFN-γ production upon stimulation, as well as expression of regulatory T cell markers, CTLA-4, and Foxp3. A significant induction of CD4+CD25+CD127(lowPD-1(highTIM-3(high regulatory T cells with an exhausted phenotype was also observed. Moreover, CCR7 expression decreased in HCV-core expressing CD4+ T cells explaining their sequestration in inflamed tissues such as the infected liver. This work provides a new perspective on de novo generation of regulatory CD4+ T cells in the periphery, induced by the expression of a single viral protein.

  13. Interaction of calreticulin with CD40 ligand, TRAIL and Fas ligand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duus, K; Pagh, R T; Holmskov, U

    2007-01-01

    is utilized by many other functionally diverse molecules and in this work the interaction of calreticulin with C1q and structurally similar molecules was investigated. In addition to C1q and MBL, CD40 ligand (CD40L), tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) and Fas ligand (FasL) were...... found to bind calreticulin strongly. A low level or no binding was observed for adiponectin, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), CD30L, surfactant protein-A and -D and collagen VIII. The interaction with calreticulin required a conformational change in CD40L, TRAIL and FasL and showed the same...

  14. Properties of human blood monocytes. I. CD91 expression and log orthogonal light scatter provide a robust method to identify monocytes that is more accurate than CD14 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudig, Dorothy; Hunter, Kenneth W; Diamond, W John; Redelman, Doug

    2014-03-01

    This study was designed to improve identification of human blood monocytes by using antibodies to molecules that occur consistently on all stages of monocyte development and differentiation. We examined blood samples from 200 healthy adults without clinically diagnosed immunological abnormalities by flow cytometry (FCM) with multiple combinations of antibodies and with a hematology analyzer (Beckman LH750). CD91 (α2 -macroglobulin receptor) was expressed only by monocytes and to a consistent level among subjects [mean median fluorescence intensity (MFI) = 16.2 ± 3.2]. Notably, only 85.7 ± 5.82% of the CD91(+) monocytes expressed high levels of the classical monocyte marker CD14, with some CD91(+) CD16(+) cells having negligible CD14, indicating that substantial FCM under-counts will occur when monocytes are identified by high CD14. CD33 (receptor for sialyl conjugates) was co-expressed with CD91 on monocytes but CD33 expression varied by nearly ten-fold among subjects (mean MFI = 17.4 ± 7.7). In comparison to FCM analyses, the hematology analyzer systematically over-counted monocytes and eosinophils while lymphocyte and neutrophil differential values generally agreed with FCM methods. CD91 is a better marker to identify monocytes than CD14 or CD33. Furthermore, FCM (with anti-CD91) identifies monocytes better than a currently used clinical CBC instrument. Use of anti-CD91 together with anti-CD14 and anti-CD16 supports the identification of the diagnostically significant monocyte populations with variable expression of CD14 and CD16. Copyright © 2013 Clinical Cytometry Society.

  15. An Anacardiaceae preparation reduces the expression of inflammation-related genes in murine macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiro, J; García, D; Arranz, J A; Delgado, R; Sanmartín, M L; Orallo, F

    2004-08-01

    This study investigated the effects of an aqueous extract of the stem bark of Mangifera indica L. (Anacardiaceae; Vimang), which contains a defined mixture of components including polyphenols (principally mangiferin, MA), triterpenes, phytosteroids, fatty acids and microelements, on expression of inflammation mediators in inflammatory murine macrophages after stimulation in vitro with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma). In vitro treatment with Vimang at 4 microg/ml reduced levels of NOS-2 mRNA and NOS-2, while treatment at 40 microg/ml also reduced levels of COX-2 mRNA, COX-2, and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). Results suggested that MA is involved in these effects. In vitro treatment with Vimang at 40 microg/ml also inhibited mRNA levels of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin 1beta (IL-1beta), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), but did not affect mRNA levels of IL-6 or tumor growth factor-beta (TGF-beta). Extracellular release of TNF-alpha by inflammatory macrophages was inhibited by in vitro treatment with Vimang at the same concentrations that showed inhibition of TNF-alpha mRNA levels. The inhibition of TNF-alpha production appears to be at least partially attributable to MA. Vimang at 4 microg/ml decreased mRNA levels of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) but did not affect expression of the NF-kappaB inhibitor (IkappaB). These data indicate that the potent anti-inflammatory effects of Vimang are due to selective modulation of the expression of inflammation-related genes, leading to attenuation of macrophage activation.

  16. Deficient Fas expression by CD4+ CCR5+ T cells in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Julià, Eva; Montalban, Xavier; Al-Zayat, Hammad

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether T cells expressing CCR5 and CXCR3 from multiple sclerosis (MS) patients are more resistant to apoptosis. METHODS: Expression of CD69, TNF-R1, Fas, FasL, bcl-2, and bax was investigated in 41 MS patients and 12 healthy controls by flow cytometry in CD4+ and CD8+ T...... cells expressing CCR5 and CXCR3. RESULTS: In MS patients, the percentage of CD69 was increased and Fas expression decreased in CD4+ CCR5+ T cells. INTERPRETATION: The lower Fas expression in activated CD4+ CCR5+ T cells might contribute to disease pathogenesis by prolonging cell survival and favoring...

  17. Association of murine lupus and thymic full-length endogenous retroviral expression maps to a bone marrow stem cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krieg, A.M.; Gourley, M.F.; Steinberg, A.D.

    1991-01-01

    Recent studies of thymic gene expression in murine lupus have demonstrated 8.4-kb (full-length size) modified polytropic (Mpmv) endogenous retroviral RNA. In contrast, normal control mouse strains do not produce detectable amounts of such RNA in their thymuses. Prior studies have attributed a defect in experimental tolerance in murine lupus to a bone marrow stem cell rather than to the thymic epithelium; in contrast, infectious retroviral expression has been associated with the thymic epithelium, rather than with the bone marrow stem cell. The present study was designed to determine whether the abnormal Mpmv expression associated with murine lupus mapped to thymic epithelium or to a marrow precursor. Lethally irradiated control and lupus-prone mice were reconstituted with T cell depleted bone marrow; one month later their thymuses were studied for endogenous retroviral RNA and protein expression. Recipients of bone marrow from nonautoimmune donors expressed neither 8.4-kb Mpmv RNA nor surface MCF gp70 in their thymuses. In contrast, recipients of bone marrow from autoimmune NZB or BXSB donors expressed thymic 8.4-kb Mpmv RNA and mink cell focus-forming gp70. These studies demonstrate that lupus-associated 8.4-kb Mpmv endogenous retroviral expression is determined by bone marrow stem cells

  18. Microarray Gene Expression Analysis of Murine Tumor Heterogeneity Defined by Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI

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    Nick G. Costouros

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Current methods of studying angiogenesis are limited in their ability to serially evaluate in vivo function throughout a target tissue. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI and pharmacokinetic modeling provide a useful method for evaluating tissue vasculature based on contrast accumulation and washout. While it is often assumed that areas of high contrast enhancement and washout comprise areas of increased angiogenesis and tumor activity, the actual molecular pathways that are active in such areas are poorly understood. Using DCE-MRI in a murine subcutaneous tumor model, we were able to perform pharmacokinetic functional analysis of a tumor, coregistration of MRI images with histological cross-sections, immunohistochemistry, laser capture microdissection, and genetic profiling of tumor heterogeneity based on pharmacokinetic parameters. Using imaging as a template for biologic investigation, we have not found evidence of increased expression of proangiogenic modulators at the transcriptional level in either distinct pharmacokinetic region. Furthermore, these regions show no difference on histology and CD31 immunohistochemistry. However, the expression of ribosomal proteins was greatly increased in high enhancement and washout regions, implying increased protein translation and consequent increased cellular activity. Together, these findings point to the potential importance of posttranscriptional regulation in angiogenesis and the need for the development of angiogenesis-specific contrast agents to evaluate in vivo angiogenesis at a molecular level.

  19. Correlations between transmembrane 4 L6 family member 5 (TM4SF5, CD151, and CD63 in liver fibrotic phenotypes and hepatic migration and invasive capacities.

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    Minkyung Kang

    Full Text Available Transmembrane 4 L6 family member 5 (TM4SF5 is overexpressed during CCl4-mediated murine liver fibrosis and in human hepatocellular carcinomas. The tetraspanins form tetraspanin-enriched microdomains (TEMs consisting of large membrane protein complexes on the cell surface. Thus, TM4SF5 may be involved in the signal coordination that controls liver malignancy. We investigated the relationship between TM4SF5-positive TEMs with liver fibrosis and tumorigenesis, using normal Chang hepatocytes that lack TM4SF5 expression and chronically TGFβ1-treated Chang cells that express TM4SF5. TM4SF5 expression is positively correlated with tumorigenic CD151 expression, but is negatively correlated with tumor-suppressive CD63 expression in mouse fibrotic and human hepatic carcinoma tissues, indicating cooperative roles of the tetraspanins in liver malignancies. Although CD151 did not control the expression of TM4SF5, TM4SF5 appeared to control the expression levels of CD151 and CD63. TM4SF5 interacted with CD151, and caused the internalization of CD63 from the cell surface into late lysosomal membranes, presumably leading to terminating the tumor-suppressive functions of CD63. TM4SF5 could overcome the tumorigenic effects of CD151, especially cell migration and extracellular matrix (ECM-degradation. Taken together, TM4SF5 appears to play a role in liver malignancy by controlling the levels of tetraspanins on the cell surface, and could provide a promising therapeutic target for the treatment of liver malignancies.

  20. Expression of MIF and CD74 in leukemic cell lines: correlation to DR expression destiny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgouli, Mirella; Papadimitriou, Lina; Glymenaki, Maria; Patsaki, Valia; Athanassakis, Irene

    2016-06-01

    Invariant chain (Ii) or CD74 is a non-polymorphic glycoprotein, which apart from its role as a chaperone dedicated to MHCII molecules, is known to be a high-affinity receptor for macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF). The present study aimed to define the roles of CD74 and MIF in the immune surveillance escape process. Towards this direction, the cell lines HL-60, Raji, K562 and primary pre-B leukemic cells were examined for expression and secretion of MIF. Flow cytometry analysis detected high levels of MIF and intracellular/membrane CD74 expression in all leukemic cells tested, while MIF secretion was shown to be inversely proportional to intracellular HLA-DR (DR) expression. In the MHCII-negative cells, IFN-γ increased MIF expression and induced its secretion in HL-60 and K562 cells, respectively. In K562 cells, CD74 (Iip33Iip35) was shown to co-precipitate with HLA-DOβ (DOβ), inhibiting thus MIF or DR binding. Induced expression of DOα in K562 (DOα-DOβ+) cells in different transfection combinations decreased MIF expression and secretion, while increasing surface DR expression. Thus, MIF could indeed be part of the antigen presentation process.

  1. CD40L induces functional tunneling nanotube networks exclusively in dendritic cells programmed by mediators of type 1 immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaccard, Colleen R; Watkins, Simon C; Kalinski, Pawel; Fecek, Ronald J; Yates, Aarika L; Salter, Russell D; Ayyavoo, Velpandi; Rinaldo, Charles R; Mailliard, Robbie B

    2015-02-01

    The ability of dendritic cells (DC) to mediate CD4(+) T cell help for cellular immunity is guided by instructive signals received during DC maturation, as well as the resulting pattern of DC responsiveness to the Th signal, CD40L. Furthermore, the professional transfer of antigenic information from migratory DC to lymph node-residing DC is critical for the effective induction of cellular immune responses. In this study we report that, in addition to their enhanced IL-12p70 producing capacity, human DC matured in the presence of inflammatory mediators of type 1 immunity are uniquely programmed to form networks of tunneling nanotube-like structures in response to CD40L-expressing Th cells or rCD40L. This immunologic process of DC reticulation facilitates intercellular trafficking of endosome-associated vesicles and Ag, but also pathogens such HIV-1, and is regulated by the opposing roles of IFN-γ and IL-4. The initiation of DC reticulation represents a novel helper function of CD40L and a superior mechanism of intercellular communication possessed by type 1 polarized DC, as well as a target for exploitation by pathogens to enhance direct cell-to-cell spread. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  2. ICAM-1-based rabies virus vaccine shows increased infection and activation of primary murine B cells in vitro and enhanced antibody titers in-vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James E Norton

    Full Text Available We have previously shown that live-attenuated rabies virus (RABV-based vaccines infect and directly activate murine and human primary B cells in-vitro, which we propose can be exploited to help develop a single-dose RABV-based vaccine. Here we report on a novel approach to utilize the binding of Intracellular Adhesion Molecule-1 (ICAM-1 to its binding partner, Lymphocyte Function-associated Antigen-1 (LFA-1, on B cells to enhance B cell activation and RABV-specific antibody responses. We used a reverse genetics approach to clone, recover, and characterize a live-attenuated recombinant RABV-based vaccine expressing the murine Icam1 gene (rRABV-mICAM-1. We show that the murine ICAM-1 gene product is incorporated into virus particles, potentially exposing ICAM-1 to extracellular binding partners. While rRABV-mICAM-1 showed 10-100-fold decrease in viral titers on baby hamster kidney cells compared to the parental virus (rRABV, rRABV-mICAM-1 infected and activated primary murine B cells in-vitro more efficiently than rRABV, as indicated by significant upregulation of CD69, CD40, and MHCII on the surface of infected B cells. ICAM-1 expression on the virus surface was responsible for enhanced B cell infection since pre-treating rRABV-mICAM-1 with a neutralizing anti-ICAM-1 antibody reduced B cell infection to levels observed with rRABV alone. Furthermore, 100-fold less rRABV-mICAM-1 was needed to induce antibody titers in immunized mice equivalent to antibody titers observed in rRABV-immunized mice. Of note, only 10(3 focus forming units (ffu/mouse of rRABV-mICAM-1 was needed to induce significant anti-RABV antibody titers as early as five days post-immunization. As both speed and potency of antibody responses are important in controlling human RABV infection in a post-exposure setting, these data show that expression of Icam1 from the RABV genome, which is then incorporated into the virus particle, is a promising strategy for the development of a

  3. CD117 expression in operable oesophageal squamous cell carcinomas predicts worse clinical outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Huijie; Yuan, Yuan; Wang, Junsheng; Zhou, Fuyou; Zhang, Mingzhi; Giercksky, Karl-Erik; Nesland, Jahn M; Suo, Zhenhe

    2013-01-01

    Aims To investigate the aberrant expression of CD117 in oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and its prognostic significance. Methods and results Immunohistochemical staining for CD117 was performed on tissue microarray and routine tissue sections from 157 oesophageal SCC patients and 10 normal oesophageal epithelia adjacent to tumour. The positive rate of CD117 expression was 29.9% in oesophageal SCC tissues, whereas no CD117 expression was detected in the 10 normal oesophageal epithelia. CD117 expression was significantly associated with T stage (P < 0.001), distant metastasis (P = 0.015), lymph node metastasis (P = 0.019), and clinical stage (P = 0.021). Progression-free survival in the patients with CD117-positive tumours was shorter than that in the patients with CD117-negative tumours (P = 0.010). In univariate analyses, CD117 expression was the most significant factor for overall survival of oesophageal SCC patients (P < 0.001), followed by lymph node metastasis (P = 0.001), T stage (P = 0.002), clinical stage (P = 0.006), distant metastasis (P = 0.020), and histological grade (P = 0.027). Multivariate analyses verified that CD117 expression was an independent prognostic marker for oesophageal SCC patients (P = 0.002). In addition, CD117 expression predicted poorer survival in patients without distant metastases. Conclusions CD117 expression in operable oesophageal SCC may be a valuable prognostic marker, and detection of its expression in clinical samples may be useful in defining a subclass of oesophageal SCCs with extremely poor clinical outcome, which may require a specially targeted treatment modality. PMID:23570416

  4. Induction of granzyme B expression in T-cell receptor/CD28-stimulated human regulatory T cells is suppressed by inhibitors of the PI3K-mTOR pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelley Todd W

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regulatory T cells (Tregs can employ a cell contact- and granzyme B-dependent mechanism to mediate suppression of bystander T and B cells. Murine studies indicate that granzyme B is involved in the Treg-mediated suppression of anti-tumor immunity in the tumor microenvironment and in the Treg-mediated maintenance of allograft survival. In spite of its central importance, a detailed study of granzyme B expression patterns in human Tregs has not been performed. Results Our data demonstrated that natural Tregs freshly isolated from the peripheral blood of normal adults lacked granzyme B expression. Tregs subjected to prolonged TCR and CD28 triggering, in the presence of IL-2, expressed high levels of granzyme B but CD3 stimulation alone or IL-2 treatment alone failed to induce granzyme B. Treatment of Tregs with the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR inhibitor, rapamycin or the PI3 kinase (PI3K inhibitor LY294002 markedly suppressed granzyme B expression. However, neither rapamycin, as previously reported by others, nor LY294002 inhibited Treg proliferation or induced significant cell death in TCR/CD28/IL-2 stimulated cells. The proliferation rate of Tregs was markedly higher than that of CD4+ conventional T cells in the setting of rapamycin treatment. Tregs expanded by CD3/CD28/IL-2 stimulation without rapamycin demonstrated increased in vitro cytotoxic activity compared to Tregs expanded in the presence of rapamycin in both short term (6 hours and long term (48 hours cytotoxicity assays. Conclusion TCR/CD28 mediated activation of the PI3K-mTOR pathway is important for granyzme B expression but not proliferation in regulatory T cells. These findings may indicate that suppressive mechanisms other than granzyme B are utilized by rapamycin-expanded Tregs.

  5. CD147 expression predicts biochemical recurrence after prostatectomy independent of histologic and pathologic features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, Tyler M; Ewald, Jonathan A; Huang, Wei; Ricke, William A

    2015-07-25

    CD147 is an MMP-inducing protein often implicated in cancer progression. The purpose of this study was to investigate the expression of CD147 in prostate cancer (PCa) progression and the prognostic ability of CD147 in predicting biochemical recurrence after prostatectomy. Plasma membrane-localized CD147 protein expression was quantified in patient samples using immunohistochemistry and multispectral imaging, and expression was compared to clinico-pathological features (pathologic stage, Gleason score, tumor volume, preoperative PSA, lymph node status, surgical margins, biochemical recurrence status). CD147 specificity and expression were confirmed with immunoblotting of prostate cell lines, and CD147 mRNA expression was evaluated in public expression microarray datasets of patient prostate tumors. Expression of CD147 protein was significantly decreased in localized tumors (pT2; p = 0.02) and aggressive PCa (≥pT3; p = 0.004), and metastases (p = 0.001) compared to benign prostatic tissue. Decreased CD147 was associated with advanced pathologic stage (p = 0.009) and high Gleason score (p = 0.02), and low CD147 expression predicted biochemical recurrence (HR 0.55; 95 % CI 0.31-0.97; p = 0.04) independent of clinico-pathologic features. Immunoblot bands were detected at 44 kDa and 66 kDa, representing non-glycosylated and glycosylated forms of CD147 protein, and CD147 expression was lower in tumorigenic T10 cells than non-tumorigenic BPH-1 cells (p = 0.02). Decreased CD147 mRNA expression was associated with increased Gleason score and pathologic stage in patient tumors but is not associated with recurrence status. Membrane-associated CD147 expression is significantly decreased in PCa compared to non-malignant prostate tissue and is associated with tumor progression, and low CD147 expression predicts biochemical recurrence after prostatectomy independent of pathologic stage, Gleason score, lymph node status, surgical margins, and tumor volume in multivariable

  6. Elevated expression of CD93 promotes angiogenesis and tumor growth in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bao, Lili [Department of Otorhinolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Affiliated Hospital of Nantong University, Nantong, Jiangsu Province (China); Tang, Mingming [Department of Otorhinolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Affiliated Cancer Hospital of Nantong University, Nantong, 226361, Jiangsu (China); Zhang, Qicheng; You, Bo; Shan, Ying; Shi, Si; Li, Li [Department of Otorhinolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Affiliated Hospital of Nantong University, Nantong, Jiangsu Province (China); Hu, Songqun, E-mail: hsq@ntu.edu.cn [Department of Otorhinolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Affiliated Hospital of Nantong University, Nantong, Jiangsu Province (China); You, Yiwen, E-mail: youyiwen_nantong@163.com [Department of Otorhinolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Affiliated Hospital of Nantong University, Nantong, Jiangsu Province (China)

    2016-08-05

    CD93, also known as the complement component C1q receptor (C1qRp), has been reported to promote the progression of some cancer types. However, the expression and physiological significance of CD93 in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) remain largely elusive. In this study, we first examined the expression of CD93 in NPC and experimentally manipulated its expression. We observed that vascular CD93 expression is elevated in NPC and is correlated with T classification, N classification, distant metastasis, clinical stage and poor prognosis (all P < 0.05). In addition, overexpression of CD93 promoted angiogenesis in vitro. What’s more, we found that CD93 was highly expressed in NPC tissues and cells, and the regulation of CD93 on cell proliferation was determined by cell counting kit (CCK)-8 assay and cell cycle analyses. Our findings provide unique insight into the pathogenesis of NPC and underscore the need to explore novel therapeutic targets such as CD93 to improve NPC treatment. -- Highlights: •This is the first research about the relationship between CD93 and nasopharyngeal carcinoma. •We explored the prognostic significance of vascular CD93 expression in nasopharyngeal carcinoma. •We researched on angiogenesis and cell proliferation of nasopharyngeal carcinoma and how CD93 affected them.

  7. Expression of bovine herpesvirus 1 glycoproteins gI and gIII in transfected murine cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitzpatrick, D.R.; Zamb, T.; Parker, M.D.; van Drunen Littel-van den Hurk, S.; Babiuk, L.A.; Lawman, M.J.P.

    1988-01-01

    Genes encoding two of the major glycoproteins of bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV-1), gI and gIII, were cloned into the eucaryotic expression vectors pRSVcat and pSV2neo and transfected into murine LMTK - cells, and cloned cell lines were established. The relative amounts of gI or gIII expressed from the two vectors were similar. Expression of gI was cell associated and localized predominantly in the perinuclear region, but nuclear and plasma membrane staining was also observed. Expression of gI was additionally associated with cell fusion and the formation of polykaryons and giant cells. Expression of gIII was localized predominantly in the nuclear and plasma membranes. Radioimmunoprecipitation in the presence or absence of tunicamycin revealed that the recombinant glycoproteins were proteolytically processed and glycosylated and had molecular weights similar to those of the forms of gI and gIII expressed in BHV-1 infected bovine cells. However, both recombinant glycoproteins were glycosylated to a lesser extent than were the forms found in BHV-1 infected bovine cells. For gI, a deficiency in N-linked glycosylated of the amino-terminal half of the protein was identified; for gIII, a deficiency in O-linked glycosylation was implicated. The reactivity pattern of a panel of gI- and gIII-specific monoclonal antibodies, including six which recognize conformation-dependent epitopes, was found to be unaffected by the glycosylation differences and was identical for transfected of BHV-1-infected murine cells. Use of the transfected cells as targets in immune-mediated cytotoxicity assays demonstrated the functional recognition of recombinant gI and gIII by murine antibody and cytotoxic T lymphocytes

  8. Chemoresistance of CD133(+) colon cancer may be related with increased survivin expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mi-Ra; Ji, Sun-Young; Mia-Jan, Khalilullah; Cho, Mee-Yon

    2015-07-31

    CD133, putative cancer stem cell marker, deemed to aid chemoresistance. However, this claim has been challenged recently and we previously reported that patients with CD133(+) colon cancer have benefit from 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) chemotherapy incontrast to no benefit in patients with CD133(-) cancer. To elucidate the role of CD133 expression in chemoresistance, we silenced the CD133 expression in a colon cancer cell line and determined its effect on the biological characteristics downstream. We comparatively analyzed the sequential changes of MDR1, ABCG2, AKT1 and survivin expression and the result of proliferation assay (WST-1 assay) with 5-FU treatment in CD133(+) and siRNA-induced CD133(-) cells, derived from Caco-2 colon cancer cell line. 5-FU treatment induced significantly increase of the mRNA expression of MDR1, ABCG2 and AKT1genes, but not protein level. CD133 had little to no effect on the mRNA and protein expression of these genes. However, survivin expression at mRNA and protein level were significantly increased in CD133(+) cells compared with siRNA-induced CD133-cells and Mock (not sorted CD133(+) cells) at 96 h after siRNA transfection. The cytotoxicity assay demonstrated notable increase of chemoresistance to 5-FU treatment (10 μM) in CD133(+) cells at 96 h after siRNA transfection. From this study, we conclude that CD133(+) cells may have chemoresistance to 5-FU through the mechanism which is related with survivin expression, instead of MDR1, ABCG2 and AKT1 expression. Therefore a survivin inhibitor can be a new target for effective treatment of CD133(+) colon cancer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Gene expression analysis of embryonic stem cells expressing VE-cadherin (CD144 during endothelial differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Libermann Towia

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Endothelial differentiation occurs during normal vascular development in the developing embryo. This process is recapitulated in the adult when endothelial progenitor cells are generated in the bone marrow and can contribute to vascular repair or angiogenesis at sites of vascular injury or ischemia. The molecular mechanisms of endothelial differentiation remain incompletely understood. Novel approaches are needed to identify the factors that regulate endothelial differentiation. Methods Mouse embryonic stem (ES cells were used to further define the molecular mechanisms of endothelial differentiation. By flow cytometry a population of VEGF-R2 positive cells was identified as early as 2.5 days after differentiation of ES cells, and a subset of VEGF-R2+ cells, that were CD41 positive at 3.5 days. A separate population of VEGF-R2+ stem cells expressing the endothelial-specific marker CD144 (VE-cadherin was also identified at this same time point. Channels lined by VE-cadherin positive cells developed within the embryoid bodies (EBs formed by differentiating ES cells. VE-cadherin and CD41 expressing cells differentiate in close proximity to each other within the EBs, supporting the concept of a common origin for cells of hematopoietic and endothelial lineages. Results Microarray analysis of >45,000 transcripts was performed on RNA obtained from cells expressing VEGF-R2+, CD41+, and CD144+ and VEGF-R2-, CD41-, and CD144-. All microarray experiments were performed in duplicate using RNA obtained from independent experiments, for each subset of cells. Expression profiling confirmed the role of several genes involved in hematopoiesis, and identified several putative genes involved in endothelial differentiation. Conclusion The isolation of CD144+ cells during ES cell differentiation from embryoid bodies provides an excellent model system and method for identifying genes that are expressed during endothelial differentiation and that

  10. E-cadherin and CD10 expression in atypical hyperplastic and malignant endometrial lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, A.R.H.; Muhammad, E.M.S.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Loss of E-cadherin is a critical step for development and progression of malignant tumors. CD10; a marker of non-neoplastic and neoplastic endometrial stroma, is associated with aggressiveness of many epithelial malignancies. Aims: To evaluate expression and correlation of E-cadherin and CD10 in endometrial lesions and their possible role in differentiating atypical endometrial hyperplasia from endometrial carcinoma. The association of E-cadherin and CD10 expression with clinico-pathological parameters of endometrial carcinoma was also investigated. Materials and methods: Fifty four cases including 28 endometrial carcinomas; 19 endometrial hyperplasia and 7 cases of normal endometrial changes were enrolled for this study. The expression of E-cadherin and CD10 was evaluated by immunohistochemistry using the streptavidin–biotin technique. Results: There was a strong association between malignant change of endometrial glands and membrano- cytoplasmic localization of E-cadherin (p< 0.001). Expression of E-cadherin but not CD10 was significantly higher in endometrial carcinomas compared to atypical endometrial hyperplasia (p < 0.01). Expression of E-cadherin was not associated with CD10 expression in different endometrial lesions. High grade tumors expressed low levels of both E-cadherin (p<0.01) and CD10 (p < 0.05) and serous endometrial carcinoma had low E-cadherin and CD10 expression compared to endometrioid carcinoma (p< 0.01 and <0.05, respectively). Expression of both molecules showed no association with depth of tumor invasion or FIGO stage. Tumors with lower E-cadherin or CD10 expression had higher rates of vascular tumor emboli (p< 0.01 and <0.07, respectively). Conclusions: Although expression of E-cadherin and CD10 in endometrial lesions was not correlated, reduced expression of both molecules could be critical for progression of endometrial carcinoma.

  11. Efficient adenovector CD40 ligand immunotherapy of canine malignant melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Euler, Henrik; Sadeghi, Arian; Carlsson, Björn; Rivera, Patricio; Loskog, Angelica; Segall, Thomas; Korsgren, Olle; Tötterman, Thomas H

    2008-05-01

    Cutaneous canine melanomas are usually benign in contrast to human malignant melanoma. However, the canine oropharyngeal, uveal, and mucocutaneous neoplasms are aggressive and have metastatic potential. Surgery and to a lesser extent radiotherapy and chemotherapy are widely adopted treatments but are seldom curative in advanced stages. The similarities between human and canine melanoma make spontaneous canine melanoma an excellent disease model for exploring novel therapies. Herein, we report the first 2 adenovector CD40L immunogene (AdCD40L) treatments of aggressive canine malignant melanoma. Case no. 1 was an advanced stage III oral melanoma that was cured from malignant melanoma with 2 intratumor AdCD40L injections before cytoreductive surgery. After treatment, the tumor tissue was infiltrated with T lymphocytes and B lymphocytes suggesting immune activation. This dog survived 401 days after the first round of gene therapy and was free of melanoma at autopsy. Case no. 2 had a conjunctival malignant melanoma with a rapid progression. This case was treated with 6 AdCD40L injections over 60 days. One hundred and twenty days after start of gene therapy and 60 days after the last injection, the tumor had regressed dramatically, and the dog had a minimal tumor mass and no signs of progression or metastasis. Our results indicate that AdCD40L immunogene therapy is beneficial in canine malignant melanoma and could be considered for human malignant melanoma as well.

  12. Role of polymorphic Fc receptor Fc gammaRIIa in cytokine release and adverse effects of murine IgG1 anti-CD3/T cell receptor antibody (WT31).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tax, W J; Tamboer, W P; Jacobs, C W; Frenken, L A; Koene, R A

    1997-01-15

    Anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody (mAb) OKT3 is immunosuppressive, but causes severe adverse effects during the first administration ("first-dose reaction"). These adverse effects are presumably caused by cytokine release that results from T-cell activation. In vitro, T-cell activation by anti-CD3 mAb requires interaction with monocyte Fc receptors. The Fc receptor for murine IgG1, Fc gammaRIIa, is polymorphic. In some individuals, murine IgG1 anti-CD3 mAb causes T-cell proliferation and cytokine release in vitro (high responders [HR]), whereas in individuals with the low-responder (LR) phenotype it does not. We have now investigated the role of this Fc gammaRIIa polymorphism in the release of cytokines in vivo and the occurrence of adverse effects after the administration of WT31, a murine IgG1 anti-CD3/T cell receptor mAb. WT31 caused an increase of plasma tumor necrosis factor-alpha in all four HR patients and none of the five LR patients. In all HR patients except one, plasma gamma-interferon and interleukin 6 also increased, and a first-dose response was observed, whereas no cytokine release or adverse effects occurred in any of the LR patients. WT31 caused lymphopenia in all HR and none of the LR patients. FACS analysis demonstrated that in HR patients, after the initial disappearance of CD3+ cells from peripheral blood, modulation of CD3 occurred, whereas in LR patients a high degree of coating of the lymphocytes was observed. Surprisingly, WT31 also induced a marked granulocytopenia, as well as a decrease of thrombocytes, in three of the four HR patients (and in none of the LR patients). These data provide direct clinical evidence that Fc receptor interaction determines the release of cytokines and the occurrence of adverse effects after administration of anti-CD3/T cell receptor mAb. Furthermore, these data suggest that tumor necrosis factor-alpha by itself is not sufficient to induce the first-dose reaction.

  13. The level of CD147 expression correlates with cyclophilin-induced signalling and chemotaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constant Stephanie

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies identified CD147 as the chemotactic receptor on inflammatory leukocytes for extracellular cyclophilins (eCyp. However, CD147 is not known to associate with signal transducing molecules, so other transmembrane proteins, such as proteoglycans, integrins, and CD98, were suggested as receptor or co-receptor for eCyp. CD147 is ubiquitously expressed on many cell types, but relationship between the level of CD147 expression and cellular responses to eCyp has never been analyzed. Given the role of eCyp in pathogenesis of many diseases, it is important to know whether cellular responses to eCyp are regulated at the level of CD147 expression. Results Here, we manipulated CD147 expression levels on HeLa cells using RNAi and investigated the signalling and chemotactic responses to eCypA. Both Erk activation and chemotaxis correlated with the level of CD147 expression, with cells exhibiting low level expression being practically unresponsive to eCypA. Conclusions Our results provide the first demonstration of a chemotactic response of HeLa cells to eCypA, establish a correlation between the level of CD147 expression and the magnitude of cellular responses to eCypA, and indicate that CD147 may be a limiting factor in the receptor complex determining cyclophilin-induced Erk activation and cell migration.

  14. Increased TLR4 expression in murine placentas after oral infection with periodontal pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arce, R.M.; Barros, S.P.; Wacker, B.; Peters, B.; Moss, K.; Offenbacher, S.

    2009-01-01

    Maternal periodontitis has emerged as a putative risk factor for preterm births in humans. The periodontitis-associated dental biofilm is thought to serve as an important source of oral bacteria and related virulence factors that hematogenously disseminate and affect the fetoplacental unit; however the underlying biological mechanisms are yet to be fully elucidated. This study hypothesized that an oral infection with the human periodontal pathogens Campylobacter rectus and Porphyromonas gingivalis is able to induce fetal growth restriction, placental inflammation and enhance Toll-like receptors type 4 (TLR4) expression in a murine pregnancy model. Female Balb/C mice (n=40) were orally infected with C. rectus and/or P. gingivalis over a 16-week period and mated once per week. Pregnant mice were sacrificed at embryonic day (E) 16.5 and placentas were collected and analyzed for TLR4 mRNA levels and qualitative protein expression by real time PCR and immunofluorescence. TLR4 mRNA expression was found to be increased in C. rectus-infected group (1.98±0.886 fold difference, Pperiodontal pathogens. The TLR4 pathway has been implicated in the pathogenesis of preterm births; therefore the abnormal regulation of placental TLR4 may give new insights into how maternal periodontitis and periodontal pathogens might be linked to placental inflammation and preterm birth pathogenesis. PMID:19101032

  15. Quantitative gene expression profiling of CD45+ and CD45- skeletal muscle-derived side population cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditte Caroline Andersen, Ditte Caroline; Kristiansen, Gitte Qvist; Jensen, Line

    2012-01-01

    The skeletal muscle-derived side population (mSP) which highly excludes Hoechst 33342 is composed of CD45(+) and CD45(-) subpopulations; yet, rareness of mSP cells in general has complicated extensive quantitative analysis of gene expression profiles in primarily isolated mSP cells. Here, we desc...... a satellite cell subpopulation) remain in the mSPCD45(-) fraction, and we show that these cells express high levels of many of the known myogenic precursor/stem cell related markers, including Pax7 and Myf5.......The skeletal muscle-derived side population (mSP) which highly excludes Hoechst 33342 is composed of CD45(+) and CD45(-) subpopulations; yet, rareness of mSP cells in general has complicated extensive quantitative analysis of gene expression profiles in primarily isolated mSP cells. Here, we...... describe the isolation of adult mouse normal skeletal muscle residing SPCD45(+) and SPCD45(-) cells from a parent mononuclear muscle-derived cell (MDC) population. Relative quantitative real time PCR (RT-PCR) of 64 genes revealed that mSPCD45(-) compared with mSPCD45(+) was enriched for cells expressing...

  16. Serum Levels of Platelet Released CD40 Ligand Are Increased in Early Onset Occlusive Carotid Artery Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    József Balla

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Soluble CD40 ligand (sCD40L has been suggested as a key mediator between inflammation and atherosclerosis, and the CD40-CD40L interaction has a role in atherosclerotic lesion progression. We evaluated if platelet released serum sCD40L and sCD40 levels differ between patients with early onset occlusive carotid artery disease and age-matched controls.

  17. Expression of Monocarboxylate Transporters 1, 2, and 4 in Human Tumours and Their Association with CD147 and CD44

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Céline Pinheiro

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs are important cellular pH regulators in cancer cells; however, the value of MCT expression in cancer is still poorly understood. In the present study, we analysed MCT1, MCT2, and MCT4 protein expression in breast, colon, lung, and ovary neoplasms, as well as CD147 and CD44. MCT expression frequency was high and heterogeneous among the different tumours. Comparing with normal tissues, there was an increase in MCT1 and MCT4 expressions in breast carcinoma and a decrease in MCT4 plasma membrane expression in lung cancer. There were associations between CD147 and MCT1 expressions in ovarian cancer as well as between CD147 and MCT4 in both breast and lung cancers. CD44 was only associated with MCT1 plasma membrane expression in lung cancer. An important number of MCT1 positive cases are negative for both chaperones, suggesting that MCT plasma membrane expression in tumours may depend on a yet nonidentified regulatory protein.

  18. p62 regulates CD40-mediated NFκB activation in macrophages through interaction with TRAF6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seibold, Kristina; Ehrenschwender, Martin, E-mail: martin.ehrenschwender@ukr.de

    2015-08-14

    CD40 is a member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor family. Activation-induced recruitment of adapter proteins, so-called TNF-receptor-associated factors (TRAFs) to the cytoplasmic tail of CD40 triggers signaling cascades important in the immune system, but has also been associated with excessive inflammation in diseases such as atherosclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis. Especially, pro-inflammatory nuclear factor κB (NFκB) signaling emanating from CD40-associated TRAF6 appears to be a key pathogenic driving force. Consequently, targeting the CD40-TRAF6 interaction is emerging as a promising therapeutic strategy, but the underlying molecular machinery of this signaling axis is to date poorly understood. Here, we identified the multifunctional adaptor protein p62 as a critical regulator in CD40-mediated NFκB signaling via TRAF6. CD40 activation triggered formation of a TRAF6-p62 complex. Disturbing this interaction tremendously reduced CD40-mediated NFκB signaling in macrophages, while TRAF6-independent signaling pathways remained unaffected. This highlights p62 as a potential target in hyper-inflammatory, CD40-associated pathologies. - Highlights: • CD40 activation triggers interaction of the adapter protein TRAF6 with p62. • TRAF6-p62 interaction regulates CD40-mediated NFκB signaling in macrophages. • Defective TRAF6-p62 interaction reduces CD40-mediated NFκB activation in macrophages.

  19. Homeostatic properties and phenotypic maturation of murine CD4+ pre-thymic emigrants in the thymus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Dong

    Full Text Available After a tightly regulated developmental program in the thymus, "mature" single positive (SP thymocytes leave the thymus and enter the periphery. These newly arrived recent thymic emigrants (RTEs are phenotypically and functionally immature, and will complete a dynamic maturation in the peripheral lymphoid organs before being licensed to be resident naïve T cells. To study the early events occurring in the RTE maturation process, we identified the phenotype of CD4(+ pre-RTEs, a population of CD4(+ SP thymocytes that have acquired the thymus egress capability. Compared to peripheral naïve T cells, CD4(+ pre-RTEs displayed superior survival capability in lymphoreplete mice and faster proliferation under lymphopenic condition. The differences in Bcl2/Bim expression and/or heightened IL-7 signaling pathway may account for the pre-RTEs' better responsiveness to homeostatic signals. Qa2, the expression of which indicates the phenotypic maturation of SPs and RTEs, was found to be upregulated in CD4(+ pre-RTEs in thymic perivascular space. Migratory dendritic cells that surround this region contribute to Qa2 expression in pre-RTEs. The dendritic cell-driven Qa2 induction of CD4(+ pre-RTEs is independent of MHC class II and Aire molecules.

  20. CD147 expression predicts biochemical recurrence after prostatectomy independent of histologic and pathologic features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauman, Tyler M.; Ewald, Jonathan A.; Huang, Wei; Ricke, William A.

    2015-01-01

    CD147 is an MMP-inducing protein often implicated in cancer progression. The purpose of this study was to investigate the expression of CD147 in prostate cancer (PCa) progression and the prognostic ability of CD147 in predicting biochemical recurrence after prostatectomy. Plasma membrane-localized CD147 protein expression was quantified in patient samples using immunohistochemistry and multispectral imaging, and expression was compared to clinico-pathological features (pathologic stage, Gleason score, tumor volume, preoperative PSA, lymph node status, surgical margins, biochemical recurrence status). CD147 specificity and expression were confirmed with immunoblotting of prostate cell lines, and CD147 mRNA expression was evaluated in public expression microarray datasets of patient prostate tumors. Expression of CD147 protein was significantly decreased in localized tumors (pT2; p = 0.02) and aggressive PCa (≥pT3; p = 0.004), and metastases (p = 0.001) compared to benign prostatic tissue. Decreased CD147 was associated with advanced pathologic stage (p = 0.009) and high Gleason score (p = 0.02), and low CD147 expression predicted biochemical recurrence (HR 0.55; 95 % CI 0.31–0.97; p = 0.04) independent of clinico-pathologic features. Immunoblot bands were detected at 44 kDa and 66 kDa, representing non-glycosylated and glycosylated forms of CD147 protein, and CD147 expression was lower in tumorigenic T10 cells than non-tumorigenic BPH-1 cells (p = 0.02). Decreased CD147 mRNA expression was associated with increased Gleason score and pathologic stage in patient tumors but is not associated with recurrence status. Membrane-associated CD147 expression is significantly decreased in PCa compared to non-malignant prostate tissue and is associated with tumor progression, and low CD147 expression predicts biochemical recurrence after prostatectomy independent of pathologic stage, Gleason score, lymph node status, surgical margins, and tumor volume in multivariable

  1. Chemoresistance of CD133{sup +} colon cancer may be related with increased survivin expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Mi-Ra; Ji, Sun-Young; Mia-Jan, Khalilullah [Department of Pathology, Yonsei University, Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Mee-Yon, E-mail: meeyon@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Pathology, Yonsei University, Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Genomic Cohort, Yonsei University, Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-31

    CD133, putative cancer stem cell marker, deemed to aid chemoresistance. However, this claim has been challenged recently and we previously reported that patients with CD133{sup +} colon cancer have benefit from 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) chemotherapy incontrast to no benefit in patients with CD133{sup −} cancer. To elucidate the role of CD133 expression in chemoresistance, we silenced the CD133 expression in a colon cancer cell line and determined its effect on the biological characteristics downstream. We comparatively analyzed the sequential changes of MDR1, ABCG2, AKT1 and survivin expression and the result of proliferation assay (WST-1 assay) with 5-FU treatment in CD133{sup +} and siRNA-induced CD133{sup −} cells, derived from Caco-2 colon cancer cell line. 5-FU treatment induced significantly increase of the mRNA expression of MDR1, ABCG2 and AKT1genes, but not protein level. CD133 had little to no effect on the mRNA and protein expression of these genes. However, survivin expression at mRNA and protein level were significantly increased in CD133{sup +} cells compared with siRNA-induced CD133-cells and Mock (not sorted CD133{sup +} cells) at 96 h after siRNA transfection. The cytotoxicity assay demonstrated notable increase of chemoresistance to 5-FU treatment (10 μM) in CD133{sup +} cells at 96 h after siRNA transfection. From this study, we conclude that CD133{sup +} cells may have chemoresistance to 5-FU through the mechanism which is related with survivin expression, instead of MDR1, ABCG2 and AKT1 expression. Therefore a survivin inhibitor can be a new target for effective treatment of CD133{sup +} colon cancer. - Highlights: • We evaluate the role of CD133 in chemoresistance of colon cancer. • We compared the chemoresistance of CD133{sup +} cells and siRNA-induced CD133{sup −} cells. • CD133 had little to no effect on MDR1, ABCG2 and AKT1 expression. • Survivin expression and chemoresistance were increased in CD133{sup +} colon cancer cells.

  2. Ribonucleases 6 and 7 have antimicrobial function in the human and murine urinary tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becknell, Brian; Eichler, Tad; Beceiro, Susana; Li, Birong; Easterling, Robert; Carpenter, Ashley R.; James, Cindy; McHugh, Kirk M.; Hains, David S.; Partida-Sanchez, Santiago; Spencer, John David

    2014-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests antimicrobial peptides protect the urinary tract from infection. Ribonuclease 7 (RNase 7), a member of the RNase A superfamily, is a potent epithelial-derived protein that maintains human urinary tract sterility. RNase 7 expression is restricted to primates, limiting evaluation of its antimicrobial activity in vivo. Here we identified Ribonuclease 6 (RNase 6) as the RNase A Superfamily member present in humans and mice that is most conserved at the amino acid level relative to RNase 7. Like RNase 7, recombinant human and murine RNase 6 has potent antimicrobial activity against uropathogens. Quantitative real-time PCR and immunoblot analysis indicate that RNase 6 mRNA and protein are up-regulated in the human and murine urinary tract during infection. Immunostaining located RNase 6 to resident and infiltrating monocytes, macrophages, and neutrophils. Uropathogenic E. coli induces RNase 6 peptide expression in human CD14+ monocytes and murine bone marrow derived macrophages. Thus, RNase 6 is an inducible, myeloid-derived protein with markedly different expression from the epithelial-derived RNase 7 but with equally potent antimicrobial activity. Our studies suggest RNase 6 serves as an evolutionarily conserved antimicrobial peptide that participates in the maintenance of urinary tract sterility. PMID:25075772

  3. CD25+ B-1a Cells Express Aicda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroaki Kaku

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available B-1a cells are innate-like B-lymphocytes producing natural antibodies. Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID, a product of the Aicda gene, plays a central role in class-switch recombination and somatic hypermutation in B cells. Although a role for Aicda in B-1a cells has been suggested on the basis of experiments with knock out (KO mice, whether B-1a cells express Aicda, and if so, which B-1a cell subpopulation expresses Aicda, remains unknown. Here, we demonstrate that B-1 cells express Aicda, but at a level below that expressed by germinal center (GC B cells. We previously reported that B-1a cells can be subdivided based on CD25 expression. We show here that B-1a cell Aicda expression is concentrated in the CD25+ B-1a cell subpopulation. These results suggest the possibility that previous studies of memory B cells identified on the basis of Aicda expression may have inadvertently included an unknown number of CD25+ B-1a cells. Although B-1a cells develop normally in the absence of Aicda, a competitive reconstitution assay reveals enhanced vigor for AID KO B-1a cell bone marrow (BM progenitors, as compared with wild-type BM B-1 cell progenitors. These results suggest that AID inhibits the development of B-1a cells from BM B-1 cell progenitors in a competitive environment.

  4. Lack of evidence of CD40 ligand involvement in transfusion-related acute lung injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuinman, P. R.; Gerards, M. C.; Jongsma, G.; Vlaar, A. P.; Boon, L.; Juffermans, N. P.

    2011-01-01

    Activated platelets have been implicated in playing a major role in transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI), as platelets can trigger neutrophils, resulting in vascular damage. We hypothesized that binding of platelet CD40 ligand (CD40L) to endothelial CD40 is essential in the onset of TRALI.

  5. CD40 signaling synergizes with TLR-2 in the BCR independent activation of resting B cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shweta Jain

    Full Text Available Conventionally, signaling through BCR initiates sequence of events necessary for activation and differentiation of B cells. We report an alternative approach, independent of BCR, for stimulating resting B (RB cells, by involving TLR-2 and CD40--molecules crucial for innate and adaptive immunity. CD40 triggering of TLR-2 stimulated RB cells significantly augments their activation, proliferation and differentiation. It also substantially ameliorates the calcium flux, antigen uptake capacity and ability of B cells to activate T cells. The survival of RB cells was improved and it increases the number of cells expressing activation induced deaminase (AID, signifying class switch recombination (CSR. Further, we also observed increased activation rate and decreased threshold period required for optimum stimulation of RB cells. These results corroborate well with microarray gene expression data. This study provides novel insights into coordination between the molecules of innate and adaptive immunity in activating B cells, in a BCR independent manner. This strategy can be exploited to design vaccines to bolster B cell activation and antigen presenting efficiency, leading to faster and better immune response.

  6. CD40 signaling synergizes with TLR-2 in the BCR independent activation of resting B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Shweta; Chodisetti, Sathi Babu; Agrewala, Javed N

    2011-01-01

    Conventionally, signaling through BCR initiates sequence of events necessary for activation and differentiation of B cells. We report an alternative approach, independent of BCR, for stimulating resting B (RB) cells, by involving TLR-2 and CD40--molecules crucial for innate and adaptive immunity. CD40 triggering of TLR-2 stimulated RB cells significantly augments their activation, proliferation and differentiation. It also substantially ameliorates the calcium flux, antigen uptake capacity and ability of B cells to activate T cells. The survival of RB cells was improved and it increases the number of cells expressing activation induced deaminase (AID), signifying class switch recombination (CSR). Further, we also observed increased activation rate and decreased threshold period required for optimum stimulation of RB cells. These results corroborate well with microarray gene expression data. This study provides novel insights into coordination between the molecules of innate and adaptive immunity in activating B cells, in a BCR independent manner. This strategy can be exploited to design vaccines to bolster B cell activation and antigen presenting efficiency, leading to faster and better immune response.

  7. FoxP3+CD4+CD25+ T cells with regulatory properties can be cultured from colonic mucosa of patients with Crohn's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsen, J; Agnholt, J; Hoffmann, H J; Rømer, J L; Hvas, C L; Dahlerup, J F

    2005-01-01

    CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) are involved in the maintenance of peripheral tolerance and ensure a balanced immune response competent of fighting pathogens and at the same time recognizing commensals as harmless. This feature is lost in Crohn's disease (CD). The forkhead/winged helix transcription factor FoxP3 is a master gene for Treg function and defects in the FoxP3 gene lead to a clinical picture similar to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Murine colitis can be cured by adoptive transfer of Tregs and ex vivo-generated gut-specific Tregs represent an attractive option for therapy in CD. Thus, defective Tregs could contribute to the development of CD. We cultured biopsies of colonic mucosa in the presence of high concentrations of interleukin (IL)-2 and IL-4 to overcome the anergic nature of naturally occurring CD4+CD25+ Tregs in the mucosa. We investigated the expression of FoxP3 and regulatory potential of gut-derived CD4+CD25+ T cells cultured from patients with CD and healthy individuals. The FoxP3 expression was analysed by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and the suppressive effect of FoxP3+CD4+CD25+ T cells on proliferation and cytokine production of autologous CD4+ T cells was assessed by flow cytometry. Cultured gut-derived T cells with CD4+CD25+ phenotype expressed FoxP3 and were able as the freshly isolated Tregs from peripheral blood to suppress proliferation and cytokine production of autologous CD4+ T cells. Thus, we demonstrate that FoxP3+CD4+CD25+ T cells with regulatory properties can be propagated in vitro from inflamed mucosa of CD patients, which may be of interest in adoptive immunotherapy. PMID:16045746

  8. A colitogenic memory CD4+ T cell population mediates gastrointestinal graft-versus-host disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Vivian; Agle, Kimberle; Chen, Xiao; Beres, Amy; Komorowski, Richard; Belle, Ludovic; Taylor, Carolyn; Zhu, Fenlu; Haribhai, Dipica; Williams, Calvin B.; Verbsky, James; Blumenschein, Wendy; Sadekova, Svetlana; Bowman, Eddie; Ballantyne, Christie; Weaver, Casey; Serody, David A.; Vincent, Benjamin; Serody, Jonathan; Cua, Daniel J.; Drobyski, William R.

    2016-01-01

    Damage to the gastrointestinal tract is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and is attributable to T cell–mediated inflammation. In this work, we identified a unique CD4+ T cell population that constitutively expresses the β2 integrin CD11c and displays a biased central memory phenotype and memory T cell transcriptional profile, innate-like properties, and increased expression of the gut-homing molecules α4β7 and CCR9. Using several complementary murine GVHD models, we determined that adoptive transfer and early accumulation of β2 integrin–expressing CD4+ T cells in the gastrointestinal tract initiated Th1-mediated proinflammatory cytokine production, augmented pathological damage in the colon, and increased mortality. The pathogenic effect of this CD4+ T cell population critically depended on coexpression of the IL-23 receptor, which was required for maximal inflammatory effects. Non–Foxp3-expressing CD4+ T cells produced IL-10, which regulated colonic inflammation and attenuated lethality in the absence of functional CD4+Foxp3+ T cells. Thus, the coordinate expression of CD11c and the IL-23 receptor defines an IL-10–regulated, colitogenic memory CD4+ T cell subset that is poised to initiate inflammation when there is loss of tolerance and breakdown of mucosal barriers. PMID:27500496

  9. ArtinM Mediates Murine T Cell Activation and Induces Cell Death in Jurkat Human Leukemic T Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira-Brito, Patrícia Kellen Martins; Gonçalves, Thiago Eleutério; Vendruscolo, Patrícia Edivânia; Roque-Barreira, Maria Cristina

    2017-01-01

    The recognition of cell surface glycans by lectins may be critical for the innate and adaptive immune responses. ArtinM, a d-mannose-binding lectin from Artocarpus heterophyllus, activates antigen-presenting cells by recognizing TLR2 N-glycans and induces Th1 immunity. We recently demonstrated that ArtinM stimulated CD4+ T cells to produce proinflammatory cytokines. Here, we further studied the effects of ArtinM on adaptive immune cells. We showed that ArtinM activates murine CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, augmenting their positivity for CD25, CD69, and CD95 and showed higher interleukin (IL)-2 and interferon (IFN)-γ production. The CD4+ T cells exhibited increased T-bet expression in response to ArtinM, and IL-2 production by CD4+ and CD8+ T cells depended on the recognition of CD3εγ-chain glycans by ArtinM. The ArtinM effect on aberrantly-glycosylated neoplastic lymphocytes was studied in Jurkat T cells, in which ArtinM induced IL-2, IFN-γ, and IL-1β production, but decreased cell viability and growth. A higher frequency of AnnexinV- and propidium iodide-stained cells demonstrated the induction of Jurkat T cells apoptosis by ArtinM, and this apoptotic response was reduced by caspases and protein tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The ArtinM effects on murine T cells corroborated with the immunomodulatory property of lectin, whereas the promotion of Jurkat T cells apoptosis may reflect a potential applicability of ArtinM in novel strategies for treating lymphocytic leukemia. PMID:28665310

  10. CD133-expressing thyroid cancer cells are undifferentiated, radioresistant and survive radioiodide therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ke, Chien-Chih; Liu, Ren-Shyan; Yang, An-Hang; Liu, Ching-Sheng; Chi, Chin-Wen; Tseng, Ling-Ming; Tsai, Yi-Fan; Ho, Jennifer H.; Lee, Chen-Hsen; Lee, Oscar K.

    2013-01-01

    131 I therapy is regularly used following surgery as a part of thyroid cancer management. Despite an overall relatively good prognosis, recurrent or metastatic thyroid cancer is not rare. CD133-expressing cells have been shown to mark thyroid cancer stem cells that possess the characteristics of stem cells and have the ability to initiate tumours. However, no studies have addressed the influence of CD133-expressing cells on radioiodide therapy of the thyroid cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate whether CD133 + cells contribute to the radioresistance of thyroid cancer and thus potentiate future recurrence and metastasis. Thyroid cancer cell lines were analysed for CD133 expression, radiosensitivity and gene expression. The anaplastic thyroid cancer cell line ARO showed a higher percentage of CD133 + cells and higher radioresistance. After γ-irradiation of the cells, the CD133 + population was enriched due to the higher apoptotic rate of CD133 - cells. In vivo 131 I treatment of ARO tumour resulted in an elevated expression of CD133, Oct4, Nanog, Lin28 and Glut1 genes. After isolation, CD133 + cells exhibited higher radioresistance and higher expression of Oct4, Nanog, Sox2, Lin28 and Glut1 in the cell line or primarily cultured papillary thyroid cancer cells, and lower expression of various thyroid-specific genes, namely NIS, Tg, TPO, TSHR, TTF1 and Pax8. This study demonstrates the existence of CD133-expressing thyroid cancer cells which show a higher radioresistance and are in an undifferentiated status. These cells possess a greater potential to survive radiotherapy and may contribute to the recurrence of thyroid cancer. A future therapeutic approach for radioresistant thyroid cancer may focus on the selective eradication of CD133 + cells. (orig.)

  11. PROGNOSTIC SIGNIFICANCE OF CD56 EXPRESSION IN ACUTE LEUKEMIAS

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    B. M. Ahmed

    2014-12-01

    Conclusions. CD56 antigenic expression in AML cases represents an adverse prognostic factor. It should be regularly investigated in cases of AML for better prognostic stratification and assessment. KEY WORDS: CD56; leukemia, myeloid; prognosis

  12. Cyclooxygenase-2 inhibition blocks M2 macrophage differentiation and suppresses metastasis in murine breast cancer model.

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    Yi-Rang Na

    Full Text Available Tumor cells are often associated with abundant macrophages that resemble the alternatively activated M2 subset. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs inhibit anti-tumor immune responses and promote metastasis. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 inhibition is known to prevent breast cancer metastasis. This study hypothesized that COX-2 inhibition affects TAM characteristics potentially relevant to tumor cell metastasis. We found that the specific COX-2 inhibitor, etodolac, inhibited human M2 macrophage differentiation, as determined by decreased CD14 and CD163 expressions and increased TNFα production. Several key metastasis-related mediators, such as vascular endothelial growth factor-A, vascular endothelial growth factor-C, and matrix metalloproteinase-9, were inhibited in the presence of etodolac as compared to untreated M2 macrophages. Murine bone marrow derived M2 macrophages also showed enhanced surface MHCII IA/IE and CD80, CD86 expressions together with enhanced TNFα expressions with etodolac treatment during differentiation. Using a BALB/c breast cancer model, we found that etodolac significantly reduced lung metastasis, possibly due to macrophages expressing increased IA/IE and TNFα, but decreased M2 macrophage-related genes expressions (Ym1, TGFβ. In conclusion, COX-2 inhibition caused loss of the M2 macrophage characteristics of TAMs and may assist prevention of breast cancer metastasis.

  13. Hydroxychloroquine inhibits CD154 expression in CD4+ T lymphocytes of systemic lupus erythematosus through NFAT, but not STAT5, signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shu-Fen; Chang, Chia-Bin; Hsu, Jui-Mei; Lu, Ming-Chi; Lai, Ning-Sheng; Li, Chin; Tung, Chien-Hsueh

    2017-08-09

    Overexpression of membranous CD154 in T lymphocytes has been found previously in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Because hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) has been used frequently in the treatment of lupus, we sought to identify the effects of HCQ on CD154 and a possibly regulatory mechanism. CD4 + T cells were isolated from the blood of lupus patients. After stimulation with ionomycin or IL-15 and various concentrations of HCQ, expression of membranous CD154 and NFAT and STAT5 signaling were assessed. HCQ treatment had significant dose-dependent suppressive effects on membranous CD154 expression in ionomycin-activated T cells from lupus patients. Furthermore, HCQ inhibited intracellular sustained calcium storage release, and attenuated the nuclear translocation of NFATc2 and the expression of NFATc1. However, CD154 expressed through IL-15-mediated STAT5 signaling was not inhibited by HCQ treatment. HCQ inhibited NFAT signaling in activated T cells and blocked the expression of membranous CD154, but not STAT5 signaling. These findings provide a mechanistic insight into SLE in HCQ treatment.

  14. BIP induces mice CD19(hi) regulatory B cells producing IL-10 and highly expressing PD-L1, FasL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Youfa; Jiang, Qing; Ou, Yanghui; Zhang, Fan; Qing, Kai; Sun, Yuanli; Lu, Wenjie; Zhu, Huifen; Gong, Feili; Lei, Ping; Shen, Guanxin

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have shown that B cells possess a regulatory function in mouse models of autoimmune diseases. Regulatory B cells can modulate immune response through many types of molecular mechanisms, including the production of IL-10 and the expression of PD-1 Ligand and Fas Ligand, but the microenvironmental factors and mechanisms that induce regulatory B cells have not been fully identified. BIP (binding immunoglobulin protein), a member of the heat shock protein 70 family, is a type of evolutionarily highly conserved protein. In this article, we have found that IL-10(+), PD-L1(hi) and FasL(hi) B cells are discrete cell populations, but enriched in CD19(hi) cells. BIP can induce IL-10-producing splenic B cells, IL-10 secretion and B cells highly expressing PD-L1 and FasL. CD40 signaling acts in synergy with BIP to induce regulatory B cells. BIP increased surface CD19 molecule expression intensity and IL-10(+), PD-L1(hi) and FasL(hi) B cells induced by BIP share the CD19(hi) phenotype. Furthermore, B cells treated with BIP and anti-CD40 can lead to suppression of T cell proliferation and the effect is partially IL-10-dependent and mainly BIP-induced. Taken together, our findings identify a novel function of BIP in the induction of regulatory B cells and add a new reason for the therapy of autoimmune disorders or other inflammatory conditions. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Cell Adhesion Molecule CD166/ALCAM Functions Within the Crypt to Orchestrate Murine Intestinal Stem Cell HomeostasisSummary

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    Nicholas R. Smith

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims: Intestinal epithelial homeostasis is maintained by active-cycling and slow-cycling stem cells confined within an instructive crypt-based niche. Exquisite regulating of these stem cell populations along the proliferation-to-differentiation axis maintains a homeostatic balance to prevent hyperproliferation and cancer. Although recent studies focus on how secreted ligands from mesenchymal and epithelial populations regulate intestinal stem cells (ISCs, it remains unclear what role cell adhesion plays in shaping the regulatory niche. Previously we have shown that the cell adhesion molecule and cancer stem cell marker, CD166/ALCAM (activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule, is highly expressed by both active-cycling Lgr5+ ISCs and adjacent Paneth cells within the crypt base, supporting the hypothesis that CD166 functions to mediate ISC maintenance and signal coordination. Methods: Here we tested this hypothesis by analyzing a CD166–/– mouse combined with immunohistochemical, flow cytometry, gene expression, and enteroid culture. Results: We found that animals lacking CD166 expression harbored fewer active-cycling Lgr5+ ISCs. Homeostasis was maintained by expansion of the transit-amplifying compartment and not by slow-cycling Bmi1+ ISC stimulation. Loss of active-cycling ISCs was coupled with deregulated Paneth cell homeostasis, manifested as increased numbers of immature Paneth progenitors due to decreased terminal differentiation, linked to defective Wnt signaling. CD166–/– Paneth cells expressed reduced Wnt3 ligand expression and depleted nuclear β-catenin. Conclusions: These data support a function for CD166 as an important cell adhesion molecule that shapes the signaling microenvironment by mediating ISC–niche cell interactions. Furthermore, loss of CD166 expression results in decreased ISC and Paneth cell homeostasis and an altered Wnt microenvironment. Keywords: Intestinal Stem Cell, Homeostasis

  16. Immunohistochemical expression of CD 10 in Cutaneous basal ,and Squamous Cell Carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AIAD, H.A.; HANOUT, H.M.

    2007-01-01

    Background: CD 10 is a zinc-dependent metallo peptidase known as common acute lymphoblastic leukemia antigen (CALLA). Although CD I 0 expression has been investigated in some cutaneous tumors, to our knowledge, data regarding its expression in cutaneous epithelial neoplasms are very limited. We aimed to determine the immunohistochemical expression of Cd 10 in basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (Succ) and to associate it with the available clinico pathological parameters in both tumors. Patients and Methods: This study included 16 Succ and 21 BCC cases (17 solid type, 2 morphea type and 2 adenoid basal types). BCC cases were divided into 12 cases with microscopic infiltrative base and 9 cases with well-circumscribed base. The localization of anti-CD 10 to the tumor and/or stromal cells was determined in each case. Results: Positive CD 10 staining was identified as brown cytoplasmic, with or without cell membrane staining. In all the 16 SCC cases, tumor cells failed to stain with CD 10 in contrast to the stromal cells that showed CD 10 expression in 13 cases (81%). In BCC cases, the expression of CD 10 was noted in tumor cells in 10 cases (476%) and in stromal cells of 20 cases (95.24%). Most of CD 10+ (7/10) BCC showed well-circumscribed deep margin, however, most of CD 10- cases (9/11) showed infiltrating base (p=0.030). BCCs with infiltrating deep margins (12 cases) tended to show CD 10 negative basaloid cells (9/12) and CD 10 positive stromal cells (12/12) (p=0.0003). Conclusion: From our results we suggest that CD 10 might be a useful immunohistochemical marker to differentiate between BCC and SCC. At least, if tumor cells were CD 10 positive, this would favor BCC over SCC. Absence of CD 10 in all the SCC and in infiltrating BCC together with its overexpression in the surrounding stromal cells might confer invasive properties to such tumors. However, its relation to other poor prognostic factors needs larger studies to be confirmed

  17. Imaging Expression of Cytosine Deaminase-Herpes Virus Thymidine Kinase Fusion Gene (CD/TK Expression with [124I]FIAU and PET

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    Trevor Hackman

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Double prodrug activation gene therapy using the Escherichia coli cytosine deaminase (CDherpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk fusion gene (CD/TK with 5-fluorocytosine (5FC, ganciclovir (GCV, and radiotherapy is currently under evaluation for treatment of different tumors. We assessed the efficacy of noninvasive imaging with [124I]FIAU (2′-fluoro-2′-deoxy-1-β-d-arabinofuranosyl-5-iodo-uracil and positron emission tomography (PET for monitoring expression of the CD/TK fusion gene. Walker-256 tumor cells were transduced with a retroviral vector bearing the CD/TK gene (W256CD/TK cells. The activity of HSV1-TK and CD subunits of the CD/TK gene product was assessed in different single cell-derived clones of W256CD/TK cells using the FIAU radiotracer accumulation assay in cells and a CD enzyme assay in cell homogenates, respectively. A linear relationship was observed between the levels of CD and HSV1-tk subunit expression in corresponding clones in vitro over a wide range of CD/TK expression levels. Several clones of W256CD/TK cells with significantly different levels of CD/TK expression were selected and used to produce multiple subcutaneous tumors in rats. PET imaging of HSV1-TK subunit activity with [124I]FIAU was performed on these animals and demonstrated that different levels of CD/TK expression in subcutaneous W256CD/TK tumors can be imaged quantitatively. CD expression in subcutaneous tumor sample homogenates was measured using a CD enzyme assay. A comparison of CD and HSV1-TK subunit enzymatic activity of the CD/TK fusion protein in vivo showed a significant correlation. Knowing this relationship, the parametric images of CD subunit activity were generated. Imaging with [124I]FIAU and PET could provide pre- and posttreatment assessments of CD/TK-based double prodrug activation in clinical gene therapy trials.

  18. Increased concentrations of soluble CD40 ligand platelet in patients with primary antiphospholipidic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galicia López, Aida; Olguín Ortega, Lourdes; Saavedra, Miguel A; Méndez Cruz, René; Jimenez Flores, Rafael; García de la Peña, Maximiliano

    2013-01-01

    To determine the concentrations of sCD40L in patients with PAPS, and establish its association with the number of thrombosis. We included patients with PAPS and healthy controls of the same age and sex. For analysis, patients with PAPS were divided into 2 groups: 1) patients with 1 thrombosis, and 2) patients with >1 thrombosis. Soluble CD40L concentrations were determined by ELISA method. sCD40L concentrations were significantly higher in patients with PAPS compared with the controls (9.72 ng ± 11.23 ng/ml vs. 4.69 ± 4.04 ng/ml) (P=.04) There was no association between serum levels of sCD40L and the number of thrombosis (1 thrombosis: 9.81 ± 9.87 ng/ml vs 9.63 ± 12.75 ng/ml in ≥ 1thrombosis (P=.13). In women with pregnancy and abortions, (13 patients) concentrations of sCD40L were higher than in those patients without a history of abortion (26 patients) but without statically significant difference (12.11 ± 16.46 ng/ml vs. 8.80 ± 8.61 ng/ml) (P=.33). There was no correlation between levels of sCD40L and the total number of thrombosis. Patients with PAPS have higher concentrations of sCD40L compared with healthy subjects, although this is not associated with a greater number of thrombosis. Among patients with PAPS, there is a tendency to higher concentrations of sCD40L in women with pregnancy and history of abortion. Since the platelet is the main cellular source of sCD40L, is possible that this pathway plays a pathogenic role in patients with PAPS. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  19. Synergy of anti-CD40, CpG and MPL in activation of mouse macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yongyu; Felder, Mildred A R; Sondel, Paul M; Rakhmilevich, Alexander L

    2015-08-01

    Activation of macrophages is a prerequisite for their antitumor effects. Several reagents, including agonistic anti-CD40 monoclonal antibody (anti-CD40), CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG) and monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL), can stimulate activation of macrophages. Our previous studies showed synergy between anti-CD40 and CpG and between anti-CD40 and MPL in macrophage activation and antitumor efficacy in mice. In the present study, we asked whether there was synergy among these three reagents. The activation of adherent peritoneal exudate cells (PEC) obtained from mice injected with anti-CD40 and then treated with CpG and/or MPL in vitro was determined by their ability to suppress proliferation of tumor cells and to produce various cytokines and chemokines in vitro. Cell sorting and histology followed by functional testing showed that macrophages were the main cell population in PEC activated by CD40 ligation in vivo. A combination of anti-CD40, CpG or MPL activated PEC to suppress proliferation of B16 cells and produce nitric oxide far greater than the single reagents or any of the double combinations of these reagents. In addition, the combination of all three reagents activated PEC to secrete IL-12, IFN-γ and MCP-1 to a greater degree than any single reagent or any two combined reagents. These results demonstrate that macrophages can be synergistically activated by anti-CD40, CpG and MPL, suggesting that this novel combined approach might be further investigated as potential cancer therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Synergy of anti-CD40, CpG and MPL in activation of mouse macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yongyu; Felder, Mildred A.R.; Sondel, Paul M.; Rakhmilevich, Alexander L.

    2015-01-01

    Activation of macrophages is a prerequisite for their antitumor effects. Several reagents, including agonistic anti-CD40 monoclonal antibody (anti-CD40), CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG) and monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL), can stimulate activation of macrophages. Our previous studies showed synergy between anti-CD40 and CpG and between anti-CD40 and MPL in macrophage activation and antitumor efficacy in mice. In the present study, we asked whether there was synergy among these three reagents. The activation of adherent peritoneal exudate cells (PEC) obtained from mice injected with anti-CD40 and then treated with CpG and/or MPL in vitro was determined by their ability to suppress proliferation of tumor cells and to produce various cytokines and chemokines in vitro. Cell sorting and histology followed by functional testing showed that macrophages were the main cell population in PEC activated by CD40 ligation in vivo. A combination of anti-CD40, CpG or MPL activated PEC to suppress proliferation of B16 cells and produce nitric oxide far greater than the single reagents or any of the double combinations of these reagents. In addition, the combination of all three reagents activated PEC to secrete IL-12, IFN-γ and MCP-1 to a greater degree than any single reagent or any two combined reagents. These results demonstrate that macrophages can be synergistically activated by anti-CD40, CpG and MPL, suggesting that this novel combined approach might be further investigated as potential cancer therapy. PMID:25829245

  1. CD147 and matrix-metalloproteinase-2 expression in metastatic and non-metastatic uveal melanomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüke, Julia; Vukoja, Vlatka; Brandenbusch, Tim; Nassar, Khaled; Rohrbach, Jens Martin; Grisanti, Salvatore; Lüke, Matthias; Tura, Aysegül

    2016-06-03

    Extracellular matrix remodelling regulated by matrix-metalloproteinase (MMP) inducer (CD147) is a crucial process during tumor cell invasion and regulation of blood supply. In this study, we evaluated the correlation of CD147 and MMP-2 expression with major prognostic factors for uveal melanoma and the development of metastasis. The expression of CD147 and MMP-2 was analyzed in 49 samples of uveal melanomas. Triple immunofluorescence stainings using markers against glial cells (GFAP), endothelial cells (CD34) and macrophages (CD68) were performed to further analyse the exact localisation of CD147 and MMP-2 positivity. In 28 cases clinical metastatic disease were found. The remaining 21 cases showed no signs of metastatic disease for an average follow-up of 10 years. Correlation analysis (Pearson correlation) was performed to analyse the association of CD147 and MMP-2 expression with known prognostic factors, vasculogenic mimicry (VM), the mature vasculature (von Willebrand Factor) and tumor induced angiogenesis (by means of Endoglin expression). CD147 and MMP-2 were expressed in 47 (96.0 %) of the uveal melanomas. CD147 up-regulation was significantly correlated with a higher MMP-2 expression. The overall expression analysis revealed no significant difference in the metastatic (p = 0.777) and non-metastatic subgroup (p = 0.585). No correlation of CD147 expression and any system of blood supply was evident. In the non-metastatic sub-group a significant correlation of clustered CD147 positive cells with largest basal diameter (p = 0.039), height (p = 0.047) and TNM-stage (p = 0.013) was evident. These data may indicate that CD147 regulates MMP-2 expression in uveal melanoma cells.

  2. Active RNA replication of hepatitis C virus downregulates CD81 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Po-Yuan; Chen, Steve S-L

    2013-01-01

    So far how hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication modulates subsequent virus growth and propagation still remains largely unknown. Here we determine the impact of HCV replication status on the consequential virus growth by comparing normal and high levels of HCV RNA expression. We first engineered a full-length, HCV genotype 2a JFH1 genome containing a blasticidin-resistant cassette inserted at amino acid residue of 420 in nonstructural (NS) protein 5A, which allowed selection of human hepatoma Huh7 cells stably-expressing HCV. Short-term establishment of HCV stable cells attained a highly-replicating status, judged by higher expressions of viral RNA and protein as well as higher titer of viral infectivity as opposed to cells harboring the same genome without selection. Interestingly, maintenance of highly-replicating HCV stable cells led to decreased susceptibility to HCV pseudotyped particle (HCVpp) infection and downregulated cell surface level of CD81, a critical HCV entry (co)receptor. The decreased CD81 cell surface expression occurred through reduced total expression and cytoplasmic retention of CD81 within an endoplasmic reticulum -associated compartment. Moreover, productive viral RNA replication in cells harboring a JFH1 subgenomic replicon containing a similar blasticidin resistance gene cassette in NS5A and in cells robustly replicating full-length infectious genome also reduced permissiveness to HCVpp infection through decreasing the surface expression of CD81. The downregulation of CD81 surface level in HCV RNA highly-replicating cells thus interfered with reinfection and led to attenuated viral amplification. These findings together indicate that the HCV RNA replication status plays a crucial determinant in HCV growth by modulating the expression and intracellular localization of CD81.

  3. Active RNA replication of hepatitis C virus downregulates CD81 expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po-Yuan Ke

    Full Text Available So far how hepatitis C virus (HCV replication modulates subsequent virus growth and propagation still remains largely unknown. Here we determine the impact of HCV replication status on the consequential virus growth by comparing normal and high levels of HCV RNA expression. We first engineered a full-length, HCV genotype 2a JFH1 genome containing a blasticidin-resistant cassette inserted at amino acid residue of 420 in nonstructural (NS protein 5A, which allowed selection of human hepatoma Huh7 cells stably-expressing HCV. Short-term establishment of HCV stable cells attained a highly-replicating status, judged by higher expressions of viral RNA and protein as well as higher titer of viral infectivity as opposed to cells harboring the same genome without selection. Interestingly, maintenance of highly-replicating HCV stable cells led to decreased susceptibility to HCV pseudotyped particle (HCVpp infection and downregulated cell surface level of CD81, a critical HCV entry (coreceptor. The decreased CD81 cell surface expression occurred through reduced total expression and cytoplasmic retention of CD81 within an endoplasmic reticulum -associated compartment. Moreover, productive viral RNA replication in cells harboring a JFH1 subgenomic replicon containing a similar blasticidin resistance gene cassette in NS5A and in cells robustly replicating full-length infectious genome also reduced permissiveness to HCVpp infection through decreasing the surface expression of CD81. The downregulation of CD81 surface level in HCV RNA highly-replicating cells thus interfered with reinfection and led to attenuated viral amplification. These findings together indicate that the HCV RNA replication status plays a crucial determinant in HCV growth by modulating the expression and intracellular localization of CD81.

  4. Expression of Th17 and CD4+ CD25+ T regulatory cells in peripheral blood of acute leukemia patients and their prognostic significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Mingli; Guo, Li; Ma, Yan; Li, Yi

    2016-11-01

    To discuss the expression of T helper cell 17 (Th17) cells and CD4+ CD25+ Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Treg) in peripheral blood (PB) of patients with acute leukemia (AL), and to explore the relationship between them and disease prognosis. 40 patients diagnosed with acute leukemia in The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University from July 2012 to August 2014 were selected as the observation group. Meanwhile, 40 healthy people were taken as the control group. Flow Cytometry Method (FCM) was used to detect the level of Th17 cells and CD4 + CD25 + Foxp3 + cells in peripheral blood of the two groups, and enzyme-linked immuno sorbent assay (ELISA) method was used to test the level of IL17 and TGF-β in peripheral blood of two groups; reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was adopted to analyze the mRNA levels of RORγT and Foxp3 in peripheral blood. In addition, we examined the levels of Th17 and CD4 + CD25 + Foxp3 + cells and associated factor levels in patients with remission after AL chemotherapy. the Th17 cells (CD3 + CD4 + IL-17 + ) in acute leukemia patients accounted for (1.51±0.27)%, which was significantly higher than that of control group (0.36±0.23)%, with statistical significance (t=20.51, Pcells in AL patients was (3.37±0.48)%, which was significantly higher than that of control group of (1.26±0.27)%, with statistical significance (t=24.23, Pt=7.83, Pt=7.83, Pt=12.27, Pt=7.89, Pcells and CD4 + CD25 + Foxp3 + cells, and the serum levels of IL-17 and TGF-β in acute leukemia patients all decreased significantly after 6 months of chemotherapy, and the difference was statistically significant (Pcells, CD4+ CD25+ Foxp3 + cells and their secretory proteins IL-17, TGF-β and transcription factors were significantly increased in AL patients. Therefore, regular detection of peripheral blood Th17 and Treg cells, as well as their secretory proteins are useful for monitoring the immune status and prognosis of patients.

  5. Regulation of CD93 cell surface expression by protein kinase C isoenzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikewaki, Nobunao; Kulski, Jerzy K; Inoko, Hidetoshi

    2006-01-01

    Human CD93, also known as complement protein 1, q subcomponent, receptor (C1qRp), is selectively expressed by cells with a myeloid lineage, endothelial cells, platelets, and microglia and was originally reported to be involved in the complement protein 1, q subcomponent (C1q)-mediated enhancement of phagocytosis. The intracellular molecular events responsible for the regulation of its expression on the cell surface, however, have not been determined. In this study, the effect of protein kinases in the regulation of CD93 expression on the cell surface of a human monocyte-like cell line (U937), a human NK-like cell line (KHYG-1), and a human umbilical vein endothelial cell line (HUV-EC-C) was investigated using four types of protein kinase inhibitors, the classical protein kinase C (cPKC) inhibitor Go6976, the novel PKC (nPKC) inhibitor Rottlerin, the protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor H-89 and the protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) inhibitor herbimycin A at their optimum concentrations for 24 hr. CD93 expression was analyzed using flow cytometry and glutaraldehyde-fixed cellular enzyme-linked immunoassay (EIA) techniques utilizing a CD93 monoclonal antibody (mAb), mNI-11, that was originally established in our laboratory as a CD93 detection probe. The nPKC inhibitor Rottlerin strongly down-regulated CD93 expression on the U937 cells in a dose-dependent manner, whereas the other inhibitors had little or no effect. CD93 expression was down-regulated by Go6976, but not by Rottlerin, in the KHYG-1 cells and by both Rottlerin and Go6976 in the HUV-EC-C cells. The PKC stimulator, phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), strongly up-regulated CD93 expression on the cell surface of all three cell-lines and induced interleukin-8 (IL-8) production by the U937 cells and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) production by the KHYG-1 cells. In addition, both Go6976 and Rottlerin inhibited the up-regulation of CD93 expression induced by PMA and IL-8 or IFN-gamma production in the respective cell

  6. Reishi Protein LZ-8 Induces FOXP3+ Treg Expansion via a CD45-Dependent Signaling Pathway and Alleviates Acute Intestinal Inflammation in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsien-Yeh Hsu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available LZ-8, an immunomodulatory protein isolated from Ganoderma lucidum (also known as Ling-Zhi or Reishi, has been shown to promote cell proliferation and IL-2 production in T cells. In this study, we show that LZ-8 induces the expansion of both murine and human CD4+ T cells into FOXP3+ regulatory T (Treg cells. LZ-8 treatment was found to stimulate a 4-fold and a 10-fold expansion in the Treg populations of murine and human primary CD4+ T cells, respectively. In addition, the expression of CTLA-4 and IL-10 was induced in LZ-8-treated CD4+ T cells. Using neutralizing antibodies and gene-deficient T-cell lines, we also found that LZ-8 promotes Treg expansion through a CD45-mediated signaling pathway and that the CD18-dependent induction of IL-2 was involved in Treg formation and IL-10 production. The suppressive activity of LZ-8 was confirmed using a murine model of DSS-induced colitis; the disease was alleviated by the adoptive transfer of LZ-8-treated CD4+ T cells. In conclusion, a new regulatory function for LZ-8 was identified, and the molecular mechanisms underlying this function were elucidated.

  7. CD49a Expression Defines Tissue-Resident CD8+ T Cells Poised for Cytotoxic Function in Human Skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheuk, Stanley; Schlums, Heinrich; Sérézal, Irène Gallais

    2017-01-01

    with vitiligo, where melanocytes are eradicated locally, CD8+CD49a+ Trm cells that constitutively expressed perforin and granzyme B accumulated both in the epidermis and dermis. Conversely, CD8+CD49a– Trm cells from psoriasis lesions predominantly generated IL-17 responses that promote local inflammation...

  8. MicroRNA miR-328 regulates zonation morphogenesis by targeting CD44 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chia-Hui; Lee, Daniel Y; Deng, Zhaoqun; Jeyapalan, Zina; Lee, Shao-Chen; Kahai, Shireen; Lu, Wei-Yang; Zhang, Yaou; Yang, Burton B

    2008-06-18

    Morphogenesis is crucial to initiate physiological development and tumor invasion. Here we show that a microRNA controls zonation morphogenesis by targeting hyaluronan receptor CD44. We have developed a novel system to study microRNA functions by generating constructs expressing pre-miRNAs and mature miRNAs. Using this system, we have demonstrated that expression of miR-328 reduced cell adhesion, aggregation, and migration, and regulated formation of capillary structure. Protein analysis indicated that miR-328 repressed CD44 expression. Activities of luciferase constructs harboring the target site in CD44, but not the one containing mutation, were repressed by miR-328. Zonation morphogenesis appeared in cells transfected by miR-328: miR-328-transfected cells were present on the surface of zonating structures while the control cells stayed in the middle. MiR-328-mediated CD44 actions was validated by anti-CD44 antibody, hyaluronidase, CD44 siRNA, and CD44 expression constructs. In vivo experiments showed that CD44-silencing cells appeared as layers on the surfaces of nodules or zonating structures. Immuno-histochemistry also exhibited CD44-negative cells on the surface layers of normal rat livers and the internal zones of Portal veins. Our results demonstrate that miR-328 targets CD44, which is essential in regulating zonation morphogenesis: silencing of CD44 expression is essential in sealing the zonation structures to facilitate their extension and to inhibit complex expansion.

  9. MicroRNA miR-328 regulates zonation morphogenesis by targeting CD44 expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Hui Wang

    Full Text Available Morphogenesis is crucial to initiate physiological development and tumor invasion. Here we show that a microRNA controls zonation morphogenesis by targeting hyaluronan receptor CD44. We have developed a novel system to study microRNA functions by generating constructs expressing pre-miRNAs and mature miRNAs. Using this system, we have demonstrated that expression of miR-328 reduced cell adhesion, aggregation, and migration, and regulated formation of capillary structure. Protein analysis indicated that miR-328 repressed CD44 expression. Activities of luciferase constructs harboring the target site in CD44, but not the one containing mutation, were repressed by miR-328. Zonation morphogenesis appeared in cells transfected by miR-328: miR-328-transfected cells were present on the surface of zonating structures while the control cells stayed in the middle. MiR-328-mediated CD44 actions was validated by anti-CD44 antibody, hyaluronidase, CD44 siRNA, and CD44 expression constructs. In vivo experiments showed that CD44-silencing cells appeared as layers on the surfaces of nodules or zonating structures. Immuno-histochemistry also exhibited CD44-negative cells on the surface layers of normal rat livers and the internal zones of Portal veins. Our results demonstrate that miR-328 targets CD44, which is essential in regulating zonation morphogenesis: silencing of CD44 expression is essential in sealing the zonation structures to facilitate their extension and to inhibit complex expansion.

  10. Activation of human CD141+ and CD1c+ dendritic cells in vivo with combined TLR3 and TLR7/8 ligation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Frances E; Chang, Karshing; Minoda, Yoshihito; Rojas, Ingrid M Leal; Haigh, Oscar L; Daraj, Ghazal; Tullett, Kirsteen M; Radford, Kristen J

    2018-04-01

    Mice reconstituted with human hematopoietic stem cells are valuable models to study aspects of the human immune system in vivo. We describe a humanized mouse model (hu mice) in which fully functional human CD141 + and CD1c + myeloid and CD123 + plasmacytoid dendritic cells (DC) develop from human cord blood CD34 + cells in immunodeficient mice. CD141 + DC are the human equivalents of murine CD8 + /CD103 + DC which are essential for the induction of tumor-inhibitory cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses, making them attractive targets to exploit for the development of new cancer immunotherapies. We used CD34 + -engrafted NSG-A2 mice to investigate activation of DC subsets by synthetic dsRNA or ssRNA analogs polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid/poly I:C and Resiquimod/R848, agonists for TLR3 and TLR8, respectively, both of which are expressed by CD141 + DC. Injection of hu mice with these agonists resulted in upregulation of costimulatory molecules CD80, CD83 and CD86 by CD141 + and CD1c + DC alike, and their combination further enhanced expression of these molecules by both subsets. When combined, poly I:C and R848 enhanced serum levels of key cytokines associated with cross-presentation and the induction of cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses including IFN-α, IFN-β, IL-12 and CXCL10. These data advocate a combination of poly I:C and R848 TLR agonists as means of activating human DC for immunotherapy. © 2018 Australasian Society for Immunology Inc.

  11. The gene expression profile of CD11c+ CD8α- dendritic cells in the pre-diabetic pancreas of the NOD mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wouter Beumer

    Full Text Available Two major dendritic cell (DC subsets have been described in the pancreas of mice: The CD11c+ CD8α- DCs (strong CD4+ T cell proliferation inducers and the CD8α+ CD103+ DCs (T cell apoptosis inducers. Here we analyzed the larger subset of CD11c+ CD8α- DCs isolated from the pancreas of pre-diabetic NOD mice for genome-wide gene expression (validated by Q-PCR to elucidate abnormalities in underlying gene expression networks. CD11c+ CD8α- DCs were isolated from 5 week old NOD and control C57BL/6 pancreas. The steady state pancreatic NOD CD11c+ CD8α- DCs showed a reduced expression of several gene networks important for the prime functions of these cells, i.e. for cell renewal, immune tolerance induction, migration and for the provision of growth factors including those for beta cell regeneration. A functional in vivo BrdU incorporation test showed the reduced proliferation of steady state pancreatic DC. The reduced expression of tolerance induction genes (CD200R, CCR5 and CD24 was supported on the protein level by flow cytometry. Also previously published functional tests on maturation, immune stimulation and migration confirm the molecular deficits of NOD steady state DC. Despite these deficiencies NOD pancreas CD11c+ CD8α- DCs showed a hyperreactivity to LPS, which resulted in an enhanced pro-inflammatory state characterized by a gene profile of an enhanced expression of a number of classical inflammatory cytokines. The enhanced up-regulation of inflammatory genes was supported by the in vitro cytokine production profile of the DCs. In conclusion, our data show that NOD pancreatic CD11c+ CD8α- DCs show various deficiencies in steady state, while hyperreactive when encountering a danger signal such as LPS.

  12. Airway delivery of soluble factors from plastic-adherent bone marrow cells prevents murine asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionescu, Lavinia I; Alphonse, Rajesh S; Arizmendi, Narcy; Morgan, Beverly; Abel, Melanie; Eaton, Farah; Duszyk, Marek; Vliagoftis, Harissios; Aprahamian, Tamar R; Walsh, Kenneth; Thébaud, Bernard

    2012-02-01

    Asthma affects an estimated 300 million people worldwide and accounts for 1 of 250 deaths and 15 million disability-adjusted life years lost annually. Plastic-adherent bone marrow-derived cell (BMC) administration holds therapeutic promise in regenerative medicine. However, given the low cell engraftment in target organs, including the lung, cell replacement cannot solely account for the reported therapeutic benefits. This suggests that BMCs may act by secreting soluble factors. BMCs also possess antiinflammatory and immunomodulatory properties and may therefore be beneficial for asthma. Our objective was to investigate the therapeutic potential of BMC-secreted factors in murine asthma. In a model of acute and chronic asthma, intranasal instillation of BMC conditioned medium (CdM) prevented airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and inflammation. In the chronic asthma model, CdM prevented airway smooth muscle thickening and peribronchial inflammation while restoring blunted salbutamol-induced bronchodilation. CdM reduced lung levels of the T(H)2 inflammatory cytokines IL-4 and IL-13 and increased levels of IL-10. CdM up-regulated an IL-10-induced and IL-10-secreting subset of T regulatory lymphocytes and promoted IL-10 expression by lung macrophages. Adiponectin (APN), an antiinflammatory adipokine found in CdM, prevented AHR, airway smooth muscle thickening, and peribronchial inflammation, whereas the effect of CdM in which APN was neutralized or from APN knock-out mice was attenuated compared with wild-type CdM. Our study provides evidence that BMC-derived soluble factors prevent murine asthma and suggests APN as one of the protective factors. Further identification of BMC-derived factors may hold promise for novel approaches in the treatment of asthma.

  13. Enhancement of CD147 on M1 macrophages induces differentiation of Th17 cells in the lung interstitial fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Jie-jie; Zhang, Kui; Chen, Li-na; Miao, Jin-lin; Yao, Meng; Ren, Ying; Fu, Zhi-guang; Chen, Zhi-nan; Zhu, Ping

    2014-09-01

    Lung interstitial fibrosis is a chronic lung disease, and few effective therapies are available to halt or reverse the progression of the disease. In murine and human lung fibrosis, the expression of CD147 is increased. However, the role of CD147 in lung fibrosis has not been identified, and it remains to be determined whether lung fibrosis would be improved by decreasing the expression of CD147. A murine bleomycin-induced lung interstitial fibrosis model was used in the experiments, and HAb18 mAbs and CsA were administered during the induction of lung fibrosis. In our study, we found that the HAb18 mAbs markedly reduced the collagen score and down-regulated M1 macrophages and Th17 cells. In vitro, flow cytometry analysis showed that M1 macrophages induced higher Th17 differentiation than M2 macrophages. After treatment with HAb18 mAbs or after reducing the expression of CD147 by lentivirus interference in M1 macrophages, the level of Th17 cells were significantly inhibited. In conclusion, HAb18 mAbs or CsA treatment ameliorates lung interstitial fibrosis. CD147 promoted M1 macrophage and induced the differentiation of Th17 cells in lung interstitial fibrosis, perhaps by regulating some cytokines such as IL-6, IL-1β, IL-12 and IL-23. These results indicated that CD147 may play an important role in the development of lung interstitial fibrosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. IL-10 down-regulates the expression of survival associated gene hspX of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in murine macrophage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babban Jee

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB adopts a special survival strategy to overcome the killing mechanism(s of host immune system. Amongst the many known factors, small heat shock protein 16.3 (sHSP16.3 of MTB encoded by gene hspX has been reported to be critical for the survival of MTB. In the present study, the effect of recombinant murine interferon-gamma (rmIFN-γ and recombinant murine interleukin-10 (rmIL-10 on the expression of gene hspX of MTB in murine macrophage RAW264.7 has been investigated. By real-time RT-PCR, it was observed that three increasing concentrations (5, 25 and 50 ng/ml of rmIFN-γ significantly up-regulated the expression of hspX whereas similar concentrations of rmIL-10 (5, 25 and 50 ng/ml significantly down-regulated the hspX expression. This effect was not only dependent on the concentration of the stimulus but this was time-dependent as well. A contrasting pattern of hspX expression was observed against combinations of two different concentrations of rmIFN-γ and rmIL-10. The study results suggest that rIL-10 mediated down-regulation of hspX expression, in the presence of low concentration of rIFN-γ, could be used as an important strategy to decrease the dormancy of MTB in its host and thus making MTB susceptible to the standard anti-mycobacterial therapy used for treating tuberculosis. However, as these are only preliminary results in the murine cell line model, this hypothesis needs to be first validated in human cell lines and subsequently in animal models mimicking the latent infection using clinical isolates of MTB before considering the development of modified regimens for humans.

  15. Sequencing and expression analysis of CD3γ/δ and CD3ɛ chains in mandarin fish, Siniperca chuatsi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zheng; Nie, Pin

    2013-01-01

    The genomic and cDNA sequences of the CD3γ/δ and CD3ɛ homologues in the mandarin fish, Siniperca chuats i, were determined. As in other vertebrate CD3 molecules, the deduced amino acid sequences of mandarin fish CD3γ/δ and CD3ɛ contained conserved residues and motifs, such as cysteine residues and CXXC and immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motifs. However, mandarin fish CD3γ/δ and CD3ɛ showed some differences to their mammalian counterparts, specifically the absence of a negatively charged residue in the transmembrane region of CD3γ/δ. Additionally, while an N -glycosylation site was present in CD3ɛ, the site was not observed in CD3γ/δ. The CD3γ/δ and CD3ɛ subunit sequences contain six and five exons, respectively, consistent with homologues from Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar. Phylogenetic analysis also revealed that CD3γ/δ and CD3ɛ in mandarin fish are closely related to their counterparts in Acanthopterygian fish. Real-time PCR showed CD3γ/δ and CD3ɛ were expressed mainly in the thymus and spleen in normal healthy fish and, to a lesser extent, in mucosal-associated lymphoid tissues, such as the intestine and gills. When lymphocytes isolated from head kidney were treated with the mitogens phytohemagglutinin, concanavalin, and polyriboinosinic polyribocytidylic acid, mRNA expression levels of CD3γ/δ and CD3ɛ were significantly elevated within 12 h of treatment. This indicated the presence of T lymphocytes in the head kidney of teleost fish, and also the recognition of mitogens by the lymphocytes. Mandarin fish infected with the bacterial pathogen Flavobacterium columnare also showed an increase in the expression of CD3γ/δ and CD3ɛ mRNA, indicating that CD3γ/δ and CD3ɛ lymphocytes are involved in the immune response of this species.

  16. Anaplasma phagocytophilum-Related Defects in CD8, NKT, and NK Lymphocyte Cytotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana G. Scorpio

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Human granulocytic anaplasmosis, caused by the tick-transmitted Anaplasma phagocytophilum, is not controlled by innate immunity, and induces a proinflammatory disease state with innate immune cell activation. In A. phagocytophilum murine infection models, hepatic injury occurs with production of IFNγ thought to be derived from NK, NKT cells, and CD8 T lymphocytes. Specific A. phagocytophilum ligands that drive inflammation and disease are not known, but suggest a clinical and pathophysiologic basis strikingly like macrophage activation syndrome (MAS and hemophagocytic syndrome (HPS. We studied in vivo responses of NK, NKT, and CD8 T lymphocytes from infected animals for correlates of lymphocyte-mediated cytotoxicity and examined in vitro interactions with A. phagocytophilum-loaded antigen-presenting cells (APCs. Murine splenocytes were examined and found deficient in cytotoxicity as determined by CD107a expression in vitro for specific CTL effector subsets as determined by flow cytometry. Moreover, A. phagocytophilum-loaded APCs did not lead to IFNγ production among CTLs in vitro. These findings support the concept of impaired cytotoxicity with A. phagocytophilum presentation by APCs that express MHC class I and that interact with innate and adaptive immune cells with or after infection. The findings strengthen the concept of an enhanced proinflammatory phenotype, such as MAS and HPS disease states as the basis of disease and severity with A. phagocytophilum infection, and perhaps by other obligate intracellular bacteria.

  17. Dynamic Wnt5a expression in murine hair follicle cycle and its inhibitory effects on follicular.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, De-Ren; Lv, Zhong-Fa; Qiao, Gang

    2014-04-01

    To analyze the dynamic expression of Wnt family member 5A (Wingless-type MMTV integration Wnt site family, member 5a) in murine hair cycle and its inhibitory effects on follicle in vivo. Situ hybridization in full-thickness skin was used to observe the change of mouse protein expression in different growth stages, and Ad-Wnt5a was injected after defeathering to observe the hair follicle growth in vivo. The Wnt5a mRNA was expressed at birth, and was firstly increased then decreased along with the progress of the hair cycle. It reached the peak in advanced stage of growth cycle (P<0.05). Rhoa and β-catenin expression levels were significantly decreased in three groups. Rac2 expression was significantly up-regulated, and the expression level of Wnt5a, Shh and Frizzled2 was increased, but less significantly than group 2. The expression of Wnt5a mRNA is consistent with change of murine follicle cycle, and has obvious inhibitory effects on the growth of hair follicle in vivo, indicating that it is antagonistic to Wnts pathway and interferes the growth of follicle together. Copyright © 2014 Hainan Medical College. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Correlation between CD105 expression and postoperative recurrence and metastasis of hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Wei

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Angiogenesis is one of the mechanisms most critical to the postoperative recurrence and metastasis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Thus, finding the molecular markers associated with angiogenesis may help identify patients at increased risk for recurrence and metastasis of HCC. This study was designed to investigate whether CD105 or CD34 could serve as a valid prognostic marker in patients with HCC by determining if there is a correlation between CD105 or CD34 expression and postoperative recurrence or metastasis. Methods Immunohistochemical staining for the CD105, CD34 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF antibodies was performed in 113 HCC tissue specimens containing paracarcinomatous tissue and in 14 normal liver tissue specimens. The quantitation of microvessels identified by anti-CD105 and anti-CD34 monoclonal antibodies and the semiquantitation of VEGF expression identified by anti-VEGF monoclonal antibody were analyzed in conjunction with the clinicopathological characteristics of the HCC and any available follow-up information about the patients from whom the specimens were obtained. Results CD105 was not expressed in the vascular endothelial cells of any normal liver tissue or paracarcinomatous liver tissue but was expressed in the vascular endothelial cells of all HCC tissue. In contrast, CD34 was expressed in the vascular endothelial cells of normal liver tissue, paracarcinomatous tissue, and HCC tissue in the following proportions of specimens: 86.7%, 93.8%, and 100%, respectively. The microvascular densities (MVDs of HCC determined by using an anti-CD105 mAb (CD105-MVD and an anti-CD34 mAb (CD34-MVD, were 71.7 ± 8.3 (SD and 106.3 ± 10.4 (SD, respectively. There was a significant correlation between CD105-MVD and CD34-MVD (r = 0.248, P = 0.021. Although CD34-MVD was significantly correlated with VEGF expression (r = 0.243, P = 0.024, CD105-MVD was more closely correlated (r = 0.300, P= 0.005. The

  19. HIV-1 induces DCIR expression in CD4+ T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra A Lambert

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The C-type lectin receptor DCIR, which has been shown very recently to act as an attachment factor for HIV-1 in dendritic cells, is expressed predominantly on antigen-presenting cells. However, this concept was recently challenged by the discovery that DCIR can also be detected in CD4(+ T cells found in the synovial tissue from rheumatoid arthritis (RA patients. Given that RA and HIV-1 infections share common features such as a chronic inflammatory condition and polyclonal immune hyperactivation status, we hypothesized that HIV-1 could promote DCIR expression in CD4(+ T cells. We report here that HIV-1 drives DCIR expression in human primary CD4(+ T cells isolated from patients (from both aviremic/treated and viremic/treatment naive persons and cells acutely infected in vitro (seen in both virus-infected and uninfected cells. Soluble factors produced by virus-infected cells are responsible for the noticed DCIR up-regulation on uninfected cells. Infection studies with Vpr- or Nef-deleted viruses revealed that these two viral genes are not contributing to the mechanism of DCIR induction that is seen following acute infection of CD4(+ T cells with HIV-1. Moreover, we report that DCIR is linked to caspase-dependent (induced by a mitochondria-mediated generation of free radicals and -independent intrinsic apoptotic pathways (involving the death effector AIF. Finally, we demonstrate that the higher surface expression of DCIR in CD4(+ T cells is accompanied by an enhancement of virus attachment/entry, replication and transfer. This study shows for the first time that HIV-1 induces DCIR membrane expression in CD4(+ T cells, a process that might promote virus dissemination throughout the infected organism.

  20. Newly Characterized Murine Undifferentiated Sarcoma Models Sensitive to Virotherapy with Oncolytic HSV-1 M002

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric K. Ring

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite advances in conventional chemotherapy, surgical techniques, and radiation, outcomes for patients with relapsed, refractory, or metastatic soft tissue sarcomas are dismal. Survivors often suffer from lasting morbidity from current treatments. New targeted therapies with less toxicity, such as those that harness the immune system, and immunocompetent murine sarcoma models to test these therapies are greatly needed. We characterized two new serendipitous murine models of undifferentiated sarcoma (SARC-28 and SARC-45 and tested their sensitivity to virotherapy with oncolytic herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1. Both models expressed high levels of the primary HSV entry molecule nectin-1 (CD111 and were susceptible to killing by interleukin-12 (IL-12 producing HSV-1 M002 in vitro and in vivo. M002 resulted in a significant intratumoral increase in effector CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and activated monocytes, and a decrease in myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs in immunocompetent mice. Compared to parent virus R3659 (no IL-12 production, M002 resulted in higher CD8:MDSC and CD8:T regulatory cell (Treg ratios, suggesting that M002 creates a more favorable immune tumor microenvironment. These data provide support for clinical trials targeting sarcomas with oncolytic HSV-1. These models provide an exciting opportunity to explore combination therapies for soft tissue sarcomas that rely on an intact immune system to reach full therapeutic potential.

  1. Identification of a murine cysteinyl leukotriene receptor by expression in Xenopus laevis oocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mollerup, Jens; Jørgensen, Sune T.; Hougaard, Charlotte

    2001-01-01

    We report the identification of an EST encoding a murine cysteinyl leukotriene (mCysLT) receptor. LTD4, LTC4 and LTE4 but not LTB4 or various nucleotides activated Ca2+-evoked Cl- currents in mCysLT1 expressing Xenopus laevis oocytes. The response to LTD4 was blocked by MK-571, reduced by pretrea...... by pretreatment with pertussis toxin (PTX), and was partly dependent on extracellular Ca2+. The identified murine CysLT1 receptor differs from the hCysLT1 receptor with regard to PTX sensitivity, receptor-mediated Ca2+ influx, and antagonist sensitivity....

  2. Monoclonal antibodies to murine thrombospondin-1 and thrombospondin-2 reveal differential expression patterns in cancer and low antigen expression in normal tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bujak, Emil; Pretto, Francesca; Ritz, Danilo; Gualandi, Laura; Wulhfard, Sarah; Neri, Dario

    2014-01-01

    There is a considerable interest for the discovery and characterization of tumor-associated antigens, which may facilitate antibody-based pharmacodelivery strategies. Thrombospondin-1 and thrombospondin-2 are homologous secreted proteins, which have previously been reported to be overexpressed during remodeling typical for wound healing and tumor progression and to possibly play a functional role in cell proliferation, migration and apoptosis. To our knowledge, a complete immunohistochemical characterization of thrombospondins levels in normal rodent tissues has not been reported so far. Using antibody phage technology, we have generated and characterized monoclonal antibodies specific to murine thrombospondin-1 and thrombospondin-2, two antigens which share 62% aminoacid identity. An immunofluorescence analysis revealed that both antigens are virtually undetectable in normal mouse tissues, except for a weak staining of heart tissue by antibodies specific to thrombospondin-1. The analysis also showed that thrombospondin-1 was strongly expressed in 5/7 human tumors xenografted in nude mice, while it was only barely detectable in 3/8 murine tumors grafted in immunocompetent mice. By contrast, a high-affinity antibody to thrombospondin-2 revealed a much lower level of expression of this antigen in cancer specimens. Our analysis resolves ambiguities related to conflicting reports on thrombosponding expression in health and disease. Based on our findings, thrombospondin-1 (and not thrombospondin-2) may be considered as a target for antibody-based pharmacodelivery strategies, in consideration of its low expression in normal tissues and its upregulation in cancer. - Highlights: • High affinity monoclonal antibodies to murine and human TSP1 and 2 were raised. • Both antigens are virtually undetectable in normal mouse tissues. • Strong positivity of human tumor xenografts for TSP1 was detected. • Study revealed much lower level of TSP2 expression in cancer specimens

  3. Monoclonal antibodies to murine thrombospondin-1 and thrombospondin-2 reveal differential expression patterns in cancer and low antigen expression in normal tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bujak, Emil [Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH Zürich), Vladimir-Prelog-Weg 2, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Pretto, Francesca; Ritz, Danilo; Gualandi, Laura; Wulhfard, Sarah [Philochem AG, Libernstrasse 3, CH-8112 Otelfingen (Switzerland); Neri, Dario, E-mail: neri@pharma.ethz.ch [Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH Zürich), Vladimir-Prelog-Weg 2, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-09-10

    There is a considerable interest for the discovery and characterization of tumor-associated antigens, which may facilitate antibody-based pharmacodelivery strategies. Thrombospondin-1 and thrombospondin-2 are homologous secreted proteins, which have previously been reported to be overexpressed during remodeling typical for wound healing and tumor progression and to possibly play a functional role in cell proliferation, migration and apoptosis. To our knowledge, a complete immunohistochemical characterization of thrombospondins levels in normal rodent tissues has not been reported so far. Using antibody phage technology, we have generated and characterized monoclonal antibodies specific to murine thrombospondin-1 and thrombospondin-2, two antigens which share 62% aminoacid identity. An immunofluorescence analysis revealed that both antigens are virtually undetectable in normal mouse tissues, except for a weak staining of heart tissue by antibodies specific to thrombospondin-1. The analysis also showed that thrombospondin-1 was strongly expressed in 5/7 human tumors xenografted in nude mice, while it was only barely detectable in 3/8 murine tumors grafted in immunocompetent mice. By contrast, a high-affinity antibody to thrombospondin-2 revealed a much lower level of expression of this antigen in cancer specimens. Our analysis resolves ambiguities related to conflicting reports on thrombosponding expression in health and disease. Based on our findings, thrombospondin-1 (and not thrombospondin-2) may be considered as a target for antibody-based pharmacodelivery strategies, in consideration of its low expression in normal tissues and its upregulation in cancer. - Highlights: • High affinity monoclonal antibodies to murine and human TSP1 and 2 were raised. • Both antigens are virtually undetectable in normal mouse tissues. • Strong positivity of human tumor xenografts for TSP1 was detected. • Study revealed much lower level of TSP2 expression in cancer specimens

  4. Protective role of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α-dependent CD39 and CD73 in fulminant acute liver failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tak, Eunyoung [Asan Institute for Life Sciences and Asan-Minnesota Institute for Innovating Transplantation, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Dong-Hwan; Kim, Seok-Hwan; Park, Gil-Chun [Division of Liver Transplantation and Hepatobiliary Surgery, Asan-Minnesota Institute for Innovating Transplantation, Department of Surgery, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jun, Dae Young; Lee, Jooyoung [Asan Institute for Life Sciences and Asan-Minnesota Institute for Innovating Transplantation, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Bo-hyun [Department of Surgery, Inje University Haeundae Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kirchner, Varvara A. [Division of Transplantation, Department of Surgery and Asan-Minnesota Institute for Innovating Transplantation, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Hwang, Shin [Division of Liver Transplantation and Hepatobiliary Surgery, Asan-Minnesota Institute for Innovating Transplantation, Department of Surgery, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Song, Gi-Won, E-mail: drsong71@amc.seoul.kr [Division of Liver Transplantation and Hepatobiliary Surgery, Asan-Minnesota Institute for Innovating Transplantation, Department of Surgery, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sung-Gyu [Division of Liver Transplantation and Hepatobiliary Surgery, Asan-Minnesota Institute for Innovating Transplantation, Department of Surgery, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-01-01

    Acute liver failure (ALF) is a severe life-threatening disease which usually arises in patients with-irreversible liver illnesses. Although human ectonucleotide triphosphate diphosphohydrolase-1, E-NTPDase1 (CD39) and ecto-5′-nucleotidase, Ecto5′NTase (CD73) are known to protect tissues from ALF, the expression and function of CD39 and CD73 during ALF are currently not fully investigated. We tested whether CD39 and CD73 are upregulated by hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1α, and improve ischemic tolerance to ALF. To test our hypothesis, liver biopsies were obtained and we found that CD39 and CD73 mRNA and proteins from human specimens were dramatically elevated in ALF. We investigated that induction of CD39 and CD73 in ALF-related with wild type mice. In contrast, deletion of cd39 and cd73 mice has severe ALF. In this study, we concluded that CD39 and CD73 are molecular targets for the development of drugs for ALF patients care. - Highlights: • HIF-1a is stabilized during acute liver failure • Upregulation of CD39 and CD73 following acute liver failure • CD39 and CD73 are transcriptionally induced by HIF-1a • Deletion of Cd39 and CD73 aggravates murine acute liver failure • DMOG treatment induces HIF-1a stabilization, CD39 and CD73 during acute liver failure in WT mice.

  5. GP2 is selectively expressed by small intestinal CD103+CD11b+ cDC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller-Luda, Katarzyna; Ahmadi, Fatemeh; Ohno, Hiroshi

    DC in the small intestine. Moreover, GP2 expressing cDC in the small intestine were dramatically reduced in the setting of intestinal inflammation. We have previously shown that mice with an IRF4 deletion in CD11c+ cells (Cd11c-cre.Irf4 fl/fl mice) have reduced numbers of small intestinal CD103+CD11b+ c......DC. Interesting, we found that GP2+ CD103+CD11b+ cDC were dramatically reduced in these mice. Finally, to address the in vivo role of GP2 expression by cDC, we have generated mice with a selective deletion of GP2 in CD103+CD11b+ cDC (huLangerin-cre.gp2 fl/fl  mice). Results from these ongoing studies...

  6. Expression of Kirsten murine sarcoma virus sequences in Beagle dog tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerkof, P.R.; Kelly, G.

    1988-01-01

    Labeled cDNA synthesized from RNA extracted from 238 PuO 2 -, 239 PuO 2 -, and 90 Sr-induced lung tumors in Beagle dogs, from nontumor tissue from 239 PuO 2 -exposed dogs, and from unexposed dog lung and liver tissue produces strong hybridization signals with a plasmid (pKSma) that contains Kirsten murine sarcoma virus (KMSV) sequences. At least 90 percent of the KMSV sequences are expressed in these dog tissues, including sequences corresponding to p21 K-ras, qp70 envelope glycoprotein, and at least one other proviral sequence. The expression of Kirsten ras and other sarcoma virus sequences may have important implications for the interpretation of carcinogenesis studies in these dogs. (author)

  7. Molecular characterization and expression profiling of cd-responsive genes in triticum durum

    OpenAIRE

    Cebeci, Özge; Cebeci, Ozge

    2006-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a toxic heavy metal which has detrimental effects both in plants and human. There is a lack of knowledge on the molecular mechanisms of Cd toxicity in crop plants. The objective of this study was to identify and clone expressed Cd-responsive genes from two Triticum durum cvs. Balcah-85 and Balcah-2000 using mRNA differential display technique. We identified 10 cDNA clones whose level of expression significantly changed upon Cd exposure and thus isolated for further characteriz...

  8. CD36 is involved in oleic acid detection by the murine olfactory system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja eOberland

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Olfactory signals influence food intake in a variety of species. To maximize the chances of finding a source of calories, an animal’s preference for fatty foods and triglycerides already becomes apparent during olfactory food search behavior. However, the molecular identity of both receptors and ligands mediating olfactory-dependent fatty acid recognition are, so far, undescribed. We here describe that a subset of olfactory sensory neurons expresses the fatty acid receptor CD36 and demonstrate a receptor-like localization of CD36 in olfactory cilia by STED microscopy. CD36-positive olfactory neurons share olfaction-specific transduction elements and project to numerous glomeruli in the ventral olfactory bulb. In accordance with the described roles of CD36 as fatty acid receptor or co-receptor in other sensory systems, the number of olfactory neurons responding to oleic acid, a major milk component, in Ca2+ imaging experiments is drastically reduced in young CD36 knock-out mice. Strikingly, we also observe marked age-dependent changes in CD36 localization, which is prominently present in the ciliary compartment only during the suckling period. Our results support the involvement of CD36 in fatty acid detection by the mammalian olfactory system.

  9. Local IL-23 expression in murine vaginal candidiasis and its relationship with infection and immune status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yan; Tan, Zhijian; Liu, Zhixiang; Xia, Dechao; Li, Jiawen

    2006-01-01

    To investigate the expression of vaginal IL-23 and its role in experimental murine vaginal candidiasis and its relationship with infection and immune status, immuno-competent (group A) and immuno-suppressed (group B) murine models of vaginal candidiasis were established in estrogen-treated mice. Non-estrogen-treated mice were used as controls (group C). The level of IL-23 p19 mRNA in murine vaginal tissue was determined by RT-PCR. Significantly increased levels of IL-23p19mRNA were observed on the 4th, the 7th and 14th day after inoculation in immuno-competent group when compared with that in control group (Pvaginal candidiasis and has a protective function during infection. Low vaginal IL-23 level may correlate with the increased susceptibility to Candida albicans in immuno-suppressed group.

  10. Expression of CD44v6 and Its Association with Prognosis in Epithelial Ovarian Carcinomas

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    Dang-xia Zhou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate CD44v6 protein expression and its prognostic value of CD44v6 in ovarian carcinoma. The expression of CD44v6 was analyzed in 62 patients with ovarian carcinoma by immunohistochemical method. The data obtained were analyzed by univariate and multivariate analyses. The present study clearly demonstrates that tumor tissues from 41 (66.1% patients showed positive expression with CD44v6. The expression of CD44v6 was significantly correlated with histological type, FIGO stage and histological grade of ovarian carcinomas. Concerning the prognosis, the survival period of patients with CD44v6 positive was shorter than that of patients with CD44v6 negative (36.6% versus 66.7%, 5-year survival, P<0.05. Univariate analysis showed that CD44v6 expression, histological type, FIGO stage and histological grade were associated with 5-year survival, and CD44v6 expression was associated with histological type, FIGO stage and histological grade and 5-year survival. In multivariate analysis, using the COX-regression model, CD44v6 expression was important prognostic factor. In conclusion, these results suggest that CD44v6 may be related to histological type, FIGO stage and histological grade of ovarian carcinomas, and CD44v6 may be an important molecular marker for poor prognosis in ovarian carcinomas.

  11. The role of CD154-CD40 versus CD28-B7 costimulatory pathways in regulating allogeneic Th1 and Th2 responses in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kishimoto, K; Dong, V M; Issazadeh-Navikas, Shohreh

    2000-01-01

    We used signal transducer and activator of transcription 4 (STAT4) and STAT6 gene knockout (-/-) mice as recipients of fully mismatched cardiac allografts to study the role of T-cell costimulatory pathways in regulating allogeneic T-helper 1 (Th1) versus Th2 responses in vivo. STAT4(-/-) mice have...... impaired Th1 responses, whereas STAT6(-/-) mice do not generate normal Th2 responses. Cardiac allografts from C57BL/6 mice were transplanted into normal wild-type (WT), STAT4(-/-), and STAT6(-/-) BALB/c recipients. STAT4(-/-) and STAT6(-/-) mice rejected their grafts with the same tempo as untreated WT....... Furthermore, there was a similar differential effect of CD28-B7 versus CD154-CD40 blockade in inhibiting immune responses in animals immunized with ovalbumin and complete Freund's adjuvant. These novel data indicate that Th1 and Th2 cells are differentially regulated by CD28-B7 versus CD154-CD40 costimulation...

  12. CD4+ T cell-mediated cytotoxicity is associated with MHC class II expression on malignant CD19+ B cells in diffuse large B cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yong; Zha, Jie; Lin, Zhijuan; Fang, Zhihong; Zeng, Hanyan; Zhao, Jintao; Luo, Yiming; Li, Zhifeng; Xu, Bing

    2018-01-15

    Diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is a common B cell malignancy with approximately 30% of patients present relapsed or refractory disease after first-line therapy. Research of further treatment options is needed. Cytotoxic CD4 + T cells express cytolytic molecules and have potential antitumor function. Here, we showed that the CD19 + cells from DLBCL patients presented significantly reduced expression of MHC II molecules than those from healthy controls. Three years after the first-line treatment, patients that presented relapsed disease had significantly lower MHC II expression on their CD19 + cells than patients who did not show recurrence. Examining cytotoxic CD4 + T cells show that DLBCL patients presented significantly elevated frequencies of granzyme A-, granzyme B-, and/or perforin-expressing cytotoxic CD4 + T cells. Also, frequency of cytotoxic CD4 + T cells in DLBCL patients was positively correlated with the MHC II expression level. Subsequently, the cytotoxic potential of CD4 + T cells against autologous CD19 + cells was investigated. We found that the cytotoxic potential of CD4 + T cells was highest in MHC II-high, intermediate in MHC II-mid, and lowest in MHC II-low patients. The percentage of MHC II-expressing viable CD19 + cells presented a significant reduction after longer incubation with cytotoxic CD4 + T cells, suggesting that cytotoxic CD4 + T cells preferentially eliminated MHC II-expressing CD19 + cells. Blocking MHC II on CD19 + cells significantly reduced the cytolytic capacity of CD4 + T cells. Despite these discoveries, the frequency of cytotoxic CD4 + T cells did not predict the clinical outcome of DLBCL patients. Together, these results demonstrated that cytotoxic CD4 + T cells presented an MHC II-dependent cytotoxic potential against autologous CD19 + cells and could potentially represent a future treatment option for DLBCL. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Polyclonal T-cells express CD1a in Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH lesions.

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    Jennifer A West

    Full Text Available Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH is a complex and poorly understood disorder that has characteristics of both inflammatory and neoplastic disease. By using eight-colour flow cytometry, we have identified a previously unreported population of CD1a(+/CD3(+ T-cells in LCH lesions. The expression of CD1a is regarded as a hallmark of this disease; however, it has always been presumed that it was only expressed by pathogenic Langerhans cells (LCs. We have now detected CD1a expression by a range of T-cell subsets within all of the LCH lesions that were examined, establishing that CD1a expression in these lesions is no longer restricted to pathogenic LCs. The presence of CD1a(+ T-cells in all of the LCH lesions that we have studied to date warrants further investigation into their biological function to determine whether these cells are important in the pathogenesis of LCH.

  14. Genome-wide expression profiling analysis to identify key genes in the anti-HIV mechanism of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lijie; Wang, Yunqi; Li, Yi; Dong, Ya; Yang, Aimin; Zhang, Jie; Li, Fengying; Zhang, Rongqiang

    2018-07-01

    Comprehensive bioinformatics analyses were performed to explore the key biomarkers in response to HIV infection of CD4 + and CD8 + T cells. The numbers of CD4 + and CD8 + T cells of HIV infected individuals were analyzed and the GEO database (GSE6740) was screened for differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in HIV infected CD4 + and CD8 + T cells. Gene Ontology enrichment, KEGG pathway analyses, and protein-protein interaction (PPI) network were performed to identify the key pathway and core proteins in anti-HIV virus process of CD4 + and CD8 + T cells. Finally, we analyzed the expressions of key proteins in HIV-infected T cells (GSE6740 dataset) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells(PBMCs) (GSE511 dataset). 1) CD4 + T cells counts and ratio of CD4 + /CD8 + T cells decreased while CD8 + T cells counts increased in HIV positive individuals; 2) 517 DEGs were found in HIV infected CD4 + and CD8 + T cells at acute and chronic stage with the criterial of P-value T cells. The main biological processes of the DEGs were response to virus and defense response to virus. At chronic stage, ISG15 protein, in conjunction with IFN-1 pathway might play key roles in anti-HIV responses of CD4 + T cells; and 4) The expression of ISG15 increased in both T cells and PBMCs after HIV infection. Gene expression profile of CD4 + and CD8 + T cells changed significantly in HIV infection, in which ISG15 gene may play a central role in activating the natural antiviral process of immune cells. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Clonorchis sinensis-derived total protein attenuates airway inflammation in murine asthma model by inducing regulatory T cells and modulating dendritic cell functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Young-Il; Kim, Seung Hyun; Ju, Jung Won; Cho, Shin Hyeong; Lee, Won Ja; Park, Jin Wook; Park, Yeong-Min; Lee, Sang Eun

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Treatment with Clonorchis sinensis-derived total protein attenuates OVA-induced airway inflammation and AHR to methacholine. → Induction of CD4 + CD25 + Foxp3 + T cells and IL-10 along with suppression of splenocyte proliferation by C. sinensis-derived total protein. → C. sinensis-derived total protein interferes with the expression of co-stimulatory molecules in DCs. -- Abstract: Asthma is characterized by Th2-mediated inflammation, resulting in airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) through airway remodeling. Recent epidemiological and experimental reports have suggested an inverse relationship between the development of allergy and helminth infections. Infection by Clonorchis sinensis, a liver fluke that resides in the bile duct of humans, is endemic predominantly in Asia including Korea and China. Using a murine model for asthma, we investigated the effects of C. sinensis-derived total protein (Cs-TP) on allergen-induced airway inflammation and the mechanism underlying the protective effects of Cs-TP administration on asthma. Treatment with Cs-TP attenuated OVA-induced airway inflammation and methacholine-induced AHR, as well as eosinophilia development, lymphocyte infiltration into the lung, and goblet cell metaplasia. This protective effect of Cs-TP is associated with markedly reduced OVA-specific IgE and Th1/Th2 cytokine production. Moreover, Cs-TP increased the number of CD4 + CD25 + Foxp3 + regulatory T (Treg) cells as well as their suppressive activity. In fact, proliferation of OVA-restimulated splenocytes was suppressed significantly. Cs-TP also inhibited the expression of such co-stimulatory molecules as CD80, CD86, and CD40 in LPS- or OVA-stimulated dendritic cells (DCs), suggesting that Cs-TP could interfere with the capacity of airway DCs to prime naive T cells. These data demonstrate the capacity of C. sinensis to ameliorate allergic asthma and broaden our understanding of the paradoxical relationship between the allergic immune

  16. Expression analysis of asthma candidate genes during human and murine lung development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melén, Erik; Kho, Alvin T; Sharma, Sunita; Gaedigk, Roger; Leeder, J Steven; Mariani, Thomas J; Carey, Vincent J; Weiss, Scott T; Tantisira, Kelan G

    2011-06-23

    Little is known about the role of most asthma susceptibility genes during human lung development. Genetic determinants for normal lung development are not only important early in life, but also for later lung function. To investigate the role of expression patterns of well-defined asthma susceptibility genes during human and murine lung development. We hypothesized that genes influencing normal airways development would be over-represented by genes associated with asthma. Asthma genes were first identified via comprehensive search of the current literature. Next, we analyzed their expression patterns in the developing human lung during the pseudoglandular (gestational age, 7-16 weeks) and canalicular (17-26 weeks) stages of development, and in the complete developing lung time series of 3 mouse strains: A/J, SW, C57BL6. In total, 96 genes with association to asthma in at least two human populations were identified in the literature. Overall, there was no significant over-representation of the asthma genes among genes differentially expressed during lung development, although trends were seen in the human (Odds ratio, OR 1.22, confidence interval, CI 0.90-1.62) and C57BL6 mouse (OR 1.41, CI 0.92-2.11) data. However, differential expression of some asthma genes was consistent in both developing human and murine lung, e.g. NOD1, EDN1, CCL5, RORA and HLA-G. Among the asthma genes identified in genome wide association studies, ROBO1, RORA, HLA-DQB1, IL2RB and PDE10A were differentially expressed during human lung development. Our data provide insight about the role of asthma susceptibility genes during lung development and suggest common mechanisms underlying lung morphogenesis and pathogenesis of respiratory diseases.

  17. Gliadin stimulation of murine macrophage inflammatory gene expression and intestinal permeability are MyD88-dependent: role of the innate immune response in Celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Karen E; Sapone, Anna; Fasano, Alessio; Vogel, Stefanie N

    2006-02-15

    Recent studies have demonstrated the importance of TLR signaling in intestinal homeostasis. Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune enteropathy triggered in susceptible individuals by the ingestion of gliadin-containing grains. In this study, we sought to test the hypothesis that gliadin initiates this response by stimulating the innate immune response to increase intestinal permeability and by up-regulating macrophage proinflammatory gene expression and cytokine production. To this end, intestinal permeability and the release of zonulin (an endogenous mediator of gut permeability) in vitro, as well as proinflammatory gene expression and cytokine release by primary murine macrophage cultures, were measured. Gliadin and its peptide derivatives, 33-mer and p31-43, were found to be potent inducers of both a zonulin-dependent increase in intestinal permeability and macrophage proinflammatory gene expression and cytokine secretion. Gliadin-induced zonulin release, increased intestinal permeability, and cytokine production were dependent on myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88), a key adapter molecule in the TLR/IL-1R signaling pathways, but were neither TLR2- nor TLR4-dependent. Our data support the following model for the innate immune response to gliadin in the initiation of CD. Gliadin interaction with the intestinal epithelium increases intestinal permeability through the MyD88-dependent release of zonulin that, in turn, enables paracellular translocation of gliadin and its subsequent interaction with macrophages within the intestinal submucosa. There, the interaction of gliadin with macrophages elicits a MyD88-dependent proinflammatory cytokine milieu that facilitates the interaction of T cells with APCs, leading ultimately to the Ag-specific adaptive immune response seen in patients with CD.

  18. In Vivo Murine-Matured Human CD3+ Cells as a Preclinical Model for T Cell-Based Immunotherapies

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    Kevin G. Haworth

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Adoptive cellular immunotherapy is a promising and powerful method for the treatment of a broad range of malignant and infectious diseases. Although the concept of cellular immunotherapy was originally proposed in the 1990s, it has not seen successful clinical application until recent years. Despite significant progress in creating engineered receptors against both malignant and viral epitopes, no efficient preclinical animal models exist for rapidly testing and directly comparing these engineered receptors. The use of matured human T cells in mice usually leads to graft-versus-host disease (GvHD, which severely limits the effectiveness of such studies. Alternatively, adult apheresis CD34+ cells engraft in neonatal non-obese diabetic (NOD-severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-common γ chain–/– (NSG mice and lead to the development of CD3+ T cells in peripheral circulation. We demonstrate that these in vivo murine-matured autologous CD3+ T cells from humans (MATCH can be collected from the mice, engineered with lentiviral vectors, reinfused into the mice, and detected in multiple lymphoid compartments at stable levels over 50 days after injection. Unlike autologous CD3+ cells collected from human donors, these MATCH mice did not exhibit GvHD after T cell administration. This novel mouse model offers the opportunity to screen different immunotherapy-based treatments in a preclinical setting.

  19. Cellular endocytic compartment localization of expressed canine CD1 molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjærff, Mette; Keller, Stefan M.; Affolter, Verena K.

    2016-01-01

    CD1 molecules are glycoproteins present primarily on dendritic cells (DCs), which recognize and presenta variety of foreign- and self-lipid antigens to T-cells. Humans have five different CD1 isoforms that sur-vey distinct cellular compartments allowing for recognition of a large repertoire...... onlya diminished GFP expression. In conclusion, canine CD1 transfectants show distinct localization patternsthat are similar to human CD1 proteins with the exception of the canine CD1d isoform, which most likelyis non-functional. These findings imply that canine CD1 localization overall resembles human...... CD1 traf-ficking patterns. This knowledge is important for the understanding of lipid antigen-receptor immunityin the dog....

  20. CD38+ M-MDSC expansion characterizes a subset of advanced colorectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakasheva, Tatiana A; Dominguez, George A; Hashimoto, Ayumi; Lin, Eric W; Chiu, Christopher; Sasser, Kate; Lee, Jae W; Beatty, Gregory L; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I; Rustgi, Anil K

    2018-03-22

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are a population of immature immune cells with several protumorigenic functions. CD38 is a transmembrane receptor-ectoenzyme expressed by MDSCs in murine models of esophageal cancer. We hypothesized that CD38 could be expressed on MDSCs in human colorectal cancer (CRC), which might allow for a new perspective on therapeutic targeting of human MDSCs with anti-CD38 monoclonal antibodies in this cancer. Blood samples were collected from 41 CRC patients and 8 healthy donors, followed by peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) separation. Polymorphonuclear (PMN-) and monocytic (M-) MDSCs and CD38 expression levels were quantified by flow cytometry. The immunosuppressive capacity of M-MDSCs from 10 CRC patients was validated in a mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) assay. A significant expansion of CD38+ M-MDSCs and a trend of expansion of CD38+ PMN-MDSCs (accompanied by a trend of increased CD38 expression on both M- and PMN-MDSCs) were observed in PBMCs of CRC patients when compared with healthy donors. The CD38+ M-MDSCs from CRC patients were found to be immunosuppressive when compared with mature monocytes. CD38+ M- and PMN-MDSC frequencies were significantly higher in CRC patients who previously received treatment when compared with treatment-naive patients. This study provides a rationale for an attempt to target M-MDSCs with an anti-CD38 monoclonal antibody in metastatic CRC patients. NCI P01-CA14305603, the American Cancer Society, Scott and Suzi Lustgarten Family Colon Cancer Research Fund, Hansen Foundation, and Janssen Research and Development.

  1. CD4(+) T cell-mediated protection against a lethal outcome of systemic infection with vesicular stomatitis virus requires CD40 ligand expression, but not IFN-gamma or IL-4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, C; Jensen, T; Nansen, A

    1999-01-01

    experiments using B cell- and T cell-deficient recipients revealed that no protection could be obtained in the absence of B cells, whereas treatment with virus-specific immune (IgG) serum controlled viral spreading to the central nervous system (CNS), but did not necessarily accomplish virus elimination......To investigate the mechanism(s) whereby T cells protect against a lethal outcome of systemic infection with vesicular stomatitis virus, mice with targeted defects in genes central to T cell function were tested for resistance to i.v. infection with this virus. Our results show that mice lacking...... the capacity to secrete both IFN-gamma and perforin completely resisted disease. Similar results were obtained using IL-4 knockout mice, indicating that neither cell-mediated nor T(h)2-dependent effector systems were required. In contrast, mice deficient in expression of CD40 ligand were more susceptible than...

  2. Local expression of vaginal Th1 and Th2 cytokines in murine vaginal candidiasis under different immunity conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shanjuan; Li, Shaohua; Wu, Yan; Liu, Zhixiang; Li, Jiawen

    2008-08-01

    To investigate the expression of vaginal Th1 and Th2 cytokines in rats with experimental vaginal candidiasis under different immune conditions, ICR murine vaginal candidiasis model was established and immno-suppressed murine models of vaginal cadidiasis were established in estrogen-treated mice. Non-estrogen-treated mice were used as controls. The mRNA level of Th1 (IL-2)/Th2 (IL-4, IL-10, TGF-beta1) cytokines in murine vaginal tissues was determined by RT-PCR. The cykotine in local tissues was increased to different extent under normal immune condition. IL-2 mRNA was increased during early stage of infection, while IL-10 was increased transiently during late stage of infection. TGF-beta1 production was found to be increased persistently. At same time, the expression of IL-2 mRNA was suppressed in immno-suppressed group, and the level of IL-4, IL-10, and TGF-beta1 were higher than the normal immunity group to different degree during infection. The high level of IL-2 mRNA during early stage of infection was associated with clearance of mucosal Candidia albicans (C. albicans), and its expression suppressed leading to decreased clearance of mucosal C. albican in immuno-suppression. The over-expression of IL-4 and IL-10 could significantly enhance the susceptibility to C. albicans infection in mice.

  3. Co-expression of TIMP-1 and its cell surface binding partner CD63 in glioblastomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aaberg-Jessen, Charlotte; Sørensen, Mia D.; Matos, Ana L.S.A.

    2018-01-01

    scoring. CD63 expression in tumor-associated microglia/macrophages was examined by double-immunofluorescence with ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1 (Iba1). The association between CD63 and TIMP-1 was investigated using previously obtained TIMP-1 data from our astrocytoma cohort. Cellular co-expression...... of CD63 was widely distributed in astrocytomas with a significantly increased level in glioblastomas. CD63 levels did not significantly correlate with patient survival at a protein level, and CD63 did not augment the prognostic significance of TIMP-1. Up to 38% of the CD63+ cells expressed Iba1; however......, Iba1 did not appear to impact the prognostic value of CD63. A significant correlation was found between TIMP-1 and CD63, and the TIMP-1 and CD63 proteins were co-expressed at the cellular level and located in close molecular proximity, suggesting that TIMP-1 and CD63 could be co...

  4. Auditory stimulation of opera music induced prolongation of murine cardiac allograft survival and maintained generation of regulatory CD4+CD25+ cells

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    Uchiyama Masateru

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interactions between the immune response and brain functions such as olfactory, auditory, and visual sensations are likely. This study investigated the effect of sounds on alloimmune responses in a murine model of cardiac allograft transplantation. Methods Naïve CBA mice (H2k underwent transplantation of a C57BL/6 (B6, H2b heart and were exposed to one of three types of music--opera (La Traviata, classical (Mozart, and New Age (Enya--or one of six different single sound frequencies, for 7 days. Additionally, we prepared two groups of CBA recipients with tympanic membrane perforation exposed to opera for 7 days and CBA recipients exposed to opera for 7 days before transplantation (pre-treatment. An adoptive transfer study was performed to determine whether regulatory cells were generated in allograft recipients. Immunohistochemical, cell-proliferation, cytokine, and flow cytometry assessments were also performed. Results CBA recipients of a B6 cardiac graft that were exposed to opera music and Mozart had significantly prolonged allograft survival (median survival times [MSTs], 26.5 and 20 days, respectively, whereas those exposed to a single sound frequency (100, 500, 1000, 5000, 10,000, or 20,000 Hz or Enya did not (MSTs, 7.5, 8, 9, 8, 7.5, 8.5 and 11 days, respectively. Untreated, CBA mice with tympanic membrane perforations and CBA recipients exposed to opera for 7 days before transplantation (pre-treatment rejected B6 cardiac grafts acutely (MSTs, 7, 8 and 8 days, respectively. Adoptive transfer of whole splenocytes, CD4+ cells, or CD4+CD25+ cells from opera-exposed primary allograft recipients resulted in significantly prolonged allograft survival in naive secondary recipients (MSTs, 36, 68, and > 100 days, respectively. Proliferation of splenocytes, interleukin (IL-2 and interferon (IFN-γ production was suppressed in opera-exposed mice, and production of IL-4 and IL-10 from opera-exposed transplant recipients increased

  5. Changes in Soluble CD18 in Murine Autoimmune Arthritis and Rheumatoid Arthritis Reflect Disease Establishment and Treatment Response.

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    Tue Wenzel Kragstrup

    Full Text Available In rheumatoid arthritis (RA immune activation and presence of autoantibodies may precede clinical onset of disease, and joint destruction can progress despite remission. However, the underlying temporal changes of such immune system abnormalities in the inflammatory response during treat-to-target strategies remain poorly understood. We have previously reported low levels of the soluble form of CD18 (sCD18 in plasma from patients with chronic RA and spondyloarthritis. Here, we study the changes of sCD18 before and during treatment of early RA and following arthritis induction in murine models of rheumatoid arthritis.The level of sCD18 was analyzed with a time-resolved immunoflourometric assay in 1 plasma from early treatment naïve RA patients during a treat-to-target strategy (the OPERA cohort, 2 plasma from chronic RA patients, 3 serum from SKG and CIA mice following arthritis induction, and 4 supernatants from synovial fluid mononuclear cells (SFMCs and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs from 6 RA patients cultured with TNFα or adalimumab.Plasma levels of sCD18 were decreased in chronic RA patients compared with early RA patients and in early RA patients compared with healthy controls. After 12 months of treatment the levels in early RA patients were similar to healthy controls. This normalization of plasma sCD18 levels was more pronounced in patients with very early disease who achieved an early ACR response. Plasma sCD18 levels were associated with radiographic progression. Correspondingly, the serum level of sCD18 was decreased in SKG mice 6 weeks after arthritis induction compared with healthy littermates. The sCD18 levels in both SKG and CIA mice exhibited a biphasic course after arthritis induction with an initial increase above baseline followed by a decline. Shedding of CD18 from RA SFMC and RA PBMC cultures was increased by TNFα and decreased by adalimumab.The plasma sCD18 levels were altered in patients with RA, in mice

  6. Differential expression of CD10 in prostate cancer and its clinical implication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall'Era, Marc A; True, Lawrence D; Siegel, Andrew F; Porter, Michael P; Sherertz, Tracy M; Liu, Alvin Y

    2007-01-01

    Background CD10 is a transmembrane metallo-endopeptidase that cleaves and inactivates a variety of peptide growth factors. Loss of CD10 expression is a common, early event in human prostate cancer; however, CD10 positive cancer cells frequently appear in lymph node metastasis. We hypothesize that prostate tumors expressing high levels of CD10 have a more aggressive biology with an early propensity towards lymph node metastasis. Methods Eighty-seven patients, 53 with and 34 without pathologically organ confined prostate cancer at the time of radical prostatectomy (RP), were used for the study. Fourteen patients with lymph node metastasis found at the time of surgery were identified and included in this study. Serial sections from available frozen tumor specimens in OCT were processed for CD10 immunohistochemistry. Cancer glands were graded for the presence and intensity of CD10 staining, and overall percentage of glands staining positive was estimated. Clinical characteristics including pre- and post-operative PSA and Gleason score were obtained. A similar study as a control for the statistical analysis was performed with CD13 staining. For statistical analysis, strong staining was defined as > 20% positivity based on the observed maximum separation of the cumulative distributions. Results CD10 expression significantly correlated with Gleason grade, tumor stage, and with pre-operative serum PSA. Seventy percent of RP specimens from patients with node metastasis showed strong staining for CD10, compared to 30% in the entire cohort (OR = 3.4, 95% CI: 1.08–10.75, P = 0.019). Increased staining for CD10 was associated with PSA recurrence after RP. CD13 staining did not correlate significantly with any of these same clinical parameters. Conclusion These results suggest that the expression of CD10 by prostate cancer corresponds to a more aggressive phenotype with a higher malignant potential, described histologically by the Gleason score. CD10 offers potential clinical

  7. Differential expression of CD10 in prostate cancer and its clinical implication

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    Porter Michael P

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CD10 is a transmembrane metallo-endopeptidase that cleaves and inactivates a variety of peptide growth factors. Loss of CD10 expression is a common, early event in human prostate cancer; however, CD10 positive cancer cells frequently appear in lymph node metastasis. We hypothesize that prostate tumors expressing high levels of CD10 have a more aggressive biology with an early propensity towards lymph node metastasis. Methods Eighty-seven patients, 53 with and 34 without pathologically organ confined prostate cancer at the time of radical prostatectomy (RP, were used for the study. Fourteen patients with lymph node metastasis found at the time of surgery were identified and included in this study. Serial sections from available frozen tumor specimens in OCT were processed for CD10 immunohistochemistry. Cancer glands were graded for the presence and intensity of CD10 staining, and overall percentage of glands staining positive was estimated. Clinical characteristics including pre- and post-operative PSA and Gleason score were obtained. A similar study as a control for the statistical analysis was performed with CD13 staining. For statistical analysis, strong staining was defined as > 20% positivity based on the observed maximum separation of the cumulative distributions. Results CD10 expression significantly correlated with Gleason grade, tumor stage, and with pre-operative serum PSA. Seventy percent of RP specimens from patients with node metastasis showed strong staining for CD10, compared to 30% in the entire cohort (OR = 3.4, 95% CI: 1.08–10.75, P = 0.019. Increased staining for CD10 was associated with PSA recurrence after RP. CD13 staining did not correlate significantly with any of these same clinical parameters. Conclusion These results suggest that the expression of CD10 by prostate cancer corresponds to a more aggressive phenotype with a higher malignant potential, described histologically by the Gleason score. CD10

  8. Production of multiple transgenic Yucatan miniature pigs expressing human complement regulatory factors, human CD55, CD59, and H-transferase genes.

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    Young-Hee Jeong

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to generate transgenic pigs coexpressing human CD55, CD59, and H-transferase (HT using an IRES-mediated polycistronic vector. The study focused on hyperacute rejection (HAR when considering clinical xenotransplantation as an alternative source for human organ transplants. In total, 35 transgenic cloned piglets were produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT and were confirmed for genomic integration of the transgenes from umbilical cord samples by PCR analysis. Eighteen swine umbilical vein endothelial cells (SUVEC were isolated from umbilical cord veins freshly obtained from the piglets. We observed a higher expression of transgenes in the transgenic SUVEC (Tg SUVEC compared with the human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC. Among these genes, HT and hCD59 were expressed at a higher level in the tested Tg organs compared with non-Tg control organs, but there was no difference in hCD55 expression between them. The transgenes in various organs of the Tg clones revealed organ-specific and spatial expression patterns. Using from 0 to 50% human serum solutions, we performed human complement-mediated cytolysis assays. The results showed that, overall, the Tg SUVEC tested had greater survival rates than did the non-Tg SUVEC, and the Tg SUVEC with higher HT expression levels tended to have more down-regulated α-Gal epitope expression, resulting in greater protection against cytotoxicity. By contrast, several Tg SUVEC with low CD55 expression exhibited a decreased resistance response to cytolysis. These results indicated that the levels of HT expression were inversely correlated with the levels of α-Gal epitope expression and that the combined expression of hCD55, hCD59, and HT proteins in SUVECs markedly enhances a protective response to human serum-mediated cytolysis. Taken together, these results suggest that combining a polycistronic vector system with SCNT methods provides a fast and efficient alternative

  9. CLA and CD62E expression in oral lichen planus lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werneck, Juliana Tristão; Dias, Eliane Pedra; Gonçalves, Lucio Souza; Silva Junior, Arley

    2016-03-01

    There are few reports on the migration of CLA+ T cells through E-selectin in cutaneous lichen planus, with only one study on oral lichen planus (OLP). This study aimed to analyze CLA expression and assess whether there is a correlation with E-selectin (CD62E) in OLP lesions. Biopsies were performed on 11 patients including two areas: one without clinical and histopathological features of OLP [perilesional group (PLG)] and the other with clinical and histopathological features of OLP [OLP group (OLPG)]. The specimens obtained were divided into two: One was fixed in formalin for routine analysis (H&E), and the other was frozen for CD3, CD4, CD8, CLA, and CD62E immunofluorescence markers. More CD4+ (median 1409, range 860-2519), CD8+ (median 1568, range 654-3258), and CLA+ T cells (median 958, range 453-2198) and higher CD62E expression (median 37, range 27-85) were identified in OLPG (P = 0.003; P = 0.003; P = 0.004; P = 0.003, respectively) than those in PLG. The median prevalence analysis was also significantly higher for CLA+CD8+ T cells in OLPG (OLPG = 39.4%, range 18.4-64.2; PLG = 29.4%, range 12.1-47.1) (P = 0.026). None of the correlations between CD3+ or CLA+ T cells and CD62E in OLPG and in PLG were significant. The significant presence of CLA+ T cells and E-selectin expressions in the OLPG suggests their involvement in the etiopathogenesis of OLP; however, only a weak correlation between CLA+ T cells and E-selectin was observed. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Immunomodulatory effects of royal jelly on aorta CD3, CD68 and eNOS expression in hypercholesterolaemic rats

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    Amal Attia El-Morsy Ibrahim

    2014-08-01

    RJ administration (300 mg/kg/day with CH, produced a counteractive effect, represented in recompense of biochemical alteration, CD4 and CD8 expression. RJ intake also amended the histological picture. The immunohistochemical picture revealed a decrease in CD3, CD86 and eNOS in the aortic tissue. These findings attributed to the significant immunomodulatory effect of RJ remedy suppress deleterious effects of hypercholesterolaemia.

  11. Expression of two isoforms of CD44 in human endometrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behzad, F; Seif, M W; Campbell, S; Aplin, J D

    1994-10-01

    The distribution of the cell-surface adhesion glycoprotein CD44 in human endometrium was examined by immunofluorescence using six monoclonal antibodies to epitopes common to all forms of the molecule, and by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Immunoreactivity was observed throughout the menstrual cycle in stroma, vessels, glandular, and luminal epithelium. Variations in staining intensity were observed, especially in the epithelial compartment. CD44 was also expressed strongly by decidualized stromal cells of first-trimester pregnancy. No systematic variation of immunoreactivity was observed with stages of the normal cycle, but a fraction (25%) of the specimens lacked reactivity in the epithelium. To determine the molecular size of the epithelial isoform, an immunoprecipitation technique was developed using surface-radioiodinated, detergent-extracted glands. This indicated the presence at the cell surface of a single dominant CD44E species with an approximate molecular mass of 130 kDa. RT-PCR was used to investigate the isoforms present in whole endometrial tissue, isolated gland fragments, and Ishikawa endometrial carcinoma cells. Complementary DNA produced from total endometrial mRNA was PCR-amplified across the splice junction between exons 5 and 15. Transcripts corresponding to the hyaluronate receptor CD44H as well as a larger isoform were identified. CD44H was absent, or very scarce, in cDNA from purified gland epithelium. In contrast, Ishikawa cells expressed this form abundantly. The glands and Ishikawa cells also expressed CD44E containing sequences encoded by exons 12, 13, and 14. These data demonstrate the presence of CD44 in human endometrium and decidua, and show that different isoforms of CD44 are associated with tissue compartments in which different functional roles can be anticipated.

  12. Expression of Kirsten murine sarcoma virus sequences in Beagle dog tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerkof, P R; Kelly, G

    1988-12-01

    Labeled cDNA synthesized from RNA extracted from {sup 238}PuO{sub 2}-, {sup 239}PuO{sub 2}-, and {sup 90}Sr-induced lung tumors in Beagle dogs, from nontumor tissue from {sup 239}PuO{sub 2}-exposed dogs, and from unexposed dog lung and liver tissue produces strong hybridization signals with a plasmid (pKSma) that contains Kirsten murine sarcoma virus (KMSV) sequences. At least 90 percent of the KMSV sequences are expressed in these dog tissues, including sequences corresponding to p21 K-ras, qp70 envelope glycoprotein, and at least one other proviral sequence. The expression of Kirsten ras and other sarcoma virus sequences may have important implications for the interpretation of carcinogenesis studies in these dogs. (author)

  13. Purification and characterization of recombinant full-length and protease domain of murine MMP-9 expressed in Drosophila S2 cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasch, Morten G; Lund, Ida K; Illemann, Martin

    2010-01-01

    MMP-9. Constructs encoding zymogens of full-length murine MMP-9 and a version lacking the O-glycosylated linker region and hemopexin domains were therefore generated and expressed in stably transfected Drosophila S2 insect cells. After 7 days of induction the expression levels of the full......-length and truncated versions were 5 mg/l and 2 mg/l, respectively. The products were >95% pure after gelatin Sepharose chromatography and possessed proteolytic activity when analyzed by gelatin zymography. Using the purified full-length murine MMP-9 we raised polyclonal antibodies by immunizations of rabbits......Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) is a 92-kDa soluble pro-enzyme implicated in pathological events including cancer invasion. It is therefore an attractive target for therapeutic intervention studies in mouse models. Development of inhibitors requires sufficient amounts of correctly folded murine...

  14. SEPTIN2 and STATHMIN Regulate CD99-Mediated Cellular Differentiation in Hodgkin's Lymphoma.

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    Wenjing Jian

    Full Text Available Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL is a lymphoid neoplasm characterized by Hodgkin's and Reed-Sternberg (H/RS cells, which is regulated by CD99. We previously reported that CD99 downregulation led to the transformation of murine B lymphoma cells (A20 into cells with an H/RS phenotype, while CD99 upregulation induced differentiation of classical Hodgkin's lymphoma (cHL cells (L428 into terminal B-cells. However, the molecular mechanism remains unclear. In this study, using fluorescence two-dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS, we have analyzed the alteration of protein expression following CD99 upregulation in L428 cells as well as downregulation of mouse CD99 antigen-like 2 (mCD99L2 in A20 cells. Bioinformatics analysis showed that SEPTIN2 and STATHMIN, which are cytoskeleton proteins, were significantly differentially expressed, and chosen for further validation and functional analysis. Differential expression of SEPTIN2 was found in both models and was inversely correlated with CD99 expression. STATHMIN was identified in the A20 cell line model and its expression was positively correlated with that of CD99. Importantly, silencing of SEPTIN2 with siRNA substantially altered the cellular cytoskeleton in L428 cells. The downregulation of STATHMIN by siRNA promoted the differentiation of H/RS cells toward terminal B-cells. These results suggest that SEPTIN2-mediated cytoskeletal rearrangement and STATHMIN-mediated differentiation may contribute to changes in cell morphology and differentiation of H/RS cells with CD99 upregulation in HL.

  15. Clonal analysis of the T-cell response to in vivo expressed Mycobacterium tuberculosis protein Rv2034, using a CD154 expression based T-cell cloning method.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna Commandeur

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB, caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb, remains a leading cause of death worldwide. A better understanding of the role of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, which are both important to TB protection, is essential to unravel the mechanisms of protection and to identify the key antigens seen by these T cells. We have recently identified a set of in vivo expressed Mtb genes (IVE-TB which is expressed during in vivo pulmonary infection in mice, and shown that their encoded antigens are potently recognized by polyclonal T cells from tuberculin skin test-positive, in vitro ESAT-6/CFP10-responsive individuals. Here we have cloned T cells specific for one of these newly identified in vivo expressed Mtb (IVE-TB antigens, Rv2034. T cells were enriched based on the expression of CD154 (CD40L, which represents a new method for selecting antigen-specific (low frequency T cells independent of their specific function. An Rv2034-specific CD4+ T-cell clone expressed the Th1 markers T-bet, IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-2 and the cytotoxicity related markers granzyme B and CD107a as measured by flow cytometry. The clone specifically recognized Rv2034 protein, Rv2034 peptide p81-100 and Mtb lysate. Remarkably, while the recognition of the dominant p81-100 epitope was HLA-DR restricted, the T-cell clone also recognized a neighboring epitope (p88-107 in an HLA-DR- as well as HLA-DQ1-restricted fashion. Importantly, the T-cell clone was able to inhibit Mtb outgrowth from infected monocytes significantly. The characterization of the polyfunctional and Mtb inhibitory T-cell response to IVE-TB Rv2034 at the clonal level provides detailed further insights into the potential of IVE-TB antigens as new vaccine candidate antigens in TB. Our new approach allowed the identification of T-cell subsets that likely play a significant role in controlling Mtb infection, and can be applied to the analysis of T-cell responses in patient populations.

  16. [Expression of homeobox gene Msx-1, Msx-2 and Dlx-2 during murine mandibular first molar development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Li; Chen, Zhi; Song, Guang-tai; Fan, Ming-wen; Zhang, Qi; Wang, Zhi-feng

    2003-11-01

    To observe the expression of homeobox gene Msx-1, Msx-2 and Dlx-2 during murine mandibular first molar development. The murine heads or mandibles on embryonic days 11-18 (E11-18) and postnatal day 1-3 (P1-3) were removed, fixed and embedded, 5 micro m serial sections were cut in the coronal plane. Msx-1, Msx-2 and Dlx-2 RNA probes were synthesized by in vitro transcription and labeled with digoxigenin. Msx-1, Msx-2 and Dlx-2 mRNA expression was observed after in situ hybridization. During molar development Msx-1 transcripts appeared only in mesenchymal cells, not in epithelial cells. Msx-2 and Dlx-2 both expressed in the epithelial and mesenchymal cells. At the initiation stage of the molar development Msx-2 and Dlx-2 had similar expression. At the bud stage (E13-14) Msx-2 mRNA signaling was intensive in the enamel organ and slight in the dental mesenchyme; Dlx-2 signaling was stronger in the dental papilla. At cap stage (E15-16) Msx-2 showed prominent mRNA signaling in enamel knot and Dlx-2 was maximal in the dental papilla. At the late bell stage (P2-3) Msx-2 transcripts were observed in odontoblasts but not labeled in ameloblasts, and Dlx-2 transcripts appeared in ameloblasts but no labeling was seen in odontoblasts. Msx-1, Msx-2 and Dlx-2 are expressed in various patterns during murine mandibular first molar development, suggesting they possibly play a role in the interaction between the epithelium and mesenchyme during the molar development.

  17. Niclosamide, an oral antihelmintic drug, exhibits antimetastatic activity in hepatocellular carcinoma cells through downregulating twist-mediated CD10 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Ming-Hsien; Ho, Yung-Chuan; Yang, Shun-Fa; Yang, Yi-Chieh; Lai, Szu-Yu; Chen, Wan-Shen; Chen, Ming-Jenn; Yeh, Chao-Bin

    2018-02-26

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common malignancies in the world, especially, in eastern Asia, and its prognosis is poor once metastasis occurs. Niclosamide, a US Food and Drug Administration-approved antihelmintic drug, was shown to inhibit the growth of various cancers including HCC, but the effect of niclosamide on cell motility and the underlying mechanism have not yet been completely defined. The present study demonstrated that niclosamide, at 0-40 nM, concentration-dependently inhibited wound closure and the migratory/invasive capacities of human Huh7 and SK-Hep-1 HCC cells without exhibiting cytotoxicity. A protease array analysis showed that CD10 was dramatically downregulated in Huh7 cells after niclosamide treatment. Western blot and flow cytometric assays further demonstrated that CD10 expression was concentration-dependently downregulated in Huh7 and SK-Hep-1 cells after niclosamide treatment. Mechanistic investigations found that niclosamide suppressed Twist-mediated CD10 transactivation. Moreover, knockdown of CD10 expression by CD10 small interfering RNA in HCC cells suppressed cell migratory/invasive abilities and overexpression of CD10 relieved the migration inhibition induced by niclosamide. Taken together, our results indicated that niclosamide could be a potential agent for inhibiting metastasis of HCC, and CD10 is an important target of niclosamide for suppressing the motility of HCC cells. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Sequential Expression of the Neuropeptides Substance P and Somatostatin in Granulomas Associated with Murine Cysticercosis

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson, Prema; White, A. Clinton; Lewis, Dorothy E.; Thornby, John; David, Elliott; Weinstock, Joel

    2002-01-01

    Neurocysticercosis, a parasitic infection of the human central nervous system caused by Taenia solium, is a leading cause of seizures. Seizures associated with neurocysticercosis are caused mainly by the host inflammatory responses to dying parasites in the brain parenchyma. We previously demonstrated sequential expression of Th1 cytokines in early-stage granulomas, followed by expression of Th2 cytokines in later-stage granulomas in murine cysticercosis. However, the mechanism leading to thi...

  19. Pediatric medulloblastoma xenografts including molecular subgroup 3 and CD133+ and CD15+ cells are sensitive to killing by oncolytic herpes simplex viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Gregory K; Moore, Blake P; Nan, Li; Kelly, Virginia M; Etminan, Tina; Langford, Catherine P; Xu, Hui; Han, Xiaosi; Markert, James M; Beierle, Elizabeth A; Gillespie, G Yancey

    2016-02-01

    Childhood medulloblastoma is associated with significant morbidity and mortality that is compounded by neurotoxicity for the developing brain caused by current therapies, including surgery, craniospinal radiation, and chemotherapy. Innate therapeutic resistance of some aggressive pediatric medulloblastoma has been attributed to a subpopulation of cells, termed cancer-initiating cells or cancer stemlike cells (CSCs), marked by the surface protein CD133 or CD15. Brain tumors characteristically contain areas of pathophysiologic hypoxia, which has been shown to drive the CSC phenotype leading to heightened invasiveness, angiogenesis, and metastasis. Novel therapies that target medulloblastoma CSCs are needed to improve outcomes and decrease toxicity. We hypothesized that oncolytic engineered herpes simplex virus (oHSV) therapy could effectively infect and kill pediatric medulloblastoma cells, including CSCs marked by CD133 or CD15. Using 4 human pediatric medulloblastoma xenografts, including 3 molecular subgroup 3 tumors, which portend worse patient outcomes, we determined the expression of CD133, CD15, and the primary HSV-1 entry molecule nectin-1 (CD111) by fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis. Infectability and cytotoxicity of clinically relevant oHSVs (G207 and M002) were determined in vitro and in vivo by FACS, immunofluorescent staining, cytotoxicity assays, and murine survival studies. We demonstrate that hypoxia increased the CD133+ cell fraction, while having the opposite effect on CD15 expression. We established that all 4 xenografts, including the CSCs, expressed CD111 and were highly sensitive to killing by G207 or M002. Pediatric medulloblastoma, including Group 3 tumors, may be an excellent target for oHSV virotherapy, and a clinical trial in medulloblastoma is warranted. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Cholesteryl ester hydroperoxides increase macrophage CD36 gene expression via PPARα

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jedidi, Iness; Couturier, Martine; Therond, Patrice; Gardes-Albert, Monique; Legrand, Alain; Barouki, Robert; Bonnefont-Rousselot, Dominique; Aggerbeck, Martine

    2006-01-01

    The uptake of oxidized LDL by macrophages is a key event in the development of atherosclerosis. The scavenger receptor CD36 is one major receptor that internalizes oxidized LDL. In differentiated human macrophages, we compared the regulation of CD36 expression by copper-oxidized LDL or their products. Only oxidized derivatives of cholesteryl ester (CEOOH) increased the amount of CD36 mRNA (2.5-fold). Both oxidized LDL and CEOOH treatment increased two to fourfold the transcription of promoters containing peroxisome-proliferator-activated-receptor responsive elements (PPRE) in the presence of PPARα or γ. Electrophoretic-mobility-shift-assays with nuclear extracts prepared from macrophages treated by either oxidized LDL or CEOOH showed increased binding of PPARα to the CD36 gene promoter PPRE. In conclusion, CEOOH present in oxidized LDL increase CD36 gene expression in a pathway involving PPARα

  1. CD166/ALCAM expression is characteristic of tumorigenicity and invasive and migratory activities of pancreatic cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Fujiwara

    Full Text Available CD166, also known as activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM, is expressed by various cells in several tissues including cancer. However, the role of CD166 in malignant tumors is controversial, especially in pancreatic cancer. This study aimed to clarify the role and significance of CD166 expression in pancreatic cancer.We performed immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry to analyze the expression of CD166 in surgical pancreatic tissues and pancreatic cancer cell lines. The differences between isolated CD166+ and CD166- pancreatic cancer cells were analyzed by invasion and migration assays, and in mouse xenograft models. We also performed quantitative RT-PCR and microarray analyses to evaluate the expression levels of CD166 and related genes in cultured cells.Immunohistochemistry revealed high expression of CD166 in pancreatic cancer tissues (12.2%; 12/98 compared with that in normal pancreas controls (0%; 0/17 (p = 0.0435. Flow cytometry indicated that CD166 was expressed in 33.8-70.2% of cells in surgical pancreatic tissues and 0-99.5% of pancreatic cancer cell lines. Invasion and migration assays demonstrated that CD166- pancreatic cancer cells showed stronger invasive and migratory activities than those of CD166+ cancer cells (p<0.05. On the other hand, CD166+ Panc-1 cells showed a significantly stronger colony formation activity than that of CD166- Panc-1 cells (p<0.05. In vivo analysis revealed that CD166+ cells elicited significantly greater tumor growth than that of CD166- cells (p<0.05 in both subcutaneous and orthotopic mouse tumor models. mRNA expression of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition activator Zeb1 was over-expressed in CD166- cells (p<0.001. Microarray analysis showed that TSPAN8 and BST2 were over-expressed in CD166+ cells, while BMP7 and Col6A1 were over-expressed in CD166- cells.CD166+ pancreatic cancer cells are strongly tumorigenic, while CD166- pancreatic cancer cells exhibit comparatively stronger

  2. Reversal of CD8 T-Cell–Mediated Mucocutaneous Graft-Versus-Host-Like Disease by the JAK Inhibitor Tofacitinib

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okiyama, Naoko; Furumoto, Yasuko; Villarroel, Vadim A; Linton, Jay T; Tsai, Wanxia L; Gutermuth, Jan; Ghoreschi, Kamran; Gadina, Massimo; O'Shea, John J; Katz, Stephen I

    2014-01-01

    The utility of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is limited by graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. Patients with GVHD exhibit cutaneous manifestations with histological features of interface dermatitis followed by scleroderma-like changes. JAK inhibitors represent a class of immunomodulatory drugs that inhibit signaling by multiple cytokines. Herein we report the effects of tofacitinib in a murine model of GVHD. Oral administration of tofacitinib prevented GVHD-like disease manifested by weight loss and mucocutaneous lesions. More importantly, tofacitinib was also effective in reversing established disease. Tofacitinib diminished the expansion and activation of murine CD8 T cells in this model, and had similar effects on IL-2-stimulated human CD8 T cells. Tofacitinib also inhibited the expression of IFN-γ-inducible chemoattractants by keratinocytes, and IFN-γ-inducible cell death of keratinocytes. Tofacitinib may be an effective drug for treatment against CD8 T-cell–mediated mucocutaneous diseases in patients with GVHD. PMID:24213371

  3. Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cells Expressing CD44 Are Enriched for Stem Cell-Like Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Elaine Lai-Han; Fiscus, Ronald R.; Tung, James W.; Tin, Vicky Pui-Chi; Cheng, Lik Cheung; Sihoe, Alan Dart-Loon; Fink, Louis M.; Ma, Yupo; Wong, Maria Pik

    2010-01-01

    Background The cancer stem cell theory hypothesizes that cancers are perpetuated by cancer stem cells (CSC) or tumor initiating cells (TIC) possessing self-renewal and other stem cell-like properties while differentiated non-stem/initiating cells have a finite life span. To investigate whether the hypothesis is applicable to lung cancer, identification of lung CSC and demonstration of these capacities is essential. Methodology/Principal Finding The expression profiles of five stem cell markers (CD34, CD44, CD133, BMI1 and OCT4) were screened by flow cytometry in 10 lung cancer cell lines. CD44 was further investigated by testing for in vitro and in vivo tumorigenecity. Formation of spheroid bodies and in vivo tumor initiation ability were demonstrated in CD44+ cells of 4 cell lines. Serial in vivo tumor transplantability in nude mice was demonstrated using H1299 cell line. The primary xenografts initiated from CD44+ cells consisted of mixed CD44+ and CD44− cells in similar ratio as the parental H1299 cell line, supporting in vivo differentiation. Semi-quantitative Real-Time PCR (RT-PCR) showed that both freshly sorted CD44+ and CD44+ cells derived from CD44+-initiated tumors expressed the pluripotency genes OCT4/POU5F1, NANOG, SOX2. These stemness markers were not expressed by CD44− cells. Furthermore, freshly sorted CD44+ cells were more resistant to cisplatin treatment with lower apoptosis levels than CD44− cells. Immunohistochemical analysis of 141 resected non-small cell lung cancers showed tumor cell expression of CD44 in 50.4% of tumors while no CD34, and CD133 expression was observed in tumor cells. CD44 expression was associated with squamous cell carcinoma but unexpectedly, a longer survival was observed in CD44-expressing adenocarcinomas. Conclusion/Significance Overall, our results demonstrated that stem cell-like properties are enriched in CD44-expressing subpopulations of some lung cancer cell lines. Further investigation is required to clarify

  4. Maturation of dendritic cells by recombinant human CD40L-trimer leads to a homogeneous cell population with enhanced surface marker expression and increased cytokine production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Würtzen, P A; Nissen, Mogens Holst; Claesson, M H

    2001-01-01

    allostimulus or through the presentation of PPD, and influenza M1-peptide specific CTL activity was obtained with nonmaturated (CD83-) and maturated (CD83+) DC. In conclusion, a final maturation of monocyte-derived DC through huCD40LT resulted in a highly homogeneous cell population with enhanced surface...

  5. CD13 Promotes Mesenchymal Stem Cell-mediated regeneration of ischemic muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mamunur eRahman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are multipotent, tissue-resident cells that can facilitate tissue regeneration and thus show great promise as potential therapeutic agents. Functional MSCs have been isolated and characterized from a wide array of adult tissues and are universally identified by the shared expression of a core panel of MSCs markers. One of these markers is the multifunctional cell surface peptidase CD13 that has been shown to be expressed on human and murine MSCs from many tissues. To investigate whether this universal expression indicates a functional role for CD13 in MSC biology we isolated, expanded and characterized MSCs from bone marrow of wild type (WT and CD13KO mice. Characterization of these cells demonstrated that both WT and CD13KO MSCs expressed the full complement of MSC markers (CD29, CD44, CD49e, CD105, Sca1, showed comparable proliferation rates and were capable of differentiating toward the adipogenic and osteogenic lineages. However, MSCs lacking CD13 were unable to differentiate into vascular cells, consistent with our previous characterization of CD13 as an angiogenic regulator. Compared to WT MSCs, adhesion and migration on various extracellular matrices of CD13KO MSCs were significantly impaired, which correlated with decreased phospho-FAK levels and cytoskeletal alterations. Crosslinking human MSCs with activating CD13 antibodies increased cell adhesion to endothelial monolayers and induced FAK activation in a time dependent manner. In agreement with these in vitro data, intramuscular injection of CD13KO MSCs in a model of severe ischemic limb injury resulted in significantly poorer perfusion, decreased ambulation, increased necrosis and impaired vascularization compared to those receiving WT MSCs. This study suggests that CD13 regulates FAK activation to promote MSC adhesion and migration, thus contributing to MSC-mediated tissue repair. CD13 may present a viable target to enhance the efficacy of mesenchymal

  6. Expression of CD147 in advanced non-small cell lung cancer correlated with cisplatin-based chemotherapy resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, H Z; Qu, Y Q; Liang, A B; Deng, A M; Zhang, W J; Xiu, B; Wang, H; Wang, H

    2011-01-01

    CD147, a widely expressed cell surface glycoprotein in cancer, is associated with tumor invasiveness and chemotherapy resistance. Recently, CD147 is also regarded as a potential therapeutic target for cancer therapy. The aim of the study was to investigate CD147 expression in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and evaluate its correlation with cisplatin-based chemotherapy resistance. In this study, we examined immunohistochemically the expression of CD147 in 118 advanced NSCLC cases treated with cisplatin-based chemotherapy, and then the association of CD147 expression with clinicopathological characteristics was analyzed. Furthermore, RNA interference approach was used to silence CD147 expression in a cisplatin-resistant human lung cancer cell line A549/DDP, and the inhibition effect of cisplatin on tumor cells was assayed by MTT. In the overall series, positive CD147 expression was observed in 101/118 (85.6%) cases. A membranous CD147 pattern was identified in 76/101 (75.2%) of CD147 positive tumors. CD147 membranous expression,but not the overall CD147 expression, was associated with poor response to cisplatin-based chemotherapies and a poor prognosis in advanced NSCLC patients. In vitro results showed that silencing CD147 increased the proliferation inhibitory effect of cisplatin to A549/DDP cells. In conclusion, our study indicated that membranous CD147 expression is a predictive factor of the response to cisplatin-based chemotherapies, and the use of CD147-targeted therapeutic adjuvants might be considered in the treatment of advanced NSCLC patients.

  7. MicroRNA expressions in PMBCs, CD4+, and CD8+ T-cells from patients suffering from autoimmune Addison's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernecker, C; Halim, F; Haase, M; Willenberg, H S; Ehlers, M; Schott, M

    2013-08-01

    Autoimmune Addison's disease (AD) is a rare but potentially life threatening disease. The exact etiology of the immune response to the adrenal gland is still unknown. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) critically control gene-expression and play an important role in regulating the immune response. The aim of this study was to determine key immunoregulatory miRNAs influencing autoimmune adrenal insufficiency. For this purpose selected miRNAs were amplified by a semiquantitative SYBR Green PCR from blood mononuclear cells and after purification from CD4+ and CD 8+ cells of 6 patients with autoimmune adrenal insufficiency and 10 healthy controls. In CD4+ T-cells miRNA 181a*_1 (18.02 in AD vs. 11.99 in CG, p=0.0047) is significantly increased whereas miRNA 200a_1 (12.48 in AD vs. 19.40 in CG, p=0.0003) and miRNA 200a_2* (8.59 in AD vs. 17.94 in CG, p=0.0160) are significantly decreased. miRNA 200a_1 (12.37 in AD group vs. 18.12 in control group, p=0.001) and miRNA 200a_2* (10.72 in AD group vs. 17.84 in control group, p=0.022) are also significantly decreased in CD8+ T-cells. This study could show for the first time a significant change of three defined miRNAs in PBMCs, CD4+, and CD8+ T-cells of autoimmune AD patients in vivo. These data may help to better understand the cause of the autoimmune processes leading to autoimmune AD. They extend our very limited knowledge concerning miRNAs in autoimmune Addison's disease. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Analysis of CD83 antigen expression in human breast fibroadenoma and adjacent tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Nascimento Borges

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Dendritic cell maturation is considered essential for starting an immune response. The CD83 antigen is an important marker of dendritic cell maturation. The objectives here were to analyze CD83 antigen expression in human breast fibroadenoma and breast tissue adjacent to the lesion and to identify clinical factors that might influence this expression. DESIGN AND SETTING: This was a retrospective study at a public university hospital, in which 29 histopathological samples of breast fibroadenoma and adjacent breast tissue, from 28 women of reproductive age, were analyzed. METHODS: The immunohistochemistry method was used to analyze the cell expression of the antigen. The antigen expression in the cells was evaluated by means of random manual counting using an optical microscope. RESULTS: Positive expression of the CD83 antigen in the epithelial cells of the fibroadenoma (365.52; standard deviation ± 133.13 in relation to the adjacent breast tissue cells (189.59; standard deviation ± 140.75 was statistically larger (P < 0.001. Several clinical features were analyzed, but only parity was shown to influence CD83 antigen expression in the adjacent breast tissue, such that positive expression was more evident in nulliparous women (P = 0.042. CONCLUSIONS: The expression of the CD83 antigen in the fibroadenoma was positive and greater than in the adjacent breast tissue. Positive expression of the antigen in the adjacent breast tissue was influenced by parity, and was significantly more evident in nulliparous women.

  9. CD40 Ligand Deficient C57BL/6 Mouse Is a Potential Surrogate Model of Human X-Linked Hyper IgM (X-HIGM Syndrome for Characterizing Immune Responses against Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalina Lopez-Saucedo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Individuals with X-HIGM syndrome fail to express functional CD40 ligand; consequently they cannot mount effective protective antibody responses against pathogenic bacteria. We evaluated, compared, and characterized the humoral immune response of wild type (WT and C57-CD40L deficient (C57-CD40L−/− mice infected with Citrobacter rodentium. Basal serum isotype levels were similar for IgM and IgG3 among mice, while total IgG and IgG2b concentrations were significantly lower in C57-CD40L−/− mice compared with WT. Essentially IgG1 and IgG2c levels were detectable only in WT mice. C57-CD40L−/− animals, orally inoculated with 2×109 CFU, presented several clinical manifestations since the second week of infection and eventually died. In contrast at this time point no clinical manifestations were observed among C57-CD40L−/− mice infected with 1×107 CFU. Infection was subclinical in WT mice inoculated with either bacterial dose. The serum samples from infected mice (1×107 CFU, collected at day 14 after infection, had similar C. rodentium-specific IgM titres. Although C57-CD40L−/− animals had lower IgG and IgG2b titres than WT mice, C57-CD40L−/− mice sera displayed complement-mediated bactericidal activity against C. rodentium. C. rodentium-infected C57-CD40L−/− mice are capable of producing antibodies that are protective. C57-CD40L−/− mouse is a useful surrogate model of X-HIGM syndrome for studying immune responses elicited against pathogens.

  10. Decreased Expression of T-Cell Costimulatory Molecule CD28 on CD4 and CD8 T Cells of Mexican Patients with Pulmonary Tuberculosis

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    German Bernal-Fernandez

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with tuberculosis frequently develop anergy, a state of T-cell hyporesponsiveness in which defective T-cell costimulation could be a factor. To know if the expression of T-cell costimulatory molecules was altered in tuberculosis, we analyzed the peripheral blood T-cell phenotype of 23 Mexican patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. There was severe CD4 (P<.001 and CD8 (P<.01 lymphopenia and upregulation of costimulatory molecule CD30 on CD4 and CD8 T cells (P<.05; this increase was higher in relapsing tuberculosis. The main finding was severe downregulation of the major costimulatory molecule CD28 on both CD8 and CD4 T cells (P<.001. Depletion of the CD4/CD28 subset, a hitherto undescribed finding, is relevant because CD4 T cells constitute the main arm of the cell-mediated antimycobacterial immune response.

  11. Cell expression patterns of CD147 in N-diethylnitrosamine/phenobarbital-induced mouse hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Meng; Wu, Jiao; He, Feng; Wang, Xi-Long; Li, Can; Chen, Zhi-Nan; Bian, Huijie

    2015-02-01

    Overexpression of CD147/basigin in hepatic cells promotes the progression of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Whether CD147 also expressed in liver non-parenchymal cells and associated with HCC development was unknown. The aim of the study was to explore time-dependent cell expression patterns of CD147 in a widely accepted N-diethylnitrosamine/phenobarbital (DEN/PB)-induced HCC mouse model. Liver samples collected at month 1-12 of post-DEN/PB administration were assessed the localization of CD147 in hepatocytes, endothelial cells, hepatic stellate cells, and macrophages. Immunohistochemistry analysis showed that CD147 was upregulated in liver tumors during month 1-8 of DEN/PB induction. Expression of CD147 was positively correlated with cytokeratin 18, a hepatocyte marker (r = 0.7857, P = 0.0279), CD31 (r = 0.9048, P = 0.0046), an endothelial cell marker, and CD68, a macrophage marker (r = 0.7619, P = 0.0368). A significant correlation was also observed between CD147 and alpha-smooth muscle actin (r = 0.8857, P = 0.0333) at DEN/PB initiation and early stage of tumor formation. Immunofluorescence and fluorescence in situ hybridization showed that CD147 co-expressed with cytokeratin 18, CD31, alpha-smooth muscle actin, and CD68. Moreover, there existed positive correlations between CD147 and microvessel density (r = 0.7857, P = 0.0279), CD147 and Ki-67 (r = 0.9341, P = 0.0022) in the development of DEN/PB-induced HCC. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that CD147 was upregulated in the liver parenchymal and mesenchymal cells and involved in angiogenesis and tumor cell proliferation in the development of DEN/PB-induced HCC.

  12. Regulation and Gene Expression Profiling of NKG2D Positive Human Cytomegalovirus-Primed CD4+ T-Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Helle; Folkersen, Lasse; Skov, Søren

    2012-01-01

    NKG2D is a stimulatory receptor expressed by natural killer (NK) cells, CD8+ T-cells, and γδ T-cells. NKG2D expression is normally absent from CD4+ T-cells, however recently a subset of NKG2D+ CD4+ T-cells has been found, which is specific for human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). This particular subset of HCMV-specific NKG2D+ CD4+ T-cells possesses effector-like functions, thus resembling the subsets of NKG2D+ CD4+ T-cells found in other chronic inflammations. However, the precise mechanism leading to NKG2D expression on HCMV-specific CD4+ T-cells is currently not known. In this study we used genome-wide analysis of individual genes and gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) to investigate the gene expression profile of NKG2D+ CD4+ T-cells, generated from HCMV-primed CD4+ T-cells. We show that the HCMV-primed NKG2D+ CD4+ T-cells possess a higher differentiated phenotype than the NKG2D– CD4+ T-cells, both at the gene expression profile and cytokine profile. The ability to express NKG2D at the cell surface was primarily determined by the activation or differentiation status of the CD4+ T-cells and not by the antigen presenting cells. We observed a correlation between CD94 and NKG2D expression in the CD4+ T-cells following HCMV stimulation. However, knock-down of CD94 did not affect NKG2D cell surface expression or signaling. In addition, we show that NKG2D is recycled at the cell surface of activated CD4+ T-cells, whereas it is produced de novo in resting CD4+ T-cells. These findings provide novel information about the gene expression profile of HCMV-primed NKG2D+ CD4+ T-cells, as well as the mechanisms regulating NKG2D cell surface expression. PMID:22870231

  13. Regulation and gene expression profiling of NKG2D positive human cytomegalovirus-primed CD4+ T-cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helle Jensen

    Full Text Available NKG2D is a stimulatory receptor expressed by natural killer (NK cells, CD8(+ T-cells, and γδ T-cells. NKG2D expression is normally absent from CD4(+ T-cells, however recently a subset of NKG2D(+ CD4(+ T-cells has been found, which is specific for human cytomegalovirus (HCMV. This particular subset of HCMV-specific NKG2D(+ CD4(+ T-cells possesses effector-like functions, thus resembling the subsets of NKG2D(+ CD4(+ T-cells found in other chronic inflammations. However, the precise mechanism leading to NKG2D expression on HCMV-specific CD4(+ T-cells is currently not known. In this study we used genome-wide analysis of individual genes and gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA to investigate the gene expression profile of NKG2D(+ CD4(+ T-cells, generated from HCMV-primed CD4(+ T-cells. We show that the HCMV-primed NKG2D(+ CD4(+ T-cells possess a higher differentiated phenotype than the NKG2D(- CD4(+ T-cells, both at the gene expression profile and cytokine profile. The ability to express NKG2D at the cell surface was primarily determined by the activation or differentiation status of the CD4(+ T-cells and not by the antigen presenting cells. We observed a correlation between CD94 and NKG2D expression in the CD4(+ T-cells following HCMV stimulation. However, knock-down of CD94 did not affect NKG2D cell surface expression or signaling. In addition, we show that NKG2D is recycled at the cell surface of activated CD4(+ T-cells, whereas it is produced de novo in resting CD4(+ T-cells. These findings provide novel information about the gene expression profile of HCMV-primed NKG2D(+ CD4(+ T-cells, as well as the mechanisms regulating NKG2D cell surface expression.

  14. Increased expression of CD133 and reduced dystroglycan expression are strong predictors of poor outcome in colon cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coco Claudio

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Expression levels of CD133, a cancer stem cell marker, and of the α-subunit of the dystroglycan (α-DG complex, have been previously reported to be altered in colorectal cancers. Methods Expression levels of CD133 and α-DG were assessed by immunohistochemistry in a series of colon cancers and their prognostic significance was evaluated. Results Scattered cells positive for CD133 were rarely detected at the bases of the crypts in normal colonic mucosa while in cancer cells the median percentage of positive cells was 5% (range 0–80. A significant correlation was observed with pT parameter and tumor stage but not with tumor grade and N status. Recurrence and death from disease were significantly more frequent in CD133-high expressing tumors and Kaplan-Meier curves showed a significant separation between high vs low expressor groups for both disease-free (p = 0.002 and overall (p = 0.008 survival. Expression of α-DG was reduced in a significant fraction of tumors but low α-DG staining did not correlate with any of the classical clinical-pathological parameters. Recurrence and death from the disease were significantly more frequent in α-DG-low expressing tumors and Kaplan-Meier curves showed a significant separation between high vs low expressor tumors for both disease-free (p = 0.02 and overall (p = 0.02 survival. Increased expression of CD133, but not loss of α-DG, confirmed to be an independent prognostic parameters at a multivariate analysis associated with an increased risk of recurrence (RR = 2.4; p = 0.002 and death (RR = 2.3; p = 0.003. Conclusions Loss of α-DG and increased CD133 expression are frequent events in human colon cancer and evaluation of CD133 expression could help to identify high-risk colon cancer patients.

  15. Immunohistochemical expression of CD44s in renal cell carcinoma lacks independent prognostic significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Henriques da Costa

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To analyze the immunohistochemical expression of the standard isoform of CD44 (CD44s adhesion molecule in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (CCRCC and its impact on clinical outcomes. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Ninety-nine consecutive patients treated surgically for RCC between 1992 and 2009 were selected. A single pathologist reviewed all cases to effect a uniform reclassification and determine the most representative tumor areas for construction of a tissue microarray. The same pathologist, who was blinded to the outcome of the cases, semi-quantitatively scored the staining intensity of CD44s in all specimens. The counting was done using the H-Score algorithm. RESULTS: Of the 99 immunostained RCC specimens, 57(57.7% showed low expression, and 42(42.4% showed high expression levels of CD44s. The expression of CD44s was directly associated with tumor size (p = 0.03, clinical stage (p = 0.02 and Fuhrman grade (p = 0.02. Disease specific survival (DSS rates for patients whose specimens expressed low and high levels of CD44s was 88.1% and 67.5%, respectively (p = 0.009. Progression free survival (PFS rates in patients with low and high expression of CD44s were 78.8% and 61.7%, respectively (p = 0.05. Classical features such as the presence of metastasis and clinical stage remained isolated predictors of survival. CONCLUSIONS: Immunohistochemical expression of CD44s was associated with important clinical variables such as stage and Fuhrman grade. However, it was not an independent predictor of survival. Therefore, we believe it has a limited role as a prognostic marker in patients with CCRCC.

  16. Enhancement of tumor radioresponse by combined chemotherapy in murine hepatocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seong, Jin Sil; Kim, Sung Hee; Suh, Chang Ok

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify drugs that can enhance radioresponse of murine hepatocarcinoma. C3H/HeJ mice bearing 8 mm tumors of murine hepatocarcinoma, HCa-l, were treated with 25 Gy radiation and one of the following drugs: 5-Fu, 150 mg/kg; adriamycin, 8 mg/kg; cisplatin, 6 mg/kg; paclitaxel, 40 mg/kg; and gemcitabine, 50 mg/kg. Tumor response to the treatment was determined by tumor growth delay assay and by enhancement factor. Apoptotic level was assessed in tissue sections. Expression of regulating molecules was analyzed by western blotting for p53, 8c1-2, Sax, Bel-XL, Bd-XS, and p21 WAF1/CIP1 . Among the drugs tested, only gemcitabine enhanced the antitumor effect of radiation, with enhancement factor of 1.6. Induction of apoptosis by a combination of gerncitabine and radiation was shown as only additive level. In analysis of radiation-induced expression of regulating molecules, the most significant change by combining gemcitabine was activation of p21 WAF1/CIP1 . Gemcitabine is the first drug showing an enhancement of radioresponse in murine hepatocarcinoma, when combined with radiation. The key element of enhancement is thought to be p21 WAF1/CIP1

  17. Enhancement of tumor radioresponse by combined chemotherapy in murine hepatocarcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seong, Jin Sil; Kim, Sung Hee; Suh, Chang Ok [College of Medicine, Yonsei Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify drugs that can enhance radioresponse of murine hepatocarcinoma. C3H/HeJ mice bearing 8 mm tumors of murine hepatocarcinoma, HCa-l, were treated with 25 Gy radiation and one of the following drugs: 5-Fu, 150 mg/kg; adriamycin, 8 mg/kg; cisplatin, 6 mg/kg; paclitaxel, 40 mg/kg; and gemcitabine, 50 mg/kg. Tumor response to the treatment was determined by tumor growth delay assay and by enhancement factor. Apoptotic level was assessed in tissue sections. Expression of regulating molecules was analyzed by western blotting for p53, 8c1-2, Sax, Bel-XL, Bd-XS, and p21{sup WAF1/CIP1}. Among the drugs tested, only gemcitabine enhanced the antitumor effect of radiation, with enhancement factor of 1.6. Induction of apoptosis by a combination of gerncitabine and radiation was shown as only additive level. In analysis of radiation-induced expression of regulating molecules, the most significant change by combining gemcitabine was activation of p21 {sup WAF1/CIP1}. Gemcitabine is the first drug showing an enhancement of radioresponse in murine hepatocarcinoma, when combined with radiation. The key element of enhancement is thought to be p21{sup WAF1/CIP1}.

  18. Murine epidermal Langerhans cells and langerin-expressing dermal dendritic cells are unrelated and exhibit distinct functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nagao, Keisuke; Ginhoux, Florent; Leitner, Wolfgang W.; Motegi, Sei-Ichiro; Bennett, Clare L.; Clausen, Björn E.; Merad, Miriam; Udey, Mark C.

    2009-01-01

    A new langerin(+) DC subset has recently been identified in murine dermis (langerin(+) dDC), but the lineage and functional relationships between these cells and langerin(+) epidermal Langerhans cells (LC) are incompletely characterized. Selective expression of the cell adhesion molecule EpCAM by LC

  19. Expression, refolding and crystallization of murine MHC class I H-2Db in complex with human β2-microglobulin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandalova, Tatyana; Michaëlsson, Jakob; Harris, Robert A.; Ljunggren, Hans-Gustaf; Kärre, Klas; Schneider, Gunter; Achour, Adnane

    2005-01-01

    Mouse MHC class I H-2Db in complex with human β2m and the LCMV-derived peptide gp33 has been produced and crystallized. Resolution of the structure of this complex combined with the structural comparison with the previously solved crystal structure of H-2Db/mβ2m/gp33 should lead to a better understanding of how the β2m subunit affects the overall conformation of MHC complexes as well as the stability of the presented peptides. β 2 -Microglobulin (β 2 m) is non-covalently linked to the major histocompatibility (MHC) class I heavy chain and interacts with CD8 and Ly49 receptors. Murine MHC class I can bind human β 2 m (hβ 2 m) and such hybrid molecules are often used in structural and functional studies. The replacement of mouse β 2 m (mβ 2 m) by hβ 2 m has important functional consequences for MHC class I complex stability and specificity, but the structural basis for this is unknown. To investigate the impact of species-specific β 2 m subunits on MHC class I conformation, murine MHC class I H-2D b in complex with hβ 2 m and the peptide gp33 derived from lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) has been expressed, refolded in vitro and crystallized. Crystals containing two complexes per asymmetric unit and belonging to the space group P2 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 68.1, b = 65.2, c = 101.9 Å, β = 102.4°, were obtained

  20. Datasets for the validation of the "in vivo" siRNA-silencing of CD40 and for the detection of new markers of atherosclerosis progression in ApoE-deficient mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Hueso

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Data presented in this Data in Brief article correspond to the article "in vivo" silencing of CD40 reduces progression of experimental atherogenesis through a NFκB/miR-125b axis and reveals new potential mediators in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis" (M. Hueso, L. De Ramon, E. Navarro, E. Ripoll, J.M. Cruzado, J.M. Grinyo, J. Torras, 2016 [1]. Here, we describe the validation of the silencing of CD40 expression with a specific siRNA in ApoE−/− mouse aortas, and its systemic effects on splenic lymphocytic subpopulations as well as on the infiltration of aortic intima by F4/80+, galectin-3+ macrophages or by NF-κB+ cells. We also show the output of a Gene Ontology and TLDA analysis which allowed the detection of potential mediators of atherosclerosis progression. We provide the scientific community with a set of genes whose expression is increased during atherosclerosis progression but downregulated upon CD40 silencing.

  1. An incomplete TCA cycle increases survival of Salmonella Typhimurium during infection of resting and activated murine macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowden, Steven D; Ramachandran, Vinoy K; Knudsen, Gitte M; Hinton, Jay C D; Thompson, Arthur

    2010-11-08

    In comparison to the comprehensive analyses performed on virulence gene expression, regulation and action, the intracellular metabolism of Salmonella during infection is a relatively under-studied area. We investigated the role of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle in the intracellular replication of Salmonella Typhimurium in resting and activated macrophages, epithelial cells, and during infection of mice. We constructed deletion mutations of 5 TCA cycle genes in S. Typhimurium including gltA, mdh, sdhCDAB, sucAB, and sucCD. We found that the mutants exhibited increased net intracellular replication in resting and activated murine macrophages compared to the wild-type. In contrast, an epithelial cell infection model showed that the S. Typhimurium ΔsucCD and ΔgltA strains had reduced net intracellular replication compared to the wild-type. The glyoxylate shunt was not responsible for the net increased replication of the TCA cycle mutants within resting macrophages. We also confirmed that, in a murine infection model, the S. Typhimurium ΔsucAB and ΔsucCD strains are attenuated for virulence. Our results suggest that disruption of the TCA cycle increases the ability of S. Typhimurium to survive within resting and activated murine macrophages. In contrast, epithelial cells are non-phagocytic cells and unlike macrophages cannot mount an oxidative and nitrosative defence response against pathogens; our results show that in HeLa cells the S. Typhimurium TCA cycle mutant strains show reduced or no change in intracellular levels compared to the wild-type. The attenuation of the S. Typhimurium ΔsucAB and ΔsucCD mutants in mice, compared to their increased net intracellular replication in resting and activated macrophages suggest that Salmonella may encounter environments within the host where a complete TCA cycle is advantageous.

  2. CD47 expression in Epstein-Barr virus-associated gastric carcinoma: coexistence with tumor immunity lowering the ratio of CD8+/Foxp3+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Hiroyuki; Saito, Ruri; Ichimura, Takashi; Iwasaki, Akiko; Yamazawa, Sho; Shinozaki-Ushiku, Aya; Morikawa, Teppei; Ushiku, Tetsuo; Yamashita, Hiroharu; Seto, Yasuyuki; Fukayama, Masashi

    2018-04-01

    Epstein-Barr virus-associated gastric carcinoma (EBVaGC) frequently harbors dense lymphocytic infiltration, suggesting a specific microenvironment allowing coexistence with tumor immunity. CD47, which mediates the "do not eat me" signal in innate immunity, is also important in adaptive anti-tumor immunity. We investigated the significance of CD47 in EBVaGC compared with EBV-negative gastric cancer and the correlation with various immune cells. By immunohistochemistry of CD47, high, low, and negative expression was observed in 24, 63, and 12% of EBVaGC (n = 41), while 11, 49, and 39% of EBV-negative gastric cancer (n = 262), respectively, indicating that high expression of CD47 in cancer cells was significantly frequent and increased in EBVaGC (P = 0.043). In contrast to EBV-negative gastric carcinoma in which no significant correlation was observed between CD47 and survival, high expression of CD47 correlated significantly with worse disease-specific survival (P = 0.011) and overall survival (P = 0.013) in EBVaGC. To further clarify the role of CD47 expression in EBVaGC, digital image analysis of immune cell infiltration revealed that high CD47 expression was correlated with a lower ratio of CD8 + /Foxp3 + T cells (P = 0.021), a sensitive indicator of tumor immunity. Thus, CD47 lowers anti-tumor immunity in EBVaGC by finely tuning profile of infiltrating T cells, suggesting that CD47 is an additional target for cancer immunotherapy against this virus-driven gastric cancer.

  3. CD200-expressing human basal cell carcinoma cells initiate tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colmont, Chantal S; Benketah, Antisar; Reed, Simon H; Hawk, Nga V; Telford, William G; Ohyama, Manabu; Udey, Mark C; Yee, Carole L; Vogel, Jonathan C; Patel, Girish K

    2013-01-22

    Smoothened antagonists directly target the genetic basis of human basal cell carcinoma (BCC), the most common of all cancers. These drugs inhibit BCC growth, but they are not curative. Although BCC cells are monomorphic, immunofluorescence microscopy reveals a complex hierarchical pattern of growth with inward differentiation along hair follicle lineages. Most BCC cells express the transcription factor KLF4 and are committed to terminal differentiation. A small CD200(+) CD45(-) BCC subpopulation that represents 1.63 ± 1.11% of all BCC cells resides in small clusters at the tumor periphery. By using reproducible in vivo xenograft growth assays, we determined that tumor initiating cell frequencies approximate one per 1.5 million unsorted BCC cells. The CD200(+) CD45(-) BCC subpopulation recreated BCC tumor growth in vivo with typical histological architecture and expression of sonic hedgehog-regulated genes. Reproducible in vivo BCC growth was achieved with as few as 10,000 CD200(+) CD45(-) cells, representing ~1,500-fold enrichment. CD200(-) CD45(-) BCC cells were unable to form tumors. These findings establish a platform to study the effects of Smoothened antagonists on BCC tumor initiating cell and also suggest that currently available anti-CD200 therapy be considered, either as monotherapy or an adjunct to Smoothened antagonists, in the treatment of inoperable BCC.

  4. CD133 and BMI1 expressions and its prognostic role in primary ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This study aimed to analyse the expression of CD133 mRNA and its correlations ... CD133 mRNA and BMI1 protein expression could independently predict the glioblastoma .... treatment at the National Institute of Mental Health and Neu- .... Low. 16 (76.2). High. 53 mutations of which 38 were exonic and 15 were intronic.

  5. Failure to synthesize the human T-cell CD3-zeta chain and its consequence for the T-cell receptor-CD3 complex expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geisler, C; Kuhlmann, J; Plesner, T

    1989-01-01

    components, the human T-cell tumour line Jurkat was chemically mutagenized followed by negative selection with F101.01 (a monoclonal antibody against the TcR-CD3 complex), and cloning. Growing clones were analysed for TcR-CD3 expression by immunofluorescence. One clone, J79, was found to express greatly...... diminished levels of TcR-CD3. This clone produced all the TcR-CD3 components except the CD3-zeta, as demonstrated by metabolic labelling and immunoprecipitation followed by one- and two-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. These data indicate that the CD3-zeta determines...

  6. Prognostic significance of CD44s expression in resected non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ko Yoon

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CD44s is a cell adhesion molecule known to mediate cellular adhesion to the extracellular matrix, a prerequisite for tumor cell migration. CD44s plays an important role in invasion and metastasis of various cancers. In the present study, we sought to determine whether CD44s is involved in clinical outcomes of patients with resected non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Methods Using immunohistochemical staining, we investigated CD44s protein expression using tissue array specimens from 159 patients with resected NSCLC (adenocarcinoma (AC; n = 82 and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC; n = 77. Additionally, the immunoreactivity of cyclooxygenase (COX-2 was also studied. The clinicopathological implications of these molecules were analyzed statistically. Results High CD44s expression was detected more frequently in NSCLC patients with SCC (66/72; 91.7% than in those with AC histology (P 0.001. Additionally, high CD44s expression was significant correlated with more advanced regional lymph node metastasis (P = 0.021. In multivariate analysis of survival in NSCLC patients with AC histology, significant predictors were lymph node metastasis status (P P = 0.046, and high CD44s expression (P = 0.014. For NSCLC patients with SCC histology, the significant predictor was a more advanced tumor stage (P = 0.015. No significant association was found between CD44s and clinical outcome (P = 0.311. Conclusions High CD44s expression was a negative prognostic marker with significance in patients with resected NSCLC, particularly those with AC histology, and was independent of tumor stage.

  7. Prognostic significance of CD44s expression in resected non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Yoon Ho; Won, Hye Sung; Jeon, Eun Kyoung; Hong, Sook Hee; Roh, Sang Young; Hong, Young Seon; Byun, Jae Ho; Jung, Chan-Kwon; Kang, Jin Hyoung

    2011-01-01

    CD44s is a cell adhesion molecule known to mediate cellular adhesion to the extracellular matrix, a prerequisite for tumor cell migration. CD44s plays an important role in invasion and metastasis of various cancers. In the present study, we sought to determine whether CD44s is involved in clinical outcomes of patients with resected non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Using immunohistochemical staining, we investigated CD44s protein expression using tissue array specimens from 159 patients with resected NSCLC (adenocarcinoma (AC; n = 82) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC; n = 77). Additionally, the immunoreactivity of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 was also studied. The clinicopathological implications of these molecules were analyzed statistically. High CD44s expression was detected more frequently in NSCLC patients with SCC (66/72; 91.7%) than in those with AC histology (P <0.001). Additionally, high CD44s expression was significant correlated with more advanced regional lymph node metastasis (P = 0.021). In multivariate analysis of survival in NSCLC patients with AC histology, significant predictors were lymph node metastasis status (P < 0.001), high-grade tumor differentiation (P = 0.046), and high CD44s expression (P = 0.014). For NSCLC patients with SCC histology, the significant predictor was a more advanced tumor stage (P = 0.015). No significant association was found between CD44s and clinical outcome (P = 0.311). High CD44s expression was a negative prognostic marker with significance in patients with resected NSCLC, particularly those with AC histology, and was independent of tumor stage

  8. Elastin receptor (S-gal) occupancy by elastin peptides modulates T-cell response during murine emphysema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meghraoui-Kheddar, Aïda; Pierre, Alexandre; Sellami, Mehdi; Audonnet, Sandra; Lemaire, Flora; Le Naour, Richard

    2017-09-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and emphysema are associated with increased elastin peptides (EP) production because of excessive breakdown of lung connective tissue. We recently reported that exposure of mice to EP elicited hallmark features of emphysema. EP effects are largely mediated through a receptor complex that includes the elastin-binding protein spliced-galactosidase (S-gal). In previous studies, we established a correlation between cytokine production and S-gal protein expression in EP-treated immune cells. In this study, we investigated the S-gal-dependent EP effects on T-helper (Th) and T-cytotoxic (Tc) responses during murine EP-triggered pulmonary inflammation. C57BL/6J mice were endotracheally instilled with the valine-glycine-valine-alanine-proline-glycine (VGVAPG) elastin peptide, and, 21 days after treatment, local and systemic T-lymphocyte phenotypes were analyzed at cytokine and transcription factor expression levels by multicolor flow cytometry. Exposure of mice to the VGVAPG peptide resulted in a significant increase in the proportion of the CD4 + and CD8 + T cells expressing the cytokines IFN-γ or IL-17a and the transcription factors T-box expressed in T cells or retinoic acid-related orphan receptor-γt (RORγt) without effects on IL-4 and Gata-binding protein 3 to DNA sequence [A/T]GATA[A/G] expression. These effects were maximized when each T-cell subpopulation was challenged ex vivo with EP, and they were inhibited in vivo when an analogous peptide antagonizing the EP/S-gal interactions was instilled together with the VGVAPG peptide. This study demonstrates that, during murine emphysema, EP-S-gal interactions contribute to a Th-1 and Th-17 proinflammatory T-cell response combined with a Tc-1 response. Our study also highlights the S-gal receptor as a putative pharmacological target to modulate such an immune response. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  9. YKL-40 is differentially expressed in human embryonic stem cells and in cell progeny of the three germ layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøchner, Christian B; Johansen, Julia S; Larsen, Lars A

    2012-01-01

    oxygen tension, in culture medium with or without basic fibroblast growth factor, and on feeder layers comprising mouse embryonic fibroblasts or human foreskin fibroblasts to evaluate whether hESCs and their progeny produced YKL-40 and to characterize YKL-40 expression during differentiation. Secreted......The secreted glycoprotein YKL-40 participates in cell differentiation, inflammation, and cancer progression. High YKL-40 expression is reported during early human development, but its functions are unknown. Six human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines were cultured in an atmosphere of low or high...... YKL-40 protein and YKL-40 mRNA expression were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and quantitative RT-PCR. Serial-sectioned colonies were stained for YKL-40 protein and for pluripotent hESC (OCT4, NANOG) and germ layer (HNF-3ß, PDX1, CD34, p63, nestin, PAX6) markers. Double...

  10. Soluble CD40 Ligand and Oxidative Response Are Reciprocally Stimulated during Shiga Toxin-Associated Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria J. Abrey Recalde

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Shiga toxin (Stx, produced by Escherichia coli, is the main pathogenic factor of diarrhea-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS, which is characterized by the obstruction of renal microvasculature by platelet-fibrin thrombi. It is well known that the oxidative imbalance generated by Stx induces platelet activation, contributing to thrombus formation. Moreover, activated platelets release soluble CD40 ligand (sCD40L, which in turn contributes to oxidative imbalance, triggering the release of reactive oxidative species (ROS on various cellular types. The aim of this work was to determine if the interaction between the oxidative response and platelet-derived sCD40L, as consequence of Stx-induced endothelium damage, participates in the pathogenic mechanism during HUS. Activated human glomerular endothelial cells (HGEC by Stx2 induced platelets to adhere to them. Although platelet adhesion did not contribute to endothelial damage, high levels of sCD40L were released to the medium. The release of sCD40L by activated platelets was inhibited by antioxidant treatment. Furthermore, we found increased levels of sCD40L in plasma from HUS patients, which were also able to trigger the respiratory burst in monocytes in a sCD40L-dependent manner. Thus, we concluded that platelet-derived sCD40L and the oxidative response are reciprocally stimulated during Stx2-associated HUS. This process may contribute to the evolution of glomerular occlusion and the microangiopathic lesions.

  11. Soluble CD40 Ligand and Oxidative Response Are Reciprocally Stimulated during Shiga Toxin-Associated Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrey Recalde, Maria J.; Alvarez, Romina S.; Alberto, Fabiana; Mejias, Maria P.; Ramos, Maria V.; Fernandez Brando, Romina J.; Bruballa, Andrea C.; Exeni, Ramon A.; Alconcher, Laura; Ibarra, Cristina A.; Amaral, María M.; Palermo, Marina S.

    2017-01-01

    Shiga toxin (Stx), produced by Escherichia coli, is the main pathogenic factor of diarrhea-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), which is characterized by the obstruction of renal microvasculature by platelet-fibrin thrombi. It is well known that the oxidative imbalance generated by Stx induces platelet activation, contributing to thrombus formation. Moreover, activated platelets release soluble CD40 ligand (sCD40L), which in turn contributes to oxidative imbalance, triggering the release of reactive oxidative species (ROS) on various cellular types. The aim of this work was to determine if the interaction between the oxidative response and platelet-derived sCD40L, as consequence of Stx-induced endothelium damage, participates in the pathogenic mechanism during HUS. Activated human glomerular endothelial cells (HGEC) by Stx2 induced platelets to adhere to them. Although platelet adhesion did not contribute to endothelial damage, high levels of sCD40L were released to the medium. The release of sCD40L by activated platelets was inhibited by antioxidant treatment. Furthermore, we found increased levels of sCD40L in plasma from HUS patients, which were also able to trigger the respiratory burst in monocytes in a sCD40L-dependent manner. Thus, we concluded that platelet-derived sCD40L and the oxidative response are reciprocally stimulated during Stx2-associated HUS. This process may contribute to the evolution of glomerular occlusion and the microangiopathic lesions. PMID:29068360

  12. Expression of the Wilms' tumor gene WT1 in the murine urogenital system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, J; Schalling, M; Buckler, A J; Rogers, A; Haber, D A; Housman, D

    1991-08-01

    The Wilms' tumor gene WT1 is a recessive oncogene that encodes a putative transcription factor implicated in nephrogenesis during kidney development. In this report we analyze expression of WT1 in the murine urogenital system. WT1 is expressed in non-germ-cell components of the testis and ovaries in both young and adult mice. In situ mRNA hybridization studies demonstrate that WT1 is expressed in the granulosa and epithelial cells of ovaries, the Sertoli cells of the testis, and in the uterine wall. In addition to the 3.1-kb WT1 transcript detected by Northern blotting of RNA from kidney, uterus, and gonads, there is an approximately 2.5-kb WT1-related mRNA species in testis. The levels of WT1 mRNA in the gonads are among the highest observed, surpassing amounts detected in the embryonic kidney. During development, these levels are differentially regulated, depending on the sexual differentiation of the gonad. Expression of WT1 mRNA in the female reproductive system does not fluctuate significantly from days 4 to 40 postpartum. In contrast, WT1 mRNA levels in the tesis increase steadily after birth, reaching their highest expression levels at day 8 postpartum and decreasing slightly as the animal matures. Expression of WT1 in the gonads is detectable as early as 12.5 days postcoitum (p.c.). As an initial step toward exploring the tissue-specific expression of WT1, DNA elements upstream of WT1 were cloned and sequenced. Three putative transcription initiation sites, utilized in testis, ovaries, and uterus, were mapped by S1 nuclease protection assays. The sequences surrounding these sites have a high G + C content, and typical upstream CCAAT and TATAA boxes are not present. These studies allowed us to identify the translation initiation site for WT1 protein synthesis. We have also used an epitope-tagging protocol to demonstrate that WT1 is a nuclear protein, consistent with its role as a transcription factor. Our results demonstrate regulation of WT1 expression

  13. CD4+CD25+ T cells expressing FoxP3 in Icelandic horses affected with insect bite hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamza, Eman; Steinbach, Falko; Marti, Eliane

    2012-07-15

    Insect bite hypersensitivity (IBH) is an IgE-mediated dermatitis caused by bites of midges from the genus Culicoides. We have shown previously that peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from IBH-affected horses produce higher levels of IL-4 and lower levels of IL-10 and TGF-β1 than those from healthy horses, suggesting that IBH is associated with a reduced regulatory immune response. FoxP3 is a crucial marker of regulatory T cells (Tregs). Here we have determined the proportion of CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+) T cells by flow cytometry in PBMC directly after isolation or after stimulation with Culicoides extract or a control antigen (Tetanus Toxoid). There were no differences between healthy and IBH horses either in the proportion of FoxP3(+)CD4(+)CD25(+) cells in freshly isolated PBMC or in the following stimulation with Tetanus Toxoid. However, upon stimulation of PBMC with the allergen, expression of FoxP3 by CD4(+)CD25(+high) and CD4(+)CD25(+dim) cells was significantly higher in healthy than in IBH horses. Addition of recombinant IL-4 to PBMC from healthy horses stimulated with the allergen significantly decreased the proportion of FoxP3 expressing cells within CD4(+)CD25(+high). These results suggest that IBH is associated with a decreased number of allergen-induced Tregs. This could be a consequence of the increased IL-4 production by PBMC of IBH-affected horses. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Regulatory CD4 T cells inhibit HIV-1 expression of other CD4 T cell subsets via interactions with cell surface regulatory proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mingce; Robinson, Tanya O; Duverger, Alexandra; Kutsch, Olaf; Heath, Sonya L; Cron, Randy Q

    2018-03-01

    During chronic HIV-1 infection, regulatory CD4 T cells (Tregs) frequently represent the largest subpopulation of CD4 T cell subsets, implying relative resistant to HIV-1. When HIV-1 infection of CD4 T cells was explored in vitro and ex vivo from patient samples, Tregs possessed lower levels of HIV-1 DNA and RNA in comparison with conventional effector and memory CD4 T cells. Moreover, Tregs suppressed HIV-1 expression in other CD4 T cells in an in vitro co-culture system. This suppression was mediated in part via multiple inhibitory surface proteins expressed on Tregs. Antibody blockade of CTLA-4, PD-1, and GARP on Tregs resulted in increased HIV-1 DNA integration and mRNA expression in neighboring CD4 T cells. Moreover, antibody blockade of Tregs inhibitory proteins resulted in increased HIV-1 LTR transcription in co-cultured CD4 T cells. Thus, Tregs inhibit HIV-1 infection of other CD4 T cell subsets via interactions with inhibitory cell surface proteins. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Spontaneous loss and alteration of antigen receptor expression in mature CD4+ T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyoizumi, Seishi; Akiyama, Mitoshi; Hirai, Yuko; Kusunoki; Yoichiro; Tanabe, Kazumi; Umeki, Shigeko; Nakamura, Nori; Yamakido, Michio; Hamamoto, Kazuko.

    1990-04-01

    The T-cell receptor CD3 (TCR/CD3) complex plays a central role in antigen recognition and activation of mature T cells, and therefore abnormalities in the expression of the complex should induce unresponsiveness of T cells to antigen stimulus. Using flow cytometry, we detected and enumerated variant cells with loss or alteration of surface TCR/CD3 expression among human mature CD4 + T cells. The presence of variant CD4 + T cells was demonstrated by isolating and cloning them from peripheral blood, and their abnormalities can be accounted for by alterations in TCR expression such as defects of protein expression and partial protein deletion. The variant frequency in peripheral blood increased with aging in normal donors and was highly elevated in patients with ataxia telangiectasia, an autosomal recessive inherited disease with defective DNA repair and variable T-cell immunodeficiency. These findings suggest that such alterations in TCR expression are induced by somatic mutagenesis of TCR genes and can be important factors related to age-dependent and genetic disease-associated T-cell dysfunction. (author)

  16. CD36 expression and lipid metabolism following an oral glucose challenge in South Asians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Jeetesh V; Banerjee, Amitava; Montoro-Garcia, Silvia; Shantsila, Eduard; Alam, Mushfique; Flinders, Paul; Houlton, Kathleen Al; Hughes, Elizabeth A; Lip, Gregory Yh; Gill, Paramjit S

    2015-07-10

    To investigate lipid metabolism and the relationship with monocyte expression of the fatty acid translocase CD36 in South Asians. An observational study of South Asians whom as an ethnic group have - a higher risk of developing diabetes. The susceptibility to diabetes is coupled with an earlier and more rapid progression of micro-, and macro-vascular complications. Twenty-nine healthy South Asian participants [mean age 34.6 (8.9) years, 76.2% male, mean body-mass index 25.0 (5.2) kg/m(2)] were recruited from an urban residential area of central Birmingham (United Kingdom). The main outcomes measured were post prandial (30 min) and post absorptive (120 min) changes from fasting (0 min) in circulating lipoproteins, lipds and hormones, and monocyte expression of CD36 post injection of a 75 g oral glucose challenge. The inducements of variations of monocyte CD36 expression were analysed. Our results showed evident changes in monocyte CD36 expression following the glucose challenge (P challenge (P lifestyle exposures have a role in moderating the expression of CD36.

  17. Expression of CD150 in tumors of the central nervous system: identification of a novel isoform.

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    Olga Romanets-Korbut

    Full Text Available CD150 (IPO3/SLAM belongs to the SLAM family of receptors and serves as a major entry receptor for measles virus. CD150 is expressed on normal and malignant cells of the immune system. However, little is known about its expression outside the hematopoietic system, especially tumors of the central nervous system (CNS. Although CD150 was not found in different regions of normal brain tissues, our immunohistochemical study revealed its expression in 77.6% of human CNS tumors, including glioblastoma, anaplastic astrocytoma, diffuse astrocytoma, ependymoma, and others. CD150 was detected in the cytoplasm, but not on the cell surface of glioma cell lines, and it was colocalized with the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi complex markers. In addition to the full length mRNA of the mCD150 splice isoform, in glioma cells we found a highly expressed novel CD150 transcript (nCD150, containing an 83 bp insert. The insert is derived from a previously unrecognized exon designated Cyt-new, which is located 510 bp downstream of the transmembrane region exon, and is a specific feature of primate SLAMF1. Both mCD150 and nCD150 cDNA variants did not contain any mutations and had the leader sequence. The nCD150 transcript was also detected in normal and malignant B lymphocytes, primary T cells, dendritic cells and macrophages; however, in glioma cells nCD150 was found to be the predominant CD150 isoform. Similarly to mCD150, cell surface expression of nCD150 allows wild type measles virus entry to the cell. Our data indicate that CD150 expression in CNS tumors can be considered a new diagnostic marker and potential target for novel therapeutic approaches.

  18. Experimental murine fascioliasis derives early immune suppression with increased levels of TGF-β and IL-4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Joon-Yong; Bae, Young-An; Yun, Doo-Hee; Yang, Hyun-Jong; Kong, Yoon

    2012-12-01

    In fascioliasis, T-helper 2 (Th2) responses predominate, while little is known regarding early immune phenomenon. We herein analyzed early immunophenotype changes of BALB/c, C57BL/6, and C3H/He mice experimentally infected with 5 Fasciola hepatica metacercariae. A remarkable expansion of CD19(+) B cells was observed as early as week 1 post-infection while CD4(+)/CD8(+) T cells were down-regulated. Accumulation of Mac1(+) cells with time after infection correlated well with splenomegaly of all mice strains tested. The expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α mRNA in splenocytes significantly decreased while that of IL-4 up-regulated. IL-1β expression was down-modulated in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice, but not in C3H/He. Serum levels of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β were considerably elevated in all mice during 3 weeks of infection period. These collective results suggest that experimental murine fascioliasis might derive immune suppression with elevated levels of TGF-β and IL-4 during the early stages of infection.

  19. CD30 ligand is frequently expressed in human hematopoietic malignancies of myeloid and lymphoid origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gattei, V; Degan, M; Gloghini, A; De Iuliis, A; Improta, S; Rossi, F M; Aldinucci, D; Perin, V; Serraino, D; Babare, R; Zagonel, V; Gruss, H J; Carbone, A; Pinto, A

    1997-03-15

    CD30 ligand (CD30L) is a type-II membrane glycoprotein capable of transducing signals leading to either cell death or proliferation through its specific counterstructure CD30. Although several lines of evidence indicate that CD30L plays a key role as a paracrine- or autocrine-acting surface molecule in the deregulated cytokine cascade of Hodgkin's disease, little is known regarding its distribution and biologic significance in other human hematopoietic malignancies. By analyzing tumor cells from 181 patients with RNA studies and immunostaining by the anti-CD30L monoclonal antibody M80, we were able to show that human hematopoietic malignancies of different lineage and maturation stage display a frequent and broad expression of the ligand. CD30L mRNA and surface protein were detected in 60% of acute myeloid leukemias (AMLs), 54% of B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemias (ALLs), and in a consistent fraction (68%) of B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders. In this latter group, hairy cell leukemia and high-grade B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (B-NHL) expressed a higher surface density of CD30L as compared with B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia and low-grade B-NHL. Purified plasmacells from a fraction of multiple myeloma patients also displayed CD30L mRNA and protein. A more restricted expression of CD30L was found in T-cell tumors that was mainly confined to neoplasms with an activated peripheral T-cell phenotype, such as T-cell prolymphocytic leukemia, peripheral T-NHL, and adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma. In contrast, none of the T-lineage ALLs analyzed expressed the ligand. In AML, a high cellular density of CD30L was detected in French-American-British M3, M4, and M5 phenotypes, which are directly associated with the presence on tumor cells of certain surface structures, including the p55 interleukin-2 receptor alpha-chain, the alpha(M) (CD11b) chain of beta2 integrins, and the intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (CD54). Analysis of normal hematopoietic cells

  20. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) modulates CD38 expression, absorbs retinoic acid and may perturb retinoid signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futrega, Kathryn; Yu, Jianshi; Jones, Jace W; Kane, Maureen A; Lott, William B; Atkinson, Kerry; Doran, Michael R

    2016-04-21

    Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is the most commonly used material in the manufacture of customized cell culture devices. While there is concern that uncured PDMS oligomers may leach into culture medium and/or hydrophobic molecules may be absorbed into PDMS structures, there is no consensus on how or if PDMS influences cell behaviour. We observed that human umbilical cord blood (CB)-derived CD34(+) cells expanded in standard culture medium on PDMS exhibit reduced CD38 surface expression, relative to cells cultured on tissue culture polystyrene (TCP). All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) induces CD38 expression, and we reasoned that this hydrophobic molecule might be absorbed by PDMS. Through a series of experiments we demonstrated that ATRA-mediated CD38 expression was attenuated when cultures were maintained on PDMS. Medium pre-incubated on PDMS for extended durations resulted in a time-dependant reduction of ATRA in the medium and increasingly attenuated CD38 expression. This indicated a time-dependent absorption of ATRA into the PDMS. To better understand how PDMS might generally influence cell behaviour, Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) was used to identify potential upstream regulators. This analysis was performed for differentially expressed genes in primary cells including CD34(+) haematopoietic progenitor cells, mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC), and keratinocytes, and cell lines including prostate cancer epithelial cells (LNCaP), breast cancer epithelial cells (MCF-7), and myeloid leukaemia cells (KG1a). IPA predicted that the most likely common upstream regulator of perturbed pathways was ATRA. We demonstrate here that ATRA is absorbed by PDMS in a time-dependent manner and results in the concomitant reduced expression of CD38 on the cell surface of CB-derived CD34(+) cells.

  1. Inhibition of CD147 expression promotes chemosensitivity in HNSCC cells by deactivating MAPK/ERK signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chao; Wang, Jianqi; Fan, Longkun; Guo, Yanjun

    2017-02-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is one of the most common cancers in the world. CD147, a transmembrane glycoprotein, has been reported to be correlated with cancer progression, metastasis, and chemoresistance in various cancers. In this study, we aimed to investigate the mechanism of CD147 in regulating drug resistance in HNSCC cells. qRT-PCR were used to evaluated the expression of CD147 in 57 HNSCC tumorous tissues and 2 cell lines. Increased expression of CD147 was found in most HNSCC samples, and the expression level of CD147 was correlated with multidrug resistance. CD147 RNA silencing decreased the chemoresistance of HNSCC cells by deactivating MAPK/ERK signaling pathway. Further investigation revealed that either rescue expression of CD147 or treatment of MAPK/ERK activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) in CD147 knockdown CRC cell line attenuated the decreased chemoresistance in CD147 knockdown cells. Taken together, our results suggest that CD147 promotes chemoresistance by activating MAPK/ERK signaling pathway in HNSCC. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Differential requirements of CD4(+) T-cell signals for effector cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) priming and functional memory CTL development at higher CD8(+) T-cell precursor frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umeshappa, Channakeshava S; Nanjundappa, Roopa H; Xie, Yufeng; Freywald, Andrew; Xu, Qingyong; Xiang, Jim

    2013-04-01

    Increased CD8(+) T-cell precursor frequency (PF) precludes the requirement of CD4(+) helper T (Th) cells for primary CD8(+) cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) responses. However, the key questions of whether unhelped CTLs generated at higher PF are functional effectors, and whether unhelped CTLs can differentiate into functional memory cells at higher PF are unclear. In this study, ovalbumin (OVA) -pulsed dendritic cells (DC(OVA)) derived from C57BL/6, CD40 knockout (CD40(-/-)) or CD40 ligand knockout (CD40L(-/-)) mice were used to immunize C57BL/6, Ia(b-/-), CD40(-/-) or CD40L(-/-) mice, whose PF was previously increased with transfer of 1 × 10(6) CD8(+) T cells derived from OVA-specific T-cell receptor (TCR) transgenic OTI, OTI(CD40(-/-)) or OTI(CD40L(-/-)) mice. All the immunized mice were then assessed for effector and memory CTL responses. Following DC immunization, relatively comparable CTL priming occurred without CD4(+) T-cell help and Th-provided CD40/CD40L signalling. In addition, the unhelped CTLs were functional effectors capable of inducing therapeutic immunity against established OVA-expressing tumours. In contrast, the functional memory development of CTLs was severely impaired in the absence of CD4(+) T-cell help and CD40/CD40L signalling. Finally, unhelped memory CTLs failed to protect mice against lethal tumour challenge. Taken together, these results demonstrate that CD4(+) T-cell help at higher PF, is not required for effector CTL priming, but is required for functional memory CTL development against cancer. Our data may impact the development of novel preventive and therapeutic approaches in cancer patients with compromised CD4(+) T-cell functions. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis (strain CIDCA 133) stimulates murine macrophages infected with Citrobacter rodentium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugo, Ayelén A; Rolny, Ivanna S; Romanin, David; Pérez, Pablo F

    2017-03-01

    Citrobacter rodentium is a specific murine enteropathogen which causes diarrheal disease characterized by colonic hyperplasia and intestinal inflammation. Recruitment of neutrophils and macrophages constitute a key step to control the infection. Since modulation of the activity of professional phagocytic cells could contribute to improve host´s defences against C. rodentium, we investigated the effect of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis (strain CIDCA 133) on the interaction between murine macrophages (RAW 264.7) and C. rodentium. Phagocytosis, surface molecules and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOs) expression were determined by flow cytometry. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) were assessed by fluorescence microscopy. The presence of lactobacilli increased phagocytosis of C. rodentium whereas C. rodentium had no effect on lactobacilli internalization. Survival of internalized C. rodentium diminished when strain CIDCA 133 was present. CD-86, MHCII, iNOs expression and nitrite production were increased when C. rodentium and lactobacilli were present even though strain CIDCA 133 alone had no effect. Strain CIDCA 133 led to a strong induction of ROS activity which was not modified by C. rodentium. Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis (strain CIDCA 133) is able to increase the activation of murine macrophages infected with C. rodentium. The sole presence of lactobacilli is enough to modify some stimulation markers (e.g. ROS induction) whereas other markers require the presence of both bacteria; thus, indicating a synergistic effect.

  4. Control of CD56 expression and tumor cell cytotoxicity in human Vγ2Vδ2 T cells

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    Focaccetti Chiara

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In lymphocyte subsets, expression of CD56 (neural cell adhesion molecule-1 correlates with cytotoxic effector activity. For cells bearing the Vγ2Vδ2 T cell receptor, isoprenoid pyrophosphate stimulation leads to uniform activation and proliferation, but only a fraction of cells express CD56 and display potent cytotoxic activity against tumor cells. Our goal was to show whether CD56 expression was regulated stochastically, similar to conventional activation antigens, or whether CD56 defined a lineage of cells committed to the cytotoxic phenotype. Results Tracking individual cell clones defined by their Vγ2 chain CDR3 region sequences, we found that CD56 was expressed on precursor cytotoxic T cells already present in the population irrespective of their capacity to proliferate after antigen stimulation. Public T cell receptor sequences found in the CD56+ subset from one individual might appear in the CD56- subset of another donor. The commitment of individual clones to CD56+ or CD56- lineages was stable for each donor over a 1 year interval. Conclusion The ability to express CD56 was not predicted by TCR sequence or by the strength of signal received by the TCR. For γδ T cells, cytotoxic effector function is acquired when cytotoxic precursors within the population are stimulated to proliferate and express CD56. Expression of CD56 defines a committed lineage to the cytotoxic phenotype.

  5. Downregulation of cathepsin G reduces the activation of CD4+ T cells in murine autoimmune diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Fang; Lai, Xiaoyang; Li, Jing; Lei, Shuihong; Hu, Lei

    2017-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is an autoimmune disease due to progressive injury of islet cells mediated by T lymphocytes (T cells). Our previous studies have shown that only cathepsin G (CatG), not other proteases, is involved in the antigen presentation of proinsulin, and if the presentation is inhibited, the activation of CD4+ T cells induced by proinsulin is alleviated in T1DM patients, and CatG-specific inhibitor reduces the activation of CD4+ cells induced by proinsulin in T1DM patients. Therefore, we hypothesize that CatG may play an important role in the activation of CD4+ T cells in T1DM. To this end, mouse studies were conducted to demonstrate that CatG impacts the activation of CD4+ T cells in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice. CatG gene expression and the activation of CD4+ T cells were examined in NOD mice. The effect of CatG inhibitor was investigated in NOD mice on the activation of CD4+ T cells, islet β cell function, islet inflammation and β-cell apoptosis. Furthermore, NOD mice were injected with CatG siRNA in early stage to observe the effect of CatG knockdown on the activation status of CD4+ T cells and the progression of diabetes. During the pathogenesis of diabetes, the expression level of CatG in NOD mice gradually increased and the CD4+ T cells were gradually activated, resulting in more TH1 cells and less TH2 and Treg cells. Treatment with CatG-specific inhibitor reduced the blood glucose level, improved the function of islet β cells and reduced the activation of CD4+ T cells. Early application of CatG siRNA improved the function of islet β cells, reduced islet inflammation and β cell apoptosis, and lowered the activation level of CD4+ T cells, thus slowing down the progression of diabetes.

  6. PU.1 is essential for CD11c expression in CD8(+/CD8(- lymphoid and monocyte-derived dendritic cells during GM-CSF or FLT3L-induced differentiation.

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    Xue-Jun Zhu

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs regulate innate and acquired immunity through their roles as antigen-presenting cells. Specific subsets of mature DCs, including monocyte-derived and lymphoid-derived DCs, can be distinguished based on distinct immunophenotypes and functional properties. The leukocyte integrin, CD11c, is considered a specific marker for DCs and it is expressed by all DC subsets. We created a strain of mice in which DCs and their progenitors could be lineage traced based on activity of the CD11c proximal promoter. Surprisingly, we observed levels of CD11c promoter activity that were similar in DCs and in other mature leukocytes, including monocytes, granulocytes, and lymphocytes. We sought to identify DNA elements and transcription factors that regulate DC-associated expression of CD11c. The ets transcription factor, PU.1, is a key regulator of DC development, and expression of PU.1 varies in different DC subsets. GM-CSF increased monocyte-derived DCs in mice and from mouse bone marrow cultured in vitro, but it did not increase CD8(+ lymphoid-derived DCs or B220(+ plasmacytoid DCs. FLT3L increased both monocyte-derived DCs and lymphoid-derived DCs from mouse bone marrow cultured in vitro. GM-CSF increased the 5.3 Kb CD11c proximal promoter activity in monocyte-derived DCs and CD8(+ lymphoid-derived DCs, but not in B220(+ plasmacytoid DCs. In contrast, FLT3L increased the CD11c proximal promoter activity in both monocyte-derived DCs and B220(+ plasmacytoid DCs. We used shRNA gene knockdown and chromatin immunoprecipitation to demonstrate that PU.1 is required for the effects of GM-CSF or FLT3L on monocyte-derived DCs. We conclude that both GM-CSF and FLT3L act through PU.1 to activate the 5.3 Kb CD11c proximal promoter in DCs and to induce differentiation of monocyte-derived DCs. We also confirm that the CD11c proximal promoter is not sufficient to direct lineage specificity of CD11c expression, and that additional DNA elements are required

  7. Cutting Edge: 2B4-Mediated Coinhibition of CD4+ T Cells Underlies Mortality in Experimental Sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ching-Wen; Mittal, Rohit; Klingensmith, Nathan J; Burd, Eileen M; Terhorst, Cox; Martin, Greg S; Coopersmith, Craig M; Ford, Mandy L

    2017-09-15

    Sepsis is a leading cause of death in the United States, but the mechanisms underlying sepsis-induced immune dysregulation remain poorly understood. 2B4 (CD244, SLAM4) is a cosignaling molecule expressed predominantly on NK cells and memory CD8 + T cells that has been shown to regulate T cell function in models of viral infection and autoimmunity. In this article, we show that 2B4 signaling mediates sepsis lymphocyte dysfunction and mortality. 2B4 expression is increased on CD4 + T cells in septic animals and human patients at early time points. Importantly, genetic loss or pharmacologic inhibition of 2B4 significantly increased survival in a murine cecal ligation and puncture model. Further, CD4-specific conditional knockouts showed that 2B4 functions on CD4 + T cell populations in a cell-intrinsic manner and modulates adaptive and innate immune responses during sepsis. Our results illuminate a novel role for 2B4 coinhibitory signaling on CD4 + T cells in mediating immune dysregulation. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  8. Expression of a retinoic acid signature in circulating CD34 cells from coronary artery disease patients

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    van der Laan Anja M

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Circulating CD34+ progenitor cells have the potential to differentiate into a variety of cells, including endothelial cells. Knowledge is still scarce about the transcriptional programs used by CD34+ cells from peripheral blood, and how these are affected in coronary artery disease (CAD patients. Results We performed a whole genome transcriptome analysis of CD34+ cells, CD4+ T cells, CD14+ monocytes, and macrophages from 12 patients with CAD and 11 matched controls. CD34+ cells, compared to other mononuclear cells from the same individuals, showed high levels of KRAB box transcription factors, known to be involved in gene silencing. This correlated with high expression levels in CD34+ cells for the progenitor markers HOXA5 and HOXA9, which are known to control expression of KRAB factor genes. The comparison of expression profiles of CD34+ cells from CAD patients and controls revealed a less naïve phenotype in patients' CD34+ cells, with increased expression of genes from the Mitogen Activated Kinase network and a lowered expression of a panel of histone genes, reaching levels comparable to that in more differentiated circulating cells. Furthermore, we observed a reduced expression of several genes involved in CXCR4-signaling and migration to SDF1/CXCL12. Conclusions The altered gene expression profile of CD34+ cells in CAD patients was related to activation/differentiation by a retinoic acid-induced differentiation program. These results suggest that circulating CD34+ cells in CAD patients are programmed by retinoic acid, leading to a reduced capacity to migrate to ischemic tissues.

  9. Expression of human cationic trypsinogen (PRSS1) in murine acinar cells promotes pancreatitis and apoptotic cell death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athwal, T; Huang, W; Mukherjee, R; Latawiec, D; Chvanov, M; Clarke, R; Smith, K; Campbell, F; Merriman, C; Criddle, D; Sutton, R; Neoptolemos, J; Vlatković, N

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis (HP) is an autosomal dominant disease that displays the features of both acute and chronic pancreatitis. Mutations in human cationic trypsinogen (PRSS1) are associated with HP and have provided some insight into the pathogenesis of pancreatitis, but mechanisms responsible for the initiation of pancreatitis have not been elucidated and the role of apoptosis and necrosis has been much debated. However, it has been generally accepted that trypsinogen, prematurely activated within the pancreatic acinar cell, has a major role in the initiation process. Functional studies of HP have been limited by the absence of an experimental system that authentically mimics disease development. We therefore developed a novel transgenic murine model system using wild-type (WT) human PRSS1 or two HP-associated mutants (R122H and N29I) to determine whether expression of human cationic trypsinogen in murine acinar cells promotes pancreatitis. The rat elastase promoter was used to target transgene expression to pancreatic acinar cells in three transgenic strains that were generated: Tg(Ela-PRSS1)NV, Tg(Ela-PRSS1*R122H)NV and Tg(Ela-PRSS1*N29I)NV. Mice were analysed histologically, immunohistochemically and biochemically. We found that transgene expression is restricted to pancreatic acinar cells and transgenic PRSS1 proteins are targeted to the pancreatic secretory pathway. Animals from all transgenic strains developed pancreatitis characterised by acinar cell vacuolisation, inflammatory infiltrates and fibrosis. Transgenic animals also developed more severe pancreatitis upon treatment with low-dose cerulein than controls, displaying significantly higher scores for oedema, inflammation and overall histopathology. Expression of PRSS1, WT or mutant, in acinar cells increased apoptosis in pancreatic tissues and isolated acinar cells. Moreover, studies of isolated acinar cells demonstrated that transgene expression promotes apoptosis rather than necrosis. We therefore

  10. MicroRNA-gene expression network in murine liver during Schistosoma japonicum infection.

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    Pengfei Cai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Schistosomiasis japonica remains a significant public health problem in China and Southeast Asian countries. The most typical and serious outcome of the chronic oriental schistosomiasis is the progressive granuloma and fibrosis in the host liver, which has been a major medical challenge. However, the molecular mechanism underling the hepatic pathogenesis is still not clear. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using microarrays, we quantified the temporal gene expression profiles in the liver of Schistosoma japonicum-infected BALB/c mice at 15, 30, and 45 day post infection (dpi with that from uninfected mice as controls. Gene expression alternation associated with liver damage was observed in the initial phase of infection (dpi 15, which became more magnificent with the onset of egg-laying. Up-regulated genes were dominantly associated with inflammatory infiltration, whereas down-regulated genes primarily led to the hepatic functional disorders. Simultaneously, microRNA profiles from the same samples were decoded by Solexa sequencing. More than 130 miRNAs were differentially expressed in murine liver during S. japonicum infection. MiRNAs significantly dysregulated in the mid-phase of infection (dpi 30, such as mmu-miR-146b and mmu-miR-155, may relate to the regulation of hepatic inflammatory responses, whereas miRNAs exhibiting a peak expression in the late phase of infection (dpi 45, such as mmu-miR-223, mmu-miR-146a/b, mmu-miR-155, mmu-miR-34c, mmu-miR-199, and mmu-miR-134, may represent a molecular signature of the development of schistosomal hepatopathy. Further, a dynamic miRNA-gene co-expression network in the progression of infection was constructed. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: This study presents a global view of dynamic expression of both mRNA and miRNA transcripts in murine liver during S. japonicum infection, and highlights that miRNAs may play a variety of regulatory roles in balancing the immune responses during the

  11. Analysis of the capacity to produce IL-3 in murine AIDS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neuenschwander, A U; Marker, O; Thomsen, Allan Randrup

    1994-01-01

    Adult C57BL/6 mice infected with LP-BM5 murine leukaemia virus represent a model of murine AIDS (MAIDS). In this study we have analysed the capacity of CD4+ T cells from infected mice to produce IL-3 following stimulation with ConA for 24-72 h. In contrast to the position with IL-2, the production...

  12. Murine gammaherpesvirus M2 protein induction of IRF4 via the NFAT pathway leads to IL-10 expression in B cells.

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    Udaya S Rangaswamy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Reactivation of the gammaherpesviruses Epstein-Barr virus (EBV, Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV and murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68 from latently infected B cells has been linked to plasma cell differentiation. We have previously shown that the MHV68 M2 protein is important for virus reactivation from B cells and, when expressed alone in primary murine B cells, can drive B cell differentiation towards a pre-plasma cell phenotype. In addition, expression of M2 in primary murine B cells leads to secretion of high levels of IL-10 along with enhanced proliferation and survival. Furthermore, the absence of M2 in vivo leads to a defect in the appearance of MHV68 infected plasma cells in the spleen at the peak of MHV68 latency. Here, employing an inducible B cell expression system, we have determined that M2 activates the NFAT pathway in a Src kinase-dependent manner--leading to induction of the plasma cell-associated transcription factor, Interferon Regulatory F