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Sample records for expressing colonization factor

  1. COX-2 gene expression in colon cancer tissue related to regulating factors and promoter methylation status

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    Lagerstedt Kristina

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increased cyclooxygenase activity promotes progression of colorectal cancer, but the mechanisms behind COX-2 induction remain elusive. This study was therefore aimed to define external cell signaling and transcription factors relating to high COX-2 expression in colon cancer tissue. Method Tumor and normal colon tissue were collected at primary curative operation in 48 unselected patients. COX-2 expression in tumor and normal colon tissue was quantified including microarray analyses on tumor mRNA accounting for high and low tumor COX-2 expression. Cross hybridization was performed between tumor and normal colon tissue. Methylation status of up-stream COX-2 promoter region was evaluated. Results Tumors with high COX-2 expression displayed large differences in gene expression compared to normal colon. Numerous genes with altered expression appeared in tumors of high COX-2 expression compared to tumors of low COX-2. COX-2 expression in normal colon was increased in patients with tumors of high COX-2 compared to normal colon from patients with tumors of low COX-2. IL1β, IL6 and iNOS transcripts were up-regulated among external cell signaling factors; nine transcription factors (ATF3, C/EBP, c-Fos, Fos-B, JDP2, JunB, c-Maf, NF-κB, TCF4 showed increased expression and 5 (AP-2, CBP, Elk-1, p53, PEA3 were decreased in tumors with high COX-2. The promoter region of COX-2 gene did not show consistent methylation in tumor or normal colon tissue. Conclusions Transcription and external cell signaling factors are altered as covariates to COX-2 expression in colon cancer tissue, but DNA methylation of the COX-2 promoter region was not a significant factor behind COX-2 expression in tumor and normal colon tissue.

  2. Elevated TATA-binding protein expression drives vascular endothelial growth factor expression in colon cancer

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    Johnson, Sandra A.S.; Lin, Justin J.; Walkey, Christopher J.; Leathers, Michael P.; Coarfa, Cristian; Johnson, Deborah L.

    2017-01-01

    The TATA-binding protein (TBP) plays a central role in eukaryotic gene transcription. Given its key function in transcription initiation, TBP was initially thought to be an invariant protein. However, studies showed that TBP expression is upregulated by oncogenic signaling pathways. Furthermore, depending on the cell type, small increases in cellular TBP amounts can induce changes in cellular growth properties towards a transformed phenotype. Here we sought to identify the specific TBP-regulated gene targets that drive its ability to induce tumorigenesis. Using microarray analysis, our results reveal that increases in cellular TBP concentrations produce selective alterations in gene expression that include an enrichment for genes involved in angiogenesis. Accordingly, we find that TBP levels modulate VEGFA expression, the master regulator of angiogenesis. Increases in cellular TBP amounts induce VEGFA expression and secretion to enhance cell migration and tumor vascularization. TBP mediates changes in VEGFA transcription requiring its recruitment at a hypoxia-insensitive proximal TSS, revealing a mechanism for VEGF regulation under non-stress conditions. The results are clinically relevant as TBP expression is significantly increased in both colon adenocarcinomas as well as adenomas relative to normal tissue. Furthermore, TBP expression is positively correlated with VEGFA expression. Collectively, these studies support the idea that increases in TBP expression contribute to enhanced VEGFA transcription early in colorectal cancer development to drive tumorigenesis. PMID:28415573

  3. Regulation of UGT1A1 and HNF1 transcription factor gene expression by DNA methylation in colon cancer cells

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    Harvey Mario

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 (UGT1A1 is a pivotal enzyme involved in metabolism of SN-38, the active metabolite of irinotecan commonly used to treat metastatic colorectal cancer. We previously demonstrated aberrant methylation of specific CpG dinucleotides in UGT1A1-negative cells, and revealed that methylation state of the UGT1A1 5'-flanking sequence is negatively correlated with gene transcription. Interestingly, one of these CpG dinucleotides (CpG -4 is found close to a HNF1 response element (HRE, known to be involved in activation of UGT1A1 gene expression, and within an upstream stimulating factor (USF binding site. Results Gel retardation assays revealed that methylation of CpG-4 directly affect the interaction of USF1/2 with its cognate sequence without altering the binding for HNF1-alpha. Luciferase assays sustained a role for USF1/2 and HNF1-alpha in UGT1A1 regulation in colon cancer cells. Based on the differential expression profiles of HNF1A gene in colon cell lines, we also assessed whether methylation affects its expression. In agreement with the presence of CpG islands in the HNF1A promoter, treatments of UGT1A1-negative HCT116 colon cancer cells with a DNA methyltransferase inhibitor restore HNF1A gene expression, as observed for UGT1A1. Conclusions This study reveals that basal UGT1A1 expression in colon cells is positively regulated by HNF1-alpha and USF, and negatively regulated by DNA methylation. Besides, DNA methylation of HNF1A could also play an important role in regulating additional cellular drug metabolism and transporter pathways. This process may contribute to determine local inactivation of drugs such as the anticancer agent SN-38 by glucuronidation and define tumoral response.

  4. The Histone Acetyltransferase GCN5 Expression Is Elevated and Regulated by c-Myc and E2F1 Transcription Factors in Human Colon Cancer

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    Yin, Yan-Wei; Jin, Hong-Jian; Zhao, Wenjing; Gao, Beixue; Fang, Jiangao; Wei, Junmin; Zhang, Donna D.; Zhang, Jianing; Fang, Deyu

    2017-01-01

    The histone acetyltransferase GCN5 has been suggested to be involved in promoting cancer cell growth. But its role in human colon cancer development remains unknown. Herein we discovered that GCN5 expression is significantly upregulated in human colon adenocarcinoma tissues. We further demonstrate that GCN5 is upregulated in human colon cancer at the mRNA level. Surprisingly, two transcription factors, the oncogenic c-Myc and the proapoptotic E2F1, are responsible for GCN5 mRNA transcription. Knockdown of c-Myc inhibited colon cancer cell proliferation largely through downregulating GCN5 transcription, which can be fully rescued by the ectopic GCN5 expression. In contrast, E2F1 expression induced human colon cancer cell death, and suppression of GCN5 expression in cells with E2F1 overexpression further facilitated cell apoptosis, suggesting that GCN5 expression is induced by E2F1 as a possible negative feedback in suppressing E2F1-mediated cell apoptosis. In addition, suppression of GCN5 with its specific inhibitor CPTH2 inhibited human colon cancer cell growth. Our studies reveal that GCN5 plays a positive role in human colon cancer development, and its suppression holds a great therapeutic potential in antitumor therapy. PMID:26637399

  5. p53 Over-expression and p53 mutations in colon carcinomas: Relation to dietary risk factors

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    Voskuil, D.W.; Kampman, E.; Kraats, A.A. van; Balder, H.F.; Muijen, G.N.P. van; Goldbohm, R.A.; Veer, P. van 't

    1999-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have suggested that dietary factors may differently affect p53-dependent and p53-independent pathways to colon cancer. Results of such studies may depend on the method used to assess p53 status. This case-control study of 185 colon-cancer cases and 259 controls examines this

  6. WISP genes are members of the connective tissue growth factor family that are up-regulated in wnt-1-transformed cells and aberrantly expressed in human colon tumors.

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    Pennica, D; Swanson, T A; Welsh, J W; Roy, M A; Lawrence, D A; Lee, J; Brush, J; Taneyhill, L A; Deuel, B; Lew, M; Watanabe, C; Cohen, R L; Melhem, M F; Finley, G G; Quirke, P; Goddard, A D; Hillan, K J; Gurney, A L; Botstein, D; Levine, A J

    1998-12-08

    Wnt family members are critical to many developmental processes, and components of the Wnt signaling pathway have been linked to tumorigenesis in familial and sporadic colon carcinomas. Here we report the identification of two genes, WISP-1 and WISP-2, that are up-regulated in the mouse mammary epithelial cell line C57MG transformed by Wnt-1, but not by Wnt-4. Together with a third related gene, WISP-3, these proteins define a subfamily of the connective tissue growth factor family. Two distinct systems demonstrated WISP induction to be associated with the expression of Wnt-1. These included (i) C57MG cells infected with a Wnt-1 retroviral vector or expressing Wnt-1 under the control of a tetracyline repressible promoter, and (ii) Wnt-1 transgenic mice. The WISP-1 gene was localized to human chromosome 8q24.1-8q24.3. WISP-1 genomic DNA was amplified in colon cancer cell lines and in human colon tumors and its RNA overexpressed (2- to >30-fold) in 84% of the tumors examined compared with patient-matched normal mucosa. WISP-3 mapped to chromosome 6q22-6q23 and also was overexpressed (4- to >40-fold) in 63% of the colon tumors analyzed. In contrast, WISP-2 mapped to human chromosome 20q12-20q13 and its DNA was amplified, but RNA expression was reduced (2- to >30-fold) in 79% of the tumors. These results suggest that the WISP genes may be downstream of Wnt-1 signaling and that aberrant levels of WISP expression in colon cancer may play a role in colon tumorigenesis.

  7. Tumor Necrosis Factor-α-Induced Colitis Increases NADPH Oxidase 1 Expression, Oxidative Stress, and Neutrophil Recruitment in the Colon: Preventive Effect of Apocynin

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    Souad Mouzaoui

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species- (ROS- mediated injury has been implicated in several inflammatory disorders, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. NADPH oxidases (NOXs are the major source of endogenous ROS. Here, we investigated the role of NOXs derived-ROS in a mouse model of colitis induced by the proinflammatory cytokine, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α. Intraperitoneal injection of TNFα (10 μg · kg−1 induced an acute inflammation of the colon and a marked increase in expression of NADPH oxidase 1 (NOX1, a colon specific NADPH oxidase isoform. TNFα-induced colitis was also characterized by high production of keratinocyte-derived chemokine (KC and mucosal infiltration of neutrophils, NOX2-expressing cells. Concomitantly, ROS production and lipid peroxidation were significantly enhanced while catalase activity and glutathione level were reduced indicating a redox imbalance in the colon. Furthermore, the redox-sensitive MAP kinases, ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK, were activated during TNFα-induced colitis. Pretreatment of mice with apocynin, an NADPH oxidase inhibitor with antioxidant properties, before TNFα challenge, prevented all these events. These data suggest that ROS derived from NADPH oxidases (mainly NOX1 and NOX2 and MAP kinase pathways could contribute to the induction and expansion of oxidative lesions characteristics of IBD and that apocynin could potentially be beneficial in IBD treatment.

  8. Transforming growth factor-β1 regulated phosphorylated AKT and interferon gamma expressions are associated with epithelial cell survival in rhesus macaque colon explants.

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    Pahar, Bapi; Pan, Diganta; Lala, Wendy; Kenway-Lynch, Carys S; Das, Arpita

    2015-05-01

    Transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) is an important immunoregulatory cytokine that plays an obligate role in regulating T-cell functions. Here, we demonstrated the role of TGF-β1 in regulating the survival of intestinal epithelial cells (ECs) in rhesus colon explant cultures using either anti-TGF-β1 antibody or recombinant TGF-β1 proteins. Neutralization of endogenous TGF-β1 using anti-TGF-β1 antibodies induced apoptosis of both intestinal ECs and lamina propria (LP) cells. Additionally, endogenous TGF-β1 blocking significantly increased expression of IFNγ, TNFα, CD107a and Perforin in LP cells compared to media and isotype controls. A significant decrease in pAKT expression was detected in anti-TGF-β1 MAbs treated explants compared to isotype and rTGF-β1 protein treated explants. Our results demonstrated TGF-β1 regulated pAKT and IFNγ expressions were associated with epithelial cell survival in rhesus macaque colon explants and suggest a potential role of mucosal TGF-β1 in regulating intestinal homeostasis and EC integrity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Differential expression proteomics of human colon cancer.

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    Mazzanti, Roberto; Solazzo, Michela; Fantappié, Ornella; Elfering, Sarah; Pantaleo, Pietro; Bechi, Paolo; Cianchi, Fabio; Ettl, Adam; Giulivi, Cecilia

    2006-06-01

    The focus of this study was to use differential protein expression to investigate operative pathways in early stages of human colon cancer. Colorectal cancer represents an ideal model system to study the development and progression of human tumors, and the proteomic approach avoids overlooking posttranslational modifications not detected by microarray analyses and the limited correlation between transcript and protein levels. Colon cancer samples, confined to the intestinal wall, were analyzed by expression proteomics and compared with matched samples from normal colon tissue. Samples were processed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, and spots differentially expressed and consistent across all patients were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry analyses and by Western blot analyses. After differentially expressed proteins and their metabolic pathways were analyzed, the following main conclusions were achieved for tumor tissue: 1) a shift from beta-oxidation, as the main source of energy, to anaerobic glycolysis was observed owed to the alteration of nuclear- versus mitochondrial-encoded proteins and other proteins related to fatty acid and carbohydrate metabolism; 2) lower capacity for Na(+) and K(+) cycling; and 3) operativity of the apoptosis pathway, especially the mitochondrial one. This study of the human colon cancer proteome represents a step toward a better understanding of the metabolomics of colon cancer at early stages confined to the intestinal wall.

  10. Loss of KCNQ1 expression in stage II and stage III colon cancer is a strong prognostic factor for disease recurrence.

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    den Uil, Sjoerd H; Coupé, Veerle M H; Linnekamp, Janneke F; van den Broek, Evert; Goos, Jeroen A C M; Delis-van Diemen, Pien M; Belt, Eric J Th; van Grieken, Nicole C T; Scott, Patricia M; Vermeulen, Louis; Medema, Jan Paul; Bril, Herman; Stockmann, Hein B A C; Cormier, Robert T; Meijer, Gerrit A; Fijneman, Remond J A

    2016-12-06

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer worldwide. Accurately identifying stage II CRC patients at risk for recurrence is an unmet clinical need. KCNQ1 was previously identified as a tumour suppressor gene and loss of expression was associated with poor survival in patients with CRC liver metastases. In this study the prognostic value of KCNQ1 in stage II and stage III colon cancer patients was examined. KCNQ1 mRNA expression was assessed in 90 stage II colon cancer patients (AMC-AJCCII-90) using microarray gene expression data. Subsequently, KCNQ1 protein expression was evaluated in an independent cohort of 386 stage II and stage III colon cancer patients by immunohistochemistry of tissue microarrays. Low KCNQ1 mRNA expression in stage II microsatellite stable (MSS) colon cancers was associated with poor disease-free survival (DFS) (P=0.025). Loss of KCNQ1 protein expression from epithelial cells was strongly associated with poor DFS in stage II MSS (PKCNQ1 seemed an independent prognostic value in addition to other high-risk parameters like angio-invasion, nodal stage and microsatellite instability-status. We conclude that KCNQ1 is a promising biomarker for prediction of disease recurrence and may aid stratification of patients with stage II MSS colon cancer for adjuvant chemotherapy.

  11. Trans-Cinnamaldehyde, Carvacrol, and Eugenol Reduce Campylobacter jejuni Colonization Factors and Expression of Virulence Genes in Vitro.

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    Upadhyay, Abhinav; Arsi, Komala; Wagle, Basanta R; Upadhyaya, Indu; Shrestha, Sandip; Donoghue, Ann M; Donoghue, Dan J

    2017-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a major foodborne pathogen that causes severe gastroenteritis in humans characterized by fever, diarrhea, and abdominal cramps. In the human gut, Campylobacter adheres and invades the intestinal epithelium followed by cytolethal distending toxin mediated cell death, and enteritis. Reducing the attachment and invasion of Campylobacter to intestinal epithelium and expression of its virulence factors such as motility and cytolethal distending toxin (CDT) production could potentially reduce infection in humans. This study investigated the efficacy of sub-inhibitory concentrations (SICs, concentration not inhibiting bacterial growth) of three GRAS (generally recognized as safe) status phytochemicals namely trans-cinnamaldehyde (TC; 0.005, 0.01%), carvacrol (CR; 0.001, 0.002%), and eugenol (EG; 0.005, 0.01%) in reducing the attachment, invasion, and translocation of C. jejuni on human intestinal epithelial cells (Caco-2). Additionally, the effect of these phytochemicals on Campylobacter motility and CDT production was studied using standard bioassays and gene expression analysis. All experiments had duplicate samples and were replicated three times on three strains (wild type S-8, NCTC 11168, 81-176) of C. jejuni. Data were analyzed using ANOVA with GraphPad ver. 6. Differences between the means were considered significantly different at P jejuni adhesion, invasion, and translocation of Caco-2 cells (P jejuni genes critical for infection in humans (P jejuni infection in humans.

  12. Expression of colonization factor CS5 of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC is enhanced in vivo and by the bile component Na glycocholate hydrate.

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    Matilda Nicklasson

    Full Text Available Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC is an important cause of acute watery diarrhoea in developing countries. Colonization factors (CFs on the bacterial surface mediate adhesion to the small intestinal epithelium. Two of the most common CFs worldwide are coli surface antigens 5 and 6 (CS5, CS6. In this study we investigated the expression of CS5 and CS6 in vivo, and the effects of bile and sodium bicarbonate, present in the human gut, on the expression of CS5. Five CS5+CS6 ETEC isolates from adult Bangladeshi patients with acute diarrhoea were studied. The level of transcription from the CS5 operon was approximately 100-fold higher than from the CS6 operon in ETEC bacteria recovered directly from diarrhoeal stool without sub-culturing (in vivo. The glyco-conjugated primary bile salt sodium glycocholate hydrate (NaGCH induced phenotypic expression of CS5 in a dose-dependent manner and caused a 100-fold up-regulation of CS5 mRNA levels; this is the first description of NaGCH as an enteropathogenic virulence inducer. The relative transcription levels from the CS5 and CS6 operons in the presence of bile or NaGCH in vitro were similar to those in vivo. Another bile salt, sodium deoxycholate (NaDC, previously reported to induce enteropathogenic virulence, also induced expression of CS5, whereas sodium bicarbonate did not.

  13. Expression of colonization factor CS5 of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is enhanced in vivo and by the bile component Na glycocholate hydrate.

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    Nicklasson, Matilda; Sjöling, Åsa; von Mentzer, Astrid; Qadri, Firdausi; Svennerholm, Ann-Mari

    2012-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is an important cause of acute watery diarrhoea in developing countries. Colonization factors (CFs) on the bacterial surface mediate adhesion to the small intestinal epithelium. Two of the most common CFs worldwide are coli surface antigens 5 and 6 (CS5, CS6). In this study we investigated the expression of CS5 and CS6 in vivo, and the effects of bile and sodium bicarbonate, present in the human gut, on the expression of CS5. Five CS5+CS6 ETEC isolates from adult Bangladeshi patients with acute diarrhoea were studied. The level of transcription from the CS5 operon was approximately 100-fold higher than from the CS6 operon in ETEC bacteria recovered directly from diarrhoeal stool without sub-culturing (in vivo). The glyco-conjugated primary bile salt sodium glycocholate hydrate (NaGCH) induced phenotypic expression of CS5 in a dose-dependent manner and caused a 100-fold up-regulation of CS5 mRNA levels; this is the first description of NaGCH as an enteropathogenic virulence inducer. The relative transcription levels from the CS5 and CS6 operons in the presence of bile or NaGCH in vitro were similar to those in vivo. Another bile salt, sodium deoxycholate (NaDC), previously reported to induce enteropathogenic virulence, also induced expression of CS5, whereas sodium bicarbonate did not.

  14. Trans-Cinnamaldehyde, Carvacrol, and Eugenol Reduce Campylobacter jejuni Colonization Factors and Expression of Virulence Genes in Vitro

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    Dan J. Donoghue

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Campylobacter jejuni is a major foodborne pathogen that causes severe gastroenteritis in humans characterized by fever, diarrhea, and abdominal cramps. In the human gut, Campylobacter adheres and invades the intestinal epithelium followed by cytolethal distending toxin mediated cell death, and enteritis. Reducing the attachment and invasion of Campylobacter to intestinal epithelium and expression of its virulence factors such as motility and cytolethal distending toxin (CDT production could potentially reduce infection in humans. This study investigated the efficacy of sub-inhibitory concentrations (SICs, concentration not inhibiting bacterial growth of three GRAS (generally recognized as safe status phytochemicals namely trans-cinnamaldehyde (TC; 0.005, 0.01%, carvacrol (CR; 0.001, 0.002%, and eugenol (EG; 0.005, 0.01% in reducing the attachment, invasion, and translocation of C. jejuni on human intestinal epithelial cells (Caco-2. Additionally, the effect of these phytochemicals on Campylobacter motility and CDT production was studied using standard bioassays and gene expression analysis. All experiments had duplicate samples and were replicated three times on three strains (wild type S-8, NCTC 11168, 81–176 of C. jejuni. Data were analyzed using ANOVA with GraphPad ver. 6. Differences between the means were considered significantly different at P < 0.05. The majority of phytochemical treatments reduced C. jejuni adhesion, invasion, and translocation of Caco-2 cells (P < 0.05. In addition, the phytochemicals reduced pathogen motility and production of CDT in S-8 and NCTC 11168 (P < 0.05. Real-time quantitative PCR revealed that phytochemicals reduced the transcription of select C. jejuni genes critical for infection in humans (P < 0.05. Results suggest that TC, CR, and EG could potentially be used to control C. jejuni infection in humans.

  15. The roles of tumor necrosis factor-alpha in colon tight junction protein expression and intestinal mucosa structure in a mouse model of acute liver failure

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    Lv Sa

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP is a common clinical disease and one of the most severe complications of acute liver failure (ALF. Although the mechanism responsible for SBP is unclear, cytokines play an important role. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α on the structure of the intestinal mucosa and the expression of tight junction (Zona Occludens 1; ZO-1 protein in a mouse model of ALF. Methods We induced ALF using D-galactosamine/lipopolysaccharide (GalN/LPS or GalN/TNF-α and assessed the results using transmission electron microscopy, immunohistochemistry, Western blotting, ELISA and real-time quantitative PCR. The effects of administration of anti-TNF-α IgG antibody or anti-TNF-α R1 antibody before administration of GalN/LPS or GalN/TNF-α, respectively, on TNF-α were also assessed. Results Morphological abnormalities in the intestinal mucosa of ALF mice were positively correlated with serum TNF-α level. Electron microscopic analysis revealed tight junction (TJ disruptions, epithelial cell swelling, and atrophy of intestinal villi. Gut bacteria invaded the body at sites where TJ disruptions occurred. Expression of ZO-1 mRNA was significantly decreased in both ALF models, as was the level of ZO-1 protein. Prophylactic treatment with either anti-TNF-α IgG antibody or anti-tumor necrosis factor-a receptor1 (anti-TNF-α R1 antibody prevented changes in intestinal tissue ultrastructure and ZO-1 expression. Conclusion TNF-α affects the structure of the intestinal mucosa, decreases expression of ZO-1, and affects the morphology of the colon in a mouse model of ALF. It also may participate in the pathophysiological mechanism of SBP complicated to ALF.

  16. Glucocorticoid receptor alpha and beta variant expression is associated with ASF/SF2 splicing factor upregulation in HT-29 colon cancer and MCF-7 breast carcinoma cells.

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    Piotrowska, Hanna; Jagodzinski, Pawel P

    2009-04-01

    Transcriptional activity of NF-kappaB is inhibited by the liganded glucocorticoid receptor (GR), which exists mainly in two splice variants as functional GRalpha and nonfunctional GRbeta. We investigated the effect of 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-dAzaC), trichostatin A (TSA), and sodium butyrate (NaBu) on GRalpha,GRbeta and ASF/SF2 splicing factor expression in HT-29 colon and MCF-7 breast carcinoma cells. HT-29 and MCF-7 cells were cultured in the absence or in the presence of 5-dAzaC, TSA, and NaBu, followed by RNA and protein isolation. The transcript and protein levels of GRalpha, GRbeta ASF/SF2 were determined by reverse transcription, real-time quantitative PCR and Western blot analysis. We found that 5-dAzaC, TSA, and NaBu lead to an increase in GRalpha and ASF/SF2 transcript levels and a decrease in GRbeta transcript levels in HT-29 and MCF-7 cells. The 5-dAzaC, TSA, and NaBu resulted in increased GRalpha and ASF/SF2 protein levels and GRbeta protein downregulation in HT-29 cells. The most increased GRalpha protein expression in MCF-7 cells was observed with NaBu. However, all of these compounds inhibited GRbeta protein expression in MCF-7 cells. The MCF-7 cells treated with NaBu demonstrated a remarkable increase in ASF/SF2 protein expression. Because NF-kappaB is considered to be a factor in the augmentation of malignant properties of cells, treatment of tumors with 5-dAzaC, TSA, and NaBu may provide a novel approach to the enhancement of therapeutic effects of glucocorticoids in epithelial carcinomas.

  17. Dietary factors in colon cancer: international relationships.

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    McKeown-Eyssen, G E; Bright-See, E

    1984-01-01

    The relationship between dietary factors and mortality from colon cancer was explored by an analysis of the correlation between age-adjusted colon cancer death rates for men in 38 countries and estimates of the availability of a number of dietary components. Cereals were the only source of fiber found to be negatively associated with colon cancer mortality after adjustment for the availability of total or animal fats, or total or red meats, foods that were themselves positively associated with mortality. The estimate of dietary fiber from cereals was more closely associated with mortality than that of crude fiber. The previously postulated protective effects of vitamins C and A and of cruciferous vegetables were not supported by the international data; we found no evidence of a negative association between colon cancer mortality and availability of these dietary factors. The positive association previously reported between colon cancer and beer consumption disappeared following adjustment for animal fat.

  18. The anti-proliferative effect of L-carnosine correlates with a decreased expression of hypoxia inducible factor 1 alpha in human colon cancer cells.

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    Barbara Iovine

    Full Text Available In recent years considerable attention has been given to the use of natural substances as anticancer drugs. The natural antioxidant dipeptide L-carnosine belongs to this class of molecules because it has been proved to have a significant anticancer activity both in vitro and in vivo. Previous studies have shown that L-carnosine inhibits the proliferation of human colorectal carcinoma cells by affecting the ATP and Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS production. In the present study we identified the Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1α (HIF-1α as a possible target of L-carnosine in HCT-116 cell line. HIF-1α protein is over-expressed in multiple types of human cancer and is the major cause of resistance to drugs and radiation in solid tumours. Of particular interest are experimental data supporting the concept that generation of ROS provides a redox signal for HIF-1α induction, and it is known that some antioxidants are able to suppress tumorigenesis by inhibiting HIF-1α. In the current study we found that L-carnosine reduces the HIF-1α protein level affecting its stability and decreases the HIF-1 transcriptional activity. In addition, we demonstrated that L-carnosine is involved in ubiquitin-proteasome system promoting HIF-1α degradation. Finally, we compared the antioxidant activity of L-carnosine with that of two synthetic anti-oxidant bis-diaminotriazoles (namely 1 and 2, respectively. Despite these three compounds have the same ability in reducing intracellular ROS, 1 and 2 are more potent scavengers and have no effect on HIF-1α expression and cancer cell proliferation. These findings suggest that an analysis of L-carnosine antioxidant pathway will clarify the mechanism underlying the anti-proliferative effects of this dipeptide on colon cancer cells. However, although the molecular mechanism by which L-carnosine down regulates or inhibits the HIF-1α activity has not been yet elucidated, this ability may be promising in treating hypoxia

  19. Expression of ICAM-1 in colon epithelial cells

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    Vainer, Ben; Sørensen, Susanne; Seidelin, Jakob

    2003-01-01

    Studies have suggested that in ulcerative colitis (UC), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) is involved in migration of leukocytes toward the colonic epithelium. A suitable in vitro model of chronic colonic inflammation does not exist, and the role of the epithelium is based on monolayers...... of cancer cells. Conflicting results exist on epithelial ICAM-1 expression, and the aim of this study was to compare the expression in various models of colonic epithelium....

  20. Protein expression analysis of inflammation-related colon carcinogenesis

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    Yasui Yumiko

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic inflammation is a risk factor for colorectal cancer (CRC development. The aim of this study was to determine the differences in protein expression between CRC and the surrounding nontumorous colonic tissues in the mice that received azoxymethane (AOM and dextran sodium sulfate (DSS using a proteomic analysis. Materials and Methods: Male ICR mice were given a single intraperitoneal injection of AOM (10 mg/kg body weight, followed by 2% (w/v DSS in their drinking water for seven days, starting one week after the AOM injection. Colonic adenocarcinoma developed after 20 weeks and a proteomics analysis based on two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and ultraflex TOF/TOF mass spectrometry was conducted in the cancerous and nontumorous tissue specimens. Results: The proteomic analysis revealed 21 differentially expressed proteins in the cancerous tissues in comparison to the nontumorous tissues. There were five markedly increased proteins (beta-tropomyosin, tropomyosin 1 alpha isoform b, S100 calcium binding protein A9, and an unknown protein and 16 markedly decreased proteins (Car1 proteins, selenium-binding protein 1, HMG-CoA synthase, thioredoxin 1, 1 Cys peroxiredoxin protein 2, Fcgbp protein, Cytochrome c oxidase, subunit Va, ETHE1 protein, and 7 unknown proteins. Conclusions: There were 21 differentially expressed proteins in the cancerous tissues of the mice that received AOM and DSS. Their functions include metabolism, the antioxidant system, oxidative stress, mucin production, and inflammation. These findings may provide new insights into the mechanisms of inflammation-related colon carcinogenesis and the establishment of novel therapies and preventative strategies to treat carcinogenesis in the inflamed colon.

  1. LRF inhibits p53 expression in colon cancer cells via modulating DAP5 activity.

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    Zhu, Min; Wang, Peng; Feng, Fan; Li, Ming-Yang

    2017-10-01

    The p53 protein plays a critical role in suppression of tumour growth; its regulation is not fully understood. Leukaemia/lymphoma-related factor (LRF) promotes tumour cell growth. This study tests a hypothesis that LRF inhibits p53 expression in colon cancer cells. In this study, human colon cancer cell lines, LIM1215 and HCT116 cells, were used. The expression of LRF and p53 in the cells was analysed by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting. We observed that the expression of protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) was detected in both LIM1215 and HCT116 human colon cancer cells. Activation of PAR2 increased the expression of LRF and inhibited the p53 expression in the cancer cells. We also detected a complex of LRF and DAP5, one of the p53 gene transcription factors. The interaction of LRF and DAP5 resulted in the repression of p53 expression in the colon cancer cells. In conclusion, PAR2 activation increases the expression of LRF in colon cancer cells, which interacts with DAP5 to repress the p53 expression. Leukaemia/lymphoma-related factor may be a novel target in the treatment of colon cancer. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Variation in Candida albicans EFG1 expression enables host-dependent changes in colonizing fungal populations.

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    Pierce, Jessica V; Kumamoto, Carol A

    2012-01-01

    To understand differences in host-Candida albicans interactions that occur during colonization of healthy or compromised hosts, production of phenotypic variants and colonization of healthy or immunodeficient mice by C. albicans were studied. We showed that activity of the transcription factor Efg1p exhibited cell-to-cell variability and identified Efg1p as a major regulator of colonization. In C. albicans populations colonizing the murine gastrointestinal tract, average expression of EFG1 differed depending on the immune status of the host. We propose that cellular heterogeneity in Efg1p activity allows the C. albicans colonizing population to differ depending on the immune status of the host, because selective pressure from a healthy host alters the composition of the population. These data are the first demonstration that differences in host immune status are associated with differences in gene expression in colonizing C. albicans cells. Altered gene expression in organisms colonizing immunocompromised hosts may begin the transition of C. albicans from a commensal to a pathogen. In healthy people, the fungus Candida albicans colonizes the gastrointestinal tract and other sites without producing obvious pathology. In an immunocompromised patient, the organism can cause serious disease. The demonstration that the expression and activity of the C. albicans transcription factor Efg1p differs during colonization of healthy or immunocompromised mice shows that the organism adjusts its physiology when colonizing different hosts. Further, the effects of a healthy host on a heterogeneous C. albicans population containing cells with different levels of Efg1p activity show that selective pressure in the host can change the makeup of the population, allowing the population to respond to host immune status. The ability to sense host status may be key to the ability of C. albicans to colonize as a harmless commensal in some hosts but become a deadly pathogen in others.

  3. CIP2A influences survival in colon cancer and is critical for maintaining Myc expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armin Wiegering

    Full Text Available The cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A (CIP2A is an oncogenic factor that stabilises the c-Myc protein. CIP2A is overexpressed in several tumours, and expression levels are an independent marker for long-term outcome. To determine whether CIP2A expression is elevated in colon cancer and whether it might serve as a prognostic marker for survival, we analysed CIP2A mRNA expression by real-time PCR in 104 colon cancer samples. CIP2A mRNA was overexpressed in colon cancer samples and CIP2A expression levels correlated significantly with tumour stage. We found that CIP2A serves as an independent prognostic marker for disease-free and overall survival. Further, we investigated CIP2A-dependent effects on levels of c-Myc, Akt and on cell proliferation in three colon cancer cell lines by silencing CIP2A using small interfering (si and short hairpin (sh RNAs. Depletion of CIP2A substantially inhibited growth of colon cell lines and reduced c-Myc levels without affecting expression or function of the upstream regulatory kinase, Akt. Expression of CIP2A was found to be dependent on MAPK activity, linking elevated c-Myc expression to deregulated signal transduction in colon cancer.

  4. Clinicopathologic factors identify sporadic mismatch repair-defective colon cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halvarsson, Britta; Anderson, Harald; Domanska, Katarina

    2008-01-01

    Identification of sporadic mismatch repair (MMR)-defective colon cancers is increasingly demanded for decisions on adjuvant therapies. We evaluated clinicopathologic factors for the identification of these prognostically favorable tumors. Histopathologic features in 238 consecutive colon cancers...... and excluded 61.5% of the tumors from MMR testing. This clinicopathologic index thus successfully selects MMR-defective colon cancers. Udgivelsesdato: 2008-Feb...

  5. Colonic Saturated Fatty Acid Concentrations and Expression of COX-1, but not Diet, Predict Prostaglandin E2 in Normal Human Colon Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidahmed, ElKhansa; Sen, Ananda; Ren, Jianwei; Patel, Arsh; Turgeon, D Kim; Ruffin, Mack T; Brenner, Dean E; Djuric, Zora

    2016-10-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in the colon is a pro-inflammatory mediator that is associated with increased risk of colon cancer. In this study, expression of genes in the PGE2 pathway were quantified in colon biopsies from a trial of a Mediterranean versus a Healthy Eating diet in 113 individuals at high risk for colon cancer. Colon biopsies were obtained before and after 6 months of intervention. Quantitative, real-time PCR was used to measure mRNA expression of prostaglandin H synthases (PTGS1 and 2), prostaglandin E synthases (PTGES1 and 3), prostaglandin dehydrogenase (HPGD), and PGE2 receptors (PTGER2, PTGER4). The most highly expressed genes were HPGD and PTGS1. In multivariate linear regression models of baseline data, both colon saturated fatty acid concentrations and PTGS1 expression were significant, positive predictors of colon PGE2 concentrations after controlling for nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use, gender, age, and smoking status. The effects of dietary intervention on gene expression were minimal with small increases in expression noted for PTGES3 in both arms and in PTGER4 in the Mediterranean arm. These results indicate that short-term dietary change had little effect on enzymes in the prostaglandin pathway in the colon and other factors, such as differences in fatty acid metabolism, might be more influential.

  6. Reduced expression of TANGO in colon and hepatocellular carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, Stephanie; Bosserhoff, Anja K

    2007-10-01

    The TANGO gene was originally identified as a new family member of the MIA gene family. The gene codes for a 14-kDa protein of so far unknown function. Recently, we identified TANGO as a tumor suppressor in malignant melanoma. In this study we evaluated TANGO transcription in different colon and hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines and tissue samples, to analyze whether loss of TANGO expression is a more general process in tumor development. TANGO was down-regulated or lost in all hepatocellular and colon cell lines compared to primary human hepatocytes or normal colon epithelial cells, respectively, and in most of the tumor samples compared to non-tumorous tissue. These results were confirmed in situ by immunohistochemistry on paraffin-embedded sections of colon and hepatocellular tumors. Functional assays with exogenous TANGO treatment of colon and hepatoma cell lines revealed reduced motility and invasion capacity. Our studies present for the first time the down-regulation of TANGO in colon and hepatocellular carcinoma and provide the first indications for a tumor suppressor role of the TANGO gene in human colon and hepatocellular carcinoma. Thus, functional relevant loss of TANGO expression may contribute to general tumor development and progression, and may provide a new target for therapeutic strategies.

  7. Abnormal Expressions of Age, RAGE, TGF- b1 and TGF- b1 Receptor in Colonic Wall Contributed to STZ-Induced Diabetic Colon Remodeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Jingbo; Gregersen, Hans

    2016-01-01

    glycation end product (AGE) and AGE receptor (RAGE) were up-regulated in the diabetic colon wall (2). However, it lacks data in relation to the association between AGE, RAGE, transforming growth factor- b1 (TGF-b1) and TGFb1 receptor expressions with colon morphological and biomechanical remodeling...... glucose level was measured. The parameters of morphometric and biomechanical properties of colonic segments were obtained from diabetic (DM) and normal (Con) rats. The expressions of AGE, RAGE, TGF- b1 and TGF- b1 receptor were detected in different layers of the colon by immunohistochemistry. In order...... to determine the expressions of AGE, RAGE, TGF- b1 and TGF- b1 receptor in association with other parameters, and to see interrelation among AGE, RAGE, TGF- b1 and TGF- b1 receptor expressions, the multiple linear regression analysis was done. Results: The expressions of AGE, RAGE, TGF-b1 and TGF- b1 receptor...

  8. Differential expression of nanog1 and nanogp8 in colon cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishiguro, Tatsuya; Sato, Ai; Ohata, Hirokazu; Sakai, Hiroaki [Division of Cancer Differentiation, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Nakagama, Hitoshi, E-mail: hnakagam@ncc.go.jp [Division of Cancer Development System, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Okamoto, Koji, E-mail: kojokamo@ncc.go.jo [Division of Cancer Differentiation, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan)

    2012-02-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanog is expressed in a majority of colon cancer cell lines examined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both nanog1 and nanogp8 are expressed in colon cancer cells with varying ratios. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanog mediates cell proliferation of colon cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanog predominantly localizes in cytoplasm of colon cancer cells. -- Abstract: Nanog, a homeodomain transcription factor, is an essential regulator for promotion of self-renewal of embryonic stem cells and inhibition of their differentiation. It has been demonstrated that nanog1 as well as nanogp8, a retrogene of nanog1, is preferentially expressed in advanced stages of several types of cancer, suggesting their involvement during cancer progression. Here, we investigated the expression of Nanog in well-characterized colon cancer cell lines. Expression of Nanog was detectable in 5 (HCT116, HT29, RKO, SW48, SW620) out of seven cell lines examined. RNA expression analyses of nanog1 and nanogp8 indicated that, while nanog1 was a major form in SW620 as well as in teratoma cells Tera-2, nanogp8 was preferentially expressed in HT29 and HCT116. In accordance with this, shRNA-mediated knockdown of nanog1 caused the reduction of Nanog in SW620 but not in HT29. Inhibition of Nanog in SW620 cells negatively affected cell proliferation and tumor formation in mouse xenograft. Biochemical subcellular fractionation and immunostaining analyses revealed predominant localization of Nanog in cytoplasm in SW620 and HT29, while it was mainly localized in nucleus in Tera-2. Our data indicate that nanog1 and nanogp8 are differentially expressed in colon cancer cells, and suggest that their expression contributes to proliferation of colon cancer cells.

  9. TfR2 expression in human colon carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calzolari, Alessia; Deaglio, Silvia; Maldi, Elena; Cassoni, Paola; Malavasi, Fabio; Testa, Ugo

    2009-01-01

    Different proteins regulate iron metabolism at the level of various tissues. Among these is a second transferrin receptor (TfR2) that seems to play a key role in the regulation of iron homeostasis. Although TfR2 expression in normal tissues is restricted at the level of the liver, we observed that TfR2 is frequently expressed in cancer cell lines. Taking advantage of this observation we investigated TfR2 expression in primary colon cancers, and showed that this receptor is expressed in about 26% of cases. TfR2 expression in colon cancer is not related to histological grade, but is preferentially associated with mucinous tumors. In colon cancer cell lines, TfR2 is localized in membrane lipid rafts, induces ERK1/ERK2 phosphorylation, when activated by its ligand transferring, and is preferentially expressed during S-M phases of the cell cycle. The presence of TfR2 on the membrane of colon cancer cells may contribute the growth advantage to these cells.

  10. Factors affecting decomposition and Diptera colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campobasso, C P; Di Vella, G; Introna, F

    2001-08-15

    Understanding the process of corpse decomposition is basic to establishing the postmortem interval (PMI) in any death investigation even using insect evidence. The sequence of postmortem changes in soft tissues usually gives an idea of how long an individual has been dead. However, modification of the decomposition process can considerably alter the estimate of the time of death. A body after death is sometimes subject to depredation by various types of animals among which insects can have a predominant role in the breakdown of the corpse thus, accelerating the decomposition rate. The interference of the insect community in the decomposition process has been investigated by several experimental studies using animal models and very few contributions directly on cadavers. Several of the most frequent factors affecting PMI estimates such as temperature, burial depth and access of the body to insects are fully reviewed. On account of their activity and world wide distribution, Diptera are the insects of greatest forensic interest. The knowledge of factors inhibiting or favouring colonization and Diptera development is a necessary pre-requisite for estimating the PMI using entomological data.

  11. Reproductive and hormonal factors in male and female colon cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kampman, E.; Bijl, A.J.; Kok, C.; Veer, P. van 't

    1994-01-01

    We analysed data from a case-control study in the Netherlands in order to investigate whether reproductive events and hormonal factors are similarly related to colon cancer risk in men and women after adjustment for dietary factors. In total, 232 colon cancer cases (102 women, 130 men) and 259

  12. Prostaglandin E2 stimulates Fas ligand expression via the EP1 receptor in colon cancer cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Callaghan, G

    2012-02-03

    Fas ligand (FasL\\/CD95L) is a member of the tumour necrosis factor superfamily that triggers apoptosis following crosslinking of the Fas receptor. Despite studies strongly implicating tumour-expressed FasL as a major inhibitor of the anti-tumour immune response, little is known about the mechanisms that regulate FasL expression in tumours. In this study, we show that the cyclooxygenase (COX) signalling pathway, and in particular prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)), plays a role in the upregulation of FasL expression in colon cancer. Suppression of either COX-2 or COX-1 by RNA interference in HCA-7 and HT29 colon tumour cells reduced FasL expression at both the mRNA and protein level. Conversely, stimulation with PGE(2) increased FasL expression and these cells showed increased cytotoxicity against Fas-sensitive Jurkat T cells. Prostaglandin E(2)-induced FasL expression was mediated by signalling via the EP1 receptor. Moreover, immunohistochemical analysis using serial sections of human colon adenocarcinomas revealed a strong positive correlation between COX-2 and FasL (r=0.722; P<0.0001) expression, and between EP1 receptor and FasL (r=0.740; P<0.0001) expression, in the tumour cells. Thus, these findings indicate that PGE(2) positively regulates FasL expression in colon tumour cells, adding another pro-neoplastic activity to PGE(2).

  13. Glycoprotein expression by adenomatous polyps of the colon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roney, Celeste A.; Xie, Jianwu; Xu, Biying; Jabour, Paul; Griffiths, Gary; Summers, Ronald M.

    2008-03-01

    Colon cancer is the second leading cause of cancer related deaths in the United States. Specificity in diagnostic imaging for detecting colorectal adenomas, which have a propensity towards malignancy, is desired. Adenomatous polyp specimens of the colon were obtained from the mouse model of colorectal cancer called adenomatous polyposis coli-multiple intestinal neoplasia (APC Min). Histological evaluation, by the legume protein Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEA-1), determined expression of the glycoprotein α-L-fucose. FITC-labelled UEA-1 confirmed overexpression of the glycoprotein by the polyps on fluorescence microscopy in 17/17 cases, of which 13/17 included paraffin-fixed mouse polyp specimens. In addition, FITC-UEA-1 ex vivo multispectral optical imaging of 4/17 colonic specimens displayed over-expression of the glycoprotein by the polyps, as compared to non-neoplastic mucosa. Here, we report the surface expression of α-L-fucosyl terminal residues by neoplastic mucosal cells of APC specimens of the mouse. Glycoprotein expression was validated by the carbohydrate binding protein UEA-1. Future applications of this method are the development of agents used to diagnose cancers by biomedical imaging modalities, including computed tomographic colonography (CTC). UEA-1 targeting to colonic adenomas may provide a new avenue for the diagnosis of colorectal carcinoma by CT imaging.

  14. Clinical significance of adiponectin expression in colon cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Canhoroz

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: Adiponectin, which is secreted by adipose tissue, may have a role in the development and progression of cancer via its pro-apoptotic and/or anti-proliferative effects. Adiponectin expression in tumor tissues is likely to have a negative effect on disease - free survival in patients with stage II/III colon cancer; however, no statistically significant effect was demonstrated.

  15. Expression and clinical significance of tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2 in colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Peifen; Guo, Wenjie; Yuan, Huaqin; Li, Qian; Wang, Weicheng; Sun, Yang; Li, Xiaomin; Gu, Yanhong

    2014-04-01

    Protein-tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2, encoded by gene PTPN11, has been identified as a tumor-promoting factor in several types of leukemia and is hyper-activated by other mechanisms in some solid tumors including gastric cancer, breast cancer, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), etc. But few were reported on the expression and significances of SHP-2 in colon cancer. Here, we detect SHP-2 expression in colon cancer cells, colon cancer-induced by AOM+DSS in mice and 232 human colon cancer specimens, including 58 groups of self-matched adjacent peritumor tissues and normal tissues. We found that compared to the normal colon tissues, SHP-2 significantly decreased in tumor tissues (Pcolon tumor cells as well as mice colon tumors. And in humans samples, low SHP-2 expression showed a significantly correlation with poor tumor differentiation (P<0.05), late TNM stage (P=0.1666) and lymph node metastasis (P<0.05). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 4α Is Essential for Embryonic Development of the Mouse Colon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, Wendy D.; Battle, Michele A.; Yang, Chuhu; Kaestner, Klaus H.; Sladek, Frances M.; Duncan, Stephen A.

    2013-01-01

    Background & Aims Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha (HNF4α) is a transcription factor that has been shown to be required for hepatocyte differentiation and development of the liver. It has also been implicated in regulating expression of genes that act in the epithelium of the lower gastrointestinal tract. This implied that HNF4α might be required for development of the gut. Methods Mouse embryos were generated in which Hnf4a was ablated in the epithelial cells of the fetal colon by using Cre-loxP technology. Embryos were examined by using a combination of histology, immunohistochemistry, DNA microarray, reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, electrophoretic mobility shift assays, and chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses to define the consequences of loss of HNF4α on colon development. Results Embryos were recovered at E18.5 that lacked HNF4α in their colons. Although early stages of colonic development occurred, HNF4α-null colons failed to form normal crypts. In addition, goblet-cell maturation was perturbed and expression of an array of genes that encode proteins with diverse roles in colon function was disrupted. Several genes whose expression in the colon was dependent on HNF4α contained HNF4α-binding sites within putative transcriptional regulatory regions and a subset of these sites were occupied by HNF4α in vivo. Conclusions HNF4α is a transcription factor that is essential for development of the mammalian colon, regulates goblet-cell maturation, and is required for expression of genes that control normal colon function and epithelial cell differentiation. PMID:16618389

  17. Risk factors for anastomotic dehiscence in colon cancer surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gessler, Bodil; Bock, David; Pommergaard, Hans-Christian

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of this was to assess potential risk factors for anastomotic dehiscence in colon cancer surgery in a national cohort. METHODS: All patients, who had undergone a resection of a large bowel segment with an anastomosis between 2008 and 2011, were identified in the Swedish Colon Cancer...

  18. Citrinin as an accessory establishment factor of P. expansum for the colonization of apples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touhami, Najim; Soukup, Sebastian T; Schmidt-Heydt, Markus; Kulling, Sabine E; Geisen, Rolf

    2018-02-02

    Penicillium expansum is the causal agent of blue mold decay of apples. This fungal species can produce the two important mycotoxins patulin and citrinin. It was previously shown that patulin represents a colonization factor for the infection of apples. No definitive information about the importance of citrinin for the colonization of apples is currently available. The pksCT gene of the citrinin cluster codes for the citrinin polyketide synthase. Mutants of P. expansum in which the pksCT was inactivated showed a drastic decrease in the citrinin production. In addition, the pksCT mutants were also reduced in the ability to colonize apples. Externally added citrinin restored the capacity of the mutants to colonize apples roughly to that of the wild type. A kinetic analysis of the expression of the two respective pks genes of patulin (patK) and citrinin (pksCT) revealed that both genes are highly expressed in the first phase during the colonization process. The production of patulin in the apple matrix coincides with the expression of the patK gene. Almost no citrinin could be identified analytically during the first phase but only at a later stage of the colonization. It could be demonstrated that citrinin is degraded in apples and can tightly be bound to pectin. Overall the results suggest that citrinin may have an accessory function for the establishment of the colonization guided by other factors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. SOX9 Expression Predicts Relapse of Stage II Colon Cancer Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Espersen, Maiken Lise Marcker; Linnemann, Dorte; Christensen, Ib Jarle

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate if the protein expression of Sex-determining region y-box 9 (SOX9) in primary tumors could predict relapse of stage II colon cancer patients.144 patients with stage II primary colon cancer were retrospectively enrolledin the study. SOX9 expression was eval......The aim of this study was to investigate if the protein expression of Sex-determining region y-box 9 (SOX9) in primary tumors could predict relapse of stage II colon cancer patients.144 patients with stage II primary colon cancer were retrospectively enrolledin the study. SOX9 expression...... low to high expression) in univariate (HR: 0.73; 95% CI: 0.56-0.94; p=0.01) and multivariate cox proportional hazards analysis (HR: 0.75; 95% CI: 0.58-0.96; p=0.02) adjusting for mismatch repair deficiency and histopathological risk factors. Conversely, low SOX9 expression at the invasive front...

  20. Urotensin-II receptor is over-expressed in colon cancer cell lines and in colon carcinoma in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federico, Alessandro; Zappavigna, Silvia; Romano, Marco; Grieco, Paolo; Luce, Amalia; Marra, Monica; Gravina, Antonietta Gerarda; Stiuso, Paola; D'Armiento, Francesco Paolo; Vitale, Giovanni; Tuccillo, Concetta; Novellino, Ettore; Loguercio, Carmela; Caraglia, Michele

    2014-01-01

    Urotensin (U)-II receptor (UTR) has been previously reported to be over-expressed in a number of tumours. Whether UTR-related pathway plays a role in colon carcinogenesis is unknown. We evaluated UTR protein and mRNA expression in human epithelial colon cancer cell lines and in normal colon tissue, adenomatous polyps and colon cancer. U-II protein expression was assessed in cancer cell lines. Moreover, we evaluated the effects of U-II(4-11) (an UTR agonist), antagonists and knockdown of UTR protein expression through a specific shRNA, on proliferation, invasion and motility of human colon cancer cells. Cancer cell lines expressed U-II protein and UTR protein and mRNA. By immunohistochemistry, UTR was expressed in 5-30% of epithelial cells in 45 normal controls, in 30-48% in 21 adenomatous polyps and in 65-90% in 48 colon adenocarcinomas. UTR mRNA expression was increased by threefold in adenomatous polyps and eightfold in colon cancer, compared with normal colon. U-II(4-11) induced a 20-40% increase in cell growth while the blockade of the receptor with specific antagonists caused growth inhibition of 20-40%. Moreover, the knock down of UTR with a shRNA or the inhibition of UTR with the antagonist urantide induced an approximately 50% inhibition of both motility and invasion. UTR appears to be involved in the regulation of colon cancer cell invasion and motility. These data suggest that UTR-related pathway may play a role in colon carcinogenesis and that UTR may function as a target for therapeutic intervention in colon cancer. © 2013 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation.

  1. Mortality risk factor analysis in colonic perforation: would retroperitoneal contamination increase mortality in colonic perforation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Ri Na; Kye, Bong-Hyeon; Kim, Gun; Kim, Hyung Jin; Cho, Hyeon-Min

    2017-10-01

    Colonic perforation is a lethal condition presenting high morbidity and mortality in spite of urgent surgical treatment. This study investigated the surgical outcome of patients with colonic perforation associated with retroperitoneal contamination. Retrospective analysis was performed for 30 patients diagnosed with colonic perforation caused by either inflammation or ischemia who underwent urgent surgical treatment in our facility from January 2005 to December 2014. Patient characteristics were analyzed to find risk factors correlated with increased postoperative mortality. Using the Physiological and Operative Severity Score for the Enumeration of Mortality and Morbidity (POSSUM) audit system, the mortality and morbidity rates were estimated to verify the surgical outcomes. Patients with retroperitoneal contamination, defined by the presence of retroperitoneal air in the preoperative abdominopelvic CT, were compared to those without retroperitoneal contamination. Eight out of 30 patients (26.7%) with colonic perforation had died after urgent surgical treatment. Factors associated with mortality included age, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) physical status classification, and the ischemic cause of colonic perforation. Three out of 6 patients (50%) who presented retroperitoneal contamination were deceased. Although the patients with retroperitoneal contamination did not show significant increase in the mortality rate, they showed significantly higher ASA physical status classification than those without retroperitoneal contamination. The mortality rate predicted from Portsmouth POSSUM was higher in the patients with retroperitoneal contamination. Patients presenting colonic perforation along with retroperitoneal contamination demonstrated severe comorbidity. However, retroperitoneal contamination was not found to be correlated with the mortality rate.

  2. Endogenous Antimicrobial Peptide Expression in Response to Bacterial Epidermal Colonization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Brandwein

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial commensal colonization of human skin is vital for the training and maintenance of the skin’s innate and adaptive immune functions. In addition to its physical barrier against pathogen colonization, the skin expresses a variety of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs which are expressed constitutively and induced in response to pathogenic microbial stimuli. These AMPs are differentially effective against a suite of microbial skin colonizers, including both bacterial and fungal residents of the skin. We review the breadth of microorganism-induced cutaneous AMP expression studies and their complementary findings on the efficacy of skin AMPs against different bacterial and fungal species. We suggest further directions for skin AMP research based on emerging skin microbiome knowledge in an effort to advance our understanding of the nuanced host–microbe balance on human skin. Such advances should enable the scientific community to bridge the gap between descriptive disease-state AMP studies and experimental single-species in vitro studies, thereby enabling research endeavors that more closely mimic the natural skin environs.

  3. Alteration of gene expression in macroscopically normal colonic mucosa from individuals with a family history of sporadic colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Chun-Yi; Moore, Dan H; Wong, Patrick; Bennington, James L; Lee, Nancy M; Chen, Ling-Chun

    2005-02-15

    We have shown that the expression of several genes associated with human colon cancer is altered in the morphologically normal colonic mucosa (MNCM) of APC(min) mice and humans with colon cancers. To determine whether these alterations also occur in the MNCM of individuals who have not developed colon cancer but are at high risk of doing so, we measured gene expression in the MNCM of individuals with a family history of colon cancer. Expression of 16 genes in the MNCM of 12 individuals with a first-degree relative with sporadic colon cancer and 16 normal controls were measured by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR. All subjects tested had normal colonoscopic examinations. Biopsy samples of MNCM were obtained from the ascending, transverse, descending, and rectosigmoid regions of the colon (2-8 biopsy samples were obtained from each region). Relative to normal controls, the expression of several genes, including PPAR-gamma, SAA1, and IL-8 were significantly altered in the macroscopically normal rectosigmoid mucosa from individuals with a family history of colon cancer. Molecular abnormalities that precede the appearance of adenomatous polyp are present in the MNCM of individuals who have a family history of colon cancer. This observation raises the possibility of screening for individuals who are at an increased risk of developing colon cancer by analysis of gene expression in rectosigmoid biopsy samples. To assess this possibility, prospective studies will be needed to determine whether or not altered gene expression is associated with the subsequent development of adenomatous polyps and/ or colonic carcinomas.

  4. Family history and environmental risk factors for colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Esteve; Gallus, Silvano; La Vecchia, Carlo; Talamini, Renato; Negri, Eva; Franceschi, Silvia

    2004-04-01

    We analyzed the joint effect of environmental risk factors and family history of colorectal cancer on colon cancer. We used data from a case-control study conducted in northern Italy between 1992 and 1996 including 1225 cases with colon cancer and 4154 controls. We created a weighed risk factor score for the main environmental risk factors in this population (positive family history, high education, low occupational physical activity, high daily meal frequency, low intake of fiber, low intake of calcium, and low intake of beta-carotene). Compared with the reference category (subjects with no family history of colorectal cancer and in the lowest tertile of the risk factor score), the odds ratios of colon cancer were 2.27 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.89-2.73] for subjects without family history and in the highest environmental risk factor score, 3.20 (95% CI = 2.05-5.01) for those with family history and low risk factor score, and 7.08 (95% CI = 4.68-10.71) for those with family history and high risk factor score. The pattern of risk was similar for men and women and no meaningful differences emerged according to subsite within the colon. Family history of colorectal cancer interacts with environmental risk factors of colon cancer.

  5. Multiepitope fusion antigen induces broadly protective antibodies that prevent adherence of Escherichia coli strains expressing colonization factor antigen I (CFA/I), CFA/II, and CFA/IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Xiaosai; Knudsen, David E; Wollenberg, Katie M; Sack, David A; Zhang, Weiping

    2014-02-01

    Diarrhea is the second leading cause of death in children younger than 5 years and continues to be a major threat to global health. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains are the most common bacteria causing diarrhea in developing countries. ETEC strains are able to attach to host small intestinal epithelial cells by using bacterial colonization factor antigen (CFA) adhesins. This attachment helps to initiate the diarrheal disease. Vaccines that induce antiadhesin immunity to block adherence of ETEC strains that express immunologically heterogeneous CFA adhesins are expected to protect against ETEC diarrhea. In this study, we created a CFA multiepitope fusion antigen (MEFA) carrying representative epitopes of CFA/I, CFA/II (CS1, CS2, and CS3), and CFA/IV (CS4, CS5, and CS6), examined its immunogenicity in mice, and assessed the potential of this MEFA as an antiadhesin vaccine against ETEC. Mice intraperitoneally immunized with this CFA MEFA exhibited no adverse effects and developed immune responses to CFA/I, CFA/II, and CFA/IV adhesins. Moreover, after incubation with serum of the immunized mice, ETEC or E. coli strains expressing CFA/I, CFA/II, or CFA/IV adhesins were significantly inhibited in adherence to Caco-2 cells. Our results indicated this CFA MEFA elicited antibodies that not only cross-reacted to CFA/I, CFA/II and CFA/IV adhesins but also broadly inhibited adherence of E. coli strains expressing these seven adhesins and suggested that this CFA MEFA could be a candidate to induce broad-spectrum antiadhesin protection against ETEC diarrhea. Additionally, this antigen construction approach (creating an MEFA) may be generally used in vaccine development against heterogenic pathogens.

  6. Multiepitope Fusion Antigen Induces Broadly Protective Antibodies That Prevent Adherence of Escherichia coli Strains Expressing Colonization Factor Antigen I (CFA/I), CFA/II, and CFA/IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Xiaosai; Knudsen, David E.; Wollenberg, Katie M.

    2014-01-01

    Diarrhea is the second leading cause of death in children younger than 5 years and continues to be a major threat to global health. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains are the most common bacteria causing diarrhea in developing countries. ETEC strains are able to attach to host small intestinal epithelial cells by using bacterial colonization factor antigen (CFA) adhesins. This attachment helps to initiate the diarrheal disease. Vaccines that induce antiadhesin immunity to block adherence of ETEC strains that express immunologically heterogeneous CFA adhesins are expected to protect against ETEC diarrhea. In this study, we created a CFA multiepitope fusion antigen (MEFA) carrying representative epitopes of CFA/I, CFA/II (CS1, CS2, and CS3), and CFA/IV (CS4, CS5, and CS6), examined its immunogenicity in mice, and assessed the potential of this MEFA as an antiadhesin vaccine against ETEC. Mice intraperitoneally immunized with this CFA MEFA exhibited no adverse effects and developed immune responses to CFA/I, CFA/II, and CFA/IV adhesins. Moreover, after incubation with serum of the immunized mice, ETEC or E. coli strains expressing CFA/I, CFA/II, or CFA/IV adhesins were significantly inhibited in adherence to Caco-2 cells. Our results indicated this CFA MEFA elicited antibodies that not only cross-reacted to CFA/I, CFA/II and CFA/IV adhesins but also broadly inhibited adherence of E. coli strains expressing these seven adhesins and suggested that this CFA MEFA could be a candidate to induce broad-spectrum antiadhesin protection against ETEC diarrhea. Additionally, this antigen construction approach (creating an MEFA) may be generally used in vaccine development against heterogenic pathogens. PMID:24351757

  7. Gene expression profiles in stages II and III colon cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsteinsson, Morten; Kirkeby, Lene T; Hansen, Raino

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: A 128-gene signature has been proposed to predict outcome in patients with stages II and III colorectal cancers. In the present study, we aimed to reproduce and validate the 128-gene signature in external and independent material. METHODS: Gene expression data from the original material...... were retrieved from the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) (n¿=¿111) in addition to a Danish data set (n¿=¿37). All patients had stages II and III colon cancers. A Prediction Analysis of Microarray classifier, based on the 128-gene signature and the original training set of stage I (n¿=¿65) and stage IV (n......¿=¿76) colon cancers, was reproduced. The stages II and III colon cancers were subsequently classified as either stage I-like (good prognosis) or stage IV-like (poor prognosis) and assessed by the 36 months cumulative incidence of relapse. RESULTS: In the GEO data set, results were reproducible in stage...

  8. Expression profiling of colon cancer cell lines and colon biopsies: Towards a screening system for potential cancer-preventive compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erk, M.J. van; Krul, C.A.M.; Caldenhoven, E.; Stierum, R.H.; Peters, W.H.; Woutersen, R.A.; Ommen, B. van

    2005-01-01

    Interest in mechanisms of colon cancer prevention by food compounds is strong and research in this area is often performed with cultured colon cancer cells. In order to assess utility for screening of potential cancer-preventive (food) compounds, expression profiles of 14 human cell lines derived

  9. Expression profiling of colon cancer cell lines and colon biopsies: towards a screening system for potential cancer-preventive compounds.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erk, M.J. van; Krul, C.A.; Caldenhoven, E.; Stierum, R.H.; Peters, W.H.M.; Woutersen, R.A.; Ommen, B.

    2005-01-01

    Interest in mechanisms of colon cancer prevention by food compounds is strong and research in this area is often performed with cultured colon cancer cells. In order to assess utility for screening of potential cancer-preventive (food) compounds, expression profiles of 14 human cell lines derived

  10. Comparison of glycoprotein expression between ovarian and colon adenocarcinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Multhaupt, H A; Arenas-Elliott, C P; Warhol, M J

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Tumor-associated antigens may be expressed as surface glycoproteins. These molecules undergo qualitative and quantitative modifications during cell differentiation and malignant transformation. During malignant transformation, incomplete glycosylation is common, and certain glycosylation...... pathways are preferred. These antigens might help distinguish between ovarian and colonic adenocarcinomas in the primary and metastatic lesions. Different cytokeratins have been proposed as relatively organ-specific antigens. DESIGN: We used monoclonal antibodies against T1, Tn, sialosyl-Tn, B72.3, CA125...... in distinguishing between these 2 entities. CONCLUSION: A panel of monoclonal antibodies against cytokeratins 7 and 20 antigens, CA125, and carcinoembryonic antigen is useful in differentiating serous and endometrioid adenocarcinomas of the ovary from colonic adenocarcinomas. Mucinous ovarian adenocarcinomas cannot...

  11. Expression of metallothionein in dimethylhydrazine-induced colonic precancerous and cancerous model in rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela Christudoss

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: This study suggests that a decrease in the colonic MT mRNA expression, MT protein expression, and content in DMH-induced colonic cancer model is associated with the development of preneoplastic lesions and further progression to carcinoma in the colon results in a greater reduction in the levels of each of these parameters.

  12. The gut microbiota engages different signaling pathways to induce Duox2 expression in the ileum and colon epithelium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommer, F; Bäckhed, Gert Fredrik

    2015-01-01

    , but not when germ-free mice were colonized with various commensal bacteria. Duox2 expression was more rapidly induced by the gut microbiota in the colon than in the ileum. Furthermore, we showed that regulation of Duox2 expression in the ileum involved TIR-domain-containing adaptor protein including interferon......-β (TRIF) and canonical nuclear factor-κB p50/p65 signaling, whereas regulation of Duox2 expression in the colon involved MyD88 and the p38 pathway. Collectively, these data indicate that the gut microbiota uses two distinct signaling pathways to induce Duox2 expression in the ileum and colon epithelium....

  13. Attenuated Escherichia coli strains expressing the colonization factor antigen I (CFA/I) and a detoxified heat-labile enterotoxin (LThK63) enhance clearance of ETEC from the lungs of mice and protect mice from intestinal ETEC colonization and LT-induced fluid accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrd, Wyatt; Boedeker, Edgar C

    2013-03-15

    Although enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) infections are important causes of infantile and traveler's diarrhea there is no licensed vaccine available for those at-risk. Our goal is to develop a safe, live attenuated ETEC vaccine. We used an attenuated E. coli strain (O157:H7, Δ-intimin, Stx1-neg, Stx2-neg) as a vector (ZCR533) to prepare two vaccine strains, one strain expressing colonization factor antigen I (ZCR533-CFA/I) and one strain expressing CFA/I and a detoxified heat-labile enterotoxin (ZCR533-CFA/I+LThK63) to deliver ETEC antigens to mucosal sites in BALB/c mice. Following intranasal and intragastric immunization with the vaccine strains, serum IgG and IgA antibodies were measured to the CFA/I antigen, however, only serum IgG antibodies were detected to the heat-labile enterotoxin. Intranasal administration of the vaccine strains induced respiratory and intestinal antibody responses to the CFA/I and LT antigens, while intragastric administration induced only intestinal antibody responses with no respiratory antibodies detected to the CFA/I and LT antigens. Mice immunized intranasally with the vaccine strains showed enhanced clearance of wild-type (wt) ETEC bacteria from the lungs. Mice immunized intranasally and intragastrically with the vaccine strains were protected from intestinal colonization following oral challenge with ETEC wt bacteria. Mice immunized intragastrically with the ZCR533-CFA/I+LThK63 vaccine strain had less fluid accumulate in their intestine following challenge with ETEC wt bacteria or with purified LT as compared to the sham mice indicating that the immunized mice were protected from LT-induced intestinal fluid accumulation. Thus, mice intragastrically immunized with the ZCR533-CFA/I+LThK63 vaccine strain were able to effectively neutralize the activity of the LT enterotoxin. However, no difference in intestinal fluid accumulation was detected in the mice immunized intranasally with the vaccine strain as compared to the sham

  14. The game theory of Candida albicans colonization dynamics reveals host status-responsive gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyc, Katarzyna M; Herwald, Sanna E; Hogan, Jennifer A; Pierce, Jessica V; Klipp, Edda; Kumamoto, Carol A

    2016-03-01

    The fungal pathogen Candida albicans colonizes the gastrointestinal (GI) tract of mammalian hosts as a benign commensal. However, in an immunocompromised host, the fungus is capable of causing life-threatening infection. We previously showed that the major transcription factor Efg1p is differentially expressed in GI-colonizing C. albicans cells dependent on the host immune status. To understand the mechanisms that underlie this host-dependent differential gene expression, we utilized mathematical modeling to dissect host-pathogen interactions. Specifically, we used principles of evolutionary game theory to study the mechanism that governs dynamics of EFG1 expression during C. albicans colonization. Mathematical modeling predicted that down-regulation of EFG1 expression within individual fungal cells occurred at different average rates in different hosts. Rather than using relatively transient signaling pathways to adapt to a new environment, we demonstrate that C. albicans overcomes the host defense strategy by modulating the activity of diverse fungal histone modifying enzymes that control EFG1 expression. Based on our modeling and experimental results we conclude that C. albicans cells sense the local environment of the GI tract and respond to differences by altering EFG1 expression to establish optimal survival strategies. We show that the overall process is governed via modulation of epigenetic regulators of chromatin structure.

  15. Multiepitope Fusion Antigen Induces Broadly Protective Antibodies That Prevent Adherence of Escherichia coli Strains Expressing Colonization Factor Antigen I (CFA/I), CFA/II, and CFA/IV

    OpenAIRE

    Ruan, Xiaosai; Knudsen, David E.; Wollenberg, Katie M.; Sack, David A.; Zhang, Weiping

    2014-01-01

    Diarrhea is the second leading cause of death in children younger than 5 years and continues to be a major threat to global health. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains are the most common bacteria causing diarrhea in developing countries. ETEC strains are able to attach to host small intestinal epithelial cells by using bacterial colonization factor antigen (CFA) adhesins. This attachment helps to initiate the diarrheal disease. Vaccines that induce antiadhesin immunity to block a...

  16. Colonization factors of Campylobacter jejuni in the chicken gut

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Campylobacter contaminated broiler chicken meat is an important source of foodborne gastroenteritis and poses a serious health burden in industrialized countries. Broiler chickens are commonly regarded as a natural host for this zoonotic pathogen and infected birds carry a very high C. jejuni load in their gastrointestinal tract, especially the ceca. This eventually results in contaminated carcasses during processing. Current intervention methods fail to reduce the colonization of broiler chicks by C. jejuni due to an incomplete understanding on the interaction between C. jejuni and its avian host. Clearly, C. jejuni developed several survival and colonization mechanisms which are responsible for its highly adapted nature to the chicken host. But how these mechanisms interact with one another, leading to persistent, high-level cecal colonization remains largely obscure. A plethora of mutagenesis studies in the past few years resulted in the identification of several of the genes and proteins of C. jejuni involved in different aspects of the cellular response of this bacterium in the chicken gut. In this review, a thorough, up-to-date overview will be given of the survival mechanisms and colonization factors of C. jejuni identified to date. These factors may contribute to our understanding on how C. jejuni survival and colonization in chicks is mediated, as well as provide potential targets for effective subunit vaccine development. PMID:21714866

  17. Colonization factors of Campylobacter jejuni in the chicken gut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermans David

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Campylobacter contaminated broiler chicken meat is an important source of foodborne gastroenteritis and poses a serious health burden in industrialized countries. Broiler chickens are commonly regarded as a natural host for this zoonotic pathogen and infected birds carry a very high C. jejuni load in their gastrointestinal tract, especially the ceca. This eventually results in contaminated carcasses during processing. Current intervention methods fail to reduce the colonization of broiler chicks by C. jejuni due to an incomplete understanding on the interaction between C. jejuni and its avian host. Clearly, C. jejuni developed several survival and colonization mechanisms which are responsible for its highly adapted nature to the chicken host. But how these mechanisms interact with one another, leading to persistent, high-level cecal colonization remains largely obscure. A plethora of mutagenesis studies in the past few years resulted in the identification of several of the genes and proteins of C. jejuni involved in different aspects of the cellular response of this bacterium in the chicken gut. In this review, a thorough, up-to-date overview will be given of the survival mechanisms and colonization factors of C. jejuni identified to date. These factors may contribute to our understanding on how C. jejuni survival and colonization in chicks is mediated, as well as provide potential targets for effective subunit vaccine development.

  18. Increased expression and aberrant localization of mucin 13 in metastatic colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Brij K; Maher, Diane M; Ebeling, Mara C; Sundram, Vasudha; Koch, Michael D; Lynch, Douglas W; Bohlmeyer, Teresa; Watanabe, Akira; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Puumala, Susan E; Jaggi, Meena; Chauhan, Subhash C

    2012-11-01

    MUC13 is a newly identified transmembrane mucin. Although MUC13 is known to be overexpressed in ovarian and gastric cancers, limited information is available regarding the expression of MUC13 in metastatic colon cancer. Herein, we investigated the expression profile of MUC13 in colon cancer using a novel anti-MUC13 monoclonal antibody (MAb, clone ppz0020) by immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis. A cohort of colon cancer samples and tissue microarrays containing adjacent normal, non-metastatic colon cancer, metastatic colon cancer, and liver metastasis tissues was used in this study to investigate the expression pattern of MUC13. IHC analysis revealed significantly higher (pcolon cancer samples compared with faint or very low expression in adjacent normal tissues. Interestingly, metastatic colon cancer and liver metastasis tissue samples demonstrated significantly (pcolon cancer and adjacent normal colon samples. Moreover, cytoplasmic and nuclear MUC13 expression correlated with larger and poorly differentiated tumors. Four of six tested colon cancer cell lines also expressed MUC13 at RNA and protein levels. These studies demonstrate a significant increase in MUC13 expression in metastatic colon cancer and suggest a correlation between aberrant MUC13 localization (cytoplasmic and nuclear expression) and metastatic colon cancer.

  19. Decreased expression of cytochrome P450 protein in non-malignant colonic tissue of patients with colonic adenoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergheim, I.; Bode, C.; Parlesak, Alexandr

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes in epithelial cells lining the alimentary tract play an important role in both the elimination and activation of (pro-)carcinogens. To estimate the role of cytochrome P450 in carcinogenesis of the colon, expression patterns and protein levels of four...... representative CYPs (CYP2C, CYP2E1, CYP3A4 and CYP3A5) were determined in colon mucosa of normal and adenomatous colonic tissue of patients with adenomas and disease-free controls. METHODS: Expression of CYP2C, CYP2E1, CYP3A4, and CYP3A5 in colon mucosa of normal and adenomatous colonic tissue of patients...... with adenoma and disease-free controls was determined by RT-PCR. Protein concentration of CYPs was determined using Western blot. RESULTS: With the exception of CYP3A5, expression of CYP mRNA was similar among groups and tissues (e.g. normal colon mucosa and adenoma). CYP3A5 mRNA expression was significantly...

  20. Leptin is a growth factor for colonic epithelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hardwick, J. C.; van den Brink, G. R.; Offerhaus, G. J.; van Deventer, S. J.; Peppelenbosch, M. P.

    2001-01-01

    Obesity increases the risk of colon cancer, whereas physical activity reduces the risk. Plasma levels of leptin increase in proportion to the level of obesity and are reduced by physical activity. Leptin acts as a growth factor for several cell types and thus may provide a biological explanation for

  1. Over expression of galectin-3 associates with short-term poor prognosis in stage II colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhiliang; Ai, Zenan; Li, Nan; Xi, Haofeng; Gao, Xucan; Wang, Feng; Tan, Xiaojun; Liu, Haiying

    2016-01-01

    Over expression of galectin-3 (gal-3) has been associated with tumor invasion and distant metastases, but few reports investigated the relation between gal-3 expression and prognosis in stage II colon cancer. We studied the expressions of gal-3, E-cadherin, and vimentin in stage II colon cancer to identify predictive factors of clinical outcome. Clinical and laboratory data from 117 consecutive patients of stage II colon cancer during 2008-2010 were collected and analyzed retrospectively. Expressions of gal-3, E-cadherin, and vimentin in tumor tissue were investigated by immunohistochemistry. Potential correlations between these markers and various clinicopathological parameters as well as clinical outcomes were studied. Human colon cancer cell line SW480 was used to test the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) inducing effects of gal-3 in vitro. High expression of tumoral gal-3 was associated with tumor size, poor differentiation and negatively related to low E-cadherin expression. Compare with adjacent normal colon tissue, most tumor tissues strongly expressed gal-3 and vimentin, but had lower E-cadherin expression. Univariate analysis showed that expressions of gal-3 and vimentin in tumor were predictors of tumor recurrence and overall survival. Multivariate analysis revealed that tumoral gal-3 expression was the only independent predictor of both tumor recurrence and overall survival after resection. Cell experiments and western blotting showed exogenous gal-3 could induce SW480 cells become more aggressive and express more hallmarks of EMT. Galectin-3 may be a useful marker for identification of poor prognosis in stage II colon cancer. Cell experiments and western blotting showed exogenous gal-3 could induce SW480 cells become more aggressive and express more hallmarks of EMT.

  2. Risk factors for prolonged ileus following colon surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghadamyeghaneh, Zhobin; Hwang, Grace S; Hanna, Mark H; Phelan, Michael; Carmichael, Joseph C; Mills, Steven; Pigazzi, Alessio; Stamos, Michael J

    2016-02-01

    Prolonged ileus is one of the most common postoperative complications after colorectal surgery. We sought to investigate the predictors of prolonged ileus following elective colon resections procedures. The national participant user files of NSQIP databases were utilized to examine the clinical outcomes of patients undergoing elective colon resection during 2012-2013. Multivariate regression analysis was performed to investigate predictors of prolonged ileus. Prolonged ileus was defined as no return of bowel function in 7 days. We sampled a total of 27,560 patients who underwent colon resections; of these, 3497 (12.7%) patients had prolonged ileus. Patients with ileocolonic anastomosis (ICA) had a significantly higher rate of prolonged ileus compared to patients with colorectal anastomosis (CRA) (15 vs. 11.5%, AOR 1.25, P Factors such as preoperative sepsis (AOR 1.63, P risk of prolonged ileus, whereas oral antibiotic bowel preparation (AOR 0.77, P surgery (AOR 0.51, P risk. Prolonged ileus is a common condition following colon resection, with an incidence of 12.7%. Among colon surgeries, colectomy with ICA resulted in the highest rate of postoperative prolonged ileus. Prolonged ileus is positively associated with anastomotic leak and intra-abdominal infections; thus, a high index of suspicion must be had in all patients with prolonged postoperative ileus.

  3. Risk factors for recurrence after acute colonic diverticulitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hupfeld, Line; Burcharth, Jakob; Pommergaard, Hans-Christian

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: Several factors may influence the risk of recurrence after an episode of acute colonic diverticulitis. Until now, a comprehensive systematic overview and evaluation of relevant risk factors have not been presented. This review aimed at assembling and evaluating current evidence on risk...... factors for recurrence after conservatively treated acute colonic diverticulitis. METHODS: PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane databases were searched for studies evaluating risk factors for recurrence after acute diverticulitis treated non-surgically defined as antibiotic treatment, percutaneous abscess....../low, medium, high). RESULTS: Of 1153 screened records, 35 studies were included, enrolling 396,676 patients with acute diverticulitis. A total of 50,555 patients experienced recurrences. Primary diverticulitis with abscess formation and young age increased the risk of recurrence. Readmission risk was higher...

  4. Peroxireduxin-4 is Over-Expressed in Colon Cancer and its Down-Regulation Leads to Apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra M. Leydold

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to gain insight into the biological basis of colon cancer progression by characterizing gene expression differences between normal colon epithelium, corresponding colorectal primary tumors and metastases. We found a close similarity in gene expression patterns between primary tumors and metastases, indicating a correlation between gene expression and morphological characteristics. PRDX4 was identified as highly expressed both in primary colon tumors and metastases, and selected for further characterization. Our study revealed that “Prdx4” (PrxIV, AOE372 shows functional similarities to other Prx family members by negatively affecting apoptosis induction in tumor cells. In addition, our study links Prdx4 with Hif-1α, a key regulatory factor of angiogenesis. Targeting Prdx4 may be an attractive approach in cancer therapy, as its inhibition is expected to lead to induction of apoptosis and blockage of Hif-1α-mediated tumor angiogenesis.

  5. Effects of bromopride on expression of metalloproteinases and interleukins in left colonic anastomoses: an experimental study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, S.M. [Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências Médicas, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de Brasília, Brasília, DF (Brazil); Jerônimo, M.S. [Programa de Pós-Graduação em Patologia Molecular, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de Brasília, Brasília, DF (Brazil); Silva-Pereira, I.; Bocca, A.L. [Departamento de Biologia Celular, Instituto de Biologia, Universidade de Brasília, Brasília, DF (Brazil); Sousa, J.B. [Departamento de Clínica Cirúrgica, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de Brasília, Brasília, DF (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    Anastomotic dehiscence is the most severe complication of colorectal surgery. Metalloproteinases (MMPs) and interleukins (ILs) can be used to analyze the healing process of anastomosis. To evaluate the effects of bromopride on MMP and cytokine gene expression in left colonic anastomoses in rats with or without induced abdominal sepsis, 80 rats were divided into two groups for euthanasia on the third or seventh postoperative day (POD). They were then divided into subgroups of 20 rats for sepsis induction or not, and then into subgroups of 10 rats for administration of bromopride or saline. Left colonic anastomosis was performed and abdominal sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture. A colonic segment containing the anastomosis was removed for analysis of gene expression of MMP-1α, MMP-8, MMP-13, IL-β, IL-6, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and interferon-γ (IFN-γ). On the third POD, bromopride was associated with increased MMP-1α, MMP-13, IL-6, IFN-γ, and IL-10 gene expression. On the seventh POD, all MMP transcripts became negatively modulated and all IL transcripts became positively modulated. In the presence of sepsis, bromopride administration increased MMP-8 and IFN-γ gene expression and decreased MMP-1, TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-10 gene expression on the third POD. On the seventh POD, we observed increased expression of MMP-13 and all cytokines, except for TNF-α. In conclusion, bromopride interferes with MMP and IL gene expression during anastomotic healing. Further studies are needed to correlate these changes with the healing process.

  6. Effects of bromopride on expression of metalloproteinases and interleukins in left colonic anastomoses: an experimental study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.M. Silva

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Anastomotic dehiscence is the most severe complication of colorectal surgery. Metalloproteinases (MMPs and interleukins (ILs can be used to analyze the healing process of anastomosis. To evaluate the effects of bromopride on MMP and cytokine gene expression in left colonic anastomoses in rats with or without induced abdominal sepsis, 80 rats were divided into two groups for euthanasia on the third or seventh postoperative day (POD. They were then divided into subgroups of 20 rats for sepsis induction or not, and then into subgroups of 10 rats for administration of bromopride or saline. Left colonic anastomosis was performed and abdominal sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture. A colonic segment containing the anastomosis was removed for analysis of gene expression of MMP-1α, MMP-8, MMP-13, IL-β, IL-6, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, and interferon-γ (IFN-γ. On the third POD, bromopride was associated with increased MMP-1α, MMP-13, IL-6, IFN-γ, and IL-10 gene expression. On the seventh POD, all MMP transcripts became negatively modulated and all IL transcripts became positively modulated. In the presence of sepsis, bromopride administration increased MMP-8 and IFN-γ gene expression and decreased MMP-1, TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-10 gene expression on the third POD. On the seventh POD, we observed increased expression of MMP-13 and all cytokines, except for TNF-α. In conclusion, bromopride interferes with MMP and IL gene expression during anastomotic healing. Further studies are needed to correlate these changes with the healing process.

  7. Gut microbial colonization orchestrates TLR2 expression, signaling and epithelial proliferation in the small intestinal mucosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nives Hörmann

    Full Text Available The gut microbiota is an environmental factor that determines renewal of the intestinal epithelium and remodeling of the intestinal mucosa. At present, it is not resolved if components of the gut microbiota can augment innate immune sensing in the intestinal epithelium via the up-regulation of Toll-like receptors (TLRs. Here, we report that colonization of germ-free (GF Swiss Webster mice with a complex gut microbiota augments expression of TLR2. The microbiota-dependent up-regulation of components of the TLR2 signaling complex could be reversed by a 7 day broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment. TLR2 downstream signaling via the mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK1/2 and protein-kinase B (AKT induced by bacterial TLR2 agonists resulted in increased proliferation of the small intestinal epithelial cell line MODE-K. Mice that were colonized from birth with a normal gut microbiota (conventionally-raised; CONV-R showed signs of increased small intestinal renewal and apoptosis compared with GF controls as indicated by elevated mRNA levels of the proliferation markers Ki67 and Cyclin D1, elevated transcripts of the apoptosis marker Caspase-3 and increased numbers of TUNEL-positive cells per intestinal villus structure. In accordance, TLR2-deficient mice showed reduced proliferation and reduced apoptosis. Our findings suggest that a tuned proliferation response of epithelial cells following microbial colonization could aid to protect the host from its microbial colonizers and increase intestinal surface area.

  8. Co-expression of CD133(+)/CD44(+) in human colon cancer and liver metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellizzi, Antonia; Sebastian, Sinto; Ceglia, Pasquale; Centonze, Matteo; Divella, Rosa; Manzillo, Elvira Foglia; Azzariti, Amalia; Silvestris, Nicola; Montemurro, Severino; Caliandro, Cosimo; De Luca, Raffaele; Cicero, Giuseppe; Rizzo, Sergio; Russo, Antonio; Quaranta, Michele; Simone, Giovanni; Paradiso, Angelo

    2013-02-01

    Although relatively good therapeutic results are achieved in non-advanced cancer, the prognosis of the advanced colon cancer still remains poor, dependent on local or distant recurrence of the disease. One of the factors responsible for recurrence is supposed to be cancer stem cells (CSCs) or tumor-initiating cells, which are a population of cancer cells with ability to perpetuate themselves through self-renewal and to generate differentiated cells, thought to be responsible for tumor recurrence. This study globally approach the possible role of tissue-derived stem cells in the initiation of colon cancer and its metastatic process in the liver. Fresh surgical specimens from colon cancer, non-tumor tissue and liver metastasis were obtained directly from the operating room, examined, and immediately processed. CSCs were selected under serum-free conditions and characterized by CD44 and CD133 expression levels. CD133(+)/CD44(+) cell populations were then investigated in paraffin-embedded tissues and circulating tumor cells isolated from peripheral blood of the same group of colon cancer patients. Our data demonstrate that metastatic properties of cell populations from blood and liver metastasis, differently from primitive tumors, seem to be strictly related to the phenotype CD133 positive and CD44 positive. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Identification of colonic fibroblast secretomes reveals secretory factors regulating colon cancer cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sun-Xia; Xu, Xiao-En; Wang, Xiao-Qing; Cui, Shu-Jian; Xu, Lei-Lei; Jiang, Ying-Hua; Zhang, Yang; Yan, Hai-Bo; Zhang, Qian; Qiao, Jie; Yang, Peng-Yuan; Liu, Feng

    2014-10-14

    Stromal microenvironment influences tumor cell proliferation and migration. Fibroblasts represent the most abundant stromal constituents. Here, we established two pairs of normal fibroblast (NF) and cancer-associated fibroblast (CAF) cultures from colorectal adenocarcinoma tissues and the normal counterparts. The NFs and CAFs were stained positive for typical fibroblast markers and inhibited colon cancer (CC) cell proliferation in in vitro cocultures and in xenograft mouse models. The fibroblast conditioned media were analyzed using LC-MS and 227 proteins were identified at a false discovery rate of 1.3%, including 131 putative secretory and 20 plasma membrane proteins. These proteins were enriched for functional categories of extracellular matrix, adhesion, cell motion, inflammatory response, redox homeostasis and peptidase inhibitor. Secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine, transgelin, follistatin-related protein 1 (FSTL1) and decorin was abundant in the fibroblast secretome as confirmed by Western blot. Silencing of FSTL1 and transgelin in colonic fibroblast cell line CCD-18Co induced an accelerated proliferation of CC cells in cocultures. Exogenous FSTL1 attenuates CC cell proliferation in a negative fashion. FSTL1 was upregulated in CC patient plasma and cancerous tissues but had no implication in prognosis. Our results provided novel insights into the molecular signatures and modulatory role of CC associated fibroblasts. In this study, a label-free LC-MS was performed to analyze the secretomes of two paired primary fibroblasts, which were isolated from fresh surgical specimen of colorectal adenocarcinoma and adjacent normal colonic tissues and exhibited negative modulatory activity for colon cancer cell growth in in vitro cocultures and in vivo xenograph mouse models. Follistatin-related protein 1 was further revealed to be one of the stroma-derived factors of potential suppression role for colon cancer cell proliferation. Our results provide novel

  10. Expression and significance of TSGF, CEA and AFP in patients before and after radical surgery for colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yi; Wang, Jing-Liang; Tao, Hai-Tao; Wu, Bai-Shou; Sun, Jin; Cheng, Yao; Dong, Wei-Wei; Li, Rui-Xin

    2013-01-01

    To explore the expression and significance of tumor specific growth factor (TSGF), carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and alpha fetoprotein (AFP) in cancer tissue and serum of patients with colon cancer. Radical surgery for colon cancer was performed on 43 patients with laparoscope under conditions of general anesthesia. The Elisa method was used to detect the levels of serum TSGF, CEA and AFP before and after radical operation, and cancer tissue underwent TSGF, CEA and AFP immunohistochemistry staining after laparoscopic surgery. The decreased conditions of serum TSGF, CEA and AFP in patients with colon cancer at different levels of differentiation and clinical stagings were analyzed, and the relationships of expression rates between histological types, colon cancer morphology, lymph node metastasis and TSGF, CEA as well as AFP in cancer tissue were assessed. Compared with before radical surgery, the levels of serum TSGF, CEA and AFP decreased notably in patients after operations (pAFP was noted in patients with moderately differentiated cancer tissue (pAFP was the largest in patients at phase Dukes A (pAFP with different histological types and colon cancer morphologies (p>0.05). The positive expression rates of TSGF and CEA in patients with lymph node metastasis were significantly higher than those without lymph node metastasis (pAFP can be used to evaluate the effect of radical operation for colon cancer, and the changed levels of different markers are associated with tumor differentiation, clinical stating and presence or absence of lymph node metastasis.

  11. Laminin-5 γ2 Chain Expression Correlates with Unfavorable Prognosis in Colon Carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Lenander

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Expression of the γ2 chain at the invasive front of different tumors has indicated an important role for laminin-5 in cell migration during tumor invasion and tissue remodeling. As there is considerable need for reliable invasion and prognostic markers we evaluated the correlation of laminin-5 γ2 chain expression with clinicopathologic parameters and patient survival in 93 primary colon carcinomas. Epithelial cells of normal mucosa were consistently negative for staining. In contrast, positive cytoplasmic staining was observed in 89 tumors (96%. Twenty-four (26% cases were scored as sparse, 34 (37% as moderate, and 31 (33% as frequent γ2 chain expression. There was a significant association of laminin-5 γ2 chain expression and local invasiveness of colon carcinomas according to Dukes stage (A-C (p = 0.001 and tumor budding (p < 0.001. A statistical significance could also be noted in decreasing tumor differentiation (p < 0.001 and correlation to tumor size (p = 0.032. No correlation was observed to tumor site. Univariate analysis identified laminin-5 (p = 0.010, tumor differentiation (p = 0.006 and Dukes grade (p < 0.001 as significant variables in predicting prognosis. However, by multivariate analyses, this study could not demonstrate that laminin-5 γ2 chain expression is an independent predictive factor for survival. The results indicate that laminin-5 γ2 chain expression is up-regulated during the progression of human colon cancer and that it plays a role in the aggressiveness of these tumors. Demonstration of laminin-5 γ2 chain positivity also facilitates detection of individual cells or minor cell clusters invading the surrounding stroma.

  12. EGF-R is Expressed and AP-1 and NF-κ:B Are Activated in Stromal Myofibroblasts Surrounding Colon Adenocarcinomas Paralleling Expression of COX-2 and VEGF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinopoulos, Panagiotis A.; Vandoros, Gerasimos P.; Karamouzis, Michalis V.; Gkermpesi, Maria; Sotiropoulou-Bonikou, Georgia; Papavassiliou, Athanasios G.

    2007-01-01

    Background: COX-2 and VEGF are important triggers of colon cancer growth, metastasis and angiogenesis. Cox-2 promoter contains transcriptional regulatory elements for AP-1 and NF-κ:B transcription factors whilst vegf is a known AP-1 downstream target gene. We investigated whether stromal myofibroblasts surrounding colon adenocarcinomas express COX-2 and VEGF and whether activation of AP-1 and NF-κ:B, as well as expression of EGF-R parallel expression of COX-2 and VEGF in these cells. Methods: Immunohistochemical methodology was performed on archival sections from 40 patients with colon adenocarcinomas. We evaluated c-FOS, p-c-JUN (phosphorylated c-JUN), p-Iκ:B-α (phosphorylated Iκ:B-α), EGF-R, COX-2, NF-κ:B and VEGF expression in stromal myofibroblasts surrounding colon adenocarcinomas. Double immunostaining with a-smooth muscle actin and each antibody was done to verify the expression of these molecules in stromal myofibroblasts. Results: VEGF, p-Iκ:B-α, NF-κ:B, c-FOS, p-c-JUN, EGF-R and COX-2 were expressed in stromal myofibroblasts surrounding colon adenocarcinomas in the majority of cases. EGF-R, p-Iκ:B-α, NF-κ:B, c-FOS and p-c-JUN correlated positively with COX-2 and VEGF expression. Conclusion: Stromal myofibroblasts surrounding colon adenocarcinomas are an important source of VEGF and COX-2 production, while AP-1 and NF-κ:B transcription factors are activated and EGF-R is expressed in these cells and associated with COX-2 and VEGF production. PMID:18032824

  13. EGF-R is Expressed and AP-1 and NF-κ:B Are Activated in Stromal Myofibroblasts Surrounding Colon Adenocarcinomas Paralleling Expression of COX-2 and VEGF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panagiotis A. Konstantinopoulos

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: COX-2 and VEGF are important triggers of colon cancer growth, metastasis and angiogenesis. Cox-2 promoter contains transcriptional regulatory elements for AP-1 and NF-κ:B transcription factors whilst vegf is a known AP-1 downstream target gene. We investigated whether stromal myofibroblasts surrounding colon adenocarcinomas express COX-2 and VEGF and whether activation of AP-1 and NF-κ:B, as well as expression of EGF-R parallel expression of COX-2 and VEGF in these cells. Methods: Immunohistochemical methodology was performed on archival sections from 40 patients with colon adenocarcinomas. We evaluated c-FOS, p-c-JUN (phosphorylated c-JUN, p-Iκ:B-α (phosphorylated Iκ:B-α, EGF-R, COX-2, NF-κ:B and VEGF expression in stromal myofibroblasts surrounding colon adenocarcinomas. Double immunostaining with a-smooth muscle actin and each antibody was done to verify the expression of these molecules in stromal myofibroblasts. Results: VEGF, p-Iκ:B-α, NF-κ:B, c-FOS, p-c-JUN, EGF-R and COX-2 were expressed in stromal myofibroblasts surrounding colon adenocarcinomas in the majority of cases. EGF-R, p-Iκ:B-α, NF-κ:B, c-FOS and p-c-JUN correlated positively with COX-2 and VEGF expression. Conclusion: Stromal myofibroblasts surrounding colon adenocarcinomas are an important source of VEGF and COX-2 production, while AP-1 and NF-κ:B transcription factors are activated and EGF-R is expressed in these cells and associated with COX-2 and VEGF production.

  14. Expression of ICAM-1 in colon epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vainer, Ben; Sørensen, Susanne; Seidelin, Jakob

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies have suggested that in ulcerative colitis (UC), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) is involved in migration of leukocytes toward the colonic epithelium. A suitable in vitro model of chronic colonic inflammation does not exist, and the role of the epithelium is based on...

  15. Human Colon Tumors Express a Dominant-Negative Form of SIGIRR That Promotes Inflammation and Colitis-Associated Colon Cancer in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Junjie; Bulek, Katarzyna; Gulen, Muhammet F; Zepp, Jarod A; Karagkounis, Georgio; Martin, Bradley N; Zhou, Hao; Yu, Minjia; Liu, Xiuli; Huang, Emina; Fox, Paul L; Kalady, Matthew F; Markowitz, Sanford D; Li, Xiaoxia

    2015-12-01

    higher levels of the inflammatory cytokines IL-17A and IL-6 had activation of the transcription factors STAT3 and NFκB. SIGIRR(N86/102S) expressed in colons of mice did not localize to the epithelial cell surface. Levels of SIGIRR are lower in human colorectal tumors, compared with nontumor tissues; tumors contain the dominant-negative isoform SIGIRR(ΔE8). This mutant protein blocks localization of full-length SIGIRR to the surface of colon epithelial cells and its ability to downregulate IL1R signaling. Expression of SIGIRR(N86/102S) in the colonic epithelium of mice increases expression of inflammatory cytokines and formation and size of colitis-associated tumors. Copyright © 2015 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Infrequent detection of germline allele-specific expression of TGFBR1 in lymphoblasts and tissues of colon cancer patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Guda, Kishore

    2009-06-15

    Recently, germline allele-specific expression (ASE) of the gene encoding for transforming growth factor-beta type I receptor (TGFBR1) has been proposed to be a major risk factor for cancer predisposition in the colon. Germline ASE results in a lowered expression of one of the TGFBR1 alleles (>1.5-fold), and was shown to occur in approximately 20% of informative familial and sporadic colorectal cancer (CRC) cases. In the present study, using the highly quantitative pyrosequencing technique, we estimated the frequency of ASE in TGFBR1 in a cohort of affected individuals from familial clusters of advanced colon neoplasias (cancers and adenomas with high-grade dysplasia), and also from a cohort of individuals with sporadic CRCs. Cases were considered positive for the presence of ASE if demonstrating an allelic expression ratio <0.67 or >1.5. Using RNA derived from lymphoblastoid cell lines, we find that of 46 informative Caucasian advanced colon neoplasia cases with a family history, only 2 individuals display a modest ASE, with allelic ratios of 1.65 and 1.73, respectively. Given that ASE of TGFBR1, if present, would likely be more pronounced in the colon compared with other tissues, we additionally determined the allele ratios of TGFBR1 in the RNA derived from normal-appearing colonic mucosa of sporadic CRC cases. We, however, found no evidence of ASE in any of 44 informative sporadic cases analyzed. Taken together, we find that germline ASE of TGFBR1, as assayed in lymphoblastoid and colon epithelial cells of colon cancer patients, is a relatively rare event.

  17. FHL2 expression in peritumoural fibroblasts correlates with lymphatic metastasis in sporadic but not in HNPCC-associated colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gullotti, Lucia; Czerwitzki, Jacqueline; Kirfel, Jutta; Propping, Peter; Rahner, Nils; Steinke, Verena; Kahl, Philip; Engel, Christoph; Schüle, Roland; Buettner, Reinhard; Friedrichs, Nicolaus

    2011-12-01

    Four and a half LIM domain protein-2 (FHL2) is a component of the focal adhesion structures and has been suggested to have an important role in cancer progression. This study analyses the role of FHL2 in peritumoural fibroblasts of sporadic and hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). Tissue specimens of 48 sporadic and 49 hereditary colon cancers, respectively, were stained immunohistochemically for FHL2, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 ligand and α-SMA. Myofibroblasts at the tumour invasion front co-expressed α-SMA and FHL2. Sporadic colon cancer but not HNPCC cases showed a correlation between TGF-β1 expression of the invading tumour cells and FHL2 staining of peritumoural myofibroblasts. Overexpression of FHL2 in peritumoural myofibroblasts correlated to lymphatic metastasis in sporadic colon cancer but not in HNPCC. In cultured mouse fibroblasts, TGF-β1 treatment induced myofibroblast differentiation, stimulated FHL2 protein expression and elevated number of migratory cells in transwell motility assays, suggesting that FHL2 is regulated downstream of TGF-β. Physical contact of colon cancer cells and myofibroblasts via FHL2-positive focal adhesions was detected in human colon carcinoma tissue and in co-culture assays using sporadic as well as HNPCC-derived tumour cell lines. Our data provide strong evidence for an important role of FHL2 in the progression of colon cancers. Tumour-secreted TGF-β1 stimulates FHL2 protein expression in peritumoural fibroblasts, probably facilitating the invasion of tumour glands into the surrounding tissue by enhanced myofibroblast migration and tight connection of fibroblasts to tumour cells via focal adhesions. These findings are absent in HNPCC-associated colon cancers in vivo and may contribute to a less invasive and more protruding tumour margin of microsatellite instable carcinomas.

  18. Risk factors for severity and recurrence of colonic diverticular bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquim Natércia

    Full Text Available Background: Colonic diverticular bleeding is the most common cause of lower gastrointestinal bleeding. Risk factors related to severity and repeated bleeding episodes are not completely clearly defined. Objective: To characterize a Portuguese population hospitalized due to colonic diverticular bleeding and to identify the clinical predictors related to bleeding severity and rebleeding. Methods: Retrospective analysis of all hospitalized patients diagnosed with colonic diverticular bleeding from January 2008 to December 2013 at our institution. The main outcomes evaluated were bleeding severity, defined as any transfusion support requirements and/or signs of hemodynamic shock, and 1-year recurrence rate. Results: Seventy-four patients were included, with a mean age of 75.7 ± 9.5 years; the majority were male (62.2%. Thirty-six patients (48.6% met the criteria for severe bleeding; four independent risk factors for severe diverticular bleeding were identified: low hemoglobin level at admission (≤ 11 g/dL; OR 18.8, older age (≥ 75 years; OR 4.7, bilateral diverticular location (OR 14.2 and chronic kidney disease (OR 5.6. The 1-year recurrence rate was 12.9%. We did not identify any independent risk factor for bleeding recurrence in this population. Conclusion: In this series, nearly half of the patients hospitalized with diverticular bleeding presented with severe bleeding. Patients with low hemoglobin levels, older age, bilateral diverticular location and chronic kidney disease had a significantly increased risk for severe diverticular bleeding. In addition, a small number of patients rebled within the first year after the index episode, although we could not identify independent risk factors associated with the recurrence of diverticular bleeding.

  19. Risk factors for the appearance of central venous catheters colonization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mioljević Vesna

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction/Aim. Intravascular device placement (IVD is a part of everyday medical practice, however, its application is associated with a high risk of onset of nosocomial infections (NI and increased mortality and morbidity. Nosocomial blood infections (NBIs account for 10% of all the registered NI. NBIs are more frequent in patients with a placed IVD and it present an important risk factor for the onset of NBI, i.e. catheter-associated NBIs (CANBIs. Pathogenesis of CANBIs is complex and conditioned by the presence of different characteristics related to a catheter, patient and a specific causative organism. The most common CRBSI causes include coagulase-negative staphylococcus, S. aureus, Enterobacter spp, Candida spp, Klebsiella spp, Pseudomonas spp. and Enterococcus spp. Methods. All the patients hospitalized at the Intensive Care Department of the Clinic of Digestive Diseases over the period January 1, 2004-September 1, 2004 were retrospectively analyzed. The study included 107 patients in whom central venous catheter (CVC was placed for more than 48 h. All the causes isolated from a CVC segment were recorded. Culture, isolation and identification of the causative organisms were performed using standard microbiological methods in the Bacteriological Laboratory within the Emergency Center, Clinical Center of Serbia. Catheter segment samples (tip of the CVC 3-5 cm long were analyzed. Based on the insight into medical documentation, patients’ examination and medical staff interview, catheter and patient-related characteristics were recorded. Results. A total of 107 CVCs were analyzed, out of which 56 (52% were sterile while 51 (48% were colonized. The results of our study evidenced that total parenteral nutrition (TPN (p < 0.05, number of catheterization days (p < 0.05, and central venous pressure measurement (p < 0.05 were significantly associated with CVC colonization. In this study, no statistically significant difference in catheter

  20. [Expression and Significance of PI-PLCε1 in Colon Cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Ran; Yang, Kun; Huang, Xiao-Li

    2017-11-01

    To study the expression and clinical significance of phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase Cε1 (PI-PLCε1) in the pathogenesis of colon cancer. qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry were used to detect the expression of PI-PLCε1in the 42 cases of colon cancer tissues and their corresponding adjacent tissues. And the effects of tumor differentiation and tumor site on the expression PI-PLCε1 of colon cancer tissues were compared. The results of qRT-PCR showed that the expression of PI-PLCε1in colon cancer tissue significantly lower than that in the adjacent tissue ( PPI-PLCε1gene of colon cancer tissue was not effected by tumor differentiation and tumor site ( P>0.05). The results of immuno-histochemistry showed that the positive expression rate of PI-PLCε1 protein in colon cancer tissue was significantly lower than that in the adjacent tissue ( PPI-PLCε1 protein was not effected by tumor differentiation ( P>0.05),but the expression was different in tumor site ( PPI-PLCε1 was reduced in colon tissue and barely to tumor differentiation.

  1. Constitutive expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase in the normal human colonic epithelium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perner, A; Andresen, Lars; Normark, M

    2002-01-01

    Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in the human colon is considered expressed only in inflammatory states such as ulcerative or collagenous colitis. As subtle iNOS labelling was previously observed in some colonic mucosal biopsies from a heterogeneous group of controls with non-inflamed bowel...

  2. Clinicopathological and prognostic significance of HER-2/neu and VEGF expression in colon carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jing

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HER-2/neu and VEGF expression is correlated with disease behaviors in various cancers. However, evidence for their expression in colon cancer is rather contradictory both for the protein expression status and prognostic value. HER-2/neu is found to participate in VEGF regulation, and has known correlation with VEGF expression in some tumors. In this study, we investigated HER-2/neu and VEGF expression in Chinese colon patients and explored whether there was any correlation between their expression patterns. Methods HER-2/neu and VEGF were investigated immunohistochemically using tumor samples obtained from 317 colon cancer patients with all tumor stages. Correlation of the degree of staining with clinicopathological parameters and survival was investigated. Results Positive expression rates of HER-2/neu and VEGF in colon cancer were 15.5% and 55.5% respectively. HER-2/neu expression was significantly correlated with tumor size and distant metastases (P (P > 0.05. Expression of VEGF was significantly correlated with tumor size, tumor stage, lymph node metastases, and distant metastases (P (P = 0.146. No correlation between HER-2/neu and VEGF expression was detected (P = 0.151. Conclusions HER-2/neu and VEGF are not important prognostic markers of colon cancer. The present results do not support any association between HER2/neu and VEGF expression in this setting.

  3. MiR-34a inhibits colon cancer proliferation and metastasis by inhibiting platelet-derived growth factor receptor α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunyan; Wang, Yulin; Lu, Shuming; Zhang, Zhuqing; Meng, Hua; Liang, Lina; Zhang, Yan; Song, Bo

    2015-11-01

    The microRNA (miRNA), miR‑34a is significant in colon cancer progression. In the present study, the role of miR‑34a in colon cancer cell proliferation and metastasis was investigated. It was found that the expression of miR‑34a in colon cancer tissues and cell lines was lower when compared with that of normal tissues and cells. Further research demonstrated that miR‑34a inhibited cell proliferation, induced G1 phase arrest, and suppressed metastasis and epithelial mesenchymal transition in colon cancer cells. Bioinformatic prediction indicated that platelet‑derived growth factor receptor α (PDGFRA) was a potential target gene of miR‑34a and a luciferase assay identified that PDGFRA was a novel direct target gene of miR‑34a. In addition, assays of western blot analyses and quantitative reverse‑transcription polymerase chain reaction confirmed that miR‑34a decreased PDGFRA mRNA expression and protein levels in colon cancer cells. Assessment of cellular function indicated that miR‑34a inhibited colon cancer progression via PDGFRA. These findings demonstrate that miR‑34a may act as a negative regulator in colon cancer by targeting PDGFRA.

  4. Colonic PDGFRα Overexpression Accompanied Forkhead Transcription Factor FOXO3 Up-Regulation in STZ-Induced Diabetic Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongli Lu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Colonic transit disorder-induced constipation is a major complication in diabetic patients. PDGFRα+ (platelet-derived growth factor receptor α-positive cells play critical roles in the inhibitory regulation of colonic motility, and FOXO3 (forkhead transcription factor 3 has a broad range of biological functions. The present study was designed to investigate the relationship between FOXO3 and PDGFRα+ cell proliferation in streptozotocin (STZ-induced diabetic mice. Methods: The major experimental techniques used in this paper are immunohistochemistry, quantitative RT-RCR and Western blotting for the evaluation of specific protein expression; ChIP assay for identifying the interaction between FOXO3 protein and the PDGFRα promotor; and lentiviral transfection for the overexpression of short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs to down-regulate FOXO3. Results: In proximal colonic smooth muscle tissue of STZ-induced diabetic mice, there was a significant increase in PDGFRα and Ki67 immunoreactivity. PDGFRα mRNA and protein expression levels were both significantly increased in colonic smooth muscle tissue, but PDGFRβ expression was unchanged. Meanwhile, the expression of PDGF ligands, including both PDGFα and PDGFβ, was significantly increased in diabetic colonic smooth muscle tissue. In whole cell and nuclear extracts, the expression of FOXO3 protein was also significantly increased; however, the expression of P-FOXO3 (phosphorylated FOXO3 protein was significantly decreased. When NIH cells were incubated with 50 mmol/L glucose for 12 h, 24 h and 48 h, the expression of PDGFRα significantly increased, and in whole cell and nuclear extracts, the expression of FOXO3 protein was significantly increased. However, the expression of P-FOXO3 protein was significantly decreased. FOXO3 could bind to a site on the PDGFRα promoter, and the basal expression of PDGFRα was significantly reduced when endogenous FOXO3 expression was knocked down with FOXO3

  5. Pretargeted 177Lu radioimmunotherapy of carcinoembryonic antigen-expressing human colonic tumors in mice

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schoffelen, R; Graaf, W.T.A. van der; Franssen, G.M; Sharkey, R.M; Goldenberg, D.M; McBride, W.J; Rossi, E.A; Eek, A; Oyen, W.J.G; Boerman, O.C

    2010-01-01

    ... (CEA)-expressing human tumors. METHODS: To obtain the optimal therapeutic efficacy, several strategies were evaluated to increase the total amount of radioactivity targeted to subcutaneous LS174T colon cancer tumors in BALB/c nude mice...

  6. Aberrant, ectopic expression of VEGF and VEGF receptors 1 and 2 in malignant colonic epithelial cells. Implications for these cells growth via an autocrine mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahluwalia, Amrita [Veterans Affairs Long Beach Healthcare System, Long Beach, CA (United States); Jones, Michael K. [Veterans Affairs Long Beach Healthcare System, Long Beach, CA (United States); Department of Medicine, University of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Szabo, Sandor [Veterans Affairs Long Beach Healthcare System, Long Beach, CA (United States); Department of Pathology, University of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Tarnawski, Andrzej S., E-mail: amrita.ahluwalia@va.gov [Veterans Affairs Long Beach Healthcare System, Long Beach, CA (United States); Department of Medicine, University of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2013-08-09

    Highlights: •Malignant colonic epithelial cells express VEGF and its receptors. •Cultured colon cancer cells secrete VEGF into the medium. •Inhibition of VEGF receptor significantly decreases colon cancer cell proliferation. •VEGF is critical for colon cancer cell growth. -- Abstract: Vascular endothelial growth factor A (referred to as VEGF) is implicated in colon cancer growth. Currently, the main accepted mechanism by which VEGF promotes colon cancer growth is via the stimulation of angiogenesis, which was originally postulated by late Judah Folkman. However, the cellular source of VEGF in colon cancer tissue; and, the expression of VEGF and its receptors VEGF-R1 and VEGF-R2 in colon cancer cells are not fully known and are subjects of controversy. Material and methods: We examined and quantified expression of VEGF, VEGF-R1 and VEGF-R2 in three different human colonic tissue arrays containing sections of adenocarcinoma (n = 43) and normal mucosa (n = 41). In human colon cancer cell lines HCT116 and HT29 and normal colon cell lines NCM356 and NCM460, we examined expression of VEGF, VEGF-R1 and VEGF-R2 mRNA and protein, VEGF production and secretion into the culture medium; and, the effect of a potent, selective inhibitor of VEGF receptors, AL-993, on cell proliferation. Results: Human colorectal cancer specimens had strong expression of VEGF in cancer cells and also expressed VEGF-R1 and VEGF-R2.In vitro studies showed that human colon cancer cell lines, HCT116 and HT29, but not normal colonic cell lines, express VEGF, VEGF-R1 and VEGF-R2 and secrete VEGF into the medium up to a concentration 2000 pg/ml within 48 h. Furthermore, we showed that inhibition of VEGF receptors using a specific VEGF-R inhibitor significantly reduced proliferation (by >50%) of cultured colon cancer cell lines. Conclusions: Our findings support the contention that VEGF generated by colon cancer cells stimulates their growth directly through an autocrine mechanism that is

  7. IGF-1 Gene Expression in Rat Colonic Mucosa After Different Exercise Volumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buehlmeyer, Katja; Doering, Frank; Daniel, Hannelore; Petridou, Anatoli; Mougios, Vassilis; Schulz, Thorsten; Michna, Horst

    2007-01-01

    The evidence is increasing for a close link between the insulin/insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system and colon cancer prevention by physical exercise. To reveal exercise-induced alterations in colon mucosa, gene expression of IGF-1 and related genes and serum IGF-1 were investigated. Twenty male Wistar rats performed a 12 week voluntary exercise program. Nine rats served as the control group. Gene expression of IGF-1, IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R) and IGF-binding protein 3 (IGF-BP3) were quantified by real-time RT-PCR. Circulating IGF-1 was analyzed exercise volume-dependent. Based on 3 distinguished groups with low (L-EX, 8314 m·night-1), we observed lower serum IGF-1 levels (P < 0.05) in all exercise groups as compared to the control group and IGF-1 levels declined proportional to the increase in exercise volume. A significant (p < 0.05) positive correlation was found between IGF-1 concentration and body mass (r = 0.50) and a significant negative correlation exists between body mass and exercise volume (r = -0.50). Significant differences in colonic mRNA levels of IGF-1, IGF-1R and IGF-BP3 could not be observed. Based on our data we propose that the exercise as well as the body mass reduction leads to a decrease in circulating IGF-1 and this might represent a prime link to colon cancer prevention. Key pointsThere were significantly lower serum IGF-1 levels in all exercise groups as compared to the control group.GF-1 levels declined proportional to the increase in exercise volume.A significant positive correlation was found between IGF-1 concentration and body mass and a significant negative correlation was found between body mass and exercise volume.Significant differences in colonic mRNA levels of IGF-1, IGF-1R and IGF-BP3 could not be observed. PMID:24149475

  8. Expression analysis of BMP2, BMP5, BMP10 in human colon tissues from Hirschsprung disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mei; Chen, Wenwen; Mi, Jie; Chen, Dong; Wang, Weilin; Gao, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are members of the transforming growth factor β (TGF β) superfamily. BMP2, BMP5 and BMP10 exert their biological functions by interacting with membrane bound receptors belonging to the serine/threonine kinase family. Hirschsprung disease (HSCR) is characterized by the absence of intramural ganglion cells in the nerve plexuses of the distal gut. However, putative Notch function in enteric nervous system (ENS) development and the etiology of HSCR is unknown. Aganglionic and ganglionic colon segment tissues of 50 HSCR patients were investigated for the expression pattern of BMP2, BMP5 and BMP10 using real-time RT-PCR, Western blot analysis and immunohistochemical staining. The mRNA levels of BMP2, BMP5 and BMP10 in the stenotic colon segment from HSCR patients were significantly higher than those in the normal ones. Similar increased expressions of them in the stenotic colon segments were detected by Western blotting coupled with densitometry analysis. Lastly, immunohistologicl stain showed significant BMP2, 5 and 10 increases in mucous and muscular layers from stenotic colon segments compared to normal segments. BMP2, BMP5 and BMP10 are elevated in the stenotic colon segment of HSCR, and BMPs signaling plays a pivotal role in the development of HSCR.

  9. Induction of cancer stem cell properties in colon cancer cells by defined factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobu Oshima

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells (CSCs are considered to be responsible for the dismal prognosis of cancer patients. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying the acquisition and maintenance of CSC properties in cancer cells because of their rarity in clinical samples. We herein induced CSC properties in cancer cells using defined factors. We retrovirally introduced a set of defined factors (OCT3/4, SOX2 and KLF4 into human colon cancer cells, followed by culture with conventional serum-containing medium, not human embryonic stem cell medium. We then evaluated the CSC properties in the cells. The colon cancer cells transduced with the three factors showed significantly enhanced CSC properties in terms of the marker gene expression, sphere formation, chemoresistance and tumorigenicity. We designated the cells with CSC properties induced by the factors, a subset of the transduced cells, as induced CSCs (iCSCs. Moreover, we established a novel technology to isolate and collect the iCSCs based on the differences in the degree of the dye-effluxing activity enhancement. The xenografts derived from our iCSCs were not teratomas. Notably, in contrast to the tumors from the parental cancer cells, the iCSC-based tumors mimicked actual human colon cancer tissues in terms of their immunohistological findings, which showed colonic lineage differentiation. In addition, we confirmed that the phenotypes of our iCSCs were reproducible in serial transplantation experiments. By introducing defined factors, we generated iCSCs with lineage specificity directly from cancer cells, not via an induced pluripotent stem cell state. The novel method enables us to obtain abundant materials of CSCs that not only have enhanced tumorigenicity, but also the ability to differentiate to recapitulate a specific type of cancer tissues. Our method can be of great value to fully understand CSCs and develop new therapies targeting CSCs.

  10. Colorectal (Colon) Cancer: What Are the Risk Factors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Colorectal (Colon) Cancer Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... Risk Assessment Tool (National Cancer Institute) Learning About Colon Cancer Stay Informed Language: English Español (Spanish) File Formats ...

  11. A gastrin precursor, gastrin-gly, upregulates VEGF expression in colonic epithelial cells through an HIF-1-independent mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Claudine; Kowalski-Chauvel, Aline; Do, Catherine; Résa, Cécile; Najib, Souad; Daulhac, Laurence; Wang, Timothy C.; Ferrand, Audrey; Seva, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    One of the major angiogenic factor released by tumor cells is VEGF. Its high expression is correlated with poor prognosis in colorectal tumors. In colon cancer, gastrin gene expression is also upregulated. In these tumors, gastrin precursors are mainly produced and act as growth factors. Recently, a study has also shown that the gastrin precursor, G-gly induced in vitro tubules formation by vascular endothelial cells suggesting a potential proangiogenic role. Here, we demonstrate that stimulation of human colorectal cancer cell lines with G-gly increases the expression of the proangiogenic factor VEGF at the mRNA and protein levels. In addition, blocking the progastrin autocrine loop leads to a downregulation of VEGF. Although HIF-1 is a major transcriptional activator for VEGF our results suggest an alternative mechanism for VEGF regulation in normoxic conditions, independent of HIF-1 that involves the PI3K/AKT pathway. Indeed we show that G-gly does not lead to HIF-1 accumulation in colon cancer cells. Moreover, we found that G-gly activates the PI3K/AKT pathway and inhibition of this pathway reverses the effects of G-gly observed on VEGF mRNA and protein levels. In correlation with these results, we observed in vivo, on colon tissue sections from transgenic mice overexpressing G-gly, an increase in VEGF expression in absence of HIF-1 accumulation. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that gastrin precursors, known to promote colon epithelial cells proliferation and survival can also contribute to the angiogenesis process by stimulating the expression of the proangiogenic factor VEGF via the PI3K pathway and independently of hypoxia conditions. PMID:19876923

  12. Sulforaphane inhibits hypoxia-induced HIF-1α and VEGF expression and migration of human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong Hwan; Sung, Bokyung; Kang, Yong Jung; Hwang, Seong Yeon; Kim, Min Jeong; Yoon, Jeong-Hyun; Im, Eunok; Kim, Nam Deuk

    2015-12-01

    The effects of sulforaphane (a natural product commonly found in broccoli) was investigated on hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) expression in HCT116 human colon cancer cells and AGS human gastric cancer cells. We found that hypoxia-induced HIF-1α protein expression in HCT116 and AGS cells, while treatment with sulforaphane markedly and concentration-dependently inhibited HIF-1α expression in both cell lines. Treatment with sulforaphane inhibited hypoxia-induced vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in HCT116 cells. Treatment with sulforaphane modulated the effect of hypoxia on HIF-1α stability. However, degradation of HIF-1α by sulforaphane was not mediated through the 26S proteasome pathway. We also found that the inhibition of HIF-1α by sulforaphane was not mediated through AKT and extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation under hypoxic conditions. Finally, hypoxia-induced HCT116 cell migration was inhibited by sulforaphane. These data suggest that sulforaphane may inhibit human colon cancer progression and cancer cell angiogenesis by inhibiting HIF-1α and VEGF expression. Taken together, these results indicate that sulforaphane is a new and potent chemopreventive drug candidate for treating patients with human colon cancer.

  13. Colonic epithelial cell expression of ICAM-1 relates to loss of surface continuity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vainer, Ben; Horn, Thomas; Nielsen, Ole Haagen

    2006-01-01

    . The aim of this study was to assess the ICAM-1 expression in human colonic tissue representing UC, Crohn's disease (CD), adenomas, and adenocarcinomas, with special attention to the epithelium. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissue from the archives of the Department...... and the nature of inflammation, the data indicate increased susceptibility of cancer cells to express ICAM-1. Epithelial and macrophage ICAM-1 might be involved in the immune surveillance and the first-line defense of the diseased colon.......OBJECTIVE: Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) is important in ulcerative colitis (UC) by mediating the arrest and further migration of neutrophils. In vitro studies have shown that colonocytes from chronically inflamed colon and cultured colon cancer cells are capable of expressing ICAM-1...

  14. Prognostic factors and scoring system for survival in colonic perforation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Shuhei; Shimomatsuya, Takumi; Nakajima, Masayuki; Amaya, Hirokazu; Kobuchi, Taketsune; Shiraishi, Susumu; Konishi, Sayuri; Ono, Susumu; Maruhashi, Kazuhiro

    2005-01-01

    No ideal and generally accepted prognostic factors and scoring systems exist to determine the prognosis of peritonitis associated with colonic perforation. This study was designed to investigate prognostic factors and evaluate the various scoring systems to allow identification of high-risk patients. Between 1996 and 2003, excluding iatrogenic and trauma cases, 26 consecutive patients underwent emergency operations for colorectal perforation and were selected for this retrospective study. Several clinical factors were analyzed as possible predictive factors, and APACHE II, SOFA, MPI, and MOF scores were calculated. The overall mortality was 26.9%. Compared with the survivors, non-survivors were found more frequently in Hinchey's stage III-IV, a low preoperative marker of pH, base excess (BE), and a low postoperative marker of white blood cell count, PaO2/FiO2 ratio, and renal output (24h). According to the logistic regression model, BE was a significant independent variable. Concerning the prognostic scoring systems, an APACHE II score of 19, a SOFA score of 8, an MPI score of 30, and an MOF score of 7 or more were significantly related to poor prognosis. Preoperative BE and postoperative white blood cell count were reliable prognostic factors and early classification using prognostic scoring systems at specific points in the disease process are useful to improve our understanding of the problems involved.

  15. Effect of Dietary Zinc Oxide on Morphological Characteristics, Mucin Composition and Gene Expression in the Colon of Weaned Piglets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ping; Pieper, Robert; Rieger, Juliane; Vahjen, Wilfried; Davin, Roger; Plendl, Johanna; Meyer, Wilfried; Zentek, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    The trace element zinc is often used in the diet of weaned piglets, as high doses have resulted in positive effects on intestinal health. However, the majority of previous studies evaluated zinc supplementations for a short period only and focused on the small intestine. The hypothesis of the present study was that low, medium and high levels of dietary zinc (57, 164 and 2,425 mg Zn/kg from zinc oxide) would affect colonic morphology and innate host defense mechanisms across 4 weeks post-weaning. Histological examinations were conducted regarding the colonic morphology and neutral, acidic, sialylated and sulphated mucins. The mRNA expression levels of mucin (MUC) 1, 2, 13, 20, toll-like receptor (TLR) 2, 4, interleukin (IL)-1β, 8, 10, interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) were also measured. The colonic crypt area increased in an age-depending manner, and the greatest area was found with medium concentration of dietary zinc. With the high concentration of dietary zinc, the number of goblet cells containing mixed neutral-acidic mucins and total mucins increased. Sialomucin containing goblet cells increased age-dependently. The expression of MUC2 increased with age and reached the highest level at 47 days of age. The expression levels of TLR2 and 4 decreased with age. The mRNA expression of TLR4 and the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-8 were down-regulated with high dietary zinc treatment, while piglets fed with medium dietary zinc had the highest expression. It is concluded that dietary zinc level had a clear impact on colonic morphology, mucin profiles and immunological traits in piglets after weaning. Those changes might support local defense mechanisms and affect colonic physiology and contribute to the reported reduction of post-weaning diarrhea. PMID:24609095

  16. Reduced expression of voltage-gated Kv11.1 (hERG) K(+) channels in aganglionic colon in Hirschsprung's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomuschat, Christian; O'Donnell, Anne Marie; Coyle, David; Puri, Prem

    2016-01-01

    The pathophysiology of Hirschsprung's disease (HSCR) is not entirely understood. There is no clear explanation for the occurrence of the spastic or tonically contracted aganglionic segment of bowel. Kv11.1 (hERG) channels play a critical role in the regulation of the resting membrane potential as well as affecting either the force or frequency of contraction of smooth muscles. We designed this study to investigate the expression and distribution of hERG channels in the normal colon and the colon of patients with HSCR. We investigated hERG protein expression in both the ganglionic and aganglionic regions of HSCR patients (n = 10) versus normal control colon (n = 10). Protein distribution was assessed using immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy. Gene and protein expressions were quantified using real-time polymerase chain reaction, western blot analysis and densitometry. Confocal microscopy of the normal colon revealed strong hERG channel expression in interstitial cells of Cajal, platelet-derived growth factor-alpha receptor- (PDGFRα(+)) positive cells and enteric neurons. hERG expression was markedly decreased in aganglionic bowel, whereas colonic hERG gene expression levels were significantly decreased in aganglionic compared to ganglionic bowel and controls (p < 0.05). Western blotting revealed decreased colonic hERG protein expression in aganglionic HSCR specimens compared to controls. We demonstrate, for the first time, the expression and distribution of hERG channels in the human colon. The decreased expression of hERG in the aganglionic colon may be responsible for the increased tone in the aganglionic narrow spastic segment of bowel.

  17. Differential Gene Expression in Colon Tissue Associated With Diet, Lifestyle, and Related Oxidative Stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha L Slattery

    Full Text Available Several diet and lifestyle factors may impact health by influencing oxidative stress levels. We hypothesize that level of cigarette smoking, alcohol, anti-inflammatory drugs, and diet alter gene expression. We analyzed RNA-seq data from 144 colon cancer patients who had information on recent cigarette smoking, recent alcohol consumption, diet, and recent aspirin/non-steroidal anti-inflammatory use. Using a false discovery rate of 0.1, we evaluated gene differential expression between high and low levels of exposure using DESeq2. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA was used to determine networks associated with de-regulated genes in our data. We identified 46 deregulated genes associated with recent cigarette use; these genes enriched causal networks regulated by TEK and MAP2K3. Different differentially expressed genes were associated with type of alcohol intake; five genes were associated with total alcohol, six were associated with beer intake, six were associated with wine intake, and four were associated with liquor consumption. Recent use of aspirin and/or ibuprofen was associated with differential expression of TMC06, ST8SIA4, and STEAP3 while a summary oxidative balance score (OBS was associated with SYCP3, HDX, and NRG4 (all up-regulated with greater oxidative balance. Of the dietary antioxidants and carotenoids evaluated only intake of beta carotene (1 gene, Lutein/Zeaxanthine (5 genes, and Vitamin E (4 genes were associated with differential gene expression. There were similarities in biological function of de-regulated genes associated with various dietary and lifestyle factors. Our data support the hypothesis that diet and lifestyle factors associated with oxidative stress can alter gene expression. However genes altered were unique to type of alcohol and type of antioxidant. Because of potential differences in associations observed between platforms these findings need replication in other populations.

  18. Up-regulation of CHAF1A, a poor prognostic factor, facilitates cell proliferation of colon cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Zehua; Cui, Feifei; Yu, Fudong; Peng, Xiao; Jiang, Tao; Chen, Dawei [Department of General Surgery, Shanghai Jiaotong University Affiliated First People’s Hospital, 85 Wujin Road, Shanghai 200080 (China); Lu, Su [Department of Pathology, Shanghai Jiaotong University Affiliated First People’s Hospital, 85 Wujin Road, Shanghai 200080 (China); Tang, Huamei, E-mail: tanghuamei@gmail.com [Department of Pathology, Shanghai Jiaotong University Affiliated First People’s Hospital, 85 Wujin Road, Shanghai 200080 (China); Peng, Zhihai, E-mail: zhihai.peng@hotmail.com [Department of General Surgery, Shanghai Jiaotong University Affiliated First People’s Hospital, 85 Wujin Road, Shanghai 200080 (China)

    2014-06-27

    Highlights: • We identified that CHAF1A was up-regulated in colon tumor mucosa in TMA. • The expression pattern of CHAF1A was validated with qPCR and western-blot. • CHAF1A overexpression is an independent indicator for poor colon cancer survival. • CHAF1A facilitates cell proliferation of colon cancer both in vitro and in vivo. - Abstract: Deregulation of chromatin assembly factor 1, p150 subunit A (CHAF1A) has recently been reported to be involved in the development of some cancer types. In this study, we identified that the frequency of positive CHAF1A staining in primary tumor mucosa (45.8%, 93 of 203 samples) was significantly elevated compared to that in paired normal mucosa (18.7%, 38 of 203 samples). The increased expression was strongly associated with cancer stage, tumor invasion, and histological grade. The five-year survival rate of patients with CHAF1A-positive tumors was remarkably lower than that of patients with CHAF1A-negative tumors. Colon cancer cells with CHAF1A knockdown exhibited decreased cell growth index, reduction in colony formation ability, elevated cell apoptosis rate as well as impaired colon tumorigenicity in nude mice. Hence, CHAF1A upregulation functions as a poor prognostic indicator of colon cancer, potentially contributing to its progression by mediating cancer cell proliferation.

  19. Regulation of APC and AXIN2 expression by intestinal tumor suppressor CDX2 in colon cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Anders Krüger; Coskun, Mehmet; Bzorek, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Wnt signaling is often constitutively active in colorectal cancer cells. The expression of the intestinal specific transcription factor CDX2 is found to be transiently decreased in invasive cells at the tumor/stroma interface. A recent ChIP-Seq study has indicated that several Wnt signaling...... suggest that a low CDX2 level has influence on the Wnt signaling in invasive colon cancer cells possibly promoting cellular migration....

  20. The significance of combining VEGFA, FLT1, and KDR expressions in colon cancer patient prognosis and predicting response to bevacizumab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang SD

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Shu-Dong Zhang,1,2,* Cian M McCrudden,3,* Chen Meng,4 Yao Lin,4 Hang Fai Kwok1,31Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Macau, Avenida de Universidade, Macau, Special Administrative Region of the People’s Republic of China; 2Center for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen’s University Belfast, United Kingdom; 3School of Pharmacy, Queen’s University Belfast, United Kingdom; 4College of Life Sciences, Fujian Normal University, Fujian, People’s Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Targeting angiogenesis through inhibition of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF pathway has been successful in the treatment of late stage colorectal cancer. However, not all patients benefit from inhibition of VEGF. Ras status is a powerful biomarker for response to anti-epidermal growth factor receptor therapy; however, an appropriate biomarker for response to anti-VEGF therapy is yet to be identified. VEGF and its receptors, FLT1 and KDR, play a crucial role in colon cancer progression; individually, these factors have been shown to be prognostic in colon cancer; however, expression of none of these factors alone was predictive of tumor response to anti-VEGF therapy. In the present study, we analyzed the expression levels of VEGFA, FLT1, and KDR in two independent colon cancer datasets and found that high expression levels of all three factors afforded a very poor prognosis. The observation was further confirmed in another independent colon cancer dataset, wherein high levels of expression of this three-gene signature was predictive of poor prognosis in patients with proficient mismatch repair a wild-type KRas status, or mutant p53 status. Most importantly, this signature also predicted tumor response to bevacizumab, an antibody targeting VEGFA, in a cohort of bevacizumab-treated patients. Since bevacizumab has been proven to be an important drug in the treatment of advanced stage colon cancer, our results

  1. High interleukin-6 mRNA expression is a predictor of relapse in colon cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Jesper; Kirkeby, Lene T.; Olsen, Jørgen

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the expression of interleukin-6 (IL6) in colon cancer tissue, and to examine if the risk of relapse is influenced by IL6 expression. Materials and Methods: Fresh-frozen biopsies from tumor and normal adjacent tissues were taken from patients with colon cancer during surgery...... and stored at −80°C. mRNA expression for interleukin-6 was evaluated with reverse transcription real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Survival analyses were carried-out using a Cox competing risk regression model. Results: IL6 mRNA was significantly more highly expressed in tumor tissue compared...... for clinicopathological characteristics (Hazard Ratio=2.16, 95% CI=1.07-4.40; pInterleukin-6 is up-regulated in colon cancer tissue at the transcriptional level and is significantly associated with increased risk of relapse....

  2. High interleukin-6 mRNA expression is a predictor of relapse in colon cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Jesper; Kirkeby, Lene T; Olsen, Jørgen

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the expression of interleukin-6 (IL6) in colon cancer tissue, and to examine if the risk of relapse is influenced by IL6 expression. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Fresh-frozen biopsies from tumor and normal adjacent tissues were taken from patients with colon cancer during surgery...... and stored at -80 °C. mRNA expression for interleukin-6 was evaluated with reverse transcription real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Survival analyses were carried-out using a Cox competing risk regression model. RESULTS: IL6 mRNA was significantly more highly expressed in tumor tissue compared...... for clinicopathological characteristics (Hazard Ratio=2.16, 95% CI=1.07-4.40; pInterleukin-6 is up-regulated in colon cancer tissue at the transcriptional level and is significantly associated with increased risk of relapse....

  3. TRPV3, a thermosensitive channel is expressed in mouse distal colon epithelium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueda, Takashi, E-mail: tueda@med.nagoya-cu.ac.jp [Department of Neurobiology and Anatomy, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya City University, 1 Kawasumi, Mizuho-cho, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 467-8601 (Japan); Yamada, Takahiro, E-mail: yamada-taka@syd.odn.ne.jp [Department of Neurobiology and Anatomy, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya City University, 1 Kawasumi, Mizuho-cho, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 467-8601 (Japan); Ugawa, Shinya, E-mail: ugawa@med.nagoya-cu.ac.jp [Department of Neurobiology and Anatomy, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya City University, 1 Kawasumi, Mizuho-cho, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 467-8601 (Japan); Ishida, Yusuke, E-mail: y.ishida@med.nagoya-cu.ac.jp [Department of Neurobiology and Anatomy, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya City University, 1 Kawasumi, Mizuho-cho, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 467-8601 (Japan); Shimada, Shoichi, E-mail: sshimada@med.nagoya-cu.ac.jp [Department of Neurobiology and Anatomy, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya City University, 1 Kawasumi, Mizuho-cho, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 467-8601 (Japan)

    2009-05-22

    The thermo-transient receptor potential (thermoTRP) subfamily is composed of channels that are important in nociception and thermo-sensing. Here, we show a selective expression of TRPV3 channel in the distal colon throughout the gastrointestinal tract. Expression analyses clearly revealed that TRPV3 mRNA and proteins were expressed in the superficial epithelial cells of the distal colon, but not in those of the stomach, duodenum or proximal colon. In a subset of primary epithelial cells cultured from the distal colon, carvacrol, an agonist for TRPV3, elevated cytosolic Ca{sup 2+}concentration in a concentration-dependent manner. This response was inhibited by ruthenium red, a TRPV channel antagonist. Organotypic culture supported that the carvacrol-responsive cells were present in superficial epithelial cells. Moreover, application of carvacrol evoked ATP release in primary colonic epithelial cells. We conclude that TRPV3 is present in absorptive cells in the distal colon and may be involved in a variety of cellular functions.

  4. Stage dependent expression and tumor suppressive function of FAM134B (JK1) in colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Farhadul; Gopalan, Vinod; Wahab, Riajul; Smith, Robert A; Qiao, Bin; Lam, Alfred King-Yin

    2017-01-01

    The aims of the present study are to investigate sub-cellular location, differential expression in different cancer stages and functional role of FAM134B in colon cancer development. FAM134B expression was studied and quantified at protein and mRNA levels in cell lines using immunocytochemistry, Western blot and real-time PCR. In vitro functional assays and an in vivo xenotransplantation mouse models were used to investigate the molecular role of FAM134B in cancer cell biology in response to FAM134B silencing with shRNA lentiviral particles. FAM134B protein was noted in both cytoplasm and nuclei of cancer cells. In cancer cells derived from stage IV colon cancer, FAM134B expression was remarkably reduced when compared to non-cancer colon cells and cancer cells derived from stage II colon cancer. FAM134B knockdown significantly (P colon cancer cells following lentiviral transfection. Furthermore, FAM134B suppression significantly increased (34-52%; P cancer suppressor gene in colon cancer. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Dietary factors and microsatellite instability in sporadic colon carcinomas.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diergaarde, B.; Braam, H.; Muijen, G.N.P. van; Ligtenberg, M.J.L.; Kok, F.J.; Kampman, E.

    2003-01-01

    Microsatellite instability (MSI) occurs in 10-20% of the sporadic colon carcinomas and appears to be primarily due to alterations in hMLH1 and hMSH2. Little is known about the role of diet in MSI-related colon carcinogenesis. We used data from a Dutch population-based case-control study on sporadic

  6. Dietary factors and microsatellite instability in sporadic colon carcinomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diergaarde, B.; Braam, H.; Muijen, van G.N.P.; Ligtenberg, M.J.L.; Kok, F.J.; Kampman, E.

    2003-01-01

    Microsatellite instability (MSI) occurs in 10-20% of the sporadic colon carcinomas and appears to be primarily due to alterations in hMLH1 and hMSH2. Little is known about the role of diet in MSI-related colon carcinogenesis. We used data from a Dutch population-based case-control study on sporadic

  7. Ageing, chronic alcohol consumption and folate are determinants of genomic DNA methylation, p16 promoter methylation and the expression of p16 in the mouse colon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elder age and chronic alcohol consumption are important risk factors for the development of colon cancer. Each factor can alter genomic and gene-specific DNA methylation. This study examined the effects of aging and chronic alcohol consumption on genomic and p16-specific methylation, and p16 express...

  8. Aging and chronic alcohol consumption are determinants of p16 gene expression, genomic DNA methylation and p16 promoter methylation in the mouse colon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elder age and chronic alcohol consumption are important risk factors for the development of colon cancer. Each factor can alter genomic and gene-specific DNA methylation. This study examined the effects of aging and chronic alcohol consumption on genomic and p16-specific methylation, and p16 express...

  9. Gene expression changes in the colon epithelium are similar to those of intact colon during late inflammation in interleukin-10 gene deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna E Russ

    Full Text Available In addition to their role in absorption and secretion, epithelial cells play an important role in the protection of the colon mucosa from the resident microbiota and are important for the maintenance of homeostasis. Microarray analysis of intact colon samples is widely used to gain an overview of the cellular pathways and processes that are active in the colon during inflammation. Laser microdissection of colon epithelial cells allows a more targeted analysis of molecular pathways in the mucosa, preceding and during inflammation, with potentially increased sensitivity to changes in specific cell populations. The aim of this study was to investigate the molecular changes that occur in early and late inflammation stages in colon epithelium of a mouse model of inflammatory bowel diseases. Microarray analysis of intact colon samples and microdissected colon epithelial cell samples from interleukin-10 gene deficient and control mice at 6 and 12 weeks of age was undertaken. Results of gene set enrichment analysis showed that more immune-related pathways were identified between interleukin-10 gene deficient and control mice at 6 weeks of age in epithelial cells than intact colon. This suggests that targeting epithelial cells could increase sensitivity for detecting immune changes that occur early in the inflammatory process. However, in the later stages of inflammation, microarray analyses of intact colon and epithelium both provide a similar overview of gene expression changes in the colon mucosa at the pathway level.

  10. Integrative genomic approaches to dissect clinically-significant relationships between the VDR cistrome and gene expression in primary colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Mark D; Campbell, Moray J

    2017-10-01

    Recently, we undertook a pan-cancer analyses of the nuclear hormone receptor (NR) superfamily in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), and revealed that the vitamin D receptor (NR1I1/VDR) was commonly and significantly down-regulated specifically in colon adenocarcinoma cohort (COAD). To examine the consequence of down-regulated VDR expression we re-analyzed VDR chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-Seq) data from LS180 colon cancer cells (GSE31939). This analysis identified 1809 loci that displayed significant (p.adjcolon tumor suppressor, Galactin 4) had significantly shorted disease free survival. These analyses suggest that reduced expression of VDR in colon cancer (but neither loss nor mutation) changes the actions of the VDR by both dampening the expression of tumor suppressors (e.g. LGALS4) whilst either stabilizing or not down-regulating expression of oncogenes (e.g. Carbonic Anhydrase 9 (CA9)). These integrative genomic approaches are relatively generic and applicable to the study of any transcription factor. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Mechanism(S) Involved in the Colon-Specific Expression of the Thiamine Pyrophosphate (Tpp) Transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabokina, Svetlana M; Ramos, Mel Brendan; Said, Hamid M

    2016-01-01

    Microbiota of the large intestine synthesizes considerable amount of vitamin B1 (thiamine) in the form of thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP). We have recently demonstrated the existence of an efficient and specific carrier-mediated uptake process for TPP in human colonocytes, identified the TPP transporter (TPPT) involved (product of the SLC44A4 gene), and shown that expression of TPPT along the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is restricted to the colon. Our aim in this study was to determine the molecular basis of the colon-specific expression of TPPT focusing on a possible epigenetic mechanism. Our results showed that the CpG island predicted in the SLC44A4 promoter is non-methylated in the human colonic epithelial NCM460 cells, but is hyper-methylated in the human duodenal epithelial HuTu80 cells (as well as in the human retinal pigment epithelial ARPE19 cells). In the mouse (where TPPT expression in the GI tract is also restricted to the colon), the CpG island predicted in the Slc44a4 promoter is non-methylated in both the jejunum and colon, thus arguing against possible contribution of DNA methylation in the colon-specific expression of TPPT. A role for histone modifications in the tissue-specific pattern of Slc44a4 expression, however, was suggested by the findings that in mouse colon, histone H3 in the 5'-regulatory region of Slc44a4 is tri-methylated at lysine 4 and acetylated at lysine 9, whereas the tri-methylation at lysine 27 modification was negligible. In contrast, in the mouse jejunum, histone H3 is hyper-trimethylated at lysine 27 (repressor mark). Similarly, possible involvement of miRNA(s) in the tissue-specific expression of TPPT was also suggested by the findings that the 3'-UTR of SLC44A4 is targeted by specific miRNAs/RNA binding proteins in non-colonic, but not in colonic, epithelial cells. These studies show, for the first time, epigenetic mechanisms (histone modifications) play a role in determining the tissue-specific pattern of expression of TPPT

  12. Serologic responses to somatic O and colonization-factor antigens of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli in travelers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deetz, T R; Evans, D J; Evans, D G; DuPont, H L

    1979-07-01

    To improve the retrospective diagnoses of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) as a cause of travelers' diarrhea, as well as to determine the presence of colonization-factor antigens in these infections, a study of serologic responses to antigens of ETEC was done. Paired sera from 60 United States students in Cholula, Puebla, Mexico, were analyzed for rises in titer of antibody to heat-labile toxin, eight somatic antigen O serogroups associated with ETEC, and two colonization-factor antigens, CFA/I and CFA/II. Only 9% had a response to O antigens, while 20% had responses to the colonization-factor antigens. Response to the colonization-factor antigens correlated significantly with response to the heat-labile toxin and with culture evidence of ETEC infection. Serologic studies confirmed that colonization-factor antigen has a role in naturally acquired cases of travelers' diarrhea and that it can be used as an additional determinant of infection with ETEC.

  13. Gene expression profiles of colonic mucosa in healthy young adult and senior dogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Yong Kil

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We have previously reported the effects of age and diet on nutrient digestibility, intestinal morphology, and large intestinal fermentation patterns in healthy young adult and senior dogs. However, a genome-wide molecular analysis of colonic mucosa as a function of age and diet has not yet been performed in dogs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Colonic mucosa samples were collected from six senior (12-year old and six young adult (1-year old female beagles fed one of two diets (animal protein-based vs. plant protein-based for 12 months. Total RNA in colonic mucosa was extracted and hybridized to Affymetrix GeneChip® Canine Genome Arrays. Results indicated that the majority of gene expression changes were due to age (212 genes rather than diet (66 genes. In particular, the colonic mucosa of senior dogs had increased expression of genes associated with cell proliferation, inflammation, stress response, and cellular metabolism, whereas the expression of genes associated with apoptosis and defensive mechanisms were decreased in senior vs. young adult dogs. No consistent diet-induced alterations in gene expression existed in both age groups, with the effects of diet being more pronounced in senior dogs than in young adult dogs. CONCLUSION: Our results provide molecular insight pertaining to the aged canine colon and its predisposition to dysfunction and disease. Therefore, our data may aid in future research pertaining to age-associated gastrointestinal physiological changes and highlight potential targets for dietary intervention to limit their progression.

  14. Gene expression profiles of colonic mucosa in healthy young adult and senior dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kil, Dong Yong; Vester Boler, Brittany M; Apanavicius, Carolyn J; Schook, Lawrence B; Swanson, Kelly S

    2010-09-22

    We have previously reported the effects of age and diet on nutrient digestibility, intestinal morphology, and large intestinal fermentation patterns in healthy young adult and senior dogs. However, a genome-wide molecular analysis of colonic mucosa as a function of age and diet has not yet been performed in dogs. Colonic mucosa samples were collected from six senior (12-year old) and six young adult (1-year old) female beagles fed one of two diets (animal protein-based vs. plant protein-based) for 12 months. Total RNA in colonic mucosa was extracted and hybridized to Affymetrix GeneChip® Canine Genome Arrays. Results indicated that the majority of gene expression changes were due to age (212 genes) rather than diet (66 genes). In particular, the colonic mucosa of senior dogs had increased expression of genes associated with cell proliferation, inflammation, stress response, and cellular metabolism, whereas the expression of genes associated with apoptosis and defensive mechanisms were decreased in senior vs. young adult dogs. No consistent diet-induced alterations in gene expression existed in both age groups, with the effects of diet being more pronounced in senior dogs than in young adult dogs. Our results provide molecular insight pertaining to the aged canine colon and its predisposition to dysfunction and disease. Therefore, our data may aid in future research pertaining to age-associated gastrointestinal physiological changes and highlight potential targets for dietary intervention to limit their progression.

  15. Injury and mechanism of recombinant E. coli expressing STa on piglets colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Yang; Li, Xueni; Zhang, Lin; Shi, Yutao; DU, Linxiao; Ding, Binying; Hou, Yongqing; Gong, Joshua; Wu, Tao

    2018-02-09

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is primary pathogenic bacteria of piglet diarrhea, over two thirds of piglets diarrhea caused by ETEC are resulted from STa-producing ETEC strains. This experiment was conducted to construct the recombinant E. coli expressing STa and study the injury and mechanism of recombinant E. coli expressing STa on 7 days old piglets colon. Twenty-four 7 days old piglets were allotted to four treatments: control group, STa group (2 × 10 9 CFU E. coli LMG194-STa), LMG194 group (2 × 10 9 CFU E. coli LMG194) and K88 group (2 × 10 9 CFU E. coli K88). The result showed that E. coli infection significantly increased diarrhea rates; changed DAO activity in plasma and colon; damaged colonic mucosal morphology including crypt depth, number of globet cells, density of lymphocytes and lamina propria cell density; substantially reduced antioxidant capacity by altering activities of GSH-Px, SOD, and TNOS and productions of MDA and H 2 O 2 ; obviously decreased AQP3, AQP4 and KCNJ13 protein expression levels; substantially altered the gene expression levels of inflammatory cytokines. Conclusively, STa group had the biggest effect on these indices in four treatment groups. These results suggested that the recombinant strain expressed STa can induce piglets diarrhea and colonic morphological and funtional damage by altering expression of proteins connect to transportation function and genes associated with intestinal injury and inflammatory cytokines.

  16. Time- and dose-dependent effects of curcumin on gene expression in human colon cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Erk Marjan J

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Curcumin is a spice and a coloring food compound with a promising role in colon cancer prevention. Curcumin protects against development of colon tumors in rats treated with a colon carcinogen, in colon cancer cells curcumin can inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis, it is an anti-oxidant and it can act as an anti-inflammatory agent. The aim of this study was to elucidate mechanisms and effect of curcumin in colon cancer cells using gene expression profiling. Methods Gene expression changes in response to curcumin exposure were studied in two human colon cancer cell lines, using cDNA microarrays with four thousand human genes. HT29 cells were exposed to two different concentrations of curcumin and gene expression changes were followed in time (3, 6, 12, 24 and 48 hours. Gene expression changes after short-term exposure (3 or 6 hours to curcumin were also studied in a second cell type, Caco-2 cells. Results Gene expression changes (>1.5-fold were found at all time points. HT29 cells were more sensitive to curcumin than Caco-2 cells. Early response genes were involved in cell cycle, signal transduction, DNA repair, gene transcription, cell adhesion and xenobiotic metabolism. In HT29 cells curcumin modulated a number of cell cycle genes of which several have a role in transition through the G2/M phase. This corresponded to a cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase as was observed by flow cytometry. Functional groups with a similar expression profile included genes involved in phase-II metabolism that were induced by curcumin after 12 and 24 hours. Expression of some cytochrome P450 genes was downregulated by curcumin in HT29 and Caco-2 cells. In addition, curcumin affected expression of metallothionein genes, tubulin genes, p53 and other genes involved in colon carcinogenesis. Conclusions This study has extended knowledge on pathways or processes already reported to be affected by curcumin (cell cycle arrest, phase

  17. De novo expression of human polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 6 (GalNAc-T6) in colon adenocarcinoma inhibits the differentiation of colonic epithelium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lavrsen, Kirstine; Dabelsteen, Sally; Vakhrushev, Sergey Y

    2017-01-01

    investigated the expression patterns of all of the GalNAc-Ts in colon cancer by analysing transcriptomic data. We found that GalNAc-T6 was highly upregulated in colon adenocarcinomas but absent in normal-appearing adjacent colon tissue. The results were verified by immunohistochemistry, suggesting that Gal...... that this isoform has unique cellular functions. In support of this notion, the genetically and functionally closely related GalNAc-T3 homologue did not shown compensatory functionality for effects observed for GalNAc-T6. Taken together, these data strongly suggest that aberrant GalNAc-T6 expression and site......-specific glycosylation is involved in oncogenic transformation....

  18. Regional mucosa-associated microbiota determine physiological expression of TLR2 and TLR4 in murine colon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunwei Wang

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Many colonic mucosal genes that are highly regulated by microbial signals are differentially expressed along the rostral-caudal axis. This would suggest that differences in regional microbiota exist, particularly mucosa-associated microbes that are less likely to be transient. We therefore explored this possibility by examining the bacterial populations associated with the normal proximal and distal colonic mucosa in context of host Toll-like receptors (TLR expression in C57BL/6J mice housed in specific pathogen-free (SPF and germ-free (GF environments. 16S rRNA gene-based terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP and clone library analysis revealed significant differences in the community structure and diversity of the mucosa-associated microbiota located in the distal colon compared to proximal colon and stool, the latter two clustering closely. Differential expression of colonic TLR2 and TLR4 along the proximal-distal axis was also found in SPF mice, but not in GF mice, suggesting that enteric microbes are essential in maintaining the regional expression of these TLRs. TLR2 is more highly expressed in proximal colon and decreases in a gradient to distal while TLR4 expression is highest in distal colon and a gradient of decreased expression to proximal colon is observed. After transfaunation in GF mice, both regional colonization of mucosa-associated microbes and expression of TLRs in the mouse colon were reestablished. In addition, exposure of the distal colon to cecal (proximal microbiota induced TLR2 expression. These results demonstrate that regional colonic mucosa-associated microbiota determine the region-specific expression of TLR2 and TLR4. Conversely, region-specific host assembly rules are essential in determining the structure and function of mucosa-associated microbial populations. We believe this type of host-microbial mutualism is pivotal to the maintenance of intestinal and immune homeostasis.

  19. Vancomycin-resistant enterococci colonization among dialysis patients: a meta-analysis of prevalence, risk factors, and significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacharioudakis, Ioannis M; Zervou, Fainareti N; Ziakas, Panayiotis D; Rice, Louis B; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2015-01-01

    Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) have become important nosocomial pathogens causing outbreaks worldwide. Patients undergoing dialysis represent a vulnerable population due to their comorbid conditions, frequent use of antibacterial agents, and frequent contact with health care settings. Systematic review and meta-analysis of cross-sectional studies of screening for VRE colonization. Patients receiving long-term dialysis treatment. We performed a systematic literature search of PubMed and EMBASE databases to identify studies performing screening for VRE colonization among dialysis patients. Region, recent use of vancomycin or other antibiotics, previous hospitalization. (1) VRE colonization and (2) rate of VRE infection among colonized and noncolonized individuals. Relative effects were expressed as ORs and 95% CIs. We identified 23 studies that fulfilled the inclusion criteria and provided data for 4,842 dialysis patients from 100 dialysis centers. The pooled prevalence of VRE colonization was 6.2% (95% CI, 2.8%-10.8%), with significant variability between centers. The corresponding number for North American centers was 5.2% (95% CI, 2.8%-8.2%). Recent use of any antibiotic (OR, 3.62; 95% CI, 1.22-10.75), particularly vancomycin (OR, 5.15; 95% CI, 1.56-17.02), but also use of antibiotics other than vancomycin (OR, 2.92; 95% CI, 0.99-8.55) and recent hospitalization (OR, 4.55; 95% CI, 1.93-10.74) significantly increased the possibility of a VRE-positive surveillance culture. Colonized patients had a significantly higher risk of VRE infection (OR, 21.62; 95% CI, 5.33-87.69) than their noncolonized counterparts. In 19 of 23 studies, a low percentage of dialysis patients (dialysis centers. Previous antibiotic use, in particular vancomycin, and recent hospitalization are important predicting factors of colonization, whereas the risk of VRE infection is significantly higher for colonized patients. Copyright © 2014 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by

  20. Down-regulation of GPR137 expression inhibits proliferation of colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kai; Shen, Zhen; Liang, Xianjun; Liu, Tongjun; Wang, Tiejun; Jiang, Yang

    2014-11-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPRs) are highly related to oncogenesis and cancer metastasis. G protein-coupled receptor 137 (GPR137) was initially reported as a novel orphan GPR about 10 years ago. Some orphan GPRs have been implicated in human cancers. The aim of this study is to investigate the role of GPR137 in human colon cancer. Expression levels of GRP137 were analyzed in different colon cancer cell lines by quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis. Lentivirus-mediated short hairpin RNA was specifically designed to knock down GPR137 expression in colon cancer cells. Cell viability was measured by methylthiazoletetrazolium and colony formation assays. In addition, cell cycle characteristic was investigated by flow cytometry. GRP137 expression was observed in all seven colon cancer cell lines at different levels. The mRNA and protein levels of GPR137 were down-regulated in both HCT116 and RKO cells after lentivirus infection. Lentivirus-mediated silencing of GPR137 reduced the proliferation rate and colonies numbers. Knockdown of GPR137 in both cell lines led to cell cycle arrest in the G0/G1 phase. These results indicated that GPR137 plays an important role in colon cancer cell proliferation. A better understanding of GPR137's effects on signal transduction pathways in colon cancer cells may provide insights into the novel gene therapy of colon cancer. © The Author 2014. Published by ABBS Editorial Office in association with Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  1. Human Colon-Derived Soluble Factors Modulate Gut Microbiota Composition

    OpenAIRE

    Hevia, Arancha; Bernardo, David; Montalvillo, Enrique; Al-Hassi, Hafid O.; Fernández-Salazar, Luis; Garrote, Jose A.; Milani, Christian; Ventura, Marco; Arranz, Eduardo; Knight, Stella C.; Margolles, Abelardo; Sánchez, Borja

    2015-01-01

    The commensal microbiota modulates immunological and metabolic aspects of the intestinal mucosa contributing to development of human gut diseases including inflammatory bowel disease. The host/microbiota interaction often referred to as a crosstalk, mainly focuses on the effect of the microbiota on the host neglecting effects that the host could elicit on the commensals. Colonic microenvironments from three human healthy controls (obtained from the proximal and distal colon, both in resting c...

  2. Gene expression patterns and dynamics of the colonization of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) by highly virulent and weakly virulent strains of Fusarium oxysporum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niño-Sánchez, Jonathan; Tello, Vega; Casado-del Castillo, Virginia; Thon, Michael R.; Benito, Ernesto P.; Díaz-Mínguez, José María

    2015-01-01

    The dynamics of root and hypocotyl colonization, and the gene expression patterns of several fungal virulence factors and plant defense factors have been analyzed and compared in the interaction of two Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. phaseoli strains displaying clear differences in virulence, with a susceptible common bean cultivar. The growth of the two strains on the root surface and the colonization of the root was quantitatively similar although the highly virulent (HV) strain was more efficient reaching the central root cylinder. The main differences between both strains were found in the temporal and spatial dynamics of crown root and hypocotyl colonization. The increase of fungal biomass in the crown root was considerably larger for the HV strain, which, after an initial stage of global colonization of both the vascular cylinder and the parenchymal cells, restricted its growth to the newly differentiated xylem vessels. The weakly virulent (WV) strain was a much slower and less efficient colonizer of the xylem vessels, showing also growth in the intercellular spaces of the parenchyma. Most of the virulence genes analyzed showed similar expression patterns in both strains, except SIX1, SIX6 and the gene encoding the transcription factor FTF1, which were highly upregulated in root crown and hypocotyl. The response induced in the infected plant showed interesting differences for both strains. The WV strain induced an early and strong transcription of the PR1 gene, involved in SAR response, while the HV strain preferentially induced the early expression of the ethylene responsive factor ERF2. PMID:25883592

  3. Bacterial colonization factors control specificity and stability of the gut microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S Melanie; Donaldson, Gregory P; Mikulski, Zbigniew; Boyajian, Silva; Ley, Klaus; Mazmanian, Sarkis K

    2013-09-19

    Mammals harbour a complex gut microbiome, comprising bacteria that confer immunological, metabolic and neurological benefits. Despite advances in sequence-based microbial profiling and myriad studies defining microbiome composition during health and disease, little is known about the molecular processes used by symbiotic bacteria to stably colonize the gastrointestinal tract. We sought to define how mammals assemble and maintain the Bacteroides, one of the most numerically prominent genera of the human microbiome. Here we find that, whereas the gut normally contains hundreds of bacterial species, germ-free mice mono-associated with a single Bacteroides species are resistant to colonization by the same, but not different, species. To identify bacterial mechanisms for species-specific saturable colonization, we devised an in vivo genetic screen and discovered a unique class of polysaccharide utilization loci that is conserved among intestinal Bacteroides. We named this genetic locus the commensal colonization factors (ccf). Deletion of the ccf genes in the model symbiont, Bacteroides fragilis, results in colonization defects in mice and reduced horizontal transmission. The ccf genes of B. fragilis are upregulated during gut colonization, preferentially at the colonic surface. When we visualize microbial biogeography within the colon, B. fragilis penetrates the colonic mucus and resides deep within crypt channels, whereas ccf mutants are defective in crypt association. Notably, the CCF system is required for B. fragilis colonization following microbiome disruption with Citrobacter rodentium infection or antibiotic treatment, suggesting that the niche within colonic crypts represents a reservoir for bacteria to maintain long-term colonization. These findings reveal that intestinal Bacteroides have evolved species-specific physical interactions with the host that mediate stable and resilient gut colonization, and the CCF system represents a novel molecular mechanism for

  4. Subgingival bacterial colonization profiles correlate with gingival tissue gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Handfield Martin

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease caused by the microbiota of the periodontal pocket. We investigated the association between subgingival bacterial profiles and gene expression patterns in gingival tissues of patients with periodontitis. A total of 120 patients undergoing periodontal surgery contributed with a minimum of two interproximal gingival papillae (range 2-4 from a maxillary posterior region. Prior to tissue harvesting, subgingival plaque samples were collected from the mesial and distal aspects of each tissue sample. Gingival tissue RNA was extracted, reverse-transcribed, labeled, and hybridized with whole-genome microarrays (310 in total. Plaque samples were analyzed using checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridizations with respect to 11 bacterial species. Random effects linear regression models considered bacterial levels as exposure and expression profiles as outcome variables. Gene Ontology analyses summarized the expression patterns into biologically relevant categories. Results Wide inter-species variation was noted in the number of differentially expressed gingival tissue genes according to subgingival bacterial levels: Using a Bonferroni correction (p -7, 9,392 probe sets were differentially associated with levels of Tannerella forsythia, 8,537 with Porphyromonas gingivalis, 6,460 with Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, 506 with Eikenella corrodens and only 8 with Actinomyces naeslundii. Cluster analysis identified commonalities and differences among tissue gene expression patterns differentially regulated according to bacterial levels. Conclusion Our findings suggest that the microbial content of the periodontal pocket is a determinant of gene expression in the gingival tissues and provide new insights into the differential ability of periodontal species to elicit a local host response.

  5. Chemoresistance of CD133{sup +} colon cancer may be related with increased survivin expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Mi-Ra; Ji, Sun-Young; Mia-Jan, Khalilullah [Department of Pathology, Yonsei University, Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Mee-Yon, E-mail: meeyon@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Pathology, Yonsei University, Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Genomic Cohort, Yonsei University, Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-31

    CD133, putative cancer stem cell marker, deemed to aid chemoresistance. However, this claim has been challenged recently and we previously reported that patients with CD133{sup +} colon cancer have benefit from 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) chemotherapy incontrast to no benefit in patients with CD133{sup −} cancer. To elucidate the role of CD133 expression in chemoresistance, we silenced the CD133 expression in a colon cancer cell line and determined its effect on the biological characteristics downstream. We comparatively analyzed the sequential changes of MDR1, ABCG2, AKT1 and survivin expression and the result of proliferation assay (WST-1 assay) with 5-FU treatment in CD133{sup +} and siRNA-induced CD133{sup −} cells, derived from Caco-2 colon cancer cell line. 5-FU treatment induced significantly increase of the mRNA expression of MDR1, ABCG2 and AKT1genes, but not protein level. CD133 had little to no effect on the mRNA and protein expression of these genes. However, survivin expression at mRNA and protein level were significantly increased in CD133{sup +} cells compared with siRNA-induced CD133-cells and Mock (not sorted CD133{sup +} cells) at 96 h after siRNA transfection. The cytotoxicity assay demonstrated notable increase of chemoresistance to 5-FU treatment (10 μM) in CD133{sup +} cells at 96 h after siRNA transfection. From this study, we conclude that CD133{sup +} cells may have chemoresistance to 5-FU through the mechanism which is related with survivin expression, instead of MDR1, ABCG2 and AKT1 expression. Therefore a survivin inhibitor can be a new target for effective treatment of CD133{sup +} colon cancer. - Highlights: • We evaluate the role of CD133 in chemoresistance of colon cancer. • We compared the chemoresistance of CD133{sup +} cells and siRNA-induced CD133{sup −} cells. • CD133 had little to no effect on MDR1, ABCG2 and AKT1 expression. • Survivin expression and chemoresistance were increased in CD133{sup +} colon cancer cells.

  6. Physical activity, mediating factors and risk of colon cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aleksandrova, Krasimira; Jenab, Mazda; Leitzmann, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Background: There is convincing evidence that high physical activity lowers the risk of colon cancer; however, the underlying biological mechanisms remain largely unknown. We aimed to determine the extent to which body fatness and biomarkers of various biologically plausible pathways account for ......%; 111%) of the association, respectively. Conclusions: Promoting physical activity, particularly outdoors, and maintaining metabolic health and adequate vitamin D levels could represent a promising strategy for colon cancer prevention.......Background: There is convincing evidence that high physical activity lowers the risk of colon cancer; however, the underlying biological mechanisms remain largely unknown. We aimed to determine the extent to which body fatness and biomarkers of various biologically plausible pathways account...... for the association between physical activity and colon cancer. Methods: We conducted a nested case-control study in a cohort of 519 978 men and women aged 25 to 70 years followed from 1992 to 2003. A total of 713 incident colon cancer cases were matched, using risk-set sampling, to 713 controls on age, sex, study...

  7. Role and species–specific expression of colon T cell homing receptor GPR15 in colitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Linh P.; Pan, Junliang; Dinh, Theresa Thanh; Hadeiba, Husein; O’Hara, Edward; Ebtikar, Ahmad; Hertweck, Arnulf; Gökmen, M. Refik; Lord, Graham M.; Jenner, Richard G.

    2014-01-01

    Lymphocyte recruitment maintains intestinal immune homeostasis but also contributes to inflammation. The orphan chemoattractant receptor GPR15 mediates regulatory T cell homing and immunosuppression in the mouse colon. We show that GPR15 is also expressed by mouse TH17 and TH1 effector cells, and is required for colitis in a model that depends on their trafficking to the colon. In humans GPR15 is expressed by effector cells including pathogenic TH2 cells in ulcerative colitis, but is not expressed by regulatory T (Treg) cells. The TH2 transcriptional activator GATA-3 and the Treg–associated transcriptional repressor FOXP3 robustly bind human, but not mouse, GPR15 enhancer sequences, correlating with expression. Our results highlight species differences in GPR15 regulation, and suggest it as a potential therapeutic target for colitis. PMID:25531831

  8. Expression of serotonin receptors in the colonic tissue of chronic diarrhea rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Tong; Qiu, Juanjuan; Wan, Jiajia; Wang, Fengyun; Tang, Xudong; Guo, Huishu

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the difference among the expression of serotonin receptors (5-HT3, 5-HT4, and 5-HT7receptors) in colonic tissue of chronic diarrhea rats. A rat model of chronic diarrhea was established by lactose diet. The expression of 5-HT3, 5-HT4, and 5-HT7receptors in the colonic tissue was detected using immunohistochemistry, real-time PCR and Western blotting techniques. There is no significant difference on the protein expression of 5-HT3receptor between the normal group and the chronic diarrhea model group. The mRNA expression of 5-HT3receptor in the chronic diarrhea model group was significantly lower than that in the normal group (n = 10; Pchronic diarrhea model group were significantly higher than those in the normal group (n = 10; Pchronic diarrhea model group were significantly decreased compared with the normal group (n = 10; Pdiarrhea by lactose diet.

  9. A pilot study comparing protein expression in different segments of the normal colon and rectum and in normal colon versus adenoma in patients with Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Chongjuan; Chen, Jinyun; Pande, Mala; Lynch, Patrick M; Frazier, Marsha L

    2013-07-01

    Lynch syndrome (LS) is a common inherited predisposition to colorectal cancer (CRC). In LS patients, CRC is predominantly located in the right colon, as opposed to sporadic CRC, which usually affects the left colon or rectum. Previous studies have demonstrated a clear distinction in gene expression between sporadic CRC and normal colon at different locations in the colorectum. However, little is known about LS gene expression profiles in different areas of the colorectum. Here, we compared the protein expression profiles for normal colorectal samples among different locations as well as between adenomas and matched normal tissue in LS. Protein from 33 tissue samples (27 normal tissues and 6 adenomas) from 9 patients with LS was extracted for reverse-phase protein array (RPPA) analysis. The antibody panel used for RPPA included 109 key proteins involved in various cancer-related pathways. Cluster 3.0 was used for unsupervised and supervised clustering analysis. IGF1R and COL6A1 were expressed significantly differently between the normal right and normal left colon (q < 0.05); FN1, COL6A1, and IGF1R were expressed significantly differently between the normal right colon and normal rectum (q < 0.05). In the adenomas and matched normal tissue, PEA-15 was the only protein with significantly different expression (q < 0.05). We found differences in protein expression between normal tissues from the right colon, left colon, and rectum as well as between adenomas and matched normal tissue. However, those differences should be further confirmed in a larger sample size.

  10. Preterm Birth Reduces Nutrient Absorption With Limited Effect on Immune Gene Expression and Gut Colonization in Pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mette V; Cilieborg, Malene S.; Skovgaard, Kerstin

    2015-01-01

    reduced 5 of 30 intestinal genes related to nutrient absorption and innate immunity, relative to near-term pigs, whereas 2 genes were upregulated. Preterm birth also reduced ex vivo intestinal glucose and leucine uptake (40%-50%), but failed to increase cytokine secretions from intestinal explants......The primary risk factors for necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) are preterm birth, enteral feeding, and gut colonization. It is unclear whether feeding and colonization induce excessive expression of immune genes that lead to NEC. Using a pig model, we hypothesized that reduced gestational age would...... upregulate immune-related genes and cause bacterial imbalance after birth. Preterm (85%-92% gestation, n = 53) and near-term (95%-99% gestation, n = 69) pigs were delivered by cesarean section and euthanized at birth or after 2 days of infant formula or bovine colostrum feeding. At birth, preterm delivery...

  11. Effects of NM-3 on lymphatic vessel density and vascular endothelial growth factor of colon cancer in orthotopic implantation model of a severe combined immune deficiency mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Shui Zhu

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The molecular mechanisms involved colon cancer tumorigenesis and development of colon cancer remain unclear. The aim of this study is to explore the inhibitive effects of NM-3 on lymphatic vessel density and vascular endothelial growth factor of micrometastatic lesion of orthotopic implantated colon cancer in the severe combined immune deficiency (SCID nude mice. Human colon cancer SW1116 cells were orthotopically implantated into the colon of the nude mice. Twenty-eight SCID nude mice were randomly divided into four groups (7 mice for each group after one week feeding and then the nude mice were treated with carboplatin and NM-3 via intraperitoneal injection twice a week for 8 weeks. The mice were sacrificed after 8 weeks and the vascular endothelial growth factor-C (VEGF-C, VEGF-D, VEGF-R-3 and lymphatic vessel density (LVD were analyzed using immunohistochemistry staining assay. LVD in NM-3 treated mice was significantly lower than that of control (normal saline treated mice. The expression of VEGF-C, VEGF-D, and VEGF-R-3 and the expression of mRNA of VEGF-C, VEGF-D, and VEGF-R-3 in NM-3 treated mice were significantly lower than that of control mice. The NM-3 inhibited the growth of colon cancer in the SCID mice of orthotopic implantatation model, and this effect may be related to the inhibitive effects of NM-3 on the lymphangiogenesis and vascular endothelial growth factor in colon cancer. NM-3 and carboplatin played a synergistic role in inhibiting lymphangiogenesis of human colon cancer in SCID nude mice and the further investigation of molecular mechanisms involved in colon cancer metastasis will provide an important evidence for understanding of lymphangiogenesis of human colon cancer.

  12. Activating transcription factor-3 (ATF3 functions as a tumor suppressor in colon cancer and is up-regulated upon heat-shock protein 90 (Hsp90 inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dietmeier Wolfgang

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Activating transcription factor-3 (ATF3 is involved in the complex process of cellular stress response. However, its exact role in cancer is discussed controversially because both tumor suppressive and oncogenic effects have been described. Here we followed-up on our previous observation that inhibition of Hsp90 may increase ATF3 expression and sought to determine the role of ATF3 in colon cancer. Methods Regulation of ATF3 was determined in cancer cells using signaling inhibitors and a heat-shock protein-90 (Hsp90 antagonist. Human HCT116 cancer cells were stably transfected with an ATF3-shRNA or a luciferase-shRNA expression plasmid and alterations in cell motility were assessed in migration assays. The impact of ATF3 down-regulation on cancer growth and metastasis were investigated in a subcutaneous tumor model, a model of hepatic tumor growth and in a model of peritoneal carcinomatosis. Human colon cancer tissues were analyzed for ATF3 expression. Results The results show that therapeutic Hsp90 inhibition substantially up-regulates the expression of ATF3 in various cancer cells, including colon, gastric and pancreatic cancer. This effect was evident both in vitro and in vivo. RNAi mediated knock-down of ATF3 in HCT116 colon cancer cells significantly increased cancer cell migration in vitro. Moreover, in xenogenic mouse models, ATF3 knock-down promoted subcutaneous tumor growth and hepatic metastasis, as well as peritoneal carcinomatosis. Importantly, ATF3 expression was lower in human colon cancer specimens, as compared to corresponding normal surrounding tissues, suggesting that ATF3 may represent a down-regulated tumor suppressor in colon cancer. Conclusion In conclusion, ATF3 down-regulation in colon cancer promotes tumor growth and metastasis. Considering that blocking Hsp90 induces ATF3 expression, Hsp90 inhibition may represent a valid strategy to treat metastatic colon cancer by up-regulating this anti

  13. Chemoresistance of CD133(+) colon cancer may be related with increased survivin expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mi-Ra; Ji, Sun-Young; Mia-Jan, Khalilullah; Cho, Mee-Yon

    2015-07-31

    CD133, putative cancer stem cell marker, deemed to aid chemoresistance. However, this claim has been challenged recently and we previously reported that patients with CD133(+) colon cancer have benefit from 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) chemotherapy incontrast to no benefit in patients with CD133(-) cancer. To elucidate the role of CD133 expression in chemoresistance, we silenced the CD133 expression in a colon cancer cell line and determined its effect on the biological characteristics downstream. We comparatively analyzed the sequential changes of MDR1, ABCG2, AKT1 and survivin expression and the result of proliferation assay (WST-1 assay) with 5-FU treatment in CD133(+) and siRNA-induced CD133(-) cells, derived from Caco-2 colon cancer cell line. 5-FU treatment induced significantly increase of the mRNA expression of MDR1, ABCG2 and AKT1genes, but not protein level. CD133 had little to no effect on the mRNA and protein expression of these genes. However, survivin expression at mRNA and protein level were significantly increased in CD133(+) cells compared with siRNA-induced CD133-cells and Mock (not sorted CD133(+) cells) at 96 h after siRNA transfection. The cytotoxicity assay demonstrated notable increase of chemoresistance to 5-FU treatment (10 μM) in CD133(+) cells at 96 h after siRNA transfection. From this study, we conclude that CD133(+) cells may have chemoresistance to 5-FU through the mechanism which is related with survivin expression, instead of MDR1, ABCG2 and AKT1 expression. Therefore a survivin inhibitor can be a new target for effective treatment of CD133(+) colon cancer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Sulfatide recognition by colonization factor antigen CS6 from enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lena Jansson

    Full Text Available The first step in the pathogenesis of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC infections is adhesion of the bacterium to the small intestinal epithelium. Adhesion of ETEC is mediated by a number of antigenically distinct colonization factors, and among these, one of the most commonly detected is the non-fimbrial adhesin coli surface antigen 6 (CS6. The potential carbohydrate recognition by CS6 was investigated by binding of recombinant CS6-expressing E. coli and purified CS6 protein to a large number of variant glycosphingolipids separated on thin-layer chromatograms. Thereby, a highly specific binding of the CS6-expressing E. coli, and the purified CS6 protein, to sulfatide (SO(3-3Galbeta1Cer was obtained. The binding of the CS6 protein and CS6-expressing bacteria to sulfatide was inhibited by dextran sulfate, but not by dextran, heparin, galactose 4-sulfate or galactose 6-sulfate. When using recombinantly expressed and purified CssA and CssB subunits of the CS6 complex, sulfatide binding was obtained with the CssB subunit, demonstrating that the glycosphingolipid binding capacity of CS6 resides within this subunit. CS6-binding sulfatide was present in the small intestine of species susceptible to CS6-mediated infection, e.g. humans and rabbits, but lacking in species not affected by CS6 ETEC, e.g. mice. The ability of CS6-expressing ETEC to adhere to sulfatide in target small intestinal epithelium may thus contribute to virulence.

  15. Amphiregulin acts as an autocrine growth factor in two human polarizing colon cancer lines that exhibit domain selective EGF receptor mitogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Damstrup, L; Kuwada, S K; Dempsey, P. J.; Brown, C L; Hawkey, C J; Poulsen, H. S.; Wiley, H S; Coffey, R J

    1999-01-01

    Colonic enterocytes, like many epithelial cells in vivo, are polarized with functionally distinct apical and basolateral membrane domains. The aims of this study were to characterize the endogenous epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like ligands expressed in two polarizing colon cancer cell lines, HCA-7 Colony 29 (HCA-7) and Caco-2, and to examine the effects of cell polarity on EGF receptor-mediated mitogenesis. HCA-7 and Caco-2 cells were grown on plastic, or as a polarized monolayer on Transwel...

  16. Systems Pharmacogenomics Finds RUNX1 Is an Aspirin-Responsive Transcription Factor Linked to Cardiovascular Disease and Colon Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Voora, MD

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aspirin prevents cardiovascular disease and colon cancer; however aspirin's inhibition of platelet COX-1 only partially explains its diverse effects. We previously identified an aspirin response signature (ARS in blood consisting of 62 co-expressed transcripts that correlated with aspirin's effects on platelets and myocardial infarction (MI. Here we report that 60% of ARS transcripts are regulated by RUNX1 – a hematopoietic transcription factor - and 48% of ARS gene promoters contain a RUNX1 binding site. Megakaryocytic cells exposed to aspirin and its metabolite (salicylic acid, a weak COX-1 inhibitor showed up regulation in the RUNX1 P1 isoform and MYL9, which is transcriptionally regulated by RUNX1. In human subjects, RUNX1 P1 expression in blood and RUNX1-regulated platelet proteins, including MYL9, were aspirin-responsive and associated with platelet function. In cardiovascular disease patients RUNX1 P1 expression was associated with death or MI. RUNX1 acts as a tumor suppressor gene in gastrointestinal malignancies. We show that RUNX1 P1 expression is associated with colon cancer free survival suggesting a role for RUNX1 in aspirin's protective effect in colon cancer. Our studies reveal an effect of aspirin on RUNX1 and gene expression that may additionally explain aspirin's effects in cardiovascular disease and cancer.

  17. The Genital Tract Virulence Factor pGP3 Is Essential for Chlamydia muridarum Colonization in the Gastrointestinal Tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Lili; Zhang, Tianyuan; Melero, Jose; Huang, Yumeng; Liu, Yuanjun; Liu, Quanzhong; He, Cheng; Nelson, David E; Zhong, Guangming

    2018-01-01

    The cryptic plasmid is essential for Chlamydia muridarum dissemination from the genital tract to the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Following intravaginal inoculation, a C. muridarum strain deficient in plasmid-encoded pGP3 or pGP4 but not pGP5, pGP7, or pGP8 failed to spread to the mouse gastrointestinal tract, although mice infected with these strains developed productive genital tract infections. pGP3- or pGP4-deficient strains also failed to colonize the gastrointestinal tract when delivered intragastrically. pGP4 regulates pGP3, while pGP3 does not affect pGP4 expression, indicating that pGP3 is critical for C. muridarum colonization of the gastrointestinal tract. Mutants deficient in GlgA, a chromosome-encoded protein regulated by pGP4, also consistently colonized the mouse gastrointestinal tract. Interestingly, C. muridarum colonization of the gastrointestinal tract positively correlated with pathogenicity in the upper genital tract. pGP3-deficient C. muridarum strains did not induce hydrosalpinx or spread to the GI tract even when delivered to the oviduct by intrabursal inoculation. Thus, the current study not only has revealed that pGP3 is a novel chlamydial colonization factor in the gastrointestinal tract but also has laid a foundation for investigating the significance of gastrointestinal Chlamydia. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  18. Caveolin-1-Mediated Expression and Secretion of Kallikrein 6 in Colon Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca S. Henkhaus

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Kallikreins are secreted proteases that may play a functional role and/or serve as a serum biomarker for the presence or progression of certain types of cancers. Kallikrein 6 (KLK6 has been shown to be upregulated in several types of cancers, including colon. The aims of this study were to elucidate pathways that influence KLK6 gene expression and KLK6 protein secretion in the HCT116 human colon cancer cells. Our data indicate a central role for caveolin-1 (CAV-1, the main structural protein of caveolae, in both KLK6 gene expression and protein secretion. Sucrose gradient subcellular fractionation reveals that CAV-1 and KLK6 colocalize to lipid raft domains in the plasma membrane of HCT116 cells. Furthermore, we show that CAV-1, although it does not directly interact with the KLK6 molecule, enhances KLK6 secretion from the cells. Deactivation of CAV-1, through SRC-mediated phosphorylation, decreased KLK6 secretion. We also demonstrate that, in colon cancer cells, CAV-1 increased the amount of phosphorylated AKT in cells by inhibiting the activity of the AKT-negative regulators PP1 and PP2A. This study demonstrates that proteins such as CAV-1 and AKT, which are known to be altered in colon cancer, affect KLK6 expression and KLK6 secretion.

  19. Reduction of Orc6 expression sensitizes human colon cancer cells to 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine J Gavin

    Full Text Available Previous studies from our group have shown that the expression levels of Orc6 were highly elevated in colorectal cancer patient specimens and the induction of Orc6 was associated with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU treatment. The goal of this study was to investigate the molecular and cellular impact of Orc6 in colon cancer. In this study, we use HCT116 (wt-p53 and HCT116 (null-p53 colon cancer cell lines as a model system to investigate the impact of Orc6 on cell proliferation, chemosensitivity and pathways involved with Orc6. We demonstrated that the down regulation of Orc6 sensitizes colon cancer cells to both 5-FU and cisplatin (cis-pt treatment. Decreased Orc6 expression in HCT-116 (wt-p53 cells by RNA interference triggered cell cycle arrest at G1 phase. Prolonged inhibition of Orc6 expression resulted in multinucleated cells in HCT-116 (wt-p53 cell line. Western immunoblot analysis showed that down regulation of Orc6 induced p21 expression in HCT-116 (wt-p53 cells. The induction of p21 was mediated by increased level of phosphorylated p53 at ser-15. By contrast, there is no elevated expression of p21 in HCT-116 (null-p53 cells. Orc6 down regulation also increased the expression of DNA damaging repair protein GADD45beta and reduced the expression level of JNK1. Orc6 may be a potential novel target for future anti cancer therapeutic development in colon cancer.

  20. Factors associated with redundant sigmoid colon at Mulago Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Sigmoid Volvulus is the most common form of Volvulus of the gastrointestinal tract and in Uganda; this condition is one of the top causes of intestinal obstruction. It is associated with a pre-existing redundant sigmoid colon which has a narrow attachment of the sigmoid mesentery to the posterior abdominal wall.

  1. Factors Associated with Redundant Sigmoid Colon at Mulago ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    jen

    Background: Sigmoid Volvulus is the most common form of Volvulus of the gastrointestinal tract and in Uganda; this condition is one of the top causes of intestinal obstruction. It is associated with a pre-existing redundant sigmoid colon which has a narrow attachment of the sigmoid mesentery to the posterior abdominal wall.

  2. Identification of CEA-interacting proteins in colon cancer cells and their changes in expression after irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Byong Chul [Colorectal Cancer Branch, Research Institute, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Yeo, Seung Gu [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Soonchunhyang University Hospital, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    The serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level has been recognized as a prognostic factor in colorectal cancer, and associated with response of rectal cancer to radiotherapy. This study aimed to identify CEA-interacting proteins in colon cancer cells and observe post-irradiation changes in their expression. CEA expression in colon cancer cells was examined by Western blot analysis. Using an anti-CEA antibody or IgG as a negative control, immunoprecipitation was performed in colon cancer cell lysates. CEA and IgG immunoprecipitates were used for liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis. Proteins identified in the CEA immunoprecipitates but not in the IgG immunoprecipitates were selected as CEA-interacting proteins. After radiation treatment, changes in expression of CEA-interacting proteins were monitored by Western blot analysis. CEA expression was higher in SNU-81 cells compared with LoVo cells. The membrane localization of CEA limited the immunoprecipitation results and thus the number of CEA-interacting proteins identified. Only the Ras-related protein Rab-6B and lysozyme C were identified as CEA-interacting proteins in LoVo and SNU-81 cells, respectively. Lysozyme C was detected only in SNU-81, and CEA expression was differently regulated in two cell lines; it was down-regulated in LoVo but up-regulated in SNU-81 in radiation dosage-dependent manner. CEA-mediated radiation response appears to vary, depending on the characteristics of individual cancer cells. The lysozyme C and Rab subfamily proteins may play a role in the link between CEA and tumor response to radiation, although further studies are needed to clarify functional roles of the identified proteins.

  3. Silibinin modulates caudal-type homeobox transcription factor (CDX2), an intestine specific tumor suppressor to abrogate colon cancer in experimental rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangeetha, N; Nalini, N

    2015-01-01

    To authenticate the colon cancer preventive potential of silibinin, the efficacy of silibinin needs to be tested by evaluating an organ-specific biomarker. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of silibinin on the colonic expression of the caudal-type homeobox transcription factor (CDX2) an intestine specific tumor suppressor gene and its downstream targets in the colon of rats challenged with 1,2 dimethyl hydrazine (DMH). Rats of groups 1 and 2 were treated as control and silibinin control. Rats under groups 3 and 4 were given DMH (20 mg/kg body weight (b.w.) subcutaneously) once a week for 15 consecutive weeks from the 4th week of the experimental period. In addition, group 4 rats alone were treated with silibinin (50 mg/kg b.w. per os) everyday throughout the study period of 32 weeks. Histological investigation and messenger RNA and protein expression studies were performed in the colonic tissues of experimental rats. Findings of the study revealed that DMH administration significantly decreased the expression of CDX2 and Guanylyl cyclase C (GCC) in the colon of experimental rats. Further the decreased levels of CDX2 protein, colonic mucin content, and increased number of mast cells in the colon of DMH alone-administered rats reflects the onset of carcinogenesis. The pathological changes caused due to CDX2 suppression were attenuated by silibinin supplementation. © The Author(s) 2014.

  4. Experimental infections with Mycoplasma agalactiae identify key factors involved in host-colonization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Baranowski

    Full Text Available Mechanisms underlying pathogenic processes in mycoplasma infections are poorly understood, mainly because of limited sequence similarities with classical, bacterial virulence factors. Recently, large-scale transposon mutagenesis in the ruminant pathogen Mycoplasma agalactiae identified the NIF locus, including nifS and nifU, as essential for mycoplasma growth in cell culture, while dispensable in axenic media. To evaluate the importance of this locus in vivo, the infectivity of two knock-out mutants was tested upon experimental infection in the natural host. In this model, the parental PG2 strain was able to establish a systemic infection in lactating ewes, colonizing various body sites such as lymph nodes and the mammary gland, even when inoculated at low doses. In these PG2-infected ewes, we observed over the course of infection (i the development of a specific antibody response and (ii dynamic changes in expression of M. agalactiae surface variable proteins (Vpma, with multiple Vpma profiles co-existing in the same animal. In contrast and despite a sensitive model, none of the knock-out mutants were able to survive and colonize the host. The extreme avirulent phenotype of the two mutants was further supported by the absence of an IgG response in inoculated animals. The exact role of the NIF locus remains to be elucidated but these data demonstrate that it plays a key role in the infectious process of M. agalactiae and most likely of other pathogenic mycoplasma species as many carry closely related homologs.

  5. Experimental Infections with Mycoplasma agalactiae Identify Key Factors Involved in Host-Colonization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranowski, Eric; Bergonier, Dominique; Sagné, Eveline; Hygonenq, Marie-Claude; Ronsin, Patricia; Berthelot, Xavier; Citti, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Mechanisms underlying pathogenic processes in mycoplasma infections are poorly understood, mainly because of limited sequence similarities with classical, bacterial virulence factors. Recently, large-scale transposon mutagenesis in the ruminant pathogen Mycoplasma agalactiae identified the NIF locus, including nifS and nifU, as essential for mycoplasma growth in cell culture, while dispensable in axenic media. To evaluate the importance of this locus in vivo, the infectivity of two knock-out mutants was tested upon experimental infection in the natural host. In this model, the parental PG2 strain was able to establish a systemic infection in lactating ewes, colonizing various body sites such as lymph nodes and the mammary gland, even when inoculated at low doses. In these PG2-infected ewes, we observed over the course of infection (i) the development of a specific antibody response and (ii) dynamic changes in expression of M. agalactiae surface variable proteins (Vpma), with multiple Vpma profiles co-existing in the same animal. In contrast and despite a sensitive model, none of the knock-out mutants were able to survive and colonize the host. The extreme avirulent phenotype of the two mutants was further supported by the absence of an IgG response in inoculated animals. The exact role of the NIF locus remains to be elucidated but these data demonstrate that it plays a key role in the infectious process of M. agalactiae and most likely of other pathogenic mycoplasma species as many carry closely related homologs. PMID:24699671

  6. [A prospective study of factors influencing on the clinical characteristics of colonic diverticulosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sun Young; Kim, You Sun; Kim, Hyun Tae; Kwon, Sun Ok; Oh, Myoung Ki; Cha, In Hye; Ok, Kyeong Sam; Kwak, Cheol Hun; Kim, Jin Nam; Moon, Jeong Seop

    2013-08-25

    The prevalence of colonic diverticulosis in Korea is increasing in conjunction with the adoption of western dietary pattern, extension of lifespan, and advances in diagnostic modalities. The clinical characteristics of colonic diverticulosis seem to be gradually becoming similar to those of Western societies. Therefore, factors associated with the clinical characteristics of colonic diverticulosis in Korea were investigated. The data of 200 patients diagnosed with colonic diverticulosis using colonoscopy between May 2010 and April 2012 at Inje University Seoul Paik Hospital (Seoul, Korea) were prospectively collected. Clinical parameters acquired through a questionnaire include age, body mass index, waist circumference, exercise, diet, smoking, drinking habits, etc. Correlation between these factors and the clinical features of diverticulosis were analyzed. Mean age of the patients was 54.9±11.9 (range 17-79) years and male to female ratio was 2.2:1. Most diverticula were located on the right side of the colon (83%) and the mean number of diverticulum was 4.07±3.9. Factor associated with the location of diverticulum on the left side was age (p=0.001). There was a positive correlation between the waist circumference and the number of diverticulum (partial correlation coefficient r'=0.143, p=0.047). Diverticulitis occurred more frequently in younger patients than in older patients (p=0.002). Colonic diverticulosis in older patients is found more frequently on the left colon, and the number of diverticulosis is associated with central obesity.

  7. Vaginal colonization of the Streptococcus agalactiae in pregnant woman in Tunisia: risk factors and susceptibility of isolates to antibiotics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ferjani, A; Ben Abdallah, H; Ben Saida, N; Gozzi, C; Boukadida, J

    2006-01-01

    .... We have evaluated prospectively GBS vaginal colonization in pregnant women and we have tried to determine the risk factors of the colonization by GBS and the particularities of the different isolated strains...

  8. Candida spp. airway colonization: A potential risk factor for Acinetobacter baumannii ventilator-associated pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xiaojiang; Zhu, Song; Yan, Dongxing; Chen, Weiping; Chen, Ruilan; Zou, Jian; Yan, Jingdong; Zhang, Xiangdong; Farmakiotis, Dimitrios; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2016-08-01

    This retrospective study was conducted to identify potential risk factors for Acinetobacter baumannii (A. baumannii) ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) and evaluate the association between Candida spp. airway colonization and A. baumannii VAP. Intensive care unit (ICU) patients who were on mechanical ventilation (MV) for ≥48 hours were divided into the following groups: patients with and without Candida spp. airway colonization; colonized patients receiving antifungal treatment or not; patients with A. baumannii VAP and those without VAP. Logistic regression analysis and propensity score matching were used to identify factors independently associated with A. baumannii VAP. Among 618 eligible patients, 264 (43%) had Candida spp. airway colonization and 114 (18%) developed A. baumannii VAP. Along with MV for ≥7 days (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 8.9, 95% confidence intervals [95% CI] 4.9-15.8) and presence of a central venous catheter (aOR 3.2, 95% CI 1.1-9), Candida spp. airway colonization (aOR 2.6, 95% CI 1.6-4.3) was identified as an independent risk factor for A. baumannii VAP. Patients with Candida spp. airway colonization were more likely to develop A. baumannii VAP than non-colonized patients (23% vs 15%, P=.01 and 34% vs. 15%, PCandida spp. airway colonization (43%) and A. baumannii VAP (18%) were common in ICU patients who were on mechanical ventilation for at least 48 hours. Candida spp. airway colonization was an independent risk factor for subsequent A. baumannii VAP. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Clinicopathologic factors identify sporadic mismatch repair-defective colon cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halvarsson, Britta; Anderson, Harald; Domanska, Katarina

    2008-01-01

    were linked to MMR status based on immunostaining and BRAF mutation status.MMR defects were identified in 22.7% of the tumors, with 46 classified as sporadic. When the clinical parameters of age, sex, and proximal tumor location were combined with the morphologic features with the highest relative...... and excluded 61.5% of the tumors from MMR testing. This clinicopathologic index thus successfully selects MMR-defective colon cancers. Udgivelsesdato: 2008-Feb...

  10. P. aeruginosa colonization at ICU admission as a risk factor for developing P. aeruginosa ICU pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fleur P. Paling

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To determine the incidence of P. aeruginosa (PA ICU pneumonia and its independent association with PA colonization at ICU admission. Methods This was a post-hoc analysis of a prospectively collected cohort study. Adult ICU patients with a length of stay of ≥48 h were included and assessed for microbiologically confirmed PA ICU pneumonia. Multivariate survival analysis was performed, including the covariates age, gender, PA colonization at ICU admission, ICU admission specialty and mechanical ventilation at ICU admission, while taking into account the effect of competing risks. Results We included 5093 patients, 2447 (48% were tested for colonization; of those 226 (9.2% were PA colonized at ICU admission. The incidence of PA ICU pneumonia was 1.34% (n = 68. PA colonization was an independent risk factor (subdistribution hazard ratio [SHR] 8.8; 95% confidence interval [CI] 4.9–15.7, as was mechanical ventilation (SHR 5.3, 95% CI 2.7–10.6. Conclusion In this study the incidence of P. aeruginosa ICU pneumonia was 1.34%. Hazard ratios for PA colonized patients compared to non-colonized to develop PA ICU pneumonia were 8.8. The high risk associated with P. aeruginosa colonization for subsequent infection may offer a target for future interventions.

  11. Transcriptional regulation of defence genes and involvement of the WRKY transcription factor in arbuscular mycorrhizal potato root colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallou, Adrien; Declerck, Stéphane; Cranenbrouck, Sylvie

    2012-03-01

    The establishment of arbuscular mycorrhizal associations causes major changes in plant roots and affects significantly the host in term of plant nutrition and resistance against biotic and abiotic stresses. As a consequence, major changes in root transcriptome, especially in plant genes related to biotic stresses, are expected. Potato microarray analysis, followed by real-time quantitative PCR, was performed to detect the wide transcriptome changes induced during the pre-, early and late stages of potato root colonization by Glomus sp. MUCL 41833. The microarray analysis revealed 526 up-regulated and 132 down-regulated genes during the pre-stage, 272 up-regulated and 109 down-regulated genes during the early stage and 734 up-regulated and 122 down-regulated genes during the late stage of root colonization. The most important class of regulated genes was associated to plant stress and in particular to the WRKY transcription factors genes during the pre-stage of root colonization. The expression profiling clearly demonstrated a wide transcriptional change during the pre-, early and late stages of root colonization. It further suggested that the WRKY transcription factor genes are involved in the mechanisms controlling the arbuscular mycorrhizal establishment by the regulation of plant defence genes.

  12. The role of melatonin, sirtuin2 and FoXO1 transcription factor in the aging process of colon in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbulut, Kazime Gonca; Aktas, Sedef Hande; Akbulut, Hakan

    2015-02-01

    The protein family of sirtuins and FoXO1 transcription factor have been shown to play significant roles in the aging process. In this study we aimed to investigate the changes in the levels of SIRT2, NFκB and FoXO1 and oxidative parameters of colonic mucosa during aging, and the effects of exogenous melatonin (MLT). A total of twenty-four young (3-months-old) and aged (24 months old) male Wistar rats, divided into control [1% ethanol--phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), s.c. for 21 days] and melatonin (10 mg kg(-1) MLT 1% ethanol in PBS, s.c. for 21 days) were used in the study. The levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) as a parameter of lipid peroxidation, glutathione, NFkB pathway activation, SIRT2 expression, and FoXO1 transcription factor of colonic mucosa were assayed. The MDA levels and SIRT2 expression in the colonic mucosa were significantly increased in the aged group when compared to the younger group. However, the levels of FoXO1 transcription factor were significantly decreased in the aged group. Melatonin significantly decreased the MDA and SIRT2 expression levels of the colonic mucosa in the aged rats. In conclusion, our findings suggest a suppressive role of melatonin in the aging process of colonic tissue via decreasing SIRT2 expression.

  13. Ketogenic HMGCS2 Is a c-Myc target gene expressed in differentiated cells of human colonic epithelium and down-regulated in colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camarero, Nuria; Mascaró, Cristina; Mayordomo, Cristina; Vilardell, Felip; Haro, Diego; Marrero, Pedro F

    2006-09-01

    HMGCS2, the gene that regulates ketone body production, is expressed in liver and several extrahepatic tissues, such as the colon. In CaCo-2 colonic epithelial cells, the expression of this gene increases with cell differentiation. Accordingly, immunohistochemistry with specific antibodies shows that HMGCS2 is expressed mainly in differentiated cells of human colonic epithelium. Here, we used a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay to study the molecular mechanism responsible for this expression pattern. The assay revealed that HMGCS2 is a direct target of c-Myc, which represses HMGCS2 transcriptional activity. c-Myc transrepression is mediated by blockade of the transactivating activity of Miz-1, which occurs mainly through a Sp1-binding site in the proximal promoter of the gene. Accordingly, the expression of human HMGCS2 is down-regulated in 90% of Myc-dependent colon and rectum tumors. HMGCS2 protein expression is down-regulated preferentially in moderately and poorly differentiated carcinomas. In addition, it is also down-regulated in 80% of small intestine Myc-independent tumors. Based on these findings, we propose that ketogenesis is an undesirable metabolic characteristic of the proliferating cell, which is down-regulated through c-Myc-mediated repression of the key metabolic gene HMGCS2.

  14. Prevalence of maternal group B streptococcal colonization and related risk factors in a Brazilian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander S. Zusman

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of maternal group B Streptococcal (GBS colonization and compare risk factor data related to GBS colonization. A prospective surveillance study of 598 pregnant women was conducted in two socioeconomically diverse maternity hospitals in Ribeirão Preto, Brazil between June and October 1999. Swabs from the lower vagina were obtained between 35 and 37 weeks gestation and cultured on selective media. Risk factor data were obtained by patient interview and chart review. The overall maternal GBS colonization prevalence rate was 17.9%. There was no association of GBS colonization with maternity hospital and no association of GBS colonization with previously identified risk factors, such as age, race, martial status, maternal education, parity, smoking, or alcohol use. There is a relatively high prevalence of maternal GBS colonization in this Brazilian population, although previously-identified-risk factors were not found to be important. This study provides baseline data for the creation of community-based GBS disease prevention protocols.

  15. High Endogenous Expression of Chitinase 3-Like 1 and Excessive Epithelial Proliferation with Colonic Tumor Formation in MOLF/EiJ Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daren Low

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC development is mediated by uncontrolled survival and proliferation of tumor progenitor cells. Using animal models to identify and study host-derived factors that underlie this process can aid interventions in preventing tumor expansion and metastasis. In healthy steady states in humans and mice (e.g. C57BL/6 strain, colonic Chitinase 3-like 1 (CHI3L1 gene expression is undetectable. However, this expression can be induced during intestinal inflammation and tumorigenesis where CHI3L1 plays an important role in tissue restitution and cell proliferation. Here, we show that a wild-derived mouse strain MOLF/EiJ expresses high levels of colonic epithelial CHI3L1 at the steady state due to several nucleotide polymorphisms in the proximal promoter regions of the CHI3L1 gene. Interestingly, these mice spontaneously developed polypoid nodules in the colon with signs of immune cell infiltrations at steady state. The CHI3L1 positive colonic epithelial cells were highly proliferative and exhibited malignant transformation and expansion when exposed in vivo to azoxymethane, one of the well-known colonic carcinogens.

  16. Different effects of ERβ and TROP2 expression in Chinese patients with early-stage colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yu-Jing; Wang, Guo-Qiang; Lu, Zhen-Hai; Zhang, Lin; Li, Ji-Bin; Wu, Xiao-Jun; Ding, Pei-Rong; Ou, Qing-Jian; Zhang, Mei-Fang; Jiang, Wu; Pan, Zhi-Zhong; Wan, De-Sen

    2012-12-01

    Estrogen receptor beta (ERβ) and TROP2 expressed in colon carcinoma and might play an important role there. We explored the relationship of ERβ and TROP2 expression with the prognosis of early-stage colon cancer. ERβ and TROP2 levels were assessed by immunohistochemistry in normal mucosa and tumoral tissues from 220 Chinese patients with T(3)N(0)M(0) (stage IIa) and T(4)N(0)M(0) (stage IIb) colon cancer in the Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, who underwent curative surgical resection between 1995 and 2003. The Cox proportional hazards regression model was applied to analyze the overall survival (OS) data, and the ROC curve, Kaplan-Meier estimate, log rank test, and Jackknife method were used to show the effect of ERβ and TROP2 expression at different stages of cancer. The 5-year survival rates were not significantly different between the patients with stage IIa and stage IIb colon cancer (83 vs. 80 %, respectively). The high expression of ERβ was related to decreasing OS in stage IIa and stage IIb colon cancer, while the high expression of TROP2 was related to decreasing OS in stage IIb colon cancer. The expression of ERβ and TROP2 has tumor-suppressive and tumor-promoting effect in stage IIa and stage IIb colon cancer, respectively.

  17. Dietary fat and risk of colon and rectal cancer with aberrant MLH1 expression, APC or KRAS genes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijenberg, M.P.; Luchtenborg, M.; Goeij, A.F. de; Brink, M.; Muijen, G.N.P. van; Bruine, A.P. de; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate baseline fat intake and the risk of colon and rectal tumors lacking MLH1 (mutL homolog 1, colon cancer, nonpolyposis type 2) repair gene expression and harboring mutations in the APC (adenomatous polyposis coli) tumor suppressor gene and in the KRAS (v-Ki-ras2 Kirsten rat

  18. Hydrocarbon degradation, plant colonization and gene expression of alkane degradation genes by endophytic Enterobacter ludwigii strains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yousaf, Sohail [AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, Bioresources Unit, A-2444 Seibersdorf (Austria); Afzal, Muhammad [AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, Bioresources Unit, A-2444 Seibersdorf (Austria); National Institute for Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering (NIBGE), Faisalabad (Pakistan); Reichenauer, Thomas G. [AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, Environmental Resources and Technologies Unit, A-2444 Seibersdorf (Austria); Brady, Carrie L. [Forestry and Agricultural Biotechnology Institute, Department of Microbiology and Plant Pathology, University of Pretoria, Pretoria (South Africa); Sessitsch, Angela, E-mail: angela.sessitsch@ait.ac.at [AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, Bioresources Unit, A-2444 Seibersdorf (Austria)

    2011-10-15

    The genus Enterobacter comprises a range of beneficial plant-associated bacteria showing plant growth promotion. Enterobacter ludwigii belongs to the Enterobacter cloacae complex and has been reported to include human pathogens but also plant-associated strains with plant beneficial capacities. To assess the role of Enterobacter endophytes in hydrocarbon degradation, plant colonization, abundance and expression of CYP153 genes in different plant compartments, three plant species (Italian ryegrass, birdsfoot trefoil and alfalfa) were grown in sterile soil spiked with 1% diesel and inoculated with three endophytic E. ludwigii strains. Results showed that all strains were capable of hydrocarbon degradation and efficiently colonized the rhizosphere and plant interior. Two strains, ISI10-3 and BRI10-9, showed highest degradation rates of diesel fuel up to 68% and performed best in combination with Italian ryegrass and alfalfa. All strains expressed the CYP153 gene in all plant compartments, indicating an active role in degradation of diesel in association with plants. - Highlights: > E. ludwigii strains efficiently colonized plants in a non-sterile soil environment. > E. ludwigii strains efficiently expressed alkane degradation genes in plants. > E. ludwigii efficiently degraded alkane contaminations and promoted plant growth. > E. ludwigii interacted more effectively with Italian ryegrass than with other plants. > Degradation activity varied with plant and microbial genotype as well as with time. - Enterobacter ludwigii strains belonging to the E. cloacae complex are able to efficiently degrade alkanes when associated with plants and to promote plant growth.

  19. Differences in protein expression and gene amplification of cyclins between colon and rectal adenocarcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aamodt, Rolf; Jonsdottir, Kristin; Andersen, Solveig Norheim; Bondi, Johan; Bukholm, Geir; Bukholm, Ida R K

    2009-01-01

    Adenocarcinomas of rectum and colon may be different with regard to the cellular biological basis for cancer development. A material of 246 rectal cancers removed surgically at Akershus University Hospital in the years 1992-2000 was investigated and was compared to a material of 219 colon cancers operated on at Akershus University Hospital during the years 1988, 1990 and 1997-2000. There were highly significant differences between the rectal and the colon cancers in the protein expression of cyclin D1, cyclin D3, cyclin E, nuclear beta-catenin, and c-Myc and in gene amplification of cyclin A2, cyclin B1, cyclin D1, and cyclin E. Gene amplification and protein expression in the rectal cancers correlated significantly for the cyclins B1, D3, and E. A statistically significant relation was observed between overexpression of cyclin A2 and local relapse of rectal carcinomas, as higher expression of cyclin A2 was associated with lower local recurrence rate.

  20. Differences in Protein Expression and Gene Amplification of Cyclins between Colon and Rectal Adenocarcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolf Aamodt

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Adenocarcinomas of rectum and colon may be different with regard to the cellular biological basis for cancer development. A material of 246 rectal cancers removed surgically at Akershus University Hospital in the years 1992–2000 was investigated and was compared to a material of 219 colon cancers operated on at Akershus University Hospital during the years 1988, 1990 and 1997–2000. There were highly significant differences between the rectal and the colon cancers in the protein expression of cyclin D1, cyclin D3, cyclin E, nuclear β-catenin, and c-Myc and in gene amplification of cyclin A2, cyclin B1, cyclin D1, and cyclin E. Gene amplification and protein expression in the rectal cancers correlated significantly for the cyclins B1, D3, and E. A statistically significant relation was observed between overexpression of cyclin A2 and local relapse of rectal carcinomas, as higher expression of cyclin A2 was associated with lower local recurrence rate.

  1. [Effect of dietary fiber in the quantitative expression of butyrate receptor GPR43 in rats colon].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corte Osorio, L Y; Martínez Flores, H E; Ortiz Alvarado, R

    2011-01-01

    Short chain fatty acids (SCFA) acetate, propionate and butyrate are the major anions produced by the bacterial fermentation of dietary fiber (DF) in colon. Recently, butyrate has been recently studied because is important to maintain colonic functions and because it has been related with a protective effect in colorectal cancer, which is mainly, explained by its potential to regulate gene expression by inhibiting enzyme histonedeacetylase (HDAC). Several investigationsshown that SCFAreceptor GPR43 is involved insignal transduction mechanisms once they bind to ligands such as butyrate to generate different physiological effects in colonocytes. Determine if dietary fiber consumption from nopal (Opuntia ficus I.) containing a ratio of soluble-insoluble fiber 40/60, has a direct influence on the quantitative expression of butyrate-specific receptor GPR43. Wistar rats were fed with four different diets formulated at different concentrations of dietary fiber of 0, 5, 15 and 25% of dietary fiber from opuntia, respectively. The results shown an increase in the expression of GPR43 (93.1%) when rats was fed with a 5% fiber diet, using β-actin as a reference gene. The results of this investigation will contribute to determinate the relation of diet with intestinal health for the purpose of expanding the knowledge of butyric acid on colonic functions.

  2. Clinical and sociodemographic factors associated with colon surveillance among patients with a history of colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rulyak, Stephen J; Mandelson, Margaret T; Brentnall, Teresa A; Rutter, Carolyn M; Wagner, Edward H

    2004-02-01

    Substantial variability in the use of colon surveillance among colorectal cancer survivors has been reported. This study sought to examine trends in the use of colon surveillance among patients who have had colorectal cancer and to investigate factors associated with utilization. Health maintenance organization enrollees with a diagnosis of local or regional colon or rectal cancer between January 1993 and December 1999 were studied. Receipt of a colon examination by colonoscopy or by flexible sigmoidoscopy, together with barium contrast radiography of the colon was determined from automated clinical records, and rates of colon surveillance were estimated by using survival analysis. A total of 1002 patients with a diagnosis of colorectal cancer met inclusion criteria for the study. Colon examinations were performed in 61% of patients within 18 months of diagnosis and in 80% of patients within 5 years of diagnosis. The median time from diagnosis to first colon surveillance examination (14 months) was unchanged over the study period, but the interval between first and second surveillance examinations increased by 17 months (pcancer (relative risk=0.80; 95% CI[0.66, 0.97]) were less likely to undergo surveillance. Higher socioeconomic status (relative risk=1.29; 95% CI[1.03, 1.61]) and being married (relative risk=1.27; 95% CI[1.05, 1.53]) were associated with greater utilization. There was lower utilization among African American patients (relative risk=0.70; p=0.14) and increased utilization among other minorities (relative risk=1.47; p=0.06). There is substantial variability in the use of colon examination for surveillance in patients with a history of colorectal cancer, and clinical and sociodemographic factors appear to influence the likelihood of surveillance.

  3. Increased expression of CD133 and reduced dystroglycan expression are strong predictors of poor outcome in colon cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coco Claudio

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Expression levels of CD133, a cancer stem cell marker, and of the α-subunit of the dystroglycan (α-DG complex, have been previously reported to be altered in colorectal cancers. Methods Expression levels of CD133 and α-DG were assessed by immunohistochemistry in a series of colon cancers and their prognostic significance was evaluated. Results Scattered cells positive for CD133 were rarely detected at the bases of the crypts in normal colonic mucosa while in cancer cells the median percentage of positive cells was 5% (range 0–80. A significant correlation was observed with pT parameter and tumor stage but not with tumor grade and N status. Recurrence and death from disease were significantly more frequent in CD133-high expressing tumors and Kaplan-Meier curves showed a significant separation between high vs low expressor groups for both disease-free (p = 0.002 and overall (p = 0.008 survival. Expression of α-DG was reduced in a significant fraction of tumors but low α-DG staining did not correlate with any of the classical clinical-pathological parameters. Recurrence and death from the disease were significantly more frequent in α-DG-low expressing tumors and Kaplan-Meier curves showed a significant separation between high vs low expressor tumors for both disease-free (p = 0.02 and overall (p = 0.02 survival. Increased expression of CD133, but not loss of α-DG, confirmed to be an independent prognostic parameters at a multivariate analysis associated with an increased risk of recurrence (RR = 2.4; p = 0.002 and death (RR = 2.3; p = 0.003. Conclusions Loss of α-DG and increased CD133 expression are frequent events in human colon cancer and evaluation of CD133 expression could help to identify high-risk colon cancer patients.

  4. Risk factors for fecal colonization with multiple distinct strains of Escherichia coli among long-term care facility residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lautenbach, Ebbing; Tolomeo, Pam; Black, Nicole; Maslow, Joel N

    2009-05-01

    Of 49 long-term care facility residents, 21 (43%) were colonized with 2 or more distinct strains of Escherichia coli. There were no significant risk factors for colonization with multiple strains of E. coli. These results suggest that future efforts to efficiently identify the diversity of colonizing strains will be challenging.

  5. Ulcerative colitis induces changes on the expression of the endocannabinoid system in the human colonic tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Marquéz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent studies suggest potential roles of the endocannabinoid system in gastrointestinal inflammation. Although cannabinoid CB(2 receptor expression is increased in inflammatory disorders, the presence and function of the remaining proteins of the endocannabinoid system in the colonic tissue is not well characterized. METHODOLOGY: Cannabinoid CB(1 and CB(2 receptors, the enzymes for endocannabinoid biosynthesis DAGLalpha, DAGLbeta and NAPE-PLD, and the endocannabinoid-degradating enzymes FAAH and MAGL were analysed in both acute untreated active ulcerative pancolitis and treated quiescent patients in comparison with healthy human colonic tissue by immunocytochemistry. Analyses were carried out according to clinical criteria, taking into account the severity at onset and treatment received. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Western blot and immunocytochemistry indicated that the endocannabinoid system is present in the colonic tissue, but it shows a differential distribution in epithelium, lamina propria, smooth muscle and enteric plexi. Quantification of epithelial immunoreactivity showed an increase of CB(2 receptor, DAGLalpha and MAGL expression, mainly in mild and moderate pancolitis patients. In contrast, NAPE-PLD expression decreased in moderate and severe pancolitis patients. During quiescent pancolitis, CB(1, CB(2 and DAGLalpha expression dropped, while NAPE-PLD expression rose, mainly in patients treated with 5-ASA or 5-ASA+corticosteroids. The number of immune cells containing MAGL and FAAH in the lamina propria increased in acute pancolitis patients, but dropped after treatment. CONCLUSIONS: Endocannabinoids signaling pathway, through CB(2 receptor, may reduce colitis-associated inflammation suggesting a potential drugable target for the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases.

  6. Transport of d-Serine via the Amino Acid Transporter ATB0,+ Expressed in the Colon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatanaka, Takahiro; Huang, Wei; Nakanishi, Takeo; Bridges, Christy C.; Smith, Sylvia B.; Prasad, Puttur D.; Ganapathy, Malliga E.; Ganapathy, Vadivel

    2015-01-01

    d-Serine, synthesized endogenously in the brain, is an important modulator of glutamatergic neurotransmission. Since colonic bacteria produce d-serine, we asked the question whether there are transport mechanisms in the colon that might make this exogenously produced d-serine available to the host. Here we identify for the first time an amino acid transporter in the intestine for high-affinity active transport of d-serine. This transporter, called ATB0,+, is a Na+- and Cl−-coupled transporter for L-enantiomers of neutral and cationic amino acids. Here we demonstrate that ATB0,+ is also capable of mediating the Na+- and Cl−-coupled transport of d-serine. The affinity of ATB0,+ for l-serine and d-serine is similar, the Kt value for the two enantiomers being ~150 μM. In addition to d-serine, ATB0,+ transports d-alanine, d-methionine, d-leucine, and d-tryptophan. However, several other neutral and cationic amino acids that are transportable substrates for ATB0,+ as L-enantiomers are not transported when presented as D-enantiomers. ATB0,+ is expressed in the intestinal tract, interestingly not in the proximal intestine but in the distal intestine. Expression is most predominant in the colon where the transporter is localized to the luminal membrane of colonocytes, making this transporter uniquely suitable for absorption of bacteria-derived d-serine. PMID:11846403

  7. Early responses to Nod factors and mycorrhizal colonization in a non-nodulating Phaseolus vulgaris mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenas, Luis; Alemán, Emilia; Nava, Noreide; Santana, Olivia; Sánchez, Federico; Quinto, Carmen

    2006-03-01

    Legumes can acquire nitrogen through a symbiotic interaction with rhizobial bacteria. The initiation of this process is determined by a molecular dialogue between the two partners. Legume roots exude flavonoids that induce the expression of the bacterial nodulation genes, which encode proteins involved in the synthesis and secretion of signals called Nod factors (NFs). NFs signal back to the plant root and trigger several responses, leading to bacterial invasion and nodule formation. Here, we describe the molecular and cellular characterization of a Phaseolus vulgaris non-nodulating mutant (NN-mutant). Root hair cells of the NN-mutant plant respond with swelling and branching when inoculated with Rhizobium etli, albeit without curling induction. Furthermore, neither initiation of cell division in the outer cortex, nor entrapment of bacteria nor infection thread formation was observed. Both the bean wild-type and the NN-mutant responded with elevated intracellular calcium changes in the root hairs. Although the NN-mutant is deficient in early nodulin gene expression when inoculated with R. etli, it can be effectively colonized by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (Glomus intraradices). Our data indicate that the P. vulgaris NN-mutant is not blocked at the NFs early perception stage, but at later downstream stages between Ca(2+) signaling and early nodulin induction. This supports the idea that both microsymbionts are perceived and trigger different downstream pathways in the host plant.

  8. Cloning and identification of tissue-specific expression of KCNN4 splice variants in rat colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmeyer, Christian; Rahner, Christoph; Yang, Youshan; Sigworth, Frederick J; Binder, Henry J; Rajendran, Vazhaikkurichi M

    2010-08-01

    KCNN4 channels that provide the driving force for cAMP- and Ca(2+)-induced anion secretion are present in both apical and basolateral membranes of the mammalian colon. However, only a single KCNN4 has been cloned. This study was initiated to identify whether both apical and basolateral KCNN4 channels are encoded by the same or different isoforms. Reverse transcriptase-PCR (RT-PCR), real-time quantitative-PCR (RT-QPCR), and immunofluorescence studies were used to clone and identify tissue-specific expression of KCNN4 isoforms. Three distinct KCNN4 cDNAs that are designated as KCNN4a, KCNN4b, and KCNN4c encoding 425, 424, and 395 amino acid proteins, respectively, were isolated from the rat colon. KCNN4a differs from KCNN4b at both the nucleotide and the amino acid level with distinct 628 bp at the 3'-untranslated region and an additional glutamine at position 415, respectively. KCNN4c differs from KCNN4b by lacking the second exon that encodes a 29 amino acid motif. KCNN4a and KCNN4b/c are identified as smooth muscle- and epithelial cell-specific transcripts, respectively. KCNN4b and KCNN4c transcripts likely encode basolateral (40 kDa) and apical (37 kDa) membrane proteins in the distal colon, respectively. KCNN4c, which lacks the S2 transmembrane segment, requires coexpression of a large conductance K(+) channel beta-subunit for plasma membrane expression. The KCNN4 channel blocker TRAM-34 inhibits KCNN4b- and KCNN4c-mediated (86)Rb (K(+) surrogate) efflux with an apparent inhibitory constant of 0.6 +/- 0.1 and 7.8 +/- 0.4 muM, respectively. We conclude that apical and basolateral KCNN4 K(+) channels that regulate K(+) and anion secretion are encoded by distinct isoforms in colonic epithelial cells.

  9. Gene expression patterns and dynamics of the colonization of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. by highly virulent and weakly virulent strains of Fusarium oxysporum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan eNiño-Sánchez

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of root and hypocotyl colonization, and the gene expression patterns of several fungal virulence factors and plant defense factors have been analyzed and compared in the interaction of two F. oxysporum f. sp. phaseoli strains displaying clear differences in virulence, with a susceptible common bean cultivar. The growth of the two strains on the root surface and the colonization of the root was cuantitatively similar although the highly virulent strain was more efficient reaching the central root cylinder. The main differences between both strains were found in the temporal and spatial dynamics of crown root and hypocotyl colonization. The increase of fungal biomass in the crown root was considerably larger for the highly virulent strain, which, after an initial stage of global colonization of both the vascular cylinder and the parenchymal cells, restricted its growth to the newly differentiated xylem vessels. The weakly virulent strain was a much slower and less efficient colonizer of the xylem vessels, showing also growth in the intercellular spaces of the parenchyma. Most of the virulence genes analyzed showed similar expression patterns in both strains, except SIX1, SIX6 and the gene encoding the transcription factor FTF1, which were highly upregulated in root crown and hypocotyl. The response induced in the infected plant showed interesting differences for both strains. The weakly virulent strain induced an early and strong transcription of the PR1 gene, involved in SAR response, while the highly virulent strain preferentially induced the early expression of the ethylene responsive factor ERF2.

  10. Validation of a quantitative 12-multigene expression assay (Oncotype DX® Colon Cancer Assay in Korean patients with stage II colon cancer: implication of ethnic differences contributing to differences in gene expression

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    Jeong DH

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Duck Hyoun Jeong,1 Woo Ram Kim,1 Byung Soh Min,1 Young Wan Kim,2 Mi Kyung Song,3 Nam Kyu Kim1 1Department of Surgery, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, 2Department of Surgery, Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju, 3Department of Research Affairs, Biostatistics Collaboration Unit, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea Purpose: To evaluate the Recurrence Score® of the quantitative 12-multigene expression assay and to determine risk groups based on the continuous Recurrence Score® in Korean patients.Method: A total of 95 patients with pathological T3N0 tumors and mismatch repair-proficient tumors were enrolled. The Recurrence Score® was used to classify risk groups (low risk, <30; intermediate risk, 30–40; high risk, ≥41.Results: Fifty-four patients (56.8% were aged over 70 years. There were 49 men (51.6% and 56 cases of right-sided colon cancer (58.9%. Eight cases (8.4% had well-differentiated tumors, and 86 cases (90.5% showed moderate differentiation. Only one case (1.1% had a poorly differentiated tumor. Three patients (3.2% had lymphovascular invasion. Sixty-one patients were identified as low risk (64.2% and 34 patients as intermediate risk (35.8%. There were no high-risk patients. Although not significant, the 3-year recurrence risk increased with the Recurrence Score®.Conclusion: Distribution patterns of risk groups based on the Recurrence Score®, particularly the absence of a high-risk group, were different from the prior validation studies. These findings suggest that ethnic differences between Koreans and Western patients are potential contributing factors for different gene expressions in the quantitative 12-multigene expression assay. Keywords: colonic neoplasms, gene expression, adjuvant chemotherapy, ethnic groups

  11. Risk factors for vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus colonization in hematologic patients

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    Mioljević Vesna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Vancomycin-resistant Enterococci (VRE is one of the most important hospital pathogens. The aim of the study was to evaluate VRE colonization in patients hospitalized at the Hematology Intensive Care Unit, as well as the associated risk factors. Methods. A prospective cohort study involved 70 patients hospitalized at the Intensive Care Unit (ICU, Clinic for Hematology, Clinical Center of Serbia, Belgrade, during 3 months. Baseline demographic data, data about antibiotic usage and other risk factors for VRE colonization during the present and previous hospitalizations (within 6 months were recorded for each patient using the questionnaire. Feces or rectal swab was collected for culture from patients on admission and at discharge in case when VRE was not isolated on admission. Enterococci were isolated by standard microbiological methods. Isolate sensitivity was tested by disk-diffusion test using 30 μg/mL (BBL Vancomycin plates according to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI standard. Results. Analysing results showed that 7% of the patients had been already colonized with VRE upon ICU admission. The rate of VRE colonization during present hospitalization was 41.5%. Univariate logistic regression demonstrated the statistically significant differences in diagnosis, length of present stay, use of aminoglycosides and piperacillin/tazobactam in present hospitalization, duration of use of carbapenem and piperacillin/ tazobactam in present hospitalization between the VREcolonized and non-colonized patients. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML, use of carbapenem in previous hospitalization and duration of use of piperacillin/tazobactam in present hospitalization were independent risk factors for VRE-colonized patients according to multivariate logistic regression. Conclusion. VRE colonization rate was high among the patients admitted to hematology ICU. Rational use of antibiotics and active surveillance may be helpful

  12. The clinical significances of the abnormal expressions of Piwil1 and Piwil2 in colonic adenoma and adenocarcinoma

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    Wang HL

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Hai-Ling Wang,1 Bei-Bei Chen,1 Xin-Guang Cao,1 Jin Wang,2 Xiu-Feng Hu,1 Xiao-Qian Mu,1 Xiao-Bing Chen1 1The Affiliated Cancer Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Henan Cancer Hospital, Zhengzhou, People’s Republic of China; 2The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, People’s Republic of China Objective: The objective of the present investigation was to study the clinical significances of the abnormal expressions of Piwil1 and Piwil2 protein in colonic adenoma and adenocarcinoma.Methods: This study had applied immunohistochemical method to detect 45 cases of tissues adjacent to carcinoma (distance to cancerous tissue was above 5 cm, 41 cases of colonic adenoma and 92 cases of colon cancer tissues, and their Piwil1 and Piwil2 protein expression levels.Analysis: The correlation of both expression and its relationship with clinicopathological features of colon cancer was analyzed.Results: Positive expression rates of Piwil1 in tissues adjacent to carcinoma, colonic adenoma, and colon cancer were 11.1% (5/45, 53.7% (22/41, and 80.4% (74/92, respectively; the expression rates increased, and the comparisons between each two groups were statistically significant (P<0.05. In each group, the positive expression rates of Piwil2 were 24.4% (11/45 cases, 75.6% (31/41 cases, and 92.4% (85/92 cases; expression rates increased, and the comparisons between each two groups were statistically significant (P<0.05. Piwil1 expression and the correlation of the degree of differentiation, TNM stage, and lymph node metastasis were statistically significant (P<0.05. Piwil2 expression and the correlation of the degree of differentiation, tumor node metastasis (TNM stage, and lymph node metastasis had no statistical significance (P>0.05. In colon cancer tissue, Piwil1 and Piwil2 expressions were positively correlated (r=0.262, P<0.05.Conclusion: The results showed that the abnormal expression of Piwil1 and Piwil2 might play an important role in

  13. NF-kappaB, p38 MAPK and JNK are highly expressed and active in the stroma of human colonic adenomatous polyps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hardwick, J. C.; van den Brink, G. R.; Offerhaus, G. J.; van Deventer, S. J.; Peppelenbosch, M. P.

    2001-01-01

    The factors that govern the progression from colonic adenomatous polyp to colon cancer are poorly understood. The observation that NSAIDs act as chemopreventative agents and reduce the size of colonic polyps suggests the involvement of inflammatory signalling, but inflammatory signalling in colonic

  14. Differential gene expression in colon cancer of the caecum versus the sigmoid and rectosigmoid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkenkamp-Demtroder, K; Olesen, S H; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt

    2005-01-01

    as carbonic anhydrases (II, IV, VII) showed side specific expression and were downregulated in left sided tumours whereas teratocarcinoma growth factor and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) were upregulated in left sided adenocarcinomas. Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed differences in side specific expression...

  15. Influences of combination of chemotherapy and autophagy inhibitor on the calreticulin expression in colon cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui-qing PENG

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To investigate the influence of chemotherapy combined with autophagy inhibitor on apoptosis and calreticulin (CRT expression on colonic cancer cells. Methods  The colon cancer cells HCT116 were taken as the target in the present study. The inhibition rates (IC50 of chemotherapeutics oxaliplatin, 5-Fu and SN-38 were assessed by MTT assay. The changes in CRT expression on the membrane of HCT116 and apoptosis were determined with flow cytometry before and after treatment with chemotherapeutics. CRT location in HCT116 was detected by fluorescent immunoassay before and after treatment with chemotherapeutic agents. The influence on HCT116 autophagy was determined by Western blotting after treatment with these chemotherapeutic agents. The changes in CRT expression on HCT116 membrane and apoptosis were determined with flow cytometry before and after treatment with the chemotherapeutics combined with autophagy inhibitor chloroquine (CQ. Results  The ratio of apoptosis and membrane expression of CRT were elevated 12 hours after treatment with Oxaliplatin, 5-Fu and SN38, but without statistical significance. Fluorescent immunoassay showed a transposition of CRT from cytoplasm to the membrane after oxaliplatin treatment. Western blotting revealed that oxaliplatin, 5Fu and SN38 induced autophagy of HCT116 cells, and the autophagy was inhibited by the addition of CQ. Flow cytometric analysis indicated that the percentages of annexin V+ cells and membrane expression of CRT were higher after treatment with the chemotherapy agents combined with CQ. The upregulation of CRT expression on membrane was obviously higher after treatment with oxaliplatin combined with CQ than that before the treatment with these agents (P=0.027. Conclusion  Oxaliplatin combined with CQ may increase the apoptosis rate of HCT116 cells and upregulate CRT expression in the membrane. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2016.04.03

  16. Colonization of porcine small intestine by Escherichia coli: colonization and adhesion factors of pig enteropathogens that lack K88.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaacson, R E; Nagy, B; Moon, H W

    1977-04-01

    The colonizing and adhesive attributes of enterotoxigenic acapsular and/or nonpiliated mutants from K88-negative enteropathogenic Escherichia coli strains were compared with their capsulated and piliated parents (parents were piliated when grown in vitro and in vivo). Acapsular, nonpiliated mutants from three different colonizing strains of enteropathogenic E. coli lost their ability to colonize the ileum of newborn pigs. Acapsular, piliated and capsular, nonpiliated mutants were derived from one of the parental strains (987), and both mutants lacked the ability to colonize the ileum of pigs. The only mutants available from a fourth strain (431) were acapsular and piliated, and they colonized as well as their parents. These data indicate that both capsule and pili are involved in colonization by strain 987. In contrast, capsule is not required for colonization by strain 431, but pili may be.

  17. Clinical Features and Factors Associated With Surgical Treatment in Patients With Complicated Colonic Diverticulitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paik, Pill Sun

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Colonic diverticulitis is uncommon in Korea, but the incidence is rapidly increasing nowadays. The clinical features and the factors associated with complications of diverticulitis are important for properly treating the disease. Methods A retrospective review of the medical records of 225 patients that were prospectively collected between October 2007 and September 2016 was conducted. Results Diverticulitis was detected mainly in men and women aged 30 to 50 years. Diverticulitis more frequently affected the right colon (n = 194, 86.2%), but age was higher in case of left colonic involvement (42 years vs. 57 years, P diverticulitis. In the multivariate analysis, a risk factor for complicated diverticulitis was left colonic involvement (P diverticulitis, age over 50 was the only significant risk factor for surgical treatment (P = 0.024; RR, 19.350; 95% CI, 1.474–254.023). Conclusion In patients over 50 years of age with left colonic diverticulitis, a preventive colectomy should be reconsidered as one of the options for treatment. PMID:29159165

  18. Patulin is a cultivar-dependent aggressiveness factor favouring the colonization of apples by Penicillium expansum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snini, Selma P; Tannous, Joanna; Heuillard, Pauline; Bailly, Sylviane; Lippi, Yannick; Zehraoui, Enric; Barreau, Christian; Oswald, Isabelle P; Puel, Olivier

    2016-08-01

    The blue mould decay of apples is caused by Penicillium expansum and is associated with contamination by patulin, a worldwide regulated mycotoxin. Recently, a cluster of 15 genes (patA-patO) involved in patulin biosynthesis was identified in P. expansum. blast analysis revealed that patL encodes a Cys6 zinc finger regulatory factor. The deletion of patL caused a drastic decrease in the expression of all pat genes, leading to an absence of patulin production. Pathogenicity studies performed on 13 apple varieties indicated that the PeΔpatL strain could still infect apples, but the intensity of symptoms was weaker compared with the wild-type strain. A lower growth rate was observed in the PeΔpatL strain when this strain was grown on nine of the 13 apple varieties tested. In the complemented PeΔpatL:patL strain, the ability to grow normally in apple and the production of patulin were restored. Our results clearly demonstrate that patulin is not indispensable in the initiation of the disease, but acts as a cultivar-dependent aggressiveness factor for P. expansum. This conclusion was strengthened by the fact that the addition of patulin to apple infected by the PeΔpatL mutant restored the normal fungal colonization in apple. © 2015 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  19. ERCC1 and TS Expression as Prognostic and Predictive Biomarkers in Metastatic Colon Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choueiri, Michel B; Shen, John Paul; Gross, Andrew M; Huang, Justin K; Ideker, Trey; Fanta, Paul

    2015-01-01

    In patients with metastatic colon cancer, response to first line chemotherapy is a strong predictor of overall survival (OS). Currently, oncologists lack diagnostic tests to determine which chemotherapy regimen offers the greatest chance for response in an individual patient. Here we present the results of gene expression analysis for two genes, ERCC1 and TS, measured with the commercially available ResponseDX: Colon assay (Response Genetics, Los Angeles, CA) in 41 patients with de novo metastatic colon cancer diagnosed between July 2008 and August 2013 at the University of California, San Diego. In addition ERCC1 and TS expression levels as determined by RNAseq and survival data for patients in TCGA were downloaded from the TCGA data portal. We found that patients with low expression of ERCC1 (n = 33) had significantly longer median OS (36.0 vs. 10.1 mo, HR 0.29, 95% CI .095 to .84, log-rank p = 9.0x10-6) and median time to treatment to failure (TTF) following first line chemotherapy (14.1 vs. 2.4 mo, HR 0.17, 95% CI 0.048 to 0.58, log-rank p = 5.3x10-4) relative to those with high expression (n = 4). After accounting for the covariates age, sex, tumor grade and ECOG performance status in a Cox proportional hazard model the association of low ERCC1 with longer OS (HR 0.18, 95% CI 0.14 to 0.26, p = 0.0448) and TTF (HR 0.16, 95% CI 0.14 to 0.21, p = 0.0053) remained significant. Patients with low TS expression (n = 29) had significantly longer median OS (36.0 vs. 14.8 mo, HR 0.25, 95% CI 0.074 to 0.82, log-rank p = 0.022) relative to those with high expression (n = 12). The combined low expression of ERCC1/TS was predictive of response in patients treated with FOLFOX (40% vs. 91%, RR 2.3, Fisher's exact test p = 0.03, n = 27), but not with FOLFIRI (71% vs. 71%, RR 1.0, Fisher's exact test p = 1, n = 14). Overall, these findings suggest that measurement of ERCC1 and TS expression has potential clinical utility in managing patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.

  20. Lebein, a snake venom disintegrin, suppresses human colon cancer cells proliferation and tumor-induced angiogenesis through cell cycle arrest, apoptosis induction and inhibition of VEGF expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakraoui, Ons; Marcinkiewicz, Cezary; Aloui, Zohra; Othman, Houcemeddine; Grépin, Renaud; Haoues, Meriam; Essafi, Makram; Srairi-Abid, Najet; Gasmi, Ammar; Karoui, Habib; Pagès, Gilles; Essafi-Benkhadir, Khadija

    2017-01-01

    Lebein, is an heterodimeric disintegrin isolated from Macrovipera lebetina snake venom that was previously characterized as an inhibitor of ADP-induced platelet aggregation. In this study, we investigated the effect of Lebein on the p53-dependent growth of human colon adenocarcinoma cell lines. We found that Lebein significantly inhibited LS174 (p53wt), HCT116 (p53wt), and HT29 (p53mut) colon cancer cell viability by inducing cell cycle arrest through the modulation of expression levels of the tumor suppression factor p53, cell cycle regulating proteins cyclin D1, CDK2, CDK4, retinoblastoma (Rb), CDK1, and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p21 and p27. Interestingly, Lebein-induced apoptosis of colon cancer cells was dependent on their p53 status. Thus, in LS174 cells, cell death was associated with PARP cleavage and the activation of caspases 3 and 8 while in HCT116 cells, Lebein induced caspase-independent apoptosis through increased expression of apoptosis inducing factor (AIF). In LS174 cells, Lebein triggers the activation of the MAPK ERK1/2 pathway through induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS). It also decreased cell adhesion and migration to fibronectin through down regulation of α5β1 integrin. Moreover, Lebein significantly reduced the expression of two angiogenesis stimulators, Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) and Neuropilin 1 (NRP1). It inhibited the VEGF-induced neovascularization process in the quail embryonic CAM system and blocked the development of human colon adenocarcinoma in nude mice. Overall, our work indicates that Lebein may be useful to design a new therapy against colon cancer. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Morpholino-Mediated Isoform Modulation of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-2 (VEGFR2) Reduces Colon Cancer Xenograft Growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stagg, Brian C., E-mail: briancstagg@gmail.com; Uehara, Hironori; Lambert, Nathan; Rai, Ruju; Gupta, Isha; Radmall, Bryce; Bates, Taylor; Ambati, Balamurali K. [John A Moran Eye Center, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, 65 Mario Capecchi Drive, Salt Lake City, UT 84132 (United States)

    2014-11-26

    Angiogenesis plays a key role in tumor growth. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a pro-angiogenic that is involved in tumor angiogenesis. When VEGF binds to membrane-bound vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (mVEGFR2), it promotes angiogenesis. Through alternative polyadenylation, VEGFR2 is also expressed in a soluble form (sVEGFR2). sVEGFR2 sequesters VEGF and is therefore anti-angiogenic. The aim of this study was to show that treatment with a previously developed and reported antisense morpholino oligomer that shifts expression from mVEGFR2 to sVEGFR2 would lead to reduced tumor vascularization and growth in a murine colon cancer xenograft model. Xenografts were generated by implanting human HCT-116 colon cancer cells into the flanks of NMRI nu/nu mice. Treatment with the therapeutic morpholino reduced both tumor growth and tumor vascularization. Because the HCT-116 cells used for the experiments did not express VEGFR2 and because the treatment morpholino targeted mouse rather than human VEGFR2, it is likely that treatment morpholino was acting on the mouse endothelial cells rather than directly on the tumor cells.

  2. Incidence and risk factors of vancomycin-resistant enterococcus colonization in burn unit patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altoparlak, Ulku; Koca, Ozlem; Ozkurt, Zulal; Akcay, Mufide N

    2011-02-01

    This study was aimed to identify the incidence of vancomycin-resistant enterococcus (VRE) colonization in burn patients, to collate risk factors for colonization and to determine the VRE resistance profile to different antimicrobial agents. This prospective study was carried out on the burn unit, during the period from September 2008 to January 2010, in 128 patients who were hospitalized at least 3 weeks or more. Periodic swabs were taken from burn wound, rectal, axillary, umblicaly and throat regions of the patients on admission and 7th, 14th, 21st days of hospitalization. Demographics and known risk factors were retrieved and assessed by statistical methods. Only 20 patients (15.6%) were colonized with enterococci on admission and these strains isolated from rectal, umblical and throat samples were sensitive to vancomycin. Initial VRE isolation was made in the first samples from the rectum of two patients on the 7th day. The rates of rectal, umblical, throat and axillary colonization increased to 21.9%, 3.1%, 3.1% and 3.1% at 28th day, respectively. VRE strains were the first isolated from burn wounds of only one patient (0.8%) on the 14th day and the colonization rate increased to 7.0% at the 28th day. Our study indicated that rectal colonization was seen more than other sites of colonization and was strictly correlate to colonizing enterococci between burn wound and other body regions. Multivariate analyses showed that glycopeptide use, burn depth and total burn surface area were independent risk factors for acquisition of VRE. All VSE strains were susceptible to teicoplanin, tigecycline and linezolid. VSE strains were more resistant to gentamicin and streptomycin, and VRE strains were more resistant to penicillin and ampicillin. The present study showed tigecycline and linezolid to be most active agents against VRE strains. The determined VRE colonization and risk factors of VRE acquisition are expected to be useful in establishing guidelines for preventing

  3. Vanillin differentially affects azoxymethane-injected rat colon carcinogenesis and gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Ket Li; Chong, Pei Pei; Yazan, Latifah Saiful; Ismail, Maznah

    2012-12-01

    Vanillin is the substance responsible for the flavor and smell of vanilla, a widely used flavoring agent. Previous studies reported that vanillin is a good antimutagen and anticarcinogen. However, there are also some contradicting findings showing that vanillin was a comutagen and cocarcinogen. This study investigated whether vanillin is an anticarcinogen or a cocarcinogen in rats induced with azoxymethane (AOM). Rats induced with AOM will develop aberrant crypt foci (ACF). AOM-challenged rats were treated with vanillin orally and intraperitoneally at low and high concentrations and ACF density, multiplicity, and distribution were observed. The gene expression of 14 colorectal cancer-related genes was also studied. Results showed that vanillin consumed orally had no effect on ACF. However, high concentrations (300 mg/kg body weight) of vanillin administered through intraperitoneal injection could increase ACF density and ACF multiplicity. ACF were mainly found in the distal colon rather than in the mid-section and proximal colon. The expression of colorectal cancer biomarkers, protooncogenes, recombinational repair, mismatch repair, and cell cycle arrest, and tumor suppressor gene expression were also affected by vanillin. Vanillin was not cocarcinogenic when consumed orally. However, it was cocarcinogenic when being administered intraperitoneally at high concentration. Hence, the use of vanillin in food should be safe but might have cocarcinogenic potential when it is used in high concentration for therapeutic purposes.

  4. Expression of miR-34 is lost in colon cancer which can be re-expressed by a novel agent CDF

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    Roy Sanchita

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Colorectal Cancer (CRC is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. Numerous cellular events, including deregulated expression of microRNAs (miRNAs, specifically the family of miR-34 consisting of miR-34a, b and c, is known to regulate the processes of growth and metastasis. Methods We evaluated the expression of miR-34 in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE human colon cancer tissue specimens compared to normal colonic mucosa. Moreover, we also assessed the expression of miR-34 in colon cancer cell lines treated with our newly developed synthetic analogue of curcumin referred as difluorinated curcumin (CDF compared to well known inhibitor of methyl transferase. Results We found that the expression of miR-34a and miR-34c was down-regulated in colon cancer specimens compared to normal colonic mucosa and the loss of expression was also consistent with data from colon cancer cell lines. This down-regulation was attributed to promoter hypermethylation, because we found that the treatment of colon cancer cells with 5-aza-2´-deoxycytidine, a methyltransferase inhibitor, markedly induced the levels of miR-34a and miR-34c expression. Likewise, CDF was very effective in the re-expression of miR-34a and miR-34c, which was consistent with inhibition of cell growth of both chemo-sensitive and chemo-resistant colon cancer cells. The re-expression of miR-34 led to a marked reduction in the expression of its target gene, Notch-1. Conclusion The loss of expression of miR-34 in colon cancer is in part due to promoter hypermethylation of miR-34, which can be re-expressed with our novel agent CDF, suggesting that CDF could be a novel demethylating agent for restoring the expression of miR-34 family, and thus CDF could become a newer therapeutic agent for the treatment of colon cancer.

  5. Gene expression profile of colon cancer cell lines treated with SN-38

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallin, A; Francis, P; Nilbert, M

    2010-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common form of cancer in the industrial countries. Due to advances regarding the treatments, primarily development of improved surgical methods and the ability to make the earlier diagnosis, the mortality has remained constant during the past decades even though...... the incidence in fact has increased. To improve chemotherapy and enable personalised treatment, the need of biomarkers is of great significance. In this study, we evaluated the gene expression profiles of the colon cancer cell lines treated with SN-38, the active metabolite of topoisomerase-1 inhibitor...

  6. Influence of smoking on colonic gene expression profile in Crohn's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Bjerrum, Jacob Tveiten; Csillag, Claudio

    2009-01-01

    were significantly expressed differently in the inflamed CD smokers as compared to the inflamed CD never-smokers: ring finger protein 138 (RNF138), metalothionein 2A (MT2A) and six transmembrane epithelial antigen of the prostate 3 (STEAP3), SA hypertension-associated homolog, PGM2L1 and KCNJ2...... in the inflamed descending colon of smoking versus never-smoking CD patients, which might be of relevance for the poorer clinical course among CD smokers. Many gastroenterologists are still not totally aware of the benefits of smoking cessation in relation to CD, and do not put much effort into getting...

  7. Gene expression profile of colon cancer cell lines treated with SN-38

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallin, A; Francis, P; Nilbert, M

    2010-01-01

    the incidence in fact has increased. To improve chemotherapy and enable personalised treatment, the need of biomarkers is of great significance. In this study, we evaluated the gene expression profiles of the colon cancer cell lines treated with SN-38, the active metabolite of topoisomerase-1 inhibitor......Colorectal cancer is the third most common form of cancer in the industrial countries. Due to advances regarding the treatments, primarily development of improved surgical methods and the ability to make the earlier diagnosis, the mortality has remained constant during the past decades even though...

  8. A comparison of 12-gene colon cancer assay gene expression in African American and Caucasian patients with stage II colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindarajan, Rangaswamy; Posey, James; Chao, Calvin Y; Lu, Ruixiao; Jadhav, Trafina; Javed, Ahmed Y; Javed, Awais; Mahmoud, Fade A; Osarogiagbon, Raymond U; Manne, Upender

    2016-06-18

    African American (AA) colon cancer patients have a worse prognosis than Caucasian (CA) colon cancer patients, however, reasons for this disparity are not well understood. To determine if tumor biology might contribute to differential prognosis, we measured recurrence risk and gene expression using the Oncotype DX® Colon Cancer Assay (12-gene assay) and compared the Recurrence Score results and gene expression profiles between AA patients and CA patients with stage II colon cancer. We retrieved demographic, clinical, and archived tumor tissues from stage II colon cancer patients at four institutions. The 12-gene assay and mismatch repair (MMR) status were performed by Genomic Health (Redwood City, California). Student's t-test and the Wilcoxon rank sum test were used to compare Recurrence Score data and gene expression data from AA and CA patients (SAS Enterprise Guide 5.1). Samples from 122 AA and 122 CA patients were analyzed. There were 118 women (63 AA, 55 CA) and 126 men (59 AA, 67 CA). Median age was 66 years for AA patients and 68 for CA patients. Age, gender, year of surgery, pathologic T-stage, tumor location, the number of lymph nodes examined, lymphovascular invasion, and MMR status were not significantly different between groups (p = 0.93). The mean Recurrence Score result for AA patients (27.9 ± 12.8) and CA patients (28.1 ± 11.8) was not significantly different and the proportions of patients with high Recurrence Score values (≥41) were similar between the groups (17/122 AA; 15/122 CA). None of the gene expression variables, either single genes or gene groups (cell cycle group, stromal group, BGN1, FAP, INHBA1, Ki67, MYBL2, cMYC and GADD45B), was significantly different between the racial groups. After controlling for clinical and pathologic covariates, the means and distributions of Recurrence Score results and gene expression profiles showed no statistically significant difference between patient groups. The distribution of

  9. Prevalence of and risk factors for MRSA colonization in HIV-positive outpatients in Singapore

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    Kyaw Win

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Whilst there have been studies on the risks and outcomes of MRSA colonization and infections in HIV-positive patients, local data is limited on the risk factors for MRSA colonization among these patients. We undertook this study in a tertiary HIV care centre to document the risk factors for colonization and to determine the prevalence of MRSA colonization among HIV-positive outpatients in Singapore. Methods This was a cross-sectional study in which factors associated with MRSA positivity among patients with HIV infection were evaluated. A set of standardized questionnaire and data collection forms were available to interview all recruited patients. Following the interview, trained nurses collected swabs from the anterior nares/axilla/groin (NAG, throat and peri-anal regions. Information on demographics, clinical history, laboratory results and hospitalization history were retrieved from medical records. Results MRSA was detected in swab cultures from at least 1 site in 15 patients (5.1%. Inclusion of throat and/or peri-anal swabs increased the sensitivity of NAG screening by 20%. Predictors for MRSA colonization among HIV-positive patients were age, history of pneumonia, lymphoma, presence of a percutaneous device within the past 12 months, history of household members hospitalized more than two times within the past 12 months, and a most recent CD4 count less than 200. Conclusions This study highlights that a proportion of MRSA carriers would have been undetected without multiple-site screening cultures. This study could shed insight into identifying patients at risk of MRSA colonization upon hospital visit and this may suggest that a risk factor-based approach for MRSA surveillance focusing on high risk populations could be considered.

  10. Colon cancer controls versus population controls in case-control studies of occupational risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabroe Svend

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since updated population registers do not exist in many countries it is often difficult to sample valid population controls from the study base to a case-control study. Use of patient controls is an alternative option if the exposure experience under study for these patients are interchangeable with the experience for population controls. Patient controls may even be preferable from population controls under certain conditions. In this study we examine if colon cancer patients can serve as surrogates for proper population controls in case-control studies of occupational risk factors. Methods The study was conducted from 1995 to 1997. Incident colon cancer controls (N = 428 aged 35–69 years with a histological verified diagnosis and population controls (N = 583 were selected. Altogether 254 (59% of the colon cancer controls and 320 (55% of the population controls were interviewed about occupational, medical and life style conditions. Results No statistical significant difference for educational level, medical history or smoking status was seen between the two control groups. There was evidence of a higher alcohol intake, less frequent work as a farmer and less exposure to pesticides among colon cancer controls. Conclusions Use of colon cancer controls may provide valid exposure estimates in studies of many occupational risk factors for cancer, but not for studies on exposure related to farming.

  11. Differential expression of gastric MUC5AC in colonic epithelial cells: TFF3-wired IL1 β/Akt crosstalk-induced mucosal immune response against Shigella dysenteriae infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, Subramaniya Bharathi; Murali, Malliga Raman; Devaraj, Halagowder; Devaraj, Sivasithamparam Niranjali

    2012-02-01

    An understanding of the signaling mechanism(s) that regulate the differential expression of gastric mucin MUC5AC in colonic epithelial cells would contribute significantly to investigations of its role in colonic mucosa infected with the bacterial pathogen Shigella dysenteriae. Here we show that S. dysenteriae-Sinduced expression of interleukin-1β upregulates MUC2 expression and the differential expression of MUC5AC. Differential expression of MUC5AC involves crosstalk between interleukin-1β and Akt, whereby the trefoil factor family peptide TFF3 activates Akt by phosphorylation of EGFR. TFF3 also downregulates E-cadherin expression, causing accumulation of β-catenin in the cytosol. Phosphorylation of GSK-3β (inactivated) by activated Akt inhibits ubiquitylation of β-catenin, leading to its nuclear translocation, which then induces the expression of MUC5AC and cyclin D1. Accumulation of cyclin D1 alters the cell cycle, promoting cell survival and proliferation. Human colon HT29MTX cells, which overexpress MUC5AC, were resistant to adherence and invasion of S. dysenteriae when compared with other mucin-secreting HT29 cell types. Thus, during infection with S. dysenteriae, crosstalk between interleukin-1β and Akt wired by TFF3 induces expression of MUC5AC in colonic epithelial cells. Differentially expressed gastric MUC5AC aids in mucosal clearance of S. dysenteriae, inhibiting adherence and invasion of the pathogen to colonic epithelial cells, which protects the host.

  12. Galectin-8 expression decreases in cancer compared with normal and dysplastic human colon tissue and acts significantly on human colon cancer cell migration as a suppressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, N; Bronckart, Y; Camby, I; Legendre, H; Lahm, H; Kaltner, H; Hadari, Y; Van Ham, P; Yeaton, P; Pector, J-C; Zick, Y; Salmon, I; Danguy, A; Kiss, R; Gabius, H-J

    2002-01-01

    Background and aims: Galectins are β-galactoside binding proteins. This ability may have a bearing on cell adhesion and migration/proliferation in human colon cancer cells. In addition to galectins-1 and -3 studied to date, other members of this family not investigated in detail may contribute to modulation of tumour cell features. This evident gap has prompted us to extend galectin analysis beyond the two prototypes. The present study deals with the quantitative determination of immunohistochemical expression of galectin-8 in normal, benign, and malignant human colon tissue samples and in four human colon cancer models (HCT-15, LoVo, CoLo201, and DLD-1) maintained both in vitro as permanent cell lines and in vivo as nude mice xenografts. The role of galectin-8 (and its neutralising antibody) in cell migration was investigated in HCT-15, LoVo, CoLo201, and DLD-1 cell lines. Methods: Immunohistochemical expression of galectin-8 and its overall ability to bind to sugar ligands (revealed glycohistochemically by means of biotinylated histochemically inert carrier bovine serum albumin with α- and β-d-galactose, α-d-glucose, and lactose derivatives as ligands) were quantitatively determined using computer assisted microscopy. The presence of galectin-8 mRNA in the four human colon cancer cell lines was examined by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. In vitro, cellular localisation of exogenously added galectin-8 in the culture media of these colon cancer cells was visualised by fluorescence microscopy. In vitro galectin-8 mediated effects (and the influence of its neutralising antibody) on migration levels of living HCT-15, LoVo, CoLo201, and DLD-1 cells were quantitatively determined by computer assisted phase contrast microscopy. Results: A marked decrease in immunohistochemical expression of galectin-8 occurred with malignancy development in human colon tissue. Malignant colon tissue exhibited a significantly lower galectin-8 level than normal or

  13. Aspirin inhibited the metastasis of colon cancer cells by inhibiting the expression of toll-like receptor 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Jun; Zhou, Hai-Yang; Liu, Peng; You, Qing; Kuang, Fei; Shen, Yi-Nan; Hu, Zhi-Qian

    2018-01-01

    The metastasis of colorectal cancer frequently tends to liver, which is one of the three leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Growing evidence showed that aspirin could effectively inhibit liver metastasis of colorectal cancer. However, the potential mechanism has not been fully understood. Mouse splenic vein metastasis assay was used to examine the metastatic ability of colon cancer cells in vivo. And wound healing and transwell assay were applied to detect the metastasis potential of C26 and HCT116 colon cancer cell lines in vitro. RT-PCR and western blotting were used to explore Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) expression in colon cancer cell lines. The functions of TLR4 in the migration of the colon cancer cell line were analyzed by infecting cells with lentivirus containing TLR4 siRNA. We demonstrated that lipopolysaccharides (LPS) could enhance the metastasis potential of C26 and HCT116 colon cancer cell lines. However, aspirin effectively decreased the metastasis capacity of colon cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. We found that the enhancement of LPS on the migration of colon cancer cells by inducing epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) phenotype demonstrated a TLR4-dependent manner. Aspirin treatment lead to the downregulation of TLR4 on C26 cells which resulted in the decrease of C26 cells migration and EMT phenotype that induced by LPS. Additionally, the inhibitory effect from aspirin on the expression of TLR4 on C26 cells leads to the downregulation of NF-κB. The results of our study indicate that LPS origin from intestinal flora may promote the metastasis of colon cancer to liver and aspirin may inhibit the metastasis of colon cancer by inhibiting the expression of TLR4.

  14. Age-related gene expression analysis in enteric ganglia of human colon after laser microdissection

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    Susan eHetz

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The enteric nervous system (ENS poses the intrinsic innervation of the gastrointestinal tract and plays a critical role for all stages of postnatal life. There is increasing scientific and clinical interest in acquired or age-related gastrointestinal dysfunctions that can be manifested in diseases such as gut constipation or fecal incontinence. In this study, we sought to analyze age-dependent changes in the gene expression profile of the human ENS, particularly in the myenteric plexus. Therefore, we used the laser microdissection technique which has been proven as a feasible tool to analyze distinct cell populations within heterogeneously composed tissues.Full biopsy gut samples were prepared from children (4-12 months, middle aged (48-58 years and aged donors (70-95 years. Cryosections were histologically stained with H&E, the ganglia of the myenteric plexus identified and RNA isolated using laser microdissection technique. Quantitative PCR was performed for selected neural genes, neurotransmitters and receptors. Data were confirmed on protein level using NADPH-diaphorase staining and immunohistochemistry.As result, we demonstrate age-associated alterations in site-specific gene expression pattern of the ENS. Thus, in the adult and aged distal parts of the colon a marked decrease in relative gene expression of neural key genes like NGFR, RET, NOS1 and a concurrent increase of CHAT were observed. Further, we detected notable regional differences of RET, CHAT, TH and S100B comparing gene expression in aged proximal and distal colon. Interestingly, markers indicating cellular senescence or oxidative stress (SNCA, CASP3, CAT, SOD2 and TERT were largely unchanged within the ENS. For the first time, our study also describes the age-dependent expression pattern of all major sodium channels within the ENS.Our results are in line with previous studies showing spatio-temporal differences within the mammalian ENS.

  15. Identification of bacteriology and risk factor analysis of asymptomatic bacterial colonization in pacemaker replacement patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Xian-Ming; Yu, Hua; Sun, Xue-Xia; An, Yi; Li, Bing; Li, Xue-Bin

    2015-01-01

    Recent researches revealed that asymptomatic bacterial colonization on PMs might be ubiquitous and increase the risk of clinical PM infection. Early diagnosis of patients with asymptomatic bacterial colonization could provide opportunity for targeted preventive measures. The present study explores the incidence of bacterial colonization of generator pockets in pacemaker replacement patients without signs of infection, and to analyze risk factors for asymptomatic bacterial colonization. From June 2011 to December 2013, 118 patients underwent pacemaker replacement or upgrade. Identification of bacteria was carried out by bacterial culture and 16S rRNA sequencing. Clinical risk characteristics were analyzed. The total bacterial positive rate was 37.3% (44 cases), and the coagulase-negative Staphylococcus aureus detection rate was the highest. Twenty two (18.6%) patients had positive bacterial culture results, of which 50% had coagulase-negative staphylococcus. The bacterial DNA detection rate was 36.4 % (43 cases). Positive bacterial DNA results from pocket tissues and the surface of the devices were 22.0% and 29.7%, respectively. During follow-up (median, 27.0 months), three patients (6.8%, 3/44) became symptomatic with the same genus of microorganism, S. aureus (n=2) and S. epidermidis (n=1). Multivariable logistic regression analysis showed that history of bacterial infection, use of antibiotics, application of antiplatelet drugs, replacement frequency were independent risk factors for asymptomatic bacterial colonization. There was a high incidence of asymptomatic bacterial colonization in pacemaker patients with independent risk factors. Bacterial culture combined genetic testing could improve the detection rate.

  16. Farm specific risk factors for Campylobacter colonization of broilers in six European countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borck Høg, Birgitte; Sommer, Helle Mølgaard; Williams, N.

    2015-01-01

    was clearly affected by country. In descending order; broiler flocks were more likely to be colonized in Poland, the UK, Spain, the Netherlands, Denmark and Norway due to country specific factors that could not be explained by the management and climate variables in the explored models. The seasonality...

  17. Colon cancer in rapidly developing countries: review of the lifestyle, dietary, consanguinity and hereditary risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulbari Bener

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Colon cancer rates are rising dramatically in once low incidence nations. These nations are undergoing rapid economic development and are known as “nations in transition” (NIT. This review identifies some of the most common etiological risk factors of colon cancer in these nations and evaluates the existing epidemiological evidence. The main risk factors which were found to be prevalent in NIT include: lifestyle factors such as physical inactivity, obesity and abdominal adiposity, alcohol consumption and cigarette smoking; dietary factors such as fatty food and red meat consumption. Protective factors included white meat and fiber consumption. Several studies found to have significantly higher rates of colon cancer among the young population (<40 years old. There appears to be a quantitative and qualitative increase in risk to relatives of patients diagnosed at a young age compared with those diagnosed later in life, at least part of which is likely to be the result of a hereditary susceptibility. Close relatives of patients with colon cancer are at an increased risk of developing a colon cancer. Close relatives of early onset cases warrant more intensive endoscopic screening and at an earlier age than relatives of patients diagnosed at older ages. Furthermore, these suggest the existence of genetic predispositions in these nations which need to be investigated further and have implications for screening programs. In conclusion, public health awareness campaigns promoting prevention of modifiable risk factors and screening initiatives with guidelines suited to the age-specific incidence rates of NIT are needed very urgently.

  18. Hypogammaglobulinemia and Poor Performance Status are Predisposing Factors for Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococcus Colonization in Patients with Hematological Malignancies

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    Elif Gülsüm Ümit

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE are common pathogens of hospital-acquired infection. Long hospitalization periods, use of broadspectrum antibiotics, and immunosuppression are major risks for VRE colonization. We aimed to evaluate patients’ characteristics and factors that may contribute to VRE colonization. Materials and Methods: Data of 66 patients with colonization and 112 patients without colonization who were hospitalized in the hematology clinic were collected. Hematological malignancies, preexisting gastrointestinal complaints, the presence of hypogammaglobulinemia at the time of diagnosis, complications like neutropenic enterocolitis (NEC, and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG and Karnofsky performance statuses were recorded. Results: Ages of the patients ranged between 19 and 95 years (mean: 55.99. Karnofsky and ECOG scores were statistically related to VRE colonization (p7 days may also be accepted as a risk factor, independent of diagnosis or antibiotic use. Performance status is also an important factor for colonization, which may be related to poorer hygiene and increased external help.

  19. Bone morphogenetic protein 2 is expressed by, and acts upon, mature epithelial cells in the colon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hardwick, James C. H.; van den Brink, Gijs R.; Bleuming, Sylvia A.; Ballester, Isabel; van den Brande, Jan M. H.; Keller, Josbert J.; Offerhaus, G. Johan A.; van Deventer, Sander J. H.; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.

    2004-01-01

    Background & Aims: The recent findings of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) receptor la mutations in juvenile polyposis and frequent Smad4 mutations in colon cancer suggest a role for BMPs in the colonic epithelium and colon cancer. We investigated the role of BMP2 in the colon. Methods: We assessed

  20. Time- and dose-dependent effects of curcumin on gene expression in human colon cancer cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erk, M.J. van; Teuling, E.; Staal, Y.C.M.; Huybers, S.; Bladeren, P.J. van; Aarts, J.M.M.J.G.; Ommen, B. van

    2004-01-01

    Background. Curcumin is a spice and a coloring food compound with a promising role in colon cancer prevention. Curcumin protects against development of colon tumors in rats treated with a colon carcinogen, in colon cancer cells curcumin can inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis, it is an

  1. Time- and dose-dependent effects of curcumin on gene expression in human colon cancer cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erk, van M.J.; Teuling, E.; Staal, Y.C.M.; Huybers, S.; Bladeren, van P.J.; Aarts, J.M.M.J.G.; Ommen, van B.

    2004-01-01

    Background: Curcumin is a spice and a coloring food compound with a promising role in colon cancer prevention. Curcumin protects against development of colon tumors in rats treated with a colon carcinogen, in colon cancer cells curcumin can inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis, it is an

  2. Time- and dose-dependent effects of curcumin on gene expression in human colon cancer cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Erk, Marjan J; Teuling, Eva; Staal, Yvonne C. M.; Huybers, Sylvie; Van Bladeren, Peter J; Aarts, Jac MMJG; Van Ommen, Ben

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Curcumin is a spice and a coloring food compound with a promising role in colon cancer prevention. Curcumin protects against development of colon tumors in rats treated with a colon carcinogen, in colon cancer cells curcumin can inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis, it is an

  3. The effect of bile acids and piroxicam on MHC antigen expression in rat colonocytes during colon cancer development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigas, B; Tsioulias, G J; Allan, C; Wali, R K; Brasitus, T A

    1994-10-01

    The effect of bile acids and piroxicam on the expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) antigens in colonocytes was evaluated in rats treated with the colonic carcinogen azoxymethane (AOM). Male Fischer-344 rats were fed a basal diet (AIN-76) supplemented with 0.4% cholic acid, 0.4% ursodeoxycholic acid, 0.2% ursodeoxycholic acid plus 0.2% cholic acid, or 75 p.p.m. piroxicam. Rats were injected subcutaneously once a week for 2 weeks with AOM (15 mg/kg body weight/week) or vehicle, after being fed their respective diets for two weeks. The rats were killed at 16 weeks, while parallel identical groups of rats were killed at 28 weeks, and colon tumours were counted. None of the rats treated with AOM-vehicle developed tumours at 28 weeks, while in the AOM-treated rats the frequency of colonic tumours was as follows: AOM alone 50%, cholic acid 74%, ursodeoxycholic acid 17%, piroxicam 28%, ursodeoxycholic plus cholic acid 46%. The expression of RT1A, RT1B and RT1D was determined in isolated colonocytes by immune fluocytometry. Normal rat colonocytes express all three MHC antigens strongly. Neither the bile acids nor piroxicam affected MHC antigen expression in AOM-vehicle-treated rats. AOM did not effect MHC antigen expression compared to normal controls. Cholic acid had no significant effect on the expression of MHC antigens in AOM-treated rats. Ursodeoxycholic acid alone or in combination with cholic acid increased the expression of RT1A compared to normal controls, of RT1B compared to AOM-treated rats, and of RT1D compared to controls or AOM-treated rats. Piroxicam increased the expression of all three antigens compared to either control or AOM-treated rats. These findings indicate that (1) ursodeoxycholic acid and piroxicam up-regulate colonic MHC antigen expression in the AOM model of colonic carcinogenesis; (2) the colon of rats exposed to AOM responds differently than the normal colon with respect to MHC regulation; and (3) the protective effect of

  4. High-fat diet induced leptin and Wnt expression: RNA-sequencing and pathway analysis of mouse colonic tissue and tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penrose, Harrison M; Heller, Sandra; Cable, Chloe; Nakhoul, Hani; Baddoo, Melody; Flemington, Erik; Crawford, Susan E; Savkovic, Suzana D

    2017-03-01

    Obesity, an immense epidemic affecting approximately half a billion adults, has doubled in prevalence in the last several decades. Epidemiological data support that obesity, due to intake of a high-fat, western diet, increases the risk of colon cancer; however, the mechanisms underlying this risk remain unclear. Here, utilizing next generation RNA sequencing, we aimed to determine the high-fat diet (HFD) mediated expression profile in mouse colon and the azoxymethane/dextran sulfate sodium model of colon cancer. Mice on HFD had significantly higher colonic inflammation, tumor burden, and a number of differentially expressed transcripts compared to mice on regular diet (RD). We identified 721 transcripts differentially expressed in mouse HFD colon that were in a shared pattern with colonic tumors (RD and HFD). Importantly, in mouse colon, HFD stimulated an expression signature strikingly similar to human colon cancer, especially those with inflammatory microsatellite instability. Furthermore, pathway analysis of these transcripts demonstrated their association with active inflammation and colon cancer signaling, with leptin and Wnt as the top two transcripts elevated in mouse HFD colon shared with tumors. Moreover, in mouse colon, HFD-stimulated tumorigenic Wnt pathway activation was further validated by upregulation of β-catenin transcriptional targets. Finally, in human colon cancer, upregulation of leptin pathway members was shown with a large network of dysregulated transcripts being linked with worse overall survival. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and effects of L-arginine on colonic nitric oxide production and fluid transport in patients with "minimal colitis"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perner, Anders; Andresen, Lars; Normark, Michel

    2005-01-01

    Some patients with idiopathic, chronic diarrhoea have minimal, non-specific colonic inflammation. As nitric oxide (NO) acts as a secretagogue in the colon, we studied the expression of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) in mucosal biopsies and the effects of NOS stimulation on colonic transfer of fluid...

  6. Effects of moderate alcohol consumption on gene expression related to colonic inflammation and antioxidant enzymes in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klarich, DawnKylee S; Penprase, Jerrold; Cintora, Patricia; Medrano, Octavio; Erwin, Danielle; Brasser, Susan M; Hong, Mee Young

    2017-06-01

    Excessive alcohol consumption is a risk factor associated with colorectal cancer; however, some studies have reported that moderate alcohol consumption may not contribute additional risk for developing colorectal cancer while others suggest that moderate alcohol consumption provides a protective effect that reduces colorectal cancer risk. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of moderate voluntary alcohol (20% ethanol) intake on alternate days for 3 months in outbred Wistar rats on risk factors associated with colorectal cancer development. Colonic gene expression of cyclooxygenase-2, RelA, 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1, superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, glutathione-S-transferase M1, and aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 were determined. Blood alcohol content, liver function enzyme activities, and 8-oxo-deoxyguanosine DNA adducts were also assessed. Alcohol-treated rats were found to have significantly lower 8-oxo-deoxyguanosine levels in blood, a marker of DNA damage. Alanine aminotransferase and lactate dehydrogenase were both significantly lower in the alcohol group. Moderate alcohol significantly decreased cyclooxygenase-2 gene expression, an inflammatory marker associated with colorectal cancer risk. The alcohol group had significantly increased glutathione-S-transferase M1 expression, an antioxidant enzyme that helps detoxify carcinogens, such as acetaldehyde, and significantly increased aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 expression, which allows for greater acetaldehyde clearance. Increased expression of glutathione-S-transferase M1 and aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 likely contributed to reduce mucosal damage that is caused by acetaldehyde accumulation. These results indicate that moderate alcohol may reduce the risk for colorectal cancer development, which was evidenced by reduced inflammation activity and lower DNA damage after alcohol exposure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Salvia miltiorrhiza inhibits the expressions of transcription factor T-bet

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SM powder for injection repressed the expressions of T-bet and TNFα in the experimental colitis in mice, which could relieve the inflamed colonic lesions and elevate the survival of mice. Keywords: Salvia miltiorrhiza, T-bet, tumor necrosis factor α, colitis, mice, inflammatory bowel disease, Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis ...

  8. Comparison of the expression and function of Lin28A and Lin28B in colon cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Mingjiao; Yang, Chao; Zhang, Yan; Ning, Ning; Zhao, Ran; Yang, Weiwei; Jin, Yinji; Li, Jing; Redpath, Riju James Rajkumar Ezakiel; Zhang, Lei; Jin, Xiaoming; Zhong, Zhaohua; Zhang, Fengmin; Wei, Yunwei; Shen, Guomin; Wang, Dong; Liu, Ying; Wang, Guangyu; Li, Xiaobo

    2016-01-01

    Lin28A and Lin28B are highly conserved RNA binding proteins with similar structure and functions. Recent studies demonstrated that both of them act as oncogenes and promote cancer progression. However, few researches compared the expression and functions of both oncogenes in human malignant tumors at same time. Additionally, although the expression and role of Lin28B in colon cancer is frequently reported, the expression and functions of Lin28A in colon cancer are largely unknown. In this study, we have systematically evaluated the expressional pattern, mutation status and correlation of both Lin28A and Lin28B in colon cancer tissues for the first time, and compared the roles of Lin28A and Lin28B in the proliferation, migration, invasion and apoptosis of colon cancer cells in vitro. We have showed that they are co-expressed and have functional similarities, however, the molecular mechanisms underlying their similar functions may not be identical. This study contributes to clarify the similarities and differences of Lin28A and Lin28B in colon cancer progression. PMID:27793004

  9. Psyllium and fat in diets differentially affect the activities and expressions of colonic sphingomyelinases and caspase in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yajun; Ohlsson, Lena; Duan, Rui-Dong

    2004-05-01

    Dietary fibre and fat affect colonic tumourigenesis and inflammation. Sphingomyelin metabolism may have implications for the pathogenesis of colonic tumours and ulcerative colitis. The present study examined the effects of psyllium and fat on the enzymes responsible for sphingomyelin metabolism and apoptosis in the colon. Mice were fed control, psyllium-containing (100 g/kg), high-fat (313 g/kg, 53 % energy as fat) or high-fat plus psyllium diets for 4 weeks. The activities of acid, neutral and alkaline sphingomyelinase (SMase), neutral ceramidase, and caspase 3, 8 and 9 in colonic mucosa were determined. The expressions of alkaline SMase and caspase 3 were examined. The psyllium-containing diet was found to increase significantly the activities of alkaline SMase and caspase 3 and decreased those of acid SMase and neutral ceramidase. The high-fat diet had opposite effects on these enzymes and attenuated the effects of psyllium. Western blotting showed that psyllium increased and high-fat decreased the levels of alkaline SMase and caspase 3 in colonic mucosa. The change in caspase 3 activity was positively correlated with that of alkaline SMase and negatively with acid SMase. No similar changes of acid and alkaline phosphatase activities in the colon or acid and neutral SMase activity in the liver were identified. In conclusion, colonic sphingomyelin metabolism and apoptosis were affected by psyllium and fat in an opposite manner. The results may have implications for colorectal tumourigenesis and inflammation.

  10. Depletion of mitochondrial fission factor DRP1 causes increased apoptosis in human colon cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue-Yamauchi, Akane, E-mail: ainoyama@research.twmu.ac.jp [Department of Pathology, Tokyo Women' s Medical University, 8-1 Kawada-cho, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-8666 (Japan); Oda, Hideaki [Department of Pathology, Tokyo Women' s Medical University, 8-1 Kawada-cho, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-8666 (Japan)

    2012-04-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DRP1 is required for mitochondrial fission in colon cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DRP1 participates in inhibition of colon cancer cell apoptosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DRP1 can inhibit apoptosis through the regulation of cytochrome c release. -- Abstract: Mitochondria play a critical role in regulation of apoptosis, a form of programmed cell death, by releasing apoptogenic factors including cytochrome c. Growing evidence suggests that dynamic changes in mitochondrial morphology are involved in cellular apoptotic response. However, whether DRP1-mediated mitochondrial fission is required for induction of apoptosis remains speculative. Here, we show that siRNA-mediated DRP1 knockdown promoted accumulation of elongated mitochondria in HCT116 and SW480 human colon cancer cells. Surprisingly, DRP1 down-regulation led to decreased proliferation and increased apoptosis of these cells. A higher rate of cytochrome c release and reductions in mitochondrial membrane potential were also revealed in DRP1-depleted cells. Taken together, our present findings suggest that mitochondrial fission factor DRP1 inhibits colon cancer cell apoptosis through the regulation of cytochrome c release and mitochondrial membrane integrity.

  11. Aspirin Inhibits Colon Cancer Cell and Tumor Growth and Downregulates Specificity Protein (Sp) Transcription Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathi, Satya; Jutooru, Indira; Chadalapaka, Gayathri; Nair, Vijayalekshmi; Lee, Syng-Ook; Safe, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) is highly effective for treating colon cancer patients postdiagnosis; however, the mechanisms of action of aspirin in colon cancer are not well defined. Aspirin and its major metabolite sodium salicylate induced apoptosis and decreased colon cancer cell growth and the sodium salt of aspirin also inhibited tumor growth in an athymic nude mouse xenograft model. Colon cancer cell growth inhibition was accompanied by downregulation of Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 proteins and decreased expression of Sp-regulated gene products including bcl-2, survivin, VEGF, VEGFR1, cyclin D1, c-MET and p65 (NFκB). Moreover, we also showed by RNA interference that β-catenin, an important target of aspirin in some studies, is an Sp-regulated gene. Aspirin induced nuclear caspase-dependent cleavage of Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 proteins and this response was related to sequestration of zinc ions since addition of zinc sulfate blocked aspirin-mediated apoptosis and repression of Sp proteins. The results demonstrate an important underlying mechanism of action of aspirin as an anticancer agent and, based on the rapid metabolism of aspirin to salicylate in humans and the high salicylate/aspirin ratios in serum, it is likely that the anticancer activity of aspirin is also due to the salicylate metabolite. PMID:23110215

  12. Aspirin inhibits colon cancer cell and tumor growth and downregulates specificity protein (Sp) transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathi, Satya; Jutooru, Indira; Chadalapaka, Gayathri; Nair, Vijayalekshmi; Lee, Syng-Ook; Safe, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) is highly effective for treating colon cancer patients postdiagnosis; however, the mechanisms of action of aspirin in colon cancer are not well defined. Aspirin and its major metabolite sodium salicylate induced apoptosis and decreased colon cancer cell growth and the sodium salt of aspirin also inhibited tumor growth in an athymic nude mouse xenograft model. Colon cancer cell growth inhibition was accompanied by downregulation of Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 proteins and decreased expression of Sp-regulated gene products including bcl-2, survivin, VEGF, VEGFR1, cyclin D1, c-MET and p65 (NFκB). Moreover, we also showed by RNA interference that β-catenin, an important target of aspirin in some studies, is an Sp-regulated gene. Aspirin induced nuclear caspase-dependent cleavage of Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 proteins and this response was related to sequestration of zinc ions since addition of zinc sulfate blocked aspirin-mediated apoptosis and repression of Sp proteins. The results demonstrate an important underlying mechanism of action of aspirin as an anticancer agent and, based on the rapid metabolism of aspirin to salicylate in humans and the high salicylate/aspirin ratios in serum, it is likely that the anticancer activity of aspirin is also due to the salicylate metabolite.

  13. Aspirin inhibits colon cancer cell and tumor growth and downregulates specificity protein (Sp transcription factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satya Pathi

    Full Text Available Acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin is highly effective for treating colon cancer patients postdiagnosis; however, the mechanisms of action of aspirin in colon cancer are not well defined. Aspirin and its major metabolite sodium salicylate induced apoptosis and decreased colon cancer cell growth and the sodium salt of aspirin also inhibited tumor growth in an athymic nude mouse xenograft model. Colon cancer cell growth inhibition was accompanied by downregulation of Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 proteins and decreased expression of Sp-regulated gene products including bcl-2, survivin, VEGF, VEGFR1, cyclin D1, c-MET and p65 (NFκB. Moreover, we also showed by RNA interference that β-catenin, an important target of aspirin in some studies, is an Sp-regulated gene. Aspirin induced nuclear caspase-dependent cleavage of Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 proteins and this response was related to sequestration of zinc ions since addition of zinc sulfate blocked aspirin-mediated apoptosis and repression of Sp proteins. The results demonstrate an important underlying mechanism of action of aspirin as an anticancer agent and, based on the rapid metabolism of aspirin to salicylate in humans and the high salicylate/aspirin ratios in serum, it is likely that the anticancer activity of aspirin is also due to the salicylate metabolite.

  14. Epidemiology and risk factors for Staphylococcus aureus colonization in children in the post-PCV7 era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kleinman Ken

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The incidence of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA has risen dramatically in the U.S., particularly among children. Although Streptococcus pneumoniae colonization has been inversely associated with S. aureus colonization in unvaccinated children, this and other risk factors for S. aureus carriage have not been assessed following widespread use of the heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7. Our objectives were to (1 determine the prevalence of S. aureus and MRSA colonization in young children in the context of widespread use of PCV7; and (2 examine risk factors for S. aureus colonization in the post-PCV7 era, including the absence of vaccine-type S. pneumoniae colonization. Methods Swabs of the anterior nares (S. aureus were obtained from children enrolled in an ongoing study of nasopharyngeal pneumococcal colonization of healthy children in 8 Massachusetts communities. Children 3 months to S. aureus was identified and antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed. Epidemiologic risk factors for S. aureus colonization were collected from parent surveys and chart reviews, along with data on pneumococcal colonization. Multivariate mixed model analyses were performed to identify factors associated with S. aureus colonization. Results Among 1,968 children, the mean age (SD was 2.7 (1.8 years, 32% received an antibiotic in the past 2 months, 2% were colonized with PCV7 strains and 24% were colonized with non-PCV7 strains. The prevalence of S. aureus colonization remained stable between 2003–04 and 2006–07 (14.6% vs. 14.1%, while MRSA colonization remained low (0.2% vs. 0.9%, p = 0.09. Although absence of pneumococcal colonization was not significantly associated with S. aureus colonization, age (6–11 mo vs. ≥5 yrs, OR 0.39 [95% CI 0.24–0.64]; 1–1.99 yrs vs. ≥5 yrs, OR 0.35 [0.23–0.54]; 2–2.99 yrs vs. ≥5 yrs, OR 0.45 [0.28–0.73]; 3–3.99 yrs vs. ≥5 yrs, OR 0

  15. The splicing factor SRSF6 is amplified and is an oncoprotein in lung and colon cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cohen-Eliav, Michal; Golan-Gerstl, Regina; Siegfried, Zahava

    2013-01-01

    An increasing body of evidence connects alterations in the process of alternative splicing with cancer development and progression. However, a direct role of splicing factors as drivers of cancer development is mostly unknown. We analyzed the gene copy number of several splicing factors in colon...... and lung tumors and found that the gene encoding for the splicing factor SRSF6 is amplified and overexpressed in these cancers. Moreover, overexpression of SRSF6 in immortal lung epithelial cells enhanced proliferation, protected them from chemotherapy-induced cell death and converted them...... to be tumorigenic in mice. In contrast, knockdown of SRSF6 in lung and colon cancer cell lines inhibited their tumorigenic abilities. SRSF6 up- or down regulation altered the splicing of several tumor suppressors and oncogenes to generate the oncogenic isoforms and reduce the tumor suppressive isoforms. Our data...

  16. Dairy cattle serum and milk factors contributing to the risk of colon and breast cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    zur Hausen, Harald; de Villiers, Ethel-Michele

    2015-08-15

    The analysis of published epidemiological data on colon and breast cancer reveals a remarkable concordance for most regions of the world. A low incidence for both cancers has been recorded in Mongolia and Bolivia. Discrepant data, however, have been reported for India, Japan and Korea. In India, the incidence of breast cancer is significantly higher than for colon cancer, in Japan and Korea colon cancer exceeds by far the rate of breast cancer. Here, studies are summarized pointing to a species-specific risk for colon cancer after consumption of beef originating from dairy cattle. Uptake of dairy products of Bos taurus-derived milk cattle, particularly consumed at early age, is suggested to represent one of the main risk factors for the development of breast cancer. A recent demonstration of reduced breast cancer rates in individuals with lactose intolerance (Ji et al., Br J Cancer 2014; 112:149-52) seems to be in line with this interpretation. Species-specific risk factors for these cancers are compatible with the transmission of different infectious factors transferred via meat or dairy products. Countries with discordant rates of colon and breast cancer reveal a similar discordance between meat and milk product consumption of dairy cattle. The recent isolation of a larger number of novel presumably viral DNAs from serum, meat and dairy products of healthy dairy cows, at least part of them infectious for human cells, deserves further investigation. Systemic infections early in life, resulting in latency and prevention of subsequent infections with the same agent by neutralizing antibodies, would require reconsideration of ongoing prospective studies conducted in the adult population. © 2015 UICC.

  17. Prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus Colonization and Risk Factors for Infection Among Military Personnel in a Shipboard Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, Jennifer A; Maguire, Jason D; Fraser, Jamie; Tribble, David R; Deiss, Robert G; Bryan, Coleman; Tisdale, Michele D; Crawford, Katrina; Ellis, Michael; Lalani, Tahaniyat

    2016-06-01

    Staphylococcal skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs), especially those due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) are an important public health issue for the military. Limited data exist regarding the prevalence of S. aureus colonization in the shipboard setting. We conducted a cross-sectional, observational study to determine the point prevalence of S. aureus colonization among military personnel onboard a naval vessel. Asymptomatic active duty personnel completed a survey for risk factors associated with colonization and SSTIs. Culture specimens were obtained from the anterior nares, pharynx, groin, and perirectal regions. MRSA isolates underwent testing for antimicrobial resistance, virulence factors, and pulsed-field type. 400 individuals were enrolled, 198 (49.5%) of whom were colonized with S. aureus, with MRSA identified in 14 participants (3.5%). No significant risk factors were associated with MRSA colonization. USA800 was the most common colonizing MRSA strain in the cohort and was detected in 10 participants (71%). Two participants (14%) were colonized with USA300 MRSA. In this first report of S. aureus epidemiology in a shipboard setting, we observed high rates of S. aureus and MRSA colonization. Longitudinal studies are needed to document the incident rates of S. aureus colonization during shipboard deployment and its impact on SSTI risk. Reprint & Copyright © 2016 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  18. Deletion hotspots in AMACR promoter CpG island are cis-regulatory elements controlling the gene expression in the colon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Zhang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Alpha-methylacyl-coenzyme A racemase (AMACR regulates peroxisomal beta-oxidation of phytol-derived, branched-chain fatty acids from red meat and dairy products -- suspected risk factors for colon carcinoma (CCa. AMACR was first found overexpressed in prostate cancer but not in benign glands and is now an established diagnostic marker for prostate cancer. Aberrant expression of AMACR was recently reported in Cca; however, little is known about how this gene is abnormally activated in cancer. By using a panel of immunostained-laser-capture-microdissected clinical samples comprising the entire colon adenoma-carcinoma sequence, we show that deregulation of AMACR during colon carcinogenesis involves two nonrandom events, resulting in the mutually exclusive existence of double-deletion at CG3 and CG10 and deletion of CG12-16 in a newly identified CpG island within the core promoter of AMACR. The double-deletion at CG3 and CG10 was found to be a somatic lesion. It existed in histologically normal colonic glands and tubular adenomas with low AMACR expression and was absent in villous adenomas and all CCas expressing variable levels of AMACR. In contrast, deletion of CG12-16 was shown to be a constitutional allele with a frequency of 43% in a general population. Its prevalence reached 89% in moderately differentiated CCas strongly expressing AMACR but only existed at 14% in poorly differentiated CCas expressing little or no AMACR. The DNA sequences housing these deletions were found to be putative cis-regulatory elements for Sp1 at CG3 and CG10, and ZNF202 at CG12-16. Chromatin immunoprecipitation, siRNA knockdown, gel shift assay, ectopic expression, and promoter analyses supported the regulation by Sp1 and ZNF202 of AMACR gene expression in an opposite manner. Our findings identified key in vivo events and novel transcription factors responsible for AMACR regulation in CCas and suggested these AMACR deletions may have diagnostic/prognostic value for

  19. Multi-level gene expression profiles affected by thymidylate synthase and 5-fluorouracil in colon cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chu Edward

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thymidylate synthase (TS is a critical target for cancer chemotherapy and is one of the most extensively studied biomarkers for fluoropyrimidine-based chemotherapy. In addition to its critical role in enzyme catalysis, TS functions as an RNA binding protein to regulate the expression of its own mRNA translation and other cellular mRNAs, such as p53, at the translational level. In this study, a comprehensive gene expression analysis at the levels of both transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation was conducted to identify response markers using human genome array with TS-depleted human colon cancer HCT-C18 (TS- cells and HCT-C18 (TS+ cells stably transfected with the human TS cDNA expression plasmid. Results A total of 38 genes were found to be significantly affected by TS based on the expression profiles of steady state mRNA transcripts. However, based on the expression profiles of polysome associated mRNA transcripts, over 149 genes were affected by TS overexpression. This indicates that additional post-transcriptionally controlled genes can be captured with profiling polysome associated mRNA population. This unique approach provides a comprehensive overview of genes affected by TS. Additional novel post-transcriptionally regulated genes affected by 5-fluorouracil (5-FU treatment were also discovered via similar approach. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first time that a comprehensive gene expression profile regulated by TS and 5-FU was analyzed at the multiple steps of gene regulation. This study will provide candidate markers that can be potentially used for predicting therapeutic outcomes for fluoropyrimidine-based cancer chemotherapy.

  20. Specific Colon Cancer Cell Cytotoxicity Induced by Bacteriophage E Gene Expression under Transcriptional Control of Carcinoembryonic Antigen Promoter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana R. Rama

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer is one of the most prevalent cancers in the world. Patients in advanced stages often develop metastases that require chemotherapy and usually show a poor response, have a low survival rate and develop considerable toxicity with adverse symptoms. Gene therapy may act as an adjuvant therapy in attempts to destroy the tumor without affecting normal host tissue. The bacteriophage E gene has demonstrated significant antitumor activity in several cancers, but without any tumor-specific activity. The use of tumor-specific promoters may help to direct the expression of therapeutic genes so they act against specific cancer cells. We used the carcinoembryonic antigen promoter (CEA to direct E gene expression (pCEA-E towards colon cancer cells. pCEA-E induced a high cell growth inhibition of human HTC-116 colon adenocarcinoma and mouse MC-38 colon cancer cells in comparison to normal human CCD18co colon cells, which have practically undetectable levels of CEA. In addition, in vivo analyses of mice bearing tumors induced using MC-38 cells showed a significant decrease in tumor volume after pCEA-E treatment and a low level of Ki-67 in relation to untreated tumors. These results suggest that the CEA promoter is an excellent candidate for directing E gene expression specifically toward colon cancer cells.

  1. Gene expression classification of colon cancer into molecular subtypes: characterization, validation, and prognostic value.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laetitia Marisa

    Full Text Available Colon cancer (CC pathological staging fails to accurately predict recurrence, and to date, no gene expression signature has proven reliable for prognosis stratification in clinical practice, perhaps because CC is a heterogeneous disease. The aim of this study was to establish a comprehensive molecular classification of CC based on mRNA expression profile analyses.Fresh-frozen primary tumor samples from a large multicenter cohort of 750 patients with stage I to IV CC who underwent surgery between 1987 and 2007 in seven centers were characterized for common DNA alterations, including BRAF, KRAS, and TP53 mutations, CpG island methylator phenotype, mismatch repair status, and chromosomal instability status, and were screened with whole genome and transcriptome arrays. 566 samples fulfilled RNA quality requirements. Unsupervised consensus hierarchical clustering applied to gene expression data from a discovery subset of 443 CC samples identified six molecular subtypes. These subtypes were associated with distinct clinicopathological characteristics, molecular alterations, specific enrichments of supervised gene expression signatures (stem cell phenotype-like, normal-like, serrated CC phenotype-like, and deregulated signaling pathways. Based on their main biological characteristics, we distinguished a deficient mismatch repair subtype, a KRAS mutant subtype, a cancer stem cell subtype, and three chromosomal instability subtypes, including one associated with down-regulated immune pathways, one with up-regulation of the Wnt pathway, and one displaying a normal-like gene expression profile. The classification was validated in the remaining 123 samples plus an independent set of 1,058 CC samples, including eight public datasets. Furthermore, prognosis was analyzed in the subset of stage II-III CC samples. The subtypes C4 and C6, but not the subtypes C1, C2, C3, and C5, were independently associated with shorter relapse-free survival, even after

  2. [Dietary factors and cancer of the colon and rectum in a population based case-control study in Shanghai].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, G; Gao, Y; Ji, B

    1994-10-01

    The study was a population-based case control one, to compare possible difference in the risk factors between colonic and rectal cancer. This study showed that: (1) High intake of pork and saturated fat was an important risk factor for colon cancer, and only slightly related to rectal cancer. (2) Low consumption of vegetables especially cruciferous vegetables, rhizome vegetables, sea weeds, legume vegetables, dietary fiber and some vitamins mainly derived from vegetables, e.g. vitamin c and carotene, was associated with an increased risk for both colonic and rectal cancer, and these factors were closer relationship with rectal cancer than colon cancer. (3) High intake of the fried and pickled foods significantly increase the risk of occurrence of these cancers. (4) The ratio of bowel cancer in first degree relatives of colon cancer cases was 2.9 times of control group (P 0.05) compared with control group.

  3. Anti-tumor effects of fibroblast growth factor-binding protein (FGF-BP knockdown in colon carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schulze Daniel

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fibroblast growth factors FGF-1 and FGF-2 are often upregulated in tumors, but tightly bound to heparan sulphate proteoglycans of the extracellular matrix (ECM. One mechanism of their bioactivation relies on the FGF-binding protein (FGF-BP which, upon reversible binding to FGF-1 or -2, leads to their release from the ECM. FGF-BP increases tumorigenicity and is highly expressed in tumors like colon carcinoma. In this paper, we analyse cellular and molecular consequences of RNAi-mediated FGF-BP knockdown in colon carcinoma, and explore the therapeutic effects of the nanoparticle-mediated delivery of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs for FGF-BP targeting. Results Employing stable RNAi cells, we establish a dose-dependence of cell proliferation on FGF-BP expression levels. Decreased proliferation is mirrored by alterations in cell cycle distribution and upregulation of p21, which is relevant for mediating FGF-BP effects. While inhibition of proliferation is mainly associated with reduced Akt and increased GSK3β activation, antibody array-based analyses also reveal other alterations in MAPK signalling. Additionally, we demonstrate induction of apoptosis, mediated through caspase-3/7 activation, and alterations in redox status upon FGF-BP knockdown. These effects are based on the upregulation of Bad, Bax and HIF-1α, and the downregulation of catalase. In a therapeutic FGF-BP knockdown approach based on RNAi, we employ polymer-based nanoparticles for the in vivo delivery of siRNAs into established wildtype colon carcinoma xenografts. We show that the systemic treatment of mice leads to the inhibition of tumor growth based on FGF-BP knockdown. Conclusions FGF-BP is integrated in a complex network of cytoprotective effects, and represents a promising therapeutic target for RNAi-based knockdown approaches.

  4. Effect of enhanced biosecurity and selected on-farm factors on Campylobacter colonization of chicken broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiev, M; Beauvais, W; Guitian, J

    2017-02-01

    Human campylobacteriosis is the most commonly reported gastrointestinal bacterial infection in the EU; poultry meat has been identified as the main source of infection. We tested the hypothesis that enhanced biosecurity and other factors such as welfare status, breed, the practice of partial depopulation and number of empty days between flocks may prevent Campylobacter spp. caecal colonization of poultry batches at high levels (>123 000 c.f.u./g in pooled caecal samples). We analysed data from 2314 poultry batches sampled at slaughter in the UK in 2011-2013. We employed random-effects logistic regression to account for clustering of batches within farms and adjust for confounding. We estimated population attributable fractions using adjusted risk ratios. Enhanced biosecurity reduced the odds of colonization at partial depopulation [odds ratio (OR) 0·25, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0·14-0·47] and, to a lesser extent, at final depopulation (OR 0·47, 95% CI 0·25-0·89). An effect of the type of breed was also found. Under our assumptions, approximately 1/3 of highly colonized batches would be avoided if they were all raised under enhanced biosecurity or without partial depopulation. The results of the study indicate that on-farm measures can play an important role in reducing colonization of broiler chickens with Campylobacter spp. and as a result human exposure.

  5. Analysis of farm specific risk factors for Campylobacter colonization of broilers in six European countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommer, Helle Mølgaard; Borck Høg, Birgitte; Larsen, Lars Stehr

    2016-01-01

    This study presents on-farm risk factors for the colonization of broiler flocks with Campylobacter based on comparable data from six European countries: Denmark, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Spain, and the UK. The study includes explanatory variables from a large questionnaire concerning...... production, farm management procedures and farm conditions, climate data on mean temperature, sunshine hours, and precipitation, as well as data on Campylobacter status of broiler flocks. All together the study comprises data from more than 6000 flocks. The data were analysed using a generalized linear model....... These were generally related to inadequate biosecurity. Identified risk factors were: broiler houses older than 15 years, absence of anterooms and barriers in each house, shared tools between houses, long downtime, and drinker systems with bells or cups. Also, the risk of broiler flocks becoming colonized...

  6. Acquired resistance to 5-fluorouracil via HSP90/Src-mediated increase in thymidylate synthase expression in colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Ji-Young; Lee, Ji-Sun; Min, Hye-Young; Lee, Ho-Young

    2015-10-20

    5-fluorouracil (5-FU), one of the first-line chemotherapeutic agents for the treatment of gastrointestinal malignancies, has shown limited efficacy. The expression of thymidylate synthase (TYMS) has been reported to be associated with the resistance to 5-FU. Here, we demonstrate that the enhanced HSP90 function and subsequent activation of Src induce expression of TYMS and acquired resistance to 5-FU in colon cancer. We show that the persistent 5-FU treatment granted 5-FU-sensitive HCT116 colon cancer cells morphologic, molecular, and behavioral characteristic of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), contributing to emergence of acquired resistance to 5-FU. HCT116/R, a HCT116 colon cancer cell subline carrying acquired resistance to 5-FU, showed increased expression and activation of HSP90's client proteins and transcriptional up-regulation of TYMS. Forced overexpression of HSP90 or constitutive active Src in HCT116 cells increased TYMS expression. Conversely, pharmacological blockade of HSP90 or Src in HCT116/R cells effectively suppressed the changes involved in 5-FU resistance in vitro and xenograft tumor growth, hematogenous spread, and metastatic tumor development in vivo. This study suggests a novel function of HSP90-Src pathway in regulation of TYMS expression and acquisition of 5-FU resistance. Thus, therapeutics targeting this pathway may be an effective clinical strategy to overcome 5-FU resistance in colon cancer.

  7. Systemic analysis of the differential gene expression profile in a colonic adenoma-normal SSH library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Bingjian; Xu, Jing; Zhu, Yiming; Zhang, Hao; Lai, Maode

    2007-03-01

    The discovery of differentially expressed genes of colonic adenoma minus normal mucosa enables the understanding of early molecular events in colorectal carcinogenesis. In our previous study, we have developed an adenoma minus normal mucosa suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) library and identified 109 differentially expressed clones. An in-house EST pipeline and the Gene Ontology web-based tool () were used to analyze these clones. Realtime quantitative RT-PCR (Q-PCR) was applied to detect the expression of 14-3-3 zeta, REG4 and 6 ribosomal protein genes (RPS2, RPS12, RPS27A, RPL5, RPL7a and RPL10a) in 14 adenomas (8 with concurrent cancers) and 44 colorectal adenocarcinomas with paired normal mucosa. Sixty-two candidate genes were obtained from this library. Bioinformatics analysis indicated that both ribosomal protein genes and immune-related genes were enriched. REG4 was significantly upregulated in colorectal adenomas (medium fold: 1.676, pSSH library may be helpful in understanding the molecular mechanism of colorectal cancer initiation and progression. REG4 and 14-3-3 zeta may be potential biomarkers for early colorectal cancer detection.

  8. Risk factors associated with prolonged postoperative ileus after elective colon resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juárez-Parra, M A; Carmona-Cantú, J; González-Cano, J R; Arana-Garza, S; Trevino-Frutos, R J

    2015-01-01

    There is a coordinated inhibition of motility of the colon after its surgical manipulation that contributes to the accumulation of fluids and gas, in turn characterized by nausea,vomiting, pain, abdominal distension, and constipation. Motility is recovered in the majority of patients within the first 72 hours. A delay in its resolution is known as prolonged postoperative ileus. To study the preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative risk factors for developing prolonged ileus in patients that underwent elective colon resection.Materials and methods: The association between 25 perioperative variables and the presentation of prolonged ileus was analyzed in 85 patients that underwent colon resection at Hospital Christus Muguerza Alta Especialidad within the time frame of 2011 and 2014. Postoperative ileus occurred in 22.3% of the patients. The statistically significant predictors of ileus were obesity (OR 1.119, P=.048) and admission to the intensive care unit (OR3.571, P=.050). The use of peridural anesthesia during the surgical act was found to be a protective factor (OR 0.363, P=.050). The presence of these risk factors can alert the physician to the need for a closer follow-up in patients at high risk for postoperative ileus, and the use of peridural anesthesiacan possibly lower the incidence of ileus.

  9. A variant of Smurf2 protects mice against colitis-associated colon cancer by inducing transforming growth factor β signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dornhoff, Heike; Becker, Christoph; Wirtz, Stefan; Strand, Dennis; Tenzer, Stefan; Rosfa, Susanne; Neufert, Clemens; Mudter, Jonas; Markl, Jürgen; Siebler, Jürgen; Neurath, Markus F

    2012-05-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β signaling, which is down-regulated by the E3 ubiquitin ligase Smad ubiquitin regulating factor 2 (Smurf2), promotes development of cancer. We identified a splice variant of Smurf2 (ΔE2Smurf2) and investigated its role in colon carcinogenesis in mice. Colitis-associated colon cancer was induced in mice by administration of azoxymethane, followed by 3 cycles of oral administration of dextran sodium sulfate. Messenger RNA levels of Smurf2 in colon tumors and control tissue were measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction; lymphocyte and cytokine levels were measured in tumor and tissue samples. Tumor-infiltrating CD4(+) cells expressed higher levels of ΔE2Smurf2 than CD4(+) cells from nontumor tissues of wild-type mice. T cell-specific overexpression of ΔE2Smurf2 increased TGF-β signaling by suppressing protein levels of Smurf2, accompanied by an increase in levels of TGF-β receptor type II. Transgenic mice that overexpress ΔE2Smurf2 were protected against development of colitis-associated tumors and down-regulated proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-6. Patients with chronic inflammatory bowel disease had a significantly lower ratio of Smurf2/ΔE2Smurf2 than control individuals. T cell-specific ΔE2Smurf2 degrades wild-type Smurf2 and controls intestinal tumor growth in mice by up-regulating TGF-β receptor type II, reducing proliferation and production of proinflammatory cytokines. Copyright © 2012 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Avian resistance to Campylobacter jejuni colonization is associated with an intestinal immunogene expression signature identified by mRNA sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Connell

    Full Text Available Campylobacter jejuni is the most common cause of human bacterial gastroenteritis and is associated with several post-infectious manifestations, including onset of the autoimmune neuropathy Guillain-Barré syndrome, causing significant morbidity and mortality. Poorly-cooked chicken meat is the most frequent source of infection as C. jejuni colonizes the avian intestine in a commensal relationship. However, not all chickens are equally colonized and resistance seems to be genetically determined. We hypothesize that differences in immune response may contribute to variation in colonization levels between susceptible and resistant birds. Using high-throughput sequencing in an avian infection model, we investigate gene expression associated with resistance or susceptibility to colonization of the gastrointestinal tract with C. jejuni and find that gut related immune mechanisms are critical for regulating colonization. Amongst a single population of 300 4-week old chickens, there was clear segregation in levels of C. jejuni colonization 48 hours post-exposure. RNAseq analysis of caecal tissue from 14 C. jejuni-susceptible and 14 C. jejuni-resistant birds generated over 363 million short mRNA sequences which were investigated to identify 219 differentially expressed genes. Significantly higher expression of genes involved in the innate immune response, cytokine signaling, B cell and T cell activation and immunoglobulin production, as well as the renin-angiotensin system was observed in resistant birds, suggesting an early active immune response to C. jejuni. Lower expression of these genes in colonized birds suggests suppression or inhibition of a clearing immune response thus facilitating commensal colonization and generating vectors for zoonotic transmission. This study describes biological processes regulating C. jejuni colonization of the avian intestine and gives insight into the differential immune mechanisms incited in response to commensal

  11. Ciprofloxacin Affects Host Cells by Suppressing Expression of the Endogenous Antimicrobial Peptides Cathelicidins and Beta-Defensin-3 in Colon Epithelia

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    Protim Sarker

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotics exert several effects on host cells including regulation of immune components. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs, e.g., cathelicidins and defensins display multiple functions in innate immunity. In colonic mucosa, cathelicidins are induced by butyrate, a bacterial fermentation product. Here, we investigated the effect of antibiotics on butyrate-induced expression of cathelicidins and beta-defensins in colon epithelial cells. Real-time PCR analysis revealed that ciprofloxacin and clindamycin reduce butyrate-induced transcription of the human cathelicidin LL-37 in the colonic epithelial cell line HT-29. Suppression of LL-37 peptide/protein by ciprofloxacin was confirmed by Western blot analysis. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated that ciprofloxacin suppresses the rabbit cathelicidin CAP-18 in rectal epithelia of healthy and butyrate-treated Shigella-infected rabbits. Ciprofloxacin also down-regulated butyrate-induced transcription of the human beta-defensin-3 in HT-29 cells. Microarray analysis of HT-29 cells revealed upregulation by butyrate with subsequent down-regulation by ciprofloxacin of additional genes encoding immune factors. Dephosphorylation of histone H3, an epigenetic event provided a possible mechanism of the suppressive effect of ciprofloxacin. Furthermore, LL-37 peptide inhibited Clostridium difficile growth in vitro. In conclusion, ciprofloxacin and clindamycin exert immunomodulatory function by down-regulating AMPs and other immune components in colonic epithelial cells. Suppression of AMPs may contribute to the overgrowth of C. difficile, causing antibiotic-associated diarrhea.

  12. Different waves of effector genes with contrasted genomic location are expressed by Leptosphaeria maculans during cotyledon and stem colonization of oilseed rape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gervais, Julie; Plissonneau, Clémence; Linglin, Juliette; Meyer, Michel; Labadie, Karine; Cruaud, Corinne; Fudal, Isabelle; Rouxel, Thierry; Balesdent, Marie-Hélène

    2017-10-01

    Leptosphaeria maculans, the causal agent of stem canker disease, colonizes oilseed rape (Brassica napus) in two stages: a short and early colonization stage corresponding to cotyledon or leaf colonization, and a late colonization stage during which the fungus colonizes systemically and symptomlessly the plant during several months before stem canker appears. To date, the determinants of the late colonization stage are poorly understood; L. maculans may either successfully escape plant defences, leading to stem canker development, or the plant may develop an 'adult-stage' resistance reducing canker incidence. To obtain an insight into these determinants, we performed an RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) pilot project comparing fungal gene expression in infected cotyledons and in symptomless or necrotic stems. Despite the low fraction of fungal material in infected stems, sufficient fungal transcripts were detected and a large number of fungal genes were expressed, thus validating the feasibility of the approach. Our analysis showed that all avirulence genes previously identified are under-expressed during stem colonization compared with cotyledon colonization. A validation RNA-seq experiment was then performed to investigate the expression of candidate effector genes during systemic colonization. Three hundred and seven 'late' effector candidates, under-expressed in the early colonization stage and over-expressed in the infected stems, were identified. Finally, our analysis revealed a link between the regulation of expression of effectors and their genomic location: the 'late' effector candidates, putatively involved in systemic colonization, are located in gene-rich genomic regions, whereas the 'early' effector genes, over-expressed in the early colonization stage, are located in gene-poor regions of the genome. © 2016 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  13. Comprehensive genomic analyses of a metastatic colon cancer to the lung by whole exome sequencing and gene expression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Li Tai; Lee, Sharon; Choi, Helen; Kim, Hong Kwan; Jew, Gregory; Kang, Hio Chung; Chen, Lin; Jablons, David; Kim, Il-Jin

    2014-01-01

    We performed whole exome sequencing and gene expression analysis on a metastatic colon cancer to the lung, along with the adjacent normal tissue of the lung. Whole exome sequencing uncovered 71 high-confidence non‑synonymous mutations. We selected 16 mutation candidates, and 13 out of 16 mutations were validated by targeted deep sequencing using the Ion Torrent PGM customized AmpliSeq panel. By integrating mutation, copy number and gene expression microarray data, we identified a JAZF1 mutation with a gain-of-copy, suggesting its oncogenic potential for the lung metastasis from colon cancer. Our pathway analyses showed that the identified mutations closely reflected characteristics of the metastatic site (lung) while mRNA gene expression patterns kept genetic information of its primary tumor (colon). The most significant gene expression network was the 'Colorectal Cancer Metastasis Signaling', containing 6 (ADCY2, ADCY9, APC, GNB5, K-ras and LRP6) out of the 71 mutated genes. Some of these mutated genes (ADCY9, ADCY2, GNB5, K-ras, HDAC6 and ARHGEF17) also belong to the 'Phospholipase C Signaling' network, which suggests that this pathway and its mutated genes may contribute to a lung metastasis from colon cancer.

  14. The Prognostic Impact of Protein Expression of E-Cadherin-Catenin Complexes Differs between Rectal and Colon Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolf Aamodt

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The E-cadherin-catenin complex provides cell-cell adhesion. In order for a carcinoma to metastasize, cancer cells must let go of their hold of neighboring cells in the primary tumor. The presence of components of the E-cadherin-catenin complex in 246 rectal adenocarcinomas was examined by immunohistochemistry and compared to their presence in 219 colon carcinomas. The expression data were correlated to clinical information from the patients' records. There were statistically significant differences in protein expression between the rectal and the colon carcinomas regarding membranous -catenin, -catenin, p120-catenin, and E-cadherin, as well as nuclear -catenin. In the rectal carcinomas, there was a significant inverse association between the expression of p120-catenin in cell membranes of the primary tumors and the occurrence of local recurrence, while membranous protein expression of -catenin was inversely related to distant metastases.

  15. The Prognostic Impact of Protein Expression of E-Cadherin-Catenin Complexes Differs between Rectal and Colon Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aamodt, Rolf; Bondi, Johan; Andersen, Solveig Norheim; Bakka, Arne; Bukholm, Geir; Bukholm, Ida R K

    2010-01-01

    The E-cadherin-catenin complex provides cell-cell adhesion. In order for a carcinoma to metastasize, cancer cells must let go of their hold of neighboring cells in the primary tumor. The presence of components of the E-cadherin-catenin complex in 246 rectal adenocarcinomas was examined by immunohistochemistry and compared to their presence in 219 colon carcinomas. The expression data were correlated to clinical information from the patients' records. There were statistically significant differences in protein expression between the rectal and the colon carcinomas regarding membranous beta-catenin, gamma-catenin, p120-catenin, and E-cadherin, as well as nuclear beta-catenin. In the rectal carcinomas, there was a significant inverse association between the expression of p120-catenin in cell membranes of the primary tumors and the occurrence of local recurrence, while membranous protein expression of beta-catenin was inversely related to distant metastases.

  16. Differential effect of early antibiotic intervention on bacterial fermentation patterns and mucosal gene expression in the colon of pigs under diets with different protein levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chuanjian; Yu, Miao; Yang, Yuxiang; Mu, Chunlong; Su, Yong; Zhu, Weiyun

    2017-03-01

    The study aimed to evaluate the effects of early antibiotic intervention (EAI) on bacterial fermentation patterns and mucosal immune markers in the colon of pigs with different protein level diets. Eighteen litters of piglets at day (d) 7 were fed creep feed without or with growth promoting antibiotics until d 42. At d 42, pigs within each group were further randomly assigned to a normal- or low-crude protein (CP) diet. At d 77 and d 120, five pigs per group were slaughtered for analyzing colonic bacteria, metabolites, and mucosal gene expressions. Results showed that low-CP diet increased propionate and butyrate concentrations at d 77 but reduced ammonia and phenol concentrations (P bacteria groups (Firmicutes, Clostridium cluster IV, Clostridium cluster XIVa, Escherichia coli, and Lactobacillus), but EAI showed limited effects. Low-CP diet down-regulated gene expressions of pro-inflammatory cytokines, toll-like receptor (TLR4), myeloid differentiating factor 88 (MyD88), and nuclear factor-κB p65 (NF-κB p65) (P fermentation and gene expressions of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Low-CP diet markedly reduced protein fermentation, modified microbial communities, and down-regulated gene expressions of pro-inflammatory cytokines possibly via down-regulating TLR4-MyD88-NF-κB signaling pathway.

  17. Farm specific risk factors for Campylobacter colonization of broilers in six European countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borck Høg, Birgitte; Sommer, Helle Mølgaard; Williams, N.

    What: This study, part of the EU financed CamCon project, presents the results from a multi-national risk factor study, where farm data were collected through a standardised questionnaire survey carried out in six EU countries: Denmark, Norway, the Netherlands, Poland, Spain and the UK. Why......: To identify common and country-specific, on-farm risk factors that can be used to identify the most efficient on-farm measures for preventing broiler flocks from becoming colonized with Campylobacter (See presentation by H.M. Sommer, Wednesday morning How: By applying a variance model that handles...

  18. Prevalence and risk factors for colonization of Clostridium difficile among adults living near livestock farms in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zomer, T P; VAN Duijkeren, E; Wielders, C C H; Veenman, C; Hengeveld, P; VAN DER Hoek, W; DE Greeff, S C; Smit, L A M; Heederik, D J; Yzermans, C J; Kuijper, E J; Maassen, C B M

    2017-10-01

    A cross-sectional study was performed among 2494 adults not living or working on a farm to assess prevalence of Clostridium difficile (CD) colonization and risk factors in a livestock dense area. CD prevalence was 1·2%. Twenty-one persons were colonized with a toxigenic strain and nine with a non-toxigenic strain. CD-positive persons did not live closer to livestock farms than individuals negative for CD. Antibiotic exposure in the preceding 3 months was a risk factor for CD colonization (odds ratio 3·70; 95% confidence interval 1·25-10·95).

  19. [Prevalence and risk factors for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonization among outpatients undergoing hemodialysis treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köseoğlu, Ozlem; Sayın Kutlu, Selda; Cevahir, Nural

    2012-01-01

    Infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is frequent among hemodialysis patients and lead to increased morbidity and mortality rates. It is known that nasal colonization plays an important role for the development of MRSA infections. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and risk factors for MRSA colonization among outpatients undergoing hemodialysis. A total of 466 adult patients (199 female, 267 male; age range: 18-89 years, mean age: 55.8 ± 15.1 years) who were under hemodialysis between September-December 2008 in different health centers at Pamukkale/ Denizli region, Turkey, were included in the study. Swab samples obtained from anterior nares of patients were cultivated on sheep-blood agar and mannitol-salt agar media. The isolates were identified by conventional bacteriological methods. S.aureus strains were isolated from 204 (43.8%) patients and 34 (16.7%) were found methicillin-resistant. Thus the rate of MRSA colonization in hemodialysis patients was detected as 7.3% (34/466). All of the MRSA strains were found susceptible to vancomycin, linezolid and tigecycline, while the resistance rates for the other antimicrobial agents were as follows: 70.6% to azithromycin and claritromycin; 64.7% to erythromycin; %58.8 to clindamycin, gentamicin and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole; 55.9% to ciprofloxacin; 44.1% to tetracycline and rifampin; 5.9% to chloramphenicol. Inducible clindamycin resistance in MRSA isolates was %23.5 (8/34), and multidrug resistance rate was 76.5% (26/34). Multivariate analysis revealed that the history of previous hospitalization within a year [odds ratio (OR), 3.426; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.595-7.361, p= 0.002] and the presence of chronic obstructive lung disease (OR, 5.181; 95% CI, 1.612-16.648, p= 0.006) were independent risk factors for MRSA colonization in this population. A better understanding of the prevalence and risk factors for nasal MRSA colonization among hemodialysis

  20. Synthetic triterpenoid induces 15-PGDH expression and suppresses inflammation-driven colon carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sung Hee; Kim, Byung-Gyu; Robinson, Janet; Fink, Steve; Yan, Min; Sporn, Michael B.; Markowitz, Sanford D.; Letterio, John J.

    2014-01-01

    Colitis-associated colon cancer (CAC) develops as a result of inflammation-induced epithelial transformation, which occurs in response to inflammatory cytokine-dependent downregulation of 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-PGDH) and subsequent suppression of prostaglandin metabolism. Agents that both enhance 15-PGDH expression and suppress cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) production may more effectively prevent CAC. Synthetic triterpenoids are a class of small molecules that suppress COX-2 as well as inflammatory cytokine signaling. Here, we found that administration of the synthetic triterpenoid 2-cyano-3,12-dioxooleana-1,9(11)-dien-C28-methyl ester (CDDO-Me) suppresses CAC in mice. In a spontaneous, inflammation-driven intestinal neoplasia model, deletion of Smad4 specifically in T cells led to progressive production of inflammatory cytokines, including TNF-α, IFN-γ, iNOS, IL-6, IL-1β; as well as activation of STAT1 and STAT3; along with suppression of 15-PGDH expression. Oral administration of CDDO-Me to mice with SMAD4-deficient T cells increased survival and suppressed intestinal epithelial neoplasia by decreasing production of inflammatory mediators and increasing expression of 15-PGDH. Induction of 15-PGDH by CDDO-Me was dose dependent in epithelial cells and was abrogated following treatment with TGF-β signaling inhibitors in vitro. Furthermore, CDDO-Me–dependent 15-PGDH induction was not observed in Smad3–/– mice. Similarly, CDDO-Me suppressed azoxymethane plus dextran sodium sulfate–induced carcinogenesis in wild-type animals, highlighting the potential of small molecules of the triterpenoid family as effective agents for the chemoprevention of CAC in humans. PMID:24837432

  1. Whole genome gene expression meta-analysis of inflammatory bowel disease colon mucosa demonstrates lack of major differences between Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis.

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    Atle van Beelen Granlund

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, genetic susceptibility together with environmental factors disturbs gut homeostasis producing chronic inflammation. The two main IBD subtypes are Ulcerative colitis (UC and Crohn's disease (CD. We present the to-date largest microarray gene expression study on IBD encompassing both inflamed and un-inflamed colonic tissue. A meta-analysis including all available, comparable data was used to explore important aspects of IBD inflammation, thereby validating consistent gene expression patterns. METHODS: Colon pinch biopsies from IBD patients were analysed using Illumina whole genome gene expression technology. Differential expression (DE was identified using LIMMA linear model in the R statistical computing environment. Results were enriched for gene ontology (GO categories. Sets of genes encoding antimicrobial proteins (AMP and proteins involved in T helper (Th cell differentiation were used in the interpretation of the results. All available data sets were analysed using the same methods, and results were compared on a global and focused level as t-scores. RESULTS: Gene expression in inflamed mucosa from UC and CD are remarkably similar. The meta-analysis confirmed this. The patterns of AMP and Th cell-related gene expression were also very similar, except for IL23A which was consistently higher expressed in UC than in CD. Un-inflamed tissue from patients demonstrated minimal differences from healthy controls. CONCLUSIONS: There is no difference in the Th subgroup involvement between UC and CD. Th1/Th17 related expression, with little Th2 differentiation, dominated both diseases. The different IL23A expression between UC and CD suggests an IBD subtype specific role. AMPs, previously little studied, are strongly overexpressed in IBD. The presented meta-analysis provides a sound background for further research on IBD pathobiology.

  2. Factors that mediate colonization of the human stomach by Helicobacter pylori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunne, Ciara; Dolan, Brendan; Clyne, Marguerite

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) colonizes the stomach of humans and causes chronic infection. The majority of bacteria live in the mucus layer overlying the gastric epithelial cells and only a small proportion of bacteria are found interacting with the epithelial cells. The bacteria living in the gastric mucus may act as a reservoir of infection for the underlying cells which is essential for the development of disease. Colonization of gastric mucus is likely to be key to the establishment of chronic infection. How H. pylori manages to colonise and survive in the hostile environment of the human stomach and avoid removal by mucus flow and killing by gastric acid is the subject of this review. We also discuss how bacterial and host factors may together go some way to explaining the susceptibility to colonization and the outcome of infection in different individuals. H. pylori infection of the gastric mucosa has become a paradigm for chronic infection. Understanding of why H. pylori is such a successful pathogen may help us understand how other bacterial species colonise mucosal surfaces and cause disease. PMID:24914320

  3. Nocardia Colonization: A Risk Factor for Lung Deterioration in Cystic Fibrosis Patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagan, Adi; Keller, Nathan; Vilozni, Daphna; Ramon-Saraf, Reut; Bar, Bat-El; Sarouk, Ifat; Ashkenazi, Moshe; Lavie, Moran; Efrati, Ori

    2015-06-30

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) patients are predisposed to infection and colonization with different microbes. Some cause deterioration of lung functions, while others are colonizers without clear pathogenic effects. Our aim was to understand the effects of Nocardia species in sputum cultures on the course of lung disease in CF patients. A retrospective study analyzing the impact of positive Nocardia spp. in sputum of 19 CF patients over a period of 10 years, comparing them with similar status patients without Nocardia growth. Pulmonary function tests (PFTs) are used as indicators of lung disease severity and decline rate in functions per year is calculated. No significant difference in PFTs of CF patients with positive Nocardia in sputum was found in different sub-groups according to number of episodes of growth, background variables, or treatment plans. The yearly decline in PFTs was similar to that recognized in CF patients. The control group patients showed similar background data. However, a small difference was found in the rate of decline of their PFTs, which implies a possibly slower rate of progression of lung disease. The prognosis of lung disease in CF patients colonized with Nocardia does not seem to differ based on the persistence of growth on cultures, different treatment plans or risk factors. Apparently, Nocardia does not cause a deterioration of lung functions with time. However, it may show a trend to faster decline in PFTs compared to similar status CF patients without isolation of this microorganism in their sputum.

  4. Inhibition of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor Phosphorylation on Tumor-Associated Endothelial Cells Leads to Treatment of Orthotopic Human Colon Cancer in Nude Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takamitsu Sasaki

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of our study was to determine whether the dual inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR signaling pathways in tumor-associated endothelial cells can inhibit the progressive growth of human colon carcinoma in the cecum of nude mice. SW620CE2 human colon cancer cells growing in culture and orthotopically in the cecum of nude mice expressed a high level of transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-α and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF but were negative for EGFR, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2, VEGFR. Double immunofluorescence staining revealed that tumorassociated endothelial cells expressed EGFR, VEGFR2, phosphorylated EGFR (pEGFR, phosphorylated VEGFR (pVEGFR. Treatment of mice with either 7H-pyrrolo [2,3-d]-pyrimidine lead scaffold (AEE788; an inhibitor of EGFR and VEGFR tyrosine kinase or CPT-11 as single agents significantly inhibited the growth of cecal tumors (P < .01; this decrease was even more pronounced with AEE788 combined with CPT-11 (P < .001. AEE788 alone or combined with CPT-11 also inhibited the expression of pEGFR and pVEGFR on tumor-associated endothelial cells, significantly decreased vascularization and tumor cell proliferation, increased the level of apoptosis in both tumorassociated endothelial cells and tumor cells. These data demonstrate that targeting EGFR and VEGFR signaling on tumor-associated endothelial cells provides a viable approach for the treatment of colon cancer.

  5. The Clinical Significance of DC-SIGN and DC-SIGNR, which Are Novel Markers Expressed in Human Colon Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kai; Chen, Zhe; Sun, Zhigang; Zhang, Zhuqing; Ding, Dongbing; Ren, Shuangyi; Zuo, Yunfei

    2014-01-01

    Background Colon cancer has always been diagnosed at a late stage, which is associated with poor prognosis. The currently used serum tumor markers CEA and CA19-9 display low sensitivity and specificity and may not have diagnostic value in early stage colon cancer. Thus, there is an urgent need to identify novel serum biomarkers for use in the early detection of colon cancer. Methods In this study, the expression of DC-SIGN and DC-SIGNR in serum was detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). DC-SIGN and DC-SIGNR expression was detected in cancer tissues by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Results The level of sDC-SIGN was lower in patients than in the healthy controls, while the level of sDC-SIGNR in patients was higher than in the healthy controls. Both sDC-SIGN and sDC-SIGNR had diagnostic significances for cancer patients, and the combined diagnosis of these two markers was higher than both of them alone. Furthermore, there were significant differences between both sDC-SIGN and sDC-SIGNR in stage I/II patients and the healthy controls. Moreover, high sDC-SIGN level was accompanied with the long survival time. Additionally, DC-SIGNR was negative in the cancer foci and matched normal colon tissues but was weakly positive between the cancer foci. DC-SIGN staining was faint in matched normal colon tissues, strong in the tumor stroma and the invasive margin of colon cancer tissues, and negatively correlated with the sDC-SIGN level in serum from the same patient. Interestingly, the percent survival of patients with a DC-SIGN mean density of>0.001219 (the upper 95% confidence interval of matched normal colon tissues) was higher than for all other patients. Conclusion DC-SIGN and DC-SIGNR are blood-based molecular markers that can potentially be used for the diagnosis of early stage patients. Moreover, expression of DC-SIGN in serum and cancer tissues may affect the survival time for colon cancer patients. PMID:25504222

  6. Living Conditions as a Driving Factor in Persistent Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus Colonization Among HIV-infected Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Maria Teresa C; Marlow, Mariel A; Aguiar-Alves, Fábio; Pinheiro, Marcos Gabriel; Freitas Alves, Maria de Fátima Nogueira de; Santos Cruz, Maria Letícia; Saavedra Gaspar, Mariza Curto; Rocha, Rebeca; Velarde, Luis Guillermo C; Araújo Cardoso, Claudete A

    2016-10-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) colonization has been linked to HIV-related sexual and social behaviors. MRSA risk factors may be different for HIV-infected children, adolescents and young adults. We investigated the association of MRSA colonization, persistent colonization and genotypes with potential risk factors among HIV-infected youth. For this case-control study, patients 24 years of age or younger attending 2 HIV reference centers were recruited from February to August 2012 and followed for 1 year. Nasal swabs were collected at enrollment and every 3 months. MRSA clones were characterized by staphylococcal chromosomal cassette mec typing, spa typing and multilocus sequence typing. We compared MRSA colonization and persistent colonization with patient demographic and clinical characteristics. Among 117 participants, MRSA colonization frequency (calculated for each collection based on the number of positive cultures per patient) was 12.8% at the first collection. The average MRSA colonization frequency was 10.4%. Our results showed 11.1% were persistent carriers (subjects with more than 1 positive culture in at least 3). Crowding was the only factor associated with MRSA colonization (P = 0.018). Persistent carriers had significantly higher (4.2 times) odds of living in a crowded household (95% confidence interval-1.1-16.2). We observed high genetic diversity among MRSA isolates, with t002/ST5 and t318/ST30 being the most frequent. MRSA colonization among HIV-infected youth is more closely related to living in a low-income or slum community than to HIV-related clinical factors. High genetic MRSA isolate diversity in our population suggests frequent transmission.

  7. [Risk factor of intestinal colonization with vancomycin resistant Enterococcus spp in hospitalized pediatric patients with oncological disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loyola, Paula; Tordecilla, Juan; Benadof, Dona; Yohannessen, Karla; Acuña, Mirta

    2015-08-01

    The isolation of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus spp (ERV) has increased significantly within the last few years, along with the risk of infection and dissemination of these bacteria. Our aim was to determine risk factors (RF) for intestinal colonization in hospitalized pediatric patients with oncological disease at Hospital de Niños Roberto del Río. Between January 2012 and December 2013 a transversal study was performed with 107 rectal swabs and processed with a PCR for ERV. The patients were classified as "colonized with ERV" and "not colonized with ERV" and we evaluated possible RF for intestinal colonization in both groups. VRE colonization was found in 51 patients (52%). The median of time elapsed between oncological diagnosis and VRE colonization was 35 days. The significant RF associated with VRE colonization were days of hospitalization prior to study, neutropenia and treatment with antibiotics within 30 days prior to study and mucositis. According to the RF revealed in this study we may suggest prevention standards to avoid ERV colonization. This is the first investigation in our country in hospitalized pediatric patients with oncological disease and processed with a multiplex PCR for ERV, therefore it is a great contribution about this subject in Chile.

  8. Endogenous expression of proteases in colon cancer cells facilitate influenza A viruses mediated oncolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturlan, Sanda; Stremitzer, Stefan; Bauman, Suzann; Sachet, Monika; Wolschek, Markus; Ruthsatz, Tanja; Egorov, Andrej; Bergmann, Michael

    2010-09-15

    Previously we have developed a prototype for conditionally replicating oncolytic influenza A virus which is based on deletions in the non-structural (NS1) protein. Multi-cycle replication of influenza A virus in malignant tissue is critically dependent on a protease which cleaves the viral entry protein. Here we demonstrate that the malignant colon cancer cell lines Caco-2, HT-29 and SW-620 can endogenously provide a virus-activating protease, which allows lytic multi-cycle replication of NS1 deletion viruses in those cancer cells in vitro. The oncolytic potency of an influenza NS1 deletion virus (NS1-80) was further tested in SCID mice bearing HT-29 derived tumors. The intra-tumoral injection of live, but not of heat inactivated NS1-80 virus significantly inhibited progression of established tumors. We conclude that a selected set of human cancer expressing virus activating- proteases will be a preferred target for oncolytic tumor therapy using influenza A virus mutants.

  9. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α induces multidrug resistance protein in colon cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lv Y

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Yingqian Lv, Shan Zhao, Jinzhu Han, Likang Zheng, Zixin Yang, Li Zhao Department of Oncology, The Second Hospital, Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang, Hebei Province, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Multidrug resistance is the major cause of chemotherapy failure in many solid tumors, including colon cancer. Hypoxic environment is a feature for all solid tumors and is important for the development of tumor resistance to chemotherapy. Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1α is the key transcription factor that mediates cellular response to hypoxia. HIF-1α has been shown to play an important role in tumor resistance; however, the mechanism is still not fully understood. Here, we found that HIF-1α and the drug resistance-associated gene multidrug resistance associated protein 1 (MRP1 were induced by treatment of colon cancer cells with the hypoxia-mimetic agent cobalt chloride. Inhibition of HIF-1α by RNA interference and dominant-negative protein can significantly reduce the induction of MRP1 by hypoxia. Bioinformatics analysis showed that a hypoxia response element is located at -378 to -373 bp upstream of the transcription start site of MRP1 gene. Luciferase reporter assay combined with mutation analysis confirmed that this element is essential for hypoxia-mediated activation of MRP gene. Furthermore, RNA interference revealed that HIF-1α is necessary for this hypoxia-driven activation of MRP1 promoter. Importantly, chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis demonstrated that HIF-1α could directly bind to this HRE site in vivo. Together, these data suggest that MRP1 is a downstream target gene of HIF-1α, which provides a potential novel mechanism for HIF-1α-mediated drug resistance in colon cancer and maybe other solid tumors as well. Keywords: hypoxia, hypoxia-inducible factor-1α, multidrug resistance associated protein, transcriptional regulation, chemotherapy tolerance

  10. Potential Factors Enabling Human Body Colonization by Animal Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis Strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciszewski, Marcin; Szewczyk, Eligia M

    2017-05-01

    Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis (SDSE) is a pyogenic, Lancefield C or G streptococcal pathogen. Until recently, it has been considered as an exclusive animal pathogen. Nowadays, it is responsible for both animal infections in wild animals, pets, and livestock and human infections often clinically similar to the ones caused by group A streptococcus (Streptococcus pyogenes). The risk of zoonotic infection is the most significant in people having regular contact with animals, such as veterinarians, cattlemen, and farmers. SDSE is also prevalent on skin of healthy dogs, cats, and horses, which pose a risk also to people having contact with companion animals. The main aim of this study was to evaluate if there are features differentiating animal and human SDSE isolates, especially in virulence factors involved in the first stages of pathogenesis (adhesion and colonization). Equal groups of human and animal SDSE clinical strains were obtained from superficial infections (skin, wounds, abscesses). The presence of five virulence genes (prtF1, prtF2, lmb, cbp, emm type) was evaluated, as well as ability to form bacterial biofilm and produce BLIS (bacteriocin-like inhibitory substances) which are active against human skin microbiota. The study showed that the presence of genes coding for fibronectin-binding protein and M protein, as well as BLIS activity inhibiting the growth of Corynebacterium spp. strains might constitute the virulence factors which are necessary to colonize human organism, whereas they are not crucial in animal infections. Those virulence factors might be horizontally transferred from human streptococci to animal SDSE strains, enabling their ability to colonize human organism.

  11. Two distinct expression patterns of urokinase, urokinase receptor and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in colon cancer liver metastases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Illemann, Martin; Bird, Nigel; Majeed, Ali

    2009-01-01

    Metastatic growth and invasion by colon cancer cells in the liver requires the ability of the cancer cells to interact with the new tissue environment. Plasmin(ogen) is activated on cell surfaces by urokinase-type PA (uPA), and is regulated by uPAR and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1......). To compare the expression patterns of uPA, uPAR and PAI-1 in colon cancer with that in their liver metastases, we analysed matched samples from 14 patients. In all 14 primary colon cancers, we found upregulation of uPAR, uPA mRNA and PAI-1 in primarily stromal cells at the invasive front. In 5 of the 14......, whereas 8 of the remaining 9 showed direct contact between the cancer cells and the liver parenchyma. We conclude that there are 2 distinct patterns of expression of uPAR, uPA and PAI-1 in colon cancer liver metastases and that these correlate closely with 2 morphological growth patterns. These findings...

  12. Responses in colonic microbial community and gene expression of pigs to a long-term high resistant starch diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue eSun

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Intake of raw potato starch (RPS has been associated with various intestinal health benefits, but knowledge of its mechanism in a long-term is limited. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of long-term intake of RPS on microbial composition, genes expression profiles in the colon of pigs. Thirty-six Duroc × Landrace × Large White growing barrows were randomly allocated to corn starch (CS and RPS groups with a randomized block design. Each group consisted of six replicates (pens, with three pigs per pen. Pigs in the CS group were offered a corn/soybean-based diet, while pigs in the RPS group were put on a diet in which 230 g/kg (growing period or 280 g/kg (finishing period purified corn starch was replaced with purified RPS during a 100-day trial. Real-time PCR assay showed that RPS significantly decreased the number of total bacteria in the colonic digesta. MiSeq sequencing of the V3-V4 region of the 16S rRNA genes showed that RPS significantly decreased the relative abundance of Clostridium, Treponema, Oscillospira, Phascolarctobacterium, RC9 gut group, and S24-7-related operational taxonomic units (OTUs, and increased the relative abundance of Turicibacter, Blautia, Ruminococcus, Coprococcus, Marvinbryantia, and Ruminococcus bromii-related OTUs in colonic digesta and mucosa. Analysis of the colonic transcriptome profiles revealed that the RPS diet changed the colonic expression profile of the host genes mainly involved in immune response pathways. RPS significantly increased proinflammartory cytokine IL-1β gene expression and suppressed genes involved in lysosome. Our findings suggest that long-term intake of high resistant starch (RS diet may result in both positive and negative roles in gut health.

  13. Effects of metoclopramide on the expression of metalloproteinases and interleukins in left colonic anastomoses. An experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques e Silva, Silvana; Jerônimo, Márcio Sousa; Silva-Pereira, Ildinete da; Tavares, Aldo Henrique; Bocca, Anamélia Lorenzetti; Sousa, João Batista de

    2015-11-01

    To evaluate the effects of metoclopramide on metalloproteinases (MMP) and interleukins (IL) gene expression in colonic anastomoses in rats. Eighty rats were divided into two groups for euthanasia on the 3rd or 7th postoperative day (POD), then into two subgroups for sepsis induction or not, and then into subgroups to receive either metoclopramide or saline solution. Left colonic anastomosis were performed and then analyzed. On the 3rd POD, metoclopramide was associated with increased expression of MMP-1a, MMP-13, and TNF-α. On the 7th POD, the transcripts of all MMPs, TNF-α, IL-1β, IFN-γ, and IL-10 of the treated animals became negatively modulated. In the presence of sepsis, metoclopramide did not change MMPs and decreased IL-6, IL-1β, IFN-γ and IL-10 gene expression on the 3rd POD. On the 7th POD, increased expression of all MMPs, IFN-γ and IL-10 and negative modulated TNF-α and IL-6 gene expression. Administration of metoclopramide increased metalloproteinases and interleukins gene expression on the 3rd postoperative day and negatively modulated them on the 7th POD. In the presence of abdominal sepsis, metoclopramide did not change MMPs and decreased ILs gene expression on the 3rd POD. On the 7th POD, the drug increased expression of all MMPs.

  14. Expressão citofotométrica do marcador CD-34 no adenocarcinoma de cólon CD-34 cytophotometric expression in colon adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Batista Monteiro Tajra

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available A angiogênese é uma das responsáveis pelo equilíbrio homeostático entre as células. Durante o desenvolvimento do processo de degeneração maligna celular o seu desequilíbrio é considerado um importante marco neoplásico e o CD-34 parece ser um bom marcador de angiogênese. OBJETIVOS - Avaliar qual a expressão citofotométrica do CD-34 no adenocarcinoma de cólon; se apresenta alterações nas diferentes fases evolutivas na classificação modificada de Dukes; e como se expressa no cólon direito e esquerdo. MÉTODOS - Utilizaram-se 19 casos submetidos à técnica imunoistoquímica com anticorpo anti CD-34. Após, as lâminas foram lidas pelo sistema SAMBA com o software Immuno 4, analisando dois índices: marcação e densidade óptica. Os parâmetros foram marcação e expressão do marcador, quer individual quer relacionado à classificação de Dukes e lado. RESULTADOS - A média do índice de marcação foi 66,54 e densidade óptica 43,60. Em relação à classificação de Dukes, 12 do tipo B, tiveram índice de marcação 67,95 e densidade óptica 43,21 e, para os sete do tipo C, índice de marcação 64,12 e densidade óptica 44,27. Não foi possível identificar diferença em relação à classificação de Dukes. Quanto ao lado do tumor, os 11 esquerdos tiveram índice de marcação 72,08 e densidade óptica 46,70, e os oito direitos, índice de marcação 58,93 e densidade óptica 39,44. Em relação ao índice de marcação houve diferença significante, mas quanto à densidade óptica não. CONCLUSÕES - O CD-34 apresentou expressão discreta como marcador de angiogênese; sem diferença entre tipos B e C de Dukes mostrando atividade angiogênica maior à direita do que à esquerda.Angiogenesis is considered to be one of the mechanisms responsible for the homeostatic balance among cells. During cell malignant degeneration, the unbalanced cell proliferation mechanisms demonstrate to be an important factor in cancer evolution

  15. Prevalence of and risk factors for multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii colonization among high-risk nursing home residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mody, Lona; Gibson, Kristen E; Horcher, Amanda; Prenovost, Katherine; McNamara, Sara E; Foxman, Betsy; Kaye, Keith S; Bradley, Suzanne

    2015-10-01

    To characterize the epidemiology of multidrug-resistant (MDR) Acinetobacter baumannii colonization in high-risk nursing home (NH) residents. Nested case-control study within a multicenter prospective intervention trial. Four NHs in Southeast Michigan. PARTICIPANTS Case patients and control subjects were NH residents with an indwelling device (urinary catheter and/or feeding tube) selected from the control arm of the Targeted Infection Prevention study. Cases were residents colonized with MDR (resistant to ≥3 classes of antibiotics) A. baumannii; controls were never colonized with MDR A. baumannii. For active surveillance cultures, specimens from the nares, oropharynx, groin, perianal area, wounds, and device insertion site(s) were collected upon study enrollment, day 14, and monthly thereafter. A. baumannii strains and their susceptibilities were identified using standard microbiologic methods. Of 168 NH residents, 25 (15%) were colonized with MDR A. baumannii. Compared with the 143 controls, cases were more functionally disabled (Physical Self-Maintenance Score >24; odds ratio, 5.1 [95% CI, 1.8-14.9]; P<.004), colonized with Proteus mirabilis (5.8 [1.9-17.9]; P<.003), and diabetic (3.4 [1.2-9.9]; P<.03). Most cases (22 [88%]) were colonized with multiple antibiotic-resistant organisms and 16 (64%) exhibited co-colonization with at least one other resistant gram-negative bacteria. Functional disability, P. mirabilis colonization, and diabetes mellitus are important risk factors for colonization with MDR A. baumannii in high-risk NH residents. A. baumannii exhibits widespread antibiotic resistance and a preference to colonize with other antibiotic-resistant organisms, meriting enhanced attention and improved infection control practices in these residents.

  16. Differential gene expression in Rhododendron fortunei roots colonized by an ericoid mycorrhizal fungus and increased nitrogen absorption and plant growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangying Wei

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Ericoid mycorrhizal (ERM fungi are specifically symbiotic with plants in the family Ericaceae. Little is known thus far about their symbiotic establishment and subsequent nitrogen (N uptake at the molecular level. The present study devised a system for establishing a symbiotic relationship between Rhododendron fortunei Lindl. and an ERM fungus (Oidiodendron maius var. maius strain Om19, quantified seedling growth and N uptake, and compared transcriptome profiling between colonized and uncolonized roots using RNA-Seq. The Om19 colonization induced 16,892 genes that were differentially expressed in plant roots, of which 14,364 were upregulated and 2,528 were downregulated. These genes included those homologous to ATP-binding cassette transporters, calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinases, and symbiosis receptor-like kinases. N metabolism was particularly active in Om19-colonized roots, and 51 genes were upregulated, such as nitrate transporters, nitrate reductase, nitrite reductase, ammonium transporters, glutamine synthetase, and glutamate synthase. Transcriptome analysis also identified a series of genes involving endocytosis, Fc-gamma R-mediated phagocytosis, glycerophospholipid metabolism, and GnRH signal pathway that have not been reported previously. Their roles in the symbiosis require further investigation. The Om19 colonization significantly increased N uptake and seedling growth. Total N content and dry weight of colonized seedlings were 36.6% and 46.6% greater than control seedlings. This is the first transcriptome analysis of a species from the family Ericaceae colonized by an ERM fungus. The findings from this study will shed light on the mechanisms underlying symbiotic relationships of ericaceous species with ERM fungi and the symbiosis-resultant N uptake and plant growth.

  17. Epidermal growth factor receptor activation induces nuclear targeting of cyclooxygenase-2, basolateral release of prostaglandins, and mitogenesis in polarizing colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, R J; Hawkey, C J; Damstrup, L; Graves-Deal, R; Daniel, V C; Dempsey, P J; Chinery, R; Kirkland, S C; DuBois, R N; Jetton, T L; Morrow, J D

    1997-01-21

    Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs reduce the risk of colon cancer, possibly via cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibition. The growth factor-inducible COX-2, which is overexpressed in neoplastic colonic tissue, is an attractive target to mediate this effect. Herein we have exploited the ability of a human colon cancer cell line, HCA-7 Colony 29, to polarize when cultured on Transwell (Costar) filters to study COX-2 production and the vectorial release of prostaglandins (PGs). Administration of type alpha transforming growth factor to the basolateral compartment, in which the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) resides, results in a marked induction of COX-2 immunoreactivity at the base of the cells and the unexpected appearance of COX-2 in the nucleus. The increase in COX-2 protein is associated with a dose- and time-dependent increase in PG levels in the basolateral, but not apical, medium. Amphiregulin is the most abundantly expressed EGFR ligand in these cells, and the protein is present at the basolateral surface. EGFR blockade reduces baseline COX-2 immunoreactivity, PG levels, and mitogenesis in a concentration-dependent manner. Two specific COX-2 inhibitors, SC-58125 and NS 398, also, in a dose-dependent manner, attenuate baseline and type alpha transforming growth factor-stimulated mitogenesis, although PG levels are decreased > 90% at all concentrations of inhibitor tested. These findings show that activation of the EGFR stimulates COX-2 production and its translocation to the nucleus, vectorial release of PGs, and mitogenesis in polarized HCA-7 Colony 29 cells.

  18. Activity and expression of human telomerase in normal and malignant cells in gastric and colon cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Jerzy; Januszkiewicz, Danuta; Lewandowski, Krzysztof; Nowicka-Kujawska, Karina; Pernak, Monika; Rembowska, Jolanta; Nowak, Tomasz; Wysocki, Jacek

    2003-01-01

    The reactivation of telomerase is believed to play an important role in immortalization and carcinogenesis. To investigate the expression of three components of the telomerase complex (hTR, hTERT and TP1), along with telomerase activity in malignant and normal cells. Cells were isolated from gastric and colon cancer, and from normal mucosa from the stomach and colon of participating patients. Expression of hTERT, hTR and TP1 has been studied by the reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique. The telomerase repeat amplification protocol and PCR enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay were used for analysis of telomerase activity. All telomerase components were consistently expressed in colon and gastric cancer cells. Neoplastic RNA produced consistently very strong amplification signals either for hTR, hTERT or TP1. The expression of hTR was observed in RNA isolated from all normal mucosa samples and from peripheral blood lymphocytes. The expression of TP1 and hTERT has been found in the majority of normal cells; however, the amplification signals produced were usually much weaker than in malignant cells. The limiting dilution experiments indicated that the cancer cells have at least 100-fold higher telomerase activity and at least 25-fold higher TP1 and hTERT expression in comparison to normal cells. It can be concluded that all the cancer cells tested have higher telomerase expression and activity than normal cells. Therefore, telomerase can be a good cancer marker, provided that quantitative analysis is carried out. Copyright 2003 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

  19. Is maternal colonization with group B streptococci a risk factor for preeclampsia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulla, Zuber D; Carrillo, Thelma; Kalamegham, Ramaswami; Hernandez, Loretta L; Portugal, Elizabeth; Nuwayhid, Bahij S

    2015-01-01

    To explore the association between maternal rectovaginal colonization with group B Streptococcus (GBS) and the outcome of preeclampsia, and to identify other factors such as maternal chocolate consumption that may be associated with preeclampsia on the Texas-Mexico border. A case-control study was conducted among 330 women who delivered at a teaching hospital in El Paso, Texas, during the time period April 2010 to April 2012. Preeclamptic cases (n = 165) and controls free of preeclampsia (n = 165) were matched by gestational age and date of delivery. Conditional logistic regression (with multiple imputation for missing data) was used to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) that were adjusted for maternal age and other factors. Cases (94.6%) and controls (97.0%) were predominantly Hispanic. GBS colonization was not associated with preeclampsia: adjusted OR = 1.73 (95% CI 0.63-4.74, p = 0.29). Maternal consumption of chocolate desserts once daily or more frequently as compared to Chocolate consumption during pregnancy was inversely associated with preeclampsia.

  20. Oleuropein Decreases Cyclooxygenase-2 and Interleukin-17 Expression and Attenuates Inflammatory Damage in Colonic Samples from Ulcerative Colitis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larussa, Tiziana; Oliverio, Manuela; Suraci, Evelina; Greco, Marta; Placida, Roberta; Gervasi, Serena; Marasco, Raffaella; Imeneo, Maria; Paolino, Donatella; Tucci, Luigi; Gulletta, Elio; Fresta, Massimo; Procopio, Antonio; Luzza, Francesco

    2017-04-15

    Oleuropein (OLE) is the major phenolic secoiridoid of olive tree leaves, and its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities have been demonstrated in in vitro and in vivo animal models. The aim of this study was to investigate the activity of OLE in the colonic mucosa from patients with ulcerative colitis (UC). Biopsies obtained during colonoscopy from 14 patients with active UC were immediately placed in an organ culture chamber and challenged with lipopolysaccharide from Escherichia coli (EC-LPS) at 1 μg/mL in the presence or absence of 3 mM OLE. The expression of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 and interleukin (IL)-17 was assessed in total protein extracts from treated colonic biopsies by Western blotting. Levels of IL-17 were also measured in culture supernatant by ELISA. A microscopic evaluation of the cultured biopsies was performed by conventional histology and immunohistochemistry. The expression of COX-2 and IL-17 were significantly lower in samples treated with OLE + EC-LPS compared with those treated with EC-LPS alone (0.80 ± 0.15 arbitrary units (a.u.) vs. 1.06 ± 0.19 a.u., p = 0.003, and 0.71 ± 0.08 a.u. vs. 1.26 ± 0.42 a.u., p = 0.03, respectively) as were the levels of IL-17 in culture supernatants of OLE + EC-LPS treated colonic samples (21.16 ± 8.64 pg/mL vs. 40.67 ± 9.24 pg/mL, p = 0.01). Histologically, OLE-treated colonic samples showed an amelioration of inflammatory damage with reduced infiltration of CD3, CD4, and CD20 cells, while CD68 numbers increased. The anti-inflammatory activity of OLE was demonstrated in colonic biopsies from UC patients. These new data support a potential role of OLE in the treatment of UC.

  1. Traditional Chinese Medicine Curcumin Sensitizes Human Colon Cancer to Radiation by Altering the Expression of DNA Repair-related Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guangen; Qiu, Jianming; Wang, Dong; Tao, Yong; Song, Yihuan; Wang, Hongtao; Tang, Juping; Wang, Xing; Sun, Y U; Yang, Zhijian; Hoffman, Robert M

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the radio-sensitizing efficacy of curcumin, a traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) on colon cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Human colon cancer HT-29 cells were treated with curcumin (2.5 μM), irradiation (10 Gy) and the combination of irradiation and curcumin. Cell proliferation was assessed using the MTT assay. Apoptotic cells were detected by Annexin V-PE/7-AAD analysis. PCR was performed to determine differential-expression profiling of 95 DNA-repair genes in irradiated cells and cells treated with both irradiation and curcumin. Differentially-expressed genes were confirmed by Western blotting. In vivo radio-sensitizing efficacy of curcumin was assessed in a xenograft mouse model of HT-29 colon cancer. Curcumin was administrated daily by intraperitoneal injection at 20 mg/kg/dose. Mice received irradiation (10 Gy) twice weekly. Apoptosis of the cancer cells following treatment was determined by TUNEL staining. Irradiation induced proliferation inhibition and apoptosis of HT-29 cells in vitro. Concurrent curcumin treatment sensitized the HT-29 tumor to irradiation (p<0.01). DNA repair-related genes CCNH and XRCC5 were upregulated and LIG4 and PNKP downregulated by the combination of curcumin and irradiation compared with irradiation alone (p<0.05). Combined treatment of curcumin and irradiation resulted in a significantly greater tumor-growth inhibition and apoptosis compared to irradiation treatment alone (p<0.01). Curcumin sensitizes human colon cancer in vitro and in vivo to radiation. Downregulation of LIG4 and PNKP and upregulation of XRCC5 and CCNH DNA-repair-related genes were involved in the radio-sensitizing efficacy of curcumin in colon cancer. Copyright© 2018, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  2. Sp1 is a transcription repressor to stanniocalcin-1 expression in TSA-treated human colon cancer cells, HT29.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Alice Y S; Yeung, B H Y; Ching, L Y; Wong, Chris K C

    2011-08-01

    Our previous study demonstrated that, stanniocalcin-1 (STC1) was a target of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors and was involved in trichostatin A (TSA) induced apoptosis in the human colon cancer cells, HT29. In this study, we reported that the transcriptional factor, specificity protein 1 (Sp1) in association with retinoblastoma (Rb) repressed STC1 gene transcription in TSA-treated HT29 cells. Our data demonstrated that, a co-treatment of the cells with TSA and Sp1 inhibitor, mithramycin A (MTM) led to a marked synergistic induction of STC1 transcript levels, STC1 promoter (1 kb)-driven luciferase activity and an increase of apoptotic cell population. The knockdown of Sp1 gene expression in TSA treated cells, revealed the repressor role of Sp1 in STC1 transcription. Using a protein phosphatase inhibitor okadaic acid (OKA), an increase of Sp1 hyperphosphorylation and so a reduction of its transcriptional activity, led to a significant induction of STC1 gene expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay revealed that Sp1 binding on STC1 proximal promoter in TSA treated cells. The binding of Sp1 to STC1 promoter was abolished by the co-treatment of MTM or OKA in TSA-treated cells. Re-ChIP assay illustrated that Sp1-mediated inhibition of STC1 transcription was associated with the recruitment of another repressor molecule, Rb. Collectively our findings identify STC1 is a downstream target of Sp1. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Meat and fish consumption, APC gene mutations and hMLH1 expression in colon and rectal cancer: a prospective cohort study (the Netherlands)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luchtenborg, M.; Weijenberg, M.P.; Goeij, de A.F.P.M.; Wark, P.A.; Brink, M.; Roemen, G.M.J.M.; Lentjes, M.H.F.M.; Bruine, de A.P.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Veer, van 't P.; Brandt, van den P.A.

    2005-01-01

    Objective:The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between meat and fish consumption and APC mutation status and hMLH1 expression in colon and rectal cancer. Methods:The associations were investigated in the Netherlands Cohort Study, and included 434 colon and 154 rectal cancer

  4. A Study of Thymidylate Synthase Expression as a Biomarker for Resectable Colon Cancer: Alliance (Cancer and Leukemia Group B) 9581 and 89803

    OpenAIRE

    Niedzwiecki, Donna; Hasson, Rian M.; Lenz, Heinz‐Josef; Ye, Cynthia; Redston, Mark; Ogino, Shuji; Fuchs, Charles S.; Compton, Carolyn C.; Mayer, Robert J.; Goldberg, Richard M.; Colacchio, Thomas A.; Saltz, Leonard B.; Warren, Robert S.; Bertagnolli, Monica M.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor thymidylate synthase (TS) levels were prospectively evaluated in two adjuvant therapy trials for patients with resected stage II or III colon cancer. Results indicated that high tumor TS levels were associated with improved disease‐free survival and overall survival following adjuvant therapy for colon cancer, although tumor TS expression did not predict benefit of 5‐fluorouracil‐based chemotherapy.

  5. Meat and fish consumption, APC gene mutations and hMLH1 expression in colon and rectal cancer: A prospective cohort study (The Netherlands)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lüchtenborg, M.; Weijenberg, M.P.; Goeij, A.F.P.M. de; Wark, P.A.; Brink, M.; Roemen, G.M.J.M.; Lentjes, M.H.F.M.; Bruïne, A.P. de; Goldbohm, R.A.; Veer, P. van 't; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between meat and fish consumption and APC mutation status and hMLH1 expression in colon and rectal cancer. Methods: The associations were investigated in the Netherlands Cohort Study, and included 434 colon and 154 rectal cancer

  6. Prevalence and risk factors of MRSA, ESBL and MDR bacterial colonization upon admission to an Egyptian medical ICU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouda, Ragai; Soliman, May Sherif; ElAnany, Mervat Gaber; Abadeer, Maggie; Soliman, Ghada

    2016-04-28

    Bacterial colonization of the skin and mucous membranes of intensive care unit (ICU) patients with virulent organisms such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) producers, and multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria (MDR-GNB) frequently results in life-threatening infections. Universal screening of ICU patients upon admission has been suggested. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the prevalence and pattern of MRSA, ESBL, and MDR-GNB colonization in patients upon admission to an Egyptian medical ICU, along with the related demographic and clinical risk factors. Throat, axillary, and groin swabs were obtained from all study participants in addition to rectal swabs from consenting patients. These swabs were screened for MRSA, ESBL, and MDR-GNB. Of the patients included in the study, 33%, 13%, and 63% were colonized with ESBL, MDR-GNB, and MRSA organisms, respectively. Those suffering from a more severe disease with a simplified acute physiology score II (SAPS II) > 29 demonstrated higher levels of MDR-GNB colonization upon admission, while MDR-GNB or ESBL colonization upon admission was associated with higher ICU mortality. Colonization of ICU patients with superbugs upon admission has an impact on outcome and mortality. In this Egyptian example, colonization rates were higher than in other literature reports, demonstrating the need for routine screening and decolonization, if applicable.

  7. Nonsense mediated decay resistant mutations are a source of expressed mutant proteins in colon cancer cell lines with microsatellite instability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David S Williams

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Frameshift mutations in microsatellite instability high (MSI-High colorectal cancers are a potential source of targetable neo-antigens. Many nonsense transcripts are subject to rapid degradation due to nonsense-mediated decay (NMD, but nonsense transcripts with a cMS in the last exon or near the last exon-exon junction have intrinsic resistance to nonsense-mediated decay (NMD. NMD-resistant transcripts are therefore a likely source of expressed mutant proteins in MSI-High tumours. METHODS: Using antibodies to the conserved N-termini of predicted mutant proteins, we analysed MSI-High colorectal cancer cell lines for examples of naturally expressed mutant proteins arising from frameshift mutations in coding microsatellites (cMS by immunoprecipitation and Western Blot experiments. Detected mutant protein bands from NMD-resistant transcripts were further validated by gene-specific short-interfering RNA (siRNA knockdown. A genome-wide search was performed to identify cMS-containing genes likely to generate NMD-resistant transcripts that could encode for antigenic expressed mutant proteins in MSI-High colon cancers. These genes were screened for cMS mutations in the MSI-High colon cancer cell lines. RESULTS: Mutant protein bands of expected molecular weight were detected in mutated MSI-High cell lines for NMD-resistant transcripts (CREBBP, EP300, TTK, but not NMD-sensitive transcripts (BAX, CASP5, MSH3. Expression of the mutant CREBBP and EP300 proteins was confirmed by siRNA knockdown. Five cMS-bearing genes identified from the genome-wide search and without existing mutation data (SFRS12IP1, MED8, ASXL1, FBXL3 and RGS12 were found to be mutated in at least 5 of 11 (45% of the MSI-High cell lines tested. CONCLUSION: NMD-resistant transcripts can give rise to expressed mutant proteins in MSI-High colon cancer cells. If commonly expressed in primary MSI-High colon cancers, MSI-derived mutant proteins could be useful as cancer specific

  8. Risk factors for multi-drug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii bacteremia in patients with colonization in the intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Se

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epidemic outbreaks of multi-drug resistant (MDR Acinetobacter baumannii (AB in intensive care units (ICUs are increasing. The incidence of MDR AB bacteremia, which develops as a result of colonization, is increasing through widespread dissemination of the pathogen, and further colonization. We sought to determine risk factors for MDR AB bacteremia in patients colonized with MDR AB in the ICU. Methods We conducted a retrospective, observational study of 200 patients colonized with MDR AB in the ICU at Severance Hospital, South Korea during the outbreak period between January 2008 and December 2009. Results Of the 200 patients colonized with MDR AB, 108 developed MDR AB bacteremia, and 92 did not. APACHE II scores were higher in bacteremic than non-bacteremic patients at the time of ICU admission and colonization (24.0 vs. 21.6; P = 0.035, 22.9 vs. 16.8; P P = 0.923, but the duration of time at risk was shorter in bacteremic patients (12.1 vs. 6.0 days; P = 0.016. A recent invasive procedure was a significant risk factor for development of bacteremia (odds ratio = 3.85; 95% CI 1.45-10.24; P = 0.007. Multivariate analysis indicated infection and respiratory failure at the time of ICU admission, maintenance of mechanical ventilation, maintenance of endotracheal tube instead of switching to a tracheostomy, recent central venous catheter insertion, bacteremia caused by other microorganism after colonization by MDR AB, and prior antimicrobial therapy, were significant risk factors for MDR AB bacteremia. Conclusions Patients in the ICU, colonized with MDR AB, should be considered for minimizing invasive procedures and early removal of the invasive devices to prevent development of MDR AB bacteremia.

  9. On the relationship between sialomucin and sulfomucin expression and hydrogenotrophic microbes in the human colonic mucosa.

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    Jennifer A Croix

    Full Text Available The colonic mucus layer is comprised primarily of acidomucins, which provide viscous properties and can be broadly classified into sialomucins or sulfomucins based on the presence of terminating sialic acid or sulfate groups. Differences in acidomucin chemotypes have been observed in diseases such as colorectal cancer and inflammatory bowel disease, and variation in sialo- and sulfomucin content may influence microbial colonization. For example, sulfate derived from sulfomucin degradation may promote the colonization of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB, which through sulfate respiration generate the genotoxic gas hydrogen sulfide. Here, paired biopsies from right colon, left colon, and rectum of 20 subjects undergoing routine screening colonoscopies were collected to enable parallel histochemical and microbiological studies. Goblet cell sialo- and sulfomucins in each biopsy were distinguished histochemically and quantified. Quantitative PCR and multivariate analyses were used to examine the abundance of hydrogenotrophic microbial groups and SRB genera relative to acidomucin profiles. Regional variation was observed in sialomucins and sulfomucins with the greatest abundance of each found in the rectum. Mucin composition did not appear to influence the abundance of SRB or other hydrogenotrophic microbiota but correlated with the composition of different SRB genera. A higher sulfomucin proportion correlated with higher quantities of Desulfobacter, Desulfobulbus and Desulfotomaculum, relative to the predominant Desulfovibrio genus. Thus, acidomucin composition may influence bacterial sulfate respiration in the human colon, which may in turn impact mucosal homeostasis. These results stress the need to consider mucus characteristics in the context of studies of the microbiome that target intestinal diseases.

  10. DIF-1 inhibits the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway by inhibiting TCF7L2 expression in colon cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jingushi, Kentaro; Takahashi-Yanaga, Fumi; Yoshihara, Tatsuya; Shiraishi, Fumie; Watanabe, Yutaka; Hirata, Masato; Morimoto, Sachio; Sasaguri, Toshiyuki

    2012-01-01

    We previously reported that differentiation-inducing factor-1 (DIF-1), a morphogen in Dictyostelium discoideum, inhibits the proliferation of human cancer cell lines by inducing β-catenin degradation and suppressing the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. To determine whether β-catenin degradation is essential for the effect of DIF-1, we examined the effect of DIF-1 on human colon cancer cell lines (HCT-116, SW-620 and DLD-1), in which the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway is constitutively active. DIF-1 strongly inhibited cell proliferation and arrested the cell cycle in the G(0)/G(1) phase via the suppression of cyclin D1 expression at mRNA and protein levels without reducing β-catenin protein. TCF-dependent transcriptional activity and cyclin D1 promoter activity were revealed to be inhibited via suppression of transcription factor 7-like 2 (TCF7L2) expression. Luciferase reporter assays and EMSAs using the TCF7L2 promoter fragments indicated that the binding site for the transcription factor early growth response-1 (Egr-1), which is located in the -609 to -601 bp region relative to the start codon in the TCF7L2 promoter, was involved in DIF-1 activity. Moreover, RNAi-mediated depletion of endogenous TCF7L2 resulted in reduced cyclin D1 promoter activity and protein expression, and the overexpression of TCF7L2 overrode the inhibition of the TCF-dependent transcriptional activity and cyclin D1 promoter activity induced by DIF-1. Therefore, DIF-1 seemed to inhibit the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway by suppressing TCF7L2 expression via reduced Egr-1-dependent transcriptional activity in these colon cancer cell lines. Our results provide a novel insight into the mechanisms by which DIF-1 inhibits the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of antifungal genes expressed in transgenic pea (Pisum sativum L.) on root colonization with Glomus intraradices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Fathi; Noorian, Mojgan Sharifi; Jacobsen, Hans-Jörg

    2012-01-01

    Pathogenic fungi have always been a major problem in agriculture. One of the effective methods for controlling pathogen fungi to date is the introduction of resistance genes into the genome of crops. It is interesting to find out whether the induced resistance in crops will have a negative effect on non-target organisms such as root colonization with the AM fungi.   The objective of the present research was to study the influence of producing antifungal molecules by four transgenic pea (Pisum sativum L.) lines expressing PGIP gene from raspberry, VST-stilbene synthase from vine, a hybrid of PGIP/VST and bacterial Chitinase gene (Chit30) from Streptomyces olivaceoviridis respectively on the colonization potential of Glomus intraradices. Four different experiments were done in greenhouse and climate chamber, colonization was observed in all replications. The following parameters were used for evaluation: frequency of mycorrhization, the intensity of mycorrhization, the average presence of arbuscules within the colonized areas and the presence of arbuscules in the whole root system which showed insignificant difference between transgenic and non-transgenic plants. The root/shoot ratio exhibited different values according to the experiment condition. Compared with negative non-transgenic control all transgenic lines showed the ability to establish symbiosis and the different growth parameters had insignificant effect due to mycorrhization. The results of the present study proved that the introduced pathogen resistance genes did not affect the mycorrhization allocations in pea.

  12. Selenium-enriched milk proteins and selenium yeast affect selenoprotein activity and expression differently in mouse colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ying; McIntosh, Graeme H; Le Leu, Richard K; Young, Graeme P

    2010-07-01

    Certain forms of dietary Se may have an advantage in improving Se status and reducing cancer risk. The present study compared the effects of an Se-enriched milk protein product (dairy-Se) with an Se yeast (yeast-Se) on selenoprotein activity and expression in the mouse colon. Mice were fed four diets for 4 weeks: a control milk protein diet (Se at 0.068 parts per million (ppm)), dairy-Se diets with Se at 0.5 and 1 ppm, and a yeast-Se diet with Se at 1 ppm. Cytosolic glutathione peroxidase-1 (GPx-1) activity, mRNA of selenoprotein P (SeP), GPx-1, gastrointestinal glutathione peroxidase-2 (GPx-2) and thioredoxin reductase-1 (TrxR-1) were examined in the mouse colon. Dairy-Se diets did not significantly affect GPx-1 mRNA and GPx-1 activity but produced a dose-dependent increase in SeP and GPx-2 mRNA, with a significantly higher level achieved at 1 ppm Se (P supplement had any effect on TrxR-1. The present study indicates that selenoprotein levels in the mouse colon are regulated differently depending on the Se supplement. As we have previously shown that dairy-Se at 1 ppm was protective against colorectal cancer (CRC) in an azoxymethane-induced CRC mouse model, this up-regulation of colonic GPx-2 and SeP with Se supplementation may be crucial to its chemopreventive action.

  13. Factors promoting colonization by legionellae in residential water distribution systems: an environmental case-control survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codony, F; Alvarez, J; Oliva, J M; Ciurana, B; Company, M; Camps, N; Torres, J; Minguell, S; Jové, N; Cirera, E; Admetlla, T; Abós, R; Escofet, A; Pedrol, A; Grau, R; Badosa, I; Vila, G

    2002-10-01

    As part of a case-control study of community-acquired Legionnaires' disease, several factors related to residential water distribution systems and public drinking water systems were studied in the homes of 124 patients with community-acquired Legionnaire's disease and in the homes of 354 controls. The presence of water reservoirs and hot water tanks was studied in residential systems. Factors such as deficient chlorine levels, pipe repairs and other work, water flow interruptions, the use of alternative water sources, inadequate cleaning operations in public water reservoirs, and the position of the home within the public network (and whether this location constituted an endpoint) were studied in public water supply systems. Levels of legionellae in domestic water samples were also measured. Although the use of water reservoirs and hot water tanks promotes colonization by legionellae in residential systems, none of the variables studied seems to increase the incidence of community-acquired Legionnaires' disease.

  14. Histochemical study of expression of lectin-reactive carbohydrate epitopes and glycoligand-binding sites in normal human appendix vermiformis, colonic mucosa, acute appendicitis and colonic adenoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinck, U; Bosbach, R; Korabiowska, M; Schauer, A; Gabius, H J

    1996-10-01

    In a glycohistochemical analysis of human appendix vermiformis we report the assessment of lectin binding in cells of the Gut Associated Lymphoid Tissue of normal samples and in acute appendicitis using a panel of plant, invertebrate and mammalian lectins with specificity for alpha-L-Fuc (UEA-I), alpha-D-Gluc and alpha-D-Man (Con A), alpha-D-GalNAc (DBA), GalNAc (SBA, HPA), beta-Gal (RCA-I, 14 kDa = galectin-1) and alpha-, beta-Gal (VAA). Moreover, we initiate the study of expression of carbohydrate-binding sites in this tissue and in colonic mucosa, employing several types of carrier-immobilized carbohydrate ligands as suitable probes for this purpose. Within the three populations of macrophages intra-/subepithelial macrophages of the dome region, the lamina propria of the intercryptal region and the follicle-associated epithelium were apparently reactive with most of the lectins and also with mannose and fucose residues of the tested neoglycoproteins. Distinguishing features of germinal center macrophages in relation to intra-/subepithelial phagocytes were the lack of binding of UEA-I and DBA. In comparison to all other types of phagocytes, macrophages of the T-region displayed a rather restricted binding capacity only to Con A and RCA-I. Labeling of macrophages with SBA, HPA and VAA in this location was only rarely found. With respect to dendritic cells no consistently positive reaction was seen for follicular cells, whereas interdigitating cells of the T-region bound Con A, HPA and RCA-I, and, less frequently, SBA. Lymphocytes in all anatomical subsites of the Gut Associated Lymphoid Tissue, centrocytes, centroblasts and plasma cells had binding sites for Con A and RCA-I in common. Notably, a small number of lymphocytes mostly in the T-region but also in B-cell-rich areas expressed intranuclear binding sites for fucose and mannose residues. Intraepithelial lymphocytes and lymphatic cells of the T-region differed from lymphocytes in other regions by a more

  15. Interleukin-6 induces S100A9 expression in colonic epithelial cells through STAT3 activation in experimental ulcerative colitis.

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    Min Jeoung Lee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Intestinal epithelium is essential for maintaining normal intestinal homeostasis; its breakdown leads to chronic inflammatory pathologies, such as inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs. Although high concentrations of S100A9 protein and interleukin-6 (IL-6 are found in patients with IBD, the expression mechanism of S100A9 in colonic epithelial cells (CECs remains elusive. We investigated the role of IL-6 in S100A9 expression in CECs using a colitis model. METHODS: IL-6 and S100A9 expression, signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3 phosphorylation, and infiltration of immune cells were analyzed in mice with dextran sulfate sodium (DSS-induced colitis. The effects of soluble gp130-Fc protein (sgp130Fc and S100A9 small interfering (si RNA (si-S100A9 on DSS-induced colitis were evaluated. The molecular mechanism of S100A9 expression was investigated in an IL-6-treated Caco-2 cell line using chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. RESULTS: IL-6 concentrations increased significantly in the colon tissues of DSS-treated mice. sgp130Fc or si-S100A9 administration to DSS-treated mice reduced granulocyte infiltration in CECs and induced the down-regulation of S100A9 and colitis disease activity. Treatment with STAT3 inhibitors upon IL-6 stimulation in the Caco-2 cell line demonstrated that IL-6 mediated S100A9 expression through STAT3 activation. Moreover, we found that phospho-STAT3 binds directly to the S100A9 promoter. S100A9 may recruit immune cells into inflamed colon tissues. CONCLUSIONS: Elevated S100A9 expression in CECs mediated by an IL-6/STAT3 signaling cascade may play an important role in the development of colitis.

  16. SNAP-25 is abundantly expressed in enteric neuronal networks and upregulated by the neurotrophic factor GDNF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrenschee, M; Böttner, M; Harde, J; Lange, C; Cossais, F; Ebsen, M; Vogel, I; Wedel, T

    2015-06-01

    Control of intestinal motility requires an intact enteric neurotransmission. Synaptosomal-associated protein 25 (SNAP-25) is an essential component of the synaptic vesicle fusion machinery. The aim of the study was to investigate the localization and expression of SNAP-25 in the human intestine and cultured enteric neurons and to assess its regulation by the neurotrophic factor glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF). SNAP-25 expression and distribution were analyzed in GDNF-stimulated enteric nerve cell cultures, and synaptic vesicles were evaluated by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Human colonic specimens were processed for site-specific SNAP-25 gene expression analysis and SNAP-25 immunohistochemistry including dual-labeling with the pan-neuronal marker PGP 9.5. Additionally, gene expression levels and distributional patterns of SNAP-25 were analyzed in colonic specimens of patients with diverticular disease (DD). GDNF-treated enteric nerve cell cultures showed abundant expression of SNAP-25 and exhibited granular staining corresponding to synaptic vesicles. SNAP-25 gene expression was detected in all colonic layers and isolated myenteric ganglia. SNAP-25 co-localized with PGP 9.5 in submucosal and myenteric ganglia and intramuscular nerve fibers. In patients with DD, both SNAP-25 mRNA expression and immunoreactive profiles were decreased compared to controls. GDNF-induced growth and differentiation of cultured enteric neurons is paralleled by increased expression of SNAP-25 and formation of synaptic vesicles reflecting enhanced synaptogenesis. The expression of SNAP-25 within the human enteric nervous system and its downregulation in DD suggest an essential role in enteric neurotransmission and render SNAP-25 as a marker for impaired synaptic plasticity in enteric neuropathies underlying intestinal motility disorders.

  17. Carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae colonization in pediatric and neonatal intensive care units: risk factors for progression to infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akturk, Hacer; Sutcu, Murat; Somer, Ayper; Aydın, Derya; Cihan, Rukiye; Ozdemir, Aslı; Coban, Asuman; Ince, Zeynep; Citak, Agop; Salman, Nuran

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about factors associated with carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae infections in pediatric patients, who are initally colonized with carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae. A retrospective case-control study was conducted involving pediatric and neonatal intensive care units throughout a five-year period (January 2010-December 2014). Clinical and microbiological data were extracted from Hospital Infection Control Committee reports and patients' medical records. Risk factors were assessed in carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae colonized patients who developed subsequent systemic infection (cases) and compared to carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae colonized patients who did not develop infection (controls). Throughout the study period, 2.6% of patients admitted to neonatal intensive care units and 3.6% of patients admitted to pediatric intensive care units had become colonized with carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae. After a mean of 10.6±1.9 days (median: 7 days, range: 2-38 days) following detection of colonization, 39.0% of the carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae colonized patients in pediatric intensive care units and 18.1% of carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae colonized patients in neonatal intensive care units developed systemic carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae infection. Types of systemic carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae infections included bacteremia (n=15, 62.5%), ventilator-associated pneumonia (n=4, 16.6%), ventriculitis (n=2, 8.3%), intraabdominal infections (n=2, 8.3%), and urinary tract infection (n=1, 4.1%). A logistic regression model including parameters found significant in univariate analysis of carbapenem resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae colonization and carbapenem resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae infection groups revealed underlying metabolic disease (OR: 10.1; 95% CI: 2.7-37.2), previous carbapenem use (OR: 10.1; 95% CI: 2.2-40.1), neutropenia (OR: 13.8; 95% CI: 3

  18. Chronic exposure to endosulfan induces inflammation in murine colon via β-catenin expression and IL-6 production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Téllez-Bañuelos, Martha Cecilia; Haramati, Jesse; Franco-Topete, Karina; Peregrina-Sandoval, Jorge; Franco-Topete, Ramon; Zaitseva, Galina P

    2016-11-01

    Endosulfan (ENDO) is a widely used organochlorine (OC) pesticide and persistent organo-pollutant. Epidemiological studies have shown that high levels of OC exposure were related to colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence. The objectives of the present study were to evaluate histological changes in the colon, as well as in in situ expression of β-catenin and P-selectin, and serum levels of select pro-inflammatory cytokines in mice administered ENDO; there is a relationship between increased serum IL-6 and P-selectin levels in CRC patients and aberrant β-catenin signaling is important in initiation/maintenance of most CRCs. Mice were exposed to ENDO (at dose < LD50) orally once a week for up to 24 weeks, and monitored (inclusive) for a total of 42 weeks. The experiment was comprised of three groups, one that did not receive ENDO (olive oil vehicle), one administered 2 mg ENDO/kg/week and a positive control (for induction of CRC) given a weekly 20 mg 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH)/kg injection. The results indicated that oral administration of ENDO provoked moderate inflammation starting at six weeks, and severe colonic inflammation with an appearance of dysplastic formations (aberrant crypts) in mice treated with ENDO (or DMH) for 12 weeks or longer. Serum IL-6 levels significantly increased starting at six weeks and rose to a peak of 15-fold higher than in controls at 42 weeks; TNFα levels likewise significantly increased, with a later peak (≈four-fold higher than controls) at 30-42 weeks. Immunohistochemical analysis of the colon also showed that expression of β-catenin and P-selectin increased with length of exposure to ENDO. Taken together, the results indicate that continued repeated oral exposure to ENDO induces increased expression of β-catenin and P-selectin, inflammation in the colon, and, ultimately, local tissue dysplasia.

  19. Co-Expression of HER Family Members in Patients with Dukes’ C and D Colon Cancer and Their Impacts on Patient Prognosis and Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khelwatty, Said Abdullah; Essapen, Sharadah; Bagwan, Izhar; Green, Margaret; Seddon, Alan Michael; Modjtahedi, Helmout

    2014-01-01

    The human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is an important therapeutic target in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer and anti-EGFR antibodies cetuximab and panitumumab have been approved for the treatment of such patients. Despite these advances, the duration of response in some patients can be limited. Since, EGFR is capable of forming heterodimers with the other members of the HER (Human epidermal receptor) family, it is important to investigate the co-expression and prognostic significance of all members of the HER family in colorectal cancer patients. The expression of the HER family members were determined in tumour specimens from 86 patients with Dukes’ C and D (metastatic) colon cancer using immunohistochemistry. Sections were scored by the percentage of positive tumour cells and intensity of staining. Their associations with clinicopathological parameters, and overall survival and disease free survival were evaluated using univariate and multivariate analysis. Overall, 43%, 77%, 52% and 92% of the cases were EGFR, HER-2, HER-3 and HER-4 positive respectively. Interestingly, 35%, 24%, 43%, and 18% of the cases had co-expression of EGFR/HER-2, EGFR/HER-3, EGFR/HER-4 and all four members of the HER family respectively. Of these, only the expression of EGFR and co-expression of EGFR/HER-4 were associated with poorer disease-free survival in both univariate and multivariate analysis. Co-expression of all members of the HER family in colon cancer supports the need for further investigations on their predictive value for response to therapy with anti-EGFR mAbs and whether such sub-population of patients may benefit from therapy with the new generation of pan-HER inhibitors. PMID:24609222

  20. Effects of anti-miR-182 on TSP-1 expression in human colon cancer cells: there is a sense in antisense?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amodeo, Valeria; Bazan, Viviana; Fanale, Daniele; Insalaco, Lavinia; Caruso, Stefano; Cicero, Giuseppe; Bronte, Giuseppe; Rolfo, Christian; Santini, Daniele; Russo, Antonio

    2013-11-01

    miRNAs are attractive molecules for cancer treatment, including colon rectal cancer (CRC). We investigate on the molecular mechanism by which miR-182 could regulate thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) expression, a protein downregulated in CRC and inversely correlated with tumor vascularity and metastasis. MicroRNAs are small non-coding RNAs that regulate the expression of different genes, involved in cancer progression, angiogenesis and metastasis. miR-182, over-expressed in colorectal cancer (CRC), has like predictive target thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1), a protein inversely correlated with tumor vascularity and metastasis that results downregulated in different types of cancer including CRC. We found that TSP-1 increased after transfection with anti-miR-182 and we showed that miR-182 targets TSP-1 3'UTR-mRNA in both cells. Moreover, we observed that anti-miR-182 did not induce significant variation of Egr-1 expression, but affected the nuclear translocation and its binding on tsp-1 promoter in HCT-116. Equally, Sp-1 was slightly increased as total protein, rather we found a nuclear accumulation and its loading on the TSP-1 promoter in HT-29 transfected with anti-miR-182. Our data suggest that miR-182 targets the anti-angiogenic factor TSP-1 and that anti-miR-182 determines an upregulation of TSP-1 expression in colon cancer cells. Moreover, anti-miR-182 exerts a transcriptional regulatory mechanism of tsp-1 modulating Egr-1 and Sp-1 function. Anti-miR-182 could be used to restore TSP-1 expression in order to contrast angiogenic and invasive events in CRC.

  1. Betulinic acid inhibits colon cancer cell and tumor growth and induces proteasome-dependent and -independent downregulation of specificity proteins (Sp transcription factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pathi Satya

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Betulinic acid (BA inhibits growth of several cancer cell lines and tumors and the effects of BA have been attributed to its mitochondriotoxicity and inhibition of multiple pro-oncogenic factors. Previous studies show that BA induces proteasome-dependent degradation of specificity protein (Sp transcription factors Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 in prostate cancer cells and this study focused on the mechanism of action of BA in colon cancer cells. Methods The effects of BA on colon cancer cell proliferation and apoptosis and tumor growth in vivo were determined using standardized assays. The effects of BA on Sp proteins and Sp-regulated gene products were analyzed by western blots, and real time PCR was used to determine microRNA-27a (miR-27a and ZBTB10 mRNA expression. Results BA inhibited growth and induced apoptosis in RKO and SW480 colon cancer cells and inhibited tumor growth in athymic nude mice bearing RKO cells as xenograft. BA also decreased expression of Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 transcription factors which are overexpressed in colon cancer cells and decreased levels of several Sp-regulated genes including survivin, vascular endothelial growth factor, p65 sub-unit of NFκB, epidermal growth factor receptor, cyclin D1, and pituitary tumor transforming gene-1. The mechanism of action of BA was dependent on cell context, since BA induced proteasome-dependent and proteasome-independent downregulation of Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 in SW480 and RKO cells, respectively. In RKO cells, the mechanism of BA-induced repression of Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 was due to induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS, ROS-mediated repression of microRNA-27a, and induction of the Sp repressor gene ZBTB10. Conclusions These results suggest that the anticancer activity of BA in colon cancer cells is due, in part, to downregulation of Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 transcription factors; however, the mechanism of this response is cell context-dependent.

  2. Biliary endoprosthesis: a prospective analysis of bacterial colonization and risk factors for sludge formation.

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    Jochen Schneider

    Full Text Available Bacterial colonization of biliary stents is one of the driving forces behind sludge formation which may result in stent occlusion. Major focus of the study was to analyze the spectrum and number of microorganisms in relation to the indwelling time of stents and the risk factors for sludge formation. 343 stents were sonicated to optimize the bacterial release from the biofilm and identified by matrix-associated laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometer (MALDI-TOF. 2283 bacteria were analyzed in total. The most prevalent microorganisms were Enterococcus species (spp. (504;22%, followed by Klebsiella spp. (218;10% and Candida spp. (188;8%. Colonization of the stents mainly began with aerobic gram-positive bacteria (43/49;88% and Candida spp. (25/49;51%, whereas stents with an indwelling time>60 days(d showed an almost equal colonization rate by aerobic gram-negative (176/184;96% and aerobic gram-positive bacteria (183/184;99% and a high proportion of anaerobes (127/184;69%. Compared to stents without sludge, more Clostridium spp. [(P = 0.02; Odds Ratio (OR: 2.4; 95% confidence interval (95%CI: (1.1-4.9] and Staphylococcus spp. [(P = 0.03; OR (95%CI: 4.3 (1.1-16.5] were cultured from stents with sludge. Multivariate analysis revealed a significant relationship between the number of microorganisms [P<0.01; OR (95%CI: 1.3(1.1-1.5], the indwelling time [P<0.01; 1-15 d vs. 20-59 d: OR (95%CI: 5.6(1.4-22, 1-15 d vs. 60-3087 d: OR (95% CI: 9.5(2.5-35.7], the presence of sideholes [P<0.01; OR (95%CI: 3.5(1.6-7.9] and the occurrence of sludge. Stent occlusion was found in 70/343(20% stents. In 35% of cases, stent occlusion resulted in a cholangitis or cholestasis. In conclusion, microbial colonization of the stents changed with the indwelling time. Sludge was associated with an altered spectrum and an increasing number of microorganisms, a long indwelling time and the presence of sideholes. Interestingly, stent occlusion did not

  3. Colon cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colorectal cancer; Cancer - colon; Rectal cancer; Cancer - rectum; Adenocarcinoma - colon; Colon - adenocarcinoma; Colon carcinoma ... eat may play a role in getting colon cancer. Colon cancer may be linked to a high-fat, ...

  4. Predictive risk factors of early postoperative enteric fistula in colon and rectal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoomi, Hossein; Carmichael, Joseph C; Mills, Steven; Pigazzi, Alessio; Stamos, Michael J

    2013-10-01

    Early postoperative enteric fistula (PEF) is a complication associated with a high rate of morbidity and mortality in colon and rectal surgery. We evaluated the effect of patient characteristics, comorbidities, pathology, resection type, surgical technique, lysis of adhesions, and admission type on the rate of PEF in colorectal surgery. Using the National Inpatient Sample database, we examined the clinical data of patients who underwent colon and rectal resection from 2009 to 2010. A total of 646,414 patients underwent colorectal resection during this period. Overall, the rate of PEF was 0.37 per cent (2407 patients). Using multivariate regression analysis, Crohn's disease (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 4.68), lysis of abdominal adhesions (AOR, 4.25), open procedure (AOR, 3.18), and transverse colectomy (AOR, 2.13) significantly impacted the risk of PEF. Although teaching hospitals (AOR, 1.69), obesity (AOR, 1.40), male gender (AOR, 1.30), emergent surgery (AOR, 1.27), age older than 65 years (AOR, 1.24), and diabetes mellitus (AOR, 1.21) also had statistically significant impact on rates of PEF, these were less clinically significant than the other factors. The presence of Crohn's disease and lysis of abdominal adhesions are strongly associated with the development of PEF after colorectal surgery. Laparoscopic surgery was associated with a lower rate of PEF; further studies would be needed to evaluate the importance of this finding.

  5. Risk factors and outcomes of organ-space surgical site infections after elective colon and rectal surgery

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    Aina Gomila

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Organ-space surgical site infections (SSI are the most serious and costly infections after colorectal surgery. Most previous studies of risk factors for SSI have analysed colon and rectal procedures together. The aim of the study was to determine whether colon and rectal procedures have different risk factors and outcomes for organ-space SSI. Methods A multicentre observational prospective cohort study of adults undergoing elective colon and rectal procedures at 10 Spanish hospitals from 2011 to 2014. Patients were followed up until 30 days post-surgery. Surgical site infection was defined according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention criteria. Oral antibiotic prophylaxis (OAP was considered as the administration of oral antibiotics the day before surgery combined with systemic intravenous antibiotic prophylaxis. Results Of 3,701 patients, 2,518 (68% underwent colon surgery and 1,183 (32% rectal surgery. In colon surgery, the overall SSI rate was 16.4% and the organ-space SSI rate was 7.9%, while in rectal surgery the rates were 21.6% and 11.5% respectively (p < 0.001. Independent risk factors for organ-space SSI in colon surgery were male sex (Odds ratio -OR-: 1.57, 95% CI: 1.14–2.15 and ostomy creation (OR: 2.65, 95% CI: 1.8–3.92 while laparoscopy (OR: 0.5, 95% CI: 0.38–0.69 and OAP combined with intravenous antibiotic prophylaxis (OR: 0.7, 95% CI: 0.51–0.97 were protective factors. In rectal surgery, independent risk factors for organ-space SSI were male sex (OR: 2.11, 95% CI: 1.34–3.31 and longer surgery (OR: 1.49, 95% CI: 1.03–2.15, whereas OAP with intravenous antibiotic prophylaxis (OR: 0.49, 95% CI: 0.32–0.73 was a protective factor. Among patients with organ-space SSI, we found a significant difference in the overall 30-day mortality, being higher in colon surgery than in rectal surgery (11.5% vs 5.1%, p = 0.04. Conclusions Organ-space SSI in colon and rectal surgery has some

  6. Comparison of Lesion Severity, Distribution, and Colonic Mucin Expression in Pigs With Acute Swine Dysentery Following Oral Inoculation With “Brachyspira hampsonii” or Brachyspira hyodysenteriae

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wilberts, B. L; Arruda, P. H; Kinyon, J. M; Madson, D. M; Frana, T. S; Burrough, E. R

    2014-01-01

    ...) clade II or a classic strain of B. hyodysenteriae (B204; n = 10) to compare gross and microscopic lesions and alterations in colonic mucin expression in pigs with clinical disease versus controls (n = 6...

  7. Results of a phase I pilot clinical trial examining the effect of plant-derived resveratrol and grape powder on Wnt pathway target gene expression in colonic mucosa and colon cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony V Nguyen

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Anthony V Nguyen1, Micaela Martinez1, Michael J Stamos2, Mary P Moyer3, Kestutis Planutis1, Christopher Hope1 Randall F Holcombe11Division of Hematology/Oncology and Chao Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, 2Department of Surgery, University of California, Irvine CA, USA; 3Incell Corporation, San Antonio, TX USAContext: Resveratrol exhibits colon cancer prevention activity in animal models; it is purported to have this activity in humans and inhibit a key signaling pathway involved in colon cancer initiation, the Wnt pathway, in vitro.Design: A phase I pilot study in patients with colon cancer was performed to evaluate the effects of a low dose of plant-derived resveratrol formulation and resveratrol-containing freeze-dried grape powder (GP on Wnt signaling in the colon. Eight patients were enrolled and normal colonic mucosa and colon cancer tissue were evaluated by Wnt pathway-specific microarray and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR pre- and post-exposure to resveratrol/GP.Results: Based on the expression of a panel of Wnt target genes, resveratrol/GP did not inhibit the Wnt pathway in colon cancer but had significant (p < 0.03 activity in inhibiting Wnt target gene expression in normal colonic mucosa. The greatest effect on Wnt target gene expression was seen following ingestion of 80 g of GP per day (p < 0.001. These results were confirmed with qRT-PCR of cyclinD1 and axinII. The inhibitory effect of GP on Wnt signal throughput was confirmed in vitro with a normal colonic mucosa-derived cell line.Conclusions: These data suggest that GP, which contains low dosages of resveratrol in combination with other bioactive components, can inhibit the Wnt pathway in vivo and that this effect is confined to the normal colonic mucosa. Further study of dietary supplementation with resveratrol-containing foods such as whole grapes or GP as a potential colon cancer preventive strategy is warranted.Trial registration: NCT00256334

  8. Factors affected by surgical technique when treating total colonic aganglionosis: laparoscopy-assisted versus open surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyano, Go; Ochi, Takanori; Lane, Geoffrey J; Okazaki, Tadaharu; Yamataka, Atsuyuki

    2013-04-01

    We compared laparoscopy-assisted Duhamel (Lap-D) with open surgery (Duhamel or Soave = D/S) for treating total colonic aganglionosis (TCA) in children to establish what factors may affect outcome. Fourteen TCA cases treated between 1990 and 2010 were reviewed. Open D/S (O-D/S) through a vertical midline abdominal incision was routine from 1990 to 2005, whereupon Lap-D became routine. Lap-D involves laparoscopic colon resection, ileostomy take-down, and ileum pull-through through an additional Pfannenstiel incision. We compared pre-operative nutrition, operating time, intraoperative blood loss, duration until oral challenge, postoperative analgesic usage, incidence of enterocolitis, early complications that arose within 30 days of surgery, and late complications, and wound cosmesis 1 year postoperatively (Grade-1: unacceptable, Grade-2: passable, Grade-3: excellent). Six had O-D/S (2D, 4S) and eight had Lap-D. Differences in patient demographics, mean ages/weights at surgery, average length of the aganglionic segment from the terminal ileum, operating time, and time taken for oral challenge were all not significant, full feeding took longer in O-D/S (6.7 vs. 5.9 days). Preoperative central vein intravenous hyperalimentation was required for one case in O-D/S and two cases in Lap-D. These three required hospitalization for at least 30 days postoperatively and parenteral nutrition after discharge. Although there were no intraoperative complications in either group, there was one case of transient ileus in O-D/S that resolved conservatively. Cosmesis was significantly better in Lap-D (O-D/S = 1.2; Lap-D = 2.1; p < 0.05). Cosmesis was the only factor that was significantly different between Lap-D and O-D/S; all other factors were similar.

  9. Oxidative Stress Promotes Doxorubicin-Induced Pgp and BCRP Expression in Colon Cancer Cells Under Hypoxic Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinzón-Daza, Martha L; Cuellar-Saenz, Yenith; Nualart, Francisco; Ondo-Mendez, Alejandro; Del Riesgo, Lilia; Castillo-Rivera, Fabio; Garzón, Ruth

    2017-07-01

    P-glycoprotein (Pgp) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) are ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters that are overexpressed in different drug-resistant cancer cell lines. In this study, we investigated whether doxorubicin promotes Pgp and/or BCRP expression to induce drug resistance in colon cancer cells under hypoxic conditions. We analyzed HIF-1α activity via ELISA, Pgp, and BCRP expression by qRT-PCR and the relationship between doxorubicin uptake and ABC transporter expression via confocal microscopy in HT-29WT and HT-29 doxorubicin-resistant colon cancer cells (HT-29DxR). These cells were treated with doxorubicin and/or CoCl2 (chemical hypoxia), and reactive oxygen species inductors. We found that the combination of chemically induced hypoxia and doxorubicin promoted Pgp mRNA expression within 24 h in HT-29WT and HT-29DxR cells. Both doxorubicin and CoCl2 alone or in combination induced Pgp and BCRP expression, as demonstrated via confocal microscopy in each of the above two cell lines. Thus, we surmised that Pgp and BCRP expression may result from synergistic effects exerted by the combination of doxorubicin-induced ROS production and HIF-1α activity under hypoxic conditions. However, HIF-1α activity disruption via the administration of E3330, an APE-1 inhibitor, downregulated Pgp expression and increased doxorubicin delivery to HT-29 cells, where it served as a substrate for Pgp, indicating the existence of an indirect relationship between Pgp expression and doxorubicin accumulation. Thus, we concluded that Pgp and BCRP expression can be regulated via cross-talk between doxorubicin and hypoxia, promoting drug resistance in HT-29 WT, and HT-29DxR cells and that this process may be ROS dependent. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 1868-1878, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. High expression of the DNA methyltransferase gene characterizes human neoplastic cells and progression stages of colon cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Deiry, W.S.; Nelkin, B.D.; Celano, P.; Ray-Whay Chiu Yen; Falco, J.P.; Hamilton, S.R.; Baylin, S.B. (Johns Hopkins Medical Inst., Baltimore, MD (United States))

    1991-04-15

    DNA methylation abnormalities occur consistently in human neoplasia including widespread hypomethylation and more recently recognized local increases in DNA methylation that hold potential for gene inactivation events. To study this imbalance further, the authors have localized to chromosome 19 a portion of the human DNA methyltransferase gene that codes for the enzyme catalyzing DNA methylation. Expression of this gene is low in normal human cells, significantly increased (30- to 50-fold by PCR analysis) in virally transformed cells, and strikingly elevated in human cancer cells (several hundredfold). In comparison to colon mucosa from patients without neoplasia, median levels of DNA methyltransferase transcripts are 15-fold increased in histologically normal mucosa from patients with cancers or the benign polyps that can precede cancers, 60-fold increased in the premalignant polyps, and >200-fold increased in the cancers. Thus, increases in DNA methyltransferase gene expression precede development of colonic neoplasia and continue during progression of colonic neoplasms. These increases may play a role in the genetic instability of cancer and mark early events in cell transformation.

  11. Abdominal obesity, insulin resistance, and colon carcinogenesis are increased in mutant mice lacking gastrin gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowey, Stephanie L; Quast, Michael; Belalcazar, Ligia Maria; Wei, Jingwa; Deng, Xiaoling; Given, Randall; Singh, Pomila

    2005-06-15

    The authors recently reported that gastrin gene knockout (GAS-KO) mice had an increased risk for colon carcinogenesis in response to azoxymethane (AOM) compared with their wild type (WT) littermates. In the current report, the authors discuss the predisposition of GAS-KO mice to develop obesity and metabolic hormonal changes that may contribute to their increased risk of colon carcinogenesis. The weight and deposition of fat was monitored in the mice over a 14 month period, using magnetic resonance imaging and nuclear magnetic resonance techniques. Changes in plasma concentrations of ghrelin, leptin, insulin, and glucose were assessed using radioimmunoassay analysis and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Preneoplastic markers of colon carcinogenesis (aberrant crypt foci [ACFs]), in response to AOM, were measured in a subset of obese versus lean GAS-KO mice and were compared with the markers in WT mice. Increases in visceral adiposity were evident by age 2 months in GAS-KO mice, resulting in macroscopic obesity by age 7 months. Hyperinsulinemia and insulin:glucose ratios were increased significantly in GAS-KO mice as young as 1 month and preceded alterations in nonfasting leptin and ghrelin levels. The number of ACFs per mouse colon were increased significantly in the following order: obese GAS-KO mice > lean GAS-KO mice > WT mice. Fasting plasma insulin levels were 0.88 +/- 0.1 ng/mL, 1.45 +/- 0.3, and 2.76 +/- 0.9 ng/mL in the WT, GAS-KO lean, and GAS-KO obese mice, respectively. The current results suggest the novel possibility that loss of amidated gastrins may increase adipogenesis, hyperinsulinemia, and colon carcinogenesis in GAS-KO mice. The increase in colon carcinogenesis may be due in part to hyperinsulinemia, increased obesity, and other associated hormone changes that were measured in GAS-KO mice. Copyright 2005 American Cancer Society.

  12. A Combined ULBP2 and SEMA5A Expression Signature as a Prognostic and Predictive Biomarker for Colon Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Demirkol, Secil; Gomceli, Ismail; Isbilen, Murat; Dayanc, Baris Emre; Tez, Mesut; BOSTANCI, Erdal Birol; Turhan, Nesrin; Akoglu, Musa; Ozyerli, Ezgi; Durdu, Sevi; Konu, Ozlen; Nissan, Aviram; Gonen, Mithat; Gure, Ali Osmay

    2017-01-01

    Background: Prognostic biomarkers for cancer have the power to change the course of disease if they add value beyond known prognostic factors, if they can help shape treatment protocols, and if they are reliable. The aim of this study was to identify such biomarkers for colon cancer and to understand the molecular mechanisms leading to prognostic stratifications based on these biomarkers. Methods and Findings: We used an in house R based script (SSAT) for the in silico discovery of stage-inde...

  13. Difluorinated-curcumin (CDF restores PTEN expression in colon cancer cells by down-regulating miR-21.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanchita Roy

    Full Text Available Despite recent advancement in medicine, nearly 50% of patients with colorectal cancer show recurrence of the disease. Although the reasons for the high relapse are not fully understood, the presence of chemo- and radiotherapy-resistant cancer stem/stem-like cells, where many oncomirs like microRNA-21 (miR-21 are upregulated, could be one of the underlying causes. miR-21 regulates the processes of invasion and metastasis by downregulating multiple tumor/metastatic suppressor genes including PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog. Tumor suppressor protein PTEN controls self-renewal of stem cells. Indeed, our current data demonstrate a marked downregulation of PTEN in SCID mice xenografts of miR-21 over-expressing colon cancer HCT116 cells. Colonospheres that are highly enriched in cancer stem/stem like cells reveal increased miR-21 expression and decreased PTEN. Difluorinated curcumin (CDF, a novel analog of the dietary ingredient curcumin, which has been shown to inhibit the growth of 5-Flurouracil + Oxaliplatin resistant colon cancer cells, downregulated miR-21 in chemo-resistant colon cancer HCT116 and HT-29 cells and restored PTEN levels with subsequent reduction in Akt phosphorylation. Similar results were also observed in metastatic colon cancer SW620 cells. Since PTEN-Akt confers drug resistance to different malignancies including colorectal cancer, our observation of normalization of miR-21-PTEN-Akt pathway by CDF suggests that the compound could be a potential therapeutic agent for chemotherapy-resistant colorectal cancer.

  14. Marriage is a dependent risk factor for mortality of colon adenocarcinoma without a time-varying effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Minling; Li, Lixian; Yu, Wei; Chen, Jie; Xiong, Weibin; Chen, Shuang; Yu, Li

    2017-03-21

    It has been well recognized that the effects of many prognostic factors could change during long-term follow-up. Although marriage has been proven to be a significant prognostic factor for the survival of colon cancer, whether the effect of marriage is constant with time remain unknown. This study analyzed the impact of marital status on the mortality of colon cancer patients with an extended Cox model that allowed for time-varying effects. We identified 71,955 patients who underwent colectomy between 2004 and 2009 to treat colon adenocarcinoma from the Surveilance, Epidemiology and End Results Database. The multivariate extended Cox model was used to evaluate the effect of marital status on all-cause mortality, while the Fine-Gray competing risks model was used for colon cancer-specific mortality, with death from other causes as the competing risk. The unmarried patients carried a 1.37-fold increased risk of all-cause mortality compared with the married patients (95%CI: 1.33-1.40; peffects on survival. Marriage is a dependent prognosis factor for survival of surgically treated colon adenocarcinoma patients. Psychological interventions are suggested to improve receipt of treatment among unmarried patients, as their poor survival may be due to the inefficient treatment.

  15. Colonic miRNA expression/secretion, regulated by intestinal epithelial PepT1, plays an important role in cell-to-cell communication during colitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saravanan Ayyadurai

    Full Text Available PepT1 is a member of the proton-oligopeptide cotransporter family SLC15, which mediates the transport of di/tripeptides from intestinal lumen into epithelial cells. MicroRNAs (miRNAs, a small noncoding RNAs (21-23 nucleotides, post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression by binding to the 3'-untranslated regions (UTRs of their target mRNAs. Although the role of most miRNAs remains elusive, they have been implicated in vital cellular functions such as intestinal epithelial cells differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis. In the present study, we investigated the effect of intestinal epithelial PepT1 expression on microRNA (miRNA expression/secretion in the colons of control mice and in mice with experimentally induced colonic inflammation (colitis. The colonic miRNA expression was deregulated in both colitis and control mice but the deregulation of miRNA expression/secretion was specific to colonic tissue and did not affect other tissues such as spleen and liver. Intestinal epithelial PepT1-dependent deregulation of colonic miRNA expression not only affects epithelial cells but also other cell types, such as intestinal macrophages. Importantly, we found the miRNA 23b which was known to be involved in inflammatory bowel disease was secreted and transported between cells to impose a gene-silencing effect on recipient intestinal macrophages. Based on our data, we may conclude that the expression of a specific protein, PepT1, in the intestine affects local miRNA expression/secretion in the colon on a tissue specific manner and may play an important role during the induction and progression of colitis. Colonic miRNA expression/secretion, regulated by intestinal epithelial PepT1, could play a crucial role in cell-to-cell communication during colitis.

  16. Pretargeted 177Lu radioimmunotherapy of carcinoembryonic antigen-expressing human colonic tumors in mice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoffelen, R.; Graaf, W.T.A. van der; Franssen, G.M.; Sharkey, R.M.; Goldenberg, D.M.; McBride, W.J.; Rossi, E.A.; Eek, A.; Oyen, W.J.G.; Boerman, O.C.

    2010-01-01

    Pretargeted radioimmunotherapy (PRIT) with bispecific antibodies in combination with a radiolabeled peptide reduces the radiation dose to normal tissues, especially the bone marrow. In this study, the optimization, therapeutic efficacy, and toxicity of PRIT of colon cancer with a (177)Lu-labeled

  17. Klebsiella pneumoniae capsule expression is necessary for colonization of large intestines of streptomycin-treated mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Favre-Bonte, S.; Licht, Tine Rask; Forestier, C.

    1999-01-01

    The role of the Klebsiella pneumoniae capsular polysaccharide (K antigen) during colonization of the mouse large intestine was assessed with mild-type K. pneumoniae LM21 and its isogenic capsule-defective mutant. When bacterial strains were fed alone to mice, the capsulated bacteria persisted...

  18. MGL ligand expression is correlated to BRAF mutation and associated with poor survival of stage III colon cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenos, Kristiaan; Goos, Jeroen A.C.M.; Vuist, Ilona M.; den Uil, Sjoerd H.; Delis-van Diemen, Pien M.; Belt, Eric J.Th.; Stockmann, Hein B.A.C.; Bril, Herman; de Wit, Meike; Carvalho, Beatriz; Giblett, Susan; Pritchard, Catrin A.; Meijer, Gerrit A.; van Kooyk, Yvette; Fijneman, Remond J.A.; van Vliet, Sandra J.

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most prevalent cancer type worldwide with a mortality rate of approximately 50%. Elevated cell-surface expression of truncated carbohydrate structures such as Tn antigen (GalNAcα-Ser/Thr) is frequently observed during tumor progression. We have previously demonstrated that the C-type lectin macrophage galactose-type lectin (MGL), expressed by human antigen presenting cells, can distinguish healthy tissue from CRC through its specific recognition of Tn antigen. Both MGL binding and oncogenic BRAF mutations have been implicated in establishing an immunosuppressive microenvironment. Here we aimed to evaluate whether MGL ligand expression has prognostic value and whether this was correlated to BRAFV600E mutation status. Using a cohort of 386 colon cancer patients we demonstrate that high MGL binding to stage III tumors is associated with poor disease-free survival, independent of microsatellite instability or adjuvant chemotherapy. In vitro studies using CRC cell lines showed an association between MGL ligand expression and the presence of BRAFV600E. Administration of specific BRAFV600E inhibitors resulted in decreased expression of MGL-binding glycans. Moreover, a positive correlation between induction of BRAFV600E and MGL binding to epithelial cells of the gastrointestinal tract was found in vivo using an inducible BRAFV600E mouse model. We conclude that the BRAFV600E mutation induces MGL ligand expression, thereby providing a direct link between oncogenic transformation and aberrant expression of immunosuppressive glycans. The strong prognostic value of MGL ligands in stage III colon cancer patients, i.e. when tumor cells disseminate to lymph nodes, further supports the putative immune evasive role of MGL ligands in metastatic disease. PMID:26172302

  19. A prognostic analysis of 895 cases of stage III colon cancer in different colon subsites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Ma, Junli; Zhang, Sai; Deng, Ganlu; Wu, Xiaoling; He, Jingxuan; Pei, Haiping; Shen, Hong; Zeng, Shan

    2015-09-01

    Stage III colon cancer is currently treated as an entity with a unified therapeutic principle. The aim of the retrospective study is to explore the clinicopathological characteristics and outcomes of site-specific stage III colon cancers and the influences of tumor location on prognosis. Eight hundred ninety-five patients with stage III colon cancer treated with radical operation and subsequent adjuvant chemotherapy (5-fluorouracil/oxaliplatin) were divided into seven groups according to colon segment (cecum, ascending colon, hepatic flexure, transverse colon, splenic flexure, descending colon, and sigmoid colon). Expression of excision repair cross-complementing group 1 (ERCC1) and thymidylate synthase (TS) was examined by immunohistochemistry. We assessed if differences exist in patient characteristics and clinic outcomes between the seven groups. There were significant differences in tumor differentiation (P Cancer (AJCC) tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage (P colon. Cox regression analyses identified that tumor location was an independent prognostic factor for RFS and OS. Stage III colon cancer located proximally carried a poorer survival than that located distally. Different efficacies of FOLFOX adjuvant chemotherapy may be an important factor affecting survival of site-specific stage III colon cancers.

  20. Impaired colonization and infection of tomato roots by the Deltafrp1 mutant of Fusarium oxysporum correlates with reduced CWDE gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonkers, Wilfried; Rodrigues, Christopher D Andrade; Rep, Martijn

    2009-05-01

    The vascular wilt pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici efficiently invades roots and colonizes vascular tissues of its host tomato. For these processes, the F-box protein Frp1 is required. The Fusarium oxysporum Deltafrp1 mutant was characterized in detail to uncover the cause of its colonization defect. Using growth assays, we could attribute poor root colonization to reduced assimilation of organic acids, amino acids (except proline), or polysaccharides, singly or in combination. External root colonization by the Deltafrp1 mutant is restored by the addition of 0.1% glucose or proline but infection still does not occur. This is due to the inability of the Deltafrp1 mutant to penetrate the roots, as demonstrated by the lack of expression of SIX1 in the Deltafrp1 strain, which is a gene exclusively expressed inside roots, and loss of cell wall-degrading enzyme (CWDE) gene expression. Many of the metabolic defects of the Deltafrp1 strain can be attributed to reduced expression of the ICL1 (isocitrate lyase) gene. Strikingly, an Deltaicl1 mutant is still fully pathogenic and capable of external root colonization. We conclude that the inability of the Deltafrp1 strain to colonize and invade roots is not primarily due to metabolic defects but can be attributed to reduced expression of several CWDE genes.

  1. Diet and lifestyle factors associated with miRNA expression in colorectal tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slattery ML

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Martha L Slattery,1 Jennifer S Herrick,1 Lila E Mullany,1 John R Stevens,2 Roger K Wolff1 1Department of Internal Medicine, The University of Utah, Salt Lake City, 2Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Utah State University, Logan, UT, USA Abstract: MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small non-protein-coding RNA molecules that regulate gene expression. Diet and lifestyle factors have been hypothesized to be involved in the regulation of miRNA expression. In this study it was hypothesized that diet and lifestyle factors are associated with miRNA expression. Data from 1,447 cases of colorectal cancer to evaluate 34 diet and lifestyle variables using miRNA expression in normal colorectal mucosa as well as for differential expression between paired carcinoma and normal tissue were used. miRNA data were obtained using an Agilent platform. Multiple comparisons were adjusted for using the false discovery rate q-value. There were 250 miRNAs differentially expressed between carcinoma and normal colonic tissue by level of carbohydrate intake and 198 miRNAs differentially expressed by the level of sucrose intake. Of these miRNAs, 166 miRNAs were differentially expressed for both carbohydrate intake and sucrose intake. Ninety-nine miRNAs were differentially expressed by the level of whole grain intake in normal colonic mucosa. Level of oxidative balance score was associated with 137 differentially expressed miRNAs between carcinoma and paired normal rectal mucosa. Additionally, 135 miRNAs were differentially expressed in colon tissue based on recent NSAID use. Other dietary factors, body mass index, waist and hip circumference, and long-term physical activity levels did not alter miRNA expression after adjustment for multiple comparisons. These results suggest that diet and lifestyle factors regulate miRNA level. They provide additional support for the influence of carbohydrate, sucrose, whole grains, NSAIDs, and oxidative balance score on colorectal cancer risk

  2. Genistein inhibits proliferation of colon cancer cells by attenuating a negative effect of epidermal growth factor on tumor suppressor FOXO3 activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wasland Kaarin

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Soy consumption is associated with a lower incidence of colon cancer which is believed to be mediated by one of its of components, genistein. Genistein may inhibit cancer progression by inducing apoptosis or inhibiting proliferation, but mechanisms are not well understood. Epidermal growth factor (EGF-induced proliferation of colon cancer cells plays an important role in colon cancer progression and is mediated by loss of tumor suppressor FOXO3 activity. The aim of this study was to assess if genistein exerts anti-proliferative properties by attenuating the negative effect of EGF on FOXO3 activity. Methods The effect of genistein on proliferation stimulated by EGF-mediated loss of FOXO3 was examined in human colonic cancer HT-29 cells. EGF-induced FOXO3 phosphorylation and translocation were assessed in the presence of genistein. EGF-mediated loss of FOXO3 interactions with p53 (co-immunoprecipitation and promoter of p27kip1 (ChIP assay were examined in presence of genistein in cells with mutated p53 (HT-29 and wild type p53 (HCT116. Silencing of p53 determined activity of FOXO3 when it is bound to p53. Results Genistein inhibited EGF-induced proliferation, while favoring dephosphorylation and nuclear retention of FOXO3 (active state in colon cancer cells. Upstream of FOXO3, genistein acts via the PI3K/Akt pathway to inhibit EGF-stimulated FOXO3 phosphorylation (i.e. favors active state. Downstream, EGF-induced disassociation of FOXO3 from mutated tumor suppressor p53, but not wild type p53, is inhibited by genistein favoring FOXO3-p53(mut interactions with the promoter of the cell cycle inhibitor p27kip1 in colon cancer cells. Thus, the FOXO3-p53(mut complex leads to elevated p27kip1 expression and promotes cell cycle arrest. Conclusion These novel anti-proliferative mechanisms of genistein suggest a possible role of combining genistein with other chemoreceptive agents for the treatment of colon cancer.

  3. Plant and fungal gene expression in mycorrhizal protocorms of the orchid Serapias vomeracea colonized by Tulasnella calospora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestrini, Raffaella; Nerva, Luca; Sillo, Fabiano; Girlanda, Mariangela; Perotto, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Little is known on the molecular bases of plant-fungal interactions in orchid mycorrhiza. We developed a model system to investigate gene expression in mycorrhizal protocorms of Serapias vomeracea colonised by Tulasnella calospora. Our recent results with a small panel of genes as indicators of plant response to mycorrhizal colonization indicate that genes related with plant defense were not significantly up-regulated in mycorrhizal tissues. Here, we used laser microdissection to investigate whether expression of some orchid genes was restricted to specific cell types. Results showed that SvNod1, a S. vomeracea nodulin-like protein containing a plastocyanin-like domain, is expressed only in protocorm cells containing intracellular fungal hyphae. In addition, we investigated a family of fungal zinc metallopeptidases (M36). This gene family has expanded in the T. calospora genome and RNA-Seq experiments indicate that some members of the M36 metallopeptidases family are differentially regulated in orchid mycorrhizal protocorms.

  4. Gibberellins Interfere with Symbiosis Signaling and Gene Expression and Alter Colonization by Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi in Lotus japonicus1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Naoya; Handa, Yoshihiro; Tsuzuki, Syusaku; Kojima, Mikiko; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Kawaguchi, Masayoshi

    2015-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhiza is a mutualistic plant-fungus interaction that confers great advantages for plant growth. Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi enter the host root and form symbiotic structures that facilitate nutrient supplies between the symbionts. The gibberellins (GAs) are phytohormones known to inhibit AM fungal infection. However, our transcriptome analysis and phytohormone quantification revealed GA accumulation in the roots of Lotus japonicus infected with AM fungi, suggesting that de novo GA synthesis plays a role in arbuscular mycorrhiza development. We found pleiotropic effects of GAs on the AM fungal infection. In particular, the morphology of AM fungal colonization was drastically altered by the status of GA signaling in the host root. Exogenous GA treatment inhibited AM hyphal entry into the host root and suppressed the expression of Reduced Arbuscular Mycorrhization1 (RAM1) and RAM2 homologs that function in hyphal entry and arbuscule formation. On the other hand, inhibition of GA biosynthesis or suppression of GA signaling also affected arbuscular mycorrhiza development in the host root. Low-GA conditions suppressed arbuscular mycorrhiza-induced subtilisin-like serine protease1 (SbtM1) expression that is required for AM fungal colonization and reduced hyphal branching in the host root. The reduced hyphal branching and SbtM1 expression caused by the inhibition of GA biosynthesis were recovered by GA treatment, supporting the theory that insufficient GA signaling causes the inhibitory effects on arbuscular mycorrhiza development. Most studies have focused on the negative role of GA signaling, whereas our study demonstrates that GA signaling also positively interacts with symbiotic responses and promotes AM colonization of the host root. PMID:25527715

  5. Gibberellins interfere with symbiosis signaling and gene expression and alter colonization by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in Lotus japonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Naoya; Handa, Yoshihiro; Tsuzuki, Syusaku; Kojima, Mikiko; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Kawaguchi, Masayoshi

    2015-02-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhiza is a mutualistic plant-fungus interaction that confers great advantages for plant growth. Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi enter the host root and form symbiotic structures that facilitate nutrient supplies between the symbionts. The gibberellins (GAs) are phytohormones known to inhibit AM fungal infection. However, our transcriptome analysis and phytohormone quantification revealed GA accumulation in the roots of Lotus japonicus infected with AM fungi, suggesting that de novo GA synthesis plays a role in arbuscular mycorrhiza development. We found pleiotropic effects of GAs on the AM fungal infection. In particular, the morphology of AM fungal colonization was drastically altered by the status of GA signaling in the host root. Exogenous GA treatment inhibited AM hyphal entry into the host root and suppressed the expression of Reduced Arbuscular Mycorrhization1 (RAM1) and RAM2 homologs that function in hyphal entry and arbuscule formation. On the other hand, inhibition of GA biosynthesis or suppression of GA signaling also affected arbuscular mycorrhiza development in the host root. Low-GA conditions suppressed arbuscular mycorrhiza-induced subtilisin-like serine protease1 (SbtM1) expression that is required for AM fungal colonization and reduced hyphal branching in the host root. The reduced hyphal branching and SbtM1 expression caused by the inhibition of GA biosynthesis were recovered by GA treatment, supporting the theory that insufficient GA signaling causes the inhibitory effects on arbuscular mycorrhiza development. Most studies have focused on the negative role of GA signaling, whereas our study demonstrates that GA signaling also positively interacts with symbiotic responses and promotes AM colonization of the host root. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  6. Allele Variants of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Heat-Labile Toxin Are Globally Transmitted and Associated with Colonization Factors

    KAUST Repository

    Joffré, Enrique

    2015-01-15

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in the developing world. ETEC-mediated diarrhea is orchestrated by heat-labile toxin (LT) and heat-stable toxins (STp and STh), acting in concert with a repertoire of more than 25 colonization factors (CFs). LT, the major virulence factor, induces fluid secretion after delivery of a monomeric ADP-ribosylase (LTA) and its pentameric carrier B subunit (LTB). A study of ETEC isolates from humans in Brazil reported the existence of natural LT variants. In the present study, analysis of predicted amino acid sequences showed that the LT amino acid polymorphisms are associated with a geographically and temporally diverse set of 192 clinical ETEC strains and identified 12 novel LT variants. Twenty distinct LT amino acid variants were observed in the globally distributed strains, and phylogenetic analysis showed these to be associated with different CF profiles. Notably, the most prevalent LT1 allele variants were correlated with major ETEC lineages expressing CS1 + CS3 or CS2 + CS3, and the most prevalent LT2 allele variants were correlated with major ETEC lineages expressing CS5 + CS6 or CFA/I. LTB allele variants generally exhibited more-stringent amino acid sequence conservation (2 substitutions identified) than LTA allele variants (22 substitutions identified). The functional impact of LT1 and LT2 polymorphisms on virulence was investigated by measuring total-toxin production, secretion, and stability using GM1-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (GM1-ELISA) and in silico protein modeling. Our data show that LT2 strains produce 5-fold more toxin than LT1 strains (P < 0.001), which may suggest greater virulence potential for this genetic variant. Our data suggest that functionally distinct LT-CF variants with increased fitness have persisted during the evolution of ETEC and have spread globally.

  7. Insulin, CCAAT/enhancer-binding proteins and lactate regulate the human 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 gene expression in colon cancer cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Andrieu

    Full Text Available 11β-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (11beta-HSD modulate mineralocorticoid receptor transactivation by glucocorticoids and regulate access to the glucocorticoid receptor. The isozyme 11beta-HSD2 is selectively expressed in mineralocorticoid target tissues and its activity is reduced in various disease states with abnormal sodium retention and hypertension, including the apparent mineralocorticoid excess. As 50% of patients with essential hypertension are insulin resistant and hyperinsulinemic, we hypothesized that insulin downregulates the 11beta-HSD2 activity. In the present study we show that insulin reduced the 11beta-HSD2 activity in cancer colon cell lines (HCT116, SW620 and HT-29 at the transcriptional level, in a time and dose dependent manner. The downregulation was reversible and required new protein synthesis. Pathway analysis using mRNA profiling revealed that insulin treatment modified the expression of the transcription factor family C/EBPs (CCAAT/enhancer-binding proteins but also of glycolysis related enzymes. Western blot and real time PCR confirmed an upregulation of C/EBP beta isoforms (LAP and LIP with a more pronounced increase in the inhibitory isoform LIP. EMSA and reporter gene assays demonstrated the role of C/EBP beta isoforms in HSD11B2 gene expression regulation. In addition, secretion of lactate, a byproduct of glycolysis, was shown to mediate insulin-dependent HSD11B2 downregulation. In summary, we demonstrate that insulin downregulates HSD11B2 through increased LIP expression and augmented lactate secretion. Such mechanisms are of interest and potential significance for sodium reabsorption in the colon.

  8. An In Vitro Blood-Feeding Method Revealed Differential Borrelia turicatae (Spirochaetales: Spirochaetaceae) Gene Expression After Spirochete Acquisition and Colonization in the Soft Tick Ornithodoros turicata (Acari: Argasidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neelakanta, Girish; Sultana, Hameeda; Sonenshine, Daniel E; Marconi, Richard T

    2017-03-01

    In the Midwestern, Southwestern, and Southern part of the United States, the soft tick Ornithodoros turicata transmits the spirochete Borrelia turicatae, the causative agent of relapsing fever in humans. In this study, we report a simplified and an efficient method of in vitro feeding to evaluate O. turicata-B. turicatae interactions. Both nymphal and adult female ticks successfully acquired spirochetes upon in vitro feeding on the B. turicatae-infected blood. We also noted transstadial transmission of spirochetes to adult ticks that were molted from nymphs fed on B. turicatae-infected blood. A differential expression pattern for some of the B. turicatae genes was evident after acquisition and colonization of the vector. The levels of arthropod-associated lipoprotein Alp-mRNA were significantly upregulated and the mRNA levels of factor H binding protein FhbA and immunogenic protein BipA were significantly downregulated in the spirochetes after acquisition into ticks in comparison with spirochetes grown in culture medium. In addition, genes such as bta124 and bta116 were significantly upregulated in spirochetes in unfed ticks in comparison with the levels noted in spirochetes after acquisition. These findings represent an efficient in vitro blood-feeding method to study B. turicatae gene expression after acquisition and colonization in these ticks. In summary, we report that B. turicatae survive and develop in the tick host when acquired by in vitro feeding. We also report that B. turicatae genes are differentially expressed in ticks in comparison with the in vitro-grown cultures, indicating influence of tick environment on spirochete gene expression. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Impaired barrier function by dietary fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS in rats is accompanied by increased colonic mitochondrial gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kramer Evelien

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dietary non-digestible carbohydrates stimulate the gut microflora and are therefore presumed to improve host resistance to intestinal infections. However, several strictly controlled rat infection studies showed that non-digestible fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS increase, rather than decrease, translocation of Salmonella towards extra-intestinal sites. In addition, it was shown that FOS increases intestinal permeability already before infection. The mechanism responsible for this adverse effect of FOS is unclear. Possible explanations are altered mucosal integrity due to changes in tight junctions or changes in expression of defense molecules such as antimicrobials and mucins. To examine the mechanisms underlying weakening of the intestinal barrier by FOS, a controlled dietary intervention study was performed. Two groups of 12 rats were adapted to a diet with or without FOS. mRNA was collected from colonic mucosa and changes in gene expression were assessed for each individual rat using Agilent rat whole genome microarrays. Results Among the 997 FOS induced genes we observed less mucosal integrity related genes than expected with the clear permeability changes. FOS did not induce changes in tight junction genes and only 8 genes related to mucosal defense were induced by FOS. These small effects are unlikely the cause for the clear increase in intestinal permeability that is observed. FOS significantly increased expression of 177 mitochondria-related genes. More specifically, induced expression of genes involved in all five OXPHOS complexes and the TCA cycle was observed. These results indicate that dietary FOS influences intestinal mucosal energy metabolism. Furthermore, increased expression of 113 genes related to protein turnover, including proteasome genes, ribosomal genes and protein maturation related genes, was seen. FOS upregulated expression of the peptide hormone proglucagon gene, in agreement with previous studies, as

  10. Changes in the expression of galanin and galanin receptors in the wall of the colon in pigs experimentally infected with Brachyspira hyodysenteriae

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    Wąsowicz Krzysztof

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The expression of galanin (GAL and its three receptors (GalR1, GalR2, and GalR3 were studied with real-time PCR in the colonic wall of pigs suffering from experimental colitis caused by the infection with Brachyspira hyodysenteriae. The expression was studied in the muscular membrane, mucosa/submucosa layer, and in lymphocytes isolated from mucosa/submucosa. The expression levels were normalized to glyceraldehyde-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH expression and compared to expression levels in control animals. GAL expression was found in all three studied compartments of the colonic wall. A significant decrease in GAL expression level was found in the mucosa/submucosa and in isolated lymphocytes, whereas the decrease was much less profound in the muscular membrane. In the case of galanin receptors their expression was found in all studied compartments of the colonic wall, however at different levels, as compared to GAPDH expression. The decrease of galanin receptors expression was found in all studied compartments of the colonic wall of the sick animals.

  11. Differential interaction of Salmonella enterica serovars with lettuce cultivars and plant-microbe factors influencing the colonization efficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klerks, M.M.; Franz, E.; Gent-Pelzer, van M.P.E.; Zijlstra, C.; Bruggen, van A.H.C.

    2007-01-01

    The availability of knowledge of the route of infection and critical plant and microbe factors influencing the colonization efficiency of plants by human pathogenic bacteria is essential for the design of preventive strategies to maintain safe food. This research describes the differential

  12. Type 1 Fimbriae, a Colonization Factor of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli, Are Controlled by the Metabolic Sensor CRP-cAMP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Claudia M.; Åberg, Anna; Straseviçiene, Jurate; Emődy, Levente; Uhlin, Bernt Eric; Balsalobre, Carlos

    2009-01-01

    Type 1 fimbriae are a crucial factor for the virulence of uropathogenic Escherichia coli during the first steps of infection by mediating adhesion to epithelial cells. They are also required for the consequent colonization of the tissues and for invasion of the uroepithelium. Here, we studied the role of the specialized signal transduction system CRP-cAMP in the regulation of type 1 fimbriation. Although initially discovered by regulating carbohydrate metabolism, the CRP-cAMP complex controls a major regulatory network in Gram-negative bacteria, including a broad subset of genes spread into different functional categories of the cell. Our results indicate that CRP-cAMP plays a dual role in type 1 fimbriation, affecting both the phase variation process and fimA promoter activity, with an overall repressive outcome on fimbriation. The dissection of the regulatory pathway let us conclude that CRP-cAMP negatively affects FimB-mediated recombination by an indirect mechanism that requires DNA gyrase activity. Moreover, the underlying studies revealed that CRP-cAMP controls the expression of another global regulator in Gram-negative bacteria, the leucine-responsive protein Lrp. CRP-cAMP-mediated repression is limiting the switch from the non-fimbriated to the fimbriated state. Consistently, a drop in the intracellular concentration of cAMP due to altered physiological conditions (e.g. growth in presence of glucose) increases the percentage of fimbriated cells in the bacterial population. We also provide evidence that the repression of type 1 fimbriae by CRP-cAMP occurs during fast growth conditions (logarithmic phase) and is alleviated during slow growth (stationary phase), which is consistent with an involvement of type 1 fimbriae in the adaptation to stress conditions by promoting biofilm growth or entry into host cells. Our work suggests that the metabolic sensor CRP-cAMP plays a role in coupling the expression of type 1 fimbriae to environmental conditions, thereby

  13. Potential roles of WRKY transcription factors in resistance to Aspergillus flavus colonization of immature maize kernels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resistance to Aspergillus flavus by maize (Zea mays L.) is mediated by several defense proteins; however the mechanism regulating the expression of these defenses is poorly understood. This study examined the potential roles of six maize WRKY transcription factors, ZmWRKY19, ZmWRKY21, ZmWRKY53, ZmW...

  14. Comparison of microarray platforms for measuring differential microRNA expression in paired normal/cancer colon tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Callari

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Microarray technology applied to microRNA (miRNA profiling is a promising tool in many research fields; nevertheless, independent studies characterizing the same pathology have often reported poorly overlapping results. miRNA analysis methods have only recently been systematically compared but only in few cases using clinical samples. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We investigated the inter-platform reproducibility of four miRNA microarray platforms (Agilent, Exiqon, Illumina, and Miltenyi, comparing nine paired tumor/normal colon tissues. The most concordant and selected discordant miRNAs were further studied by quantitative RT-PCR. Globally, a poor overlap among differentially expressed miRNAs identified by each platform was found. Nevertheless, for eight miRNAs high agreement in differential expression among the four platforms and comparability to qRT-PCR was observed. Furthermore, most of the miRNA sets identified by each platform are coherently enriched in data from the other platforms and the great majority of colon cancer associated miRNA sets derived from the literature were validated in our data, independently from the platform. Computational integration of miRNA and gene expression profiles suggested that anti-correlated predicted target genes of differentially expressed miRNAs are commonly enriched in cancer-related pathways and in genes involved in glycolysis and nutrient transport. CONCLUSIONS: Technical and analytical challenges in measuring miRNAs still remain and further research is required in order to increase consistency between different microarray-based methodologies. However, a better inter-platform agreement was found by looking at miRNA sets instead of single miRNAs and through a miRNAs - gene expression integration approach.

  15. Recombinant mouse prion protein alone or in combination with lipopolysaccharide alters expression of innate immunity genes in the colon of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dervishi, Elda; Lam, Tran H; Dunn, Suzana M; Zwierzchowski, Grzegorz; Saleem, Fozia; Wishart, David S; Ametaj, Burim N

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to test whether recombinant mouse (mo)PrP alone or in combination with LPS or under simulated endotoxemia would affect expression of genes related to host inflammatory and antimicrobial responses. To test our hypotheses colon tissues were collected from 16 male mice (FVB/N strain) and mounted in an Ussing chamber. Application of moPrP to the mucosal side of the colon affected genes related to TLR- and NLR- signaling and antimicrobial responses. When LPS was added on the mucosal side of the colon, genes related to TLR, Nlrp3 inflammasome, and iron transport proteins were over-expressed. Addition of LPS to the serosal side of the colon up-regulated genes related to TLR- and NLR-signaling, Nlrp3 inflammasome, and a chemokine. Treatment with both moPrP and LPS to the mucosal side of the colon upregulated genes associated with TLR, downstream signal transduction (DST), inflammatory response, attraction of dendritic cells to the site of inflammation, and the JNK-apoptosis pathway. Administration of moPrP to the mucosal side and LPS to the serosal side of the colon affected genes related to TLR- and NLR-signaling, DST, apoptosis, inflammatory response, cytokines, chemokines, and antimicrobial peptides. Overall this study suggests a potential role for moPrP as an endogenous 'danger signal' associated with activation of colon genes related to innate immunity and antibacterial responses.

  16. HPV16-E7 Expression Causes Fluorodeoxyuridine-mediated Radiosensitization in SW620 Human Colon Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D. Axelson

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available We have reported that HT29 colon cancer cells, which are radiosensitized by fluorodeoxyuridine (FdUrd, exhibit a greater increase in cyclin E—dependent kinase activity and progress further into S phase in the presence of FdUrd than do SW620 colon cancer cells, which are only minimally sensitized by this drug (Cancer Res 56: 3203, 1996. Although these findings suggested that the ability to progress into S phase in the presence of FdUrd permits cells to be radiosensitized, we wished to test this hypothesis by attempting to drive SW620 human colon cells into S phase by transducing them with the HPV16-E7 gene. Two-parameter flow cytometry showed that E7-transduced cells progressed through S phase after radiation and FdUrd treatment more rapidly than SW620 parental cells. We found that E7-transduced SW620 cells were significantly radiosensitized by FdUrd (100 nmol/L, 14 hours with an enhancement ratio for 2 clones of 1.47±0.03 and 1.51±0.14, compared with 1.24±0.04 in SW620 parental cells. These data strongly support the hypothesis that dysregulation of S-phase progression is an important factor in FdUrd-mediated radiosensitization.

  17. Immunization of Mice with Lactobacillus casei Expressing a Beta-Intimin Fragment Reduces Intestinal Colonization by Citrobacter rodentium ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, P. C. D.; da Silva, J. B.; Piazza, R. M. F.; Eckmann, L.; Ho, P. L.; Oliveira, M. L. S.

    2011-01-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) is a common cause of diarrhea in children from developing countries. Intimate adhesion of the bacteria to intestinal cells occurs via binding of the adhesin intimin to the TIR receptor exposed on cell surfaces. Here, Lactobacillus casei expressing a fragment of β-intimin (L. casei-Intcv) was tested as mucosal vaccines in mice against intestinal colonization with the murine pathogen Citrobacter rodentium. Oral or sublingual immunization of C57BL/6 mice with L. casei-Intcv induced anti-Intcv IgA in feces but no IgG in sera. Conversely, anti-Intcv IgG was induced in the sera of mice after sublingual immunization with purified Intcv. All vaccines were able to decrease C. rodentium recovery from feces. However, this reduction was more evident and sustained over time in mice immunized with L. casei-Intcv by the sublingual route. These mice also displayed an increase in interleukin 6 (IL-6) and gamma interferon (IFN-γ) secretion by spleen cells 10 days after infection. Additionally, oral or sublingual immunization of C3H/HePas mice, which are highly susceptible to C. rodentium infection, with L. casei-Intcv induced anti-Intcv antibodies and significantly increased survival after challenge. Immunohistological analysis of colon sections revealed that C. rodentium was located in deep fractions of the tissue from C3H/HePas mice immunized with L. casei whereas superficial staining was observed in colon sections from mice immunized with L. casei-Intcv. The results indicate that vaccines composed of L. casei expressing intimin may represent a promising approach and that the C3H/HePas infection model with C. rodentium can be used to evaluate potential vaccines against EPEC. PMID:21900533

  18. [Systemic candidiasis in medical intensive care unit: analysis of risk factors and the contribution of colonization index].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massou, S; Ahid, S; Azendour, H; Bensghir, M; Mounir, K; Iken, M; Lmimouni, B E; Balkhi, H; Drissi Kamili, N; Haimeur, C

    2013-06-01

    Description of the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of the patients introducing risk factors of invasive candidiasis. Analysis of risk factors for candidiasis invasive and evaluation of the contribution of colonization index (CI) in the diagnosis of the systematic candidiasis in medical intensive care. Prospective observational study (October 2007 to October 2009). The selected patients present risk factors of system IC candidiasis with an infectious syndrome or clinical signs suggestive of Candida infection and hospitalized more than 48 hours in medical intensive care unit. Pittet's colonization index was calculated at admission and then once a week added to a blood culture. Patients were classified according to level of evidence of Candida infection and the degree of colonization (CIcandidiasis. In multivariate analysis, the corticosteroid therapy was associated with a high colonisation (IC ≥ 0.5) and neutropenia with a high risk of systemic candidiasis. The positive predictive value of CI was 26%. The negative predictive value was 98%, the sensitivity and specificity was 93% and 48% respectively. CI has the advantage to provide a quantified data of the patient's situation in relation to the colonization. But, it isn't helpful with patients having an invasive candidiasis in medical intensive care unit. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Prolonged exposure of colon cancer cells to the epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor gefitinib (Iressa(TM)) and to the antiangiogenic agent ZD6474: Cytotoxic and biomolecular effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzariti, Amalia; Porcelli, Letizia; Xu, Jian-Ming; Simone, Grazia Maria; Paradiso, Angelo

    2006-08-28

    To analyze the biological effects of prolonged in vitro exposure of HT-29 and LoVo colon cancer cell lines to gefitinib (Iressa), an inhibitor of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activity, and ZD6474, an inhibitor of both KDR and EGFR activities. Cells were treated with each drug for up to 2 wk using either a continuous or an intermittent (4 d of drug exposure followed by 3 d of washout each week) schedule. In both cell types, prolonged exposure (up to 14 d) to gefitinib or ZD6474 produced a similar inhibition of cell growth that was persistent and independent of the treatment schedule. The effects on cell growth were associated with a pronounced inhibition of p-EGFR and/or p-KDR expression. Treatment with gefitinib or ZD6474 also inhibited the expression of EGFR downstream signal molecules, p-Erk1/2 and p-Akt, although the magnitude of these effects varied between treatments and cell lines. Furthermore, expression of the drug resistance-related protein ABCG2 was shown to significantly increase after 14 d of continuous exposure to the two drugs. We conclude that long-term exposure of colon cancer cells to gefitinib and ZD6474 does not modify their cytotoxic effects but it might have an effect on sensitivity to classical cytotoxic drugs.

  20. Prolonged exposure of colon cancer cells to the epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor gefitinib (Iressa™) and to the antiangiogenic agent ZD6474: Cytotoxic and biomolecular effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzariti, Amalia; Porcelli, Letizia; Xu, Jian-Ming; Simone, Grazia Maria; Paradiso, Angelo

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the biological effects of prolonged in vitro exposure of HT-29 and LoVo colon cancer cell lines to gefitinib (Iressa™), an inhibitor of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activity, and ZD6474, an inhibitor of both KDR and EGFR activities. METHODS: Cells were treated with each drug for up to 2 wk using either a continuous or an intermittent (4 d of drug exposure followed by 3 d of washout each week) schedule. RESULTS: In both cell types, prolonged exposure (up to 14 d) to gefitinib or ZD6474 produced a similar inhibition of cell growth that was persistent and independent of the treatment schedule. The effects on cell growth were associated with a pronounced inhibition of p-EGFR and/or p-KDR expression. Treatment with gefitinib or ZD6474 also inhibited the expression of EGFR downstream signal molecules, p-Erk1/2 and p-Akt, although the magnitude of these effects varied between treatments and cell lines. Furthermore, expression of the drug resistance-related protein ABCG2 was shown to significantly increase after 14 d of continuous exposure to the two drugs. CONCLUSION: We conclude that long-term exposure of colon cancer cells to gefitinib and ZD6474 does not modify their cytotoxic effects but it might have an effect on sensitivity to classical cytotoxic drugs. PMID:16937523

  1. Teat apex colonization with coagulase-negative Staphylococcus species before parturition: Distribution and species-specific risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Visscher, A; Piepers, S; Haesebrouck, F; De Vliegher, S

    2016-02-01

    Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) are the main cause of bovine intramammary infections and are also abundantly present in extramammary habitats such as teat apices. Teat apex colonization (TAC) with CNS has already been explored in lactating dairy cows at the species level, whereas this is not true for dry cows and end-term heifers. Therefore, the aim of this observational study was to describe CNS TAC in nonlactating dairy cows and end-term heifers in Flemish dairy herds and to identify associated risk factors at the herd, cow, and quarter level. All CNS were molecularly identified to the species level using transfer RNA intergenic spacer PCR (tDNA-PCR) and sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, allowing for species-specific statistical analyses using multivariable, multilevel logistic regression. Staphylococcus devriesei, Staphylococcus chromogenes, Staphylococcus haemolyticus, and Staphylococcus equorum were the most frequently isolated species. Staphylococcus chromogenes was the sole species colonizing teat apices of cows and heifers in all herds, whereas large between-herd differences were observed for the other species. Teat apices of red and white Holstein Friesians, of quarters dried off without an internal teat sealer, and swabbed in months with lower precipitation and higher ambient temperature were significantly more likely to be colonized by S. devriesei. Slightly dirty teat apices and teat apices swabbed in months with lower precipitation had higher odds of being colonized by S. chromogenes, whereas teat apices sampled in months with lower precipitation and higher ambient temperature were more likely to be colonized by S. haemolyticus. Dirty teat apices and teat apices swabbed in months with lower ambient temperature in combination with low precipitation had higher odds of being colonized by S. equorum. Diverse factors explaining CNS TAC, yet mostly related to humidity, ambient temperature, and hygiene, substantiate differences in epidemiological

  2. Inflammatory cytokines IL-17 and TNF-α up-regulate PD-L1 expression in human prostate and colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xun; Yang, Lingyun; Huang, Feng; Zhang, Qiuyang; Liu, Sen; Ma, Lin; You, Zongbing

    2017-04-01

    Programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1) acts on PD-1 ligands (PD-L1 and PD-L2) to suppress activation of cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Interleukin-17 (IL-17) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) are co-expressed by T helper 17 (T H 17) cells in many tumors. The purpose of this study was to test if IL-17 and TNF-α may synergistically induce PD-L1 expression in human prostate cancer LNCaP and human colon cancer HCT116 cell lines. We found that IL-17 did not induce PD-L1 mRNA expression, but up-regulated PD-L1 protein expression in HCT116 and LNCaP cells. TNF-α induced PD-L1 mRNA and protein expression in both cell lines. Neither IL-17 nor TNF-α induced PD-L2 mRNA or protein expression. IL-17 and TNF-α acted individually rather than cooperatively in induction of PD-L1 expression. IL-17 and/or TNF-α activated AKT, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) signaling pathways in HCT116 cells, whereas only NF-κB signaling was activated in LNCaP cells. NF-κB inhibitor could diminish PD-L1 protein expression induced by IL-17 and/or TNF-α in both HCT116 and LNCaP cell lines. ERK1/2 inhibitor could also reduce PD-L1 protein expression induced by IL-17 and/or TNF-α in HCT116 cells, while AKT inhibitor could abolish PD-L1 protein expression induced by IL-17 and/or TNF-α in LNCaP cells. These results suggest that IL-17 and TNF-α act individually rather than cooperatively through activation of NF-κB and ERK1/2 signaling to up-regulate PD-L1 expression in HCT116 cells, while the two inflammatory cytokines act through activation of NF-κB signaling, in the presence of AKT activity, to up-regulate PD-L1 expression in LNCaP cells. Copyright © 2017 European Federation of Immunological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Expression of group B protective surface protein (BPS) by invasive and colonizing isolates of group B streptococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Aurea E; Chhatwal, G S; Hillier, Sharon L; Baker, Carol J; Ferrieri, Patricia

    2014-12-01

    Group B protective surface protein (BPS) is expressed on the cell surface of some group B streptococcal (GBS) (Streptococcus agalactiae) strains and adds to the identification by capsular polysaccharide (CPS), and c or R proteins. We investigated the prevalence of BPS among GBS clinical isolates (303 invasive, 4122 colonizing) collected over 11 years in four American cities. Hot HCl cell extracts were tested by immunoprecipitation in agarose with rabbit antisera to BPS; the alpha (α) and beta (β) components of c protein; R1, R3, and R4 species of R protein; and CPS serotypes Ia-VIII. BPS was found in 155 isolates (seven invasive, 148 colonizing). Of these, 87 were Ia, 37 II, 20 V; none were III. BPS was expressed usually with another protein: a species of R by 87 or a component of c by 39. The predominant CPS/protein profiles with BPS were Ia/R1,BPS and II/c(α + β),BPS. Thus, along with CPS serotype and other surface proteins, BPS can be a valuable marker for precise strain characterization of unique GBS clinical isolates with complex surface protein profiles.

  4. Antifungal genes expressed in transgenic pea (Pisum sativum L.) do not affect root colonization of arbuscular mycorrhizae fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahlon, Jagroop Gill; Jacobsen, Hans-Jörg; Cahill, James F; Hall, Linda M

    2017-06-12

    Genetically modified crops have raised concerns about unintended consequences on non-target organisms including beneficial soil associates. Pea transformed with four antifungal genes 1-3 β glucanase, endochitinase, polygalacturonase-inhibiting proteins, and stilbene synthase is currently under field-testing for efficacy against fungal diseases in Canada. Transgenes had lower expression in the roots than leaves in greenhouse experiment. To determine the impact of disease-tolerant pea or gene products on colonization by non-target arbuscular mycorrhizae and nodulation by rhizobium, a field trial was established. Transgene insertion, as single gene or stacked genes, did not alter root colonization by arbuscular mycorrhiza fungus (AMF) or root nodulation by rhizobium inoculation in the field. We found no effect of transgenes on the plant growth and performance although, having a dual inoculant with both AMF and rhizobium yielded higher fresh weight shoot-to-root ratio in all the lines tested. This initial risk assessment of transgenic peas expressing antifungal genes showed no deleterious effect on non-target organisms.

  5. Subcellular distribution and expression of cofilin and ezrin in human colon adenocarcinoma cell lines with different metastatic potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Nowak

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton is regulated by a number of actin binding proteins (ABPs. Four human colon adenocarcinoma cell lines – parental and three selected sublines, which differ in motility and metastatic potential, were used to investigate the expression level and subcellular localization of selected ABPs. Our interest was focused on cofilin and ezrin. These proteins are essential for cell migration and adhesion. The data received for the three more motile adenocarcinoma sublines (EB3, 3LNLN, 5W were compared with those obtained for the parental LS180 adenocarcinoma cells and fibroblastic NRK cells. Quantitative densitometric analysis and confocal fluorescence microscopy were used to examine the expression levels and subcellular distribution of the selected ABPs. Our data show distinct increase in the level of cofilin in adenocarcinoma cells accompanied by the reduction of inactive phosphorylated form of cofilin. In more motile cells, cofilin was accumulated at cellular periphery in co-localization with actin filaments. Furthemore, we indicated translocation of ezrin towards the cell periphery within more motile cells in comparison with NRK and parental adenocarcinoma cells. In summary, our data indicate the correlation between migration ability of selected human colon adenocarcinoma sublines and subcellular distribution as well as the level of cofilin and ezrin. Therefore these proteins might be essential for the higher migratory activity of invasive tumor cells.

  6. Regulation of laminin γ2 expression by CDX2 in colonic epithelial cells is impaired during active inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coskun, Mehmet; Soendergaard, Christoffer; Joergensen, Steffen

    2017-01-01

    , proliferation, differentiation, as well as tumor invasion and intestinal inflammation, and its expression is enhanced by TNF-α in a NF-κB-dependent regulation of the recently identified LAMC2 enhancer. The aim was to determine whether CDX2 is involved in the basal regulation of LAMC2 in epithelial cells...... and to assess the influence of inflammation. Transcriptional regulation of LAMC2 was examined by reporter gene assays, overexpression, and shRNA-mediated knock-down of CDX2. CDX2-DNA interactions were assessed by chromatin immunoprecipitation on Caco-2 cells without or with TNF-α, as well as in purified colonic...... expression through interaction with elements in the LAMC2 promoter region. We further revealed an inverse effect of inflammation on CDX2 and LAMC2. The data presented provide a novel insight into how CDX2 is implicated in the transcriptional regulation of LAMC2 in intestinal epithelial cells, a function...

  7. Muscarinic Receptor Signaling in Colon Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenvinge, Erik C. von, E-mail: evonrose@medicine.umaryland.edu; Raufman, Jean-Pierre [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology & Hepatology, 22 S. Greene Street, N3W62, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Department of Veterans Affairs, VA Maryland Health Care System, 10 North Greene Street, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States)

    2011-03-02

    According to the adenoma-carcinoma sequence, colon cancer results from accumulating somatic gene mutations; environmental growth factors accelerate and augment this process. For example, diets rich in meat and fat increase fecal bile acids and colon cancer risk. In rodent cancer models, increased fecal bile acids promote colon dysplasia. Conversely, in rodents and in persons with inflammatory bowel disease, low-dose ursodeoxycholic acid treatment alters fecal bile acid composition and attenuates colon neoplasia. In the course of elucidating the mechanism underlying these actions, we discovered that bile acids interact functionally with intestinal muscarinic receptors. The present communication reviews muscarinic receptor expression in normal and neoplastic colon epithelium, the role of autocrine signaling following synthesis and release of acetylcholine from colon cancer cells, post-muscarinic receptor signaling including the role of transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptors and activation of the ERK and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways, the structural biology and metabolism of bile acids and evidence for functional interaction of bile acids with muscarinic receptors on human colon cancer cells. In murine colon cancer models, deficiency of subtype 3 muscarinic receptors attenuates intestinal neoplasia; a proof-of-concept supporting muscarinic receptor signaling as a therapeutic target for colon cancer.

  8. Muscarinic Receptor Signaling in Colon Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Pierre Raufman

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available According to the adenoma-carcinoma sequence, colon cancer results from accumulating somatic gene mutations; environmental growth factors accelerate and augment this process. For example, diets rich in meat and fat increase fecal bile acids and colon cancer risk. In rodent cancer models, increased fecal bile acids promote colon dysplasia. Conversely, in rodents and in persons with inflammatory bowel disease, low-dose ursodeoxycholic acid treatment alters fecal bile acid composition and attenuates colon neoplasia. In the course of elucidating the mechanism underlying these actions, we discovered that bile acids interact functionally with intestinal muscarinic receptors. The present communication reviews muscarinic receptor expression in normal and neoplastic colon epithelium, the role of autocrine signaling following synthesis and release of acetylcholine from colon cancer cells, post-muscarinic receptor signaling including the role of transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptors and activation of the ERK and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways, the structural biology and metabolism of bile acids and evidence for functional interaction of bile acids with muscarinic receptors on human colon cancer cells. In murine colon cancer models, deficiency of subtype 3 muscarinic receptors attenuates intestinal neoplasia; a proof-of-concept supporting muscarinic receptor signaling as a therapeutic target for colon cancer.

  9. Increased expression of chemokine receptor CCR3 and its ligands in ulcerative colitis: the role of colonic epithelial cells in in vitro studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manousou, P; Kolios, G; Valatas, V; Drygiannakis, I; Bourikas, L; Pyrovolaki, K; Koutroubakis, I; Papadaki, H A; Kouroumalis, E

    2010-01-01

    Human colonic epithelial cells express T helper type 1 (Th1)-associated chemoattractants, yet little is known about the production of Th2-associated chemoattractants. CCL11/eotaxin-1, CCL24/eotaxin-2 and CCL26/eotaxin-3 are known to attract CCR3-expressing, Th2-polarized lymphocytes. We studied constitutive and inflammation-induced expression and production of CCR3 together with its ligands in the colon and peripheral blood of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) by flow cytometry, reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction (RT–PCR) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). We further defined the regulated expression of these chemokines by RT–PCR and ELISA using cultured human epithelial cell lines. A higher fraction of peripheral T lymphocytes were found to be positive for CCR3 in patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) compared to Crohn's disease (CD), while almost no CCR3+ T cells were found in normal controls (NC). Similarly, higher and more frequent expression of CCR3 was observed in colonic biopsies from patients with UC, regardless of the disease activity, when compared to CD or NCs. Serum CCL11/eotaxin-1 was increased significantly in UC (306 ± 87 pg/ml) and less so in CD (257 ± 43 pg/ml), whereas CCL24/eotaxin-2, and CCL26/eotaxin-3 were increased only in UC. Colonic expression of the three chemokines was minimal in NCs but high in inflammatory bowel diseases (especially UC) and was independent of disease activity. Th2, and to a lesser extent Th1, cytokines were able to induce expression and production of all three eotaxins from colonic epithelial cells in culture. CCR3 and ligands over-expression would appear to be a characteristic of UC. The production of CCR3 ligands by human colonic epithelial cells suggests further that epithelium can play a role in modulating pathological T cell-mediated mucosal inflammation. PMID:21077277

  10. Colonization and virulence factors of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a pediatric population in Montería, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo-Caldera, Dina Marcela

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA is able to colonize the human body, most frequently the nostrils, but also the hands, perineum and throat. Such colonization has been proposed as a risk factor to acquire future infections. Objective: To determine the prevalence, and the microbiological and molecular characteristics of MRSA in healthy children. Methodology: A cross-sectional descriptive study was done of 150 children from 13 day care centers in Montería, Colombia. Nasal and throat swabs were obtained. The isolates were identified and characterized by microbiological and molecular methods. Results: The MRSA colonization rate was 9.3% (14/150. 62.5% of the isolates carried the subtype IVc of SCCmec, and 87.5% had the genes encoding for PVL and Sek, while 81.2% carried the gene bsaB. Conclusion: The percentage of colonization found is one of the highest reported among children from the Colombian Caribbean region, and the isolates have virulence factors that have been associated with an aggressive clinical course.

  11. Risk Factors for Colonization of E. coli in Atlantic Bottlenose Dolphins (Tursiops truncatus in the Indian River Lagoon, Florida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam M. Schaefer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Opportunistic pathogens related to degradation in water quality are of concern to both wildlife and public health. The objective of this study was to identify spatial, temporal, and environmental risk factors for E. coli colonization among Atlantic bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus inhabiting the Indian River Lagoon (IRL, FL between 2003 and 2007. Age, gender, capture location, coastal human population density, proximity of sewage treatment plants, number of septic tanks, cumulative precipitation 48 hrs and 30 days prior to capture, salinity, and water temperature were analyzed as potential risk factors. Highest E. coli colonization rates occurred in the northern segments of the IRL. The risk of E. coli colonization was the highest among the youngest individuals, in counties with the highest cumulative rainfall 48 hrs and in counties with the highest number of septic systems during the year of capture. The prevalence of colonization was the highest during 2004, a year during which multiple hurricanes hit the coast of Florida. Septic tanks, in combination with weather-related events suggest a possible pathway for introduction of fecal coliforms into estuarine ecosystems. The ability of E. coli and related bacteria to act as primary pathogens or cause opportunistic infections adds importance of these findings.

  12. The Heparanase Inhibitor PG545 Attenuates Colon Cancer Initiation and Growth, Associating with Increased p21 Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preeti Singh

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Heparanase activity is highly implicated in cellular invasion and tumor metastasis, a consequence of cleavage of heparan sulfate and remodeling of the extracellular matrix underlying epithelial and endothelial cells. Heparanase expression is rare in normal epithelia, but is often induced in tumors, associated with increased tumor metastasis and poor prognosis. In addition, heparanase induction promotes tumor growth, but the molecular mechanism that underlines tumor expansion by heparanase is still incompletely understood. Here, we provide evidence that heparanase down regulates the expression of p21 (WAF1/CIP1, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor that attenuates the cell cycle. Notably, a reciprocal effect was noted for PG545, a potent heparanase inhibitor. This compound efficiently reduced cell proliferation, colony formation, and tumor xenograft growth, associating with a marked increase in p21 expression. Utilizing the APC Min+/− mouse model, we show that heparanase expression and activity are increased in small bowel polyps, whereas polyp initiation and growth were significantly inhibited by PG545, again accompanied by a prominent induction of p21 levels. Down-regulation of p21 expression adds a novel feature for the emerging pro-tumorigenic properties of heparanase, while the potent p21 induction and anti-tumor effect of PG545 lends optimism that it would prove an efficacious therapeutic in colon carcinoma patients.

  13. Expression of human paraoxonase 1 decreases superoxide levels and alters bacterial colonization in the gut of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro A Pezzulo

    Full Text Available Paraoxonases (PON are a family of proteins (PON1, 2 and 3 with multiple enzymatic activities. PON1 interferes with homoserine lactone-mediated quorum sensing in bacteria and with reactive oxygen species (ROS in humans and mice. PON1 gene mutations have been linked to multiple traits, including aging, and diseases of the cardiovascular, nervous and gastrointestinal system. The overlapping enzymatic activities in the PON family members and high linkage disequilibrium rates within their polymorphisms confound animal and human studies of PON1 function. In contrast, arthropods such as Drosophila melanogaster have no PON homologs, resulting in an ideal model to study interactions between PON genotype and host phenotypes. We hypothesized that expression of PON1 in D. melanogaster would alter ROS. We found that PON1 alters expression of multiple oxidative stress genes and decreases superoxide anion levels in normal and germ-free D. melanogaster. We also found differences in the composition of the gut microbiota, with a remarkable increase in levels of Lactobacillus plantarum and associated changes in expression of antimicrobial and cuticle-related genes. PON1 expression directly decreased superoxide anion levels and altered bacterial colonization of the gut and its gene expression profile, highlighting the complex nature of the interaction between host genotype and gut microbiota. We speculate that the interaction between some genotypes and human diseases may be mediated by the presence of certain gut bacteria that can induce specific immune responses in the gut and other host tissues.

  14. Adjuvant chemotherapy is not associated with improved survival for all high-risk factors in stage II colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoeff, S R; van Erning, F N; Lemmens, V E P P; de Wilt, J H W; Pruijt, J F M

    2016-07-01

    Adjuvant chemotherapy can be considered in high-risk stage II colon cancer comprising pT4, poor/undifferentiated grade, vascular invasion, emergency surgery and/or chemotherapy administration and its effect on survival was evaluated for each known risk factor. All patients with high-risk stage II colon cancer who underwent resection and were diagnosed in the Netherlands between 2008 and 2012 were included. After stratification by risk factor(s) (vascular invasion could not be included), Cox regression was used to discriminate the independent association of adjuvant chemotherapy with the probability of death. Relative survival was used to estimate disease-specific survival. A total of 4,940 of 10,935 patients with stage II colon cancer were identified as high risk, of whom 790 (16%) patients received adjuvant chemotherapy. Patients with a pT4 received adjuvant chemotherapy more often (37%). Probability of death in pT4 patients receiving chemotherapy was lower compared to non-recipients (3-year overall survival 91% vs. 73%, HR 0.43, 95% CI 0.28-0.66). The relative excess risk (RER) of dying was also lower for pT4 patients receiving chemotherapy compared to non-recipients (3-year relative survival 94% vs. 85%, RER 0.36, 95% CI 0.17-0.74). For patients with only poor/undifferentiated grade, emergency surgery or chemotherapy and survival was observed. In high-risk stage II colon cancer, adjuvant chemotherapy was associated with higher survival in pT4 only. To prevent unnecessary chemotherapy-induced toxicity, further refinement of patient subgroups within stage II colon cancer who could benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy seems indicated. © 2016 UICC.

  15. Factors associated with failure of enhanced recovery programs after laparoscopic colon cancer surgery: a single-center retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Heung-Kwon; Ihn, Myong Hun; Son, Il Tae; Park, Jin Taek; Lee, Jaebong; Kim, Duck-Woo; Kang, Sung-Bum

    2016-03-01

    Although enhanced recovery programs (ERPs) have been proven to be beneficial after laparoscopic colon surgery, they may result in adverse clinical outcomes following failure. This study analyzed risk factors associated with ERP failure after laparoscopic colon cancer surgery. We analyzed the outcomes of 208 patients who underwent ERPs following laparoscopic colon cancer surgery between June 2007 and April 2013. The ERP included early oral feeding, early ambulation, and regular laxative administration. ERP failure was defined as postoperative hospital stay of more than 5 days related to postoperative complications, unplanned readmission within 30 days of surgery, or death. Surgical procedures included anterior resection (n = 101), right hemicolectomy (n = 90), and left hemicolectomy (n = 17). The mean postoperative hospital stay was 6.5 ± 2.3 days (range 3-24 days). ERP failure occurred in 36 patients (17.3%), with no mortality; reasons included ileus (n = 14), wound infection (n = 4), chylous drainage (n = 3), anastomotic bleeding (n = 3), pneumonia (n = 1), or readmission (n = 11) owing to delayed complications. Univariable analysis showed that ERP failure was associated with proximal colon cancer, side-to-side anastomosis, longer operation time, increased blood loss, and longer resected specimen length. Multivariable analysis showed that side-to-side anastomosis [odds ratio (OR) 4.534; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.902-10.811; P = 0.001] and increased blood loss (OR 1.004; 95% CI 1.001-1.008; P = 0.041) were independent risk factors for ERP failure. We showed that increased blood loss and side-to-side anastomosis in comparison with end-to-end anastomosis were independent risk factors associated with ERP failure after laparoscopic colon cancer surgery. This suggests that intraoperative elements may be important determinants to obtain successful postoperative recovery in the era of ERP.

  16. Colon cancer molecular subtypes identified by expression profiling and associated to stroma, mucinous type and different clinical behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perez Villamil Beatriz

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Colon cancer patients with the same stage show diverse clinical behavior due to tumor heterogeneity. We aimed to discover distinct classes of tumors based on microarray expression patterns, to analyze whether the molecular classification correlated with the histopathological stages or other clinical parameters and to study differences in the survival. Methods Hierarchical clustering was performed for class discovery in 88 colon tumors (stages I to IV. Pathways analysis and correlations between clinical parameters and our classification were analyzed. Tumor subtypes were validated using an external set of 78 patients. A 167 gene signature associated to the main subtype was generated using the 3-Nearest-Neighbor method. Coincidences with other prognostic predictors were assesed. Results Hierarchical clustering identified four robust tumor subtypes with biologically and clinically distinct behavior. Stromal components (p BRAF mutations. Tumor subtypes were validated using an external set of 78 patients. A 167 gene signature associated to the Low-stroma-subtype distinguished low risk patients from high risk patients in the external cohort (Dukes B and C:HR = 8.56(2.53-29.01; Dukes B,C and D:HR = 1.87(1.07-3.25. Eight different reported survival gene signatures segregated our tumors into two groups the Low-stroma-subtype and the other tumor subtypes. Conclusions We have identified novel molecular subtypes in colon cancer with distinct biological and clinical behavior that are established from the initiation of the tumor. Tumor microenvironment is important for the classification and for the malignant power of the tumor. Differential gene sets and biological pathways characterize each tumor subtype reflecting underlying mechanisms of carcinogenesis that may be used for the selection of targeted therapeutic procedures. This classification may contribute to an improvement in the management of the patients with CRC and to a

  17. Abdominal Manual Therapy Repairs Interstitial Cells of Cajal and Increases Colonic c-Kit Expression When Treating Bowel Dysfunction after Spinal Cord Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Zhu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. This study aimed to evaluate the therapeutic effects of abdominal manual therapy (AMT on bowel dysfunction after spinal cord injury (SCI, investigating interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs and related c-kit expression. Methods. Model rats were divided as SCI and SCI with drug treatment (intragastric mosapride, low-intensity (SCI + LMT; 50 g, 50 times/min, and high-intensity AMT (SCI + HMT; 100 g, 150 times/min. After 14 days of treatment, weight, improved Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan (BBB locomotor score, and intestinal movement were evaluated. Morphological structure of spinal cord and colon tissues were examined. Immunostaining, RT-PCR, and western blot were used to assess c-kit expression. Results. In SCI rats, AMT could not restore BBB, but it significantly increased weight, shortened time to defecation, increased feces amounts, and improved fecal pellet traits and colon histology. AMT improved the number, distribution, and ultrastructure of colonic ICCs, increasing colonic c-kit mRNA and protein levels. Compared with the SCI + Drug and SCI + LMT groups, the SCI + HMT group showed better therapeutic effect in improving intestinal transmission function and promoting c-kit expression. Conclusions. AMT is an effective therapy for recovery of intestinal transmission function. It could repair ICCs and increase c-kit expression in colon tissues after SCI, in a frequency-dependent and pressure-dependent manner.

  18. Oxaliplatin and Infliximab Combination Synergizes in Inducing Colon Cancer Regression

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Wenya; Xu, Jian; Zhao, Jian; ZHANG, Rui

    2017-01-01

    Background Colon cancer is one of the most common malignant cancers and causes millions of deaths each year. There are still no effective treatments for colon cancer patients who are at advanced stage. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-?) might be a good therapy target due to its widely-accepted roles in regulating multiple important biological processes, especially in promoting inflammation. Material/Methods We evaluated the expression of TNF-? in 108 human colon cancer tissue samples and 2 c...

  19. Amphiregulin acts as an autocrine growth factor in two human polarizing colon cancer lines that exhibit domain selective EGF receptor mitogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damstrup, L; Kuwada, S K; Dempsey, P J; Brown, C L; Hawkey, C J; Poulsen, H S; Wiley, H S; Coffey, R J

    1999-06-01

    Colonic enterocytes, like many epithelial cells in vivo, are polarized with functionally distinct apical and basolateral membrane domains. The aims of this study were to characterize the endogenous epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like ligands expressed in two polarizing colon cancer cell lines, HCA-7 Colony 29 (HCA-7) and Caco-2, and to examine the effects of cell polarity on EGF receptor-mediated mitogenesis. HCA-7 and Caco-2 cells were grown on plastic, or as a polarized monolayer on Transwell filters. Cell proliferation was measured by 3H-thymidine incorporation and EGF receptor (EGFR) binding was assessed by Scatchard analysis. EGFR ligand expression was determined by Northern blot analysis, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, metabolic labelling and confocal microscopy. We found that amphiregulin (AR) was the most abundant EGFR ligand expressed in HCA-7 and Caco-2 cells. AR was localized to the basolateral surface and detected in basolateral-conditioned medium. Basolateral administration of neutralizing AR antibodies significantly reduced basal DNA replication. A single class of high-affinity EGFRs was detected in the basolateral compartment, whereas the apical compartment of polarized cells, and cells cultured on plastic, displayed two classes of receptor affinity. Basolateral administration of transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-alpha) or an EGFR neutralizing antibody also resulted in a dose-dependent stimulation or attenuation, respectively, of DNA replication. However, no mitogenic response was observed when these agents were added to the apical compartment or to confluent cells cultured on plastic. We conclude that amphiregulin acts as an autocrine growth factor in HCA-7 and Caco-2 cells, and EGFR ligand-induced proliferation is influenced by cellular polarity.

  20. Differential interaction of Salmonella enterica serovars with lettuce cultivars and plant-microbe factors influencing the colonization efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klerks, Michel M; Franz, Eelco; van Gent-Pelzer, Marga; Zijlstra, Carolien; van Bruggen, Ariena H C

    2007-11-01

    The availability of knowledge of the route of infection and critical plant and microbe factors influencing the colonization efficiency of plants by human pathogenic bacteria is essential for the design of preventive strategies to maintain safe food. This research describes the differential interaction of human pathogenic Salmonella enterica with commercially available lettuce cultivars. The prevalence and degree of endophytic colonization of axenically grown lettuce by the S. enterica serovars revealed a significant serovar-cultivar interaction for the degree of colonization (S. enterica CFUs per g leaf), but not for the prevalence. The evaluated S. enterica serovars were each able to colonize soil-grown lettuce epiphytically, but only S. enterica serovar Dublin was able to colonize the plants also endophytically. The number of S. enterica CFU per g of lettuce was negatively correlated to the species richness of the surface sterilized lettuce cultivars. A negative trend was observed for cultivars Cancan and Nelly, but not for cultivar Tamburo. Chemotaxis experiments revealed that S. enterica serovars actively move toward root exudates of lettuce cultivar Tamburo. Subsequent micro-array analysis identified genes of S. enterica serovar Typhimurium that were activated by the root exudates of cultivar Tamburo. A sugar-like carbon source was correlated with chemotaxis, while also pathogenicity-related genes were induced in presence of the root exudates. The latter revealed that S. enterica is conditioned for host cell attachment during chemotaxis by these root exudates. Finally, a tentative route of infection is described that includes plant-microbe factors, herewith enabling further design of preventive strategies.

  1. Data supporting the effects of lysozyme on mRNA and protein expression in a colonic epithelial scratch wound model

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    Sarah K. Abey

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Colonic epithelial health is implicated in a host of gastrointestinal (GI diseases and disorders. Lysozyme is suspected to play a role in the ability of the epithelium to recover from injury (Abey et al., in press; Gallo, 2012; Rubio, 2014 [1–3]. Disrupted repair mechanisms may lead to delayed or ineffective recovery and disruptions to epithelial biology resulting in GI symptoms and altered barrier function (Peterson and Artis, 2014 [4]. The effect of lysozyme on the transcriptomic and proteomic profile of healthy colonic epithelial cells was investigated. Epithelial cells in culture were scratch wounded and treated with lysozyme. mRNA and protein profiles were simultaneously quantified in the same sample using a digital counting technology. Gene and protein expressions altered by the presence or absence of lysozyme are described in this article. Extensive statistical and bioinformatic analysis, and interpretation of the results can be found in “Lysozyme association with circulating RNA, extracellular vesicles, and chronic stress” (Abey et al., in press [1].

  2. Immunization against the colonization factor antigen I of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli by administration of a bivalent Salmonella typhimurium aroA strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.C.R. Guillobel

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available An expression plasmid (pCFA-1 carrying the cfaB gene that codes for the enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC fimbrial adhesin colonization factor antigen I (CFA/I subunit was constructed and used to transform a derivative of the attenuated Salmonella typhimurium aroA vaccine strain SL3261 carrying an F'lacIq. Treatment of the transformed strain with isopropyl-ß-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG resulted in elevated in vitro expression of the CFA/I subunit. Although flagellar function and lipopolysaccharide (LPS synthesis were similar in both the parental and the recombinant strains, spleen colonization was reduced in the recombinant strain. All BALB/c mice parenterally inoculated with the recombinant strain developed significant anti-CFA/I and anti-LPS serum antibody titers (P0.05 while 4/5 of the same mice developed anti-LPS IgA (P<0.05. The results indicate that the vaccine strain elicited an antibody response against the bacterial host both after oral and intravenous immunization while the response against the CFA/I antigen was significant only after inoculation by the intravenous route

  3. Combination of capecitabine and ludartin inhibits colon cancer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the efficacy of capecitabine and ludartin in the treatment of colon cancer in mice. Methods: Mice model of colon cancer was used in this study. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (Qrt-PCR) was used to quantify the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) mRNA.

  4. Genome-wide Gene Expression Analysis of Mucosal Colonic Biopsies and Isolated Colonocytes Suggests a Continuous Inflammatory State in the Lamina Propria of Patients with Quiescent Ulcerative Colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum, Jacob Tveiten; Hansen, Morten; Olsen, Jørgen

    2010-01-01

    colonocytes from UC patients and controls in order to identify the cell types responsible for the continuous inflammatory state. Methods: Adjacent mucosal colonic biopsies were obtained endoscopically from the descending colon in patients with active UC (n = 8), quiescent UC (n = 9), and with irritable bowel......Background: Genome-wide gene expression (GWGE) profiles of mucosal colonic biopsies have suggested the existence of a continuous inflammatory state in quiescent ulcerative colitis (UC). The aim of this study was to use DNA microarray-based GWGE profiling of mucosal colonic biopsies and isolated......-discriminant analysis using the SIMCA-P 11 software (Umetrics, Umea, Sweden). Results: A clear separation between active UC, quiescent UC, and control biopsies were found, whereas the model for the colonocytes was unable to distinguish between quiescent UC and controls. The differentiation between quiescent UC...

  5. Construction and expression of immunogenic hybrid enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli CFA/I and CS2 colonization fimbriae for use in vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobias, Joshua; Svennerholm, Ann-Mari; Holmgren, Jan; Lebens, Michael

    2010-07-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are an important cause of diarrheal morbidity in developing countries, especially in children and also of traveler's diarrhea. Colonization factors (CFs) of ETEC, like CFA/I and CS2 which are genetically and structurally related, play a substantial role in pathogenicity, and since intestinal-mucosal immune responses against CFs appear to be protective, much effort has focused on the development of a CF-based ETEC vaccine. We have constructed hybrid operons in which the major CS2 subunit-encoding cotA gene was inserted into the CFA/I operon, either replacing (hybrid I) or being added to the major CFA/I subunit-encoding cfaB gene (hybrid II). Using specific monoclonal antibodies against the major subunits of CFA/I and CS2, high levels of surface expression of both fimbrial subunits were shown in E. coli carrying the hybrid II operon. Oral immunization of mice with formalin-killed bacteria expressing hybrid II fimbriae induced strong CFA/I- and CS2-specific serum IgG + IgM and fecal IgA antibody responses, which were higher than those achieved by similar immunization with the reference strains. Bacteria expressing hybrid fimbriae are potential candidate strains in an oral-killed CF-ETEC vaccine, and the approach represents an attractive and novel means of producing a broad-spectrum ETEC vaccine.

  6. The frequency of genes encoding three putative group B streptococcal virulence factors among invasive and colonizing isolates

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    Borchardt Stephanie M

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Group B Streptococcus (GBS causes severe infections in very young infants and invasive disease in pregnant women and adults with underlying medical conditions. GBS pathogenicity varies between and within serotypes, with considerable variation in genetic content between strains. Three proteins, Rib encoded by rib, and alpha and beta C proteins encoded by bca and bac, respectively, have been suggested as potential vaccine candidates for GBS. It is not known, however, whether these genes occur more frequently in invasive versus colonizing GBS strains. Methods We screened 162 invasive and 338 colonizing GBS strains from different collections using dot blot hybridization to assess the frequency of bca, bac and rib. All strains were defined by serotyping for capsular type, and frequency differences were tested using the Chi square test. Results Genes encoding the beta C protein (bac and Rib (rib occurred at similar frequencies among invasive and colonizing isolates, bac (20% vs. 23%, and rib (28% vs. 20%, while the alpha (bca C protein was more frequently found in colonizing strains (46% vs, invasive (29%. Invasive strains were associated with specific serotype/gene combinations. Conclusion Novel virulence factors must be identified to better understand GBS disease.

  7. Occupational exposure to raw meat: a newly-recognized risk factor for Staphylococcus aureus nasal colonization amongst food handlers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, J; O'Donoghue, M M; Boost, M V

    2014-03-01

    Staphylococcus aureus contaminating raw meat may increase nasal colonization risk for occupationally-exposed food handlers. Food handlers from six catering establishments were nasally sampled for S. aureus and completed a questionnaire on carriage risk factors. Isolates were characterized for antibiotic susceptibility, spa type and, for methicillin-resistant strains, SCCmec type. Of 434 food handlers, 99 (22.8%) were colonized with S. aureus. Five isolates were methicillin-resistant belonging to SCCmec IV (2) and V (3). Resistance to tetracycline (20%), and erythromycin (16%) was high, but Food handlers ever handling raw meat had a significantly higher colonization risk (OR=2.7; 95% CI: 1.7-4.5), increasing to 3.7 (95% CI: 2.0-6.8) for those always exposed. This is the first report of increased colonization risk in food handlers exposed to raw meat. This occupational hazard may increase infection risk, so improved compliance with workplace hygiene may be required. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  8. High nitric oxide production, secondary to inducible nitric oxide synthase expression, is essential for regulation of the tumour-initiating properties of colon cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puglisi, Maria Ausiliatrice; Cenciarelli, Carlo; Tesori, Valentina; Cappellari, Marianna; Martini, Maurizio; Di Francesco, Angela Maria; Giorda, Ezio; Carsetti, Rita; Ricci-Vitiani, Lucia; Gasbarrini, Antonio

    2015-08-01

    Chronic inflammation is a leading cause of neoplastic transformation in many human cancers and especially in colon cancer (CC), in part due to tumour promotion by nitric oxide (NO) generated at inflammatory sites. It has also been suggested that high NO synthesis, secondary to inducible NO synthase (iNOS) expression, is a distinctive feature of cancer stem cells (CSCs), a small subset of tumour cells with self-renewal capacity. In this study we explored the contribution of NO to the development of colon CSC features and evaluated potential strategies to treat CC by modulating NO production. Our data show an integral role for endogenous NO and iNOS activity in the biology of colon CSCs. Indeed, colon CSCs with high endogenous NO production (NO(high)) displayed higher tumourigenic abilities than NO(low) fractions. The blockade of endogenous NO availability, using either a specific iNOS inhibitor or a genetic knock-down of iNOS, resulted in a significant reduction of colon CSC tumourigenic capacities in vitro and in vivo. Interestingly, analysis of genes altered by iNOS-directed shRNA showed that the knockdown of iNOS expression was associated with a significant down-regulation of signalling pathways involved in stemness and tumour progression in colon CSCs. These findings confirm that endogenous NO plays an important role in defining the stemness properties of colon CSCs through cross-regulation of several cellular signalling pathways. This discovery could shed light on the mechanisms by which NO induces the growth and invasiveness of CC, providing new insights into the link between inflammation and colon tumourigenesis. Copyright © 2015 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Expression of virulence factors by Staphylococcus aureus grown in serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oogai, Yuichi; Matsuo, Miki; Hashimoto, Masahito; Kato, Fuminori; Sugai, Motoyuki; Komatsuzawa, Hitoshi

    2011-11-01

    Staphylococcus aureus produces many virulence factors, including toxins, immune-modulatory factors, and exoenzymes. Previous studies involving the analysis of virulence expression were mainly performed by in vitro experiments using bacterial medium. However, when S. aureus infects a host, the bacterial growth conditions are quite different from those in a medium, which may be related to the different expression of virulence factors in the host. In this study, we investigated the expression of virulence factors in S. aureus grown in calf serum. The expression of many virulence factors, including hemolysins, enterotoxins, proteases, and iron acquisition factors, was significantly increased compared with that in bacterial medium. In addition, the expression of RNA III, a global regulon for virulence expression, was significantly increased. This effect was partially restored by the addition of 300 μM FeCl₃ into serum, suggesting that iron depletion is associated with the increased expression of virulence factors in serum. In chemically defined medium without iron, a similar effect was observed. In a mutant with agr inactivated grown in serum, the expression of RNA III, psm, and sec4 was not increased, while other factors were still induced in the mutant, suggesting that another regulatory factor(s) is involved. In addition, we found that serum albumin is a major factor for the capture of free iron to prevent the supply of iron to bacteria grown in serum. These results indicate that S. aureus expresses virulence factors in adaptation to the host environment.

  10. Aspergillus flavus and Fusariumverticillioides Induce Tissue Specific Gene Expression of PRms and UGT in Maize Seed before Fungal Colonization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspergillus flavus and Fusariumverticillioides are fungal pathogens that colonize maize seeds and contaminate them with mycotoxins. To investigate the plant microbe interactions, we conducted histological and molecular studies to characterize the internal colonization of maize seed by the two fungal...

  11. The Cinnamon-derived Dietary Factor Cinnamic Aldehyde Activates the Nrf2-dependent Antioxidant Response in Human Epithelial Colon Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wondrak, Georg T.; Villeneuve, Nicole F.; Lamore, Sarah D.; Bause, Alexandra S.; Jiang, Tao; Zhang, Donna D.

    2011-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major cause of tumor-related morbidity and mortality worldwide. Recent research suggests that pharmacological intervention using dietary factors that activate the redox sensitive Nrf2/Keap1-ARE signaling pathway may represent a promising strategy for chemoprevention of human cancer including CRC. In our search for dietary Nrf2 activators with potential chemopreventive activity targeting CRC, we have focused our studies on trans-cinnamic aldehyde (cinnamaldeyde, CA), the key flavor compound in cinnamon essential oil. Here we demonstrate that CA and an ethanolic extract (CE) prepared from Cinnamomum cassia bark, standardized for CA content by GC-MS analysis, display equipotent activity as inducers of Nrf2 transcriptional activity. In human colon cancer cells (HCT116, HT29) and non-immortalized primary fetal colon cells (FHC), CA- and CE-treatment upregulated cellular protein levels of Nrf2 and established Nrf2 targets involved in the antioxidant response including heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) and γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (γ-GCS, catalytic subunit). CA- and CE-pretreatment strongly upregulated cellular glutathione levels and protected HCT116 cells against hydrogen peroxide-induced genotoxicity and arsenic-induced oxidative insult. Taken together our data demonstrate that the cinnamon-derived food factor CA is a potent activator of the Nrf2-orchestrated antioxidant response in cultured human epithelial colon cells. CA may therefore represent an underappreciated chemopreventive dietary factor targeting colorectal carcinogenesis. PMID:20657484

  12. The Cinnamon-Derived Dietary Factor Cinnamic Aldehyde Activates the Nrf2-Dependent Antioxidant Response in Human Epithelial Colon Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg Thomas Wondrak

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is a major cause of tumor-related morbidity and mortality worldwide. Recent research suggests that pharmacological intervention using dietary factors that activate the redox sensitive Nrf2/Keap1-ARE signaling pathway may represent a promising strategy for chemoprevention of human cancer including CRC. In our search for dietary Nrf2 activators with potential chemopreventive activity targeting CRC, we have focused our studies on trans-cinnamic aldehyde (cinnamaldeyde, CA, the key flavor compound in cinnamon essential oil. Here we demonstrate that CA and an ethanolic extract (CE prepared from Cinnamomum cassia bark, standardized for CA content by GC-MS analysis, display equipotent activity as inducers of Nrf2 transcriptional activity. In human colon cancer cells (HCT116, HT29 and non-immortalized primary fetal colon cells (FHC, CA- and CE-treatment upregulated cellular protein levels of Nrf2 and established Nrf2 targets involved in the antioxidant response including heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1 and γ-glutamyl-cysteine synthetase (γ-GCS, catalytic subunit. CA- and CE-pretreatment strongly upregulated cellular glutathione levels and protected HCT116 cells against hydrogen peroxide-induced genotoxicity and arsenic-induced oxidative insult. Taken together our data demonstrate that the cinnamon-derived food factor CA is a potent activator of the Nrf2-orchestrated antioxidant response in cultured human epithelial colon cells. CA may therefore represent an underappreciated chemopreventive dietary factor targeting colorectal carcinogenesis.

  13. Prevalence of Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci colonization and its risk factors in chronic hemodialysis patients in Shiraz, Iran

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    Stadler Maria

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vancomycin-resistant entrococci (VRE are increasing in prevalence at many institutions, and are often reported in dialysis patients. The aim of this cross-sectional prevalence study was to determine the prevalence and risk factors of VRE colonization in chronic hemodialysis patients in two hemodialysis centers in Shiraz, Iran. Methods Rectal swabs were obtained from all consenting patients and were streaked on the surface of Cephalexin-aztreonam-arabinose agar (CAA and incubated at 37°C in air for 24 h. The vancomycin susceptibility of each isolate was confirmed by disk susceptibility testing. The MICs of vancomycin and teicoplanin were confirmed by the E test. To identify risk factors, a questionnaire was completed for all the studied patients and the data of VRE positive and negative groups were compared using Man-Withney U test for continues data and the Fisher exact test for categorical data. Results Of 146 patients investigated, 9 (6.2% were positive for VRE. All VRE strains were genotypically distinguishable. Risk factors for a VRE-positive culture were "antimicrobial receipt within 2 months before culture" (P = 0.003 and "hospitalization during previous year" (P = 0.016. Conclusion VRE colonization is an under-recognized problem among chronic dialysis patients in Iran. VRE colonization is associated with antibiotic consumption and hospitalization.

  14. Oral Escherichia coli Colonization Factor Antigen I (CFA/I) Fimbriae Ameliorate Arthritis via IL-35, not IL-27

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochetkova, Irina; Thornburg, Theresa; Callis, Gayle; Holderness, Kathryn; Maddaloni, Massimo; Pascual, David W.

    2014-01-01

    A Salmonella therapeutic expressing enterotoxigenic E. coli colonization factor antigen I (CFA/I) fimbriae protects against collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) by eliciting two regulatory T cell (Treg) subsets: TGF-β-producing Foxp3−CD39+CD4+ and IL-10-producing Foxp3+CD39+CD4+ T cells. However, it is unclear if CFA/I fimbriae alone are protective, and if other regulatory cytokines are involved especially in the context for the EBI3-sharing cytokines, Treg-derived IL-35 and APC-derived IL-27, both capable of suppressing Th17 cells and regulating autoimmune diseases. Subsequent evaluation revealed that a single oral dose of purified, soluble CFA/I fimbriae protected against CIA as effectively as Salmonella-CFA/I, and found Foxp3+CD39+CD4+ T cells as the source of secreted IL-35, whereas IL-27 production by CD11c+ cells was inhibited. Inquiring into their relevance, CFA/I fimbriae-treated IL-27 receptor-deficient (WSX-1−/−) mice were equally protected against CIA as wild-type mice suggesting a limited role for IL-27. In contrast, CFA/I fimbriae-mediated protection was abated in EBI3−/− mice accompanied by the loss of TGF-β- and IL-10-producing Tregs. Adoptive transfer of B6 CD39+CD4+ T cells to EBI3−/− mice with concurrent CFA/I plus IL-35 treatment effectively stimulated Tregs suppressing proinflammatory CII-specific Th cells. Opposingly, recipients co-transferred with B6 and EBI3−/− CD39+CD4+ T cells and treated with CFA/I plus IL-35 failed in protecting mice implicating the importance for endogenous IL-35 to confer CFA/I-mediated protection. Thus, CFA/I fimbriae stimulate IL-35 required for the co-induction of TGF-β and IL-10. PMID:24337375

  15. Human-derived gut microbiota modulates colonic secretion in mice by regulating 5-HT3receptor expression via acetate production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattarai, Yogesh; Schmidt, Bradley A; Linden, David R; Larson, Eric D; Grover, Madhusudan; Beyder, Arthur; Farrugia, Gianrico; Kashyap, Purna C

    2017-07-01

    Serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)], an important neurotransmitter and a paracrine messenger in the gastrointestinal tract, regulates intestinal secretion by its action primarily on 5-HT 3 and 5-HT 4 receptors. Recent studies highlight the role of gut microbiota in 5-HT biosynthesis. In this study, we determine whether human-derived gut microbiota affects host secretory response to 5-HT and 5-HT receptor expression. We used proximal colonic mucosa-submucosa preparation from age-matched Swiss Webster germ-free (GF) and humanized (HM; ex-GF colonized with human gut microbiota) mice. 5-HT evoked a significantly greater increase in short-circuit current (Δ I sc ) in GF compared with HM mice. Additionally, 5-HT 3 receptor mRNA and protein expression was significantly higher in GF compared with HM mice. Ondansetron, a 5-HT 3 receptor antagonist, inhibited 5-HT-evoked Δ I sc in GF mice but not in HM mice. Furthermore, a 5-HT 3 receptor-selective agonist, 2-methyl-5-hydroxytryptamine hydrochloride, evoked a significantly higher Δ I sc in GF compared with HM mice. Immunohistochemistry in 5-HT 3A -green fluorescent protein mice localized 5-HT 3 receptor expression to enterochromaffin cells in addition to nerve fibers. The significant difference in 5-HT-evoked Δ I sc between GF and HM mice persisted in the presence of tetrodotoxin (TTX) but was lost after ondansetron application in the presence of TTX. Application of acetate (10 mM) significantly lowered 5-HT 3 receptor mRNA in GF mouse colonoids. We conclude that host secretory response to 5-HT may be modulated by gut microbiota regulation of 5-HT 3 receptor expression via acetate production. Epithelial 5-HT 3 receptor may function as a mediator of gut microbiota-driven change in intestinal secretion. NEW & NOTEWORTHY We found that gut microbiota alters serotonin (5-HT)-evoked intestinal secretion in a 5-HT 3 receptor-dependent mechanism and gut microbiota metabolite acetate alters 5-HT 3 receptor expression in

  16. ERK/pERK expression and B-raf mutations in colon adenocarcinomas: correlation with clinicopathological characteristics

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    Levidou Georgia

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Colorectal (CRC carcinogenesis through various morphological stages has been linked to several genetic and epigenetic changes. The Raf/MEK/ERK (MAPK signal transduction cascade is an important mediator of a number of cellular fates. Methods In this study, we investigated the presence of B-raf and K-ras mutations in 94 consecutive cases of primary colon adenocarcinoma in correlation with the immunohistochemical expression of total and activated ERK and the expression of mismatch repair proteins (MMR hMLH1 and hMSH2 as well as their correlations with standard clinicopathological parameters. Results The immunostaining pattern for total and activated ERK was nuclear and cytoplasmic. hMLH1 and hMSH2 proteins were preserved in 45/63 (71.43% cases and 35/53 (66.04% cases respectively. Total ERK nuclear expression, was positively correlated with tumor stage (p = 0.049, whereas nuclear pERK expression was positively correlated with histological grade (p = 0.0113 and tumor stage (p = 0.0952, although the latter relationship was of marginal significance. DNA sequencing showed that 12 samples (12.7% had a mutation in B-RAF Exon 15 and none in Exon 11, whereas 22 (23.4% had a K-ras mutation. Disruption of the MAP kinase pathway-either through K-ras or B-raf mutation-was detected in 37% of all the examined cases, although the overexpression of total and activated ERK1/2 was not correlated with the mutational status of K-ras or B-raf genes. Finally, the preservation of hMLH1 or hMSH2 immunoexpression was not correlated with the presence of B-raf and/or K-ras mutations. Conclusions In this study, we present evidence that ERK activation occurs in a K-ras or B-raf -independent manner in the majority of primary colon cancer cases. Moreover, B-raf mutations are not associated with mismatch-repair deficiency through loss of hMLH1 or hMSH2 expression. Activated ERK could possibly be implicated in tumor invasiveness as well as in the acquisition of

  17. Constitutive expression of fluorescent protein by Aspergillus var. niger and Aspergillus carbonarius to monitor fungal colonization in maize plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palencia, Edwin Rene; Glenn, Anthony Elbie; Hinton, Dorothy Mae; Bacon, Charles Wilson

    2013-09-01

    Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus carbonarius are two species in the Aspergillus section Nigri (black-spored aspergilli) frequently associated with peanut (Arachis hypogea), maize (Zea mays), and other plants as pathogens. These infections are symptomless and as such are major concerns since some black aspergilli produce important mycotoxins, ochratoxins A, and the fumonisins. To facilitate the study of the black aspergilli-maize interactions with maize during the early stages of infections, we developed a method that used the enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (eYFP) and the monomeric red fluorescent protein (mRFP1) to transform A. niger and A. carbonarius, respectively. The results were constitutive expressions of the fluorescent genes that were stable in the cytoplasms of hyphae and conidia under natural environmental conditions. The hyphal in planta distribution in 21-day-old seedlings of maize were similar wild type and transformants of A. niger and A. carbonarius. The in planta studies indicated that both wild type and transformants internally colonized leaf, stem and root tissues of maize seedlings, without any visible disease symptoms. Yellow and red fluorescent strains were capable of invading epidermal cells of maize roots intercellularly within the first 3 days after inoculation, but intracellular hyphal growth was more evident after 7 days of inoculation. We also tested the capacity of fluorescent transformants to produce ochratoxin A and the results with A. carbonarius showed that this transgenic strain produced similar concentrations of this secondary metabolite. This is the first report on the in planta expression of fluorescent proteins that should be useful to study the internal plant colonization patterns of two ochratoxigenic species in the Aspergillus section Nigri. © 2013.

  18. Expression of HSP27, HSP72 and MRP proteins in in vitro co-culture of colon tumour cell spheroids with normal cells after incubation with rhTGF- beta1 and/or CPT-11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paduch, Roman; Jakubowicz-Gil, Joanna; Kandefer-Szerszen, Martyna

    2009-12-01

    We studied the expression of inducible heat shock protein (HSP27, HSP72) and multidrug-resistance protein (MRP) in co-cultures of human colon carcinoma cell spheroids obtained from different grades of tumour with normal human colon epithelium, myofibroblast and endothelial cell monolayers. We also measured the influence of recombinant human transforming growth factor beta1 (rhTGF-beta1) and camptothecin (CPT-11), added as single agents or in combination, on the levels of the HSPs, MRP, interleukin (IL)-6 and nitric oxide (NO). An immunoblotting analysis with densitometry showed that rhTGF-beta1 and/or CPT-11 increased HSP27, HSP72 and MRP expression in tumour cells and myofibroblasts, as well as in co-cultures compared with appropriate controls. By contrast, in colonic epithelium, inhibition of HSPs and MRP was comparable with that of the control. In endothelial cells, HSP72 was undetectable. Direct interaction of colon tumour spheroids with normal myofibroblasts caused a significant, tumour-grade dependent increase in IL-6 production. Production of IL-6 was significantly lowered by rhTGF-beta1 and/or CPT-11. Tumour cell spheroids cultivated alone produced larger amounts of NO than normal cells. In co-culture, the level of the radical decreased compared with the sum of NO produced by the monocultures of the two types of cells. rhTGF-beta1 and/or CPT-11 decreased NO production both in tumour and normal cell monocultures and their co-cultures. In conclusion, direct interactions between tumour and normal cells influence the expression of HSP27, HSP72 and MRP, and alter IL-6 and NO production. rhTGF-beta1 and/or CPT-11 may potentate resistance to chemotherapy by increasing HSP and MRP expression but, on the other hand, they may limit tumour cell spread by decreasing the level of some soluble mediators of inflammation (IL-6 and NO).

  19. Do ethylene response factorS9 and -14 repress PR gene expression in the interaction between Piriformospora indica and Arabidopsis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camehl, Iris; Oelmüller, Ralf

    2010-08-01

    The plant hormone ethylene (ET) plays a crucial role in the signalling network when plants have to respond to biotic stresses. We investigate the beneficial interaction between the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana and the endophytic fungus Piriformospora indica. Recently, we showed that ET signalling and ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTOR (ERF)1 are important to balance beneficial and nonbeneficial traits in this symbiosis. 147 ERF genes in Arabidopsis encode transcriptional regulators with a variety of functions involved in development, physiological processes as well as plant/microbe interactions. In the beneficial symbiosis between Arabidopsis and P. indica, overexpression of ERF1 activates defence responses, strongly reduces root colonization and thus abolishes the benefits for the plants. Here we show that additional transcription factors of the ERF family, the ERF DOMAIN PROTEIN9 (ERF9) and the ETHYLENE-RESPONSIVE ELEMENT BINDING FACTOR14 (ERF14) are involved in the interaction between the two symbionts and are required for growth promotion of the host plant. Expression of these genes is upregulated in colonized wild-type roots. Insertional inactivation of ERF9 and ERF14 diminishes the P. indica-induced growth promotion and activates the expression of the PATHOGENESIS-RELATED (PR)-1 and PR-2 genes. We propose that ERF9 and ERF14 repress PR gene expression in colonized Arabidopsis roots and thus contribute to the establishment of a beneficial interaction.

  20. Risk factors for colonization with extended-spectrum beta-lactamase producing Enterobacteriaceae in healthcare students on clinical assignment abroad: A prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelin, Martin; Forsell, Joakim; Granlund, Margareta; Evengård, Birgitta; Palmgren, Helena; Johansson, Anders

    2015-01-01

    The increase of antibiotic resistance in clinically important bacteria is a worldwide threat, especially in healthcare environments. International travel is a risk factor for gut colonization with extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-PE). The risk for healthcare students of being colonized with ESBL-PE when participating in patient-related work abroad has not been previously investigated. Swedish healthcare students travelling for pre-clinical and clinical courses outside Scandinavia submitted faecal samples and survey data before and after travel. The faecal samples were screened for ESBL-PE and carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE). Screening results and survey data were analysed to identify risk factors for colonization. In the 99 subjects who submitted a full set of samples, 35% were colonized with a new ESBL-PE strain during travel. No CPE was found. The most important risk factor for ESBL-PE colonization was travel destination, and the highest colonization rate was found in the South-East Asia region. Antibiotic treatment during travel was an independent risk factor for ESBL-PE colonization but patient-related work was not significantly associated with an increased risk. Patient-related work abroad was not a risk factor for ESBL-PE suggesting that transmission from patients is uncommon. Pre-travel advice on avoiding unnecessary antibiotic treatment during travel is recommended. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The ability of virulence factor expression by Pseudomonas aeruginosa to predict clinical disease in hospitalized patients.

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    Michel Ledizet

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that frequently causes hospital acquired colonization and infection. Accurate identification of host and bacterial factors associated with infection could aid treatment decisions for patients with P. aeruginosa cultured from clinical sites.We identified a prospective cohort of 248 hospitalized patients with positive P. aeruginosa cultures. Clinical data were analyzed to determine whether an individual met predefined criteria for infection versus colonization. P. aeruginosa isolates were tested for the expression of multiple phenotypes previously associated with virulence in animal models and humans. Logistic regression models were constructed to determine the degree of association between host and bacterial factors with P. aeruginosa infection of the bloodstream, lung, soft tissue and urinary tract.One host factor (i.e. diabetes mellitus, and one bacterial factor, a Type 3 secretion system positive phenotype, were significantly associated with P. aeruginosa infection in our cohort. Subgroup analysis of patients with P. aeruginosa isolated from the urinary tract revealed that the presence of a urinary tract catheter or stent was an additional factor for P. aeruginosa infection.Among hospitalized patients with culture-documented P. aeruginosa, infection is more likely to be present in those with diabetes mellitus and those harboring a Type 3 secretion positive bacterial strain.

  2. Effect of meteorological factors and geographic location on methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant enterococci colonization in the US.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Natalia; Perencevich, Eli; Li, Shan Shan; Morgan, Daniel J; Pineles, Lisa; Johnson, J Kristie; Robinson, Gwen; Anderson, Deverick J; Jacob, Jesse T; Maragakis, Lisa L; Harris, Anthony D

    2017-01-01

    Little is known about the effect of meteorological conditions and geographical location on bacterial colonization rates particularly of antibiotic-resistant Gram-positive bacteria. We aimed to evaluate the effect of season, meteorological factors, and geographic location on methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) colonization. The prospective cohort included all adults admitted to 20 geographically-dispersed ICUs across the US from September 1, 2011 to October 4, 2012. Nasal and perianal swabs were collected at admission and tested for MRSA and VRE colonization respectively. Poisson regression models using monthly aggregated colonization counts as the outcome and mean temperature, relative humidity, total precipitation, season, and/or latitude as predictors were constructed for each pathogen. A total of 24,704 ICU-admitted patients were tested for MRSA and 24,468 for VRE. On admission, 10% of patients were colonized with MRSA and 12% with VRE. For MRSA and VRE, a 10% increase in relative humidity was associated with approximately a 9% increase in prevalence rate. Southerly latitudes in the US were associated with higher MRSA colonization, while northerly latitudes were associated with higher VRE colonization. In contrast to MRSA, the association between VRE colonization and latitude was observed only after adjusting for relative humidity, which demonstrates how this effect is highly driven by this meteorological factor. To our knowledge, we are the first to study the effect of meteorological factors and geographical location/latitude on MRSA and VRE colonization in adults. Increasing humidity was associated with greater MRSA and VRE colonization. Southerly latitudes in the US were associated with greater MRSA and less VRE. The effect of these factors on MRSA and VRE rates has the potential not only to inform patient management and treatment, but also infection prevention interventions.

  3. Mucinous carcinoma of the colon in a 16-year-old Turkish boy with Bloom syndrome: cytogenetic, histopathologic, TP53 gene and protein expression studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balci, S; Aktas, D

    1999-05-01

    A 17-year-old Turkish boy with Bloom syndrome (BS) developed mucinous carcinoma of the transverse colon. He was followed from 2 to 17 years of age. Increased sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) were observed, and he was diagnosed with BS at the age of 7. Sun-sensitive skin lesions were examined by skin biopsy, and histopathological studies of these lesions were done. During the follow-up period, an intraabdominal mass at the transverse colon was found, and mucinous carcinoma of colon was diagnosed at the age of 16. We examined TP53 protein expression from paraffin-embedded colon tissue of the patient with an immunohistochemical method. Polymerase chain reaction products of exons 4-9 of the TP53 gene were examined by SSCP. No evidence of overexpression of TP53 protein or mutations of the TP53 gene was observed. The patient in this report is the first case with a mucinous carcinoma of colon diagnosed at an early age in the Bloom Syndrome Registry. Based on our results, carcinoma of the colon in BS patient may occur earlier than 35 years of age and the TP53 gene may not be directly related to carcinoma in Bloom syndrome.

  4. Virulence factors of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae involved in colonization, persistence and induction of lesions in its porcine host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiers, Koen; De Waele, Tine; Pasmans, Frank; Ducatelle, Richard; Haesebrouck, Freddy

    2010-01-01

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is the causative agent of porcine pleuropneumonia. The virulence factors of this microorganism involved in colonization and the induction of lung lesions have been thoroughly studied and some have been well characterized. A. pleuropneumoniae binds preferentially to cells of the lower respiratory tract in a process involving different adhesins and probably biofilm formation. Apx toxins and lipopolysaccharides exert pathogenic effects on several host cells, resulting in typical lung lesions. Lysis of host cells is essential for the bacterium to obtain nutrients from the environment and A. pleuropneumoniae has developed several uptake mechanisms for these nutrients. In addition to persistence in lung lesions, colonization of the upper respiratory tract--and of the tonsils in particular--may also be important for long-term persistent asymptomatic infection. Information on virulence factors involved in tonsillar and nasal cavity colonization and persistence is scarce, but it can be speculated that similar features as demonstrated for the lung may play a role. © The authors, published by INRA/EDP Sciences, 2010.

  5. Factores de riesgo de dehiscencia de sutura en cirugía de cáncer de colon

    OpenAIRE

    Vicente Ruiz, María

    2015-01-01

    Introducción: La dehiscencia de anastomosis (DA) tras una resección de cáncer de colon (CC) es una de las complicaciones más importantes en la cirugía colorrectal. Su incidencia varía del 2% al 4% en las anastomosis de colon proximal, y de un 6% a un 19% en las de tipo distal y extraperitoneal. Estos porcentajes son variables ya que la definición de DA no está consensuada así como tampoco sus factores de riesgo. Objetivos: El principal propósito de esta investigación fue describir y anali...

  6. Loss of claudin-3 expression induces IL6/gp130/Stat3 signaling to promote colon cancer malignancy by hyperactivating Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, R; Kumar, B; Chen, Z; Chen, X; Müller, D; Lele, S M; Washington, M K; Batra, S K; Dhawan, P; Singh, A B

    2017-11-23

    The hyperactivated Wnt/β-catenin signaling acts as a switch to induce epithelial to mesenchymal transition and promote colorectal cancer. However, due to its essential role in gut homeostasis, therapeutic targeting of this pathway has proven challenging. Additionally, IL-6/Stat-3 signaling, activated by microbial translocation through the dysregulated mucosal barrier in colon adenomas, facilitates the adenoma to adenocarcinomas transition. However, inter-dependence between these signaling pathways and key mucosal barrier components in regulating colon tumorigenesis and cancer progression remains unclear. In current study, we have discovered, using a comprehensive investigative regimen, a novel and tissue-specific role of claudin-3, a tight junction integral protein, in inhibiting colon cancer progression by serving as the common rheostat of Stat-3 and Wnt-signaling activation. Loss of claudin-3 also predicted poor patient survival. These findings however contrasted an upregulated claudin-3 expression in other cancer types and implicated role of the epigenetic regulation. Claudin-3-/- mice revealed dedifferentiated and leaky colonic epithelium, and developed invasive adenocarcinoma when subjected to colon cancer. Wnt-signaling hyperactivation, albeit in GSK-3β independent manner, differentiated colon cancer in claudin-3-/- mice versus WT-mice. Claudin-3 loss also upregulated the gp130/IL6/Stat3 signaling in colonic epithelium potentially assisted by infiltrating immune components. Genetic and pharmacological studies confirmed that claudin-3 loss induces Wnt/β-catenin activation, which is further exacerbated by Stat-3-activation and help promote colon cancer. Overall, these novel findings identify claudin-3 as a therapeutic target for inhibiting overactivation of Wnt-signaling to prevent CRC malignancy.

  7. S. aureus colonization at ICU admission as a risk factor for developing S. aureus ICU pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paling, Fleur P|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413968669; Wolkewitz, Martin; Bode, Lonneke G M; Klein Klouwenberg, Peter M C|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/33706864X; Ong, David S Y; Depuydt, Pieter; de Bus, Liesbet; Sifakis, Frangiscos; Bonten, Marc J M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/123144337; Kluijtmans, Jan|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/323262139

    OBJECTIVE: To quantify the incidence of intensive care unit (ICU) acquired pneumonia caused by Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and its association with S. aureus colonization at ICU admission. METHODS: This was a post-hoc analysis of two cohort studies in critically ill patients. The primary

  8. P. aeruginosa colonization at ICU admission as a risk factor for developing P. aeruginosa ICU pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paling, FP; Wolkewitz, Martin; Depuydt, Pieter; de Bus, Liesbet; Sifakis, Frangiscos; Bonten, Marc J M; Kluytmans, Jan A J W

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the incidence of P. aeruginosa (PA) ICU pneumonia and its independent association with PA colonization at ICU admission. METHODS: This was a post-hoc analysis of a prospectively collected cohort study. Adult ICU patients with a length of stay of ≥48 h were included and

  9. Integrated assessment by multiple gene expression analysis of quercetin bioactivity on anticancer-related mechanisms in colon cancer cells in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erk, van M.J.; Roepman, P.; Lende, van der T.R.; Stierum, R.H.; Aarts, J.M.M.J.G.; Bladeren, van P.J.; Ommen, van B.

    2005-01-01

    Background Many different mechanisms are involved in nutrient¿related prevention of colon cancer. In this study, a comprehensive assessment of the spectrum of possible biological actions of the bioactive compound quercetin is made using multiple gene expression analysis. Quercetin is a flavonoid

  10. Integrated assessment by multiple gene expression analysis of quercetin bioactivity on anticancer-related mechanisms in colon cancer cells in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erk, M.J. van; Roepman, P.; Lende, T.R. van der; Stierum, R.H.; Aarts, J.M.M.J.G.; Bladeren, P.J. van; Ommen, B. van

    2005-01-01

    Background: Many different mechanisms are involved in nutrient-related prevention of colon cancer. In this study, a comprehensive assessment of the spectrum of possible biological actions of the bioactive compound quercetin is made using multiple gene expression analysis. Quercetin is a flavonoid

  11. β-Caryophyllene attenuates dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis in mice via modulation of gene expression associated mainly with colon inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Young Cho

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We examined the modulatory activity of β-caryophyllene (CA and gene expression in colitic colon tissues in a dextran sulfate sodium (DSS-induced colitis model. Experimental colitis was induced by exposing male BALB/c mice to 5% DSS in drinking water for 7 days. CA (30 or 300 mg/kg was administered orally once a day together with DSS. CA administration attenuated the increases in the disease activity index, colon weight/length ratio, inflammation score, and myeloperoxidase activity in DSS-treated mice. Microarray analysis showed that CA administration regulated the expression in colon tissue of inflammation-related genes including those for cytokines and chemokines (Ccl2, Ccl7, Ccl11, Ifitm3, IL-1β, IL-28, Tnfrsf1b, Tnfrsf12a; acute-phase proteins (S100a8, Saa3, Hp; adhesion molecules (Cd14, Cd55, Cd68, Mmp3, Mmp10, Sema6b, Sema7a, Anax13; and signal regulatory proteins induced by DSS. CA significantly suppressed NF-κB activity, which mediates the expression of a different set of genes. These results suggest that CA attenuates DSS-induced colitis, possibly by modulating the expression of genes associated mainly with colon inflammation through inhibition of DSS-induced NF-κB activity.

  12. Lactobacillus bulgaricus, Lactobacillus rhamnosus and Lactobacillus paracasei Attenuate Salmonella Enteritidis, Salmonella Heidelberg and Salmonella Typhimurium Colonization and Virulence Gene Expression In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammed Shafeekh Muyyarikkandy

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella Enteritidis (SE, Salmonella Typhimurium (ST, and Salmonella Heidelberg (SH have been responsible for numerous outbreaks associated with the consumption of poultry meat and eggs. Salmonella colonization in chicken is characterized by initial attachment to the cecal epithelial cells (CEC followed by dissemination to the liver, spleen, and oviduct. Since cecal colonization is critical to Salmonella transmission along the food chain continuum, reducing this intestinal association could potentially decrease poultry meat and egg contamination. Hence, this study investigated the efficacy of Lactobacillus delbreuckii sub species bulgaricus (NRRL B548; LD, Lactobacillus paracasei (DUP-13076; LP, and Lactobacillus rhamnosus (NRRL B442; LR in reducing SE, ST, and SH colonization in CEC and survival in chicken macrophages. Additionally, their effect on expression of Salmonella virulence genes essential for cecal colonization and survival in macrophages was evaluated. All three probiotics significantly reduced Salmonella adhesion and invasion in CEC and survival in chicken macrophages (p < 0.05. Further, the probiotic treatment led to a significant reduction in Salmonella virulence gene expression (p < 0.05. Results of the study indicate that LD, LP, and LR could potentially be used to control SE, ST, and SH colonization in chicken. However, these observations warrant further in vivo validation.

  13. Spontaneous and cytokine induced expression and activity of matrix metalloproteinases in human colonic epithelium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, G; Saermark, T; Kirkegaard, T

    2009-01-01

    levels in cells from inflamed IBD mucosa. MMP-2 and -8 mRNA were expressed inconsistently and MMP-11, -13 and -14 mRNA undetectable. Proteolytic MMP activity was detected in CEC supernatants and the level was increased significantly in inflamed IBD epithelium. The enzyme activity was inhibited strongly...

  14. GLP-1 Induces Barrier Protective Expression in Brunner's Glands and Regulates Colonic Inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang-Berthelsen, Claus Heiner; Holm, Thomas L.; Pyke, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Background: Beneficial roles for glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1)/GLP-1R signaling have recently been described in diseases, where low-grade inflammation is a common phenomenon. We investigated the effects of GLP-1 in Brunner's glands and duodenum with abundant expression of GLP-1 receptors, as we...

  15. Relationship among expression of basic-fibroblast growth factor ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Relationship among expression of basic-fibroblast growth factor, MTDH/Astrocyte elevated gene-1, adenomatous polyposis coli, matrix metalloproteinase 9,and COX-2 markers with prognostic factors in prostate carcinomas.

  16. Epigenetic mechanisms involved in differential MDR1 mRNA expression between gastric and colon cancer cell lines and rationales for clinical chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Kyung-Jong

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The membrane transporters such as P-glycoprotein (Pgp, the MDR1 gene product, are one of causes of treatment failure in cancer patients. In this study, the epigenetic mechanisms involved in differential MDR1 mRNA expression were compared between 10 gastric and 9 colon cancer cell lines. Methods The MDR1 mRNA levels were determined using PCR and real-time PCR assays after reverse transcription. Cytotoxicity was performed using the MTT assay. Methylation status was explored by quantification PCR-based methylation and bisulfite DNA sequencing analyses. Results The MDR1 mRNA levels obtained by 35 cycles of RT-PCR in gastric cancer cells were just comparable to those obtained by 22 cycles of RT-PCR in colon cancer cells. Real-time RT-PCR analysis revealed that MDR1 mRNA was not detected in the 10 gastric cancer cell lines but variable MDR1 mRNA levels in 7 of 9 colon cancer cell lines except the SNU-C5 and HT-29 cells. MTT assay showed that Pgp inhibitors such as cyclosporine A, verapamil and PSC833 sensitized Colo320HSR (colon, highest MDR1 expression but not SNU-668 (gastric, highest and SNU-C5 (gastric, no expression to paclitaxel. Quantification PCR-based methylation analysis revealed that 90% of gastric cancer cells, and 33% of colon cancer cells were methylated, which were completely matched with the results obtained by bisulfite DNA sequencing analysis. 5-aza-2'-deoxcytidine (5AC, a DNA methyltransferase inhibitor increased the MDR1 mRNA levels in 60% of gastric cells, and in 11% of colon cancer cells. Trichostatin A (TSA, histone deacetylase inhibitor increased the MDR1 mRNA levels in 70% of gastric cancer cells and 55% of colon cancer cells. The combined treatment of 5AC with TSA increased the MDR1 mRNA levels additively in 20% of gastric cancer cells, but synergistically in 40% of gastric and 11% of colon cancer cells. Conclusion These results indicate that the MDR1 mRNA levels in gastric cancer cells are significantly

  17. Sinomenine Sensitizes Multidrug-Resistant Colon Cancer Cells (Caco-2) to Doxorubicin by Downregulation of MDR-1 Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhen; Duan, Zhi-Jun; Chang, Jiu-Yang; Zhang, Zhi-feng; Chu, Rui; Li, Yu-Ling; Dai, Ke-Hang; Mo, Guang-quan; Chang, Qing-Yong

    2014-01-01

    Chemoresistance in multidrug-resistant (MDR) cells over expressing P-glycoprotein (P-gp) encoded by the MDR1 gene, is a major obstacle to successful chemotherapy for colorectal cancer. Previous studies have indicated that sinomenine can enhance the absorption of various P-gp substrates. In the present study, we investigated the effect of sinomenine on the chemoresistance in colon cancer cells and explored the underlying mechanism. We developed multidrug-resistant Caco-2 (MDR-Caco-2) cells by exposure of Caco-2 cells to increasing concentrations of doxorubicin. We identified overexpression of COX-2 and MDR-1 genes as well as activation of the NF-κB signal pathway in MDR-Caco-2 cells. Importantly, we found that sinomenine enhances the sensitivity of MDR-Caco-2 cells towards doxorubicin by downregulating MDR-1 and COX-2 expression through inhibition of the NF-κB signaling pathway. These findings provide a new potential strategy for the reversal of P-gp-mediated anticancer drug resistance. PMID:24901713

  18. Upregulated expression of human neutrophil peptides 1, 2 and 3 (HNP 1-3) in colon cancer serum and tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrethsen, Jakob; Bøgebo, Rikke; Gammeltoft, Steen

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Molecular markers for localized colon tumours and for prognosis following therapy are needed. Proteomics research is currently producing numerous biomarker studies with clinical potential. We investigate the protein composition of plasma and of tumour extracts with the aim of identify......BACKGROUND: Molecular markers for localized colon tumours and for prognosis following therapy are needed. Proteomics research is currently producing numerous biomarker studies with clinical potential. We investigate the protein composition of plasma and of tumour extracts with the aim...... of identifying biomarkers for colon cancer. METHODS: By Surface Enhanced Laser Desorption/Ionisation--Time Of Flight/Mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF/MS) we compare the protein profiles of colon cancer serum with serum from healthy individuals and the protein profiles of colon tumours with normal colon tissue...... concentrations in serum from colon cancer patients and in protein extracts from colon tumours. A fraction of HNP 1-3 in serum is bound to unidentified high mass plasma proteins. HNP 1-3 purified from colon tumours are lethal to mammalian cells. CONCLUSIONS: HNP 1-3 may serve as blood markers for colon cancer...

  19. Altered expression of IL36γ and IL36 receptor (IL1RL2) in the colon of patients with Hirschsprung's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomuschat, Christian; O'Donnell, Anne Marie; Coyle, David; Puri, Prem

    2017-02-01

    Hirschsprung's disease associated enterocolitis (HAEC) is the most common cause of morbidity and mortality in Hirschsprung's disease (HSCR). Altered intestinal epithelial barrier function and abnormal microbiota are implicated in the pathogenesis of HAEC. IL-36γ, a member of the IL-1 superfamily, is involved in host defense and contributes to proinflammatory responses and development of inflammatory diseases. The IL36 receptor (IL1RL2) is an important mediator molecule in the inflammatory response. Animal data suggests that IL1RL2 is involved in mucosal healing. We designed this study to investigate the hypothesis that the IL-36γ axis is altered in HSCR. We investigated IL-36γ and IL1RL2 expression in ganglionic and aganglionic bowel of HSCR patients (n = 10) and controls (n = 10). qPCR, Western blotting and confocal immunofluorescence were performed. qPCR and Western blot analysis revealed that IL-36γ is strongly expressed in the aganglionic and ganglionic colon of patients with HSCR. ILR1L2 expression was significantly decreased in HSCR specimens compared to controls (p < 0.05). Confocal microscopy revealed a markedly increased expression of IL36γ in the colonic epithelium of patients with HSCR compared to controls. IL1RL2 was localized in the colonic epithelium and showed a markedly decreased expression in all HSCR specimens. To our knowledge, we report for the first time the expression of IL36γ and ILRL2 in the colon of patients with HSCR. The increased expression of IL36γ and the markedly decreased expression of IL1RL2 in the aganglionic and ganglionic bowel in HSCR may result in an increased inflammatory response and altered mucosal response healing leading to the susceptibility to develop HAEC.

  20. Identification of differentially expressed genes in normal mucosa, adenoma and adenocarcinoma of colon by SSH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, M J; Lai, M D

    2001-10-01

    To construct subtracted cDNA libraries and further identify differentially expressed genes that are related to the development of colorectal carcinoma(CRC). Suppression subtractive hybridization(SSH) was done on cDNAs of normal mucosa, adenoma and adenocarcinoma tissues from the same patient. Three subtracted cDNA libraries were constructed and then hybridized with forward and backward subtracted probes for differential screening. Positive clones from each subtracted cDNA library were selected for sequencing and BLAST analysis. Finally, virtual Northern Blot confirmed such differential expression. By this way, there were about 3-4 X 10(2) clones identified in each subtracted cDNA library, in which about 85% positive clones were differentially screened. Sequencing and BLAST homology search revealed some clones containing sequences of known gene fragments and several possibly novel genes showing few or no sequence homologies with any known sequences in the database. All results confirmed the effectiveness and sensitivity of SSH. The differentially expressed genes during the development of CRC can be used to shed light on the pathogenesis of CRC and be useful genetic markers for early diagnosis and therapy.

  1. Increased vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a well known angiogenic factor, has been shown to have direct and/or indirect influence on spinal cord injury (SCI). The purpose of this study is to observe VEGF expression changes in rats with SCI by bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) treatment. The mRNA expression of VEGF ...

  2. Bacterial colonization factors control specificity and stability of the gut microbiota

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, S. Melanie; Donaldson, Gregory P.; Mikulski, Zbigniew; Boyajian, Silva; Ley, Klaus; Mazmanian, Sarkis K.

    2013-01-01

    Mammals harbor a complex gut microbiome, comprised of bacteria that confer immunologic, metabolic and neurologic benefits 1 . Despite advances in sequence-based microbial profiling and myriad studies defining microbiome composition during health and disease, little is known about the molecular processes employed by symbiotic bacteria to stably colonize the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. We sought to define how mammals assemble and maintain the Bacteroides, one of the most numerically prominent ...

  3. Deciphering the factors associated with the colonization of rice plants by cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidyarani, Ngangom; Prasanna, Radha; Chawla, Gautam; Babu, Santosh; Singh, Rajendra

    2015-04-01

    Cyanobacteria-rice plant interactions were analyzed using a hydroponics experiment. The activity of plant defense and pathogenesis-related enzymes, scanning electron microscopy, growth, nitrogen fixation (measured as ARA), and DNA fingerprinting assays proved useful in illustrating the nature of associations of cyanobacteria with rice plants. Microscopic analyses revealed the presence of short filaments and coiled masses of filaments of cyanobacteria near the epidermis and cortex of roots and shoot tissues. Among the six cyanobacterial strains employed, Calothrix sp. (RPC1), Anabaena laxa (RPAN8), and Anabaena azollae (C16) were the best performing strains, in terms of colonization in roots and stem. These strains also enhanced nitrogen fixation and stimulated the activity of plant defense/cell wall-degrading enzymes. A significantly high correlation was also recorded between the elicited plant enzymes, growth, and ARA. DNA fingerprinting using highly iterated palindromic sequences (HIP-TG) further helped in proving the establishment of inoculated organisms in the roots/shoots of rice plants. This study illustrated that the colonization of cyanobacteria in the plant tissues is facilitated by increased elicitation of plant enzymes, leading to improved plant growth, nutrient mobilization, and enhanced plant fitness. Such strains can be promising candidates for developing "cyanobacteria colonized-nitrogen-fixing rice plants" in the future. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Expression dynamics of pluripotency genes in chicken primordial germ cells before and after colonization of the genital ridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeemipour, Mohsen; Dehghani, Hesam; Bassami, Mohammadreza; Bahrami, Ahmadreza

    2013-10-01

    Mammalian species utilize an inductive mechanism of germ cell specification, diverting the fate of some of somatic cells toward pluripotency and germ-cell totipotency. It is not known if avian species utilize a similar mechanism nor if, analogous to mammalian primordial germ cells (PGCs), pluripotency genes are continuously upregulated in migrating and genital ridge-colonizing avian PGCs. Thus, this study was conducted to quantify and to analyze the expression profile of pluripotency genes at different stages of chicken PGCs development at Hamburger and Hamilton (HH) stage 14, when the majority of PGCs have entered into the bloodstream; at HH stage 18, when PGCs have resided for 8-12 hr in the bloodstream; and at HH stage 28, when the majority of PGCs are found in the genital ridge. The transcription for Oct4, Sox2, and Nanog continuously decreased from HH stage 14 to HH stage 28. In addition, equal amounts of total RNA could be isolated from chicken PGCs at each stage of development, indicating that the observed drop of transcription of pluripotency genes is not a consequence of transcriptional repression in general. Decreased expression for all three proteins was also observed at HH stage 28. Furthermore, in comparison to blood PGCs, those residing in the gonad have lost their full capacity for colony formation. Our results indicate that, in contrast to mammalian PGCs, chicken PGCs continuously downregulate the expression of pluripotency genes and show a progressive loss of pluripotency-associated features during different stages of germ-line migration. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Quantitative gene expression underlying 18f-fluorodeoxyglucose uptake in colon cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelmann, Bodil E.; Binderup, Tina; Kjær, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    -inducible factor 1α (HIF1α) and carbonic anhydrase IX (CaIX) mRNA was examined by quantitative real time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Results: All primary tumours showed increased uptake of FDG. The mean SUVmax was 15.0 (range 5.3 – 37.8). No correlation was found between tumour size and SUVmax...

  6. Study on the expression of Runx3 and TGF-β₁ protein in the colonic tissue from rats with irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaoning; Lan, Cheng

    2011-02-01

    To investigate the expression of Runx3 and TGF-β(1) protein in the colon from rats with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Rat model for IBS was established by intracolonic instillation with acetic acid and restraint stress methods, which was confirmed by determinating the visceral sensitivity of the animals, including abdominal withdrawal reflex (AWR) score and the electronic behavior of the abdomen wall. The rats were randomly assigned into three groups: IBS(1) group (restraint stress, n = 25); IBS(2) group (both instillation with acetic acid and restraint stress, n = 25) and Control group (n=16). The colonic tissue samples were collected for histological study and the expression of Runx3 and TGF-β(1) proteins were detected by immunohistochemistry. Meanwhile, the relationship of these two proteins was calculated. Visceral hypersensitivity (AWR and abdominal electrical activity) was significantly enhanced in IBS(1) and IBS(2) groups than other groups. The colon tissue in all groups did not show any signs of inflammation. Furthermore, the expression of Runx3 and TGF-β(1) protein in the colon from all groups show no significant difference (P>0.05), with no remarkable relevancy between each other (P>0.05). The rat model for IBS was successfully established. We did not find any significant changes in the expression of Runx3 and TGF-β(1) protein in the colon tissue from IBS rats, suggesting that the quantitative changes may be not the way by which Runx3 and TGF-β(1) protein play their roles in IBS. The accurate roles of Runx3 and TGF-β(1) proteins in the pathogenesis of IBS remains to be further studied. Copyright © 2011 Hainan Medical College. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. TNFα cooperates with IFN-γ to repress Bcl-xL expression to sensitize metastatic colon carcinoma cells to TRAIL-mediated apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feiyan Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL is an immune effector molecule that functions as a selective anti-tumor agent. However, tumor cells, especially metastatic tumor cells often exhibit a TRAIL-resistant phenotype, which is currently a major impediment in TRAIL therapy. The aim of this study is to investigate the synergistic effect of TNFα and IFN-γ in sensitizing metastatic colon carcinoma cells to TRAIL-mediated apoptosis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The efficacy and underlying molecular mechanism of cooperation between TNFα and IFN-γ in sensitizing metastatic colon carcinoma cells to TRAIL-mediated apoptosis were examined. The functional significance of TNFα- and IFN-γ-producing T lymphocyte immunotherapy in combination with TRAIL therapy in suppression of colon carcinoma metastasis was determined in an experimental metastasis mouse model. We observed that TNFα or IFN-γ alone exhibits minimal sensitization effects, but effectively sensitized metastatic colon carcinoma cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis when used in combination. TNFα and IFN-γ cooperate to repress Bcl-xL expression, whereas TNFα represses Survivin expression in the metastatic colon carcinoma cells. Silencing Bcl-xL expression significantly increased the metastatic colon carcinoma cell sensitivity to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Conversely, overexpression of Bcl-xL significantly decreased the tumor cell sensitivity to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, TNFα and IFN-γ also synergistically enhanced TRAIL-induced caspase-8 activation. TNFα and IFN-γ was up-regulated in activated primary and tumor-specific T cells. TRAIL was expressed in tumor-infiltrating immune cells in vivo, and in tumor-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL ex vivo. Consequently, TRAIL therapy in combination with TNFα/IFN-γ-producing CTL adoptive transfer immunotherapy effectively suppressed colon carcinoma metastasis in vivo. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: TNFα and IFN

  8. TNFα Cooperates with IFN-γ to Repress Bcl-xL Expression to Sensitize Metastatic Colon Carcinoma Cells to TRAIL-mediated Apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Feiyan; Hu, Xiaolin; Zimmerman, Mary; Waller, Jennifer L.; Wu, Ping; Hayes-Jordan, Andrea; Lev, Dina; Liu, Kebin

    2011-01-01

    Background TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is an immune effector molecule that functions as a selective anti-tumor agent. However, tumor cells, especially metastatic tumor cells often exhibit a TRAIL-resistant phenotype, which is currently a major impediment in TRAIL therapy. The aim of this study is to investigate the synergistic effect of TNFα and IFN-γ in sensitizing metastatic colon carcinoma cells to TRAIL-mediated apoptosis. Methodology/Principal Findings The efficacy and underlying molecular mechanism of cooperation between TNFα and IFN-γ in sensitizing metastatic colon carcinoma cells to TRAIL-mediated apoptosis were examined. The functional significance of TNFα- and IFN-γ-producing T lymphocyte immunotherapy in combination with TRAIL therapy in suppression of colon carcinoma metastasis was determined in an experimental metastasis mouse model. We observed that TNFα or IFN-γ alone exhibits minimal sensitization effects, but effectively sensitized metastatic colon carcinoma cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis when used in combination. TNFα and IFN-γ cooperate to repress Bcl-xL expression, whereas TNFα represses Survivin expression in the metastatic colon carcinoma cells. Silencing Bcl-xL expression significantly increased the metastatic colon carcinoma cell sensitivity to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Conversely, overexpression of Bcl-xL significantly decreased the tumor cell sensitivity to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, TNFα and IFN-γ also synergistically enhanced TRAIL-induced caspase-8 activation. TNFα and IFN-γ was up-regulated in activated primary and tumor-specific T cells. TRAIL was expressed in tumor-infiltrating immune cells in vivo, and in tumor-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) ex vivo. Consequently, TRAIL therapy in combination with TNFα/IFN-γ-producing CTL adoptive transfer immunotherapy effectively suppressed colon carcinoma metastasis in vivo. Conclusions/Significance TNFα and IFN-γ cooperate to overcome

  9. Risk factors for financial hardship in patients receiving adjuvant chemotherapy for colon cancer: a population-based exploratory analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankaran, Veena; Jolly, Sanjay; Blough, David; Ramsey, Scott D

    2012-05-10

    Characteristics that predispose patients to financial hardship during cancer treatment are poorly understood. We therefore conducted a population-based exploratory analysis of potential factors associated with financial hardship and treatment nonadherence during and following adjuvant chemotherapy for colon cancer. Patients diagnosed with stage III colon cancer between 2008 and 2010 were identified from a population-based cancer registry representing 13 counties in Washington state. Patients were asked to complete a comprehensive survey on treatment-related costs. Patients were considered to have experienced financial hardship if they accrued debt, sold or refinanced their home, borrowed money from friends or family, or experienced a 20% or greater decline in their annual income as a result of treatment-related expenses. Logistic regression analysis was used to investigate factors associated with financial hardship and treatment nonadherence. A total of 284 responses were obtained from 555 eligible patients (response rate, 51.2%). Nearly all patients in the final sample were insured during treatment. In this sample, 38% of patients reported one or more financial hardships as a result of treatment. The factors most closely associated with treatment-related financial hardship were younger age and lower annual household income. Younger age, lower income, and unemployment or disability (which occurred in most instances following diagnosis) were most closely associated with treatment nonadherence. A significant proportion of patients undergoing adjuvant chemotherapy for stage III colon cancer may experience financial hardship, despite having health insurance coverage. Interventions to help at-risk patients early on during therapy may prevent long-term financial adverse effects.

  10. Effects of Herb-Partitioned Moxibustion on the miRNA Expression Profiles in Colon from Rats with DSS-Induced Ulcerative Colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Huang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This study explored the mechanism of herb-partitioned moxibustion (HM on dextran sulfate sodium- (DSS- induced ulcerative colitis (UC from the miRNA perspective. Methods. Rats were randomly divided into 3 groups [normal control (NC group, UC model (UC group, and herb-partitioned moxibustion (UCHM group]. The UC and UCHM groups were administered 4% DSS for 7 days. The UCHM group received HM at the Tianshu (bilateral, ST25. The effect of HM on UC was observed and the miRNA expression profile in the colon tissues was analyzed. Results. Compared with the UC group, the body weights were significantly higher in the UCHM group on day 14 (P<0.001; the macroscopic colon injury scores and microscopic histopathology scores in the UCHM group decreased (P<0.05; and there were 15 differentially expressed miRNAs in the UCHM group. The changes in miR-184 and miR-490-5p expression levels on the UC were reversed by HM intervention. Validation using qRT-PCR showed that two miRNAs expression trend was consistent with the sequencing results. Conclusion. HM at ST25 might regulate miR-184 and miR-490-5p expression, act on the transcription of their target genes to regulate inflammatory signaling pathways, and attenuate inflammation and tissue injury in the colons of rats with DSS-induced UC.

  11. Expression profiling based on graph-clustering approach to determine colon cancer pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-qu Zhu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. DNA microarray-based technologies allow simultaneous analysis of expression of thousands of genes. Aim: To search for important molecular markers and pathways that hold great promise for further treatment of patients with colorectal cancer. Materials and Methods: Here, we performed a comprehensive gene-level assessment of colorectal cancer using 35 colorectal cancer and 24 normal samples. Results: It was shown that AURKA, MT1G, and AKAP12 had a high degree of response in colorectal cancer. Besides, we further explored the underlying molecular mechanism within these different genes. Conclusions: The results indicated calcium signaling pathway and vascular smooth muscle contraction pathway were the two significant pathways, giving hope to provide insights into the development of novel therapeutic targets and pathways.

  12. Reduced Expression of Galectin-9 Contributes to a Poor Outcome in Colon Cancer by Inhibiting NK Cell Chemotaxis Partially through the Rho/ROCK1 Signaling Pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Wang

    Full Text Available Galectin-9 is a widely expressed protein that is involved in immune regulation and tumorpathogenesis and serves as a marker of a poor prognosis in various types of cancers. However, the clinical impact and the precise mechanism by which this protein contributes to colon tumor progression are unclear. In the present study, we detected the expression of galectin-9 and CD56 cells using immunohistochemistry. Spearman's rank correlation was used to clarify the association between galectin-9 expression and natural killer (NK cell infiltration. The influence of galectin-9 on NK-92 cell migration was evaluated in vitro using transwell chemotaxis assays. The role of rh-galectin-9 in F-actin polarization in NK-92 cells was investigated using laser scanning confocal microscopy. We showed that galectin-9 was expressed in 101 (78.91% colon tumor tissues and that was expressed at lower levels in these tissues than in para-tumor tissues. Low levels of galectin-9 expression were positively correlated with a poor histological grade and lymph node metastasis (P<0.05. A Kaplan-Meier method and Cox proportional hazards regression analysis showed that overall survival was longer in patients with high galectin-9 expression in an 8-year follow-up (P<0.05. Spearman's rank correlation indicated that there was a linear correlation between galectin-9 expression and CD56+ NK cell infiltration (R(2 = 0.658; P<0.0001. Galectin-9 stimulated migration in human NK-92 cells by affecting F-actin polarization through the Rho/ROCK1 signaling pathway. These results suggest that galectin-9 expression potentially represents a novel mechanism for tumors to escape immune surveillance in colon tumors.

  13. Acute left-sided colonic diverticulitis: clinical expressions, therapeutic insights, and role of computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosetti, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    The diagnostic approach of patients with suspected acute diverticulitis remains debated. On the one hand, a scoring system with the best predictive value in diagnosing acute diverticulitis has been developed in order to reduce the use of computed tomography (CT) scan, while, on the other hand, patients with a high probability of acute diverticulitis should benefit from CT scan from a clinical viewpoint, ensuring that they will receive the most appropriate treatment. The place and classification of CT scan for acute diverticulitis need to be reassessed. If the management of uncomplicated acute diverticulitis, abscess, and fecal peritonitis is now well codified, urgent surgical or medical treatment of hemodynamically stable patients presenting with intraperitoneal air or fluid without uncontrolled sepsis is still under discussion. Furthermore, the indications for laparoscopic lavage are not yet well established. It is known for years that episode(s) of acute uncomplicated diverticulitis may induce painful recurrent bowel symptoms, known as symptomatic uncomplicated diverticular disease and irritable bowel syndrome-like diverticular disease. These two clinical expressions of diverticular disease, that may darken quality of life, are treated medically aimed at symptom relief. The possible place of surgery should be discussed. Clinical and CT scan classifications should be separated entities. PMID:27574459

  14. Acute left-sided colonic diverticulitis: clinical expressions, therapeutic insights, and role of computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambrosetti P

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Patrick Ambrosetti Department of Surgery, Clinique Générale Beaulieu, Geneva, Switzerland Abstract: The diagnostic approach of patients with suspected acute diverticulitis remains debated. On the one hand, a scoring system with the best predictive value in diagnosing acute diverticulitis has been developed in order to reduce the use of computed tomography (CT scan, while, on the other hand, patients with a high probability of acute diverticulitis should benefit from CT scan from a clinical viewpoint, ensuring that they will receive the most appropriate treatment. The place and classification of CT scan for acute diverticulitis need to be reassessed. If the management of uncomplicated acute diverticulitis, abscess, and fecal peritonitis is now well codified, urgent surgical or medical treatment of hemodynamically stable patients presenting with intraperitoneal air or fluid without uncontrolled sepsis is still under discussion. Furthermore, the indications for laparoscopic lavage are not yet well established. It is known for years that episode(s of acute uncomplicated diverticulitis may induce painful recurrent bowel symptoms, known as symptomatic uncomplicated diverticular disease and irritable bowel syndrome-like diverticular disease. These two clinical expressions of diverticular disease, that may darken quality of life, are treated medically aimed at symptom relief. The possible place of surgery should be discussed. Clinical and CT scan classifications should be separated entities. Keywords: diverticulitis, urgent treatment, chronic symptoms, clinical and CT scan classifications

  15. Annexin II binds progastrin and gastrin-like peptides, and mediates growth factor effects of autocrine and exogenous gastrins on colon cancer and intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, P; Wu, H; Clark, C; Owlia, A

    2007-01-18

    We and others have reported the presence of novel progastrin (PG)/gastrin receptors on normal and cancerous intestinal cells. We had earlier reported the presence of 33-36 kDa gastrin-binding proteins on cellular membranes of colon cancer cells. The goal of the current study was to identify the protein(s) in the 33-36 kDa band, and analyse its functional significance. A carbodiimide crosslinker was used for crosslinking radio-labeled gastrins to membrane proteins from gastrin/PG responsive cell lines. Native membrane proteins, crosslinked to the ligand, were solubulized and enriched by >1000-fold, and analysed by surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization-time of flight-mass spectrometry. The peptide masses were researched against the NCBInr database using the ProFound search engine. Annexin II (ANX II) was identified, and confirmed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight-mass spectrometry. As HCT-116 cells express autocrine PG, the in situ association of PG with ANX II was demonstrated in pulldown assays. Direct binding of PG with ANX II was confirmed in an in vitro binding assay. In order to confirm a functional importance of these observations, sense and anti-sense (AS) ANX II RNA-expressing clones of intestinal epithelial (IEC-18) and human colon cancer (HCT-116) cell lines were generated. AS clones demonstrated a significant loss in the growth response to exogenous (IEC-18) and autocrine (HCT-116) PG. We have thus discovered that membrane-associated ANX II binds PG/gastrins, and partially mediates growth factor effects of the peptides.

  16. Novel Piperazine-based Compounds Inhibit Microtubule Dynamics and Sensitize Colon Cancer Cells to Tumor Necrosis Factor-induced Apoptosis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Avijeet; Anderson, Amy; Giardina, Charles

    2014-01-01

    We recently identified a series of mitotically acting piperazine-based compounds that potently increase the sensitivity of colon cancer cells to apoptotic ligands. Here we describe a structure-activity relationship study on this compound class and identify a highly active derivative ((4-(3-chlorophenyl)piperazin-1-yl)(2-ethoxyphenyl)methanone), referred to as AK301, the activity of which is governed by the positioning of functional groups on the phenyl and benzoyl rings. AK301 induced mitotic arrest in HT29 human colon cancer cells with an ED50 of ≈115 nm. Although AK301 inhibited growth of normal lung fibroblast cells, mitotic arrest was more pronounced in the colon cancer cells (50% versus 10%). Cells arrested by AK301 showed the formation of multiple microtubule organizing centers with Aurora kinase A and γ-tubulin. Employing in vitro and in vivo assays, tubulin polymerization was found to be slowed (but not abolished) by AK301. In silico molecular docking suggests that AK301 binds to the colchicine-binding domain on β-tubulin, but in a novel orientation. Cells arrested by AK301 expressed elevated levels of TNFR1 on their surface and more readily activated caspases-8, -9, and -3 in the presence of TNF. Relative to other microtubule destabilizers, AK301 was the most active TNF-sensitizing agent and also stimulated Fas- and TRAIL-induced apoptosis. In summary, we report a new class of mitosis-targeting agents that effectively sensitizes cancer cells to apoptotic ligands. These compounds should help illuminate the role of microtubules in regulating apoptotic ligand sensitivity and may ultimately be useful for developing agents that augment the anti-cancer activities of the immune response. PMID:24338023

  17. Up-regulation of MUC2 and IL-1β expression in human colonic epithelial cells by Shigella and its interaction with mucins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Radhakrishnan; Bharathi Raja, Subramaniya; Devaraj, Halagowder; Devaraj, Sivasitambaram Niranjali

    2011-01-01

    The entire gastrointestinal tract is protected by a mucous layer, which contains complex glycoproteins called mucins. MUC2 is one such mucin that protects the colonic mucosa from invading microbes. The initial interaction between microbes and mucins is an important step for microbial pathogenesis. Hence, it was of interest to investigate the relationship between host (mucin) and pathogen interaction, including Shigella induced expression of MUC2 and IL-1β during shigellosis. The mucin-Shigella interaction was revealed by an in vitro mucin-binding assay. Invasion of Shigella dysenteriae into HT-29 cells was analyzed by Transmission electron microscopy. Shigella induced mucin and IL-1β expression were analyzed by RT-PCR and Immunofluorescence. The clinical isolates of Shigella were found to be virulent by a congo-red binding assay. The in vitro mucin-binding assay revealed both Shigella dysenteriae and Shigella flexneri have binding affinity in the increasing order of: guinea pig small intestinal mucinShigella dysenteriae into HT-29 cells occurs within 2 hours. Interestingly, in Shigella dysenteriae infected conditions, significant increases in mRNA expression of MUC2 and IL-1β were observed in a time dependent manner. Further, immunofluorescence analysis of MUC2 shows more positive cells in Shigella dysenteriae treated cells than untreated cells. Our study concludes that the Shigella species specifically binds to guinea pig colonic mucin, but not to guinea pig small intestinal mucin. The guinea pig colonic mucin showed a greater binding parameter (R), and more saturable binding, suggesting the presence of a finite number of receptor binding sites in the colonic mucin of the host. In addition, modification of mucins with TFMS and sodium metaperiodate significantly reduced mucin-bacterial binding; suggesting that the mucin-Shigella interaction occurs through carbohydrate epitopes on the mucin backbones. Overproduction of MUC2 may alter adherence and invasion of

  18. Comparison of orthologous cytochrome P450 genes relative expression patterns in the bark beetles Dendroctonus rhizophagus and Dendroctonus valens (Curculionidae: Scolytinae) during host colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obregón-Molina, G; Cesar-Ayala, A K; López, M F; Cano-Ramírez, C; Zúñiga, G

    2015-12-01

    Bark beetles of the genus Dendroctonus are important components of coniferous forests. During host colonization, they must overcome the chemical defences of their host trees, which are metabolized by cytochrome P450 (CYP or P450) enzymes to compounds that are readily excreted. In this study, we report the relative expression (quantitative real-time PCR) of four orthologous cytochrome P450 genes (CYP6BW5, CYP6DG1, CYP6DJ2 and CYP9Z20) in Dendroctonus rhizophagus and Dendroctonus valens forced to attack host trees at 8 and 24 h following forced attack and in four stages during natural colonization [solitary females boring the bark (T1); both male and female members of couples before oviposition (T2); both male and female members of couples during oviposition (T3), and solitary females inside the gallery containing eggs (T4)]. For both species gene expression was different compared with that observed in insects exposed to single monoterpenes in the laboratory, and the expression patterns were significantly different amongst species, sex, gut region and exposure time or natural colonization stage. The induction of genes (CYP6BW5v1, CYP6DJ2v1 and CYP9Z20v1 from D. rhizophagus, as well as CYP6DG1v3 from D. valens) correlated with colonization stage as well as with the increase in oxygenated monoterpenes in the gut of both species throughout the colonization of the host. Our results point to different functions of these orthologous genes in both species. © 2015 The Royal Entomological Society.

  19. The expression of small regulatory RNAs in clinical samples reflects the different life styles of Staphylococcus aureus in colonization vs. infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Song

    Full Text Available Small RNAs (sRNAs are involved in the post-transcriptional regulation of metabolic pathways and in responses to stress and virulence. We analyzed the expression levels of five sRNAs of Staphylococcus aureus during human colonization or infection. Total RNA was isolated from nasal carriers, abscesses and cystic fibrosis patients (20 subjects per condition. The expression levels of the sRNAs were measured in the clinical samples and compared with those of the corresponding strains grown in vitro. Five sRNAs were encoded and expressed in all clinical strains in vitro. In vivo, the global expression of the five sRNAs was extremely variable in the abscessed patients, more homogeneous in the cystic fibrosis patients, and highly uniform in the nasal carrier samples. The expression levels of the sRNAs in vivo resembled those obtained at exponential phase or late exponential phase of growth in vitro, for three and one sRNA respectively; while for one sRNA, the expression was always higher in vivo as compared to in vitro growth. The in vitro conditions do not uniformly mimic the in vivo conditions for sRNA expression. Nasal colonization is associated with a unique expression pattern of sRNA that might reflect the commensalism of S. aureus in this niche.

  20. Arsenic trioxide causes redistribution of cell cycle, caspase activation, and GADD expression in human colonic, breast, and pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinquan; Ding, Xianzhong; Adrian, Thomas E

    2004-01-01

    Arsenic trioxide is valuable for treatment of promyelocytic leukemia, but less attention has been paid to its therapeutic potential for other cancers. In this study, the effects of arsenic trioxide were tested in human pancreatic (AsPC-1), colonic (HT-29), and breast (MCF-7) cancer cells. In all three cancer cell lines, arsenic trioxide inhibited proliferation in a concentration and time-dependent manner, as measured by 3H-methyl thymidine incorporation and cell counting. Coincident with inhibition of growth, arsenic trioxide induced marked morphologic changes, including reduced cytoplasmic volume, membrane blebbing, and nuclear condensation consistent with apoptosis. Propidium iodide DNA staining at 24 hours revealed cell cycle arrest in the G0/G1 phase and an increase in the S phase, while at 72 hr there was G2/M phase arrest with a marked increase in the sub-G0/G1, apoptotic cell population. The DNA fragmentation induced by arsenic trioxide was confirmed by the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay in all cell lines. Western blot analysis revealed activation of caspase -3, -7, and -9 by arsenic trioxide. Caspase-3 activity was confirmed by demonstrating cleavage of its downstream target, poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP). Expression of the antiapoptosis protein, Bcl-2, was time-dependently decreased. In contrast, arsenic trioxide markedly enhanced the expression of the p21 protein, GADD45 and GADD153, in a time-dependent manner. These findings suggest that arsenic trioxide has potential as a therapeutic agent for these cancers.

  1. Amiodarone inhibits tissue factor expression in monocytic THP-1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Yumiko; Morita, Toshihiro; Tanaka, Tomofumi; Ikeda, Kenichi; Kikuchi, Hironobu; Oguri, Gaku; Nakamura, Fumitaka; Nakajima, Toshiaki; Nagai, Ryozo

    2013-02-15

    There is a possibility thrombus formation is closely involved in sudden cardiac death. Amiodarone, a potassium channel inhibitor, is known to reduce mortality in patients with coronary artery disease or low ejection fraction, having antithrombotic actions. Using human monocytic THP-1 cells, we investigated the effects of amiodarone on tissue factor mRNA and protein expression. The involvement of the two main potassium channels existing in THP-1 cells was also investigated. Amiodarone (10μM) significantly and almost completely inhibited the increase of tissue factor mRNA and protein expression induced by tumor necrosis factor-α (100ng/ml). The inhibitory effects of amiodarone on tissue factor mRNA expression showed dose-dependency. Margatoxin (1nM), a selective blocker of voltage-dependent potassium channel Kv1.3, also inhibited tissue factor protein expression, but didn't significantly inhibit mRNA expression. Ba(2+), a blocker of inwardly rectifying potassium channel Kir2.1, partly inhibited the increase of tissue factor mRNA and protein expression. This is the first study that shows amiodarone inhibits tissue factor expression in monocytic cells, by inhibiting mRNA transcription. The result may correlate with the facts amiodarone has antithrombotic actions in patients under extraordinary conditions where thrombus formation is enhanced. The inhibitory effects of amiodarone on tissue factor expression are drastic, different from those of margatoxin and Ba(2+). The result suggests amiodarone has an underlying mechanism to intensely inhibit tissue factor expression other than blocking Kv1.3 and Kir2.1. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Impaired colonization of the gonads by primordial germ cells in mice lacking a chemokine, stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1)

    OpenAIRE

    Ara, Toshiaki; Nakamura, Yuri; Egawa, Takeshi; Sugiyama, Tatsuki; Abe, Kuniya; Kishimoto, Tadamitsu; Matsui, Yasuhisa; Nagasawa, Takashi

    2003-01-01

    Primordial germ cells (PGCs) are the founders of sperm or oocytes. PGCs migrate through the tissues of the embryos and colonize the gonads during development. However, the cytokines essential for colonization of the gonads by PGCs in mammals remain unclear. Stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1, also called PBSF and CXCL12) is a member of chemokines, a family of structurally related chemoattractive cytokines. SDF-1 and its primary physiologic receptor CXCR4 have multiple essential functions in...

  3. Cloning and characterization of an adenoviral vector for highly efficient and doxycycline – suppressible expression of bioactive human single – chain interleukin 12 in colon cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schäfer Hansjörg

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interleukin-12 (IL-12 is well characterized to induce cellular antitumoral immunity by activation of NK-cells and T-lymphocytes. However, systemic administration of recombinant human IL-12 resulted in severe toxicity without perceptible therapeutic benefit. Even though intratumoral expression of IL-12 leads to tumor regression and long-term survival in a variety of animal models, clinical trials have not yet shown a significant therapeutic benefit. One major obstacle in the treatment with IL-12 is to overcome the relatively low expression of the therapeutic gene without compromising the safety of such an approach. Our objective was to generate an adenoviral vector system enabling the regulated expression of very high levels of bioactive, human IL-12. Results High gene expression was obtained utilizing the VP16 herpes simplex transactivator. Strong regulation of gene expression was realized by fusion of the VP16 to a tetracycline repressor with binding of the fusion protein to a flanking tetracycline operator and further enhanced by auto-regulated expression of its fusion gene within a bicistronic promoter construct. Infection of human colon cancer cells (HT29 at a multiplicity of infection (m.o.i. of 10 resulted in the production of up to 8000 ng/106 cells in 48 h, thus exceeding any published vector system so far. Doxycycline concentrations as low as 30 ng/ml resulted in up to 5000-fold suppression, enabling significant reduction of gene expression in a possible clinical setting. Bioactivity of the human single-chain IL-12 was similar to purified human heterodimeric IL-12. Frozen sections of human colon cancer showed high expression of the coxsackie adenovirus receptor with significant production of human single chain IL-12 in colon cancer biopsies after infection with 3*107 p.f.u. Ad.3r-scIL12. Doxycycline mediated suppression of gene expression was up to 9000-fold in the infected colon cancer tissue. Conclusion VP16

  4. Expression and function of toll-like receptor 8 and Tollip in colonic epithelial cells from patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steenholdt, Casper; Andresen, Lars; Pedersen, Gitte

    2009-01-01

    . However, the role of TLR-8 in IBD is currently unknown, and therefore we investigated the expression of TLR-8 and its natural antagonist, Tollip, in normal and inflamed human gut, and examined whether the receptor is functionally active. METHODS: TLR-8 and Tollip mRNA expression were measured in colonic...... secretion was measured by ELISA after stimulation with TLR-8 ligand. RESULTS: TLR-8 mRNA and protein expression were substantially up-regulated in CEC from inflamed mucosa from patients with ulcerative colitis (approximately 350-fold, p

  5. RAM1 and RAM2 function and expression during arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis and Aphanomyces euteiches colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobbato, Enrico; Wang, Ertao; Higgins, Gillian; Bano, Syeda Asma; Henry, Christine; Schultze, Michael; Oldroyd, Giles E D

    2013-10-01

    The establishment of the symbiotic interaction between plants and arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi requires a very tight molecular dialogue. Most of the known plant genes necessary for this process are also required for nodulation in legume plants and only very recently genes specifically required for AM symbiosis have been described. Among them we identified RAM (Reduced Arbuscular Mycorrhization)1 and RAM2, a GRAS transcription factor and a GPAT respectively, which are critical for the induction of hyphopodia formation in AM fungi. RAM2 function is also required for appressoria formation by the pathogen Phytophtora palmivora. Here we investigated the activity of RAM1 and RAM2 promoters during mycorrhization and the role of RAM1 and RAM2 during infection by the root pathogen Aphanomyces euteiches. pRAM1 is activated without cell type specificity before hyphopodia formation, while pRAM2 is specifically active in arbusculated cells providing evidence for a potential function of cutin momomers in the regulation of arbuscule formation. Furthermore, consistent with what we observed with Phytophtora, RAM2 but not RAM 1 is required during Aphanomyces euteiches infection.

  6. Transcription Factors Encoded on Core and Accessory Chromosomes of Fusarium oxysporum Induce Expression of Effector Genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Charlotte van der Does

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Proteins secreted by pathogens during host colonization largely determine the outcome of pathogen-host interactions and are commonly called 'effectors'. In fungal plant pathogens, coordinated transcriptional up-regulation of effector genes is a key feature of pathogenesis and effectors are often encoded in genomic regions with distinct repeat content, histone code and rate of evolution. In the tomato pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (Fol, effector genes reside on one of four accessory chromosomes, known as the 'pathogenicity' chromosome, which can be exchanged between strains through horizontal transfer. The three other accessory chromosomes in the Fol reference strain may also be important for virulence towards tomato. Expression of effector genes in Fol is highly up-regulated upon infection and requires Sge1, a transcription factor encoded on the core genome. Interestingly, the pathogenicity chromosome itself contains 13 predicted transcription factor genes and for all except one, there is a homolog on the core genome. We determined DNA binding specificity for nine transcription factors using oligonucleotide arrays. The binding sites for homologous transcription factors were highly similar, suggesting that extensive neofunctionalization of DNA binding specificity has not occurred. Several DNA binding sites are enriched on accessory chromosomes, and expression of FTF1, its core homolog FTF2 and SGE1 from a constitutive promoter can induce expression of effector genes. The DNA binding sites of only these three transcription factors are enriched among genes up-regulated during infection. We further show that Ftf1, Ftf2 and Sge1 can activate transcription from their binding sites in yeast. RNAseq analysis revealed that in strains with constitutive expression of FTF1, FTF2 or SGE1, expression of a similar set of plant-responsive genes on the pathogenicity chromosome is induced, including most effector genes. We conclude that the Fol

  7. Transcription Factors Encoded on Core and Accessory Chromosomes of Fusarium oxysporum Induce Expression of Effector Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Does, H Charlotte; Fokkens, Like; Yang, Ally; Schmidt, Sarah M; Langereis, Léon; Lukasiewicz, Joanna M; Hughes, Timothy R; Rep, Martijn

    2016-11-01

    Proteins secreted by pathogens during host colonization largely determine the outcome of pathogen-host interactions and are commonly called 'effectors'. In fungal plant pathogens, coordinated transcriptional up-regulation of effector genes is a key feature of pathogenesis and effectors are often encoded in genomic regions with distinct repeat content, histone code and rate of evolution. In the tomato pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (Fol), effector genes reside on one of four accessory chromosomes, known as the 'pathogenicity' chromosome, which can be exchanged between strains through horizontal transfer. The three other accessory chromosomes in the Fol reference strain may also be important for virulence towards tomato. Expression of effector genes in Fol is highly up-regulated upon infection and requires Sge1, a transcription factor encoded on the core genome. Interestingly, the pathogenicity chromosome itself contains 13 predicted transcription factor genes and for all except one, there is a homolog on the core genome. We determined DNA binding specificity for nine transcription factors using oligonucleotide arrays. The binding sites for homologous transcription factors were highly similar, suggesting that extensive neofunctionalization of DNA binding specificity has not occurred. Several DNA binding sites are enriched on accessory chromosomes, and expression of FTF1, its core homolog FTF2 and SGE1 from a constitutive promoter can induce expression of effector genes. The DNA binding sites of only these three transcription factors are enriched among genes up-regulated during infection. We further show that Ftf1, Ftf2 and Sge1 can activate transcription from their binding sites in yeast. RNAseq analysis revealed that in strains with constitutive expression of FTF1, FTF2 or SGE1, expression of a similar set of plant-responsive genes on the pathogenicity chromosome is induced, including most effector genes. We conclude that the Fol pathogenicity

  8. Up-regulation of MUC2 and IL-1β expression in human colonic epithelial cells by Shigella and its interaction with mucins.

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    Radhakrishnan Prakash

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The entire gastrointestinal tract is protected by a mucous layer, which contains complex glycoproteins called mucins. MUC2 is one such mucin that protects the colonic mucosa from invading microbes. The initial interaction between microbes and mucins is an important step for microbial pathogenesis. Hence, it was of interest to investigate the relationship between host (mucin and pathogen interaction, including Shigella induced expression of MUC2 and IL-1β during shigellosis. METHODS: The mucin-Shigella interaction was revealed by an in vitro mucin-binding assay. Invasion of Shigella dysenteriae into HT-29 cells was analyzed by Transmission electron microscopy. Shigella induced mucin and IL-1β expression were analyzed by RT-PCR and Immunofluorescence. RESULTS: The clinical isolates of Shigella were found to be virulent by a congo-red binding assay. The in vitro mucin-binding assay revealed both Shigella dysenteriae and Shigella flexneri have binding affinity in the increasing order of: guinea pig small intestinal mucincolonic mucin< Human colonic mucin. Invasion of Shigella dysenteriae into HT-29 cells occurs within 2 hours. Interestingly, in Shigella dysenteriae infected conditions, significant increases in mRNA expression of MUC2 and IL-1β were observed in a time dependent manner. Further, immunofluorescence analysis of MUC2 shows more positive cells in Shigella dysenteriae treated cells than untreated cells. CONCLUSIONS: Our study concludes that the Shigella species specifically binds to guinea pig colonic mucin, but not to guinea pig small intestinal mucin. The guinea pig colonic mucin showed a greater binding parameter (R, and more saturable binding, suggesting the presence of a finite number of receptor binding sites in the colonic mucin of the host. In addition, modification of mucins with TFMS and sodium metaperiodate significantly reduced mucin-bacterial binding; suggesting that the mucin-Shigella interaction

  9. Risk factors for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonization in the neonatal intensive care unit: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washam, Matthew; Woltmann, Jon; Haberman, Beth; Haslam, David; Staat, Mary Allen

    2017-12-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) causes a significant burden of illness in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) worldwide. Identifying infants colonized with MRSA has become an important infection control strategy to interrupt nosocomial transmission. Assess risk factors for MRSA colonization in NICUs via a systematic review and meta-analysis. MEDLINE, Embase, Web of Science, and The Cochrane Library databases were searched from inception through September 2015. Studies reporting risk factors for MRSA colonization using noncolonized controls in subspecialty level III or IV NICUs were included. Two authors independently extracted data on MRSA colonization risk factors, study design, and MRSA screening methodology. Eleven articles were included in the systematic review, with 10 articles analyzed via meta-analysis. MRSA colonization was associated with gestational age <32 weeks (odds ratio [OR], 2.67; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.35-5.27; P = .01) and birth weight <1,500 g (OR, 2.63; 95% CI, 1.25-5.55; P = .01). Infant sex (P = .21), race (P = .06), inborn status (P = .09), and delivery type (P = .24) were not significantly associated with colonization. Very preterm and very-low birth weight infants were identified as having an increased risk for MRSA colonization on meta-analysis. Multifaceted infection prevention strategies should target these high-risk infants to reduce MRSA colonization rates in NICUs. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Prevalence and factors associated with wound colonization by Staphylococcus spp. and Staphylococcus aureus in hospitalized patients in inland northeastern Brazil: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Gilmara Celli Maia; dos Santos, Marquiony Marques; Lima, Nara Grazieli Martins; Cidral, Thiago André; Melo, Maria Celeste Nunes; Lima, Kenio Costa

    2014-06-13

    Infections by Staphylococcus spp. are often associated with wounds, especially in hospitalized patients. Wounds may be the source of bacteria causing cross-contamination, and are a risk factor for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of wound colonization by Staphylococcus spp., especially S. aureus and MRSA, in hospitalized patients, and to identify the factors associated with such colonization. This cross-sectional study enrolled patients with wounds who were hospitalized in a remote and underdeveloped inland region of northeastern Brazil with extreme poverty. Samples were collected using sterile swabs with 0.85% saline solution, and coagulase-negative Staphylococcus spp., S. aureus, and MRSA were identified using standard laboratory procedures. Data regarding the sociodemographic characteristics, antibiotic use, and comorbidities of the patients were collected using the medical records and a questionnaire. A total of 125 wounds were analyzed. The patients had a mean age of 63.88 years and a mean 3.84 years of school education. Eighty-one wounds (64.80%) were colonized by Staphylococcus spp. Twenty-five wounds (20%) were colonized by S. aureus, 32% of which were colonized by MRSA. Wound colonization by Staphylococcus spp. was associated with pneumonia or other respiratory disease (p = 0.03). Wound colonization by S. aureus was associated with nasal colonization by S. aureus (p 65 years (p = 0.05). Among patients with wound colonization by MRSA, 37.50% had a history of prior antibiotic use, 75% had two or more comorbidities, 25% had cancer or diabetes, 50% had cardiovascular disease, and 50% died. Wounds can be the source of Staphylococcus spp. infection, and high proportions of wounds are colonized by S. aureus and MRSA. Nasal colonization by S. aureus may be a source for wound colonization by S. aureus, illustrating the importance of preventing cross-contamination in hospital

  11. Helicobacter pylori virulence factors affecting gastric proton pump expression and acid secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Charles E; Beeson, Craig; Suarez, Giovanni; Peek, Richard M; Backert, Steffen; Smolka, Adam J

    2015-08-01

    Acute Helicobacter pylori infection of gastric epithelial cells and human gastric biopsies represses H,K-ATPase α subunit (HKα) gene expression and inhibits acid secretion, causing transient hypochlorhydria and supporting gastric H. pylori colonization. Infection by H. pylori strains deficient in the cag pathogenicity island (cag PAI) genes cagL, cagE, or cagM, which do not transfer CagA into host cells or induce interleukin-8 secretion, does not inhibit HKα expression, nor does a cagA-deficient strain that induces IL-8. To test the hypothesis that virulence factors other than those mediating CagA translocation or IL-8 induction participate in HKα repression by activating NF-κB, AGS cells transfected with HKα promoter-Luc reporter constructs containing an intact or mutated NF-κB binding site were infected with wild-type H. pylori strain 7.13, isogenic mutants lacking cag PAI genes responsible for CagA translocation and/or IL-8 induction (cagA, cagζ, cagε, cagZ, and cagβ), or deficient in genes encoding two peptidoglycan hydrolases (slt and cagγ). H. pylori-induced AGS cell HKα promoter activities, translocated CagA, and IL-8 secretion were measured by luminometry, immunoblotting, and ELISA, respectively. Human gastric biopsy acid secretion was measured by microphysiometry. Taken together, the data showed that HKα repression is independent of IL-8 expression, and that CagA translocation together with H. pylori transglycosylases encoded by slt and cagγ participate in NF-κB-dependent HKα repression and acid inhibition. The findings are significant because H. pylori factors other than CagA and IL-8 secretion are now implicated in transient hypochlorhydria which facilitates gastric colonization and potential triggering of epithelial progression to neoplasia. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  12. High level expression of human basic fibroblast growth factor in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-04-19

    Apr 19, 2010 ... High-level expression of recombinant human basic fibroblast growth factor in Escherichia coli presents research opportunities such as analysis ... The general agreement from the published data on heterologous gene ..... for protein expression (Casimiro et al., 1997; Gold et al.,. 1981; Hamdan et al., 2002; ...

  13. [Effect of Electroacupuncture at "Yintang" (GV 29) and "Tianshu" (ST 25) on the Ethology and the Expression of TRPV 1 Receptor in Colon of Irritable Bowel Syndrome Rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Li-Hua; Li, Kai-Ge; Wu, Yan-Ying; Lan, Ying; Guo, Meng-Wei; Zhu, Wen-Lian; Zhang, Lu-Fen; Zhao, Ya-Fang; Li, Xiao-Hong; Ren, Xiao-Xuan

    2017-04-25

    To observe the ethology and expression of transient receptor potential vanilloid-1(TRPV 1) in colon of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) rats treated by electroacupuncture (EA) at "Yintang" (GV 29) and "Tianshu" (ST 25), so as to explore the different effectiveness of different acupoints and its related mechanism underlying improvement of the symptoms of somatopsychic illness. Thirty-two neonatal Wistar rats were randomly divided into blank control group, model group, Yintang (GV 29) group, and Tianshu (ST 25) group (n=8 in each group). IBS model was established by neonatal maternal separation and acetic acid enema combined with colon and rectum expansion stimulation. Rats of the GV 29 and ST 25 groups were given EA treatment at age of 9 weeks old, 20 minutes, once every other day for 5 times. Latency of the 1(st) time contraction wave and numbers of contractive wave in 90 s were recorded to evaluate abdominal visceral sensitivity by abdominal withdrawal reflex. Horizontal and vertical movements were observed to assess the emotional and psychological behavior of rats by open field test. TRPV 1 expression in colon was detected by immunohistochemistry method. Compared with the black control group, latency of the 1(st) time contractive wave was significantly shortened and the wave numbers in 90 s were increased significantly in the model group (P0.05). The expression level of TRPV 1 was significantly lower in the ST 25 group than in the GV 29 group (P<0.01). EA at GV 29 and ST 25 can alleviate the abdominal pain and improve the mental and emotional disorders in IBS rats. GV 29 has a better effect on relieving the depressive-like psychoemotional behavior of IBS rats, while ST 25 is more effective in treating abdominal pain. There is significantly different influence on TRPV 1 expression in colon between these two treatment groups, which may contribute to their different effect in pain relieving.

  14. Investigation of factors responsible for cell line cytoplasmic expression differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Finn Jonathan D

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous work has described a novel cytoplasmic expression system that results in a 20-fold increase in the levels of gene expression over a standard CMV-based nuclear expression system, as compared with a 2–3 fold increase seen with previous similar systems. While this increase was seen with BHK and Neuro-2a cells, further studies revealed that some cell lines, such as COS-7, demonstrated relatively poor levels of cytoplasmic expression. The objective of this study was to determine what factors were responsible for the different expression levels between BHK (a high expressing cell line and COS-7 (a low expressing cell line. Results The main findings of this work are that the individual elements of the cytoplasmic expression system (such as the T7 RNAP gene and Internal Ribosome Entry Sequence are functioning similarly in both cell types. Both cell types were found to have the same amount of cytosolic nuclease activity, and that the cells appeared to have differences in the intra-cellular processing of DNA -cationic lipid complexes. Conclusion After exploring many factors, it was found that differences in the intra-cellular processing of the DNA-cationic lipid complex was the most probable factor responsible for the difference in cytoplasmic gene expression.

  15. Comorbidities and disease severity as risk factors for carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae colonization: report of an experience in an internal medicine unit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Nouvenne

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae (CRKP is an emerging multidrug-resistant nosocomial pathogen, spreading to hospitalized elderly patients. Risk factors in this setting are unclear. Our aims were to explore the contribution of multi-morbidity and disease severity in the onset of CRKP colonization/infection, and to describe changes in epidemiology after the institution of quarantine-ward managed by staff-cohorting. METHODS AND FINDINGS: With a case-control design, we evaluated 133 CRKP-positive patients (75 M, 58 F; mean age 79 ± 10 years and a control group of 400 CRKP-negative subjects (179 M, 221 F; mean age 79 ± 12 years admitted to Internal Medicine and Critical Subacute Care Unit of Parma University Hospital, Italy, during a 10-month period. Information about comorbidity type and severity, expressed through Cumulative Illness Rating Scale-CIRS, was collected in each patient. During an overall 5-month period, CRKP-positive patients were managed in an isolation ward with staff cohorting. A contact-bed isolation approach was established in the other 5 months. The effects of these strategies were evaluated with a cross-sectional study design. CRKP-positive subjects had higher CIRS comorbidity index (12.0 ± 3.6 vs 9.1 ± 3.5, p < 0.0001 and CIRS severity index (3.2 ± 0.4 vs 2.9 ± 0.5, p < 0.0001, along with higher cardiovascular, respiratory, renal and neurological disease burden than control group. CIRS severity index was associated with a higher risk for CRKP-colonization (OR 13.3, 95% CI6.88-25.93, independent of comorbidities. Isolation ward activation was associated with decreased monthly incidence of CRKP-positivity (from 16.9% to 1.2% of all admissions and infection (from 36.6% to 22.5% of all positive cases; p = 0.04 derived by Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Mortality rate did not differ between cases and controls (21.8% vs 15.2%, p = 0.08. The main limitations of this study are observational design and lack of data

  16. Metastatic Colon Cancer in an 18-Year-Old without Predisposing Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divya Mirchandani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available While colorectal carcinoma is a common gastrointestinal cancer in adults, it is rare in pediatrics with an incidence of 1 : 1,000,000 and represents a fraction of neoplasms encountered in children. Malignant neoplasms represent a major cause of mortality in the pediatric age group. While presenting with weight loss, iron deficiency, rectal bleeding, abdominal pain, and change in bowel habits, or symptoms similar to acute appendicitis, the working diagnosis may be considered to be anorexia. This case illustrates the importance of considering colon cancer among other disease entities as a cause of unintentional weight loss in adolescents. While this is a rare occurrence in the pediatric population, significant unintentional weight loss with altered bowel habits should prompt a search for underlying malignancy—even in the absence of a positive family history or predisposing cancer syndromes.

  17. A factor model to analyze heterogeneity in gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Mignon Guillaume

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarray technology allows the simultaneous analysis of thousands of genes within a single experiment. Significance analyses of transcriptomic data ignore the gene dependence structure. This leads to correlation among test statistics which affects a strong control of the false discovery proportion. A recent method called FAMT allows capturing the gene dependence into factors in order to improve high-dimensional multiple testing procedures. In the subsequent analyses aiming at a functional characterization of the differentially expressed genes, our study shows how these factors can be used both to identify the components of expression heterogeneity and to give more insight into the underlying biological processes. Results The use of factors to characterize simple patterns of heterogeneity is first demonstrated on illustrative gene expression data sets. An expression data set primarily generated to map QTL for fatness in chickens is then analyzed. Contrarily to the analysis based on the raw data, a relevant functional information about a QTL region is revealed by factor-adjustment of the gene expressions. Additionally, the interpretation of the independent factors regarding known information about both experimental design and genes shows that some factors may have different and complex origins. Conclusions As biological information and technological biases are identified in what was before simply considered as statistical noise, analyzing heterogeneity in gene expression yields a new point of view on transcriptomic data.

  18. Inhibiting DNA methylation activates cancer testis antigens and expression of the antigen processing and presentation machinery in colon and ovarian cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebenkäs, Cornelia; Chiappinelli, Katherine B; Guzzetta, Angela A; Sharma, Anup; Jeschke, Jana; Vatapalli, Rajita; Baylin, Stephen B; Ahuja, Nita

    2017-01-01

    Innovative therapies for solid tumors are urgently needed. Recently, therapies that harness the host immune system to fight cancer cells have successfully treated a subset of patients with solid tumors. These responses have been strong and durable but observed in subsets of patients. Work from our group and others has shown that epigenetic therapy, specifically inhibiting the silencing DNA methylation mark, activates immune signaling in tumor cells and can sensitize to immune therapy in murine models. Here we show that colon and ovarian cancer cell lines exhibit lower expression of transcripts involved in antigen processing and presentation to immune cells compared to normal tissues. In addition, treatment with clinically relevant low doses of DNMT inhibitors (that remove DNA methylation) increases expression of both antigen processing and presentation and Cancer Testis Antigens in these cell lines. We confirm that treatment with DNMT inhibitors upregulates expression of the antigen processing and presentation molecules B2M, CALR, CD58, PSMB8, PSMB9 at the RNA and protein level in a wider range of colon and ovarian cancer cell lines and treatment time points than had been described previously. In addition, we show that DNMTi treatment upregulates many Cancer Testis Antigens common to both colon and ovarian cancer. This increase of both antigens and antigen presentation by epigenetic therapy may be one mechanism to sensitize patients to immune therapies.

  19. The NAG Sensor NagC Regulates LEE Gene Expression and Contributes to Gut Colonization by Escherichia coli O157:H7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josée Harel

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC O157:H7 are human pathogens responsible for bloody diarrhea and renal failures. EHEC employ a type 3 secretion system to attach directly to the human colonic epithelium. This structure is encoded by the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE whose expression is regulated in response to specific nutrients. In this study, we show that the mucin-derived sugars N-acetylglucosamine (NAG and N-acetylneuraminic acid (NANA inhibit EHEC adhesion to epithelial cells through down-regulation of LEE expression. The effect of NAG and NANA is dependent on NagC, a transcriptional repressor of the NAG catabolism in E. coli. We show that NagC is an activator of the LEE1 operon and a critical regulator for the colonization of mice intestine by EHEC. Finally, we demonstrate that NAG and NANA as well as the metabolic activity of Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron affect the in vivo fitness of EHEC in a NagC-dependent manner. This study highlights the role of NagC in coordinating metabolism and LEE expression in EHEC and in promoting EHEC colonization in vivo.

  20. Expression and inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-8, MMP-9 and MMP-12 in early colonic anastomotic repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Peter-Martin; Eld, Mikkel; Heinemeier, Katja

    2013-01-01

    Submucosal collagen is paramount for colonic anastomotic integrity. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) mediate collagen degradation that increases the risk of wound dehiscence. Although broad-spectrum MMP inhibitors are beneficial for anastomotic strength, they can cause adverse reactions. Knowledge...

  1. Toll-like receptor mRNA expression is selectively increased in the colonic mucosa of two animal models relevant to irritable bowel syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Declan P McKernan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS is largely viewed as a stress-related disorder caused by aberrant brain-gut-immune communication and altered gastrointestinal (GI homeostasis. Accumulating evidence demonstrates that stress modulates innate immune responses; however, very little is known on the immunological effects of stress on the GI tract. Toll-like receptors (TLRs are critical pattern recognition molecules of the innate immune system. Activation of TLRs by bacterial and viral molecules leads to activation of NF-kB and an increase in inflammatory cytokine expression. It was our hypothesis that innate immune receptor expression may be changed in the gastrointestinal tract of animals with stress-induced IBS-like symptoms. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, our objective was to evaluate the TLR expression profile in the colonic mucosa of two rat strains that display colonic visceral hypersensitivity; the stress-sensitive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY rat and the maternally separated (MS rat. Quantitative PCR of TLR2-10 mRNA in both the proximal and distal colonic mucosae was carried out in adulthood. Significant increases are seen in the mRNA levels of TLR3, 4 & 5 in both the distal and proximal colonic mucosa of MS rats compared with controls. No significant differences were noted for TLR 2, 7, 9 & 10 while TLR 6 could not be detected in any samples in both rat strains. The WKY strain have increased levels of mRNA expression of TLR3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9 & 10 in both the distal and proximal colonic mucosa compared to the control Sprague-Dawley strain. No significant differences in expression were found for TLR2 while as before TLR6 could not be detected in all samples in both strains. CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that both early life stress (MS and a genetic predisposition (WKY to stress affect the expression of key sentinels of the innate immune system which may have direct relevance for the molecular pathophysiology of IBS.

  2. Superoxide production and expression of NAD(P)H oxidases by transformed and primary human colonic epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perner, A; Andresen, Lars; Pedersen, G

    2003-01-01

    Superoxide (O(2)(-)) generation through the activity of reduced nicotinamide dinucleotide (NADH) or reduced nicotinamide dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidases has been demonstrated in a variety of cell types, but not in human colonic epithelial cells.......Superoxide (O(2)(-)) generation through the activity of reduced nicotinamide dinucleotide (NADH) or reduced nicotinamide dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidases has been demonstrated in a variety of cell types, but not in human colonic epithelial cells....

  3. Expression profiling of miR-96, miR-584 and miR-422a in colon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To determine the correlation between miRNAs; miR-96, miR-422a and miR584, and colon cancer, and also to test whether any of these miRNAs can act as non-invasive biomarkers in colon cancer. Methods: The tumor samples and the corresponding normal mucosa used in this study were collected from 60 ...

  4. Risk Factors for the Development of Gastrointestinal Colonization With Fluoroquinolone-Resistant Escherichia coli in Residents of Long-Term Care Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jennifer H.; Maslow, Joel; Han, Xiaoyan; Xie, Sharon X.; Tolomeo, Pam; Santana, Evelyn; Carson, Lesley; Lautenbach, Ebbing

    2014-01-01

    Background. The objective of this study was to assess risk factors for the development of fluoroquinolone (FQ)–resistant Escherichia coli gastrointestinal tract colonization in long-term care facility (LTCF) residents. Methods. A prospective cohort study was conducted from 2006 to 2008 at 3 LTCFs. Residents initially colonized with FQ-susceptible E. coli were followed by means of serial fecal sampling for new FQ-resistant E. coli colonization for up to 12 months or until discharge or death. A Cox proportional hazards regression model was developed to identify risk factors for new FQ-resistant E. coli colonization, with antibiotic and device exposures modeled as time-varying covariates. Results. Fifty-seven (47.5%) of 120 residents became newly colonized with FQ-resistant E. coli, with a median time to colonization of 57 days. Fecal incontinence (hazard ratio [HR], 1.78; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.04–3.06; P = .04) was significantly associated with FQ-resistant E. coli acquisition. Receipt of amoxicillin-clavulanate (HR, 6.48; 95% CI, 1.43–29.4; P = .02) and the presence of a urinary catheter (HR, 3.81; 95% CI, 1.06–13.8; P = .04) during LTCF stay increased the risk of new FQ-resistant E. coli colonization. Conclusions. Acquisition of FQ-resistant E. coli was common, with nearly half of LTCF residents developing new FQ-resistant E. coli colonization. Further studies are needed on interventions to limit the emergence of FQ-resistant E. coli in LTCFs. PMID:23986544

  5. Lymph node size as a simple prognostic factor in node negative colon cancer and an alternative thesis to stage migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Märkl, Bruno; Schaller, Tina; Kokot, Yuriy; Endhardt, Katharina; Kretsinger, Hallie; Hirschbühl, Klaus; Aumann, Georg; Schenkirsch, Gerhard

    2016-10-01

    Stage migration is an accepted explanation for the association between lymph node (LN) yield and outcome in colon cancer. To investigate whether the alternative thesis of immune response is more likely, we performed a retrospective study. We enrolled 239 cases of node negative cancers, which were categorized according to the number of LNs with diameters larger than 5 mm (LN5) into the groups LN5-very low (0 to 1 LN5), LN5-low (2 to 5 LN5), and LN5-high (≥6 LN5). Significant differences were found in pT3/4 cancers with median survival times of 40, 57, and 71 months (P = .022) in the LN5-very low, LN5-low, and LN5-high groups, respectively. Multivariable analysis revealed that LN5 number and infiltration type were independent prognostic factors. LN size is prognostic in node negative colon cancer. The correct explanation for outcome differences associated with LN harvest is probably the activation status of LNs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Anticipating the clinical use of prognostic gene expression-based tests for colon cancer stage II and III: is Godot finally arriving?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sveen, Anita; Nesbakken, Arild; Ågesen, Trude H; Guren, Marianne G; Tveit, Kjell M; Skotheim, Rolf I; Lothe, Ragnhild A

    2013-12-15

    According to current recommendations for adjuvant treatment, patients with colon cancer stage II are not routinely offered chemotherapy, unless considered to have a high risk of relapse based on specific clinicopathological parameters. Following these criteria, it is challenging to identify the subgroup of patients that will benefit the most from adjuvant treatment. Contrarily, patients with colon cancer stage III are routinely offered chemotherapy, but due to expected adverse effects and frailty, elderly patients are often excluded from standard protocols. Colon cancer is a disease of the elderly and accordingly, there is a large subgroup of patients for which guidelines for adjuvant treatment remain less clear. In these two clinical settings, improved risk stratification has great potential impact on patient care, anticipating that high-risk patients will benefit from chemotherapy. However, microsatellite instability is the only molecular prognostic marker recommended for clinical use. In this perspective, we provide an updated view on the status and clinical potential of the many proposed prognostic gene expression-based tests for colon cancer stage II and III. The main limitation for clinical implementation is lack of prospective validation. For patients with stage II, highly promising tests have been identified and clinical trials are ongoing. For elderly patients with stage III, the value of such tests has received less focus, but promising early results have been shown. Although awaiting results from prospective trials, improved risk assessment for patients with stage II and III is likely to be achieved in the foreseeable future. ©2013 AACR.

  7. Tumor-specific expression of anti-mdr1 ribozyme selectively restores chemosensitivity in multidrug-resistant colon-adenocarcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Z; Gao, Z; Fields, J Z; Boman, B M

    1999-07-30

    P-glycoprotein (Pgp)-conferred multidrug resistance (MDR) is expressed in cancer and in normal colon tissues and has important physiological functions. In order to selectively reverse MDR in malignant tissue without disrupting the function of normal colonocytes, a retroviral vector (pCEAMR) containing anti-mdr1 ribozyme coupled to the carcino-embryonic-antigen (CEA) promoter was constructed and introduced into resistant colon-cancer cells (SW1116R) that produce CEA and into control resistant cells (HeLaK) that do not produce CEA. Anti-mdr1 ribozyme was expressed in SW1116R cells but not in HeLaK cells. Subsequently, the expression of mdr1 mRNA and Pgp decreased significantly in the transfected SW1116R cells, and was even lower than in parent non-resistant SW1116 cells. The functional ability of Pgp to facilitate rhodamine 123 (Rh123) efflux showed that the transfected SW1116R cells with low Pgp expression retained Rh123, whereas non-transfected SW1116R cells with high Pgp expression released the dye quickly. There was no difference in mdr1 mRNA or in Pgp between non-transfected and transfected HeLaK cells. Drug resistance to doxorubicin (DOX) decreased 93.1% in the transfected SW1116R cells, while no change in drug resistance occurred in the infected HeLaK cells. DOX could clearly inhibit the growth of transfected SW1116R tumors but had no effect on untransfected and on transfected HeLaK cells in vivo. These results indicate that our anti-mdr1 ribozyme is expressed only in CEA-producing colon-cancer cells and reverses their drug resistance selectively.

  8. The effect of inositol hexaphosphate on the expression of selected metalloproteinases and their tissue inhibitors in IL-1β-stimulated colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapral, Małgorzata; Wawszczyk, Joanna; Jurzak, Magdalena; Hollek, Andrzej; Węglarz, Ludmiła

    2012-11-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) have repeatedly been shown to play a very active role in extracellular matrix degradation associated with tumor invasion and metastasis. Tissue inhibitors of MMPs (TIMPs) are well-known for their ability to inhibit MMP activity thereby inhibiting malignant progression. Inositol hexaphosphate (IP6 phytic acid) has been recognized to have both preventive and therapeutic effects against various cancers including that of colon. In in vitro studies, IP6 has been demonstrated to inhibit cancer cell adhesion and migration. In the present study, the effect of IP6 on the expression of MMP and TIMP genes was evaluated in unstimulated and IL-1β-stimulated colon cancer cell line Caco-2. Real-time QRT-PCR was used to validate the transcription level of selected MMP and TIMP genes in Caco-2 cells after treatment with 1 ng/ml of IL-1β, 2.5 mM of IP6, and both for 6, 12, and 24 h. Stimulation of cells with IL-1β only resulted in an overexpression of MMP and their TIMP mRNAs. A significant decrease in MMP-13, MMP-3, MMP-2, and TIMP-1 basal expression was achieved by IP6. IP6 was also an efficient downregulator of MMP-1, MMP-9, and TIMP-2 genes transcription stimulated by IL-1β in 6 h lasting culture. After 12 h, IL-1β-induced MMP-2 mRNA expression was significantly reduced by IP6. Proinflammatory cytokine IL-1β upregulates MMP and TIMP mRNAs expression in colon cancer epithelial cells Caco-2. IP6 (2.5 mM) influences constitutive expression of both MMP and TIMP genes and downregulates IL-1β stimulated transcription of some of these genes. IP6 exerts its anti-metastatic activity through modulation of MMP and TIMP genes expression to prevent cancer cell migration and invasion.

  9. Krüppel-like factor 5 is essential for maintenance of barrier function in mouse colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Chidgey, Martyn; Yang, Vincent W; Bialkowska, Agnieszka B

    2017-11-01

    Krüppel-like factor 5 (KLF5) is a member of the zinc finger family of transcription factors that regulates homeostasis of the intestinal epithelium. Previous studies suggested an indispensable role of KLF5 in maintaining intestinal barrier function. In the current study, we investigated the mechanisms by which KLF5 regulates colonic barrier function in vivo and in vitro. We used an inducible and a constitutive intestine-specific Klf5 knockout mouse models (Villin-CreERT2;Klf5fl/fl designated as Klf5ΔIND and Villin-Cre;Klf5fl/fl as Klf5ΔIS ) and studied an inducible KLF5 knockdown in Caco-2 BBe cells using a lentiviral Tet-on system (Caco-2 BBe KLF5ΔIND). Specific knockout of Klf5 in colonic tissues, either inducible or constitutive, resulted in increased intestinal permeability. The phenotype was accompanied by a significant reduction in Dsg2, which encodes desmoglein-2, a desmosomal cadherin, at both mRNA and protein levels. Transmission electron microscopy showed alterations of desmosomal morphology in both KLF5 knockdown Caco-2 BBe cells and Klf5 knockout mouse colonic tissues. Inducible knockdown of KLF5 in Caco-2BBe cells grown on Transwell plates led to impaired barrier function as evidenced by decreased transepithelial electrical resistance and increased paracellular permeability to fluorescein isothiocyanate-4 kDa dextran. Furthermore, DSG2 was significantly decreased in KLF5 knockdown cells, and DSG2 overexpression partially rescued the impaired barrier function caused by KLF5 knockdown. Electron microscopy studies demonstrated altered desmosomal morphology after KLF5 knockdown. In combination with chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis and promoter study, our data show that KLF5 regulates intestinal barrier function by mediating the transcription of DSG2, a gene encoding a major component of desmosome structures.NEW & NOTEWORTHY The study is original research on the direct function of a Krüppel-like factor on intestinal barrier function, which is

  10. Human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER 2)/neu expression ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use

    2011-11-23

    Nov 23, 2011 ... 3Department of Pathology, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan, Hubei Province, 430060, China. 4Department of ... To investigate the relationship between the expression/amplification of human epidermal growth factor receptor ... epidermal growth factor receptor family; HER 2, human epidermal ...

  11. Expression of matrix metalloprotease-2, -7 and -9 on human colon, liver and bile duct cell lines by enteric and gastric Helicobacter species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagisawa, Naoko; Geironson, Linda; Al-Soud, Waleed Abu; Ljungh, Sa

    2005-05-01

    Gastric and enteric Helicobacter species have been associated with malignant and inflammatory diseases of the stomach, liver, gall bladder and intestine. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) participate in degradation of extracellular matrix, which allows bacteria to come in contact with and interact with the cells. Enhanced level of MMPs facilitates metastasis and cell invasion of tumor cells by removal of physical barriers, as well as modulation of biologic activities of the proteins residing in the extracellular matrix. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of gastric and enteric Helicobacter on induction of MMPs in hepatocytes and epithelial cells of gall bladder and colon. Human hepatocytes HepG2, gall bladder epithelial cells TFK-1, and colon epithelial cells HT29 were infected with strains of H. pylori cagA+, cagE+, H. pylori cagA-, cagE-, H. pullorum, H. cholecystus, H. bilis and H. hepaticus. Protein levels of MMPs were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunohistochemistry. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to study mRNA levels. Increased expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9 was observed on HepG2, TFK-1 and HT29 infected with H. pylori cagA+, cagE+ and H. cholecystus strains. H. pylori cagA+, cagE+, H. cholecystus, H. pullorum, H. bilis and H. hepaticus strains increased expression of MMP-7 on HT29, compared to uninfected control cells. The effect of MMP upregulation on HepG2, TFK-1 and HT29 was bacterial dose dependent. H. pylori cagA-, cagE- strain did not increase expression of MMPs. Inducible MMPs on colon and bile duct epithelial cells as well as hepatocytes may play an important role in facilitating invasion and progression of cancer by Helicobacter species colonizing the hepatobiliary and gastrointestinal tract.

  12. Invasive behavior of ulcerative colitis-associated carcinoma is related to reduced expression of CD44 extracellular domain: comparison with sporadic colon carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Araki Kayo

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To elucidate relations of invasion of ulcerative colitis (UC-associated carcinoma with its prognosis, the characteristics of invasive fronts were analyzed in comparison with sporadic colonic carcinomas. Methods Prognoses of 15 cases of UC-associated colonic carcinoma were compared with those of sporadic colon carcinoma cases, after which 75 cases of sporadic invasive adenocarcinoma were collected. Tumor budding was examined histologically at invasive fronts using immunohistochemistry (IHC of pancytokeratin. Expressions of beta-catenin with mutation analysis, CD44 extracellular domain, Zo-1, occludin, matrix matalloproteinase-7, laminin-5γ2, and sialyl Lewis X (LeX were immunohistochemically evaluated. Results UC-associated carcinoma showed worse prognosis than sporadic colon carcinoma in all the cases, and exhibited a tendency to become more poorly differentiated when carcinoma invaded the submucosa or deeper layers than sporadic carcinoma. When the lesions were compared with sporadic carcinomas considering differentiation grade, reduced expression of CD44 extracellular domain in UC-associated carcinoma was apparent. Laminin-5γ2 and sialyl-LeX expression showed a lower tendency in UC-associated carcinomas than in their sporadic counterparts. There were no differences in the numbers of tumor budding foci between the two lesion types, with no apparent relation to nuclear beta-catenin levels in IHC. Conclusions UC-associated carcinoma showed poorer differentiation when the carcinoma invaded submucosa or deeper parts, which may influence the poorer prognosis. The invasive behavior of UC-associated carcinoma is more associated with CD44 cleavage than with basement membrane disruption or sialyl-Lewis-antigen alteration.

  13. Portulaca oleracea extract can inhibit nodule formation of colon cancer stem cells by regulating gene expression of the Notch signal transduction pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Heiying; Chen, Li; Wang, Shuiming; Chao, Deng

    2017-07-01

    To investigate whether Portulaca oleracea extract affects tumor formation in colon cancer stem cells and its chemotherapy sensitivity. In addition, to analyze associated genetic changes within the Notch signal transduction pathway. Serum-free cultures of colon cancer cells (HT-29) and HT-29 cancer stem cells were treated with the chemotherapeutic drug 5-fluorouracil to assess sensitivity. Injections of the stem cells were also given to BALB/c mice to confirm tumor growth and note its characteristics. In addition, the effect of different concentrations of P. oleracea extract was tested on the growth of HT-29 colon cancer cells and HT-29 cancer stem cells, as determined by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide method. The effects of P. oleracea extract on the expression of β-catenin, Notch1, and Notch2 in the HT-29 cells were studied using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting. The tumor volume of the HT29 cells was two times larger than that of HT29 cancer stem cells. Treatment with P. oleracea extract inhibited the proliferation of both HT-29 cancer cells and HT-29 cancer stem cells at doses from 0.07 to 2.25 µg/mL. Apoptosis of HT-29 cancer cells and HT-29 cancer stem cells was assessed by flow cytometry; it was enhanced by the addition of P. oleracea extract. Finally, treatment with P. oleracea extract significantly downregulated the expression of the Notch1 and β-catenin genes in both cell types. The results of this study show that P. oleracea extract inhibits the growth of colon cancer stem cells in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, it inhibits the expression of the Notch1 and β-catenin genes. Taken together, this suggests that it may elicit its effects through regulatory and target genes that mediate the Notch signal transduction pathway.

  14. Itch inhibits IL-17-mediated colon inflammation and tumorigenesis by ROR-γt ubiquitination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathania, Mahesh; Khare, Prashant; Zeng, Minghui; Cantarel, Brandi; Zhang, Haiying; Ueno, Hideki; Venuprasad, K

    2016-08-01

    Dysregulated expression of interleukin 17 (IL-17) in the colonic mucosa is associated with colonic inflammation and cancer. However, the cell-intrinsic molecular mechanisms by which IL-17 expression is regulated remain unclear. We found that deficiency in the ubiquitin ligase Itch led to spontaneous colitis and increased susceptibility to colon cancer. Itch deficiency in the TH17 subset of helper T cells, innate lymphoid cells and γδ T cells resulted in the production of elevated amounts of IL-17 in the colonic mucosa. Mechanistically, Itch bound to the transcription factor ROR-γt and targeted ROR-γt for ubiquitination. Inhibition or genetic inactivation of ROR-γt attenuated IL-17 expression and reduced spontaneous colonic inflammation in Itch(-/-) mice. Thus, we have identified a previously unknown role for Itch in regulating IL-17-mediated colonic inflammation and carcinogenesis.

  15. Loss of hepatocyte-nuclear-factor-4alpha affects colonic ion transport and causes chronic inflammation resembling inflammatory bowel disease in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Darsigny

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hnf4alpha, an epithelial specific transcriptional regulator, is decreased in inflammatory bowel disease and protects against chemically-induced colitis in mice. However, the precise role of this factor in maintaining normal inflammatory homeostasis of the intestine remains unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the sole role of epithelial Hnf4alpha in the maintenance of gut inflammatory homeostasis in mice. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We show here that specific epithelial deletion of Hnf4alpha in mice causes spontaneous chronic intestinal inflammation leading to focal areas of crypt dropout, increased cytokines and chemokines secretion, immune cell infiltrates and crypt hyperplasia. A gene profiling analysis in diseased Hnf4alpha null colon confirms profound genetic changes in cell death and proliferative behaviour related to cancer