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Sample records for expressing human xenobiotic-metabolizing

  1. Modulation of Xenobiotic Metabolizing Enzyme and Transporter Gene Expression in Primary Cultures of Human Hepatocytes by ToxCast Chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    ToxCast chemicals were assessed for induction or suppression of xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme and transporter gene expression using primary human hepatocytes. The mRNA levels of 14 target and 2 control genes were measured: ABCB1, ABCB11, ABCG2, SLCO1B1, CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP2B6, C...

  2. Monocrotophos induces the expression and activity of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes in pre-sensitized cultured human brain cells.

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    Vinay K Tripathi

    Full Text Available The expression and metabolic profile of cytochrome P450s (CYPs is largely missing in human brain due to non-availability of brain tissue. We attempted to address the issue by using human brain neuronal (SH-SY5Y and glial (U373-MG cells. The expression and activity of CYP1A1, 2B6 and 2E1 were carried out in the cells exposed to CYP inducers viz., 3-methylcholanthrene (3-MC, cyclophosphamide (CPA, ethanol and known neurotoxicant- monocrotophos (MCP, a widely used organophosphorous pesticide. Both the cells show significant induction in the expression and CYP-specific activity against classical inducers and MCP. The induction level of CYPs was comparatively lower in MCP exposed cells than cells exposed to classical inducers. Pre-exposure (12 h of cells to classical inducers significantly added the MCP induced CYPs expression and activity. The findings were concurrent with protein ligand docking studies, which show a significant modulatory capacity of MCP by strong interaction with CYP regulators-CAR, PXR and AHR. Similarly, the known CYP inducers- 3-MC, CPA and ethanol have also shown significantly high docking scores with all the three studied CYP regulators. The expression of CYPs in neuronal and glial cells has suggested their possible association with the endogenous physiology of the brain. The findings also suggest the xenobiotic metabolizing capabilities of these cells against MCP, if received a pre-sensitization to trigger the xenobiotic metabolizing machinery. MCP induced CYP-specific activity in neuronal cells could help in explaining its effect on neurotransmission, as these CYPs are known to involve in the synthesis/transport of the neurotransmitters. The induction of CYPs in glial cells is also of significance as these cells are thought to be involved in protecting the neurons from environmental insults and safeguard them from toxicity. The data provide better understanding of the metabolizing capability of the human brain cells against

  3. Expression profiles of genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism and disposition in human renal tissues and renal cell models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van der Hauwaert, Cynthia; Savary, Grégoire [EA4483, Université de Lille 2, Faculté de Médecine de Lille, Pôle Recherche, 59045 Lille (France); Buob, David [Institut de Pathologie, Centre de Biologie Pathologie Génétique, Centre Hospitalier Régional Universitaire de Lille, 59037 Lille (France); Leroy, Xavier; Aubert, Sébastien [Institut de Pathologie, Centre de Biologie Pathologie Génétique, Centre Hospitalier Régional Universitaire de Lille, 59037 Lille (France); Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale, UMR837, Centre de Recherche Jean-Pierre Aubert, Equipe 5, 59045 Lille (France); Flamand, Vincent [Service d' Urologie, Hôpital Huriez, Centre Hospitalier Régional Universitaire de Lille, 59037 Lille (France); Hennino, Marie-Flore [EA4483, Université de Lille 2, Faculté de Médecine de Lille, Pôle Recherche, 59045 Lille (France); Service de Néphrologie, Hôpital Huriez, Centre Hospitalier Régional Universitaire de Lille, 59037 Lille (France); Perrais, Michaël [Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale, UMR837, Centre de Recherche Jean-Pierre Aubert, Equipe 5, 59045 Lille (France); and others

    2014-09-15

    Numerous xenobiotics have been shown to be harmful for the kidney. Thus, to improve our knowledge of the cellular processing of these nephrotoxic compounds, we evaluated, by real-time PCR, the mRNA expression level of 377 genes encoding xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes (XMEs), transporters, as well as nuclear receptors and transcription factors that coordinate their expression in eight normal human renal cortical tissues. Additionally, since several renal in vitro models are commonly used in pharmacological and toxicological studies, we investigated their metabolic capacities and compared them with those of renal tissues. The same set of genes was thus investigated in HEK293 and HK2 immortalized cell lines in commercial primary cultures of epithelial renal cells and in proximal tubular cell primary cultures. Altogether, our data offers a comprehensive description of kidney ability to process xenobiotics. Moreover, by hierarchical clustering, we observed large variations in gene expression profiles between renal cell lines and renal tissues. Primary cultures of proximal tubular epithelial cells exhibited the highest similarities with renal tissue in terms of transcript profiling. Moreover, compared to other renal cell models, Tacrolimus dose dependent toxic effects were lower in proximal tubular cell primary cultures that display the highest metabolism and disposition capacity. Therefore, primary cultures appear to be the most relevant in vitro model for investigating the metabolism and bioactivation of nephrotoxic compounds and for toxicological and pharmacological studies. - Highlights: • Renal proximal tubular (PT) cells are highly sensitive to xenobiotics. • Expression of genes involved in xenobiotic disposition was measured. • PT cells exhibited the highest similarities with renal tissue.

  4. In silico prediction of xenobiotic metabolism in humans

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    Mu, Fangping [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Xenobiotic metabolism in humans is catalyzed by a few enzymes with broad substrate specificities, which provide the overall broad chemical specificity for nearly all xenobiotics that humans encounter. Xenobiotic metabolism are classified into functional group biotransformations. Based on bona fide reactions and negative examples for each reaction class, support vector machine (SVM) classifiers are built. The input to SVM is a set of atomic and molecular features to define the electrostatic, steric, energetic, geometrical and topological environment of the atoms in the reaction center under the molecule. Results show that the overall sensitivity and specificity of classifiers is around 87%.

  5. Optical isomers of dihydropyridine calcium channel blockers display enantiospecific effects on the expression and enzyme activities of human xenobiotics-metabolizing cytochromes P450.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Štěpánková, Martina; Krasulová, Kristýna; Dořičáková, Aneta; Kurka, Ondřej; Anzenbacher, Pavel; Dvořák, Zdeněk

    2016-11-16

    Dihydropyridine calcium channel blockers (CCBs) are used as anti-hypertensives and in the treatment of angina pectoris. Structurally, CCBs have at least one chiral center in the molecule, thereby existing in two or more different enantiomers. In the current paper we examined effects of benidipine, felodipine and isradipine enantiomers on the expression and enzyme activities of human xenobiotics-metabolizing cytochromes P450. All CCBs dose-dependently activated aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and pregnane X receptor (PXR), as revealed by gene reporter assays. Activation of AhR, but not PXR, was enantiospecific. Consistently, CCBs induced CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 mRNAs, but not protein, in human hepatocytes and HepG2 cells, with following pattern: benidipine (-)>(+), isradipine (-)>(+) and felodipine (+)>(-). All CCBs induced CYP2A6, CYP2B6 and CYP3A4 mRNA and protein in human hepatocytes, and there were not differences between the enantiomers. All CCBs transformed AhR in its DNA-binding form, as revealed by electromobility shift assay. Tested CCBs inhibited enzyme activities of CYP3A4 (benidipine (+)>(-); felodipine (-)>(+); isradipine (-)-(+)) and CYP2C9 (benidipine (-)>(+); felodipine (+)>(-); isradipine (-)>(+)). The data presented here might be of toxicological and clinical importance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Xenobiotic-Metabolizing Enzyme and Transporter Gene Expression in Primary Cultures of Human Hepatocytes Modulated by Toxcast Chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primary human hepatocyte cultures are useful in vitro model systems of human liver because when cultured under appropriate conditions the hepatocytes retain liver-like functionality such as metabolism, transport, and cell signaling. This model system was used to characterize the ...

  7. Xenobiotic metabolism in human skin and 3D human skin reconstructs: A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gibbs, S.; Sandt, J.J.M. van de; Merk, H.F.; Lockley, D.J.; Pendlington, R.U.; Pease, C.K.

    2007-01-01

    In this review, we discuss and compare studies of xenobiotic metabolism in both human skin and 3D human skin reconstructs. In comparison to the liver, the skin is a less studied organ in terms of characterising metabolic capability. While the skin forms the major protective barrier to environmental

  8. Monocrotophos Induces the Expression of Xenobiotic Metabolizing Cytochrome P450s (CYP2C8 and CYP3A4) and Neurotoxicity in Human Brain Cells.

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    Tripathi, Vinay Kumar; Kumar, Vivek; Pandey, Ankita; Vatsa, Pankhi; Dhasmana, Anupam; Singh, Rajat Pratap; Appikonda, Sri Hari Chandan; Hwang, Inho; Lohani, Mohtashim

    2017-07-01

    Expression of various cytochrome P450s (CYPs) in mammalian brain cells is well documented. However, such studies are hampered in neural/glial cells of human origin due to nonavailability of human brain cells. To address this issue, we investigated the expression and inducibility of CYP2C8 and CYP3A4 and their responsiveness against cyclophosphamide (CPA) and organophosphorus pesticide monocrotophos (MCP), a known developmental neurotoxicant in human neural (SH-SY5Y) and glial (U373-MG) cell lines. CPA induced significant expression of CYP2C8 and CYP3A4 in both types of cells in a time-dependent manner. Neural cell line exhibited relatively higher constitutive and inducible expression of CYPs than the glial cell line. MCP exposure alone could not induce the significant expression of CYPs, whereas the cells preexposed to CPA showed a significant response to MCP. Similar to the case of CPA induced expressions, neural cells were found to be more vulnerable than glial cells. Our data indicate differential expressions of CYPs in cultured human neural and glial cell lines. The findings were synchronized with protein ligand docking studies, which showed a significant modulatory capacity of MCP by strong interaction with CYP regulators-CAR and PXR. Similarly, the known CYP inducer CPA has also shown significant high docking scores with the two studied CYP regulators. We also observed a significant induction in reactive oxygen species (ROS), lipid peroxides (LPO), micronucleus (MN), chromosomal aberration (CA), and reduction in reduced glutathione (GSH) and catalase following the exposure of MCP. Moreover, the expressions of apoptotic markers such as caspase-3, caspase-9, Bax, and p53 were significantly upregulated, whereas the levels of antiapoptotic marker, Bcl2, was downregulated after the exposure of MCP in both cell lines. These findings confirm the involvement of ROS-mediated oxidative stress, which subsequently triggers apoptosis pathways in both human neural (SH-SY5Y

  9. Fruits and vegetables protect against the genotoxicity of heterocyclic aromatic amines activated by human xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes expressed in immortal mammalian cells.

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    Platt, K L; Edenharder, R; Aderhold, S; Muckel, E; Glatt, H

    2010-12-21

    Heterocyclic aromatic amines (HAAs) can be formed during the cooking of meat and fish at elevated temperatures and are associated with an increased risk for cancer. On the other hand, epidemiological findings suggest that foods rich in fruits and vegetables can protect against cancer. In the present study three teas, two wines, and the juices of 15 fruits and 11 vegetables were investigated for their protective effect against the genotoxic effects of 2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline (IQ) and 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP). To closely mimic the enzymatic activation of these HAAs in humans, genetically engineered V79 Chinese hamster fibroblasts were employed that express human cytochrome P450-dependent monooxygenase (hCYP) 1A2 (responsible for the first step of enzymatic activation) and human N(O)-acetyltransferase (hNAT) 2*4 or human sulfotransferase (hSULT)1A1*1 (responsible for the second step of enzymatic activation): V79-hCYP1A2-hNAT2*4 for IQ activation and V79-hCYP1A2-hSULT1A1*1 for PhIP activation. HAA genotoxicity was determined by use of the comet assay. Black, green and rooibos tea moderately reduced the genotoxicity of IQ (IC(50)=0.8-0.9%), whereas red and white wine were less active. From the fruit juices, sweet cherry juice exhibited the highest inhibitory effect on IQ genotoxicity (IC(50)=0.17%), followed by juices from kiwi fruit, plum and blueberry (IC(50)=0.48-0.71%). The juices from watermelon, blackberry, strawberry, black currant, and Red delicious apple showed moderate suppression, whereas sour cherry, grapefruit, red currant, and pineapple juices were only weakly active. Granny Smith apple juice and orange juice proved inactive. Of the vegetable juices, strong inhibition of IQ genotoxicity was only seen with spinach and onion juices (IC(50)=0.42-0.54%). Broccoli, cauliflower, beetroot, sweet pepper, tomato, chard, and red-cabbage juices suppressed IQ genotoxicity only moderately, whereas cucumber juice was

  10. Metabolic Activation of Heterocyclic Amines and Expression of Xenobiotic-Metabolizing Enzymes in the Gastrointestinal Tract of Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwish, Wageh S; Nakayama, Shouta M M; Itotani, Yuumi; Ohno, Marumi; Ikenaka, Yoshinori; Ishizuka, Mayumi

    2015-07-01

    Heterocyclic amines get entry into human body mainly through ingestion of pan-fried meats cooked at high temperatures. Exposure of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) to ingested xenobiotics prior to delivery to the liver may lead to metabolic activation, which may explain the high incidence of GIT carcinogenesis. Therefore, this study investigated the mutagenic activation of 2 heterocyclic amines, 2-aminoanthracene (2-AA) and 3-amino-1-methyl-5H-prydo[4,3-b]indole (Trp-P-2), in the GIT of rats. In addition, the constitutive mRNA expression profiles of xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes (XMEs) in the GIT of rats were examined. Metabolic activation of 2-AA was detected in all GIT tissues except the duodenum and rectum, and it was detected at high levels in the ileum and cecum. Furthermore, we revealed high metabolic activation of 2-AA and Trp-P-2 in the jejunum. The mRNA expression of phase I and II enzymes in rat GIT corresponded with their mutagenic activation ability. In conclusion, our results suggest that different expression levels of XME among GIT tissues may contribute to the tissue-specific differences in metabolic activation of xenobiotics such as heterocyclic amines in rats. This study declares mutagenic activation of 2 heterocyclic amines namely 2-aminoanthracene (2-AA) and 3-amino-1-methyl-5H-prydo[4,3-b]indole (Trp-P-2), in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) of rats. In addition, results obtained in this study suggest that GIT tissue-specific expression of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes may contribute to the tissue-specific mutagenesis/carcinogenesis. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  11. Xenobiotic Metabolism and Gut Microbiomes

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    Das, Anubhav; Srinivasan, Meenakshi; Ghosh, Tarini Shankar; Mande, Sharmila S.

    2016-01-01

    Humans are exposed to numerous xenobiotics, a majority of which are in the form of pharmaceuticals. Apart from human enzymes, recent studies have indicated the role of the gut bacterial community (microbiome) in metabolizing xenobiotics. However, little is known about the contribution of the plethora of gut microbiome in xenobiotic metabolism. The present study reports the results of analyses on xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes in various human gut microbiomes. A total of 397 available gut metagenomes from individuals of varying age groups from 8 nationalities were analyzed. Based on the diversities and abundances of the xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes, various bacterial taxa were classified into three groups, namely, least versatile, intermediately versatile and highly versatile xenobiotic metabolizers. Most interestingly, specific relationships were observed between the overall drug consumption profile and the abundance and diversity of the xenobiotic metabolizing repertoire in various geographies. The obtained differential abundance patterns of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes and bacterial genera harboring them, suggest their links to pharmacokinetic variations among individuals. Additional analyses of a few well studied classes of drug modifying enzymes (DMEs) also indicate geographic as well as age specific trends. PMID:27695034

  12. Xenobiotic Metabolism and Gut Microbiomes.

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    Anubhav Das

    Full Text Available Humans are exposed to numerous xenobiotics, a majority of which are in the form of pharmaceuticals. Apart from human enzymes, recent studies have indicated the role of the gut bacterial community (microbiome in metabolizing xenobiotics. However, little is known about the contribution of the plethora of gut microbiome in xenobiotic metabolism. The present study reports the results of analyses on xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes in various human gut microbiomes. A total of 397 available gut metagenomes from individuals of varying age groups from 8 nationalities were analyzed. Based on the diversities and abundances of the xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes, various bacterial taxa were classified into three groups, namely, least versatile, intermediately versatile and highly versatile xenobiotic metabolizers. Most interestingly, specific relationships were observed between the overall drug consumption profile and the abundance and diversity of the xenobiotic metabolizing repertoire in various geographies. The obtained differential abundance patterns of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes and bacterial genera harboring them, suggest their links to pharmacokinetic variations among individuals. Additional analyses of a few well studied classes of drug modifying enzymes (DMEs also indicate geographic as well as age specific trends.

  13. Hepatic xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme and transporter gene expression through the life stages of the mouse.

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    Janice S Lee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Differences in responses to environmental chemicals and drugs between life stages are likely due in part to differences in the expression of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes and transporters (XMETs. No comprehensive analysis of the mRNA expression of XMETs has been carried out through life stages in any species. RESULTS: Using full-genome arrays, the mRNA expression of all XMETs and their regulatory proteins was examined during fetal (gestation day (GD 19, neonatal (postnatal day (PND 7, prepubescent (PND32, middle age (12 months, and old age (18 and 24 months in the C57BL/6J (C57 mouse liver and compared to adults. Fetal and neonatal life stages exhibited dramatic differences in XMET mRNA expression compared to the relatively minor effects of old age. The total number of XMET probe sets that differed from adults was 636, 500, 84, 5, 43, and 102 for GD19, PND7, PND32, 12 months, 18 months and 24 months, respectively. At all life stages except PND32, under-expressed genes outnumbered over-expressed genes. The altered XMETs included those in all of the major metabolic and transport phases including introduction of reactive or polar groups (Phase I, conjugation (Phase II and excretion (Phase III. In the fetus and neonate, parallel increases in expression were noted in the dioxin receptor, Nrf2 components and their regulated genes while nuclear receptors and regulated genes were generally down-regulated. Suppression of male-specific XMETs was observed at early (GD19, PND7 and to a lesser extent, later life stages (18 and 24 months. A number of female-specific XMETs exhibited a spike in expression centered at PND7. CONCLUSIONS: The analysis revealed dramatic differences in the expression of the XMETs, especially in the fetus and neonate that are partially dependent on gender-dependent factors. XMET expression can be used to predict life stage-specific responses to environmental chemicals and drugs.

  14. Host genes related to paneth cells and xenobiotic metabolism are associated with shifts in human ileum-associated microbial composition.

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    Tianyi Zhang

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to integrate human clinical, genotype, mRNA microarray and 16 S rRNA sequence data collected on 84 subjects with ileal Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis or control patients without inflammatory bowel diseases in order to interrogate how host-microbial interactions are perturbed in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD. Ex-vivo ileal mucosal biopsies were collected from the disease unaffected proximal margin of the ileum resected from patients who were undergoing initial intestinal surgery. Both RNA and DNA were extracted from the mucosal biopsy samples. Patients were genotyped for the three major NOD2 variants (Leufs1007, R702W, and G908R and the ATG16L1T300A variant. Whole human genome mRNA expression profiles were generated using Agilent microarrays. Microbial composition profiles were determined by 454 pyrosequencing of the V3-V5 hypervariable region of the bacterial 16 S rRNA gene. The results of permutation based multivariate analysis of variance and covariance (MANCOVA support the hypothesis that host mucosal Paneth cell and xenobiotic metabolism genes play an important role in host microbial interactions.

  15. Relationship between intratumoral expression of genes coding for xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes and benefit from adjuvant tamoxifen in estrogen receptor alpha-positive postmenopausal breast carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bièche, Ivan; Girault, Igor; Urbain, Estelle; Tozlu, Sengül; Lidereau, Rosette

    2004-01-01

    Little is known of the function and clinical significance of intratumoral dysregulation of xenobiotic-metabolizing enzyme expression in breast cancer. One molecular mechanism proposed to explain tamoxifen resistance is altered tamoxifen metabolism and bioavailability. To test this hypothesis, we used real-time quantitative RT-PCR to quantify the mRNA expression of a large panel of genes coding for the major xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes (12 phase I enzymes, 12 phase II enzymes and three members of the ABC transporter family) in a small series of normal breast (and liver) tissues, and in estrogen receptor alpha (ERα)-negative and ERα-positive breast tumors. Relevant genes were further investigated in a well-defined cohort of 97 ERα-positive postmenopausal breast cancer patients treated with primary surgery followed by adjuvant tamoxifen alone. Seven of the 27 genes showed very weak or undetectable expression in both normal and tumoral breast tissues. Among the 20 remaining genes, seven genes (CYP2A6, CYP2B6, FMO5, NAT1, SULT2B1, GSTM3 and ABCC11) showed significantly higher mRNA levels in ERα-positive breast tumors than in normal breast tissue, or showed higher mRNA levels in ERα-positive breast tumors than in ERα-negative breast tumors. In the 97 ERα-positive breast tumor series, most alterations of these seven genes corresponded to upregulations as compared with normal breast tissue, with an incidence ranging from 25% (CYP2A6) to 79% (NAT1). Downregulation was rare. CYP2A6, CYP2B6, FMO5 and NAT1 emerged as new putative ERα-responsive genes in human breast cancer. Relapse-free survival was longer among patients with FMO5-overexpressing tumors or NAT1-overexpressing tumors (P = 0.0066 and P = 0.000052, respectively), but only NAT1 status retained prognostic significance in Cox multivariate regression analysis (P = 0.0013). Taken together, these data point to a role of genes coding for xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes in breast tumorigenesis, NAT1 being an

  16. Bioactivation of the heterocyclic aromatic amine 2-amino-3-methyl-9H-pyrido [2,3-b]indole (MeA alpha C) in recombinant test systems expressing human xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glatt, H.; Pabel, U.; Meinl, W.

    2004-01-01

    2-Amino-3-methyl-9H-pyrido[2,3-b]indole (MeAalphaC) and some metabolites were investigated for mutagenicity in mammalian cell lines and bacterial strains engineered for the expression of human enzymes. MeAalphaC induced gene mutations (studied at the hprt locus) in Chinese hamster V79-derived cel...

  17. Modulation of mRNA expression and activities of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes, CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP2E1, GPx and GSTP1 by the Salicornia freitagii extract in HT-29 human colon cancer cells

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    Altay Ahmet

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Phase I-II detoxification and antioxidant enzymes are responsible for the detoxification and elimination of activated carcinogens, acting as important biomarkers for chemoprevention. Among them, cytochrome P450s plays a prominent role in the metabolic activation of xenobiotics. The herb Salicornia freitagii (SF (Amaranthaceae is known for its anticancer, antioxidant, antidiabetic and antiinflammatory activities. In this study, we determined the bioactive phenolics in the SF methanol extract and investigated its antiproliferative potential in HT-29 human colon cancer cells. We also investigated the modulation of some phase I and II enzyme (CYP 1A1, 1A2, 2E1, GSTP1 and GPx mRNA expression and enzymatic activities by the SF extract and its major bioactive phenolic compounds. LC/MS-MS analysis showed that the main phenolic compounds of the methanolic SF extract are vanillic acid (48 μg/100g and p-coumaric acid (10.8 μg/100g. SF extract, vanillic acid and p-coumaric acid exhibited high antiproliferative activities in HT-29 cells, with IC50 values of 81.79μg/mL, 98.8 μM and 221.6 μM, respectively. The mRNA expression levels of CYP1A2 and CYP2E1 were decreased, while those of GSTP1 and GPx in HT-29 cells were increased after application of either the SF extract or vanillic acid. The SF extract by itself also increased the activities of GPx and GSTP1 enzymes 1.68- and 1.49-fold, respectively. Our data indicate that the SF extract and its major bioactive compound, vanillic acid, could exert a modulatory effect on the expression of enzymes that are involved in xenobiotic activation and detoxification pathways in the gastrointestinal tract. For this reason, SF can be considered as a natural source of chemopreventive agents.

  18. Insights on the human microbiome and its xenobiotic metabolism: what is known about its effects on human physiology?

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    Tralau, Tewes; Sowada, Juliane; Luch, Andreas

    2015-03-01

    Our microbiome harbours a metabolic capacity far beyond our own. Moreover, its gene pool is highly adaptable and subject to selective pressure, including host exposure to xenobiotics. Yet, the resulting adaptations do not necessarily follow host well-being and can therefore contribute to disease or unfavourable metabolite production. This review provides an overview of our host-microbiome relationship in light of bacterial (xenobiotic) metabolism, community dynamics, entero-endocrine crosstalk, dysbiosis and potential therapeutic targets. In addition, it will highlight the need for a systematic analysis of the microbiome's potential for substance toxification. The influence of our microbiota reaches from primary metabolites to secondary effects such as substrate competition or the activation of eukaryotic Phase I and Phase II enzymes. Further on it plays a hitherto underestimated role in drug metabolism, toxicity and pathogenesis. These effects are partly caused by entero-endocrine crosstalk and interference with eukaryotic regulatory networks. On first sight, the resulting concept of a metabolically competent microbiome adds enormous complexity to human physiology. Yet, the potential specificity of microbial targets harbours therapeutic promise for diseases such as diabetes, cancer and psychiatric disorders. A better physiological and biochemical understanding of the microbiome is thus of high priority for academia and biomedical research.

  19. Transcriptional expression analysis of ABC efflux transporters and xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes in the Chinese rare minnow.

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    Yuan, Lilai; Lv, Biping; Zha, Jinmiao; Wang, Zijian

    2014-05-01

    In the present study, the cDNA fragments of five ABC transporter genes (ABCB1, ABCB11, ABCC1, ABCC2, and ABCG2) in the rare minnow were cloned, and their tissue-specific expression patterns were evaluated across eight rare minnow tissues (liver, gill, intestine, kidney, spleen, brain, skin, and muscle). Furthermore, the transcriptional effects on these ABC transporter genes and five xenobiotic-metabolizing enzyme genes (CYP1A, GSTm, GSTp1, GCLC, and UGT1a) were determined in the rare minnow liver after 12 days of pyrene exposure. Basal expression analysis showed that the tissues with high expression of the ABC transporters included the liver, kidney, and intestine. Moreover, the most highly expressed of the ABC genes were ABCB1 and ABCC2 in all eight of the tissues tested. The ABCB11 gene was almost exclusively expressed in the liver of the rare minnow, whereas ABCC1 and ABCG2 showed weak expression in all eight tissues compared to ABCB1 and ABCC2. Our results provide the first thorough examination of the expression patterns of toxicologically relevant ABC transporters in the rare minnow and serve as a necessary basis for further studies of these ABC transporters in fish. Furthermore, synergistic up-regulation of CYP1A, GSTp1, GCLC, UGT1a, and ABCC2 was observed in the rare minnow liver following pyrene exposure, while GSTm, ABCB1, ABCB11, ABCC1, and ABCG2 were not significantly affected (p ABC transporters by pyrene suggests a possible involvement and cooperation of these genes in the detoxification process in rare minnows. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Elucidation of xenobiotic metabolism pathways in human skin and human skin models by proteomic profiling.

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    Sven van Eijl

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human skin has the capacity to metabolise foreign chemicals (xenobiotics, but knowledge of the various enzymes involved is incomplete. A broad-based unbiased proteomics approach was used to describe the profile of xenobiotic metabolising enzymes present in human skin and hence indicate principal routes of metabolism of xenobiotic compounds. Several in vitro models of human skin have been developed for the purpose of safety assessment of chemicals. The suitability of these epidermal models for studies involving biotransformation was assessed by comparing their profiles of xenobiotic metabolising enzymes with those of human skin. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Label-free proteomic analysis of whole human skin (10 donors was applied and analysed using custom-built PROTSIFT software. The results showed the presence of enzymes with a capacity for the metabolism of alcohols through dehydrogenation, aldehydes through dehydrogenation and oxidation, amines through oxidation, carbonyls through reduction, epoxides and carboxylesters through hydrolysis and, of many compounds, by conjugation to glutathione. Whereas protein levels of these enzymes in skin were mostly just 4-10 fold lower than those in liver and sufficient to support metabolism, the levels of cytochrome P450 enzymes were at least 300-fold lower indicating they play no significant role. Four epidermal models of human skin had profiles very similar to one another and these overlapped substantially with that of whole skin. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The proteomics profiling approach was successful in producing a comprehensive analysis of the biotransformation characteristics of whole human skin and various in vitro skin models. The results show that skin contains a range of defined enzymes capable of metabolising different classes of chemicals. The degree of similarity of the profiles of the in vitro models indicates their suitability for epidermal toxicity testing. Overall, these

  1. Environmental pollutants parathion, paraquat and bisphenol A show distinct effects towards nuclear receptors-mediated induction of xenobiotics-metabolizing cytochromes P450 in human hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrzal, Radim; Zenata, Ondrej; Doricakova, Aneta; Dvorak, Zdenek

    2015-10-01

    Environmental pollutants parathion, bisphenol A and paraquat were not systematically studied towards the effects on the expression of phase I xenobiotics-metabolizing cytochromes P450 (CYPs). We monitored their effects on the expression of selected CYPs in primary cultures of human hepatocytes. Moreover, we investigated their effects on the receptors regulating these CYPs, particularly arylhydrocarbon receptor (AhR), pregnane X receptor (PXR) and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) by gene reporter assays. We found that parathion and bisphenol A are the activators of AhR. Moreover, they are the inducers of CYP1A1 mRNA in hepatoma cells HepG2 as well as in human hepatocytes by AhR-dependent mechanism via formation of AhR-DNA-binding complex, as revealed by gel shift assay. All three compounds possessed anti-glucocorticoid action as revealed by GR-dependent gene reporter assay and a decline in tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) gene expression in human hepatocytes. Moreover, parathion and bisphenol A are the activators of PXR and inducers of CYP3A4 mRNA and protein in the primary cultures of human hepatocytes. In conclusion, the studied compounds displayed distinct activities towards nuclear receptors involved in many biological processes and these findings may help us to better understand their adverse actions in pathological states followed after their exposure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Intestinal microbiota regulate xenobiotic metabolism in the liver.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Britta Björkholm

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The liver is the central organ for xenobiotic metabolism (XM and is regulated by nuclear receptors such as CAR and PXR, which control the metabolism of drugs. Here we report that gut microbiota influences liver gene expression and alters xenobiotic metabolism in animals exposed to barbiturates. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By comparing hepatic gene expression on microarrays from germfree (GF and conventionally-raised mice (SPF, we identified a cluster of 112 differentially expressed target genes predominantly connected to xenobiotic metabolism and pathways inhibiting RXR function. These findings were functionally validated by exposing GF and SPF mice to pentobarbital which confirmed that xenobiotic metabolism in GF mice is significantly more efficient (shorter time of anesthesia when compared to the SPF group. CONCLUSION: Our data demonstrate that gut microbiota modulates hepatic gene expression and function by altering its xenobiotic response to drugs without direct contact with the liver.

  3. Nerolidol and Farnesol Inhibit Some Cytochrome P450 Activities but Did Not Affect Other Xenobiotic-Metabolizing Enzymes in Rat and Human Hepatic Subcellular Fractions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alena Špičáková

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Sesquiterpenes, 15-carbon compounds formed from three isoprenoid units, are the main components of plant essential oils. Sesquiterpenes occur in human food, but they are principally taken as components of many folk medicines and dietary supplements. The aim of our study was to test and compare the potential inhibitory effect of acyclic sesquiterpenes, trans-nerolidol, cis-nerolidol and farnesol, on the activities of the main xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes in rat and human liver in vitro. Rat and human subcellular fractions, relatively specific substrates, corresponding coenzymes and HPLC, spectrophotometric or spectrofluorometric analysis of product formation were used. The results showed significant inhibition of cytochromes P450 (namely CYP1A, CYP2B and CYP3A subfamilies activities by all tested sesquiterpenes in rat as well as in human hepatic microsomes. On the other hand, all tested sesquiterpenes did not significantly affect the activities of carbonyl-reducing enzymes and conjugation enzymes. The results indicate that acyclic sesquiterpenes might affect CYP1A, CYP2B and CYP3A mediated metabolism of concurrently administered drugs and other xenobiotics. The possible drug–sesquiterpene interactions should be verified in in vivo experiments.

  4. Combination Effects of (TriAzole Fungicides on Hormone Production and Xenobiotic Metabolism in a Human Placental Cell Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svenja Rieke

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Consumers are exposed to multiple residues of different pesticides via the diet. Therefore, EU legislation for pesticides requires the evaluation of single active substances as well as the consideration of combination effects. Hence the analysis of combined effects of substances in a broad dose range represents a key challenge to current experimental and regulatory toxicology. Here we report evidence for additive effects for (triazole fungicides, a widely used group of antifungal agents, in the human placental cell line Jeg-3. In addition to the triazoles cyproconazole, epoxiconazole, flusilazole and tebuconazole and the azole fungicide prochloraz also pesticides from other chemical classes assumed to act via different modes of action (i.e., the organophosphate chlorpyrifos and the triazinylsulfonylurea herbicide triflusulfuron-methyl were investigated. Endpoints analysed include synthesis of steroid hormone production (progesterone and estradiol and gene expression of steroidogenic and non-steroidogenic cytochrome-P-450 (CYP enzymes. For the triazoles and prochloraz, a dose dependent inhibition of progesterone production was observed and additive effects could be confirmed for several combinations of these substances in vitro. The non-triazoles chlorpyrifos and triflusulfuron-methyl did not affect this endpoint and, in line with this finding, no additivity was observed when these substances were applied in mixtures with prochloraz. While prochloraz slightly increased aromatase expression and estradiol production and triflusulfuron-methyl decreased estradiol production, none of the other substances had effects on the expression levels of steroidogenic CYP-enzymes in Jeg-3 cells. For some triazoles, prochloraz and chlorpyrifos a significant induction of CYP1A1 mRNA expression and potential combination effects for this endpoint were observed. Inhibition of CYP1A1 mRNA induction by the AhR inhibitor CH223191 indicated AhR receptor dependence this

  5. Combination effects of (tri)azole fungicides on hormone production and xenobiotic metabolism in a human placental cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieke, Svenja; Koehn, Sophie; Hirsch-Ernst, Karen; Pfeil, Rudolf; Kneuer, Carsten; Marx-Stoelting, Philip

    2014-09-17

    Consumers are exposed to multiple residues of different pesticides via the diet. Therefore, EU legislation for pesticides requires the evaluation of single active substances as well as the consideration of combination effects. Hence the analysis of combined effects of substances in a broad dose range represents a key challenge to current experimental and regulatory toxicology. Here we report evidence for additive effects for (tri)azole fungicides, a widely used group of antifungal agents, in the human placental cell line Jeg-3. In addition to the triazoles cyproconazole, epoxiconazole, flusilazole and tebuconazole and the azole fungicide prochloraz also pesticides from other chemical classes assumed to act via different modes of action (i.e., the organophosphate chlorpyrifos and the triazinylsulfonylurea herbicide triflusulfuron-methyl) were investigated. Endpoints analysed include synthesis of steroid hormone production (progesterone and estradiol) and gene expression of steroidogenic and non-steroidogenic cytochrome-P-450 (CYP) enzymes. For the triazoles and prochloraz, a dose dependent inhibition of progesterone production was observed and additive effects could be confirmed for several combinations of these substances in vitro. The non-triazoles chlorpyrifos and triflusulfuron-methyl did not affect this endpoint and, in line with this finding, no additivity was observed when these substances were applied in mixtures with prochloraz. While prochloraz slightly increased aromatase expression and estradiol production and triflusulfuron-methyl decreased estradiol production, none of the other substances had effects on the expression levels of steroidogenic CYP-enzymes in Jeg-3 cells. For some triazoles, prochloraz and chlorpyrifos a significant induction of CYP1A1 mRNA expression and potential combination effects for this endpoint were observed. Inhibition of CYP1A1 mRNA induction by the AhR inhibitor CH223191 indicated AhR receptor dependence this effect.

  6. Metabolic Activation of Heterocyclic Amines and Expression of Xenobiotic-Metabolizing Enzymes in the Gastrointestinal Tract of Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Darwish, Wageh S.; Nakayama, Shouta M. M.; Itotani, Yuumi; Ohno, Marumi; Ikenaka, Yoshinori; Ishizuka, Mayumi

    2015-01-01

    Heterocyclic amines get entry into human body mainly through ingestion of pan-fried meats cooked at high temperatures. Exposure of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) to ingested xenobiotics prior to delivery to the liver may lead to metabolic activation, which may explain the high incidence of GIT carcinogenesis. Therefore, this study investigated the mutagenic activation of 2 heterocyclic amines, 2-aminoanthracene (2-AA) and 3-amino-1-methyl-5H-prydo[4,3-b]indole (Trp-P-2), in the GIT of rats....

  7. The hepatic circadian clock modulates xenobiotic metabolism in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBruyne, Jason P; Weaver, David R; Dallmann, Robert

    2014-08-01

    The circadian clock generates daily cycles of gene expression that regulate physiological processes. The liver plays an important role in xenobiotic metabolism and also has been shown to possess its own cell-based clock. The liver clock is synchronized by the master clock in the brain, and a portion of rhythmic gene expression can be driven by behavior of the organism as a whole even when the hepatic clock is suppressed. So far, however, there is relatively little evidence indicating whether the liver clock is functionally important in modulating xenobiotic metabolism. Thus, mice lacking circadian clock function in the whole body or specifically in liver were challenged with pentobarbital and acetaminophen, and pentobarbital sleep time (PBST) and acetaminophen toxicity, respectively, was assessed at different times of day in mutant and control mice. The results suggest that the liver clock is essential for rhythmic changes in xenobiotic detoxification. Surprisingly, it seems that the way in which the clock is disrupted determines the rate of xenobiotic metabolism in the liver. CLOCK-deficient mice are remarkably resistant to acetaminophen and exhibit a longer PBST, while PERIOD-deficient mice have a short PBST. These results indicate an essential role of the tissue-intrinsic peripheral circadian oscillator in the liver in regulating xenobiotic metabolism. © 2014 The Author(s).

  8. Toxicokinetics of the food-toxin IQ in human placental perfusion is not affected by ABCG2 or xenobiotic metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Immonen, E; Kummu, M; Petsalo, A

    2010-01-01

    Metabolizing enzymes and transporters affect toxicokinetics of foreign compounds (e.g. drugs and carcinogens) in human placenta. The heterocyclic amine, 2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline (IQ) is a food-borne carcinogen being metabolically activated by cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes, especially...... by CYP1A1/2. IQ is also a substrate for ABCG2 transporter. Placental transfer of (14)C-IQ was evaluated in 4-6 h ex vivo human placental perfusions in Finland and Denmark. In Finland placentas were perfused with (14)C-IQ alone (0.5 muM, n = 6) or in combination with GF120918 (inhibitor of ABCG2, 1 muM, n...... = 6) or Ko143 (specific inhibitor of ABCG2, 2 muM, n = 4) to study the role of ABCG2 inhibition in transfer while in Denmark perfusions were performed with (14)C-IQ alone. Critical parameters (leak from fetal to maternal circulation, pH values, blood gases, glucose consumption, the production of h...

  9. The hepatic circadian clock modulates xenobiotic metabolism in mice

    OpenAIRE

    DeBruyne, Jason P; Weaver, David R; Dallmann, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The circadian clock generates daily cycles of gene expression that regulate physiological processes. The liver plays an important role in xenobiotic metabolism, and also has been shown to possess its own cell-based clock. The liver clock is synchronized by the master clock in the brain, and a portion of rhythmic gene expression can be driven by behavior of the organism as a whole even when the hepatic clock is suppressed. So far, however, there is relatively little evidence indicating whether...

  10. Xenobiotic metabolism capacities of human skin in comparison with a 3D-epidermis model and keratinocyte-based cell culture as in vitro alternatives for chemical testing: phase II enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Götz, Christine; Pfeiffer, Roland; Tigges, Julia; Ruwiedel, Karsten; Hübenthal, Ulrike; Merk, Hans F; Krutmann, Jean; Edwards, Robert J; Abel, Josef; Pease, Camilla; Goebel, Carsten; Hewitt, Nicola; Fritsche, Ellen

    2012-05-01

    The 7th Amendment to the EU Cosmetics Directive prohibits the use of animals in cosmetic testing for certain endpoints, such as genotoxicity. Therefore, skin in vitro models have to replace chemical testing in vivo. However, the metabolic competence neither of human skin nor of alternative in vitro models has so far been fully characterized, although skin is the first-pass organ for accidentally or purposely (cosmetics and pharmaceuticals) applied chemicals. Thus, there is an urgent need to understand the xenobiotic-metabolizing capacities of human skin and to compare these activities to models developed to replace animal testing. We have measured the activity of the phase II enzymes glutathione S-transferase, UDP-glucuronosyltransferase and N-acetyltransferase in ex vivo human skin, the 3D epidermal model EpiDerm 200 (EPI-200), immortalized keratinocyte-based cell lines (HaCaT and NCTC 2544) and primary normal human epidermal keratinocytes. We show that all three phase II enzymes are present and highly active in skin as compared to phase I. Human skin, therefore, represents a more detoxifying than activating organ. This work systematically compares the activities of three important phase II enzymes in four different in vitro models directly to human skin. We conclude from our studies that 3D epidermal models, like the EPI-200 employed here, are superior over monolayer cultures in mimicking human skin xenobiotic metabolism and thus better suited for dermatotoxicity testing. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  11. Transgenic rice plants expressing human p450 genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism for phytoremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahigashi, Hiroyuki; Hirose, Sakiko; Ohkawa, Hideo; Ohkawa, Yasunobu

    2008-01-01

    Phytoremediation is the use of plants to remove xenobiotic compounds from the environment. Plants have the inherent ability to detoxify xenobiotic pollutants, but they are generally poor at degrading them. The introduction of genes involved in xenobiotic degradation is aimed at enhancing plants' potential further. Rice (Oryza sativa) is a good candidate for this purpose and has been transformed with genes encoding cytochrome P450 monooxygenases CYP1A1, CYP2B6, and CYP2C19. The transgenic plants were more tolerant to various herbicides than nontransgenic Nipponbare rice plants, owing to enhanced metabolism by the introduced P450 enzymes. Transgenic plants were able to remove atrazine and metolachlor from soil. Field testing and risk assessment are very important for developing transgenic plants for phytoremediation. Transgenic rice plants should become useful as herbicide-tolerant crops and for phytoremediation of xenobiotic pollutants in future. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Xenobiotic metabolism capacities of human skin in comparison with a 3D epidermis model and keratinocyte-based cell culture as in vitro alternatives for chemical testing: activating enzymes (Phase I).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Götz, Christine; Pfeiffer, Roland; Tigges, Julia; Blatz, Veronika; Jäckh, Christine; Freytag, Eva-Maria; Fabian, Eric; Landsiedel, Robert; Merk, Hans F; Krutmann, Jean; Edwards, Robert J; Pease, Camilla; Goebel, Carsten; Hewitt, Nicola; Fritsche, Ellen

    2012-05-01

    Skin is important for the absorption and metabolism of exposed chemicals such as cosmetics or pharmaceuticals. The Seventh Amendment to the EU Cosmetics Directive prohibits the use of animals for cosmetic testing for certain endpoints, such as genotoxicity; therefore, there is an urgent need to understand the xenobiotic metabolizing capacities of human skin and to compare these activities with reconstructed 3D skin models developed to replace animal testing. We have measured Phase I enzyme activities of cytochrome P450 (CYP) and cyclooxygenase (COX) in ex vivo human skin, the 3D skin model EpiDerm™ (EPI-200), immortalized keratinocyte-based cell lines and primary normal human epidermal keratinocytes. Our data demonstrate that basal CYP enzyme activities are very low in whole human skin and EPI-200 as well as keratinocytes. In addition, activities in monolayer cells differed from organotypic tissues after induction. COX activity was similar in skin, EPI-200 and NHEK cells, but was significantly lower in immortalized keratinocytes. Hence, the 3D model EPI-200 might represent a more suitable model for dermatotoxicological studies. Altogether, these data help to better understand skin metabolism and expand the knowledge of in vitro alternatives used for dermatotoxicity testing. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  13. The effects of multiply ionizing gamma irradiations on the xenobiotic metabolizing system in the liver of rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zavodnik, L.B.; Buko, V.U.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the work was the studying the effect of multiply low doses of gamma-irradiation in a total doze 1 and 2 Gy on processes lipid peroxidation and xenobiotics metabolizing in rat liver. It was shown the multiply irradiation causes the expressed activation of lipid peroxidation, by increase of TBARS level and dien conjugates. The system of microsomal oxidations was broken at the same time. (authors)

  14. Hepatocyte-based flow analytical bioreactor for xenobiotics metabolism bioprediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Helvenstein

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The research for new in vitro screening tools for predictive metabolic profiling of drug candidates is of major interest in the pharmaceutical field. The main motivation is to avoid late rejection in drug development and to deliver safer drugs to the market. Thanks to the superparamagnetic properties of iron oxide nanoparticles, a flow bioreactor has been developed which is able to perform xenobiotic metabolism studies. The selected cell line (HepaRG maintained its metabolic competencies once iron oxide nanoparticles were internalized. Based on magnetically trapped cells in a homemade immobilization chamber, through which a flow of circulating phase was injected to transport nutrients and/or the studied xenobiotic, off-line and online (when coupled to a high-performance liquid chromatography chain metabolic assays were developed using diclofenac as a reference compound. The diclofenac demonstrated a similar metabolization profile chromatogram, both with the newly developed setup and with the control situation. Highly versatile, this pioneering and innovative instrumental design paves the way for a new approach in predictive metabolism studies.

  15. Xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes in plants and their role in uptake and biotransformation of veterinary drugs in the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bártíková, Hana; Skálová, Lenka; Stuchlíková, Lucie; Vokřál, Ivan; Vaněk, Tomáš; Podlipná, Radka

    2015-08-01

    Many various xenobiotics permanently enter plants and represent potential danger for their organism. For that reason, plants have evolved extremely sophisticated detoxification systems including a battery of xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes. Some of them are similar to those in humans and animals, but there are several plant-specific ones. This review briefly introduces xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes in plants and summarizes present information about their action toward veterinary drugs. Veterinary drugs are used worldwide to treat diseases and protect animal health. However, veterinary drugs are also unwantedly introduced into environment mostly via animal excrements, they persist in the environment for a long time and may impact on the non-target organisms. Plants are able to uptake, transform the veterinary drugs to non- or less-toxic compounds and store them in the vacuoles and cell walls. This ability may protect not only plant themselves but also other organisms, predominantly invertebrates and wild herbivores. The aim of this review is to emphasize the importance of plants in detoxification of veterinary drugs in the environment. The results of studies, which dealt with transport and biotransformation of veterinary drugs in plants, are summarized and evaluated. In conclusion, the risks and consequences of veterinary drugs in the environment and the possibilities of phytoremediation technologies are considered and future perspectives are outlined.

  16. Phosphorylation of Isoflavones by Bacillus subtilis BCRC 80517 May Represent Xenobiotic Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chen; Wu, Bo-Yuan; Chang, Yu-Chuan; Chang, Chi-Fon; Chiou, Tai-Ying; Su, Nan-Wei

    2018-01-10

    The soy isoflavones daidzein (DAI) and genistein (GEN) have beneficial effects on human health. However, their oral bioavailability is hampered by their low aqueous solubility. Our previous study revealed two water-soluble phosphorylated conjugates of isoflavones, daidzein 7-O-phosphate and genistein 7-O-phosphate, generated via biotransformation by Bacillus subtilis BCRC80517 cultivated with isoflavones. In this study, two novel derivatives of isoflavones, daidzein 4'-O-phosphate and genistein 4'-O-phosphate, were identified by HPLC-ESI-MS/MS and 1 H, 13 C, and 31 P NMR, and their biotransformation roadmaps were proposed. Primarily, isoflavone glucosides were deglycosylated and then phosphorylated predominantly into 7-O-phosphate conjugates with traces of 4'-O-phosphate conjugates. Inevitably, trace quantities of glucosides were converted into 6″-O-succinyl glucosides. GEN was more efficiently phosphorylated than DAI. Nevertheless, the presence of GEN prolonged the time until the exponential phase of cell growth, whereas the other isoflavones showed little effect on cell growth. Our findings provide new insights into the novel microbial phosphorylation of isoflavones involved in xenobiotic metabolism.

  17. Retrofit Strategies for Incorporating Xenobiotic Metabolism into High Throughput Screening Assays (EMGS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The US EPA’s ToxCast program is designed to assess chemical perturbations of molecular and cellular endpoints using a variety of high-throughput screening (HTS) assays. However, existing HTS assays have limited or no xenobiotic metabolism which could lead to a mischaracterization...

  18. Interactions between Cigarette Smoking and Polymorphisms of Xenobiotic-Metabolizing Genes: The Risk of Oral Leukoplakia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Fen Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This case-control study investigates the role of xenobiotic-metabolizing genes, including glutathione S-transferases (GSTs and cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1 and 2E1 (CYP2E1, in the susceptibility to oral potentially malignant disorders (OPMDs.

  19. Triclocarban mediates induction of xenobiotic metabolism through activation of the constitutive androstane receptor and the estrogen receptor alpha.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Fei Yueh

    Full Text Available Triclocarban (3,4,4'-trichlorocarbanilide, TCC is used as a broad-based antimicrobial agent that is commonly added to personal hygiene products. Because of its extensive use in the health care industry and resistance to degradation in sewage treatment processes, TCC has become a significant waste product that is found in numerous environmental compartments where humans and wildlife can be exposed. While TCC has been linked to a range of health and environmental effects, few studies have been conducted linking exposure to TCC and induction of xenobiotic metabolism through regulation by environmental sensors such as the nuclear xenobiotic receptors (XenoRs. To identify the ability of TCC to activate xenobiotic sensors, we monitored XenoR activities in response to TCC treatment using luciferase-based reporter assays. Among the XenoRs in the reporter screening assay, TCC promotes both constitutive androstane receptor (CAR and estrogen receptor alpha (ERα activities. TCC treatment to hUGT1 mice resulted in induction of the UGT1A genes in liver. This induction was dependent upon the constitutive active/androstane receptor (CAR because no induction occurred in hUGT1Car(-/- mice. Induction of the UGT1A genes by TCC corresponded with induction of Cyp2b10, another CAR target gene. TCC was demonstrated to be a phenobarbital-like activator of CAR in receptor-based assays. While it has been suggested that TCC be classified as an endocrine disruptor, it activates ERα leading to induction of Cyp1b1 in female ovaries as well as in promoter activity. Activation of ERα by TCC in receptor-based assays also promotes induction of human CYP2B6. These observations demonstrate that TCC activates nuclear xenobiotic receptors CAR and ERα both in vivo and in vitro and might have the potential to alter normal physiological homeostasis. Activation of these xenobiotic-sensing receptors amplifies gene expression profiles that might represent a mechanistic base for

  20. Triclocarban Mediates Induction of Xenobiotic Metabolism through Activation of the Constitutive Androstane Receptor and the Estrogen Receptor Alpha

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yueh, Mei-Fei; Li, Tao; Evans, Ronald M.; Hammock, Bruce; Tukey, Robert H.

    2012-01-01

    Triclocarban (3,4,4′-trichlorocarbanilide, TCC) is used as a broad-based antimicrobial agent that is commonly added to personal hygiene products. Because of its extensive use in the health care industry and resistance to degradation in sewage treatment processes, TCC has become a significant waste product that is found in numerous environmental compartments where humans and wildlife can be exposed. While TCC has been linked to a range of health and environmental effects, few studies have been conducted linking exposure to TCC and induction of xenobiotic metabolism through regulation by environmental sensors such as the nuclear xenobiotic receptors (XenoRs). To identify the ability of TCC to activate xenobiotic sensors, we monitored XenoR activities in response to TCC treatment using luciferase-based reporter assays. Among the XenoRs in the reporter screening assay, TCC promotes both constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) activities. TCC treatment to hUGT1 mice resulted in induction of the UGT1A genes in liver. This induction was dependent upon the constitutive active/androstane receptor (CAR) because no induction occurred in hUGT1Car−/− mice. Induction of the UGT1A genes by TCC corresponded with induction of Cyp2b10, another CAR target gene. TCC was demonstrated to be a phenobarbital-like activator of CAR in receptor-based assays. While it has been suggested that TCC be classified as an endocrine disruptor, it activates ERα leading to induction of Cyp1b1 in female ovaries as well as in promoter activity. Activation of ERα by TCC in receptor-based assays also promotes induction of human CYP2B6. These observations demonstrate that TCC activates nuclear xenobiotic receptors CAR and ERα both in vivo and in vitro and might have the potential to alter normal physiological homeostasis. Activation of these xenobiotic-sensing receptors amplifies gene expression profiles that might represent a mechanistic base for potential human

  1. Rb and p53 Liver Functions Are Essential for Xenobiotic Metabolism and Tumor Suppression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sathidpak Nantasanti

    Full Text Available The tumor suppressors Retinoblastoma (Rb and p53 are frequently inactivated in liver diseases, such as hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC or infections with Hepatitis B or C viruses. Here, we discovered a novel role for Rb and p53 in xenobiotic metabolism, which represent a key function of the liver for metabolizing therapeutic drugs or toxins. We demonstrate that Rb and p53 cooperate to metabolize the xenobiotic 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydrocollidine (DDC. DDC is metabolized mainly by cytochrome P450 (Cyp3a enzymes resulting in inhibition of heme synthesis and accumulation of protoporphyrin, an intermediate of heme pathway. Protoporphyrin accumulation causes bile injury and ductular reaction. We show that loss of Rb and p53 resulted in reduced Cyp3a expression decreased accumulation of protoporphyrin and consequently less ductular reaction in livers of mice fed with DDC for 3 weeks. These findings provide strong evidence that synergistic functions of Rb and p53 are essential for metabolism of DDC. Because Rb and p53 functions are frequently disabled in liver diseases, our results suggest that liver patients might have altered ability to remove toxins or properly metabolize therapeutic drugs. Strikingly the reduced biliary injury towards the oxidative stress inducer DCC was accompanied by enhanced hepatocellular injury and formation of HCCs in Rb and p53 deficient livers. The increase in hepatocellular injury might be related to reduce protoporphyrin accumulation, because protoporphrin is well known for its anti-oxidative activity. Furthermore our results indicate that Rb and p53 not only function as tumor suppressors in response to carcinogenic injury, but also in response to non-carcinogenic injury such as DDC.

  2. Halogenated benzenes, effect on xenobiotic metabolism and the toxicity of other chemicals. [Insecticides, rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, G.P.

    1977-01-01

    The insecticide EPN and six halogenated benzenes were administered orally to rats over a period of 14 days. The animals were killed 24 h after the last dose. Graphs are presented to show effects of halogenated benzene on EPN detoxification; liver to body weight ratio; and activities of benzpyrene hydroxylase, azoreductase, UDP glucuronyltransferase, and microsomal cytochrome c reductase. A significant enlargement of the liver was found. The results showed that the halogenated benzenes were capable of altering xenobiotic metabolism. (HLW)

  3. [Effects of berberine on the recovery of rat liver xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes after partial hepatectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zverinsky, I V; Zverinskaya, H G; Sutsko, I P; Telegin, P G; Shlyahtun, A G

    2015-01-01

    We have studied the effect of berberine on the recovery processes of liver xenobiotic-metabolizing function during its compensatory growth after 70% partial hepatectomy. It was found the hepatic ability to metabolize foreign substances are not restored up to day 8. Administration of berberine (10 mg/kg intraperitoneally) for 6 days led to normalization of both cytochrome P450-dependent and flavin-containing monooxygenases. It is suggested that in the biotransformation of berberine involved not only cytochrome P450, but also flavin-containing monooxygenases.

  4. Xenobiotic Metabolizing Gene Variants and Renal Cell Cancer: A Multicenter Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heck, Julia E.; Moore, Lee E.; Lee, Yuan-Chin A.; McKay, James D.; Hung, Rayjean J.; Karami, Sara; Gaborieau, Valérie; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Zaridze, David G.; Mukeriya, Anush; Mates, Dana; Foretova, Lenka; Janout, Vladimir; Kollárová, Helena; Bencko, Vladimir; Rothman, Nathaniel; Brennan, Paul; Chow, Wong-Ho; Boffetta, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Background: The countries of Central and Eastern Europe have among the highest worldwide rates of renal cell cancer (RCC). Few studies have examined whether genetic variation in xenobiotic metabolic pathway genes may modify risk for this cancer. Methods: The Central and Eastern Europe Renal Cell Cancer study was a hospital-based case–control study conducted between 1998 and 2003 across seven centers in Central and Eastern Europe. Detailed data were collected from 874 cases and 2053 controls on demographics, work history, and occupational exposure to chemical agents. Genes [cytochrome P-450 family, N-acetyltransferases, NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase I (NQO1), microsomal epoxide hydrolase (mEH), catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT), uridine diphosphate-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT)] were selected for the present analysis based on their putative role in xenobiotic metabolism. Haplotypes were calculated using fastPhase. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were estimated by unconditional logistic regression adjusted for country of residence, age, sex, smoking, alcohol intake, obesity, and hypertension. Results: We observed an increased risk of RCC with one SNP. After adjustment for multiple comparisons it did not remain significant. Neither NAT1 nor NAT2 slow acetylation was associated with disease. Conclusion: We observed no association between this pathway and renal cell cancer.

  5. Natural allelic variations of xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes affect sexual dimorphism in Oryzias latipes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsumura, Takafumi; Oda, Shoji; Nakagome, Shigeki; Hanihara, Tsunehiko; Kataoka, Hiroshi; Mitani, Hiroshi; Kawamura, Shoji; Oota, Hiroki

    2014-12-22

    Sexual dimorphisms, which are phenotypic differences between males and females, are driven by sexual selection. Interestingly, sexually selected traits show geographical variations within species despite strong directional selective pressures. This paradox has eluded many evolutionary biologists for some time, and several models have been proposed (e.g. 'indicator model' and 'trade-off model'). However, disentangling which of these theories explains empirical patterns remains difficult, because genetic polymorphisms that cause variation in sexual differences are still unknown. In this study, we show that polymorphisms in cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1B1, which encodes a xenobiotic-metabolizing enzyme, are associated with geographical differences in sexual dimorphism in the anal fin morphology of medaka fish (Oryzias latipes). Biochemical assays and genetic cross experiments show that high- and low-activity CYP1B1 alleles enhanced and declined sex differences in anal fin shapes, respectively. Behavioural and phylogenetic analyses suggest maintenance of the high-activity allele by sexual selection, whereas the low-activity allele possibly has experienced positive selection due to by-product effects of CYP1B1 in inferred ancestral populations. The present data can elucidate evolutionary mechanisms behind genetic variations in sexual dimorphism and indicate trade-off interactions between two distinct mechanisms acting on the two alleles with pleiotropic effects of xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  6. Systemic responses to inhaled ozone in mice: cachexia and down-regulation of liver xenobiotic metabolizing genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Last, Jerold A.; Gohil, Kishorchandra; Mathrani, Vivek C.; Kenyon, Nicholas J.

    2005-01-01

    Rats or mice acutely exposed to high concentrations of ozone show an immediate and significant weight loss, even when allowed free access to food and water. The mechanisms underlying this systemic response to ozone have not been previously elucidated. We have applied the technique of global gene expression analysis to the livers of C57BL mice acutely exposed to ozone. Mice lost up to 14% of their original body weight, with a 42% decrease in total food consumption. We previously had found significant up-regulation of genes encoding proliferative enzymes, proteins related to acute phase reactions and cytoskeletal functions, and other biomarkers of a cachexia-like inflammatory state in lungs of mice exposed to ozone. These results are consistent with a general up-regulation of different gene families responsive to NF-κB in the lungs of the exposed mice. In the present study, we observed significant down-regulation of different families of mRNAs in the livers of the exposed mice, including genes related to lipid and fatty acid metabolism, and to carbohydrate metabolism in this tissue, consistent with a systemic cachexic response. Several interferon-dependent genes were down-regulated in the liver, suggesting a possible role for interferon as a signaling molecule between lung and liver. In addition, transcription of several mRNAs encoding enzymes of xenobiotic metabolism in the livers of mice exposed to ozone was decreased, suggesting cytokine-mediated suppression of cytochrome P450 expression. This finding may explain a previously controversial report from other investigators more than 20 years ago of prolongation of pentobarbital sleeping time in mice exposed to ozone

  7. Effect of long-term human exposure to environmental heavy metals on the expression of detoxification and DNA repair genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Bakheet, Saleh A; Attafi, Ibraheem M; Maayah, Zaid H; Abd-Allah, Adel R; Asiri, Yousif A; Korashy, Hesham M

    2013-10-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the influence of long-term environmental human exposure to three heavy metals, lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd), and mercury (Hg), on the expression of detoxifying, xenobiotic metabolizing, and DNA repair genes in Mahd Ad-Dahab city. The study groups consisted of 40 healthy male residents (heavy metal-exposed) and 20 healthy male from Riyadh city, 700 km away, and served as control group. The heavy metal-exposed group with high exposure to Pb, Cd, or Hg was divided into three subgroups Pb-, Cd-, and Hg-exposed groups, respectively. The mRNA expression levels of detoxifying, NQO1, HO-1, GSTA1, MT-1, and HSP70, were significantly decreased in all heavy metal-exposed group as compared to control group. This was accompanied with a proportional decrease in the expression of xenobiotic metabolizing gene, cytochrome P4501A1. On the other hand, the DNA repair gene OGG1 and the 8-OHdG level were dramatically inhibited in Cd-exposed group only. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Intrinsic Xenobiotic Metabolizing Enzyme Activities in Early Life Stages of Zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otte, Jens C; Schultz, Bernadette; Fruth, Daniela; Fabian, Eric; van Ravenzwaay, Bennard; Hidding, Björn; Salinas, Edward R

    2017-09-01

    Early life stages of zebrafish (Danio rerio, zf) are gaining attention as an alternative invivo test system for drug discovery, early developmental toxicity screenings and chemical testing in ecotoxicological and toxicological testing strategies. Previous studies have demonstrated transcriptional evidence for xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes (XME) during early zf development. However, elaborate experiments on XME activities during development are incomplete. In this work, the intrinsic activities of representative phase I and II XME were monitored by transformation of putative zf model substrates analyzed using photometry and high pressure liquid chromatography techniques. Six different defined stages of zf development (between 2.5 h postfertilization (hpf) to 120 hpf) were investigated by preparing a subcellular fraction from whole organism homogenates. We demonstrated that zf embryos as early as 2.5 hpf possess intrinsic metabolic activities for esterase, Aldh, Gst, and Cyp1a above the methodological detection limit. The activities of the enzymes Cyp3a and Nat were measurable during later stages in development. Activities represent dynamic patterns during development. The role of XME activities revealed in this work is relevant for the assessing toxicity in this test system and therefore contributes to a valuable characterization of zf embryos as an alternative testing organism in toxicology. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Expression of two drug-metabolizing cytochrome P450-enzymes in human salivary glands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragelund, C; Hansen, C; Torpet, L A

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The oral cavity is constantly lubricated by saliva and even small amounts of xenobiotics and / or their metabolites in the saliva may affect the oral mucosa. Our aim was therefore to clarify if xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes CYP1A2 and CYP3A4 are expressed in salivary glands. METHODS...

  10. Polymorphisms in xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes and diet influence colorectal adenoma risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northwood, Emma L; Elliott, Faye; Forman, David; Barrett, Jennifer H; Wilkie, Murray J V; Carey, Francis A; Steele, Robert J C; Wolf, Roland; Bishop, Timothy; Smith, Gillian

    2010-05-01

    We have earlier shown that diet and xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme genotypes influence colorectal cancer risk, and now investigate whether similar associations are seen in patients with premalignant colorectal adenomas (CRA), recruited during the pilot phase of the Scottish Bowel Screening Programme. Nineteen polymorphisms in 13 genes [cytochrome P450 (P450), glutathione S-transferase (GST), N-acetyl transferase, quinone reductase (NQ01) and microsomal epoxide hydrolase (EPHX1) genes] were genotyped using multiplex PCR or Taqman-based allelic discrimination assays and analyzed in conjunction with diet, assessed by food frequency questionnaire, in a case-control study [317 CRA cases (308 cases genotyped), 296 controls]. Findings significant at a nominal 5% level are reported. CRA risk was inversely associated with fruit (P=0.02, test for trend) and vegetable (P=0.001, test for trend) consumption. P450 CYP2C9*3 heterozygotes had reduced CRA risk compared with homozygotes for the reference allele [odds ratio (OR): 0.60; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.36-0.99], whereas CYP2D6*4 homozygotes (OR: 2.72; 95% CI: 1.18-6.27) and GSTM1 'null' individuals (OR: 1.43; 95% CI: 1.04-1.98) were at increased risk. The protective effect of fruit consumption was confined to GSTP1 (Ala114Val) reference allele homozygotes (OR: 0.49; 95% CI: 0.34-0.71, P=0.03 for interaction). CRA risk was not associated with meat consumption, although a significant interaction between red meat consumption and EPHX1 (His139Arg) genotype was noted (P=0.02 for interaction). We report the novel associations between P450 genotype and CRA risk, and highlight the risk association with GSTM1 genotype, common to our CRA and cancer case-control series. In addition, we report a novel modifying influence of GSTP1 genotype on dietary chemoprevention. These novel findings require independent confirmation.

  11. Systems Approaches Evaluating the Perturbation of Xenobiotic Metabolism in Response to Cigarette Smoke Exposure in Nasal and Bronchial Tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita R. Iskandar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Capturing the effects of exposure in a specific target organ is a major challenge in risk assessment. Exposure to cigarette smoke (CS implicates the field of tissue injury in the lung as well as nasal and airway epithelia. Xenobiotic metabolism in particular becomes an attractive tool for chemical risk assessment because of its responsiveness against toxic compounds, including those present in CS. This study describes an efficient integration from transcriptomic data to quantitative measures, which reflect the responses against xenobiotics that are captured in a biological network model. We show here that our novel systems approach can quantify the perturbation in the network model of xenobiotic metabolism. We further show that this approach efficiently compares the perturbation upon CS exposure in bronchial and nasal epithelial cells in vivo samples obtained from smokers. Our observation suggests the xenobiotic responses in the bronchial and nasal epithelial cells of smokers were similar to those observed in their respective organotypic models exposed to CS. Furthermore, the results suggest that nasal tissue is a reliable surrogate to measure xenobiotic responses in bronchial tissue.

  12. Systems approaches evaluating the perturbation of xenobiotic metabolism in response to cigarette smoke exposure in nasal and bronchial tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iskandar, Anita R; Martin, Florian; Talikka, Marja; Schlage, Walter K; Kostadinova, Radina; Mathis, Carole; Hoeng, Julia; Peitsch, Manuel C

    2013-01-01

    Capturing the effects of exposure in a specific target organ is a major challenge in risk assessment. Exposure to cigarette smoke (CS) implicates the field of tissue injury in the lung as well as nasal and airway epithelia. Xenobiotic metabolism in particular becomes an attractive tool for chemical risk assessment because of its responsiveness against toxic compounds, including those present in CS. This study describes an efficient integration from transcriptomic data to quantitative measures, which reflect the responses against xenobiotics that are captured in a biological network model. We show here that our novel systems approach can quantify the perturbation in the network model of xenobiotic metabolism. We further show that this approach efficiently compares the perturbation upon CS exposure in bronchial and nasal epithelial cells in vivo samples obtained from smokers. Our observation suggests the xenobiotic responses in the bronchial and nasal epithelial cells of smokers were similar to those observed in their respective organotypic models exposed to CS. Furthermore, the results suggest that nasal tissue is a reliable surrogate to measure xenobiotic responses in bronchial tissue.

  13. RNA-seq based whole transcriptome analysis of the cyclopoid copepod Paracyclopina nana focusing on xenobiotics metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bo-Young; Kim, Hui-Su; Choi, Beom-Soon; Hwang, Dae-Sik; Choi, Ah Young; Han, Jeonghoon; Won, Eun-Ji; Choi, Ik-Young; Lee, Seung-Hwi; Om, Ae-Son; Park, Heum Gi; Lee, Jae-Seong

    2015-09-01

    Copepods are among the most abundant taxa in marine invertebrates, and cyclopoid copepods include more than 1500 species and subspecies. In marine ecosystems, planktonic copepods play a significant role as food resources in the food web and sensitively respond to environmental changes. The copepod Paracylopina nana is one of the planktonic brackish water copepods and considered as a promising model species in ecotoxicology. We sequenced the whole transcriptome of P. nana using RNA-seq technology. De novo sequence assembly by Trinity integrated with TransDecoder produced 67,179 contigs including putative alternative spliced variants. A total of 12,474 genes were identified based on BLAST analysis, and gene sequences were most similar to the sequences of the branchiopod Daphnia. Gene Ontology and KEGG pathway analysis showed that most transcripts annotated were involved in pathways of various metabolisms, immune system, signal transduction, and translation. Considering numbers of sequences and enzymes involved in the pathways, particularly attention was paid to genes potentially involved in xenobiotics biodegradation and metabolism. With regard to xenobiotics metabolism, various xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes such as oxidases, dehydrogenases, and transferases were obtained from the annotated transcripts. The whole transcriptome analysis of P. nana provides valuable resources for future studies of xenobiotics-related metabolism in this marine copepod species. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Dietary lipids differentially modulate the initiation of experimental breast carcinogenesis through their influence on hepatic xenobiotic metabolism and DNA damage in the mammary gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzanares, Miguel Ángel; de Miguel, Cristina; Ruiz de Villa, M Carme; Santella, Regina M; Escrich, Eduard; Solanas, Montserrat

    2017-05-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy among women worldwide. In addition to reproductive factors, environmental factors such as nutrition and xenobiotic exposure have a role in the etiology of this malignancy. A stimulating and a potentially protective effect on experimental breast cancer has been previously described for high corn oil and high extra-virgin olive oil diets, respectively. This work investigates the effect of these lipids on the metabolism of 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA), a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon that can initiate carcinogenesis and its consequences in an experimental rat breast cancer model. The PUFA n-6-enriched diet increased expression of Phase I enzymes prior to DMBA administration and raised the activity of CYP1s in the hours immediately after induction, while reducing the activity of Phase II enzymes, mainly NQO1. The levels of reactive metabolites measured in plasma by GC-MS and DMBA-DNA adducts in the mammary gland of the animals fed the high corn oil diet were also higher than in the other groups. On the other hand, the high extra-virgin olive oil diet and the control low-fat diet exhibited better coordinated Phase I and Phase II activity, with a lower production of reactive metabolites and less DNA damage in the mammary gland. The concordance between these effects and the different efficacy of the carcinogenesis process due to the dietary treatment suggest that lipids may differently modify mammary gland susceptibility or resistance to cancer initiation over the exposure to environmental carcinogens. Dietary lipids influence the initiation of DMBA-induced mammary cancer through the modulation of liver xenobiotic metabolism, formation of reactive metabolites and subsequent DNA damage in the target tissue. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Thyme (Thymus vulgaris L.) leaves and its constituents increase the activities of xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes in mouse liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Keiko; Wada, Keiji; Tanaka, Yoshiko; Yoshimura, Teruki; Matuoka, Koozi; Anno, Takahiko

    2005-01-01

    The effects of thyme (Thymus vulgaris L.) leaves and its phenolic compounds, thymol and carvacrol, on the activities of xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes, i.e., phase I enzymes such as 7-ethoxycoumarin O-deethylase (ECOD) and phase II enzymes such as glutathione S-transferase (GST) and quinone reductase (QR), were investigated. Mice were fed with a diet containing thyme (0.5% or 2.0%) or treated orally with thymol (50-200 mg/kg) or carvacrol (50-200 mg/kg) once a day for 7 successive days, and then the enzyme activities in the livers were analyzed. Dietary administration of 2% thyme caused slightly but significantly higher ECOD, GST, and QR activities by 1.1-1.4-fold. Thymol (200 mg/kg) treatment resulted in significantly higher ECOD, GST, and QR activities by 1.3-1.9-fold, and carvacrol (200 mg/kg) treatment caused significantly higher ECOD, GST, and QR activities by 1.3-1.7-fold. Thymol-treated animals had significantly higher protein levels of GST alpha and GST micro, and carvacrol-treated animals had significantly higher levels of GST micro. These results imply that thyme contains bifunctional inducers (i.e., substances capable of inducing both phase I and phase II enzymes) and that thymol and carvacrol may account for the effects of thyme.

  16. Meat-related mutagen exposure, xenobiotic metabolizing gene polymorphisms and the risk of advanced colorectal adenoma and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilsing, Anne M J; Berndt, Sonja I; Ruder, Elizabeth H; Graubard, Barry I; Ferrucci, Leah M; Burdett, Laura; Weissfeld, Joel L; Cross, Amanda J; Sinha, Rashmi

    2012-07-01

    Meat mutagens, including heterocyclic amines (HCAs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and N-nitroso compounds (NOCs), may be involved in colorectal carcinogenesis depending on their activation or detoxification by phase I and II xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes (XME). Using unconditional logistic regression to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI), we examined the intake of five meat mutagens and >300 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 18 XME genes in relation to advanced colorectal adenoma (1205 cases and 1387 controls) and colorectal cancer (370 cases and 401 controls) within the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial. Dietary intake of meat mutagens was assessed using a food frequency questionnaire with a detailed meat-cooking module. An interaction was observed between 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (MeIQx) intake and the NAT1 polymorphism rs6586714 in the adenoma study (P(interaction) = 0.001). Among individuals carrying a GG genotype, high MeIQx intake was associated with a 43% increased risk of adenoma (95% CI 1.11-1.85, P(trend) = 0.07), whereas the reverse was observed among carriers of the A variant (OR = 0.50, 95% CI 0.30-0.84, P(trend) = 0.01). In addition, we observed some suggestive (P meat mutagens and the risk of colorectal tumours found that a NAT1 polymorphism modified the association between MeIQx intake and colorectal adenoma risk.

  17. The microbial pharmacists within us: a metagenomic view of xenobiotic metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanogiannopoulos, Peter; Bess, Elizabeth N.; Carmody, Rachel N.; Turnbaugh, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Although the significance of human genetic polymorphisms in therapeutic outcomes is well established, the importance of our “second genome” (the microbiome) has been largely overlooked. In this Review, we highlight recent studies that shed light on the mechanisms linking the human gut microbiome to the efficacy and toxicity of xenobiotics, including drugs, dietary compounds and environmental toxins. Continued progress in this area could enable more precise tools for predicting patient responses and the development of a next generation of therapeutics based on or targeted at the gut microbiome. Indeed, the admirable goal of precision medicine may require us to first understand the microbial pharmacists within. PMID:26972811

  18. Natural variations in xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes: developing tools for coral monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rougée, L. R. A.; Richmond, R. H.; Collier, A. C.

    2014-06-01

    The continued deterioration of coral reefs worldwide demonstrates the need to develop diagnostic tools for corals that go beyond general ecological monitoring and can identify specific stressors at sublethal levels. Cellular diagnostics present an approach to defining indicators (biomarkers) that have the potential to reflect the impact of stress at the cellular level, allowing for the detection of intracellular changes in corals prior to outright mortality. Detoxification enzymes, which may be readily induced or inhibited by environmental stressors, present such a set of indicators. However, in order to apply these diagnostic tools for the detection of stress, a detailed understanding of their normal, homeostatic levels within healthy corals must first be established. Herein, we present molecular and biochemical evidence for the expression and activity of major Phase I detoxification enzymes cytochrome P450 (CYP450), CYP2E1, and CYP450 reductase, as well as the Phase II enzymes UDP, glucuronosyltransferase (UGT), β-glucuronidase, glutathione- S-transferase (GST), and arylsulfatase C (ASC) in the coral Pocillopora damicornis. Additionally, we characterized enzyme expression and activity variations over a reproductive cycle within a coral's life history to determine natural endogenous changes devoid of stress exposure. Significant changes in enzyme activity over the coral's natural lunar reproductive cycle were observed for CYP2E1 and CYP450 reductase as well as UGT and GST, while β-glucuronidase and ASC did not fluctuate significantly. The data represent a baseline description of `health' for the expression and activity of these enzymes that can be used toward understanding the impact of environmental stressors on corals. Such knowledge can be applied to address causes of coral reef ecosystem decline and to monitor effectiveness of mitigation strategies. Achieving a better understanding of cause-and-effect relationships between putative stressors and biological

  19. Uses and limits of radiotracers in the study of drugs and xenobiotics metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, Y.

    1980-01-01

    This review deals with scientific papers issued in 1977-1978, on labelling of drugs and xenobiotics and their metabolism. It is divided in five parts: site of label; in vivo metabolism in animals and human beings; in vitro metabolism on tissue slices, cells culture, microsomes, membrane receptors; metabolism of xenobiotics: nutrients, food additives, detergents, plastics and fabrics; discussion. Metabolic studies, nowadays, associate radiotracers, stable isotopes with high performing procedures for analytical separation [fr

  20. Impact of environmental exposures on ovarian function and role of xenobiotic metabolism during ovotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharya, Poulomi; Keating, Aileen F.

    2012-01-01

    The mammalian ovary is a heterogeneous organ and contains oocyte-containing follicles at varying stages of development. The most immature follicular stage, the primordial follicle, comprises the ovarian reserve and is a finite number, defined at the time of birth. Depletion of all follicles within the ovary leads to reproductive senescence, known as menopause. A number of chemical classes can destroy follicles, thus hastening entry into the menopausal state. The ovarian response to chemical exposure can determine the extent of ovotoxicity that occurs. Enzymes capable of bioactivating as well as detoxifying xenobiotics are expressed in the ovary and their impact on ovotoxicity has been partially characterized for trichloroethylene, 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene, and 4-vinylcyclohexene. This review will discuss those studies, as well as illustrate where knowledge gaps remain for chemicals that have also been established as ovotoxicants. -- Highlights: ► Summary of ovotoxicant action during ovotoxicity. ► Discussion of impact of biotransformation on chemical toxicity. ► Identification of knowledge gaps in chemical metabolism.

  1. Impact of environmental exposures on ovarian function and role of xenobiotic metabolism during ovotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharya, Poulomi; Keating, Aileen F., E-mail: akeating@iastate.edu

    2012-06-15

    The mammalian ovary is a heterogeneous organ and contains oocyte-containing follicles at varying stages of development. The most immature follicular stage, the primordial follicle, comprises the ovarian reserve and is a finite number, defined at the time of birth. Depletion of all follicles within the ovary leads to reproductive senescence, known as menopause. A number of chemical classes can destroy follicles, thus hastening entry into the menopausal state. The ovarian response to chemical exposure can determine the extent of ovotoxicity that occurs. Enzymes capable of bioactivating as well as detoxifying xenobiotics are expressed in the ovary and their impact on ovotoxicity has been partially characterized for trichloroethylene, 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene, and 4-vinylcyclohexene. This review will discuss those studies, as well as illustrate where knowledge gaps remain for chemicals that have also been established as ovotoxicants. -- Highlights: ► Summary of ovotoxicant action during ovotoxicity. ► Discussion of impact of biotransformation on chemical toxicity. ► Identification of knowledge gaps in chemical metabolism.

  2. Geraniol Pharmacokinetics, Bioavailability and Its Multiple Effects on the Liver Antioxidant and Xenobiotic-Metabolizing Enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Pavan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Geraniol is a natural monoterpene showing anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, neuroprotective and anticancer effects. No pharmacokinetic and bioavailability data on geraniol are currently available. We therefore performed a systematic study to identify the permeation properties of geraniol across intestinal cells, and its pharmacokinetics and bioavailability after intravenous and oral administration to rats. In addition, we systematically investigated the potential hepatotoxic effects of high doses of geraniol on hepatic phase I, phase II and antioxidant enzymatic activities and undertook a hematochemical analysis on mice. Permeation studies performed via HPLC evidenced geraniol permeability coefficients across an in vitro model of the human intestinal wall for apical to basolateral and basolateral to apical transport of 13.10 ± 2.3 × 10-3 and 2.1 ± 0.1⋅× 10-3 cm/min, respectively. After intravenous administration of geraniol to rats (50 mg/kg, its concentration in whole blood (detected via HPLC decreased following an apparent pseudo-first order kinetics with a half-life of 12.5 ± 1.5 min. The absolute bioavailability values of oral formulations (50 mg/kg of emulsified geraniol or fiber-adsorbed geraniol were 92 and 16%, respectively. Following emulsified oral administration, geraniol amounts in the cerebrospinal fluid of rats ranged between 0.72 ± 0.08 μg/mL and 2.6 ± 0.2 μg/mL within 60 min. Mice treated with 120 mg/kg of geraniol for 4 weeks showed increased anti-oxidative defenses with no signs of liver toxicity. CYP450 enzyme activities appeared only slightly affected by the high dosage of geraniol.

  3. Prenatal Exposure of Cypermethrin Induces Similar Alterations in Xenobiotic-Metabolizing Cytochrome P450s and Rate-Limiting Enzymes of Neurotransmitter Synthesis in Brain Regions of Rat Offsprings During Postnatal Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Anshuman; Mudawal, Anubha; Maurya, Pratibha; Jain, Rajeev; Nair, Saumya; Shukla, Rajendra K; Yadav, Sanjay; Singh, Dhirendra; Khanna, Vinay Kumar; Chaturvedi, Rajnish Kumar; Mudiam, Mohana K R; Sethumadhavan, Rao; Siddiqi, Mohammad Imran; Parmar, Devendra

    2016-08-01

    Oral administration of low doses of cypermethrin to pregnant Wistar rats led to a dose-dependent differences in the induction of xenobiotic-metabolizing cytochrome P450s (CYPs) messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein in brain regions isolated from the offsprings postnatally at 3 weeks that persisted up to adulthood. Similar alterations were observed in the expression of rate-limiting enzymes of neurotransmitter synthesis in brain regions of rat offsprings. These persistent changes were associated with alterations in circulating levels of growth hormone (GH), cognitive functions, and accumulation of cypermethrin and its metabolites in brain regions of exposed offsprings. Though molecular docking studies failed to identify similarities between the docked conformations of cypermethrin with CYPs and neurotransmitter receptors, in silico analysis identified regulatory sequences of CYPs in the promoter region of rate-limiting enzymes of neurotransmitter synthesis. Further, rechallenge of the prenatally exposed offsprings at adulthood with cypermethrin (p.o. 10 mg/kg × 6 days) led to a greater magnitude of alterations in the expression of CYPs and rate-limiting enzymes of neurotransmitter synthesis in different brain regions. These alterations were associated with a greater magnitude of decrease in the circulating levels of GH and cognitive functions in rechallenged offsprings. Our data has led us to suggest that due to the immaturity of CYPs in fetus or during early development, even the low-level exposure of cypermethrin may be sufficient to interact with the CYPs, which in turn affect the neurotransmission processes and may help in explaining the developmental neurotoxicity of cypermethrin.

  4. Gene expression profiling to identify the toxicities and potentially relevant human disease outcomes associated with environmental heavy metal exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korashy, Hesham M; Attafi, Ibraheem M; Famulski, Konrad S; Bakheet, Saleh A; Hafez, Mohammed M; Alsaad, Abdulaziz M S; Al-Ghadeer, Abdul Rahman M

    2017-02-01

    Heavy metals are the most commonly encountered toxic substances that increase susceptibility to various diseases after prolonged exposure. We have previously shown that healthy volunteers living near a mining area had significant contamination with heavy metals associated with significant changes in the expression of some detoxifying genes, xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes, and DNA repair genes. However, alterations of most of the molecular target genes associated with diseases are still unknown. Thus, the aims of this study were to (a) evaluate the gene expression profile and (b) identify the toxicities and potentially relevant human disease outcomes associated with long-term human exposure to environmental heavy metals in mining area using microarray analysis. For this purpose, 40 healthy male volunteers who were residents of a heavy metal-polluted area (Mahd Al-Dhahab city, Saudi Arabia) and 20 healthy male volunteers who were residents of a non-heavy metal-polluted area were included in the study. Total RNA was isolated from whole blood using PAXgene Blood RNA tubes and then reversed transcribed and hybridized to the gene array using the Affymetrix U219 GeneChip. Microarray analysis showed about 2129 genes were identified and differentially altered, among which a shared set of 425 genes was differentially expressed in the heavy metal-exposed groups. Ingenuity pathway analysis revealed that the most altered gene-regulated diseases in heavy metal-exposed groups included hematological and developmental disorders and mostly renal and urological diseases. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction closely matched the microarray data for some genes tested. Importantly, changes in gene-related diseases were attributed to alterations in the genes encoded for protein synthesis. Renal and urological diseases were the diseases that were most frequently associated with the heavy metal-exposed group. Therefore, there is a need for further studies to validate these

  5. Multifactor dimensionality reduction analysis to elucidate the cross-talk between one-carbon and xenobiotic metabolic pathways in multi-disease models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naushad, Shaik Mohammad; Vijayalakshmi, Sana Venkata; Rupasree, Yedluri; Kumudini, Nadella; Sowganthika, Sampathkumar; Naidu, Janardhanan Venketlakshmi; Ramaiah, M Janaki; Rao, Dunna Nageswara; Kutala, Vijay Kumar

    2015-07-01

    Putatively functional polymorphisms of one-carbon and xenobiotic metabolic pathways influence susceptibility for wide spectrum of diseases. The current study was aimed to explore gene-gene interactions among these two metabolic pathways in four diseases i.e. breast cancer, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), coronary artery disease (CAD) and Parkinson's disease (PD). Multifactor dimensionality reduction analysis was carried out on four case-control datasets. Cross-talk was observed between one-carbon and xenobiotic pathways in breast cancer (RFC 80 G>A, COMT H108L and TYMS 5'-UTR 28 bp tandem repeat) and SLE (CYP1A1 m1, MTRR 66 A>G and GSTT1). Gene-gene interactions within one-carbon metabolic pathway were observed in CAD (GCPII 1561 C>T, SHMT 1420 C>T and MTHFR 677 C>T) and PD (cSHMT 1420 C>T, MTRR 66 A>G and RFC1 80 G>A). These interaction models showed good predictability of risk for PD (The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (C) = 0.83) and SLE (C = 0.73); and moderate predictability of risk for breast cancer (C = 0.64) and CAD (C = 0.63). Cross-talk between one-carbon and xenobiotic pathways was observed in diseases with female preponderance. Gene-gene interactions within one-carbon metabolic pathway were observed in diseases with male preponderance.

  6. Implication of Xenobiotic Metabolizing Enzyme gene (CYP2E1, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, mEH and NAT2 Polymorphisms in Breast Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabbouj Sallouha

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Xenobiotic Metabolizing Enzymes (XMEs contribute to the detoxification of numerous cancer therapy-induced products. This study investigated the susceptibility and prognostic implications of the CYP2E1, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, mEH and NAT2 gene polymorphisms in breast carcinoma patients. Methods The authors used polymerase chain reaction and restriction enzyme digestion to characterize the variation of the CYP2E1, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, mEH and NAT2 gene in a total of 560 unrelated subjects (246 controls and 314 patients. Results The mEH (C/C mutant and the NAT2 slow acetylator genotypes were significantly associated with breast carcinoma risk (p = 0.02; p = 0.01, respectively. For NAT2 the association was more pronounced among postmenopausal patients (p = 0.006. A significant association was found between CYP2D6 (G/G wild type and breast carcinoma risk only in postmenopausal patients (p = 0.04. Association studies of genetic markers with the rates of breast carcinoma specific overall survival (OVS and the disease-free survival (DFS revealed among all breast carcinoma patients no association to DFS but significant differences in OVS only with the mEH gene polymorphisms (p = 0.02. In addition, the mEH wild genotype showed a significant association with decreased OVS in patients with axillary lymph node-negative patients (p = 0.03 and with decreasesd DFS in patients with axillary lymph node-positive patients (p = 0.001. However, the NAT2 intermediate acetylator genotype was associated with decreased DFS in axillary lymph node-negative patients. Conclusion The present study may prove that polymorphisms of some XME genes may predict the onset of breast carcinoma as well as survival after treatment.

  7. Polymorphisms of xenobiotic-metabolizing genes and colorectal cancer risk in patients with lynch syndrome: A retrospective cohort study in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiza, Abram Bunya; You, Jeng-Fu; Wang, Wen-Chang; Tang, Reiping; Chang, Chun-Yu; Chien, Huei-Tzu; Lai, Chih-Hsiung; Chiu, Li-Ling; Lo, Tsai-Ping; Hung, Kuan-Yi; Hsiung, Chao A; Yeh, Chih-Ching

    2018-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), and N-acetyltransferase (NAT) are crucial for metabolism and clearance of xenobiotics. This study investigated whether CYP, GST, and NAT single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are associated with colorectal cancer (CRC) in patients with Lynch syndrome. The interaction between these SNPs and cigarette smoking or meat consumption was also explored. We identified 270 patients with Lynch syndrome from the Taiwan Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Cancer Consortium. A weighted Cox proportional hazard model was used to calculate the hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence interval (CIs). The GSTA1 rs3957356 TT (HR = 5.36, 95% CI = 2.39-12.0) and CYP1B1 rs1056836 CC (HR = 7.24, 95% CI = 3.51-14.9) were significantly associated with CRC risk when compared to wild-type CC and GG genotypes, respectively. However, the CYP1A1 rs4646903 CC genotype significantly reduced the risk of CRC (HR = 0.33, 95% CI = 0.12-0.89) when compared to TT genotype. Moreover, significant interactions were observed between NAT1 acetylation and CYP1B1 rs1056827 and meat consumption.Our results suggest that xenobiotic-metabolizing SNPs are not only associated with CRC risk in patients with Lynch syndrome in Taiwan but also interact with meat consumption to modify the disease risk. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 59:69-78, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Changes in cytochrome P450 gene expression and enzyme activity induced by xenobiotics in rabbits in vivo and in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orsolya Palócz

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available As considerable inter-species differences exist in xenobiotic metabolism, developing new pharmaceutical therapies for use in different species is fraught with difficulties. For this reason, very few medicines have been registered for use in rabbits, despite their importance in inter alia meat and fur production. We have developed a rapid and sensitive screening system for drug safety in rabbits based on cytochrome P450 enzyme assays, specifically CYP1A1, CYP1A2 and CYP3A6, employing an adaptation of the luciferin-based clinical assay currently used in human drug screening. Short-term (4-h cultured rabbit primary hepatocytes were treated with a cytochrome inducer (phenobarbital and 2 inhibitors (alpha-naphthoflavone and ketoconazole. In parallel, and to provide verification, New Zealand white rabbits were dosed with 80 mg/kg phenobarbital or 40 mg/kg ketoconazole for 3 d. Ketoconazole significantly increased CYP3A6 gene expression and decreased CYP3A6 activity both in vitro and in vivo. CYP1A1 activity was decreased by ketoconazole in vitro and increased in vivo. This is the first report of the inducer effect of ketoconazole on rabbit cytochrome isoenzymes in vivo. Our data support the use of a luciferin-based assay in short-term primary hepatocytes as an appropriate tool for xenobiotic metabolism assays and short-term toxicity testing in rabbits.

  9. Chemical transformation of xenobiotics by the human gut microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppel, Nitzan; Maini Rekdal, Vayu; Balskus, Emily P

    2017-06-23

    The human gut microbiota makes key contributions to the metabolism of ingested compounds (xenobiotics), transforming hundreds of dietary components, industrial chemicals, and pharmaceuticals into metabolites with altered activities, toxicities, and lifetimes within the body. The chemistry of gut microbial xenobiotic metabolism is often distinct from that of host enzymes. Despite their important consequences for human biology, the gut microbes, genes, and enzymes involved in xenobiotic metabolism are poorly understood. Linking these microbial transformations to enzymes and elucidating their biological effects is undoubtedly challenging. However, recent studies demonstrate that integrating traditional and emerging technologies can enable progress toward this goal. Ultimately, a molecular understanding of gut microbial xenobiotic metabolism will guide personalized medicine and nutrition, inform toxicology risk assessment, and improve drug discovery and development. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  10. Human papillomavirus gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chow, L.T.; Hirochika, H.; Nasseri, M.; Stoler, M.H.; Wolinsky, S.M.; Chin, M.T.; Hirochika, R.; Arvan, D.S.; Broker, T.R.

    1987-01-01

    To determine the role of tissue differentiation on expression of each of the papillomavirus mRNA species identified by electron microscopy, the authors prepared exon-specific RNA probes that could distinguish the alternatively spliced mRNA species. Radioactively labeled single-stranded RNA probes were generated from a dual promoter vector system and individually hybridized to adjacent serial sections of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded biopsies of condylomata. Autoradiography showed that each of the message species had a characteristic tissue distribution and relative abundance. The authors have characterized a portion of the regulatory network of the HPVs by showing that the E2 ORF encodes a trans-acting enhancer-stimulating protein, as it does in BPV-1 (Spalholz et al. 1985). The HPV-11 enhancer was mapped to a 150-bp tract near the 3' end of the URR. Portions of this region are duplicated in some aggressive strains of HPV-6 (Boshart and zur Hausen 1986; Rando et al. 1986). To test the possible biological relevance of these duplications, they cloned tandem arrays of the enhancer and demonstrated, using a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) assay, that they led to dramatically increased transcription proportional to copy number. Using the CAT assays, the authors found that the E2 proteins of several papillomavirus types can cross-stimulate the enhancers of most other types. This suggests that prior infection of a tissue with one papillomavirus type may provide a helper effect for superinfection and might account fo the HPV-6/HPV-16 coinfections in condylomata that they have observed

  11. Ligand-dependent and -independent regulation of human hepatic sphingomyelin phosphodiesterase acid-like 3A expression by pregnane X receptor and crosstalk with liver X receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeske, Judith; Bitter, Andreas; Thasler, Wolfgang E; Weiss, Thomas S; Schwab, Matthias; Burk, Oliver

    2017-07-15

    Pregnane X receptor (PXR) mainly regulates xenobiotic metabolism and detoxification. Additionally, it exerts pleiotropic effects on liver physiology, which in large parts depend on transrepression of other liver-enriched transcription factors. Based on the hypothesis that lower expression levels of PXR may reduce the extent of this inhibition, an exploratory genome-wide transcriptomic profiling was performed using HepG2 cell clones with different expression levels of PXR. This screen and confirmatory real-time RT-PCR identified sphingomyelin phosphodiesterase acid-like (SMPDL) 3A, a novel nucleotide phosphodiesterase and phosphoramidase, as being up-regulated by PXR-deficiency. Transient siRNA-mediated knock-down of PXR in HepG2 cells and primary human hepatocytes similarly induced mRNA up-regulation, which translated into increased intracellular and secreted extracellular protein levels. Interestingly, ligand-dependent PXR activation also induced SMPDL3A in HepG2 cells and primary human hepatocytes. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation demonstrated binding of PXR to the previously identified liver X receptor (LXR)-binding DR4 motif as well as to an adjacent ER8 motif in intron 1 of SMPDL3A. Constitutive binding of the unliganded receptor to the intron 1 chromatin indicated ligand-independent repression of SMPDL3A by PXR. Transient transfection and reporter gene analysis confirmed the specific role of these motifs in PXR- and LXR-dependent activation of the SMPDL3A intronic enhancer. PXR inhibited LXR mainly by competition for binding sites. In conclusion, this study describes that a decrease in PXR expression levels and ligand-dependent activation of PXR and LXR increase hepatic SMPDL3A levels, which possibly connects these receptors to hepatic purinergic signaling and phospholipid metabolism and may result in drug-drug interactions with phosphoramidate pro-drugs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Human Lacrimal Gland Gene Expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinay Kumar Aakalu

    Full Text Available The study of human lacrimal gland biology and development is limited. Lacrimal gland tissue is damaged or poorly functional in a number of disease states including dry eye disease. Development of cell based therapies for lacrimal gland diseases requires a better understanding of the gene expression and signaling pathways in lacrimal gland. Differential gene expression analysis between lacrimal gland and other embryologically similar tissues may be helpful in furthering our understanding of lacrimal gland development.We performed global gene expression analysis of human lacrimal gland tissue using Affymetrix ® gene expression arrays. Primary data from our laboratory was compared with datasets available in the NLM GEO database for other surface ectodermal tissues including salivary gland, skin, conjunctiva and corneal epithelium.The analysis revealed statistically significant difference in the gene expression of lacrimal gland tissue compared to other ectodermal tissues. The lacrimal gland specific, cell surface secretory protein encoding genes and critical signaling pathways which distinguish lacrimal gland from other ectodermal tissues are described.Differential gene expression in human lacrimal gland compared with other ectodermal tissue types revealed interesting patterns which may serve as the basis for future studies in directed differentiation among other areas.

  13. Age and diet affect gene expression profiles in canine liver tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Yong Kil

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The liver plays a central role in nutrient and xenobiotic metabolism, but its functionality declines with age. Senior dogs suffer from many of the chronic hepatic diseases as elderly humans, with age-related alterations in liver function influenced by diet. However, a large-scale molecular analysis of the liver tissue as affected by age and diet has not been reported in dogs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Liver tissue samples were collected from six senior (12-year old and six young adult (1-year old female beagles fed an animal protein-based diet (APB or a plant protein-based diet (PPB for 12 months. Total RNA in the liver tissue was extracted and hybridized to Affymetrix GeneChip® Canine Genome Arrays. Using a 2.0-fold cutoff and false discovery rate <0.10, our results indicated that expression of 234 genes was altered by age, while 137 genes were differentially expressed by diet. Based on functional classification, genes affected by age and/or diet were involved in cellular development, nutrient metabolism, and signal transduction. In general, gene expression suggested that senior dogs had an increased risk of the progression of liver disease and dysfunction, as observed in aged humans and rodents. In particular for aged liver, genes related to inflammation, oxidative stress, and glycolysis were up-regulated, whereas genes related to regeneration, xenobiotic metabolism, and cholesterol trafficking were down-regulated. Diet-associated changes in gene expression were more common in young adult dogs (33 genes as compared to senior dogs (3 genes. CONCLUSION: Our results provide molecular insight pertaining to the aged canine liver and its predisposition to disease and abnormalities. Therefore, our data may aid in future research pertaining to age-associated alterations in hepatic function or identification of potential targets for nutritional management as a means to decrease incidence of age-dependent liver dysfunction.

  14. A Single Meal Containing Raw, Crushed Garlic Influences Expression of Immunity- and Cancer-Related Genes in Whole Blood of Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charron, Craig S; Dawson, Harry D; Albaugh, George P; Solverson, Patrick M; Vinyard, Bryan T; Solano-Aguilar, Gloria I; Molokin, Aleksey; Novotny, Janet A

    2015-11-01

    Preclinical and epidemiologic studies suggest that garlic intake is inversely associated with the progression of cancer and cardiovascular disease. We designed a study to probe the mechanisms of garlic action in humans. We conducted a randomized crossover feeding trial in which 17 volunteers consumed a garlic-containing meal (100 g white bread, 15 g butter, and 5 g raw, crushed garlic) or a garlic-free control meal (100 g white bread and 15 g butter) after 10 d of consuming a controlled, garlic-free diet. Blood was collected before and 3 h after test meal consumption for gene expression analysis in whole blood. Illumina BeadArray was used to screen for genes of interest, followed by real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) on selected genes. To augment human study findings, Mono Mac 6 cells were treated with a purified garlic extract (0.5 μL/mL), and mRNA was measured by qRT-PCR at 0, 3, 6, and 24 h. The following 7 genes were found to be upregulated by garlic intake: aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT), hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF1A), proto-oncogene c-Jun (JUN), nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) activating protein with immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif 1 (NFAM1), oncostatin M (OSM), and V-rel avian reticuloendotheliosis viral oncogene homolog (REL). Fold-increases in mRNA transcripts ranged from 1.6 (HIF1A) to 3.0 (NFAM1) (P garlic, respectively). OSM is a pleiotropic cytokine that inhibits several tumor cell lines in culture. These data indicate that the bioactivity of garlic is multifaceted and includes activation of genes related to immunity, apoptosis, and xenobiotic metabolism in humans and Mono Mac 6 cells. This trial is registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01293591. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  15. A Single Meal Containing Raw, Crushed Garlic Influences Expression of Immunity- and Cancer-Related Genes in Whole Blood of Humans1234

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charron, Craig S; Dawson, Harry D; Albaugh, George P; Solverson, Patrick M; Vinyard, Bryan T; Solano-Aguilar, Gloria I; Molokin, Aleksey; Novotny, Janet A

    2015-01-01

    Background: Preclinical and epidemiologic studies suggest that garlic intake is inversely associated with the progression of cancer and cardiovascular disease. Objective: We designed a study to probe the mechanisms of garlic action in humans. Methods: We conducted a randomized crossover feeding trial in which 17 volunteers consumed a garlic-containing meal (100 g white bread, 15 g butter, and 5 g raw, crushed garlic) or a garlic-free control meal (100 g white bread and 15 g butter) after 10 d of consuming a controlled, garlic-free diet. Blood was collected before and 3 h after test meal consumption for gene expression analysis in whole blood. Illumina BeadArray was used to screen for genes of interest, followed by real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) on selected genes. To augment human study findings, Mono Mac 6 cells were treated with a purified garlic extract (0.5 μL/mL), and mRNA was measured by qRT-PCR at 0, 3, 6, and 24 h. Results: The following 7 genes were found to be upregulated by garlic intake: aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT), hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF1A), proto-oncogene c-Jun (JUN), nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) activating protein with immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif 1 (NFAM1), oncostatin M (OSM), and V-rel avian reticuloendotheliosis viral oncogene homolog (REL). Fold-increases in mRNA transcripts ranged from 1.6 (HIF1A) to 3.0 (NFAM1) (P garlic, respectively). OSM is a pleiotropic cytokine that inhibits several tumor cell lines in culture. Conclusion: These data indicate that the bioactivity of garlic is multifaceted and includes activation of genes related to immunity, apoptosis, and xenobiotic metabolism in humans and Mono Mac 6 cells. This trial is registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01293591. PMID:26423732

  16. Transcriptomic Analysis of Lung Tissue from Cigarette Smoke-Induced Emphysema Murine Models and Human Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Show Shared and Distinct Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Jeong H; Morrow, Jarrett; Owen, Caroline A; Qiu, Weiliang; Glass, Kimberly; Lao, Taotao; Jiang, Zhiqiang; Perrella, Mark A; Silverman, Edwin K; Zhou, Xiaobo; Hersh, Craig P

    2017-07-01

    Although cigarette smoke (CS) is the primary risk factor for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), the underlying molecular mechanisms for the significant variability in developing COPD in response to CS are incompletely understood. We performed lung gene expression profiling of two different wild-type murine strains (C57BL/6 and NZW/LacJ) and two genetic models with mutations in COPD genome-wide association study genes (HHIP and FAM13A) after 6 months of chronic CS exposure and compared the results to human COPD lung tissues. We identified gene expression patterns that correlate with severity of emphysema in murine and human lungs. Xenobiotic metabolism and nuclear erythroid 2-related factor 2-mediated oxidative stress response were commonly regulated molecular response patterns in C57BL/6, Hhip +/- , and Fam13a -/- murine strains exposed chronically to CS. The CS-resistant Fam13a -/- mouse and NZW/LacJ strain revealed gene expression response pattern differences. The Fam13a -/- strain diverged in gene expression compared with C57BL/6 control only after CS exposure. However, the NZW/LacJ strain had a unique baseline expression pattern, enriched for nuclear erythroid 2-related factor 2-mediated oxidative stress response and xenobiotic metabolism, and converged to a gene expression pattern similar to the more susceptible wild-type C57BL/6 after CS exposure. These results suggest that distinct molecular pathways may account for resistance to emphysema. Surprisingly, there were few genes commonly modulated in mice and humans. Our study suggests that gene expression responses to CS may be largely species and model dependent, yet shared pathways could provide biologically significant insights underlying individual susceptibility to CS.

  17. Molecular cloning and expression of cytochrome P450 2D6 in the livers of domestic cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Tetsuya; Honda, Kouichi; Kubota, Akira; Kitazawa, Takio; Hiraga, Takeo; Teraoka, Hiroki

    2010-12-01

    Cytochrome P450 2D (CYP2D) is one of the major metabolizing enzymes for drugs in humans and other mammals. Although domestic cats (Felis catus) are the most common companion animal in many countries, the properties of their drug-metabolizing system are largely unknown. We determined the complete cDNA sequence of the CYP2D open reading frame (1,500 bp) with both 5'- and 3'-untranslated regions in domestic cats. Feline CYP2D consists of 500 deduced amino acids and shows high homology with CYP2Ds of primates and rodents, particularly with the canine CYP2D homologue, and was designated as CYP2D6 based on its genomic structure. CYP2D6 transcripts were expressed predominantly in the liver and to a much lesser in the testis, suggesting the role of xenobiotic metabolism in the liver.

  18. Improved Xenobiotic Metabolism and Reduced Susceptibility to Cancer in Gluten-Sensitive Macaques upon Introduction of a Gluten-Free Diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sestak, Karol; Conroy, Lauren; Aye, Pyone P.; Mehra, Smriti; Doxiadis, Gaby G.; Kaushal, Deepak

    2011-01-01

    Background A non-human primate (NHP) model of gluten sensitivity was employed to study the gene perturbations associated with dietary gluten changes in small intestinal tissues from gluten-sensitive rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). Methodology Stages of remission and relapse were accomplished in gluten-sensitive animals by administration of gluten-free (GFD) and gluten-containing (GD) diets, as described previously. Pin-head-sized biopsies, obtained non-invasively by pediatric endoscope from duodenum while on GFD or GD, were used for preparation of total RNA and gene profiling, using the commercial Rhesus Macaque Microarray (Agilent Technologies),targeting expression of over 20,000 genes. Principal Findings When compared with normal healthy control, gluten-sensitive macaques showed differential gene expressions induced by GD. While observed gene perturbations were classified into one of 12 overlapping categories - cancer, metabolism, digestive tract function, immune response, cell growth, signal transduction, autoimmunity, detoxification of xenobiotics, apoptosis, actin-collagen deposition, neuronal and unknown function - this study focused on cancer-related gene networks such as cytochrome P450 family (detoxification function) and actin-collagen-matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) genes. Conclusions/Significance A loss of detoxification function paralleled with necessity to metabolize carcinogens was revealed in gluten-sensitive animals while on GD. An increase in cancer-promoting factors and a simultaneous decrease in cancer-preventing factors associated with altered expression of actin-collagen-MMP gene network were noted. In addition, gluten-sensitive macaques showed reduced number of differentially expressed genes including the cancer-associated ones upon withdrawal of dietary gluten. Taken together, these findings indicate potentially expanded utility of gluten-sensitive rhesus macaques in cancer research. PMID:21533263

  19. Improved xenobiotic metabolism and reduced susceptibility to cancer in gluten-sensitive macaques upon introduction of a gluten-free diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sestak, Karol; Conroy, Lauren; Aye, Pyone P; Mehra, Smriti; Doxiadis, Gaby G; Kaushal, Deepak

    2011-04-12

    A non-human primate (NHP) model of gluten sensitivity was employed to study the gene perturbations associated with dietary gluten changes in small intestinal tissues from gluten-sensitive rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). Stages of remission and relapse were accomplished in gluten-sensitive animals by administration of gluten-free (GFD) and gluten-containing (GD) diets, as described previously. Pin-head-sized biopsies, obtained non-invasively by pediatric endoscope from duodenum while on GFD or GD, were used for preparation of total RNA and gene profiling, using the commercial Rhesus Macaque Microarray (Agilent Technologies),targeting expression of over 20,000 genes. When compared with normal healthy control, gluten-sensitive macaques showed differential gene expressions induced by GD. While observed gene perturbations were classified into one of 12 overlapping categories--cancer, metabolism, digestive tract function, immune response, cell growth, signal transduction, autoimmunity, detoxification of xenobiotics, apoptosis, actin-collagen deposition, neuronal and unknown function--this study focused on cancer-related gene networks such as cytochrome P450 family (detoxification function) and actin-collagen-matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) genes. A loss of detoxification function paralleled with necessity to metabolize carcinogens was revealed in gluten-sensitive animals while on GD. An increase in cancer-promoting factors and a simultaneous decrease in cancer-preventing factors associated with altered expression of actin-collagen-MMP gene network were noted. In addition, gluten-sensitive macaques showed reduced number of differentially expressed genes including the cancer-associated ones upon withdrawal of dietary gluten. Taken together, these findings indicate potentially expanded utility of gluten-sensitive rhesus macaques in cancer research.

  20. Age and diet affect gene expression profiles in canine liver tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kil, Dong Yong; Vester Boler, Brittany M; Apanavicius, Carolyn J; Schook, Lawrence B; Swanson, Kelly S

    2010-10-12

    The liver plays a central role in nutrient and xenobiotic metabolism, but its functionality declines with age. Senior dogs suffer from many of the chronic hepatic diseases as elderly humans, with age-related alterations in liver function influenced by diet. However, a large-scale molecular analysis of the liver tissue as affected by age and diet has not been reported in dogs. Liver tissue samples were collected from six senior (12-year old) and six young adult (1-year old) female beagles fed an animal protein-based diet (APB) or a plant protein-based diet (PPB) for 12 months. Total RNA in the liver tissue was extracted and hybridized to Affymetrix GeneChip® Canine Genome Arrays. Using a 2.0-fold cutoff and false discovery rate dogs had an increased risk of the progression of liver disease and dysfunction, as observed in aged humans and rodents. In particular for aged liver, genes related to inflammation, oxidative stress, and glycolysis were up-regulated, whereas genes related to regeneration, xenobiotic metabolism, and cholesterol trafficking were down-regulated. Diet-associated changes in gene expression were more common in young adult dogs (33 genes) as compared to senior dogs (3 genes). Our results provide molecular insight pertaining to the aged canine liver and its predisposition to disease and abnormalities. Therefore, our data may aid in future research pertaining to age-associated alterations in hepatic function or identification of potential targets for nutritional management as a means to decrease incidence of age-dependent liver dysfunction.

  1. Constitutive Effects of Lead on Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Gene Battery and Protection by β-carotene and Ascorbic Acid in Human HepG2 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwish, Wageh S; Ikenaka, Yoshinori; Nakayama, Shouta M M; Mizukawa, Hazuki; Ishizuka, Mayumi

    2016-01-01

    Lead (Pb) is an environmental pollutant that can get entry into human body through contaminated foods, drinks, and inhaled air leading to severe biological consequences, and has been responsible for many deaths worldwide. The objectives of this study were 1st to investigate the modulatory effects of environmentally relevant concentrations of Pb on AhR gene battery, which is controlling xenobiotics metabolism. 2nd, trials to reduce Pb-induced adverse effects were done using some phytochemicals like β-carotene or ascorbic acid. Human hepatoma (HepG2) cell lines were exposed to a wide range of Pb concentrations varying from physiological to toxic levels (0 to 10 mg/L) for 24 h. High Pb concentrations (1 to 10 mg/L) significantly reduced phase I (CYP1A1 and 1A2) and phase II (UGT1A6 and NQO1) xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme mRNA expression in a mechanistic manner through the AhR regulation pathway. Additionally, these Pb concentrations induced oxidative stress in HepG2 cells in terms of production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and induced heme oxygenase-1 mRNA expression in a concentration-dependent phenomenon. Coexposure of HepG2 cells to physiological concentrations of some micronutrients, like β-carotene (10 μM) or ascorbic acid (0.1 mM), along with Pb (1 mg/L) for 24 h significantly reduced the levels of ROS production and recovered AhR mRNA expression into the normal levels. Thus, consumption of foods rich in these micronutrients may help to reduce the adverse effects of lead in areas with high levels of pollution. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  2. Artificial neural network-based exploration of gene-nutrient interactions in folate and xenobiotic metabolic pathways that modulate susceptibility to breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naushad, Shaik Mohammad; Ramaiah, M Janaki; Pavithrakumari, Manickam; Jayapriya, Jaganathan; Hussain, Tajamul; Alrokayan, Salman A; Gottumukkala, Suryanarayana Raju; Digumarti, Raghunadharao; Kutala, Vijay Kumar

    2016-04-15

    In the current study, an artificial neural network (ANN)-based breast cancer prediction model was developed from the data of folate and xenobiotic pathway genetic polymorphisms along with the nutritional and demographic variables to investigate how micronutrients modulate susceptibility to breast cancer. The developed ANN model explained 94.2% variability in breast cancer prediction. Fixed effect models of folate (400 μg/day) and B12 (6 μg/day) showed 33.3% and 11.3% risk reduction, respectively. Multifactor dimensionality reduction analysis showed the following interactions in responders to folate: RFC1 G80A × MTHFR C677T (primary), COMT H108L × CYP1A1 m2 (secondary), MTR A2756G (tertiary). The interactions among responders to B12 were RFC1G80A × cSHMT C1420T and CYP1A1 m2 × CYP1A1 m4. ANN simulations revealed that increased folate might restore ER and PR expression and reduce the promoter CpG island methylation of extra cellular superoxide dismutase and BRCA1. Dietary intake of folate appears to confer protection against breast cancer through its modulating effects on ER and PR expression and methylation of EC-SOD and BRCA1. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Biological definition of multiple chemical sensitivity from redox state and cytokine profiling and not from polymorphisms of xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Luca, Chiara; Scordo, Maria G.; Cesareo, Eleonora; Pastore, Saveria; Mariani, Serena; Maiani, Gianluca; Stancato, Andrea; Loreti, Beatrice; Valacchi, Giuseppe; Lubrano, Carla; Raskovic, Desanka; De Padova, Luigia; Genovesi, Giuseppe; Korkina, Liudmila G.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS) is a poorly clinically and biologically defined environment-associated syndrome. Although dysfunctions of phase I/phase II metabolizing enzymes and redox imbalance have been hypothesized, corresponding genetic and metabolic parameters in MCS have not been systematically examined. Objectives: We sought for genetic, immunological, and metabolic markers in MCS. Methods: We genotyped patients with diagnosis of MCS, suspected MCS and Italian healthy controls for allelic variants of cytochrome P450 isoforms (CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, and CYP3A5), UDP-glucuronosyl transferase (UGT1A1), and glutathione S-transferases (GSTP1, GSTM1, and GSTT1). Erythrocyte membrane fatty acids, antioxidant (catalase, superoxide dismutase (SOD)) and glutathione metabolizing (GST, glutathione peroxidase (Gpx)) enzymes, whole blood chemiluminescence, total antioxidant capacity, levels of nitrites/nitrates, glutathione, HNE-protein adducts, and a wide spectrum of cytokines in the plasma were determined. Results: Allele and genotype frequencies of CYPs, UGT, GSTM, GSTT, and GSTP were similar in the Italian MCS patients and in the control populations. The activities of erythrocyte catalase and GST were lower, whereas Gpx was higher than normal. Both reduced and oxidised glutathione were decreased, whereas nitrites/nitrates were increased in the MCS groups. The MCS fatty acid profile was shifted to saturated compartment and IFNgamma, IL-8, IL-10, MCP-1, PDGFbb, and VEGF were increased. Conclusions: Altered redox and cytokine patterns suggest inhibition of expression/activity of metabolizing and antioxidant enzymes in MCS. Metabolic parameters indicating accelerated lipid oxidation, increased nitric oxide production and glutathione depletion in combination with increased plasma inflammatory cytokines should be considered in biological definition and diagnosis of MCS.

  4. Promoter methylation status in genes related with inflammation, nitrosative stress and xenobiotic metabolism in low-level benzene exposure: Searching for biomarkers of oncogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Garza, Octavio; Guo, Liqiong; Byun, Hyang-Min; Carrieri, Mariella; Bartolucci, Giovanni Battista; Zhong, Jia; Baccarelli, Andrea A

    2017-11-01

    Exposure to low levels of benzene may cause acute myeloid leukemia in humans. Epigenetic effects in benzene exposure have been studied for tumor suppressor genes and oxidative stress-related genes, but other cellular pathways must be explored. Here, we studied promoter DNA methylation of IL6, CYP2E1 and iNOS in blood cells from three groups of workers: a) gas station attendants (GS) exposed to low levels of benzene; b) plastic shoe factory workers (PS) exposed to other solvents different to benzene and c) administrative workers as a reference group with no solvent exposure (C). IL6 promoter methylation was higher in GS workers (p benzene levels (r = -0.47, p benzene. Correlations between iNOS methylation with both CYP2E1 methylation and urinary SPMA levels represent novel evidence about CYP2E1 epigenetic regulation and activity related with nitrosative stress, making promoter methylation status of these genes a potential biomarker in early stages of oncogenesis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. IL-21 Receptor Expression in Human Tendinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Abigail L.; Smith, Nicola C.; Reilly, James H.; Kerr, Shauna C.; Leach, William J.; Fazzi, Umberto G.; Rooney, Brian P.; Murrell, George A. C.; Millar, Neal L.

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenetic mechanisms underlying tendinopathy remain unclear, with much debate as to whether inflammation or degradation has the prominent role. Increasing evidence points toward an early inflammatory infiltrate and associated inflammatory cytokine production in human and animal models of tendon disease. The IL-21/IL-21R axis is a proinflammatory cytokine complex that has been associated with chronic inflammatory diseases including rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease. This project aimed to investigate the role and expression of the cytokine/receptor pair IL-21/IL-21R in human tendinopathy. We found significantly elevated expression of IL-21 receptor message and protein in human tendon samples but found no convincing evidence of the presence of IL-21 at message or protein level. The level of expression of IL-21R message/protein in human tenocytes was significantly upregulated by proinflammatory cytokines (TNFα/IL-1β) in vitro. These findings demonstrate that IL-21R is present in early human tendinopathy mainly expressed by tenocytes and macrophages. Despite a lack of IL-21 expression, these data again suggest that early tendinopathy has an inflammatory/cytokine phenotype, which may provide novel translational targets in the treatment of tendinopathy. PMID:24757284

  6. IL-21 Receptor Expression in Human Tendinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abigail L. Campbell

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenetic mechanisms underlying tendinopathy remain unclear, with much debate as to whether inflammation or degradation has the prominent role. Increasing evidence points toward an early inflammatory infiltrate and associated inflammatory cytokine production in human and animal models of tendon disease. The IL-21/IL-21R axis is a proinflammatory cytokine complex that has been associated with chronic inflammatory diseases including rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease. This project aimed to investigate the role and expression of the cytokine/receptor pair IL-21/IL-21R in human tendinopathy. We found significantly elevated expression of IL-21 receptor message and protein in human tendon samples but found no convincing evidence of the presence of IL-21 at message or protein level. The level of expression of IL-21R message/protein in human tenocytes was significantly upregulated by proinflammatory cytokines (TNFα/IL-1β in vitro. These findings demonstrate that IL-21R is present in early human tendinopathy mainly expressed by tenocytes and macrophages. Despite a lack of IL-21 expression, these data again suggest that early tendinopathy has an inflammatory/cytokine phenotype, which may provide novel translational targets in the treatment of tendinopathy.

  7. Molecular interactions between NAFLD and xenobiotic metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adviti eNaik

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD, the hepatic manifestation of the metabolic syndrome, is a complex multifactorial disease characterised by metabolic deregulations that include accumulation of lipids in the liver, lipotoxicity and insulin resistance. The progression of NAFLD to NASH and cirrhosis, and ultimately to carcinomas, is governed by interplay of pro-inflammatory pathways, oxidative stress, as well as fibrogenic and apoptotic cues. As the liver is the major organ of biotransformation, deregulations in hepatic signalling pathways have effects on both, xenobiotic and endobiotic metabolism. Several major nuclear receptors involved in the transcription and regulation of phase I and II drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters also have endobiotic ligands including several lipids. Hence, hepatic lipid accumulation in steatosis and NAFLD, which leads to deregulated activation patterns of nuclear receptors, may result in altered drug metabolism capacity in NAFLD patients. On the other hand, genetic and association studies have indicated that a malfunction in drug metabolism can affect the prevalence and severity of NAFLD. This review focuses on the complex interplay between NAFLD pathogenesis and drug metabolism. A better understanding of these relationships is a prerequisite for developing improved drug dosing algorithms for the pharmacotherapy of patients with different stages of NAFLD.

  8. Expression and characterization of recombinant human serum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl yemi

    2011-11-14

    Nov 14, 2011 ... Key words: C-peptide, human serum albumin, recombinant fusion protein, Pichia pastoris, bioactivity, biological half-time. ... lines were purchased from Cell bank of Chinese academy of sciences (Shanghai, China). .... agarose electrophoresis and DNA sequencing (data was not shown). Expression and ...

  9. Expression and characterization of recombinant human serum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    C-peptide (CP), connecting the A and B chains in proinsulin, has been considered to possess physiological effects in diabetes. In order to prolong the half-life of CP in vivo, a long acting CP analog [human serum albumin (HSA-CP)] was obtained by direct gene fusion of a single-chain CP to HSA and expressed in host ...

  10. Gene Expression in the Human Endolymphatic Sac

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Martin Nue; Kirkeby, Svend; Vikeså, Jonas

    2015-01-01

    a1 sodium-bicarbonate transporter, SLC9a2 sodium-hydrogen transporter, SLC12a3 thiazide-sensitive Na-Cl transporter, and SLC34a2 sodium-phosphate transporter. CONCLUSIONS: Several important ion transporters of the SLC family are expressed in the human endolymphatic sac, including Pendrin...

  11. Age and Diet Affect Gene Expression Profiles in Canine Liver Tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Kil, Dong Yong; Vester Boler, Brittany M.; Apanavicius, Carolyn J.; Schook, Lawrence B.; Swanson, Kelly S.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The liver plays a central role in nutrient and xenobiotic metabolism, but its functionality declines with age. Senior dogs suffer from many of the chronic hepatic diseases as elderly humans, with age-related alterations in liver function influenced by diet. However, a large-scale molecular analysis of the liver tissue as affected by age and diet has not been reported in dogs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Liver tissue samples were collected from six senior (12-year old) and six ...

  12. Regulation of gene expression in human tendinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archambault Joanne M

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic tendon injuries, also known as tendinopathies, are common among professional and recreational athletes. These injuries result in a significant amount of morbidity and health care expenditure, yet little is known about the molecular mechanisms leading to tendinopathy. Methods We have used histological evaluation and molecular profiling to determine gene expression changes in 23 human patients undergoing surgical procedures for the treatment of chronic tendinopathy. Results Diseased tendons exhibit altered extracellular matrix, fiber disorientation, increased cellular content and vasculature, and the absence of inflammatory cells. Global gene expression profiling identified 983 transcripts with significantly different expression patterns in the diseased tendons. Global pathway analysis further suggested altered expression of extracellular matrix proteins and the lack of an appreciable inflammatory response. Conclusions Identification of the pathways and genes that are differentially regulated in tendinopathy samples will contribute to our understanding of the disease and the development of novel therapeutics.

  13. Bisphenol A and Its Analogues Activate Human Pregnane X Receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Sui, Yipeng; Ai, Ni; Park, Se-Hyung; Rios-Pilier, Jennifer; Perkins, Jordan T.; Welsh, William J.; Zhou, Changcheng

    2012-01-01

    Background: Bisphenol A (BPA) is a base chemical used extensively in many consumer products. BPA and its analogues are present in environmental and human samples. Many endocrine-disrupting chemicals, including BPA, have been shown to activate the pregnane X receptor (PXR), a nuclear receptor that functions as a master regulator of xenobiotic metabolism. However, the detailed mechanism by which these chemicals activate PXR remains unknown. Objective: We investigated the mechanism by which BPA ...

  14. Circadian Kisspeptin expression in human term placenta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Pedro, M A; Morán, J; Díaz, I; Murias, L; Fernández-Plaza, C; González, C; Díaz, E

    2015-11-01

    Kisspeptin is an essential gatekeeper of reproductive function. During pregnancy high circulating levels of kisspeptin have been described, however the clear role of this neuropeptide in pregnancy remains unknown. We tested the existence of rhythmic kisspeptin expression in human full-term placenta from healthy pregnant women at six different time points during the day. The data obtained by Western blotting were fitted to a mathematical model (Fourier series), demonstrating, for the first time, the existence of a circadian rhythm in placental kisspeptin expression. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Prolactin Upregulates Female-Predominant P450 Gene Expressions and Downregulates Male-Predominant Gene Expressions in Mouse Liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yuya; Kaneko, Yoshikatsu; Cho, Takamasa; Goto, Kei; Otsuka, Tadashi; Yamamoto, Suguru; Goto, Shin; Maruyama, Hiroki; Narita, Ichiei

    2017-06-01

    Prolactin is a polypeptide hormone with over 300 separate biologic activities. Its serum level is increased during pregnancy and lactation, and it has been reported that pregnancy and lactation affect drug and steroid metabolism in mice and humans. Several studies reported that pregnancy or lactation influences liver cytochrome P450 (P450) expression and its activity, affecting the biosynthesis of steroids and xenobiotics through growth hormone or sex hormones; however, the role of prolactin as the regulator of liver P450 expression has not been elucidated so far. In the present study, we focused on prolactin as the regulator of expression of liver sex-predominant genes, including P450s. To investigate the role of prolactin in the hepatic gene expressions, pCAGGS expression vector containing mouse prolactin cDNA was transfected by hydrodynamic injection into both male and female mice. Hyperprolactinemia phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 in the liver and augmented female mouse liver mRNA expression of Cyp3a16 , Cyp3a41 , Cyp3a44 , Cyp2b9 , and prolactin receptor genes, whose expressions were female-predominant in hepatocytes. Moreover, liver expression of male-predominant genes such as Cyp2d9 , Cyp7b1 , Mup1 , and Alas2 were reduced in male mice with hyperprolactinemia. The serum levels of conventional regulators of hepatic gene expressions, growth hormone, and testosterone were not affected by hyperprolactinemia. We demonstrated that prolactin upregulated female-predominant genes in female mice and downregulated male-predominant genes in male mice. We conjecture that higher concentration of prolactin would alter steroid and xenobiotic metabolisms by modulating hepatic P450 gene expressions during pregnancy and lactation. Copyright © 2017 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  16. The human endolymphatic sac expresses natriuretic peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Martin Nue; Kirkeby, Svend; Vikeså, Jonas

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: The function of the human endolymphatic sac (ES) has been enigmatic for decades. Hypotheses include controlling endolymphatic fluid homeostasis and inner ear immunological defense. Additionally, several studies indicate a possible endocrine capacity and a yet undefined role......: Several natriuretic peptides were found expressed significantly in the ES, including uroguanylin and brain natriuretic peptide, but also peptides regulating vascular tone, including adrenomedullin 2. In addition, both neurophysin and oxytocin (OXT) were found significantly expressed. All peptides were...... vasopressin receptors and aquaporin-2 channels in the inner ear via OXT expression. We hypothesize that the ES is likely to regulate inner ear endolymphatic homeostasis, possibly through secretion of several peptides, but it may also influence systemic and/or intracranial blood pressure through direct...

  17. Genome-wide expression reveals multiple systemic effects associated with detection of anticoagulant poisons in bobcats (Lynx rufus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Devaughn; Mouton, Alice; Serieys, Laurel E K; Cole, Steve; Carver, Scott; Vandewoude, Sue; Lappin, Michael; Riley, Seth P D; Wayne, Robert

    2018-02-09

    Anticoagulant rodenticides (ARs) are indiscriminate toxicants that threaten non-target predatory and scavenger species through secondary poisoning. Accumulating evidence suggests that AR exposure may have disruptive sublethal consequences on individuals that can affect fitness. We evaluated AR-related effects on genome wide expression patterns in a population of bobcats in southern California. We identify differential expression of genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism, endoplasmic reticulum stress response, epithelial integrity, and both adaptive and innate immune function. Further, we find that differential expression of immune related genes may be attributable to AR-related effects on leukocyte differentiation. Collectively, our results provide an unprecedented understanding of the sublethal effects of AR exposure on a wild carnivore. These findings highlight potential detrimental effects of ARs on a wide variety of species worldwide that may consume poisoned rodents and indicate the need to investigate gene expression effects of other toxicants added to natural environments by humans. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  18. Proteoglycan expression patterns in human hair follicle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malgouries, S; Thibaut, S; Bernard, B A

    2008-02-01

    Proteoglycans (PGs) are known to play key roles in many cellular signalling pathways involved in hair follicle biology. Although some PG core proteins have previously been described in adult human hair follicles, their glycosaminoglycan (GAG) moieties have been less studied. To add knowledge about PG core protein and GAG distributions in human anagen hair follicle and, for selected follicles, during catagen. We used immunohistochemistry and immunohistofluorescence to revisit the expression pattern of GAG chains and core proteins in human hair follicle. The studied epitopes included CD44v3, syndecan-1, perlecan, versican, aggrecan, biglycan, heparan sulphate (HS), chondroitin sulphate (CS), dermatan sulphate (DS) and keratan sulphate (KS). The membrane PGs syndecan-1 and CD44v3 were respectively detected in the epithelial part of whole hair and in the outer root sheath basal layer. The dermal part of the hair follicle contained high amounts of extracellular PGs such as perlecan, versican, aggrecan, biglycan and their saccharidic moieties, namely HS, CS, DS and KS. We also observed a variable distribution of these components along the hair follicle. Especially, we noted a PG impoverishment at the very bottom of the anagen bulb. Moreover, while type D chondroitin expression remained unaffected, 4C3-CS and PG4-CS/DS epitopes respectively decreased in the dermal papilla and the connective tissue sheath, at the onset of catagen. GAG and PG expression along the human anagen hair follicle was characterized by (i) discontinuities mainly affecting the basement membrane and (ii) disappearance of some epitopes at catagen onset. These results are discussed in term of functionalities in nutrient diffusion, cell proliferation and differentiation, and hair protection.

  19. Glucose transporter expression in the human colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merigo, Flavia; Brandolese, Alessandro; Facchin, Sonia; Missaggia, Silvia; Bernardi, Paolo; Boschi, Federico; D'Incà, Renata; Savarino, Edoardo Vincenzo; Sbarbati, Andrea; Sturniolo, Giacomo Carlo

    2018-02-21

    To investigate by immunostaining glucose transporter expression in human colorectal mucosa in controls and patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Colorectal samples were obtained from patients undergoing lower endoscopic colonoscopy or recto-sigmoidoscopy. Patients diagnosed with ulcerative colitis ( n = 18) or Crohn's disease ( n = 10) and scheduled for diagnostic colonoscopy were enrolled. Patients who underwent colonoscopy for prevention screening of colorectal cancer or were followed-up after polypectomy or had a history of lower gastrointestinal symptoms were designated as the control group (CTRL, n = 16). Inflammatory status of the mucosa at the sampling site was evaluated histologically and/or endoscopically. A total of 147 biopsies of colorectal mucosa were collected and processed for immunohistochemistry analysis. The expression of GLUT2, SGLT1, and GLUT5 glucose transporters was investigated using immunoperoxidase labeling. To compare immunoreactivity of GLUT5 and LYVE-1, which is a marker for lymphatic vessel endothelium, double-labeled confocal microscopy was used. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that GLUT2, SGLT1, and GLUT5 were expressed only in short epithelial portions of the large intestinal mucosa. No important differences were observed in glucose transporter expression between the samples obtained from the different portions of the colorectal tract and between the different patient groups. Unexpectedly, GLUT5 expression was also identified in vessels, mainly concentrated in specific areas where the vessels were clustered. Immunostaining with LYVE-1 and GLUT5 antibodies revealed that GLUT5-immunoreactive (-IR) clusters of vessels were concentrated in areas internal to those that were LYVE-1 positive. GLUT5 and LYVE-1 did not appear to be colocalized but rather showed a close topographical relationship on the endothelium. Based on their LYVE-1 expression, GLUT5-IR vessels were identified as lymphatic. Both inflamed and non

  20. GLUT-3 expression in human skeletal muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, C. A.; Wen, G.; Peng, B. H.; Popov, V. L.; Hudnall, S. D.; Campbell, G. A.

    2000-01-01

    Muscle biopsy homogenates contain GLUT-3 mRNA and protein. Before these studies, it was unclear where GLUT-3 was located in muscle tissue. In situ hybridization using a midmolecule probe demonstrated GLUT-3 within all muscle fibers. Fluorescent-tagged antibody reacting with affinity-purified antibody directed at the carboxy-terminus demonstrated GLUT-3 protein in all fibers. Slow-twitch muscle fibers, identified by NADH-tetrazolium reductase staining, possessed more GLUT-3 protein than fast-twitch fibers. Electron microscopy using affinity-purified primary antibody and gold particle-tagged second antibody showed that the majority of GLUT-3 was in association with triads and transverse tubules inside the fiber. Strong GLUT-3 signals were seen in association with the few nerves that traversed muscle sections. Electron microscopic evaluation of human peripheral nerve demonstrated GLUT-3 within the axon, with many of the particles related to mitochondria. GLUT-3 protein was found in myelin but not in Schwann cells. GLUT-1 protein was not present in nerve cells, axons, myelin, or Schwann cells but was seen at the surface of the peripheral nerve in the perineurium. These studies demonstrated that GLUT-3 mRNA and protein are expressed throughout normal human skeletal muscle, but the protein is predominantly found in the triads of slow-twitch muscle fibers.

  1. Toxicogenomic outcomes predictive of forestomach carcinogenesis following exposure to benzo(a)pyrene: Relevance to human cancer risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labib, Sarah, E-mail: Sarah.Labib@hc-sc.gc.ca; Guo, Charles H., E-mail: Charles.Guo@hc-sc.gc.ca; Williams, Andrew, E-mail: Andrew.Williams@hc-sc.gc.ca; Yauk, Carole L., E-mail: Carole.Yauk@hc-sc.gc.ca; White, Paul A., E-mail: Paul.White@hc-sc.gc.ca; Halappanavar, Sabina, E-mail: Sabina.Halappanavar@hc-sc.gc.ca

    2013-12-01

    Forestomach tumors are observed in mice exposed to environmental carcinogens. However, the relevance of this data to humans is controversial because humans lack a forestomach. We hypothesize that an understanding of early molecular changes after exposure to a carcinogen in the forestomach will provide mode-of-action information to evaluate the applicability of forestomach cancers to human cancer risk assessment. In the present study we exposed mice to benzo(a)pyrene (BaP), an environmental carcinogen commonly associated with tumors of the rodent forestomach. Toxicogenomic tools were used to profile gene expression response in the forestomach. Adult Muta™Mouse males were orally exposed to 25, 50, and 75 mg BaP/kg-body-weight/day for 28 consecutive days. The forestomach was collected three days post-exposure. DNA microarrays, real-time RT-qPCR arrays, and protein analyses were employed to characterize responses in the forestomach. Microarray results showed altered expression of 414 genes across all treatment groups (± 1.5 fold; false discovery rate adjusted P ≤ 0.05). Significant downregulation of genes associated with phase II xenobiotic metabolism and increased expression of genes implicated in antigen processing and presentation, immune response, chemotaxis, and keratinocyte differentiation were observed in treated groups in a dose-dependent manner. A systematic comparison of the differentially expressed genes in the forestomach from the present study to differentially expressed genes identified in human diseases including human gastrointestinal tract cancers using the NextBio Human Disease Atlas showed significant commonalities between the two models. Our results provide molecular evidence supporting the use of the mouse forestomach model to evaluate chemically-induced gastrointestinal carcinogenesis in humans. - Highlights: • Benzo(a)pyrene-mediated transcriptomic response in the forestomach was examined. • The immunoproteosome subunits and MHC class I

  2. Positive selection on gene expression in the human brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khaitovich, Philipp; Tang, Kun; Franz, Henriette

    2006-01-01

    Recent work has shown that the expression levels of genes transcribed in the brains of humans and chimpanzees have changed less than those of genes transcribed in other tissues [1] . However, when gene expression changes are mapped onto the evolutionary lineage in which they occurred, the brain...... shows more changes than other tissues in the human lineage compared to the chimpanzee lineage [1] , [2] and [3] . There are two possible explanations for this: either positive selection drove more gene expression changes to fixation in the human brain than in the chimpanzee brain, or genes expressed...... in the brain experienced less purifying selection in humans than in chimpanzees, i.e. gene expression in the human brain is functionally less constrained. The first scenario would be supported if genes that changed their expression in the brain in the human lineage showed more selective sweeps than other genes...

  3. Cyclooxygenase-2 expression in the normal human eye and its expression pattern in selected eye tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Jinmei; Wu, Yazhen; Heegaard, Steffen

    2011-01-01

    and retina. The COX-2 expression was less in tumours deriving from the ciliary epithelium and also in retinoblastoma. Conclusion: Cyclooxygenase-2 is constitutively expressed in normal human eyes. The expression of COX-2 is much lower in selected eye tumours involving COX-2 expressing cells.......Purpose: Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is an enzyme involved in neoplastic processes. The purpose of the present study is to investigate COX-2 expression in the normal human eye and the expression pattern in selected eye tumours involving COX-2 expressing cells. Methods: Immunohistochemical staining...... using antibodies against COX-2 was performed on paraffin sections of normal human eyes and selected eye tumours arising from cells expressing COX-2. Results: Cyclooxygenase-2 expression was found in various structures of the normal eye. Abundant expression was seen in the cornea, iris, ciliary body...

  4. Cyclooxygenase-2 expression in the normal human eye and its expression pattern in selected eye tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Jinmei; Wu, Yazhen; Heegaard, Steffen

    2011-01-01

    and retina. The COX-2 expression was less in tumours deriving from the ciliary epithelium and also in retinoblastoma. Conclusion: Cyclooxygenase-2 is constitutively expressed in normal human eyes. The expression of COX-2 is much lower in selected eye tumours involving COX-2 expressing cells....

  5. Glucose transporter expression in human skeletal muscle fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaster, M; Handberg, A; Beck-Nielsen, H

    2000-01-01

    The present study was initiated to investigate GLUT-1 through -5 expression in developing and mature human skeletal muscle. To bypass the problems inherent in techniques using tissue homogenates, we applied an immunocytochemical approach, employing the sensitive enhanced tyramide signal amplifica......The present study was initiated to investigate GLUT-1 through -5 expression in developing and mature human skeletal muscle. To bypass the problems inherent in techniques using tissue homogenates, we applied an immunocytochemical approach, employing the sensitive enhanced tyramide signal...... amplification (TSA) technique to detect the localization of glucose transporter expression in human skeletal muscle. We found expression of GLUT-1, GLUT-3, and GLUT-4 in developing human muscle fibers showing a distinct expression pattern. 1) GLUT-1 is expressed in human skeletal muscle cells during gestation...

  6. Genetic effects on gene expression across human tissues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Battle, Alexis; Brown, Christopher D.; Engelhardt, Barbara E.; Montgomery, Stephen B.; Aguet, François; Ardlie, Kristin G.; Cummings, Beryl B.; Gelfand, Ellen T.; Getz, Gad; Hadley, Kane; Handsaker, Robert E.; Huang, Katherine H.; Kashin, Seva; Karczewski, Konrad J.; Lek, Monkol; Li, Xiao; MacArthur, Daniel G.; Nedzel, Jared L.; Nguyen, Duyen T.; Noble, Michael S.; Segrè, Ayellet V.; Trowbridge, Casandra A.; Tukiainen, Taru; Abell, Nathan S.; Balliu, Brunilda; Barshir, Ruth; Basha, Omer; Bogu, Gireesh K.; Brown, Andrew; Castel, Stephane E.; Chen, Lin S.; Chiang, Colby; Conrad, Donald F.; Cox, Nancy J.; Damani, Farhan N.; Davis, Joe R.; Delaneau, Olivier; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T.; Eskin, Eleazar; Ferreira, Pedro G.; Frésard, Laure; Gamazon, Eric R.; Garrido-Martín, Diego; Gewirtz, Ariel D. H.; Gliner, Genna; Gloudemans, Michael J.; Guigo, Roderic; Hall, Ira M.; Han, Buhm; He, Yuan; Hormozdiari, Farhad; Howald, Cedric; Kyung Im, Hae; Jo, Brian; Yong Kang, Eun; Kim, Yungil; Kim-Hellmuth, Sarah; Lappalainen, Tuuli; Li, Gen; Li, Xin; Liu, Boxiang; Mangul, Serghei; McCarthy, Mark I.; McDowell, Ian C.; Mohammadi, Pejman; Monlong, Jean; Muñoz-Aguirre, Manuel; Ndungu, Anne W.; Nicolae, Dan L.; Nobel, Andrew B.; Oliva, Meritxell; Ongen, Halit; Palowitch, John J.; Panousis, Nikolaos; Papasaikas, Panagiotis; Park, Yoson; Parsana, Princy; Payne, Anthony J.; Peterson, Christine B.; Quan, Jie; Reverter, Ferran; Sabatti, Chiara; Saha, Ashis; Sammeth, Michael; Scott, Alexandra J.; Shabalin, Andrey A.; Sodaei, Reza; Stephens, Matthew; Stranger, Barbara E.; Strober, Benjamin J.; Sul, Jae Hoon; Tsang, Emily K.; Urbut, Sarah; van de Bunt, Martijn; Wang, Gao; Wen, Xiaoquan; Wright, Fred A.; Xi, Hualin S.; Yeger-Lotem, Esti; Zappala, Zachary; Zaugg, Judith B.; Zhou, Yi-Hui; Akey, Joshua M.; Bates, Daniel; Chan, Joanne; Claussnitzer, Melina; Demanelis, Kathryn; Diegel, Morgan; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Feinberg, Andrew P.; Fernando, Marian S.; Halow, Jessica; Hansen, Kasper D.; Haugen, Eric; Hickey, Peter F.; Hou, Lei; Jasmine, Farzana; Jian, Ruiqi; Jiang, Lihua; Johnson, Audra; Kaul, Rajinder; Kellis, Manolis; Kibriya, Muhammad G.; Lee, Kristen; Billy Li, Jin; Li, Qin; Lin, Jessica; Lin, Shin; Linder, Sandra; Linke, Caroline; Liu, Yaping; Maurano, Matthew T.; Molinie, Benoit; Nelson, Jemma; Neri, Fidencio J.; Park, Yongjin; Pierce, Brandon L.; Rinaldi, Nicola J.; Rizzardi, Lindsay F.; Sandstrom, Richard; Skol, Andrew; Smith, Kevin S.; Snyder, Michael P.; Stamatoyannopoulos, John; Tang, Hua; Wang, Li; Wang, Meng; van Wittenberghe, Nicholas; Wu, Fan; Zhang, Rui; Nierras, Concepcion R.; Branton, Philip A.; Carithers, Latarsha J.; Guan, Ping; Moore, Helen M.; Rao, Abhi; Vaught, Jimmie B.; Gould, Sarah E.; Lockart, Nicole C.; Martin, Casey; Struewing, Jeffery P.; Volpi, Simona; Addington, Anjene M.; Koester, Susan E.; Little, A. Roger; Brigham, Lori E.; Hasz, Richard; Hunter, Marcus; Johns, Christopher; Johnson, Mark; Kopen, Gene; Leinweber, William F.; Lonsdale, John T.; McDonald, Alisa; Mestichelli, Bernadette; Myer, Kevin; Roe, Brian; Salvatore, Michael; Shad, Saboor; Thomas, Jeffrey A.; Walters, Gary; Washington, Michael; Wheeler, Joseph; Bridge, Jason; Foster, Barbara A.; Gillard, Bryan M.; Karasik, Ellen; Kumar, Rachna; Miklos, Mark; Moser, Michael T.; Jewell, Scott D.; Montroy, Robert G.; Rohrer, Daniel C.; Valley, Dana R.; Davis, David A.; Mash, Deborah C.; Undale, Anita H.; Smith, Anna M.; Tabor, David E.; Roche, Nancy V.; McLean, Jeffrey A.; Vatanian, Negin; Robinson, Karna L.; Sobin, Leslie; Barcus, Mary E.; Valentino, Kimberly M.; Qi, Liqun; Hunter, Steven; Hariharan, Pushpa; Singh, Shilpi; Um, Ki Sung; Matose, Takunda; Tomaszewski, Maria M.; Barker, Laura K.; Mosavel, Maghboeba; Siminoff, Laura A.; Traino, Heather M.; Flicek, Paul; Juettemann, Thomas; Ruffier, Magali; Sheppard, Dan; Taylor, Kieron; Trevanion, Stephen J.; Zerbino, Daniel R.; Craft, Brian; Goldman, Mary; Haeussler, Maximilian; Kent, W. James; Lee, Christopher M.; Paten, Benedict; Rosenbloom, Kate R.; Vivian, John; Zhu, Jingchun; Brown, Andrew A.; Nguyen, Duyen Y.; Sullivan, Timothy J.; Addington, Anjene; Koester, Susan; Lockhart, Nicole C.; Roe, Bryan; Valley, Dana; He, Amy Z.; Kang, Eun Yong; Quon, Gerald; Ripke, Stephan; Shimko, Tyler C.; Teran, Nicole A.; Zhang, Hailei; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Guigó, Roderic

    2017-01-01

    Characterization of the molecular function of the human genome and its variation across individuals is essential for identifying the cellular mechanisms that underlie human genetic traits and diseases. The Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) project aims to characterize variation in gene expression

  7. Expression of human interferon gamma in Brassica napus seeds

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    TUOYO

    2010-08-09

    Aug 9, 2010 ... express human therapeutic protein, interferon gamma (IFN_γ) in Brassica napus seeds. Kozak sequence was linked to the .... witness successful expression of the human interferon gamma in Brassica napus ..... Cytosolic factors block antibody binding to the C-terminal tail of the. KDEL receptor. Eur. J. Cell ...

  8. Endothelium specific matrilysin (MMP-7) expression in human cancers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sier, C.F.M.; Hawinkels, L.J.A.C.; Zijlmans, H.J.M.A.A.; Zuidwijk, K.; Jonge de; Muller, E.S.M.; Ferreira, V.; Hanemaaijer, R.; Mulder-Stapel, A.A.; Kenter, G.G.; Verspaget, H.W.; Gorter, A.

    2008-01-01

    Over-expression of matrilysin (MMP-7) is predominantly associated with epithelial (pre)malignant cells. In the present study MMP-7 expression is also found in endothelial cells in various human cancer types. Endothelial MMP-7 was associated with CD34 and/or CD105 expression. These

  9. High level expression of human basic fibroblast growth factor in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    High level expression of human basic fibroblast growth factor in Escherichia coli : Evaluating the effect of the GC content and rare codons within the first 13 codons. ... Nterminally modified genes were PCR amplified and cloned into the expression vector, pET-22b. Meanwhile, wild-type gene remarkably expressed in all the ...

  10. Human thymic epithelial cells express functional HLA-DP molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, A; Röpke, C; Nielsen, M

    1996-01-01

    T lymphocytes, we examined whether human thymic epithelial cells (TEC) expressed HLA-DP molecules. We present evidence that TEC obtained from short time culture express low but significant levels of HLA-DP molecules. The expression of HLA-DP molecules was comparable to or higher than the expression...... of HLA-DP allospecific primed lymphocyte typing (PLT) CD4 T cell lines. IFN-gamma treatment strongly upregulated the HLA-DP allospecific PLT responses whereas other PLT responses remained largely unchanged. In conclusion, these data indicate that human thymus epithelial cells express significant levels...

  11. Foxp3 expression in human cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gourgoulianis Konstantinos I

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Transcription factor forkhead box protein 3 (Foxp3 specifically characterizes the thymically derived naturally occurring regulatory T cells (Tregs. Limited evidence indicates that it is also expressed, albeit to a lesser extent, in tissues other than thymus and spleen, while, very recently, it was shown that Foxp3 is expressed by pancreatic carcinoma. This study was scheduled to investigate whether expression of Foxp3 transcripts and mature protein occurs constitutively in various tumor types. Materials and methods Twenty five tumor cell lines of different tissue origins (lung cancer, colon cancer, breast cancer, melanoma, erythroid leukemia, acute T-cell leukemia were studied. Detection of Foxp3 mRNA was performed using both conventional RT-PCR and quantitative real-time PCR while protein expression was assessed by immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry, using different antibody clones. Results Foxp3 mRNA as well as Foxp3 protein was detected in all tumor cell lines, albeit in variable levels, not related to the tissue of origin. This expression correlated with the expression levels of IL-10 and TGFb1. Conclusion We offer evidence that Foxp3 expression, characterizes tumor cells of various tissue origins. The biological significance of these findings warrants further investigation in the context of tumor immune escape, and especially under the light of current anti-cancer efforts interfering with Foxp3 expression.

  12. Determinants of human adipose tissue gene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viguerie, Nathalie; Montastier, Emilie; Maoret, Jean-José

    2012-01-01

    of environmental and individual factors controlling AT adaptation is therefore essential. Here, expression of 271 transcripts, selected for regulation according to obesity and weight changes, was determined in 515 individuals before, after 8-week low-calorie diet-induced weight loss, and after 26-week ad libitum...... interconnection between expression of genes involved in de novo lipogenesis and components of the metabolic syndrome. Sex had a marked influence on AT expression of 88 transcripts, which persisted during the entire dietary intervention and after control for fat mass. In women, the influence of body mass index...... on expression of a subset of genes persisted during the dietary intervention. Twenty-two genes revealed a metabolic syndrome signature common to men and women. Genetic control of AT gene expression by cis signals was observed for 46 genes. Dietary intervention, sex, and cis genetic variants independently...

  13. Matrix-degrading and pro-inflammatory changes in human vascular endothelial cells exposed to cigarette smoke condensate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordskog, Brian K; Blixt, Allison D; Morgan, Walter T; Fields, Wanda R; Hellmann, Gary M

    2003-01-01

    Cigarette smoking has been associated with an increase in the severity and prevalence of atherosclerosis in the abdominal aorta. To begin our investigation of this finding, we used an integrated approach combining gene expression profiling, protein analysis, cytokine measurements, and cytotoxicity determinations to examine molecular responses of cultured human aortic and coronary endothelial cells exposed to cigarette smoke condensate (CSC) and nicotine. Exposure of endothelial cells to CSC (30 and 60 microg/mL TPM) for 24 h resulted in minimal cytotoxicity, and the upregulation of genes involved in matrix degradation (MMP-1, MMP-8, and MMP-9), xenobiotic metabolism (HO-1 and CYP1A2), and downregulation of genes involved in cell cycle regulation (including TOP2A, CCNB1, CCNA, CDKN3). Exposure of cells to a high physiological concentration of nicotine resulted in few differentially expressed genes. Immunoblot analysis of proteins selected from genes shown to be differentially regulated by microarray analysis revealed similar responses. Finally, a number of inflammatory cytokines measured in culture media were elevated in response to CSC. Together, these results describe a complex proinflammatory response, possibly mediating the recruitment of leukocytes through cytokine signaling. Additionally, fibrous cap destabilization may be facilitated by matrix metalloproteinase upregulation.

  14. Toxicogenomic effects common to triazole antifungals and conserved between rats and humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goetz, Amber K.; Dix, David J.

    2009-01-01

    The triazole antifungals myclobutanil, propiconazole and triadimefon cause varying degrees of hepatic toxicity and disrupt steroid hormone homeostasis in rodent in vivo models. To identify biological pathways consistently modulated across multiple timepoints and various study designs, gene expression profiling was conducted on rat livers from three separate studies with triazole treatment groups ranging from 6 h after a single oral gavage exposure, to prenatal to adult exposures via feed. To explore conservation of responses across species, gene expression from the rat liver studies were compared to in vitro data from rat and human primary hepatocytes exposed to the triazoles. Toxicogenomic data on triazoles from 33 different treatment groups and 135 samples (microarrays) identified thousands of probe sets and dozens of pathways differentially expressed across time, dose, and species - many of these were common to all three triazoles, or conserved between rodents and humans. Common and conserved pathways included androgen and estrogen metabolism, xenobiotic metabolism signaling through CAR and PXR, and CYP mediated metabolism. Differentially expressed genes included the Phase I xenobiotic, fatty acid, sterol and steroid metabolism genes Cyp2b2 and CYP2B6, Cyp3a1 and CYP3A4, and Cyp4a22 and CYP4A11; Phase II conjugation enzyme genes Ugt1a1 and UGT1A1; and Phase III ABC transporter genes Abcb1 and ABCB1. Gene expression changes caused by all three triazoles in liver and hepatocytes were concentrated in biological pathways regulating lipid, sterol and steroid homeostasis, identifying a potential common mode of action conserved between rodents and humans. Modulation of hepatic sterol and steroid metabolism is a plausible mode of action for changes in serum testosterone and adverse reproductive outcomes observed in rat studies, and may be relevant to human risk assessment.

  15. Rho GTPase expression in human myeloid cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne F G van Helden

    Full Text Available Myeloid cells are critical for innate immunity and the initiation of adaptive immunity. Strict regulation of the adhesive and migratory behavior is essential for proper functioning of these cells. Rho GTPases are important regulators of adhesion and migration; however, it is unknown which Rho GTPases are expressed in different myeloid cells. Here, we use a qPCR-based approach to investigate Rho GTPase expression in myeloid cells.We found that the mRNAs encoding Cdc42, RhoQ, Rac1, Rac2, RhoA and RhoC are the most abundant. In addition, RhoG, RhoB, RhoF and RhoV are expressed at low levels or only in specific cell types. More differentiated cells along the monocyte-lineage display lower levels of Cdc42 and RhoV, while RhoC mRNA is more abundant. In addition, the Rho GTPase expression profile changes during dendritic cell maturation with Rac1 being upregulated and Rac2 downregulated. Finally, GM-CSF stimulation, during macrophage and osteoclast differentiation, leads to high expression of Rac2, while M-CSF induces high levels of RhoA, showing that these cytokines induce a distinct pattern. Our data uncover cell type specific modulation of the Rho GTPase expression profile in hematopoietic stem cells and in more differentiated cells of the myeloid lineage.

  16. Expression of the alpha subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin is specifically correlated with tumorigenic expression in human cell hybrids.

    OpenAIRE

    Stanbridge, E J; Rosen, S W; Sussman, H H

    1982-01-01

    The expression of HeLa parent phenotype protein markers, the alpha subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin and placental alkaline phosphatase isoenzymes, has been evaluated in paired tumorigenic and nontumorigenic HeLa-fibroblast human cell hybrids. Both of these proteins have been used clinically as markers of malignancy. The results showed that both are expressed in the hybrids. Expression of the gonadotropin subunit in the hybrids is specifically correlated with tumorigenicity; the placent...

  17. Expression of haemopexin receptors by cultured human cytotrophoblast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.P. van Dijk (Hans); M.J. Kroos; J.S. Starreveld; H.G. van Eijk (Henk); S.P. Tang; D.X. Song

    1995-01-01

    textabstractThe expression of cell-surface haemopexin (Hx) receptors on human cytotrophoblasts was assessed by using four different Hx species purified from plasma: human Hx isolated by wheatgerm-affinity chromatography, human Hx isolated by haem-agarose-affinity

  18. Glucose transporter expression in human skeletal muscle fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaster, M; Handberg, A; Beck-Nielsen, H

    2000-01-01

    The present study was initiated to investigate GLUT-1 through -5 expression in developing and mature human skeletal muscle. To bypass the problems inherent in techniques using tissue homogenates, we applied an immunocytochemical approach, employing the sensitive enhanced tyramide signal amplifica......The present study was initiated to investigate GLUT-1 through -5 expression in developing and mature human skeletal muscle. To bypass the problems inherent in techniques using tissue homogenates, we applied an immunocytochemical approach, employing the sensitive enhanced tyramide signal...... amplification (TSA) technique to detect the localization of glucose transporter expression in human skeletal muscle. We found expression of GLUT-1, GLUT-3, and GLUT-4 in developing human muscle fibers showing a distinct expression pattern. 1) GLUT-1 is expressed in human skeletal muscle cells during gestation......, but its expression is markedly reduced around birth and is further reduced to undetectable levels within the first year of life; 2) GLUT-3 protein expression appears at 18 wk of gestation and disappears after birth; and 3) GLUT-4 protein is diffusely expressed in muscle cells throughout gestation, whereas...

  19. Expression of human PTPN22 alleles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, C; Barington, T; Husby, S

    2007-01-01

    Considering the female predominance in most of the autoimmune disorders that associate with the PTPN22 Trp620 variant and the complexity by which this variant influences immunologic tolerance, the objective of this study was to ascertain if the allele-specific expression of the disease...... and 72 h of activation, respectively, the expression of PTPN22 1858C- and T-alleles increased to the same extent (P=0.64). The present result essentially excludes such phenomena as a partial explanation for the female predominance in most of the autoimmune disorders that associate with the PTPN22 Trp620...

  20. Hexachlorobenzene induces cell proliferation, and aryl hydrocarbon receptor expression (AhR) in rat liver preneoplastic foci, and in the human hepatoma cell line HepG2. AhR is a mediator of ERK1/2 signaling, and cell cycle regulation in HCB-treated HepG2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Tomaso Portaz, Ana Clara; Caimi, Giselle Romero; Sánchez, Marcela; Chiappini, Florencia; Randi, Andrea S; Kleiman de Pisarev, Diana L; Alvarez, Laura

    2015-10-02

    Hexachlorobenzene (HCB) is a widespread environmental pollutant, and a liver tumor promoter in rodents. Depending on the particular cell lines studied, exposure to these compounds may lead to cell proliferation, terminal differentiation, or apoptosis. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that is involved in drug and xenobiotic metabolism. AhR can also modulate a variety of cellular and physiological processes that can affect cell proliferation and cell fate determination. The mechanisms by which AhR ligands, both exogenous and endogenous, affect these processes involve multiple interactions between AhR and other signaling pathways. In the present study, we examined the effect of HCB on cell proliferation and AhR expression, using an initiation-promotion hepatocarcinogenesis protocol in rat liver and in the human-derived hepatoma cell line, HepG2. Female Wistar rats were initiated with a single dose of 100 mg/kg of diethylnitrosamine (DEN) at the start of the experiment. Two weeks later, daily dosing of 100 mg/kg HCB was maintained for 10 weeks. Partial hepatectomy was performed 3 weeks after initiation. The number and area of glutathione S-transferase-P (GST-P)-positive foci, in the rat liver were used as biomarkers of liver precancerous lesions. Immunohistochemical staining showed an increase in proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)-positive cells, along with enhanced AhR protein expression in hepatocytes within GST-P-positive foci of (DEN HCB) group, when compared to DEN. In a similar manner, Western blot analysis demonstrated that HCB induced PCNA and AhR protein expression in HepG2 cells. Flow cytometry assay indicated that the cells were accumulated at S and G2/M phases of the cell cycle. HCB increased cyclin D1 protein levels and ERK1/2 phosphorylation in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment of cells with a selective MEK1 inhibitor, prevented HCB-stimulatory effect on PCNA and cyclinD1, indicating that these effects

  1. Melanopsin expressing human retinal ganglion cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hannibal, Jens; Christiansen, Anders Tolstrup; Heegaard, Steffen

    2017-01-01

    microscopy and 3D reconstruction of melanopsin immunoreactive (-ir) RGCs, we applied the criteria used in mouse on human melanopsin-ir RGCs. We identified M1, displaced M1, M2, and M4 cells. We found two other subtypes of melanopsin-ir RGCs, which were named "gigantic M1 (GM1)" and "gigantic displaced M1...

  2. Subcloning and expression of human alpha-fetoprotein gene in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Subcloning and expression of human alpha-fetoprotein gene in Pichia pastoris. ... in inducing protein production in auxotrophic media lacking histidine. This protein could be useful in monoclonal antibody production and in diagnostic kit preparations. Keywords: Alpha-fetoprotein, Pichia pastoris, cloning, expression ...

  3. Expression of human lymphotoxin alpha in Aspergillus niger

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krasevec, N.; Hondel, C.A.M.J.J. van de; Komel, R.

    2000-01-01

    A gene-fusion expression strategy was applied for heterologous expression of human lymphotoxin alpha (LTα) in the Aspergillus niger AB1.13 protease-deficient strain. The LTα gene was fused with the A. niger glucoamylase GII-form as a carrier-gene, behind its transcription control and secretion

  4. Expressive Writing: Enhancing the Emotional Intelligence of Human Services Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Yuleinys; Fischer, Jerome M.

    2017-01-01

    The skills and tasks in the human services field are highly connected to emotional intelligence abilities. The purpose of the study was to investigate the effect of an expressive writing program involving human service students in an undergraduate rehabilitation services course. The program was developed to enhance their emotional intelligence.…

  5. Uterus human leucocyte antigen expression in the perspective of transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, Tristan; Filloux, Matthieu; Guillaudeau, Angelique; Essig, Marie; Bibes, Romain; Pacha, Adam Fodil; Piver, Pascal; Aubard, Yves; Marquet, Pierre; Drouet, Mireille

    2016-12-01

    To describe class I and II human leucocyte antigen (HLA) expression using different uterine tissues in the perspective of uterus transplantation. Human uterine tissues were obtained from 12 women who had undergone hysterectomy for the treatment of benign disease. HLA class I and HLA-antigen D related (DR) expression were assessed via immunochemistry. HLA class I expression in the uterus was compared with expression in other organs and tissues, including kidney and myocardium samples. HLA class I expression was strong in the endometrial glands and mild in the myometrium. Staining of endometrial glands was similar to glomerular staining in the kidney. The myometrium seems to express HLA class I similarly to hepatocytes and myocardial cells. HLA class I expression in the uterus did not differ in younger or post-menopausal women. HLA-DR was expressed in the endometrial glands, but not in the myometrium. A lack of HLA-DR expression seemed to be correlated with cell proliferation. HLA expression in the endometrium and myometrium is different. The endometrium should be the major target of alloreactive response. As for other transplanted organs, assessment of HLA unacceptable antigens and multiple immunosuppressive treatments is necessary in uterus transplantation. © 2016 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  6. Microarray expression profiling of human dental pulp from single subject.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tete, Stefano; Mastrangelo, Filiberto; Scioletti, Anna Paola; Tranasi, Michelangelo; Raicu, Florina; Paolantonio, Michele; Stuppia, Liborio; Vinci, Raffaele; Gherlone, Enrico; Ciampoli, Cristian; Sberna, Maria Teresa; Conti, Pio

    2008-01-01

    Microarray is a recently developed simultaneous analysis of expression patterns of thousand of genes. The aim of this research was to evaluate the expression profile of human healthy dental pulp in order to find the presence of genes activated and encoding for proteins involved in the physiological process of human dental pulp. We report data obtained by analyzing expression profiles of human tooth pulp from single subjects, using an approach based on the amplification of the total RNA. Experiments were performed on a high-density array able to analyse about 21,000 oligonucleotide sequences of about 70 bases in duplicate, using an approach based on the amplification of the total RNA from the pulp of a single tooth. Obtained data were analyzed using the S.A.M. system (Significance Analysis of Microarray) and genes were merged according to their molecular functions and biological process by the Onto-Express software. The microarray analysis revealed 362 genes with specific pulp expression. Genes showing significant high expression were classified in genes involved in tooth development, protoncogenes, genes of collagen, DNAse, Metallopeptidases and Growth factors. We report a microarray analysis, carried out by extraction of total RNA from specimens of healthy human dental pulp tissue. This approach represents a powerful tool in the study of human normal and pathological pulp, allowing minimization of the genetic variability due to the pooling of samples from different individuals.

  7. Decorin gene expression and its regulation in human keratinocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → We showed that cultured human diploid epidermal keratinocytes express and synthesize decorin. → Decorin is found intracytoplasmic in suprabasal cells of cultures and in human epidermis. → Decorin mRNA expression in cHEK is regulated by pro-inflammatory and proliferative cytokines. → Decorin immunostaining of psoriatic lesions showed a lower intensity and altered intracytoplasmic arrangements. -- Abstract: In various cell types, including cancer cells, decorin is involved in regulation of cell attachment, migration and proliferation. In skin, decorin is seen in dermis, but not in keratinocytes. We show that decorin gene (DCN) is expressed in the cultured keratinocytes, and the protein is found in the cytoplasm of differentiating keratinocytes and in suprabasal layers of human epidermis. RT-PCR experiments showed that DCN expression is regulated by pro-inflammatory and proliferative cytokines. Our data suggest that decorin should play a significant role in keratinocyte terminal differentiation, cutaneous homeostasis and dermatological diseases.

  8. Decorin gene expression and its regulation in human keratinocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velez-DelValle, Cristina; Marsch-Moreno, Meytha; Castro-Munozledo, Federico [Department of Cell Biology, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Apdo. Postal 14-740, Mexico D.F. 07000 (Mexico); Kuri-Harcuch, Walid, E-mail: walidkuri@gmail.com [Department of Cell Biology, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Apdo. Postal 14-740, Mexico D.F. 07000 (Mexico)

    2011-07-22

    Highlights: {yields} We showed that cultured human diploid epidermal keratinocytes express and synthesize decorin. {yields} Decorin is found intracytoplasmic in suprabasal cells of cultures and in human epidermis. {yields} Decorin mRNA expression in cHEK is regulated by pro-inflammatory and proliferative cytokines. {yields} Decorin immunostaining of psoriatic lesions showed a lower intensity and altered intracytoplasmic arrangements. -- Abstract: In various cell types, including cancer cells, decorin is involved in regulation of cell attachment, migration and proliferation. In skin, decorin is seen in dermis, but not in keratinocytes. We show that decorin gene (DCN) is expressed in the cultured keratinocytes, and the protein is found in the cytoplasm of differentiating keratinocytes and in suprabasal layers of human epidermis. RT-PCR experiments showed that DCN expression is regulated by pro-inflammatory and proliferative cytokines. Our data suggest that decorin should play a significant role in keratinocyte terminal differentiation, cutaneous homeostasis and dermatological diseases.

  9. Neuroglobin and Cytoglobin expression in the human brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hundahl, Christian Ansgar; Kelsen, Jesper; Hay-Schmidt, Anders

    2013-01-01

    expressed and up-regulated following stroke in the human brain. The present study aimed at confirming our previous observations in rodents using two post-mortem human brains. The anatomical localization of Neuroglobin and Cytoglobin in the human brain is much like what has been described for the rodent...... and Cytoglobin in the cerebral cortex, while no expression in the cerebellar cortex was detectable. We provide a neuroanatomical indication for a different role of Neuroglobin and Cytoglobin in the human brain.......Neuroglobin and Cytoglobin are new members of the heme-globin family. Both globins are primarily expressed in neurons of the brain and retina. Neuroglobin and Cytoglobin have been suggested as novel therapeutic targets in various neurodegenerative diseases based on their oxygen binding and cell...

  10. Genetic Variants Contribute to Gene Expression Variability in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulse, Amanda M.; Cai, James J.

    2013-01-01

    Expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) studies have established convincing relationships between genetic variants and gene expression. Most of these studies focused on the mean of gene expression level, but not the variance of gene expression level (i.e., gene expression variability). In the present study, we systematically explore genome-wide association between genetic variants and gene expression variability in humans. We adapt the double generalized linear model (dglm) to simultaneously fit the means and the variances of gene expression among the three possible genotypes of a biallelic SNP. The genomic loci showing significant association between the variances of gene expression and the genotypes are termed expression variability QTL (evQTL). Using a data set of gene expression in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) derived from 210 HapMap individuals, we identify cis-acting evQTL involving 218 distinct genes, among which 8 genes, ADCY1, CTNNA2, DAAM2, FERMT2, IL6, PLOD2, SNX7, and TNFRSF11B, are cross-validated using an extra expression data set of the same LCLs. We also identify ∼300 trans-acting evQTL between >13,000 common SNPs and 500 randomly selected representative genes. We employ two distinct scenarios, emphasizing single-SNP and multiple-SNP effects on expression variability, to explain the formation of evQTL. We argue that detecting evQTL may represent a novel method for effectively screening for genetic interactions, especially when the multiple-SNP influence on expression variability is implied. The implication of our results for revealing genetic mechanisms of gene expression variability is discussed. PMID:23150607

  11. [CDNA cloning of human leptin and its expression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Zhen-Yu; Fu, Xiao-Min; Jin, Ai-Hua; Cao, Jiang

    2003-07-01

    To clone cDNA of human leptin gene and obtain leptin protein for future study on leptin binding proteins. The cDNA of human leptin with 6 x his-tag was cloned by over-hang extension PCR protocol using human genomic DNA as template, and subcloned into in vitro expression vector pIVEX2.3MCS, and the fusion protein was expressed in vitro by Rapid Translation System (RTS) (RTS500 cycle primer Kit and RTS500 ProteoMaster of Roche company). The apparent molecular weight(19.46 kD) and the immuno-specificity of the fusion protein were confirmed by SDS-PAGE and Western blot, and the expressed fusion protein stayed mainly in the supernatant of the reaction mixture in soluble form. This work provides us solid basis for further study on new leptin-associated proteins.

  12. Monoallelic expression of the human FOXP2 speech gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adegbola, Abidemi A; Cox, Gerald F; Bradshaw, Elizabeth M; Hafler, David A; Gimelbrant, Alexander; Chess, Andrew

    2015-06-02

    The recent descriptions of widespread random monoallelic expression (RMAE) of genes distributed throughout the autosomal genome indicate that there are more genes subject to RMAE on autosomes than the number of genes on the X chromosome where X-inactivation dictates RMAE of X-linked genes. Several of the autosomal genes that undergo RMAE have independently been implicated in human Mendelian disorders. Thus, parsing the relationship between allele-specific expression of these genes and disease is of interest. Mutations in the human forkhead box P2 gene, FOXP2, cause developmental verbal dyspraxia with profound speech and language deficits. Here, we show that the human FOXP2 gene undergoes RMAE. Studying an individual with developmental verbal dyspraxia, we identify a deletion 3 Mb away from the FOXP2 gene, which impacts FOXP2 gene expression in cis. Together these data suggest the intriguing possibility that RMAE impacts the haploinsufficiency phenotypes observed for FOXP2 mutations.

  13. Human Empathy, Personality and Experience Affect the Emotion Ratings of Dog and Human Facial Expressions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miiamaaria V Kujala

    Full Text Available Facial expressions are important for humans in communicating emotions to the conspecifics and enhancing interpersonal understanding. Many muscles producing facial expressions in humans are also found in domestic dogs, but little is known about how humans perceive dog facial expressions, and which psychological factors influence people's perceptions. Here, we asked 34 observers to rate the valence, arousal, and the six basic emotions (happiness, sadness, surprise, disgust, fear, and anger/aggressiveness from images of human and dog faces with Pleasant, Neutral and Threatening expressions. We investigated how the subjects' personality (the Big Five Inventory, empathy (Interpersonal Reactivity Index and experience of dog behavior affect the ratings of dog and human faces. Ratings of both species followed similar general patterns: human subjects classified dog facial expressions from pleasant to threatening very similarly to human facial expressions. Subjects with higher emotional empathy evaluated Threatening faces of both species as more negative in valence and higher in anger/aggressiveness. More empathetic subjects also rated the happiness of Pleasant humans but not dogs higher, and they were quicker in their valence judgments of Pleasant human, Threatening human and Threatening dog faces. Experience with dogs correlated positively with ratings of Pleasant and Neutral dog faces. Personality also had a minor effect on the ratings of Pleasant and Neutral faces in both species. The results imply that humans perceive human and dog facial expression in a similar manner, and the perception of both species is influenced by psychological factors of the evaluators. Especially empathy affects both the speed and intensity of rating dogs' emotional facial expressions.

  14. Human Empathy, Personality and Experience Affect the Emotion Ratings of Dog and Human Facial Expressions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kujala, Miiamaaria V.; Somppi, Sanni; Jokela, Markus; Vainio, Outi; Parkkonen, Lauri

    2017-01-01

    Facial expressions are important for humans in communicating emotions to the conspecifics and enhancing interpersonal understanding. Many muscles producing facial expressions in humans are also found in domestic dogs, but little is known about how humans perceive dog facial expressions, and which psychological factors influence people’s perceptions. Here, we asked 34 observers to rate the valence, arousal, and the six basic emotions (happiness, sadness, surprise, disgust, fear, and anger/aggressiveness) from images of human and dog faces with Pleasant, Neutral and Threatening expressions. We investigated how the subjects’ personality (the Big Five Inventory), empathy (Interpersonal Reactivity Index) and experience of dog behavior affect the ratings of dog and human faces. Ratings of both species followed similar general patterns: human subjects classified dog facial expressions from pleasant to threatening very similarly to human facial expressions. Subjects with higher emotional empathy evaluated Threatening faces of both species as more negative in valence and higher in anger/aggressiveness. More empathetic subjects also rated the happiness of Pleasant humans but not dogs higher, and they were quicker in their valence judgments of Pleasant human, Threatening human and Threatening dog faces. Experience with dogs correlated positively with ratings of Pleasant and Neutral dog faces. Personality also had a minor effect on the ratings of Pleasant and Neutral faces in both species. The results imply that humans perceive human and dog facial expression in a similar manner, and the perception of both species is influenced by psychological factors of the evaluators. Especially empathy affects both the speed and intensity of rating dogs’ emotional facial expressions. PMID:28114335

  15. Automated discovery of functional generality of human gene expression programs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg K Gerber

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available An important research problem in computational biology is the identification of expression programs, sets of co-expressed genes orchestrating normal or pathological processes, and the characterization of the functional breadth of these programs. The use of human expression data compendia for discovery of such programs presents several challenges including cellular inhomogeneity within samples, genetic and environmental variation across samples, uncertainty in the numbers of programs and sample populations, and temporal behavior. We developed GeneProgram, a new unsupervised computational framework based on Hierarchical Dirichlet Processes that addresses each of the above challenges. GeneProgram uses expression data to simultaneously organize tissues into groups and genes into overlapping programs with consistent temporal behavior, to produce maps of expression programs, which are sorted by generality scores that exploit the automatically learned groupings. Using synthetic and real gene expression data, we showed that GeneProgram outperformed several popular expression analysis methods. We applied GeneProgram to a compendium of 62 short time-series gene expression datasets exploring the responses of human cells to infectious agents and immune-modulating molecules. GeneProgram produced a map of 104 expression programs, a substantial number of which were significantly enriched for genes involved in key signaling pathways and/or bound by NF-kappaB transcription factors in genome-wide experiments. Further, GeneProgram discovered expression programs that appear to implicate surprising signaling pathways or receptor types in the response to infection, including Wnt signaling and neurotransmitter receptors. We believe the discovered map of expression programs involved in the response to infection will be useful for guiding future biological experiments; genes from programs with low generality scores might serve as new drug targets that exhibit minimal

  16. Right ventricular long noncoding RNA expression in human heart failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yan; Su, Yan Ru; Clark, Travis; Brittain, Evan; Absi, Tarek; Maltais, Simon; Hemnes, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The expression of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) in human heart failure (HF) has not been widely studied. Using RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq), we compared lncRNA expression in 22 explanted human HF hearts with lncRNA expression in 5 unused donor human hearts. We used Cufflinks to identify isoforms and DESeq to identify differentially expressed genes. We identified the noncoding RNAs by cross-reference to Ensembl release 73 (Genome Reference Consortium human genome build 37) and explored possible functional roles using a variety of online tools. In HF hearts, RNA-Seq identified 84,793 total messenger RNA coding and noncoding different transcripts, including 13,019 protein-coding genes, 2,085 total lncRNA genes, and 1,064 pseudogenes. By Ensembl noncoding RNA categories, there were 48 lncRNAs, 27 pseudogenes, and 30 antisense RNAs for a total of 105 differentially expressed lncRNAs in HF hearts. Compared with donor hearts, HF hearts exhibited differential expression of 7.7% of protein-coding genes, 3.7% of lncRNAs (including pseudogenes), and 2.5% of pseudogenes. There were not consistent correlations between antisense lncRNAs and parent genes and between pseudogenes and parent genes, implying differential regulation of expression. Exploratory in silico functional analyses using online tools suggested a variety of possible lncRNA regulatory roles. By providing a comprehensive profile of right ventricular polyadenylated messenger RNA transcriptome in HF, RNA-Seq provides an inventory of differentially expressed lncRNAs, including antisense transcripts and pseudogenes, for future mechanistic study. PMID:25992278

  17. CHARACTERIZATION OF THE OLFACTORY RECEPTORS EXPRESSED IN HUMAN SPERMATOZOA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline eFlegel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The detection of external cues is fundamental for human spermatozoa to locate the oocyte in the female reproductive tract. This task requires a specific chemoreceptor repertoire that is expressed on the surface of human spermatozoa, which is not fully identified to date. Olfactory receptors (ORs are candidate molecules and have been attributed to be involved in sperm chemotaxis and chemokinesis, indicating an important role in mammalian spermatozoa. An increasing importance has been suggested for spermatozoal RNA, which led us to investigate the expression of all 387 OR genes. This study provides the first comprehensive analysis of OR transcripts in human spermatozoa of several individuals by RNA-Seq. We detected 91 different transcripts in the spermatozoa samples that could be aligned to annotated OR genes. Using stranded mRNA-Seq, we detected a class of these putative OR transcripts in an antisense orientation, indicating a different function, rather than coding for a functional OR protein. Nevertheless, we were able to detect OR proteins in various compartments of human spermatozoa, indicating distinct functions in human sperm. A panel of various OR ligands induced Ca2+ signals in human spermatozoa, which could be inhibited by mibefradil. This study indicated that a variety of ORs are expressed at the mRNA and protein level in human spermatozoa and demonstrates that ORs are involved in the physiological processes.

  18. Characterization of the Olfactory Receptors Expressed in Human Spermatozoa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flegel, Caroline; Vogel, Felix; Hofreuter, Adrian; Schreiner, Benjamin S. P.; Osthold, Sandra; Veitinger, Sophie; Becker, Christian; Brockmeyer, Norbert H.; Muschol, Michael; Wennemuth, Gunther; Altmüller, Janine; Hatt, Hanns; Gisselmann, Günter

    2016-01-01

    The detection of external cues is fundamental for human spermatozoa to locate the oocyte in the female reproductive tract. This task requires a specific chemoreceptor repertoire that is expressed on the surface of human spermatozoa, which is not fully identified to date. Olfactory receptors (ORs) are candidate molecules and have been attributed to be involved in sperm chemotaxis and chemokinesis, indicating an important role in mammalian spermatozoa. An increasing importance has been suggested for spermatozoal RNA, which led us to investigate the expression of all 387 OR genes. This study provides the first comprehensive analysis of OR transcripts in human spermatozoa of several individuals by RNA-Seq. We detected 91 different transcripts in the spermatozoa samples that could be aligned to annotated OR genes. Using stranded mRNA-Seq, we detected a class of these putative OR transcripts in an antisense orientation, indicating a different function, rather than coding for a functional OR protein. Nevertheless, we were able to detect OR proteins in various compartments of human spermatozoa, indicating distinct functions in human sperm. A panel of various OR ligands induced Ca2+ signals in human spermatozoa, which could be inhibited by mibefradil. This study indicates that a variety of ORs are expressed at the mRNA and protein level in human spermatozoa. PMID:26779489

  19. Importance of the brow in facial expressiveness during human communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neely, John Gail; Lisker, Paul; Drapekin, Jesse

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate laterality and upper/lower face dominance of expressiveness during prescribed speech using a unique validated image subtraction system capable of sensitive and reliable measurement of facial surface deformation. Observations and experiments of central control of facial expressions during speech and social utterances in humans and animals suggest that the right mouth moves more than the left during nonemotional speech. However, proficient lip readers seem to attend to the whole face to interpret meaning from expressed facial cues, also implicating a horizontal (upper face-lower face) axis. Prospective experimental design. Experimental maneuver: recited speech. image-subtraction strength-duration curve amplitude. Thirty normal human adults were evaluated during memorized nonemotional recitation of 2 short sentences. Facial movements were assessed using a video-image subtractions system capable of simultaneously measuring upper and lower specific areas of each hemiface. The results demonstrate both axes influence facial expressiveness in human communication; however, the horizontal axis (upper versus lower face) would appear dominant, especially during what would appear to be spontaneous breakthrough unplanned expressiveness. These data are congruent with the concept that the left cerebral hemisphere has control over nonemotionally stimulated speech; however, the multisynaptic brainstem extrapyramidal pathways may override hemiface laterality and preferentially take control of the upper face. Additionally, these data demonstrate the importance of the often-ignored brow in facial expressiveness. Experimental study. EBM levels not applicable.

  20. Analysis of Mammalian Septin Expression in Human Malignant Brain Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Seok Kim

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Septins are a highly conserved subfamily of GTPases that play an important role in the process of cytokinesis. To increase our understanding of the expression and localization of the different mammalian septins in human brain tumors, we used antibodies against septins 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, and 11 in immunofluorescence and Western blot analyses of astrocytomas and medulloblastomas. We then characterized the expression and subcellular distribution of the SEPT2 protein in aphidicolin-synchronized U373 MG astrocytoma cells by immunofluorescence and fluorescenceactivated cell sorter analysis. To determine the role of SEPT2 in astrocytoma cytokinesis, we inducibly expressed a dominant-negative (DN SEPT2 mutant in U373 MG astrocytoma cells. We show variable levels and expression patterns of the different septins in brain tissue, brain tumor specimens, and human brain tumor cell lines. SEPT2 was abundantly expressed in all brain tumor samples and cell lines studied. SEPT3 was expressed in medulloblastoma specimens and cell lines, but not in astrocytoma specimens or cell lines. SEPT2 expression was cell cycle-related, with maximal levels in G2-M. Immunocytochemical analysis showed endogenous levels of the different septins within the perinuclear and peripheral cytoplasmic regions. In mitosis, SEPT2 was concentrated at the cleavage furrow. By immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry, we show that a DN SEPT2 mutant inhibits the completion of cell division and results in the accumulation of multinucleated cells. These results suggest that septins are variably expressed in human brain tumors. Stable expression of the DN SEPT2 mutant leads to a G2-M cell cycle block in astrocytoma cells.

  1. Expression of Tropomyosin 2 Gene Isoforms in Human Cardiac Tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Syamalima Dube; Santhi Yalamanchili; Joseph Lachant; Lynn Abbott; Patricia Benz; Poiesz BJ; Dipak K Dube

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that although the transcript levels of TPM1α and TPM1k are expressed in human hearts in comparable levels, the level of TPM1α protein is ~90%. The proteins of TPM1κ and TPM2α are about 5% of the total sarcomeric TM. The TPM2 gene is known to generate three alternatively spliced isoforms, which are designated as TPM2α, TPM2β, and TPM2γ. The expression level of TPM2β and TPM2γ in human hearts is unknown. Using a series of primers pairs and probes for RNA PCR, we foun...

  2. Gene expression analysis of human fetal ovarian primordial follicle formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Paul A; Flannigan, Samantha; Mathers, Anna; Gillanders, Kim; Lea, Richard G; Wood, Maureen J; Maheshwari, Abha; Bhattacharya, Siladitya; Collie-Duguid, Elaina S R; Baker, Paul J; Monteiro, Ana; O'Shaughnessy, Peter J

    2009-04-01

    Primordial follicle formation dictates the maximal potential female reproductive capacity and establishes the ovarian reserve. Currently, little is known about this process in the human. The aim of the study was to identify genes associated with the onset of human fetal primordial follicle formation in morphologically normal human fetuses. We conducted an observational study of the female fetal gonad, comparing gene expression before and during primordial follicle formation. The study was conducted at the Universities of Aberdeen, Glasgow, and Nottingham. Ovaries were collected from 51 morphologically normal human female fetuses of women undergoing elective termination of normal second trimester pregnancies. We performed fetal ovarian transcript expression by Affymetrix array and quantitative RT-PCR and gene product expression and localization by Western blot and immunohistochemistry. Five transcripts were down-regulated and 61 were up-regulated in ovaries from older fetuses (18-20 wk) in which primordial follicle formation had started compared with younger (15-16 wk) fetuses in which no primordial follicles were observed. The altered genes contribute to major functions, including gene expression, tissue morphology, and apoptosis, that are essential for ovarian development. NALP5, the most highly regulated transcript, is an oocyte-specific maternal effect gene that is regulated downstream of FIGLA. NALP5 probably plays a key role in the onset of human primordial follicle formation and thus the establishment of ovarian reserve in women.

  3. TWIST is Expressed in Human Gliomas, Promotes Invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria C. Elias

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available TWIST is a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH transcription factor that regulates mesodermal development, promotes tumor cell metastasis, and, in response to cytotoxic stress, enhances cell survival. Our screen for bHLH gene expression in rat C6 glioma revealed TWIST. To delineate a possible oncogenic role for TWIST in the human central nervous system (CNS, we analyzed TWIST message, protein expression in gliomas, normal brain. TWIST was detected in the large majority of human glioma-derived cell lines, human gliomas examined. Increased TWIST mRNA levels were associated with the highest grade gliomas, increased TWIST expression accompanied transition from low grade to high grade in vivo, suggesting a role for TWIST in promoting malignant progression. In accord, elevated TWIST mRNA abundance preceded the spontaneous malignant transformation of cultured mouse astrocytes hemizygous for p53. Overexpression of TWIST protein in a human glioma cell line significantly enhanced tumor cell invasion, a hallmark of high-grade gliomas. These findings support roles for TWIST both in early glial tumorigenesis, subsequent malignant progression. TWIST was also expressed in embryonic, fetal human brain, in neurons, but not glia, of mature brain, indicating that, in gliomas, TWIST may promote the functions also critical for CNS development or normal neuronal physiology.

  4. Expression and immunohistochemical localization of leptin in human periapical granulomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-González, Jénifer; Carmona-Fernández, Antonio; Pérez-Pérez, Antonio; Sánchez-Jiménez, Flora; Sánchez-Margalet, Víctor

    2015-01-01

    Background Leptin, initially described as an adipocyte-derived hormone to regulate weight control, is expressed in normal and inflamed human dental pulp, being up-regulated during pulp experimental inflammation. Leptin receptor (LER) has been identified in human periapical granulomas. The aim of this study was to analyze and characterize the expression of leptin in human periapical granulomas. Material and Methods Fifteen periapical inflammatory lesions were obtained from extracted human teeth and teeth which underwent periapical surgery. After their morphological categorization as periapical granulomas and gradation of the inflammatory infiltrate, they were examined by immunohistochemistry using human leptin policlonal antibodies. Leptin mRNA expression was also determined by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) and the amount of leptin protein was analyzed by immunoblot. Results All periapical lesions exhibited the characteristic of chronic granulomatous inflammatory process with inflammatory infiltrate grade III. Leptin+ cells were detected in 13 periapical granulomas (86.6%). The median number of Leptin+ cells in periapical granulomas was 1.70 (0.00-7.4). Amongst the inflammatory cells in the periapical granulomas, only macrophages were reactive to leptin antibodies. Western blot analysis revealed the presence in all samples of a protein with apparent molecular weight of approximately 16 kDa, corresponding to the estimated molecular weights of leptin. The expression of leptin mRNA was confirmed by qRT-PCR analysis and the size of the amplified fragment (296 bp for leptin and 194 bp for cyclophilin) was assessed by agarose gel electrophoresis. Conclusions For the first time, it has been demonstrated that human periapical granuloma expresses the adipokine leptin. Key words: Apical granuloma, dental pulp, endodontics, leptin, leptin receptor, immune system, immunohistochemistry, periapical inflammatory response. PMID:25662559

  5. Expression of fully functional tetrameric human hemoglobin in Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, S.J.; Looker, D.L.; Roehrich, J.M.; Cozart, P.E.; Durfee, S.L.; Tedesco, J.L.; Stetler, G.L.

    1990-01-01

    Synthesis genes encoding the human α- and β-globin polypeptides have been expressed from a single operon in Escherichia coli. The α- and β-globin polypeptides associate into soluble tetramers, incorporate heme, and accumulate to >5% of the total cellular protein. Purified recombinant hemoglobin has the correct stoichiometry of α- and β-globin chains and contains a full complement of heme. Each globin chain also contains an additional methionine as an extension to the amino terminus. The recombinant hemoglobin has a C 4 reversed-phase HPLC profile essentially identical to that of human hemoglobin A 0 and comigrates with hemoglobin A 0 on SDS/PAGE. The visible spectrum and oxygen affinity are similar to that of native human hemoglobin A 0 . The authors have also expressed the α- and β-globin genes separately and found that the expression of the α-globin gene alone results in a marked decrease in the accumulation of α-globin in the cell. Separate expression of the β-globin gene results in high levels of insoluble β-globin. These observations suggest that the presence of α- and β-globin in the same cell stabilizes α-globin and aids the correct folding of β-globin. This system provides a simple method for expressing large quantities of recombinant hemoglobin and allows facile manipulation of the genes encoding hemoglobin to produce functionally altered forms of this protein

  6. RANK and RANK ligand expression in primary human osteosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Branstetter

    2015-09-01

    Our results demonstrate RANKL expression was observed in the tumor element in 68% of human OS using IHC. However, the staining intensity was relatively low and only 37% (29/79 of samples exhibited≥10% RANKL positive tumor cells. RANK expression was not observed in OS tumor cells. In contrast, RANK expression was clearly observed in other cells within OS samples, including the myeloid osteoclast precursor compartment, osteoclasts and in giant osteoclast cells. The intensity and frequency of RANKL and RANK staining in OS samples were substantially less than that observed in GCTB samples. The observation that RANKL is expressed in OS cells themselves suggests that these tumors may mediate an osteoclastic response, and anti-RANKL therapy may potentially be protective against bone pathologies in OS. However, the absence of RANK expression in primary human OS cells suggests that any autocrine RANKL/RANK signaling in human OS tumor cells is not operative, and anti-RANKL therapy would not directly affect the tumor.

  7. Expression of functional human C1 inhibitor in COS cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eldering, E.; Nuijens, J. H.; Hack, C. E.

    1988-01-01

    Full length human C1 inhibitor cDNA was cloned into a vector suitable for transient expression in COS-1 cells. Transfected COS cells secreted an immunoreactive protein of Mr approximately 110,000 that appeared to be functionally equivalent to the plasma-derived protein as established by the

  8. Proteoglycan and collagen expression during human air conducting system development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Godoy-Guzmán

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The lung is formed from a bud that grows and divides in a dichotomous way. A bud is a new growth center which is determined by epithelial-mesenchymal interactions where proteins of the extracellular matrix (ECM might be involved. To understand this protein participation during human lung development, we examined the expression and distribution of proteoglycans in relation to the different types of collagens during the period in which the air conducting system is installed. Using light microscopy and immunohistochemistry we evaluate the expression of collagens (I, III and VI and proteoglycans (decorin, biglycan and lumican between 8 to 10 weeks post fertilization and 11 to 14 weeks of gestational age of human embryo lungs. We show that decorin, lumican and all the collagen types investigated were expressed at the epithelium-mesenchymal interface, forming a sleeve around the bronchiolar ducts. In addition, biglycan was expressed in both the endothelial cells and the smooth muscle of the blood vessels. Thus, the similar distribution pattern of collagen and proteoglycans in the early developmental stages of the human lung may be closely related to the process of dichotomous division of the bronchial tree. This study provides a new insight concerning the participation of collagens and proteoglycans in the epithelial-mesenchymal interface during the period in which the air conducting system is installed in the human fetal lung.

  9. A panoramic view of gene expression in the human kidney

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabardès-Garonne, Danielle; Méjean, Arnaud; Aude, Jean-Christophe; Cheval, Lydie; Di Stefano, Antonio; Gaillard, Marie-Claude; Imbert-Teboul, Martine; Wittner, Monika; Balian, Chanth; Anthouard, Véronique; Robert, Catherine; Ségurens, Béatrice; Wincker, Patrick; Weissenbach, Jean; Doucet, Alain; Elalouf, Jean-Marc

    2003-01-01

    To gain a molecular understanding of kidney functions, we established a high-resolution map of gene expression patterns in the human kidney. The glomerulus and seven different nephron segments were isolated by microdissection from fresh tissue specimens, and their transcriptome was characterized by using the serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) method. More than 400,000 mRNA SAGE tags were sequenced, making it possible to detect in each structure transcripts present at 18 copies per cell with a 95% confidence level. Expression of genes responsible for nephron transport and permeability properties was evidenced through transcripts for 119 solute carriers, 84 channels, 43 ion-transport ATPases, and 12 claudins. Searching for differences between the transcriptomes, we found 998 transcripts greatly varying in abundance from one nephron portion to another. Clustering analysis of these transcripts evidenced different extents of similarity between the nephron portions. Approximately 75% of the differentially distributed transcripts corresponded to cDNAs of known or unknown function that are accurately mapped in the human genome. This systematic large-scale analysis of individual structures of a complex human tissue reveals sets of genes underlying the function of well-defined nephron portions. It also provides quantitative expression data for a variety of genes mutated in hereditary diseases and helps in sorting candidate genes for renal diseases that affect specific portions of the human nephron. PMID:14595018

  10. Gene expression in the aging human brain: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Adith; Mather, Karen A; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Baune, Bernhard T; Sachdev, Perminder S

    2016-03-01

    The review aims to provide a summary of recent developments in the study of gene expression in the aging human brain. Profiling differentially expressed genes or 'transcripts' in the human brain over the course of normal aging has provided valuable insights into the biological pathways that appear activated or suppressed in late life. Genes mediating neuroinflammation and immune system activation in particular, show significant age-related upregulation creating a state of vulnerability to neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disease in the aging brain. Cellular ionic dyshomeostasis and age-related decline in a host of molecular influences on synaptic efficacy may underlie neurocognitive decline in later life. Critically, these investigations have also shed light on the mobilization of protective genetic responses within the aging human brain that help determine health and disease trajectories in older age. There is growing interest in the study of pre and posttranscriptional regulators of gene expression, and the role of noncoding RNAs in particular, as mediators of the phenotypic diversity that characterizes human brain aging. Gene expression studies in healthy brain aging offer an opportunity to unravel the intricately regulated cellular underpinnings of neurocognitive aging as well as disease risk and resiliency in late life. In doing so, new avenues for early intervention in age-related neurodegenerative disease could be investigated with potentially significant implications for the development of disease-modifying therapies.

  11. Recombinant expression and purification of L2 domain of human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of the present study was cloning and expressing the fragment coding for L2 region of human EGFR for the production of recombinant L2 protein. The total RNA from A431 cells line was extracted and used for amplification of the sequence coding for L2 domain of EGFR by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain ...

  12. Cytokeratin expression in human fetal tongue and buccal mucosa

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Introduction. Cytokeratins (CK), a group of intermediate filaments (IF), are specifically expressed by epithelial tissues (Anderton. 1981). There are 20 different polypeptides of CK exp- ressed by human epithelia that have been catalogued on the basis of their molecular weights and isoelectric points. (Moll et al 1982a, 1990).

  13. Investigation of G72 (DAOA expression in the human brain

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    Hirsch Steven

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polymorphisms at the G72/G30 locus on chromosome 13q have been associated with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder in more than ten independent studies. Even though the genetic findings are very robust, the physiological role of the predicted G72 protein has thus far not been resolved. Initial reports suggested G72 as an activator of D-amino acid oxidase (DAO, supporting the glutamate dysfunction hypothesis of schizophrenia. However, these findings have subsequently not been reproduced and reports of endogenous human G72 mRNA and protein expression are extremely limited. In order to better understand the function of this putative schizophrenia susceptibility gene, we attempted to demonstrate G72 mRNA and protein expression in relevant human brain regions. Methods The expression of G72 mRNA was studied by northern blotting and semi-quantitative SYBR-Green and Taqman RT-PCR. Protein expression in human tissue lysates was investigated by western blotting using two custom-made specific anti-G72 peptide antibodies. An in-depth in silico analysis of the G72/G30 locus was performed in order to try and identify motifs or regulatory elements that provide insight to G72 mRNA expression and transcript stability. Results Despite using highly sensitive techniques, we failed to identify significant levels of G72 mRNA in a variety of human tissues (e.g. adult brain, amygdala, caudate nucleus, fetal brain, spinal cord and testis human cell lines or schizophrenia/control post mortem BA10 samples. Furthermore, using western blotting in combination with sensitive detection methods, we were also unable to detect G72 protein in a number of human brain regions (including cerebellum and amygdala, spinal cord or testis. A detailed in silico analysis provides several lines of evidence that support the apparent low or absent expression of G72. Conclusion Our results suggest that native G72 protein is not normally present in the tissues that we analysed

  14. Regulation of MYCN expression in human neuroblastoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobs, Joannes FM; Bokhoven, Hans van; Leeuwen, Frank N van; Hulsbergen-van de Kaa, Christina A; Vries, I Jolanda M de; Adema, Gosse J; Hoogerbrugge, Peter M; Brouwer, Arjan PM de

    2009-01-01

    Amplification of the MYCN gene in neuroblastoma (NB) is associated with a poor prognosis. However, MYCN-amplification does not automatically result in higher expression of MYCN in children with NB. We hypothesized that the discrepancy between MYCN gene expression and prognosis in these children might be explained by the expression of either MYCN-opposite strand (MYCNOS) or the shortened MYCN-isoform (ΔMYCN) that was recently identified in fetal tissues. Both MYCNOS and ΔMYCN are potential inhibitors of MYCN either at the mRNA or at the protein level. Expression of MYCN, MYCNOS and ΔMYCN was measured in human NB tissues of different stages. Transcript levels were quantified using a real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction assay (QPCR). In addition, relative expression of these three transcripts was compared to the number of MYCN copies, which was determined by genomic real-time PCR (gQPCR). Both ΔMYCN and MYCNOS are expressed in all NBs examined. In NBs with MYCN-amplification, these transcripts are significantly higher expressed. The ratio of MYCN:ΔMYCN expression was identical in all tested NBs. This indicates that ΔMYCN and MYCN are co-regulated, which suggests that ΔMYCN is not a regulator of MYCN in NB. However, the ratio of MYCNOS:MYCN expression is directly correlated with NB disease stage (p = 0.007). In the more advanced NB stages and NBs with MYCN-amplification, relatively more MYCNOS is present as compared to MYCN. Expression of the antisense gene MYCNOS might be relevant to the progression of NB, potentially by directly inhibiting MYCN transcription by transcriptional interference at the DNA level. The MYCNOS:MYCN-ratio in NBs is significantly correlated with both MYCN-amplification and NB-stage. Our data indicate that in NB, MYCN expression levels might be influenced by MYCNOS but not by ΔMYCN

  15. Sex-Dependent Gene Expression in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Ronen

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Males and females have a variety of sexually dimorphic traits, most of which result from hormonal differences. However, differences between male and female embryos initiate very early in development, before hormonal influence begins, suggesting the presence of genetically driven sexual dimorphisms. By comparing the gene expression profiles of male and X-inactivated female human pluripotent stem cells, we detected Y-chromosome-driven effects. We discovered that the sex-determining gene SRY is expressed in human male pluripotent stem cells and is induced by reprogramming. In addition, we detected more than 200 differentially expressed autosomal genes in male and female embryonic stem cells. Some of these genes are involved in steroid metabolism pathways and lead to sex-dependent differentiation in response to the estrogen precursor estrone. Thus, we propose that the presence of the Y chromosome and specifically SRY may drive sex-specific differences in the growth and differentiation of pluripotent stem cells.

  16. Gene expression for carbonic anhydrase isoenzymes in human nasal mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarun, Alice S; Bryant, Bruce; Zhai, Wenwu; Solomon, Colin; Shusterman, Dennis

    2003-09-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) is physiologically important in the reversible hydration reaction of CO(2); it is expressed in a number of isoforms (CA I-XIV) with varying degrees of enzymatic activity. In nasal chemesthesis, CA inhibition decreases the electrophysiologic response to CO(2), a common irritant test compound. CA enzymatic activity has been demonstrated in the human nasal mucosa using enzyme histochemical methods, but no systematic study of nasal mucosal CA isoenzyme gene expression has been published. We examined CA gene expression in superficial nasal mucosal scrapings from 15 subjects (6 females; 6 allergic rhinitics; age range, 21-56 years). Both non-quantitative and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) were performed using primers for each gene coding for the 11 catalytically active CA isoenzymes and the housekeeping gene GADPH. Amplification products of GADPH and 10 of the 11 CA genes were detected in the specimens (CA VA was not detected). Relative expression of the CA genes was quantified using real-time PCR. Averaged across subjects, the relative abundance of the CA isoenzyme transcripts is as follows: CA XII > CA II > CA VB > CA IV > CA IX > CA III > CA XIV > CA I > CA VI > CA VII. Limited qualitative validation of gene expression was obtained by immunohistochemistry for CA I, CA II and CA IV. We also observed inter-individual variability in the expression of CA isoenzymes in human nasal mucosa, potentially contributing to differences in nasal chemosensitivity to CO(2) between individuals

  17. D2-40/podoplanin expression in the human placenta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuping; Sun, Jingxia; Gu, Yang; Zhao, Shuang; Groome, Lynn J.; Alexander, J. Steven

    2011-01-01

    Placental tissue expresses many lymphatic markers. The current study was undertaken to examine if D2-40/podoplanin, a lymphatic endothelial marker, was expressed in the human placentas, and how it is altered developmentally and pathologically. We studied D2-40/podoplanin and VEGFR-3 expressions in placentas from normotensive pregnancies at different gestational ages and in placentas from women with clinically defined preeclampsia. D2-40 expression in systemic lymphatic vessel endothelium served as a positive control. Protein expression for D2-40, VEGFR-3, and β-actin were determined by Western blot in placentas from normotensive (n=6) and preeclamptic (n=5) pregnancies. Our results show that D2-40/podoplanin was strongly expressed in the placenta, mainly as a network plexus pattern in the villous stroma throughout gestation. CD31 was limited to villous core fetal vessel endothelium and VEGFR-3 was found in both villous core fetal vessel endothelium and trophoblasts. D2-40/podoplanin expression was significantly decreased, and VEGFR-3 significantly increased in preeclamptic placental tissues compared to normotensive placental controls. Placental villous stroma is a reticular-like structure, and the localization of D2-40 to the stroma suggests that a lymphatic-like conductive network may exist in the human placenta. D2-40/podoplanin is an O-linked sialoglycoprotein. Although little is known regarding biological functions of sialylated glycoproteins within the placenta, placental D2-40/podoplanin may support fetal vessel angiogenesis during placenta development and reduced D2-40/podoplanin expression in preeclamptic placenta may contribute to altered interstitial fluid homeostasis and impaired angiogenesis in this pregnancy disorder. PMID:21095001

  18. Neural decoding of expressive human movement from scalp electroencephalography (EEG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachery Ryan Hernandez

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Although efforts to characterize human movement through EEG have revealed neural activities unique to limb control that can be used to infer movement kinematics, it is still unknown the extent to which EEG can be used to discern the expressive qualities that influence such movements. In this study we used EEG and inertial sensors to record brain activity and movement of five skilled and certified Laban Movement Analysis (LMA dancers. Each dancer performed whole body functional movements of three Action types: movements devoid of expressive qualities ('Neutral', non-expressive movements while thinking about specific expressive qualities ('Think’, and enacted expressive movements ('Do'. The expressive movement qualities that were used in the 'Think' and 'Do' actions consisted of a sequence of eight Laban Efforts as defined by LMA - a notation system and language for describing, visualizing, interpreting and documenting all varieties of human movement. We used delta band (0.2 – 4 Hz EEG as input to a machine learning algorithm that computed locality-preserving Fisher’s discriminant analysis (LFDA for dimensionality reduction followed by Gaussian mixture models (GMMs to decode the type of Action. We also trained our LFDA-GMM models to classify all the possible combinations of Action Type and Laban Effort (giving a total of 17 classes. Classification accuracy rates were 59.4 ± 0.6% for Action Type and 88.2 ± 0.7% for Laban Effort Type. Ancillary analyses of the potential relations between the EEG and movement kinematics of the dancer's body, indicated that motion-related artifacts did not significantly influence our classification results. In summary, this research demonstrates that EEG has valuable information about the expressive qualities of movement. These results may have applications for advancing the understanding of the neural basis of expressive movements and for the development of neuroprosthetics to restore movements.

  19. Exocyst complex protein expression in the human placenta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, I M; Ackerman, W E; Vandre, D D; Robinson, J M

    2014-07-01

    Protein production and secretion are essential to syncytiotrophoblast function and are associated with cytotrophoblast cell fusion and differentiation. Syncytiotrophoblast hormone secretion is a crucial determinant of maternal-fetal health, and can be misregulated in pathological pregnancies. Although, polarized secretion is a key component of placental function, the mechanisms underlying this process are poorly understood. While the octameric exocyst complex is classically regarded as a master regulator of secretion in various mammalian systems, its expression in the placenta remained unexplored. We hypothesized that the syncytiotrophoblast would express all exocyst complex components and effector proteins requisite for vesicle-mediated secretion more abundantly than cytotrophoblasts in tissue specimens. A two-tiered immunobiological approach was utilized to characterize exocyst and ancillary proteins in normal, term human placentas. Exocyst protein expression and localization was documented in tissue homogenates via immunoblotting and immunofluorescence labeling of placental sections. The eight exocyst proteins, EXOC1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8, were found in the human placenta. In addition, RAB11, an important exocyst complex modulator, was also expressed. Exocyst and Rab protein expression appeared to be regulated during trophoblast differentiation, as the syncytiotrophoblast expressed these proteins with little, if any, expression in cytotrophoblast cells. Additionally, exocyst proteins were localized at or near the syncytiotrophoblast apical membrane, the major site of placental secretion. Our findings highlight exocyst protein expression as novel indicators of trophoblast differentiation. The exocyst's regulated localization within the syncytiotrophoblast in conjunction with its well known functions suggests a possible role in placental polarized secretion. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. MAGE, BAGE and GAGE gene expression in human rhabdomyosarcomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalerba, P; Frascella, E; Macino, B; Mandruzzato, S; Zambon, A; Rosolen, A; Carli, M; Ninfo, V; Zanovello, P

    2001-07-01

    MAGE, BAGE and GAGE genes encode tumor-associated antigens that are presented by HLA class I molecules and recognized by CD8(+) cytolytic T lymphocytes. These antigens are currently regarded as promising targets for active, specific tumor immunotherapy because MAGE, BAGE and GAGE genes are expressed in many human cancers of different histotype and are silent in normal tissues, with the exception of spermatogonia and placental cells. MAGE, BAGE and GAGE gene expression has been extensively studied in different tumors of adults but is largely unknown in many forms of pediatric solid cancer. Using RT-PCR, we analyzed MAGE-1, MAGE-2, MAGE-3, MAGE-4, MAGE-6, BAGE, GAGE-1,-2 or -8 and GAGE-3,-4,-5,-6 or -7b gene expression in 31 samples of pediatric rhabdomyosarcoma, the most frequent form of malignant soft tissue tumor in children. MAGE genes were expressed in a substantial proportion of patients (MAGE-1, 38%; MAGE-2, 51%; MAGE-3, 35%; MAGE-4, 22%; MAGE-6, 35%), while expression of BAGE (6%); GAGE-1, GAGE-2 and GAGE-8 (9%); and GAGE-3, GAGE-4, GAGE-5, GAGE-6 and GAGE-7B (16%) was less frequent. Overall, 58% of tumors expressed at least 1 gene, and 35% expressed 3 or more genes simultaneously. Our data suggest that a subset of rhabdomyosarcoma patients could be eligible for active, specific immunotherapy directed against MAGE, BAGE and GAGE antigens. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Identification of expressed and conserved human noncoding RNAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Morten Muhlig; Tehler, Disa; Vang, Søren; Sudzina, Frantisek; Hedegaard, Jakob; Nordentoft, Iver; Ørntoft, Torben Falck; Lund, Anders H.; Pedersen, Jakob Skou

    2014-01-01

    The past decade has shown mammalian genomes to be pervasively transcribed and identified thousands of noncoding (nc) transcripts. It is currently unclear to what extent these transcripts are of functional importance, as experimental functional evidence exists for only a small fraction. Here, we characterize the expression and evolutionary conservation properties of 12,115 known and novel nc transcripts, including structural RNAs, long nc RNAs (lncRNAs), antisense RNAs, EvoFold predictions, ultraconserved elements, and expressed nc regions. Expression levels are evaluated across 12 human tissues using a custom-designed microarray, supplemented with RNAseq. Conservation levels are evaluated at both the base level and at the syntenic level. We combine these measures with epigenetic mark annotations to identify subsets of novel nc transcripts that show characteristics similar to known functional ncRNAs. Few novel nc transcripts show both high expression and conservation levels. However, overall, we observe a positive correlation between expression and both conservation and epigenetic annotations, suggesting that a subset of the expressed transcripts are under purifying selection and likely functional. The identified subsets of expressed and conserved novel nc transcripts may form the basis for further functional characterization. PMID:24344320

  2. Expression and function of human hemokinin-1 in human and guinea pig airways

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Human hemokinin-1 (hHK-1) and endokinins are peptides of the tachykinin family encoded by the TAC4 gene. TAC4 and hHK-1 expression as well as effects of hHK-1 in the lung and airways remain however unknown and were explored in this study. Methods RT-PCR analysis was performed on human bronchi to assess expression of tachykinin and tachykinin receptors genes. Enzyme immunoassay was used to quantify hHK-1, and effects of hHK-1 and endokinins on contraction of human and guinea pig airways were then evaluated, as well as the role of hHK-1 on cytokines production by human lung parenchyma or bronchi explants and by lung macrophages. Results In human bronchi, expression of the genes that encode for hHK-1, tachykinin NK1-and NK2-receptors was demonstrated. hHK-1 protein was found in supernatants from explants of human bronchi, lung parenchyma and lung macrophages. Exogenous hHK-1 caused a contractile response in human bronchi mainly through the activation of NK2-receptors, which blockade unmasked a NK1-receptor involvement, subject to a rapid desensitization. In the guinea pig trachea, hHK-1 caused a concentration-dependant contraction mainly mediated through the activation of NK1-receptors. Endokinin A/B exerted similar effects to hHK-1 on both human bronchi and guinea pig trachea, whereas endokinins C and D were inactive. hHK-1 had no impact on the production of cytokines by explants of human bronchi or lung parenchyma, or by human lung macrophages. Conclusions We demonstrate endogenous expression of TAC4 in human bronchi, the encoded peptide hHK-1 being expressed and involved in contraction of human and guinea pig airways. PMID:20929541

  3. Expression and function of human hemokinin-1 in human and guinea pig airways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sage Edouard

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human hemokinin-1 (hHK-1 and endokinins are peptides of the tachykinin family encoded by the TAC4 gene. TAC4 and hHK-1 expression as well as effects of hHK-1 in the lung and airways remain however unknown and were explored in this study. Methods RT-PCR analysis was performed on human bronchi to assess expression of tachykinin and tachykinin receptors genes. Enzyme immunoassay was used to quantify hHK-1, and effects of hHK-1 and endokinins on contraction of human and guinea pig airways were then evaluated, as well as the role of hHK-1 on cytokines production by human lung parenchyma or bronchi explants and by lung macrophages. Results In human bronchi, expression of the genes that encode for hHK-1, tachykinin NK1-and NK2-receptors was demonstrated. hHK-1 protein was found in supernatants from explants of human bronchi, lung parenchyma and lung macrophages. Exogenous hHK-1 caused a contractile response in human bronchi mainly through the activation of NK2-receptors, which blockade unmasked a NK1-receptor involvement, subject to a rapid desensitization. In the guinea pig trachea, hHK-1 caused a concentration-dependant contraction mainly mediated through the activation of NK1-receptors. Endokinin A/B exerted similar effects to hHK-1 on both human bronchi and guinea pig trachea, whereas endokinins C and D were inactive. hHK-1 had no impact on the production of cytokines by explants of human bronchi or lung parenchyma, or by human lung macrophages. Conclusions We demonstrate endogenous expression of TAC4 in human bronchi, the encoded peptide hHK-1 being expressed and involved in contraction of human and guinea pig airways.

  4. Clinical significance of HuR expression in human malignancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotta-Loizou, Ioly; Giaginis, Constantinos; Theocharis, Stamatios

    2014-09-01

    Hu-antigen R (HuR) is an RNA-binding protein that regulates the stability, translation, and nucleus-to-cytoplasm translocation of target mRNAs. The aim of the present review was to summarize and present the currently available information in the English literature on HuR expression in various human tumors, verifying its possible clinical significance. HuR function is directly linked to its subcellular localization. In normal cells, HuR is mostly localized in the nucleus, while in malignant cells, an increase in cytoplasmic HuR levels has been noted, in both cell lines and tissue samples. Moreover, in malignancy, elevated HuR expression levels and cytoplasmic immunohistochemical pattern have been correlated with advanced clinicopathological parameters and altered expression levels of proteins implicated in neoplasia. Additionally, elevated HuR expression levels and mainly cytoplasmic immunohistochemical pattern were correlated with decreased patients' survival rate in various human tumors. HuR is a putative drug target for cancer therapy, since it is expressed ubiquitously in malignant clinical samples and has an apparently consistent role in tumor formation and progression.

  5. Decoding NADPH oxidase 4 expression in human tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L. Meitzler

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available NADPH oxidase 4 (NOX4 is a redox active, membrane-associated protein that contributes to genomic instability, redox signaling, and radiation sensitivity in human cancers based on its capacity to generate H2O2 constitutively. Most studies of NOX4 in malignancy have focused on the evaluation of a small number of tumor cell lines and not on human tumor specimens themselves; furthermore, these studies have often employed immunological tools that have not been well characterized. To determine the prevalence of NOX4 expression across a broad range of solid tumors, we developed a novel monoclonal antibody that recognizes a specific extracellular region of the human NOX4 protein, and that does not cross-react with any of the other six members of the NOX gene family. Evaluation of 20 sets of epithelial tumors revealed, for the first time, high levels of NOX4 expression in carcinomas of the head and neck (15/19 patients, esophagus (12/18 patients, bladder (10/19 patients, ovary (6/17 patients, and prostate (7/19 patients, as well as malignant melanoma (7/15 patients when these tumors were compared to histologically-uninvolved specimens from the same organs. Detection of NOX4 protein upregulation by low levels of TGF-β1 demonstrated the sensitivity of this new probe; and immunofluorescence experiments found that high levels of endogenous NOX4 expression in ovarian cancer cells were only demonstrable associated with perinuclear membranes. These studies suggest that NOX4 expression is upregulated, compared to normal tissues, in a well-defined, and specific group of human carcinomas, and that its expression is localized on intracellular membranes in a fashion that could modulate oxidative DNA damage.

  6. Characterisation of the expression of NMDA receptors in human astrocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Chak Lee

    Full Text Available Astrocytes have long been perceived only as structural and supporting cells within the central nervous system (CNS. However, the discovery that these glial cells may potentially express receptors capable of responding to endogenous neurotransmitters has resulted in the need to reassess astrocytic physiology. The aim of the current study was to characterise the expression of NMDA receptors (NMDARs in primary human astrocytes, and investigate their response to physiological and excitotoxic concentrations of the known endogenous NMDAR agonists, glutamate and quinolinic acid (QUIN. Primary cultures of human astrocytes were used to examine expression of these receptors at the mRNA level using RT-PCR and qPCR, and at the protein level using immunocytochemistry. The functionality role of the receptors was assessed using intracellular calcium influx experiments and measuring extracellular lactate dehydrogenase (LDH activity in primary cultures of human astrocytes treated with glutamate and QUIN. We found that all seven currently known NMDAR subunits (NR1, NR2A, NR2B, NR2C, NR2D, NR3A and NR3B are expressed in astrocytes, but at different levels. Calcium influx studies revealed that both glutamate and QUIN could activate astrocytic NMDARs, which stimulates Ca2+ influx into the cell and can result in dysfunction and death of astrocytes. Our data also show that the NMDAR ion channel blockers, MK801, and memantine can attenuate glutamate and QUIN mediated cell excitotoxicity. This suggests that the mechanism of glutamate and QUIN gliotoxicity is at least partially mediated by excessive stimulation of NMDARs. The present study is the first to provide definitive evidence for the existence of functional NMDAR expression in human primary astrocytes. This discovery has significant implications for redefining the cellular interaction between glia and neurons in both physiological processes and pathological conditions.

  7. Epigenetic regulation of maspin expression in human ovarian carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Stephen L; Fitzgerald, Matthew P; White, Natalie O; Hitchler, Michael J; Futscher, Bernard W; De Geest, Koen; Domann, Frederick E

    2006-08-01

    Maspin expression is often deregulated in human cancer cells compared to their normal cells due to loss of epigenetic control. In contrast to normal human ovarian surface epithelial (HOSE) cells, ovarian carcinoma cells display a gain of maspin mRNA expression. The objective of this study was to determine whether gain of maspin expression in ovarian cancer is governed by epigenetic mechanisms. We examined the cytosine methylation and chromatin accessibility status of the maspin promoter in normal HOSE cells and ovarian carcinoma cells with real-time RT-PCR, sodium bisulfite genomic sequencing, and chromatin accessibility assays. 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC) was used to induce demethylation of the maspin promoter. Ad p53 was used to induce transient overexpression of wild-type p53. Normal HOSE cells were maspin-negative in association with methylation of the maspin promoter. In the maspin-positive ovarian cancer cell lines, the maspin promoter was unmethylated. Increased maspin expression in ovarian carcinoma cells was accompanied by a more accessible chromatin structure in the maspin promoter. In the maspin-negative ovarian cancer cell line A222, maspin could be induced following 5-aza-dC treatment or by forced overexpression of p53. These results suggest that changes in cytosine methylation and chromatin accessibility play an important role in maspin expression in human ovarian carcinoma. Deregulation of maspin expression in ovarian cancer is due to loss of epigenetic control as has been shown in other cancers. This observation provides further evidence of the strict epigenetic control of the maspin gene.

  8. Quality of human milk expressed in a human milk bank and at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Mayla S; Oliveira, Angela M de M; Hattori, Wallisen T; Abdallah, Vânia O S

    2017-08-30

    To evaluate the quality of the human milk expressed at home and at a human milk bank. This a retrospective, analytical, and observational study, performed by assessing titratable acidity records and the microbiological culture of 100 human milk samples expressed at home and at a human milk bank, in 2014. For the statistical analysis, generalized estimating equations (GEE) and the chi-squared test were used. When comparing the two sample groups, no significant difference was found, with 98% and 94% of the samples being approved among those collected at the milk bank and at home, respectively. No main interaction effect between local and titratable acidity records (p=0.285) was observed, and there was no statistically significant difference between the expected and observed values for the association between the collection place and the microbiological culture results (p=0.307). The quality of human milk expressed at home and at the milk bank are in agreement with the recommended standards, confirming that the expression of human milk at home is as safe as expression at the human milk bank, provided that the established hygiene, conservation, storage, and transport standards are followed. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  9. Expression profiling of insulin action in human myotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars; Gaster, Michael; Oakeley, Edward J

    2004-01-01

    , metabolic enzymes, and finally cell cycle regulating genes. One-hundred-forty-four genes were differentially expressed in myotubes from donors with type 2 diabetes compared with control subjects, including HSP70, apolipoprotein D/E, tropomyosin, myosin, and actin previously reported from in vivo studies......), 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8, and 24 h, mRNA contents were analyzed in human myotubes for each time point using Affymetrix DNA chip technology. Insulin treatment induced an inflammatory and pro-angiogenic response in the myotubes, with expression of early response factors followed by inflammatory chemokines...

  10. MicroRNA expression variability in human cervical tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia M Pereira

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are short (approximately 22 nt non-coding regulatory RNAs that control gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Deregulation of miRNA expression has been discovered in a wide variety of tumours and it is now clear that they contribute to cancer development and progression. Cervical cancer is one of the most common cancers in women worldwide and there is a strong need for a non-invasive, fast and efficient method to diagnose the disease. We investigated miRNA expression profiles in cervical cancer using a microarray platform containing probes for mature miRNAs. We have evaluated miRNA expression profiles of a heterogeneous set of cervical tissues from 25 different patients. This set included 19 normal cervical tissues, 4 squamous cell carcinoma, 5 high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL and 9 low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL samples. We observed high variability in miRNA expression especially among normal cervical samples, which prevented us from obtaining a unique miRNA expression signature for this tumour type. However, deregulated miRNAs were identified in malignant and pre-malignant cervical tissues after tackling the high expression variability observed. We were also able to identify putative target genes of relevant candidate miRNAs. Our results show that miRNA expression shows natural variability among human samples, which complicates miRNA data profiling analysis. However, such expression noise can be filtered and does not prevent the identification of deregulated miRNAs that play a role in the malignant transformation of cervical squamous cells. Deregulated miRNAs highlight new candidate gene targets allowing for a better understanding of the molecular mechanism underlying the development of this tumour type.

  11. Human intrinsic factor expressed in the plant Arabidopsis thaliana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fedosov, Sergey N; Laursen, Niels B; Nexø, Ebba

    2003-01-01

    Intrinsic factor (IF) is the gastric protein that promotes the intestinal uptake of vitamin B12. Gastric IF from animal sources is used in diagnostic tests and in vitamin pills. However, administration of animal IF to humans becomes disadvantageous because of possible pathogenic transmission...... and contamination by other B12 binders. We tested the use of recombinant plants for large-scale production of pathogen-free human recombinant IF. Human IF was successfully expressed in the recombinant plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Extract from fresh plants possessed high B12-binding capacity corresponding to 70 mg...... to recombinant IF and gastric IF were alike, as was the interaction of recombinant and native IF with the specific receptor cubilin. The data presented show that recombinant plants have a great potential as a large-scale source of human IF for analytical and therapeutic purposes....

  12. Gene Expression in Human Accessory Lacrimal Glands of Wolfring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubels, John L.; Gipson, Ilene K.; Spurr-Michaud, Sandra J.; Tisdale, Ann S.; Van Dyken, Rachel E.; Hatton, Mark P.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. The accessory lacrimal glands are assumed to contribute to the production of tear fluid, but little is known about their function. The goal of this study was to conduct an analysis of gene expression by glands of Wolfring that would provide a more complete picture of the function of these glands. Methods. Glands of Wolfring were isolated from frozen sections of human eyelids by laser microdissection. RNA was extracted from the cells and hybridized to gene expression arrays. The expression of several of the major genes was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. Results. Of the 24 most highly expressed genes, 9 were of direct relevance to lacrimal function. These included lysozyme, lactoferrin, tear lipocalin, and lacritin. The glands of Wolfring are enriched in genes related to protein synthesis, targeting, and secretion, and a large number of genes for proteins with antimicrobial activity were detected. Ion channels and transporters, carbonic anhydrase, and aquaporins were abundantly expressed. Genes for control of lacrimal function, including cholinergic, adrenergic, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, purinergic, androgen, and prolactin receptors were also expressed in gland of Wolfring. Conclusions. The data suggest that the function of glands of Wolfring is similar to that of main lacrimal glands and are consistent with secretion electrolytes, fluid, and protein under nervous and hormonal control. Since these glands secrete directly onto the ocular surface, their location may allow rapid response to exogenous stimuli and makes them readily accessible to topical drugs. PMID:22956620

  13. Retrotransposon expression and incorporation of cloned human and mouse retroelements in human spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazaros, Leandros; Kitsou, Chrysoula; Kostoulas, Charilaos; Bellou, Sofia; Hatzi, Elissavet; Ladias, Paris; Stefos, Theodoros; Markoula, Sofia; Galani, Vasiliki; Vartholomatos, Georgios; Tzavaras, Theodore; Georgiou, Ioannis

    2017-03-01

    To investigate the expression of long interspersed element (LINE) 1, human endogenous retrovirus (HERV) K10, and short interspersed element-VNTR-Alu element (SVA) retrotransposons in ejaculated human spermatozoa by means of reverse-transcription (RT) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis as well as the potential incorporation of cloned human and mouse active retroelements in human sperm cell genome. Laboratory study. University research laboratories and academic hospital. Normozoospermic and oligozoospermic white men. RT-PCR analysis was performed to confirm the retrotransposon expression in human spermatozoa. Exogenous retroelements were tagged with a plasmid containing a green fluorescence (EGFP) retrotransposition cassette, and the de novo retrotransposition events were tested with the use of PCR, fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis, and confocal microscopy. Retroelement expression in human spermatozoa, incorporation of cloned human and mouse active retroelements in human sperm genome, and de novo retrotransposition events in human spermatozoa. RT-PCR products of expressed human LINE-1, HERV-K10, and SVA retrotransposons were observed in ejaculated human sperm samples. The incubation of human spermatozoa with either retrotransposition-active human LINE-1 and HERV-K10 or mouse reverse transcriptase-deficient VL30 retrotransposons tagged with an EGFP-based retrotransposition cassette led to EGFP-positive spermatozo; 16.67% of the samples were positive for retrotransposition. The respective retrotransposition frequencies for the LINE-1, HERV-K10, and VL30 retrotransposons in the positive samples were 0.34 ± 0.13%, 0.37 ± 0.17%, and 0.30 ± 0.14% per sample of 10,000 spermatozoa. Our results show that: 1) LINE-1, HERV-K10, and SVA retrotransposons are transcriptionally expressed in human spermatozoa; 2) cloned active retroelements of human and mammalian origin can be incorporated in human sperm genome; 3) active reverse transcriptases exist in human

  14. Expression and Initial Characterization of Human ALDH3B1

    OpenAIRE

    Marchitti, Satori A.; Orlicky, David J.; Vasiliou, Vasilis

    2007-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) are critical enzymes in the metabolism of endogenous and exogenous aldehydes. The human genome contains nineteen putatively functional ALDH genes; ALDH3B1 belongs to the ALDH3 family. While recent studies have linked the ALDH3B1 locus to schizophrenia, nothing was known, until now, about the properties and significance of the ALDH3B1 protein. The aim of this study was to characterize the ALDH3B1 protein. Human ALDH3B1 was baculovirus-expressed and found to be c...

  15. Cytokines and Growth Factors Expressed by Human Cutaneous Melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elias G. Elias

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Cytokines and growth factors have biologic effects that could stimulate tumor growth, invasion and angiogenesis. The incidence of 24 factors was investigated in 25 cultured human melanoma cell lines and in 62 fixed tissues at different stages of the disease. Over 80% of the human melanoma cell lines expressed TGF-β, IL-8, IL-6, VEGF, PDGF-AA and OPN. Significantly higher TGF-β, IGF-1 and IL-15 were determined in primary lesions compared to distant metastases by immunohistochemistry. Illustrating the complexity of the milieu of the tumor microenvironment, some of these factors may have to be considered in targeted therapy.

  16. Changing expression of the genes related to human hair graying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Young Jin; Yoon, Tae Jin; Lee, Young Ho

    2008-01-01

    Hair graying is one of the prototypical signs of human aging, but its mechanism is largely unknown. To elucidate the mechanism of hair graying, we investigated gene expression related to melanogenesis in human hair. The key molecules in melanogenesis, microphthalmia-associated transcription factor-M (MITF-M), Sox10, Pax3, tyrosine related protein-1 (TRP-1), and tyrosinase, were absent or greatly reduced in the bulbs of white hair compared to black hair. Melanocyte stem cells (MSCs) or melanocytes express markers for neural crest cells, Sox10, Pax3, and MITF-M. Taken together, our data suggest that hair graying is caused by defective migration of MSCs into the bulb area of hair.

  17. Cloning, expression, and chromosome mapping of human galectin-7

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Peder; Rasmussen, H H; Flint, T

    1995-01-01

    The galectins are a family of beta-galactoside-binding proteins implicated in modulating cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. Here we report the cloning and expression of a novel member of this family (galectin-7) that correspond to IEF (isoelectric focusing) 17 (12,700 Da; pI, 7.6) in the human...... keratinocyte protein data base, and that is strikingly down-regulated in SV40 transformed keratinocytes (K14). The cDNA was cloned from a lambda gt11 cDNA expression library using degenerated oligodeoxyribonucleotides back-translated from an IEF 17 peptide sequence. The protein encoded by the galectin-7 clone......-galactoside interaction are conserved. Galectin-7 was partially externalized to the medium by keratinocytes although it has no typical secretion signal peptide. Immunoblotting as well as immunofluorescence analysis of human tissues with a specific galectin-7 antibody revealed a narrow distribution of the protein which...

  18. Human Corneal MicroRNA Expression Profile in Fungal Keratitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boomiraj, Hemadevi; Mohankumar, Vidyarani; Lalitha, Prajna; Devarajan, Bharanidharan

    2015-12-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, stable, noncoding RNA molecules with regulatory function and marked tissue specificity that posttranscriptionally regulate gene expression. However, their role in fungal keratitis remains unknown. The purpose of this study was to identify the miRNA profile and its regulatory role in fungal keratitis. Normal donor (n = 3) and fungal keratitis (n = 5) corneas were pooled separately, and small RNA deep sequencing was performed using a sequencing platform. A bioinformatics approach was applied to identify differentially-expressed miRNAs and their targets, and select miRNAs were validated by real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR). The regulatory functions of miRNAs were predicted by combining miRNA target genes and pathway analysis. The mRNA expression levels of select target genes were further analyzed by qPCR. By deep sequencing, 75 miRNAs were identified as differentially expressed with fold change greater than 2 and probability score greater than 0.9 in fungal keratitis corneas. The highly dysregulated miRNAs (miR-511-5p, miR-142-3p, miR-155-5p, and miR-451a) may regulate wound healing as they were predicted to specifically target wound inflammatory genes. Moreover, the increased expression of miR-451a in keratitis correlated with reduced expression of its target, macrophage migration inhibitory factor, suggesting possible regulatory functions. This is, to our knowledge, the first report on comprehensive human corneal miRNA expression profile in fungal keratitis. Several miRNAs with high expression in fungal keratitis point toward their potential role in regulation of pathogenesis. Further insights in understanding their role in corneal wound inflammation may help design new therapeutic strategies.

  19. Jagged1 inhibits osteoprotegerin expression by human periodontal ligament cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manokawinchoke, J; Sumrejkanchanakij, P; Subbalekha, K; Pavasant, P; Osathanon, T

    2016-12-01

    Notch signaling regulates bone homeostasis. The present study investigated the effect of Jagged1 on osteoprotegerin (OPG) and receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) expression in human periodontal ligament stromal (hPDL) cells. hPDL cells were seeded on to indirect immobilized Jagged1 surfaces. OPG expression was determined using real-time polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Lentiviral small hairpin RNA particles against NOTCH2 were employed to inhibit NOTCH2 expression. Osteoclast formation was evaluated using RAW264.7 cells. An influence of exogenous OPG on osteogenic differentiation was determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction and Alizarin Red S staining. Jagged1 significantly enhanced HES1 and HEY1mRNA expression in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, OPG mRNA and protein levels dramatically decreased upon exposing hPDL cells to Jagged1. However, RANKL mRNA levels were not significantly different. There was also no difference in M-CSF and MCP-1mRNA expression. A γ-secretase inhibitor and cycloheximide treatment rescued Jagged1-attenuated OPG expression. Furthermore, shNOTCH2 overexpressing hPDL cells did not exhibit a decrease in OPG expression upon exposure to Jagged1, implying the involvement of NOTCH2 in the regulatory mechanism. Culturing RAW264.7 cells with conditioned medium from Jagged1-treated hPDL cells enhanced osteoclast formation compared with those cultured with conditioned medium of the control group. Lastly, OPG treatment did not influence osteogenic differentiation by hPDL cells. These results suggest that Jagged1 activates Notch signaling in hPDL cells, leading to decreased OPG expression. This may imply an indirect role of Jagged1 on the regulation of osteoclast differentiation via hPDL cells. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Identification of expressed and conserved human noncoding RNAs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten Muhlig; Tehler, Disa; Vang, Søren

    2014-01-01

    The past decade has shown mammalian genomes to be pervasively transcribed and identified thousands of noncoding (nc) transcripts. It is currently unclear to what extent these transcripts are of functional importance, as experimental functional evidence exists for only a small fraction. Here, we...... characterize the expression and evolutionary conservation properties of 12,115 known and novel nc transcripts, including structural RNAs, long nc RNAs (lncRNAs), antisense RNAs, EvoFold predictions, ultraconserved elements, and expressed nc regions. Expression levels are evaluated across 12 human tissues using...... a custom-designed microarray, supplemented with RNAseq. Conservation levels are evaluated at both the base level and at the syntenic level. We combine these measures with epigenetic mark annotations to identify subsets of novel nc transcripts that show characteristics similar to known functional nc...

  1. Neural decoding of expressive human movement from scalp electroencephalography (EEG)

    OpenAIRE

    Zachery Ryan Hernandez; Zachery Ryan Hernandez; Jesus Gabriel Cruz-Garza; Jesus Gabriel Cruz-Garza; Sargoon eNepaul; Karen Kohn Bradley; Jose Luis Contreras-Vidal; Jose Luis Contreras-Vidal

    2014-01-01

    Although efforts to characterize human movement through EEG have revealed neural activities unique to limb control that can be used to infer movement kinematics, it is still unknown the extent to which EEG can be used to discern the expressive qualities that influence such movements. In this study we used EEG and inertial sensors to record brain activity and movement of five skilled and certified Laban Movement Analysis (LMA) dancers. Each dancer performed whole body functional movements of t...

  2. Expression of human α1-proteinase inhibitor in Aspergillus niger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Punt Peter J

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human α1-proteinase inhibitor (α1-PI, also known as antitrypsin, is the most abundant serine protease inhibitor (serpin in plasma. Its deficiency is associated with development of progressive, ultimately fatal emphysema. Currently in the United States, α1-PI is available for replacement therapy as an FDA licensed plasma-derived (pd product. However, the plasma source itself is limited; moreover, even with efficient viral inactivation steps used in manufacture of plasma products, the risk of contamination from emerging viruses may still exist. Therefore, recombinant α1-PI (r-α1-PI could provide an attractive alternative. Although r-α1-PI has been produced in several hosts, protein stability in vitro and rapid clearance from the circulation have been major issues, primarily due to absent or altered glycosylation. Results We have explored the possibility of expressing the gene for human α1-PI in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger (A. niger, a system reported to be capable of providing more "mammalian-like" glycosylation patterns to secretable proteins than commonly used yeast hosts. Our expression strategy was based on fusion of α1-PI with a strongly expressed, secreted leader protein (glucoamylase G2, separated by dibasic processing site (N-V-I-S-K-R that provides in vivo cleavage. SDS-PAGE, Western blot, ELISA, and α1-PI activity assays enabled us to select the transformant(s secreting a biologically active glycosylated r-α1-PI with yields of up to 12 mg/L. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS analysis further confirmed that molecular mass of the r-α1-PI was similar to that of the pd-α1-PI. In vitro stability of the r-α1-PI from A. niger was tested in comparison with pd-α1-PI reference and non-glycosylated human r-α1-PI from E. coli. Conclusion We examined the suitability of the filamentous fungus A. niger for the expression of the human gene for α1-PI, a medium size

  3. Expression of pemphigus-autoantigen desmoglein 1 in human thymus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouquet, H; Berrih-Aknin, S; Bismuth, J; Joly, P; Gilbert, D; Tron, F

    2008-05-01

    Desmoglein (Dsg) 1 is a transmembrane glycoprotein of the desmosome allowing cell-cell adhesion between keratinocytes, whose expression is restricted to stratified squamous epithelia-like epidermis. Dsg1 is the target autoantigen of pathogenic autoantibodies produced by pemphigus foliaceus and 50% of pemphigus vulgaris patients in a Dsg1-specific T-cell-dependent pathway. Herewith, we show that mRNA of the DSG1 gene is present in normal human thymus and show by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis that the expression of DSG1 transcript increases with age. Although immunoblot analysis on human thymus extracts using different anti-Dsg1 antibodies did not allow to detect the protein, we show by double-immunofluorescence assay that Dsg1 is expressed at protein level by CD19+ CD63+ cells located in the medulla. These data provide another illustration of the thymic expression of a tissue-specific autoantigen involved in an organ-specific autoimmune disease, which may participate in the tolerance acquisition and/or regulation of Dsg1-specific T cells.

  4. Expression and clinical value of EGFR in human meningiomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnus B. Arnli

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Meningiomas are common intracranial tumors in humans that frequently recur despite having a predominantly benign nature. Even though these tumors have been shown to commonly express EGFR/c-erbB1 (epidermal growth factor receptor, results from previous studies are uncertain regarding the expression of either intracellular or extracellular domains, cellular localization, activation state, relations to malignancy grade, and prognosis. Aims This study was designed to investigate the expression of the intracellular and extracellular domains of EGFR and of the activated receptor as well as its ligands EGF and TGFα in a large series of meningiomas with long follow-up data, and investigate if there exists an association between antibody expression and clinical and histological data. Methods A series of 186 meningiomas consecutively operated within a 10-year period was included. Tissue microarrays were constructed and immunohistochemically analyzed with antibodies targeting intracellular and extracellular domains of EGFR, phosphorylated receptor, and EGF and TGFα. Expression levels were recorded as a staining index (SI. Results Positive immunoreactivity was observed for all antibodies in most cases. There was in general high SIs for the intracellular domain of EGFR, phosphorylated EGFR, EGF, and TGFα but lower for the extracellular domain. Normal meninges were negative for all antibodies. Higher SIs for the phosphorylated EGFR were observed in grade II tumors compared with grade I (p = 0.018. Survival or recurrence was significantly decreased in the time to recurrence analysis (TTR with high SI-scores of the extracellular domain in a univariable survival analysis (HR 1.152, CI (1.036–1.280, p = 0.009. This was not significant in a multivariable analysis. Expression of the other antigens did not affect survival. Conclusion EGFR is overexpressed and in an activated state in human meningiomas. High levels of ligands also support this

  5. Expression of thioredoxin during progression of hamster and human cholangiocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Byung-Il; Kim, Yeong-Hun; Yi, Jung-Yeon; Kang, Min-Soo; Jang, Ja-June; Joo, Kyoung-Hwan; Kim, Yongbaek; McHugh Law, J; Kim, Dae-Yong

    2010-01-01

    Thioredoxin (Trx) is a multifunctional redox protein that has growth-promoting and anti-apoptotic effects on cells and protects cells from endogenous and exogenous free radicals. Recently, altered expression of Trx has been reported in various cancers. In the present study, we investigated altered expression of Trx at the precancerous and carcinogenic phases during cholangiocarcinogenesis in a hamster cholangiocarcinoma (ChC) model, using semiquantitative immunohistochemical and Western blot analyses. Moreover, to determine if the results correlated well with those in human ChCs, we carried out a comparative immunohistochemical study for Trx in tissue-arrayed human ChCs with different grades of tumor cell differentiation. Trx was found highly expressed in the cytoplasm of dysplastic bile ducts with highly abnormal growth patterns and ChCs irrespective of tumor type or tumor cell differentiation. Overexpression of Trx at the precancerous and carcinogenic phases was further supported by significant elevation of Trx protein in Western blotting. The results from the hamster ChCs were in good agreement with those from human ChCs. Our results strongly suggested that the redox regulatory function of Trx plays an important role in bile duct cell transformation and tumor progression during cholangiocarcinogenesis.

  6. Comparison of the Gene Expression Profiles of Human Hematopoietic Stem Cells between Humans and a Humanized Xenograft Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuzawa, Hideyuki; Matsushita, Hiromichi; Yahata, Takashi; Tanaka, Masayuki; Ando, Kiyoshi

    2017-04-20

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of NOD/Shi-scid-IL2Rγ null (NOG) mice transplanted with human CD34 + /CD38 - /Lin -/low hematopoietic cells from cord blood (CB) as an experimental model of the gene expression in human hematopoiesis. We compared the gene expressions of human CD34 + /CD38 - /Lin -/low cells from human bone marrow (BM) and in xenograft models. The microarray data revealed that 25 KEGG pathways were extracted from the comparison of human CD34 + /CD38 - /Lin -/low HSCs between CB and BM, and that 17 of them--which were mostly related to cellular survival, RNA metabolism and lymphoid development--were shared with the xenograft model. When the probes that were commonly altered in CD34 + /CD38 - /Lin -/low cells from both human and xenograft BM were analyzed, most of them, including the genes related hypoxia, hematopoietic differentiation, epigenetic modification, translation initiation, and RNA degradation, were downregulated. These alterations of gene expression suggest a reduced differentiation capacity and likely include key alterations of gene expression for settlement of CB CD34 + /CD38 - /Lin -/low cells in BM. Our findings demonstrate that the xenograft model of human CB CD34 + /CD38 - /Lin -/low cells using NOG mice was useful, at least in part, for the evaluation of the gene expression profile of human hematopoietic stem cells.

  7. Mapping the genetic architecture of gene expression in human liver.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric E Schadt

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Genetic variants that are associated with common human diseases do not lead directly to disease, but instead act on intermediate, molecular phenotypes that in turn induce changes in higher-order disease traits. Therefore, identifying the molecular phenotypes that vary in response to changes in DNA and that also associate with changes in disease traits has the potential to provide the functional information required to not only identify and validate the susceptibility genes that are directly affected by changes in DNA, but also to understand the molecular networks in which such genes operate and how changes in these networks lead to changes in disease traits. Toward that end, we profiled more than 39,000 transcripts and we genotyped 782,476 unique single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in more than 400 human liver samples to characterize the genetic architecture of gene expression in the human liver, a metabolically active tissue that is important in a number of common human diseases, including obesity, diabetes, and atherosclerosis. This genome-wide association study of gene expression resulted in the detection of more than 6,000 associations between SNP genotypes and liver gene expression traits, where many of the corresponding genes identified have already been implicated in a number of human diseases. The utility of these data for elucidating the causes of common human diseases is demonstrated by integrating them with genotypic and expression data from other human and mouse populations. This provides much-needed functional support for the candidate susceptibility genes being identified at a growing number of genetic loci that have been identified as key drivers of disease from genome-wide association studies of disease. By using an integrative genomics approach, we highlight how the gene RPS26 and not ERBB3 is supported by our data as the most likely susceptibility gene for a novel type 1 diabetes locus recently identified in a large

  8. Characterization and tissue-specific expression of human LRIG2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmlund, Camilla; Nilsson, Jonas; Guo, Dongsheng; Starefeldt, Anna; Golovleva, Irina; Henriksson, Roger; Hedman, Håkan

    2004-05-12

    We have recently identified and cloned the human LRIG1 gene (formerly LIG1). LRIG1 is a predicted integral membrane protein with a domain organization reminiscent of the Drosophila epidermal growth factor (EGF)-receptor antagonist Kekkon-1. We have searched for additional members of the human LRIG family and identified LRIG2 (). The LRIG2 gene was localized to chromosome 1p13 and had an open reading frame of 1065 amino acids. The LRIG2 protein was predicted to have the same domain organization as LRIG1 with a signal peptide, an extracellular part containing15 leucine-rich repeats and three immunoglobulin-like domains, a transmembrane domain, and a cytoplasmic tail. The LRIG2 amino acid sequence was 47% identical to human LRIG1 and mouse Lrig1 (also known as Lig-1). Northern blotting and RT-PCR revealed LRIG2 transcripts in all tissues analyzed. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR showed the most prominent RNA expression in skin, uterus, ovary, kidney, brain, small intestine, adrenal gland, and stomach. Immunoblotting of COS-7 cell lysates demonstrated that heterologously expressed human LRIG2 had an apparent molecular weight of 132 kDa under reducing gel-running conditions. N-glycosidase F treatment resulted in a reduction of the apparent molecular weight to 107 kDa, showing that LRIG2 was a glycoprotein carrying N-linked oligosaccharides. Cell surface biotinylation experiments and confocal fluorescence laser microscopy demonstrated expression of LRIG2 both at the cell surface and in the cytoplasm. LRIG2 was detected in tissue lysates from stomach, prostate, lung, and fetal brain by immunoblotting. In conclusion, LRIG2 was found to be a glycoprotein which was encoded by a gene on human chromosome 1p13 and its mRNA was present in all tissues analyzed.

  9. Comparative expression pathway analysis of human and canine mammary tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marconato Laura

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spontaneous tumors in dog have been demonstrated to share many features with their human counterparts, including relevant molecular targets, histological appearance, genetics, biological behavior and response to conventional treatments. Mammary tumors in dog therefore provide an attractive alternative to more classical mouse models, such as transgenics or xenografts, where the tumour is artificially induced. To assess the extent to which dog tumors represent clinically significant human phenotypes, we performed the first genome-wide comparative analysis of transcriptional changes occurring in mammary tumors of the two species, with particular focus on the molecular pathways involved. Results We analyzed human and dog gene expression data derived from both tumor and normal mammary samples. By analyzing the expression levels of about ten thousand dog/human orthologous genes we observed a significant overlap of genes deregulated in the mammary tumor samples, as compared to their normal counterparts. Pathway analysis of gene expression data revealed a great degree of similarity in the perturbation of many cancer-related pathways, including the 'PI3K/AKT', 'KRAS', 'PTEN', 'WNT-beta catenin' and 'MAPK cascade'. Moreover, we show that the transcriptional relationships between different gene signatures observed in human breast cancer are largely maintained in the canine model, suggesting a close interspecies similarity in the network of cancer signalling circuitries. Conclusion Our data confirm and further strengthen the value of the canine mammary cancer model and open up new perspectives for the evaluation of novel cancer therapeutics and the development of prognostic and diagnostic biomarkers to be used in clinical studies.

  10. Gene Expression Profiling in Wild-Type and PPAR-Null Mice Exposed to Perfluorooctane Sulfonate Reveals PPAR-Independent Effects

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    Mitchell B. Rosen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS is a perfluoroalkyl acid (PFAA and a persistent environmental contaminant found in the tissues of humans and wildlife. Although blood levels of PFOS have begun to decline, health concerns remain because of the long half-life of PFOS in humans. Like other PFAAs, such as, perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA, PFOS is an activator of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPAR and exhibits hepatocarcinogenic potential in rodents. PFOS is also a developmental toxicant in rodents where, unlike PFOA, its mode of action is independent of PPAR. Wild-type (WT and PPAR-null (Null mice were dosed with 0, 3, or 10 mg/kg/day PFOS for 7 days. Animals were euthanized, livers weighed, and liver samples collected for histology and preparation of total RNA. Gene profiling was conducted using Affymetrix 430_2 microarrays. In WT mice, PFOS induced changes that were characteristic of PPAR transactivation including regulation of genes associated with lipid metabolism, peroxisome biogenesis, proteasome activation, and inflammation. PPAR-independent changes were indicated in both WT and Null mice by altered expression of genes related to lipid metabolism, inflammation, and xenobiotic metabolism. Such results are similar to studies done with PFOA and are consistent with modest activation of the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR, and possibly PPAR and/or PPAR/. Unique treatment-related effects were also found in Null mice including altered expression of genes associated with ribosome biogenesis, oxidative phosphorylation, and cholesterol biosynthesis. Of interest was up-regulation of Cyp7a1, a gene which is under the control of various transcription regulators. Hence, in addition to its ability to modestly activate PPAR, PFOS induces a variety of PPAR-independent effects as well.

  11. The xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes in Helix aspersa (snail) and Pleurozium schreberi (moss), potential bio-marker of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons air pollution; Les enzymes de biotransformation des xenobiotiques chez helix aspersa (escargot) et pleurozium schreberi (mousse), biomarqueurs potentiels de la pollution atmospherique par les hydrocarbures aromatiques polycycliques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ismert, M.

    2000-12-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the potential value of xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes as bio-marker of air pollution by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). Using several models of PAH air pollution, we investigated their effects on cytochrome P450 (7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase, EROD and 7-ethoxycoumarin O-deethylase, ECOD) and glutathione-dependent enzyme activities (glutathione S-transferases, GST with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitro-benzene and 4-nitro-quinoline-1-oxide as substrates, glutathione reductase and glutathione peroxidases) in three organs of the snail Helix aspersa as well as on glutathione-dependent and antioxidant (ascorbate peroxidase and catalase) enzyme activities in the moss Pleurozium schreberi. In the first model, H. aspersa and P. schreberi were exposed to a naphthalene-saturated atmosphere during three days. While, this treatment did not provoke any variation of the enzyme activities explored in P. schreberi, it modified the level of some snail enzyme activities in an organ-dependent manner. Naphthalene exposure affected none of the tested activities in the mantle cavity-forming tissues (MCFT), but significantly decreased EROD and ECOD activities in the kidney (KD) as opposed to their increase in the digestive gland (DG). In the second model, these organisms were exposed for 8 hours to a work place where the atmosphere was essentially PAH burden. Benzo[a]pyrene was used as the PAH model compound. None of the selected enzyme activities were affected in the moss. Conversely, EROD and ECOD activities were significantly increased in the KD and DG of H. aspersa, whatever the PAH burden. Moreover, GST activities with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitro-benzene as the acceptor substrate were enhanced in the DG. In the third model, the organisms were transplanted in three urban places during one or several weeks. GST activities with both substrates were positively correlated with the level of nitrogen oxides in the digestive gland of H. aspersa. Overall, our work

  12. TKTL1 expression in human malign and benign cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kämmerer, Ulrike; Gires, Olivier; Pfetzer, Nadja; Wiegering, Armin; Klement, Rainer Johannes; Otto, Christoph

    2015-06-10

    Overexpression of transketolase-like 1 protein TKTL1 in cancer cells has been reported to correlate with enhanced glycolysis and lactic acid production. Furthermore, enhanced TKTL1 expression was put into context with resistance to chemotherapy and ionizing radiation. Here, a panel of human malign and benign cells, which cover a broad range of chemotherapy and radiation resistance as well as reliance on glucose metabolism, was analyzed in vitro for TKTL1 expression. 17 malign and three benign cell lines were characterized according to their expression of TKTL1 on the protein level with three commercially available anti-TKTL1 antibodies utilizing immunohistochemistry and Western blot, as well as on mRNA level with three published primer pairs for RT-qPCR. Furthermore, sensitivities to paclitaxel, cisplatin and ionizing radiation were assessed in cell survival assays. Glucose consumption and lactate production were quantified as surrogates for the "Warburg effect". Considerable amounts of tktl1 mRNA and TKTL1 protein were detected only upon stable transfection of the human embryonic kidney cell line HEK293 with an expression plasmid for human TKTL1. Beyond that, weak expression of endogenous tktl1 mRNA was measured in the cell lines JAR and U251. Western blot analysis of JAR and U251 cells did not detect TKTL1 at the expected size of 65 kDa with all three antibodies specific for TKTL1 protein and immunohistochemical staining was observed with antibody JFC12T10 only. All other cell lines tested here revealed expression of tktl1 mRNA below detection limits and were negative for TKTL1 protein. However, in all cell lines including TKTL1-negative HEK293-control cells, antibody JFC12T10 detected multiple proteins with different molecular weights. Importantly, JAR and U251 did neither demonstrate an outstanding production of lactic acid nor increased resistance against chemotherapeutics or to ionizing radiation, respectively. Using RT-qPCR and three different antibodies we

  13. TKTL1 expression in human malign and benign cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kämmerer, Ulrike; Gires, Olivier; Pfetzer, Nadja; Wiegering, Armin; Klement, Rainer Johannes; Otto, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Overexpression of transketolase-like 1 protein TKTL1 in cancer cells has been reported to correlate with enhanced glycolysis and lactic acid production. Furthermore, enhanced TKTL1 expression was put into context with resistance to chemotherapy and ionizing radiation. Here, a panel of human malign and benign cells, which cover a broad range of chemotherapy and radiation resistance as well as reliance on glucose metabolism, was analyzed in vitro for TKTL1 expression. 17 malign and three benign cell lines were characterized according to their expression of TKTL1 on the protein level with three commercially available anti-TKTL1 antibodies utilizing immunohistochemistry and Western blot, as well as on mRNA level with three published primer pairs for RT-qPCR. Furthermore, sensitivities to paclitaxel, cisplatin and ionizing radiation were assessed in cell survival assays. Glucose consumption and lactate production were quantified as surrogates for the “Warburg effect”. Considerable amounts of tktl1 mRNA and TKTL1 protein were detected only upon stable transfection of the human embryonic kidney cell line HEK293 with an expression plasmid for human TKTL1. Beyond that, weak expression of endogenous tktl1 mRNA was measured in the cell lines JAR and U251. Western blot analysis of JAR and U251 cells did not detect TKTL1 at the expected size of 65 kDa with all three antibodies specific for TKTL1 protein and immunohistochemical staining was observed with antibody JFC12T10 only. All other cell lines tested here revealed expression of tktl1 mRNA below detection limits and were negative for TKTL1 protein. However, in all cell lines including TKTL1-negative HEK293-control cells, antibody JFC12T10 detected multiple proteins with different molecular weights. Importantly, JAR and U251 did neither demonstrate an outstanding production of lactic acid nor increased resistance against chemotherapeutics or to ionizing radiation, respectively. Using RT-qPCR and three different antibodies

  14. Cytochrome P450 aromatase expression in human seminoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montanaro Daniela

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The enzyme cytochrome P450 aromatase, catalysing the conversion of androgens into estrogens, has been detected in normal human testicular cells suggesting a physiological role of local estrogen biosynthesis on spermatogenesis control. Estrogens, regulating cell growth and apoptosis, can also be involved in tumorigenesis process, but the possible link between estrogens and testicular neoplastic process is, up to now, scarcely known. This study examined aromatase expression in human seminoma, which is the most common germ cell tumour of the testis. Methods The tumour-bearing testes were obtained from 20 patients with classic seminoma undergoing to therapeutic orchidectomy. Paraffin embedded tissues were processed for immunohistochemistry using a mouse monoclonal antibody generated against human placental cytochrome P450 arom, as primary antibody, and a biotinylated goat-anti-mouse IgG, as secondary antibody. Furthermore, Western blot analysis of seminoma extracts was carried out. Results Intense P450 arom immunoreactivity was observed in the seminoma cells and Western blot analysis confirmed the immunodetection. A strong immunostaining was also detected in cells of intratubular germ cell neoplasia (IGCN, adjacent to seminoma. Conclusion The present study demonstrated, for the first time in human, aromatase expression in neoplastic cells of seminoma suggesting a relation between local estrogen biosynthesis and germ cell tumorigenesis. The P450 arom immunolocalization in the cells of IGCN, representing the common precursor of most germ cell tumors, seems to support these findings.

  15. [Expression of interleukin-17F in human apical periodontitis lesions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hui; Li, Song

    2012-06-01

    To examine the expression of interleukin-17F (IL-17F) in apical periodontitis lesions. Human apical periodontitis lesions were collected after periapical surgery from November 1, 2009 to August 1, 2011. After histological processing, serial sectioning, HE staining, and microscopic analysis, 33 periapical cysts and 18 periapical granulomas were selected for immunohistochemical analysis for IL-17F. Five alveolar bone samples were obtained from a group of impacted third molars recommended for extraction. These bone samples did not show any inflammation and were used as normal samples. Differences in IL-17F expression between the tissues with periapical cyst and periapica granuloma were subsequently analyzed by rank-sum test. IL-17F was expressed in epithelial cells, lymphocytes, fibroblast and endothelial cells of both types of lesions. Both types of lesions presented increased IL-17F expression when compared to healthy periapical alveolar bone. The expression of IL-17F in apical cyst (0.2365 ± 0.0708) and apical granuloma (0.8852 ± 0.0576) was significantly different (Z = 3.735, P granuloma was significantly different.

  16. Adhesion Molecule Expression in Human Endothelial Cells under Simulated Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudimov, E. G.; Andreeva, E. R.; Buravkova, L. B.

    2013-02-01

    High gravisensitivity of endothelium is now well recognized. Therefore, the microgravity can be one of the main factors affecting the endothelium in space flight. In this work we studied the effects of gravity vector randomization (3D-clinorotation in RPM) on the viability of endothelial cells from human umbilical vein (HUVEC) and the expression of adhesion molecules on its surface. After RPM exposure, HUVEC conditioning medium was collected for cytokines evaluation, a part of vials was used for immunocytochemistry and other one - for cytofluorimetric analysis of ICAM-I, VCAM-I, PECAM-I, E-selectin, Endoglin, VE-cadherin expression. The viability of HUVEC and constitutive expression of EC marker molecules PECAM-I and Endoglin were similar in all experimental groups both after 6 and 24 hrs of exposure. There were no differences in ICAM-I and E-selectin expression on HUVEC in 3 groups after 6 hrs of exposure. 24 hrs incubation has provoked decrease in ICAM-I and E-selectin expression. Thus, gravity vector randomization can lead to the disruption of ECs monolayer.

  17. Expression of interleukin-17RC protein in normal human tissues

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    Ge Dongxia

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interleukin-17 (IL-17 cytokines and receptors play an important role in many autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. IL-17 receptors IL-17RA and IL-17RC have been found to form a heterodimer for mediating the signals of IL-17A and IL-17F cytokines. While the function and signaling pathway of IL-17RA has been revealed, IL-17RC has not been well characterized. The function and signaling pathway of IL-17RC remain largely unknown. The purpose of the present study was to systematically examine IL-17RC protein expression in 53 human tissues. Results IL-17RC expression in 51 normal human tissues and two benign tumors (i.e., lymphangioma and parathyroid adenoma on the tissue microarrays was determined by immunohistochemical staining, using two polyclonal antibodies against IL-17RC. IL-17RC protein was expressed in many cell types including the myocardial cells, vascular and lymphatic endothelial cells, glandular cells (of the adrenal, parathyroid, pituitary, thyroid, pancreas, parotid salivary, and subepidermal glands, epithelial cells (of the esophagus, stomach, intestine, anus, renal tubule, breast, cervix, Fallopian tube, epididymis, seminal vesicle, prostate, gallbladder, bronchus, lung, and skin, oocytes in the ovary, Sertoli cells in the testis, motor neurons in the spinal cord, autonomic ganglia and nerves in the intestine, skeletal muscle cells, adipocytes, articular chondrocytes, and synovial cells. High levels of IL-17RC protein expression were observed in most vascular and lymphatic endothelium and squamous epithelium. The epithelium of the breast, cervix, Fallopian tube, kidney, bladder and bronchus also expressed high levels of IL-17RC, so did the glandular cells in the adrenal cortex, parotid salivary and subepidermal glands. In contrast, IL-17RC protein was not detectable in the smooth muscle cells, fibroblasts, antral mucosa of the stomach, mucosa of the colon, endometrium of the uterus, neurons of the brain

  18. Proteins differentially expressed in human beta-cells-enriched pancreatic islet cultures and human insulinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terra, Letícia F; Teixeira, Priscila C; Wailemann, Rosangela A M

    2013-01-01

    In view of the great demand for human beta-cells for physiological and medical studies, we generated cell lines derived from human insulinomas which secrete insulin, C-peptide and express neuroendocrine and islet markers. In this study, we set out to characterize their proteomes, comparing them...... to those of primary beta-cells using DIGE followed by MS. The results were validated by Western blotting. An average of 1800 spots was detected with less than 1% exhibiting differential abundance. Proteins more abundant in human islets, such as Caldesmon, are involved in the regulation of cell......, a molecular snapshot of the orchestrated changes in expression of proteins involved in key processes which could be correlated with the altered phenotype of human beta-cells. Collectively our observations prompt research towards the establishment of bioengineered human beta-cells providing a new and needed...

  19. YY1 positively regulates human UBIAD1 expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Funahashi, Nobuaki; Hirota, Yoshihisa; Nakagawa, Kimie; Sawada, Natumi; Watanabe, Masato; Suhara, Yoshitomo; Okano, Toshio

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin K is involved in bone formation and blood coagulation. Natural vitamin K compounds are composed of the plant form phylloquinone (vitamin K 1 ) and a series of bacterial menaquionones (MK-n; vitamin K 2 ). Menadione (vitamin K 3 ) is an artificial vitamin K compound. MK-4 contains 4-isoprenyl as a side group in the 2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone common structure and has various bioactivities. UbiA prenyltransferase domain containing 1 (UBIAD1 or TERE1) is the menaquinone-4 biosynthetic enzyme. UBIAD1 transcript expression significantly decreases in patients with prostate carcinoma and overexpressing UBIAD1 inhibits proliferation of a tumour cell line. UBIAD1 mRNA expression is ubiquitous in mouse tissues, and higher UBIAD1 mRNA expression levels are detected in the brain, heart, kidneys and pancreas. Several functions of UBIAD1 have been reported; however, regulation of the human UBIAD1 gene has not been elucidated. Here we report cloning and characterisation of the human UBIAD1 promoter. A 5′ rapid amplification of cDNA ends analysis revealed that the main transcriptional start site was 306 nucleotides upstream of the translation initiation codon. Deletion and mutation analyses revealed the functional importance of the YY1 consensus motif. Electrophoretic gel mobility shift and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that YY1 binds the UBIAD1 promoter in vitro and in vivo. In addition, YY1 small interfering RNA decreased endogenous UBIAD1 mRNA expression and UBIAD1 conversion activity. These results suggest that YY1 up-regulates UBIAD1 expression and UBIAD1 conversion activity through the UBIAD1 promoter. - Highlights: • We cloned the human UBIAD1 promoter. • The functional importance of the YY1 motif was identified in the UBIAD1 promoter. • YY1 binds the UBIAD1 promoter in vitro and in vivo. • Knockdown of YY1 significantly decreased UBIAD1 expression. • YY1 up-regulates UBIAD1 conversion activity through the UBIAD1 promoter

  20. YY1 positively regulates human UBIAD1 expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Funahashi, Nobuaki, E-mail: nfunahashi@ri.ncgm.go.jp [Department of Hygienic Sciences, Kobe Pharmaceutical University, Kobe (Japan); Department of Metabolic Disorder, Diabetes Research Center, Research Institute, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Hirota, Yoshihisa [Department of Hygienic Sciences, Kobe Pharmaceutical University, Kobe (Japan); Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Suzuka University of Medical Science, Suzuka (Japan); Nakagawa, Kimie; Sawada, Natumi; Watanabe, Masato [Department of Hygienic Sciences, Kobe Pharmaceutical University, Kobe (Japan); Suhara, Yoshitomo [Department of Bioscience and Engineering, Shibaura Institute of Technology, Saitama (Japan); Okano, Toshio [Department of Hygienic Sciences, Kobe Pharmaceutical University, Kobe (Japan)

    2015-05-01

    Vitamin K is involved in bone formation and blood coagulation. Natural vitamin K compounds are composed of the plant form phylloquinone (vitamin K{sub 1}) and a series of bacterial menaquionones (MK-n; vitamin K{sub 2}). Menadione (vitamin K{sub 3}) is an artificial vitamin K compound. MK-4 contains 4-isoprenyl as a side group in the 2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone common structure and has various bioactivities. UbiA prenyltransferase domain containing 1 (UBIAD1 or TERE1) is the menaquinone-4 biosynthetic enzyme. UBIAD1 transcript expression significantly decreases in patients with prostate carcinoma and overexpressing UBIAD1 inhibits proliferation of a tumour cell line. UBIAD1 mRNA expression is ubiquitous in mouse tissues, and higher UBIAD1 mRNA expression levels are detected in the brain, heart, kidneys and pancreas. Several functions of UBIAD1 have been reported; however, regulation of the human UBIAD1 gene has not been elucidated. Here we report cloning and characterisation of the human UBIAD1 promoter. A 5′ rapid amplification of cDNA ends analysis revealed that the main transcriptional start site was 306 nucleotides upstream of the translation initiation codon. Deletion and mutation analyses revealed the functional importance of the YY1 consensus motif. Electrophoretic gel mobility shift and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that YY1 binds the UBIAD1 promoter in vitro and in vivo. In addition, YY1 small interfering RNA decreased endogenous UBIAD1 mRNA expression and UBIAD1 conversion activity. These results suggest that YY1 up-regulates UBIAD1 expression and UBIAD1 conversion activity through the UBIAD1 promoter. - Highlights: • We cloned the human UBIAD1 promoter. • The functional importance of the YY1 motif was identified in the UBIAD1 promoter. • YY1 binds the UBIAD1 promoter in vitro and in vivo. • Knockdown of YY1 significantly decreased UBIAD1 expression. • YY1 up-regulates UBIAD1 conversion activity through the UBIAD1

  1. Clinicopathological significance of PTPN12 expression in human breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, Xunyi; Yuan, Zhentao; Jiang, Dandan; Li, Funian

    2012-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 12 (PTPN12) is a recently identified tumor suppressor gene (TSG) that is frequently compromised in human triple-negative breast cancer. In the present study, we investigated the expression of PTPN12 protein by patients with breast cancer in a Chinese population and the relationship between PTPN12 expression levels and patient clinicopathological features and prognosis. Additionally, we explored the underlying down-regulation mechanism from the perspective of an epigenetic alteration. We examined PTPN12 mRNA expression in five breast cancer cell lines using semi-quantitative reverse-transcription PCR, and detected PTPN12 protein expression using immunohistochemistry in 150 primary invasive breast cancer cases and paired adjacent non-tumor tissues. Methylation-specific PCR was performed to analyze the promoter CpG island methylation status of PTPN12. PTPN12 was significantly down-regulated in breast cancer cases (48/150) compared to adjacent noncancerous tissues (17/150; P < 0.05). Furthermore, low expression of PTPN12 showed a significant positive correlation with tumor size (P = 0.047), lymph node metastasis (P = 0.001), distant metastasis (P = 0.009), histological grade (P = 0.012), and survival time (P = 0.019). Additionally, promoter CpG island hypermethylation occurs more frequently in breast cancer cases and breast cancer cell lines with low PTPN12 expression. Our findings suggest that PTPN12 is potentially a methylation-silenced TSG for breast cancer that may play an important role in breast carcinogenesis and could potentially serve as an independent prognostic factor for invasive breast cancer patients

  2. Developmental gene expression profiles of the human pathogen Schistosoma japonicum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McManus Donald P

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The schistosome blood flukes are complex trematodes and cause a chronic parasitic disease of significant public health importance worldwide, schistosomiasis. Their life cycle is characterised by distinct parasitic and free-living phases involving mammalian and snail hosts and freshwater. Microarray analysis was used to profile developmental gene expression in the Asian species, Schistosoma japonicum. Total RNAs were isolated from the three distinct environmental phases of the lifecycle – aquatic/snail (eggs, miracidia, sporocysts, cercariae, juvenile (lung schistosomula and paired but pre-egg laying adults and adult (paired, mature males and egg-producing females, both examined separately. Advanced analyses including ANOVA, principal component analysis, and hierarchal clustering provided a global synopsis of gene expression relationships among the different developmental stages of the schistosome parasite. Results Gene expression profiles were linked to the major environmental settings through which the developmental stages of the fluke have to adapt during the course of its life cycle. Gene ontologies of the differentially expressed genes revealed a wide range of functions and processes. In addition, stage-specific, differentially expressed genes were identified that were involved in numerous biological pathways and functions including calcium signalling, sphingolipid metabolism and parasite defence. Conclusion The findings provide a comprehensive database of gene expression in an important human pathogen, including transcriptional changes in genes involved in evasion of the host immune response, nutrient acquisition, energy production, calcium signalling, sphingolipid metabolism, egg production and tegumental function during development. This resource should help facilitate the identification and prioritization of new anti-schistosome drug and vaccine targets for the control of schistosomiasis.

  3. Muscle gene expression patterns in human rotator cuff pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Alexander; McCarthy, Meagan; Pichika, Rajeswari; Sato, Eugene J; Lieber, Richard L; Schenk, Simon; Lane, John G; Ward, Samuel R

    2014-09-17

    Rotator cuff pathology is a common source of shoulder pain with variable etiology and pathoanatomical characteristics. Pathological processes of fatty infiltration, muscle atrophy, and fibrosis have all been invoked as causes for poor outcomes after rotator cuff tear repair. The aims of this study were to measure the expression of key genes associated with adipogenesis, myogenesis, and fibrosis in human rotator cuff muscle after injury and to compare the expression among groups of patients with varied severities of rotator cuff pathology. Biopsies of the supraspinatus muscle were obtained arthroscopically from twenty-seven patients in the following operative groups: bursitis (n = 10), tendinopathy (n = 7), full-thickness rotator cuff tear (n = 8), and massive rotator cuff tear (n = 2). Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) was performed to characterize gene expression pathways involved in myogenesis, adipogenesis, and fibrosis. Patients with a massive tear demonstrated downregulation of the fibrogenic, adipogenic, and myogenic genes, indicating that the muscle was not in a state of active change and may have difficulty responding to stimuli. Patients with a full-thickness tear showed upregulation of fibrotic and adipogenic genes; at the tissue level, these correspond to the pathologies most detrimental to outcomes of surgical repair. Patients with bursitis or tendinopathy still expressed myogenic genes, indicating that the muscle may be attempting to accommodate the mechanical deficiencies induced by the tendon tear. Gene expression in human rotator cuff muscles varied according to tendon injury severity. Patients with bursitis and tendinopathy appeared to be expressing pro-myogenic genes, whereas patients with a full-thickness tear were expressing genes associated with fatty atrophy and fibrosis. In contrast, patients with a massive tear appeared to have downregulation of all gene programs except inhibition of myogenesis. These data highlight the

  4. Analysis of expression of transcription factors in early human retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Ma, Lixiang; Wang, Songtao; Wang, Xiaobing; Sun, Yan; Gao, Lu; Li, Jin; Zhou, Guomin

    2017-08-01

    The retina originates in the central nervous system. Due to its accessibility and simplicity, the retina has become an invaluable model for studying the basic mechanisms involved in development. To date, considerable knowledge regarding the interactions among genes that coordinate retinal development has been gained from extensive research in model animals. However, our understanding of retinal development in humans remains undeveloped. Here, we analyze the expression of transcription factors that are involved in the early development of the retina in human embryos at 6-12 weeks post-conception. Our work demonstrates that early developing neural retinas can be divided into two layers, the outer and inner neuroblast layers. Eye-field transcription factors and those related to the early development of the retina have distinct expression patterns in the two layers. Cell-type-specific transcription factors emerge at 8 weeks. These data provide clear and systemic structures for early retinal development in human. Copyright © 2017 ISDN. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Gene Expression Profile Changes due to Bleomycin-Induced DNA Damage in Human Fibroblasts in Space

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To understand gene expression responses in confluent human fibroblast in microgravity conditions to bleomycin treatment. Confluent human fibroblasts AG01522 were...

  6. Progesterone Upregulates Gene Expression in Normal Human Thyroid Follicular Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Santin Bertoni

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid cancer and thyroid nodules are more prevalent in women than men, so female sex hormones may have an etiological role in these conditions. There are no data about direct effects of progesterone on thyroid cells, so the aim of the present study was to evaluate progesterone effects in the sodium-iodide symporter NIS, thyroglobulin TG, thyroperoxidase TPO, and KI-67 genes expression, in normal thyroid follicular cells, derived from human tissue. NIS, TG, TPO, and KI-67 mRNA expression increased significantly after TSH 20 μUI/mL, respectively: 2.08 times, P<0.0001; 2.39 times, P=0.01; 1.58 times, P=0.0003; and 1.87 times, P<0.0001. In thyroid cells treated with 20 μUI/mL TSH plus 10 nM progesterone, RNA expression of NIS, TG, and KI-67 genes increased, respectively: 1.78 times, P<0.0001; 1.75 times, P=0.037; and 1.95 times, P<0.0001, and TPO mRNA expression also increased, though not significantly (1.77 times, P=0.069. These effects were abolished by mifepristone, an antagonist of progesterone receptor, suggesting that genes involved in thyroid cell function and proliferation are upregulated by progesterone. This work provides evidence that progesterone has a direct effect on thyroid cells, upregulating genes involved in thyroid function and growth.

  7. Exercise-induced metallothionein expression in human skeletal muscle fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penkowa, Milena; Keller, Pernille; Keller, Charlotte

    2005-01-01

    in both type I and II muscle fibres. This is the first report demonstrating that MT-I + II are significantly induced in human skeletal muscle fibres following exercise. As MT-I + II are antioxidant factors that protect various tissues during pathological conditions, the MT-I + II increases post exercise......Exercise induces free oxygen radicals that cause oxidative stress, and metallothioneins (MTs) are increased in states of oxidative stress and possess anti-apoptotic effects. We therefore studied expression of the antioxidant factors metallothionein I and II (MT-I + II) in muscle biopsies obtained...... in response to 3 h of bicycle exercise performed by healthy men and in resting controls. Both MT-I + II proteins and MT-II mRNA expression increased significantly in both type I and II muscle fibres after exercise. Moreover, 24 h after exercise the levels of MT-II mRNA and MT-I + II proteins were still highly...

  8. Human HLA-Ev (147) Expression in Transgenic Animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, R; Maeda, A; Sakai, R; Eguchi, H; Lo, P-C; Hasuwa, H; Ikawa, M; Nakahata, K; Zenitani, M; Yamamichi, T; Umeda, S; Deguchi, K; Okuyama, H; Miyagawa, S

    2016-05-01

    In our previous study, we reported on the development of substituting S147C for HLA-E as a useful gene tool for xenotransplantation. In this study we exchanged the codon of HLA-Ev (147), checked its function, and established a line of transgenic mice. A new construct, a codon exchanging human HLA-Ev (147) + IRES + human beta 2-microgloblin, was established. The construct was subcloned into pCXN2 (the chick beta-actin promoter and cytomegalovirus enhancer) vector. Natural killer cell- and macrophage-mediated cytotoxicities were performed using the established the pig endothelial cell (PEC) line with the new gene. Transgenic mice with it were next produced using a micro-injection method. The expression of the molecule on PECs was confirmed by the transfection of the plasmid. The established molecules on PECs functioned well in regulating natural killer cell-mediated cytotoxicity and macrophage-mediated cytotoxicity. We have also successfully generated several lines of transgenic mice with this plasmid. The expression of HLA-Ev (147) in each mouse organ was confirmed by assessing the mRNA. The chick beta-actin promoter and cytomegalovirus enhancer resulted in a relatively broad expression of the gene in each organ, and a strong expression in the cases of the heart and lung. A synthetic HLA-Ev (147) gene with a codon usage optimized to a mammalian system represents a critical factor in the development of transgenic animals for xenotransplantation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Melanopsin-expressing retinal ganglion cells: implications for human diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    La Morgia, Chiara; Ross-Cisneros, Fred N; Hannibal, Jens

    2011-01-01

    interest on these cells, mainly focused on animal models. Only recently, a few studies have started to address the relevance of the mRGC system in humans and related diseases. We recently discovered that mRGCs resist neurodegeneration in two inherited mitochondrial disorders that cause blindness, i......In the last decade, there was the seminal discovery of melanopsin-expressing retinal ganglion cells (mRGCs) as a new class of photoreceptors that subserve the photoentrainment of circadian rhythms and other non-image forming functions of the eye. Since then, there has been a growing research...

  10. Human AZU-1 gene, variants thereof and expressed gene products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huei-Mei; Bissell, Mina

    2004-06-22

    A human AZU-1 gene, mutants, variants and fragments thereof. Protein products encoded by the AZU-1 gene and homologs encoded by the variants of AZU-1 gene acting as tumor suppressors or markers of malignancy progression and tumorigenicity reversion. Identification, isolation and characterization of AZU-1 and AZU-2 genes localized to a tumor suppressive locus at chromosome 10q26, highly expressed in nonmalignant and premalignant cells derived from a human breast tumor progression model. A recombinant full length protein sequences encoded by the AZU-1 gene and nucleotide sequences of AZU-1 and AZU-2 genes and variant and fragments thereof. Monoclonal or polyclonal antibodies specific to AZU-1, AZU-2 encoded protein and to AZU-1, or AZU-2 encoded protein homologs.

  11. Long Noncoding RNA Expression during Human B-Cell Development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Petri

    Full Text Available Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs have emerged as important regulators of diverse cellular processes, but their roles in the developing immune system are poorly understood. In this study, we analysed lncRNA expression during human B-cell development by array-based expression profiling of eleven distinct flow-sorted B-cell subsets, comprising pre-B1, pre-B2, immature, naive, memory, and plasma cells from bone marrow biopsies (n = 7, and naive, centroblast, centrocyte, memory, and plasmablast cells from tonsil tissue samples (n = 6, respectively. A remapping strategy was used to assign the array probes to 37630 gene-level probe sets, reflecting recent updates in genomic and transcriptomic databases, which enabled expression profiling of 19579 long noncoding RNAs, comprising 3947 antisense RNAs, 5277 lincRNAs, 7625 pseudogenes, and 2730 additional lncRNAs. As a first step towards inferring the functions of the identified lncRNAs in developing B-cells, we analysed their co-expression with well-characterized protein-coding genes, a method known as "guilt by association". By using weighted gene co-expression network analysis, we identified 272 lincRNAs, 471 antisense RNAs, 376 pseudogene RNAs, and 64 lncRNAs within seven sub-networks associated with distinct stages of B-cell development, such as early B-cell development, B-cell proliferation, affinity maturation of antibody, and terminal differentiation. These data provide an important resource for future studies on the functions of lncRNAs in development of the adaptive immune response, and the pathogenesis of B-cell malignancies that originate from distinct B-cell subpopulations.

  12. Sarcoptes scabiei mites modulate gene expression in human skin equivalents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjorie S Morgan

    Full Text Available The ectoparasitic mite, Sarcoptes scabiei that burrows in the epidermis of mammalian skin has a long co-evolution with its hosts. Phenotypic studies show that the mites have the ability to modulate cytokine secretion and expression of cell adhesion molecules in cells of the skin and other cells of the innate and adaptive immune systems that may assist the mites to survive in the skin. The purpose of this study was to identify genes in keratinocytes and fibroblasts in human skin equivalents (HSEs that changed expression in response to the burrowing of live scabies mites. Overall, of the more than 25,800 genes measured, 189 genes were up-regulated >2-fold in response to scabies mite burrowing while 152 genes were down-regulated to the same degree. HSEs differentially expressed large numbers of genes that were related to host protective responses including those involved in immune response, defense response, cytokine activity, taxis, response to other organisms, and cell adhesion. Genes for the expression of interleukin-1α (IL-1α precursor, IL-1β, granulocyte/macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF precursor, and G-CSF precursor were up-regulated 2.8- to 7.4-fold, paralleling cytokine secretion profiles. A large number of genes involved in epithelium development and keratinization were also differentially expressed in response to live scabies mites. Thus, these skin cells are directly responding as expected in an inflammatory response to products of the mites and the disruption of the skin's protective barrier caused by burrowing. This suggests that in vivo the interplay among these skin cells and other cell types, including Langerhans cells, dendritic cells, lymphocytes and endothelial cells, is responsible for depressing the host's protective response allowing these mites to survive in the skin.

  13. Sarcoptes scabiei mites modulate gene expression in human skin equivalents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Marjorie S; Arlian, Larry G; Markey, Michael P

    2013-01-01

    The ectoparasitic mite, Sarcoptes scabiei that burrows in the epidermis of mammalian skin has a long co-evolution with its hosts. Phenotypic studies show that the mites have the ability to modulate cytokine secretion and expression of cell adhesion molecules in cells of the skin and other cells of the innate and adaptive immune systems that may assist the mites to survive in the skin. The purpose of this study was to identify genes in keratinocytes and fibroblasts in human skin equivalents (HSEs) that changed expression in response to the burrowing of live scabies mites. Overall, of the more than 25,800 genes measured, 189 genes were up-regulated >2-fold in response to scabies mite burrowing while 152 genes were down-regulated to the same degree. HSEs differentially expressed large numbers of genes that were related to host protective responses including those involved in immune response, defense response, cytokine activity, taxis, response to other organisms, and cell adhesion. Genes for the expression of interleukin-1α (IL-1α) precursor, IL-1β, granulocyte/macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) precursor, and G-CSF precursor were up-regulated 2.8- to 7.4-fold, paralleling cytokine secretion profiles. A large number of genes involved in epithelium development and keratinization were also differentially expressed in response to live scabies mites. Thus, these skin cells are directly responding as expected in an inflammatory response to products of the mites and the disruption of the skin's protective barrier caused by burrowing. This suggests that in vivo the interplay among these skin cells and other cell types, including Langerhans cells, dendritic cells, lymphocytes and endothelial cells, is responsible for depressing the host's protective response allowing these mites to survive in the skin.

  14. Regulation of human renin expression in chorion cell primary cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, K.G.; Haidar, M.A.; Baxter, J.D.; Reudelhuber, T.L.

    1990-01-01

    The human renin gene is expressed in the kidney, placenta, and several other sites. The release of renin or its precursor, prorenin, can be affected by several regulatory agents. In this study, primary cultures of human placental cells were used to examine the regulation of prorenin release and renin mRNA levels and of the transfected human renin promoter linked to chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter sequences. Treatment of the cultures with a calcium ionophore alone, calcium ionophore plus forskolin (that activates adenylate cyclase), or forskolin plus a phorbol ester increased prorenin release and renin mRNA levels 1.3 endash to 6 endash fold, but several classes of steroids did not affect prorenin secretion or renin RNA levels. These results suggest that (i) the first 584 base pairs of the renin gene 5'endash flanking DNA do not contain functional glucocorticoid or estrogen response elements, (ii) placental prorenin release and renin mRNA are regulated by calcium ion and by the combinations of cAMP with either C kinase or calcium ion, and (iii) the first 100 base pairs of the human renin 5'endash flanking DNA direct accurate initiation of transcription and can be regulated by cAMP. Thus, some control of renin release in the placenta (and by inference in other tissues) occurs via transcriptional influences on its promoter

  15. DMPD: LPS induction of gene expression in human monocytes. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 11257452 LPS induction of gene expression in human monocytes. Guha M, Mackman N. Ce...ll Signal. 2001 Feb;13(2):85-94. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show LPS induction of gene expression in huma...n monocytes. PubmedID 11257452 Title LPS induction of gene expression in human monocytes. Authors Guha M, Ma

  16. Human Cementum Protein 1 induces expression of bone and cementum proteins by human gingival fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carmona-Rodriguez, Bruno; Alvarez-Perez, Marco Antonio; Narayanan, A. Sampath; Zeichner-David, Margarita; Reyes-Gasga, Jose; Molina-Guarneros, Juan; Garcia-Hernandez, Ana Lilia; Suarez-Franco, Jose Luis; Chavarria, Ivet Gil; Villarreal-Ramirez, Eduardo; Arzate, Higinio

    2007-01-01

    We recently presented evidence showing that a human cementoblastoma-derived protein, named Cementum Protein 1 (CEMP1) may play a role as a local regulator of cementoblast differentiation and cementum-matrix mineralization. This protein was shown to be expressed by cementoblasts and progenitor cells localized in the periodontal ligament. In this study we demonstrate that transfection of CEMP1 into human gingival fibroblasts (HGF) induces mineralization and expression of bone and cementum-matrix proteins. The transfected HGF cells had higher alkaline phosphatase activity and proliferation rate and they expressed genes for alkaline phosphatase, bone sialoprotein, osteocalcin, osteopontin, the transcription factor Runx2/Cbfa1, and cementum attachment protein (CAP). They also produced biological-type hydroxyapatite. These findings indicate that the CEMP1 might participate in differentiation and mineralization of nonosteogenic cells, and that it might have a potential function in cementum and bone formation

  17. Expression and biochemical characterization of recombinant human epididymis protein 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Ling; Liu, Yunhui; Zhen, Shuai; Wan, Deyou; Cao, Jiyue; Gao, Xin

    2014-10-01

    Whey acidic proteins (WAP) belong to a large gene family of antibacterial peptides that perform critical immune system functions. The function of human epididymis protein 4 (HE4), a 124-amino acid long polypeptide that has two whey acidic protein four-disulfide core (WFDC) domains, is not well studied. Here, a fusion gene encoding the HE4 protein fused to an IgG1 Fc domain was constructed. The recombinant HE4 protein was expressed as a secretory protein in Pichia pastoris and mammalian HEK293-F cells and was subsequently purified. Our data suggested that the HE4 protein produced by these two expression systems bound to both gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria, but demonstrated slightly inhibitory activity towards the growth of Staphylococcus aureus. Moreover, HE4 exhibited proteinase inhibitory activity towards trypsin, elastase, matrix metallopeptidase 9, and the secretory proteinases from Bacillus subtilis. The effects of glycosylation on the biochemical characterization of HE4 were also investigated. LC-ESI-MS glycosylation analysis showed that the high-mannose glycosylated form of HE4 expressed by P. pastoris has lower biological activity when compared to its complex-glycosylated form produced from HEK293-F cells. The implications of this are discussed, which may be provide theoretical basis for its important role in the development of cancer and innate immune system. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. ADAMTS13 expression in human chondrosarcoma cells induced by insulin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rıdvan Fırat

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: A Disintegrin-like Metalloproteinase with Thrombospondin Motifs (ADAMTS proteins is a proteinase enzyme group that primarily located in the extracellular matrix (ECM. Insulin has been known to stimulate proteoglycan biosynthesis in chondrosarcoma chondrocytes and thereby the levels of ADAMTS proteins. The aim of this study is to evaluate the time-dependent effects of insulin on the ADAMTS13 expression in OUMS-27 human chondrosarcoma cell line to test the hypothesis that insulin diminishes ADAMTS13 expression because of its anabolic effects. Methods: To test this hypothesis OUMS-27 cells were cultured in Dulbecco’s modified Eagle’ medium (DMEM containing 10μg/mL insulin. The medium containing insulin was changed every other day up to 11th day. Cells were harvested at 1, 3, 7, and 11th days and protein and RNA isolations were performed at the proper times. The levels of RNA expression of ADAMTS13 was quantified by qRT-PCR using appropriate primers while protein levels was detected by Western blot technique using anti-ADAMTS13 antibody. Results: Although there was a decrease in both RNA and protein levels in insulin-applied groups compared to the control cells, it was not statistically significant. Conclusion: Under the light of our findings, it is suggested that insulin does not participate in regulation of ADAMTS13 in OUMS-27 chondrosarcoma cells. J Clin Exp Invest 2014; 5 (2: 226-232

  19. Aberrant phenotypes of transgenic mice expressing dimeric human erythropoietin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Seong-Jo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dimeric human erythropoietin (dHuEPO peptides are reported to exhibit significantly higher biological activity than the monomeric form of recombinant EPO. The objective of this study was to produce transgenic (tg mice expressing dHuEPO and to investigate the characteristics of these mice. Methods A dHuEPO-expressing vector under the control of the goat beta-casein promoter, which produced a dimer of human EPO molecules linked by a 2-amino acid peptide linker (Asp-Ile, was constructed and injected into 1-cell fertilized embryos by microinjection. Mice were screened using genomic DNA samples obtained from tail biopsies. Blood samples were obtained by heart puncture using heparinized tubes, and hematologic parameters were assessed. Using the microarray analysis tool, we analyzed differences in gene expression in the spleens of tg and control mice. Results A high rate of spontaneous abortion or death of the offspring was observed in the recipients of dHuEPO embryos. We obtained 3 founder lines (#4, #11, and #47 of tg mice expressing the dHuEPO gene. However, only one founder line showed stable germline integration and transmission, subsequently establishing the only transgenic line (#11. We obtained 2 F1 mice and 3 F2 mice from line #11. The dHuEPO protein could not be obtained because of repeated spontaneous abortions in the tg mice. Tg mice exhibited symptoms such as short lifespan and abnormal blood composition. The red blood cell count, white blood cell count, and hematocrit levels in the tg mice were remarkably higher than those in the control mice. The spleens of the tg mice (F1 and F2 females were 11- and -21-fold larger than those of the control mice. Microarray analysis revealed 2,672 spleen-derived candidate genes; more genes were downregulated than upregulated (849/764. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR were used for validating the results of the microarray

  20. Dogs can discriminate emotional expressions of human faces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Corsin A; Schmitt, Kira; Barber, Anjuli L A; Huber, Ludwig

    2015-03-02

    The question of whether animals have emotions and respond to the emotional expressions of others has become a focus of research in the last decade [1-9]. However, to date, no study has convincingly shown that animals discriminate between emotional expressions of heterospecifics, excluding the possibility that they respond to simple cues. Here, we show that dogs use the emotion of a heterospecific as a discriminative cue. After learning to discriminate between happy and angry human faces in 15 picture pairs, whereby for one group only the upper halves of the faces were shown and for the other group only the lower halves of the faces were shown, dogs were tested with four types of probe trials: (1) the same half of the faces as in the training but of novel faces, (2) the other half of the faces used in training, (3) the other half of novel faces, and (4) the left half of the faces used in training. We found that dogs for which the happy faces were rewarded learned the discrimination more quickly than dogs for which the angry faces were rewarded. This would be predicted if the dogs recognized an angry face as an aversive stimulus. Furthermore, the dogs performed significantly above chance level in all four probe conditions and thus transferred the training contingency to novel stimuli that shared with the training set only the emotional expression as a distinguishing feature. We conclude that the dogs used their memories of real emotional human faces to accomplish the discrimination task. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Cloning, expression and location of RNase9 in human epididymis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin YQ

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mammalian spermatozoa become fully motile and fertile during transit through the luminal fluid of the epididymis. At least 200 proteins are present in the epididymal lumen, but the potential roles of these luminal proteins in male fertility are unknown. Investigation of the function of these proteins will elucidate the mechanism of sperm maturation, and also provide new drug targets for male contraception. We cloned RNase9 from a human epididymis cDNA library for characterization and analysis of its functions. Findings It was predicted that human RNase9 gene was located on chromosome 14q11.2 and encoded a 205 amino acids protein with a signal peptide of 26 amino acids at the N-terminus. The protein had eight conserved cysteine residues characteristic of the RNase A family members and several potential post-translational modification sites. At the transcriptional level, RNase9 was expressed in a wide variety of tissues, and the expression was higher in men than in boys. RNase9 was localized to the post-equatorial region of the sperms' head. Immunofluorescence staining showed that RNase9 protein was present mostly in the epithelium of the epididymal tubule. Recombinant RNase9 had no ribonuclease activity. In addition, RNase9 had no detectable effect on sperm motility and fertilization as demonstrated by blocking spermatozoa with anti-RNase9 polyclonal serum. Conclusion RNase9 is expressed in a wide variety of tissues. It is located on the post-equatorial region of the sperm head and the epithelium of epididymal tubule. Although RNase9 belongs to the RNase A family, it has no ribonuclease activity.

  2. Global changes in Staphylococcus aureus gene expression in human blood.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Malachowa

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of bloodstream infections worldwide. In the United States, many of these infections are caused by a strain known as USA300. Although progress has been made, our understanding of the S. aureus molecules that promote survival in human blood and ultimately facilitate metastases is incomplete. To that end, we analyzed the USA300 transcriptome during culture in human blood, human serum, and trypticase soy broth (TSB, a standard laboratory culture media. Notably, genes encoding several cytolytic toxins were up-regulated in human blood over time, and hlgA, hlgB, and hlgC (encoding gamma-hemolysin subunits HlgA, HlgB, and HlgC were among the most highly up-regulated genes at all time points. Compared to culture supernatants from a wild-type USA300 strain (LAC, those derived from an isogenic hlgABC-deletion strain (LACΔhlgABC had significantly reduced capacity to form pores in human neutrophils and ultimately cause neutrophil lysis. Moreover, LACΔhlgABC had modestly reduced ability to cause mortality in a mouse bacteremia model. On the other hand, wild-type and LACΔhlgABC strains caused virtually identical abscesses in a mouse skin infection model, and bacterial survival and neutrophil lysis after phagocytosis in vitro was similar between these strains. Comparison of the cytolytic capacity of culture supernatants from wild-type and isogenic deletion strains lacking hlgABC, lukS/F-PV (encoding PVL, and/or lukDE revealed functional redundancy among two-component leukotoxins in vitro. These findings, along with a requirement of specific growth conditions for leukotoxin expression, may explain the apparent limited contribution of any single two-component leukotoxin to USA300 immune evasion and virulence.

  3. Sperm protein 17 is expressed in human nervous system tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grizzi, Fabio; Baena, Riccardo Rodriguez y; Dioguardi, Nicola; Chiriva-Internati, Maurizio; Gaetani, Paolo; Franceschini, Barbara; Di Ieva, Antonio; Colombo, Piergiuseppe; Ceva-Grimaldi, Giorgia; Bollati, Angelo; Frezza, Eldo E; Cobos, E

    2006-01-01

    Human sperm protein 17 (Sp17) is a highly conserved protein that was originally isolated from a rabbit epididymal sperm membrane and testis membrane pellet. It has recently been included in the cancer/testis (CT) antigen family, and shown to be expressed in multiple myeloma and ovarian cancer. We investigated its immunolocalisation in specimens of nervous system (NS) malignancies, in order to establish its usefulness as a target for tumour-vaccine strategies. The expression of Sp17 was assessed by means of a standardised immunohistochemical procedure [(mAb/antigen) MF1/Sp17] in formalin-fixed and paraffin embedded surgical specimens of NS malignancies, including 28 neuroectodermal primary tumours (6 astrocytomas, 16 glioblastoma multiforme, 5 oligodendrogliomas, and 1 ependymoma), 25 meningeal tumours, and five peripheral nerve sheath tumours (4 schwannomas, and 1 neurofibroma),. A number of neuroectodermal (21%) and meningeal tumours (4%) were found heterogeneously immunopositive for Sp17. None of the peripheral nerve sheath tumours was immunopositive for Sp17. The expression pattern was heterogeneous in all of the positive samples, and did not correlate with the degree of malignancy. The frequency of expression and non-uniform cell distribution of Sp17 suggest that it cannot be used as a unique immunotherapeutic target in NS cancer. However, our results do show the immunolocalisation of Sp17 in a proportion of NS tumour cells, but not in their non-pathological counterparts. The emerging complex function of Sp17 makes further studies necessary to clarify the link between it and immunopositive cells

  4. Allopregnanolone Alters the Gene Expression Profile of Human Glioblastoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen J. Zamora-Sánchez

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastomas (GBM are the most frequent and aggressive brain tumors. In these malignancies, progesterone (P4 promotes proliferation, migration, and invasion. The P4 metabolite allopregnanolone (3α-THP similarly promotes cell proliferation in the U87 human GBM cell line. Here, we evaluated global changes in gene expression of U87 cells treated with 3α-THP, P4, and the 5α-reductase inhibitor, finasteride (F. 3α-THP modified the expression of 137 genes, while F changed 90. Besides, both steroids regulated the expression of 69 genes. After performing an over-representation analysis of gene ontology terms, we selected 10 genes whose products are cytoskeleton components, transcription factors, and proteins involved in the maintenance of DNA stability and replication to validate their expression changes by RT-qPCR. 3α-THP up-regulated six genes, two of them were also up-regulated by F. Two genes were up-regulated by P4 alone, however, such an effect was blocked by F when cells were treated with both steroids. The remaining genes were regulated by the combined treatments of 3α-THP + F or P4 + F. An in-silico analysis revealed that promoters of the six up-regulated genes by 3α-THP possess cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP responsive elements along with CCAAT/Enhancer binding protein alpha (CEBPα binding sites. These findings suggest that P4 and 3α-THP regulate different sets of genes that participate in the growth of GBMs.

  5. Expression cartography of human tissues using self organizing maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Henry; Löffler, Markus; von Bergen, Martin; Binder, Hans

    2011-07-27

    Parallel high-throughput microarray and sequencing experiments produce vast quantities of multidimensional data which must be arranged and analyzed in a concerted way. One approach to addressing this challenge is the machine learning technique known as self organizing maps (SOMs). SOMs enable a parallel sample- and gene-centered view of genomic data combined with strong visualization and second-level analysis capabilities. The paper aims at bridging the gap between the potency of SOM-machine learning to reduce dimension of high-dimensional data on one hand and practical applications with special emphasis on gene expression analysis on the other hand. The method was applied to generate a SOM characterizing the whole genome expression profiles of 67 healthy human tissues selected from ten tissue categories (adipose, endocrine, homeostasis, digestion, exocrine, epithelium, sexual reproduction, muscle, immune system and nervous tissues). SOM mapping reduces the dimension of expression data from ten of thousands of genes to a few thousand metagenes, each representing a minicluster of co-regulated single genes. Tissue-specific and common properties shared between groups of tissues emerge as a handful of localized spots in the tissue maps collecting groups of co-regulated and co-expressed metagenes. The functional context of the spots was discovered using overrepresentation analysis with respect to pre-defined gene sets of known functional impact. We found that tissue related spots typically contain enriched populations of genes related to specific molecular processes in the respective tissue. Analysis techniques normally used at the gene-level such as two-way hierarchical clustering are better represented and provide better signal-to-noise ratios if applied to the metagenes. Metagene-based clustering analyses aggregate the tissues broadly into three clusters containing nervous, immune system and the remaining tissues. The SOM technique provides a more intuitive and

  6. Update on allele nomenclature for human cytochromes P450 and the Human Cytochrome P450 Allele (CYP-allele) Nomenclature Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Sarah C; Ingelman-Sundberg, Magnus

    2013-01-01

    Interindividual variability in xenobiotic metabolism and drug response is extensive and genetic factors play an important role in this variation. A majority of clinically used drugs are substrates for the cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzyme system and interindividual variability in expression and function of these enzymes is a major factor for explaining individual susceptibility for adverse drug reactions and drug response. Because of the existence of many polymorphic CYP genes, for many of which the number of allelic variants is continually increasing, a universal and official nomenclature system is important. Since 1999, all functionally relevant polymorphic CYP alleles are named and published on the Human Cytochrome P450 Allele (CYP-allele) Nomenclature Web site (http://www.cypalleles.ki.se). Currently, the database covers nomenclature of more than 660 alleles in a total of 30 genes that includes 29 CYPs as well as the cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (POR) gene. On the CYP-allele Web site, each gene has its own Webpage, which lists the alleles with their nucleotide changes, their functional consequences, and links to publications identifying or characterizing the alleles. CYP2D6, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, and CYP3A4 are the most important CYPs in terms of drug metabolism, which is also reflected in their corresponding highest number of Webpage hits at the CYP-allele Web site.The main advantage of the CYP-allele database is that it offers a rapid online publication of CYP-alleles and their effects and provides an overview of peer-reviewed data to the scientific community. Here, we provide an update of the CYP-allele database and the associated nomenclature.

  7. Expression of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Neutralizing Antibody Fragments Using Human Vaginal Lactobacillus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcobal, Angela; Liu, Xiaowen; Zhang, Wenlei; Dimitrov, Antony S; Jia, Letong; Lee, Peter P; Fouts, Timothy R; Parks, Thomas P; Lagenaur, Laurel A

    Eradication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) by vaccination with epitopes that produce broadly neutralizing antibodies is the ultimate goal for HIV prevention. However, generating appropriate immune responses has proven difficult. Expression of broadly neutralizing antibodies by vaginal colonizing lactobacilli provides an approach to passively target these antibodies to the mucosa. We tested the feasibility of expressing single-chain and single-domain antibodies (dAbs) in Lactobacillus to be used as a topical microbicide/live biotherapeutic. Lactobacilli provide an excellent platform to express anti-HIV proteins. Broadly neutralizing antibodies have been identified against epitopes on the HIV-1 envelope and have been made into active antibody fragments. We tested single-chain variable fragment m9 and dAb-m36 and its derivative m36.4 as prototype antibodies. We cloned and expressed the antibody fragments m9, m36, and m36.4 in Lactobacillus jensenii-1153 and tested the expression levels and functionality. We made a recombinant L. jensenii 1153-1128 that expresses dAb-m36.4. All antibody fragments m9, m36, and m36.4 were expressed by lactobacilli. However, we noted the smaller m36/m36.4 were expressed to higher levels, ≥3 μg/ml. All L. jensenii-expressed antibody fragments bound to gp120/CD4 complex; Lactobacillus-produced m36.4 inhibited HIV-1 BaL in a neutralization assay. Using a TZM-bl assay, we characterized the breadth of neutralization of the m36.4. Delivery of dAbs by Lactobacillus could provide passive transfer of these antibodies to the mucosa and longevity at the site of HIV-1 transmission.

  8. Human embryonic stem cells hemangioblast express HLA-antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Wei-Ping

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been suggested that the initial differentiation of endothelial and hematopoietic cells during embryogenesis occurs from a common progenitor, called hemangioblast (hB. We hypothesized that these cells with dual hematopoietic/endothelial potential could be used in future regenerative medicine. Methods We used the two-step differentiation technology to generate bipotential blast cells from human embryonic stem cells (hES. This involved short differentiation in our in vitro EB system followed by differentiation in semisolid culture medium supplemented with mixture of cytokines. Results The occurrence of blast-colony-forming cells (BL-CFC during EB differentiation (day 0–6 was transient and peaked on day 3. The emergence of this event was associated with expression of mesoderm gene T, and inversely correlated with expression of endoderm gene FoxA2. Similarly, the highest BL-CFC number was associated with increase in expression of early hematopoietic/endothelial genes: CD34, CD31 and KDR. The derived colonies were composed of 30–50 blast cells on day 6 in culture. These cells had homogenous appearance in Wright-Giemsa stain, but to a different extent expressed markers of immature hematopoietic and endothelial cells (CD31, CD34, VE-cadherin, Flt-1 and mature differentiated cells (CD45, CD33, CD146. We found that some of them expressed fetal and embryonic globin genes. Interestingly, these cells expressed also HLA class I molecules, however at very low levels compared to endothelial and hematopoietic cells. The blast cells could be successfully differentiated to hematopoietic cells in a CFU assay. In these conditions, blast cells formed CFU-M colonies (63.4 ± 0.8% containing macrophages, BFU-E colonies (19.5 ± 3.5% containing nucleated red blood cells, and CFU-EM colonies (17.1 ± 2.7% composed of macrophages and nucleated erythrocytes. Cells of CFU-EM and BFU-E colonies expressed both ε – and γ- globin genes, but

  9. Exclusive neuronal expression of SUCLA2 in the human brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dobolyi, Arpád; Ostergaard, Elsebet; Bagó, Attila G

    2015-01-01

    SUCLA2 encodes the ATP-forming β subunit (A-SUCL-β) of succinyl-CoA ligase, an enzyme of the citric acid cycle. Mutations in SUCLA2 lead to a mitochondrial disorder manifesting as encephalomyopathy with dystonia, deafness and lesions in the basal ganglia. Despite the distinct brain pathology......-SUCL-β) encoded by SUCLG2, or in situ hybridization histochemistry for SUCLG2 mRNA could not be demonstrated in either neurons or astrocytes. Western blotting of post mortem brain samples revealed minor G-SUCL-β immunoreactivity that was, however, not upregulated in samples obtained from diabetic versus non......-diabetic patients, as has been described for murine brain. Our work establishes that SUCLA2 is expressed exclusively in neurons in the human cerebral cortex....

  10. Expression and site-directed mutagenesis of human dihydrofolate reductase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prendergast, N.J.; Delcamp, T.J.; Smith, P.L.; Freisheim, J.H.

    1988-05-17

    A procaryotic high-level expression vector for human dihydrofolate reductase has been constructed and the protein characterized as a first step toward structure-function studies of this enzyme. A vector bearing the tac promoter, four synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides, and a restriction fragment from the dihydrofolate reductase cDNA were ligated in a manner which optimized the transcriptional and translational frequency of the enzyme mRNA. The reductase, comprising ca. 17% of the total soluble protein in the host bacteria, was purified to apparent homogeneity as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and characterized by amino acid composition, partial amino acid sequence, and steady-sate kinetic analysis. This expression vector has been used as a template for double-stranded plasmid DNA site-specific mutagenesis. Functional studies on a Cys-6 ..-->.. Ser-6 mutant enzyme support the contention that Cys-6 is obligatory for organomercurial activation of human dihydrofolate reductase. The Ser-6 mutant enzyme was not activated to any extent following a 24-h incubation with p-(hydroxymercuri)benzoate and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (reduced) (NADPH), whereas the k/sub cat/ for Cys-6 reductase increased 2-fold under identical conditions. The specific activities of the Cys-6 and Ser-6 enzymes were virtually identical as determined by methotrexate titration as were the K/sub m/ values for both dihydrofolate and NADPH. The Ser-6 mutant showed a decreased temperature stability and was more sensitive to inactivation by ..cap alpha..-chymotrypsin when compared to the wild-type enzyme. These results suggest that the Ser-6 mutant reductase is conformationally altered relative to the Cys-6 native enzyme.

  11. Gene expression profiling in the inductive human hematopoietic microenvironment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Yongjun; Chen, Edwin; Li Liheng; Gong Baiwei; Xie Wei; Nanji, Shaherose; Dube, Ian D.; Hough, Margaret R.

    2004-01-01

    Human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and their progenitors can be maintained in vitro in long-term bone marrow cultures (LTBMCs) in which constituent HSCs can persist within the adherent layers for up to 2 months. Media replenishment of LTBMCs has been shown to induce transition of HSCs from a quiescent state to an active cycling state. We hypothesize that the media replenishment of the LTBMCs leads to the activation of important regulatory genes uniquely involved in HSC proliferation and differentiation. To profile the gene expression changes associated with HSC activation, we performed suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) on day 14 human LTBMCs following 1-h media replenishment and on unmanipulated controls. The generated SSH library contained 191 differentially up-regulated expressed sequence tags (ESTs), the majority corresponding to known genes related to various intracellular processes, including signal transduction pathways, protein synthesis, and cell cycle regulation. Nineteen ESTs represented previously undescribed sequences encoding proteins of unknown function. Differential up-regulation of representative genes, including IL-8, IL-1, putative cytokine 21/HC21, MAD3, and a novel EST was confirmed by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Levels of fibronectin, G-CSF, and stem cell factor also increased in the conditioned media of LTBMCs as assessed by ELISA, indicating increased synthesis and secretion of these factors. Analysis of our library provides insights into some of the immediate early gene changes underlying the mechanisms by which the stromal elements within the LTBMCs contribute to the induction of HSC activation and provides the opportunity to identify as yet unrecognized factors regulating HSC activation in the LTBMC milieu

  12. Syndecan expressions in the human amnion and chorionic plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Lorenzi

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The syndecan family consists of four distinct membrane glycoproteins in mammals. Syndecans control cell proliferation, differentiation, adhesion and migration through participation in cell-cell interactions, anchorage of cells to the extracellular environment, and modulation of multiple growth factors. Therefore, syndecans may play a pivotal role in the regulation of cell behaviour depending on the cellular microenvironment. Here, we demonstrate that syndecan-1, syndecan-2 and syndecan-4 are expressed in fetal membrane tissue with different immunolocalizations. Syndecan-1 is expressed in the amniotic epithelium, localizing at basolateral cell surfaces. Syndecan-2 and syndecan-4, in contrast, are mostly localized in intracellular compartments, in the extravillous cytotrophoblastic cells and in some fibroblasts of the chorionic plate as well as in the amniotic epithelial cells. In the latter, syndecan-4 is mainly localized in the apical part of the cells. Our results strongly suggest a key role of syndecan-1, syndecan-2 and syndecan-4 in the determination of structural and functional characteristics of human amnion and chorionic plate. Since the solute exchanges between fetus and mother take place in fetal membranes, our data suggest that syndecans are important players in the placenta for the establishment of the fetal-maternal inter-communication.

  13. Gene expression profiling gut microbiota in different races of humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei; Zhang, Yu-Hang; Huang, Tao; Cai, Yu-Dong

    2016-03-01

    The gut microbiome is shaped and modified by the polymorphisms of microorganisms in the intestinal tract. Its composition shows strong individual specificity and may play a crucial role in the human digestive system and metabolism. Several factors can affect the composition of the gut microbiome, such as eating habits, living environment, and antibiotic usage. Thus, various races are characterized by different gut microbiome characteristics. In this present study, we studied the gut microbiomes of three different races, including individuals of Asian, European and American races. The gut microbiome and the expression levels of gut microbiome genes were analyzed in these individuals. Advanced feature selection methods (minimum redundancy maximum relevance and incremental feature selection) and four machine-learning algorithms (random forest, nearest neighbor algorithm, sequential minimal optimization, Dagging) were employed to capture key differentially expressed genes. As a result, sequential minimal optimization was found to yield the best performance using the 454 genes, which could effectively distinguish the gut microbiomes of different races. Our analyses of extracted genes support the widely accepted hypotheses that eating habits, living environments and metabolic levels in different races can influence the characteristics of the gut microbiome.

  14. Over-Expression, Purification and Crystallization of Human Dihydrolipoamide Dehydrogenase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Y. S.; Ciszak, Ewa; Patel, Mulchand

    2000-01-01

    Dehydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (E3; dihydrolipoan-tide:NAD+ oxidoreductase, EC 1.8.1.4) is a common catalytic component found in pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex, and branched-chain cc-keto acid dehydrogenase complex. E3 is also a component (referred to as L protein) of the glycine cleavage system in bacterial metabolism (2). Active E3 forms a homodimer with four distinctive subdomain structures (FAD binding, NAD+ binding, central and interface domains) with non-covalently but tightly bound FAD in the holoenzyme. Deduced amino acids from cloned full-length human E3 gene showed a total of 509 amino acids with a leader sequence (N-terminal 35 amino acids) that is excised (mature form) during transportation of expressed E3 into mitochondria membrane. So far, three-dimensional structure of human E3 has not been reported. Our effort to achieve the elucidation of the X-ray crystal structure of human E3 will be presented. Recombinant pPROEX-1 expression vector (from GIBCO BRL Life Technologies) having the human E3 gene without leader sequence was constructed by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) and subsequent ligation, and cloned in E.coli XL1-Blue by transformation. Since pPROEX-1 vector has an internal His-tag (six histidine peptide) located at the upstream region of a multicloning site, one-step affinity purification of E3 using nickelnitriloacetic acid (Ni-NTA) agarose resin, which has a strong affinity to His-tag, was feasible. Also a seven-amino-acid spacer peptide and a recombinant tobacco etch virus protease recognition site (seven amino acids peptide) found between His-tag and first amino acid of expressed E3 facilitated the cleavage of His-tag from E3 after the affinity purification. By IPTG induction, ca. 15 mg of human E3 (mature form) was obtained from 1L LB culture with overnight incubation at 25C. Over 98% of purity of E3 from one-step Ni-NTA agarose affinity purification was confirmed by SDS-PAGE analysis. For

  15. Expression of CD44 splice variants in human primary brain tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaaijk, P.; Troost, D.; Morsink, F.; Keehnen, R. M.; Leenstra, S.; Bosch, D. A.; Pals, S. T.

    1995-01-01

    Expression of CD44, particularly of certain splice variants, has been linked to tumor progression and metastatic potential in a number of different animal and human cancers. Although differential expression of CD44 standard epitopes (CD44s) in human brain tumors has been reported, the expression of

  16. Expression and function of the human estrogen receptor in yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, J.H.; Metzger, D.; Chambon, P.

    1988-01-01

    Gene expression in eukaryotes is regulated at many levels. Moreover, there is increasing evidence that the basic control mechanisms of transcription initiation have been conserved across the range of eukaryotes from yeast to man. In vertebrates, the nuclear receptors, whose activity is dependent on the binding of specific ligands, stimulate transcription by interacting with specific cis-acting sequences and display all of the hallmarks of inducible enhancer factors. Alignment of their amino acid sequences indicates that they are composed of a series of conserved domains. The domain structure of the human estrogen receptor (hER) is typical of receptor proteins. Region C, containing two putative zinc fingers, comprises the DNA-binding domain responsible for specific recognition of estrogen response elements (ERE). Region E contains the hormone-binding domain and domain(s) responsible for transcription activation. A mutant of the hER, called HE15, which lacks the hormone-binding domain, binds DNA in vivo and in vitro but activates transcription only poorly in a constitutive manner in vivo in HeLa cells. A series of studies have demonstrated that the hormone- and DNA-binding domains of the nuclear receptors function independently. Chimeric proteins consisting of the DNA-binding domain of yeast GAL4 coupled to the hormone-binding domains of either the hER or glucocorticoid receptor element (GRE) will stimulate transcription in HeLa cells when bound to a UAS. Taken together, these results demonstrate that the hER and other nuclear receptors, as well as GAL4 and GCN4 proteins of yeast, consist of discrete and separable DNA-binding and transcription-activation functions. To investigate these striking parallels further, the authors have expressed the hER in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and have analyzed its hormone- and DNA-binding properties in vitro and its ability to stimulate transcription in vivo

  17. Expression of stem cell markers in the human fetal kidney.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sally Metsuyanim

    Full Text Available In the human fetal kidney (HFK self-renewing stem cells residing in the metanephric mesenchyme (MM/blastema are induced to form all cell types of the nephron till 34(th week of gestation. Definition of useful markers is crucial for the identification of HFK stem cells. Because wilms' tumor, a pediatric renal cancer, initiates from retention of renal stem cells, we hypothesized that surface antigens previously up-regulated in microarrays of both HFK and blastema-enriched stem-like wilms' tumor xenografts (NCAM, ACVRIIB, DLK1/PREF, GPR39, FZD7, FZD2, NTRK2 are likely to be relevant markers. Comprehensive profiling of these putative and of additional stem cell markers (CD34, CD133, c-Kit, CD90, CD105, CD24 in mid-gestation HFK was performed using immunostaining and FACS in conjunction with EpCAM, an epithelial surface marker that is absent from the MM and increases along nephron differentiation and hence can be separated into negative, dim or bright fractions. No marker was specifically localized to the MM. Nevertheless, FZD7 and NTRK2 were preferentially localized to the MM and emerging tubules (50% of HFK cells and predominantly co-express EpCAM(bright, indicating they are mostly markers of differentiation. Furthermore, localization of NCAM exclusively in the MM and in its nephron progenitor derivatives but also in stroma and the expression pattern of significantly elevated renal stem/progenitor genes Six2, Wt1, Cited1, and Sall1 in NCAM(+EpCAM(- and to a lesser extent in NCAM(+EpCAM(+ fractions confirmed regional identity of cells and assisted us in pinpointing the presence of subpopulations that are putative MM-derived progenitor cells (NCAM(+EpCAM(+FZD7(+, MM stem cells (NCAM(+EpCAM(-FZD7(+ or both (NCAM(+FZD7(+. These results and concepts provide a framework for developing cell selection strategies for human renal cell-based therapies.

  18. Stable liver-specific expression of human IDOL in humanized mice raises plasma cholesterol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Salam; Somanathan, Suryanarayan; Billheimer, Jeffrey; Wilson, James M; Rader, Daniel J

    2016-05-01

    IDOL (inducible degrader of the low-density lipoprotein receptor, LDLR) is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that promotes the ubiquitination and degradation of the LDLR. IDOL is a potential therapeutic target for the development of a novel class of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C)-lowering therapies. In an attempt to develop a mouse model for testing IDOL inhibitors, we examined the effects of adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated stable expression of human IDOL in the livers of mice 'humanized' with regard to lipoprotein metabolism. Using a liver-specific AAV serotype 8 (AAV8)-mediated delivery, AAV-hIDOL produced a dose-dependent increase in LDL-C levels and a decrease in liver LDLR protein. Furthermore, we expressed hIDOL in a 'humanized' mouse model of heterozygous familial hypercholesterolaemia (LDLR(+/-)/Apobec1(-/-)/hApoB-Tg, LAhB). In this model, total cholesterol (TC) and LDL-C levels were increased by ∼60% starting from 1 week and were sustainable for at least 3 weeks post-injection. Finally, we demonstrate that the effects caused by hIDOL expression are LDLR- dependent given the unchanged plasma lipids in LAhB mice lacking LDLR. In conclusion, our study demonstrates a dose-dependent physiological effect of human IDOL on LDL metabolism in mice. This provides a potential model for preclinical testing of IDOL inhibitors for reduction of LDL-C levels. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2016. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Human disease-drug network based on genomic expression profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Guanghui; Agarwal, Pankaj

    2009-08-06

    Drug repositioning offers the possibility of faster development times and reduced risks in drug discovery. With the rapid development of high-throughput technologies and ever-increasing accumulation of whole genome-level datasets, an increasing number of diseases and drugs can be comprehensively characterized by the changes they induce in gene expression, protein, metabolites and phenotypes. We performed a systematic, large-scale analysis of genomic expression profiles of human diseases and drugs to create a disease-drug network. A network of 170,027 significant interactions was extracted from the approximately 24.5 million comparisons between approximately 7,000 publicly available transcriptomic profiles. The network includes 645 disease-disease, 5,008 disease-drug, and 164,374 drug-drug relationships. At least 60% of the disease-disease pairs were in the same disease area as determined by the Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) disease classification tree. The remaining can drive a molecular level nosology by discovering relationships between seemingly unrelated diseases, such as a connection between bipolar disorder and hereditary spastic paraplegia, and a connection between actinic keratosis and cancer. Among the 5,008 disease-drug links, connections with negative scores suggest new indications for existing drugs, such as the use of some antimalaria drugs for Crohn's disease, and a variety of existing drugs for Huntington's disease; while the positive scoring connections can aid in drug side effect identification, such as tamoxifen's undesired carcinogenic property. From the approximately 37K drug-drug relationships, we discover relationships that aid in target and pathway deconvolution, such as 1) KCNMA1 as a potential molecular target of lobeline, and 2) both apoptotic DNA fragmentation and G2/M DNA damage checkpoint regulation as potential pathway targets of daunorubicin. We have automatically generated thousands of disease and drug expression profiles using GEO

  20. Effects of the pharmaceuticals diclofenac and metoprolol on gene expression levels of enzymes of biotransformation, excretion pathways and estrogenicity in primary hepatocytes of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gröner, Frederike; Ziková, Andrea; Kloas, Werner

    2015-01-01

    The expression levels of key enzymes of the xenobiotic metabolism and excretion pathways concerning biotransformation phases I (cytochrome P4501A), II (glutathione S-transferase) and III (multidrug resistance protein) and of the estrogenic biomarker vitellogenin (vtg) were investigated in primary hepatocytes isolated from male Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) after exposure to diclofenac and metoprolol, two pharmaceuticals prevalent in the aquatic environment worldwide. The lowest test concentration (4×10(-9) M) was chosen to reflect an environmentally relevant exposure situation. Furthermore concentration dependent effects were investigated. Therefore a series of concentrations higher than the environmentally relevant range were used (10- and 100-fold). Diclofenac significantly induced all chosen biomarkers already at the environmentally relevant concentration indicating that biotransformation and elimination occur via the pathways under investigation. Estrogenic potential of this substance was demonstrated by VTG up-regulation as well. Metoprolol was either less effective than diclofenac or metabolized using different pathways. Key enzymes of the xenobiotic metabolism were less (CYP1A, GST) or not (MDRP) induced and a mild increase in vtg mRNA was detected only for 4×10(-8) M. No concentration-dependency for metoprolol was found. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. In vitro systems toxicology approach to investigate the effects of repeated cigarette smoke exposure on human buccal and gingival organotypic epithelial tissue cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlage, Walter K; Iskandar, Anita R; Kostadinova, Radina; Xiang, Yang; Sewer, Alain; Majeed, Shoaib; Kuehn, Diana; Frentzel, Stefan; Talikka, Marja; Geertz, Marcel; Mathis, Carole; Ivanov, Nikolai; Hoeng, Julia; Peitsch, Manuel C

    2014-10-01

    Smoking has been associated with diseases of the lung, pulmonary airways and oral cavity. Cytologic, genomic and transcriptomic changes in oral mucosa correlate with oral pre-neoplasia, cancer and inflammation (e.g. periodontitis). Alteration of smoking-related gene expression changes in oral epithelial cells is similar to that in bronchial and nasal epithelial cells. Using a systems toxicology approach, we have previously assessed the impact of cigarette smoke (CS) seen as perturbations of biological processes in human nasal and bronchial organotypic epithelial culture models. Here, we report our further assessment using in vitro human oral organotypic epithelium models. We exposed the buccal and gingival organotypic epithelial tissue cultures to CS at the air-liquid interface. CS exposure was associated with increased secretion of inflammatory mediators, induction of cytochrome P450s activity and overall weak toxicity in both tissues. Using microarray technology, gene-set analysis and a novel computational modeling approach leveraging causal biological network models, we identified CS impact on xenobiotic metabolism-related pathways accompanied by a more subtle alteration in inflammatory processes. Gene-set analysis further indicated that the CS-induced pathways in the in vitro buccal tissue models resembled those in the in vivo buccal biopsies of smokers from a published dataset. These findings support the translatability of systems responses from in vitro to in vivo and demonstrate the applicability of oral organotypical tissue models for an impact assessment of CS on various tissues exposed during smoking, as well as for impact assessment of reduced-risk products.

  2. Modified expression of surface glyconjugates in stored human platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhar, A.; Ganguly, P.

    1987-01-01

    Platelets are anucleated cells which play an important part in blood coagulation and thrombosis. These cells may be stored in the blood bank for only 4/5 days. In order to improve the storage of platelets, it is essential to first understand the changes in these cells due to storage. In this work, human platelets were stored in autologous plasma at 4 0 or 22 0 and their surface changes were monitored with three lectins - wheat germ afflutinin (WGA), concanavalin A (Con A) and lentil lectin (LL). Blood was drawn from healthy donors and platelet rich plasma (PRP) was collected by slow speed centrifugation. Platelets stored at either temperature for different times showed increased sensitivity to agglutination by WGA after 34-48 hrs. Lectins, Con A and LL, which were not agglutinating to fresh platelets readily caused agglutination after 48-72 hrs. The platelets stored for 25 hrs or longer period were insensitive to thrombin but showed enhanced aggregation with WGA. Labelling of surface glycoconjugates of stored platelets with 3 H-boro-hydride revealed progressive loss of a glycoprotein of Mr 150,000 (GPIb infinity) together with the appearance of components of Mr 69,000; Mr 60,000; Mr 25,000. New high molecular weight glycoproteins were also detected only in stored platelets. The author studies clearly indicate that modification or altered expression of platelets surface glycoproteins may be one factor of storage related dysfunction of platelets

  3. Turning Avatar into Realistic Human Expression Using Linear and Bilinear Interpolations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazim Alkawaz, Mohammed; Mohamad, Dzulkifli; Rehman, Amjad; Basori, Ahmad Hoirul

    2014-06-01

    The facial animation in term of 3D facial data has accurate research support of the laser scan and advance 3D tools for complex facial model production. However, the approach still lacks facial expression based on emotional condition. Though, facial skin colour is required to offers an effect of facial expression improvement, closely related to the human emotion. This paper presents innovative techniques for facial animation transformation using the facial skin colour based on linear interpolation and bilinear interpolation. The generated expressions are almost same to the genuine human expression and also enhance the facial expression of the virtual human.

  4. Multiple folding pathways for heterologously expressed human prion protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, G S; Hill, A F; Joseph, C; Hosszu, L; Power, A; Waltho, J P; Clarke, A R; Collinge, J

    1999-04-12

    Human PrP (residues 91-231) expressed in Escherichia coli can adopt several conformations in solution depending on pH, redox conditions and denaturant concentration. Oxidised PrP at neutral pH, with the disulphide bond intact, is a soluble monomer which contains 47% alpha-helix and corresponds to PrPC. Denaturation studies show that this structure has a relatively small, solvent-excluded core and unfolds to an unstructured state in a single, co-operative transition with a DeltaG for folding of -5.6 kcal mol-1. The unfolding behaviour is sensitive to pH and at 4.0 or below the molecule unfolds via a stable folding intermediate. This equilibrium intermediate has a reduced helical content and aggregates over several hours. When the disulphide bond is reduced the protein adopts different conformations depending upon pH. At neutral pH or above, the reduced protein has an alpha-helical fold, which is identical to that observed for the oxidised protein. At pH 4 or below, the conformation rearranges to a fold that contains a high proportion of beta-sheet structure. In the reduced state the alpha- and beta-forms are slowly inter-convertible whereas when oxidised the protein can only adopt an alpha-conformation in free solution. The data we present here shows that the human prion protein can exist in multiple conformations some of which are known to be capable of forming fibrils. The precise conformation that human PrP adopts and the pathways for unfolding are dependent upon solvent conditions. The conditions we examined are within the range that a protein may encounter in sub-cellular compartments and may have implications for the mechanism of conversion of PrPC to PrPSc in vivo. Since the conversion of PrPC to PrPSc is accompanied by a switch in secondary structure from alpha to beta, this system provides a useful model for studying major structural rearrangements in the prion protein.

  5. Cholinergic regulation of VIP gene expression in human neuroblastoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Bo; Georg, Birgitte; Fahrenkrug, Jan

    1997-01-01

    Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, muscarinic receptor, neuroblastoma cell, mRNA, gene expression, peptide processing......Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, muscarinic receptor, neuroblastoma cell, mRNA, gene expression, peptide processing...

  6. Gene Expression Analysis to Assess the Relevance of Rodent Models to Human Lung Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Timothy E; Lofgren, Shane; Khatri, Purvesh; Rogers, Angela J

    2017-08-01

    The relevance of animal models to human diseases is an area of intense scientific debate. The degree to which mouse models of lung injury recapitulate human lung injury has never been assessed. Integrating data from both human and animal expression studies allows for increased statistical power and identification of conserved differential gene expression across organisms and conditions. We sought comprehensive integration of gene expression data in experimental acute lung injury (ALI) in rodents compared with humans. We performed two separate gene expression multicohort analyses to determine differential gene expression in experimental animal and human lung injury. We used correlational and pathway analyses combined with external in vitro gene expression data to identify both potential drivers of underlying inflammation and therapeutic drug candidates. We identified 21 animal lung tissue datasets and three human lung injury bronchoalveolar lavage datasets. We show that the metasignatures of animal and human experimental ALI are significantly correlated despite these widely varying experimental conditions. The gene expression changes among mice and rats across diverse injury models (ozone, ventilator-induced lung injury, LPS) are significantly correlated with human models of lung injury (Pearson r = 0.33-0.45, P human lung injury. Predicted therapeutic targets, peptide ligand signatures, and pathway analyses are also all highly overlapping. Gene expression changes are similar in animal and human experimental ALI, and provide several physiologic and therapeutic insights to the disease.

  7. The Influence of Motor Training on Human Express Saccade Production

    OpenAIRE

    Bibi, Raquel; Edelman, Jay A.

    2009-01-01

    Express saccadic eye movements are saccades of extremely short latency. In monkey, express saccades have been shown to occur much more frequently when the monkey has been trained to make saccades in a particular direction to targets that appear in predictable locations. Such results suggest that express saccades occur in large number only under highly specific conditions, leading to the view that vector-specific training and motor preparatory processes are required to make an express saccade ...

  8. Factors affecting the gene expression of in vitro cultured human preimplantation embryos

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mantikou, E.; Jonker, M.J.; Wong, K.M.; van Montfoort, A.P.A.; de Jong, M.; Breit, T.M.; Repping, S.; Mastenbroek, S.

    2016-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION: What is the relative effect of common environmental and biological factors on transcriptome changes during human preimplantation development? SUMMARY ANSWER: Developmental stage and maternal age had a larger effect on the global gene expression profile of human preimplantation

  9. Effect of 5'-flanking sequence deletions on expression of the human insulin gene in transgenic mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fromont-Racine, M; Bucchini, D; Madsen, O

    1990-01-01

    Expression of the human insulin gene was examined in transgenic mouse lines carrying the gene with various lengths of DNA sequences 5' to the transcription start site (+1). Expression of the transgene was demonstrated by 1) the presence of human C-peptide in urine, 2) the presence of specific......, and -168 allowed correct initiation of the transcripts and cell specificity of expression, while quantitative expression gradually decreased. Deletion to -58 completely abolished the expression of the gene. The amount of human product that in mice harboring the longest fragment contributes up to 50......% of the total insulin does not alter the normal proportion of mice insulins I and II. These results suggest that expression of the human insulin gene in vivo results from the cooperation of several cis-regulatory elements present in the various deleted fragments. With none of the deletions used, expression...

  10. Comparison of Recombinant Human Haptocorrin Expressed in Human Embryonic Kidney Cells and Native Haptocorrin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Furger, Evelyne; Fedosov, Sergey N; Lildballe, Dorte Launholt

    2012-01-01

    HC, that compared to native HC contains four excessive amino acids (…LVPR) at the C-terminus, showed subtle changes in the binding kinetics of Cbl, cobinamide and the fluorescent Cbl conjugate CBC. The recombinant protein has properties very similar to native HC and although showing slightly different ligand......Haptocorrin (HC) is a circulating corrinoid binding protein with unclear function. In contrast to transcobalamin, the other transport protein in blood, HC is heavily glycosylated and binds a variety of cobalamin (Cbl) analogues. HC is present not only in blood but also in various secretions like...... milk, tears and saliva. No recombinant form of HC has been described so far. We report the expression of recombinant human HC (rhHC) in human embryonic kidney cells. We purified the protein with a yield of 6 mg (90 nmol) per litre of cell culture supernatant. The isolated rhHC behaved as native HC...

  11. Gene expression variability in human hepatic drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lun Yang

    Full Text Available Interindividual variability in the expression of drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters (DMETs in human liver may contribute to interindividual differences in drug efficacy and adverse reactions. Published studies that analyzed variability in the expression of DMET genes were limited by sample sizes and the number of genes profiled. We systematically analyzed the expression of 374 DMETs from a microarray data set consisting of gene expression profiles derived from 427 human liver samples. The standard deviation of interindividual expression for DMET genes was much higher than that for non-DMET genes. The 20 DMET genes with the largest variability in the expression provided examples of the interindividual variation. Gene expression data were also analyzed using network analysis methods, which delineates the similarities of biological functionalities and regulation mechanisms for these highly variable DMET genes. Expression variability of human hepatic DMET genes may affect drug-gene interactions and disease susceptibility, with concomitant clinical implications.

  12. Gene expression analysis in human breast cancer associated blood vessels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dylan T Jones

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis is essential for solid tumour growth, whilst the molecular profiles of tumour blood vessels have been reported to be different between cancer types. Although presently available anti-angiogenic strategies are providing some promise for the treatment of some cancers it is perhaps not surprisingly that, none of the anti-angiogenic agents available work on all tumours. Thus, the discovery of novel anti-angiogenic targets, relevant to individual cancer types, is required. Using Affymetrix microarray analysis of laser-captured, CD31-positive blood vessels we have identified 63 genes that are upregulated significantly (5-72 fold in angiogenic blood vessels associated with human invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC of the breast as compared with blood vessels in normal human breast. We tested the angiogenic capacity of a subset of these genes. Genes were selected based on either their known cellular functions, their enriched expression in endothelial cells and/or their sensitivity to anti-VEGF treatment; all features implicating their involvement in angiogenesis. For example, RRM2, a ribonucleotide reductase involved in DNA synthesis, was upregulated 32-fold in IDC-associated blood vessels; ATF1, a nuclear activating transcription factor involved in cellular growth and survival was upregulated 23-fold in IDC-associated blood vessels and HEX-B, a hexosaminidase involved in the breakdown of GM2 gangliosides, was upregulated 8-fold in IDC-associated blood vessels. Furthermore, in silico analysis confirmed that AFT1 and HEX-B also were enriched in endothelial cells when compared with non-endothelial cells. None of these genes have been reported previously to be involved in neovascularisation. However, our data establish that siRNA depletion of Rrm2, Atf1 or Hex-B had significant anti-angiogenic effects in VEGF-stimulated ex vivo mouse aortic ring assays. Overall, our results provide proof-of-principle that our approach can identify a cohort of

  13. Expression of messenger molecules and receptors in rat and human sphenopalatine ganglion indicating therapeutic targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinberg, Anna; Frederiksen, Simona D.; Blixt, Frank W

    2016-01-01

    were expressed in rat and human SPG. In addition, we found SV2-A and SNAP25 expression in both rat and human SPG. We report that all three 5-HT receptors studied occur in neurons and satellite glial cells (SGCs) of the SPG. 5-HT1B receptors were in addition found in the walls of intraganglionic blood...

  14. Differences in gene expression profiles between human preimplantation embryos cultured in two different IVF culture media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleijkers, Sander H. M.; Eijssen, Lars M. T.; Coonen, Edith; Derhaag, Josien G.; Mantikou, Eleni; Jonker, Martijs J.; Mastenbroek, Sebastiaan; Repping, Sjoerd; Evers, Johannes L. H.; Dumoulin, John C. M.; van Montfoort, Aafke P. A.

    2015-01-01

    Is gene expression in human preimplantation embryos affected by the medium used for embryo culture in vitro during an IVF treatment? Six days of in vitro culture of human preimplantation embryos resulted in medium-dependent differences in expression level of genes involved in apoptosis, protein

  15. Differences in gene expression profiles between human preimplantation embryos cultured in two different IVF culture media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleijkers, S.H.M.; Eijssen, L.M.T.; Coonen, E.; Derhaag, J.G.; Mantikou, E.; Jonker, M.J.; Mastenbroek, S.; Repping, S.; Evers, J.L.H.; Dumoulin, J.C.M.; van Montfoort, A.P.A.

    2015-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION: Is gene expression in human preimplantation embryos affected by the medium used for embryo culture in vitro during an IVF treatment? SUMMARY ANSWER: Six days of in vitro culture of human preimplantation embryos resulted in medium-dependent differences in expression level of genes

  16. Induction of basal cell carcinoma features in transgenic human skin expressing Sonic Hedgehog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, H; Oro, A E; Scott, M P; Khavari, P A

    1997-07-01

    Hedgehog (HH) signaling proteins mediate inductive events during animal development. Mutation of the only known HH receptor gene, Patched (PTC), has recently been implicated in inherited and sporadic forms of the most common human cancer, basal cell carcinoma (BCC). In Drosophila, HH acts by inactivating PTC function, raising the possibility that overexpression of Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) in human epidermis might have a tumorigenic effect equivalent to loss of PTC function. We used retroviral transduction of normal human keratinocytes to constitutively express SHH. SHH-expressing cells demonstrated increased expression of both the known HH target, BMP-2B, as well as bcl-2, a protein prominently expressed by keratinocytes in BCCs. These keratinocytes were then used to regenerate human skin transgenic for long terminal repeat-driven SHH (LTR-SHH) on immune-deficient mice. LTR-SHH human skin consistently displays the abnormal specific histologic features seen in BCCs, including downgrowth of epithelial buds into the dermis, basal cell palisading and separation of epidermis from the underlying dermis. In addition, LTR-SHH skin displays the gene expression abnormalities previously described for human BCCs, including decreased BP180/BPAG2 and laminin 5 adhesion proteins and expression of basal epidermal keratins. These data indicate that expression of SHH in human skin recapitulates features of human BCC in vivo, suggest that activation of this conserved signaling pathway contributes to the development of epithelial neoplasia and describe a new transgenic human tissue model of neoplasia.

  17. Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang-Xia Wang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The miR-15/107 family comprises a group of 10 paralogous microRNAs (miRNAs, sharing a 5′ AGCAGC sequence. These miRNAs have overlapping targets. In order to characterize the expression of miR-15/107 family miRNAs, we employed customized TaqMan Low-Density micro-fluid PCR-array to investigate the expression of miR-15/107 family members, and other selected miRNAs, in 11 human tissues obtained at autopsy including the cerebral cortex, frontal cortex, primary visual cortex, thalamus, heart, lung, liver, kidney, spleen, stomach and skeletal muscle. miR-103, miR-195 and miR-497 were expressed at similar levels across various tissues, whereas miR-107 is enriched in brain samples. We also examined the expression patterns of evolutionarily conserved miR-15/107 miRNAs in three distinct primary rat brain cell preparations (enriched for cortical neurons, astrocytes and microglia, respectively. In primary cultures of rat brain cells, several members of the miR-15/107 family are enriched in neurons compared to other cell types in the central nervous system (CNS. In addition to mature miRNAs, we also examined the expression of precursors (pri-miRNAs. Our data suggested a generally poor correlation between the expression of mature miRNAs and their precursors. In summary, we provide a detailed study of the tissue and cell type-specific expression profile of this highly expressed and phylogenetically conserved family of miRNA genes.

  18. c-myc down-regulates class I HLA expression in human melanomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versteeg, R.; NOORDERMEER, I. A.; Krüse-Wolters, M.; Ruiter, D. J.; Schrier, P. I.

    1988-01-01

    Expression of class I HLA antigen has been shown to be reduced in a number of human tumours. Here we show that in a panel of 11 melanoma cell lines with variable class I HLA expression an inverse correlation exists between the mRNA levels of c-myc and class I HLA. This suggests that high expression

  19. Gene expression profiles in adenosine-treated human mast cells ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The role of mast cells in allergic diseases and innate immunity has been widely researched and much is known about the expression profiles of immune-related genes in mast cells after bacterial challenges. However, little is known about the gene expression profiles of mast cells in response to adenosine. Herein, we ...

  20. Cytokeratin expression in human fetal tongue and buccal mucosa

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    unusually complex pattern of expression of cytokeratin poly- peptides and vimentin; Differentiation 40 207–214. Markey A C, Lane E B, Churchill L J, MacDonald M and Leigh. I M 1991 Expression of simple epithelial keratins 8 and 18 in epidermal neoplasia; Invest. Dermatol. 97 763–770. Moll R, Franke W W, Schiller D L, ...

  1. Human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER 2)/neu expression ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use

    2011-11-23

    Nov 23, 2011 ... receptor (HER 2)/neu and its clinical significance in colorectal cancer, in this study, clinicopathological data and paraffin-embedded specimen .... Correlation between the HER 2/neu protein expression, amplication and clinicopathologic feature in 192 colorectal cancer. Variable. HER2 protein expression. P.

  2. Somatostatin receptor subtype expression in human thyroid tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klagge, A; Krause, K; Schierle, K; Steinert, F; Dralle, H; Fuhrer, D

    2010-04-01

    Somatostatin receptors (SSTR) are expressed in various endocrine tumours. The expression of SSTR at the tumour cell surface confers the possibility for diagnostic imaging and therapy of tumours using radiolabeled somatostatin analogues. The majority of currently available somatostatin analogues show a higher binding affinity for the SSTR2 subtype. To date, the precise expression pattern of the SSTR subtypes 1-5 in thyroid epithelial tumours remains to be determined. We investigated the mRNA expression of SSTR1-5 in benign and malignant epithelial thyroid tumours [20 cold thyroid nodules (CTNs), 20 toxic thyroid nodules (TTNs), 20 papillary, 20 follicular, and 5 anaplastic carcinomas (PTCs, FTCs, ATCs, respectively)] and compared them to normal surrounding thyroid tissues. Four out of five SSTR subtypes were detected in malignant thyroid tumours, benign neoplasia, and normal surrounding tissue with a predominant expression of SSTR2 and SSTR5, and a weak expression of SSTR1 and SSTR3. Weak SSTR4 mRNA expression was detected in some PTCs. Compared to normal thyroid tissue, SSTR2 was significantly upregulated in PTC and ATC. In addition significant upregulation of SSTR3 was found in PTC. SSTR5 mRNA expression was increased in PTC and FTC and significantly decreased in CTN and TTN compared to normal thyroid tissue. SSTR2 is the predominant subtype in thyroid epithelial tumours with a high expression pattern, in particular, in PTC . Perspectively, the expression of distinct SSTR in thyroid epithelial tumours might represent a promising avenue for diagnostics and therapy of advanced thyroid cancer with somatostatin analogues. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart New York.

  3. Determinants of ABH expression on human blood platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooling, Laura L W; Kelly, Kathleen; Barton, James; Hwang, Debbie; Koerner, Theodore A W; Olson, John D

    2005-04-15

    Platelets express ABH antigens, which can adversely effect platelet transfusion recovery and survival in ABH-incompatible recipients. To date, there has been no large, comprehensive study comparing specific donor factors with ABH expression on platelet membranes and glycoconjugates. We studied ABH expression in 166 group A apheresis platelet donors by flow cytometry, Western blotting, and thin layer chromatography relative to donor age, sex, A1/A2 subgroup, and Lewis phenotype. Overall, A antigen on platelet membranes, glycoproteins, and glycosphingolipids was linked to an A1 red blood cell (RBC) phenotype. Among A1 donors, platelet ABH varied significantly between donors (0%-87%). Intradonor variability, however, was minimal, suggesting that platelet ABH expression is a stable, donor-specific characteristic, with 5% of A1 donors typing as either ABH high- or low-expressers. Group A2 donors, in contrast, possessed a Bombay-like phenotype, lacking both A and H antigens. Unlike RBCs, ABH expression on platelets may be determined primarily by H-glycosyltransferase (FUT1) activity. Identification of A2 and A1 low expressers may increase the availability and selection of crossmatched and HLA-matched platelets. Platelets from group A2 may also be a superior product for patients undergoing A/O major mismatch allogeneic progenitor cell transplantation.

  4. Characterization of Bioactive Recombinant Human Lysozyme Expressed in Milk of Cloned Transgenic Cattle

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Bin; Wang, Jianwu; Tang, Bo; Liu, Yufang; Guo, Chengdong; Yang, Penghua; Yu, Tian; Li, Rong; Zhao, Jianmin; Zhang, Lei; Dai, Yunping; Li, Ning

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is great potential for using transgenic technology to improve the quality of cow milk and to produce biopharmaceuticals within the mammary gland. Lysozyme, a bactericidal protein that protects human infants from microbial infections, is highly expressed in human milk but is found in only trace amounts in cow milk. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have produced 17 healthy cloned cattle expressing recombinant human lysozyme using somatic cell nuclear transfer. In this study,...

  5. Morphing between expressions dissociates continuous from categorical representations of facial expression in the human brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Richard J.; Young, Andrew W.; Andrews, Timothy J.

    2012-01-01

    Whether the brain represents facial expressions as perceptual continua or as emotion categories remains controversial. Here, we measured the neural response to morphed images to directly address how facial expressions of emotion are represented in the brain. We found that face-selective regions in the posterior superior temporal sulcus and the amygdala responded selectively to changes in facial expression, independent of changes in identity. We then asked whether the responses in these regions reflected categorical or continuous neural representations of facial expression. Participants viewed images from continua generated by morphing between faces posing different expressions such that the expression could be the same, could involve a physical change but convey the same emotion, or could differ by the same physical amount but be perceived as two different emotions. We found that the posterior superior temporal sulcus was equally sensitive to all changes in facial expression, consistent with a continuous representation. In contrast, the amygdala was only sensitive to changes in expression that altered the perceived emotion, demonstrating a more categorical representation. These results offer a resolution to the controversy about how facial expression is processed in the brain by showing that both continuous and categorical representations underlie our ability to extract this important social cue. PMID:23213218

  6. Human eosinophils constitutively express a unique serine protease, PRSS33

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumika Toyama

    2017-07-01

    Conclusions: Activated eosinophils may induce fibroblast extracellular matrix protein synthesis via cell surface expression of PRSS33, which would at least partly explain eosinophils' role(s in airway remodeling.

  7. Integrin expression on normal and neoplastic human breast epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damjanovich, L; Fülöp, B; Adány, R; Nemes, Z

    1997-01-01

    Integrin adhesion receptor expression of different benign and malignant breast tumours was examined by means of immunohistochemical techniques. A panel of seven different anti-alpha and two different anti-beta subunit antibodies was used. Normal breast epithelium displayed a well characterized and constant pattern of integrin expression consisting of strong alpha 1,2,3,6 and alpha v, and a relatively weaker beta 1 and beta 3 staining. No staining for alpha 4 or alpha 5 could be detected on the epithelial cells. Benign fibroadenomas did not show changes in their receptor expression compared to normal tissues. In the cases of different types of breast cancer, there was a significant downregulation of all subunits. The staining pattern was distinct if there could a basement membrane like structure be detected around the invading tumour nodules. When laminin and collagen type IV surrounded the tumour cells, those cells in contact with the extracellular matrix components still displayed strong positivity for the integrin subunits. Other cells inside the tumour cell nests or not surrounded by basement membrane did not express integrins. The positively staining cells might be more differentiated owing to the effect the basement membrane. Myoepithelial labeling of the integrin expressing cells gave negative results. The observed integrin expression heterogeneity renders the histologic picture difficult to interpret with regard to clinical behavior of the tumour.

  8. Expression of DP2 (CRTh2, a prostaglandin D₂ receptor, in human mast cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae Chul Moon

    Full Text Available PGD₂ has long been implicated in allergic diseases. Recent cloning of a second PGD₂ receptor, DP2 (also known as CRTh2, led to a greater understanding of the physiological and pathophysiological implications of PGD₂. PGD₂ signaling through DP1 and DP2 mediates different and often opposite effects in many cell types of the immune system. Although mast cells (MC are the largest source of PGD₂ in the body, there is little information about their potential expression of DP2 and its functional significance. In this study, we show that tissue MC in human nasal polyps express DP2 protein, and that human MC lines and primary cultured human MC express mRNA as well as protein of DP2. By immunohistochemistry, we detected that 34% of MC in human nasal polyps expressed DP2. In addition, flow cytometry showed that 87% of the LAD2 human MC line and 98% of primary cultured human MC contained intracellular DP2. However, we could not detect surface expression of DP2 on human MC by single cell analysis using imaging flow cytometry. Blocking of endogenous PGD2 production with aspirin did not induce surface expression of DP2 in human MC. Two DP2 selective agonists, DK-PGD₂ and 15R-15-methyl PGD₂ induced dose-dependent intracellular calcium mobilization that was abrogated by pertussis toxin, but not by three DP2 selective antagonists. MC mediator release including degranulation was not affected by DP2 selective agonists. Thus, human MC express DP2 intracellularly rather than on their surface, and the function of DP2 in human MC is different than in other immune cells such as Th2 cells, eosinophils and basophils where it is expressed on the cell surface and induces Th2 cytokine and/or granule associated mediator release. Further studies to elucidate the role of intracellular DP2 in human MC may expand our understanding of this molecule and provide novel therapeutic opportunities.

  9. Toxic effects of di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate on mortality, growth, reproduction and stress-related gene expression in the soil nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Ji-Yeon; Jung, In-Ho; Lee, Jai-Young; Choi, Jinhee

    2007-07-31

    In this study, di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) toxicities to Caenorhabditis elegans were investigated using multiple toxic endpoints, such as mortality, growth, reproduction and stress-related gene expression, focusing on the identification of chemical-induced gene expression as a sensitive biomarker for DEHP monitoring. The possible use of C. elegans as a sentinel organism in the monitoring of soil ecosystem health was also tested by conducting the experiment on the exposure of nematode to field soil. Twenty-four-hour median lethal concentration (LC50) data suggest that DEHP has a relatively high potential of acute toxicity to C. elegans. Decreases in body length and egg number per worm observed after 24h of DEHP exposure may induce long-term alteration in the growth and reproduction of the nematode population. Based on the result from the C. elegans genome array and indicated in the literatures, stress proteins, metallothionein, vitellogenin, xenobiotic metabolism enzymes, apoptosis-related proteins, and antioxidant enzyme genes were selected as stress-related genes and their expression in C. elegans by DEHP exposure was analyzed semi-quantitatively. Expression of heat shock protein (hsp)-16.1 and hsp-16.2 genes was decreased by DEHP exposure. Expression of cytochrome P450 (cyp) 35a2 and glutathione-S-transferease (gst)-4, phase I and phase II of xenobiotic metabolism enzymes, was increased by DEHP exposure in a concentration-dependent manner. An increase in stress-related gene expressions occurred concomitantly with the deterioration on the physiological level, which suggests an increase in expression of those genes may not be considered as a homeostatic response but as a toxicity that might have physiological consequences. The experiment with the soil from the landfill site suggests that the potential of the C. elegans biomarker identified in laboratory conditions should be calibrated and validated for its use in situ.

  10. Heterologously expressed bacterial and human multidrug resistance proteins confer cadmium resistance to Escherichia coli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Achard-Joris, M; van Saparoea, HBV; Driessen, AJM; Bourdineaud, JP; Bourdineaud, Jean-Paul

    2005-01-01

    The human MDR1 gene is induced by cadmium exposure although no resistance to this metal is observed in human cells overexpressing hMDR1. To access the role of MDR proteins in cadmium resistance, human MDR1, Lactococcus lactis lmrA, and Oenococcus oeni omrA were expressed in an Escherichia coli tolC

  11. CXCL12/SDF-1 over-expression in human insulinomas and its biological relevance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ilhan, Aysegul; Nabokikh, Anastasiya; Maj, Magdalena

    2009-01-01

    This study was performed on the basis of previously obtained investigative gene array data concerning the over-expression of CXCL12/SDF-1 in human insulinomas versus human pancreatic islet preparations. The presence of CXCL12/SDF-1 was studied by RT-qPCR in human insulinomas (n=8) versus pancreatic...

  12. PKCα expression regulated by Elk-1 and MZF-1 in human HCC cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsieh, Y.-H.; Wu, T.-T.; Tsai, J.-H.; Huang, C.-Y.; Hsieh, Y.-S.; Liu, J.-Y.

    2006-01-01

    Our previous study found that PKCα was highly expressed in the poor-differentiated human HCC cells and associated with cell migration and invasion. In this study, we further investigated the gene regulation of this enzyme. We showed that PKCα expression enhancement in the poor-differentiated human HCC cells was found neither by DNA amplification nor by increasing mRNA stability using differential PCR and mRNA decay assays. After screening seven transcription factors in the putative cis-acting regulatory elements of human PKCα promoters, only Elk-1 and MZF-1 antisense oligonucleotide showed a significant reduction in the PKCα mRNA level. They also reduced cell proliferation, cell migratory and invasive capabilities, and DNA binding activities in the PKCα promoter region. Over-expression assay confirmed that the PKCα expression may be modulated by these two factors at the transcriptional level. Therefore, these results may provide a novel mechanism for PKCα expression regulation in human HCC cells

  13. Expression of Siglec-11 by human and chimpanzee ovarian stromal cells, with uniquely human ligands: implications for human ovarian physiology and pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoxia; Chow, Renee; Deng, Liwen; Anderson, Dan; Weidner, Noel; Godwin, Andrew K; Bewtra, Chanda; Zlotnik, Albert; Bui, Jack; Varki, Ajit; Varki, Nissi

    2011-01-01

    Siglecs (Sialic acid-binding Immunoglobulin Superfamily Lectins) are cell surface signaling receptors of the I-type lectin group that recognize sialic acid-bearing glycans. CD33-related-Siglecs are a subset with expression primarily in cells of hematopoietic origin and functional relevance to immune reactions. Earlier we reported a human-specific gene conversion event that markedly changed the coding region for the extracellular domain of Siglec-11, associated with human-specific expression in microglia (Hayakawa T, Angata T, Lewis AL, Mikkelsen TS, Varki NM, Varki A. 2005. A human-specific gene in microglia. Science. 309:1693). Analyzing human gene microarrays to define new patterns of expression, we observed high levels of SIGLEC11 transcript in the ovary and adrenal cortex. Thus, we examined human and chimpanzee tissues using a well-characterized anti-Siglec-11 mouse monoclonal antibody. Although adrenal expression was variable and confined to infiltrating macrophages in capillaries, ovarian expression of Siglec-11 in both humans and chimpanzees was on fibroblasts, the first example of Siglec expression on mesenchyme-derived stromal cells. Cytokines from such ovarian stromal fibroblasts play important roles in follicle development and ovulation. Stable transfection of SIGLEC11 into a primary human ovarian stromal fibroblast cell line altered the secretion of growth-regulated oncogene α, interleukin (IL)-10, IL-7, transforming growth factor β1 and tumor necrosis factor-α, cytokines involved in ovarian physiology. Probing for Siglec-11 ligands revealed distinct and strong mast cell expression in human ovaries, contrasting to diffuse stromal ligands in chimpanzee ovaries. Interestingly, there was a trend of increased Siglec-11 expression in post-menopausal ovaries compared with pre-menopausal ones. Siglec-11 expression was also found on human ovarian stromal tumors and in polycystic ovarian syndrome, a human-specific disease. These results indicate potential

  14. Tenascin and fibronectin expression in healing human myocardial scars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, I. E.; Arends, J. W.; Daemen, M. J.

    1996-01-01

    Fibronectin and tenascin are matrix proteins known to be present in early experimental wound healing. As only limited data are available regarding early matrix changes in human myocardial infarction, the presence of tenascin and fibronectin was studied in human myocardial infarctions of different

  15. Human papillomavirus 16 E6 and E7 oncoprotein expression alters microRNA expression in extracellular vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harden, Mallory E; Munger, Karl

    2017-08-01

    Extracellular vesicles released by cancer cells are mediators of intercellular communication that have been reported to contribute to carcinogenesis. Since they are readily detected in bodily fluids, they may also be used as cancer biomarkers. The E6/E7 oncoproteins drive human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated cancers, which account for approximately 5% of all human cancers worldwide. Here, we investigate how HPV16 E6/E7 oncogene expression in primary human epithelial cells alters miR expression in extracellular vesicles and compare these to changes in intracellular miR expression. Examining a panel of 68 cancer related miRs revealed that many miRs had similar expression patterns in cells and in extracellular vesicles, whereas some other miRs had different expression patterns and may be selectively packaged into extracellular vesicles. Interestingly, the set of miRs that may be selectively packaged in HPV16 E6/E7 extracellular vesicles is predicted to inhibit necrosis and apoptosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Elevated AKR1C3 expression promotes prostate cancer cell survival and prostate cell-mediated endothelial cell tube formation: implications for prostate cancer progressioan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dozmorov, Mikhail G; Lin, Hsueh-Kung; Azzarello, Joseph T; Wren, Jonathan D; Fung, Kar-Ming; Yang, Qing; Davis, Jeffrey S; Hurst, Robert E; Culkin, Daniel J; Penning, Trevor M

    2010-01-01

    Aldo-keto reductase (AKR) 1C family member 3 (AKR1C3), one of four identified human AKR1C enzymes, catalyzes steroid, prostaglandin, and xenobiotic metabolism. In the prostate, AKR1C3 is up-regulated in localized and advanced prostate adenocarcinoma, and is associated with prostate cancer (PCa) aggressiveness. Here we propose a novel pathological function of AKR1C3 in tumor angiogenesis and its potential role in promoting PCa progression. To recapitulate elevated AKR1C3 expression in cancerous prostate, the human PCa PC-3 cell line was stably transfected with an AKR1C3 expression construct to establish PC3-AKR1C3 transfectants. Microarray and bioinformatics analysis were performed to identify AKR1C3-mediated pathways of activation and their potential biological consequences in PC-3 cells. Western blot analysis, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and an in vitro Matrigel angiogenesis assays were applied to validate the pro-angiogenic activity of PC3-AKR1C3 transfectants identified by bioinformatics analysis. Microarray and bioinformatics analysis suggested that overexpression of AKR1C3 in PC-3 cells modulates estrogen and androgen metabolism, activates insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 and Akt signaling pathways, as well as promotes tumor angiogenesis and aggressiveness. Levels of IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R) and Akt activation as well as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression and secretion were significantly elevated in PC3-AKR1C3 transfectants in comparison to PC3-mock transfectants. PC3-AKR1C3 transfectants also promoted endothelial cell (EC) tube formation on Matrigel as compared to the AKR1C3-negative parental PC-3 cells and PC3-mock transfectants. Pre-treatment of PC3-AKR1C3 transfectants with a selective IGF-1R kinase inhibitor (AG1024) or a non-selective phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3K) inhibitor (LY294002) abolished ability of the cells to promote EC tube formation. Bioinformatics

  17. Elevated AKR1C3 expression promotes prostate cancer cell survival and prostate cell-mediated endothelial cell tube formation: implications for prostate cancer progressioan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davis Jeffrey S

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aldo-keto reductase (AKR 1C family member 3 (AKR1C3, one of four identified human AKR1C enzymes, catalyzes steroid, prostaglandin, and xenobiotic metabolism. In the prostate, AKR1C3 is up-regulated in localized and advanced prostate adenocarcinoma, and is associated with prostate cancer (PCa aggressiveness. Here we propose a novel pathological function of AKR1C3 in tumor angiogenesis and its potential role in promoting PCa progression. Methods To recapitulate elevated AKR1C3 expression in cancerous prostate, the human PCa PC-3 cell line was stably transfected with an AKR1C3 expression construct to establish PC3-AKR1C3 transfectants. Microarray and bioinformatics analysis were performed to identify AKR1C3-mediated pathways of activation and their potential biological consequences in PC-3 cells. Western blot analysis, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, and an in vitro Matrigel angiogenesis assays were applied to validate the pro-angiogenic activity of PC3-AKR1C3 transfectants identified by bioinformatics analysis. Results Microarray and bioinformatics analysis suggested that overexpression of AKR1C3 in PC-3 cells modulates estrogen and androgen metabolism, activates insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1 and Akt signaling pathways, as well as promotes tumor angiogenesis and aggressiveness. Levels of IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R and Akt activation as well as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF expression and secretion were significantly elevated in PC3-AKR1C3 transfectants in comparison to PC3-mock transfectants. PC3-AKR1C3 transfectants also promoted endothelial cell (EC tube formation on Matrigel as compared to the AKR1C3-negative parental PC-3 cells and PC3-mock transfectants. Pre-treatment of PC3-AKR1C3 transfectants with a selective IGF-1R kinase inhibitor (AG1024 or a non-selective phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3K inhibitor (LY294002 abolished ability of the cells

  18. Expression and Significances of Contactin-1 in Human Gastric Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Wei Yu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. This study aimed at determining the relationship between vascular endothelial growth factor-C (VEGF-C, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-3 (VEGFR-3, and contactin-1 (CNTN-1 expression in gastric cancer (GC. Methods. The expression level of CNTN-1 mRNA and CNTN-1 protein of 33 cases was determined using RT-PCR and Western Blot. And 105 cases were immunohistochemically examined for VEGF-C, VEGFR-3, and CNTN-1 expressions. Assessment of lymphatic vessel density (LVD was also performed by D2-40 immunostaining. Then we analyzed the relationships between VEGF-C, VEGFR-3, and CNTN-1, as well as their correlations with clinicopathologic features, LVD, and survival time. Results. The positivity rate of VEGF-C, VEGFR-3, and CNTN-1 in primary tumor was 56.19%, 64.76%, and 58.09%. The expression of CNTN-1 significantly correlated with VEGF-C (P<0.001 and VEGFR-3 (P<0.001. All of them were closely related to TNM stage, lymphatic invasion, and lymph node involvement (P<0.05. LVD was significantly correlated with VEGF-C (P=0.001, VEGFR-3 (P=0.011, and CNTN-1 expression (P<0.001. VEGF-C, VEGFR-3, and CNTN-1 expression significantly associated with poorer prognosis (P<0.001, P=0.034, P=0.012, resp.. Conclusion. CNTN-1 associated with VEGF-C and VEGFR-3 expression in GC. All of them correlated with lymphatic metastasis, which might play an important role in the lymphatic invasion via lymphangiogenesis pathway in GC.

  19. Prostate stem cell antigen is expressed in normal and malignant human brain tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Hiroe; Sakamoto, Hiromi; Yoshida, Teruhiko; Saeki, Norihisa

    2018-03-01

    Prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA) is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored cell surface protein and exhibits an organ-dependent expression pattern in cancer. PSCA is upregulated in prostate cancer and downregulated in gastric cancer. PSCA is expressed in a variety of human organs. Although certain studies previously demonstrated its expression in the mammalian and avian brain, its expression in the human brain has not been thoroughly elucidated. Additionally, it was previously reported that PSCA is weakly expressed in the astrocytes of the normal human brain but aberrantly expressed in glioma, suggesting that PSCA is a promising target of glioma therapy and prostate cancer therapy. The current study identified PSCA expression in the neural and choroid plexus cells of the normal human brain by immunohistochemistry. In brain tumors, PSCA was expressed in medulloblastoma and glioma, and its expression was also observed in papilloma and papillary carcinoma of the choroid plexus, ependymoma and meningioma. The results suggest that PSCA may have a tumor-promoting function in brain tumors and is a potential target for their therapy. However, its expression in normal neuronal and choroid plexus cells implies that a PSCA-targeted therapy may lead to certain adverse phenomena.

  20. Cognitive penetrability and emotion recognition in human facial expressions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco eMarchi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Do our background beliefs, desires, and mental images influence our perceptual experience of the emotions of others? In this paper, we will address the possibility of cognitive penetration of perceptual experience in the domain of social cognition. In particular, we focus on emotion recognition based on the visual experience of facial expressions. After introducing the current debate on cognitive penetration, we review examples of perceptual adaptation for facial expressions of emotion. This evidence supports the idea that facial expressions are perceptually processed as wholes. That is, the perceptual system integrates lower-level facial features, such as eyebrow orientation, mouth angle etc., into facial compounds. We then present additional experimental evidence showing that in some cases, emotion recognition on the basis of facial expression is sensitive to and modified by the background knowledge of the subject. We argue that such sensitivity is best explained as a difference in the visual experience of the facial expression, not just as a modification of the judgment based on this experience. The difference in experience is characterized as the result of the interference of background knowledge with the perceptual integration process for faces. Thus, according to the best explanation, we have to accept cognitive penetration in some cases of emotion recognition. Finally, we highlight a recent model of social vision in order to propose a mechanism for cognitive penetration used in the face-based recognition of emotion.

  1. Activated human mast cells induce LOX-1-specific scavenger receptor expression in human monocyte-derived macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mervi Alanne-Kinnunen

    Full Text Available Activated mast cells in atherosclerotic lesions degranulate and release bioactive compounds capable of regulating atherogenesis. Here we examined the ability of activated human primary mast cells to regulate the expression of the major scavenger receptors in cultured human primary monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDMs.Components released by immunologically activated human primary mast cells induced a transient expression of lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor (LOX-1 mRNA in HMDMs, while the expression of two other scavenger receptors, MSR1 and CD36, remained unaffected. The LOX-1-inducing secretory components were identified as histamine, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α, and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β1, which exhibited a synergistic effect on LOX-1 mRNA expression. Histamine induced a transient expression of LOX-1 protein. Mast cell -induced increase in LOX-1 expression was not associated with increased uptake of oxidized LDL by the macrophages.Mast cell-derived histamine, TNF-α, and TGF-β1 act in concert to induce a transient increase in LOX-1 expression in human primary monocyte-derived macrophages. The LOX-1-inducing activity potentially endows mast cells a hitherto unrecognized role in the regulation of innate immune reactions in atherogenesis.

  2. [Expression of MAGE, GAGE, and BAGE genes in human hepatocellular carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Jun-bin; Chen, Zhi

    2003-03-01

    To observe the expression of MAGE, GAGE and BAGE genes in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell lines. The expression levels of MAGE-1, MAGE-3, GAGE1-8, GAGE1-2 and BAGE mRNAs in HCC cell lines SMMC-7721, QQY-7701, BEL-7402 were studied by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and were compared with those in biopsied liver tissues. MAGE-1 and BAGE mRNAs were expressed in SMMC-7721 cells. MAGE-3 and BAGE mRNAs were expressed in QQY-7701 cells. MAGE-1 and GAGE1-2 mRNAs were expressed in BEL-7402 cells. None of these genes was expressed in biopsied liver tissues. MAGE-1, MAGE-3, GAGE1-8, GAGE1-2 and BAGE are expressed in hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines. These tumor-specific antigens can be used as molecular markers for early diagnosis and possible targets for immunotherapy of human HCC.

  3. Smac/DIABLO expression in human gastrointestinal carcinoma: Association with clinicopathological parameters and survivin expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shintani, Michiko; Sangawa, Akiko; Yamao, Naoki; Kamoshida, Shingo

    2014-12-01

    Lack of apoptosis is a key factor in carcinogenesis and tumor progression. Survivin is a member of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein (IAP) family. Second mitochondria-derived activator of caspases/direct inhibitor of apoptosis-binding protein with low pI (Smac/DIABLO) is an antagonist of IAPs. Recently, Smac/DIABLO was identified as a potent therapeutic target. However, the clinical significance of Smac/DIABLO in gastrointestinal carcinomas remains unclear. In the present study, Smac/DIABLO expression was analyzed by immunohistochemistry in 72 gastric adenocarcinomas and 78 colorectal adenocarcinomas. The expression of Smac/DIABLO was significantly higher in colorectal carcinoma than in gastric carcinoma. Additionally, a correlation was found between the expression of Smac/DIABLO and nuclear survivin in well- to moderately-differentiated colorectal adenocarcinomas (r=0.245; PSmac/DIABLO expression. Our previous studies revealed that the expression of cleaved caspase-9 was significantly lower in colorectal carcinoma than in gastric carcinoma (PSmac/DIABLO expression, are significantly higher in colorectal carcinoma than in gastric carcinoma. We hypothesize that the analysis of Smac/DIABLO, survivin and LC3 expression in colorectal carcinoma is likely to aid cancer therapy due to the involvement of these markers in apoptosis and/or autophagy.

  4. Purinergic receptors expressed in human skeletal muscle fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bornø, A; Ploug, Thorkil; Bune, L T

    2012-01-01

    in immunolabelled transverse sections of muscle biopsies. The receptors P2Y(4), P2Y(11) and likely P2X(1) were present intracellularly or in the plasma membrane of muscle fibres and were thus selected for further detailed morphological analysis. P2X(1) receptors were expressed in intracellular vesicles...... of purinergic receptors in skeletal muscle fibres in patients with type 2 diabetes and age-matched controls. Muscle biopsies from vastus lateralis were obtained from six type 2 diabetic patients and seven age-matched controls. Purinergic receptors were analysed using light and confocal microscopy...... and sarcolemma. P2Y(4) receptors were present in sarcolemma. P2Y(11) receptors were abundantly and diffusely expressed intracellularly and were more explicitly expressed in type I than in type II fibres, whereas P2X(1) and P2Y(4) showed no fibre-type specificity. Both diabetic patients and healthy controls...

  5. Sequence and expression analysis of gaps in human chromosome 20

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minocherhomji, Sheroy; Seemann, Stefan; Mang, Yuan

    2012-01-01

    /or overlap disease-associated loci, including the DLGAP4 locus. In this study, we sequenced ~99% of all three unfinished gaps on human chr 20, determined their complete genomic sizes and assessed epigenetic profiles using a combination of Sanger sequencing, mate pair paired-end high-throughput sequencing......The finished human genome-assemblies comprise several hundred un-sequenced euchromatic gaps, which may be rich in long polypurine/polypyrimidine stretches. Human chromosome 20 (chr 20) currently has three unfinished gaps remaining on its q-arm. All three gaps are within gene-dense regions and...

  6. Androgen-Dependent Regulation of Human MUC1 Mucin Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Mitchell

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available MUC1 mucin is transcriptionally regulated by estrogen, progesterone, and glucocorticoids. Our objective was to determine whether androgen receptor. (20AR activation regulates expression of MUC1. The following breast and prostatic cell lines were phenotyped and grouped according to AR and MUC1protein expression: 1 AR+MUCi + [DAR17+19. (20AR transfectants of DU-145, ZR-75-1, MDA-MB-453, and T47D]; 2 AR-MUCi+ [DZeoi. (20AR- vector control, DU-145, BT20, MDA-MB231, and MCF7]; 3 AIR +MUCi -. (20LNCaP and LNCaP-r. Cell proliferation was determined using the MTT assay in the presence of synthetic androgen R1881, 0.1 pM to 1 µM. Cell surface MUC1expression was determined by flow cytometry in the presence or absence of oestradiol, medroxy progesterone acetate or R1881, with and without 4 hydroxy-flutamide. (204-OH, a nonsteroidal AR antagonist. The functional significance of MUC1expression was investigated with a cell-cell aggregation assay. Only AR+ MUC1 + cell lines showed a significant increase in MUC1expression with AR activation. (20P. (20range =.01 to .0001, reversed in the presence of 4-OHF. Cell proliferation was unaffected. Increased expression of MUC1was associated with a significant. (20P. (20range =.002 to .001 reduction in cell-cell adhesion. To our knowledge, this is the first description of androgen-dependent regulation of MUC1mucin. This is also functionally associated with decreased cell-cell adhesion, a recognised feature of progressive malignancy. These findings have important implications for physiological and pathological processes.

  7. Large Scale Gene Expression Meta-Analysis Reveals Tissue-Specific, Sex-Biased Gene Expression in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayne, Benjamin T.; Bianco-Miotto, Tina; Buckberry, Sam; Breen, James; Clifton, Vicki; Shoubridge, Cheryl; Roberts, Claire T.

    2016-01-01

    The severity and prevalence of many diseases are known to differ between the sexes. Organ specific sex-biased gene expression may underpin these and other sexually dimorphic traits. To further our understanding of sex differences in transcriptional regulation, we performed meta-analyses of sex biased gene expression in multiple human tissues. We analyzed 22 publicly available human gene expression microarray data sets including over 2500 samples from 15 different tissues and 9 different organs. Briefly, by using an inverse-variance method we determined the effect size difference of gene expression between males and females. We found the greatest sex differences in gene expression in the brain, specifically in the anterior cingulate cortex, (1818 genes), followed by the heart (375 genes), kidney (224 genes), colon (218 genes), and thyroid (163 genes). More interestingly, we found different parts of the brain with varying numbers and identity of sex-biased genes, indicating that specific cortical regions may influence sexually dimorphic traits. The majority of sex-biased genes in other tissues such as the bladder, liver, lungs, and pancreas were on the sex chromosomes or involved in sex hormone production. On average in each tissue, 32% of autosomal genes that were expressed in a sex-biased fashion contained androgen or estrogen hormone response elements. Interestingly, across all tissues, we found approximately two-thirds of autosomal genes that were sex-biased were not under direct influence of sex hormones. To our knowledge this is the largest analysis of sex-biased gene expression in human tissues to date. We identified many sex-biased genes that were not under the direct influence of sex chromosome genes or sex hormones. These may provide targets for future development of sex-specific treatments for diseases. PMID:27790248

  8. Large scale gene expression meta-analysis reveals tissue-specific, sex-biased gene expression in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Mayne

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The severity and prevalence of many diseases are known to differ between the sexes. Organ specific sex-biased gene expression may underpin these and other sexually dimorphic traits. To further our understanding of sex differences in transcriptional regulation, we performed meta-analyses of sex biased gene expression in multiple human tissues. We analysed 22 publicly available human gene expression microarray data sets including over 2500 samples from 15 different tissues and 9 different organs. Briefly, by using an inverse-variance method we determined the effect size difference of gene expression between males and females. We found the greatest sex differences in gene expression in the brain, specifically in the anterior cingulate cortex, (1818 genes, followed by the heart (375 genes, kidney (224 genes, colon (218 genes and thyroid (163 genes. More interestingly, we found different parts of the brain with varying numbers and identity of sex-biased genes, indicating that specific cortical regions may influence sexually dimorphic traits. The majority of sex-biased genes in other tissues such as the bladder, liver, lungs and pancreas were on the sex chromosomes or involved in sex hormone production. On average in each tissue, 32% of autosomal genes that were expressed in a sex-biased fashion contained androgen or estrogen hormone response elements. Interestingly, across all tissues, we found approximately two-thirds of autosomal genes that were sex-biased were not under direct influence of sex hormones. To our knowledge this is the largest analysis of sex-biased gene expression in human tissues to date. We identified many sex-biased genes that were not under the direct influence of sex chromosome genes or sex hormones. These may provide targets for future development of sex-specific treatments for diseases.

  9. Gently does it: Humans outperform a software classifier in recognizing subtle, nonstereotypical facial expressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yitzhak, Neta; Giladi, Nir; Gurevich, Tanya; Messinger, Daniel S; Prince, Emily B; Martin, Katherine; Aviezer, Hillel

    2017-12-01

    According to dominant theories of affect, humans innately and universally express a set of emotions using specific configurations of prototypical facial activity. Accordingly, thousands of studies have tested emotion recognition using sets of highly intense and stereotypical facial expressions, yet their incidence in real life is virtually unknown. In fact, a commonplace experience is that emotions are expressed in subtle and nonprototypical forms. Such facial expressions are at the focus of the current study. In Experiment 1, we present the development and validation of a novel stimulus set consisting of dynamic and subtle emotional facial displays conveyed without constraining expressers to using prototypical configurations. Although these subtle expressions were more challenging to recognize than prototypical dynamic expressions, they were still well recognized by human raters, and perhaps most importantly, they were rated as more ecological and naturalistic than the prototypical expressions. In Experiment 2, we examined the characteristics of subtle versus prototypical expressions by subjecting them to a software classifier, which used prototypical basic emotion criteria. Although the software was highly successful at classifying prototypical expressions, it performed very poorly at classifying the subtle expressions. Further validation was obtained from human expert face coders: Subtle stimuli did not contain many of the key facial movements present in prototypical expressions. Together, these findings suggest that emotions may be successfully conveyed to human viewers using subtle nonprototypical expressions. Although classic prototypical facial expressions are well recognized, they appear less naturalistic and may not capture the richness of everyday emotional communication. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  10. The expression of Egfl7 in human normal tissues and epithelial tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Chun; Yang, Lian-Yue; Wu, Fan; Tao, Yi-Ming; Liu, Lin-Sen; Zhang, Jin-Fan; He, Ya-Ning; Tang, Li-Li; Chen, Guo-Dong; Guo, Lei

    2013-04-23

    To investigate the expression of Egfl7 in normal adult human tissues and human epithelial tumors.
 RT-PCR and Western blot were employed to detect Egfl7 expression in normal adult human tissues and 10 human epithelial tumors including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), lung cancer, breast cancer, prostate cancer, colorectal cancer, gastric cancer, esophageal cancer, malignant glioma, ovarian cancer and renal cancer. Immunohistochemistry and cytoimmunofluorescence were subsequently used to determine the localization of Egfl7 in human epithelial tumor tissues and cell lines. ELISA was also carried out to examine the serum Egfl7 levels in cancer patients. In addition, correlations between Egfl7 expression and clinicopathological features as well as prognosis of HCC and breast cancer were also analyzed on the basis of immunohistochemistry results.
 Egfl7 was differentially expressed in 19 adult human normal tissues and was overexpressed in all 10 human epithelial tumor tissues. The serum Egfl7 level was also significantly elevated in cancer patients. The increased Egfl7 expression in HCC correlated with vein invasion, absence of capsule formation, multiple tumor nodes and poor prognosis. Similarly, upregulation of Egfl7 in breast cancer correlated strongly with TNM stage, lymphatic metastasis, estrogen receptor positivity, Her2 positivity and poor prognosis. 
 Egfl7 is significantly upregulated in human epithelial tumor tissues, suggesting Egfl7 to be a potential biomarker for human epithelial tumors, especially HCC and breast cancer.

  11. Gender-specific gene expression in post-mortem human brain: localization to sex chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vawter, Marquis P; Evans, Simon; Choudary, Prabhakara; Tomita, Hiroaki; Meador-Woodruff, Jim; Molnar, Margherita; Li, Jun; Lopez, Juan F; Myers, Rick; Cox, David; Watson, Stanley J; Akil, Huda; Jones, Edward G; Bunney, William E

    2004-02-01

    Gender differences in brain development and in the prevalence of neuropsychiatric disorders such as depression have been reported. Gender differences in human brain might be related to patterns of gene expression. Microarray technology is one useful method for investigation of gene expression in brain. We investigated gene expression, cell types, and regional expression patterns of differentially expressed sex chromosome genes in brain. We profiled gene expression in male and female dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, and cerebellum using the Affymetrix oligonucleotide microarray platform. Differentially expressed genes between males and females on the Y chromosome (DBY, SMCY, UTY, RPS4Y, and USP9Y) and X chromosome (XIST) were confirmed using real-time PCR measurements. In situ hybridization confirmed the differential expression of gender-specific genes and neuronal expression of XIST, RPS4Y, SMCY, and UTY in three brain regions examined. The XIST gene, which silences gene expression on regions of the X chromosome, is expressed in a subset of neurons. Since a subset of neurons express gender-specific genes, neural subpopulations may exhibit a subtle sexual dimorphism at the level of differences in gene regulation and function. The distinctive pattern of neuronal expression of XIST, RPS4Y, SMCY, and UTY and other sex chromosome genes in neuronal subpopulations may possibly contribute to gender differences in prevalence noted for some neuropsychiatric disorders. Studies of the protein expression of these sex-chromosome-linked genes in brain tissue are required to address the functional consequences of the observed gene expression differences.

  12. High level expression of human basic fibroblast growth factor in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-04-19

    Apr 19, 2010 ... Meanwhile, wild-type gene remarkably expressed in all the strains especially in codon plus strain, rare codon substituted ... Key words: Translation initiation region mutagenesis, modified gene, codon optimization, GC content reduction. ..... Yeast-enhanced green fluorescent protein (yEGFP) a reporter of ...

  13. Resveratrol Represses Pokemon Expression in Human Glioma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yutao; Cui, Jiajun; Xue, Feng; Overstreet, Anne-Marie; Zhan, Yiping; Shan, Dapeng; Li, Hui; Li, Hui; Wang, Yongjun; Zhang, Mengmeng; Yu, Chunjiang; Xu, Zhi-Qing David

    2016-03-01

    POK erythroid myeloid ontogenic factor (Pokemon), an important proto-oncoprotein, is a transcriptional repressor that regulates the expression of many genes and plays an important role in tumorigenesis. Resveratrol (RSV), a natural polyphenolic compound, has many beneficial biological effects on health. In this study, we investigated the role of Pokemon in RSV-induced biological effects and the effect of RSV on the expression of Pokemon in glioma cells. We found that overexpression of Pokemon decreased RSV-induced cell apoptosis, senescence, and anti-proliferative effects. Moreover, we showed that RSV could efficiently decrease the activity of the Pokemon promoter and the expression of Pokemon. Meanwhile, RSV also inhibited Sp1 DNA binding activity to the Pokemon promoter; whereas, it did not influence the expression and nuclear translocation of Sp1. In addition, we found that RSV could increase the recruitment of HDAC1, but decreased p300 to the Pokemon promoter. Taken together, all these results extended our understanding on the anti-cancer mechanism of RSV in glioma cells.

  14. Recombinant expression and purification of L2 domain of human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-08-16

    Aug 16, 2010 ... in cell multiplication processes and seem as good targets for interventional therapies. EGFR is a receptor tyrosine kinase that expresses in a significantly higher level in several types of cancer cells and its activation results in cell proliferation, differentiation, cell adhesion, migration and angiogenesis.

  15. SREBP inhibits VEGF expression in human smooth muscle cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motoyama, Koka; Fukumoto, Shinya; Koyama, Hidenori; Emoto, Masanori; Shimano, Hitoshi; Maemura, Koji; Nishizawa, Yoshiki

    2006-01-01

    Sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs) are transcription factors that regulate expression of genes encoding enzymes for lipid biosynthesis. SREBPs are activated by HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins). Statins have been also reported to suppress vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Therefore, we hypothesized that SREBPs are involved in statin-mediated regulation of VEGF production in VSMCs. SREBP1 was robustly expressed, and was activated by atorvastatin in VSMCs, as demonstrated by increased levels of the mature nuclear form of SREBP1, and increased promoter activities of a reporter containing sterol regulatory elements by atorvastatin. Moreover, overexpression of SREBP1a dose-dependently suppressed VEGF promoter activity. Site-specific mutation or deletion of the proximal Sp1 sites reduced the inhibitory effects of SREBP1a on VEGF promoter activity. These data demonstrated that SREBP1, activated by atorvastatin, suppressed VEGF expression through the indirect interaction with the proximal tandem Sp1 sites in VSMCs

  16. Transient expression of Human papillomavirus type 16 L2 epitope ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Transient expression of foreign genes based on plant viral vectors is a suitable system for the production of relevant immunogens that can be used for the development of a new generation of vaccines against a variety of infectious diseases. In the present study the epitope derived from HPV-16 L2 minor capsid protein ...

  17. Sexual dimorphism in clock genes expression in human adipose tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study was carried out to investigate whether sex-related differences exist in the adipocyte expression of clock genes from subcutaneous abdominal and visceral fat depots in severely obese patients. METHODS: We investigated 16 morbidly obese patients, eight men and eight women (mean age 45 +/- 2...

  18. Gene expression profiles in adenosine-treated human mast cells

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl yemi

    2011-10-26

    Oct 26, 2011 ... assignment (Ewing and Green, 1998a; Ewing et al., 1998b). The trace files were trimmed with trim-alt 0.05 (P-score>20). In addition, vector trimming was conducted with cross-match software. Each gene expression pattern was analyzed by clustering. (30 bp or more 94% homology) and assembly.

  19. SREBP inhibits VEGF expression in human smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motoyama, Koka; Fukumoto, Shinya; Koyama, Hidenori; Emoto, Masanori; Shimano, Hitoshi; Maemura, Koji; Nishizawa, Yoshiki

    2006-03-31

    Sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs) are transcription factors that regulate expression of genes encoding enzymes for lipid biosynthesis. SREBPs are activated by HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins). Statins have been also reported to suppress vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Therefore, we hypothesized that SREBPs are involved in statin-mediated regulation of VEGF production in VSMCs. SREBP1 was robustly expressed, and was activated by atorvastatin in VSMCs, as demonstrated by increased levels of the mature nuclear form of SREBP1, and increased promoter activities of a reporter containing sterol regulatory elements by atorvastatin. Moreover, overexpression of SREBP1a dose-dependently suppressed VEGF promoter activity. Site-specific mutation or deletion of the proximal Sp1 sites reduced the inhibitory effects of SREBP1a on VEGF promoter activity. These data demonstrated that SREBP1, activated by atorvastatin, suppressed VEGF expression through the indirect interaction with the proximal tandem Sp1 sites in VSMCs.

  20. Expression of human interferon gamma in Brassica napus seeds ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Presence and expression of the transgene were confirmed in the transformants by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sodium dodecylsulfatepolyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Analysis of transgenic plants by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), dot blot and western blot indicated that IFN_y ...

  1. Expression characteristics of the human CD97 antigen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eichler, W.; Hamann, J. [=Jörg; Aust, G.

    1997-01-01

    Molecules whose expression is increased upon stimulation on leukocyte populations are of considerable interest because insights into their structure and function extend knowledge of the intracellular and intercellular events that accompany cellular activation. One such molecule is CD97, a cell

  2. Expression of cystatin C in human esophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Qinghong; Zhao, Yonggang; Yang, Yuxian; Zheng, Guiyu; Wang, Gefei; Zhang, Peng; Cui, Youhong; Su, Shaobo; Li, Kangsheng

    2011-01-01

    Cystatin C is a member of the cysteine protease inhibitors and its function is to decrease protease activity. A recent study showed that it was aberrantly expressed in many malignant tumors in association with tumor invasion and metastasis. We attempted to detect its expression in esophageal cancer tissues and adjacent reparative normal tissues. Samples of cancers and non-cancerous esophageal tissues were obtained as matched pairs from 30 surgery patients with esophageal cancer and paraffin embedded. The expression of cystatin C in tissues was investigated by immunohistochemistry. Fisher's exact test was used to analyze the relationship between esophageal cancer tissues and adjacent normal tissues. Furthermore, mRNA was extracted, and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction was performed. The intensity of cystatin C immunostaining in tumor tissues was increased compared to that of adjacent normal tissues. mRNA expression of the cystatin C gene was greater in esophageal cancer than in normal tissues (P cystatin C may play an important role in the pathogenesis and metastasis of esophageal cancer.

  3. Expression of Sirtuins in the Retinal Neurons of Mice, Rats, and Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongdou Luo

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Sirtuins are a class of histone deacetylases (HDACs that have been shown to regulate a range of pathophysiological processes such as cellular aging, inflammation, metabolism, and cell proliferation. There are seven mammalian Sirtuins (SIRT1-7 that play important roles in stress response, aging, and neurodegenerative diseases. However, the location and function of Sirtuins in neurons are not well defined. This study assessed the retinal expression of Sirtuins in mice, rats, and humans and measured the expression of Sirtuins in aged and injured retinas. Expression of all 7 Sirtuins was confirmed by Western blot and Real-Time PCR analysis in all three species. SIRT1 is highly expressed in mouse, rat, and human retinas, whereas SIRT2-7 expression was relatively lower in human retinas. Immunofluorescence was also used to examine the expression and localization of Sirtuins in rat retinal neurons. Importantly, we demonstrate a marked reduction of SIRT1 expression in aged retinal neurons as well as retinas injured by acute ischemia-reperfusion. On the other hand, none of the other Sirtuins exhibit any significant age-related changes in expression except for SIRT5, which was significantly higher in the retinas of adults compared to both young and aged rats. Our work presents the first composite analysis of Sirtuins in the retinal neurons of mice, rats, and humans, and suggests that increasing the expression and activity of SIRT1 may be beneficial for the treatment of glaucoma and other age-related eye dysfunction.

  4. Prokineticin 1 protein expression is a useful new prognostic factor for human sporadic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakazawa, Toshiyuki; Goi, Takanori; Hirono, Yasuo; Yamaguchi, Akio

    2015-05-01

    Hematogenous metastasis, regarded as closely related to angiogenic growth factors, is associated with colorectal cancer prognosis. The angiogenic growth factor prokineticin 1 (PROK1) has been cloned from endocrine cells. However, its protein expression in human malignant tumors has not been studied. The current study established the anti-PROK1 monoclonal antibody (mAb) and examined the relationship between the expression of PROK1 protein and human colorectal cancer. The expression of PROK1 protein was assessed in 620 resected sporadic colorectal cancer tissue samples by immunohistochemical staining with in-house-developed human PROK1 mAb to investigate the relationship of PROK1 expression to clinicopathologic factors, recurrence, and survival rate and to evaluate its prognostic significance. The expression of PROK1 protein was detected in 36 % (223/620) of human primary colorectal cancer lesions but no in the healthy mucosa adjacent to the colorectal cancer lesions. According to the clinicopathologic examinations, the frequency of positive PROK1 expression was significantly higher in cases with serosal invasion, lymphatic invasion, venous invasion, lymph node metastasis, liver metastasis, hematogenous metastasis, and higher stage disease. The recurrence rate and prognosis for patients with PROK1 expression-positive lesions were significantly worse. In the Cox proportional hazard model, PROK1 expression was an independent prognostic factor. The expression of PROK1 protein was identified for the first time as a new prognostic factor in colorectal cancer.

  5. Identification and validation of suitable endogenous reference genes for gene expression studies in human peripheral blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamova, Boryana S; Apperson, Michelle; Walker, Wynn L; Tian, Yingfang; Xu, Huichun; Adamczy, Peter; Zhan, Xinhua; Liu, Da-Zhi; Ander, Bradley P; Liao, Isaac H; Gregg, Jeffrey P; Turner, Renee J; Jickling, Glen; Lit, Lisa; Sharp, Frank R

    2009-08-05

    Gene expression studies require appropriate normalization methods. One such method uses stably expressed reference genes. Since suitable reference genes appear to be unique for each tissue, we have identified an optimal set of the most stably expressed genes in human blood that can be used for normalization. Whole-genome Affymetrix Human 2.0 Plus arrays were examined from 526 samples of males and females ages 2 to 78, including control subjects and patients with Tourette syndrome, stroke, migraine, muscular dystrophy, and autism. The top 100 most stably expressed genes with a broad range of expression levels were identified. To validate the best candidate genes, we performed quantitative RT-PCR on a subset of 10 genes (TRAP1, DECR1, FPGS, FARP1, MAPRE2, PEX16, GINS2, CRY2, CSNK1G2 and A4GALT), 4 commonly employed reference genes (GAPDH, ACTB, B2M and HMBS) and PPIB, previously reported to be stably expressed in blood. Expression stability and ranking analysis were performed using GeNorm and NormFinder algorithms. Reference genes were ranked based on their expression stability and the minimum number of genes needed for nomalization as calculated using GeNorm showed that the fewest, most stably expressed genes needed for acurate normalization in RNA expression studies of human whole blood is a combination of TRAP1, FPGS, DECR1 and PPIB. We confirmed the ranking of the best candidate control genes by using an alternative algorithm (NormFinder). The reference genes identified in this study are stably expressed in whole blood of humans of both genders with multiple disease conditions and ages 2 to 78. Importantly, they also have different functions within cells and thus should be expressed independently of each other. These genes should be useful as normalization genes for microarray and RT-PCR whole blood studies of human physiology, metabolism and disease.

  6. Identification and validation of suitable endogenous reference genes for gene expression studies in human peripheral blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turner Renee J

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene expression studies require appropriate normalization methods. One such method uses stably expressed reference genes. Since suitable reference genes appear to be unique for each tissue, we have identified an optimal set of the most stably expressed genes in human blood that can be used for normalization. Methods Whole-genome Affymetrix Human 2.0 Plus arrays were examined from 526 samples of males and females ages 2 to 78, including control subjects and patients with Tourette syndrome, stroke, migraine, muscular dystrophy, and autism. The top 100 most stably expressed genes with a broad range of expression levels were identified. To validate the best candidate genes, we performed quantitative RT-PCR on a subset of 10 genes (TRAP1, DECR1, FPGS, FARP1, MAPRE2, PEX16, GINS2, CRY2, CSNK1G2 and A4GALT, 4 commonly employed reference genes (GAPDH, ACTB, B2M and HMBS and PPIB, previously reported to be stably expressed in blood. Expression stability and ranking analysis were performed using GeNorm and NormFinder algorithms. Results Reference genes were ranked based on their expression stability and the minimum number of genes needed for nomalization as calculated using GeNorm showed that the fewest, most stably expressed genes needed for acurate normalization in RNA expression studies of human whole blood is a combination of TRAP1, FPGS, DECR1 and PPIB. We confirmed the ranking of the best candidate control genes by using an alternative algorithm (NormFinder. Conclusion The reference genes identified in this study are stably expressed in whole blood of humans of both genders with multiple disease conditions and ages 2 to 78. Importantly, they also have different functions within cells and thus should be expressed independently of each other. These genes should be useful as normalization genes for microarray and RT-PCR whole blood studies of human physiology, metabolism and disease.

  7. Yes-associated protein 1 is widely expressed in human brain tumors and promotes glioblastoma growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Brent A; Bai, Haibo; Odia, Yazmin; Jain, Deepali; Anders, Robert A; Eberhart, Charles G

    2011-07-01

    The hippo pathway and its downstream mediator yes-associated protein 1 (YAP1) regulate mammalian organ size in part through modulating progenitor cell numbers. YAP1 has also been implicated as an oncogene in multiple human cancers. Currently, little is known about the expression of YAP1 either in normal human brain tissue or in central nervous system neoplasms. We used immunohistochemistry to evaluate nuclear YAP1 expression in the fetal and normal adult human brains and in 264 brain tumors. YAP1 was expressed in fetal and adult brain regions known to harbor neural progenitor cells, but there was little YAP1 immunoreactivity in the adult cerebral cortex. YAP1 protein was also readily detected in the nuclei of human brain tumors. In medulloblastoma, the expression varied between histologic subtypes and was most prominent in nodular/desmoplastic tumors. In gliomas, it was frequently expressed in infiltrating astrocytomas and oligodendrogliomas but rarely in pilocytic astrocytomas. Using a loss-of-function approach, we show that YAP1 promoted growth of glioblastoma cell lines in vitro. High levels of YAP1 messenger RNA expression were associated with aggressive molecular subsets of glioblastoma and with a nonsignificant trend toward reduced mean survival in human astrocytoma patients. These findings suggest that YAP1 may play an important role in normal human brain development and that it could represent a new target in human brain tumors.

  8. COX-2 expression positively correlates with PD-L1 expression in human melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botti, Gerardo; Fratangelo, Federica; Cerrone, Margherita; Liguori, Giuseppina; Cantile, Monica; Anniciello, Anna Maria; Scala, Stefania; D'Alterio, Crescenzo; Trimarco, Chiara; Ianaro, Angela; Cirino, Giuseppe; Caracò, Corrado; Colombino, Maria; Palmieri, Giuseppe; Pepe, Stefano; Ascierto, Paolo Antonio; Sabbatino, Francesco; Scognamiglio, Giosuè

    2017-02-23

    The resistance to PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitors for the treatment of melanoma have prompted investigators to implement novel clinical trials which combine immunotherapy with different treatment modalities. Moreover is also important to investigate the mechanisms which regulate the dynamic expression of PD-L1 on tumor cells and PD-1 on T cells in order to identify predictive biomarkers of response. COX-2 is currently investigated as a major player of tumor progression in several type of malignancies including melanoma. In the present study we investigated the potential relationship between COX-2 and PD-L1 expression in melanoma. Tumor samples obtained from primary melanoma lesions and not matched lymph node metastases were analyzed for both PD-L1 and COX-2 expression by IHC analysis. Status of BRAF and NRAS mutations was analyzed by sequencing and PCR. Co-localization of PD-L1 and COX-2 expression was analyzed by double fluorescence staining. Lastly the BRAF V600E A375 and NRAS Q61R SK-MEL-2 melanoma cell lines were used to evaluate the effect of COX-2 inhibition by celecoxib on expression of PD-L1 in vitro. BRAF V600E/V600K and NRAS Q61R/Q61L were detected in 57.8 and 8.9% of the metastatic lesions, and in 65.9 and 6.8% of the primary tumors, respectively. PD-L1 and COX-2 expression were heterogeneously expressed in both primary melanoma lesions and not matched lymph node metastases. A significantly lower number of PD-L1 negative lesions was found in primary tumors as compared to not matched metastatic lesions (P = 0.002). COX-2 expression significantly correlated with PD-L1 expression in both primary (P = 0.001) and not matched metastatic (P = 0.048) lesions. Furthermore, in melanoma tumors, cancer cells expressing a higher levels of COX-2 also co-expressed a higher level of PD-L1. Lastly, inhibition of COX-2 activity by celecoxib down-regulated the expression of PD-L1 in both BRAF V600E A375 and NRAS Q61R SK-MEL-2 melanoma cell lines. COX-2 expression correlates

  9. Regulated expression of human A γ-, β-, and hybrid γ β-globin genes in transgenic mice: manipulation of the developmental expression patterns.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Kollias (George); N. Wrighton; J. Hurst; F.G. Grosveld (Frank)

    1986-01-01

    textabstractWe have introduced the human fetal gamma- and adult beta-globin genes into the germ line of mice. Analysis of the resulting transgenic mice shows that the human gamma-globin gene is expressed like an embryonic mouse globin gene; the human beta-globin gene is expressed (as previously

  10. Temporal expression pattern of genes during the period of sex differentiation in human embryonic gonads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mamsen, Linn S.; Ernst, Emil H.; Borup, Rehannah

    2017-01-01

    (IHC). SRY/SOX9 expression initiated in testis around day 40 pc, followed by initiation of AMH and steroidogenic genes required for androgen production at day 53 pc. In ovaries, gene expression of RSPO1, LIN28, FOXL2, WNT2B, and ETV5, were significantly higher than in testis, whereas GLI1...... was significantly higher in testis than ovaries. Gene expression was confirmed by IHC for GAGE, SOX9, AMH, CYP17A1, LIN28, WNT2B, ETV5 and GLI1. Gene expression was not associated with the maternal smoking habits. Collectively, a precise temporal determination of changes in expression of key genes involved in human...

  11. Impact of Panax ginseng and Ginkgo biloba extracts on expression level of transcriptional factors and xenobiotic-metabolizing cytochrome P450 enzymes / Wpływ ekstraktów z Panax ginseng i Ginkgo biloba na poziom ekspresji czynników transkrypcyjnych i enzymów cytochromu P450 metabolizujących ksenobiotyki

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogacz Anna

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Wstęp: Mimo powszechnego stosowania Panax ginseng i Ginkgo biloba dane dotyczące bezpieczeństwa, a także interakcji pomiędzy preparatami roślinnymi a lekami syntetycznymi są bardzo ograniczone. W niniejszych badaniach założono, iż żeń-szeń oraz miłorząb mogą modulować aktywność i zawartość izoenzymów cytochromu P450 biorących udział w biotransformacji różnych substancji ksenobiotycznych. Cel: Określenie wpływu preparatów roślinnych na poziom ekspresji enzymów CYP i ich czynników transkrypcyjnych. Metody: Szczurom rasy Wistar podawano standaryzowany Panax ginseng (30 mg/kg oraz Ginkgo biloba (200 mg/kg przez 3 do 10 dni. Ekspresję w tkance wątrobowej analizowano za pomocą metody PCR w czasie rzeczywistym. Wyniki: Uzyskane wyniki wykazały spadek poziomu mRNA CYP3A1 (homolog ludzkiego enzymu CYP3A4 po podaniu ekstraktu z żeń-szenia. Ekspresja genu CYP2C6 (homolog ludzkiego enzymu CYP2C9 również uległa obniżeniu. Dodatkowo, obserwowaliśmy wzrost ekspresji CYP1A1 (homolog ludzkiego enzymu CYP1A1 i CYP1A2 (homolog ludzkiego enzymu CYP1A2 po 10 dniach stosowania P. ginseng. Ponadto, ekstrakt z G. biloba spowodował również wzrost poziomu mRNA CYP1A1, CYP2C6, CYP3A1 i CYP3A2 w modelu in vivo. Wnioski: Badania sugerują, że wyciągi roślinne mogą modulować ekspresję czynników transkrypcyjnych i enzymów CYP uczestniczących w metabolizmie ksenobiotyków i chemicznej karcynogenezie.

  12. Endothelial lipase is highly expressed in macrophages in advanced human atherosclerotic lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartels, Emil D; Nielsen, John E; Lindegaard, Marie Louise Skakkebæk

    2007-01-01

    Endothelial lipase (EL) is expressed in endothelial cells, and affects plasma lipoprotein metabolism by hydrolyzing phospholipids in HDL. To determine the cellular expression of EL mRNA and protein in human atherosclerotic lesions, we performed in situ hybridization and immunohistochemical studies......, there was a positive association between the expression of EL mRNA and CD68 mRNA in plaques from 26 patients. The impact of differentiation from monocytes into macrophages, and subsequently foam cells (by incubation with acetylated LDL) on expression was studied using THP-1 monocytes and primary human monocytes. EL m......RNA expression increased markedly when either type of monocytes was differentiated into macrophages. Upon further differentiation into foam cells EL mRNA decreased whereas protein levels remained high compared to monocytes. In conclusion, macrophages in advanced human atherosclerotic lesions display high levels...

  13. Dynamic gene expression response to altered gravity in human T cells (parabolic flight)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We investigated differentially regulated genes in human Jurkat T lymphocytic cells in 20s and 5min microgravity and in hypergravity and compared expression profiles...

  14. microRNA expression profiles in human peripheral blood lymphocytes cultured in modeled microgravity

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In the present study we analyzed miRNA and mRNA expression profiles in human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) incubated in microgravity condition simulated by a...

  15. Gene expression profiling of human peripheral blood lymphocytes cultured in modeled microgravity

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In the present study we analyzed miRNA and mRNA expression profiles in human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) incubated in microgravity condition simulated by a...

  16. Kisspeptin Expression in the Human Infundibular Nucleus in Relation to Sex, Gender Identity, and Sexual Orientation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taziaux, Melanie; Staphorsius, Annemieke S; Ghatei, Mohammad A; Bloom, Stephen R; Swaab, Dick F; Bakker, Julie

    CONTEXT: Since the discovery of its central role in reproduction, our functional neuroanatomical knowledge of the hypothalamic kisspeptin system is predominantly based on animal studies. Although sex differences in kisspeptin expression have been shown in humans in adulthood, the developmental

  17. Ectopic expression of telomerase enhances osteopontin and osteocalcin expression during osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells from elder donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Machado CB

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Age related bone loss is one of the most prevalent diseases in the elder population. The osteoblasts are the effectors cells of bone formation and regeneration. With the aging the osteoblasts become senescent reducing their ability to produce bone. Cellular replicative senescence is triggered by telomers shortening. Telomerase elongate the telomers length and maintain the cell proliferative capacity. Here, we demonstrated that the expression of human telomerase reverse transcriptase mediated by an adenovirus vector increases the levels of osteopontin and osteocalcin mRNA during the in vitro osteogenic differentiation of elderly human mesenchymal stem cells. Bone marrow human mesenchymal stem cells were obtained from old donors (>65 years and induced to differentiate into osteoblasts for 14 days. The levels of mRNA of human telomerase reverse transcriptase, osteopontin and osteocalcin during the differentiation were assessed by semi-quantitative PCR before and during the differentiation on days 7 and 14. Infected cells showed 1.5 fold increase in telomerase expression. Also telomerized cells exhibit 1.5 fold increase in osteopontin and 0.5 fold increase in osteocalcin expression compared to primary osteoblasts isolated from the same donors. The transformed cells were not able to form tumours in NUDE mice.

  18. Expression of CD44 variants in human inflammatory synovitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hale, L.P. [Duke Univ. Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Haynes, B.F.; McCachren, S. [Duke Univ. Arthritis Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    1995-11-01

    The cell surface hyaluronate receptor CD44 has previously been shown to have immunomodulatory activity and to be upregulated in inflammatory synovitis. Since these findings were reported, the genomic structure of CD44 has been delineated, and multiple splice variants have been described. Therefore, we determined which CD44 variant exons are present during inflammatory synovitis by a combination of Northern blot analysis and reverse transcription followed by polymerase chain reaction amplification of synovial RNA. Immunohistochemical staining was used to define the sites of expression of individual v6 and v9 exons in synovial tissue. The standard (S) or hematopoietic isoform, CD44S, was the predominant form of CD44 expressed in synovium and was expressed by most cell types. Other isoforms, containing alternatively spliced exons in the proximal extracellular domain, were found by RT-PCR, but at lower levels than CD44S. The second most prevalent form was CD44E, which has an insertion of three exons (v8-v10) in the proximal extracellular domain. Immunohistochemical studies showed that reactivity with v9-specific antibodies was primarily in macrophages, particularly those in the synovial lining layer. CD44 exon v6, previously reported to be important in immune activation and in epithelial tumor metastasis, was also expressed in synovial lining cells and in occasional synovial interstitial cells. The presence of CD44 variants containing v9 in rheumatoid synovial macrophages may be important in the adhesion and activation of mononuclear phagocytes in the synovium and, thus, may be a target for novel antiinflammatory therapies in the future. The role of CD44 isoforms in cellular adhesion, immune activation, and joint erosion in inflammatory synovitis deserves further study. 7 figs., 2 tabs., 56 refs.

  19. Identification of Human HK Genes and Gene Expression Regulation Study in Cancer from Transcriptomics Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhang; Liu, Jingxing; Wu, Jiayan; Yu, Jun

    2013-01-01

    The regulation of gene expression is essential for eukaryotes, as it drives the processes of cellular differentiation and morphogenesis, leading to the creation of different cell types in multicellular organisms. RNA-Sequencing (RNA-Seq) provides researchers with a powerful toolbox for characterization and quantification of transcriptome. Many different human tissue/cell transcriptome datasets coming from RNA-Seq technology are available on public data resource. The fundamental issue here is how to develop an effective analysis method to estimate expression pattern similarities between different tumor tissues and their corresponding normal tissues. We define the gene expression pattern from three directions: 1) expression breadth, which reflects gene expression on/off status, and mainly concerns ubiquitously expressed genes; 2) low/high or constant/variable expression genes, based on gene expression level and variation; and 3) the regulation of gene expression at the gene structure level. The cluster analysis indicates that gene expression pattern is higher related to physiological condition rather than tissue spatial distance. Two sets of human housekeeping (HK) genes are defined according to cell/tissue types, respectively. To characterize the gene expression pattern in gene expression level and variation, we firstly apply improved K-means algorithm and a gene expression variance model. We find that cancer-associated HK genes (a HK gene is specific in cancer group, while not in normal group) are expressed higher and more variable in cancer condition than in normal condition. Cancer-associated HK genes prefer to AT-rich genes, and they are enriched in cell cycle regulation related functions and constitute some cancer signatures. The expression of large genes is also avoided in cancer group. These studies will help us understand which cell type-specific patterns of gene expression differ among different cell types, and particularly for cancer. PMID:23382867

  20. Expression of cDNAs in human Natural Killer cell lines by retroviral transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miah, S M Shahjahan; Campbell, Kerry S

    2010-01-01

    Human NK-like cell lines are difficult to transfect using standard mammalian expression vectors and conventional transfection protocols, but they are susceptible to retroviral transduction as a means to introduce cDNAs. Our laboratory has exploited this technique to study a number of receptors in human NK cell lines. The method utilizes a bicistronic retroviral vector that co-expresses either drug resistance or enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) in parallel with the gene of interest. After a single infection with recombinant retrovirus, transduced NK cells can be sorted for expression of EGFP or the transduced cell surface marker. Alternatively, cells expressing the transduced cDNAs can be selected for by treatment with neomycin, puromycin, or hygromycin. Using this method, the sorted/selected cells uniformly express the gene of interest and the expression is stable for many weeks of culture.

  1. Gene expression profiles of human promyelocytic leukemia cell lines exposed to volatile organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarma, Sailendra Nath; Kim, Youn-Jung; Ryu, Jae-Chun

    2010-05-27

    Benzene, toluene, o-xylene, ethylbenzene, trichloroethylene and dichloromethane are the most widely used volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and their toxic mechanisms are still undefined. This study analyzed the genome-wide expression profiles of human promyelocytic leukemia HL-60 cells exposed to VOCs using a 35-K whole human genome oligonucleotide microarray to ascertain potential biomarkers. Genes with a significantly increased expression levels (over 1.5-fold and p-values lines to VOC exposure.

  2. Expression of histamine receptors in the human endolymphatic sac

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, M Nue; Kirkeby, S; Vikeså, J.

    2016-01-01

    in 2012. This leaves betahistine (Betaserc) as the only drug for potential prevention of the incapacitating attacks of dizziness, tinnitus and hearing loss. However, the histamine receptors targeted by betahistine have never been demonstrated in the human ES. Accordingly, this study aims to investigate...

  3. Unfettered expression and human dignity: Langston Hughes's not ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In literature as in other disciplines, freedom of speech entails the unburdening of one's intent from the innermost recesses of one's mind. It is a great relief and a ventilation of the conscious and sub-conscious being. Langston Hughes and Chinua Achebe are noted human rights proponents in their American and Nigerian ...

  4. Human intrinsic factor expressed in the plant Arabidopsis thaliana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fedosov, Sergey N; Laursen, Niels B; Nexø, Ebba

    2003-01-01

    Intrinsic factor (IF) is the gastric protein that promotes the intestinal uptake of vitamin B12. Gastric IF from animal sources is used in diagnostic tests and in vitamin pills. However, administration of animal IF to humans becomes disadvantageous because of possible pathogenic transmission...

  5. Characterization of gene expression regulated by human OTK18 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fearon D. T. and Locksley R. M. 1996 The instructive role of innate immunity in the acquired immune response. Science 272, 50–53. Goldman M. J., Anderson G. M., Stolzenberg E. D., Kari U. P., Za- slof M. and Wilson J. M. 1997 Human beta-defensin-1 is a salt- sensitive antibiotic in lung that is inactivated in cystic fibrosis.

  6. Transient expression of Human papillomavirus type 16 L2 epitope ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-01-11

    terminus of coat protein of Potato virus X in plants. J. Biosci. 37 125–133]. DOI 10.1007/s12038-011-9177-z. 1. Introduction. Human papillomavirus (HPV) causes cervical cancer and is the second biggest cause of female cancer ...

  7. CD40 is functionally expressed on human thymic epithelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galy, A. H.; Spits, H.

    1992-01-01

    CD40 is a prominent B cell Ag also found on certain epithelial cells and on carcinomas. In this report, we analyzed CD40 distribution in the human thymus. CD40 was not found on the majority of CD45-positive thymocytes, but was present in a CD45-negative stromal cell population. Immunohistology

  8. In vivo extracellular matrix protein expression by human periodontal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is well known that the orthodontic force applied to teeth generates a series of events that remodel the periodontal ligament (PDL). Extracellular matrix proteins (ECM) are described as molecular regulators of these events. However, the exact contribution of these proteins in human PDL modeling by orthodontic force ...

  9. Cancer-associated loss of TARSH gene expression in human primary lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terauchi, Kunihiko; Shimada, Junichi; Uekawa, Natsuko; Yaoi, Takeshi; Maruyama, Mitsuo; Fushiki, Shinji

    2006-01-01

    We have previously identified mouse Tarsh as one of the cellular senescence-related genes and showed the loss of expression of TARSH mRNA in four human lung cancer cell lines. TARSH is a presumptive signal transduction molecule interacting with NESH, which is implicated to have some roles in lung cancer metastasis. The amplification of complete ORF-encoding TARSH cDNA was done with reverse transcription-PCR. Northern blotting was carried out using TARSH cDNA probes. To clarify the relationship between TARSH and lung cancer, we quantified TARSH mRNA expression in 15 human lung cancer cell lines and 32 primary non-small cell lung cancers. We first determined the complete ORF-encoding cDNA sequence which is expressed in the human lung. On the Northern hybridization analysis, TARSH was strongly expressed in the human lung. The expression of TARSH mRNA is remarkably downregulated in all the lung cancer cell lines examined. Furthermore, TARSH expression was significantly low in all of the tumor specimens when compared to the expression in corresponding non-neoplastic lung tissue specimens. The cancer-associated transcriptional inactivation of TARSH suggests that TARSH could be used as a biomarker for lung cancer development as well as a molecular adjunct for lung carcinogenesis in human.

  10. Comparative pharmacology of a new recombinant FSH expressed by a human cell line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koechling, Wolfgang; Plaksin, Daniel; Croston, Glenn E.

    2017-01-01

    Recombinant FSH proteins are important therapeutic agents for the treatment of infertility, including follitropin alfa expressed in Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells and, more recently, follitropin delta expressed in the human cell line PER.C6. These recombinant FSH proteins have distinct glycosy...

  11. Systematic analysis of gene expression patterns associated with postmortem interval in human tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yizhang; Wang, Likun; Yin, Yuxin; Yang, Ence

    2017-07-14

    Postmortem mRNA degradation is considered to be the major concern in gene expression research utilizing human postmortem tissues. A key factor in this process is the postmortem interval (PMI), which is defined as the interval between death and sample collection. However, global patterns of postmortem mRNA degradation at individual gene levels across diverse human tissues remain largely unknown. In this study, we performed a systematic analysis of alteration of gene expression associated with PMI in human tissues. From the Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) database, we evaluated gene expression levels of 2,016 high-quality postmortem samples from 316 donors of European descent, with PMI ranging from 1 to 27 hours. We found that PMI-related mRNA degradation is tissue-specific, gene-specific, and even genotype-dependent, thus drawing a more comprehensive picture of PMI-associated gene expression across diverse human tissues. Additionally, we also identified 266 differentially variable (DV) genes, such as DEFB4B and IFNG, whose expression is significantly dispersed between short PMI (S-PMI) and long PMI (L-PMI) groups. In summary, our analyses provide a comprehensive profile of PMI-associated gene expression, which will help interpret gene expression patterns in the evaluation of postmortem tissues.

  12. Expression of biologically active human interferon alpha 2 in aloe vera

    Science.gov (United States)

    We have developed a system for transgenic expression of proteins in Aloe Vera. Using this approach we have generated plants expressing the human gene interferon alpha 2, IFNa2. IFNa2 is a small secreted cytokine that plays a vital role in regulating the body’s immune response to viral infections a...

  13. Gene Expression Platform for Synthetic Biology in the Human Pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sorg, Robin A; Kuipers, Oscar P; Veening, Jan-Willem

    2015-01-01

    The human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) is a bacterium that owes its success to complex gene expression regulation patterns on both the cellular and the population level. Expression of virulence factors enables a mostly hazard-free presence of the commensal, in balance with the

  14. GLUT12 expression in human placenta in first trimester and term

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gude, NM; Stevenson, JL; Rogers, S; Best, JD; Kalionis, B; Erwich, JJHM; Timmer, A; King, RG

    The aim of this study was to characterize the expression of a novel glucose transporter protein GLUT12 in human placenta. GLUT12 mRNA expression was identified by RT-PCR in extracts from five normal term placentae and in extracts from cultured cells of the JAR, JEG-3 and HTR-8Svneo cell lines. In

  15. Proteomic analysis of differential protein expression in human atherosclerotic plaque progression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donners, Marjo M. P. C.; Verluyten, Monique J.; Bouwman, Freek G.; Mariman, Edwin C. M.; Devreese, Bart; Vanrobaeys, Frank; van Beeumen, Jozef; van den Akker, Luc H. J. M.; Daemen, Mat J. A. P.; Heeneman, Sylvia

    2005-01-01

    In this study, differential protein expression was assessed during human atherosclerotic plaque progression. A multifaceted approach was used in which differential protein expression was studied by two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis and validated in individual patients using western blotting

  16. Hematological indices, inflammatory markers and neutrophil CD64 expression: comparative trends during experimental human endotoxemia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meer, W. van der; Pickkers, P.; Scott, C.S.; Hoeven, J.G. van der; Gunnewiek, J.K.

    2007-01-01

    CD64 is a high-affinity Fc(gamma)RI receptor expressed by activated neutrophils that has been recently evaluated as a potential sepsis parameter. In the present study, the kinetics of neutrophil membrane CD64 expression were examined during a standardized inflammatory response, using a human

  17. Genome-Wide Expression Profiling of Five Mouse Models Identifies Similarities and Differences with Human Psoriasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swindell, William R.; Johnston, Andrew; Carbajal, Steve; Han, Gangwen; Wohn, Christian; Lu, Jun; Xing, Xianying; Nair, Rajan P.; Voorhees, John J.; Elder, James T.; Wang, Xiao-Jing; Sano, Shigetoshi; Prens, Errol P.; DiGiovanni, John; Pittelkow, Mark R.; Ward, Nicole L.; Gudjonsson, Johann E.

    2011-01-01

    Development of a suitable mouse model would facilitate the investigation of pathomechanisms underlying human psoriasis and would also assist in development of therapeutic treatments. However, while many psoriasis mouse models have been proposed, no single model recapitulates all features of the human disease, and standardized validation criteria for psoriasis mouse models have not been widely applied. In this study, whole-genome transcriptional profiling is used to compare gene expression patterns manifested by human psoriatic skin lesions with those that occur in five psoriasis mouse models (K5-Tie2, imiquimod, K14-AREG, K5-Stat3C and K5-TGFbeta1). While the cutaneous gene expression profiles associated with each mouse phenotype exhibited statistically significant similarity to the expression profile of psoriasis in humans, each model displayed distinctive sets of similarities and differences in comparison to human psoriasis. For all five models, correspondence to the human disease was strong with respect to genes involved in epidermal development and keratinization. Immune and inflammation-associated gene expression, in contrast, was more variable between models as compared to the human disease. These findings support the value of all five models as research tools, each with identifiable areas of convergence to and divergence from the human disease. Additionally, the approach used in this paper provides an objective and quantitative method for evaluation of proposed mouse models of psoriasis, which can be strategically applied in future studies to score strengths of mouse phenotypes relative to specific aspects of human psoriasis. PMID:21483750

  18. Expression of human protamine P1 in sperm of transgenic mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wyrobek, A.J.; Keith, C.; Stilwell, J.; Lowe, X. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, CA (United States); Anderson, G. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Transgenic mice were produced by pronuclear injection with DNA constructs containing human protamine P1 cDNA recombined with a murine protamine P1 promoter, and were identified by PCR. Expression of human P1 was investigated using huplm, a monoclonal antibody specific for human P1, applied to murine testicular cells, smears of epididymal sperm, and smears of detergent-isolated sperm nuclei. Various antibodies and nontransgenic littermates were used as controls. Two male founders (T3 and T7) sired more than five generations of transgenic offspring each with continued expression of human P1 in their sperm. Transgenic animals appear of normal fertility with sperm of typical nuclear morphology. The human P1 transgene was expressed postmeioticly in both lines, as expected. Nearly 100% of sperm of T3 and T7 hemizygotes labeled with huplm, consistent with complete diffusion of human P1 protein through the intercellular bridge of spermatogenic cells. Human P1 labeling of sperm nuclei was not visibly affected by sonication or by treatment with the detergent MATAB or the reducing agent DTT. A third founder female (T5) showed a transmission pattern consistent with insertion of the transgene into an X chromosome; her transgenic offspring expressed human P1 in only a small fraction of sperm. Human P1 transgenes may serve as efficient targets for germinal mutations and transgenicmice may provide promising models for investigating the DNA complexes.

  19. Human glucagon gene promoter sequences regulating tissue-specific versus nutrient-regulated gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nian, Min; Gu, Jun; Irwin, David M; Drucker, Daniel J

    2002-01-01

    The glucagon-like peptides (GLPs) are synthesized and secreted in a nutrient-dependent manner in rodents; however, the factors regulating human GLP-1 and GLP-2 biosynthesis remain unclear. To understand how nutrients regulate human proglucagon gene expression, we studied the expression of a human proglucagon promoter-growth hormone (GH) transgene in 1.6 human glucagon-GH transgenic mice. Fasting-refeeding significantly decreased and increased the levels of circulating mouse insulin and transgene-derived hGH (P fasting vs. refeeding) and decreased and upregulated, respectively, the levels of endogenous mouse proglucagon RNA in the ileum but not in the jejunum or colon. High-fiber feeding significantly increased the levels of glucose-stimulated circulating hGH and upregulated levels of mouse intestinal proglucagon gene expression in the jejunum, ileum, and colon (P fasting-refeeding nor a high-fiber diet upregulated the expression of the human proglucagon promoter-hGH transgene. These findings demonstrate that human proglucagon gene regulatory sequences specifying tissue-specific expression in gut endocrine cells are not sufficient for recognition of energy-derived signals regulating murine glucagon gene expression in enteroendocrine cells in vivo.

  20. Upregulation of annexin A1 expression by butyrate in human melanoma cells induces invasion by inhibiting E-cadherin expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jimin; Song, In-Sung; Pak, Jhang Ho; Jang, Sung-Wuk

    2016-11-01

    Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a critical step in the metastasis of epithelial cancer cells. Butyrate, which is produced from dietary fiber by colonic bacterial fermentation, has been reported to influence EMT. However, some studies have reported that butyrate promotes EMT, while others have reported an inhibitory effect. To clarify these controversial results, it is necessary to elucidate the mechanism by which butyrate can influence EMT. In this study, we examined the potential role of annexin A1 (ANXA1), which was previously reported to promote EMT in breast cancer cells, as a mediator of EMT regulation by butyrate. We found that ANXA1 mRNA and protein were expressed in highly invasive melanoma cell lines (A2058 and A375), but not in SK-MEL-5 cells, which are less invasive. We also showed that butyrate induced ANXA1 mRNA and protein expression and promoted EMT-related cell invasion in SK-MEL-5 cells. Downregulation of ANXA1 expression using specific small interfering RNAs in butyrate-treated SK-MEL-5 cells resulted in increased expression of the epithelial marker E-cadherin and decreased cell invasion. Moreover, overexpressing ANXA1 decreased the expression of the E-cadherin. Collectively, these results indicate that butyrate induces the expression of ANXA1 in human melanoma cells, which then promotes invasion through activating the EMT signaling pathway.

  1. Human melanocytes form a PAX3-expressing melanocyte cluster on Matrigel by the cell migration process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyunjung; Jin, Sun Hee; Han, Mi Hwa; Lee, Jinyoung; Ahn, Seyeon; Seong, Minjeong; Choi, Hyun; Han, Jiyeon; Cho, Eun-Gyung; Lee, Tae Ryong; Noh, Minsoo

    2014-10-01

    The interactions between human epidermal melanocytes and their cellular microenvironment are important in the regulation of human melanocyte functions or in their malignant transformation into melanoma. Although the basement membrane extracellular matrix (BM-ECM) is one of major melanocyte microenvironments, the effects of BM-ECM on the human melanocyte functions are not fully explained at a molecular level. This study was aimed to characterize the molecular and cellular interactions between normal human melanocytes (NHMs) and BM-ECM. We investigated cell culture models of normal human melanocytes or melanoma cells on three-dimensional (3D) Matrigel to understand the roles of the basement membrane microenvironment in human melanocyte functions. Melanogenesis and melanobast biomarker expression in both primary human melanocytes and melanoma cells on 3D Matrigel were evaluated. We found that NHMs migrated and formed reversible paired box 3 (PAX3) expressing cell clusters on three-dimensional (3D) Matrigel. The melanogenesis was significantly decreased in the PAX3 expressing cell cluster. The expression profile of PAX3, SOX10, and MITF in the melanocyte cluster on 3D Matrigel was similar to that of melanoblasts. Interestingly, PAX3 and SOX10 showed an inverse expression profile in NHMs, whereas the inverse expression pattern of PAX3 and SOX10 was disrupted in melanoma MNT1 and WM266-4 cells. The human melanocyte culture on 3D Matrigel provides an alternative model system to study functions of human melanoblasts. In addition, this system will contribute to the elucidation of PAX3-related tumorigenic mechanisms to understand human melanoma. Copyright © 2014 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Expression, purification and characterization of human Dopamine ß-monooxygenase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vendelboe, Trine Vammen

    This thesis deals with expression, purification and characterization of the copper containing enzyme dopamine ß-monooxygenase (DBM). DBM is an ascorbate dependent protein that requires Cu in the active site in order to be functional. DBM is made of four domains; An Nterminal DOMON domain, the two...... others, one of the reasons why these proteins are considered to follow the same mechanism. DBM converts dopamine (DA) into Norepinphrine (NE). Both substrate and product functions as neurotransmitters and the levels of these are involved in many different disorders such as depression and hypertension...

  3. Expression patterns of genes critical for BMP signaling pathway in developing human primary tooth germs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiuqing; Shen, Bin; Ruan, Ningsheng; Guan, Zhen; Zhang, Yanding; Chen, YiPing; Hu, Xuefeng

    2014-12-01

    The developing murine tooth has been used as an excellent model system to study the molecular mechanism of organ development and regeneration. While the expression patterns of numerous regulatory genes have been examined and their roles have begun to be revealed in the developing murine tooth, little is known about gene expression and function in human tooth development. In order to unveil the molecular mechanisms that regulate human tooth morphogenesis, we examined the expression patterns of the major BMP signaling pathway molecules in the developing human tooth germ at the cap and bell stages by in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry, and real-time RT-PCR. Expression of BMP ligands and antagonist, including BMP2, BMP3, BMP4, BMP7, and NOOGGIN, exhibited uniform patterns in the tooth germs of incisor and molar at the cap and bell stages with stronger expression in the inner dental epithelium than that in the dental mesenchyme. Both type I and type II BMP receptors were present in widespread expression pattern in the whole-enamel organ and the dental mesenchyme with the strongest expression in inner dental epithelium at the cap and bell stages. SMAD4 and SMAD1/5/8 showed an expression pattern similar to that of BMP ligands with more intensive signals in the inner dental epithelium. Despite some unique and distinct patterns as compared to the mouse, the intensive expression of BMP signaling pathway molecules in the developing human tooth strongly suggests conserved functions of BMP signaling during human odontogenesis, such as in mediating tissue interactions and regulating differentiation and organization of odontogenic tissues. Our results provide an important set of documents for studying molecular regulatory mechanisms underlying tooth development and regeneration in humans.

  4. Identification of Novel Placentally Expressed Aspartic Proteinase in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Majewska

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This study presents pioneering data concerning the human pregnancy-associated glycoprotein-Like family, identified in the genome, of the term placental transcriptome and proteome. RNA-seq allowed the identification of 1364 bp hPAG-L/pep cDNA with at least 56.5% homology with other aspartic proteinases (APs. In silico analyses revealed 388 amino acids (aa of full-length hPAG-L polypeptide precursor, with 15 aa-signal peptide, 47 aa-blocking peptide and 326 aa-mature protein, and two Asp residues (D, specific for a catalytic cleft of the APs (VVFDTGSSNLWV91-102 and AIVDTGTSLLTG274-285. Capillary sequencing identified 9330 bp of the hPAG-L gene (Gen Bank Acc. No. KX533473, composed of nine exons and eight introns. Heterologous Western blotting revealed the presence of one dominant 60 kDa isoform of the hPAG-L amongst cellular placental proteins. Detection with anti-pPAG-P and anti-Rec pPAG2 polyclonals allowed identification of the hPAG-L proteins located within regions of chorionic villi, especially within the syncytiotrophoblast of term singleton placentas. Our novel data extend the present knowledge about the human genome, as well as placental transcriptome and proteome during term pregnancy. Presumably, this may contribute to establishing a new diagnostic tool for examination of some disturbances during human pregnancy, as well as growing interest from both scientific and clinical perspectives.

  5. Transcriptional and epigenetic regulation of KIAA1199 gene expression in human breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cem Kuscu

    Full Text Available Emerging evidence has demonstrated that upregulated expression of KIAA1199 in human cancer bodes for poor survival. The regulatory mechanism controlling KIAA1199 expression in cancer remains to be characterized. In the present study, we have isolated and characterized the human KIAA1199 promoter in terms of regulation of KIAA1199 gene expression. A 3.3 kb fragment of human genomic DNA containing the 5'-flanking sequence of the KIAA1199 gene possesses both suppressive and activating elements. Employing a deletion mutagenesis approach, a 1.4 kb proximal region was defined as the basic KIAA1199 promoter containing a TATA-box close to the transcription start site. A combination of 5'-primer extension study with 5'RACE DNA sequencing analysis revealed one major transcription start site that is utilized in the human KIAA1199 gene. Bioinformatics analysis suggested that the 1.4 kb KIAA1199 promoter contains putative activating regulatory elements, including activator protein-1(AP-1, Twist-1, and NF-κB sites. Sequential deletion and site-direct mutagenesis analysis demonstrated that the AP-1 and distal NF-κB sites are required for KIAA1199 gene expression. Further analyses using an electrophoretic mobility-shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation confirmed the requirement of these cis- and trans-acting elements in controlling KIAA1199 gene expression. Finally, we found that upregulated KIAA1199 expression in human breast cancer specimens correlated with hypomethylation of the regulatory region. Involvement of DNA methylation in regulation of KIAA1199 expression was recapitulated in human breast cancer cell lines. Taken together, our study unraveled the regulatory mechanisms controlling KIAA1199 gene expression in human cancer.

  6. Identification of differentially expressed microRNAs in human male breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schipper Elisa

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The discovery of small non-coding RNAs and the subsequent analysis of microRNA expression patterns in human cancer specimens have provided completely new insights into cancer biology. Genetic and epigenetic data indicate oncogenic or tumor suppressor function of these pleiotropic regulators. Therefore, many studies analyzed the expression and function of microRNA in human breast cancer, the most frequent malignancy in females. However, nothing is known so far about microRNA expression in male breast cancer, accounting for approximately 1% of all breast cancer cases. Methods The expression of 319 microRNAs was analyzed in 9 primary human male breast tumors and in epithelial cells from 15 male gynecomastia specimens using fluorescence-labeled bead technology. For identification of differentially expressed microRNAs data were analyzed by cluster analysis and selected statistical methods. Expression levels were validated for the most up- or down-regulated microRNAs in this training cohort using real-time PCR methodology as well as in an independent test cohort comprising 12 cases of human male breast cancer. Results Unsupervised cluster analysis separated very well male breast cancer samples and control specimens according to their microRNA expression pattern indicating cancer-specific alterations of microRNA expression in human male breast cancer. miR-21, miR519d, miR-183, miR-197, and miR-493-5p were identified as most prominently up-regulated, miR-145 and miR-497 as most prominently down-regulated in male breast cancer. Conclusions Male breast cancer displays several differentially expressed microRNAs. Not all of them are shared with breast cancer biopsies from female patients indicating male breast cancer specific alterations of microRNA expression.

  7. Gene expression profile analysis of human intervertebral disc degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we used microarray analysis to investigate the biogenesis and progression of intervertebral disc degeneration. The gene expression profiles of 37 disc tissue samples obtained from patients with herniated discs and degenerative disc disease collected by the National Cancer Institute Cooperative Tissue Network were analyzed. Differentially expressed genes between more and less degenerated discs were identified by significant analysis of microarray. A total of 555 genes were significantly overexpressed in more degenerated discs with a false discovery rate of < 3%. Functional annotation showed that these genes were significantly associated with membrane-bound vesicles, calcium ion binding and extracellular matrix. Protein-protein interaction analysis showed that these genes, including previously reported genes such as fibronectin, COL2A1 and f-catenin, may play key roles in disc degeneration. Unsupervised clustering indicated that the widely used morphology-based Thompson grading system was only marginally associated with the molecular classification of intervertebral disc degeneration. These findings indicate that detailed, systematic gene analysis may be a useful way of studying the biology of intervertebral disc degeneration.

  8. Lipopolysaccharide induces autotaxin expression in human monocytic THP-1 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Song; Zhang Junjie

    2009-01-01

    Autotaxin (ATX) is a secreted enzyme with lysophospholipase D (lysoPLD) activity, which converts lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) into lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a bioactive phospholipid involved in numerous biological activities, including cell proliferation, differentiation, and migration. In the present study, we found that bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a well-known initiator of the inflammatory response, induced ATX expression in monocytic THP-1 cells. The activation of PKR, JNK, and p38 MAPK was required for the ATX induction. The LPS-induced ATX in THP-1 cells was characterized as the β isoform. In the presence of LPC, ATX could promote the migrations of THP-1 and Jurkat cells, which was inhibited by pertussis toxin (PTX), an inhibitor of Gi-mediated LPA receptor signaling. In summary, LPS induces ATX expression in THP-1 cells via a PKR, JNK and p38 MAPK-mediated mechanism, and the ATX induction is likely to enhance immune cell migration in proinflammatory response by regulating LPA levels in the microenvironment.

  9. Endothelial lipase is highly expressed in macrophages in advanced human atherosclerotic lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartels, Emil D; Nielsen, John E; Lindegaard, Marie Louise Skakkebæk

    2007-01-01

    Endothelial lipase (EL) is expressed in endothelial cells, and affects plasma lipoprotein metabolism by hydrolyzing phospholipids in HDL. To determine the cellular expression of EL mRNA and protein in human atherosclerotic lesions, we performed in situ hybridization and immunohistochemical studies......RNA expression increased markedly when either type of monocytes was differentiated into macrophages. Upon further differentiation into foam cells EL mRNA decreased whereas protein levels remained high compared to monocytes. In conclusion, macrophages in advanced human atherosclerotic lesions display high levels...

  10. Vitamin D receptor and vitamin D metabolizing enzymes are expressed in the human male reproductive tract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomberg Jensen, Martin; Nielsen, John E; Jørgensen, Anne

    2010-01-01

    The vitamin D receptor (VDR) is expressed in human testis, and vitamin D (VD) has been suggested to affect survival and function of mature spermatozoa. Indeed, VDR knockout mice and VD deficient rats show decreased sperm counts and low fertility. However, the cellular response to VD is complex......, since it is not solely dependent on VDR expression, but also on cellular uptake of circulating VD and presence and activity of VD metabolizing enzymes. Expression of VD metabolizing enzymes has not previously been investigated in human testis and male reproductive tract. Therefore, we performed...

  11. Flow cytometric assay detecting cytotoxicity against human endogenous retrovirus antigens expressed on cultured multiple sclerosis cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller-Larsen, A; Brudek, T; Petersen, T

    2013-01-01

    expressing increased amounts of human endogenous retrovirus antigens. MS patients also have increased antibody levels to these antigens. The target cells are spontaneously growing peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of B cell lineage, expressing human endogenous retrovirus HERV epitopes...... on their surface. Polyclonal antibodies against defined peptides in the Env- and Gag-regions of the HERVs were raised in rabbits and used in antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) -assays. Rituximab® (Roche), a chimeric monoclonal antibody against CD20 expressed primarily on B cells, was used...

  12. Nocodazole treatment decreases expression of pluripotency markers Nanog and Oct4 in human embryonic stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallas, Ade; Pook, Martin; Maimets, Martti

    2011-01-01

    in the expression of transcription markers Nanog and Oct4 as well as SSEA-3 and SSEA-4 in human embryonic cells after their treatment with nocodazole. Multivariate permeabilised-cell flow cytometry was applied for characterising the expression of Nanog and Oct4 during different cell cycle phases. Among untreated h......ESC we detected Nanog-expressing cells, which also expressed Oct4, SSEA-3 and SSEA-4. We also found another population expressing SSEA-4, but without Nanog, Oct4 and SSEA-3 expression. Nocodazole treatment resulted in a decrease of cell population positive for all four markers Nanog, Oct4, SSEA-3, SSEA-4....... Nocodazole-mediated cell-cycle arrest was accompanied by higher rate of apoptosis and upregulation of p53. Twenty-four hours after the release from nocodazole block, the cell cycle of hESC normalised, but no increase in the expression of transcription markers Nanog and Oct4 was detected. In addition...

  13. Expression of insulin signalling components in the sensory epithelium of the human saccule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Degerman, Eva; Rauch, Uwe; Lindberg, Sven

    2013-01-01

    , as judged from co-expression or non-co-expression with glial fibrillary acidic protein, a marker for supporting cells. Furthermore, IRS1 appears to be localized in association with sensory nerves, whereas GLUT4 is expressed in the peri-nuclear area of stromal cells, as is the case for aquaporin 2. Thus......Several studies have demonstrated a link between diabetes and the dysfunction of the inner ear. Few studies, however, have reported the signalling mechanisms involved in metabolic control in human inner ear cells. Knowledge of the expression and role of the insulin receptor and downstream...... exhibits expression of a calcium-sensitive cAMP/cGMP phosphodiesterase 1C (PDE1C) and the vasopressin type 2 receptor. IRS1 and PDE1C are selectively expressed in sensory epithelial hair cells, whereas the other components are expressed in sensory epithelial supporting cells or in both cell types...

  14. Factors affecting the gene expression of in vitro cultured human preimplantation embryos

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mantikou, E.; Jonker, M. J.; Wong, K. M.; van Montfoort, A. P. A.; de Jong, M.; Breit, T. M.; Repping, S.; Mastenbroek, S.

    2016-01-01

    What is the relative effect of common environmental and biological factors on transcriptome changes during human preimplantation development? Developmental stage and maternal age had a larger effect on the global gene expression profile of human preimplantation embryos than the culture medium or

  15. Regulation of MicroRNA-378 expression in mature human adipose ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the effects of adiponectin (ADPN), free fatty acids (FFAs), growth hormone (GH), and dexamethasone (DEX) on miR-378 expression in human adipose tissue cells, and their influence on regulation of obesity and insensitivity to insulin. Methods: Human pre-adipocytes were cultured and differentiated.

  16. Differential expression of glutamic acid decarboxylase in rat and human islets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, J S; Russel, S; Marshall, M O

    1993-01-01

    The GABA synthesizing enzyme GAD is a prominent islet cell autoantigen in type I diabetes. The two forms of GAD (GAD64 and GAD67) are encoded by different genes in both rats and humans. By in situ hybridization analysis of rat and human pancreases, expression of both genes was detected in rat isl...

  17. Improved methodology for the affinity isolation of human protein complexes expressed at near endogenous levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domanski, Michal; Molloy, Kelly; Jiang, Hua

    2012-01-01

    An efficient and reliable procedure for the capture of affinity-tagged proteins and associated complexes from human cell lines is reported. Through multiple optimizations, high yield and low background affinity-purifications are achieved from modest quantities of human cells expressing endogenous...

  18. Systems genomics study reveals expression quantitative trait loci, regulator genes and pathways associated with boar taint in pigs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Drag

    Full Text Available Boar taint is an offensive odour and/or taste from a proportion of non-castrated male pigs caused by skatole and androstenone accumulation during sexual maturity. Castration is widely used to avoid boar taint but is currently under debate because of animal welfare concerns. This study aimed to identify expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs with potential effects on boar taint compounds to improve breeding possibilities for reduced boar taint. Danish Landrace male boars with low, medium and high genetic merit for skatole and human nose score (HNS were slaughtered at ~100 kg. Gene expression profiles were obtained by RNA-Seq, and genotype data were obtained by an Illumina 60K Porcine SNP chip. Following quality control and filtering, 10,545 and 12,731 genes from liver and testis were included in the eQTL analysis, together with 20,827 SNP variants. A total of 205 and 109 single-tissue eQTLs associated with 102 and 58 unique genes were identified in liver and testis, respectively. By employing a multivariate Bayesian hierarchical model, 26 eQTLs were identified as significant multi-tissue eQTLs. The highest densities of eQTLs were found on pig chromosomes SSC12, SSC1, SSC13, SSC9 and SSC14. Functional characterisation of eQTLs revealed functions within regulation of androgen and the intracellular steroid hormone receptor signalling pathway and of xenobiotic metabolism by cytochrome P450 system and cellular response to oestradiol. A QTL enrichment test revealed 89 QTL traits curated by the Animal Genome PigQTL database to be significantly overlapped by the genomic coordinates of cis-acting eQTLs. Finally, a subset of 35 cis-acting eQTLs overlapped with known boar taint QTL traits. These eQTLs could be useful in the development of a DNA test for boar taint but careful monitoring of other overlapping QTL traits should be performed to avoid any negative consequences of selection.

  19. Pulmonary expression of CYP2A13 and ABCB1 is regulated by FOXA2, and their genetic interaction is associated with lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Chan; Wang, Jiucun; Kou, Xiaochen; Chen, Xiabin; Qin, Zhaoyu; Jiang, Yan; Sun, Chang; Xu, Jibin; Tan, Wen; Jin, Li; Lin, Dongxin; He, Fuchu; Wang, Haijian

    2015-05-01

    Inhaled xenobiotics such as tobacco-specific carcinogen 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone are mainly metabolized by phase I oxidase cytochrome P450, family 2, subfamily A, polypeptide 13 (CYP2A13), phase II conjugate UDP glucuronosyltransferase 2 family, polypeptide B17 (UGT2B17), and phase III transporter ATP-binding cassette, subfamily B (MDR/TAP), member 1 (ABCB1), with genetic polymorphisms implicated in lung cancer. Their genetic interaction and pulmonary expression regulation are largely unknown. We analyzed joint association for CYP2A13 and ABCB1 polymorphisms in 2 independent lung cancer case populations (669 and 566 patients) and 1 common control population (749 subjects), and characterized the trans-acting function of the lung development-related transcription factor forkhead box A2 (FOXA2). We undertook FOXA2 overexpression and down-regulation in lung epithelial cell lines, analyzed functional impact on the transactivation of CYP2A13, UGT2B17, and ABCB1, and measured correlation for their expressions in lung tissues. We found a substantial reduction in cancer risk (OR 0.39; 95% CI 0.25-0.61; Pinteraction = 0.029) associated with combined genotypes for CYP2A13 R257C and a functionary regulatory variant in the cis element of ABCB1 synergistically targeted by GATA binding protein 6 and FOXA2. Genetic manipulation of FOXA2 consistently influenced its binding to and transactivation of the promoters of CYP2A13, UGT2B17, and ABCB1, whose mRNA and protein expressions were all consistently correlated with those of FOXA2 in both tumorous and normal lung tissues. We therefore establish FOXA2 as a core transcriptional modulator for pulmonary xenobiotic metabolic pathways and uncover an etiologically relevant interaction between CYP2A13 and ABCB1, furthering our understanding of expression and function of the xenobiotic metabolism system. © FASEB.

  20. Expression of cystatin C in clinical human colorectal cancer tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Yousif; Sebzda, Tadeusz; Warwas, Maria; Kopec, Wieslaw; Ziólkowska, Jolanta; Siewinski, Maciej

    2005-01-01

    We studied the relation between the antipapain activity of cysteine proteinase inhibitors (CPI) and immunohistochemical staining for cystatin C, using anti-chicken cystatin antibodies, in the colorectal cancer tissues. In primary tumour tissues immuno-peroxidase reactivity was present in the cytoplasm and on the cell surface membranes. Sections of non malignant tissues showed no staining. The percentages of positive staining were greater for adenocarcinoma than carcinoma,100% and 77% respectively. Antipapain activity which was increased in malignant tissues in comparison to control, rose successively from well differentiated carcinomas through moderately to poor differentiated. Invasive adenocarcinomas had higher antipapain activity than noninvasive ones. The results indicated that immunohistochemical detection of cystatin using anti-chicken cystatin antibodies could be useful in studying the prognostic significance of cystatin C expression in colorectal cancer.

  1. Expression and immunohistochemical localization of leptin receptor in human periapical granuloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-González, J; Carmona-Fernández, A; Pérez-Pérez, A; Sánchez-Jiménez, F; Sánchez-Margalet, V; Segura-Egea, J J

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the expression and immunohistochemical localization of leptin receptor (LEPR) in human periapical granulomas. Periapical inflammatory lesions were obtained from extracted human teeth and teeth which underwent periapical surgery. After their histopathological categorization as periapical granulomas (n = 20), they were examined by immunohistochemistry using human LEPR monoclonal antibodies. LEPR mRNA expression was also determined by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR), and the amount of LEPR protein was analysed by immunoblot. All granuloma samples expressed LEPR. Amongst inflammatory cells, only macrophages showed expression of LEPR. Western blot analysis revealed the presence in the samples of a protein with apparent molecular weight of ~120 kDa, corresponding to the estimated molecular weight of LEPR. The qRT-PCR analysis demonstrated the expression of LEPR mRNA, corresponding the size of the amplified fragment (338 bp), assessed by agarose gel electrophoresis, to that of LEPR mRNA. Human periapical granulomas express LEPR. In periapical granulomas, only macrophages showed expression of LEPR. This finding suggests that leptin can play a role in inflammatory and immune periapical responses. © 2014 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. The roadmap of WT1 protein expression in the human fetal heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duim, Sjoerd N; Smits, Anke M; Kruithof, Boudewijn P T; Goumans, Marie-José

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor Wilms' Tumor-1 (WT1) is essential for cardiac development. Deletion of Wt1 in mice results in disturbed epicardial and myocardial formation and lack of cardiac vasculature, causing embryonic lethality. Little is known about the role of WT1 in the human fetal heart. Therefore, as a first step, we analyzed the expression pattern of WT1 protein during human cardiac development from week 4 till week 20. WT1 expression was apparent in epicardial, endothelial and endocardial cells in a spatiotemporal manner. The expression of WT1 follows a pattern starting at the epicardium and extending towards the lumen of the heart, with differences in timing and expression levels between the atria and ventricles. The expression of WT1 in cardiac arterial endothelial cells reduces in time, whereas WT1 expression in the endothelial cells of cardiac veins and capillaries remains present at all stages studied. This study provides for the first time a detailed description of the expression of WT1 protein during human cardiac development, which indicates an important role for WT1 also in human cardiogenesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. LINE FUSION GENES: a database of LINE expression in human genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Hong-Seog

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Long Interspersed Nuclear Elements (LINEs are the most abundant retrotransposons in humans. About 79% of human genes are estimated to contain at least one segment of LINE per transcription unit. Recent studies have shown that LINE elements can affect protein sequences, splicing patterns and expression of human genes. Description We have developed a database, LINE FUSION GENES, for elucidating LINE expression throughout the human gene database. We searched the 28,171 genes listed in the NCBI database for LINE elements and analyzed their structures and expression patterns. The results show that the mRNA sequences of 1,329 genes were affected by LINE expression. The LINE expression types were classified on the basis of LINEs in the 5' UTR, exon or 3' UTR sequences of the mRNAs. Our database provides further information, such as the tissue distribution and chromosomal location of the genes, and the domain structure that is changed by LINE integration. We have linked all the accession numbers to the NCBI data bank to provide mRNA sequences for subsequent users. Conclusion We believe that our work will interest genome scientists and might help them to gain insight into the implications of LINE expression for human evolution and disease. Availability http://www.primate.or.kr/line

  4. Similarity of GATA-3 Expression between Rat and Human Mammary Glands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Yuichi; Yoshizawa, Katsuhiko; Emoto, Yuko; Yuki, Michiko; Yuri, Takashi; Shikata, Nobuaki; Tsubura, Airo

    2014-07-01

    The GATA family members are zinc finger transcription factors involved in cell differentiation and proliferation. In particular, GATA-3 is necessary for mammary gland maturation and is a useful marker in the characterization of mammary carcinoma in humans. The expression of GATA-3 protein in normal mammary glands, fibroadenomas and carcinomas was immunohistochemically compared in female rats and humans. In normal mammary glands of rats and humans, scattered luminal cells in the acini and whole ductal epithelial cells were positive for GATA-3 in the nuclei. No positive cells were detected in rat or human fibroadenomas. In rat and human mammary carcinomas, the nuclei of proliferating luminal-derived cancer cells expressed GATA-3. Therefore, GATA-3 protein is a candidate marker for mammary carcinoma in rats as well as humans.

  5. Characterization of a novel human scavenger receptor cysteine-rich molecule SCART1 expressed by lymphocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, D.; Fink, D. R.; Steffensen, M. A.

    2013-01-01

    a member of the SRCR superfamily, mSCART1, which primarily is expressed on a large subset of γδ T cells in mice. Here we report the cloning and characterization of human SCART1 (hSCART1) mainly expressed by CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes. The hSCART1 gene maps to chromosome 10, region q26.3, a region...... domain. Shorter splice forms have also been isolated. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis on human blood-fractions has shown that hSCART1 is expressed primarily by CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes with either αβ or γδ T cell receptors, and real-time PCR on 22 different human tissues showed high expression...

  6. Expression of a humanized viral 2A-mediated lux operon efficiently generates autonomous bioluminescence in human cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingting Xu

    Full Text Available Expression of autonomous bioluminescence from human cells was previously reported to be impossible, suggesting that all bioluminescent-based mammalian reporter systems must therefore require application of a potentially influential chemical substrate. While this was disproven when the bacterial luciferase (lux cassette was demonstrated to function in a human cell, its expression required multiple genetic constructs, was functional in only a single cell type, and generated a significantly reduced signal compared to substrate-requiring systems. Here we investigate the use of a humanized, viral 2A-linked lux genetic architecture for the efficient introduction of an autobioluminescent phenotype across a variety of human cell lines.The lux cassette was codon optimized and assembled into a synthetic human expression operon using viral 2A elements as linker regions. Human kidney, breast cancer, and colorectal cancer cell lines were both transiently and stably transfected with the humanized operon and the resulting autobioluminescent phenotype was evaluated using common imaging instrumentation. Autobioluminescent cells were screened for cytotoxic effects resulting from lux expression and their utility as bioreporters was evaluated through the demonstration of repeated monitoring of single populations over a prolonged period using both a modified E-SCREEN assay for estrogen detection and a classical cytotoxic compound detection assay for the antibiotic Zeocin. Furthermore, the use of self-directed bioluminescent initiation in response to target detection was assessed to determine its amenability towards deployment as fully autonomous sensors. In all cases, bioluminescent measurements were supported with traditional genetic and transcriptomic evaluations.Our results demonstrate that the viral 2A-linked, humanized lux genetic architecture successfully produced autobioluminescent phenotypes in all cell lines tested without the induction of cytotoxicity

  7. RAGE Expression in Human T Cells: A Link between Environmental Factors and Adaptive Immune Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akirav, Eitan M.; Preston-Hurlburt, Paula; Garyu, Justin; Henegariu, Octavian; Clynes, Raphael; Schmidt, Ann Marie; Herold, Kevan C.

    2012-01-01

    The Receptor for Advanced Glycation Endproducts (RAGE) is a scavenger ligand that binds glycated endproducts as well as molecules released during cell death such as S100b and HMGB1. RAGE is expressed on antigen presenting cells where it may participate in activation of innate immune responses but its role in adaptive human immune responses has not been described. We have found that RAGE is expressed intracellularly in human T cells following TCR activation but constitutively on T cells from patients with diabetes. The levels of RAGE on T cells from patients with diabetes are not related to the level of glucose control. It co-localizes to the endosomes. Its expression increases in activated T cells from healthy control subjects but bystander cells also express RAGE after stimulation of the antigen specific T cells. RAGE ligands enhance RAGE expression. In patients with T1D, the level of RAGE expression decreases with T cell activation. RAGE+ T cells express higher levels of IL-17A, CD107a, and IL-5 than RAGE− cells from the same individual with T1D. Our studies have identified the expression of RAGE on adaptive immune cells and a role for this receptor and its ligands in modulating human immune responses. PMID:22509345

  8. Comparative analysis of peptidylarginine deiminase-2 expression in canine, feline and human mammary tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherrington, B D; Mohanan, S; Diep, A N; Fleiss, R; Sudilovsky, D; Anguish, L J; Coonrod, S A; Wakshlag, J J

    2012-01-01

    The peptidylarginine deiminase (PAD) enzyme family converts arginine residues in proteins to citrulline. In the canine mammary gland, PAD2 expression is first detected in epithelial cells in oestrus and becomes more widely expressed during dioestrus. PAD2 appears to modify nuclear histones, suggesting a role for the enzyme in chromatin remodelling and gene regulation. Recent evidence suggests that PAD2 plays a role in gene regulation in primary human breast epithelial cells. PAD2 may therefore be involved in gene regulation as it relates to mammary development, the oestrus cycle and potentially to neoplasia. The aim of the present study was to determine whether PAD2 expression was increased or decreased in mammary carcinoma compared with normal mammary tissue. A human mammary tissue microarray and archival surgical biopsy tissues from canine and feline mammary tumours were used to demonstrate differential expression of PAD2 in mammary carcinoma that appeared to be consistent across species. Normal human and canine mammary epithelium showed strong cytoplasmic and nuclear expression of PAD2, but there was reduced PAD2 expression in mammary carcinomas from both species. Feline mammary carcinomas had complete loss of nuclear PAD2 expression. Loss of nuclear PAD2 expression may therefore represent a marker of progression towards more aggressive neoplasia. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Cloning, Sequencing, and the Expression of the Elusive Sarcomeric TPM4α Isoform in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipak K. Dube

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In mammals, tropomyosin is encoded by four known TPM genes (TPM1, TPM2, TPM3, and TPM4 each of which can generate a number of TPM isoforms via alternative splicing and/or using alternate promoters. In humans, the sarcomeric isoform(s of each of the TPM genes, except for the TPM4, have been known for a long time. Recently, on the basis of computational analyses of the human genome sequence, the predicted sequence of TPM4α has been posted in GenBank. We designed primer-pairs for RT-PCR and showed the expression of the transcripts of TPM4α and a novel isoform TPM4δ in human heart and skeletal muscle. qRT-PCR shows that the relative expression of TPM4α and TPM4δ is higher in human cardiac muscle. Western blot analyses using CH1 monoclonal antibodies show the absence of the expression of TPM4δ protein (~28 kDa in human heart muscle. 2D western blot analyses with the same antibody show the expression of at least nine distinct tropomyosin molecules with a mass ~32 kD and above in adult heart. By Mass spectrometry, we determined the amino acid sequences of the extracted proteins from these spots. Spot “G” reveals the putative expression of TPM4α along with TPM1α protein in human adult heart.

  10. Epidermal growth factor increases LRF/Pokemon expression in human prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Himanshu; Aggarwal, Anshu; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2011-10-01

    Leukemia/lymphoma related factor/POK erythroid myeloid ontogenic factor (LRF/Pokemon) is a member of the POK family of proteins that promotes oncogenesis in several forms of cancer. Recently, we found higher LRF expression in human breast and prostate carcinomas compared to the corresponding normal tissues. The aim of this study was to examine the regulation of LRF expression in human prostate cells. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) and its receptors mediate several tumorigenic cascades that regulate cell differentiation, proliferation, migration and survival of prostate cancer cells. There was significantly higher level of LRF expression in the nucleus of LNCaP and PC-3 cells than RWPE-1 cells. A significant increase in LRF expression was observed with increasing doses of EGF in more aggressive and androgen-sensitive prostate cancer cells suggesting that EGF signaling pathway is critical in upregulating the expression of LRF/Pokemon to promote oncogenesis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Mosquito Passage Dramatically Changes var Gene Expression in Controlled Human Plasmodium falciparum Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, Anna; Petter, Michaela; Krumkamp, Ralf; Esen, Meral; Held, Jana; Scholz, Judith A M; Li, Tao; Sim, B Kim Lee; Hoffman, Stephen L; Kremsner, Peter G; Mordmüller, Benjamin; Duffy, Michael F; Tannich, Egbert

    2016-04-01

    Virulence of the most deadly malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum is linked to the variant surface antigen PfEMP1, which is encoded by about 60 var genes per parasite genome. Although the expression of particular variants has been associated with different clinical outcomes, little is known about var gene expression at the onset of infection. By analyzing controlled human malaria infections via quantitative real-time PCR, we show that parasite populations from 18 volunteers expressed virtually identical transcript patterns that were dominated by the subtelomeric var gene group B and, to a lesser extent, group A. Furthermore, major changes in composition and frequency of var gene transcripts were detected between the parental parasite culture that was used to infect mosquitoes and Plasmodia recovered from infected volunteers, suggesting that P. falciparum resets its var gene expression during mosquito passage and starts with the broad expression of a specific subset of var genes when entering the human blood phase.

  12. Effects of bright light exposure during daytime on peripheral clock gene expression in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Maki; Wakamura, Tomoko; Morita, Takeshi; Okamoto, Akihiko; Akashi, Makoto; Matsui, Takuya; Sato, Motohiko

    2017-06-01

    Light is the strongest synchronizer controlling circadian rhythms. The intensity and duration of light change throughout the year, thereby influencing body weight, food preferences, and melatonin secretion in humans and animals. Although the expression of clock genes has been examined using human samples, it currently remains unknown whether bright light during the daytime affects the expression of these genes in humans. Therefore, we herein investigated the effects of bright light exposure during the daytime on clock gene expression in the hair follicular and root cells of the human scalp. Seven healthy men (20.4 ± 2.2 years old; 172.3 ± 5.8 cm; 64.3 ± 8.5 kg; BMI 21.7 ± 3.1 kg/m 2 , mean ± SD) participated in this study. Subjects completed 3-day experimental sessions twice in 1 month during which they were exposed to bright and dim light conditions. The mRNA expression of Per1-3, Cry1-2, Rev-erb-α (Nr1d1), Rev-erb-β (Nr1d2), and Dec1 was analyzed using branched DNA probes. No significant changes were observed in the expression of Per1, Per2, Per3, Cry1, Cry2, Rev-erb-α (Nr1d1), or Dec1 following exposure to bright light conditions. However, the expression of Rev-erb-β (Nr1d2) tended to be stronger under bright light than dim light conditions. These results suggest that the bright light stimulus did not influence the expression of clock genes in humans. Long-lasting bright light exposure during the daytime may be required to change the expression of clock genes in humans.

  13. Expression pattern of the human ABC transporters in pluripotent embryonic stem cells and in their derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdei, Zsuzsa; Lőrincz, Réka; Szebényi, Kornélia; Péntek, Adrienn; Varga, Nóra; Likó, István; Várady, György; Szakács, Gergely; Orbán, Tamás I; Sarkadi, Balázs; Apáti, Agota

    2014-09-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters have key roles in various physiological functions as well as providing chemical defense and stress tolerance in human tissues. In this study, we have examined the expression pattern of all ABC proteins in pluripotent human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and in their differentiated progenies. We paid special attention to the cellular expression and localization of multidrug transporter ABC proteins. Stem cell differentiation was carried out without chemical induction or cell sorting, and specialized cell types were separated mechanically. Cellular features regarding pluripotency and tissue identity, as well as ABC transporter expression were studied by flow cytomtery, immuno-microscopy, and qPCR-based low-density arrays. Pluripotent hESCs and differentiated cell types (cardiomyocytes, neuronal cells, and mesenchymal stem cells) were distinguished by morphology, immunostaining markers, and selected mRNA expression patterns. We found that the mRNA expression levels of the 48 human ABC proteins also clearly distinguished the pluripotent and the respective differentiated cell types. When multidrug and lipid transporter ABC protein expression was examined by using well characterized specific antibodies by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy, the protein expression data corresponded well to the mRNA expression results. Moreover, the cellular localization of these important human ABC transporter proteins could be established in the pluripotent and differentiated hESC derived samples. These studies provide valuable information regarding ABC protein expression in human stem cells and their differentiated offspring. The results may also help to obtain further information concerning the specialized cellular functions of selected ABC transporters. © 2014 Clinical Cytometry Society.

  14. Modulation of SOCS protein expression influences the interferon responsiveness of human melanoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesinski, Gregory B; Zimmerer, Jason M; Kreiner, Melanie; Trefry, John; Bill, Matthew A; Young, Gregory S; Becknell, Brian; Carson, William E III

    2010-01-01

    Endogenously produced interferons can regulate the growth of melanoma cells and are administered exogenously as therapeutic agents to patients with advanced cancer. We investigated the role of negative regulators of interferon signaling known as suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS) in mediating interferon-resistance in human melanoma cells. Basal and interferon-alpha (IFN-α) or interferon-gamma (IFN-γ)-induced expression of SOCS1 and SOCS3 proteins was evaluated by immunoblot analysis in a panel of n = 10 metastatic human melanoma cell lines, in human embryonic melanocytes (HEM), and radial or vertical growth phase melanoma cells. Over-expression of SOCS1 and SOCS3 proteins in melanoma cells was achieved using the PINCO retroviral vector, while siRNA were used to inhibit SOCS1 and SOCS3 expression. Tyr 701 -phosphorylated STAT1 (P-STAT1) was measured by intracellular flow cytometry and IFN-stimulated gene expression was measured by Real Time PCR. SOCS1 and SOCS3 proteins were expressed at basal levels in melanocytes and in all melanoma cell lines examined. Expression of the SOCS1 and SOCS3 proteins was also enhanced following stimulation of a subset of cell lines with IFN-α or IFN-γ. Over-expression of SOCS proteins in melanoma cell lines led to significant inhibition of Tyr 701 -phosphorylated STAT1 (P-STAT1) and gene expression following stimulation with IFN-α (IFIT2, OAS-1, ISG-15) or IFN-γ (IRF1). Conversely, siRNA inhibition of SOCS1 and SOCS3 expression in melanoma cells enhanced their responsiveness to interferon stimulation. These data demonstrate that SOCS proteins are expressed in human melanoma cell lines and their modulation can influence the responsiveness of melanoma cells to IFN-α and IFN-γ

  15. Empathy toward virtual humans depicting a known or unknown person expressing pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchard, Stéphane; Bernier, François; Boivin, Éric; Dumoulin, Stéphanie; Laforest, Mylène; Guitard, Tanya; Robillard, Geneviève; Monthuy-Blanc, Johana; Renaud, Patrice

    2013-01-01

    This study is about pain expressed by virtual humans and empathy in users immersed in virtual reality. It focuses on whether people feel more empathy toward the pain of a virtual human when the virtual human is a realistic representation of a known individual, as opposed to an unknown person, and if social presence is related to users' empathy toward a virtual human's pain. The 42 participants were immersed in virtual reality using a large immersive cube with images retro projected on all six faces (CAVE-Like system) where they can interact in real time with virtual characters. The first immersion (baseline/control) was with a virtual animal, followed by immersions involving discussions with a known virtual human (i.e., the avatar of a person they were familiar with) or an unknown virtual human. During the verbal exchanges in virtual reality, the virtual humans expressed acute and very strong pain. The pain reactions were identical in terms of facial expressions, and verbal and nonverbal behaviors. The Conditions by Time interactions in the repeated measures analyses of variance revealed that participants were empathic toward both virtual humans, yet more empathic toward the known virtual human. Multivariate regression analyses revealed that participants' feeling of social presence--impression that the known virtual character is really there, with them--was a significant predictor of empathy.

  16. Human hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines exhibit multidrug resistance unrelated to MRD1 gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, D W; Lu, Y G; Chin, K V; Pastan, I; Gottesman, M M

    1991-03-01

    Multidrug resistance of human cancer cells may result from expression of P-glycoprotein, the product of the MRD1 gene, acting as an energy-dependent drug efflux pump. However, direct evidence that expression of the MDR1 gene contributes to the multidrug resistance of human liver carcinomas has not been established. In this study, we tested five cell lines derived from human hepatocellular carcinomas for sensitivity to a variety of drugs used widely as anticancer agents; these included vinblastine, doxorubicin, actinomycin D, mitomycin C, 5-fluorouracil, 6-mercaptopurine, melphalan, methotrexate, cis-platinum and etoposide (VP-16). All five hepatoma cell lines were resistant at different levels to these chemicals compared to human KB cells. Although it has been demonstrated that resistance to vinblastine, colchicine, doxorubicin and actinomycin D in human multidrug-resistant cells is associated with overexpression of P-glycoprotein, very little expression of P-glycoprotein was found in these human hepatoma cells. Neither verapamil nor quinidine, inhibitors of the drug efflux pump, were able to overcome multidrug resistance in hepatoma cells. These results indicate that the multidrug resistance phenotype in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells cannot be attributed to expression of the MDR1 gene, but that novel mechanisms may account for the resistance of these cancer cells.

  17. Elevated expression and potential roles of human Sp5, a member of Sp transcription factor family, in human cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yongxin; Guo Yingqiu; Ge Xijin; Itoh, Hirotaka; Watanabe, Akira; Fujiwara, Takeshi; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Aburatani, Hiroyuki

    2006-01-01

    In this report, we describe the expression and function of human Sp5, a member of the Sp family of zinc finger transcription factors. Like other family members, the Sp5 protein contains a Cys2His2 zinc finger DNA binding domain at the C-terminus. Our experiments employing Gal4-Sp5 fusion proteins reveal multiple transcriptional domains, including a N-terminal activity domain, an intrinsic repressive element, and a C-terminal synergistic domain. Elevated expression of Sp5 was noted in several human tumors including hepatocellular carcinoma, gastric cancer, and colon cancer. To study the effects of the Sp5 protein on growth properties of human cancer cells and facilitate the identification of its downstream genes, we combined an inducible gene expression system with microarray analysis to screen for its transcriptional targets. Transfer of Sp5 into MCF-7 cells that expressed no detectable endogenous Sp5 protein elicited significant growth promotion activity. Several of the constitutively deregulated genes have been associated with tumorigenesis (CDC25C, CEACAM6, TMPRSS2, XBP1, MYBL1, ABHD2, and CXCL12) and Wnt/β-Catenin signaling pathways (BAMBI, SIX1, IGFBP5, AES, and p21 WAF1 ). This information could be utilized for further mechanistic research and for devising optimized therapeutic strategies against human cancers

  18. Epitopes of human immunodeficiency virus regulatory proteins tat, nef, and rev are expressed in normal human tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parmentier, H. K.; van Wichen, D. F.; Meyling, F. H.; Goudsmit, J.; Schuurman, H. J.

    1992-01-01

    The expression of regulatory proteins tat, rev, and nef of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) and tat of HIV-2 was studied in frozen sections of lymph nodes from HIV-1-infected individuals, and various tissues from uninfected persons. In HIV-1-positive lymph nodes, monoclonal antibodies to

  19. Rate of evolution in brain-expressed genes in humans and other primates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hurng-Yi Wang

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Brain-expressed genes are known to evolve slowly in mammals. Nevertheless, since brains of higher primates have evolved rapidly, one might expect acceleration in DNA sequence evolution in their brain-expressed genes. In this study, we carried out full-length cDNA sequencing on the brain transcriptome of an Old World monkey (OWM and then conducted three-way comparisons among (i mouse, OWM, and human, and (ii OWM, chimpanzee, and human. Although brain-expressed genes indeed appear to evolve more rapidly in species with more advanced brains (apes > OWM > mouse, a similar lineage effect is observable for most other genes. The broad inclusion of genes in the reference set to represent the genomic average is therefore critical to this type of analysis. Calibrated against the genomic average, the rate of evolution among brain-expressed genes is probably lower (or at most equal in humans than in chimpanzee and OWM. Interestingly, the trend of slow evolution in coding sequence is no less pronounced among brain-specific genes, vis-à-vis brain-expressed genes in general. The human brain may thus differ from those of our close relatives in two opposite directions: (i faster evolution in gene expression, and (ii a likely slowdown in the evolution of protein sequences. Possible explanations and hypotheses are discussed.

  20. Modulation of cytokine expression in human macrophages by endocrine-disrupting chemical Bisphenol-A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yanzhen; Mei, Chenfang [State Key Laboratory of Applied Microbiology Southern China, Guangzhou 510070 (China); Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Microbial Culture Collection and Application, Guangdong Institute of Microbiology, Guangzhou 510070 (China); Liu, Hao [Affiliated Cancer Hospital and Cancer Research Institute, Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou 510095 (China); Wang, Hongsheng [Department of Microbial and Biochemical Pharmacy, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Zeng, Guoqu; Lin, Jianhui [State Key Laboratory of Applied Microbiology Southern China, Guangzhou 510070 (China); Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Microbial Culture Collection and Application, Guangdong Institute of Microbiology, Guangzhou 510070 (China); Xu, Meiying, E-mail: xumy@gdim.cn [State Key Laboratory of Applied Microbiology Southern China, Guangzhou 510070 (China); Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Microbial Culture Collection and Application, Guangdong Institute of Microbiology, Guangzhou 510070 (China)

    2014-09-05

    Highlights: • Effects of BPA on the cytokines expression of human macrophages were investigated. • BPA increased pro-inflammation cytokines TNF-α and IL-6 production. • BPA decreased anti-inflammation IL-10 and TGF-β production. • ERα/β/ERK/NF-κB signaling involved in BPA-mediated cytokines expression. - Abstract: Exposure to environmental endocrine-disrupting chemical Bisphenol-A (BPA) is often associated with dysregulated immune homeostasis, but the mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, the effects of BPA on the cytokines responses of human macrophages were investigated. Treatment with BPA increased pro-inflammation cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) production, but decreased anti-inflammation cytokines interleukin-10 (IL-10) and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) production in THP1 macrophages, as well as in primary human macrophages. BPA effected cytokines expression through estrogen receptor α/β (ERα/β)-dependent mechanism with the evidence of ERα/β antagonist reversed the expression of cytokines. We also identified that activation of extracellular regulated protein kinases (ERK)/nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) signal cascade marked the effects of BPA on cytokines expression. Our results indicated that BPA effected inflammatory responses of macrophages via modulating of cytokines expression, and provided a new insight into the link between exposure to BPA and human health.

  1. Modulation of cytokine expression in human macrophages by endocrine-disrupting chemical Bisphenol-A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yanzhen; Mei, Chenfang; Liu, Hao; Wang, Hongsheng; Zeng, Guoqu; Lin, Jianhui; Xu, Meiying

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Effects of BPA on the cytokines expression of human macrophages were investigated. • BPA increased pro-inflammation cytokines TNF-α and IL-6 production. • BPA decreased anti-inflammation IL-10 and TGF-β production. • ERα/β/ERK/NF-κB signaling involved in BPA-mediated cytokines expression. - Abstract: Exposure to environmental endocrine-disrupting chemical Bisphenol-A (BPA) is often associated with dysregulated immune homeostasis, but the mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, the effects of BPA on the cytokines responses of human macrophages were investigated. Treatment with BPA increased pro-inflammation cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) production, but decreased anti-inflammation cytokines interleukin-10 (IL-10) and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) production in THP1 macrophages, as well as in primary human macrophages. BPA effected cytokines expression through estrogen receptor α/β (ERα/β)-dependent mechanism with the evidence of ERα/β antagonist reversed the expression of cytokines. We also identified that activation of extracellular regulated protein kinases (ERK)/nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) signal cascade marked the effects of BPA on cytokines expression. Our results indicated that BPA effected inflammatory responses of macrophages via modulating of cytokines expression, and provided a new insight into the link between exposure to BPA and human health

  2. Mapping of antigenic sites in human neuron-specific enolase by expression subcloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, G B; Reeves, I G; Day, I N

    1994-05-01

    Human serum neuron-specific enolase (NSE) is a marker of neurons and of small-cell carcinoma of the lung; improved immunoassays of NSE remain an important goal. Here, we used overlapping complementary DNA (cDNA) clones for reconstruction to express full-length recombinant NSE, and also to express a set of cloned subfragments through the prokaryotic expression vectors pUEX and pUBEX. Subfragments expressed as fusion proteins were used to characterize immunogenic and antigenic regions and epitopes and, expressed as affinity matrices, to derive purified, fractionated polyclonal antibodies. NSE epitope data can be visualized with yeast enolase-1 crystal structure coordinates: The two protein sequences align almost perfectly and are 61% identical. This approach demonstrates the complementarity of cDNA expression with techniques of polyclonal antiserum and monoclonal antibody production and with chemical peptide synthesis in the refinement of immunodiagnostic reagents.

  3. Systematic analysis of gene expression pattern in has-miR-197 over-expressed human uterine leiomyoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Jing; Wu, Xiaoli; Fu, Ziyi; Tan, Jie; Xu, Qing

    2015-10-01

    Our previous study showed that the expression of miR-197 in leiomyoma was down-regulated compared with myometrium. Further, miR-197 has been identified to affect uterine leiomyoma cell proliferation, apoptosis, and metastasis ability, though the responsible molecular mechanism has not been well elucidated. In this study, we sought to determine the expression patterns of miR-197 targeted genes and to explore their potential functions, participating Pathways and the networks that are involved in the biological behavior of human uterine leiomyoma. After transfection of human uterine leiomyoma cells with miR-197, we confirmed the expression level of miR-197 using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR), and we detected the gene expression profiles after miR-197 over-expression through DNA microarray analysis. Further, we performed GO and Pathway analysis. The dominantly dys-regulated genes, which were up- or down-regulated by more than 10-fold, compared with parental cells, were confirmed using qRT-PCR technology. Compared with the control group, miR-197 was up-regulated by 30-fold after miR-197 lentiviral transfection. The microarray data showed that 872 genes were dys-regulated by more than 2-fold in human uterine leiomyoma cells after miR-197 overexpression, including 537 up-regulated and 335 down-regulated genes. The GO analysis indicated that the dys-regulated genes were primarily involved in response to stimuli, multicellular organ processes, and the signaling of biological progression. Further, Pathway analysis data showed that these genes participated in regulating several signaling Pathways, including the JAK/STAT signaling Pathway, the Toll-like receptor signaling Pathway, and cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction. The qRT-PCR results confirmed that 17 of the 66 selected genes, which were up- or down-regulated more than 10-fold by miR-197, were consistent with the microarray results, including tumorigenesis-related genes, such as DRT7, SLC549, SFMBT2, FLJ37956

  4. Expression of SHH signaling pathway components in the developing human lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mingfeng; Wang, Hong; Teng, Hongqi; Shi, Jueping; Zhang, Yanding

    2010-10-01

    The Sonic hedgehog (Shh) cascade is crucial for the patterning of the early lung morphogenesis in mice, but its role in the developing human lung remains to be determined. In the present study, the expression patterns of SHH signaling pathway components, including SHH, PTCH1, SMO, GLI1, GLI2 and GLI3 were examined by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry, and compared with the equivalent patterns in mice. Our results showed that, as in mice, SHH was expressed in the epithelium of the developing human lung. However, SHH receptors (PTCH1 and SMO) and SHH signaling effectors (GLI1-3) were strongly detected in the human lung epithelium, but weakly in the mesenchyme, slightly different from their expressions in mice. Furthermore, the expression levels of SHH signaling pathway genes in human lung, but not that of GLI1, were subsequently downregulated at the canalicular stage evaluated by real-time PCR, coincident with a decline in the developing murine lung. In conclusion, in spite of slight differences, the considerable similarities of gene expression in human and mice suggest that conserved molecular networks regulate mammalian lung development.

  5. [Construction and expression of recombinant adenovirus containing human catalase gene in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou-Yang, Xiao-ling; Li, Ai-ling; Ning, Qi-lan; Yang, Xu-dong; Xu, Nan; Wang, Hui-lian

    2011-05-01

    To construct the adenovirus vector containing recombinant human catalase (CAT) and to express the recombinant gene in vitro. Total RNA was extracted from human leukocytes and full-length human CAT cDNA was obtained with RT-PCR method. The CAT gene was cloned into pcDNA3.1(+) vector and pcDNA3.1(+)CAT was constructed. The positive clones were confirmed by the restriction enzyme digestion and gene sequencing. The CAT gene was cloned into the entry vector pENTR1A, and pENTR1A-CAT vector was constructed. By LR reaction pENTR1A-CAT and pAd/CMV/V5-DEST was recombined in vitro, and the recombinant adenovirus pAd/CMV/V5-DEST-CAT was obtained. The positive pAd/CMV/V5-DEST-CAT was confirmed by sequencing and transfected into 293A cells with Pac I linearization and Lipofectamine 2 000, and the recombinant virus particles were packaged and amplified in the cells. The expression of CAT protein and CAT enzyme activities of the recombinant virus were determined by Western blot and 240 nm UV absorption methods. High expression of recombinant adenovirus was obtained and the expressed human catalase had high enzyme activity. Ad/CMV/V5-DEST-CAT vector containing human catalase gene has been constructed successfully; and the expressed enzyme in 293A cells has high activity.

  6. Adiponectin and Its Receptors Are Differentially Expressed in Human Tissues and Cell Lines of Distinct Origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Jasinski-Bergner

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Adiponectin is secreted by adipose tissue and exerts high abundance and an anti-inflammatory potential. However, only little information exists about the expression profiles of adiponectin and its recently identified receptor CDH13 in non-tumorous human tissues and their association to clinical parameters. Methods: The expression levels of adiponectin and CDH13 were analyzed in heart, liver, kidney, spleen, skin, blood vessels, peripheral nerve and bone marrow of 21 human body donors, in 12 human cell lines, and in purified immune effector cell populations of healthy blood donors by immunohistochemistry, Western-blot, and semi-quantitative PCR. The obtained results were then correlated to clinical parameters, including age, sex and known diseases like cardiovascular and renal diseases. Results: Adiponectin expression in renal corpuscles was significantly higher in humans with known renal diseases. A coordinated expression of adiponectin and CDH13 was observed in the myocard. High levels of adiponectin could be detected in the bone marrow, in certain lymphoid tumor cell lines and in purified immune effector cell populations of healthy donors, in particular in cytotoxic T cells. Conclusion: For the first time, the expression profiles of adiponectin and CDH13 are analyzed in many human tissues in correlation to each other and to clinical parameters.

  7. FAK-Src-paxillin system expression and disease outcome in human neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratimenos, Panagiotis; Koutroulis, Ioannis; Syriopoulou, Vasiliki; Michailidi, Christina; Delivoria-Papadopoulos, Maria; Klijanienko, Jerzy; Theocharis, Stamatios

    2017-05-01

    Neuroblastoma (NB) often presents with metastatic disease and poor survival. The need for new prognostic markers remains invaluable. The FAK-Src-Paxillin protein system is associated with aggressive phenotype in adult malignancies but is largely unexplored in pediatric NB. To assess FAK-Src-Paxillin protein expression in human NB cell lines and clinical cytology material and to delineate its association with survival. Western blot and immunohistochemistry were applied for FAK-Src-Paxillin expression in NB cell lines and 23 human cytology specimens, respectively. Protein expression in human clinical samples was correlated with clinicopathological parameters, MYCN amplification and survival. FAK, Src and Paxillin proteins are expressed in human NB cells lines, and can be detected in clinical cytology specimens from NB patients, (59%, 32% and 33% respectively). Simultaneous FAK-Src-Paxillin expression was noted in 30% of NB patients. Children with concomitant positivity FAK, Src, and Paxillin tumors, as well as MYCN amplification, had increased mortality compared to those without. FAK-Src-Paxillin system is a marker of unfavorable prognosis for human NB patients but also a promising therapeutic target.

  8. Stable expression and characterization of human PN1 and PN3 sodium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiba, Isamu; Seki, Tetsuo; Mori, Masayuki; Iizuka, Masaki; Nishimura, Seiichiro; Sasaki, Sachie; Imoto, Keiji; Barsoumian, Edward L

    2003-01-01

    Nociceptive transduction in inflammatory and neuropathic pain involves peripherally expressed voltage-gated sodium channels, such as tetrodotoxin (TTX)-sensitive PN1 and TTX-resistant PN3. We generated recombinant cell lines stably expressing the human PN1 and PN3 sodium channels in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells using inducible expression vectors. The PN1 and PN3 cDNAs were isolated from human adrenal gland and heart poly(A)+ RNAs, respectively. The recombinant human PN1 currents exhibited rapid activation and inactivation kinetics and were blocked by TTX with a half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 32.6 nM. The human PN3 channel expressed in stable transfectants showed TTX-resistant inward currents with slow inactivation kinetics. The IC50 value for TTX was 73.3 microM. The voltage-dependence of activation of the PN3 channel was shifted to the depolarizing direction, compared to that of the PN1 channel. Lidocaine and mexiletine exhibited tonic and use-dependent block of PN1 and PN3 channels. The PN1 channel was more susceptible to inhibition by mexiletine than PN3. These results suggest that stable transfectants expressing the human PN1 and PN3 sodium channels will be useful tools to define subtype selectivity for sodium channel blockers.

  9. Three-Dimensional Constraints on Human Cognition as Expressed in Human Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Christopher C.

    2015-01-01

    Those advocating the existence of a distinct language instinct generally claim that human language is not reliant on general human cognition. However, limitations on recursive patterns in human language are universally attested, from the micro-level elements of phonology, throughout the mid-level elements of morphology and syntax, and up to the…

  10. HUMAN LIVER SLICES EXPRESS THE SAME LIDOCAINE BIOTRANSFORMATION RATE AS ISOLATED HUMAN HEPATOCYTES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    OLINGA, P; MEIJER, DKF; SLOOFF, MJH; GROOTHUIS, GMM; Merema, M.T.

    1993-01-01

    In order to investigate whether liver slices are a valuable tool for the assessment of drug metabolism in human liver, we compared the phase I metabolism of lidocaine in human liver slices and hepatocytes prepared from three human livers. Lidocaine is mainly metabolised to monoethylglycinexylidide

  11. Orphan nuclear receptor Nur77 participates in human apolipoprotein A5 gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Kwang-Hoon, E-mail: ksong@kiom.re.kr [Korea Institute of Oriental Medicine, Daejeon 305-811 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-01-29

    The orphan nuclear receptor Nur77 (NR4A1) has been reported to play a crucial role in the modulation of diverse metabolic processes in liver. Here, we reported the identification of human apolipoprotein A5 (ApoA5), which implicated in lowering plasma triglyceride levels, as a novel target gene of Nur77. Nur77 induced the human ApoA5 promoter activity. Using 5'-deletion and mutagenesis of human ApoA5 promoter analysis and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, it was shown that Nur77 directly regulated human ApoA5 gene expression by binding to a Nur77 response element (AAAGGTCA) located in the proximal human ApoA5 promoter region. In addition, we demonstrated that blocking of Nur77 transcriptional activity via overexpression of dominant negative Nur77 suppressed human ApoA5 promoter activity and mRNA expression in human hepatoma cells, HepG2. Taken together, our results demonstrated that Nur77 is a novel regulator of human ApoA5 gene expression and provide a new insight into the role of this orphan nuclear receptor in lipoprotein metabolism and triglyceride homeostasis.

  12. Orphan nuclear receptor Nur77 participates in human apolipoprotein A5 gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Kwang-Hoon

    2010-01-01

    The orphan nuclear receptor Nur77 (NR4A1) has been reported to play a crucial role in the modulation of diverse metabolic processes in liver. Here, we reported the identification of human apolipoprotein A5 (ApoA5), which implicated in lowering plasma triglyceride levels, as a novel target gene of Nur77. Nur77 induced the human ApoA5 promoter activity. Using 5'-deletion and mutagenesis of human ApoA5 promoter analysis and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, it was shown that Nur77 directly regulated human ApoA5 gene expression by binding to a Nur77 response element (AAAGGTCA) located in the proximal human ApoA5 promoter region. In addition, we demonstrated that blocking of Nur77 transcriptional activity via overexpression of dominant negative Nur77 suppressed human ApoA5 promoter activity and mRNA expression in human hepatoma cells, HepG2. Taken together, our results demonstrated that Nur77 is a novel regulator of human ApoA5 gene expression and provide a new insight into the role of this orphan nuclear receptor in lipoprotein metabolism and triglyceride homeostasis.

  13. Global gene expression profiling of individual human oocytes and embryos demonstrates heterogeneity in early development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Shaw

    Full Text Available Early development in humans is characterised by low and variable embryonic viability, reflected in low fecundity and high rates of miscarriage, relative to other mammals. Data from assisted reproduction programmes provides additional evidence that this is largely mediated at the level of embryonic competence and is highly heterogeneous among embryos. Understanding the basis of this heterogeneity has important implications in a number of areas including: the regulation of early human development, disorders of pregnancy, assisted reproduction programmes, the long term health of children which may be programmed in early development, and the molecular basis of pluripotency in human stem cell populations. We have therefore investigated global gene expression profiles using polyAPCR amplification and microarray technology applied to individual human oocytes and 4-cell and blastocyst stage embryos. In order to explore the basis of any variability in detail, each developmental stage is replicated in triplicate. Our data show that although transcript profiles are highly stage-specific, within each stage they are relatively variable. We describe expression of a number of gene families and pathways including apoptosis, cell cycle and amino acid metabolism, which are variably expressed and may be reflective of embryonic developmental competence. Overall, our data suggest that heterogeneity in human embryo developmental competence is reflected in global transcript profiles, and that the vast majority of existing human embryo gene expression data based on pooled oocytes and embryos need to be reinterpreted.

  14. Comparative Analysis of Gene Expression for Convergent Evolution of Camera Eye Between Octopus and Human

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogura, Atsushi; Ikeo, Kazuho; Gojobori, Takashi

    2004-01-01

    Although the camera eye of the octopus is very similar to that of humans, phylogenetic and embryological analyses have suggested that their camera eyes have been acquired independently. It has been known as a typical example of convergent evolution. To study the molecular basis of convergent evolution of camera eyes, we conducted a comparative analysis of gene expression in octopus and human camera eyes. We sequenced 16,432 ESTs of the octopus eye, leading to 1052 nonredundant genes that have matches in the protein database. Comparing these 1052 genes with 13,303 already-known ESTs of the human eye, 729 (69.3%) genes were commonly expressed between the human and octopus eyes. On the contrary, when we compared octopus eye ESTs with human connective tissue ESTs, the expression similarity was quite low. To trace the evolutionary changes that are potentially responsible for camera eye formation, we also compared octopus-eye ESTs with the completed genome sequences of other organisms. We found that 1019 out of the 1052 genes had already existed at the common ancestor of bilateria, and 875 genes were conserved between humans and octopuses. It suggests that a larger number of conserved genes and their similar gene expression may be responsible for the convergent evolution of the camera eye. PMID:15289475

  15. Development and evaluation of new mask protocols for gene expression profiling in humans and chimpanzees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siegmund Kimberly D

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cross-species gene expression analyses using oligonucleotide microarrays designed to evaluate a single species can provide spurious results due to mismatches between the interrogated transcriptome and arrayed probes. Based on the most recent human and chimpanzee genome assemblies, we developed updated and accessible probe masking methods that allow human Affymetrix oligonucleotide microarrays to be used for robust genome-wide expression analyses in both species. In this process, only data from oligonucleotide probes predicted to have robust hybridization sensitivity and specificity for both transcriptomes are retained for analysis. Results To characterize the utility of this resource, we applied our mask protocols to existing expression data from brains, livers, hearts, testes, and kidneys derived from both species and determined the effects probe numbers have on expression scores of specific transcripts. In all five tissues, probe sets with decreasing numbers of probes showed non-linear trends towards increased variation in expression scores. The relationships between expression variation and probe number in brain data closely matched those observed in simulated expression data sets subjected to random probe masking. However, there is evidence that additional factors affect the observed relationships between gene expression scores and probe number in tissues such as liver and kidney. In parallel, we observed that decreasing the number of probes within probe sets lead to linear increases in both gained and lost inferences of differential cross-species expression in all five tissues, which will affect the interpretation of expression data subject to masking. Conclusion We introduce a readily implemented and updated resource for human and chimpanzee transcriptome analysis through a commonly used microarray platform. Based on empirical observations derived from the analysis of five distinct data sets, we provide novel guidelines

  16. The orphan nuclear receptor Nur77 regulates decidual prolactin expression in human endometrial stromal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Yue; Hu, Yali; Zhao, Jing; Zhen, Xin; Yan, Guijun; Sun, Haixiang

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Decidually produced PRL plays a key role during pregnancy. → Overexpression of Nur77 increased PRL mRNA expression and enhanced decidual PRL promoter activity. → Knockdown of Nur77 decreased decidual PRL secretion induced by 8-Br-cAMP and MPA. → Nur77 is a novel transcription factor that plays an active role in decidual prolactin expression. -- Abstract: Prolactin (PRL) is synthesized and released by several extrapituitary tissues, including decidualized stromal cells. Despite the important role of decidual PRL during pregnancy, little is understood about the factors involved in the proper regulation of decidual PRL expression. Here we present evidence that the transcription factor Nur77 plays an active role in decidual prolactin expression in human endometrial stromal cells (hESCs). Nur77 mRNA expression in hESCs was significantly increased after decidualization stimulated by 8-Br-cAMP and medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA). Adenovirus-mediated overexpression of Nur77 in hESCs markedly increased PRL mRNA expression and enhanced decidual PRL promoter (dPRL/-332Luc) activity in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, knockdown of Nur77 in hESCs significantly decreased decidual PRL promoter activation and substantially attenuated PRL mRNA expression and PRL secretion (P < 0.01) induced by 8-Br-cAMP and MPA. These results demonstrate that Nur77 is a novel transcription factor that contributes significantly to the regulation of prolactin gene expression in human endometrial stromal cells.

  17. The orphan nuclear receptor Nur77 regulates decidual prolactin expression in human endometrial stromal cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Yue; Hu, Yali; Zhao, Jing; Zhen, Xin [Reproductive Medicine Center, The Affiliated Drum Tower Hospital of Nanjing University Medical School, Nanjing 210008 (China); Yan, Guijun, E-mail: yanguijun33@gmail.com [Reproductive Medicine Center, The Affiliated Drum Tower Hospital of Nanjing University Medical School, Nanjing 210008 (China); Sun, Haixiang, E-mail: stevensunz@163.com [Reproductive Medicine Center, The Affiliated Drum Tower Hospital of Nanjing University Medical School, Nanjing 210008 (China)

    2011-01-14

    Research highlights: {yields} Decidually produced PRL plays a key role during pregnancy. {yields} Overexpression of Nur77 increased PRL mRNA expression and enhanced decidual PRL promoter activity. {yields} Knockdown of Nur77 decreased decidual PRL secretion induced by 8-Br-cAMP and MPA. {yields} Nur77 is a novel transcription factor that plays an active role in decidual prolactin expression. -- Abstract: Prolactin (PRL) is synthesized and released by several extrapituitary tissues, including decidualized stromal cells. Despite the important role of decidual PRL during pregnancy, little is understood about the factors involved in the proper regulation of decidual PRL expression. Here we present evidence that the transcription factor Nur77 plays an active role in decidual prolactin expression in human endometrial stromal cells (hESCs). Nur77 mRNA expression in hESCs was significantly increased after decidualization stimulated by 8-Br-cAMP and medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA). Adenovirus-mediated overexpression of Nur77 in hESCs markedly increased PRL mRNA expression and enhanced decidual PRL promoter (dPRL/-332Luc) activity in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, knockdown of Nur77 in hESCs significantly decreased decidual PRL promoter activation and substantially attenuated PRL mRNA expression and PRL secretion (P < 0.01) induced by 8-Br-cAMP and MPA. These results demonstrate that Nur77 is a novel transcription factor that contributes significantly to the regulation of prolactin gene expression in human endometrial stromal cells.

  18. Decreasing lncRNA HOTAIR expression inhibits human colorectal cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Jun; Ni, Yaoyao; He, Xiangfeng; Wu, Di; Li, Miao; Wu, Songyan; Zhang, Rong; Guo, Mei; Zhao, Fengsu

    2016-01-01

    Research on the relationship between aberrant long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) and cancer stem cell (CSC) biology in cancer patients has been recently gaining attention. The goal of this study was to investigate whether the decreasing lncRNA HOTAIR expression would inhibit human colorectal cancer (CRC) stem cells. CD133(+)CSCs were isolated from human CRC LoVo cell line by using a magnetic-activated cell sorting system, and were transfected with the expression vector-based small hairpin RNA targeting HOTAIR (shHOTAIR). The ability of cellular proliferation, migration, invasion, colony-forming, and the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-associated molecule expression as well as the tumorigenicity of CD133(+)-shHOTAIR were evaluated by the MTT, wound-healing, cellular invasion, colony formation and Western blot assays, respectively. This study found that, when compared with control cells in vitro, CD133(+)-shHOTAIR exhibited the decreased HOTAIR expression, suppressed cellular proliferation, migration, invasion, colony-forming, and inhibited the Vimentin expression with increased E-cadherin expression. In particular, the down-regulation of the HOTAIR expression in CD133(+)CSCs markedly attenuated the tumor growth and lung metastasis in xenograft nude mice. Taken together, this study found that down-regulating the HOTAIR expression in CD133(+)CSCs could serve as a potential anti-cancer regimen to inhibit the invasiveness and metastasis of CRC CSCs.

  19. Expression patterns of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase and nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase in human malignant lymphomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olesen, Uffe Høgh; Hastrup, Nina; Sehested, Maxwell

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine in human malignant lymphomas the expression patterns of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) and nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase (NAPRT), the primary, rate-limiting enzymes in the synthesis of NAD+. NAMPT is a potential biomarker for sensitivity to NAMPT inhibitors and NAPRT is a biomarker for the use of nicotinic acid as a chemoprotectant in treatment with NAMPT inhibitors. The NAMPT inhibitor, APO866, is currently in clinical phase II trials in lymphomas. The expression of NAMPT and NAPRT was investigated in 53 samples of malignant lymphomas (diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, follicular B-cell lymphoma, Hodgkin's lymphoma and peripheral T-cell lymphoma). The expression of NAMPT was generally high in the more aggressive malignant lymphomas, with >80% strong expression, whereas the expression in the more indolent follicular lymphoma (FL) was significantly lower (>75% moderate or low expression, p = 0.0002). NAMPT was very highly expressed in Hodgkin Reed-Sternberg cells in Hodgkin's lymphoma. NAPRT expression was more varied (p > 0.0001) with 30-50% low expression except for Hodgkin's lymphoma where 85% displayed low expression (p = 0.0024). In conclusion, FL are a promising target for NAMPT inhibitors whereas substantial subsets of malignant lymphomas especially in Hodgkin lymphoma may be suitable for a combination treatment with nicotinic acid and NAMPT inhibitors. © 2011 The Authors. APMIS © 2011 APMIS.

  20. A Novel Method for Gene Expression Mapping of Metastatic Competence in Human Bladder Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Wu

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Expression profiling by DNA microarray analysis has provided insights into molecular alterations that underpin cancer progression and metastasis. Although differential expression of microarray-defined probes can be related to numerical or structural chromosomal alterations, it is unclear if such changes are also clustered in distinct chromosomes or genomic regions and whether chromosomal alterations always reflect changes in gene expression. Here we apply the dChip algorithm and a novel technique to test the hypothesis that expression changes occurring as a function of tumor progression and metastasis are nonrandomly distributed. Expression profiling of a human xenograff model of lung metastasis phenotype indicates that chromosomes 2, 11, and 20 contain higher percentages of differentially expressed genes (P<.05. Furthermore, we show that a number of differentially expressed probes mapped to chromosome 17q, defining the existence of an expression “hot spot” corresponding to an area of gain determined by comparative genomic hybridization (CGH. Interestingly, other areas of gains detected by CGH were not associated with expression hot spots. In summary, we show that gene expression changes during bladder cancer lung metastasis occur nonrandomly in specific chromosomes and intrachromosomal locations.

  1. PERT: A Method for Expression Deconvolution of Human Blood Samples from Varied Microenvironmental and Developmental Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csaszar, Elizabeth; Yu, Mei; Morris, Quaid; Zandstra, Peter W.

    2012-01-01

    The cellular composition of heterogeneous samples can be predicted using an expression deconvolution algorithm to decompose their gene expression profiles based on pre-defined, reference gene expression profiles of the constituent populations in these samples. However, the expression profiles of the actual constituent populations are often perturbed from those of the reference profiles due to gene expression changes in cells associated with microenvironmental or developmental effects. Existing deconvolution algorithms do not account for these changes and give incorrect results when benchmarked against those measured by well-established flow cytometry, even after batch correction was applied. We introduce PERT, a new probabilistic expression deconvolution method that detects and accounts for a shared, multiplicative perturbation in the reference profiles when performing expression deconvolution. We applied PERT and three other state-of-the-art expression deconvolution methods to predict cell frequencies within heterogeneous human blood samples that were collected under several conditions (uncultured mono-nucleated and lineage-depleted cells, and culture-derived lineage-depleted cells). Only PERT's predicted proportions of the constituent populations matched those assigned by flow cytometry. Genes associated with cell cycle processes were highly enriched among those with the largest predicted expression changes between the cultured and uncultured conditions. We anticipate that PERT will be widely applicable to expression deconvolution strategies that use profiles from reference populations that vary from the corresponding constituent populations in cellular state but not cellular phenotypic identity. PMID:23284283

  2. Expression of Pluripotency Markers in Nonpluripotent Human Neural Stem and Progenitor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Per Henrik; Benedikz, Eirikur; Uhlén, Per; Hovatta, Outi; Sundström, Erik

    2017-06-15

    Nonpluripotent neural progenitor cells (NPCs) derived from the human fetal central nervous system were found to express a number of messenger RNA (mRNA) species associated with pluripotency, such as NANOG, REX1, and OCT4. The expression was restricted to small subpopulations of NPCs. In contrast to pluripotent stem cells, there was no coexpression of the pluripotency-associated genes studied. Although the expression of these genes rapidly declined during the in vitro differentiation of NPCs, we found no evidence that the discrete expression was associated with the markers of multipotent neural stem cells (CD133 + /CD24 lo ), the capacity of sphere formation, or high cell proliferation rates. The rate of cell death among NPCs expressing pluripotency-associated genes was also similar to that of other NPCs. Live cell imaging showed that NANOG- and REX1-expressing NPCs continuously changed morphology, as did the nonexpressing cells. Depletion experiments showed that after the complete removal of the subpopulations of NANOG- and REX1-expressing NPCs, the expression of these genes appeared in other NPCs within a few days. The percentage of NANOG- and REX1-expressing cells returned to that observed before depletion. Our results are best explained by a model in which there is stochastic transient expression of pluripotency-associated genes in proliferating NPCs.

  3. Differences in gene expression profiles between human preimplantation embryos cultured in two different IVF culture media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleijkers, Sander H M; Eijssen, Lars M T; Coonen, Edith; Derhaag, Josien G; Mantikou, Eleni; Jonker, Martijs J; Mastenbroek, Sebastiaan; Repping, Sjoerd; Evers, Johannes L H; Dumoulin, John C M; van Montfoort, Aafke P A

    2015-10-01

    Is gene expression in human preimplantation embryos affected by the medium used for embryo culture in vitro during an IVF treatment? Six days of in vitro culture of human preimplantation embryos resulted in medium-dependent differences in expression level of genes involved in apoptosis, protein degradation, metabolism and cell-cycle regulation. Several human studies have shown an effect of culture medium on embryo development, pregnancy outcome and birthweight. However, the underlying mechanisms in human embryos are still unknown. In animal models of human development, it has been demonstrated that culture of preimplantation embryos in vitro affects gene expression. In humans, it has been found that culture medium affects gene expression of cryopreserved embryos that, after thawing, were cultured in two different media for 2 more days. In a multicenter trial, women were randomly assigned to two culture medium groups [G5 and human tubal fluid (HTF)]. Data on embryonic development were collected for all embryos. In one center, embryos originating from two pronuclei (2PN) zygotes that were not selected for transfer or cryopreservation on Day 2 or 3 because of lower morphological quality, were cultured until Day 6 and used in this study, if couples consented. Ten blastocysts each from the G5 and HTF study groups, matched for fertilization method, maternal age and blastocyst quality, were selected and their mRNA was isolated and amplified. Embryos were examined individually for genome-wide gene expression using Agilent microarrays and PathVisio was used to identify the pathways that showed a culture medium-dependent activity. Expression of 951 genes differed significantly (P culture experiment until Day 6. This study shows that gene expression in human preimplantation embryos is altered by the culture medium used during IVF treatment and provides insight into the biological pathways that are affected. Whether these changes in gene expression have any long-term effects

  4. Presumed pluripotency markers UTF-1 and REX-1 are expressed in human adult testes and germ cell neoplasms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, D.M.; Nielsen, J.E.; Skakkebaek, N.E.

    2008-01-01

    and REX-1 during human gonadal development and in TGCT. METHODS: Expression of UTF-1 and REX-1 was studied in 52 specimens from human gonadal development and in 86 samples from TGCT. RESULTS: UTF-1 and REX-1 were expressed throughout male gonadal development. In the mature testis, UTF-1 was expressed...

  5. Multimedia Content Development as a Facial Expression Datasets for Recognition of Human Emotions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamonto, N. E.; Maulana, H.; Liliana, D. Y.; Basaruddin, T.

    2018-02-01

    Datasets that have been developed before contain facial expression from foreign people. The development of multimedia content aims to answer the problems experienced by the research team and other researchers who will conduct similar research. The method used in the development of multimedia content as facial expression datasets for human emotion recognition is the Villamil-Molina version of the multimedia development method. Multimedia content developed with 10 subjects or talents with each talent performing 3 shots with each capturing talent having to demonstrate 19 facial expressions. After the process of editing and rendering, tests are carried out with the conclusion that the multimedia content can be used as a facial expression dataset for recognition of human emotions.

  6. [Cloning and characterization of genes differentially expressed in human dental pulp cells and gingival fibroblasts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhong-dong; Wu, Ji-nan; Zhou, Lin; Ling, Jun-qi; Guo, Xi-min; Xiao, Ming-zhen; Zhu, Feng; Pu, Qin; Chai, Yu-bo; Zhao, Zhong-liang

    2007-02-01

    To study the biological properties of human dental pulp cells (HDPC) by cloning and analysis of genes differentially expressed in HDPC in comparison with human gingival fibroblasts (HGF). HDPC and HGF were cultured and identified by immunocytochemistry. HPDC and HGF subtractive cDNA library was established by PCR-based modified subtractive hybridization, genes differentially expressed by HPDC were cloned, sequenced and compared to find homogeneous sequence in GenBank by BLAST. Cloning and sequencing analysis indicate 12 genes differentially expressed were obtained, in which two were unknown genes. Among the 10 known genes, 4 were related to signal transduction, 2 were related to trans-membrane transportation (both cell membrane and nuclear membrane), and 2 were related to RNA splicing mechanisms. The biological properties of HPDC are determined by the differential expression of some genes and the growth and differentiation of HPDC are associated to the dynamic protein synthesis and secretion activities of the cell.

  7. ADAMTS8 and ADAMTS15 expression predicts survival in human breast carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Porter, Sarah; Span, Paul N; Sweep, Fred C G J

    2006-01-01

    We recently undertook expression profiling of all 19 human ADAMTS metalloproteinases (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs) in malignant and non-neoplastic breast tissue and showed that 11 of the ADAMTS genes are dysregulated in breast carcinoma. We identified a subgroup...... of ADAMTSs, based on functional and amino acid sequence similarity (ADAMTS1, 4, 5, 8 and 15), to be the focus of further study in breast carcinoma. Further RNA expression analysis by real-time PCR on a different cohort of 229 patients with breast cancer has identified ADAMTS8 as a predictor of poor overall...... breast carcinoma, fitted the expectation that relatively high expression levels of ADAMTS8 together with low expression levels of ADAMTS15 seen in human breast carcinoma are associated with a poor clinical outcome. In summary, ADAMTS8 and ADAMTS15 have emerged as novel predictors of survival in patients...

  8. Strong induction of AIM2 expression in human epidermis in acute and chronic inflammatory skin conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Koning, Heleen D; Bergboer, Judith G M; van den Bogaard, Ellen H; van Vlijmen-Willems, Ivonne M J J; Rodijk-Olthuis, Diana; Simon, Anna; Zeeuwen, Patrick L J M; Schalkwijk, Joost

    2012-12-01

    Absent in melanoma 2 (AIM2) is a double-stranded DNA receptor, and its activation initiates an interleukin-1 beta processing inflammasome. AIM2 is implicated in host defense against several pathogens, but could hypothetically also contribute to autoinflammatory or autoimmune diseases, such as is the case for NLRP3. Using thoroughly characterised antibodies, we analysed AIM2 expression in human tissues and primary cells. A strong epidermal upregulation of AIM2 protein expression was observed in several acute and chronic inflammatory skin disorders, such as psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, venous ulcera, contact dermatitis, and experimental wounds. We also found AIM2 induction by interferon-gamma in submerged and three-dimensional in vitro models of human epidermis. Our data highlight the dynamics of epidermal AIM2 expression, showing Langerhans cell and melanocyte-restricted expression in normal epidermis but a pronounced induction in subpopulations of epidermal keratinocytes under inflammatory conditions. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  9. Direct evidence of fiber type-dependent GLUT-4 expression in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaster, M; Poulsen, P; Handberg, A

    2000-01-01

    GLUT-4 expression in individual fibers of human skeletal muscles in younger and older adults was studied. Furthermore, the dependency of insulin-stimulated glucose uptake on fiber type distribution was investigated. Fiber type distribution was determined in cryosections of muscle biopsies from 8...... younger (29 yr) and 8 older (64 yr) healthy subjects, and estimates of GLUT-4 expression in individual fibers were obtained by combining immunohistochemistry and stereology. GLUT-4 was more abundantly expressed in slow compared with fast muscle fibers in both younger (P ... of slow fibers in the young (r = -0.45, P > 0.25) or in the elderly (r = 0. 11, P > 0.75) subjects. In conclusion, in human skeletal muscle, GLUT-4 expression is fiber type dependent and decreases with age, particularly in fast muscle fibers....

  10. Recombinant human CIS2 (SOCS2) protein: subcloning, expression, purification, and characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biener, Eva; Maurice, Sarah; Sandowski, Yael; Cohen, Yael; Gusakowsky, Eugene E; Hooghe, Robert; Yoshimura, Akihiko; Livnah, Oded; Gertler, Arieh

    2002-07-01

    The 1x myc-tagged cDNA encoding for human CIS2 protein was subcloned into a pET-29a+ vector in order to express and produce a recombinant S-peptide tagged and 1x myc-tagged protein in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3). The constitutively expressed protein was isolated from inclusion bodies by a simple solubilization-renaturation procedure and purified by anion-exchange chromatography on Q-Sepharose. The recombinant form was found to be pure and monomeric as judged by both SDS-PAGE and gel-filtration chromatography and its biological activity was proven by its ability to bind to the tyrosine-phosphorylated cytosolic fragment of human growth hormone receptor fused to glutathione-S-transferase. Recombinant CIS2 was compared by biochemical, immunological, and molecular methods to the CIS2 protein expressed in eukaryotic cells. This report describes the first substantial production of biologically active recombinant human CIS2.

  11. Bacterial Expression of Human Butyrylcholinesterase as a Tool for Nerve Agent Bioscavengers Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Brazzolotto

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Human butyrylcholinesterase is a performant stoichiometric bioscavenger of organophosphorous nerve agents. It is either isolated from outdated plasma or functionally expressed in eukaryotic systems. Here, we report the production of active human butyrylcholinesterase in a prokaryotic system after optimization of the primary sequence through the Protein Repair One Stop Shop process, a structure- and sequence-based algorithm for soluble bacterial expression of difficult eukaryotic proteins. The mutant enzyme was purified to homogeneity. Its kinetic parameters with substrate are similar to the endogenous human butyrylcholinesterase or recombinants produced in eukaryotic systems. The isolated protein was prone to crystallize and its 2.5-Å X-ray structure revealed an active site gorge region identical to that of previously solved structures. The advantages of this alternate expression system, particularly for the generation of butyrylcholinesterase variants with nerve agent hydrolysis activity, are discussed.

  12. Bacterial Expression of Human Butyrylcholinesterase as a Tool for Nerve Agent Bioscavengers Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazzolotto, Xavier; Igert, Alexandre; Guillon, Virginia; Santoni, Gianluca; Nachon, Florian

    2017-10-27

    Human butyrylcholinesterase is a performant stoichiometric bioscavenger of organophosphorous nerve agents. It is either isolated from outdated plasma or functionally expressed in eukaryotic systems. Here, we report the production of active human butyrylcholinesterase in a prokaryotic system after optimization of the primary sequence through the Protein Repair One Stop Shop process, a structure- and sequence-based algorithm for soluble bacterial expression of difficult eukaryotic proteins. The mutant enzyme was purified to homogeneity. Its kinetic parameters with substrate are similar to the endogenous human butyrylcholinesterase or recombinants produced in eukaryotic systems. The isolated protein was prone to crystallize and its 2.5-Å X-ray structure revealed an active site gorge region identical to that of previously solved structures. The advantages of this alternate expression system, particularly for the generation of butyrylcholinesterase variants with nerve agent hydrolysis activity, are discussed.

  13. Expression of the human growth hormone variant gene in cultured fibroblasts and transgenic mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selden, R.F.; Wagner, T.E.; Blethen, S.; Yun, J.S.; Rowe, M.E.; Goodman, H.M.

    1988-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the human growth hormone variant gene, one of the five members of the growth hormone gene family, predicts that it encodes a growth hormone-like protein. As a first step in determining whether this gene is functional in humans, the authors have expressed a mouse methallothionein I/human growth hormone variant fusion gene in mouse L cells and in transgenic mice. The growth hormone variant protein expressed in transiently transfected L cells is distinct from growth hormone itself with respect to reactivity with anti-growth hormone monoclonal antibodies, behavior during column chromatography, and isoelectric point. Transgenic mice expressing the growth hormone variant protein are 1.4- to 1.9-fold larger than nontransgenic controls, suggesting that the protein has growth-promoting properties

  14. High-resolution temporal and regional mapping of MAPT expression and splicing in human brain development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hefti, Marco M; Farrell, Kurt; Kim, SoongHo; Bowles, Kathryn R; Fowkes, Mary E; Raj, Towfique; Crary, John F

    2018-01-01

    The microtubule associated protein tau plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disease. Recent studies suggest that tau also plays a role in disorders of neuronal connectivity, including epilepsy and post-traumatic stress disorder. Animal studies have shown that the MAPT gene, which codes for the tau protein, undergoes complex pre-mRNA alternative splicing to produce multiple isoforms during brain development. Human data, particularly on temporal and regional variation in tau splicing during development are however lacking. In this study, we present the first detailed examination of the temporal and regional sequence of MAPT alternative splicing in the developing human brain. We used a novel computational analysis of large transcriptomic datasets (total n = 502 patients), quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and western blotting to examine tau expression and splicing in post-mortem human fetal, pediatric and adult brains. We found that MAPT exons 2 and 10 undergo abrupt shifts in expression during the perinatal period that are unique in the canonical human microtubule-associated protein family, while exon 3 showed small but significant temporal variation. Tau isoform expression may be a marker of neuronal maturation, temporally correlated with the onset of axonal growth. Immature brain regions such as the ganglionic eminence and rhombic lip had very low tau expression, but within more mature regions, there was little variation in tau expression or splicing. We thus demonstrate an abrupt, evolutionarily conserved shift in tau isoform expression during the human perinatal period that may be due to tau expression in maturing neurons. Alternative splicing of the MAPT pre-mRNA may play a vital role in normal brain development across multiple species and provides a basis for future investigations into the developmental and pathological functions of the tau protein.

  15. [Prediction and bioinformatics analysis of human gene expression profiling regulated by amifostine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bo; Cai, Li-Li; Chi, Xiao-Hua; Lu, Xue-Chun; Zhang, Feng; Tuo, Shuai; Zhu, Hong-Li; Liu, Li-Hong; Yan, Jiang-Wei; Tuo, Chao-Wei

    2011-06-01

    Objective of this study was to perform bioinformatics analysis of the characteristics of gene expression profiling regulated by amifostine and predict its novel potential biological function to provide a direction for further exploring pharmacological actions of amifostine and study methods. Amifostine was used as a key word to search internet-based free gene expression database including GEO, affymetrix gene chip database, GenBank, SAGE, GeneCard, InterPro, ProtoNet, UniProt and BLOCKS and the sifted amifostine-regulated gene expression profiling data was subjected to validity testing, gene expression difference analysis and functional clustering and gene annotation. The results showed that only one data of gene expression profiling regulated by amifostine was sifted from GEO database (accession: GSE3212). Through validity testing and gene expression difference analysis, significant difference (p < 0.01) was only found in 2.14% of the whole genome (460/192000). Gene annotation analysis showed that 139 out of 460 genes were known genes, in which 77 genes were up-regulated and 62 genes were down-regulated. 13 out of 139 genes were newly expressed following amifostine treatment of K562 cells, however expression of 5 genes was completely inhibited. Functional clustering displayed that 139 genes were divided into 11 categories and their biological function was involved in hematopoietic and immunologic regulation, apoptosis and cell cycle. It is concluded that bioinformatics method can be applied to analysis of gene expression profiling regulated by amifostine. Amifostine has a regulatory effect on human gene expression profiling and this action is mainly presented in biological processes including hematopoiesis, immunologic regulation, apoptosis and cell cycle and so on. The effect of amifostine on human gene expression need to be further testified in experimental condition.

  16. Regulated gene expression in cultured type II cells of adult human lung

    OpenAIRE

    Ballard, Philip L.; Lee, Jae W.; Fang, Xiaohui; Chapin, Cheryl; Allen, Lennell; Segal, Mark R.; Fischer, Horst; Illek, Beate; Gonzales, Linda W.; Kolla, Venkatadri; Matthay, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    Alveolar type II cells have multiple functions, including surfactant production and fluid clearance, which are critical for lung function. Differentiation of type II cells occurs in cultured fetal lung epithelial cells treated with dexamethasone plus cAMP and isobutylmethylxanthine (DCI) and involves increased expression of 388 genes. In this study, type II cells of human adult lung were isolated at ∼95% purity, and gene expression was determined (Affymetrix) before and after culturing 5 days...

  17. An atlas of human gene expression from massively parallel signature sequencing (MPSS)

    OpenAIRE

    Jongeneel, C. Victor; Delorenzi, Mauro; Iseli, Christian; Zhou, Daixing; Haudenschild, Christian D.; Khrebtukova, Irina; Kuznetsov, Dmitry; Stevenson, Brian J.; Strausberg, Robert L.; Simpson, Andrew J.G.; Vasicek, Thomas J.

    2005-01-01

    We have used massively parallel signature sequencing (MPSS) to sample the transcriptomes of 32 normal human tissues to an unprecedented depth, thus documenting the patterns of expression of almost 20,000 genes with high sensitivity and specificity. The data confirm the widely held belief that differences in gene expression between cell and tissue types are largely determined by transcripts derived from a limited number of tissue-specific genes, rather than by combinations of more promiscuousl...

  18. Expression profiling of human melanocytes in response to UV-B irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saioa López

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive gene expression analysis of human melanocytes was performed assessing the transcriptional profile of dark melanocytes (DM and light melanocytes (LM at basal conditions and after UV-B irradiation at different time points (6, 12 and 24 h, and in culture with different keratinocyte-conditioned media (KCM+ and KCM−. The data, previously published in [1], have been deposited in NCBI's Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO accession number: GSE70280.

  19. Hypoxia regulates microRNA expression in the human carotid body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mkrtchian, Souren; Lee, Kian Leong; Kåhlin, Jessica; Ebberyd, Anette; Poellinger, Lorenz; Fagerlund, Malin Jonsson; Eriksson, Lars I.

    2017-01-01

    The carotid body (CB) is the key sensing organ for physiological oxygen levels in the body. Under conditions of low oxygen (hypoxia), the CB plays crucial roles in signaling to the cardiorespiratory center in the medulla oblongata for the restoration of oxygen homeostasis. How hypoxia regulates gene expression in the human CB remains poorly understood. While limited information on transcriptional regulation in animal CBs is available, the identity and impact of important post-transcriptional regulators such as non-coding RNAs, and in particular miRNAs are not known. Here we show using ex vivo experiments that indeed a number of miRNAs are differentially regulated in surgically removed human CB slices when acute hypoxic conditions were applied. Analysis of the hypoxia-regulated miRNAs shows that they target biological pathways with upregulation of functions related to cell proliferation and immune response and downregulation of cell differentiation and cell death functions. Comparative analysis of the human CB miRNAome with the global miRNA expression patterns of a large number of different human tissues showed that the CB miRNAome had a unique profile which reflects its highly specialized functional status. Nevertheless, the human CB miRNAome is most closely related to the miRNA expression pattern of brain tissues indicating that they may have the most similar developmental origins. - Highlights: • Hypoxia triggers differential expression of many miRNAs in the human carotid body. • This can lead to the upregulation of proliferation and immune response functions. • CB expression profile in the carotid body resembles the miRNA expression pattern in the brain. • miRNAs are involved in the regulation of carotid body functions including oxygen sensing.

  20. Differentially expressed wound healing-related microRNAs in the human diabetic cornea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funari, Vincent A; Winkler, Michael; Brown, Jordan; Dimitrijevich, Slobodan D; Ljubimov, Alexander V; Saghizadeh, Mehrnoosh

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs are powerful gene expression regulators, but their corneal repertoire and potential changes in corneal diseases remain unknown. Our purpose was to identify miRNAs altered in the human diabetic cornea by microarray analysis, and to examine their effects on wound healing in cultured telomerase-immortalized human corneal epithelial cells (HCEC) in vitro. Total RNA was extracted from age-matched human autopsy normal (n=6) and diabetic (n=6) central corneas, Flash Tag end-labeled, and hybridized to Affymetrix® GeneChip® miRNA Arrays. Select miRNAs associated with diabetic cornea were validated by quantitative RT-PCR (Q-PCR) and by in situ hybridization (ISH) in independent samples. HCEC were transfected with human pre-miR™miRNA precursors (h-miR) or their inhibitors (antagomirs) using Lipofectamine 2000. Confluent transfected cultures were scratch-wounded with P200 pipette tip. Wound closure was monitored by digital photography. Expression of signaling proteins was detected by immunostaining and Western blot. Using microarrays, 29 miRNAs were identified as differentially expressed in diabetic samples. Two miRNA candidates showing the highest fold increased in expression in the diabetic cornea were confirmed by Q-PCR and further characterized. HCEC transfection with h-miR-146a or h-miR-424 significantly retarded wound closure, but their respective antagomirs significantly enhanced wound healing vs. controls. Cells treated with h-miR-146a or h-miR-424 had decreased p-p38 and p-EGFR staining, but these increased over control levels close to the wound edge upon antagomir treatment. In conclusion, several miRNAs with increased expression in human diabetic central corneas were found. Two such miRNAs inhibited cultured corneal epithelial cell wound healing. Dysregulation of miRNA expression in human diabetic cornea may be an important mediator of abnormal wound healing.

  1. Differentially expressed wound healing-related microRNAs in the human diabetic cornea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent A Funari

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs are powerful gene expression regulators, but their corneal repertoire and potential changes in corneal diseases remain unknown. Our purpose was to identify miRNAs altered in the human diabetic cornea by microarray analysis, and to examine their effects on wound healing in cultured telomerase-immortalized human corneal epithelial cells (HCEC in vitro. Total RNA was extracted from age-matched human autopsy normal (n=6 and diabetic (n=6 central corneas, Flash Tag end-labeled, and hybridized to Affymetrix® GeneChip® miRNA Arrays. Select miRNAs associated with diabetic cornea were validated by quantitative RT-PCR (Q-PCR and by in situ hybridization (ISH in independent samples. HCEC were transfected with human pre-miR™miRNA precursors (h-miR or their inhibitors (antagomirs using Lipofectamine 2000. Confluent transfected cultures were scratch-wounded with P200 pipette tip. Wound closure was monitored by digital photography. Expression of signaling proteins was detected by immunostaining and Western blot. Using microarrays, 29 miRNAs were identified as differentially expressed in diabetic samples. Two miRNA candidates showing the highest fold increased in expression in the diabetic cornea were confirmed by Q-PCR and further characterized. HCEC transfection with h-miR-146a or h-miR-424 significantly retarded wound closure, but their respective antagomirs significantly enhanced wound healing vs. controls. Cells treated with h-miR-146a or h-miR-424 had decreased p-p38 and p-EGFR staining, but these increased over control levels close to the wound edge upon antagomir treatment. In conclusion, several miRNAs with increased expression in human diabetic central corneas were found. Two such miRNAs inhibited cultured corneal epithelial cell wound healing. Dysregulation of miRNA expression in human diabetic cornea may be an important mediator of abnormal wound healing.

  2. Hypoxia regulates microRNA expression in the human carotid body

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mkrtchian, Souren, E-mail: souren.mkrtchian@ki.se [Section for Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institute, SE-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden); Lee, Kian Leong, E-mail: csilkl@nus.edu.sg [Cancer Science Institute of Singapore, National University of Singapore, 117599 Singapore (Singapore); Kåhlin, Jessica [Section for Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institute, SE-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden); Function Perioperative Medicine and Intensive Care, Karolinska University Hospital, SE-171 76 Stockholm (Sweden); Ebberyd, Anette [Section for Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institute, SE-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden); Poellinger, Lorenz [Cancer Science Institute of Singapore, National University of Singapore, 117599 Singapore (Singapore); Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Karolinska Institute, SE-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden); Fagerlund, Malin Jonsson; Eriksson, Lars I. [Section for Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institute, SE-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden); Function Perioperative Medicine and Intensive Care, Karolinska University Hospital, SE-171 76 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2017-03-15

    The carotid body (CB) is the key sensing organ for physiological oxygen levels in the body. Under conditions of low oxygen (hypoxia), the CB plays crucial roles in signaling to the cardiorespiratory center in the medulla oblongata for the restoration of oxygen homeostasis. How hypoxia regulates gene expression in the human CB remains poorly understood. While limited information on transcriptional regulation in animal CBs is available, the identity and impact of important post-transcriptional regulators such as non-coding RNAs, and in particular miRNAs are not known. Here we show using ex vivo experiments that indeed a number of miRNAs are differentially regulated in surgically removed human CB slices when acute hypoxic conditions were applied. Analysis of the hypoxia-regulated miRNAs shows that they target biological pathways with upregulation of functions related to cell proliferation and immune response and downregulation of cell differentiation and cell death functions. Comparative analysis of the human CB miRNAome with the global miRNA expression patterns of a large number of different human tissues showed that the CB miRNAome had a unique profile which reflects its highly specialized functional status. Nevertheless, the human CB miRNAome is most closely related to the miRNA expression pattern of brain tissues indicating that they may have the most similar developmental origins. - Highlights: • Hypoxia triggers differential expression of many miRNAs in the human carotid body. • This can lead to the upregulation of proliferation and immune response functions. • CB expression profile in the carotid body resembles the miRNA expression pattern in the brain. • miRNAs are involved in the regulation of carotid body functions including oxygen sensing.

  3. Hypoxic regulation of cytoglobin and neuroglobin expression in human normal and tumor tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emara Marwan

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cytoglobin (Cygb and neuroglobin (Ngb are recently identified globin molecules that are expressed in vertebrate tissues. Upregulation of Cygb and Ngb under hypoxic and/or ischemic conditions in vitro and in vivo increases cell survival, suggesting possible protective roles through prevention of oxidative damage. We have previously shown that Ngb is expressed in human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM cell lines, and that expression of its transcript and protein can be significantly increased after exposure to physiologically relevant levels of hypoxia. In this study, we extended this work to determine whether Cygb is also expressed in GBM cells, and whether its expression is enhanced under hypoxic conditions. We also compared Cygb and Ngb expression in human primary tumor specimens, including brain tumors, as well as in human normal tissues. Immunoreactivity of carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX, a hypoxia-inducible metalloenzyme that catalyzes the hydration of CO2 to bicarbonate, was used as an endogenous marker of hypoxia. Results Cygb transcript and protein were expressed in human GBM cells, and this expression was significantly increased in most cells following 48 h incubation under hypoxia. We also showed that Cygb and Ngb are expressed in both normal tissues and human primary cancers, including GBM. Among normal tissues, Cygb and Ngb expression was restricted to distinct cell types and was especially prominent in ductal cells. Additionally, certain normal organs (e.g. stomach fundus, small bowel showed distinct regional co-localization of Ngb, Cygb and CA IX. In most tumors, Ngb immunoreactivity was significantly greater than that of Cygb. In keeping with previous in vitro results, tumor regions that were positively stained for CA IX were also positive for Ngb and Cygb, suggesting that hypoxic upregulation of Ngb and Cygb also occurs in vivo. Conclusions Our finding of hypoxic up-regulation of Cygb/Ngb in GBM cell lines and human

  4. [Effect of cisplatin on the expression of Pokemon gene: experiment with different human lung cancer cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhi-Hong; Wang, Sheng-Fa; Yu, Liang; Wang, Ju; Cong, De-Gang; Chang, Hao; Wang, Xue-Feng; Zhang, Tie-Wa; Zhang, Jian; Fu, Kai; Jiang, Jiu-Yang

    2008-04-29

    To investigate the correlation between Pokemon gene and cisplatin mechanism. Human lung adenocarcinoma cells of the lines A549 and AGZY83-a, human lung squamous carcinoma cells of the line HE-99, and human giant cell lung cancer cells of the line 95D were cultured and cisplatin was added into the medium. Other lung cancer cells of the above mentioned lines were cultured in the medium without cisplatin and were used as control groups. RT-PCR and Western blotting were used to detect the mRNA and protein expression of Pokemon. Pokemon mRNA and protein were expressed highly in all the 4 cell lines. The Pokemon gene expression did not changed significantly after cisplatin treatment groups. There were not significant differences in the mRNA and protein expression of Pokemon among the 4 experiment groups and the control groups (all P > 0.05). Cisplatin has no effect on the Pokemon gene expression of the human lung cancer cells.

  5. Arctigenin from Arctium lappa inhibits interleukin-2 and interferon gene expression in primary human T lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Wei-Jern; Chang, Chu-Ting; Wang, Guei-Jane; Lee, Tzong-Huei; Chang, Shwu-Fen; Lu, Shao-Chun; Kuo, Yuh-Chi

    2011-03-25

    Arctium lappa (Niubang), a Chinese herbal medicine, is used to treat tissue inflammation. This study investigates the effects of arctigenin (AC), isolated from A. lappa, on anti-CD3/CD28 Ab-stimulated cell proliferation and cytokine gene expression in primary human T lymphocytes. Cell proliferation was determined with enzyme immunoassays and the tritiated thymidine uptake method. Cytokine production and gene expression were analyzed with reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. AC inhibited primary human T lymphocytes proliferation activated by anti-CD3/CD28 Ab. Cell viability test indicated that the inhibitory effects of AC on primary human T lymphocyte proliferation were not due to direct cytotoxicity. AC suppressed interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) production in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, AC decreased the IL-2 and IFN-γ gene expression in primary human T lymphocytes induced by anti-CD3/CD28 Ab. Reporter gene analyses revealed that AC decreased NF-AT-mediated reporter gene expression. AC inhibited T lymphocyte proliferation and decreased the gene expression of IL-2, IFN-γ and NF-AT.

  6. Arctigenin from Arctium lappa inhibits interleukin-2 and interferon gene expression in primary human T lymphocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Arctium lappa (Niubang), a Chinese herbal medicine, is used to treat tissue inflammation. This study investigates the effects of arctigenin (AC), isolated from A. lappa, on anti-CD3/CD28 Ab-stimulated cell proliferation and cytokine gene expression in primary human T lymphocytes. Methods Cell proliferation was determined with enzyme immunoassays and the tritiated thymidine uptake method. Cytokine production and gene expression were analyzed with reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Results AC inhibited primary human T lymphocytes proliferation activated by anti-CD3/CD28 Ab. Cell viability test indicated that the inhibitory effects of AC on primary human T lymphocyte proliferation were not due to direct cytotoxicity. AC suppressed interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) production in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, AC decreased the IL-2 and IFN-γ gene expression in primary human T lymphocytes induced by anti-CD3/CD28 Ab. Reporter gene analyses revealed that AC decreased NF-AT-mediated reporter gene expression. Conclusion AC inhibited T lymphocyte proliferation and decreased the gene expression of IL-2, IFN-γ and NF-AT. PMID:21435270

  7. Arctigenin from Arctium lappa inhibits interleukin-2 and interferon gene expression in primary human T lymphocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Shwu-Fen

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arctium lappa (Niubang, a Chinese herbal medicine, is used to treat tissue inflammation. This study investigates the effects of arctigenin (AC, isolated from A. lappa, on anti-CD3/CD28 Ab-stimulated cell proliferation and cytokine gene expression in primary human T lymphocytes. Methods Cell proliferation was determined with enzyme immunoassays and the tritiated thymidine uptake method. Cytokine production and gene expression were analyzed with reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Results AC inhibited primary human T lymphocytes proliferation activated by anti-CD3/CD28 Ab. Cell viability test indicated that the inhibitory effects of AC on primary human T lymphocyte proliferation were not due to direct cytotoxicity. AC suppressed interleukin-2 (IL-2 and interferon-γ (IFN-γ production in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, AC decreased the IL-2 and IFN-γ gene expression in primary human T lymphocytes induced by anti-CD3/CD28 Ab. Reporter gene analyses revealed that AC decreased NF-AT-mediated reporter gene expression. Conclusion AC inhibited T lymphocyte proliferation and decreased the gene expression of IL-2, IFN-γ and NF-AT.

  8. Tandem repeat variation in human and great ape populations and its impact on gene expression divergence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgin Sonay, Tugce; Carvalho, Tiago; Robinson, Mark D; Greminger, Maja P; Krützen, Michael; Comas, David; Highnam, Gareth; Mittelman, David; Sharp, Andrew; Marques-Bonet, Tomàs; Wagner, Andreas

    2015-11-01

    Tandem repeats (TRs) are stretches of DNA that are highly variable in length and mutate rapidly. They are thus an important source of genetic variation. This variation is highly informative for population and conservation genetics. It has also been associated with several pathological conditions and with gene expression regulation. However, genome-wide surveys of TR variation in humans and closely related species have been scarce due to technical difficulties derived from short-read technology. Here we explored the genome-wide diversity of TRs in a panel of 83 human and nonhuman great ape genomes, in a total of six different species, and studied their impact on gene expression evolution. We found that population diversity patterns can be efficiently captured with short TRs (repeat unit length, 1-5 bp). We examined the potential evolutionary role of TRs in gene expression differences between humans and primates by using 30,275 larger TRs (repeat unit length, 2-50 bp). Genes that contained TRs in the promoters, in their 3' untranslated region, in introns, and in exons had higher expression divergence than genes without repeats in the regions. Polymorphic small repeats (1-5 bp) had also higher expression divergence compared with genes with fixed or no TRs in the gene promoters. Our findings highlight the potential contribution of TRs to human evolution through gene regulation. © 2015 Bilgin Sonay et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  9. An atlas of human gene expression from massively parallel signature sequencing (MPSS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jongeneel, C Victor; Delorenzi, Mauro; Iseli, Christian; Zhou, Daixing; Haudenschild, Christian D; Khrebtukova, Irina; Kuznetsov, Dmitry; Stevenson, Brian J; Strausberg, Robert L; Simpson, Andrew J G; Vasicek, Thomas J

    2005-07-01

    We have used massively parallel signature sequencing (MPSS) to sample the transcriptomes of 32 normal human tissues to an unprecedented depth, thus documenting the patterns of expression of almost 20,000 genes with high sensitivity and specificity. The data confirm the widely held belief that differences in gene expression between cell and tissue types are largely determined by transcripts derived from a limited number of tissue-specific genes, rather than by combinations of more promiscuously expressed genes. Expression of a little more than half of all known human genes seems to account for both the common requirements and the specific functions of the tissues sampled. A classification of tissues based on patterns of gene expression largely reproduces classifications based on anatomical and biochemical properties. The unbiased sampling of the human transcriptome achieved by MPSS supports the idea that most human genes have been mapped, if not functionally characterized. This data set should prove useful for the identification of tissue-specific genes, for the study of global changes induced by pathological conditions, and for the definition of a minimal set of genes necessary for basic cell maintenance. The data are available on the Web at http://mpss.licr.org and http://sgb.lynxgen.com.

  10. A Comparison of Collection Techniques for Gene Expression Analysis of Human Oral Taste Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Nicholas Steven; Liu, Dongli; Shaw, Jan; Hannan, Garry; Duesing, Konsta; Keast, Russell

    2016-01-01

    Variability in human taste perception is associated with both genetic and environmental factors. The influence of taste receptor expression on this variability is unknown, in part, due to the difficulty in obtaining human oral tissue that enables quantitative expression measures of taste genes. In a comparison of six current techniques (Oragene RNeasy Kit, Isohelix swab, Livibrush cytobrush, tongue saliva, cheek saliva collection, and fungiform papillae biopsy), we identify the fungiform papillae biopsy is the optimal sampling technique to analyse human taste gene expression. The fungiform papillae biopsy resulted in the highest RNA integrity, enabling amplification of all the assessed taste receptor genes (TAS1R1, TAS1R2, TAS1R3, SCNN1A and CD36) and taste tissue marker genes (NCAM1, GNAT3 and PLCβ2). Furthermore, quantitative expression was observed in a subset of taste genes assessed from the saliva collection techniques (cheek saliva, tongue saliva and Oragene RNA kit). These saliva collection techniques may be useful as a non-invasive alternative sampling technique to the fungiform papillae biopsy. Identification of the fungiform papillae biopsy as the optimal collection method will facilitate further research into understanding the effect of gene expression on variability in human taste perception.

  11. The experimental study of genetic engineering human neural stem cells mediated by lentivirus to express multigene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Pei-qiang; Tang, Xun; Lin, Yue-qiu; Martin, Oudega; Sun, Guang-yun; Xu, Lin; Yang, Yun-kang; Zhou, Tian-hua

    2006-02-01

    To explore the feasibility to construct genetic engineering human neural stem cells (hNSCs) mediated by lentivirus to express multigene in order to provide a graft source for further studies of spinal cord injury (SCI). Human neural stem cells from the brain cortex of human abortus were isolated and cultured, then gene was modified by lentivirus to express both green fluorescence protein (GFP) and rat neurotrophin-3 (NT-3); the transgenic expression was detected by the methods of fluorescence microscope, dorsal root ganglion of fetal rats and slot blot. Genetic engineering hNSCs were successfully constructed. All of the genetic engineering hNSCs which expressed bright green fluorescence were observed under the fluorescence microscope. The conditioned medium of transgenic hNSCs could induce neurite flourishing outgrowth from dorsal root ganglion (DRG). The genetic engineering hNSCs expressed high level NT-3 which could be detected by using slot blot. Genetic engineering hNSCs mediated by lentivirus can be constructed to express multigene successfully.

  12. Sex-Specific Selection and Sex-Biased Gene Expression in Humans and Flies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changde Cheng

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Sexual dimorphism results from sex-biased gene expression, which evolves when selection acts differently on males and females. While there is an intimate connection between sex-biased gene expression and sex-specific selection, few empirical studies have studied this relationship directly. Here we compare the two on a genome-wide scale in humans and flies. We find a distinctive "Twin Peaks" pattern in humans that relates the strength of sex-specific selection, quantified by genetic divergence between male and female adults at autosomal loci, to the degree of sex-biased expression. Genes with intermediate degrees of sex-biased expression show evidence of ongoing sex-specific selection, while genes with either little or completely sex-biased expression do not. This pattern apparently results from differential viability selection in males and females acting in the current generation. The Twin Peaks pattern is also found in Drosophila using a different measure of sex-specific selection acting on fertility. We develop a simple model that successfully recapitulates the Twin Peaks. Our results suggest that many genes with intermediate sex-biased expression experience ongoing sex-specific selection in humans and flies.

  13. ERVK Polyprotein Processing and Reverse Transcriptase Expression in Human Cell Line Models of Neurological Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamneet Manghera

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Enhanced expression of the reverse transcriptase (RT protein encoded by human endogenous retrovirus-K (ERVK is a promising biomarker for several inflammatory and neurological diseases. However, unlike RT enzymes encoded by exogenous retroviruses, little work has been done to identify ERVK RT isoforms, their expression patterns, and cellular localization. Using Western blot, we showcase the ERVK gag-pro-pol polyprotein processing leading to the production of several ERVK RT isoforms in human neuronal (ReNcell CX and astrocytic (SVGA models of neuroinflammatory disease. Since the pro-inflammatory cytokine IFNγ plays a key role in the pathology of several ERVK-associated neurological diseases, we sought to determine if IFNγ can drive ERVK RT expression. IFNγ signalling markedly enhanced ERVK polyprotein and RT expression in both human astrocytes and neurons. RT isoforms were expressed in a cell-type specific pattern and the RT-RNase H form was significantly increased with IFNγ treatment. Fluorescent imaging revealed distinct cytoplasmic, perinuclear and nuclear ERVK RT staining patterns upon IFNγ stimulation of astrocytes and neurons. These findings indicate that ERVK expression is inducible under inflammatory conditions such as IFNγ exposure—and thus, these newly established in vitro models may be useful in exploring ERVK biology in the context of neuroinflammatory disease.

  14. Gene expression levels are a target of recent natural selection in the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudaravalli, Sridhar; Veyrieras, Jean-Baptiste; Stranger, Barbara E; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T; Pritchard, Jonathan K

    2009-03-01

    Changes in gene expression may represent an important mode of human adaptation. However, to date, there are relatively few known examples in which selection has been shown to act directly on levels or patterns of gene expression. In order to test whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that affect gene expression in cis are frequently targets of positive natural selection in humans, we analyzed genome-wide SNP and expression data from cell lines associated with the International HapMap Project. Using a haplotype-based test for selection that was designed to detect incomplete selective sweeps, we found that SNPs showing signals of selection are more likely than random SNPs to be associated with gene expression levels in cis. This signal is significant in the Yoruba (which is the population that shows the strongest signals of selection overall) and shows a trend in the same direction in the other HapMap populations. Our results argue that selection on gene expression levels is an important type of human adaptation. Finally, our work provides an analytical framework for tackling a more general problem that will become increasingly important: namely, testing whether selection signals overlap significantly with SNPs that are associated with phenotypes of interest.

  15. Arterial shear stress reduces eph-b4 expression in adult human veins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Model, Lynn S; Hall, Michael R; Wong, Daniel J; Muto, Akihito; Kondo, Yuka; Ziegler, Kenneth R; Feigel, Amanda; Quint, Clay; Niklason, Laura; Dardik, Alan

    2014-09-01

    Vein graft adaptation to the arterial environment is characterized by loss of venous identity, with reduced Ephrin type-B receptor 4 (Eph-B4) expression but without increased Ephrin-B2 expression. We examined changes of vessel identity of human saphenous veins in a flow circuit in which shear stress could be precisely controlled. Medium circulated at arterial or venous magnitudes of laminar shear stress for 24 hours; histologic, protein, and RNA analyses of vein segments were performed. Vein endothelium remained viable and functional, with platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM)-expressing cells on the luminal surface. Venous Eph-B4 expression diminished (p = .002), Ephrin-B2 expression was not induced (p = .268), and expression of osteopontin (p = .002) was increased with exposure to arterial magnitudes of shear stress. Similar changes were not found in veins placed under venous flow or static conditions. These data show that human saphenous veins remain viable during ex vivo application of shear stress in a bioreactor, without loss of the venous endothelium. Arterial magnitudes of shear stress cause loss of venous identity without gain of arterial identity in human veins perfused ex vivo. Shear stress alone, without immunologic or hormonal influence, is capable of inducing changes in vessel identity and, specifically, loss of venous identity.

  16. [Screening of differentially expressed genes in human renal cell carcinoma using suppression subtractive hybridization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Chen, Wei; Li, Xu

    2008-01-01

    To suppress COL1A1 and COL3A1 gene expressions in human skin fibroblasts (HSFs) by means of RNA interference (RNAi). SSH was performed in two directions to isolate the differentially expressed genes between human a RCC cell line RLC-310 and a normal renal cell line HK-2 (ATCC). The cDNAs obtained from the final nested PCR were directly inserted into T/A cloning vector to establish a subtractive cDNA library of specifically or highly expressed genes in RCC. Reverse Northern dot blotting was performed to screen the truly differentially expressed genes, and 200 positive genes were randomly selected for sequencing. The two-directional subtractive libraries contained more than 1200 clones, and 213 positive clones were obtained using reverse Northern blotting. Sequence analysis of these clones identified 144 differentially expressed genes, including 67 up-regulated and 77 down-regulated genes, in which 14 novel ESTs and 21 functionally unknown genes were found. Cluster analysis indicated the involvement of the sequenced genes in cell growth, cell adhesion and apoptosis. Reliable subtractive cDNA libraries of human RCC have been constructed successfully with SSH. The identification of the gene expression profile in RCC may help clarify the mechanism of tumorigenesis and development of RCC, and also sheds light on new targets for prevention, diagnosis and therapy of this malignancy.

  17. Expression of the Rai (Shc C) adaptor protein in the human enteric nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanacci, V; Bassotti, G; Ortensi, B; Fisogni, S; Cathomas, G; Maurer, C A; Galletti, A; Salerni, B; Pelicci, G

    2008-03-01

    The adaptor protein Rai (ShcC/N-Shc) is almost exclusively present in the nervous system, although little is documented about its expression in the gut and the enteric nervous system (ENS). As Rai is a physiological substrate of Ret, an important factor for the development of ENS, we have evaluated the expression of Rai in the ENS in various segments of the human gastrointestinal tract. The expression of Rai was assessed by immunohistochemistry in disease-free human gut samples (oesophagus, stomach, small bowel and colon) obtained from subjects undergoing surgical procedures. Rai was not expressed in the epithelia or lymphoid tissue, whereas a moderate level of expression was observed in the endothelial cells of blood vessels and on the outer membrane of smooth muscle cells in both the muscularis mucosae and the muscularis propria. In the ENS, strong positivity was observed only in enteric glial cells, overlapping with GFAP and S100. In conclusion, Rai is expressed in the human gut, especially in the enteric glial cells. We conclude that Rai may provide an additional marker for this cell type.

  18. Analysis of the human tissue-specific expression by genome-wide integration of transcriptomics and antibody-based proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagerberg, Linn; Hallström, Björn M; Oksvold, Per; Kampf, Caroline; Djureinovic, Dijana; Odeberg, Jacob; Habuka, Masato; Tahmasebpoor, Simin; Danielsson, Angelika; Edlund, Karolina; Asplund, Anna; Sjöstedt, Evelina; Lundberg, Emma; Szigyarto, Cristina Al-Khalili; Skogs, Marie; Takanen, Jenny Ottosson; Berling, Holger; Tegel, Hanna; Mulder, Jan; Nilsson, Peter; Schwenk, Jochen M; Lindskog, Cecilia; Danielsson, Frida; Mardinoglu, Adil; Sivertsson, Asa; von Feilitzen, Kalle; Forsberg, Mattias; Zwahlen, Martin; Olsson, IngMarie; Navani, Sanjay; Huss, Mikael; Nielsen, Jens; Ponten, Fredrik; Uhlén, Mathias

    2014-02-01

    Global classification of the human proteins with regards to spatial expression patterns across organs and tissues is important for studies of human biology and disease. Here, we used a quantitative transcriptomics analysis (RNA-Seq) to classify the tissue-specific expression of genes across a representative set of all major human organs and tissues and combined this analysis with antibody-based profiling of the same tissues. To present the data, we launch a new version of the Human Protein Atlas that integrates RNA and protein expression data corresponding to ∼80% of the human protein-coding genes with access to the primary data for both the RNA and the protein analysis on an individual gene level. We present a classification of all human protein-coding genes with regards to tissue-specificity and spatial expression pattern. The integrative human expression map can be used as a starting point to explore the molecular constituents of the human body.

  19. Expression of Inwardly Rectifying Potassium Channel Subunits in Native Human Retinal Pigment Epithelium

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Dongli; Zhang, Xiaoming; Hughes, Bret A.

    2008-01-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that the inwardly rectifying K+ (Kir) channel subunit Kir7.1 is highly expressed in bovine and human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). The purpose of this study was to determine whether any of the 14 other members of the Kir gene family are expressed in native human RPE. Conventional reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis indicated that in addition to Kir7.1, 7 other Kir channel subunits (Kir1.1, Kir2.1, Kir2.2, Kir3.1, Kir3.4, Kir4.2 and...

  20. Expression of YKL-40 by peritumoral macrophages in human small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Junker, Nanna; Johansen, Julia S; Andersen, Claus B

    2005-01-01

    YKL-40 is a 40 kDa protein with possible involvement in tissue remodeling, cell proliferation and angiogenesis. Elevated serum YKL-40 levels in patients with metastatic cancers (including small cell lung cancer (SCLC)) are associated with poor prognosis. The aim of this study was to identify...... the cellular source of YKL-40 in SCLC patient biopsies and in a panel of 20 human SCLC lines cultured in vitro and in vivo in nude mice. In general, the SCLC cell lines had no or very limited (human) YKL-40 expression, whereas, by RT-PCR a pronounced murine (i.e., stromal) YKL-40 expression was present in all...

  1. Co-expression of BMPs and BMP-inhibitors in human fractures and non-unions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloen, Peter; Lauzier, Dominique; Hamdy, Reggie C

    2012-07-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are increasingly being used clinically to enhance fracture repair and healing of non-unions. However, the potential efficacy of supraphysiological dosing for clinical results warrants further clarification of the BMP signaling pathway in human fracture healing. As BMP signaling can be fine-tuned at numerous levels, the role of BMP-inhibitors has become a major focus. The aim of the present study was to document co-expression of BMPs, pSmad 1/5/8, and BMP-inhibitors in human fracture callus and human non-unions. Using human tissue of fracture callus (n=14) and non-unions (n=4) we documented expression of BMPs (BMP2, BMP3 and BMP7), pSmad 1/5/8 and the BMP-inhibitors noggin, gremlin, chordin, Smad-6, Smad-7 and BAMBI. Co-expression of pSmad 1/5/8, BMPs and BMP-inhibitors was noted in the osteoblasts of fracture callus as well as of non-unions. Expression of BMP-inhibitors was generally stronger in non-unions than in fracture callus. The most pertinent differences were noted in the cartilaginous tissue components. Expression of BMP2 in chondrocytes was markedly decreased in non-unions compared to fracture callus and that of BMP7 was almost completely absent. Expression of BMP-inhibitors was almost the same in osteoblasts, chondrocytes and fibroblasts of fracture callus and well as in non-unions. Interestingly, although BMP ligands were present in the chondrocytes and fibroblasts of non-unions, they did not co-express pSmad 1/5/8 suggesting that BMP signaling may have been inhibited at some point before Smad 1/5/8 phosphorylation. These results suggest co-expression of BMP, pSmad 1/5/8 and BMP-inhibitors occurs in human fracture callus as well as non-unions but the relative expression of BMPs vs. BMP-inhibitors was different between these two tissue types. In contrast to our expectations, the expression of BMP inhibitors was comparable between fracture callus and non-unions, whereas the expression of BMPs was notably lower in the

  2. High expression of arachidonate 15-lipoxygenase and proinflammatory markers in human ischemic heart tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnusson, Lisa U.; Lundqvist, Annika; Asp, Julia; Synnergren, Jane; Johansson, Cecilia Thalén; Palmqvist, Lars; Jeppsson, Anders; Hultén, Lillemor Mattsson

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We found a 17-fold upregulation of ALOX15 in the ischemic heart. ► Incubation of human muscle cells in hypoxia showed a 22-fold upregulation of ALOX15. ► We observed increased levels of proinflammatory markers in ischemic heart tissue. ► Suggesting a link between ischemia and inflammation in ischemic heart biopsies. -- Abstract: A common feature of the ischemic heart and atherosclerotic plaques is the presence of hypoxia (insufficient levels of oxygen in the tissue). Hypoxia has pronounced effects on almost every aspect of cell physiology, and the nuclear transcription factor hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) regulates adaptive responses to low concentrations of oxygen in mammalian cells. In our recent work, we observed that hypoxia increases the proinflammatory enzyme arachidonate 15-lipoxygenase (ALOX15B) in human carotid plaques. ALOX15 has recently been shown to be present in the human myocardium, but the effect of ischemia on its expression has not been investigated. Here we test the hypothesis that ischemia of the heart leads to increased expression of ALOX15, and found an almost 2-fold increase in HIF-1α mRNA expression and a 17-fold upregulation of ALOX15 mRNA expression in the ischemic heart biopsies from patients undergoing coronary bypass surgery compared with non ischemic heart tissue. To investigate the effect of low oxygen concentration on ALOX15 we incubated human vascular muscle cells in hypoxia and showed that expression of ALOX15 increased 22-fold compared with cells incubated in normoxic conditions. We also observed increased mRNA levels of proinflammatory markers in ischemic heart tissue compared with non-ischemic controls. In summary, we demonstrate increased ALOX15 in human ischemic heart biopsies. Furthermore we demonstrate that hypoxia increases ALOX15 in human muscle cells. Our results yield important insights into the underlying association between hypoxia and inflammation in the human ischemic heart disease.

  3. Expression analysis of asthma candidate genes during human and murine lung development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melén, Erik; Kho, Alvin T; Sharma, Sunita; Gaedigk, Roger; Leeder, J Steven; Mariani, Thomas J; Carey, Vincent J; Weiss, Scott T; Tantisira, Kelan G

    2011-06-23

    Little is known about the role of most asthma susceptibility genes during human lung development. Genetic determinants for normal lung development are not only important early in life, but also for later lung function. To investigate the role of expression patterns of well-defined asthma susceptibility genes during human and murine lung development. We hypothesized that genes influencing normal airways development would be over-represented by genes associated with asthma. Asthma genes were first identified via comprehensive search of the current literature. Next, we analyzed their expression patterns in the developing human lung during the pseudoglandular (gestational age, 7-16 weeks) and canalicular (17-26 weeks) stages of development, and in the complete developing lung time series of 3 mouse strains: A/J, SW, C57BL6. In total, 96 genes with association to asthma in at least two human populations were identified in the literature. Overall, there was no significant over-representation of the asthma genes among genes differentially expressed during lung development, although trends were seen in the human (Odds ratio, OR 1.22, confidence interval, CI 0.90-1.62) and C57BL6 mouse (OR 1.41, CI 0.92-2.11) data. However, differential expression of some asthma genes was consistent in both developing human and murine lung, e.g. NOD1, EDN1, CCL5, RORA and HLA-G. Among the asthma genes identified in genome wide association studies, ROBO1, RORA, HLA-DQB1, IL2RB and PDE10A were differentially expressed during human lung development. Our data provide insight about the role of asthma susceptibility genes during lung development and suggest common mechanisms underlying lung morphogenesis and pathogenesis of respiratory diseases.

  4. Prognostic impact of programmed death-ligand 1 expression in correlation with human leukocyte antigen class I expression status in stage I adenocarcinoma of the lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai, Ayako; Yoneda, Kazue; Shimajiri, Shohei; Kuroda, Koji; Hanagiri, Takeshi; Fujino, Yoshihisa; Tanaka, Fumihiro

    2018-01-01

    The study objective was to investigate the prognostic impact of programmed death-ligand 1 expression in correlation with human leukocyte antigen class I expression on tumor cells in early-stage adenocarcinoma of the lung, because both programmed death-ligand 1 and human leukocyte antigen class I molecules play important roles in cancer immunity. Ninety-four patients with completely resected pathologic stage I lung adenocarcinoma were retrospectively reviewed. Programmed death-ligand 1 expression on tumor cells was evaluated with immunohistochemistry in correlation with several clinicopathologic and molecular features, including human leukocyte antigen class I expression on tumor cells. Fifteen patients (16.0%) had tumor with positive programmed death-ligand 1 expression (percentage of tumor cells expressing programmed death-ligand 1, ≥5%), and the incidence was significantly higher in poorly differentiated tumors. There was no significant correlation between human leukocyte antigen class I expression and programmed death-ligand 1 expression. Programmed death-ligand 1 positivity was a significant factor to predict a poor survival (5-year survival, 66.7% vs 85.9%; P = .049), which was enhanced in tumors with normal human leukocyte antigen class I expression (P = .029) but was not evident in tumors with reduced human leukocyte antigen class I expression (P = .552). The prognostic impact of programmed death-ligand 1 expression on tumor cells in early-stage lung adenocarcinoma may be distinct according to concurrent human leukocyte antigen class I expression. Copyright © 2017 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Expression of Zonulin, c-kit, and Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein in Human Gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skardelly, Marco; Armbruster, Franz Paul; Meixensberger, Jürgen; Hilbig, Heidegard

    2009-08-18

    The hallmarks of human malignant gliomas are their marked invasiveness and vascularity. Because angiogenesis and tumor invasion have been associated with extracellular matrix degradation and intercellular tight junctions, the involvement of zonulin in glioma biology is in the focus. We selected for histological examination five cases of glioblastoma WHO IV (nomenclature of the World Health Organization) and one case each from astrocytoma WHO III, meningioma WHO III, and meningioma WHO I as control samples. The meningioma WHO I is regarded as benign, whereas the meningioma WHO III is recognized as the transition form of malignant tumors in humans. The visualization of a newly designed antibody against human zonulin was studied in triple-labeling studies using fluorescence immunocytochemistry and compared with the expression of c-kit and glial fibrillary acidic protein in differently developed human gliomas. We found that increasing the expression of c-kit is accompanied by an increase of zonulin expression. Both are correlated to the degree of malignancy of human brain tumors. The expression of zonulin is correlated to the degradation of the blood-brain barrier as revealed by Griffonia simplicifolia lectin. In differently graded tumors, we found differently graded involvement of blood vessels in the tumor development, explaining patients' survival.

  6. Retroviral-mediated transfer and expression of human β-globin genes in cultured murine and human erythroid cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber-Benarous, A.; Cone, R.D.; London, I.M.; Mulligan, R.C.

    1988-01-01

    The authors cloned human β-globin DNA sequences from a genomic library prepared from DNA isolated from the human leukemia cell line K562 and have used the retroviral vector pZip-NeoSV(X)1 to introduce a 3.0-kilobase segment encompassing the globin gene into mouse erythroleukemia cells. Whereas the endogenous K562 β-globin gene is repressed in K562 cells, when introduced into mouse erythroleukemia cells by retroviral-mediated gene transfer, the β-globin gene from K562 cells was transcribed and induced 5-20-fold after treatment of the cells with dimethyl sulfoxide. The transcripts were correctly initiated, and expression and regulation of the K562 gene were identical to the expression of a normal human β-globin gene transferred into mouse erythroleukemia cells in the same way. They have also introduced the normal human β-globin gene into K562 cells using the same retrovirus vector. SP6 analysis of the RNA isolated from the transduced cells showed that the normal β-globin gene was transcribed at a moderately high level, before or after treatment with hemin. Based on these data, they suggest that the lack of expression of the endogenous β-globin gene in K562 cells does not result from an alteration in the gene itself and may not result from a lack of factor(s) necessary for β-lobin gene transcription. Retroviral-mediated transfer of the human β-globin gene may, however, uniquely influence expression of the gene K562 cells

  7. Effect of sleep deprivation on rhythms of clock gene expression and melatonin in humans.

    OpenAIRE

    Ackermann, K; Plomp, R; Lao, O; Middleton, B; Revell, VL; Skene, DJ; Kayser, M

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of sleep deprivation on the human circadian system. Plasma melatonin and cortisol levels and leukocyte expression levels of 12 genes were examined over 48 h (sleep vs. no-sleep nights) in 12 young males (mean ± SD: 23 ± 5 yrs). During one night of total sleep deprivation, BMAL1 expression was suppressed, the heat shock gene HSPA1B expression was induced, and the amplitude of the melatonin rhythm increased, whereas other high-amplitude clock gene rhythms (e.g...

  8. Cognitive defects are reversible in inducible mice expressing pro-aggregant full-length human Tau

    OpenAIRE

    Van der Jeugd, Ann; Hochgräfe, Katja; Ahmed, Tariq; Decker, Jochen M.; Sydow, Astrid; Hofmann, Anne; Wu, Dan; Messing, Lars; Balschun, Detlef; D'Hooge, Rudi; Mandelkow, Eva-Maria

    2012-01-01

    Neurofibrillary lesions of abnormal Tau are hallmarks of Alzheimer´s disease and frontotemporal dementias. Our regulatable (Tet-OFF) mouse models of tauopathy express variants of human full-length Tau in the forebrain (CaMKIIα promoter) either with mutation ΔK280 (pro-aggregant) or ΔK280/I277P/I308P (anti-aggregant). Co-expression of luciferase enables in vivo quantification of gene expression by bioluminescence imaging. Pro-aggregant mice develop synapse loss and Tau pathology including miss...

  9. Differential expression of glutamic acid decarboxylase in rat and human islets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, J S; Russel, S; Marshall, M O

    1993-01-01

    islets, whereas only GAD64 mRNA was detected in human islets. Immunocytochemical analysis of rat and human pancreatic sections or isolated islets with antibodies to GAD64 and GAD67 in combination with antibodies to insulin, glucagon, or SRIF confirmed that a GAD64 and GAD67 expression were beta......The GABA synthesizing enzyme GAD is a prominent islet cell autoantigen in type I diabetes. The two forms of GAD (GAD64 and GAD67) are encoded by different genes in both rats and humans. By in situ hybridization analysis of rat and human pancreases, expression of both genes was detected in rat...... as observed in vivo, whereas GAD67 was localized not only to the beta-cells but also in the alpha-cells and delta-cells. A small but distinct fraction of GAD positive cells in these monolayer cultures did not accumulate GABA immunoreactivity, which may indicate cellular heterogeneity with respect to GABA...

  10. IMP3 expression in human ovarian cancer is associated with improved survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noske, Aurelia; Faggad, Areeg; Wirtz, Ralph

    2009-01-01

    investigated the expression of IMP3 at protein and mRNA levels in a cohort of primary ovarian carcinomas and in 11 ovarian cancer cell lines. Western blot analysis revealed an expression of IMP3 in all ovarian cancer cell lines and immunohistochemistry demonstrated a positive cytoplasmic staining in 32 of 68...... carcinomas (47%). In contrast, epithelium of borderline tumors, as well as, benign ovarian lesions and normal ovaries exhibited only weak or no IMP3 expression. In univariate Kaplan-Meier analysis, IMP3 protein expression was significantly associated with better overall survival (P=0.048). To confirm......The insulin-like growth factor-II mRNA-binding protein IMP3 plays an important role in embryogenesis and recent reports suggest an involvement in tumorigenesis. Although IMP3 expression has been well studied in mouse and human fetal and adult gonads, its role in ovarian cancer is unknown. We...

  11. Sustained expression of human cytomegalovirus glycoprotein B (UL55) in the seeds of homozygous rice plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tackaberry, Eilleen S; Prior, Fiona A; Rowlandson, Karen; Tocchi, Monika; Mehic, Jelica; Porter, Suzanne; Walsh, Mike; Schleiss, Mark R; Ganz, Peter R; Sardana, Ravinder K; Altosaar, Illimar; Dudani, Anil K

    2008-09-01

    Production of recombinant subunit vaccines in transgenic plants may be a means of reducing vaccine costs while increasing availability and safety. A plant-derived product found safe and effective for oral administration would provide additional advantages when used as a vaccine. Outstanding issues with the technology include transgene stability through successive generations and consistent bioproduction. We previously reported expression of glycoprotein B (gB) of human cytomegalovirus in seeds of transgenic tobacco. Here the goal was to determine if gB could be similarly expressed in rice, and if so, to examine expression over several plant generations. Results show that immunoreactive gB was successfully expressed in transgenic rice seeds, with sustained expression over three generations. The gB contained several neutralizing epitopes and was stable over 27 months.

  12. Expression and localization of claudins-3 and -12 in transformed human brain endothelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schrade Anja

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to characterize the hCMEC/D3 cell line, an in vitro model of the human Blood Brain Barrier (BBB for the expression of brain endothelial specific claudins-3 and -12. Findings hCMEC/D3 cells express claudins-3 and -12. Claudin-3 is distinctly localized to the TJ whereas claudin -12 is observed in the perinuclear region and completely absent from TJs. We show that the expression of both proteins is lost in cell passage numbers where the BBB properties are no longer fully conserved. Expression and localization of claudin-3 is not modulated by simvastatin shown to improve barrier function in vitro and also recommended for routine hCMEC/D3 culture. Conclusions These results support conservation of claudin-3 and -12 expression in the hCMEC/D3 cell line and make claudin-3 a potential marker for BBB characteristics in vitro.

  13. Expression of GLUT1 in stratified squamous epithelia and oral carcinoma from humans and rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voldstedlund, M; Dabelsteen, Erik

    1997-01-01

    mucosa from rat and man, and a human oral carcinoma by indirect immunofluorescence microscopy. The results showed that GLUT1 was expressed in the basal and parabasal layers of the different stratified squamous epithelia, with some variations between keratinized and non-keratinized subtypes. GLUT1...... was also expressed in ductal- and myoepithelial cells of minor salivary glands and perineural sheath located in the lamina propra, and furthermore in the cells of an oral carcinoma. GLUT4 was not expressed in any of the tissues examined. This distribution of GLUT1 does not fit with the idea of GLUT1......Most cells express facilitative glucose transporters. Four isoforms (GLUT1-4) transporting D-glucose across the plasma membrane show a specific tissue distribution, which is the basis for tissue-specific patterns in glucose metabolism. GLUT1 is expressed at high levels in tissue barriers...

  14. Curcumin and silibinin inhibit telomerase expression in T47D human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasiri, Marzieh; Zarghami, Nosratollah; Koshki, Kazem Nejati; Mollazadeh, Mahdieh; Moghaddam, Mohammad Pourhassan; Yamchi, Mohammad Rahmati; Esfahlan, Rana Jahanban; Barkhordari, Amin; Alibakhshi, Abbas

    2013-01-01

    Telomerase has been considered as an attractive molecular target for breast cancer therapy. The main objective of this work is to assess the inhibitory effects of silibinin and curcumin, two herbal substances, on telomerase gene expression in breast cancer cells. For determination of cell viability tetrazolium-based assays were conducted after 24, 48, and 72 h exposure times and expression of human telomerase reverse transcriptase gene was measured with real-time PCR. Each compound exerted cytotoxic effects on T47D cells and inhibited telomerase gene expression, both in a time-and dose-dependent manner. The mixture of curcumin and silibinin showed relatively more inhibitory effect on growth of T47D cells and hTERT gene expression as compared with either agent alone. These findings suggest that cell viability along with hTERT gene expression in breast cancer cells could be reduced by curcumin and silibinin.

  15. Regional differences in expression of specific markers for human embryonic stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Steen B; Møllgård, Kjeld; Olesen, Christian

    2007-01-01

    Characterization of human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines derived from the inner cell masses of blastocysts generally includes expression analysis of markers such as OCT4, NANOG, SSEA3, SSEA4, TRA-1-60 and TRA-1-81. Expression is usually detected by immunocytochemical staining of entire colonies...... staining to weak or absent NANOG staining, and vice versa. SSEA4 staining was only observed in small clusters or single cells and not confined to the TRA territory. Co-expression of all markers was only detected in small areas. SSEA1 expression was found exclusively outside the TRA territory. In conclusion......, pronounced regional differences in the expression of markers considered specific for undifferentiated hESC may suggest the existence of different cell populations....

  16. Analysis of CD83 antigen expression in human breast fibroadenoma and adjacent tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Nascimento Borges

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Dendritic cell maturation is considered essential for starting an immune response. The CD83 antigen is an important marker of dendritic cell maturation. The objectives here were to analyze CD83 antigen expression in human breast fibroadenoma and breast tissue adjacent to the lesion and to identify clinical factors that might influence this expression. DESIGN AND SETTING: This was a retrospective study at a public university hospital, in which 29 histopathological samples of breast fibroadenoma and adjacent breast tissue, from 28 women of reproductive age, were analyzed. METHODS: The immunohistochemistry method was used to analyze the cell expression of the antigen. The antigen expression in the cells was evaluated by means of random manual counting using an optical microscope. RESULTS: Positive expression of the CD83 antigen in the epithelial cells of the fibroadenoma (365.52; standard deviation ± 133.13 in relation to the adjacent breast tissue cells (189.59; standard deviation ± 140.75 was statistically larger (P < 0.001. Several clinical features were analyzed, but only parity was shown to influence CD83 antigen expression in the adjacent breast tissue, such that positive expression was more evident in nulliparous women (P = 0.042. CONCLUSIONS: The expression of the CD83 antigen in the fibroadenoma was positive and greater than in the adjacent breast tissue. Positive expression of the antigen in the adjacent breast tissue was influenced by parity, and was significantly more evident in nulliparous women.

  17. Fos and jun proteins are specifically expressed during differentiation of human keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehic, Denis; Bakiri, Latifa; Ghannadan, Minoo; Wagner, Erwin F; Tschachler, Erwin

    2005-01-01

    Activator protein 1 (AP-1) proteins play key roles in the regulation of cell proliferation and differentiation. In this study we investigated the expression of Fos and Jun proteins in different models of terminal differentiation of human keratinocytes and in skin from psoriasis patients. All Jun and Fos proteins, with the exception of FosB, were efficiently expressed in keratinocytes in monolayer cultures. In contrast, in normal epidermis as well as in organotypic epidermal cultures, the expression pattern of AP-1 proteins was dependent on the differentiation stage. Fos proteins were readily detected in nuclei of keratinocytes of basal and suprabasal layers. JunB and JunD were expressed in all layers of normal epidermis. Interestingly, expression of c-Jun started suprabasally, then disappeared and became detectable again in distinct cells of the outermost granular layer directly at the transition zone to the stratum corneum. In psoriatic epidermis, c-Jun expression was prominent in both hyperproliferating basal and suprabasal keratinocytes, whereas c-Fos expression was unchanged. These data indicate that AP-1 proteins are expressed in a highly specific manner during terminal differentiation of keratinocytes and that the enhanced expression of c-Jun in basal and suprabasal keratinocytes might contribute to the pathogenesis of psoriasis.

  18. Expression of iron-related genes in human brain and brain tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Britton Robert S

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Defective iron homeostasis may be involved in the development of some diseases within the central nervous system. Although the expression of genes involved in normal iron balance has been intensively studied in other tissues, little is known about their expression in the brain. We investigated the mRNA levels of hepcidin (HAMP, HFE, neogenin (NEO1, transferrin receptor 1 (TFRC, transferrin receptor 2 (TFR2, and hemojuvelin (HFE2 in normal human brain, brain tumors, and astrocytoma cell lines. The specimens included 5 normal brain tissue samples, 4 meningiomas, one medulloblastoma, 3 oligodendrocytic gliomas, 2 oligoastrocytic gliomas, 8 astrocytic gliomas, and 3 astrocytoma cell lines. Results Except for hemojuvelin, all genes studied had detectable levels of mRNA. In most tumor types, the pattern of gene expression was diverse. Notable findings include high expression of transferrin receptor 1 in the hippocampus and medulla oblongata compared to other brain regions, low expression of HFE in normal brain with elevated HFE expression in meningiomas, and absence of hepcidin mRNA in astrocytoma cell lines despite expression in normal brain and tumor specimens. Conclusion These results indicate that several iron-related genes are expressed in normal brain, and that their expression may be dysregulated in brain tumors.

  19. Regional differences in gene expression and promoter usage in aged human brains

    KAUST Repository

    Pardo, Luba M.

    2013-02-19

    To characterize the promoterome of caudate and putamen regions (striatum), frontal and temporal cortices, and hippocampi from aged human brains, we used high-throughput cap analysis of gene expression to profile the transcription start sites and to quantify the differences in gene expression across the 5 brain regions. We also analyzed the extent to which methylation influenced the observed expression profiles. We sequenced more than 71 million cap analysis of gene expression tags corresponding to 70,202 promoter regions and 16,888 genes. More than 7000 transcripts were differentially expressed, mainly because of differential alternative promoter usage. Unexpectedly, 7% of differentially expressed genes were neurodevelopmental transcription factors. Functional pathway analysis on the differentially expressed genes revealed an overrepresentation of several signaling pathways (e.g., fibroblast growth factor and wnt signaling) in hippocampus and striatum. We also found that although 73% of methylation signals mapped within genes, the influence of methylation on the expression profile was small. Our study underscores alternative promoter usage as an important mechanism for determining the regional differences in gene expression at old age.

  20. Chronological changes in microRNA expression in the developing human brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P Moreau

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are endogenously expressed noncoding RNA molecules that are believed to regulate multiple neurobiological processes. Expression studies have revealed distinct temporal expression patterns in the developing rodent and porcine brain, but comprehensive profiling in the developing human brain has not been previously reported.We performed microarray and TaqMan-based expression analysis of all annotated mature miRNAs (miRBase 10.0 as well as 373 novel, predicted miRNAs. Expression levels were measured in 48 post-mortem brain tissue samples, representing gestational ages 14-24 weeks, as well as early postnatal and adult time points.Expression levels of 312 miRNAs changed significantly between at least two of the broad age categories, defined as fetal, young, and adult.We have constructed a miRNA expression atlas of the developing human brain, and we propose a classification scheme to guide future studies of neurobiological function.

  1. Expression of E-cadherin in human mast cell line HMC-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Minoru; Kawai, Kenzo; Tanaka, Makoto; Tegoshi, Tatsuya; Arizono, Naoki

    2003-11-01

    E-cadherin is one of the cell adhesion molecules normally expressed on epithelial cells. We previously reported that murine bone marrow-derived mast cells express E-cadherin that could be involved in homophilic binding with epithelial cell E-cadherin. In the present study we examined whether E-cadherin is also expressed in human mast cell HMC-1. Gene expression of E-cadherin and beta-catenin was observed in HMC-1 by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), while N-cadherin expression was undetectable. cDNA sequencing of HMC-1 E-cadherin revealed no deletions or mutations. E-cadherin expression in HMC-1 was confirmed by immunoblotting as well as by flow cytometric analyses. In the presence of E-cadherin blocking antibody or a synthetic E-cadherin decapeptide with HAV sequence in culture medium, adhesion of HMC-1 cells to the A431 epithelial cell monolayer was slightly but significantly suppressed. In contrast, N- or P-cadherin decapeptides did not suppress the binding. These results indicated that human mast cell HMC-1 expresses E-cadherin, and is possibly involved in cellular interactions with epithelial cells, while other functions still remain to be elucidated.

  2. Tec protein tyrosine kinase inhibits CD25 expression in human T-lymphocyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susaki, Kentaro; Kitanaka, Akira; Dobashi, Hiroaki; Kubota, Yoshitsugu; Kittaka, Katsuharu; Kameda, Tomohiro; Yamaoka, Genji; Mano, Hiroyuki; Mihara, Keichiro; Ishida, Toshihiko

    2010-01-04

    The Tec protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) belongs to a group of structurally related nonreceptor PTKs that also includes Btk, Itk, Rlk, and Bmx. Previous studies have suggested that these kinases play important roles in hematopoiesis and in the lymphocyte signaling pathway. Despite evidence suggesting the involvement of Tec in the T-lymphocyte activation pathway via T-cell receptor (TCR) and CD28, Tec's role in T-lymphocytes remains unclear because of the lack of apparent defects in T-lymphocyte function in Tec-deficient mice. In this study, we investigated the role of Tec in human T-lymphocyte using the Jurkat T-lymphoid cell line stably transfected with a cDNA encoding Tec. We found that the expression of wild-type Tec inhibited the expression of CD25 induced by TCR cross-linking. Second, we observed that LFM-A13, a selective inhibitor of Tec family PTK, rescued the suppression of TCR-induced CD25 expression observed in wild-type Tec-expressing Jurkat cells. In addition, expression of kinase-deleted Tec did not alter the expression level of CD25 after TCR ligation. We conclude that Tec PTK mediates signals that negatively regulate CD25 expression induced by TCR cross-linking. This, in turn, implies that this PTK plays a role in the attenuation of IL-2 activity in human T-lymphocytes.

  3. Expression of Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor in Human Placentas and Fetal Tissues

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Yi-zhou; Wang, Kai; Fang, Roy; Zheng, Jing

    2010-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), a ligand-activated transcription factor, mediates many biological processes, including fetal development. In this study, we examined AhR protein expression in human placentas from normal (N) and severe preeclamptic (sPE) pregnancies, as well as human fetal tissues from the second trimester of pregnancy, using immunohistochemistry and/or Western blot analysis. In the placentas, the AhR immunoreactivity was present primarily in syncytiotrophoblasts. The AhR ...

  4. Comprehensive sampling of gene expression in human cell lines with massively parallel signature sequencing

    OpenAIRE

    Jongeneel, C. Victor; Iseli, Christian; Stevenson, Brian J.; Riggins, Gregory J.; Lal, Anita; Mackay, Alan; Harris, Robert A.; O'Hare, Michael J.; Neville, A. Munro; Simpson, Andrew J. G.; Strausberg, Robert L.

    2003-01-01

    Whereas information is rapidly accumulating about the structure and position of genes encoded in the human genome, less is known about the complexity and relative abundance of their expression in individual human cells and tissues. Here, we describe the characteristics of the transcriptomes of two cultured cell lines, HB4a (normal breast epithelium) and HCT-116 (colon adenocarcinoma), using massively parallel signature sequencing (MPSS). We generated in excess of 107 short signature sequences...

  5. Human prolyl hydroxylase expression in uterine leiomyoma during the menstrual cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Iwahashi, Masaaki; Muragaki, Yasuteru; Ino, Kazuhiko

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background To investigate the role of prolyl hydroxylase (PH), a key enzyme of collagen synthesis, in human uterine leiomyoma, PH expression was determined in the normal uterine myometrium and the leiomyoma tissues during the menstrual cycle. Methods The tissues were obtained from 40 regularly cycling women (aged 29 to 53 yr) who were undergoing abdominal hysterectomy for symptomatic uterine leiomyoma. Immunohistochemistry for human PH with specific monoclonal antibody was used for a...

  6. Cloning, sequencing, and expression of cDNA for human β-glucuronidase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oshima, A.; Kyle, J.W.; Miller, R.D.

    1987-01-01

    The authors report here the cDNA sequence for human placental β-glucuronidase (β-D-glucuronoside glucuronosohydrolase, EC 3.2.1.31) and demonstrate expression of the human enzyme in transfected COS cells. They also sequenced a partial cDNA clone from human fibroblasts that contained a 153-base-pair deletion within the coding sequence and found a second type of cDNA clone from placenta that contained the same deletion. Nuclease S1 mapping studies demonstrated two types of mRNAs in human placenta that corresponded to the two types of cDNA clones isolated. The NH 2 -terminal amino acid sequence determined for human spleen β-glucuronidase agreed with that inferred from the DNA sequence of the two placental clones, beginning at amino acid 23, suggesting a cleaved signal sequence of 22 amino acids. When transfected into COS cells, plasmids containing either placental clone expressed an immunoprecipitable protein that contained N-linked oligosaccharides as evidenced by sensitivity to endoglycosidase F. However, only transfection with the clone containing the 153-base-pair segment led to expression of human β-glucuronidase activity. These studies provide the sequence for the full-length cDNA for human β-glucuronidase, demonstrate the existence of two populations of mRNA for β-glucuronidase in human placenta, only one of which specifies a catalytically active enzyme, and illustrate the importance of expression studies in verifying that a cDNA is functionally full-length

  7. TEAD1 inhibits prolactin gene expression in cultured human uterine decidual cells1

    OpenAIRE

    Kessler, Cherie A.; Bachurski, Cindy J.; Schroeder, Jennifer; Stanek, Jerzy; Handwerger, Stuart

    2008-01-01

    Forced overexpression of TEAD1 in human uterine fibroblast (HUF) and human endometrial stromal cells markedly inhibited prolactin promoter activity in both cell types in a dose-dependent manner, with maximal inhibition of greater than 90%. Conversely, the knockdown of TEAD1 expression in HUF cells with a TEAD1 siRNA resulted in a 75–80% increase in prolactin mRNA levels (P

  8. Both pituitary and placental growth hormone transcripts are expressed in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melen, L; Hennen, G; Dullaart, RPF; Igout, A

    1997-01-01

    The hGH-V gene codes for a variant of human pituitary growth hormone (hGH-N) named placental growth hormone (hPGH). hPGH shares 93% amino acid identity with hGH-N. Until now the hGH-V gene was considered to be exclusively expressed in human placenta, where it replaces maternal circulating hGH-N at

  9. Nuclear expression of claudin-3 in human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell lines and tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokuhara, Yasunori; Morinishi, Tatsuya; Matsunaga, Toru; Sakai, Manabu; Sakai, Takayoshi; Ohsaki, Hiroyuki; Kadota, Kyuichi; Kushida, Yoshio; Haba, Reiji; Hirakawa, Eiichiro

    2018-01-01

    Claudins are members of a large family of transmembrane proteins, which are essential for the formation of tight junctions and have a significant effect on the biological behavior of tumor progression. Previous studies have demonstrated that several claudins show aberrant expression patterns in numerous types of cancer. The present study investigated the expression and localization of claudin-3 and claudin-7 in human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell lines and tissues. The protein expression levels of claudin-3 and claudin-7 were determined using immunocytochemical and immunohistochemical staining. Claudin-3, but not claudin-7, exhibited nuclear localization in the human colorectal adenocarcinoma Caco-2 and SW620 cell lines. Surgically resected colorectal adenocarcinoma tissue specimens were obtained, and the associations between the expression of claudin-3 or claudin-7 and various