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Sample records for expressed planobispora rosea

  1. Antibiotic production improvement in the rare actinomycete Planobispora rosea by selection of mutants resistant to the aminoglycosides streptomycin and gentamycin and to rifamycin.

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    Beltrametti, Fabrizio; Rossi, Roberta; Selva, Enrico; Marinelli, Flavia

    2006-04-01

    During a strain improvement program, spontaneous mutants with single or combined resistance to streptomycin (Str(r)), gentamycin (Gen(r)) or rifamycin (Rif(r)) were selected from the industrial strain of Planobispora rosea, which is the producer of thiazolylpeptide GE2270. Among the mutants resistant to each single antibiotic, higher producers occurred more frequently (60%) among Gen(r) than in Rif(r) (10%) and Str(r) (24%) populations. Two Gen(r) mutants showed up to 1.5-fold improvement in GE2270 production while single resistant mutants Str(r) and Rif(r) produced slightly more than the parental strains. The combination of Str(r) and Rif(r) in the same strain improved GE2270 yield up to 1.7-fold. Finally, a higher GE2270 producing strain (1.8-fold improvement with respect to the parental strain) was selected among those mutants with triple resistance to streptomycin, rifamycin and gentamycin. A hierarchical increase in aerial mycelium and spore formation was observed which paralleled GE2270 production improvement.

  2. Effects of a Rhodiola rosea L. extract on acquisition and expression of morphine tolerance and dependence in mice.

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    Mattioli, Laura; Perfumi, Marina

    2011-03-01

    This study investigated the effect of Rhodiola rosea L. extract on acquisition and expression of morphine tolerance and dependence in mice. Therefore animals were injected with repeated administration of morphine (10 mg/kg, subcutaneous) twice daily for five or six days, in order to make them tolerant or dependent. Rhodiola rosea L. extract (0, 10, 15 and 20 mg/kg) was administered by the intragastric route 60 min prior to each morphine injection (for acquisition) or prior the last injection of morphine or naloxone on test day (for tolerance or dependence expression, respectively). Morphine tolerance was evaluated by testing its analgesic effect in the tail flick test at the 1st and 5th days. Morphine dependence was evaluated by counting the number of withdrawal signs (jumping, rearing, forepaw tremor, teeth chatter) after naloxone injection (5 mg/kg; intraperitoneal) on the test day (day 6). Results showed that Rhodiola rosea L. extract significantly reduced the expression of morphine tolerance, while it was ineffective in modulating its acquisition. Conversely, Rhodiola rosea L. extract significantly and dose-dependently attenuated both development and expression of morphine dependence after chronic or acute administration. These data suggest that Rhodiola rosea L. may have human therapeutic potential for treatment of opioid addiction.

  3. Rhodiola rosea Impairs Acquisition and Expression of Conditioned Place Preference Induced by Cocaine

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    Federica Titomanlio

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel approach to the treatment of adverse effects of drugs of abuse is one which makes use of natural products. The present study investigated the effect of Rhodiola rosea L. hydroalcoholic extract (RHO on cocaine-induced hyperactivity and conditioned place preference (CPP in mice. In a first experiment, mice received RHO (15, 20 or 25 mg/kg, IG, cocaine (25 mg/kg, i.p. (COC, or a combination of both drugs (COC + RHO15, COC + RHO20, and COC + RHO25, and their locomotor activity was evaluated. In a second experiment, the effects of RHO on the acquisition, expression, and reinstatement of cocaine CPP (induced by drug priming or social defeat stress were evaluated. RHO alone did not increase activity but potentiated the hyperactivity induced by cocaine. Rhodiola did not induce motivational effects by itself but attenuated the acquisition and expression of cocaine-induced CPP. Moreover, it was found that RHO did not block reinstatement. The results indicate that RHO is effective in reducing the rewarding properties of cocaine but is ineffective in preventing priming or stress-induced cocaine reinstatement. In light of these findings, the benefits of Rhodiola rosea L. as a treatment of cocaine addiction would seem to be limited.

  4. Higher Expression of Toll-like Receptors 3, 7, 8, and 9 in Pityriasis Rosea.

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    El-Ela, Mostafa Abou; El-Komy, Mohamed; Hay, Rania Abdel; Hegazy, Rehab; Sharobim, Amin; Rashed, Laila; Amr, Khalda

    2017-03-01

    Pityriasis rosea (PR) is a common papulosquamous skin disease in which an infective agent may be implicated. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play an important role in immune responses and in the pathophysiology of inflammatory skin diseases. Our aim was to determine the possible roles of TLRs 3, 7, 8, and 9 in the pathogenesis of PR. Twenty-four PR patients and 24 healthy individuals (as controls) were included in this case control study. All recruits were subjected to routine laboratory investigations. Biopsies were obtained from one active PR lesion and from healthy skin of controls for the detection of TLR 3, 7, 8, and 9 gene expression using real-time polymerase chain reaction. This study included 24 patients (8 females and 16 males) with active PR lesions, with a mean age of 28.62 years. Twenty four healthy age- and sex-matched individuals were included as controls (8 females and 16 males, with a mean age of 30.83 years). The results of the routine laboratory tests revealed no significant differences between both groups. Significantly elevated expression of all studied TLRs were detected in PR patients relative to healthy controls (p < .001). TLRs 3, 7, 8, and 9 might be involved in the pathogenesis of PR.

  5. Higher Expression of Toll-like Receptors 3, 7, 8, and 9 in Pityriasis Rosea

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    Mostafa Abou El-Ela

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Pityriasis rosea (PR is a common papulosquamous skin disease in which an infective agent may be implicated. Toll-like receptors (TLRs play an important role in immune responses and in the pathophysiology of inflammatory skin diseases. Our aim was to determine the possible roles of TLRs 3, 7, 8, and 9 in the pathogenesis of PR. Methods Twenty-four PR patients and 24 healthy individuals (as controls were included in this case control study. All recruits were subjected to routine laboratory investigations. Biopsies were obtained from one active PR lesion and from healthy skin of controls for the detection of TLR 3, 7, 8, and 9 gene expression using real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results This study included 24 patients (8 females and 16 males with active PR lesions, with a mean age of 28.62 years. Twenty four healthy age- and sex-matched individuals were included as controls (8 females and 16 males, with a mean age of 30.83 years. The results of the routine laboratory tests revealed no significant differences between both groups. Significantly elevated expression of all studied TLRs were detected in PR patients relative to healthy controls (p < .001. Conclusions TLRs 3, 7, 8, and 9 might be involved in the pathogenesis of PR.

  6. Pityriasis Rosea

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    ... Ribbon Commands Skip to main content Turn off Animations Turn on Animations Our Sponsors Log in | Register Menu Log in | ... Rosea Is Diagnosed Physical examination and thorough medical history, plus KOH prep, in which a tiny sample ...

  7. Schisandra chinensis and Rhodiola rosea exert an anti-stress effect on the HPA axis and reduce hypothalamic c-Fos expression in rats subjected to repeated stress.

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    Xia, Nan; Li, Jie; Wang, Hongwei; Wang, Jian; Wang, Yangtian

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of Schisandra chinensis (S. chinensis) and Rhodiola rosea (R. rosea) on rats subjected to 5 h of stress, induced by water-floating followed by treadmill exercise. Hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) activity and c-Fos and Fos-related antigen 2 (Fra-2) mRNA expression levels in the hypothalamus of the rats were evaluated. Rats were distributed into four groups: S. chinensis (n=12), R. rosea (n=10), stress control (n=10) and quiet control (n=8). Following a training period of 6 consecutive days, the S. chinensis, R. rosea and stress control groups underwent a 3-h water-floating session in the presence of feline predators immediately followed by 2 h treadmill running to induce psychological and physical stress. Following compound stress induction, the serum levels of corticosterone (CORT), adrenocorticotropic hormone and interleukin-1β and the mRNA expression levels of hypothalamic corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), neuropeptide-Y, c-Fos and Fra-2 were evaluated using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, radioimmunoassay and quantitative polymerase chain reaction, respectively. The results indicated that S. chinensis and R. rosea markedly decreased the stress-induced elevation of CRH and peripheral CORT levels. The mRNA expression levels of c-Fos and Fra-2 in the hypothalamus were significantly increased after 5 h compound stress, and reduced levels of c-Fos expression were detected in rats treated with R. rosea. Thus, S. chinensis and R. rosea exert an anti-stress effect in rats subjected to stress by balancing the HPA axis, and possibly by reducing the expression of c-Fos in the hypothalamus.

  8. Three encochitinase-encoding genes identified in the biocontrol fungus Clonostachys rosea are differentially expressed

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    Mamarabadi, Mojtaba; Jensen, Birgit; Lübeck, Mette

    2008-01-01

    . rosea were made by disruption of the endochitinase genes via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation and their biocontrol activity was evaluated. While in planta bioassays showed no significant difference in biocontrol efficacy between the disruptants and the wildtype, the real time RT-PCR analysis showed...

  9. Expression of a serine protease gene prC is up-regulated by oxidative stress in the fungus Clonostachys rosea: implications for fungal survival.

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    Cheng-Gang Zou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Soil fungi face a variety of environmental stresses such as UV light, high temperature, and heavy metals. Adaptation of gene expression through transcriptional regulation is a key mechanism in fungal response to environmental stress. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the transcription factors Msn2/4 induce stress-mediated gene expression by binding to the stress response element. Previous studies have demonstrated that the expression of extracellular proteases is up-regulated in response to heat shock in fungi. However, the physiological significance of regulation of these extracellular proteases by heat shock remains unclear. The nematophagous fungus Clonostachys rosea can secret an extracellular serine protease PrC during the infection of nematodes. Since the promoter of prC has three copies of the stress response element, we investigated the effect of environmental stress on the expression of prC. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Our results demonstrated that the expression of prC was up-regulated by oxidants (H(2O(2 or menadione and heat shock, most likely through the stress response element. After oxidant treatment or heat shock, the germination of conidia in the wild type strain was significantly higher than that in the prC mutant strain in the presence of nematode cuticle. Interestingly, the addition of nematode cuticle significantly attenuated the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS induced by oxidants and heat shock in the wild type strain, but not in prC mutant strain. Moreover, low molecule weight (<3 kD degradation products of nematode cuticle suppressed the inhibitory effect of conidial germination induced by oxidants and heat shock. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results indicate that PrC plays a protective role in oxidative stress in C. rosea. PrC degrades the nematode cuticle to produce degradation products, which in turn offer a protective effect against oxidative stress by scavenging ROS. Our study reveals a novel

  10. Real-time RT-PCR expression analysis of chitinase and endoglucanase genes in the three-way interaction between the biocontrol strain Clonostachys rosea IK726, Botrytis cinera and strawberry

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    Mamarabadi, Mojtaba; Jensen, Birgit; Jensen, Søren Dan Funck

    2008-01-01

    Clonostachys rosea is a well-known biocontrol agent against Botrytis cinerea, the causal agent of gray mold in strawberry. The activity of cell wall-degrading enzymes might play a significant role for successful biocontrol by C. rosea. The expression pattern of four chitinases, and two endoglucan...... of IK726 are involved in biocontrol on leaves. This is the first example of monitoring of expression of chitinolytic genes in interactions between biocontrol agents and pathogens in plant material.......Clonostachys rosea is a well-known biocontrol agent against Botrytis cinerea, the causal agent of gray mold in strawberry. The activity of cell wall-degrading enzymes might play a significant role for successful biocontrol by C. rosea. The expression pattern of four chitinases, and two......, allowing in situ activity assessment of each fungus in vitro and during their interaction on strawberry leaves. Growth of B. cinerea was inhibited in all pathogen-antagonist interactions while the activity of IK726 was slightly increased. In all in vitro interactions, four of the six genes were upregulated...

  11. Metabolism of Zearalenone by Genetically Modified Organisms Expressing the Detoxification Gene from Clonostachys rosea

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    Takahashi-Ando, Naoko; Ohsato, Shuichi; Shibata, Takehiko; Hamamoto, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Isamu; Kimura, Makoto

    2004-01-01

    Zearalenone (ZEN) is converted to a nontoxic product by a lactonohydololase encoded by zhd101. An enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene was fused to zhd101 (i.e., egfp::zhd101) and expressed in Escherichia coli. Both recombinant ZHD101 and EGFP::ZHD101 were purified to homogeneity and characterized. Maximal activity of ZHD101 toward ZEN was measured at approximately 37 to 45°C and pH 10.5 (kcat at 30°C, 0.51 s−1). The enzyme was irreversibly inactivated at pH values below 4.5 or by treatment with serine protease inhibitors. ZHD101 was also active against five ZEN cognates, although the efficiencies were generally low; e.g., the kcat was highest with zearalanone (1.5 s−1) and lowest with β-zearalenol (0.075 s−1). EGFP::ZHD101 had properties similar to those of the individual proteins with regard to the EGFP fluorescence and lactonohydrolase activity. Fortuitously, EGFP::ZHD101 exhibited a good correlation between the fluorescence intensity and reaction velocity under various pH conditions. We therefore used egfp::zhd101 to visually monitor the lactonohydrolase activity in genetically modified organisms and evaluated the usefulness of zhd101 for in vivo detoxification of ZEN. While recombinant E. coli and transgenic rice calluses exhibited strong EGFP fluorescence and completely degraded ZEN in liquid media, recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae gave poor fluorescence and did not eliminate all the toxicity of the mycotoxin in the medium; i.e., the rest of ZEN was transformed into an unfavorable substrate, β-zearalenol, by an as-yet-unidentified reductase and remained in the medium. Even so, as much as 75% of ZEN was detoxified by the yeast transformant, which is better than the detoxification system in which food-grade Lactobacillus strains are used (H. El-Nezami, N. Polychronaki, S. Salminen, and H. Mykkuäne, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 68:3545-3549, 2002). An appropriate combination of a candidate host microbe and the codon-optimized synthetic gene

  12. A Rhodiola rosea root extract protects skeletal muscle cells against chemically induced oxidative stress by modulating heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) expression.

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    Hernández-Santana, Aaron; Pérez-López, Verónica; Zubeldia, Jose María; Jiménez-del-Rio, Miguel

    2014-04-01

    Rhodiola rosea is a perennial plant in the Crassulaceae family, recently postulated to exert its adaptogenic functions partially by modulating the expression of molecular factors such as heat shock proteins (HSP). The aim of this study was to analyze the efficacy of a Rhodiola rosea extract (Rhodiolife) in protecting murine skeletal muscle cells (C2 C12 myotubes) from chemically induced oxidative stress and to establish whether modulation of HSP70 expression is observed. C2 C12 cells treated with Rhodiolife did not experience any loss of viability (p > 0.05) at concentrations of 1-100 µg/mL for up to 24 h. In control cultures, viability decreased 25% following exposure to 2 mM H2 O2 (1 h). However, no significant decrease in viability in cells pre-treated with extract at concentrations as low as 1 µg/mL was observed. HSP70 mRNA levels were up-regulated two-fold in cell cultures treated with Rhodiolife (10 µg/mL), and expression was further enhanced by exposure to H2 O2 (six-fold, p < 0.05). HSP70 protein levels were maintained in pre-treated cell cultures compared to controls but was significantly lower (-50%) in cells lacking treatment exposed to H2 O2 . The present results indicate that Rhodiolife protects C2 C12 myotubes against peroxide-induced oxidative stress through the modulation of the molecular chaperone HSP70. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Chronic Rhodiola rosea extract supplementation enforces exhaustive swimming tolerance.

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    Lee, Fang-Tsai; Kuo, Tz-Yin; Liou, Shaw-Yih; Chien, Chiang-Ting

    2009-01-01

    We explored the effects and mechanisms of Rhodiola rosea extract supplementation on swimming-induced fatigue in rats. The concentrations of active components in Rhodiola rosea have been determined by high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometer. The Rhodiola rosea extract supplementation in water for 2-4 weeks was evaluated in male Wistar rats with 90-min unloaded swimming exercise and 5% body weight loaded swimming up to fatigue. We measured the fatigue biomarkers, including blood urea nitrogen (BUN), glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT) and glutamic pyruvic transaminase (GPT), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), hepatic glycogen content, the activity of fat metabolism enzymes, sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1 (SREBP-1) and fatty acid synthase (FAS), the tissue oxygen content and ratio of red and white skeletal muscle fibers in rats. Rhodiola rosea significantly increased liver glycogen, SREBP-1, FAS, heat shock protein 70 expression, Bcl-2/Bax ratio and oxygen content before swimming. Rhodiola rosea supplementation significantly increased the swimming time in a dose-dependent manner and reduced swimming-enhanced serum BUN, GOT and GPT levels. The ratio of red and white muscle fibers was not altered after chronic Rhodiola rosea extract supplementation. Chronic Rhodiola rosea supplementation significantly improved exhaustive swimming-induced fatigue by the increased glycogen content, energy supply of lipogenic enzyme expressions and protective defense mechanisms.

  14. Effects of a Rhodiola rosea L. extract on the acquisition, expression, extinction, and reinstatement of morphine-induced conditioned place preference in mice.

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    Mattioli, Laura; Titomanlio, Federica; Perfumi, Marina

    2012-05-01

    Opioid addiction is a chronic, recurrent brain disease that is characterised by compulsive drug seeking and a high rate of relapse even after long periods of abstinence. Prevention of relapse is the primary goal of addiction treatment and is still the major limitation in drug therapy. The present study investigated the effects of a Rhodiola rosea L. hydroalcoholic extract (RHO), a well-known traditional oriental medicine, on establishment and reinstatement of morphine-induced conditioned place preference (CPP) in mice. CPP was induced by intraperitoneal injection of morphine (10 mg/kg) as an 8-day conditioning schedule. The effects of RHO on the rewarding properties of morphine were tested in mice receiving oral administration of RHO (10, 15, and 20 mg/kg) 60 min prior to each morphine injection (acquisition) or prior to the CPP test on day 9 (expression). Once established, CPP was extinguished by repeated testing, during which conditioned mice were injected daily with different doses of RHO. Finally, the efficacy of RHO in blocking reinstatement of CPP provoked by priming injections and physical stress was also evaluated. RHO administration showed dose dependency for prevention of establishment of CPP and was effective in facilitating extinction of morphine-induced CPP. RHO suppressed both priming- and stress-induced reinstatement of CPP in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, as RHO was effective for reducing craving and vulnerability to relapse, it might be a very effective natural remedy for the treatment of opioid addiction.

  15. Rhodiola rosea extends lifespan and improves stress tolerance in silkworm, Bombyx mori.

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    Chen, Cong; Song, Jiangbo; Chen, Min; Li, Zhiquan; Tong, Xiaoling; Hu, Hai; Xiang, Zhonghuai; Lu, Cheng; Dai, Fangyin

    2016-04-01

    The root of Rhodiola rosea is widely used in Traditional Chinese Medicine. The extract from R. rosea is reported to extend the lifespan of yeast, nematode, and fruit fly. However, the molecular mechanism is not fully understood. Here, we tested whether R. rosea extends the lifespan of the silkworm. An aqueous extract of R. rosea significantly prolonged the lifespan of the silkworm, without affecting its daily food intake, body weight, or fecundity, suggesting that R. rosea did not exhibit obvious side effects. Rhodiola rosea extract also enhanced the stress resistance in the silkworm, against heat stress (37 °C) and starvation. The R. rosea extract increased the activity of the major antioxidant enzymes, glutathione S-transferase and catalase, and altered the content of glutathione and malondialdehyde. Rhodiola rosea increased the expression of BmFoxO, which is a downstream regulator of insulin/IGF-1 signaling (IIS) pathway in the silkworm. Our results showed that R. rosea extends lifespan, in which IIS pathway might be involved, and enhances stress resistance in the silkworm. Thus, the silkworm might be used as a novel animal model for lifespan study and efficacy evaluation of Traditional Chinese Medicines.

  16. Does pityriasis rosea Koebnerise?

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    Nwabudike Lawrence Chukwudi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The Koebner phenomenon or isomorphic phenomenon is described in dermatology texts as the production of lesions of the original disease, in clinically uninvolved skin, following trauma. The lesions are located at the site of trauma and evidence of a traumatic causation is the linear arrangement of some of the lesions, such as in the case of lichen planus. Other disorders known to exhibit the Koebner phenomenon include psoriasis and vitiligo. A number of other diseases are associated with the Koebner phenomenon. Pathergy is a phenomenon of pustule production following trauma, which occurs in certain disorders such as Pyoderma gangrenosum and Behçet?s disease. In some disorders such as impetigo and verruca vulgaris, inoculation may give the appearance of the Koebner phenomenon. A case of pityriasis rosea and Koebner phenomenon at the site of routine blood assay is described in this work. This author has not thus far encountered any description of the Koebner reaction in relation to pityriasis rosea in the literature, but, perhaps, with this report, other physicians will be more open to this possibility and actually uncover similar cases.

  17. Anti-Inflammatory and Neuroprotective Effects of Constituents Isolated from Rhodiola rosea

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    Yeonju Lee; Jae-Chul Jung; Soyong Jang; Jieun Kim; Zulfiqar Ali; Khan, Ikhlas A.; Seikwan Oh

    2013-01-01

    To determine the biological activity of Rhodiola rosea, the protein expression of iNOS and proinflammatory cytokines was measured after the activation of murine microglial BV2 cells by LPS under the exposure of constituents of Rhodiola rosea: crude extract, rosin, rosarin, and salidroside (each 1?50? ? g/mL). The LPS-induced expression of iNOS and cytokines in BV2 cells was suppressed by the constituents of Rhodiola rosea in a concentration-dependent manner. Also the expression of the proinfl...

  18. Analysis of Clonostachys rosea-induced resistance to tomato gray mold disease in tomato leaves.

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    Liana Dalcantara Ongouya Mouekouba

    Full Text Available Tomato gray mold disease, caused by Botrytis cinerea, is a serious disease in tomato. Clonostachys rosea is an antagonistic microorganism to B. cinerea. To investigate the induced resistance mechanism of C. rosea, we examined the effects of these microorganisms on tomato leaves, along with changes in the activities of three defense enzymes (PAL, PPO, GST, second messengers (NO, H2O2, O2(- and phytohormones (IAA, ABA, GA3, ZT, MeJA, SA and C2H4. Compared to the control, all treatments induced higher levels of PAL, PPO and GST activity in tomato leaves and increased NO, SA and GA3 levels. The expression of WRKY and MAPK, two important transcription factors in plant disease resistance, was upregulated in C. rosea- and C. rosea plus B. cinerea-treated samples. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis analysis showed that two abundant proteins were present in the C. rosea plus B. cinerea-treated samples but not in the other samples. These proteins were determined (by mass spectrum analysis to be LEXYL2 (β-xylosidase and ATP synthase CF1 alpha subunit. Therefore, C. rosea plus B. cinerea treatment induces gray mold resistance in tomato. This study provides a basis for elucidating the mechanism of C. rosea as a biocontrol agent.

  19. Effect of ethanol extract of Rhodiola rosea on the early nephropathy in type 2 diabetic rats.

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    Wang, Zhi-sen; Gao, Fei; Lu, Fu-er

    2013-06-01

    This study aimed to investigate the therapeutical effects of Rhodiola rosea extract on rats with type 2 diabetic nephropathy (DN). The rat type 2 DN model was established by high fat and high calorie feeding and intravenous injection of streptozocin (STZ). Wistar rats were randomly divided into normal group, control group, low dose Rhodiola rosea group, high dose Rhodiola rosea group and Captopril group. Oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was performed to determine the impairment of glucose tolerance in the established animal model. A series of parameters including fasting blood glucose (FBG), total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), creatinine clearance rate (Ccr), 24-h urinary albumin (UA), the ratio of kidney mass/body weight (renal index) and glomerular area were examined after 8 weeks. Moreover, the expression of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 in renal tissues was detected by using immunohistochemisty. At the end of the eighth week, FBG, TC, TG, Ccr, 24-h urinary albumin, the ratio of kidney mass/body weight and glomerular area were significantly reduced in Rhodiola rosea extract treatment groups as compared with those in control group. TGF-β1 expression in renal tissues of Rhodiola rosea extract treatment groups was also significantly decreased as compared with that of control group. These results indicate that Rhodiola rosea extract may have a protective effect on early nephropathy in diabetic rats, which might be related to the decrease of the renal expression of TGF-β1.

  20. Anti-Inflammatory and Neuroprotective Effects of Constituents Isolated from Rhodiola rosea.

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    Lee, Yeonju; Jung, Jae-Chul; Jang, Soyong; Kim, Jieun; Ali, Zulfiqar; Khan, Ikhlas A; Oh, Seikwan

    2013-01-01

    To determine the biological activity of Rhodiola rosea, the protein expression of iNOS and proinflammatory cytokines was measured after the activation of murine microglial BV2 cells by LPS under the exposure of constituents of Rhodiola rosea: crude extract, rosin, rosarin, and salidroside (each 1-50  μ g/mL). The LPS-induced expression of iNOS and cytokines in BV2 cells was suppressed by the constituents of Rhodiola rosea in a concentration-dependent manner. Also the expression of the proinflammatory factors iNOS, IL-1 β , and TNF- α in the kidney and prefrontal cortex of brain in mice was suppressed by the oral administration of Rhodiola rosea crude extract (500 mg/kg). To determine the neuroprotective effect of constituents of Rhodiola rosea, neuronal cells were activated by L-glutamate, and neurotoxicity was analyzed. The L-glutamate-induced neurotoxicity was suppressed by the treatment with rosin but not by rosarin. The level of phosphorylated MAPK, pJNK, and pp38 was increased by L-glutamate treatment but decreased by the treatment with rosin and salidroside. These results indicate that Rhodiola rosea may have therapeutic potential for the treatment of inflammation and neurodegenerative disease.

  1. Anti-Inflammatory and Neuroprotective Effects of Constituents Isolated from Rhodiola rosea

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    Yeonju Lee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To determine the biological activity of Rhodiola rosea, the protein expression of iNOS and proinflammatory cytokines was measured after the activation of murine microglial BV2 cells by LPS under the exposure of constituents of Rhodiola rosea: crude extract, rosin, rosarin, and salidroside (each 1–50 μg/mL. The LPS-induced expression of iNOS and cytokines in BV2 cells was suppressed by the constituents of Rhodiola rosea in a concentration-dependent manner. Also the expression of the proinflammatory factors iNOS, IL-1β, and TNF-α in the kidney and prefrontal cortex of brain in mice was suppressed by the oral administration of Rhodiola rosea crude extract (500 mg/kg. To determine the neuroprotective effect of constituents of Rhodiola rosea, neuronal cells were activated by L-glutamate, and neurotoxicity was analyzed. The L-glutamate-induced neurotoxicity was suppressed by the treatment with rosin but not by rosarin. The level of phosphorylated MAPK, pJNK, and pp38 was increased by L-glutamate treatment but decreased by the treatment with rosin and salidroside. These results indicate that Rhodiola rosea may have therapeutic potential for the treatment of inflammation and neurodegenerative disease.

  2. Overexpression of AmRosea1 Gene Confers Drought and Salt Tolerance in Rice

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    Mingzhu Dou

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Ectopic expression of the MYB transcription factor of AmROSEA1 from Antirrhinum majus has been reported to change anthocyanin and other metabolites in several species. In this study, we found that overexpression of AmRosea1 significantly improved the tolerance of transgenic rice to drought and salinity stresses. Transcriptome analysis revealed that a considerable number of stress-related genes were affected by exogenous AmRosea1 during both drought and salinity stress treatments. These affected genes are involved in stress signal transduction, the hormone signal pathway, ion homeostasis and the enzymes that remove peroxides. This work suggests that the AmRosea1 gene is a potential candidate for genetic engineering of crops.

  3. Attenuation of long-term Rhodiola rosea supplementation on exhaustive swimming-evoked oxidative stress in the rat.

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    Huang, Shih-Chung; Lee, Fang-Tsai; Kuo, Tz-Yin; Yang, Joan-Hwa; Chien, Chiang-Ting

    2009-10-31

    Rhodiola rosea improves exercise endurance and fatigue. We hypothesized that ingredients in Rhodiola rosea may increase antioxidant capability against swimming induced oxidative stress. In this study, we have identified the Rhodiola rosea ingredients, p-tyrosol, salidroside, rosin, rosavin and rosarin by high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometer and evaluated their O2(-)*, H2O2, and HOCl scavenging activities by a chemiluminescence analyzer. We next explored the effect and mechanism of Rhodiola rosea on 90-min swimming-induced oxidative stress in male Wistar rats fed with three doses of Rhodiola rosea extracts in drinking water (5, 25, 125 mg/day/rat) for 4 weeks. Our results showed that the 4 major ingredients (salidroside, rosin, rosavin and rosarin) from Rhodiola rosea extracts scavenged O2(-)*, H2O2, and HOCl activity in a dose-dependent manner. The ninety-min swimming exercise increased the O2(-)* production in the order: liver > skeletal muscle > blood, indicating that liver is the most sensitive target organ. The level of plasma malonedialdehyde, a lipid peroxidation product, was also increased after exercise. Treatment of 4 weeks of Rhodiola rosea extracts significantly inhibited swimming exercise-enhanced O2(-)* production in the blood, liver and skeletal muscle and plasma malonedialdehyde concentration. The expression in Mn-superoxide dismutase Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase, and catalase in livers were all enhanced after 4 weeks of Rhodiola rosea supplementation especially at the dose of 125 mg/day/rat. Treatment of Rhodiola rosea extracts for 4 weeks significantly increased swimming performance. In conclusion, treatment of Rhodiola rosea extracts for 4 weeks could reduce swimming-enhanced oxidative stress possibly via the reactive oxygen species scavenging capability and the enhancement of the antioxidant defense mechanisms.

  4. Extension of Drosophila lifespan by Rhodiola rosea through a mechanism independent from dietary restriction.

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    Schriner, Samuel E; Lee, Kevin; Truong, Stephanie; Salvadora, Kathyrn T; Maler, Steven; Nam, Alexander; Lee, Thomas; Jafari, Mahtab

    2013-01-01

    Rhodiola rosea has been extensively used to improve physical and mental performance and to protect against stress. We, and others, have reported that R. rosea can extend lifespan in flies, worms, and yeast. However, its molecular mechanism is currently unknown. Here, we tested whether R. rosea might act through a pathway related to dietary restriction (DR) that can extend lifespan in a range of model organisms. While the mechanism of DR itself is also unknown, three molecular pathways have been associated with it: the silent information regulator 2 (SIR2) proteins, insulin and insulin-like growth factor signaling (IIS), and the target of rapamycin (TOR). In flies, DR is implemented through a reduction in dietary yeast content. We found that R. rosea extract extended lifespan in both sexes independent of the yeast content in the diet. We also found that the extract extended lifespan when the SIR2, IIS, or TOR pathways were genetically perturbed. Upon examination of water and fat content, we found that R. rosea decreased water content and elevated fat content in both sexes, but did not sensitize flies to desiccation or protect them against starvation. There were some sex-specific differences in response to R. rosea. In female flies, the expression levels of glycolytic genes and dSir2 were down-regulated, and NADH levels were decreased. In males however, R. rosea provided no protection against heat stress and had no effect on the major heat shock protein HSP70 and actually down-regulated the mitochondrial HSP22. Our findings largely rule out an elevated general resistance to stress and DR-related pathways as mechanistic candidates. The latter conclusion is especially relevant given the limited potential for DR to improve human health and lifespan, and presents R. rosea as a potential viable candidate to treat aging and age-related diseases in humans.

  5. Extension of Drosophila lifespan by Rhodiola rosea through a mechanism independent from dietary restriction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel E Schriner

    Full Text Available Rhodiola rosea has been extensively used to improve physical and mental performance and to protect against stress. We, and others, have reported that R. rosea can extend lifespan in flies, worms, and yeast. However, its molecular mechanism is currently unknown. Here, we tested whether R. rosea might act through a pathway related to dietary restriction (DR that can extend lifespan in a range of model organisms. While the mechanism of DR itself is also unknown, three molecular pathways have been associated with it: the silent information regulator 2 (SIR2 proteins, insulin and insulin-like growth factor signaling (IIS, and the target of rapamycin (TOR. In flies, DR is implemented through a reduction in dietary yeast content. We found that R. rosea extract extended lifespan in both sexes independent of the yeast content in the diet. We also found that the extract extended lifespan when the SIR2, IIS, or TOR pathways were genetically perturbed. Upon examination of water and fat content, we found that R. rosea decreased water content and elevated fat content in both sexes, but did not sensitize flies to desiccation or protect them against starvation. There were some sex-specific differences in response to R. rosea. In female flies, the expression levels of glycolytic genes and dSir2 were down-regulated, and NADH levels were decreased. In males however, R. rosea provided no protection against heat stress and had no effect on the major heat shock protein HSP70 and actually down-regulated the mitochondrial HSP22. Our findings largely rule out an elevated general resistance to stress and DR-related pathways as mechanistic candidates. The latter conclusion is especially relevant given the limited potential for DR to improve human health and lifespan, and presents R. rosea as a potential viable candidate to treat aging and age-related diseases in humans.

  6. Serotonin involvement in Rhodiola rosea attenuation of nicotine withdrawal signs in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannucci, C; Navarra, M; Calzavara, E; Caputi, A P; Calapai, G

    2012-09-15

    Rhodiola rosea has been used for centuries in the traditional medicine to stimulate nervous system, to enhance physical and mental performance and to treat fatigue. It is known that administration of Rhodiola rosea extract elicits antidepressant activity, but the mechanism of action still remains unclear. Evidence from animal models and human studies show that nicotine reduces symptoms of depression and that nicotine cessation induces depressive-like symptoms. We investigated the effects of Rhodiola rosea on nicotine withdrawal signs. Nicotine dependence was induced by subcutaneous nicotine injection (2 mg/kg, four times daily) for 14 days. Another group of animals treated with nicotine (for 14 days) and successively with Rhodiola rosea extract was co-administered with selective 5-HT receptorial antagonist WAY 100635 (1 mg/kg). After nicotine withdrawal animals were evaluated for behavioural parameters (locomotor activity, abstinence signs, marble burying test), diencephalic serotonin metabolism and serotonin receptor-1A expression. Results show a significant increase of 5-HT content in N treated with R. rosea, with a significant increase of serotonin receptor 1A, suggesting an involvement of serotonin in beneficial effects of R. rosea on suffering produced by nicotine withdrawal. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  7. Protection of human cultured cells against oxidative stress by Rhodiola rosea without activation of antioxidant defenses.

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    Schriner, Samuel E; Avanesian, Agnesa; Liu, Yanxia; Luesch, Hendrik; Jafari, Mahtab

    2009-09-01

    Rhodiola rosea root has been long used in traditional medical systems in Europe and Asia as an adaptogen to increase an organism's resistance to physical stress. Recent research has demonstrated its ability to improve mental and physical stamina, to improve mood, and to help alleviate high-altitude sickness. We have also recently found that R. rosea is able to extend the life span of Drosophila melanogaster. The mode of action of R. rosea is currently unknown; it has been suggested by some to act as an antioxidant, whereas others have argued that it may actually be a pro-oxidant and act through a hormetic mechanism. We found that R. rosea supplementation could protect cultured cells against ultraviolet light, paraquat, and H(2)O(2). However, it did not alter the levels of the major antioxidant defenses nor did it markedly activate the antioxidant response element or modulate heme-oxygenase-1 expression levels at relevant concentrations. In addition, R. rosea extract was not able to significantly degrade H(2)O(2) in vitro. These results suggest that in human cultured cells R. rosea does not act as an antioxidant and that its mode of action cannot be sufficiently explained through a pro-oxidant hormetic mechanism.

  8. [Rhodiola rosea and its neuropsychotropic effects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juřica, Jan; Koupá, Tereza

    2016-01-01

    The paper reviews the neuropsychotropic effects of Rhodiola rosea, a succulent perennial plant which is native to dry, high-altitude regions of the northern hemisphere. The most valued part of the plant is its rhizome, which has a rose-like fragrance. In the available literature, there is a large number of mentions of its healing properties; nonetheless, only few of them are based on reliable scientific evidence. Of the neuropsychotropic effects, there are mentions of anxiolytic, antidepressant, neuroprotective and pro- cognitive properties and nonspecific "adaptogenic" effects. These effects are well established according to the preclinical studies; nonetheless many of clinical studies have serious drawbacks in design or interpretation of results. Extracts of R. rosea are well tolerated in general and thus regarded as safe. On the other hand, some pharmacokinetic interactions at the level of cytochrome P450 enzymes cannot be omitted. The extracts of R. rosea, are considered, according to the regulation of the Ministry of Health, as food supplements. According to the long standing use of R. rosea, it may be used for traditional treatment of symptoms of fatigue or mental weakness, but it seems that there is not enough evidence for general recommendation of use of R. rosea extracts in clinical practice.Key words: Rhodiola rosea neuropsychotropic effects phytomedicine.

  9. Hydroalcoholic extract of Rhodiola rosea L. (Crassulaceae) and its hydrolysate inhibit melanogenesis in B16F0 cells by regulating the CREB/MITF/tyrosinase pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Hsiu-Mei; Chien, Yin-Chih; Wu, Chieh-Hsi; Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung; Wu, Wan-Chen; Pan, Yu-Yun; Su, Yu-Han; Wen, Kuo-Ching

    2014-03-01

    We investigated the effects of an aqueous alcohol extract of Rhodiola rosea (R. rosea) and its hydrolysate on melanin synthesis and the mechanisms mediating the activity. The ratio of tyrosol to salidroside was 2.3 in hydroalcoholic extract, and 51.0 in hydrolysate. We found that R. rosea extract and its hydrolysate inhibited melanin synthesis and tyrosinase activity in mouse melanoma cells (B16F0 cells). R. rosea extract also inhibited gene and protein expression of melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) and inhibited c-AMP response element binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation, suppressed the activation of AKT and glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta (GSK3β), and inhibited the expression of microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) and tyrosinase-related protein 1 (TRP-1). R. rosea hydrolysate inhibited the phosphorylation of CREB, the activation of AKT and GSK3β, and the expression of MITF and tyrosinase. Our results suggest that R. rosea extract is a novel tyrosinase inhibitor and that it exerts its effects by regulating the CREB/MITF/tyrosinase pathway in B16F0. Further in vivo studies are needed to determine the effectiveness of R. rosea extract as a skin whitening agent. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Extension of Drosophila Lifespan by Rhodiola rosea Depends on Dietary Carbohydrate and Caloric Content in a Simplified Diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schriner, Samuel E; Coskun, Volkan; Hogan, Sean P; Nguyen, Cindy T; Lopez, Terry E; Jafari, Mahtab

    2016-03-01

    The root and rhizome extract of Rhodiola rosea has been extensively used in traditional medicine to improve physical and mental performance and to protect against stress. We, and others, have reported that R. rosea can extend lifespan in flies, worms, and yeast. We also previously found that the extract can act independently of dietary restriction (DR), a treatment that can extend lifespan in a range of model organisms. In flies, DR is implemented through a reduction in dietary yeast content. Here, we report that the ability of R. rosea extract to extend lifespan in flies is dependent on the carbohydrate and caloric content when supplemented with a simplified diet composed of yeast and sucrose. R. rosea extract elevated the sugar content in flies and down-regulated hexokinase expression, suggesting that it perturbs carbohydrate metabolism in flies. In our previous studies, bananas, barley malt, and corn syrup provided dietary carbohydrates, and R. rosea extract could extend lifespan with a range of caloric levels. We conclude that the lifespan-extending effect of R. rosea extract in flies is dependent on dietary carbohydrate and caloric contents coupled with an interaction with complex dietary components present in bananas, barley, or corn.

  11. Identification of mycoparasitism-related genes in Clonostachys rosea 67-1 active against Sclerotinia sclerotiorum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhan-Bin; Sun, Man-Hong; Li, Shi-Dong

    2015-12-14

    Clonostachys rosea is a mycoparasite that has shown great potential in controlling various plant fungal pathogens. In order to find mycoparasitism-related genes in C. rosea, the transcriptome of the efficient isolate 67-1 in association with sclerotia of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum was sequenced and analysed. The results identified 26,351 unigenes with a mean length of 1,102 nucleotides, among which 18,525 were annotated in one or more databases of NR, KEGG, Swiss-Prot, GO and COG. Differentially expressed genes at 8 h, 24 h and 48 h after sclerotial induction were analysed, and 6,890 unigenes were upregulated compared with the control without sclerotia. 713, 1,008 and 1,929 genes were specifically upregulated expressed, while 1,646, 283 and 529 genes were specifically downregulated, respectively. Gene ontology terms analysis indicated that these genes were mainly involved in metabolism of biological process, catalysis of molecular function and cellular component. The expression levels of 12 genes that were upregulated after encountering with S. sclerotiorum were monitored using real-time PCR. The results indicated that the quantitative detection was consistent with the transcriptome analysis. The study provides transcriptional gene expression information on C. rosea parasitizing S. sclerotiorum and forms the basis for further investigation of mycoparasitism-related genes of C. rosea.

  12. Effects of Two Different Rhodiola rosea Extracts on Primary Human Visceral Adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomari, Elena; Stefanon, Bruno; Colitti, Monica

    2015-05-11

    Rhodiola rosea (Rro) has been reported to have various pharmacological properties, including anti-fatigue, anti-stress and anti-inflammatory activity. It is also known to improve glucose and lipid metabolism, but the effects of Rhodiola rosea on adipocyte differentiation and metabolism are not still elucidated. In this study the anti-adipogenic and lipolytic activity of two extracts of Rhodiola rosea, containing 3% salidroside (RS) or 1% salidroside and 3% rosavines (RR) on primary human visceral adipocytes was investigated. Pre-adipocytes were analyzed after 10 and 20 days of treatment during differentiation and after 7 days of treatment when they reached mature shape. The RS extract significantly induced higher apoptosis and lipolysis in comparison to control cells and to RR extract. In contrast, RR extract significantly reduced triglyceride incorporation during maturation. Differentiation of pre-adipocytes in the presence of RS and RR extracts showed a significant decrease in expression of genes involved in adipocyte function such as SLC2A4 and the adipogenic factor FGF2 and significant increase in expression of genes involved in inhibition of adipogenesis, such as GATA3, WNT3A, WNT10B. Furthermore RR extract, in contrast to RS, significantly down-regulates PPARG, the master regulator of adipogenesis and FABP4. These data support the lipolytic and anti-adipogenetic activity of two different commercial extracts of Rhodiola rosea in primary human visceral pre-adipocytes during differentiation.

  13. Effects of Two Different Rhodiola rosea Extracts on Primary Human Visceral Adipocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Pomari

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Rhodiola rosea (Rro has been reported to have various pharmacological properties, including anti-fatigue, anti-stress and anti-inflammatory activity. It is also known to improve glucose and lipid metabolism, but the effects of Rhodiola rosea on adipocyte differentiation and metabolism are not still elucidated. In this study the anti-adipogenic and lipolytic activity of two extracts of Rhodiola rosea, containing 3% salidroside (RS or 1% salidroside and 3% rosavines (RR on primary human visceral adipocytes was investigated. Pre-adipocytes were analyzed after 10 and 20 days of treatment during differentiation and after 7 days of treatment when they reached mature shape. The RS extract significantly induced higher apoptosis and lipolysis in comparison to control cells and to RR extract. In contrast, RR extract significantly reduced triglyceride incorporation during maturation. Differentiation of pre-adipocytes in the presence of RS and RR extracts showed a significant decrease in expression of genes involved in adipocyte function such as SLC2A4 and the adipogenic factor FGF2 and significant increase in expression of genes involved in inhibition of adipogenesis, such as GATA3, WNT3A, WNT10B. Furthermore RR extract, in contrast to RS, significantly down-regulates PPARG, the master regulator of adipogenesis and FABP4. These data support the lipolytic and anti-adipogenetic activity of two different commercial extracts of Rhodiola rosea in primary human visceral pre-adipocytes during differentiation.

  14. A Perilipin Gene from Clonostachys rosea f. Catenulata HL-1-1 Is Related to Sclerotial Parasitism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhan-Bin Sun

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Clonostachys rosea f. catenulata is a promising biocontrol agent against many fungal plant pathogens. To identify mycoparasitism-related genes from C. rosea f. catenulata, a suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH cDNA library of C. rosea f. catenulata HL-1-1 that parasitizes the sclerotia of S. sclerotiorum was constructed. 502 clones were sequenced randomly, and thereby 472 expressed sequence tags (ESTs were identified. Forty-three unigenes were annotated and exhibited similarity to a wide diversity of genes. Quantitative real -time PCR showed that a perilipin-like protein encoding gene, Per3, was up-regulated by 6.6-fold over the control at 96 h under the induction of sclerotia. The full-length sequence of Per3 was obtained via 5' and 3' rapid identification of cDNA ends. Overexpression of Per3 in HL-1-1 significantly enhanced the parasitic ability on sclerotia. The results indicated that Per3 might be involved in the mycoparasitism of C. rosea f. catenulata HL-1-1. This is the first report of a perilipin as a potential biocontrol gene in mycoparasites. The study provides usefu l insights into the interaction between C. rosea f. catenulata and fungal plant pathogens.

  15. A Three-Way Transcriptomic Interaction Study of a Biocontrol Agent (Clonostachys rosea), a Fungal Pathogen (Helminthosporium solani), and a Potato Host (Solanum tuberosum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysøe, Erik; Dees, Merete W; Brurberg, May Bente

    2017-08-01

    Helminthosporium solani causes silver scurf, which affects the quality of potato. The biocontrol agent Clonostachys rosea greatly limited the severity of silver scurf symptoms and amount of H. solani genomic DNA in laboratory experiments. Transcriptomic analysis during interaction showed that H. solani gene expression was highly reduced when coinoculated with the biocontrol agent C. rosea, whereas gene expression of C. rosea was clearly boosted as a response to the pathogen. The most notable upregulated C. rosea genes were those encoding proteins involved in cellular response to oxidative stress, proteases, G-protein signaling, and the methyltransferase LaeA. The most notable potato response to both fungi was downregulation of defense-related genes and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinases. At a later stage, this shifted, and most potato defense genes were turned on, especially those involved in terpenoid biosynthesis when H. solani was present. Some biocontrol-activated defense-related genes in potato were upregulated during early interaction with C. rosea alone that were not triggered by H. solani alone. Our results indicate that the reductions of silver scurf using C. rosea are probably due to a combination of mechanisms, including mycoparasitism, biocontrol-activated stimulation of plant defense mechanisms, microbial competition for nutrients, space, and antibiosis.

  16. Rhodiola rosea for physical and mental fatigue: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishaque Sana

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rhodiola rosea (R. rosea is grown at high altitudes and northern latitudes. Due to its purported adaptogenic properties, it has been studied for its performance-enhancing capabilities in healthy populations and its therapeutic properties in a number of clinical populations. To systematically review evidence of efficacy and safety of R. rosea for physical and mental fatigue. Methods Six electronic databases were searched to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs and controlled clinical trials (CCTs, evaluating efficacy and safety of R. rosea for physical and mental fatigue. Two reviewers independently screened the identified literature, extracted data and assessed risk of bias for included studies. Results Of 206 articles identified in the search, 11 met inclusion criteria for this review. Ten were described as RCTs and one as a CCT. Two of six trials examining physical fatigue in healthy populations report R. rosea to be effective as did three of five RCTs evaluating R. rosea for mental fatigue. All of the included studies exhibit either a high risk of bias or have reporting flaws that hinder assessment of their true validity (unclear risk of bias. Conclusion Research regarding R. rosea efficacy is contradictory. While some evidence suggests that the herb may be helpful for enhancing physical performance and alleviating mental fatigue, methodological flaws limit accurate assessment of efficacy. A rigorously-designed well reported RCT that minimizes bias is needed to determine true efficacy of R. rosea for fatigue.

  17. Antihyperalgesic Activity of Rhodiola rosea in a Diabetic Rat Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Déciga-Campos, Myrna; González-Trujano, Maria Eva; Ventura-Martínez, Rosa; Montiel-Ruiz, Rosa Mariana; Ángeles-López, Guadalupe Esther; Brindis, Fernando

    2016-02-01

    Preclinical Research Rhodiola rosea L. (Crassulaceae) is used for enhancing physical and mental performance. Recent studies demonstrated that R. rosea had anti-inflammatory activity in animal models, for example, carrageenan- and nystatin-induced edema in rats, possibly by inhibiting phospholipase A2 and cyclooxygenases-1 and -2. In addition, R. rosea had antinociceptive activity in thermal and chemical pain tests as well as mechanical hyperalgesia. The purpose of the present study was to assess the antihyperalgesic effect of an ethanol extract of Rhodiola rosea (R. rosea) in a diabetic rat model. Rats were administered a single dose of streptozotocin (STZ; 50 mg/kg, i.p.) and hyperalgesia was evaluated four weeks later. Formalin-evoked (0.5%) flinching was increased in diabetic rats compared with nondiabetic controls Systemic (1-100 mg/kg, i.p.) and local (0.1-10 mg/paw into the dorsal surface of the right hind paw) administration of R. rosea ethanol extract dose-dependently reduced formalin-induced hyperalgesia in diabetic rats. The antihyperalgesic effect of R. rosea was compared with gabapentin. These results suggest that R. rosea ethanol extract may have potential as a treatment for diabetic hyperalgesia. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Rhodiola rosea for physical and mental fatigue: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishaque, Sana; Shamseer, Larissa; Bukutu, Cecilia; Vohra, Sunita

    2012-05-29

    Rhodiola rosea (R. rosea) is grown at high altitudes and northern latitudes. Due to its purported adaptogenic properties, it has been studied for its performance-enhancing capabilities in healthy populations and its therapeutic properties in a number of clinical populations. To systematically review evidence of efficacy and safety of R. rosea for physical and mental fatigue. Six electronic databases were searched to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and controlled clinical trials (CCTs), evaluating efficacy and safety of R. rosea for physical and mental fatigue. Two reviewers independently screened the identified literature, extracted data and assessed risk of bias for included studies. Of 206 articles identified in the search, 11 met inclusion criteria for this review. Ten were described as RCTs and one as a CCT. Two of six trials examining physical fatigue in healthy populations report R. rosea to be effective as did three of five RCTs evaluating R. rosea for mental fatigue. All of the included studies exhibit either a high risk of bias or have reporting flaws that hinder assessment of their true validity (unclear risk of bias). Research regarding R. rosea efficacy is contradictory. While some evidence suggests that the herb may be helpful for enhancing physical performance and alleviating mental fatigue, methodological flaws limit accurate assessment of efficacy. A rigorously-designed well reported RCT that minimizes bias is needed to determine true efficacy of R. rosea for fatigue.

  19. The ABC transporter ABCG29 is involved in H2O2 tolerance and biocontrol traits in the fungus Clonostachys rosea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Mukesh; Jensen, Dan Funck; Karlsson, Magnus

    2016-04-01

    For successful biocontrol interactions, biological control organisms must tolerate toxic metabolites produced by themselves or plant pathogens during mycoparasitic/antagonistic interactions, by host plant during colonization of the plant, and xenobiotics present in the environment. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters can play a significant role in tolerance of toxic compounds by mediating active transport across the cellular membrane. This paper reports on functional characterization of an ABC transporter ABCG29 in the biocontrol fungus Clonostachys rosea strain IK726. Gene expression analysis showed induced expression of abcG29 during exposure to the Fusarium spp. mycotoxin zearalenone (ZEA) and the fungicides Cantus, Chipco Green and Apron. Expression of abcG29 in C. rosea was significantly higher during C. rosea-C. rosea (Cr-Cr) interaction or in exposure to C. rosea culture filtrate for 2 h, compared to interaction with Fusarium graminearum or 2 h exposure to F. graminearum culture filtrate. In contrast with gene expression data, ΔabcG29 strains did not display reduced tolerance towards ZEA, fungicides or chemical agents known for inducing oxidative, cell wall or osmotic stress, compared to C. rosea WT. The exception was a significant reduction in tolerance to H2O2 (10 mM) in ΔabcG29 strains when conidia were used as an inoculum. The antagonistic ability of ΔabcG29 strains towards F. graminearum, Fusarium oxysporum or Botrytis cinerea in dual plate assays were not different compared with WT. However, in biocontrol assays ΔabcG29 strains displayed reduced ability to protect Arabidopsis thaliana leaves from B. cinerea, and barley seedling from F. graminearum as measured by an A. thaliana detached leaf assay and a barley foot rot disease assay, respectively. These data show that the ABCG29 is dispensable for ZEA and fungicides tolerance, and antagonism but not H2O2 tolerance and biocontrol effects in C. rosea.

  20. Rhodiola rosea L. as a putative botanical antidepressant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amsterdam, Jay D; Panossian, Alexander G

    2016-06-15

    Rhodiola rosea (R. rosea) is a botanical adaptogen with putative anti-stress and antidepressant properties. Evidence-based data supporting the effectiveness of R. rosea for depression in adults is limited, and therefore a comprehensive review of available animal and human studies suggesting a putative antidepressant action is warranted. A review of the literature was undertaken to ascertain studies of possible antidepressant mechanisms of action and studies of the safety and effectiveness of R. rosea extracts in animals and adult humans. A search of MEDLINE and the Russian state library database was conducted (up to October 2015) on R. rosea. R. rosea extracts and its purified constituent, salidroside, has been shown to produce a variety of mediator interactions with several molecular networks of neuroendocrine-immune and neurotransmitter receptor systems likely to be involved in the pathophysiology of depression. A wide variety of preclinical in vivo and ex vivo studies with laboratory animals suggests the presence of several biochemical and pharmacological antidepressant-like actions. Clinical assessment of R. rosea L. rhizome extracts in humans with various depressive syndromes is based upon results from two randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials of 146 subjects with major depressive disorder and seven open-label studies totaling 714 individuals with stress-induced mild depression (diagnosed as asthenic syndrome or psychoneurosis). Overall, results of these studies suggests a possible antidepressant action for R. rosea extract in adult humans. In contrast to most conventional antidepressants, R. rosea extract appears to be well-tolerated in short-term studies with a favorable safety profile. R. rosea demonstrates multi-target effects on various levels of the regulation of cell response to stress, affecting various components of the neuroendocrine, neurotransmitter receptor and molecular networks associated with possible beneficial effects on mood

  1. Anti-Fatigue Effects of Fermented Rhodiola rosea Extract in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Dong-Zhou; Hong, Hee-Do; Kim, Kyung-Im; CHOI, Sang Yoon

    2015-01-01

    Rhodiola rosea is a perennial plant which grows in the alpine regions of Europe and Asia. Although the protective effects of R. rosea extract from fatigue due to exercise stress have been reported, studies on fermented R. rosea extract remain insufficient to date. Therefore, this study was conducted to examine the protective effects of fermented R. rosea extract against fatigue and exercise stress. As a result, fermented R. rosea extract was found to significantly increase swimming time, hepa...

  2. Panax ginseng, Rhodiola rosea and Schisandra chinensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Shun-Wan

    2012-03-01

    Panax ginseng (Ginseng), Rhodiola rosea (Hong Jing Tian) and Schisandra chinensis (Wu Wei Zi) are well-known herbs in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). Recently, there have been a number of studies on these three herbs. This review discusses their active components and major pharmacological effects. For P. ginseng, it has been shown to have an anti-inflammatory activity, affects pulmonary function and erectile dysfunction, improves cognition in patients with Alzheimer's disease and promotes sexual arousal in menopausal women as well as prevents cancer. For R. rosea, its effectiveness in alleviating depression and reducing fatigue is summarized in this review. Additionally, anti-cancer and other clinical effects of S. chinensis are also discussed. These three herbs are considered as adaptogens as they bear multiple functions and their effects were found to be very different in patients depending on the circumstances (age, gender, environment, diet, season, etc.). Thus, in most cases, the art of the TCM practitioner is to prescribe these herbs after a complete evaluation of overall heath status of the patients.

  3. Transaldolase gene Tal67 enhances the biocontrol activity of Clonostachys rosea 67-1 against Sclerotinia sclerotiorum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing-Yu; Li, Shi-Dong; Sun, Man-Hong

    2016-06-03

    Clonostachys rosea is a promising biocontrol agent that parasitizes various fungal plant pathogens. In this paper, transaldolase gene Tal67 was found to be greatly upregulated in C. rosea isolate 67-1 during mycoparasitism of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum sclerotia. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed a significant increase in expression at 0-48 h after induction by sclerotia, and the level peaked at 13.9-fold higher than the control at 24 h. Gene disruption led to a decrease in the growth rate of the Tal67-deficient strain ΔTal67 to 5.3 mm/day, which was much lower than the wild type and the complemented strain ΔTal67+ (P sclerotiorum decreased by 24.6%. However, reinsertion of the transaldolase gene recovered the fungicidal activity of C. rosea. The efficacy of the mutants against soybean Sclerotinia stem rot was evaluated in the greenhouse, and the control efficiency of isolate 67-1 reached 65.3%, while the efficiency of the ΔTal67 strain decreased sharply to 17.8%, and the complemented strain ΔTal67+ recovered to 64.8%. These results suggest that Tal67 plays an important role in the growth and biocontrol activity of C. rosea. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Zearalenone detoxification by zearalenone hydrolase is important for the antagonistic ability of Clonostachys rosea against mycotoxigenic Fusarium graminearum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kosawang, Chatchai; Karlsson, Magnus; Vélëz, Heriberto

    2014-01-01

    The fungus Clonostachys rosea is antagonistic against plant pathogens, including Fusarium graminearum, which produces the oestrogenic mycotoxin zearalenone (ZEA). ZEA inhibits other fungi, and C. rosea can detoxify ZEA through the enzyme zearalenone lactonohydrolase (ZHD101). As the relevance...... of ZEA detoxification for biocontrol is unknown, we studied regulation and function of ZHD101 in C. rosea. Quantitative reverse-transcription PCR revealed zhd101 gene expression in all conditions studied and demonstrated dose-dependent induction by ZEA. Known inducers of the Polyketide Synthase pathway...... did not induce zhd101 expression, suggesting specificity of the enzyme towards ZEA. To assess the role of ZHD101 during biocontrol interactions, we generated two Δzhd101 mutants incapable of ZEA-detoxification and confirmed their defect in degrading ZEA by HPLC. The Δzhd101 mutants displayed a lower...

  5. An Atypical Case of Pityriasis Rosea Gigantea after Influenza Vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios Papakostas

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Pityriasis rosea is a common erythematosquamous eruption, typically presenting along the cleavage lines of the skin. A wide spectrum of atypical manifestations may challenge even the most experienced physician. Here we report a rare case of a suberythrodermic pityriasis rosea with gigantic plaques after an influenza vaccination, and we discuss the possible triggers of atypical manifestations of such a common dermatological disease in the setting of an altered immunity.

  6. Rhodiola rosea L. and Alzheimer's Disease: From Farm to Pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabavi, Seyed Fazel; Braidy, Nady; Orhan, Ilkay Erdogan; Badiee, Arash; Daglia, Maria; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad

    2016-04-01

    Rhodiola rosea L. (roseroot) is a common member of the family Crassulaceae, known as one of the most important popular medicinal plants in the northern region of Europe. The roots of R. rosea possess a wide range of pharmacological activities such as antioxidant, antiinflammatory, anticancer, cardioprotective, and neuroprotective effects that are because of the presence of different phytochemicals such as phenols and flavonoids. In addition, the presence of salidroside, rosavins, and p-tyrosol are responsible for its beneficial effects for the treatment of on depression, fatigue, and cognitive dysfunction. A plethora of studies report that R. rosea has potent neuroprotective effects through the suppression of oxidative stress, neuroinflammation, and excitotoxicity in brain tissues and antagonism of oncogenic p21-activated kinase. However, to our knowledge, no review articles have been published addressing the neuroprotective effects of R. rosea. Therefore, the present article aims at critically reviewing the available literature on the beneficial effects of R. rosea on as a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative diseases where oxidative stress plays a major role in disease development and progression. We also discuss the cultivation, phytochemistry, clinical impacts, and adverse effects of R. rosea to provide a broader insight on the therapeutic potential for this plant. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Gestational Pityriasis Rosea: Suggestions for Approaching Affected Pregnant Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monastirli, Alexandra; Pasmatzi, Efstathia; Badavanis, George; Tsambaos, Dionysios

    2016-12-01

    Dear Editor, Pityriasis rosea is a common, acute, and self-limiting dermatosis, which is associated with the endogenous systemic reactivation of human herpesvirus (HHV)-6 and/or HHV-7 (1). It predominantly affects individuals of both sexes in their second or third decade of life and is clinically characterized by the occurrence of an initial erythematosquamous plaque followed by the appearance of disseminated similar but smaller lesions one or two weeks later. Several patients develop systemic symptoms such as nausea, anorexia, malaise, headache, fever, arthralgia, and lymphadenopathy that may precede or accompany the eruption; the latter follows the cleavage lines of the trunk creating the configuration of a Christmas tree and spontaneously resolves within 4 to 8 weeks. Mainly based on the nature of the underlying viral reactivation, pityriasis rosea is classified into five different forms (2): 1) Classic and 2) Relapsing (characterized by sporadic and relapsing HHV-6/7 systemic reactivation, respectively), 3) Persistent (persistence of HHV-6/7 viremia), 4) Pediatric (longer activity of HHV-6/7 infection; recent primary infection) and 5) Gestational (HHV-6/7 reactivation and possible intrauterine transmission). Clearly, the inevitable impairment of immune response in pregnancy favors viral reactivation and possibly also the intrauterine transmission of HHV-6/7. Indeed, it is well known and documented that pityriasis rosea more frequently occurs in pregnant women (18%) as compared to the general population (6%) (3). However, the literature concerning the possible effect of pityriasis rosea on the outcome of pregnancy is surprisingly sparse. Only an Italian group, Drago et al (4,5), has systematically investigated the impact of this disorder on pregnant women. They found that 22 out of 61 women (36%) who developed pityriasis rosea during pregnancy had unfavorable outcomes, whereas 8 others miscarried (13%). None of the latter had any risk factors, other than

  8. Characterization of the anxiolytic activity of Nunavik Rhodiola rosea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cayer, Christian; Ahmed, Fida; Filion, Vicky; Saleem, Ammar; Cuerrier, Alain; Allard, Marc; Rochefort, Guy; Merali, Zul; Arnason, John T

    2013-10-01

    Rhodiola rosea is a medicinal plant used by the indigenous Inuit people of Nunavik and Nunatsiavut, Eastern Canada, as a mental and physical rejuvenating agent. This traditional use led to the present investigation of R. rosea in the context of anxiety disorders. An alcohol extract of R. rosea roots was characterized phytochemically and orally administered for three consecutive days to Sprague-Dawley rats at 8 mg/kg, 25 mg/kg, and 75 mg/kg body weight. The rats were subjected to three behavioral paradigms of anxiety, including the elevated plus maze, social interaction, and contextual conditioned emotional response tests. Rhodiola rosea showed dose-dependent anxiolytic activity in the elevated plus maze and conditioned emotional response tests, with moderate effects in the higher-anxiety SI test. The active dose varied according to the anxiety test. In order to elucidate a mechanism, the extract was further tested in an in vitro GABAA-benzodiazepine receptor-binding assay, where it demonstrated low activity. This study provides the first comparative assessment of the anxiolytic activity of Nunavik R. rosea in several behaviour models and suggests that anxiolytic effects may be primarily mediated via pathways other than the GABAA-benzodiazepine site of the GABAA receptor. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. Anti-Fatigue Effects of Fermented Rhodiola rosea Extract in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Dong-Zhou; Hong, Hee-Do; Kim, Kyung-Im; Choi, Sang Yoon

    2015-01-01

    Rhodiola rosea is a perennial plant which grows in the alpine regions of Europe and Asia. Although the protective effects of R. rosea extract from fatigue due to exercise stress have been reported, studies on fermented R. rosea extract remain insufficient to date. Therefore, this study was conducted to examine the protective effects of fermented R. rosea extract against fatigue and exercise stress. As a result, fermented R. rosea extract was found to significantly increase swimming time, hepatic superoxide dismutase content, and serum lactate dehydrogenase in mice, while decreasing serum blood urea nitrogen content compared to R. rosea extract. Given the above results, it is considered that fermented R. rosea extract effectively protects against fatigue caused by strenuous exercise. PMID:25866748

  10. Anti-Fatigue Effects of Fermented Rhodiola rosea Extract in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Dong-Zhou; Hong, Hee-Do; Kim, Kyung-Im; Choi, Sang Yoon

    2015-03-01

    Rhodiola rosea is a perennial plant which grows in the alpine regions of Europe and Asia. Although the protective effects of R. rosea extract from fatigue due to exercise stress have been reported, studies on fermented R. rosea extract remain insufficient to date. Therefore, this study was conducted to examine the protective effects of fermented R. rosea extract against fatigue and exercise stress. As a result, fermented R. rosea extract was found to significantly increase swimming time, hepatic superoxide dismutase content, and serum lactate dehydrogenase in mice, while decreasing serum blood urea nitrogen content compared to R. rosea extract. Given the above results, it is considered that fermented R. rosea extract effectively protects against fatigue caused by strenuous exercise.

  11. Rhodiola rosea suppresses thymus T-lymphocyte apoptosis by downregulating tumor necrosis factor-α-induced protein 8-like-2 in septic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ming-Wei; Su, Mei-Xian; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Lin-Ming; Wang, Yun-Hui; Qian, Chuan-Yun

    2015-08-01

    In recent years, several studies have shown that Rhodiola rosea can enhance cellular immunity and humoral immune function in mice, and thus, it has become a research hotspot. However, its underlying mechanism of action has remained elusive. The present study investigated whether Rhodiola rosea was able to downregulate the expression of tumor necrosis factor-α-inducible protein 8-like 2 (TIPE2), thereby inhibiting the expression of apoptotic genes, attenuating T-lymphocyte apoptosis and improving immunity in septic mice. A mouse model of caecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-induced sepsis was established, and animals in the treatment group were pre-treated with an intraperitoneal injection of Rhodiola rosea extract, while animals in the control group and sham-operated group were injected with an equivalent amount of normal saline. TIPE2, B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), Fas and Fas ligand (FasL) mRNA and protein levels in thymic T cells were determined using reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis, respectively. Furthermore, the thymus T-lymphocyte apoptosis rate, thymus T-lymphocyte count and thymus T-lymphocyte sub-sets were assessed using flow cytometry. Levels of T-helper cell type 1 (Th1) cytokines [Interleukin (IL)-2, IL-12 and interferon (IFN)-γ] and Th2 cytokines (IL-4 and IL-10) were determined using ELISA. The results showed that, compared to that in the CLP group, the expression of TIPE2, Fas and FasL in the treatment group was significantly decreased, while the expression of Bcl-2 was increased (PRhodiola rosea rescued decreased in the counts of the CD3(+) T and CD4(+) T sub-sets of thymus T lymphocytes in the CLP group (PRhodiola rosea led to further increases. The thymus index of septic mice treated with Rhodiola rosea as well as their survival rate were improved as compared with those in the CLP group. These findings suggested that Rhodiola rosea has protective effects against sepsis by decreasing apoptosis

  12. Pharmacokinetic interaction between losartan and Rhodiola rosea in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanakis, M; Vizirianakis, I S; Batzias, G; Niopas, I

    2013-01-01

    The study investigates the potential interaction of the herbal medicinal product of Rhodiola rosea on the pharmacokinetics of losartan and its active metabolite EXP3174 after concurrent oral administration to rabbits. We conducted a randomized, single-dose, two-treatment, two-period, two-sequence, cross-over pharmacokinetic study on 6 healthy female New Zealand rabbits, after concurrent oral administration of losartan (5 mg/kg) and the herbal medicinal product of R. rosea (50 mg/kg). Quantification of losartan and its main active metabolite EXP3174 was achieved using a validated HPCL/UV method. Pharmacokinetic and statistical analysis was performed using the EquivTest/PK software. Administration of the herbal medicinal product of R. rosea resulted in a statistically significant increase of the following pharmacokinetic parameters for losartan: the maximum plasma concentration (C(max)), the area under the curve (AUC) and the apparent total body clearance (CL/F). An almost 2-fold increase in the AUC of losartan was observed after concurrent administration of the herbal medicinal product of R. rosea. No statistically significant alteration was observed in the pharmacokinetic parameters of the active metabolite of losartan EXP3174. The data of this study suggest that R. rosea significantly alters the pharmacokinetic properties of losartan after concurrent oral administration to rabbits. A study in humans should be conducted to assess the clinical significance of a possible herb-drug interaction between the herbal medicinal products of R. rosea and drugs such as losartan, which are substrates of both CYPs and P-gp. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Rhodiola rosea L extract shows protective activity against ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the protective effect of Rhodiola rosea L. extract (RRLE) against Alzheimer's disease in 3xTg-AD mice. Methods: The cognitive function of 3xTg-AD mice was assessed using Morris water maze test. The levels of amyloid beta deposits and NeuN in the hippocampus were evaluated by.

  14. Wound healing properties of stem bark extract of Tabebuia rosea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The wound healing properties of the methanol stem bark extract of Tabebuia rosea (Bignoniaceae) were evaluated in rats using the excision wound model. Extraction of the powdered plant material by continuous extraction in a soxhlet afforded 5.73% w/w of the Tabebuia methanol extract (TME). Phytochemical analysis and ...

  15. [The interaction of Rhodiola rosea and antidepressants. A case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maniscalco, Ignazio; Toffol, Elda; Giupponi, Giancarlo; Conca, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Rhodiola rosea (Russian Rhodiola/Golden Root) is a high mountain plant from the arctic regions of Europe and Asia which has the active substance phenylpropanoide. It has sedative, anti-depressive, drive-enhancing and stress-modulated properties stimulating the distribution of dopamine and serotonin; in combination with other drugs, an increase of side effects and risk profile has to be expected. A case report is presented in order to illustrate the interaction between Rhodiola rosea and antidepressants. We report the case of a 68-year-old female patient with recurrent moderate depressive disorder with somatic syndrome (ICD-10 F33.11) who developed vegetative syndrome, restlessness feeling and trembling since she began to ingest Rhodiola rosea in addition to paroxetine. Prescribing Rhodiola rosea with paroxetine, pharmacokinetic and -dynamic interactions have to be assumed. The symptoms of the patient can be interpreted as a serotonergic syndrome. Because of its different effects, the plant is widely used. An increase of clinical relevant risks should be considered in the add-on treatments.

  16. Rhodiola rosea L extract shows protective activity against ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the protective effect of Rhodiola rosea L. extract (RRLE) against Alzheimer's disease in 3xTg-AD mice. Methods: The cognitive function of 3xTg-AD mice was assessed using Morris water maze test. The levels of amyloid beta deposits and NeuN in the hippocampus were evaluated by ...

  17. The authenticity and quality of Rhodiola rosea products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booker, Anthony; Jalil, Banaz; Frommenwiler, Debora; Reich, Eike; Zhai, Lixiang; Kulic, Zarko; Heinrich, Michael

    2016-06-15

    Rhodiola rosea L. Crassulaceae, root (Golden Root, Arctic Root) is a high-value herbal medicinal product, registered in the UK for the treatment of stress-induced fatigue, exhaustion and anxiety based on traditional use and used throughout Europe as a herbal medicinal product for similar indications. Numerous unregistered supplements are also available. There are several Chinese species used in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), including Rhodiola crenulata (Hook.f. & Thomoson) that is believed to be a common adulterant in the R. rosea value chain. The project is embedded in a larger study aiming to investigate the diverse value chains that lead to the production of R. rosea as an herbal medicinal product or supplement. Here we focus on a comparison of the quality of the finished products and assess any phytochemical variation between products registered under the Traditional Herbal Medicine Products Directive (THMPD) and products obtained from the market without any registration (i.e. generally unlicensed supplements). Our key aim is to establish the extent of the problem in terms of adulteration of consumer products claiming to contain R. rosea (or R. crenulata). Approximately 40 commercial products (granulated powders and extracts) were sourced from different suppliers. We analysed these samples using high performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC), mass spectrometry (MS) and (1)H NMR spectroscopy coupled with multi-variate analysis software following a method previously developed by our group for the analysis of turmeric products. We investigate the phytochemistry of the different species and assess the potential of R. crenulata as an adulterant at the end of the R. rosea value chains. The consistency of the products varies significantly. Approximately one fifth of commercial products that claimed to be R. rosea did not contain rosavin (the key reference markers used to distinguish R. rosea from related species). Moreover some products appeared not to

  18. Insights on the evolution of mycoparasitism from the genome of Clonostachys rosea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, Magnus; Durling, Mikael Brandström; Choi, Jaeyoung

    2015-01-01

    lifestyle. The genome of C. rosea is estimated to 58.3 Mbp, and contains 14268 predicted genes. A phylogenomic analysis shows that C. rosea clusters as sister taxon to plant pathogenic Fusarium species, with mycoparasitic/saprotrophic Trichoderma species in an ancestral position. A comparative analysis......Clonostachys rosea is a mycoparasitic fungus that can control several important plant diseases. Here we report on the genome sequencing of C. rosea and a comparative genome analysis, in order to resolve the phylogenetic placement of C. rosea and to study the evolution of mycoparasitism as a fungal......, the fungicide Boscalid or metabolites from the biocontrol bacterium Pseudomonas chlororaphis. The data suggests that tolerance towards secondary metabolites is a prominent feature in the biology of C. rosea....

  19. RHODIOLA ROSEA: STATUS OF RESEARCH AND POSSIBILITIES FOR COSMECEUTICAL AND DERMATOLOGICAL DRUGS PRODUCTION

    OpenAIRE

    E. F. Stepanova; B. Shirzad; S. B. Evseeva

    2016-01-01

    Rhodiola rosea is one of the most popular adaptogene agents. Apart from adaptogene, it has the whole range of other pharmaceutical properties: antioxidant, nootropic, antidepressant, immunomodulatory, and other. Russian industry manufactures liquid extract of Rhodiola rosea, as well as food BAS based on the Rhodiola rosea, but there are no dosage forms for external use.The purpose of this work is to analyze scientific information about general characteristics of the pharmacological activity a...

  20. Nomenclature of drug-induced pityriasis rosea-like rashes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuh AAT

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Antonio AT Chuh1Prince of Wales Hospital, Hospital Authority, 2The Jockey Club School of Public Health and Primary Care, Faculty of Medicine, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, Hong KongI read with admiration an article published in your prestigious journal on the rare adverse effects of clozapine (CLZ.1I write to address a specific issue in this article. In the second paragraph of the section “Dermatological adverse effects”, it was stated that a 54-year-old patient with schizophrenia treated for 28 days with CLZ developed a generalized rash compatible with pityriasis rosea (skin rash that usually begins as one large circular or oval spot on your chest, abdomen, or back.I wish to point out certain problems for coining pityriasis rosea (PR as the diagnostic label in the patient concerned.View original paper by De Fazio and colleagues.

  1. Rhodiola rosea in vitro culture - phytochemical analysis and antioxidant action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirosława Furmanowa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Various Rhodiola rosea organs and tissues from in vitro culture were studied in two areas: searching for the biological active four phenolic compounds and measurement of antioxidant activity of dry residues of EtOH-extracts soluble in PBS using chemiluminescence method. For phytochemical investigation HPLC method was used. Salidroside was typical for organs of intact plant, rosavin for roots of different origin and shoots of intact plants, triandrin was more typical for tissue cultured in vitro, but it was found in all studied samples. Caffeic acid was detected mainly in green and yellow lines of callus, less in other Rhodiola rosea plant material. The highest antioxidant activity showed the extract from 1,5-years-old callus of green and yellow line, which contained caffeic acid and triandrin. Further observations are in progress.

  2. Prevention of torsion-induced testicular injury by Rhodiola rosea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uyeturk, Ugur; Terzi, E Hakan; Gucuk, Adnan; Kemahli, Eray; Ozturk, Hayrettin; Tosun, Mehmet

    2013-07-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of Rhodiola rosea (R. rose) extract in terms of preventing tissue injury induced by testicular torsion and subsequent ischemia/reperfusion (I/R). Twenty-one Wistar albino male rats were divided into 3 groups: group 1 = control group, group 2 = I/R group, and group 3 = I/R + extract group. After 2 hours of ischemia and 4 hours of reperfusion, testes were removed and evaluated histologically by hematoxylin and eosin staining. Apoptosis in spermatogonial cells of seminiferous tubules was determined by transferase biotin-2'-deoxyuridine, 5'-triphosphate nick end labeling (TUNEL). To assess oxidative damage, serum malondialdehyde (MDA) and glutathione (GSH) levels were measured. Median MDA and GSH levels were, respectively, 12 ± 3 pmol/mL and 24.8 ± 3.8 μM in group 1, 38 ± 11 pmol/mL and 10.3 ± 1.7 μM in group 2, and 19 ± 5 pmol/mL and 17.6 ± 1.3 μM in group 3 (P rosea extract was shown to have partially preventive effects on testicular injury induced by torsion in this rat model. The mechanism by which R. rosea extract cause these effects merits further investigation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Monoamine oxidase inhibition by Rhodiola rosea L. roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Diermen, Daphne; Marston, Andrew; Bravo, Juan; Reist, Marianne; Carrupt, Pierre-Alain; Hostettmann, Kurt

    2009-03-18

    Rhodiola rosea L. (Crassulaceae) is traditionally used in Eastern Europe and Asia to stimulate the nervous system, enhance physical and mental performance, treat fatigue, psychological stress and depression. In order to investigate the influence of Rhodiola rosea L. roots on mood disorders, three extracts were tested against monoamine oxidases (MAOs A and B) in a microtitre plate bioassay. Methanol and water extracts gave the highest inhibitory activity against MAOs. Twelve compounds were then isolated by bioassay-guided fractionation using chromatographic methods. The structures were determined by 1H, 13C NMR and HR-MS. The methanol and water extracts exhibited respectively inhibitions of 92.5% and 84.3% on MAO A and 81.8% and 88.9% on MAO B, at a concentration of 100 microg/ml. The most active compound (rosiridin) presented an inhibition over 80% on MAO B at a concentration of 10(-5) M (pIC50=5.38+/-0.05). The present investigation demonstrates that Rhodiola rosea L. roots have potent anti-depressant activity by inhibiting MAO A and may also find application in the control of senile dementia by their inhibition of MAO B.

  4. Melitofilia em Canavalia rosea (Sw. DC. (Leguminosae-Papilionoideae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Verçoza

    2010-11-01

    Abstract. This work aimed to study the floral biology and the pollination’s ecology of Canavalia rosea (Sw. DC. (Leguminosae-Papilionoideae by bees in the sandbank vegetation of the Grumari Environmental Protection Area (EPA , located in the western zone of Rio de Janeiro’s city. The study was developed between the months of June of 2008 to June of 2009. Sampling on morphology, color and odor of the flowers of the species were made. The number of open flowers per day in each individual was recorded, as well as the opening steps, determining the period of anthesis. The occurrence of floral visitors was recorded through the observation of the visit’s time, of the adaptability for pollination, of the ease of access to the reward and of the intra-floral behavior played. C. rosea occurs in psamophily communities and in post-beach sandbank of Grumari’s EPA. It presents typical characteristics of mellitophily (pollination by bees and the flowers are pollinated by Xylocopa frontalis Oliver. It also receives visits from Tetragonisca angustula Latreille, Trigona spinipes Fabricius and Apis mellifera Linnaeus, which collects pollen without pollinating the flowers. X. frontalis proved to be the only effective pollinator of C. rosea in the Grumari sandbank, making the plant directly dependent on this species for fruit and seed’s production in this location.

  5. Immune-Stimulatory Effects of Althaea rosea Flower Extracts through the MAPK Signaling Pathway in RAW264.7 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yon-Suk Kim

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Althaea rosea (Linn. is a medicinal plant from China and Korea that has been traditionally used to control inflammation, to stop bedwetting and as a mouthwash in cases of bleeding gums. Its flowers are employed medicinally for their emollient, demulcent and diuretic properties, which make them useful in chest complaints. Furthermore, a flower extract decoction is used to improve blood circulation, for the treatment of constipation, dysmenorrhoea, haemorrhages, etc. However, the possible mechanisms of the immune-stimulatory effect remains to be elucidated. Therefore, we investigated the role of Althaea rosea flower (ARF extracts in the immune-stimulatory effect of macrophages and the underlying mechanisms of action. ARF water extract (ARFW could dose-dependently increase NO production and cytokines (IL-6 and TNF-α. We also found that ARFW significantly increased the expression of iNOS and COX-2 proteins in RAW264.7 cells. Consistent with these results, MAPK protein (JNK, ERK, p38 expression levels were induced after treatment with ARFW. Additionally, ARFW showed a marked increase in the phosphorylation level of IκBα and subsequent IκBα degradation allowing NF-κB nuclear translocation. These results suggest that the immune-stimulatory effect of A. rosea flower extracts is mediated through the translocation of NF-κB p65 subunit into the nucleus from the cytoplasm and subsequent activation of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-6 and TNF-α and other mediators (iNOS and COX-2, which occurs mainly through MAPK signalling pathway. Thus, we suggest that ARFW could be considered as a potential therapeutic agent useful in the development of immune-stimulatory compounds.

  6. The effects of an acute dose of Rhodiola rosea on endurance exercise performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noreen, Eric E; Buckley, James G; Lewis, Stephanie L; Brandauer, Josef; Stuempfle, Kristin J

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of an acute oral dose of 3 mg·kg(-1) of Rhodiola rosea on endurance exercise performance, perceived exertion, mood, and cognitive function. Subjects (n = 18) ingested either R. rosea or a carbohydrate placebo 1 hour before testing in a double-blind, random crossover manner. Exercise testing consisted of a standardized 10-minute warm-up followed by a 6-mile time trial (TT) on a bicycle ergometer. Rating of perceived exertion (RPE) was measured every 5 minutes during the TT using a 10-point Borg scale. Blood lactate concentration, salivary cortisol, and salivary alpha amylase were measured before warm-up, 2 minutes after warm-up, and 2 minutes after TT (n = 15). A Profile of Mood States questionnaire and a Stroop Color Test were completed before warm-up and after TT. Testing was repeated 2-7 days later with the other condition. Rhodiola rosea ingestion significantly decreased heart rate during the standardized warm-up (R. rosea = 136 ± 17 b·min(-1); placebo = 140 ± 17 b·min(-1); mean ± SD; p = 0.001). Subjects completed the TT significantly faster after R. rosea ingestion (R. rosea = 25.4 ± 2.7 minutes; placebo = 25.8 ± 3.0 minutes; p = 0.037). The mean RPE was lower in the R. rosea trial (R. rosea = 6.0 ± 0.9; placebo = 6.6 ± 1.0; p = 0.04). This difference was even more pronounced when a ratio of the RPE relative to the workload was calculated (R. rosea = 0.048 ± 0.01; placebo = 0.057 ± 0.02; p = 0.007). No other statistically significant differences were observed. Acute R. rosea ingestion decreases heart rate response to submaximal exercise and appears to improve endurance exercise performance by decreasing the perception of effort.

  7. Potent in vitro inhibition of CYP3A4 and P-glycoprotein by Rhodiola rosea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellum, Bent H; Tosse, Anita; Hoybakk, Kathrine; Thomsen, Mette; Rohloff, Jens; Georg Nilsen, Odd

    2010-03-01

    Six clones of RHODIOLA ROSEA, obtained from plants originating from widely different areas in Norway, were investigated for their IN VITRO inhibitory potential on CYP3A4-mediated metabolism and P-gp efflux transport activity. Presumed active constituents in the ethanol extracts of the different clones were quantified. C-DNA baculovirus expressed CYP3A4 and Caco-2 cells were used for inhibitory assays, and as positive control inhibitors ketoconazole and verapamil were applied, respectively. A validated HPLC methodology was used to quantify the formation of 6-beta-OH-testosterone and scintillation counting was used to quantify the transport of (3)H-digoxin in Caco-2 cells. All clones showed potent inhibition of CYP3A4 and P-gp activities, with IC (50) values ranging from 1.7 to 3.1 microg/mL and from 16.7 to 51.7 microg/mL, respectively, being below that reported for other herbs and some known classic drug inhibitors, such as St. John's wort and fluoxetine. RHODIOLA ROSEA might thus be a candidate for clinically relevant drug interactions. The concentration of presumed biologically active constituents in the different clones varied considerably, but this variation was not related to the clones' inhibitory potential on CYP3A4 or P-gp activities. Other constituents might thus be responsible for the observed inhibitory properties. The place of origin seemed to be of minor importance for CYP3A4 or P-gp inhibition. Copyright Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart New York.

  8. Rhodiola rosea L. extract and its active compound salidroside antagonized both induction and reinstatement of nicotine place preference in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titomanlio, Federica; Perfumi, Marina; Mattioli, Laura

    2014-05-01

    Conventional pharmacological treatments for drug addiction aim to reduce three most important aspects: withdrawal syndrome, craving, and relapse. Pharmacological treatments currently available for the treatment of tobacco smoking are able to alleviate withdrawal symptoms but are not sufficiently effective in reducing craving and rarely effective to prevent relapse. Rhodiola rosea L., a well-known traditional oriental medicine with anxiolytic, antidepressive, antistress, and adaptogenic properties, has been recently shown to be effective in the prevention and treatment of nicotine-withdrawal symptoms. The present study used the conditioned place preference (CPP) model to systematically investigate, in mice, the effects of a R. rosea L. extract (RHO) and its active compound salidroside (SDS), on the reinforcing properties of nicotine and their efficacy in the vulnerability to reinstatement. To study the effects on the rewarding properties of nicotine, RHO (10, 15, and 20 mg/kg) and SDS (0.2 mg/kg) were tested both in the acquisition and expression of CPP induced by nicotine injection (0.5 mg/kg). Moreover, the efficacy of RHO and SDS in preventing relapse induced by nicotine priming (0.1 mg/kg, s.c.) and by restraint stress was also evaluated. Results showed the ability of RHO and salidroside to significantly reduce the rewarding properties of nicotine at all doses tested. RHO and SDS also suppressed both priming- and stress-induced reinstatement of CPP. The present study showed the positive effects of R. rosea L. in reducing rewarding properties and preventing relapse to nicotine and evidenced the important role of salidroside in the effects of the extract.

  9. Brain abscess by Kocuria rosea: Case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Esteban Muñoz Montoya

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Brain abscess is one of the most serious complications of head and neck infections (Tunkel, 2010 [1]. Defined as a focal intracranial infection that is initiated as an area of cerebritis and evolves into a collection of pus surrounded by a vascularized capsule (Tunkel and Scheld, 2011 [2]. The infectious agents depend on the pathogenesis of the infection and the presence of various predisposing conditions, however, in general: Streptococcus sp. is the most frequent microorganism (Tunkel and Scheld, 2011 [2]: Greenberg, 2010 [3]. In this article we report a case of brain abscess caused by Kocuria rosea, an entity that has not been reported previously in literature.

  10. Pityriasis rosea-like eruptions due to mustard oil application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zawar Vijay

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A young man employed in a construction company, presented with cutaneous lesions clinically simulating pityriasis rosea. Satisfactory and complete response to corticosteroids and antihistamines was followed by recurrence. Multiple recurrences within a short span of time arose a suspicion of alternative diagnosis. Site visit helped us to rule out occupational contact dermatitis. Further history taking revealed that he was recently using mustard oil for body massage. Subsequent patch testing confirmed contact hypersensitivity to mustard oil. Avoidance of the contact with mustard oil arrested appearance of further skin lesions. We stress the importance of taking a good history in clinical practice in disclosing a possible contactant.

  11. Rhodiola rosea versus sertraline for major depressive disorder: A randomized placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Jun J; Xie, Sharon X; Zee, Jarcy; Soeller, Irene; Li, Qing S; Rockwell, Kenneth; Amsterdam, Jay D

    2015-03-15

    We performed a proof of concept trial to evaluate relative safety and efficacy of Rhodiola rosea (R. rosea) versus sertraline for mild to moderate major depressive disorder. We hypothesize that R. rosea would have similar therapeutic effects as sertraline but with less adverse events. Phase II randomized placebo controlled clinical trial. 57 subjects were randomized to 12 weeks of standardized R. rosea extract, sertraline, or placebo. Changes over time in Hamilton Depression Rating (HAM-D), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and Clinical Global Impression Change (CGI/C) scores among groups were examined using mixed-effects models. Modest, albeit statistically non-significant, reductions were observed for HAM-D, BDI, and CGI/C scores for all treatment conditions with no significant difference between groups (p = 0.79, p = 0.28, and p = 0.17, respectively). The decline in HAM-D scores was greater for sertraline (-8.2, 95% confidence interval [CI], -12.7 to -3.6) versus R. rosea (-5.1, 95% CI: -8.8 to -1.3) and placebo (-4.6, 95% CI: -8.6 to -0.6). While the odds of improving (versus placebo) were greater for sertraline (1.90 [0.44-8.20]; odds ratio [95% CI]) than R. rosea (1.39 [0.38-5.04]), more subjects on sertraline reported adverse events (63.2%) than R. rosea (30.0%) or placebo (16.7%) (p = 0.012). Although R. rosea produced less antidepressant effect versus sertraline, it also resulted in significantly fewer adverse events and was better tolerated. These findings suggest that R. rosea, although less effective than sertraline, may possess a more favorable risk to benefit ratio for individuals with mild to moderate depression. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. Antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of Rhodiola rosea L. extract in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doncheva, Nina D; Mihaylova, Anita St; Getova, Damianka P

    2013-01-01

    Rhodiola rosea (golden root) is a unique phytoadaptagen with immunomodulatory, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive activity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of the alcohol/water extract of Rhodiola rosea roots in rats. Thirty male Wistar rats were used in the study. They were divided in 3 groups (n = 10), treated respectively with saline (controls), Rhodiola rosea extract 50 mg/kg bw and 100 mg/kg bw orally. The antinociceptive effect was evaluated using the hot-plate test, Randall-Sellito test and the formalin test. The hot-plate test evaluates the reaction time of rats which are dropped on a heated surface. The analgesy-meter test exerts a force increased at constant rate. In the formalin test we measured the total time spent in licking the injected paw during the early (0-10 min) and late phase (20-30 min) of test. To study anti-inflammatory effect the carrageenan-induced paw edema was used. The paw volume was measured plethysmometrically at 2, 3 and 4 hours. In the hot-plate test Rhodiola rosea increased in both doses the latency reaction compared with that in the controls. In analgesy-meter test Rhodiola rosea in a dose of 50 mg/kg showed a significant increase of pressure reaction compared with the controls. In the formalin test Rhodiola rosea in a dose of 100 mg/kg significantly decreased the paw licking time during the first phase. In the plethysmometer test Rhodiola rosea extract significantly reduced carrageenan-induced paw edema when compared with the saline-induced edema. The studied extract of Rhodiola rosea exhibited significant analgesic activity in all the pain models used--inhibition of thermal pain, mechanical hyperalgesia and formalin-induced pain behavior. Significant anti-inflammatory activity was observed from Rhodiola rosea extract in carrageenan induced paw edema in rats.

  13. Pityriasis Rosea in a Woman and Her Husband – Case Report and Review of the Literature

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    Natalya Lemster

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Pityriasis rosea is an acute, self-limited papulosquamous dermatosis of the trunk and extremities. Many atypical forms of the disease have been reported in the literature [Ahmed et al.: Clin Exp Dermatol 2000;25:624–626; Imamura et al.: Dermatologica 1985;171:474–477]. It is rare to find pityriasis rosea in multiple family members (within a household at the same time. There have been only 4 reported cases where a couple has contracted pityriasis rosea simultaneously [Miller et al.: Arch Derm Syphilol 1941;44:66–68; Niles et al.: Arch Derm Syphilol 1940;41:264].

  14. The Role of Biotechnology for Conservation and Biologically Active Substances Production of Rhodiola rosea: Endangered Medicinal Species

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    Krasimira Tasheva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available At present, more than 50 000 plant species are used in phytotherapy and medicine. About 2/3 of them are harvested from nature leading to local extinction of many species or degradation of their habitats. Biotechnological methods offer possibilities not only for faster cloning and conservation of the genotype of the plants but for modification of their gene information, regulation, and expression for production of valuable substances in higher amounts or with better properties. Rhodiola rosea is an endangered medicinal species with limited distribution. It has outstanding importance for pharmaceutical industry for prevention and cure of cancer, heart and nervous system diseases, and so forth. Despite the great interest in golden root and the wide investigations in the area of phytochemistry, plant biotechnology remained less endeavoured and exploited. The paper presents research on initiation of in vitro cultures in Rhodiola rosea and some other Rhodiola species. Achievements in induction of organogenic and callus cultures, regeneration, and micropropagation varied but were a good basis for alternative in vitro synthesis of the desired metabolites and for the development of efficient systems for micropropagation for conservation of the species.

  15. The role of biotechnology for conservation and biologically active substances production of Rhodiola rosea: endangered medicinal species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasheva, Krasimira; Kosturkova, Georgina

    2012-01-01

    At present, more than 50,000 plant species are used in phytotherapy and medicine. About 2/3 of them are harvested from nature leading to local extinction of many species or degradation of their habitats. Biotechnological methods offer possibilities not only for faster cloning and conservation of the genotype of the plants but for modification of their gene information, regulation, and expression for production of valuable substances in higher amounts or with better properties. Rhodiola rosea is an endangered medicinal species with limited distribution. It has outstanding importance for pharmaceutical industry for prevention and cure of cancer, heart and nervous system diseases, and so forth. Despite the great interest in golden root and the wide investigations in the area of phytochemistry, plant biotechnology remained less endeavoured and exploited. The paper presents research on initiation of in vitro cultures in Rhodiola rosea and some other Rhodiola species. Achievements in induction of organogenic and callus cultures, regeneration, and micropropagation varied but were a good basis for alternative in vitro synthesis of the desired metabolites and for the development of efficient systems for micropropagation for conservation of the species.

  16. Processing of Rhodiola rosea and Bergenia crassifolia raw materials for dry extracts

    OpenAIRE

    Siivari, J.; Galambosi, B.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the research was the processing of standardised dry extracts from root yield of Rhodiola rosea and leave yield of Bergenia sp. The plants were cultivated in the experimental field of MTT Mikkeli, Finland during 2002-2006.

  17. PHYTOCOENOLOGICAL, HISTO – ANATOMICAL AND BIOCHIMICAL ASPECTS IN RHODIOLA ROSEA L. SPECIES FROM ROMANIA

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    Mihai Costica

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available : In this paper the results of morphological, anatomical and biochemical investigation in Rhodiola rosea L. - as important medicinal plant species growing in Rodnei Mountains (Oriental Carpathians - are presented

  18. RHODIOLA ROSEA: STATUS OF RESEARCH AND POSSIBILITIES FOR COSMECEUTICAL AND DERMATOLOGICAL DRUGS PRODUCTION

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    E. F. Stepanova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Rhodiola rosea is one of the most popular adaptogene agents. Apart from adaptogene, it has the whole range of other pharmaceutical properties: antioxidant, nootropic, antidepressant, immunomodulatory, and other. Russian industry manufactures liquid extract of Rhodiola rosea, as well as food BAS based on the Rhodiola rosea, but there are no dosage forms for external use.The purpose of this work is to analyze scientific information about general characteristics of the pharmacological activity and possible use of Rhodiola rosea in external drugs and cosmetics.Methods. The following resources were used for general characteristic of Rhodiola rosea, its pharmacological properties, particularly the usage of Rhodiola rosea in medical and cosmetic practices, as well prospects of its external use: eLIBRARY, PubMed, Cyberleninca, ResearchGate, information from manufacturers and dealers web-pages.Results. Rhodiola drugs are considered prospective agents for depressions therapy, Parkinson disease treatment, memory, attention defects, for arrhythmia prevention, stamina increase, and stress level decrease in sport and space medicine, for acceptability and efficiency improvement of chemo- and radiotherapy, as immunostimulatory agent. Nowadays in the Russian Federation Rhodiola rosea liquid extract is used as a tonic agent and is prescribed for over-fatigue in healthy persons, and for the sick, weakened as the result of a long-term treatment. Literature has sufficient amount of data about possible effect of biologically active substances of Rhodiola rosea at external use: antioxidant and antimicrobial, bleaching, UV-protective, metabolism stimulating.Conclusion. Thus, the data obtained give evidence about the prospect of Rhodiola use in cosmeceutics and prove the experience of its traditional use for withering and fat skin treatment, as well as acne.

  19. [Study on composition, antibiotic activity and antioxidant activity of volatile oils from uyghur medicine Althaea rosea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munira, Abudukeremu; Muheta'er, Tu'erhong; Resalat, Yimin; Xia, Na

    2015-04-01

    Althaea rosea is a type of mallow plant. Its dry flowers are one of common herb in Uyghur medicines and recorded to have several efficacies such as external application for detumescence, moistening lung and arresting cough, sweating and relieving asthma, diminishing swelling and promoting eruption, soothing the nerves and strengthening heart. However, there are only fewer studies on effective components of A. rosea and no literature about its volatile oil and pharmacological activity. In this paper, the volatile oil of A. rosea was obtained by using the chemical distillation and extraction method. The individual chemical components were separated from the volatile oil and identified by the Gas Chromatograph-Mass Spectrometer technique (GC-MS). The antioxidant activity against free radicals was detected by the'ultraviolet and visible spectrophotometer method. The antibiotic activity was detected by the filter paper diffusion method. The experimental results showed nearly 70 compounds in the volatile oil, with complex chemical components. With a low content, most of the compounds were aromatic and aliphatic compounds and their derivatives. A. rosea had a better antibiotic activity for common microorganisms, with a wide antibacterial spectrum. According to the results, the volatile oil of A. rosea will have a good application value in medicine, food and cosmetic industries, which provided a scientific basis for the development of natural A. rosea resources.

  20. Antioxidative effects of Cinnamomi cassiae and Rhodiola rosea extracts in liver of diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Hee; Hyun, Sun Hee; Choung, Se Young

    2006-01-01

    Both Cinnamomi cassiae and Rhodiola rosea extracts are used as anti-diabetic folk medicines. Recently, increased oxidative stress was shown to play an important role in the etiology and pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus and its complications. This study was designed to examine the effects of Cinnamomi cassiae and Rhodiola rosea extracts on blood glucose, lipid peroxidation, the level of reduced glutathione and its related enzymes (glutathione reductase, glutathione S-transferase), and the activity of the antioxidant enzymes (catalase, superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase) in the liver of db/db mice. Diabetic C57BL/Ks db/db mice were used as experimental models. Mice were divided into control (n=10), Cinnamomi cassiae (200 mg/kg/day, n=10), and Rhodiola rosea (200 mg/kg/day, n=10) treated groups for 12 weeks of treatment. These type II diabetic mice were used to investigate the effects of Cinnamomi cassiae and Rhodiola rosea on blood glucose, reduced glutathione, glutathione reductase, glutathione S-transferase, glutathione peroxidase, lipid peroxidation, catalase and superoxide dismutase. Cinnamomi cassiae and Rhodiola rosea extracts significantly decreased on blood glucose, increased levels of reduced glutathione and the activities of glutathione reductase, glutathione S-transferase, glutathione peroxidase, catalase and superoxide dismutase in the liver. Extract treatment also significantly decreased lipid peroxidation. Cinnamomi cassiae and Rhodiola rosea extracts may be effective for correcting hyperglycemia and preventing diabetic complications.

  1. Effect of salidroside, active principle of Rhodiola rosea extract, on binge eating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cifani, Carlo; Micioni Di B, Maria Vittoria; Vitale, Giovanni; Ruggieri, Valentina; Ciccocioppo, Roberto; Massi, Maurizio

    2010-12-02

    Stress is a key determinant of binge eating (BE). Since Rhodiola rosea is known to modulate stress responses, its effect in a model of BE was investigated. BE for highly palatable food (HPF) was evoked in female rats by three 8-day cycles of food restriction/re-feeding (for 4days 66% of the usual chow intake; for 4days food ad libitum) and acute stress on the test day (day 25). R. rosea dry extract (3% rosavin, 3.12% salidroside) or its active principles were given by gavage 1h before access to HPF. Only rats exposed to both food restrictions and stress exhibited BE in the first 15-60min after the stressful procedure. R. rosea extract 10mg/kg significantly reduced and 20mg/kg abolished the BE episode. R. rosea extract 20mg/kg abolished also stress-induced increase in serum corticosterone levels. The R. rosea active principle salidroside, but not rosavin, at doses present in the extract, dose-dependently reduced or abolished BE for the period in which it was elicited. In conclusion results indicate that R. rosea extracts may have therapeutic properties in bingeing-related eating disorders and that salidroside is the active principle responsible for this effect. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of chronic Rhodiola Rosea supplementation on sport performance and antioxidant capacity in trained male: preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisi, A; Tranchita, E; Duranti, G; Ciminelli, E; Quaranta, F; Ceci, R; Cerulli, C; Borrione, P; Sabatini, S

    2010-03-01

    Rhodiola Rosea, is an adaptogen plant which has been reported to promote fatty acids utilisation, to ameliorate antioxidant function, and to improve body resistance to physical strenuous efforts. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects on physical performance as well as on the redox status of a chronic Rhodiola Rosea supplementation in a group of competitive athletes during endurance exercise. Following a chronic supplementation with Rhodiola Rosea for 4 weeks, 14 trained male athletes underwent a cardio-pulmonary exhaustion test and blood samples to evaluate their antioxidant status and other biochemical parameters. These data were compared with those coming from the same athletes after an intake of placebo. The evaluation of physical performance parameters showed that HR Max, Borg Scale level, VO(2) max and duration of the test were essentially unaffected by Rhodiola Rosea assumption. On the contrary, Rhodiola Rosea intake reduced, in a statistically significative manner, plasma free fatty acids levels. No effect on blood glucose was found. Blood antioxidant status and inflammatory parameters resulted unaffected by Rhodiola Rosea supplementation. Blood lactate and plasma creatine kinase levels were found significantly lower (PRhodiola Rosea treated subjects when compared to the placebo treated group. Chronic Rhodiola Rosea supplementation is able to reduce both lactate levels and parameters of skeletal muscle damage after an exhaustive exercise session. Moreover this supplementation seems to ameliorate fatty acid consumption. Taken together those observation confirm that Rhodiola Rosea may increase the adaptogen ability to physical exercise.

  3. Evaluation of anticonvulsant, antimicrobial and hemolytic activity of Aitchisonia rosea

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    Shahid Rasool

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the anticonvulsant, antimicrobial and hemolytic effect of Aitchisonia rosea. The anticonvulsant effect was studied at doses 400 and 800 mg/kg against pentylenetetrazole, strychnine and picrotoxin-induced seizures in albino mice. The antimicrobial assay was conducted by disc diffusion method and minimum inhibitory concentration. Hemolytic effect was analyzed by reported method. Phenolic compounds present in the n-butanol fraction of the plant were estimated by HPLC. The plant showed maximum response against drug-induced convulsions and provided protection to animals at both doses. It also showed maximum zone of inhibition and highly significant MIC against all bacterial and fungal strains. The plant protected the RBCs from hemolysis. The highest amount of phenolics found was caffeic acid (7.5 ± 0.04.

  4. Protective effect of Rhodiola rosea polysaccharides on cryopreserved boar sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shen-Min; Wang, Ting; Wen, Duan-Gai; Hou, Jian-Quan; Li, Hai-Bo

    2016-01-01

    Cryopreservation brings sublethal damage to sperm, resulting in reduced fertile life of sperm. Rhodiola rosea polysaccharides (RPs) have antiviral, antioxidant and antitumor activities. In the present study, the cryoprotective effect of RPs on boar sperm quality parameters after frozen-thawed process was investigated. Boar sperm was cryopreserved in the extender with RPs added at concentrations of 0 (used as control), 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10mg/L and their effects on the quality of frozen-thawed boar sperm were assessed. Addition of RPs significantly improved sperm motility, mitochondrial activity, acrosomal integrity, plasma membrane integrity, superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activity and decreased sperm malonaldehyde level (p<0.05). The results indicated that the addition of RPs to the freezing extender decreased the cryodamage to the boar sperm. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Rhodiola rosea Exerts Antiviral Activity in Athletes Following a Competitive Marathon Race.

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    Ahmed, Maryam; Henson, Dru A; Sanderson, Matthew C; Nieman, David C; Zubeldia, Jose M; Shanely, R Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Rhodiola rosea, a medicinal plant with demonstrated adaptogenic properties, has recently been reported to contain active compounds with antimicrobial activity. The goal of this study was to measure the antiviral and antibacterial properties of the bioactive metabolites of Rhodiola rosea in the serum of experienced marathon runners following supplementation. Marathon runners, randomly divided into two groups, ingested 600 mg/day of Rhodiola rosea (n = 24, 6 female, 18 male) or placebo (n = 24, 7 females, 17 males) for 30 days prior to, the day of, and 7 days post-marathon. Blood serum samples were collected the day before, 15 min post-, and 1.5 h post-marathon. Serum from Rhodiola rosea-supplemented runners collected after marathon running did not attenuate the marathon-induced susceptibility of HeLa cells to killing by vesicular stomatitis virus. However, the use of Rhodiola rosea induced antiviral activity at early times post-infection by delaying an exercise-dependent increase in virus replication (P = 0.013 compared to placebo). Serum from both groups collected 15 min post-marathon significantly promoted the growth of Escherichia coli in culture as compared to serum collected the day before the marathon (P = 0.003, all subjects). Furthermore, the serum from subjects ingesting Rhodiola rosea did not display antibacterial properties at any time point as indicated by a lack of group differences immediately (P = 0.785) or 1.5 h (P = 0.633) post-marathon. These results indicate that bioactive compounds in the serum of subjects ingesting Rhodiola rosea may exert protective effects against virus replication following intense and prolonged exercise by inducing antiviral activity.

  6. Rhodiola rosea exerts anti-viral activity in athletes following a competitive marathon race

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    Maryam eAhmed

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Rhodiola rosea, a medicinal plant with demonstrated adaptogenic properties, has recently been reported to contain active compounds with antimicrobial activity. The goal of this study was to measure the antiviral and antibacterial properties of the bioactive metabolites of Rhodiola rosea in the serum of experienced marathon runners following supplementation. Marathon runners, randomly divided into two group, ingested 600mg/day of Rhodiola rosea (n=24, 6 female, 18 male or placebo (n=24, 7 female, 17 male for 30 days prior to, the day of, and seven days post-marathon. Blood serum samples were collected the day before, 15 minutes post- and 1.5 hours post-marathon. Serum from Rhodiola rosea supplemented runners collected after marathon running did not attenuate the marathon-induced susceptibility of HeLa cells to killing by vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV. However, the use of Rhodiola rosea induced antiviral activity at early times post-infection by delaying an exercise-dependent increase in virus replication (P=0.013 compared to placebo. Serum from both groups collected 15 minutes post-marathon significantly promoted the growth of Escherichia coli in culture as compared to serum collected the day before the marathon (P=0.003, all subjects. Furthermore, the serum from subjects ingesting Rhodiola rosea did not display antibacterial properties at any time point as indicated by a lack of group differences immediately (P=0.785 or 1.5 hours (P=0.633 post-marathon. These results indicate that bioactive compounds in the serum of subjects ingesting Rhodiola rosea may exert protective effects against virus replication following intense and prolonged exercise by inducing antiviral activity.

  7. The efficacy of azithromycin in pityriasis rosea: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

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    Deepika Pandhi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Macrolides are prescribed in the treatment of pityriasis rosea despite conflicting results of the limited number of studies evaluating their role in its treatment. Aim: A randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial was conducted to evaluate the effect of azithromycin on the clinical course of pityriasis rosea. Methods: Seventy patients of pityriasis rosea were given either azithromycin (n = 35 or placebo (n = 35 and were followed-up at 2, 4 and 6 weeks. Pruritus was assessed in both groups using the visual analogue scale (VAS . Change in the pityriasis rosea severity score (PRSS and in the VAS were recorded as outcome measures and were compared statistically. Results: The decrease in PRSS from baseline through 2, 4 and 6 weeks within both treatment (P < 0.001 and placebo (P < 0.001 arms was found to be statistically significant; however, this change was not significantly different in the two groups (P = 0.179. Similarly, the decrease in VAS was found to be statistically significant within both groups (P < 0.001; however, the change was comparable between the two groups (P < 0.937. Analysis by Fisher′s exact test did not find a significant difference between the two groups for PRSS and VAS. Conclusion: Azithromycin is not effective in pityriasis rosea and the use of macrolides for this disease should not be encouraged in clinical practice.

  8. A description of the naturalised Clusia rosea Jacq. (Clusiaceae populations in South Africa

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    Michael D. Cheek

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Clusia rosea is an ornamental plant that has been cultivated in South Africa since the late 19th century. Ornamental plant species are known to be a source of invasive plants.Objectives: To document the current distribution of C. rosea in South Africa and its naturalisation status.Method: Reports of C. rosea were verified in the field and herbarium vouchers were collected. Coordinates were taken for each plant, their reproductive status was assessed and heights were measured. In addition, the Southern African Plant Invaders Atlas database and five herbaria were checked for records.Results: A total of 284 plants were found outside of cultivation, mostly in the KwaZulu-Natal Coastal Belt Grassland. Clusia rosea appears to be reproducing through apomixis. No records of naturalisation could be found elsewhere in Africa.Conclusion: It is recommended that C. rosea be added to the Species Under Surveillance – Possible Eradication or Containment Targets (SUSPECT list to investigate whether it requires formal legal listing.

  9. Salidroside, a Bioactive Compound of Rhodiola Rosea, Ameliorates Memory and Emotional Behavior in Adult Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmeri, Agostino; Mammana, Leonardo; Tropea, Maria Rosaria; Gulisano, Walter; Puzzo, Daniela

    2016-02-26

    Rhodiola Rosea (R. Rosea) is a plant used in traditional popular medicine to enhance cognition and physical performance. R. Rosea medicinal properties have been related to its capability to act as an adaptogen, i.e., a substance able to increase the organism's resistance to a variety of chemical, biological, and physical stressors in a non-specific way. These adaptogen properties have been mainly attributed to the glycoside salidroside, one of the bioactive compounds present in the standardized extracts of R. Rosea. Here, we aimed to investigate whether a single dose of salidroside is able to affect memory and emotional behavior in wild type adult mice. We performed fear conditioning to assess cued and contextual memory, elevated plus maze and open field to evaluate anxiety, and tail suspension test to evaluate depression. Our results showed that a single i.p. administration of salidroside was able to enhance fear memory and exerted an anxiolytic and antidepressant effect. These data confirmed the adaptogenic effect of R. Rosea bioactive compounds in animal models and suggest that salidroside might represent an interesting pharmacological tool to ameliorate cognition and counteract mood disorders.

  10. Chemical composition of the essential oils of Rhodiola rosea L. of three different origins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evstatieva, Ljuba; Todorova, Milka; Antonova, Daniela; Staneva, Jordanka

    2010-01-01

    Rhodiola rosea L. (Crassulaceae), or “rose root” is a perennial herbaceous plant, distributed in the Northern Hemisphere. Pharmacological studies have shown that R. rosea exhibits different biological activities – antioxidant, antidepressant, anticancer, etc. The aim of this study was to compare the chemical composition of essential oils from rhizomes of three commercial samples of R. rosea originated from Bulgaria (sample 1), China (sample 2) and India (sample 3). The oils were analyzed by GC and GC-MS. Thus, the main volatile component in the Bulgaria and Chinese R. rosea was geraniol, followed by myrthenol in sample 1 or octanol in sample 2. Phenethylalcohol was a principal constituent in the Indian oil. Myrtenol and octanol were in significant amounts too. Aliphatic hydrocarbons were characteristic of the latter sample. It is notable that cinnamyl alcohol, which was present in large concentration in Bulgarian sample, was not detected in the other two samples. The obtained results showed considerable differences in the composition of the studied three origins of R. rosea. PMID:21120024

  11. Neuroprotective effect of Rhodiola rosea Linn against MPTP induced cognitive impairment and oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Reenu; Nalini, G; Chidambaranathan, N

    2013-04-01

    Ageing and age-related neurodegenerative changes including Parkinson's disease are characterized by an important role of reactive oxygen species. It is characterized by signs of major oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage in the pars compacta of substantia nigra. Present study was designed to investigate whether Rhodiola rosea extract would prevent MPTP induced neurotoxicity in Male wistar rats. Male Wistar rats were divided into following five groups: Group I received vehicle (saline (10 ml/kg for 21 days) orally); Group II received Rhodiola rosea extract (250 mg/kg for 21 days) orally; Group III was treated with 20 mg/kg MPTP i.p. for 21 days; Group IV received 20 mg/kg MPTP, i.p. along with 100 mg/kg Rhodiola rosea orally for 21 days. Group V received 20 mg/kg MPTP i.p. along with 250 mg/kg Rhodiola rosea orally for 21 days. MPTP induced rats showed behavioral alterations in elevated plus maze testing. Group III rats elicited significant increase in lipid hydroperoxide along with reduction in level of glutathione peroxidase, catalase, superoxide dismutase and total antioxidants. Histological evidence revealed that MPTP treated rats shown pathological changes like cellular inflammation and vascular degeneration in brain tissue. The oxidative stress and related biochemical alteration by MPTP were attenuated by Rhodiola rosea treatment. However, further studies may be necessary to elucidate the precise mechanism to support the clinical use of a plant source as antiparkinsonism drug.

  12. The golden root, Rhodiola rosea, prolongs lifespan but decreases oxidative stress resistance in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayliak, Maria M; Lushchak, Volodymyr I

    2011-11-15

    The effect of aqueous extract from R. rosea root on lifespan and the activity of antioxidant enzymes in budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been studied. The supplementation of the growth medium with R. rosea extract decreased survival of exponentially growing S. cerevisiae cells under H(2)O(2)-induced oxidative stress, but increased viability and reproduction success of yeast cells in stationary phase. The extract did not significantly affect catalase activity and decreased SOD activity in chronologically aged yeast population. These results suggest that R. rosea acts as a stressor for S. cerevisiae cells, what sensitizes yeast cells to oxidative stress at exponential phase, but induces adaptation in stationary phase cells demonstrating the positive effect on yeast survival without activation of major antioxidant enzymes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. [Evaluating adaptogenic properties of Rhodiola rosea extract in human mononuclear cell culture and rat tissues].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreeva, L I; Boĭkova, A A; Nikiforova, D V

    2013-01-01

    The administration of various doses of Rhodiola rosea roots and rhizome spissum with known concentrations of salidroside, n-tyrosol, and rosavine leads to an increase in stress proteins 70 content in human mononuclear cell culture and in tissues of Wistar rats. A one-week peroral administration of Rh. Rosea preparation increases the content of constitutive Hsc70 in liver and the amount of hepatocytes with low succinate dehydrogenase activity. A two-week administration of Rh. Rosea extract leads to an increase in the levels of inducible Hsp70 and constitutive Hsc70 proteins in liver, hippocampus and left heart ventricle. These results are indicative of an increase in nonspecific resistance and the activation of adaptogenic processes.

  14. Pitiríase rósea Pityriasis rosea

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    Sandra Maria Bitencourt Miranda

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Pitiríase rósea é doença inflamatória aguda da pele, que regride espontaneamente, normalmente sem deixar seqüelas, em período que varia de quatro a oito semanas. Clinicamente é caracterizada pelo aparecimento de típicas lesões eritêmato-pápulo-escamosas. Atinge todas as idades, embora seja mais comumente observada entre 10 e 35 anos. Apesar de exaustivas pesquisas, sua etiologia ainda permanece desconhecida. São discutidos alguns aspectos epidemiológicos, anatomoclínicos, diagnósticos diferenciais, doenças associadas, com ênfase no tratamento e etiologia da doença.Pityriasis rosea is a skin disease characterized by acute inflammation that fades away spontaneously without scar tissue formation for an average period of 4 to 8 weeks. Clinically, it is characterized by the occurrence of typical erythematous papulosquamous lesions distributed mainly over the trunk and extremities. It affects people of all ages, but is more often observed in the age range of 10 to 35 years. Even though it is extensively studied, its etiology remains unknown. In this study, the authors analyze some epidemiologic aspects, differential diagnosis, related diseases, and give special attention to treatment and possible etiology.

  15. The Effect of Height, Wing Length, and Wing Symmetry on Tabebuia rosea Seed Dispersal

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    Yasmeen Moussa

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between the vertical drop height and the horizontal distance traveled (dispersal ratio was investigated for a sample of fifty Tabebuia rosea seeds by dropping the seeds from five heights ranging from 1.00 to 2.00 meters. The dispersal ratio was found to be a constant 0.16 m/m for these heights. The effects of total seed length and asymmetry of seed wings on dispersal ratio were also measured using separate samples of fifty Tabebuia rosea seeds. It was found that neither seed length nor asymmetry had a significant effect on the dispersal ratio.

  16. Central additive effect of Ginkgo biloba and rhodiola rosea on psychomotor vigilance task and short-term working memory accuracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    hayder M. al-kuraishy

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aim: The present study investigates the effect of combined treatment with Ginkgo biloba and/or rhodiola rosea on psychomotor vigilance task and short-term working memory accuracy. Subjects and Methods: A total number of 112 volunteers was enrolled to study the effect of Ginkgo biloba and rhodiola rosea on psychomotor vigilance task and short-term working memory accuracy as compared to placebo effects,the central cognitive effect was assessed by Critical flicker-fusion frequency (CFFF, Psychomotor vigilance Task (PVT and computerized N-back test. Results: Placebo produced no significant effects on all neurocognitive tests measure p>0.05 in normal healthy volunteers, Ginkgo biloba or Rhodiola rosea improve psychomotor vigilance task and low to moderate working memory accuracy, The combined effect of Rhodiola rosea and Ginkgo biloba leading to more significant effect on psychomotor vigilance task, all levels of short term working memory accuracy and critical fusion versus flicker p<0.01, more than of Ginkgo biloba or Rhodiola rosea when they used alone. Conclusion: The combined effect of Rhodiola rosea and Ginkgo biloba leading to more significant effect on cognitive function than either Ginkgo biloba or Rhodiola rosea when they used alone. [J Intercult Ethnopharmacol 2016; 5(1.000: 7-13

  17. Rhodiola rosea therapy for major depressive disorder: a study protocol for a randomized, double-blind, placebo- controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Jun J; Li, Qing S; Soeller, Irene; Xie, Sharon X; Amsterdam, Jay D

    2014-06-20

    Rhodiola rosea (R. rosea), a botanical of both western and traditional Chinese medicine, has been used as a folk remedy for improving stamina and reducing stress. However, few controlled clinical trials have examined the safety and efficacy of R. rosea for the treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD). This study seeks to evaluate the safety and efficacy of R. rosea in a 12-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel group study design. Subjects with MDD not receiving antidepressant therapy will be randomized to either R. rosea extract 340-1,360 mg daily; sertraline 50-200 mg daily, or placebo for 12 weeks. The primary outcome measure will be change over time in the mean 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating score. Secondary outcome measures will include safety and quality of life ratings. Statistical procedures will include mixed-effects models to assess efficacy for primary and secondary outcomes. This study will provide valuable preliminary information on the safety and efficacy data of R. rosea versus conventional antidepressant therapy of MDD. It will also inform additional hypotheses and study design of future, fully powered, phase III clinical trials with R. rosea to determine its safety and efficacy in MDD.

  18. Central additive effect of Ginkgo biloba and Rhodiola rosea on psychomotor vigilance task and short-term working memory accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Kuraishy, Hayder M

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigates the effect of combined treatment with Ginkgo biloba and/or Rhodiola rosea on psychomotor vigilance task (PVT) and short-term working memory accuracy. A total number of 112 volunteers were enrolled to study the effect of G. biloba and R. rosea on PVT and short-term working memory accuracy as compared to placebo effects, the central cognitive effect was assessed by critical flicker-fusion frequency, PVT, and computerized N-back test. Placebo produced no significant effects on all neurocognitive tests measure P > 0.05 in normal healthy volunteers, G. biloba or R. rosea improve PVT and low to moderate working memory accuracy, The combined effect of R. rosea and G. biloba leading to more significant effect on PVT, all levels of short-term working memory accuracy and critical fusion versus flicker P rosea when they used alone. The combined effect of R. rosea and G. biloba leading to a more significant effect on cognitive function than either G. biloba or R. rosea when they used alone.

  19. Tyrosinase Inhibitory Effect and Antioxidative Activities of Fermented and Ethanol Extracts of Rhodiola rosea and Lonicera japonica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuh-Shuen Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This is the first study to investigate the biological activities of fermented extracts of Rhodiola rosea L. (Crassulaceae and Lonicera japonica Thunb. (Caprifoliaceae. Alcaligenes piechaudii CC-ESB2 fermented and ethanol extracts of Rhodiola rosea and Lonicera japonica were prepared and the antioxidative activities of different concentrations of samples were evaluated using in vitro antioxidative assays. Tyrosinase inhibition was determined by using the dopachrome method with L-DOPA as substrate. The results demonstrated that inhibitory effects (ED50 values on mushroom tyrosinase of fermented Rhodiola rosea, fermented Lonicera japonica, ethanol extract of Lonicera japonica, and ethanol extract of Rhodiola rosea were 0.78, 4.07, 6.93, and >10 mg/ml, respectively. The DPPH scavenging effects of fermented Rhodiola rosea (ED50 = 0.073 mg/ml and fermented Lonicera japonica (ED50 = 0.207 mg/ml were stronger than effects of their respective ethanol extracts. Furthermore, the scavenging effect increases with the presence of high content of total phenol. However, the superoxide scavenging effects of fermented Rhodiola rosea was less than effects of fermented Lonicera japonica. The results indicated that fermentation of Rhodiola rosea and Lonicera japonica can be considered as an effective biochemical process for application in food, drug, and cosmetics.

  20. Tyrosinase inhibitory effect and antioxidative activities of fermented and ethanol extracts of Rhodiola rosea and Lonicera japonica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuh-Shuen; Liou, Hua-Chian; Chan, Chin-Feng

    2013-01-01

    This is the first study to investigate the biological activities of fermented extracts of Rhodiola rosea L. (Crassulaceae) and Lonicera japonica Thunb. (Caprifoliaceae). Alcaligenes piechaudii CC-ESB2 fermented and ethanol extracts of Rhodiola rosea and Lonicera japonica were prepared and the antioxidative activities of different concentrations of samples were evaluated using in vitro antioxidative assays. Tyrosinase inhibition was determined by using the dopachrome method with L-DOPA as substrate. The results demonstrated that inhibitory effects (ED50 values) on mushroom tyrosinase of fermented Rhodiola rosea, fermented Lonicera japonica, ethanol extract of Lonicera japonica, and ethanol extract of Rhodiola rosea were 0.78, 4.07, 6.93, and >10 mg/ml, respectively. The DPPH scavenging effects of fermented Rhodiola rosea (ED50 = 0.073 mg/ml) and fermented Lonicera japonica (ED50 = 0.207 mg/ml) were stronger than effects of their respective ethanol extracts. Furthermore, the scavenging effect increases with the presence of high content of total phenol. However, the superoxide scavenging effects of fermented Rhodiola rosea was less than effects of fermented Lonicera japonica. The results indicated that fermentation of Rhodiola rosea and Lonicera japonica can be considered as an effective biochemical process for application in food, drug, and cosmetics.

  1. Evaluation of Clonostachys rosea for Control of Plant-Parasitic Nematodes in Soil and in Roots of Carrot and Wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Mudassir; Dubey, Mukesh; McEwan, Kerstin; Menzel, Uwe; Franko, Mikael Andersson; Viketoft, Maria; Jensen, Dan Funck; Karlsson, Magnus

    2018-01-01

    Biological control is a promising approach to reduce plant diseases caused by nematodes. We tested the effect of the fungus Clonostachys rosea strain IK726 inoculation on nematode community composition in a naturally nematode infested soil in a pot experiment, and the effect of C. rosea on plant health. The numbers of plant-parasitic nematode genera extracted from soil and plant roots decreased by 40 to 73% when C. rosea was applied, while genera of nonparasitic nematodes were not affected. Soil inoculation of C. rosea increased fresh shoot weight and shoot length of wheat plants by 20 and 24%, respectively, while only shoot dry weight increased by 48% in carrots. Light microscopy of in vitro C. rosea-nematode interactions did not reveal evidence of direct parasitism. However, culture filtrates of C. rosea growing in potato dextrose broth, malt extract broth and synthetic nutrient broth exhibited toxicity toward nematodes and immobilized 57, 62, and 100% of the nematodes, respectively, within 48 h. This study demonstrates that C. rosea can control plant-parasitic nematodes and thereby improve plant growth. The most likely mechanism responsible for the antagonism is antibiosis through production of nematicidal compounds, rather than direct parasitism.

  2. Putrescine biosensor based on putrescine oxidase from Kocuria rosea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bóka, Beáta; Adányi, Nóra; Szamos, Jenő; Virág, Diána; Kiss, Attila

    2012-10-10

    The novel putrescine oxidase based amperometric biosensor selectively measures putrescine, which can be considered as an indicator of microbial spoilage. Putrescine oxidase (PUOX, EC 1.4.3.10) was isolated from Kocuria rosea (Micrococcus rubens) by an improved and simplified purification process. Cells were grown on brain heart infusion medium supplemented with putrescine. Cell-free extract was prepared in Tris buffer (pH 8.0) by Bead-beater. A newly elaborated step based on three-phase partitioning (TPP) was applied in the purification protocol of PUOX. The purified enzyme was immobilized on the surface of a spectroscopic graphite electrode in redox hydrogel with horseradish peroxidase, Os mediator and poly(ethylene glycol) (400) diglycidyl ether (PEGDGE) as crosslinking agent. This modified working electrode was used in wall-jet type amperometric cell together with the Ag/AgCl (0.1M KCl) reference electrode and a platinum wire as auxiliary electrode in flow injection analysis system (FIA). Hydrogel composition, pH and potential dependence were studied. Optimal working conditions were 0.45 mLmin(-1) flow rate of phosphate buffer (66 mM, pH 8.0) and +50 mV polarizing potential vs. Ag/AgCl. The linear measuring range of the method was 0.01-0.25 mM putrescine, while the detection limit was 5 μM. Beer samples were investigated by the putrescine biosensor and the results were compared by those of HPLC reference method. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Memory-enhancing effect of Rhodiola rosea L extract on aged mice ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: The memory-enhancing effects of Rhodiola rosea L. extract (RRLE) on normal aged mice were assessed. Methods: In the open-field test, the effect of RRLE (150 and 300 mg/kg) on mouse locomotive activities was evaluated by investigating the extract's influence on CAT and AchE activities in the brain tissue of ...

  4. Approaches of Rhodiola kirilowii and Rhodiola rosea field cultivation in Poland and their potential health benefits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Grech-Baran

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Numerous researches have been carried out on plants of the Rhodiola species, especially Rhodiola kirilowii (Regel Maxim. and Rhodiola rosea. Various compounds have been reported to be isolated from R. kirilowii and R. rosea, including cyanogenic glycosides, monoterpene alcohols and their glycosides, aryl glycosides, phenylethanoids, phenylpropanoids and their glycosides (salidroside and rosavins respectively, as well as flavonoids, flavonlignans, proanthocyanidins and gallic acid derivatives and the latter have free radical scavenging capacity. The benefits claimed for Rhodiola include adapogenic, neuroprotective, anti-depresive anti-tumour and cardioprotective activities. Currently, the adaptogenic activity of Rhodiola compounds are properties evaluated mainly in human clinical trials. The mechanism of the action of Rhodiola extracts include affecting the levels of cortisol and NO by interactions with glucocorticoid receptors directly or via the c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK pathway. However, the natural populations of R. rosea in Poland are threatened; therefore, the cultivation of R. rosea and alternative species R. kirilowii might be a possible solution for producing these kinds of plants in Poland in sufficient quantities and quality for pharmaceutical purposes. Lack of proven interaction with other drugs and no confirmed adverse effects during clinical trials encourages further investigation. These herb preparations ought to be studied extensively to establish their position as potential drugs for a variety of diseases.

  5. Evaluation of Rhodiola rosea L. extract on affective and physical signs of nicotine withdrawal in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattioli, Laura; Perfumi, Marina

    2011-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of a Rhodiola rosea L. extract on the prevention of the development of nicotine dependence and for the reduction of abstinence suffering following nicotine cessation in mice. Dependence was induced in mice by subcutaneous injections of nicotine (2 mg/kg, 4 times/day) for eight days. Spontaneous abstinence syndrome was evaluated 20 h after the last nicotine administration, by analysis of withdrawal signs, as affective (anxiety-like behaviour) and physical (somatic signs and locomotor activity). Rhodiola rosea L. extract was administered orally during nicotine treatment (10, 15 and 20 mg/kg) or during nicotine withdrawal (20 mg/kg). Results show that both affective and somatic signs (head shaking, paw tremors, body tremors, ptosis, jumping, piloerection and chewing) induced by nicotine withdrawal are abolished by administration of Rhodiola rosea L. extract in a dose-dependent fashion, during both nicotine exposure and nicotine cessation. In conclusion, our data encourage additional studies to define the use of R. rosea L. as a therapeutic approach in the treatment of smoking cessation.

  6. Rhodiola Rosea as antioxidant in red blood cells: ultrastructural and hemolytic behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Battistelli

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Rhodiola rosea L. (Crassulaceae is a plant that lives at high altitude in Europe and Asia, usually used for its high capacity to increase the organism resistance to different stress conditions. Although a few international literature supports these effects, today R. rosea has become a common component of many dietary supplements also in the Western world. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of the R. rosea roots aqueous extract on in vitro human erythrocytes exposed to hypochlorous acid (HOCl- oxidative stress. Several damages occur in human erythrocytes exposed in vitro to HOCl, among these membrane protein and lipid modifications, shifting from the discocyte shape to the echinocyte one, and determining lysis ultimately. Therefore, in the present work, the evaluation of the antioxidant capacity of the Rhodiola extract has been carried out by means of scanning electron microscopy and of hemolytic behaviour on human erythrocytes exposed to HOCl in the presence of increasing doses of the aqueous extract in different experimental environments (co-incubation and subsequent incubations. The results obtained are consistent with a significative protection of the extract in presence of the oxidative agent, but a cautionary note emerges from the analysis of the data related to the cell exposition to the plant extract in the absence of any induced oxidative stress. In fact, the addition to erythrocyte of high doses of R. rosea extract always determines severe alterations of the cell shape.

  7. [Genetic diversity of different geographical populations of Rhodiola rosea based on AFLP markers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiang; Ruan, Xiao; Jiang, Hao; Meng, Qingwen; Wang, Lihe

    2009-09-01

    To research the genetic diversity of different Rhodiola rosea geographical populations in Tianshan Mountain, China; The genetic diversity of eighteen R. rosea geological populations from six niches was estimated using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers. The data of amplified bands were analyzed by the software POPGENE v1.31 (32-bit) and SPSS. The nine primers employed produced a total of 238 discernable and reproducible amplified fragments. There were 228 polymorphic bands. The percentage of polymorphic bands with in different populations was 95.6%. Genetic diversity analysis showed that average number of alleles per loci was Na = 1.4883, effective number of alleles per loci Ne = 1.3907, Neis gene diversity index H = 0.2170, Shannon's information index I = 0.3108, the percentage of polymorphic loci P = 52.71, genetic differentiation among populations Gst = 0.364; UPGMA cluster analysis based on genetic distance data divided eighteen populations into two clusters: Cluster I composed of twelve populations and Cluster II 6 populations which distributed in attitude upper 3 175 m; Our researches suggest that the best niche of R. rosea was at attitude between 3 150-3 250 m; this region is important for the conservation of R. rosea germplasm resource.

  8. The Effects of Rhodiola rosea L. Extract on Anxiety, Stress, Cognition and Other Mood Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cropley, Mark; Banks, Adrian P; Boyle, Julia

    2015-12-01

    This trial evaluated the impact of a Rhodiola rosea L. extract on self-reported anxiety, stress, cognition, and other mood symptoms. Eighty mildly anxious participants were randomized into two different groups of either Rhodiola rosea L (2 × 200 mg dose Vitano®, 1 tablet taken before breakfast and 1tablet before lunch) or a control condition (no treatment). Self-report measures and cognitive tests were completed at four testing sessions over a period of 14 days. Relative to the controls, the experimental group demonstrated a significant reduction in self-reported, anxiety, stress, anger, confusion and depression at 14 days and a significant improvements in total mood. No relevant differences in cognitive performance between the groups were observed. Rhodiola rosea L (Vitano®) presented a favourable safety tolerability profile. Although this was a non-placebo controlled trial, it is unlikely that the findings were the result of placebo effects as changes appeared gradual and were specific to certain psychological measures. However, we cannot determine a causal relationship; further investigations are recommended to support the effects of Rhodiola rosea L. extract on stress related symptoms. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Rhodiola rosea ability to enrich cellular antioxidant defences of cultured human keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcabrini, Cinzia; De Bellis, Roberta; Mancini, Umberto; Cucchiarini, Luigi; Potenza, Lucia; De Sanctis, Roberta; Patrone, Vania; Scesa, Carla; Dachà, Marina

    2010-04-01

    Keratinocytes are cells strongly exposed to oxidative stress, but normally good equipped for antioxidant responses. However, it has long been suggested that exogenous antioxidants could play a useful role in minimizing the adverse skin responses associated with such oxidant species. In this work it was paid attention to the extract of Rhodiola rosea L. roots by using the phytocomplex as a whole because of the important activity of its composition and mutual distribution of its components. We have measured the protection afforded by the extract to reduced glutathione levels, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase activity, and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances levels in cultured human keratinocytes (NCTC 2544) exposed to different oxidative insults: Fe(II)/ascorbate, Fe(II)/H(2)O(2), and tert-butyl-hydroperoxide. We also have investigated the influence of the R. rosea extract on the production of intracellular reactive oxygen species and on the activity of antioxidant enzymes (catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase). Furthermore, we have demonstrated that R. rosea extract was able to increase in a time- and dose-dependent manner the activity of the trans plasma membrane oxido reductase activity as an indirect evaluation of the intracellular redox status and this effect was already evident with small concentration of the extract and in a long time. As a result, NCTC 2544 are able to better counteract to several oxidative insults if incubated with R. rosea extract demonstrating a very good antioxidant activity of this phytocomplex.

  10. Anti-inflammatory activity of Rhodiola rosea--"a second-generation adaptogen".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bawa, A S; Khanum, Farhath

    2009-08-01

    Rhodiola rosea (golden root), a unique phytoadaptogen grown in high-altitude regions has gained attention for its various therapeutic properties. In India, this plant is found in the Himalayan belt and has not been completely explored for its beneficial health effects. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the anti-inflammatory efficacy of the tincture extract of Rhodiola rosea roots (RTE). The anti-inflammatory activity was determined through carrageenan-induced paw oedema, formaldehyde-induced arthritis and nystatin-induced paw oedema in rat model. The tincture extract exhibited inhibitory effect against acute and subacute inflammation at a dose of 250 mg/kg body weight. Inhibition of nystatin-induced oedema was also observed in a dose-dependent manner. The in vitro inhibitory effects of the tincture extract from R. rosea roots was evaluated against the enzymes relating to inflammation. The enzymes include cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and Phospholipase A2 (PLA2). The extract showed varying inhibitory activities against these enzymes depending on the concentrations. A potent inhibition was observed against Cox-2 and PLA2. Inhibition of nystatin induced oedema and phospholipase A2 suggested that membrane stabilization could be the most probable mechanism of action of RTE in anti-inflammation. The findings in this study may provide the use of R. rosea root extract in the treatment of inflammatory conditions. Copyright 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Approaches of Rhodiola kirilowii and Rhodiola rosea field cultivation in Poland and their potential health benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grech-Baran, Marta; Sykłowska-Baranek, Katarzyna; Pietrosiuk, Agnieszka

    2015-01-01

    Numerous researches have been carried out on plants of the Rhodiola species, especially Rhodiola kirilowii (Regel) Maxim. and Rhodiola rosea. Various compounds have been reported to be isolated from R. kirilowii and R. rosea, including cyanogenic glycosides, monoterpene alcohols and their glycosides, aryl glycosides, phenylethanoids, phenylpropanoids and their glycosides (salidroside and rosavins respectively), as well as flavonoids, flavonlignans, proanthocyanidins and gallic acid derivatives and the latter have free radical scavenging capacity. The benefits claimed for Rhodiola include adapogenic, neuroprotective, anti-depresive anti-tumour and cardioprotective activities. Currently, the adaptogenic activity of Rhodiola compounds are properties evaluated mainly in human clinical trials. The mechanism of the action of Rhodiola extracts include affecting the levels of cortisol and NO by interactions with glucocorticoid receptors directly or via the c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK) pathway. However, the natural populations of R. rosea in Poland are threatened; therefore, the cultivation of R. rosea and alternative species R. kirilowii might be a possible solution for producing these kinds of plants in Poland in sufficient quantities and quality for pharmaceutical purposes. Lack of proven interaction with other drugs and no confirmed adverse effects during clinical trials encourages further investigation. These herb preparations ought to be studied extensively to establish their position as potential drugs for a variety of diseases.

  12. The effectiveness and efficacy of Rhodiola rosea L.: a systematic review of randomized clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Shao Kang; Perry, Rachel; Ernst, Edzard

    2011-02-15

    To critically assess the current evidence from randomized clinical trials (RCTs) for or against the effectiveness or efficacy of Rhodiola rosea. Systematic literature searches were performed in six electronic databases: AMED (1985-July 2009), CINAHL (1982-July 2009), The Cochrane Library (search in July 2009), EMBASE (1974-July 2009), MEDLINE (1950-July 2009) and Web of Science (searched in July 2009). No language restrictions were imposed. Reference lists of all retrieved articles were searched, and experts and manufacturers were contacted for unpublished RCT. RCTs testing the efficacy or effectiveness of mono-preparations of R. rosea as sole treatment administered orally against a control intervention in any human individual suffering from any condition or healthy human volunteers were included. Studies were selected, data extracted, and quality assessed by two independent reviewers. Eleven RCTs met the inclusion criteria; all were placebo-controlled. Six trials investigated the effects of R. rosea on physical performance, four on mental performance, and two in patients diagnosed with mental health condition. The methodological quality of most trials was moderate or good. Only few mild adverse events were reported. R. rosea may have beneficial effects on physical performance, mental performance, and certain mental health conditions. There is, however, a lack of independent replications of the single different studies. Five of the 10 RCTs reached more than three points on the Jadad score (i.e., good quality). More research seems warranted. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. Pause menopause with Rhodiola rosea, a natural selective estrogen receptor modulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerbarg, Patricia L; Brown, Richard P

    2016-06-15

    Menopausal women are challenged by the adverse effects of estrogen loss on energy, mood, cognitive function, and memory. These stresses are compounded by increased risks for cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, and cancer. Known to have neuroprotective, cardio-protective, anti-oxidative and anti-carcinogenic effects, Rhodiola rosea extracts have also been shown to improve energy, mood, cognitive function and memory. We propose that R. rosea be investigated for use as a potential selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM) in the prevention and treatment of menopause-related fatigue, stress, depression, cognitive decline, memory impairment, cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis and cancer. This paper briefly reviews the relationship between estrogen decline and menopause-related health risks, the molecular mechanisms underlying estrogenic effects on health, and the evidence indicating beneficial effects of R. rosea extracts on these mechanisms and health risks. Mechanisms include non-genomic and genomic effects, for example: activation of intra-cellular signal transduction pathways by binding to estrogen receptors, ERα-mediated activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase with increased nitric oxide release; and anti-inflammatory effects, counteracting TNFα by inhibiting nuclear factor-Kappa-B (NF-KB) and protection of osteoblasts from hydrogen peroxide. A clinical case illustrating treatment of a menopausal woman with R. rosea is presented. Risks, benefits, gaps in knowledge, and future directions are discussed. Numerous lines of evidence indicate that R. rosea should be investigated as a potential selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM) to prevent, delay or mitigate menopause-related cognitive, psychological, cardiovascular and osteoporotic conditions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. Effects of culture conditions on spore types of Clonostachys rosea 67-1 in submerged fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, M H; Chen, Y M; Liu, J F; Li, S D; Ma, G Z

    2014-04-01

    The promising biocontrol isolate Clonostachys rosea 67-1 was investigated to clarify the effects of culture conditions on chlamydospore production in submerged fermentation. Culture conditions significantly affected both performance and types of C. rosea sporulation. C. rosea 67-1 was hard to generate chlamydospores under conventional conditions. However, the proportion of resistant spores increased to 17·4 and 15·5% in PD and rice meal media, respectively, in 8 days. Chlamydospore productivity was boosted (>threefold) with the addition of 50-200 mg l(-1) CuSO4 . The pH of the medium played a vital role in 67-1 sporulation. The percentage of chlamydospores decreased rapidly with increased pH (88·1% at pH 3·0 to 1·0% at pH 6·5). The optimal pH for conidia production was 6·0-6·5, at which chlamydospore forming was strongly inhibited. Regulating pH during fermentation contributed to improving output and proportion of resistant spores. When 67-1 was inoculated into broth with an initial pH of 6·5, followed by adjustment to pH 3·5 after 48 h, the number of chlamydospores reached 1·1 × 10(8) ml(-1). The impact of temperature and rotational speed was also analysed; an ultimate capacity of chlamydospores was achieved at 30°C and the speed above 120 rev min(-1) (P culture conditions on performance and types of C. rosea sporulation and subsequently inadequate research on the techniques for chlamydospore production. In addressing these concerns, this study provides a unique insight into the manipulation of C. rosea sporulation and chlamydospore fermentation of the biocontrol fungus. © 2013 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  15. Tyrosinase Inhibitory Effect and Antioxidative Activities of Fermented and Ethanol Extracts of Rhodiola rosea and Lonicera japonica

    OpenAIRE

    Yuh-Shuen Chen; Hua-Chian Liou; Chin-Feng Chan

    2013-01-01

    This is the first study to investigate the biological activities of fermented extracts of Rhodiola rosea L. (Crassulaceae) and Lonicera japonica Thunb. (Caprifoliaceae). Alcaligenes piechaudii CC-ESB2 fermented and ethanol extracts of Rhodiola rosea and Lonicera japonica were prepared and the antioxidative activities of different concentrations of samples were evaluated using in vitro antioxidative assays. Tyrosinase inhibition was determined by using the dopachrome method with L-DOPA as subs...

  16. Central additive effect of Ginkgo biloba and Rhodiola rosea on psychomotor vigilance task and short-term working memory accuracy

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Kuraishy, Hayder M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aim: The present study investigates the effect of combined treatment with Ginkgo biloba and/or rhodiola rosea on psychomotor vigilance task and short-term working memory accuracy. Subjects and Methods: A total number of 112 volunteers was enrolled to study the effect of Ginkgo biloba and rhodiola rosea on psychomotor vigilance task and short-term working memory accuracy as compared to placebo effects,the central cognitive effect was assessed by Critical flicker-fusion frequency (...

  17. Rhodiola rosea for mental and physical fatigue in nursing students: a randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salima Punja

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Fatigue is one of many unintended consequences of shift work in the nursing profession. Natural health products (NHPs for fatigue are becoming an increasingly popular topic of clinical study; one such NHP is Rhodiola rosea. A well-designed, rigorously conducted randomized controlled trial is required before therapeutic claims for this product can be made. OBJECTIVE: To compare the efficacy of R. rosea with placebo for reducing fatigue in nursing students on shift work. DESIGN: A parallel-group randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial of 18-55 year old students from the Faculty of Nursing from the University of Alberta, participating in clinical rotations between January 2011 and September 2011. INTERVENTIONS: Participants were randomized to take 364 mg of either R. rosea or identical placebo at the start of their wakeful period and up to one additional capsule within the following four hours on a daily basis over a 42-day period. OUTCOMES: The primary outcome was reduction in fatigue over the 42-day trial period measured using the Vitality-subscale of the RAND-36, cross-validated by the visual analogue scale for fatigue (VAS-F. Secondary outcomes included health-related quality of life, individualized outcomes assessment, and adverse events. RESULTS: A total of 48 participants were randomized to R. rosea (n = 24 or placebo (n = 24. The mean change in scores on the Vitality-subscale was significantly different between the study groups at day 42 in favor of placebo (-17.3 (95% CI -30.6, -3.9, p = 0.011, The mean change in scores on the VAS-F was also significantly difference between study groups at day 42 in favour of placebo (1.9 (95% CI 0.4, 3.5, p = 0.015. Total number of adverse events did not differ between R. rosea and placebo groups. CONCLUSION: This study indicates that among nursing students on shift work, a 42-day course of R. Rosea compared with placebo worsened fatigue; however, the results

  18. Rhodiola rosea for mental and physical fatigue in nursing students: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punja, Salima; Shamseer, Larissa; Olson, Karin; Vohra, Sunita

    2014-01-01

    Fatigue is one of many unintended consequences of shift work in the nursing profession. Natural health products (NHPs) for fatigue are becoming an increasingly popular topic of clinical study; one such NHP is Rhodiola rosea. A well-designed, rigorously conducted randomized controlled trial is required before therapeutic claims for this product can be made. To compare the efficacy of R. rosea with placebo for reducing fatigue in nursing students on shift work. A parallel-group randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial of 18-55 year old students from the Faculty of Nursing from the University of Alberta, participating in clinical rotations between January 2011 and September 2011. Participants were randomized to take 364 mg of either R. rosea or identical placebo at the start of their wakeful period and up to one additional capsule within the following four hours on a daily basis over a 42-day period. The primary outcome was reduction in fatigue over the 42-day trial period measured using the Vitality-subscale of the RAND-36, cross-validated by the visual analogue scale for fatigue (VAS-F). Secondary outcomes included health-related quality of life, individualized outcomes assessment, and adverse events. A total of 48 participants were randomized to R. rosea (n = 24) or placebo (n = 24). The mean change in scores on the Vitality-subscale was significantly different between the study groups at day 42 in favor of placebo (-17.3 (95% CI -30.6, -3.9), p = 0.011), The mean change in scores on the VAS-F was also significantly difference between study groups at day 42 in favour of placebo (1.9 (95% CI 0.4, 3.5), p = 0.015). Total number of adverse events did not differ between R. rosea and placebo groups. This study indicates that among nursing students on shift work, a 42-day course of R. Rosea compared with placebo worsened fatigue; however, the results should be interpreted with caution. Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01278992.

  19. Endophytic colonization of tomato plants by the biological control agent Clonostachys rosea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høyer, Anna Kaja; Jørgensen, Hans Jørgen Lyngs; Amby, Daniel Buchvaldt

    Fungal endophytes live naturally inside plants without causing symptoms. On the contrary, they can promote plant growth and increase tolerance to abiotic and biotic stress. These beneficial effects have increased the agricultural interest for exploitation of fungal isolates with an endophytic life......-style. Clonostachys rosea occurs naturally world-wide and is capable of colonizing many different habitats. The fungus is primarily known as a versatile biological control agent. However, it has also been reported as a plant endophyte in, e.g., soybean, red clover and cacao. The C. rosea isolate IK726 efficiently...... controls seed- and soil-borne diseases and can furthermore promote plant growth. However, it is not known whether IK726 can colonize plants internally and therefore, the objective of the present study was to examine the possibility of an endophytic life-style of IK726 in tomato. Tomato seeds were sown...

  20. Origin and development of plasma membrane derived invaginations in Vinca rosea l.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahlberg, P.; Walkinshaw, C.; Olson, K.

    1971-01-01

    The occurrence, morphology, and possible ontogeny of plasma-membrane-related structures are described which can develop into invaginations or intravacuolar formations. An underlying study of meristematic tissues from the shoot of Vinca rosea supports the interpretation that endocytosis does occur in plant cells and that it is appropriate to refer to these structures as endocytoses. The function of these invaginations or their content remains to be elucidated.

  1. Pengaruh Naungan Yang Berbeda Terhadap Jumlah Stomata Dan Ukuran Porus Stomata Daun Zephyranthes Rosea Lindl

    OpenAIRE

    Haryanti, Sri

    2010-01-01

    The aims of this experiment was to study the effect difference of shelter towards the sum of stomata and longth and wide porus of stomata Zephyranthes rosea. The experiment was performent by using Randomized Complete Design (3 treatment with 3 replicatesfor each treatment). experiment. The treatment was 1 paranet,2 paranets and control (no paranet). Parameter was sum of leaf and wide of leaf. Data was analized by using Anova test. The result of this experiment indicated that ...

  2. Effect of commercial Rhodiola rosea on CYP enzyme activity in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thu, Ole Kristian; Spigset, Olav; Nilsen, Odd Georg; Hellum, Bent

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of the herbal drug Rhodiola rosea on the activity of the cytochrome P-450 (CYP) enzymes CYP1A2, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, and CYP3A4 in humans. In a randomized cross-over study, 13 healthy volunteers were given a cocktail with single doses of the CYP substrates caffeine (CYP1A2), losartan (CYP2C9), omeprazole (CYP2C19), dextromethorphan (CYP2D6), and midazolam (CYP3A4) with and without 14 days of pretreatment with a commercially available R. rosea product (Arctic Root, produced by the Swedish Herbal Institute). Four hours after intake of the drug cocktail, a blood sample was obtained, the serum concentrations of the drugs and their metabolites were analyzed, and the metabolic ratios were calculated as a measure of CYP enzyme activity. A statistically significant 21% decrease in the EXP-3174/losartan ratio was found after pretreatment with R. rosea (p = 0.023), indicating a reduced CYP2C9 metabolic activity. The effect was more pronounced in CYP2C9 extensive metabolizers than in CYP2C9 intermediate and poor metabolizers. For the other CYP enzymes tested, no significant effects were observed. This study indicates that R. rosea inhibits the metabolic capacity of CYP2C9 in humans. Although the effect is modest, it might be clinically relevant during treatment with CYP2C9 substrates with a narrow therapeutic index, such as phenytoin and warfarin.

  3. In vitro inhibition of cytochrome P-450 activities and quantification of constituents in a selection of commercial Rhodiola rosea products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thu, Ole Kristian; Nilsen, Odd Georg; Hellum, Bent

    2016-12-01

    Rhodiola rosea L. (Crassulaceae) products are popular natural remedies with a worldwide distribution. Recent studies have revealed potent CYP inhibition by R. rosea extracts both in vitro and in vivo, but information on in vitro CYP inhibition by commercial products are lacking. Variations in commercial R. rosea product quality have also been published. This study evaluates the variation of in vitro CYP inhibition potential and product quality of six commercially available R. rosea products. Human CYPs isolated from baculovirus-infected cell system were incubated with testosterone (CYP3A4), dextromethorphan (CYP2D6) or phenacetin (CYP1A2). Positive CYP inhibitors ketoconazole (CYP3A4), quinidine (CYP2D6) and β-naphtoflavone (CYP1A2) were used as controls. Quantification of rosavin, rosarin, rosin, tyrosol and salidroside were used to evaluate R. rosea content. IC50 values ranged from 7.2-106.6 μg/mL for CYP3A4, 13.0-186.1 μg/mL for 2D6 and 10.7-116.0 μg/mL for 1A2. The tincture formulation of R. rosea was the strongest inhibitor giving the lowest IC50 values of 7.2 ± 0.7, 13 ± 1.7 and 10.7 ± 5.6 μg/mL, respectively. CYP3A4 was significantly more inhibited by the different products than CYP1A2 (p rosea product. Constituent concentrations were not linked to enzyme inhibition. The present results show a large variation in inhibitory potential between the products. Several of the products demonstrate similar inhibition levels as the product Arctic Root already proven to inhibit CYP enzyme activity in man.

  4. Synergistic interactions between the antinociceptive effect of Rhodiola rosea extract and B vitamins in the mouse formalin test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montiel-Ruiz, Rosa Mariana; González-Trujano, María Eva; Déciga-Campos, Myrna

    2013-11-15

    In this study, the pharmacological interactions between a Rhodiola rosea ethanol extract and B-vitamins such as thiamine (B1), riboflavine (B2), pyridoxine (B6), cyanocobalamin (B12) and a mixture of vitamins B1+B6+B12 was investigated in the mouse formalin test. Individual dose response curves of the Rhodiola rosea ethanol extract, as well as B-vitamins alone or in a mixture were evaluated in mice in which nociception was induced with 2% formalin intraplantarly. The antinociceptive mechanisms of the Rhodiola rosea were investigated by exploring the role of the opioid and serotonin receptors and the nitric oxide pathway. Isobolographic analysis was used to evaluate the pharmacological interactions between the Rhodiola rosea ethanol extract and each B-vitamin individually or the mixture of vitamins B1+B6+B12 by using the ED30 and a fixed 1:1 ratio combination. Administration of the Rhodiola rosea extract alone or in combination with all of the vitamins produced a significant and dose-dependent antinociceptive response. The antinociceptive effect of the Rhodiola rosea extract (ED50=81 mg/kg, p.o.) was significant and reverted in the presence of antagonists of the 5-HT1A, GABA/BDZs and opioid receptors and by blocking mediators of the nitric oxide/cGMP/K(+) channels pathway. Isobolograms demonstrate that all of the combinations investigated in this study produced a synergistic interaction experimental ED30 values were significantly smaller than those calculated theoretically. These results provide evidence that a Rhodiola rosea ethanol extract in combination with B-vitamins produces a significant diminution in the nociceptive response in a synergistic manner, which is controlled by various mechanisms. These findings could aid in the design of clinical studies and suggest that these combinations could be applied for pain therapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Two potent cytochrome P450 2D6 inhibitors found in Rhodiola rosea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wen; Zhang, Tingting; Wang, Zhi; Liu, Tao; Liu, Yanping; Cao, Zhihong; Sui, Zhongguo

    2013-12-01

    Throughout the world, in particular in Russia, Northern Europe and China, Rhodiola species are used as herb supplements. Previously, we found that the extract of Rhodiola rosea, one of the most widely used Rhodiola species, had an inhibitory effect on the catalytic activity of cytochrome P450 2D6. Here, its inhibitory components were identified. A human liver microsomal in vitro system was used with dextromethorphan as substrate. The production rate of destrorphan, a metabolite of dextromethorphan, was used to measure enzyme activity. The concentration of destrorphan in the samples was measured using LC-MS/MS. Inhibitory activity of eight main components from Rhodiola rosea was evaluated. Rhodiosin and rhodionin showed inhibitory activity with IC50 values of 0.761 microM and 0.420 microM, respectively. The other components showed no obvious inhibition (with a residual enzyme activity of more than 90%). Both rhodiosin and rhodionin were determined to be non-competitive inhibitors with Ki values of 0.769 microM and 0.535 microM. Two of the main Rhodiola rosea compounds, rhodiosin and rhodionin, can inhibit cytochrome P450 2D6 non-competitively with high specificity which could have implications for interactions with co-administered drugs.

  6. Biometric features and content of phenolic compounds of roseroot (Rhodiola rosea L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artur Adamczak

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Roseroot (Rhodiola rosea L. belongs to important herbs in folk medicine of Scandinavia, Russia, Mongolia, and China. Its therapeutic usage is mainly associated with the adaptogenic properties of this species. Roseroot is characterized by high morphological, phytochemical, and genetic differentiation. The aim of the present work was to determine the biometric and phytochemical co-variability of this taxon. Samples of Rh. rosea were collected from 4-year-old experimental field cultivation established by rhizome division in western Poland. For each plant, the biometric measurements of the clumps, shoots, leaves, and rhizomes with roots were carried out. In the underground plant parts (raw material, the contents of the main active compounds (phenylpropanoids, phenylethanoids, phenolic acids, and catechins were determined by the HPLC-DAD method. K-means clustering analysis showed three well-separated plant groups of Rh. rosea that differed significantly in the level of most of the investigated components. It was interesting that in the raw material with a high content of phenylethanoids, a low level of phenyl­propanoids was found, and vice versa. These chemical groups clearly differed in luxuriance of plants, too. The important diagnostic feature was also the degree of leaf serration. The morphological and phytochemical co-variability of roseroot was confirmed by the correlations detected between some active compounds (especially catechins and rosavin and biometric traits describing the size and serration of leaves, the size of clumps and shoots as well as the weight of the raw material.

  7. Rosenroot (Rhodiola rosea): traditional use, chemical composition, pharmacology and clinical efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panossian, A; Wikman, G; Sarris, J

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this review article was to summarize accumulated information related to chemical composition, pharmacological activity, traditional and official use of Rhodiola rosea L. in medicine. In total approximately 140 compounds were isolated from roots and rhizome - monoterpene alcohols and their glycosides, cyanogenic glycosides, aryl glycosides, phenylethanoids, phenylpropanoids and their glycosides, flavonoids, flavonlignans, proanthocyanidins and gallic acid derivatives. Studies on isolated organs, tissues, cells and enzymes have revealed that Rhodiola preparations exhibit adaptogenic effect including, neuroprotective, cardioprotectiv e, anti-fatigue, antidepressive, anxiolytic, nootropic, life-span increasing effects and CNS stimulating activity. A number of clinical trials demonstrate that repeated administration of R. rosea extract SHR-5 exerts an anti-fatigue effect that increases mental performance (particularly the ability to concentrate in healthy subjects), and reduces burnout in patients with fatigue syndrome. Encouraging results exist for the use of Rhodiola in mild to moderate depression, and generalized anxiety. Several mechanisms of action possibly contributing to the clinical effect have been identified for Rhodiola extracts. They include interactions with HPA-system (cortisol-reducing), protein kinases p-JNK, nitric oxide, and defense mechanism proteins (e.g. heat shock proteins Hsp 70 and FoxO/DAF-16). Lack of interaction with other drugs and adverse effects in the course of clinical trials make it potentially attractive for use as a safe medication. In conclusion, Rhodiola rosea has robust traditional and pharmacological evidence of use in fatigue, and emerging evidence supporting cognition and mood.

  8. Decolorization and detoxification of sulfonated azo dye methyl orange by Kocuria rosea MTCC 1532.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parshetti, G K; Telke, A A; Kalyani, D C; Govindwar, S P

    2010-04-15

    Kocuria rosea (MTCC 1532) showed 100% decolorization of methyl orange (50 mg l(-1)) under static condition. The optimum pH and temperature for dye decolorization was 6.8 and 30 degrees C, respectively. The K. rosea (MTCC 1532) showed maximum decolorization of methyl orange when growth medium containing yeast extract as compared to other substrates. The culture exhibited significant ability to decolorize repeated additions of dye, with reduction in time up to 12 h at eighth dye aliquot addition. Significant induction of reductases (NADH-DCIP reductase and azoreductase) suggests its involvement in decolorization of methyl orange. The metabolites formed after decolorization of methyl orange, such as 4-amino sulfonic acid and N,N'-dimethyl p-phenyldiamine were characterized using FTIR and MS. Phytotoxicity and microbial toxicity study showed the methyl orange was toxic and metabolites obtained after its decolorization was nontoxic for experimental plants (Triticum aestivum and Phaseolus mungo) and bacteria (K. rosea, Pseudomonas aurugenosa and Azatobacter vinelandii). 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Preventive Effects of Rhodiola rosea L. on Bleomycin-Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ke; Si, Xiao-Ping; Huang, Jian; Han, Jian; Liang, Xu; Xu, Xiao-Bo; Wang, Yi-Ting; Li, Guo-Yu; Wang, Hang-Yu; Wang, Jin-Hui

    2016-06-03

    Rhodiola rosea L. (RRL) possesses a wide range of pharmacological properties, including lung-protective activity, and has been utilized in folk medicine for several 100 years. However, the lung-protective mechanism remains unclear. This study investigated the possible lung-protective activity mechanism of RRL in a pulmonary fibrosis (PF) rat model. Lung fibrotic injury was induced in Sprague-Dawley rats by single intratracheal instillation of saline containing bleomycin (BLM; 5 mg/kg). The rats were administered 125, 250, or 500 mg/kg of a 95% ethanol extract of RRL for 28 days. The animals were killed to detect changes in body weight, serum levels of glutathione (GSH) and total superoxide dismutase (T-SOD), as well as lung tissue hydroxyproline (HYP) content. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), and interleukin 6 (IL-6) levels were measured in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Hematoxylin and eosin, Masson's trichrome, and immunohistochemical staining were performed to observe the histopathological changes in lung tissues. Additionally, target-related proteins were measured by Western blotting. RRL alleviated the loss of body weight induced by instilling BLM in PF rats, particularly at the 500 mg/kg per day dose. RRL reduced HYP (p < 0.01) and increased GSH and T-SOD contents. BALF levels of TNF-α, TGF-β1, and IL-6 decreased significantly in the RRL-treated groups. Expression levels of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and α-smooth muscle actin decreased significantly in a dose-dependent manner in response to RRL. Moreover, the levels of TGF-β1 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 in lung tissues also decreased in the RRL-treated groups. RRL alleviated BLM-induced PF in rats. Our results reveal that the protective effects of RRL against fibrotic lung injury in rats are correlated with its anti-inflammatory, antioxidative, and anti-fibrotic properties. MMP-9 may play

  10. Preventive Effects of Rhodiola rosea L. on Bleomycin-Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke Zhang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Rhodiola rosea L. (RRL possesses a wide range of pharmacological properties, including lung-protective activity, and has been utilized in folk medicine for several 100 years. However, the lung-protective mechanism remains unclear. This study investigated the possible lung-protective activity mechanism of RRL in a pulmonary fibrosis (PF rat model. Lung fibrotic injury was induced in Sprague–Dawley rats by single intratracheal instillation of saline containing bleomycin (BLM; 5 mg/kg. The rats were administered 125, 250, or 500 mg/kg of a 95% ethanol extract of RRL for 28 days. The animals were killed to detect changes in body weight, serum levels of glutathione (GSH and total superoxide dismutase (T-SOD, as well as lung tissue hydroxyproline (HYP content. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1, and interleukin 6 (IL-6 levels were measured in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Hematoxylin and eosin, Masson’s trichrome, and immunohistochemical staining were performed to observe the histopathological changes in lung tissues. Additionally, target-related proteins were measured by Western blotting. RRL alleviated the loss of body weight induced by instilling BLM in PF rats, particularly at the 500 mg/kg per day dose. RRL reduced HYP (p < 0.01 and increased GSH and T-SOD contents. BALF levels of TNF-α, TGF-β1, and IL-6 decreased significantly in the RRL-treated groups. Expression levels of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9 and α-smooth muscle actin decreased significantly in a dose-dependent manner in response to RRL. Moreover, the levels of TGF-β1 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 in lung tissues also decreased in the RRL-treated groups. RRL alleviated BLM-induced PF in rats. Our results reveal that the protective effects of RRL against fibrotic lung injury in rats are correlated with its anti-inflammatory, antioxidative, and anti-fibrotic properties. MMP-9 may

  11. Evaluation of Rhodiola rosea supplementation on skeletal muscle damage and inflammation in runners following a competitive marathon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanely, R Andrew; Nieman, David C; Zwetsloot, Kevin A; Knab, Amy M; Imagita, Hidetaka; Luo, Beibei; Davis, Barbara; Zubeldia, José M

    2014-07-01

    Adaptogens modulate intracellular signaling and increase expression of heat shock protein 72 (HSP72). Rhodiola rosea (RR) is a medicinal plant with demonstrated adaptogenic properties. The purpose of this study was to measure the influence of RR supplementation on exercise-induced muscle damage, delayed onset of muscle soreness (DOMS), plasma cytokines, and extracellular HSP72 (eHSP72) in experienced runners completing a marathon. Experienced marathon runners were randomized to RR (n=24, 6 female, 18 male) or placebo (n=24, 7 female, 17 male) groups and under double-blinded conditions ingested 600mg/day RR extract or placebo for 30days prior to, the day of, and seven days post-marathon. Blood samples were collected, and vertical jump and DOMS assessed the day before, 15min post- and 1.5h post-marathon. DOMS was also assessed for seven days post-marathon. Marathon race performance did not differ between RR and placebo groups (3.87±0.12h and 3.93±0.12h, respectively, p=0.722). Vertical jump decreased post-marathon (time effect, p0.300). In conclusion, RR supplementation (600mg/day) for 30days before running a marathon did not attenuate the post-marathon decrease in muscle function, or increases in muscle damage, DOMS, eHSP72, or plasma cytokines in experienced runners. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Transformation of Rhodiola rosea with rol-genes from Agrobacterium rhizogenes to enhance the production of bioactive compounds and analyses of key genes in their pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stofberg, Jimmi; Antypa, Natalia-Meropi; Müller, Renate

    . rhizogenes-mediated transformation of leaf explants to obtain HRs. It consists of two steps: a) growth of HRs in bioreactors and b) regeneration of entire plants derived from nodular tissue. Another part of the study involves gene expression analyses of key genes in the biosynthetic pathway of salidroside...... to decreasing wild populations and climate changes threaten the plant further. Hence, alternatives are needed to circumvent this development. The objective of this study is to increase the content of bioactive compounds of R. rosea in planta. Transformation with root oncogenic loci (rol) genes from...... Agrobacterium rhizogenes leads to development of hairy roots (HRs) at the infection site. Transformed HRs have for several plant resulted in a higher contents of secondary metabolites compared to untransformed wild types. The method comprises clonal propagation of in vitro and in vivo material followed by A...

  13. The effects of Rhodiola rosea extract on 5-HT level, cell proliferation and quantity of neurons at cerebral hippocampus of depressive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Q G; Zeng, Y S; Qu, Z Q; Tang, J Y; Qin, Y J; Chung, P; Wong, R; Hägg, U

    2009-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of Rhodiola rosea extract and depression on the serotonin (5-HT) level, cell proliferation and quantity of neurons at cerebral hippocampus of depressive rats induced by Chronic Mild Stress (CMS). Seventy male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into seven groups (10 per group): normal control group, untreated depressive rat model group, negative control group, positive control group, low dosage Rhodiola rosea extract (1.5g/kg) group, medium dosage Rhodiola rosea extract (3g/kg) group and high dosage Rhodiola rosea extract (6g/kg) group. After the depressive rats induced by CMS had received Rhodiola rosea extract for 3 weeks, the 5-HT levels at cerebral hippocampus were detected by high performance liquid chromatography. Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) was injected in vivo to label the proliferating cells at hippocampus, and morphometry was used to count the hippocampal neurons. The results showed that the 5-HT level of the three experimental groups had recovered to normal status. The immunohistochemistry of hippocampus BrdU positive cells had returned to the normal level in the group of depressive rats with low dosage Rhodiola rosea extract. In conclusion the results demonstrated that Rhodiola rosea extract could improve 5-HT level in hippocampus in depressive rats, and low dosage Rhodiola rosea could induce neural stem cell proliferation at hippocampus to return to normal level, repairing the injured neurons at hippocampus.

  14. Clonostachys rosea reduces spot blotch in barley by inhibiting prepenetration growth and sporulation of Bipolaris sorokiniana without inducing resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Birgit; Lübeck, Peter Stephensen; Jørgensen, Hans J.L.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several diseases threaten cereal production and fungicides are therefore widely used. Biological control is an environmentally friendly alternative and the fungus Clonostachys rosea is a versatile antagonist, effective against several plant diseases. We studied the ability of C. rosea...... to control barley leaf pathogens and the mechanisms behind the inhibition emphasising induced resistance. RESULTS: Under controlled conditions, spray application of C. rosea isolate IK726 to barley leaves reduced Bipolaris sorokiniana severity up to 70% when applied 24 h before or simultaneously...... as the pathogen, whereas application 24 h after the pathogen had no effect. IK726 also reduced the sporulation capacity of B. sorokiniana. Microscopy of B. sorokiniana infection revealed that IK726 primarily inhibited conidial germination and appressorium formation while further pathogen development and host...

  15. Rapid resolution liquid chromatography (RRLC) analysis for quality control of Rhodiola rosea roots and commercial standardized products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yuan-Chun; Wang, Xiao-Qiang; Hou, Fei Fei; Ma, Jie; Luo, Mai; Lu, Shane; Jin, Peter; Terevsky, Nelly; Chen, Alice; Xu, Iris; Patel, Asmita V; Gorecki, Dariusz

    2011-05-01

    A simple, sensitive and reliable reversed phase Rapid Resolution Liquid Chromatography (RRLC) method was developed and validated for six biologically active compounds (salidroside, tyrosol, rosarin, rosavin, rosin and rosiridin) in Rhodiola rosea L. roots and powder extracts. The method uses a Phenomenex C18 (2)-HST column at 40 degrees C with a neutral gradient system mobile phase (H20 and acetonitrile), a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min, and UV detection wavelengths set at 205 and 254 nm, simultaneously. Baseline separation of the six active compounds was achieved within 8 minutes. The average percentages of rosavins (rosarin, rosavin, and rosin) in authentic R. rosea roots and root powder extracts were quantitatively determined and a characteristic R. rosea roots RRLC profile was established. The RRLC method is accurate and sensitive; in addition, it effectively increases the sample analysis throughput compared with conventional HPLC.

  16. Purple pitcher plant (Sarracenia rosea Dieback and partial community disassembly following experimental storm surge in a coastal pitcher plant bog.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J Abbott

    Full Text Available Sea-level rise and frequent intense hurricanes associated with climate change will result in recurrent flooding of inland systems such as Gulf Coastal pitcher plant bogs by storm surges. These surges can transport salt water and sediment to freshwater bogs, greatly affecting their biological integrity. Purple pitcher plants (Sarracenia rosea are Gulf Coast pitcher plant bog inhabitants that could be at a disadvantage under this scenario because their pitcher morphology may leave them prone to collection of saline water and sediment after a surge. We investigated the effects of storm surge water salinity and sediment type on S. rosea vitality, plant community structure, and bog soil-water conductivity. Plots (containing ≥1 ramet of S. rosea were experimentally flooded with fresh or saline water crossed with one of three sediment types (local, foreign, or no sediment. There were no treatment effects on soil-water conductivity; nevertheless, direct exposure to saline water resulted in significantly lower S. rosea cover until the following season when a prescribed fire and regional drought contributed to the decline of all the S. rosea to near zero percent cover. There were also significant differences in plant community structure between treatments over time, reflecting how numerous species increased in abundance and a few species decreased in abundance. However, in contrast to S. rosea, most of the other species in the community appeared resilient to the effects of storm surge. Thus, although the community may be somewhat affected by storm surge, those few species that are particularly sensitive to the storm surge disturbance will likely drop out of the community and be replaced by more resilient species. Depending on the longevity of these biological legacies, Gulf Coastal pitcher plant bogs may be incapable of fully recovering if they become exposed to storm surge more frequently due to climate change.

  17. Purple pitcher plant (Sarracenia rosea) Dieback and partial community disassembly following experimental storm surge in a coastal pitcher plant bog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Matthew J; Battaglia, Loretta L

    2015-01-01

    Sea-level rise and frequent intense hurricanes associated with climate change will result in recurrent flooding of inland systems such as Gulf Coastal pitcher plant bogs by storm surges. These surges can transport salt water and sediment to freshwater bogs, greatly affecting their biological integrity. Purple pitcher plants (Sarracenia rosea) are Gulf Coast pitcher plant bog inhabitants that could be at a disadvantage under this scenario because their pitcher morphology may leave them prone to collection of saline water and sediment after a surge. We investigated the effects of storm surge water salinity and sediment type on S. rosea vitality, plant community structure, and bog soil-water conductivity. Plots (containing ≥1 ramet of S. rosea) were experimentally flooded with fresh or saline water crossed with one of three sediment types (local, foreign, or no sediment). There were no treatment effects on soil-water conductivity; nevertheless, direct exposure to saline water resulted in significantly lower S. rosea cover until the following season when a prescribed fire and regional drought contributed to the decline of all the S. rosea to near zero percent cover. There were also significant differences in plant community structure between treatments over time, reflecting how numerous species increased in abundance and a few species decreased in abundance. However, in contrast to S. rosea, most of the other species in the community appeared resilient to the effects of storm surge. Thus, although the community may be somewhat affected by storm surge, those few species that are particularly sensitive to the storm surge disturbance will likely drop out of the community and be replaced by more resilient species. Depending on the longevity of these biological legacies, Gulf Coastal pitcher plant bogs may be incapable of fully recovering if they become exposed to storm surge more frequently due to climate change.

  18. Accelerated ripening of Kedong sufu with autochthonous starter cultures Kocuria rosea KDF3 and its protease KP3 as adjuncts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Z; Chen, H; Lv, X T; Deng, H L; Chen, X; Li, J J; Guo, L

    2014-04-01

    Application of autochthonous strain Kocuria rosea KDF3 and its protease KP3 as adjuncts for acceleration of Kedong sufu ripening. Kedong sufu was manufactured using autochthonous cultures (batch A), K. rosea KDF3 plus autochthonous cultures (batch B) and protease KP3 plus autochthonous cultures (batch C). The effects of certain key factors on the quality of sufu were analysed during a 150-day ripening period. The physicochemical properties of sufu samples from batches B and C after 120 days of ripening met the national standard requirements and samples from batch A after 150 days of ripening. The sensory evaluations of sufu samples from batches B and C after 120 days of ripening and from batch A after 150 days of ripening showed no significant differences (P > 0·05). Furthermore, the mechanism underlying the shorter ripening time and typical sensory quality of sufu prepared with K. rosea KDF3 or protease KP3 was partly revealed by profiles of peptides and free amino acids. The maturation times of Kedong sufu were shortened by 30 days, and the desired characteristics were obtained by adding K. rosea KDF3 or its protease KP3. Kocuria rosea KDF3 or its protease KP3 can hasten sufu maturation. They could be used as adjuncts or additives for accelerating the ripening of Kedong sufu. This study is the first report of using autochthonous strain K. rosea KDF3 or its protease KP3 as adjuncts for accelerating Kedong sufu ripening. The results are useful for characterizing the ripening of Kedong sufu, and they lay the foundation for pilot plant tests and full-scale plant tests. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  19. [Effects of Rhodiola rosea on body weight and intake of sucrose and water in depressive rats induced by chronic mild stress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qiao-Ge; Zeng, Yuan-Shan; Tang, Jiu-Yu; Qin, Ya-Jing; Chen, Sui-Jun; Zhong, Zhi-Qiang

    2008-09-01

    To explore the effects of Rhodiola rosea on the body weight and the intake of sucrose and water in depressive rats induced by chronic mild stress.dz A total of 70 male SD rats were divided into seven groups, including normal control group (treated with 0.5% sodium carboxymethycellulose), untreated group, negative control group (treated with 0.5% sodium carboxymethycellulose), positive control group (treated with fluoxetine), low-, medium- and high-dose Rhodiola rosea group (treated with 1.5, 3, 6 g/kg Rhodiola rosea respectively). Except for rats in normal control group, the other sixty rats endured chronic stress for 4 weeks to establish the depression model. After that, rats were administered Rhodiola rosea for 3 weeks. During the whole experiment, the body weight, and sucrose intake, tap water intake of all rats were examined once a week. After the termination of the stress regime, compared with the normal control group, the body weight and 1% sucrose intake in depressive rats were decreased. After 3-week Rhodiola rosea treatment, the body weight and 1% sucrose intake increased in rats of the low-dose Rhodiola rosea group and recovered to the level of the normal control group. Low-dose Rhodiola rosea can increase the body weight and sucrose intake of depressive rats, making them recover to normal status.

  20. Citrus aurantium and Rhodiola rosea in combination reduce visceral white adipose tissue and increase hypothalamic norepinephrine in a rat model of diet-induced obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verpeut, Jessica L; Walters, Amy L; Bello, Nicholas T

    2013-06-01

    Extracts from the immature fruit of Citrus aurantium are often used for weight loss but are reported to produce adverse cardiovascular effects. Root extracts of Rhodiola rosea have notable antistress properties. The hypothesis of these studies was that C aurantium (6% synephrine) and R rosea (3% rosavins, 1% salidroside) in combination would improve diet-induced obesity alterations in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. In normal-weight animals fed standard chow, acute administration of C aurantium (1-10 mg/kg) or R rosea (2-20 mg/kg) alone did not reduce deprivation-induced food intake, but C aurantium (5.6 mg/kg) + R rosea (20 mg/kg) produced a 10.5% feeding suppression. Animals maintained (13 weeks) on a high-fat diet (60% fat) were exposed to 10-day treatments of C aurantium (5.6 mg/kg) or R rosea (20 mg/kg) alone or in combination. Additional groups received vehicle (2% ethanol) or were pair fed to the C aurantium + R rosea group. Although high-fat diet intake and weight loss were not influenced, C aurantium + R rosea had a 30% decrease in visceral fat weight compared with the other treatments. Only the C aurantium group had an increased heart rate (+7%) compared with vehicle. In addition, C aurantium + R rosea administration resulted in an elevation (+15%) in hypothalamic norepinephrine and an elevation (+150%) in frontal cortex dopamine compared with the pair-fed group. These initial findings suggest that treatments of C aurantium + R rosea have actions on central monoamine pathways and have the potential to be beneficial for the treatment of obesity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Differential effects of Rhodiola rosea on regulatory T cell differentiation and interferon‑γ production in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xi; Li, Pingping; Zhang, Peng; Chu, Ming; Liu, Hongju; Chen, Xiaoping; Ge, Qing

    2016-07-01

    Rhodiola rosea (R. rosea), a type of adaptogen, has been previously reported to exhibit immunostimulating activity in rodents and in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in vitro. To examine the effect of R. rosea on T cells under simulated microgravity, spaceflight analogs of human head‑down bed rest (HDBR) at ‑6˚ and murine hind limb unloading (HU) were used. A decrease in the levels of interferon‑γ (IFN‑γ) and interleukin‑17 (IL‑17) and an increase in regulatory T (Treg) cells were observed in the placebo group following HDBR. The R. rosea treated HBDR group demonstrated further decreased IFN‑γ production, however, R. rosea exhibited no effect on the ratio of circulating Tregs or Treg cell differentiation. By contrast, the treatment of R. rosea on human T cells in vitro did not alter IFN‑γ secretion, however, Treg differentiation was significantly reduced. An R. rosea‑induced upregulation of hypoxia‑inducible factor 1α (HIF‑1α) contributed to the suppression of Treg differentiation in vitro. Differences in the effect of R. rosea in vitro and in vivo were also observed using a mouse model of microgravity. The results of the current study suggest that R. rosea has differential modulatory effects on T cells in vivo and in vitro and care should be taken when evaluating the effects of R. rosea on the immune system.

  2. Rhodiola rosea extracts and salidroside decrease the growth of bladder cancer cell lines via inhibition of the mTOR pathway and induction of autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhongbo; Li, Xuesen; Simoneau, Anne R; Jafari, Mahtab; Zi, Xiaolin

    2012-03-01

    The incidence of human urinary bladder cancer increases markedly with age, suggesting a mechanistic connection between aging and bladder carcinogenesis and a potential use of anti-aging agents in bladder cancer chemoprevention. Rhodiola rosea, growing in high altitude or cold regions of the world, has been reported to have anti-aging effects in Drosophila. We demonstrated that a R. rosea extract and one of its bioactive components, salidroside, inhibited the growth of bladder cancer cell lines with a minimal effect on nonmalignant bladder epithelial cells TEU-2. Interestingly, the R. rosea extract and salidroside component exhibited a selective ability to inhibit the growth of p53 knockout primary mouse embryo fibroblasts (p53-/- MEFs) compared to their wild-type counterparts. The growth inhibitory effects of the R. rosea extract and salidroside were, however, attenuated in TSC2 and p53 double knock MEFs (TSC2-/-, p53-/- MEFs), suggesting that TSC2 protein is, at least in part, required for the growth inhibitory effects of the R. rosea extract and salidroside. The R. rosea extract and salidroside treatment of UMUC3 cells resulted in an increase of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-α phosphorylation and a decrease of 4E-BP1 phosphorylation, leading to increased binding of 4E-BP1 to m7 GTP. These results indicate that the R. rosea extract and salidroside inhibit translation initiation. Furthermore, both the R. rosea extract and salidroside treatment of UMUC3 cells caused a significant percentage of cells undergoing autophagy. Therefore, the R. rosea extract and salidroside deserve further study as novel agents for chemoprevention of bladder carcinogenesis. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Citrus aurantium and Rhodiola rosea in combination reduce visceral white adipose tissue and increase hypothalamic norepinephrine in a rat model of diet-induced obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verpeut, Jessica L.; Walters, Amy L.; Bello, Nicholas T.

    2013-01-01

    Extracts from the immature fruit of Citrus aurantium are often used for weight loss but are reported to produce adverse cardiovascular effects. Root extracts of Rhodiola rosea have notable antistress properties. The hypothesis of these studies was that C aurantium (6% synephrine) and R rosea (3% rosavins, 1% salidroside) in combination would improve diet-induced obesity alterations in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. In normal-weight animals fed standard chow, acute administration of C aurantium (1-10 mg/kg) or R rosea (2-20 mg/kg) alone did not reduce deprivation-induced food intake, but C aurantium (5.6 mg/kg) + R rosea (20 mg/kg) produced a 10.5% feeding suppression. Animals maintained (13 weeks) on a high-fat diet (60% fat) were exposed to 10-day treatments of C aurantium (5.6 mg/kg) or R rosea (20 mg/kg) alone or in combination. Additional groups received vehicle (2% ethanol) or were pair fed to the C aurantium + R rosea group. Although high-fat diet intake and weight loss were not influenced, C aurantium + R rosea had a 30% decrease in visceral fat weight compared with the other treatments. Only the C aurantium group had an increased heart rate (+7%) compared with vehicle. In addition, C aurantium + R rosea administration resulted in an elevation (+15%) in hypothalamic norepinephrine and an elevation (+150%) in frontal cortex dopamine compared with the pair-fed group. These initial findings suggest that treatments of C aurantium + R rosea have actions on central monoamine pathways and have the potential to be beneficial for the treatment of obesity. PMID:23746567

  4. Is There a Link between Human Herpesvirus Infection and Toll-like Receptors in the Pathogenesis of Pityriasis Rosea? A Case-control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Ela, Mostafa Abou; Shaarawy, Eman; El-Komy, Mohamed; Fawzy, Marwa; Hay, Rania Abdel; Hegazy, Rehab; Sharobim, Amin; Moustafa, Nadine; Rashed, Laila; Sayed Amr, Khalda Sayed

    2016-12-01

    Human herpesvirus (HHV) 6 and 7 are involved in the pathogenesis of pityriasis rosea (PR). Our aim was to evaluate the role of the innate immune response in PR through the detection of Toll-like receptors (TLR) 2, 3, 4, 7, 8, and 9 expression in the skin of affected patients and to detect the possibility of being induced by HHV-6 and/or HHV-7 viral coexistence in these patients. Twenty-four patients with PR and 24 healthy controls were included in this case-control study. Biopsy was obtained from the PR lesion and from the healthy skin of controls for detection of HHV-6 and 7 as well as TLRs 2, 3, 4, 7, 8, and 9 gene expression using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Significantly elevated expression of all studied TLRs and significantly higher viral load of HHV-6 and 7 in PR cases were detected. A significant higher expression of TLR2 and 4 in HHV-7 positive cases and a significant positive correlation between TLR9 and HHV-7 viral load were documented. HHV6 and 7 may also be involved in the pathogenesis of PR via TLR pathways.

  5. Dual effects of Metarhizium spp. and Clonostachys rosea against an insect and a seed-borne pathogen in wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyser, Chad A; Jensen, Birgit; Meyling, Nicolai V

    2016-03-01

    Crops are often prone to both insect herbivory and disease, which necessitate multiple control measures. Ideally, an efficacious biological control agent must adequately control the target organism and not be inhibited by other biological control agents when applied simultaneously. Wheat seeds infected with the plant pathogen Fusarium culmorum were treated with Metarhizium brunneum or M. flavoviride and Clonostachys rosea individually and in combination, with the expectation to control both root-feeding insects and the pathogen. Emerging roots were evaluated for disease and then placed with Tenebrio molitor larvae, which were monitored for infection. Plant disease symptoms were nearly absent for seeds treated with C. rosea, both individually and in combination with Metarhizium spp. Furthermore, roots grown from seeds treated with Metarhizium spp. caused significant levels of fungal infection in larvae when used individually or combined with C. rosea. However, cotreated seeds showed reduced virulence towards T. molitor when compared with treatments using Metarhizium spp. only. This study clearly shows that seed treatments with both the entomopathogenic fungus M. brunneum and the mycoparasitic fungus C. rosea can protect plant roots from insects and disease. The dual-treatment approach to biological control presented here is consistent with the ideals of IPM strategies. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  6. Capillary electrophoresis as a fast and efficient alternative for the analysis of Urceola rosea leaf extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gufler, Vera; Ngoc, Hieu Nguyen; Stuppner, Hermann; Ganzera, Markus

    2018-03-01

    Urceola rosea, a plant whose leaves are used as food and for medical purposes, is a climbing liana found in many south-east Asian countries. Main polar compounds are flavonoids (kaempferol and quercetin glycosides) and phenolic acids. As an alternative to the established HPLC method their analysis by capillary electrophoresis is described for the first time. It was possible in <8min with a 25mM sodium tetraborate decahydrate solution with pH8.5, at a capillary temperature of 40°C and an applied voltage of 25kV. Up to five compounds could be quantified in different methanolic U. rosea extracts, which showed to be of variable composition; e.g. the content of total flavonoids ranged from 0.29 to 1.08%. In respect to quantitative results as well as validation parameters (e.g. R 2 ≥0.994, recovery rates from 95.5 to 103.6%, inter-day precision≤4.5%) the CE method was well comparable to HPLC. However, in terms of required analysis time and environmental sustainability capillary electrophoresis is definitely advantageous. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Metabolic profiling of Rhodiola rosea rhizomes by ¹H NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioset, Karine Ndjoko; Nyberg, Nils T; Van Diermen, Daphne; Malnoe, Pia; Hostettmann, Kurt; Shikov, Alexander N; Jaroszewski, Jerzy W

    2011-01-01

    Rhodiola rosea is a broadly used medicinal plant with largely unexplored natural variability in secondary metabolite levels. The aim of this work was to develop a non-target procedure for ¹H NMR spectroscopic fingerprinting of rhizome extracts for pattern recognition analysis and identification of secondary metabolites responsible for differences in sample composition. To achieve this, plants from three different geographic areas (Swiss Alps, Finland, and Altai region in Siberia) were investigated. A sample preparation procedure was developed in order to remove polymeric polyphenols as the ¹H NMR analysis of low-molecular-weight metabolites was hampered by the presence of tannins. Principal component analysis disclosed tight clustering of samples according to population. PCA models based on the aromatic region of the spectra showed that the first two components reflected changes in the content of salidroside and rosavin, respectively, the rosavin content being negatively correlated to that of rhodiocyanoside A and minor aromatics. Score plots and non-parametric variance tests demonstrated population-dependent changes according to harvest time. Data consistency was assessed using score plots and box-and-whisker graphs. In addition, a procedure for presenting loadings of PCA models based on bucketed data as high-resolution plots, which are reminiscent of real ¹H NMR spectra and help to identify latent biomarkers, is presented. This study demonstrated the usefulness of the established procedure for multivariate non-target ¹H NMR metabolic profiling of Rhodiola rosea. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Artificial neural network optimization of Althaea rosea seeds polysaccharides and its antioxidant activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Feng; Liu, Wenhui; Tian, Shuge

    2014-09-01

    A combination of an orthogonal L16(4)4 test design and a three-layer artificial neural network (ANN) model was applied to optimize polysaccharides from Althaea rosea seeds extracted by hot water method. The highest optimal experimental yield of A. rosea seed polysaccharides (ARSPs) of 59.85 mg/g was obtained using three extraction numbers, 113 min extraction time, 60.0% ethanol concentration, and 1:41 solid-liquid ratio. Under these optimized conditions, the ARSP experimental yield was very close to the predicted yield of 60.07 mg/g and was higher than the orthogonal test results (40.86 mg/g). Structural characterizations were conducted using physicochemical property and FTIR analysis. In addition, the study of ARSP antioxidant activity demonstrated that polysaccharides exhibited high superoxide dismutase activity, strong reducing power, and positive scavenging activity on superoxide anion, hydroxyl radical, 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl, and reducing power. Our results indicated that ANNs were efficient quantitative tools for predicting the total ARSP content. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Genetic structure of Fennoscandian populations of the threatened wood-decay fungus Fomitopsis rosea (Basidiomycota).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauserud, Håvard; Schumacher, Trond

    2003-02-01

    The genetic structure of five Fennoscandian populations of the threatened wood-decay fungus Fomitopsis rosea (Basidiomycota) was investigated using codominant PCR-RFLP, allele specific amplification (ASA) markers, inter simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers and mating studies. Sequence analyses of a subset of single spore isolates revealed sequence variation in four target sequences; internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and intergenic spacer (IGS1) of the nuclear ribosomal DNA, the translation elongation factor 1 alpha (efa) gene and the super oxide dismutase (sod) gene. No sequence variation was found in amplified portions of the mitochondrial large and small rRNA genes. Genotype distributions were mostly (90%) in accordance with Hardy-Weinberg expectations, and the nrDNA markers (ITS/IGS1), efa and sod were in most cases (87%) in linkage equilibrium, indicating an outcrossing reproductive mode, panmictic conditions and large population sizes of the fungus. Mating tests confirmed that F. rosea exhibits an outcrossing bipolar heterothallic mating system. Mating allele richness was high in two investigated populations. Phylogenetic analyses of ITS and IGS1 sequences from the five geographic populations revealed some geographic sub-structuring of the ITS sequences, but no sub-structuring of IGS1. The nrDNA (ITS/IGS1), efa and sod markers gave a low overall FST (0.013). The ISSR markers gave no clustering of the populations in UPGMA, and the between-population variance component was very low in AMOVA (0.4%), indicating a high level of gene flow.

  10. Efecto de la fragmentación del hábitat sobre la calidad de las semillas en Lapageria rosea Effects of habitat fragmentation on seed quality of Lapageria rosea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CAROLINA A. HENRÍQUEZ

    2004-03-01

    also affect plant fitness through a reduction in the quality of the seeds produced, as for example in seed viability, seed size or in seed germination. These factors could be affected because small populations size and high degree in isolation, frequently found in fragments, could induce to the loss of genetic population variability and the expression of inbreeding depression. Here I show the effect of forest fragmentation on the quality of seeds produced in Lapageria rosea, quality being measured as seed viability, seed size and seed germination. I collected seeds from the Maulino forest in central Chile, specifically from plants living in forest fragments and continued forest. Seed viability, seed size and seed germination capacity was estimated under laboratory conditions. Results indicated that seeds from forest fragments and from continuous forest have similar percentages of viability, although these percentages are more variable among fruits from forest fragments. Moreover, seeds from forest fragments are smaller than seeds from continuous forest. Finally, seeds from fragments have less germination capacity than seeds from continued forest. These reductions could determinate a negative effect on seedling establishment in fragmented populations and possibly in the long term population survival

  11. Multicenter, open-label, exploratory clinical trial with Rhodiola rosea extract in patients suffering from burnout symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasper S

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Siegfried Kasper,1 Angelika Dienel2 1Universitätsklinik für Psychiatrie und Psychotherapie, Medizinische Universität Wien, Wien, Austria; 2Dr Willmar Schwabe GmbH & Co. KG, Karlsruhe, Germany Purpose: This study is the first clinical trial aiming to explore the clinical outcomes in burnout patients treated with Rhodiola rosea. The reported capacity of R. rosea to strengthen the organism against stress and its good tolerability offer a promising approach in the treatment of stress-related burnout. The aim of the treatment was to increase stress resistance, thus addressing the source rather than the symptoms of the syndrome and preventing subsequent diseases associated with a history of burnout. The objective of the trial was to provide the exploratory data required for planning future randomized trials in burnout patients in order to investigate the clinical outcomes of treatment with R. rosea dry extract in this target group.Methods: The study was planned as an exploratory, open-label, multicenter, single-arm trial. A wide range of rating scales were assessed and evaluated in an exploratory data analysis to generate hypotheses regarding clinical courses and to provide a basis for the planning of subsequent studies. A total of 118 outpatients were enrolled. A daily dose of 400 mg R. rosea extract (WS® 1375, Rosalin was administered over 12 weeks. Clinical outcomes were assessed by the German version of the Maslach Burnout Inventory, Burnout Screening Scales I and II, Sheehan Disability Scale, Perceived Stress Questionnaire, Number Connection Test, Multidimensional Mood State Questionnaire, Numerical Analogue Scales for different stress symptoms and impairment of sexual life, Patient Sexual Function Questionnaire, and the Clinical Global Impression Scales. Results: The majority of the outcome measures showed clear improvement over time. Several parameters had already improved after 1 week of treatment and continued to improve further up to

  12. Lifespan extension and delay of age-related functional decline caused by Rhodiola rosea depends on dietary macronutrient balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of rhizome powder from the herb Rhodiola rosea, a traditional Western Ukraine medicinal adaptogen, on lifespan and age-related physiological functions of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. Results Flies fed food supplemented with 5.0 mg/ml and 10.0 mg/ml of R. rosea rhizome powder had a 14% to 17% higher median lifespan, whereas at 30.0 mg/ml lifespan was decreased by 9% to 12%. The preparation did not decrease fly fecundity. The effect of R. rosea supplement on lifespan was dependent on diet composition. Lifespan extension by 15% to 21% was observed only for diets with protein-to-carbohydrate ratios less than 1. Lifespan extension was also dependent on total concentration of macronutrients. Thus, for the diet with 15% yeast and 15% sucrose there was no lifespan extension, while for the diet with protein-to-carbohydrate ratio 20:1 R. rosea decreased lifespan by about 10%. Flies fed Rhodiola preparation were physically more active, less sensitive to the redox-cycling compound menadione and had a longer time of heat coma onset compared with controls. Positive effects of Rhodiola rhizome on stress resistance and locomotor activity were highest at the ‘middle age’. Conclusions The present data show that long-term food supplementation with R. rosea rhizome not only increases D. melanogaster lifespan, but also delays age-related decline of physical activity and increases stress resistance, what depends on protein-to-carbohydrate ratio of the diet. PMID:24472572

  13. The Effect of Acute Rhodiola rosea Ingestion on Exercise Heart Rate, Substrate Utilisation, Mood State, and Perceptions of Exertion, Arousal, and Pleasure/Displeasure in Active Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Neil D.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of acute Rhodiola rosea (R. rosea) ingestion on substrate utilisation, mood state, RPE, and exercise affect. Ten males (mean age ± S.D. = 26 ± 6 years) completed two 30-minute cycling trials at an intensity of 70% of V˙O2max⁡ following ingestion of either 3 mg·kg−1 body mass of R. rosea or placebo using a double-blind, crossover design. During exercise, heart rate and RPE were recorded. Participants completed measures of mood state and exercise affect before and after exercise. Expired air samples were taken during exercise to determine substrate utilisation. Repeated measures analysis of variance indicated that RPE was significantly lower at 30 minutes into exercise versus placebo (P = 0.003). Perceptions of arousal (P = 0.05) and pleasure were significantly higher after exercise with R. rosea compared to placebo (P = 0.003). Mood state scores for vigor were also higher in R. rosea condition compared to placebo (P = 0.008). There were no significant differences in energy expenditure, carbohydrate, or fat oxidation between conditions (P > 0.05). Ingestion of R. rosea favourably influenced RPE and exercise affect without changes in energy expenditure or substrate utilization during 30-minute submaximal cycling performance. PMID:26464892

  14. The Effect of Acute Rhodiola rosea Ingestion on Exercise Heart Rate, Substrate Utilisation, Mood State, and Perceptions of Exertion, Arousal, and Pleasure/Displeasure in Active Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Duncan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine the effect of acute Rhodiola rosea (R. rosea ingestion on substrate utilisation, mood state, RPE, and exercise affect. Ten males (mean age ± S.D. = 26 ± 6 years completed two 30-minute cycling trials at an intensity of 70% of V˙O2max⁡ following ingestion of either 3 mg·kg−1 body mass of R. rosea or placebo using a double-blind, crossover design. During exercise, heart rate and RPE were recorded. Participants completed measures of mood state and exercise affect before and after exercise. Expired air samples were taken during exercise to determine substrate utilisation. Repeated measures analysis of variance indicated that RPE was significantly lower at 30 minutes into exercise versus placebo (P=0.003. Perceptions of arousal (P=0.05 and pleasure were significantly higher after exercise with R. rosea compared to placebo (P=0.003. Mood state scores for vigor were also higher in R. rosea condition compared to placebo (P=0.008. There were no significant differences in energy expenditure, carbohydrate, or fat oxidation between conditions (P>0.05. Ingestion of R. rosea favourably influenced RPE and exercise affect without changes in energy expenditure or substrate utilization during 30-minute submaximal cycling performance.

  15. Multicenter, open-label, exploratory clinical trial with Rhodiola rosea extract in patients suffering from burnout symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, Siegfried; Dienel, Angelika

    2017-01-01

    This study is the first clinical trial aiming to explore the clinical outcomes in burnout patients treated with Rhodiola rosea. The reported capacity of R. rosea to strengthen the organism against stress and its good tolerability offer a promising approach in the treatment of stress-related burnout. The aim of the treatment was to increase stress resistance, thus addressing the source rather than the symptoms of the syndrome and preventing subsequent diseases associated with a history of burnout. The objective of the trial was to provide the exploratory data required for planning future randomized trials in burnout patients in order to investigate the clinical outcomes of treatment with R. rosea dry extract in this target group. The study was planned as an exploratory, open-label, multicenter, single-arm trial. A wide range of rating scales were assessed and evaluated in an exploratory data analysis to generate hypotheses regarding clinical courses and to provide a basis for the planning of subsequent studies. A total of 118 outpatients were enrolled. A daily dose of 400 mg R. rosea extract (WS® 1375, Rosalin) was administered over 12 weeks. Clinical outcomes were assessed by the German version of the Maslach Burnout Inventory, Burnout Screening Scales I and II, Sheehan Disability Scale, Perceived Stress Questionnaire, Number Connection Test, Multidimensional Mood State Questionnaire, Numerical Analogue Scales for different stress symptoms and impairment of sexual life, Patient Sexual Function Questionnaire, and the Clinical Global Impression Scales. The majority of the outcome measures showed clear improvement over time. Several parameters had already improved after 1 week of treatment and continued to improve further up to the end of the study. The incidence of adverse events was low with 0.015 events per observation day. The trial reported here was the first to investigate clinical outcomes in patients suffering from burnout symptoms when treated with R. rosea

  16. Protective effects of salidroside from Rhodiola rosea on LPS-induced acute lung injury in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Shuang; Xiong, Ying; Song, Bocui; Song, Yu; Wang, Dacheng; Chu, Xiao; Chen, Na; Huo, Meixia; Deng, Xuming; Lu, Jing

    2012-08-01

    Salidroside is a major component extracted from Rhodiola rosea. In this study, we investigated protective effects of salidroside on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) in mice. In the mouse model, we found that pretreatment with a single 120 mg/kg dose of salidroside prior to the administration of intratracheal LPS induced a significant decrease in the W/D ratio and mouse myeloperoxidase activity of lung, reduction protein concentration, the number of total cells, neutrophils and macrophages in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. In addition, salidroside also inhibited the production of several inflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6 (IL-6) and IL-1β, and the NF-κB DNA-binding activation after LPS challenge. These results indicated that salidroside possess a protective effect on LPS-induced ALI in mice.

  17. Evaluation of Demographics and Climatic Factors/Disease Relationship in Patients with Pityriasis Rosea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emel Bülbül Başkan

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Pityriasis rosea (PR is an acute onset, self-limiting papulosquamous skin disease. The etiology of the disease is totally unknown, however, many epidemiological and clinical studies have suggested that infectious agents may cause the disease. Seasonal changes in the incidence may be an epidemiologic evidence for potential infectious etiology. In this study, we aimed to analyze the demographic data of PR patients and to explore the role of climatic factors in the etiology of the disease. Material and Method: We retrospectively reviewed the patient files of PR cases that had been followed up in our clinic between 2000 and 2005. Demographic data of the patients as well as the date of applications were recorded. Temperature, raining, pressure and humidity data for the City of Bursa for years 2000-2005 were obtained from the General Directorate of Meteorology, Republic of Turkey. Any potential relationship between onset time of PR and meteorological parameters was investigated statistically by using cluster analysis. Results: We reviewed the medical records of 413 patients, of whom 271 were female and 142 were male. Herald plaque was seen in 88 patients (21.3%. Pityriasis rosea was observed predominantly in persons between 20 and 29 years of age (139 patients; 33.6%. Distribution of number of cases between 2000-2005 was 51, 57, 80, 75, 63, 87. The highest number of patients was seen in winter (n: 122; 29.5% followed by spring (n: 101; 24.4%, autumn (n: 101; 24.4% and summer (n: 89; 21.7%. No statistically significant difference was found between annual and seasonal changes in the incidence of PR (p>0.05.Conclusion: We conclude that although the relation between PR and seasonal factors was not statistically significant in our study, multi-centric studies on large series of patients are needed to further investigate this topic.

  18. Alleviation of kidney damage induced by unilateral ureter obstruction in rats by Rhodiola rosea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uyeturk, Ugur; Terzi, E Hakan; Kemahli, Eray; Gucuk, Adnan; Tosun, Mehmet; Çetinkaya, Ayhan

    2013-10-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of Rhodiola rosea extract in terms of alleviating the renal damage induced by unilateral ureter obstruction (UUO) in rats. Thirty Wistar albino male rats were divided into five groups: (I) Control, (II) UUO 7 days, (III) UUO 7 days+extract,(IV) UUO 14 days, and (V) UUO 14 days+extract. Seven or 14 days after the initiation of the experimental procedure, the left kidneys of rats in all five groups were removed for histological examination, and their blood was drawn for biochemical measurements. Median malondialdehyde (MDA) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) levels were, respectively, 39.4 (5.04) nmol/mL and 25.8 (8.01) nmol/minute/mL in group I, 77.9 (12.38) nmol/mL and 5.8 (1.95) nmol/minute/mL in group II, 48.7 (12.1) nmol/mL and 9.1 (2.3) nmol/minute/mL in group III, 58.5 (23.83) nmol/mL and 8.4 (2.1) nmol/minute/mL in group IV, and 44.8 (4.97) nmol/mL and 13.8 (3.73) nmol/minute/mL in group V. There was a statistically significant difference among the groups in terms of MDA and GPx levels (prosea extract was shown to alleviate the renal damage induced by UUO through its antioxidant effects. The mechanism by which R. rosea extract causes these effects merits further investigation.

  19. 'Elaioplasts' identified as lipotubuloids in Althaea rosea, Funkia sieboldiana and Vanilla planifolia contain lipid bodies connected with microtubules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Kwiatkowska

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available "Elaioplasts" observed in Vanilla planifolia, Funkia Sieboldiana and Althaea rosea exhibit all the features characteristic of lipotubuloids earlier described in Ornithogalum umbellatum. They are cytoplasmic domains containing aggregates of lipid bodies connected with microtubules. The immunogold technique confirmed the presence of tubulin in this domain. These structures do not have their own membranes but they are surrounded by a tonoplast at the side of a vacuole since they invaginate into it. In cytoplasm of this domain among lipid bodies there are numerous ribosomes, ER cisternae and vesicles as well as few mitochondria, Golgi structures and microbodies while at older developmental stages there are also autolytic vacuoles. The fact that they are so similar to O. umbellatum lipotubuloids suggest that "elaioplasts" of V. planifolia, F. Sieboldiana and A. rosea can also be named lipotubuloids.

  20. Green synthesis and characterization of silver nanoparticles using Alcea rosea flower extract as a new generation of antimicrobials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebrahiminezhad Alireza

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Green synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs was developed by treating Ag+ with Alcea rosea flower extract. AgNO3 concentration, flower extract quantity, and reaction temperature were found to be significant factors in the bioreduction reaction. Synthesized AgNPs were almost spherical in shape with an average diameter of 7.2 nm. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR analysis revealed that oxygen-bearing functional groups in the A. rosea flower extract are responsible for reduction of Ag+. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC of AgNPs against a Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli bacteria was determined to be 37.5 μg/ml.

  1. No size or density effect on alternative mate-locating tactics in the tropical damselfly Hetaerina rosea males (Odonata: Calopterygidae

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    Paulo Enrique C. Peixoto

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Males of the damselfly Hetaerina rosea may defend mating sites along river margins (resident males or, alternatively, wander among different areas presumably searching for mates (nonterritorial males. Although the occurrence of territorial and nonterritorial males of H. rosea is very common in Brazil, studies examining which factors may be responsible for the adoption of alternative mate-locating tactics in this species are inexistent. We investigated the relationship between the adoption of these alternative mate-locating tactics by males of H. rosea and two possible causes: body weight and male abundance. We carried the study in three areas: sites 1, 2 and 3. Samples were monthly undertaken in sites 1 and 2 between September/2001 and August/2002 and in site 3 between May/1999 and January/2001. Using the scan method with fixed areas and mark-resighting techniques, we did not find any relationship between the proportion of nonterritorial males and male abundance per month on sites 2 (n=6 and 3 (n=7, indicating that the adoption of alternative mate-locating tactics is not affected by competition for territories. In the same way, nonterritorial and resident males showed similar body and thoracic weight measures (n=30 and n=27 for sites 2 and 3 respectively. Maybe the nonterritorial tactic is adopted by individuals searching for better territories or males that were evicted from their defended sites. The absence of relationship between weight and male territorial status is in accordance with other Hetaerina species. However, other traits not investigated here such as parasitic load, fat content and age may influence the adoption of different mate-acquisition tactics in H. rosea males. Rev. Biol. Trop. 57 (1-2: 361-370. Epub 2009 June 30.Los machos de la libélula Hetaerina rosea pueden defender sus sitios de apareamiento a lo largo de márgenes de ríos (machos residentes o, alternativamente, deambulan entre diferentes áreas presumiblemente

  2. Isoflurane anesthesia of wild-caught goliath birdeater spiders (Theraphosa blondi) and Chilean rose spiders (Grammostola rosea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachariah, Trevor T; Mitchell, Mark A; Guichard, Clare M; Singh, Rimme S

    2009-06-01

    Anesthesia is used in theraphosid spiders to facilitate medical procedures (e.g., physical examination, sample collection, surgery); however, most information on this subject is anecdotal. This study was conducted to systematically determine the anesthetic parameters of wild-caught, subadult goliath birdeater spiders (Theraphosa blondi) (n = 11) and Chilean rose spiders (Grammostola rosea) (n = 12). Each spider was placed in a 3-L gas anesthetic chamber and subjected to an induction of 5% isoflurane at a rate of 1 L/min oxygen. Anesthetic depth was monitored by evaluating the righting reflex every 5 min. Animals were recovered in 100% oxygen. Induction, recovery, and overall anesthetic times were determined. After an 8-wk washout period, the procedure was repeated. For both species, median induction time was 10 min. Median recovery time was 30 min for T. blondi and 12.5 min for G. rosea.

  3. A survey of the gene repertoire of Gigaspora rosea unravels conserved features among Glomeromycota for obligate biotrophy

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    Nianwu eTANG

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM fungi are a diverse group of soil fungi (Glomeromycota that form the most ancient mutualistic association termed arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis with a majority of land plants, improving their nutrition uptake and resistance to stresses. In contrast to their great ecological implications, the knowledge of the molecular biological mechanisms involved is still scant, partly due to the limited genomic resources available. Here, we describe the gene repertoire of a new AM fungus Gigaspora rosea (Diversisporales. Among the 86332 nonredundant virtual transcripts assembled, 15346 presented similarities with proteins in the Refseq database and 10175 were assigned with GO terms. KOG and Interpro domain annotations clearly showed an enrichment of genes involved in signal transduction in G. rosea. KEGG pathway analysis indicates that most primary metabolic processes are active in G. rosea. However, as for R. irregularis, several metabolic genes were not found, including the fatty acid synthase gene. This finding supports the hypothesis that AM fungi depend on the lipids produced by their hosts. Furthermore, the presence of a large number of transporters and hundreds of secreted proteins, together with the reduced number of plant cell wall degrading enzymes could be interpreted as an evolutionary adaptation to its mutualistic obligate biotrophy. The detection of meiosis-related genes suggests that G. rosea might use a cryptic sexual process. Lastly, a phylogeny of basal fungi clearly shows Glomeromycota as a sister clade to Mucoromycotina, not only to the Mucorales or Mortierellales. The characterization of the gene repertoire from an AM fungal species belonging to the order of Diversisporales and its comparison with the gene sets of R. irregularis (Glomerales and Gigaspora margarita (Diversisporales, reveal that AM fungi share several features linked to mutualistic obligate biotrophy. This work contributes to lay the foundation

  4. Pityriasis Rosea

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... benefits Become a member DermCare Team Professionalism and ethics My account Member directory Publications JAAD JAAD Case ... SkinPAC State societies Scope of practice Truth in advertising Public and patients SPOT Skin Cancer™ Community programs & ...

  5. RP-HPLC determination of phenylalkanoids and monoterpenoids in Rhodiola rosea and identification by LC-ESI-TOF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avula, Bharathi; Wang, Yan-Hong; Ali, Zulfiqar; Smillie, Troy J; Filion, Vicky; Cuerrier, Alain; Arnason, John T; Khan, Ikhlas A

    2009-08-01

    An HPLC method permitting the simultaneous determination of fourteen analytes (phenylalkanoids and monoterpenoids) from the roots of Rhodiola rosea was developed. A separation was achieved within 35 min using C(18) column material and a water-acetonitrile mobile phase, both containing a 0.05% phosphoric acid gradient system and a temperature of 53 degrees C. The method was validated for linearity, repeatability, limits of detection and limits of quantification. The limits of detection and limits of quantification of 14 phenylalkanoids and monoterpenoids were found to be 0.20-1.0 and 0.5-3.5 microg/mL, respectively. The wavelengths used for quantification of phenylalkanoids and monoterpenoids with a diode array detector were 205, 220 and 251 nm. The method was used to analyze the roots of two species of Rhodiola and commercial extracts of R. rosea and provides preliminary evidence of phytochemical differences between North American and Eurasian populations of R. rosea. LC-mass spectrometry coupled with electrospray ionization (ESI) interface method is described for the identification of phenylalkanoids and monoterpenoids in various Rhodiola samples. This method involved the use of the [M + H](+), [M + NH(4)](+) and [M + Na](+) ions in the positive ion mode with extractive ion monitoring (EIM). (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. In vivo Th1 and Th2 cytokine modulation effects of Rhodiola rosea standardised solution and its major constituent, salidroside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shih-Shen Chou; Chin, Lengsu William; Chao, Pei-Chun; Lai, Ya-Yun; Lin, Long-Yau; Chou, Ming-Yung; Chou, Ming-Chih; Wei, James Cheng-Chung; Yang, Chi-Chiang

    2011-11-01

    Although Rhodiola rosea (L.) is used widely and disseminated in Oriental medicine, its in vivo effects on cytokine modulation remain unclear. Among the biologically active components of Rhodiola rosea, salidroside was suggested to be the most active compound. The objectives of this study were to assess the toxicity and cytokine modulation effects of Rhodiola rosea standardised solution (RRSS) and salidroside. Quantitative high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis determined the content of salidroside in RRSS to be 4.39% (w/v). Groups of Balb/c mice were fed daily with different doses of RRSS or salidroside, with CAPE or distilled water used as positive and negative controls, respectively. The acute and subacute toxicity tests did not reveal weight differences, pathological changes, or abnormalities in liver or kidney function indices among the treated groups. Ovalbumin-primed mouse cytokine assays demonstrated that both T helper (Th1) (IL-2 and IFN-γ) and Th2 (IL-4 and IL-10) cytokines were significantly increased by feeding with RRSS in a dose- and time-dependent manner (p < 0.05). Moreover, the cytokine modulation effects of salidroside were less prominent than that of RRSS treatment and not dose-dependent. These findings suggest that increased secretion of both Th1- and Th2-pattern cytokines can be achieved with RRSS and salidroside treatment. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Pretreatment with Rhodiola rosea extract reduces cognitive impairment induced by intracerebroventricular streptozotocin in rats: implication of anti-oxidative and neuroprotective effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Ze-Qiang; Zhou, Yan; Zeng, Yuan-Shan; Li, Yan; Chung, Peter

    2009-08-01

    To investigate the pretreatment effects of Rhodiola rosea (R. rosea) extract on cognitive dysfunction, oxidative stress in hippocampus and hippocampal neuron injury in a rat model of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Male Sprague-Dawley rats were pretreated with R. rosea extract at doses of 1.5, 3.0, and 6.0 g/kg for 3 weeks, followed by bilateral intracerebroventricular injection with streptozotocin (1.5 mg/kg) on days 1 and 3. Behavioral alterations were monitored after 2 weeks from the lesion using Morris water maze task. Three weeks after the lesion, the rats were sacrificed for measuring the malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione reductase (GR) and reduced glutathione (GSH) levels in hippocampus and histopathology of hippocampal neurons. The MDA level was significantly increased while the GR and GSH levels were significantly decreased with striking impairments in spatial learning and memory and severe damage to hippocampal neurons in the model rat induced by intracerebroventricular injection of streptozotocin. These abnormalities were significantly improved by pretreatment with R. rosea extract (3.0 g/kg). R. rosea extract can protect rats against cognitive deficits, neuronal injury and oxidative stress induced by intracerebroventricular injection of streptozotocin, and may be used as a potential agent in treatment of neurodegenerative diseases such as AD.

  8. Development of a biocontrol agent for plant disease control with special emphasis on the near commercial fungal antagonist Clonostachys rosea strain "IK726"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Dan Funck; Knudsen, Inge M.B.; Lübeck, Mette

    2007-01-01

    . Among the success stories for control of seed- and soilborne diseases are fungal biocontrol agents based on Trichoderma harzianum, Clonostachys rosea and Conithyrium minitans, and bacterial biocontrol agents based on strains of Agrobacterium, Pseudomonas and Streptomyces. We have developed C. rosea......Numerous experiments demonstrating potential biocontrol effects on soilborne diseases have been reported in the scientific literature. However, from the lists of approved and registered biocontrol agents, it is striking how few have been commercialised and are used in practise for plant disease...... strain ‘IK726', which has proved to be an effective antagonist in several crops against seed- and soilborne diseases. Although a biocontrol agent based on C. rosea ‘IK726' is not yet commercialised, this paper will be used to address some of the biological and technical aspects that must be dealt...

  9. Acyclovir in pityriasis rosea: An observer-blind, randomized controlled trial of effectiveness, safety and tolerability

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    Anupam Das

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pityriasis rosea (PR is an acute inflammatory dermatosis. The association of human herpes virus 6 and 7 suggests the utility of use of antiviral agents in this disease. Aims and Objectives: To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of acyclovir in the treatment of PR. Methods: An observer-blind, randomized (1:1, parallel group, add-on trial was conducted on 24 adult patients with PR. Subjects of both Group A and B received the standard of care in the form of cetirizine 10 mg OD and calamine. Group A in addition received acyclovir 400 mg tablets thrice daily for 7 days. Both groups were followed up for four consecutive weeks for assessment of effectiveness and adverse events. Results: Group A complained of significantly fewer new lesions than Group B (P = 0.046. A complete response was obtained in all patients of Group A and 83% patients of Group B at the end of the follow up period. There was significant reduction in both lesional score and pruritus at second week follow-up in Group A and third week follow-up in Group B (P < 0.05. Minor adverse effects were observed in both treatment arms. Conclusion: Acyclovir offered rapid resolution of clinical severity of PR from second week onwards without significantly increased adverse events as compared to supportive therapy alone.

  10. The Role of Cytokines, Chemokines, and Growth Factors in the Pathogenesis of Pityriasis Rosea

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    Francesco Drago

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Pityriasis rosea (PR is an exanthematous disease related to human herpesvirus- (HHV- 6/7 reactivation. The network of mediators involved in recruiting the infiltrating inflammatory cells has never been studied. Object. To investigate the levels of serum cytokines, growth factors, and chemokines in PR and healthy controls in order to elucidate the PR pathogenesis. Materials and Methods. Interleukin- (IL- 1, IL-6, IL-17, interferon- (IFN- γ, tumor necrosis factor- (TNF- α, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF, and chemokines, CXCL8 (IL-8 and CXCL10 (IP-10, were measured simultaneously by a multiplex assay in early acute PR patients’ sera and healthy controls. Subsequently, sera from PR patients were analysed at 3 different times (0, 15, and 30 days. Results and discussion. Serum levels of IL-17, IFN-γ, VEGF, and IP-10 resulted to be upregulated in PR patients compared to controls. IL-17 has a key role in host defense against pathogens stimulating the release of proinflammatory cytokines/chemokines. IFN-γ has a direct antiviral activity promoting NK cells and virus specific T cells cytotoxicity. VEGF stimulates vasculogenesis and angiogenesis. IP-10 can induce chemotaxis, apoptosis, cell growth, and angiogenesis. Conclusions. Our findings suggest that these inflammatory mediators may modulate PR pathogenesis in synergistic manner.

  11. Metabolic profiling assisted quality assessment of Rhodiola rosea extracts by high-performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhanguo; Hu, Huiling; Chen, Fang; Zou, Liang; Yang, Mingfu; Wang, Anqi; Foulsham, James E; Lan, Ke

    2012-05-01

    In this work, fast and sensitive high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with multivariate analysis was utilized to assist the quality assessment of Rhodiola rosea extracts (RREs). 131 peaks were separated and detected in RREs on a fused-core C18 column. Principal component analysis (PCA) and hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) of the chromatographic data demonstrated that 10 batches of RREs could be well-differentiated and categorized into three groups which were closely related to the origins of RREs. Partial least square-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) showed that the quality differentiation might be explained by at least 6 components, in which rosavin was characterized by an external reference, rosiridine was identified by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS), and the mass spectra of the others were provided. The observation that the level of rosavin was more relevant to the multivariate chromatographic data than the ones of salidroside and tyrosol, the other two components commonly used to standardize RREs, was confirmed by the PLS prediction models. Results of the present study not only indicated that rosavin was a rational marker to represent the quality of RREs, but also demonstrated the power of HPLC-based metabolic profiling in the quality assessment of herbal extracts. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Antitumor effects of a purified polysaccharide from Rhodiola rosea and its action mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Zibin; Li, Wei; Wang, Haotian; Yan, Weiqun; Zhou, Yulai; Wang, Guanjun; Cui, Jiuwei; Wang, Fang

    2012-09-01

    In the last three decades, numerous polysaccharides and polysaccharide-protein complexes have been isolated from plant or animal and used as a promising source of therapeutic agents for cancer. In this study, we prepared a homogeneous polysaccharide (RRP-ws) from Rhodiola rosea and tested its immunomodulation and anti-cancer activity in vitro and in vivo experiments using Sarcoma 180 (S-180) cells. Preliminary physicochemical analysis identified that RRP-ws was composed of Glc, Gal, Man and Rha with a relative molar ratio of 4.2:2.4:1.6:1.0, and contained 95.14% of total carbohydrate, 2.08% of protein and no sulfate. In vitro experiment showed that RRP-ws exerted a direct cytotoxic effect on the growth of S-180 cells. In vivo experiment, RRP-ws could inhibit tumor growth of S-180 tumor transplanted in mice, and increase the relative spleen/thymus indexes and body weight. Furthermore, RRP-ws also increased the production of IL-2, TNF-α and IFN-γ in serum, and elevated the ratio of CD4+/CD8+ on peripheral blood T-lymphocyte in tumor bearing mice. The overall findings indicated that RRP-ws could be used as a novel promising immunotherapeutic agent in cancer treatment. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Adjuvant effects of salidroside from Rhodiola rosea L. on the immune responses to ovalbumin in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Shuang; He, Jiakang; Guo, Weixiao; Wei, Jingyuan; Lu, Jing; Deng, Xuming

    2011-12-01

    Salidroside, a major component of Rhodiola rosea L., was evaluated for its adjuvant effects on the immune responses in mice by ovalbumin (OVA) stimulation. BALB/c mice were immunized subcutaneously with OVA 100 μg or OVA 100 μg dissolved in saline containing alum (100 μg) or salidroside (12.5, 25, or 50 μg) on Days 1 and 15. Two weeks later (Day 28), blood samples were collected to analyze OVA-specific IgG, IgG1, and IgG2b antibodies. Meanwhile, splenocytes were harvested to assess lymphocyte proliferation, cytokines (IL-2, IL-4, and IFN-γ) production, and CD4(+), CD8(+) lymphocyte subsets. The results indicated that co-administration of salidroside with OVA significantly enhanced the ConA-, LPS-, and OVA-induced splenocyte proliferation, produced more IL-2, IL-4, IFN-γ, and IgG, IgG1, and IgG2b antibody levels, and increased the percentage of CD4(+), CD8(+) lymphocyte subsets than OVA alone. Thus, salidroside possess immunological adjuvant activity by regulating humoral and cellular immune responses in mice.

  14. Efecto de algunos antioxidantes para conservar la viabilidad en semillas de Tabebuia rosea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trujillo Enrique

    1989-12-01

    Full Text Available Varios experimentos de laboratorio se llevaron a cabo con el objeto de evaluar la eficiencia de los antioxidantes carbón
    activado, L-ciste ína, ácido ascórbico, ácido cítrico aplicados solos o en mezclas y del almacenamiento al vacío bajo condiciones de luz y oscuridad para evitar la pérdida de
    viabilidad de las semillas de Tabebuia rosea Sert. Los frutos se recolectaron de diez árboles localizados en la región de Garagoa, Boyacá y se trajeron al laboratorio donde la
    extracción de la semilla, secamiento y almacenamiento
    se realizaron bajo condiciones de luz o de oscuridad. Una vez aplicados los tratamientos la semilla se almacenó a 10°C
    y se hicieron pruebas de qerrninación a los 60, 90, 120, 150 y 180 días. Se encontró que el uso de estos compuestos antioxidantes efectivamente favorecen la conservación
    de la viabilidad de las semillas de ocobo y que el mejor tratamiento fue la combinación de empaque y almacenamiento al vacío y oscuridad, lo cual comprueba que tanto el oxígeno como la luz tienden a deteriorar la
    viabilidad de las semillas ricas en grasas.

  15. Transcriptomic profiling to identify genes involved in Fusarium mycotoxin Deoxynivalenol and Zearalenone tolerance in the mycoparasitic fungus Clonostachys rosea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kosawang, Chatchai; Karlsson, Magnus; Jensen, Dan Funck

    2014-01-01

    approach to identify genes induced by DON and ZEA in order to investigate the molecular basis of mycotoxin resistance C. rosea.Results: We generated DON- and ZEA-induced cDNA libraries based on suppression subtractive hybridization. A total of 443 and 446 sequenced clones (corresponding to 58 and 65 genes......Background: Clonostachys rosea strain IK726 is a mycoparasitic fungus capable of controlling mycotoxin-producing Fusarium species, including F. graminearum and F. culmorum, known to produce Zearalenone (ZEA) and Deoxynivalenol (DON). DON is a type B trichothecene known to interfere with protein...

  16. Primer Registro para la Argentina de Rhizophlyctis rosea (Spizellomycetales, Chytridiomycota y notas sobre su frecuencia y abundancia en suelos cultivados First record for Argentina of Rhizophlyctis rosea (Spizellomycetales, Chytridiomycota and notes on its frequency and abundance in cultivated soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agostina V. Marano

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Se colectaron muestras de suelo de dos lotes de frutilla en el Partido de Luján (Provincia de Buenos Aires, las que fueron incubadas y cebadas en laboratorio con sustratos celulósicos, queratínicos y quitínicos, con el objetivo de aislar a R. rosea (de Bary & Woronin Fisch. Todos los tipos de materiales empleados fueron positivos para esta especie. Estandarizando los sustratos adicionados, se analizó su frecuencia y abundancia y se contabilizó el número de talos que crecieron en ellos, pudiéndose obtener la densidad de talos y el número de talos por gramo de suelo (NTG. Se colectaron asimismo muestras de agua y sedimento de ambientes acuáticos, con el objetivo de registrar caracteres morfológicos provenientes de distintas cepas y realizar una descripción completa de R. rosea. Esta especie es citada por primera vez para la Argentina y en esta contribución se muestran por primera vez resultados cuantitativos de hongos zoospóricos del suelo pertenecientes al Phylum Chytridiomycota. El género Rhizophlyctis A. Fischer es también una nueva cita para el país.Soil samples from two strawberry fields in Partido de Luján (Provincia de Buenos Aires were collected, flooded and baited with cellulose, queratinic and chitinic substrates in order to obtain R. rosea (de Bary & Woronin A. Fisch. All kinds of materials employed, proved positive for this species. By standardizing the substrata addition, we analyzed frequency and abundance and by counting the thalli that grew on it, derivations of thallus density and thallus recovery per gram of soil (TRG were possible. Water and sediment samples from aquatic environments were also taken, with the aim of reporting morphological characters from different strains, and make a complete description of R. rosea. This species is recorded for the first time in Argentina and this contribution shows first quantitative results of soil fungi belonging to the Phylum Chytridiomycota , for our country. The genus

  17. Separation of four flavonoids from Rhodiola rosea by on-line combination of sample preparation and counter-current chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chaoyang; Hu, Liming; Fu, Qianyun; Gu, Xiaohong; Tao, Guanjun; Wang, Hongxin

    2013-09-06

    Purification of four flavonoids from Rhodiola rosea was developed by on-line combination of sample preparation and counter-current chromatography (CCC). Flavonoid sample was prepared by dynamic ultrasonic-assisted and solid-phase extraction using ion liquids as extractant. The preparation conditions were optimized by D-optimal design as follows: 2mol/L of 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide concentration, 360W of ultrasonic power, 1.5mL/min of flow rate, 35min of extraction time and 0.5mL (absorbent) per g (material) of absorbent amount. The prepared sample solution (20mL) was loaded and injected directly into CCC column for final separation. As a result, four flavonoids, herbacetin-3-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-7-O-α-l-rhamnopyranoside 1 (40.1mg), kaempferol-3-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-7-O-α-l-rhamn-opyranoside 2 (4.6mg), kaempferol 3-O-β-d-glucopyranoside-(2→1)-β-d-xylopyranoside 3 (20.2mg) and herbacetin-8-O-β-d-glucopyranoside 4 (22.5mg), were obtained from 20g of R. rosea material using ethyl acetate-n-butanol-H2O as solvent system at a ratio of 4:1:5 by CCC. Their structures were identified by ESI-MS/MS, NMR methods. Their purities determined by UPLC were 98.5%, 95.4%, 98.1% and 97.5%, respectively. Kaempferol-3-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-7-O-α-l-rhamnopyranoside 2 and herbacetin-8-O-β-d-glucopyrano-side 4 were isolated for first time from R. rosea. The purification method was simple, efficient and evaded tedious sample preparation process. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Purification of Phenylalkanoids and monoterpene glycosides from Rhodiola rosea L. roots by high-speed counter-current chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudge, Elizabeth; Lopes-Lutz, Daise; Brown, Paula N; Schieber, Andreas

    2013-02-01

    Rhodiola rosea L. is a medicinal herb used for its adaptogenic properties. The main active components are the phenylpropanoids collectively referred to as rosavins. To develop an isolation method for phytochemicals present in Rhodiola rosea roots using high-speed counter-current chromatography (HSCCC). The roots of Rhodiola rosea were extracted with methanol and fractionated using liquid-liquid partition and polyamide column clean-up. The purified fraction (100 mg) was subjected to semi-preparative HSCCC using the two-phase solvent system ethyl acetate:butanol:water (3:2:5). The head-to-tail elution mode was employed with a flow rate of 1.5 mL/min and a rotary speed of 1000 rpm. The separation yielded six main fractions with four components more than 90% pure. The sixth fraction was further purified using semi-preparative HPLC with a Synergi-hydro RP C₁₈ -column to obtain rosin and geranyl 1-O-α-l-arabinopyranosyl(1 → 6)-β-d-glucopyranoside. The main components isolated were rosavin (3.4 mg, 97% purity), salidroside (0.5 mg, 90% purity), benzyl-O-β-d-glucopyranoside (1.2 mg, 85% purity), rosarin (1.3 mg, 99% purity), rosiridin (1.8 mg, 92% purity), rosin (1.2 mg, 95% purity) and geranyl 1-O-α-l-arabinopyranosyl(1 → 6)-β-d-glucopyranoside (6.5 mg, 97% purity). The identity and purity of these components were confirmed using ultrafast liquid chromatography-diode-array detector-MS/MS analysis,  ¹H- and ¹³C-NMR spectroscopy. High-speed counter-current chromatography was successful in the isolation of several phytochemicals present in Rhodiola rosea roots, including two components that are not commercially available. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Noncompetitive inhibition of human CYP2C9 in vitro by a commercial Rhodiola rosea product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thu, Ole Kristian Forstrønen; Spigset, Olav; Hellum, Bent

    2017-08-01

    A commercial Rhodiola rosea (R. rosea) product has previously demonstrated CYP2C9 inhibition in humans. The purpose of this study was to provide in vitro inhibitory data for this particular interaction and to classify the mechanism of the interaction. Another aim was to examine the in vitro influence of ethanol on the CYP2C9 activity. Human CYP2C9 (wild type) isolated from a baculovirus-infected cell system was incubated with 0.8 μmol/L losartan for 20 min. Sulfaphenazole was used as a positive control. The commercial R. rosea product "Arctic Root" was used as test inhibitor. Formation of the CYP2C9-produced losartan metabolite EXP-3174 was determined by validated LC-MS/MS methodology. Possible mechanism-based (irreversible) inhibition was evaluated using time- and NADPH-dependent inhibition assays. Kinetic constants (Km , Vmax , and Ki ) were calculated from a Lineweaver-Burk plot. Mode of inhibition was determined. CYP2C9 was inhibited by "Arctic Root" with an IC50 (extract concentration yielding 50% reduction in enzyme activity) of 19.2 ± 2.7 μg/mL. Inhibitor concentrations of 20 μg/mL and 40 μg/mL yielded Ki values of 16.37 μg/mL and 5.59 μg/mL, respectively. The Lineweaver-Burk plot showed noncompetitive inhibition mode. No time- or NADPH-dependent inhibition was observed. The presence of ethanol inhibited CYP2C9 activity in a concentration-dependent manner. In conclusion, the commercial R. rosea product "Arctic Root" demonstrated noncompetitive inhibition of CYP2C9 in vitro. Further work identifying the constituents responsible for this inhibition is needed. © 2017 The Authors. Pharmacology Research & Perspectives published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd, British Pharmacological Society and American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  20. Polyploid races, genetic structure and morphological features of earthworm Aporrectodea rosea (Savigny, 1826 (Oligohaeta, Lumbricidae in Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.P. Vlasenko

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Four chromosomal races (2n=36, 3n=54, 6n=108, 8n=144 and 96 clones have been revealed among 224 specimens of the earthworm A. rosea over the territory of Ukraine by means of karyological analysis and biochemical genetic marking. Each population has been showed by several clones at least; moreover the clones from different places have never been identical. The clones in the range of one population can be identified with the set of quantitative and qualitative parameters.

  1. Polyploid races, genetic structure and morphological features of earthworm Aporrectodea rosea (Savigny, 1826) (Oligochaeta, Lumbricidae) in Ukraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlasenko, R P; Mezhzherin, S V; Garbar, A V; Kotsuba, Yu

    2011-01-01

    Four chromosomal races (2n=36, 3n=54, 6n=108, 8n=144) and 96 clones have been revealed among 224 specimens of the earthworm Aporrectodea rosea over the territory of Ukraine by means of karyological analysis and biochemical genetic marking. Each population has been showed by several clones at least; moreover the clones from different places have never been identical. The clones in the range of one population can be identified with the set of quantitative and qualitative parameters.

  2. Polyploid races, genetic structure and morphological features of earthworm Aporrectodea rosea (Savigny, 1826) (Oligochaeta, Lumbricidae) in Ukraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlasenko, R.P.; Mezhzherin, S.V.; Garbar, A.V.; Kotsuba, Yu.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Four chromosomal races (2n=36, 3n=54, 6n=108, 8n=144) and 96 clones have been revealed among 224 specimens of the earthworm Aporrectodea rosea over the territory of Ukraine by means of karyological analysis and biochemical genetic marking. Each population has been showed by several clones at least; moreover the clones from different places have never been identical. The clones in the range of one population can be identified with the set of quantitative and qualitative parameters. PMID:24260622

  3. Concentration-Dependent Effects of Rhodiola Rosea on Long-Term Survival and Stress Resistance of Yeast Saccharomyces Cerevisiae: The Involvement of YAP 1 and MSN2/4 Regulatory Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayliak, Maria M; Burdyliuk, Nadia I; Izers'ka, Lilia I; Lushchak, Volodymyr I

    2014-01-01

    Concentration-dependent effects of aqueous extract from R. rosea root on long-term survival and stress resistance of budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae were studied. At low concentrations, R. rosea aqueous extract extended yeast chronological lifespan, enhanced oxidative stress resistance of stationary-phase cells and resistance to number stressors in exponentially growing cultures. At high concentrations, R. rosea extract sensitized yeast cells to stresses and shortened yeast lifespan. These biphasic concentration-responses describe a common hormetic phenomenon characterized by a low-dose stimulation and a high-dose inhibition. Yeast pretreatment with low doses of R. rosea extract enhanced yeast survival and prevented protein oxidation under H2O2-induced oxidative stress. Positive effect of R. rosea extract on yeast survival under heat shock exposure was not accompanied with changes in antioxidant enzyme activities and levels of oxidized proteins. The deficiency in transcriptional regulators, Msn2/Msn4 and Yap1, abolished the positive effect of low doses of R. rosea extract on yeast viability under stress challenges. Potential involvement of Msn2/Msn4 and Yap1 regulatory proteins in realization of R. rosea beneficial effects is discussed.

  4. IN VITRO PROPAGATION OF MUSSAENDA (Mussaenda erythrophylla cv. Rosea PROPAGAÇÃO IN VITRO DE MUSSAENDA (Mussaenda erythrophylla cv. Rosea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Bosco de Oliveira

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available

    This research aimed to develop a protocol for the micropropagation of Mussaenda erytrophylla cv. Rosea. Calcium hypochlorite or sodium hypochlorite (2.5% was used for the sterilization of bracts segments, with or without previous immersion in alcohol 70%. For callus induction, bracts segments were inoculated on MS medium with different concentrations of BAP and NAA. For buds induction, callus were inoculated on MS medium with different concentrations of cytokinins BAP, 2iP, and KIN (0.0 mg L-1, 0.5 mg L-1, 1.0 mg L-1, and 2.0 mg L-1. For multiplication, nodal segments from in vitro plants were inoculated in MS medium with BAP, KIN, and 2iP, in the concentrations of 0.0 mg L-1, 0.5 mg L-1, 1.0 mg L-1, and 2.0 mg L-1. For rooting, nodal segments from in vitro plants were inoculated using two MS medium dilutions: full strength and half strength of MS basal salt mixture (macronutrients salts and different concentrations of IBA (0.00 mg L-1, 0.25 mg L-1, 0.50 mg L-1, and 1.00 mg L-1. The best sterilization treatment was achieved by using calcium hypochlorite combined with immersion in alcohol. For callus induction, the MS medium with 0.4 mg L-1 of NAA plus 4.0 mg L-1 of BAP was more efficient. Bud multiplication was improved in MS medium with 0.5 mg L-1 of 2iP or 1.0 mg L-1 of KIN. The highest percentage of explants with roots without emission of callus was observed in the medium with 50% and 100% of MS salts without IBA.

  5. Approaches of [i]Rhodiola kirilowii [/i]and [i]Rhodiola rosea[/i] field cultivation in Poland and their potential health benefits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Grech-Baran

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Numerous researches have been carried out on plants of the Rhodiola species, especially Rhodiola kirilowii (Regel Maxim. and Rhodiola rosea. Various compounds have been reported to be isolated from R. kirilowii and R. rosea, including cyanogenic glycosides, monoterpene alcohols and their glycosides, aryl glycosides, phenylethanoids, phenylpropanoids and their glycosides (salidroside and rosavins respectively, as well as flavonoids, flavonlignans, proanthocyanidins and gallic acid derivatives and the latter have free radical scavenging capacity. The benefits claimed for Rhodiola include adapogenic, neuroprotective, anti-depresive anti-tumour and cardioprotective activities. Currently, the adaptogenic activity of Rhodiola compounds are properties evaluated mainly in human clinical trials. The mechanism of the action of Rhodiola extracts include affecting the levels of cortisol and NO by interactions with glucocorticoid receptors directly or via the c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK pathway. However, the natural populations of R. rosea in Poland are threatened; therefore, the cultivation of R. rosea and alternative species R. kirilowii might be a possible solution for producing these kinds of plants in Poland in sufficient quantities and quality for pharmaceutical purposes. Lack of proven interaction with other drugs and no confirmed adverse effects during clinical trials encourages further investigation. These herb preparations ought to be studied extensively to establish their position as potential drugs for a variety of diseases.

  6. Role of Ni-tolerant Bacillus spp. and Althea rosea L. in the phytoremediation of Ni-contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Waheed Ullah; Yasin, Nasim Ahmad; Ahmad, Sajid Rashid; Ali, Aamir; Ahmed, Shakil; Ahmad, Aqeel

    2017-05-04

    In our current study, four nickel-tolerant (Ni-tolerant) bacterial species viz, Bacillus thuringiensis 002, Bacillus fortis 162, Bacillus subtilis 174, and Bacillus farraginis 354, were screened using Ni-contaminated media. The screened microbes exhibited positive results for synthesis of indole acetic acid (IAA), siderophore production, and phosphate solubilization. The effects of these screened microbes on Ni mobility in the soil, root elongation, plant biomass, and Ni uptake in Althea rosea plants grown in Ni-contaminated soil (200 mg Ni kg(-1)) were evaluated. Significantly higher value for water-extractable Ni (38 mg kg(-1)) was observed in case of Ni-amended soils inoculated with B. subtilis 174. Similarly, B. thuringiensis 002, B. fortis 162, and B. subtilis 174 significantly enhanced growth and Ni uptake in A. rosea. The Ni uptake in the shoots and roots of B. subtilis 174-inoculated plants enhanced up to 1.7 and 1.6-fold, respectively, as compared to that in the un-inoculated control. Bacterial inoculation also significantly improved the root and shoot biomass of treated plants. The current study presents a novel approach for bacteria-assisted phytoremediation of Ni-contaminated areas.

  7. Changes in the Content of the Glycosides, Aglycons and their Possible Precursors of Rhodiola rosea during the Vegetation Period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirmazloum, Iman; Ladányi, Márta; György, Zsuzsanna

    2015-08-01

    Phytochemical participants in the biosynthetic pathway of salidroside and cinnamyl alcohol glycosides were studied from seven Rhodiola rosea L. individuals originating from a wild population. Plants were grown in a phytotron and samples were taken at 3 weekly intervals during the vegetation period. Based on HPLC analysis, all the key compounds to which roseroot medicinal property is attributed were detected, with salidrosde being the most dominant, followed by its aglycone, tyrosol. The contents of all compounds were 2-3 times more in the rhizomes than in roots. The highest content of salidroside, tyrosol, rosarin, rosavin and cinnamyl alcohol was recorded in rhizomes and at the beginning of shoot elongation. The seven roseroot individuals showed a very high deviation in their chemical content at each sampling time. Our statistical analysis showed that the trend of salidroside accumulation in the rhizome was the most similar in all studied plants. These results have important implications for choosing a reasonable harvest time to obtain the maximum phytochemical content and a better understanding of active compounds formation in R. rosea L.

  8. Effect of provenance, plant part and processing on extract profiles from cultivated European Rhodiola rosea L. for medicinal use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peschel, Wieland; Prieto, José M; Karkour, Caroline; Williamson, Elizabeth M

    2013-02-01

    The demand for plant material of Rhodiola rosea L. (Crassulaceae) for medicinal use has increased recently, amid concerns about its quality and sustainability. We have analysed the content of phenylpropanoids (total rosavins) and salidroside in liquid extracts from 3-year old cultivated plants of European origin, and mapped the influence of plant part (rhizome versus root), genotype, drying, cutting, and extraction solvent to chemical composition. Rhizomes contained 1.5-4 times more salidroside (0.3-0.4% dry wt) and total rosavins (1.2-3.0%) than roots. The qualitative decisive phenylpropanoid content in the extracts was most influenced by plant part, solvent, and genotype, while drying temperature and cutting conditions were of less importance. We have shown that R. rosea from different boreal European provenances can be grown under temperate conditions and identified factors to obtain consistent high quality extracts provided that authentic germplasm is used and distinguished between rhizome, roots and their mixtures. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Simultaneous quantification of polyherbal formulations containing Rhodiola rosea L. and Eleutherococcus senticosus Maxim. using rapid resolution liquid chromatography (RRLC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yuan-Chun; Wang, Xiao-Qiang; Hou, Feifei; Ma, Jie; Luo, Mai; Lu, Shane; Jin, Peter; Chen, Alice; Xu, Iris; Patel, Asmita V; Gorecki, Derek

    2011-07-15

    An RRLC method capable of simultaneous identification and rapid quantification of six biologically active compounds (salidroside, tyrosol, rosarin, rosavin, rosin, rosiridin) in Rhodiola rosea L. and two active compounds (eleutheroside B and eleutheroside E) in Eleutherococcus senticosus Maxim. was developed. The chromatographic analyses were performed on a reversed phase Phenomenex C18 (2)-HST column at 40°C with a neutral mobile phase (purified water and acetonitrile) gradient system at a flow rate of 1.0ml/min and UV detection at 205 and 220nm simultaneously. Baseline separation of eight active compounds was achieved within 8min. This developed method provides good linearity (R>0.9997), precision (RSDrosea and E. senticosus raw herbs, commercial extracts, as well as polyherbal formulations containing R. rosea and E. senticosus as ingredients. This RRLC method is accurate and sensitive; in addition, it greatly increases sample analysis throughput with reduced analysis time, which is suitable for routine quality control analysis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Neuroprotective effects of Rhodiola rosea extracts against excitotoxicity and oxygen-glucose deprivation in hippocampal slice cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gramsbergen, Jan Bert; Sindberg, Jeanne; Lundberg, Louise

    . rosea roots (Clone 5, Pharmaplant, Germany, grown for four years) as well as chemical fractions and/or purified compounds (e.g. salidrosid, rosavin) against excitotoxicity and ischemia-like brain damage using organotypic hippocampal slice cultures. Hippocampal slice cultures derived from 8 days old rat...... pups were grown for 2-3 weeks before exposure to N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA, 10 µM, 24 h) or oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD, 30 or 35 min), with and without presence of R. rosea extracts or compounds during and 24 h after the insult. NMDA- or OGD-induced neuronal cell death was monitored...... and quantified by propidium iodide uptake and immunohistochemical staining for MAP2 as a neuronal marker. Significant and dose-dependent protection against NMDA and OGD-induced CA1 pyramidal cell death was obtained by crude extracts using 250 µg/ml (33-50% protection) or 500 µg/ml (45-65% protection). A number...

  11. Hemolymph biochemistry reference ranges for wild-caught Goliath birdeater spiders (Theraphosa blondi) and Chilean rose spiders (Grammostola rosea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachariah, Trevor T; Mitchell, Mark A; Guichard, Clare M; Singh, Rimme S

    2007-06-01

    Theraphosid spiders have become increasingly popular for private and public uses in the United States. However, little is known about their physiology from a medical standpoint. This study represents the first attempt to establish reference hemolymph values for two common species of theraphosids, the goliath birdeater spider (Theraphosa blondi) and the Chilean rose spider (Grammostola rosea). Eleven T. blondi and twelve G. rosea, all wild-caught subadults, were obtained after importation and hemolymph was collected for biochemical analysis. After 8 wk of captivity, hemolymph was again collected from the spiders and analyzed. The biochemical analytes measured in the study included aspartate transferase, creatine kinase, glucose, total protein, albumin, uric acid, blood urea nitrogen, phosphorous, calcium, potassium, and sodium. The osmolality of the hemolymph was estimated for each spider using two different formulae. There were significant differences in body weight, sodium, potassium, and osmolality between the sampling times for both species. There were also significant differences in creatine kinase, calcium, total protein, and blood urea nitrogen between sampling periods for T. blondi. The results of this study suggest that serial hemolymph samples may be used to assess the hydration status of theraphosid spiders. In addition, the differences in hemolymph analytes between spiders suggest that there may be differences between species that should be addressed in future studies.

  12. The distribution of inole alkaloids in different organs of Catharanthus roseus G. Don. (Vinca rosea L

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Ebrahimzadeh

    1996-08-01

    Full Text Available The study of alkaloid extract of the leaf of Vinca rosea by TLC showed the existence of 13 bands, 7 bands of them were: Serpentine, Vincristine, Vinblastine, Ajmaline, Catharantine, Vindoline and Ajmalicine. The existence of these 7 alkaloids was confirmed in the young leaves, old leaves and the roots of the plant by HPLC. Furthermore, two alkaloids with the short retention times and one alkaloid with the medium retention time in the young leaf, three alkaloids with the short retention time and one alkaloid with long retention time in the old leaf, and one alkaioid with the short retention time and two other alkaloids with the long retention times in the root, were observed."nThe study of absorption spectrum of alkaloid extract and its comparison with absorption spectrum of ajmalicine showed that the latter can be used for drawing a standard curve and detecting the amount of total alkaloids. The total alkaloids in fresh root, old leaf and young leaf were 2.1 mg , 1.3 mg and 0.9 mg/g respectively, Vindoline and Catharantine were major alkaloids in all of them. However, their amount were more in the root (1.2 mg/ g of fresh material, 0.85 in the old leaf and 0.38 in the young leaf. Vinblastine existed in all three samples but its amount was more in the root {0.22 mg per gramme of the fresh material in the root, 0.26 in the young leaf and 0.003 in the old leaf."nAjmalicine was detected only in the leaf and its amount was more in young leaf than the old leaf (0.141 mg/g of the fresh material in the young leaf and 0.013 in the old leaf. Serpentine was seen in all of the studied organs but its amount was more in the young leaf than other organs (0.192 mg/ g of the fresh material in the young leaf, 0.11 in the root and 0.07 in the old leaf. Ajmaline existed in all of the organs in minute amount but in the old leaf was more (0 .07 mg/g of the fresh material in the old !eaf,0.044 in the young leaf and 0.04 in the root . The percentage of unknown

  13. Efecto del Almacenamiento sobre la Viabilidad de la Semilla del Roble -Tabebuia Rosea (Bertol

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    Piedrahita Edgar

    1987-09-01

    Full Text Available Este estudio se llevó a cabo en el Laboratorio de Semillas Forestales de la Facultad de Agronomía de la Universidad Nacional. El objetivo principal fue estudiar los efectos del contenido de humedad de la semilla y la temperatura de almacenamiento con evaluaciones cada cuatro meses hasta el término de un año sobre la viabilidad y el vigor de la semilla del roble, Tabebuia rosea (Bertol DC. Para la evaluación de las pruebas de germinación se dispuso ensayos con un diseño completamente al azar en un arreglo factorial con tres replicaciones. Los factores involucrados fueron el período de almacenamiento (P con tres niveles: 4, 8 Y 12 meses; la temperatura (T con dos niveles: 4° y -1°C; el contenido de humedad de la semilla (H en tres niveles: 9.8, 14.7 Y 26.9%. Los resultados revelan que la semilla del roble pertenece al grupo de las "ortodoxas" y que por tanto debe ser almacenada a contenidos de humedad menores del 10% (nivel por encima del cual se considera crítico según Yoshio y Márquez, 1983 y a bajas temperaturas El nivel de contenido de humedad alto de 26.9% ,arrojó valores nulos en la conservación de la viabilidad de la semilla bajo las dos temperaturas y durante los tres períodos de evaluación. Existen diferencias significativas entre tratamientos y el contenido de humedad bajo (9.8%, el más adecuado, difiere significativamente al nivel del 0.05% del contenido de humedad medio (14.7%. El período de almacenamiento de 4 meses difiere significativamente al 0.01 % del período de 8 meses al nivel de las dos temperaturas de almacenamiento, pero el período más prolongado de 12 meses no difiere de 4 y 8 meses al nivel de temperatura de -1°C. El único tratamiento que permitió conservar la viabilidad durante todo el período de estudio fue el almacenamiento con bajo contenido de humedad (9.8% y temperatura de -1~C, al nivel de 40% de germinación absoluta. Los resultados de vigor evaluados con el Indice de Czabator

  14. Effects of meclofenoxate and Extr. Rhodiolae roseae L. on electroconvulsive shock-impaired learning and memory in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarova, M B; Petkov, V D; Markovska, V L; Petkov, V V; Mosharrof, A

    1986-09-01

    In experiments on albino rats, the authors studied the effects of meclofenoxate and Extr. Rhodiolae roseae on the memory-impairing action of convulsant electroshock. "Step-down" passive avoidance training with negative reinforcement was used to trace the changes in memory. Meclofenoxate administered i.p. in a dose of 100 mg/kg body weight for five days prevented the retrograde amnesia observed after convulsant electroshock upon retention testing on the 3rd and 24th hr after the end of the training session. The Rhodiola extract administered orally in a dose of 0.10 ml/rat for 10 days, which in other experimental approaches improved learning and memory, remained ineffective here. The role of biogenic monoamines in the learning- and memory-improving effects of meclofenoxate is considered on the basis of earlier studies by the authors.

  15. Metabolic profiling of Rhodiola rosea rhizomes by 1H NMR spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ioset, Karine Ndjoko; Nyberg, Nils T; Van Diermen, Daphne

    2011-01-01

    Introduction - Rhodiola rosea is a broadly used medicinal plant with largely unexplored natural variability in secondary metabolite levels.Objective - The aim of this work was to develop a non-target procedure for (1)H NMR spectroscopic fingerprinting of rhizome extracts for pattern recognition...... analysis and identification of secondary metabolites responsible for differences in sample composition. To achieve this, plants from three different geographic areas (Swiss Alps, Finland, and Altai region in Siberia) were investigated.Results - A sample preparation procedure was developed in order...... to remove polymeric polyphenols as the (1)H NMR analysis of low-molecular-weight metabolites was hampered by the presence of tannins. Principal component analysis disclosed tight clustering of samples according to population. PCA models based on the aromatic region of the spectra showed that the first two...

  16. Response surface methodology for the optimization of keratinase production in culture medium containing feathers produced by Kocuria rosea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernal, C; Diaz, I; Coello, N

    2006-05-01

    A 43-fold increase in keratinase production by Kocuria rosea was achieved in batch fermentation using response surface methodology. Factorial designs were used to select the components of a culture medium that showed a significant effect on keratinase production. An orthogonal-central composite experimental design was performed, with only two (feathers and magnesium) from nine initial compounds being further analyzed by response surface methodology. An optimum keratinase production of 14 886.9 U/mg was obtained with the following medium composition (per litre): NH4Cl, 0.3 g; NaCl, 0.3 g; K2HPO4, 3.2 g; KH2PO4, 4.0 g; MgSO4.6H2O, 0.5 g; yeast extract, 0.1 g; and finely milled feathers, 30 g. The medium was shaken at 400 r/min with an incubation period of 14 h at 40 degrees C.

  17. Free radical-scavenging activities of oligomeric proanthocyanidin from Rhodiola rosea L. and its antioxidant effects in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qian; Yin, Zhi-Ping; Ma, Lei; Zhao, Wen; Hao, Hong-Wei; Li, Hui-Ling

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the antioxidant activity of oligomeric proanthocyanidin from Rhodiola rosea L. (OPCRR). The free radical-scavenging activities exhibited by OPCRR, as determined by using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl, hydroxyl radical and superoxide anion (√[Formula: see text]) scavenging assays, were greater than that of vitamin C. The effects of OPCRR on the antioxidant enzymes activity and lipid peroxide content in vivo were evaluated through three observation biomarkers, including superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and malondialdehyde (MDA) in serum, heart, liver and brain tissues in mice. The OPCRR significantly enhanced the SOD and GSH-Px activities, and reduced the MDA content in mice. These results indicated that the OPCRR has a great potential to be a natural antioxidant due to its considerable antioxidant activities in vitro and in vivo.

  18. Isolation of Secondary Metabolites from the Soil-Derived Fungus Clonostachys rosea YRS-06, a Biological Control Agent, and Evaluation of Antibacterial Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Ming-Ming; Qi, Feng-Ming; Li, Jie; Jiang, Chun-Xiao; Hou, Yue; Shi, Yan-Ping; Di, Duo-Long; Zhang, Ji-Wen; Wu, Quan-Xiang

    2016-03-23

    The fungus Clonostachys rosea is widely distributed all over the world. The destructive force of this fungus, as a biological control agent, is very strong to lots of plant pathogenic fungi. As part of the ongoing search for antibiotics from fungi obtained from soil samples, the secondary metabolites of C. rosea YRS-06 were investigated. Through efficient bioassay-guided isolation, three new bisorbicillinoids possessing open-ended cage structures, tetrahydrotrichodimer ether (1) and dihydrotrichodimer ether A and B (2 and 3), and 12 known compounds were obtained. Their structures were determined via extensive NMR, HR-ESI-MS, and CD spectroscopic analyses and X-ray diffraction data. Compounds 1-3 are rare bisorbicillinoids with a γ-pyrone moiety. The biological properties of 1-15 were evaluated against six different Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Bisorbicillinoids, 2-5, and TMC-151 C and E, 14 and 15, showed potent antibacterial activity.

  19. Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang-Xia Wang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The miR-15/107 family comprises a group of 10 paralogous microRNAs (miRNAs, sharing a 5′ AGCAGC sequence. These miRNAs have overlapping targets. In order to characterize the expression of miR-15/107 family miRNAs, we employed customized TaqMan Low-Density micro-fluid PCR-array to investigate the expression of miR-15/107 family members, and other selected miRNAs, in 11 human tissues obtained at autopsy including the cerebral cortex, frontal cortex, primary visual cortex, thalamus, heart, lung, liver, kidney, spleen, stomach and skeletal muscle. miR-103, miR-195 and miR-497 were expressed at similar levels across various tissues, whereas miR-107 is enriched in brain samples. We also examined the expression patterns of evolutionarily conserved miR-15/107 miRNAs in three distinct primary rat brain cell preparations (enriched for cortical neurons, astrocytes and microglia, respectively. In primary cultures of rat brain cells, several members of the miR-15/107 family are enriched in neurons compared to other cell types in the central nervous system (CNS. In addition to mature miRNAs, we also examined the expression of precursors (pri-miRNAs. Our data suggested a generally poor correlation between the expression of mature miRNAs and their precursors. In summary, we provide a detailed study of the tissue and cell type-specific expression profile of this highly expressed and phylogenetically conserved family of miRNA genes.

  20. Application and recovery of ionic liquids in the preparative separation of four flavonoids from Rhodiola rosea by on-line three-dimensional liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Shufeng; Hu, Liming; Ma, Chaoyang; Lv, Wenping; Wang, Hongxin

    2014-09-01

    A novel on-line three-dimensional liquid chromatography method was developed to separate four main flavonoids from Rhodiola rosea. Ethyl acetate/0.5 mol/L ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride aqueous solution was selected as the solvent system. In the first-dimension separation, the target flavonoids were entrapped and subsequently desorbed into the second-dimension high-speed countercurrent chromatographic column for separation. In the third-dimension chromatography, the residual ionic liquid in the four separated flavonoids was removed and the used ionic liquid was recovered. As a result, 35.1 mg of compound 1, 20.4 mg of compound 2, 8.5 mg of compound 3, and 10.6 mg of compound 4 were obtained from 1.53 g R. rosea extract. They were identified as rhodiosin, rhodionin, herbacetin, and kaempferol, respectively. The recovery of ionic liquid reached 99.1% of the initial amount. The results showed that this method is a powerful technology for the separation of R. rosea flavonoids and that the ionic-liquid-based solvent system has advantages over traditional solvent systems in renewable and environmentally friendly properties. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. [Effects of Rhodiola rosea on level of 5-hydroxytryptamine, cell proliferation and differentiation, and number of neuron in cerebral hippocampus of rats with depression induced by chronic mild stress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Ya-jing; Zeng, Yuan-shan; Zhou, Chun-chun; Li, Yan; Zhong, Zhi-qiang

    2008-12-01

    To explore the effects of Rhodiola rosea on the level of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), cell proliferation and differentiation, and number of neuron in cerebral hippocampus of rats with depression induced by chronic mild stress. Fifty rats were divided into 5 groups: normal control, untreated, negative control, positive control and Rhodiola rosea-treated groups. There were 10 rats in each group. Except for normal control group, depression was induced in rats by chronic mild stress. The depressive rats in the other four groups were intragastrically administered with 0.5% sodium carboxymethycellulose, fluoxetine and Rhodiola rosea for 3 weeks. After the treatment, the content of 5-HT in the hippocampus was detected by high-performance liquid chromatography. The proliferating cells and differentiated cells in the hippocampus were labeled by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) or/and beta-tubulin III immunohistochemistry, and the number of hippocampal neurons was counted by morphometry. Compared with the normal control group, the content of 5-HT, number of BrdU positive cells, percentage of BrdU and beta-tubulin III double labeled cells and number of neurons in cerebral hippocampus in the Rhodiola rosea-treated group were increased and recovered to normal level. Rhodiola rosea may enhance the level of 5-HT and promote the proliferation and differentiation of neural stem cells in the hippocampus of the depressive rats, and may play a role in saving injured neurons of the hippocampus.

  2. The comparison between the efficacy of high dose acyclovir and erythromycin on the period and signs of pitiriasis rosea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsani Amirhooshang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pityriasis Rosea (PR is an acute inflammatory and self-limiting skin disorder, sometimes with troublesome symptoms. To date, there are few treatments available for this disorder. Aim: Compare the traditional treatment with erythromycin to a newly introduced antiviral treatment acyclovir for PR. Materials and Methods: Patients with clinically confirmed diagnosis of PR, matching our exclusion criteria, were enrolled. They were randomized in two groups that received high-dose oral acyclovir or erythromycin. The participants were evaluated two, four, and eight weeks after commencement of the study and followed for one year. Results: A total of 30 patients including 15 males and 15 females completed the study. After eight weeks, 13 patients in the acyclovir group experienced complete response, while in the erythromycin group only six patients had complete response (P < 0.05. Also, patients in the acyclovir group experienced faster resolution of pruritus in comparison with the erythromycin group (not significant. No adverse drug reaction was detected in both groups. Conclusion: It seemed that a high-dose of oral acyclovir was a safe and effective therapy for PR, although this remained to be confirmed in larger studies.

  3. Stability and Fitness Impact of the Visually Discernible Rosea1 Marker in the Tobacco etch virus Genome

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    Mark P. Zwart

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Antirrhinum majus Rosea1 (Ros1 is an MYB-related transcription factor that induces anthocyanin biosynthesis in plant tissues, and has been shown to be suitable for visual tracking of virus infection in plants. However, activation of anthocyanin biosynthesis has far reaching effects on plant physiology and could consequently have negative effects on viral replication. Therefore, viruses carrying the Ros1 marker might have a low fitness and consequently rapidly lose the marker. To compare the stability of the Ros1 marker, we generated Tobacco etch virus (TEV based constructs containing either Ros1 or the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP between the NIb and CP cistrons (TEV-Ros1 and TEV-eGFP, respectively. We measured the within-host competitive fitness of both viruses by direct competitions with a common competitor during infection of Nicotiana tabacum. The fitness of TEV-Ros1 was significantly lower than that of TEV-eGFP, and both recombinant viruses had a significantly lower fitness than the wild-type virus. Nevertheless, after seven weeks of infection in N. tabacum, similar levels of marker gene instability where found for both viruses. Despite lower fitness of the marked virus, Ros1 is therefore a viable alternative marker for tracking viral infection in plants.

  4. Singulisphaera rosea sp. nov., a planctomycete from acidic Sphagnum peat, and emended description of the genus Singulisphaera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulichevskaya, Irina S; Detkova, Ekaterina N; Bodelier, Paul L E; Rijpstra, W Irene C; Damsté, Jaap S Sinninghe; Dedysh, Svetlana N

    2012-01-01

    An aerobic, pink-pigmented, budding bacterium, designated strain S26(T), was isolated from an acidic Sphagnum peat bog of north-western Russia. Cells were non-motile and spherical, occurring singly, in pairs or in short chains, and were able to attach to surfaces by means of a holdfast material. Strain S26(T) was a moderately acidophilic, mesophilic organism capable of growth at pH 3.2-7.1 (optimum at pH 4.8-5.0) and at 4-33 °C (optimum at 20-26 °C). Most sugars, several organic acids and polyalcohols were the preferred growth substrates. The major fatty acids were C(16:0), C(18:1)ω9c and C(18:2)ω6c,12c. The major neutral lipids were n-C(31:9) hydrocarbon and squalene; the polar lipids were phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine and components with an unknown structure. The DNA G+C content of strain S26(T) was 62.2 mol%. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed that strain S26(T) is a member of the order Planctomycetales. Among taxonomically characterized representatives of this order, highest levels of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity (95.1-95.2%) were observed with strains of the non-filamentous, peat-inhabiting planctomycete Singulisphaera acidiphila. Strain S26(T) could be differentiated from Singulisphaera acidiphila based on pigmentation, significant differences in substrate utilization patterns, greater tolerance of acidic conditions and the presence of C(16:1)ω9c. Based on the data presented, strain S26(T) is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Singulisphaera, for which the name Singulisphaera rosea sp. nov. is proposed; the type strain is S26(T) (=DSM 23044(T)=VKM B-2599(T)).

  5. Anti-MMP-2 Activity and Skin-Penetrating Capability of the Chemical Constituents from Rhodiola rosea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tzong-Huei; Hsu, Chieh-Chih; Hsiao, George; Fang, Jia-You; Liu, Wei-Min; Lee, Ching-Kuo

    2016-05-01

    Based on the significant inhibitory activity toward matrix metalloproteinase-2 and collagenase noticed in preliminary studies, crude extracts of Rhodiola rosea were partitioned and chromatographed sequentially to afford three new compounds, 1,2,3,6-tetra-O-galloyl-4-O-p-hydroxybenzoyl-β-D-glucopyranoside (1), (E)-creoside I (2), and (R,Z)-2-methylhept-2-ene-1,6-diol (3), along with twenty-four known compounds (4-27). Their structures were determined by spectroscopic data analyses. All isolated compounds were subjected to bioactivity assays. In these, 1 specifically inhibited matrix metalloproteinase-2 activity with an IC50 value of 16.3 ± 1.6 µM, while its analogue 1,2,3,6-tetra-O-galloyl-β-D-glucopyranonoside (17) inhibited matrix metalloproteinase-2 with an IC50 value of 23.0 ± 4.8 µM. In the collagenase activity assay, the inhibitory effects of 1 and 17 at concentrations of both 20 and 40 µM were more potent than those of the positive control, 1,10-phenanthroline. In order to realize whether 17 could penetrate from the epidermal layer into the basal and dermal layers of the human skin to inhibit the activity of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and collagenase or not, a transdermal penetration test in nude and white mice skins was performed. Penetration percentages of 17 quantified by LC-MS were 27.8 % and 74.8 % in 24 hours, respectively. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Investigating the compatibility of the biocontrol agent Clonostachys rosea IK726 with prodigiosin-producing Serratia rubidaea S55 and phenazine-producing Pseudomonas chlororaphis ToZa7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamou, Nathalie N; Dubey, Mukesh; Tzelepis, Georgios; Menexes, Georgios; Papadakis, Emmanouil N; Karlsson, Magnus; Lagopodi, Anastasia L; Jensen, Dan Funck

    2016-05-01

    This study was carried out to assess the compatibility of the biocontrol fungus Clonostachys rosea IK726 with the phenazine-producing Pseudomonas chlororaphis ToZa7 or with the prodigiosin-producing Serratia rubidaea S55 against Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. radicis-lycopersici. The pathogen was inhibited by both strains in vitro, whereas C. rosea displayed high tolerance to S. rubidaea but not to P. chlororaphis. We hypothesized that this could be attributed to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins. The results of the reverse transcription quantitative PCR showed an induction of seven genes (abcB1, abcB20, abcB26, abcC12, abcC12, abcG8 and abcG25) from subfamilies B, C and G. In planta experiments showed a significant reduction in foot and root rot on tomato plants inoculated with C. rosea and P. chlororaphis. This study demonstrates the potential for combining different biocontrol agents and suggests an involvement of ABC transporters in secondary metabolite tolerance in C. rosea.

  7. Therapeutic effects and safety of Rhodiola rosea extract WS® 1375 in subjects with life-stress symptoms--results of an open-label study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, D; Heufelder, A; Zimmermann, A

    2012-08-01

    The trial was conducted to investigate the therapeutic effects and safety of a 4 week treatment with Rhodiola rosea extract WS® 1375 in subjects with life-stress symptoms. This was a multicentre, non-randomized, open-label, single-arm trial. One hundred and one subjects were enrolled in this clinical study and received the study drug at a dose of 200 mg twice daily for 4 weeks. Assessments with seven questionnaires included Numerical Analogue Scales of Subjective Stress Symptoms, Perceived Stress Questionnaire, Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory 20, Numbers Connecting Test, Sheehan Disability Scale and Clinical Global Impressions to cover various aspects of stress symptoms and adverse events. Invariably, all tests showed clinically relevant improvements with regard to stress symptoms, disability, functional impairment and overall therapeutic effect. Improvements were observed even after 3 days of treatment, as were continuing improvements after 1 and 4 weeks. Rhodiola rosea extract WS® 1375 was safe and generally well tolerated. Adverse events were mostly of mild intensity and no serious adverse events were reported. Rhodiola extract at a dose of 200 mg twice daily for 4 weeks is safe and effective in improving life-stress symptoms to a clinically relevant degree. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Alcohol- and water-based extracts obtained from Rhodiola rosea affect differently the number and metabolic activity of circulating granulocytes in Balb/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zdanowski, Robert; Lewicki, Sławomir; Skopińska-Różewska, Ewa; Buchwald, Waldemar; Mrozikiewicz, Przemysław Michał; Stankiewicz, Wanda

    2014-01-01

    Rhodiola rosea (RR) rhizomes with roots extracts are traditional natural drugs originated from Asia and now commonly used as adaptogens and antidepressants. The aim of this work was to study the in vivo effect of aqueous (RRW) and 50% hydro-alcoholic (RRA) extracts on the number and metabolic activity of blood granulocytes in mice. Mice were fed for 7 days RR extract in daily doses 0.05, 0.1, 0.2 or 0.4 mg. The metabolic activity of blood granulocytes was determined by measuring of their luminol-dependent chemiluminescent activity in scintillation counter, after zymosan stimulation. Number of blood granulocytes was diminished and their chemiluminescence was enhanced in all groups of mice fed R.rosea hydro-alcoholic extract. Aqueous extract (RRW) was ineffective in all doses applied. This study revealed difference in the number and metabolic activity of granulocytes mice fed RRA or RRW extracts. Immune characteristics of some individual compounds from RRA and RRW extracts, selected by HPLC analysis, should be carried out in the next experiments.

  9. Flavonoids of Alcea rosea L. and their immune stimulant, antioxidant and cytotoxic activities on hepatocellular carcinoma HepG-2 cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Salam, Nabil A; Ghazy, Nabila M; Sallam, Shaimaa M; Radwan, Mohamed M; Wanas, Amira S; ElSohly, Mahmoud A; El-Demellawy, Maha A; Abdel-Rahman, Nevin M; Piacente, Sonia; Shenouda, Mary L

    2017-06-05

    Alcea rosea L. is widely cultivated in gardens of Egypt as an ornamental plant and it has a great history of folkloric medicinal uses. In the present work, phytochemical investigation of the alcoholic extract of the flowers of A. rosea L. led to the isolation of six flavonoids (1-6). Dihydrokaempferol-4'-O-β-d-glucopyranoside (1), dihydrokaempferol (2), kaempferol-3-O-[6″-(E-coumaroyl)]-β-d-glucopyranoside (3), kaempferol-3-O-β-d-glucopyranoside (4), Apigenin (5) and kaempferol-3-O-α-l-rhamnopyranosyl-(1'″→6″)-β-d-glucopyranoside (6). Four of the isolated compounds were evaluated for their antioxidant, immunostimulant and cytotoxic activities against HepG-2 cell line. Compound (3) showed potent cytotoxic activity against HepG-2 cell line with high selectivity towards hepatocellular carcinoma in vitro (with IC50 = 3.8 μg/mL). Compounds 1 and 2 exhibited significant antioxidant activity and compound 4 showed a significant immune stimulant activity. Compound 1 is isolated for the first time from genus Alcea and this is the first report for its biological investigation.

  10. Preventive effect of Oenothera rosea on N-methyl-N-nitrosourea- (NMU induced gastric cancer in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almora-Pinedo Y

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Yuan Almora-Pinedo,1 Jorge Arroyo-Acevedo,2 Oscar Herrera-Calderon,3 Víctor Chumpitaz-Cerrate,4 Renán Hañari-Quispe,5 Aldo Tinco-Jayo,6 Cesar Franco-Quino,4 Linder Figueroa-Salvador7 1Department of Pharmacy, Hospital Nacional Hipólito Unanue, Lima, 2Laboratory of Experimental Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, 3Faculty of Pharmacy and Biochemistry, Universidad Nacional San Luis Gonzaga de Ica, Ica, 4Laboratory of Physiology and Pharmacology, Faculty of Dentistry, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, 5Laboratory of Animal Physiology, Universidad Andina Néstor Cáceres Velasquez, Puno, 6Academic Department of Human Medicine, School of Pharmacy and Biochemistry, Universidad Nacional San Cristóbal de Huamanga, Ayacucho, 7School of Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Universidad Peruana de Ciencias Aplicadas, Lima, Peru Background: Currently, gastric cancer (GC is considered a public health problem worldwide. Using medicinal plants for the prevention of chronic diseases such as cancer constitutes new alternatives in traditional medicine. Oenothera rosea (OR could be an option, but it needs to be evaluated. Aim: The main objective of this study was to evaluate the protective effect of OR extract on N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (NMU-induced GC in rats. Methods: In total, 80 male Holtzman rats were randomized into five groups. Group A received the saline solution (5mL/kg, group B received NMU 500 μg/kg (cancer inductor by oral administration for 16 weeks, and groups C, D, and E were treated with OR extract (100, 200, and 300 mg/kg, respectively and NMU in order to evaluate the preventive effect on cancer induced by NMU for 16 weeks. Blood and histological samples of stomachs were collected to determine histopathological, biochemical, and hematological parameters between different experimental groups. Results: Groups C, D, and E presented less histopathological changes such as anaplastic and

  11. A protocol for high frequency regeneration through nodal explant cultures and ex vitro rooting of Plumbago rosea L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, Binoy; Satheeshkumar, K; Seeni, S

    2007-01-15

    A rapid clonal multiplication scheme comprising direct multiple shoot initiation and downsizing of the node with buds proliferated upon during subculture was developed for Plumbago rosea. Sixty five per cent of the nodes (approximately 2.0 cm) dissected out of young shoots from field grown plants and cultured in MS agar medium containing 3% sucrose and 15.4 microM BAP remained contamination free and responded at 95% rate with callusing at basal cut end and axillary bud break in 5 days followed by the formation of 2.41 +/- 0.14 shoots of 0.87 +/- 0.14 cm length in 3 weeks. Though differences in frequency and number of buds formed between nodes of 1-5 positions from the young shoots was negligible, the shoots emanated from the youngest node were shorter (0.92 +/- 0.19 cm) than those (2.3 +/- 0.50 cm) of the mature 5th node. Synergistic influence of BAP and auxins on caulogenesis was absent. Bud emergence in shorter (approximately 0.5 cm) nodes was delayed up to 3 weeks and extensive callus proliferation from the cut basal end overlapped the 8.2 +/- 0.37 axillary shoots/buds formed after 7 weeks. Reduction in the size (downsized) of the 2.0 cm node with buds to 1.0 cm by dissecting out the basal internodal segment having the callus and subculture of them (approximately 1.0 cm) with buds in contact with the medium for 3 weeks contributed to maximum multiplication of 42.1 +/- 5.40 shoot buds. Division of the shoot cluster and transfer of 2-3 shoots (0.5-1.5 cm) in a clump to MS basal liquid medium induced elongation of the shoots to 4.1 +/- 0.18 cm in 2 weeks. Shoots of 3.0-4.2 cm length were rooted within 3 weeks at 100% efficiency in vitro or ex vitro without hardening. In vitro rhizogenesis in presence of 0.49 microM IBA is recommended for enhanced rooting and high yield of commercially important tuberous roots during cultivation in the field.

  12. Establecimiento y desarrollo de plántulas de Tabebuia rosea (Bignoniaceae en una selva subcaducifolia manejada de la costa Pacífica de México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Mora Santacruz

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Evaluamos el efecto de los tratamientos de remoción de suelo y roza de vegetación sobre el establecimiento y desarrollo inicial de la regeneración natural de Tabebuia rosea (Bertold DC. en una selva mediana subcaducifolia sometida a aprovechamiento maderable en la costa de Jalisco, México. Los tratamientos se aplicaron bajo la copa de árboles "semilleros" y se evaluó el número de plántulas emergidas y su desarrollo durante nueve meses. El tratamiento de remoción de suelo favoreció la emergencia de plántulas y su desarrollo inicial, mientras que el control de la vegetación competidora promovió un mayor crecimiento y menores porcentajes de mortalidad. Estos aspectos deben tomarse en cuenta para la regeneración natural de la especie después de la aplicación de las cortas con fines de aprovechamiento maderable y se sugiere incorporarlos a las técnicas silvícolas que actualmente se desarrollan en la zonaEstablishment and development of Tabebuia rosea (Bignoniaceae seedlings in a semideciduous tropical forest under management, Pacific coast of Mexico. We evaluated the effect of soil "scarification" and vegetation clearing treatments on the natural regeneration and initial development of Tabebuia rosea (Bertold DC. seedlings in a moderate sized semideciduous tropical forest subjected to wood harvesting on the coast of Jalisco, Mexico. The treatments were applied under "seed" trees, and the number of germinated seedlings and their development were evaluated for nine months. Soil "scarification" promoted seed germination and initial seedling development, while the control of the competing vegetation increased the seedling growth and reduced their mortality. These results should be taken into account for the natural regeneration of this species, after clearing, to improve wood production, and should be incorporated into the silvicultural techniques currently developed in the region. Rev. Biol. Trop. 54 (4: 1215-1225. Epub 2006 Dec. 15

  13. A trade-off between the amount and distance of pollen dispersal triggered by the mixed foraging behaviour of Sephanoides sephaniodes (Trochilidae) on Lapageria rosea (Philesiaceae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdivia, Carlos E.; González-Gómez, Paulina L.

    2006-05-01

    Nectar thieves may increase or decrease pollinator-mediated pollen flow and thus may have positive or negative effects on plant reproductive success. In temperate rainforests of South America, the hummingbird Sephanoides sephaniodes acts as both a pollinator and non-destructive nectar thief on Lapageria rosea. Although pollinators that also act as nectar thieves have the potential to significantly modify plant reproductive success, no previous study has addressed this. To determine how the mixed behaviour of S. sephanoides affects pollen flow, we experimentally exposed some flowers to nectar theft and excluded nectar thieves from other flowers. We then assessed pollen dispersal into the floral neighbourhood. Thieved flowers exported less pollen, but the pollen exported was transferred farther into the neighbourhood. Our findings indicate a trade-off between distance and amount of pollen flow.

  14. GUS and GFP transformation of the biocontrol strain Clonostachys rosea IK726 and the use of these marker genes in ecological studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lübeck, M.; Knudsen, I.M.B.; Jensen, B.

    2002-01-01

    . In addition, the biocontrol efficacy against disease caused by seed-borne Fusarium culmorum was evaluated on barley grown in sand. Compared to the wildtype, two selected GUS and GFP transformants, IK726c5 and IK726d11, did not vary in physiological properties. Both maintained the ability to colonize barley...... roots, and to reduce efficiently the severity of F. culmorum without affecting plant emergence. Quantification of GUS activity of IK726c5 in peat and vermiculite and on seeds was carried out. The GFP transformant, IK726d11, was visualized by epifluorescence and confocal scanning laser microscopy...... directly in soil, vermiculite, on carrot seed and roots, and on barley leaves. It was shown that C. rosea can thrive in very different niches. Conidia germination, colonization and conidiogenesis were demonstrated in vivo in all four environments. This is the first report on transformation of Clonostachys...

  15. Non-target effects of the microbial control agents Pseudomonas fluorescens DR54 and Clonostachys rosea IK726 in soils cropped with barley followed by sugar beet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Anders; Knudsen, Inge M.B.; Binnerup, Svend J.

    2005-01-01

    Non-target effects of a bacterial (Pseudomonas fluorescens DR54) and a fungal (Clonostachys rosea IK726) microbial control agent (MCA), on the indigenous microbiota in bulk soil and rhizosphere of barley, and subsequent a sugar beet crop, were studied in a greenhouse experiment. MCAs were...... by a factor of 106 and 20, respectively, and DR54 showed a short-lasting growth increase in the sugar beet rhizosphere. In general, the non-target effects were small and transient. IK726 seemed to have general stimulating effects on soil enzyme activity and the soil microbiota, and resulted in a significant...... introduced by seed and soil inoculation. Bulk and rhizosphere soils were sampled regularly during the growth of barley and sugar beet. The soils were assayed for the fate of MCAs and various features of the indigenous soil microbiota. At the end of the experiment (193 d), DR54 and IK726 had declined...

  16. Distribution of heavy metals in Lumbricus terrestris, Aporrectodea longa and A. rosea measured by atomic absorption and X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, C.; Laursen, J.

    1982-01-01

    Distribution of Ca, Pb, Cd, Zn, Fe and Mn has been investigated in the earthworm species Lumbricus terrestris, Aporectodea longa and A. rosea by AAS and XRF measurements. The material of L. terrestris originated from the garden of the Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University in central Copenhagen. Material of the other two species was sampled in sewage sludge treated plots. It was found that lead and cadmium are accumulated in the gut wall and from here transferred to waste nodules (brown bodies). In L. terrestris more lead was transferred to waste nodules than cadmium. Also large amounts of zinc were accumulated in the gut wall. Analyses of L. terrestris calciferous glands showed that these take part in regulation and excretion of a number of heavy metals. Lead and cadmium content was low in the ventral nerve chord and seminal vesicles. A. longa with poorly developed calciferous glands seems to rely more on waste nodule formation in the ultimate immobilization of lead.

  17. Optimization of EPS Production and Characterization by a Halophilic Bacterium, Kocuria rosea ZJUQH from Chaka Salt Lake with Response Surface Methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Di; Jiao, Yingchun; Wu, Jianan; Liu, Zhengjie; Chen, Qihe

    2017-05-16

    With the rising awareness of microbial exopolysaccharides (EPSs) application in various fields, halophilic microorganisms which produce EPSs have received broad attention. A newly identified Kocuria rosea ZJUQH CCTCC M2016754 was determined to be a moderate halobacterium on account of its successful adaption to the environment containing 10% NaCl. The optimal combination of fermentation medium compositions on EPS production was studied. In this work, a fractional factorial design was adopted to investigate the significant factors that affected EPS production. The factors of KCl and MgSO₄ were found to have a profound impact on EPS production. We utilized central composite design and response surface methodology to derive a statistical model for optimizing the submerged culture medium composition. Judging from these experimental results, the optimum culture medium for producing EPSs was composed of 0.50% casein hydrolysate, 1.00% sodium citrate, 0.30% yeast extract, 0.50% KCl, 0.50% peptone, and 5.80% MgSO₄ (initial pH 7.0). The maximal EPS was 48.01 g/L, which is close to the predicted value (50.39 g/L). In the validation experiment, the highest concentration of 70.64 g/L EPSs was obtained after 120 h under the optimized culture medium in a 5-L bioreactor. EPS from this bacterium was also characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and Fourier transform infrared analysis (FT-IR). The findings in this study imply that Kocuria rosea ZJUQH has great potential to be exploited as a source of EPSs utilized in food, the pharmaceutical and agriculture industry, and in the biotreatment of hypersaline environments.

  18. Differential activity of Striga hermonthica seed germination stimulants and Gigaspora rosea hyphal branching factors in rice and their contribution to underground communication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catarina Cardoso

    Full Text Available Strigolactones (SLs trigger germination of parasitic plant seeds and hyphal branching of symbiotic arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM fungi. There is extensive structural variation in SLs and plants usually produce blends of different SLs. The structural variation among natural SLs has been shown to impact their biological activity as hyphal branching and parasitic plant seed germination stimulants. In this study, rice root exudates were fractioned by HPLC. The resulting fractions were analyzed by MRM-LC-MS to investigate the presence of SLs and tested using bioassays to assess their Striga hermonthica seed germination and Gigaspora rosea hyphal branching stimulatory activities. A substantial number of active fractions were revealed often with very different effect on seed germination and hyphal branching. Fractions containing (--orobanchol and ent-2'-epi-5-deoxystrigol contributed little to the induction of S. hermonthica seed germination but strongly stimulated AM fungal hyphal branching. Three SLs in one fraction, putative methoxy-5-deoxystrigol isomers, had moderate seed germination and hyphal branching inducing activity. Two fractions contained strong germination stimulants but displayed only modest hyphal branching activity. We provide evidence that these stimulants are likely SLs although no SL-representative masses could be detected using MRM-LC-MS. Our results show that seed germination and hyphal branching are induced to very different extents by the various SLs (or other stimulants present in rice root exudates. We propose that the development of rice varieties with different SL composition is a promising strategy to reduce parasitic plant infestation while maintaining symbiosis with AM fungi.

  19. Distribution of heavy metals in Lumbricus terrestris, Aporrectodea longa and A. rosea measured by atomic absorption and X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, C.; Laursen, J. (Kongelige Veterinaer- og Landbohoejskole, Copenhagen (Denmark))

    1982-01-01

    Distribution of Ca, Pb, Cd, Zn, Fe and Mn has been investigated in the earthworm species Lumbricus terrestris, Aporectodea longa and A. rosea by atomic absorption and X-ray fluorescence spectrometry measurements. The material of L. terrestris originated from the garden of the Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University in central Copenhagen. Material of the other two species was sampled in sewage sludge treated plots. It was found that lead and cadmium are accumulated in the gut wall and from here transferred to waste nodules (brown bodies). In L. terrestris more lead was transferred to waste nodules than cadmium. Also large amounts of zinc were accumulated in the gut wall. Analyses of L. terrestris calciferous glands showed that these take part in regulation and excretion of a number of heavy metals. Lead and cadmium content was low in the ventral nerve chord and seminal vesicles. A. longa with poorly developed calciferous glands seems to rely more on waste nodule formation in the ultimate immobilization of lead.

  20. Rhodiola rosea extract protects human cortical neurons against glutamate and hydrogen peroxide-induced cell death through reduction in the accumulation of intracellular calcium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palumbo, Dora Rita; Occhiuto, Francesco; Spadaro, Federica; Circosta, Clara

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the neuroprotective effects of a titolated extract from Rhodiola rosea L. (RrE) and of salidroside (Sa), one of the major biologically active compounds extracted from this medicinal plant, against oxidative stressor hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) and glutamate (GLU)-induced cell apoptosis in a human cortical cell line (HCN 1-A) maintained in culture. The results obtained indicate that exposure of differentiated HCN 1-A neurons to GLU or H₂O₂ resulted in concentration-dependent cell death. A 24 h pre-treatment with RrE significantly increased cell survival and significantly prevented the plasma membrane damage and the morphological disruption caused by GLU or H₂O₂, indicating that neurons treated with RrE were protected from the neurotoxicity induced by the oxidative stressor used. In addition, RrE significantly reduced H₂O₂ or GLU-induced elevation of intracellular free Ca²⁺ concentration. The results obtained have also shown that Sa caused similar effects in all experimental models used; however, the potency of the action was lower than that of the extract containing corresponding quantities of Sa. These findings indicate that RrE has a neuroprotective effect in cortical neurons and suggest that the antioxidant activity of the RrE, due to the structural features of the synergic active principles they contain, may be responsible for its ability to stabilize cellular Ca²⁺ homeostasis. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Pityriasis rosea, Gianotti-Crosti syndrome, asymmetric periflexural exanthem, papular-purpuric gloves and socks syndrome, eruptive pseudoangiomatosis, and eruptive hypomelanosis: do their epidemiological data substantiate infectious etiologies?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Chuh

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Many clinical and laboratory-based studies have been reported for skin rashes which may be due to viral infections, namely pityriasis rosea (PR, Gianotti-Crosti syndrome (GCS, asymmetric periflexural exanthem/unilateral laterothoracic exanthem (APE/ULE, papularpurpuric gloves and socks syndrome (PPGSS, and eruptive pseudo-angiomatosis (EP. Eruptive hypomelanosis (EH is a newly discovered paraviral rash. Novel tools are now available to investigate the epidemiology of these rashes. To retrieve epidemiological data of these exanthema and analyze whether such substantiates or refutes infectious etiologies. We searched for articles published over the last 60 years and indexed by PubMed database. We then analyzed them for universality, demography, concurrent patients, temporal and spatial-temporal clustering, mini-epidemics, epidemics, and other clinical and geographical associations. Based on our criteria, we selected 55, 60, 29, 36, 20, and 4 articles for PR, GCS, APE/ULE, PPGSS, EP, and EH respectively. Universality or multiple-continental reports are found for all exanthema except EH. The ages of patients are compatible with infectious causes for PR, GCS, APE/ULE, and EH. Concurrent patients are reported for all. Significant patient clustering is demonstrated for PR and GCS. Mini-epidemics and epidemics have been reported for GCS, EP, and EH. The current epidemiological data supports, to a moderate extent, that PR, GCS, and APE could be caused by infectious agents. Support for PPGSS is marginal. Epidemiological evidences for infectious origins for EP and EH are inadequate. There might be growing epidemiological evidence to substantiate or to refute our findings in the future.

  2. Pityriasis Rosea, Gianotti-Crosti Syndrome, Asymmetric Periflexural Exanthem, Papular-Purpuric Gloves and Socks Syndrome, Eruptive Pseudoangiomatosis, and Eruptive Hypomelanosis: Do Their Epidemiological Data Substantiate Infectious Etiologies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawar, Vijay; Sciallis, Gabriel F.; Kempf, Werner; Lee, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Many clinical and laboratory-based studies have been reported for skin rashes which may be due to viral infections, namely pityriasis rosea (PR), Gianotti-Crosti syndrome (GCS), asymmetric periflexural exanthem/unilateral laterothoracic exanthem (APE/ULE), papular-purpuric gloves and socks syndrome (PPGSS), and eruptive pseudo-angiomatosis (EP). Eruptive hypomelanosis (EH) is a newly discovered paraviral rash. Novel tools are now available to investigate the epidemiology of these rashes. To retrieve epidemiological data of these exanthema and analyze whether such substantiates or refutes infectious etiologies. We searched for articles published over the last 60 years and indexed by PubMed database. We then analyzed them for universality, demography, concurrent patients, temporal and spatial-temporal clustering, mini-epidemics, epidemics, and other clinical and geographical associations. Based on our criteria, we selected 55, 60, 29, 36, 20, and 4 articles for PR, GCS, APE/ULE, PPGSS, EP, and EH respectively. Universality or multiple-continental reports are found for all exanthema except EH. The ages of patients are compatible with infectious causes for PR, GCS, APE/ULE, and EH. Concurrent patients are reported for all. Significant patient clustering is demonstrated for PR and GCS. Mini-epidemics and epidemics have been reported for GCS, EP, and EH. The current epidemiological data supports, to a moderate extent, that PR, GCS, and APE could be caused by infectious agents. Support for PPGSS is marginal. Epidemiological evidences for infectious origins for EP and EH are inadequate. There might be growing epidemiological evidence to substantiate or to refute our findings in the future. PMID:27103975

  3. Gianotti-Crosti syndrome, pityriasis rosea, asymmetrical periflexural exanthem, unilateral mediothoracic exanthem, eruptive pseudoangiomatosis and papular-purpuric gloves and socks syndrome: a brief review and arguments for diagnostic criteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Chuh

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Several exanthems including Gianotti-Crosti syndrome, pityriasis rosea, asymmetrical periflexural exanthem, eruptive pseudoangiomatosis, and papular-purpuric gloves and socks syndrome are suspected to be caused by viruses. These viruses are potentially dangerous. Gianotti-Crosti syndrome is related to hepatitis B virus infection which is the commonest cause of hepatocellular carcinoma, and Epstein-Barr virus infection which is related to nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Pityriasis rosea has been suspected to be related to human herpesvirus 7 and 8 infections, with the significance of the former still largely unknown, and the latter being a known cause of Kaposi’s sarcoma. Papular-purpuric gloves and socks syndrome is significantly associated with human B19 erythrovirus infection which can lead to aplastic anemia in individuals with congenital hemoglobinopathies, and when transmitted to pregnant women, can cause spontaneous abortions and congenital anomalies. With viral DNA sequence detection technologies, false positive results are common. We can no longer apply Koch’s postulates to establish causeeffect relationships. Biological properties of some viruses including lifelong latent infection, asymptomatic shedding, and endogenous reactivation render virological results on various body tissues difficult to interpret. We might not be able to confirm or refute viral causes for these rashes in the near future. Owing to the relatively small number of patients, virological and epidemiology studies, and treatment trials usually recruit few study and control subjects. This leads to low statistical powers and thus results have little clinical significance.

  4. Alcohol- and water-based extracts obtained from [i]Rhodiola rosea[/i] affect differently the number and metabolic activity of circulating granulocytes in Balb/c mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Zdanowski

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objective: [i]Rhodiola rosea[/i] (RR rhizomes with roots extracts are traditional natural drugs originated from Asia and now commonly used as adaptogens and antidepressants. The aim of this work was to study the in vivo effect of aqueous (RRW and 50% hydro-alcoholic (RRA extracts on the number and metabolic activity of blood granulocytes in mice. Material and methods: Mice were fed for 7 days RR extract in daily doses 0.05, 0.1, 0.2 or 0.4 mg. The metabolic activity of blood granulocytes was determined by measuring of their luminol-dependent chemiluminescent activity in scintillation counter, after zymosan stimulation. Results: Number of blood granulocytes was diminished and their chemiluminescence was enhanced in all groups of mice fed[i] R.rosea[/i] hydro-alcoholic extract. Aqueous extract (RRW was ineffective in all doses applied. Conclusion: This study revealed difference in the number and metabolic activity of granulocytes mice fed RRA or RRW extracts. Immune characteristics of some individual compounds from RRA and RRW extracts, selected by HPLC analysis, should be carried out in the next experiments.

  5. The effects of Alcea rosea L., Malva sylvestris L. and Salvia libanotica L. water extracts on the production of anti-egg albumin antibodies, interleukin-4, gamma interferon and interleukin-12 in BALB/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Ghaoui, Walid Bou Jaber; Ghanem, Elsa Bou; Chedid, Lara Abou; Abdelnoor, Alexander M

    2008-12-01

    Polysaccharides obtained from certain plants have been reported to have immunomodulatory properties. As a consequence of these reports the aim of this study was to investigate some immunomodulatory properties of water extracts of Alcea rosea L. (ARE), Malva sylvestris L. (MSE) and Salvia libanotica L. (SLE).Groups of egg albumin (EA)-immunized and -non-immunized Balb/c mice were treated with the carbohydrate-rich water extracts. Mice from each group were bled and their spleens removed at 3, 6 and 10 days post-immunization/treatment. Anti-egg albumin antibody levels in the processed sera were determined by an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). RNA was extracted from spleen cells and interleukin-4 (IL-4), interleukin-12 (IL-12) and gamma-interferon transcripts were determined by the reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR).ARE appeared to boost the antibody response to EA, but had no effect on IL-4 and gamma-interferon gene transcription. MSE and SLE appeared to have no effect on anti-EA antibody production, but enhanced IL-12 and gamma-interferon gene transcription. MSE appeared to switch off, and SLE had no effect on, IL-4 transcription.In conclusion, it appears that ARE is a B-lymphocyte polyclonal activator, and MSE and SLE are macrophage and T helper-1 (Th-1) activators. (c) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Pitiríase rósea purpúrica: relato de caso e revisão da literatura Purpuric pityriasis rosea: case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Gabriel Carbia

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available A pitiríase rósea purpúrica constitui doença rara e 10 casos foram publicados na Europa e EUA. O quadro clínico cutâneo é a forma hemorrágica ou purpúrica com variável descamação marginal. Relata-se o caso de um homem de 25 anos de idade com lesões na região escapular. A revisão da literatura enfatiza o diagnóstico diferencial das lesões purpúricas. Segundo Lilacs e Medline, não foram relatados casos na literatura latino-americana.Purpuric pityriasis rosea is an unusual disease with ten published cases in the American and European literature. The main feature is an hemorrhagic or purpuric eruption with or without scaling. A case is reported of a 25-year-old man with skin lesions affecting the scapular region. The review emphasizes the differential diagnosis of purpuric cutaneous diseases. According to LILACS and MEDLINE, no similar case has been reported in the Latin-American literature.

  7. Programmed death-ligand 1, 2 expressions are decreased in the psoriatic epidermis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae Suk; Je, Jung Hwan; Kim, Sung Hee; Shin, Dongyun; Kim, Tae-Gyun; Kim, Do Young; Kim, Soo Min; Lee, Min-Geol

    2015-08-01

    Psoriatic keratinocytes are one of the key components that amplify and maintain chronic inflammation. We hypothesized that lack of proper regulatory functions of keratinocytes can be responsible for chronic inflammation in psoriasis. Programmed death-ligands (PD-L) 1, 2 are expressed on keratinocytes, and expressions by nonlymphoid cells are important for mediating peripheral T cell tolerance. In our study, we investigated whether PD-L1, 2 expressions are altered in keratinocytes of psoriatic epidermis compared to normal epidermis. Epidermis was separated and analyzed for PD-L1, 2 expressions in mRNA and protein levels. Immunohistochemical stainings were done in skin biopsy samples from psoriasis, normal skin, allergic contact dermatitis (ACD), pityriasis rosea (PR) and lichen planus (LP). Expressions of PD-L1, 2 mRNA levels were significantly decreased in psoriatic epidermis compared to normal epidermis. In protein levels, PD-L1 expression was significantly decreased in psoriatic epidermis. However, PD-L2 expression was not detected in both normal and psoriatic epidermis. Immunohistochemical stainings revealed significantly less PD-L1 expression in psoriatic epidermis compared to normal epidermis. Even compared to other cutaneous inflammatory diseases, psoriatic epidermis showed less expression than ACD, PR and LP. PD-L2 expression was minimally detected in normal epidermis and not in psoriatic epidermis, but its expression was increased in ACD, PR and LP. In conclusion, we demonstrated that PD-L1, 2 are decreased in psoriatic epidermis in mRNA and protein levels. In addition, we showed that their expression was significantly lower than other inflammatory skin diseases. We suggest that decreased expression of PD-L1, 2 on psoriatic epidermis can contribute to its chronic unregulated inflammatory characteristics.

  8. EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA); Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of a health claim related to Rhodiola rosea L. extract and reduction of mental fatigue pursuant to Article 13(5) of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    Following an application from Nutrilinks Sarl, submitted pursuant to Article 13(5) of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006 via the Competent Authority of Belgium, the Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA) was asked to deliver an opinion on the scientific substantiation of a health claim...... rosavins and salidroside content. The Panel considers that no conclusions can be drawn from these studies for the scientific substantiation of the health claim. The Panel concludes that a cause and effect relationship has not been established between the consumption of Rhodiola rosea L...

  9. Beneficial Effect of Chronic Treatment with Extracts from Rhodiola Rosea L. and Curcuma Longa L. on the Immunoreactivity of Animals Subjected to a Chronic Mild Stress Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasileva Liliya V.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recent studies have suggested increased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines in depression. Aim: The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of extracts from Rhodiola and Curcuma on immunoreactivity of animals subjected to a chronic mild stress (CMS model followed by lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation. Materials and methods: Male Wistar rats (n=56 divided in 7 groups were treated orally with: distilled water 10 ml/kg (control and CMS model groups; Rhodiola 250 mg/kg; Rhodiola 500 mg/kg; Curcuma 250 mg/kg; Curcuma 500 mg/kg, Rhodiola 250 mg/kg and Curcuma 250 mg/kg. All groups except the control were stressed daily according to a CMS protocol. Changes in glucose preference, weight gain and locomotor activity were recorded. In the sixth week the animals were challenged with LPS and rats’ sera were obtained for ELISA evaluation of TNF-α and IL-6 levels. Results: The animals from the model group decreased their weight gain, glucose preference and locomotor activity compared to controls. The groups exposed to stress and treated with Rhodiola 500 mg/kg, Curcuma 500 mg/kg and their combination increased their locomotor activity compared to the model group. High expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-6 were found in all groups exposed to CMS and challenged by LPS. Conclusions: The groups exposed to the stress procedure showed a variety of depression-like behavioral changes. In addition, ELISA tests showed that CMS is affecting rats’ immunity by increasing the cytokines’ levels. These changes could be reversed by administration of Rhodiola and Curcuma in combination suggesting synergic interaction regarding their anti-inflammatory and anti-stress effects.

  10. Adaptogens stimulate neuropeptide Y and Hsp72 expression and release in neuroglia cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander George Panossian

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The beneficial stress-protective effect of adaptogens is related to the regulation of homeostasis via mechanisms of action associated with the HPA axis and the regulation of key mediators of the stress response, such as molecular chaperones, stress-activated c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK1, Forkhead box O (FoxO transcription factor, cortisol and nitric oxide (NO. However, it still remains unclear what the primary upstream targets are in response to stimulation by adaptogens. The present study addresses this gap in our knowledge and suggests that an important target for adaptogen mediated stress-protective effector functions is the stress hormone neuropeptide Y (NPY. We demonstrated that ADAPT-232, a fixed combination of adaptogens Eleutherococcus senticosus root extract, Schisandra chinensis berry extract, Rhodiola rosea root extract SHR-5, and its active constituent salidroside, stimulated the expression of NPY and Hsp72 in isolated human neurolgia cells. The central role of NPY was validated in experiments in which pre-treatment of human neuroglia cells with NPY-siRNA and HSF1-siRNA resulted in the significant suppression of ADAPT-232-induced NPY and Hsp72 release. Taken together our studies suggest that the stimulation and release of the stress hormones, NPY and Hsp72, into systemic circulation is an innate defense response against mild stressors (ADAPT-232, which increase tolerance and adaptation to stress.

  11. Интродукционное испытание Rhodiola rosea L. в якутском ботаническом саду

    OpenAIRE

    ПАВЛОВА П.А.

    2015-01-01

    Флора Якутии богата лекарственными растениями, большинство из которых до настоящего времени изучены недостаточно. Одним из семейств, представители которого широко применяются местным населением с лечебной целью, является род Rhodiola (Crassulaceae). В официальной медицине в качестве источника лекарственного сырья используют корневища и корни Rhodiola rosea, что подразумевает изъятие и уничтожение особей. В связи с редкостью вида, незначительностью природных запасов заготовку сырья необходимо ...

  12. Express web application development

    CERN Document Server

    Yaapa, Hage

    2013-01-01

    Express Web Application Development is a practical introduction to learning about Express. Each chapter introduces you to a different area of Express, using screenshots and examples to get you up and running as quickly as possible.If you are looking to use Express to build your next web application, ""Express Web Application Development"" will help you get started and take you right through to Express' advanced features. You will need to have an intermediate knowledge of JavaScript to get the most out of this book.

  13. High expression Zymomonas promoters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viitanen, Paul V [West Chester, PA; Tao, Luan [Havertown, PA; Zhang, Yuying [New Hope, PA; Caimi, Perry G [Kennett Square, PA; McCole, Laura : Zhang, Min; Chou, Yat-Chen [Lakewood, CO; McCutchen, Carol M [Wilmington, DE; Franden, Mary Ann [Centennial, CO

    2011-08-02

    Identified are mutants of the promoter of the Z. mobilis glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene, which direct improved expression levels of operably linked heterologous nucleic acids. These are high expression promoters useful for expression of chimeric genes in Zymomonas, Zymobacter, and other related bacteria.

  14. Extrachromosomal inducible expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veltman, Douwe M; Van Haastert, Peter J M

    2013-01-01

    Inducible expression systems are very convenient for proteins that induce strong side effects such as retardation of growth or development and are essential for the expression of toxic proteins. In this chapter we describe the doxycycline-inducible expression system, optimized for the controlled

  15. Protein expression-yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Klaus H

    2014-01-01

    Yeast is an excellent system for the expression of recombinant eukaryotic proteins. Both endogenous and heterologous proteins can be overexpressed in yeast (Phan et al., 2001; Ton and Rao, 2004). Because yeast is easy to manipulate genetically, a strain can be optimized for the expression of a specific protein. Many eukaryotic proteins contain posttranslational modifications that can be performed in yeast but not in bacterial expression systems. In comparison with mammalian cell culture expression systems, growing yeast is both faster and less expensive, and large-scale cultures can be performed using fermentation. While several different yeast expression systems exist, this chapter focuses on the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and will briefly describe some options to consider when selecting vectors and tags to be used for protein expression. Throughout this chapter, the expression and purification of yeast eIF3 is shown as an example alongside a general scheme outline. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Expressiveness in musical emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieillard, Sandrine; Roy, Mathieu; Peretz, Isabelle

    2012-09-01

    This study was designed to investigate how emotion category, characterized by distinct musical structures (happiness, sadness, threat) and expressiveness (mechanical, expressive) may influence overt and covert behavioral judgments and physiological responses in musically trained and untrained listeners. Mechanical and expressive versions of happy, sad and scary excerpts were presented while physiological measures were recorded. Participants rated the intensity of the emotion they felt. In addition, they monitored excerpts for the presence of brief breaths. Results showed that the emotion categories were rated higher in the expressive than in the mechanical versions and that this effect was larger in musicians. Moreover, expressive excerpts were found to increase skin conductance level more than the mechanical ones, independently of their arousal value, and to slow down response times in the breath detection task relative to the mechanical versions, suggesting enhanced capture of attention by expressiveness. Altogether, the results support the key role of the performer's expression in the listener's emotional response to music.

  17. Neuroglobin over expressing mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raida, Zindy; Hundahl, Christian Ansgar; Nyengaard, Jens R

    2013-01-01

    thoroughly validated antibodies and oligos, we give a detailed brain anatomical characterization of transgenic mice over expressing Neuroglobin. Moreover, using permanent middle artery occlusion the effect of elevated levels of Neuroglobin on ischemic damage was studied. Lastly, the impact of mouse strain...... genetic background on ischemic damage was investigated. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A four to five fold increase in Neuroglobin mRNA and protein expression was seen in the brain of transgenic mice. A β-actin promoter was used to drive Neuroglobin over expression, but immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization...... showed over expression to be confined to primarily the cortex, hippocampus, cerebellum, and only in neurons. The level and expression pattern of endogenous Neuroglobin was unaffected by insertion of the over expressing Ngb transgene. Neuroglobin over expression resulted in a significant reduction...

  18. Regular expressions cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Goyvaerts, Jan

    2009-01-01

    This cookbook provides more than 100 recipes to help you crunch data and manipulate text with regular expressions. Every programmer can find uses for regular expressions, but their power doesn't come worry-free. Even seasoned users often suffer from poor performance, false positives, false negatives, or perplexing bugs. Regular Expressions Cookbook offers step-by-step instructions for some of the most common tasks involving this tool, with recipes for C#, Java, JavaScript, Perl, PHP, Python, Ruby, and VB.NET. With this book, you will: Understand the basics of regular expressions through a

  19. Regular expression containment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henglein, Fritz; Nielsen, Lasse

    2011-01-01

    * for Kleene-star, and a general coin- duction rule as the only additional rule. Our axiomatization gives rise to a natural computational inter- pretation of regular expressions as simple types that represent parse trees, and of containment proofs as coercions. This gives the axiom- atization a Curry...... to be undecidable. We discuss application of regular expressions as types to bit coding of strings and hint at other applications to the wide-spread use of regular expressions for substring matching, where classical automata-theoretic techniques are a priori inapplicable. Neither regular expressions as types nor...

  20. Regular Expression Pocket Reference

    CERN Document Server

    Stubblebine, Tony

    2007-01-01

    This handy little book offers programmers a complete overview of the syntax and semantics of regular expressions that are at the heart of every text-processing application. Ideal as a quick reference, Regular Expression Pocket Reference covers the regular expression APIs for Perl 5.8, Ruby (including some upcoming 1.9 features), Java, PHP, .NET and C#, Python, vi, JavaScript, and the PCRE regular expression libraries. This concise and easy-to-use reference puts a very powerful tool for manipulating text and data right at your fingertips. Composed of a mixture of symbols and text, regular exp

  1. Darwin and Emotion Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Ursula; Thibault, Pascal

    2009-01-01

    In his book "The Expression of the Emotions in Man and Animals," Charles Darwin (1872/1965) defended the argument that emotion expressions are evolved and adaptive (at least at some point in the past) and serve an important communicative function. The ideas he developed in his book had an important impact on the field and spawned rich domains of…

  2. Pleiotrophin expression during odontogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlandsen, Heidi; Ames, Jennifer E; Tamkenath, Amena; Mamaeva, Olga; Stidham, Katherine; Wilson, Mary E; Perez-Pinera, Pablo; Deuel, Thomas F; Macdougall, Mary

    2012-05-01

    Pleiotrophin (PTN) is an extracellular matrix-associated growth factor and chemokine expressed in mesodermal and ectodermal cells. It plays an important role in osteoblast recruitment and differentiation. There is limited information currently available about PTN expression during odontoblast differentiation and tooth formation, and thus the authors aimed to establish the spatiotemporal expression pattern of PTN during mouse odontogenesis. Immortalized mouse dental pulp (MD10-D3, MD10-A11) and odontoblast-like (M06-G3) and ameloblast-like (EOE-3M) cell lines were grown and samples prepared for immunocytochemistry, Western blot, and conventional and quantitative PCR analysis. Effects of BMP2, BMP4, and BMP7 treatment on PTN expression in odontoblast-like M06-G3 cells were tested by quantitative PCR. Finally, immunohistochemistry of sectioned mice mandibles and maxillaries at developmental stages E16, E18, P1, P6, P10, and P28 was performed. The experiments showed that PTN, at both the mRNA and protein level, was expressed in all tested epithelial and mesenchymal dental cell lines and that the level of PTN mRNA was influenced differentially by the bone morphogenetic proteins. The authors observed initial expression of PTN in the inner enamel epithelium with prolonged expression in the ameloblasts and odontoblasts throughout their stages of maturation and strong expression in the terminally differentiated and enamel matrix-secreting ameloblasts and odontoblasts of the adult mouse incisors and molars.

  3. Facial expression and sarcasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockwell, P

    2001-08-01

    This study examined facial expression in the presentation of sarcasm. 60 responses (sarcastic responses = 30, nonsarcastic responses = 30) from 40 different speakers were coded by two trained coders. Expressions in three facial areas--eyebrow, eyes, and mouth--were evaluated. Only movement in the mouth area significantly differentiated ratings of sarcasm from nonsarcasm.

  4. Expressive Faces Confuse Identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redfern, Annabelle S; Benton, Christopher P

    2017-01-01

    We used highly variable, so-called 'ambient' images to test whether expressions affect the identity recognition of real-world facial images. Using movie segments of two actors unknown to our participants, we created image pairs - each image within a pair being captured from the same film segment. This ensured that, within pairs, variables such as lighting were constant whilst expressiveness differed. We created two packs of cards, one containing neutral face images, the other, their expressive counterparts. Participants sorted the card packs into piles, one for each perceived identity. As with previous studies, the perceived number of identities was higher than the veridical number of two. Interestingly, when looking within piles, we found a strong difference between the expressive and neutral sorting tasks. With expressive faces, identity piles were significantly more likely to contain cards of both identities. This finding demonstrates that, over and above other image variables, expressiveness variability can cause identity confusion; evidently, expression is not disregarded or factored out when we classify facial identity in real-world images. Our results provide clear support for a face processing architecture in which both invariant and changeable facial information may be drawn upon to drive our decisions of identity.

  5. [Prokaryotic expression systems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porowińska, Dorota; Wujak, Magdalena; Roszek, Katarzyna; Komoszyński, Michał

    2013-03-01

    For overproduction of recombinant proteins both eukaryotic and prokaryotic expression systems are used. Choosing the right system depends, among other things, on the growth rate and culture of host cells, level of the target gene expression and posttranslational processing of the synthesized protein. Regardless of the type of expression system, its basic elements are the vector and the expression host. The most widely used system for protein overproduction, both on a laboratory and industrial scale, is the prokaryotic system. This system is based primarily on the bacteria E. coli, although increasingly often Bacillus species are used. The prokaryotic system allows one to obtain large quantities of recombinant proteins in a short time. A simple and inexpensive bacterial cell culture and well-known mechanisms of transcription and translation facilitate the use of these microorganisms. The simplicity of genetic modifications and the availability of many bacterial mutants are additional advantages of the prokaryotic system. In this article we characterize the structural elements of prokaryotic expression vectors. Also strategies for preparation of the target protein gene that increase productivity, facilitate detection and purification of recombinant protein and provide its activity are discussed. Bacterial strains often used as host cells in expression systems as well as the potential location of heterologous proteins are characterized. Knowledge of the basic elements of the prokaryotic expression system allows for production of biologically active proteins in a short time and in satisfactory quantities. 

  6. Expert Oracle application express

    CERN Document Server

    Scott, John Edward

    2011-01-01

    Expert Oracle Application Express brings you groundbreaking insights into developing with Oracle's enterprise-level, rapid-development tool from some of the best practitioners in the field today. Oracle Application Express (APEX) is an entirely web-based development framework that is built into every edition of Oracle Database. The framework rests upon Oracle's powerful PL/SQL language, enabling power users and developers to rapidly develop applications that easily scale to hundreds, even thousands of concurrent users. The 13 authors of Expert Oracle Application Express build their careers aro

  7. The Expressive Organization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    not only understand their distinct identity and their brands, but are also able to express these externally and internally. In order to thrive in an era of transparency and customer choice, the authors argue, organizations will have to be expressive. This book is intended for undergraduate and postgraduate...... branding on organizational structures and processes? How do organizations discover their identities? These are some of the vexing problems addressed in this book by a diverse international team of contributors. According to the authors, the future lies with "the expressive organization". Such organizations...... students of management, business strategy, accounting, marketing, and communication studies; MBA students; Managers and consultants....

  8. Express.js blueprints

    CERN Document Server

    Augarten, Ben; Lin, Eric; Shaikh, Aidha; Soriani, Fabiano Pereira; Tisserand, Geoffrey; Zhang, Chiqing; Zhang, Kan

    2015-01-01

    This book is for beginners to Node.js and also for those who are technically advanced. By the end of this book, every competent developer will have achieved expertise in building web applications with Express.js.

  9. Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Gene Expression Omnibus is a public functional genomics data repository supporting MIAME-compliant submissions of array- and sequence-based data. Tools are provided...

  10. Academic Freedom and Artistic Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Carol Simpson

    1994-01-01

    Recent attempts to curtail artistic expression in colleges and universities, particularly in relation to federal funding, are examined and it is concluded that artistic expression merits protections of academic freedom similar to those accorded to intellectual expression. (Author/MSE)

  11. Cues and expressions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorbjörg Hróarsdóttir

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available A number of European languages have undergone a change from object-verb to verb-object order. We focus on the change in English and Icelandic, showing that while the structural change was the same, it took place at different times and different ways in the two languages, triggered by different E-language changes. As seen from the English viewpoint, low-level facts of inflection morphology may express the relevant cue for parameters, and so the loss of inflection may lead to a grammar change. This analysis does not carry over to Icelandic, as the loss of OV there took place despite rich case morphology. We aim to show how this can be explained within a cue-style approach, arguing for a universal set of cues. However, the relevant cue may be expressed differently among languages: While it may have been expressed through morphology in English, it as expressed through information structure in Icelandic. In both cases, external effects led to fewer expressions of the relevant (universal cue and a grammar change took place.

  12. The Expressive Organization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    branding on organizational structures and processes? How do organizations discover their identities? These are some of the vexing problems addressed in this book by a diverse international team of contributors. According to the authors, the future lies with "the expressive organization". Such organizations...... not only understand their distinct identity and their brands, but are also able to express these externally and internally. In order to thrive in an era of transparency and customer choice, the authors argue, organizations will have to be expressive. This book is intended for undergraduate and postgraduate......This text challenges beliefs about organizational identity, reputation, and branding. It contains a wealth of new ideas for finding the elusive answers to questions troubling contemporary organizations. How does an organization create a strong reputation? What are the implications of corporate...

  13. The Expressive Organization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This text challenges beliefs about organizational identity, reputation, and branding. It contains a wealth of new ideas for finding the elusive answers to questions troubling contemporary organizations. How does an organization create a strong reputation? What are the implications of corporate...... branding on organizational structures and processes? How do organizations discover their identities? These are some of the vexing problems addressed in this book by a diverse international team of contributors. According to the authors, the future lies with "the expressive organization". Such organizations...... not only understand their distinct identity and their brands, but are also able to express these externally and internally. In order to thrive in an era of transparency and customer choice, the authors argue, organizations will have to be expressive. This book is intended for undergraduate and postgraduate...

  14. The Expressive Organization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    not only understand their distinct identity and their brands, but are also able to express these externally and internally. In order to thrive in an era of transparency and customer choice, the authors argue, organizations will have to be expressive. This book is intended for undergraduate and postgraduate......This text challenges beliefs about organizational identity, reputation, and branding. It contains a wealth of new ideas for finding the elusive answers to questions troubling contemporary organizations. How does an organization create a strong reputation? What are the implications of corporate...... branding on organizational structures and processes? How do organizations discover their identities? These are some of the vexing problems addressed in this book by a diverse international team of contributors. According to the authors, the future lies with "the expressive organization". Such organizations...

  15. Materiality for Musical Expressions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindell, Rikard; Tahiroğlu, Koray; Riis, Morten S.

    2016-01-01

    technology and possible musical expression with a strong connection to culture and place. The emphasis on performance provided closure and motivated teams to move forward in their design and artistic processes. On the basis of the course we discuss an interdisciplinary NIME course syllabus, and we infer...

  16. Freedom of expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oljana HOXHAJ

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper "Freedom of expression" I’ ve tried to explain the close relationship between freedom right and other constitutional freedoms, which have a direct impact on values consolidation in a democratic society and giving possibilities for the public to be active in the decision making process. The researches are based in three directions: the doctrine of international low, in Albanian literature; in native and foreign legislation and also in jurisprudence of Albanians courts and the European Court of Human Rights. The theme dedicates a wide space freedom of expression in the context of public debate, thereby guaranteeing the public's right to know. Many cases of interference in freedom of expression, has been given special importance in legal terms. This intervention must have a legitimate purpose to protect more than one of the public interests. All of this work focuses on sharing the idea that everyone has the right to freedom of opinion and expression; this right includes freedom to hold opinions without interference, receive and impart information and ideas through any media and regardless of frontiers.

  17. Experience and Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanes, Jay Michael; Weisman, Eleanor

    2016-01-01

    Two artist-educators analyzed their creative process informed by John Dewey's concepts regarding the act of expression. The essay interweaves a description of their performance piece with a discussion of conceptual processes, including intermediality and collaboration as crucial in art making, learning, and pedagogical efficacy. Both the creation…

  18. Encouraging Self-Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Peter

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the importance of encouraging self-expression among students. He contends that allowing students to share their personal interests can be of benefit to all. The students' true personalities come out and they become more comfortable with one another as the year goes on.

  19. Virtual Self-Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, David V.

    2008-01-01

    This article introduces the art of three-dimensional modelling. Three-dimensional modelling is gaining acceptance as a new medium for self-expression. Students must first master the software programs, learn the tools and functions, the menu choices and settings, and use them to create realistic objects. (Contains 4 online resources.)

  20. Encircling Creative Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Susannah

    2007-01-01

    Artworks that are circular in nature are often referred to as mandalas. "Mandala" means center, circle, or circumference. Mandalas are created in many cultures for a variety of reasons, most of which are related to self-expression, ritual, and religion. In this article, the author describes how her students created mandalas. She also provides…

  1. Facial Expression Recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pantic, Maja; Li, S.; Jain, A.

    2009-01-01

    Facial expression recognition is a process performed by humans or computers, which consists of: 1. Locating faces in the scene (e.g., in an image; this step is also referred to as face detection), 2. Extracting facial features from the detected face region (e.g., detecting the shape of facial

  2. The Expressive Organization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    branding on organizational structures and processes? How do organizations discover their identities? These are some of the vexing problems addressed in this book by a diverse international team of contributors. According to the authors, the future lies with "the expressive organization". Such organizations...

  3. Facial expressions recognition with an emotion expressive robotic head

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doroftei, I.; Adascalitei, F.; Lefeber, D.; Vanderborght, B.; Doroftei, I. A.

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to present the preliminary steps in facial expressions recognition with a new version of an expressive social robotic head. So, in a first phase, our main goal was to reach a minimum level of emotional expressiveness in order to obtain nonverbal communication between the robot and human by building six basic facial expressions. To evaluate the facial expressions, the robot was used in some preliminary user studies, among children and adults.

  4. Assessing Pain by Facial Expression: Facial Expression as Nexus

    OpenAIRE

    Kenneth M Prkachin

    2009-01-01

    The experience of pain is often represented by changes in facial expression. Evidence of pain that is available from facial expression has been the subject of considerable scientific investigation. The present paper reviews the history of pain assessment via facial expression in the context of a model of pain expression as a nexus connecting internal experience with social influence. Evidence about the structure of facial expressions of pain across the lifespan is reviewed. Applications of fa...

  5. Kuiper Express: a sciencecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, David H.; Alkalai, Leon; Beauchamp, Patricia M.; Chen, Gun-Shing; Crisp, Michael P.; Brown, Robert H.; Davidson, J. M.; Huxtable, Douglas D.; Penzo, P. A.; Petrick, Stanley W.; Soderblom, Laurance A.; Stewart, A.; Vane, Gregg; Yelle, Roger V.

    1996-10-01

    The Kuiper Express is a mission to achieve the first reconnaissance of one of the primitive objects that reside in the Kuiper Belt. The objects in the Kuiper Belt are the remnants of the planetesimal swarm that formed the four giant planets of the outer Solar System. These objects, because they are far from the Sun, have not been processed by solar heating and are essentially in their primordial state. This makes them unique objects and their study will provide information on the composition of the solar nebula that cannot be extracted from a study of other objects in the Solar System. The Kuiper Express is a sciencecraft mission. A sciencecraft is an integrated unit that combines into a single system the essential elements (but no more) necessary to achieve the science objectives of the mission, including science instruments, electronics, telecommunications, power, and propulsion. The design of a sciencecraft begins with the definition of mission science objectives and cost constraint. An observational sequence and sensor subsystem are then designed. This sensor subsystem in turn becomes the design driver for the sciencecraft architecture and hardware subsystems needed to deliver the sensor to its target and return the science data to the earth. Throughout the design process, shared functionality, shared redundancy, and reduced cost are strongly emphasized. The Kuiper Express will be launched using a Delta vehicle and will use solar electric propulsion to add velocity and shape its trajectory in the inner Solar System, executing two earth gravity-assist flybys. It will also execute flybys of main belt asteroids, Mars, Uranus, and Neptune/Triton en route to its target in the Kuiper belt, where it will arrive about ten years after launch. It will use no nuclear power. The surface constituents and morphology of the objects visited will be measured and their atmospheres will be characterized. The cost of the detailed design, fabrication, and launch of the Kuiper

  6. Data Mining for Expressivity of Recombinant Protein Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kira, Satoshi; Isoai, Atsushi; Yamamura, Masayuki

    We analyzed the expressivity of recombinant proteins by using data mining methods. The expression technique of recombinant protein is a key step towards elucidating the functions of genes discovered through genomic sequence projects. We have studied the productive efficiency of recombinant proteins in fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe (S.pombe), by mining the expression results. We gathered 57 proteins whose expression levels were known roughly in the host. Correlation analysis, principal component analysis and decision tree analysis were applied to these expression data. Analysis featuring codon usage and amino acid composition clarified that the amino acid composition affected to the expression levels of a recombinant protein strongly than the effect of codon usage. Furthermore, analysis of amino acid composition showed that protein solubility and the metabolism cost of amino acids correlated with a protein expressivity. Codon usage was often interesting in the field of recombinant expressions. However, our analysis found the weak correlation codon features with expressivities. These results indicated that ready-made indices of codon bias were irrelevant ones for modeling the expressivities of recombinant proteins. Our data driven approach was an easy and powerful method to improve recombinant protein expression, and this approach should be concentrated attention with the huge amount of expression data accumulating through the post-genome era.

  7. Boolean Expression Diagrams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Henrik Reif; Hulgaard, Henrik

    2002-01-01

    a BED into a reduced ordered BDD. One is a generalized version of the BDD apply-operator while the other can exploit the structural information of the Boolean expression. This ability is demonstrated by verifying that two different circuit implementations of a 16-bit multiplier implement the same...... Boolean function. Using BEDs, this verification problem is solved efficiently, while using standard BDD techniques this problem is infeasible. Generally, BEDs are useful in applications, for example tautology checking, where the end-result as a reduced ordered BDD is small. Moreover, using operators...... for substitution and existential quantification they allow for the verification of large hierarchical circuits....

  8. Boolean Expression Diagrams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Henrik Reif; Hulgaard, Henrik

    1997-01-01

    properties of BDDs. Two algorithms are described for transforming a BED into a reduced ordered BDD. One closely mimics the BDD apply-operator while the other can exploit the structural information of the Boolean expression. The efficacy of the BED representation is demonstrated by verifying...... that the redundant and non-redundant versions of the ISCAS 85 benchmark circuits are identical. In particular, it is verified that the two 16-bit multiplication circuits (c6288 and c6288nr) implement the same Boolean functions. Using BEDs, this verification problem is solved in less than a second, while using...

  9. Expression-Invariant Age Estimation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alnajar, F.; Lou, Z.; Alvarez, J.; Gevers, T.; Valstar, M.; French, A.; Pridmore, T.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate and exploit the influence of facial expressions on automatic age estimation. Different from existing approaches, our method jointly learns the age and expression by introducing a new graphical model with a latent layer between the age/expression labels and the features.

  10. The expressions of emotions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vishnivetz, Berta

    and of expressions of emotions and movement notation that provided the sources for a careful research plan for the empirical process of this study. On this basis I chose to record onto video the four previously choreographed movements that I considered to correspond each of the following emotions: joy, fear, sadness......, anger. The selection of these four emotions demanded previously to clear up the problems the above named survey ensued. When researchers want to describe a certain movement in the field of psychology and non-verbal communication, it may result in disagreements and misunderstandings which sometimes lead...... to methodological errors. I carried a judgement study and a component study to validate the empirical data: the recorded emotions. For the judgement study I asked 71 voluntary observers from four different countries to watch the video and made an identification of what emotion it was being displayed...

  11. Natural Art, False Expressions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Hernando Nossa García

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In the documentary My Kid Could Paint That, directed by Bar-Lev, which deals with Marla Olmstead, the child prodigy of painting, several interviews with persons in the art world are conducted, among them an artist who uses a magnifying glass and the thinnest brushes to do his work. This man, although happy for the success of the child’s abstract paintings, saw in the whole spectacle a mockery of art, and stood firmly by her work. The girl’s father, also an artist, was accused of plagiarism. Cameras entered the child’s studio in order to prove that Marla was the real artist. Why should such relevance be given to authorship? What is the cause of the dispute between the expressive and the rational?

  12. Expressing emotions in blogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodriguez-Hidalgo, Carmina Rodriguez-Hidalgo; Tan, Ed S.; Verlegh, Peeter

    2017-01-01

    Textual paralanguage cues (TPC) have been signaled as effective emotion transmitters online. Though several studies have investigated their properties and occurrence, there remains a gap concerning their communicative impact within specific psychological processes, such as the social sharing...... of emotion (SSE, Rimé, 2009). This study content-analyzed Live Journal blogposts for the occurrence of TPC in three phases of online SSE: initiation, feedback and repost. We compared these to TPC on a second type of emotional expression, emotional venting. Based on Social Information processing theory (SIP......, Walther, 1992), and on the Emotional Mimicry in Context (EMC, Hess & Fischer, 2013) framework, we study predictive relationships in TPC usage in our phased model of online SSE. Results showed that TPC prevailed in SSE blogposts and strongly dominated in emotional venting posts. TPC was more common...

  13. Attention modulates emotional expression processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wronka, Eligiusz; Walentowska, Wioleta

    2011-08-01

    To investigate the time course of emotional expression processing, we recorded ERPs to facial stimuli. The first task was to discriminate emotional expressions. Enhanced negativity of the face-specific N170 was elicited by emotional as opposed to neutral faces, followed by the occipital negativity (240-340 ms poststimulus). The second task was to classify face gender. Here, N170 was unaffected by the emotional expression. However, emotional expression effect was expressed in the anterior positivity (160-250 ms poststimulus) and subsequent occipital negativity (240-340 ms poststimulus). Results support the thesis that structural encoding relevant to gender recognition and simultaneous expression analysis are independent processes. Attention modulates facial emotion processing 140-185 ms poststimulus. Involuntary differentiation of facial expression was observed later (160-340 ms poststimulus), suggesting unintentional attention capture. Copyright © 2011 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  14. Кислотно-основные свойства лигнинов лекарственных растений родиолы розовой Rhodiola rosea и серпухи венценосной Serratula Coronata

    OpenAIRE

    Белый, Владимир; Кочева, Людмила; Карманов, Анатолий; Боголицын, Константин

    2009-01-01

    Исследованы кислотно-основные свойства диоксанлигнинов родиолы розовой (Rhodiola Rosea L.) и серпухи венценосной (Serratula Coronata L.) путем спектрофотометрического определения констант ионизации фенольных гидроксильных групп. Выявлена взаимосвязь между молекулярной массой фракций исследуемых лигнинов и их кислотно-основными свойствами....

  15. Towards a semantics for mass expressions derived from gradable expressions

    OpenAIRE

    Nicolas, David

    2010-01-01

    What semantics should we attribute to mass expressions like wisdom and love, which are derived from gradable expressions (wise, to love)? We first examine how these expressions are used, then how they are interpreted in their various uses. We show in particular that, just like with ordinary concrete mass nouns (wine, furniture), sentences where they appear are liable to distributive, collective, and intermediate construals. We then propose a model to account for these data, in which derived m...

  16. Animal Cell Expression Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, M; Reichl, Ing U

    2017-10-03

    The glycan profile of therapeutic recombinant proteins such as monoclonal antibodies is a critical quality attribute, which affects the efficacy of the final product. The cellular glycosylation process during protein expression is dependent upon a number of factors such as the availability of substrates in the media, the intracellular content of nucleotide sugars, and the enzyme repertoire of the host cells. In order to control the variability of glycosylation it is important to understand the critical process parameters and their acceptable range of values to enable reproducible production of proteins with a predetermined glycan profile providing the desired biological function or therapeutic effect. The depletion of critical nutrients such as glucose or galactose, which may occur toward the end of a culture process, can lead to truncated glycans. Terminal galactosylation and sialyation are particularly variable but may be controlled by the presence of some key media components. Ammonia accumulation, pH, and dissolved oxygen levels are also known to be key bioprocess parameters that affect the glycosylation of recombinant proteins. Specific enzyme inhibitors can be added to the media to drive the formation of selected and predetermined glycan profiles. Various attempts have been made to predict the glycan profiles of cellular expressed proteins and have led to metabolic models based upon knowledge of metabolic flux and the kinetics of individual glycosylation reactions.In contrast to single recombinant proteins, the glycan profiles of viral vaccines are far more complex and difficult to predict. The example of influenza A virus shows that hemagglutinin, the major antigenic determinant, has three to nine N-glycans, which may influence the antigenicity and efficacy of the vaccine. Glycosylation of the influenza A virus has been largely unmonitored in the past as production has been from eggs, where glycan profiles of antigens are difficult if not impossible to

  17. Expression of Concern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-01

    The Journal Editors hereby issue this note of an expression of concern for the following publication: Benjamin, A. J., Jr., Kepes, S., & Bushman, B. J. (2017). Effects of weapons on aggressive thoughts, angry feelings, hostile appraisals, and aggressive behavior: A meta-analytic review of the weapons effect literature. Personality and Social Psychology Review. Advance online publication. doi:10.1177/1088868317725419 The authors of this manuscript contacted the editors indicating they had discovered some errors in the computation of effect sizes in their meta-analysis. Initial reanalysis suggested that at least one of the substantive conclusions of the manuscript was affected by the error; the authors now urge greater caution in interpreting the effect size of weapons on aggressive behavioral outcomes. The authors will undertake a thorough reanalysis and will modify the results and interpretations accordingly, and this notice will be updated upon their completion of the modifications. The editorial staff appreciates the proactive efforts of the authors in this matter. The Editors and SAGE strive to uphold the very highest standards of publication ethics and are committed to supporting the high standards of integrity of Personality and Social Psychology Review. Authors, reviewers, editors, and interested readers should consult the ethics section of SAGE and the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE) website for guidelines on publication ethics.

  18. Emotional Expression in Reality TV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Tove Arendt

    are being treated as ordinary people. My article will discuss different presentations of selves and especially the emotional verbal and nonverbal expressions in reality TV communication. Aspects of the intimate self and its emotional expressions seem to be strategically managed in reality TV and even......, that information ‘given off’ in lying behavior will must often be found in non-verbal mikro expressions and mikro gestures. I will end by discussing the strategic emotional expressions as production of floating identities in a broader framework on the basis of among others Gergen, Lipovetsky and Baumann...

  19. Oracle Application Express 4 Recipes

    CERN Document Server

    Zehoo, Edmund

    2011-01-01

    Oracle Application Express 4 Recipes provides an example-based approach to learning Application Express - the ground-breaking, rapid application development platform included with every Oracle Database license. The recipes format is ideal for the quick-study who just wants a good example or two to kick start their thinking and get pointed in the right direction. The recipes cover the gamut of Application Express development. Author and Application Express expert Edmund Zehoo shows how to create data entry screens, visualize data in the form of reports and charts, implement validation and back-

  20. Expression modeling for expression-invariant face recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haar, F.B. Ter; Veltkamp, R.C.

    2010-01-01

    Morphable face models have proven to be an effective tool for 3D face modeling and face recognition, but the extension to 3D face scans with expressions is still a challenge. The two main difficulties are (1) how to build a new morphable face model that deals with expressions, and (2) how to fit

  1. Creating an Expressive Performance Mindset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broomhead, Paul; Skidmore, Jon B.

    2014-01-01

    Students in performance situations sometimes experience physiological symptoms that inhibit their ability to perform as expressively as they otherwise might possess the understanding and ability to do. As students set out to perform with an expressive mindset, the brain's limbic system may detect some perceived danger in the situation and…

  2. Pain expression as a biometric

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haque, Mohammad A.; Nasrollahi, Kamal; Moeslund, Thomas B.

    2017-01-01

    Developing a vision-based efficient and automatic pain intensity measurement system requires the understanding of the relationship between self-reported pain intensity and pain expression in the facial videos. In this paper, we first demonstrate how pain expression in facial video frames may not ...

  3. Leishmania-based expression systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taheri, Tahereh; Seyed, Negar; Mizbani, Amir; Rafati, Sima

    2016-09-01

    Production of therapeutic or medical recombinant proteins, such as monoclonal antibodies, proteins, or active enzymes, requires a highly efficient system allowing natural folding and perfect post-translation modifications of the expressed protein. These requirements lead to the generation of a variety of gene expression systems from bacteria to eukaryotes. To achieve the best form of eukaryotic proteins, two factors need to be taken into consideration: choosing a suitable organism to express the protein of interest, and selecting an efficient delivery system. For this reason, the expression of recombinant proteins in eukaryotic nonpathogenic Leishmania parasites is an interesting approach which meets both criteria. Here, new Leishmania-based expression systems are compared with current systems that have long histories in research and industry.

  4. Measuring facial expression of emotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Karsten

    2015-12-01

    Research into emotions has increased in recent decades, especially on the subject of recognition of emotions. However, studies of the facial expressions of emotion were compromised by technical problems with visible video analysis and electromyography in experimental settings. These have only recently been overcome. There have been new developments in the field of automated computerized facial recognition; allowing real-time identification of facial expression in social environments. This review addresses three approaches to measuring facial expression of emotion and describes their specific contributions to understanding emotion in the healthy population and in persons with mental illness. Despite recent progress, studies on human emotions have been hindered by the lack of consensus on an emotion theory suited to examining the dynamic aspects of emotion and its expression. Studying expression of emotion in patients with mental health conditions for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes will profit from theoretical and methodological progress.

  5. Expression of amelogenin in odontoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papagerakis, P; MacDougall, M; Hotton, D; Bailleul-Forestier, I; Oboeuf, M; Berdal, A

    2003-03-01

    Amelogenin is the major enamel protein produced by ameloblasts. Its expression has been shown to be down-regulated in ameloblasts of vitamin-D-deficient (-D) rats. The potential expression and localization of amelogenin in odontoblasts and its regulation by vitamin D were investigated in this study. RT-PCR and semi-quantitative Northern blot analyses were performed using the odontoblast cell line MO6-G3 and microdissected dental pulp mesenchyme. Both in vitro and in vivo odontoblasts expressed various alternatively spliced amelogenin transcripts. In situ hybridization studies showed that amelogenin expression was restricted to young odontoblasts during mantle dentin deposition. Electron microscopy studies localized the amelogenin protein in the odontoblast cell process cytoplasm and mantle dentin. Amelogenin immunolabeling was stronger in -D rats, suggesting an inverse regulation by vitamin D in odontoblasts. Furthermore, amelogenin mRNA steady-state levels were significantly increased in -D dental pulp mesenchyme. In addition, a temporal-spatial lengthening of the mantle dentin stage was observed in -D animals, suggesting that developmental perturbations occur in relation to the vitamin D status and/or amelogenin expression. These data show that amelogenin is expressed by odontoblasts selectively during mantle dentin deposition. This developmental regulated expression pattern is enhanced under vitamin-D-deficiency status and in a broader context may play an important role during ameloblast and odontoblast differentiation and function.

  6. Cortical control of facial expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müri, René M

    2016-06-01

    The present Review deals with the motor control of facial expressions in humans. Facial expressions are a central part of human communication. Emotional face expressions have a crucial role in human nonverbal behavior, allowing a rapid transfer of information between individuals. Facial expressions can be either voluntarily or emotionally controlled. Recent studies in nonhuman primates and humans have revealed that the motor control of facial expressions has a distributed neural representation. At least five cortical regions on the medial and lateral aspects of each hemisphere are involved: the primary motor cortex, the ventral lateral premotor cortex, the supplementary motor area on the medial wall, and the rostral and caudal cingulate cortex. The results of studies in humans and nonhuman primates suggest that the innervation of the face is bilaterally controlled for the upper part and mainly contralaterally controlled for the lower part. Furthermore, the primary motor cortex, the ventral lateral premotor cortex, and the supplementary motor area are essential for the voluntary control of facial expressions. In contrast, the cingulate cortical areas are important for emotional expression, because they receive input from different structures of the limbic system. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7.  Prokaryotic expression systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Porowińska

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available For overproduction of recombinant proteins both eukaryotic and prokaryotic expression systems are used. Choosing the right system depends, among other things, on the growth rate and culture of host cells, level of the target gene expression and posttranslational processing of the synthesized protein. Regardless of the type of expression system, its basic elements are the vector and the expression host.The most widely used system for protein overproduction, both on a laboratory and industrial scale, is the prokaryotic system. This system is based primarily on the bacteria E. coli, although increasingly often Bacillus species are used. The prokaryotic system allows one to obtain large quantities of recombinant proteins in a short time. A simple and inexpensive bacterial cell culture and well-known mechanisms of transcription and translation facilitate the use of these microorganisms. The simplicity of genetic modifications and the availability of many bacterial mutants are additional advantages of the prokaryotic system. In this article we characterize the structural elements of prokaryotic expression vectors. Also strategies for preparation of the target protein gene that increase productivity, facilitate detection and purification of recombinant protein and provide its activity are discussed. Bacterial strains often used as host cells in expression systems as well as the potential location of heterologous proteins are characterized.Knowledge of the basic elements of the prokaryotic expression system allows for production of biologically active proteins in a short time and in satisfactory quantities. 

  8. TempoExpress: An Expressivity-Preserving Musical Tempo Transformation

    OpenAIRE

    Grachten, Maarten; Arcos, Josep Ll.; Lopez de Mantaras, Ramon

    2006-01-01

    The research described in this paper focuses on global tempo transformations of monophonic audio recordings of saxophone jazz performances. More concretely, we have investigated the problem of how a performance played at a particular tempo can be automatically rendered at another tempo while preserving its expressivity. To do so we have developed a case-based reasoning system called TempoExpress. The results we have obtained have been extensively compared against a sta...

  9. Expression in E. coli systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogsdam, Anne-M; Kristiansen, Karsten; Nøhr, Jane

    2003-01-01

    Owing to cost advantage, speed of production, and often high product yield (up to 50% of total cell protein), expression in Escherichia coli is generally the first choice when attempting to express a recombinant protein. Expression systems exist to produce recombinant protein intracellularly...... intracellularly in soluble form. In E. coli, proteins containing disulfide bonds are best produced by secretion because the disulfide forming foldases reside in the periplasm. Likewise, a correct N-terminus is more likely to be obtained upon secretion. Moreover, potentially toxic proteins are more likely...

  10. [Prosopagnosia and facial expression recognition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Shinichi

    2014-04-01

    This paper reviews clinical neuropsychological studies that have indicated that the recognition of a person's identity and the recognition of facial expressions are processed by different cortical and subcortical areas of the brain. The fusiform gyrus, especially the right fusiform gyrus, plays an important role in the recognition of identity. The superior temporal sulcus, amygdala, and medial frontal cortex play important roles in facial-expression recognition. Both facial recognition and facial-expression recognition are highly intellectual processes that involve several regions of the brain.

  11. Analysis of Facial Expression by Taste Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobitani, Kensuke; Kato, Kunihito; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko

    In this study, we focused on the basic taste stimulation for the analysis of real facial expressions. We considered that the expressions caused by taste stimulation were unaffected by individuality or emotion, that is, such expressions were involuntary. We analyzed the movement of facial muscles by taste stimulation and compared real expressions with artificial expressions. From the result, we identified an obvious difference between real and artificial expressions. Thus, our method would be a new approach for facial expression recognition.

  12. Homeobox gene expression in Brachiopoda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Altenburger, Andreas; Martinez, Pedro; Wanninger, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    The molecular control that underlies brachiopod ontogeny is largely unknown. In order to contribute to this issue we analyzed the expression pattern of two homeobox containing genes, Not and Cdx, during development of the rhynchonelliform (i.e., articulate) brachiopod Terebratalia transversa....... Not is a homeobox containing gene that regulates the formation of the notochord in chordates, while Cdx (caudal) is a ParaHox gene involved in the formation of posterior tissues of various animal phyla. The T. transversa homolog, TtrNot, is expressed in the ectoderm from the beginning of gastrulation until...... formation. TtrNot expression is absent in unfertilized eggs, in embryos prior to gastrulation, and in settled individuals during and after metamorphosis. Comparison with the expression patterns of Not genes in other metazoan phyla suggests an ancestral role for this gene in gastrulation and germ layer...

  13. DHL Express U.S

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Anonymous

    2016-01-01

      Comprised of commercial managers and support specialists located in every region of our global network, the DHL Express Public Sector Sales and Support Team provides risk management and contingency plan triggers...

  14. A Tattoo Is Expression, Too.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling-Sendor, Benjamin

    1997-01-01

    In "Stephenson v. Davenport Community School District," the U.S. Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that schools cannot adopt unduly vague policies to regulate student expression, in this case, a cross-shaped tattoo. (LMI)

  15. Expressive communication in multimedia environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, John

    1993-01-01

    Narrow bandwidth networks have provided limited capabilities for the transmission of expressive communication that is present in face-to-face communication, e.g., facial expressions and gestures, as well as affective information that is present in audio/visual media, e.g., animated graphics and stereophonic music. An understanding of the structure and functions of expressive communication in face-to-face communication and audio/visual media can inform the development of new multi-media applications in broadband networks. At the same time, a review of existing knowledge suggests that there is a need for considerable research if the rich potential of expressive communication in these new settings is to be fully developed.

  16. Precise Analysis of String Expressions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Aske Simon; Møller, Anders; Schwartzbach, Michael Ignatieff

    2003-01-01

    We perform static analysis of Java programs to answer a simple question: which values may occur as results of string expressions? The answers are summarized for each expression by a regular language that is guaranteed to contain all possible values. We present several applications of this analysis......, including statically checking the syntax of dynamically generated expressions, such as SQL queries. Our analysis constructs flow graphs from class files and generates a context-free grammar with a nonterminal for each string expression. The language of this grammar is then widened into a regular language...... through a variant of an algorithm previously used for speech recognition. The collection of resulting regular languages is compactly represented as a special kind of multi-level automaton from which individual answers may be extracted. If a program error is detected, examples of invalid strings...

  17. Compound facial expressions of emotion

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shichuan Du; Yong Tao; Aleix M. Martinez

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the different categories of facial expressions of emotion regularly used by us is essential to gain insights into human cognition and affect as well as for the design of computational...

  18. Leptospira Protein Expression During Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    We are characterizing protein expression in vivo during experimental leptospirosis using immunofluorescence microscopy. Coding regions for several proteins were identified through analysis of Leptospira interrogans serovar Copenhageni and L. borgpetersenii serovar Hardjo genomes. In addition, codi...

  19. Expression homeostasis during DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voichek, Yoav; Bar-Ziv, Raz; Barkai, Naama

    2016-03-04

    Genome replication introduces a stepwise increase in the DNA template available for transcription. Genes replicated early in S phase experience this increase before late-replicating genes, raising the question of how expression levels are affected by DNA replication. We show that in budding yeast, messenger RNA (mRNA) synthesis rate is buffered against changes in gene dosage during S phase. This expression homeostasis depends on acetylation of H3 on its internal K56 site by Rtt109/Asf1. Deleting these factors, mutating H3K56 or up-regulating its deacetylation, increases gene expression in S phase in proportion to gene replication timing. Therefore, H3K56 acetylation on newly deposited histones reduces transcription efficiency from replicated DNA, complementing its role in guarding genome stability. Our study provides molecular insight into the mechanism maintaining expression homeostasis during DNA replication. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  20. Facial Asymmetry and Emotional Expression

    OpenAIRE

    Pickin, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    This report is about facial asymmetry, its connection to emotional expression, and methods of measuring facial asymmetry in videos of faces. The research was motivated by two factors: firstly, there was a real opportunity to develop a novel measure of asymmetry that required minimal human involvement and that improved on earlier measures in the literature; and secondly, the study of the relationship between facial asymmetry and emotional expression is both interesting in its own right, and im...

  1. The motivation to express prejudice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forscher, Patrick S.; Cox, William T. L.; Graetz, Nicholas; Devine, Patricia G.

    2015-01-01

    Contemporary prejudice research focuses primarily on people who are motivated to respond without prejudice and the ways in which unintentional bias can cause these people to act inconsistent with this motivation. However, some real-world phenomena (e.g., hate speech, hate crimes) and experimental findings (e.g., Plant & Devine, 2001; 2009) suggest that some expressions of prejudice are intentional. These phenomena and findings are difficult to explain solely from the motivations to respond without prejudice. We argue that some people are motivated to express prejudice, and we develop the motivation to express prejudice (MP) scale to measure this motivation. In seven studies involving more than 6,000 participants, we demonstrate that, across scale versions targeted at Black people and gay men, the MP scale has good reliability and convergent, discriminant, and predictive validity. In normative climates that prohibit prejudice, the internal and external motivations to express prejudice are functionally non-independent, but they become more independent when normative climates permit more prejudice toward a target group. People high in the motivation to express prejudice are relatively likely to resist pressure to support programs promoting intergroup contact and vote for political candidates who support oppressive policies. The motivation to express prejudice predicted these outcomes even when controlling for attitudes and the motivations to respond without prejudice. This work encourages contemporary prejudice researchers to broaden the range of samples, target groups, and phenomena that they study, and more generally to consider the intentional aspects of negative intergroup behavior. PMID:26479365

  2. Human Lacrimal Gland Gene Expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinay Kumar Aakalu

    Full Text Available The study of human lacrimal gland biology and development is limited. Lacrimal gland tissue is damaged or poorly functional in a number of disease states including dry eye disease. Development of cell based therapies for lacrimal gland diseases requires a better understanding of the gene expression and signaling pathways in lacrimal gland. Differential gene expression analysis between lacrimal gland and other embryologically similar tissues may be helpful in furthering our understanding of lacrimal gland development.We performed global gene expression analysis of human lacrimal gland tissue using Affymetrix ® gene expression arrays. Primary data from our laboratory was compared with datasets available in the NLM GEO database for other surface ectodermal tissues including salivary gland, skin, conjunctiva and corneal epithelium.The analysis revealed statistically significant difference in the gene expression of lacrimal gland tissue compared to other ectodermal tissues. The lacrimal gland specific, cell surface secretory protein encoding genes and critical signaling pathways which distinguish lacrimal gland from other ectodermal tissues are described.Differential gene expression in human lacrimal gland compared with other ectodermal tissue types revealed interesting patterns which may serve as the basis for future studies in directed differentiation among other areas.

  3. Epimorphin expression in interstitial pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suga Moritaka

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Epimorphin modulates epithelial morphogenesis in embryonic mouse organs. We previously suggested that epimorphin contributes to repair of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in mice via epithelium-mesenchyme interactions. To clarify the role of epimorphin in human lungs, we evaluated epimorphin expression and localization in normal lungs, lungs with nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP, and lungs with usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP; we also studied the effect of recombinant epimorphin on cultured human alveolar epithelial cells in vitro. Northern and Western blotting analyses revealed that epimorphin expression in NSIP samples were significantly higher than those in control lungs and lungs with UIP. Immunohistochemistry showed strong epimorphin expression in mesenchymal cells of early fibrotic lesions and localization of epimorphin protein on mesenchymal cells and extracellular matrix of early fibrotic lesions in the nonspecific interstitial pneumonia group. Double-labeled fluorescent images revealed expression of matrix metalloproteinase 2 in re-epithelialized cells overlying epimorphin-positive early fibrotic lesions. Immunohistochemistry and metalloproteinase activity assay demonstrated augmented expression of metalloproteinase induced by recombinant epimorphin in human alveolar epithelial cells. These findings suggest that epimorphin contributes to repair of pulmonary fibrosis in nonspecific interstitial pneumonia, perhaps partly by inducing expression of matrix metalloproteinase 2, which is an important proteolytic factor in lung remodeling.

  4. Extracting expression modules from perturbational gene expression compendia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Dijck Patrick

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Compendia of gene expression profiles under chemical and genetic perturbations constitute an invaluable resource from a systems biology perspective. However, the perturbational nature of such data imposes specific challenges on the computational methods used to analyze them. In particular, traditional clustering algorithms have difficulties in handling one of the prominent features of perturbational compendia, namely partial coexpression relationships between genes. Biclustering methods on the other hand are specifically designed to capture such partial coexpression patterns, but they show a variety of other drawbacks. For instance, some biclustering methods are less suited to identify overlapping biclusters, while others generate highly redundant biclusters. Also, none of the existing biclustering tools takes advantage of the staple of perturbational expression data analysis: the identification of differentially expressed genes. Results We introduce a novel method, called ENIGMA, that addresses some of these issues. ENIGMA leverages differential expression analysis results to extract expression modules from perturbational gene expression data. The core parameters of the ENIGMA clustering procedure are automatically optimized to reduce the redundancy between modules. In contrast to the biclusters produced by most other methods, ENIGMA modules may show internal substructure, i.e. subsets of genes with distinct but significantly related expression patterns. The grouping of these (often functionally related patterns in one module greatly aids in the biological interpretation of the data. We show that ENIGMA outperforms other methods on artificial datasets, using a quality criterion that, unlike other criteria, can be used for algorithms that generate overlapping clusters and that can be modified to take redundancy between clusters into account. Finally, we apply ENIGMA to the Rosetta compendium of expression profiles for

  5. Phylogenetic analysis of gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Casey W; Luo, Xi; Wu, Zhijin

    2013-11-01

    Phylogenetic analyses of gene expression have great potential for addressing a wide range of questions. These analyses will, for example, identify genes that have evolutionary shifts in expression that are correlated with evolutionary changes in morphological, physiological, and developmental characters of interest. This will provide entirely new opportunities to identify genes related to particular phenotypes. There are, however, 3 key challenges that must be addressed for such studies to realize their potential. First, data on gene expression must be measured from multiple species, some of which may be field-collected, and parameterized in such a way that they can be compared across species. Second, it will be necessary to develop comparative phylogenetic methods suitable for large multidimensional datasets. In most phylogenetic comparative studies to date, the number n of independent observations (independent contrasts) has been greater than the number p of variables (characters). The behavior of comparative methods for these classic problems is now well understood under a wide variety of conditions. In studies of gene expression, and in studies based on other high-throughput tools, the number n of samples is dwarfed by the number p of variables. The estimated covariance matrices will be singular, complicating their analysis and interpretation, and prone to spurious results. Third, new approaches are needed to investigate the expression of the many genes whose phylogenies are not congruent with species phylogenies due to gene loss, gene duplication, and incomplete lineage sorting. Here we outline general considerations of project design for phylogenetic analyses of gene expression and suggest solutions to these three categories of challenges. These topics are relevant to high-throughput phenotypic data well beyond gene expression.

  6. Cloning and expression of a widely expressed receptor tyrosine phosphatase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sap, J; D'Eustachio, P; Givol, D

    1990-01-01

    and Bmp-2a loci. The corresponding mRNA (3.0 kilobases) is expressed in most murine tissues and most abundantly expressed in brain and kidney. Antibodies against a synthetic peptide of R-PTP-alpha identified a 130-kDa protein in cells transfected with the R-PTP-alpha cDNA.......We describe the identification of a widely expressed receptor-type (transmembrane) protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTPase; EC 3.1.3.48). Screening of a mouse brain cDNA library under low-stringency conditions with a probe encompassing the intracellular (phosphatase) domain of the CD45 lymphocyte...... antigen yielded cDNA clones coding for a 794-amino acid transmembrane protein [hereafter referred to as receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase alpha (R-PTP-alpha)] with an intracellular domain displaying clear homology to the catalytic domains of CD45 and LAR (45% and 53%, respectively). The 142-amino acid...

  7. Studying Emotional Expression in Music Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrielsson, Alf

    1999-01-01

    Explores the importance of emotional expression in music performance. Performers played music to express different emotions and then listening tests were conducted in order to determine whether the intended expressions were perceived. Presents and discusses the results. (CMK)

  8. iFace: Facial Expression Training System

    OpenAIRE

    Ito, Kyoko; Kurose, Hiroyuki; Takami, Ai; Nishida, Shogo

    2008-01-01

    In this study, a target facial expression selection interface for a facial expression training system and a facial expression training system were both proposed and developed. Twelve female dentists used the facial expression training system, and evaluations and opinions about the facial expression training system were obtained from these participants. In the future, we will attempt to improve both the target facial expression selection interface and the comparison of a current and a target f...

  9. An Expressive Extension of TLC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jesper Gulmann

    2002-01-01

    A temporal logic of causality (TLC) was introduced by Alur, Penczek and Peled in [1]. It is basically a linear time temporal logic interpreted over Mazurkiewicz traces which allows quantification over causal chains. Through this device one can directly formulate causality properties of distributed...... systems. In this paper we consider an extension of TLC by strengthening the chain quantification operators. We show that our logic TLC* adds to the expressive power of TLC. We do so by defining an Ehrenfeucht-Fraïssé game to capture the expressive power of TLC. We then exhibit a property and by means...... of this game prove that the chosen property is not definable in TLC. We then show that the same property is definable in TLC*. We prove in fact the stronger result that TLC* is expressively stronger than TLC exactly when the dependency relation associated with the underlying trace alphabet is not transitive....

  10. Sleep deprivation and gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa Souza, Annie; Ribeiro, Sidarta

    2015-01-01

    Sleep occurs in a wide range of animal species as a vital process for the maintenance of homeostasis, metabolic restoration, physiological regulation, and adaptive cognitive functions in the central nervous system. Long-term perturbations induced by the lack of sleep are mostly mediated by changes at the level of transcription and translation. This chapter reviews studies in humans, rodents, and flies to address the various ways by which sleep deprivation affects gene expression in the nervous system, with a focus on genes related to neuronal plasticity, brain function, and cognition. However, the effects of sleep deprivation on gene expression and the functional consequences of sleep loss are clearly not restricted to the cognitive domain but may include increased inflammation, expression of stress-related genes, general impairment of protein translation, metabolic imbalance, and thermal deregulation.

  11. Construction of PVX virus-expression vector to express enterotoxin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Potato X potyvirus (PVX)-based vector has been comprehensively applied in transient expression system. In order to produce the heterologous proteins more quickly and stably, the ClaI and NotI enzyme sites were introduced into the Enterotoxin fusion gene LTB-ST by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and the LTB-ST ...

  12. Efficient Expression of Antibody Fragments with the Brevibacillus Expression System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Hanagata

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Antibodies, owing to their capability to bind specifically to a target molecule, have been and will continue to be applied in various areas, including research, diagnosis and therapy. In particular, antibody fragments, which are size-reduced antibodies comprising functional variable domains, are suited for production in bacteria. They also are useful in applications requiring intracellular delivery and for further engineering toward molecules possessing multiple custom functions. An expression system based on Brevibacillus is characterized by high efficiency and simple genetic recombination for secretory production. The Brevibacillus expression system has been successfully utilized for the efficient production of antibody fragments, e.g., scFvs (single-chain antibody fragments comprising heavy-chain and light-chain variable domains, linked by a spacer sequence. Expression in fusion with a Halobacterium-derived secretory protein was shown to confer enhanced productivity. In the case of Fabs, productivity as high as 100 mg/L was accomplished in a simple system, i.e., shake flask cultures. The Brevibacillus expression system offers several advantages, shared by other bacterial systems, such as E. coli, in particular, for the ease in genetic engineering and culture production.

  13. Osteocalcin expression in pulp inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd-Elmeguid, Ashraf; Abdeldayem, Marwa; Kline, Loren W; Moqbel, Redwan; Vliagoftis, Harrisios; Yu, Donald C

    2013-07-01

    Dental pulp inflammation and repair are closely related. Osteocalcin (OCN), a glycoprotein present in dentin matrix, is expressed by odontoblasts. Although OCN is considered a reparative molecule inside the dental pulp, it is not clear if it is involved in pulpal inflammation. The objective of this study was to localize OCN in reversible and irreversible pulpitis and to describe its possible function in inflammation. Pulp tissues in the form of reversible and irreversible pulpitis were collected from the endodontic clinic. Those from impacted teeth were used as controls. Immunohistochemistry was used to localize OCN. Samples were analyzed for OCN and inflammatory mediator expression using multiplex assay. OCN in inflamed tissues was localized in cells and matrix around calcification areas and in cells around blood vessels but not in normal tissues. The plex assay (Bio-Plex 200, Bio-Rad Laboratories Ltd, Mississauga, ON, Canada) showed OCN expression in reversible pulpitis significantly higher than in irreversible pulpitis, and both were significantly higher than in the controls. A panel of inflammatory mediators showed an increase in reversible and irreversible pulpitis. Another panel was decreased in both stages compared with the controls. OCN expression in reversible pulpitis was positively correlated to the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor, fibroblast growth factor, macrophage inflammatory protein-1β, monocyte-derived chemokine, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, interleukin (IL)-17, and soluble IL-2 receptor α and negatively correlated to that of IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-8, granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor, and macrophage inflammatory protein-1α. Profound understanding of the pulp inflammatory process would lead to new molecular treatment strategies. Our data indicate that OCN expression in reversible pulpitis is associated with angiogenic markers, suggesting its potential use in regenerative treatment. Copyright © 2013 American

  14. Correction of gene expression data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darbani Shirvanehdeh, Behrooz; Stewart, C. Neal, Jr.; Noeparvar, Shahin

    2014-01-01

    This report investigates for the first time the potential inter-treatment bias source of cell number for gene expression studies. Cell-number bias can affect gene expression analysis when comparing samples with unequal total cellular RNA content or with different RNA extraction efficiencies....... For maximal reliability of analysis, therefore, comparisons should be performed at the cellular level. This could be accomplished using an appropriate correction method that can detect and remove the inter-treatment bias for cell-number. Based on inter-treatment variations of reference genes, we introduce...

  15. Microsoft Expression Web for dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Hefferman, Linda

    2013-01-01

    Expression Web is Microsoft's newest tool for creating and maintaining dynamic Web sites. This FrontPage replacement offers all the simple ""what-you-see-is-what-you-get"" tools for creating a Web site along with some pumped up new features for working with Cascading Style Sheets and other design options. Microsoft Expression Web For Dummies arrives in time for early adopters to get a feel for how to build an attractive Web site. Author Linda Hefferman teams up with longtime FrontPage For Dummies author Asha Dornfest to show the easy way for first-time Web designers, FrontPage ve

  16. Advanced express web application development

    CERN Document Server

    Keig, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    A practical book, guiding the reader through the development of a single page application using a feature-driven approach.If you are an experienced JavaScript developer who wants to build highly scalable, real-world applications using Express, this book is ideal for you. This book is an advanced title and assumes that the reader has some experience with node, Javascript MVC web development frameworks, and has heard of Express before, or is familiar with it. You should also have a basic understanding of Redis and MongoDB. This book is not a tutorial on Node, but aims to explore some of the more

  17. Gene expression in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkenkamp-Demtroder, Karin; Christensen, Lise Lotte; Olesen, Sanne Harder

    2002-01-01

    Understanding molecular alterations in colorectal cancer (CRC) is needed to define new biomarkers and treatment targets. We used oligonucleotide microarrays to monitor gene expression of about 6,800 known genes and 35,000 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) on five pools (four to six samples in each......%). Fifteen nuclear encoded mitochondrial proteins were all down-regulated in CRC. We identified several chromosomal locations with clusters of either potential oncogenes or potential tumor suppressors. Some of these, such as aminopeptidase N/CD13 and sigma B3 protein on chromosome 15q25, coincided...

  18. Beginning Oracle Application Express 4

    CERN Document Server

    Gault, Doug; Cimolini, Patrick; D'Souza, Martin; Hilaire, Timothy St

    2011-01-01

    Beginning Oracle Application Express 4 introduces one of the most talked-about development platforms to come out of Oracle Corporation in years. Oracle Application Express, called APEX for short, enables rapid and easy development of web-based applications that make full use of Oracle Database. The release of APEX 4 brings a huge leap forward in terms of functionality and usability for both the developer and the end user. Power users and programmers alike can quickly put together robust and scalable applications for use by one person, by a department, by an entire company. Whether you're new t

  19. Mars Express wins unanimous support

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-11-01

    "The green light for Mars Express shows that Europe is perfectly capable of seizing special chances in exploring space," said Roger Bonnet, ESA's director of science. "At a cost to ESA of 150 million ECU, Mars Express is the cheapest Mars mission ever, yet its importance and originality are far greater than the price tag suggests." Bonnet continued: "Mars Express has been advertised by the Science Programme Committee as a test case for new approaches in procuring and managing future science projects, with a view to achieving major savings. In the international arena, Mars Express will confirm Europe's interest in a major target for space research in the new century, when we make our forceful debut at the Red Planet. In fact, Mars Express is designed to be a pivotal element of an international multi-mission, global effort for the exploration of Mars." Development of the spacecraft will now proceed swiftly, to meet the deadline of an exceptionally favourable launch window early in June 2003. Mars Express will go into orbit around Mars at Christmas 2003. Seven scientific instruments on board will include a high-resolution camera, a range of spectrometers, and a radar to penetrate below the surface. For the first time in the history of the exploration of the Red Planet, scientists can hope to detect sub-surface water, whether it exists in the form of undergound rivers, pools, glaciers or permafrost. Signs of life on Mars, whether extinct or continuing today, may reveal themselves to a lander carried by Mars Express. This is Beagle 2, a project led by the Open University in the United Kingdom, with contributions from many other European countries. The lander also promises invaluable information about the chemistry of the Martian surface and atmosphere. Beagle 2 is to be independently funded. Some of the necessary funds have already been raised and ESA has agreed with the principal investigator to keep a place for Beagle 2 aboard Mars Express. The financial situation

  20. Spirit Boxes: Expressions of Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMuro, Ted

    1984-01-01

    After studying the culture and art of the ancient civilizations of South America, Mesopotamia, Greece, and Egypt, secondary level art students made spirit boxes as expressions of the various cultures. How to make the boxes and how to prepare the face molds are described. (RM)

  1. Visualizing structures of speech expressiveness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herbelin, Bruno; Jensen, Karl Kristoffer; Graugaard, Lars

    2008-01-01

    vowels and consonants, and which converts the speech energy into visual particles that form complex visual structures, provides us with a mean to present the expressiveness of speech into a visual mode. This system is presented in an artwork whose scenario is inspired from the reasons of language...

  2. Lysozyme expression in Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guchte, Maarten van de; Wal, Fimme Jan van der; Kok, Jan; Venema, Gerhardus

    Three lysozyme-encoding genes, one of eukaryotic and two of prokaryotic origin, were expressed in Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis. Hen egg white lysozyme (HEL) could be detected in L. lactis lysates by Western blotting. No lysozyme activity was observed, however, presumably because of the absence

  3. ASPM gene expression in medulloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vulcani-Freitas, Tânia M; Saba-Silva, Najsla; Cappellano, Andréa; Cavalheiro, Sérgio; Marie, Sueli K N; Oba-Shinjo, Sueli M; Malheiros, Suzana M F; de Toledo, Sílvia Regina Caminada

    2011-01-01

    Medulloblastomas are the most common malignant tumors of the central nervous system in childhood. The incidence is about 19-20% between children younger than 16 years old with peak incidence between 4 and 7 years. Despite its sensibility to no specific therapeutic means like chemotherapy and radiotherapy, the treatment is very aggressive and frequently results in regression, growth deficit, and endocrine dysfunction. From this point of view, new treatment approaches are needed such as molecular targeted therapies. Studies in glioblastoma demonstrated that ASPM gene was overexpressed when compared to normal brain and ASPM inhibition by siRNA-mediated inhibits tumor cell proliferation and neural stem cell proliferation, supporting ASPM gene as a potential molecular target in glioblastoma. The aim of this work was to evaluate ASPM expression in medulloblastoma fragment samples, and to compare the results with the patient clinical features. Analysis of gene expression was performed by quantitative PCR real time using SYBR Green system in tumor samples from 37 children. The t test was used to analyze the gene expression, and Mann-Whitney test was performed to analyze the relationship between gene expressions and clinical characteristics. Kaplan-Meier test evaluated curve survival. All samples overexpressed ASPM gene more than 40-fold. However, we did not find any association between the overexpressed samples and the clinical parameters. ASPM overexpression may modify the ability of stem cells to differentiate during the development of the central nervous system, contributing to the development of medulloblastoma, a tumor of embryonic origin from cerebellar progenitor cells.

  4. Construction of the expression plasmid

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    nausch

    2012-10-09

    Oct 9, 2012 ... Sepsis is one of the top 10 causes of death worldwide. (Dombrovskiy et al., 2007; Parrish et al., 2008). .... may protect recombinant C5a from proteolytic degradation as observed for unmodified C5a expressed ..... crosslinking of the 3 disulfide bridges that stabilize the four core α-helices of C5a are crucial for ...

  5. 'Endurance' Courtesy of Mars Express

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its panoramic camera to capture this false-color image of the interior of 'Endurance Crater' on the rover's 188th martian day (Aug. 4, 2004). The image data were relayed to Earth by the European Space Agency's Mars Express orbiter. The image was generated from separate frames using the cameras 750-, 530- and 480-nanometer filters.

  6. The Change of Expression Configuration Affects Identity-Dependent Expression Aftereffect but Not Identity-Independent Expression Aftereffect

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Miao; Shinomori, Keizo; Qian, Qian; Yin, Jun; Zeng, Weiming

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined the influence of expression configuration on cross-identity expression aftereffect. The expression configuration refers to the spatial arrangement of facial features in a face for conveying an emotion, e.g., an open-mouth smile vs. a closed-mouth smile. In the first of two experiments, the expression aftereffect is measured using a cross-identity/cross-expression configuration factorial design. The facial identities of test faces were the same or different from the ...

  7. Vascular Gene Expression: A Hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angélica Concepción eMartínez-Navarro

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The phloem is the conduit through which photoassimilates are distributed from autotrophic to heterotrophic tissues and is involved in the distribution of signaling molecules that coordinate plant growth and responses to the environment. Phloem function depends on the coordinate expression of a large array of genes. We have previously identified conserved motifs in upstream regions of the Arabidopsis genes, encoding the homologs of pumpkin phloem sap mRNAs, displaying expression in vascular tissues. This tissue-specific expression in Arabidopsis is predicted by the overrepresentation of GA/CT-rich motifs in gene promoters. In this work we have searched for common motifs in upstream regions of the homologous genes from plants considered to possess a primitive vascular tissue (a lycophyte, as well as from others that lack a true vascular tissue (a bryophyte, and finally from chlorophytes. Both lycophyte and bryophyte display motifs similar to those found in Arabidopsis with a significantly low E-value, while the chlorophytes showed either a different conserved motif or no conserved motif at all. These results suggest that these same genes are expressed coordinately in non- vascular plants; this coordinate expression may have been one of the prerequisites for the development of conducting tissues in plants. We have also analyzed the phylogeny of conserved proteins that may be involved in phloem function and development. The presence of CmPP16, APL, FT and YDA in chlorophytes suggests the recruitment of ancient regulatory networks for the development of the vascular tissue during evolution while OPS is a novel protein specific to vascular plants.

  8. DNA expressions - A formal notation for DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliet, Rudy van

    2015-01-01

    We describe a formal notation for DNA molecules that may contain nicks and gaps. The resulting DNA expressions denote formal DNA molecules. Different DNA expressions may denote the same molecule. Such DNA expressions are called equivalent. We examine which DNA expressions are minimal, which

  9. EXPRESS: EXPressing REstful Semantic Services Using Domain Ontologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alowisheq, Areeb; Millard, David E.; Tiropanis, Thanassis

    Existing approaches to Semantic Web Services (SWS) require a domain ontology and a semantic description of the service. In the case of lightweight SWS approaches, such as SAWSDL, service description is achieved by semantically annotating existing web service interfaces. Other approaches such as OWL-S and WSMO describe services in a separate ontology. So, existing approaches separate service description from domain description, therefore increasing design efforts. We propose EXPRESS a lightweight approach to SWS that requires the domain ontology definition only. Its simplicity stems from the similarities between REST and the Semantic Web such as resource realization, self describing representations, and uniform interfaces. The semantics of a service is elicited from a resource's semantic description in the domain ontology and the semantics of the uniform interface, hence eliminating the need for ontologically describing services. We provide an example that illustrates EXPRESS and then discuss how it compares to SA-REST and WSMO.

  10. Recombination-ready Sindbis replicon expression vectors for transgene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olson Ken E

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sindbis viruses have been widely used as tools to study gene function in cells. Despite the utility of these systems, the construction and production of alphavirus replicons is time consuming and inefficient due to potential additional restriction sites within the insert region and lack of directionality for insert ligation. In this report, we present a system useful for producing recombinant Sindbis replicons that uses lambda phage recombination technology to rapidly and specifically construct replicon expression plasmids that contain insert regions in the desired orientation. Results Recombination of the gene of interest with the replicon plasmid resulted in nearly 100% recombinants, each of which contained a correctly orientated insert. Replicons were easily produced in cell culture and packaged into pseudo-infectious viral particles. Insect and mammalian cells infected with pseudo-infectious viral particles expressed various transgenes at high levels. Finally, inserts from persistently replicating replicon RNA were easily isolated and recombined back into entry plasmids for sequencing and subsequent analysis. Conclusion Replication-ready replicon expression plasmids make the use of alphavirus replicons fast and easy as compared to traditional replicon production methods. This system represents a significant step forward in the utility and ease of use of alphavirus replicons in the study of gene function.

  11. Decomposing Path : The Nanosyntax of Directional Expressions

    OpenAIRE

    Pantcheva, Marina Blagoeva

    2011-01-01

    In my thesis, I investigate directional expressions cross-linguistically. I examine the morpho-syntactic structure of expressions of Goal (to the house), Source (from the house), Route (through the house), non-transitional paths (towards the house) and, finally, delimited paths (up to the house). I conclude that all these types of directional expressions are of different syntactic complexity. Precisely, Source expressions (from) are formed on the basis of Goal expressions (to) and Route expr...

  12. Summer Oral Expression English Course

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2011-01-01

    An English Oral Expression course will take place between 15 August and 30 September 2011. Schedule: to be determined (2 sessions of 2 hours per week). Please note that this course is for learners who have a good knowledge of English (CERN level 7 upwards). If you are interested in following this course, please enrol here. Or contact: Kerstin FUHRMEISTER (70896) Tessa OSBORNE (72957)  

  13. Gene expression based cancer classification

    OpenAIRE

    Sara Tarek; Reda Abd Elwahab; Mahmoud Shoman

    2017-01-01

    Cancer classification based on molecular level investigation has gained the interest of researches as it provides a systematic, accurate and objective diagnosis for different cancer types. Several recent researches have been studying the problem of cancer classification using data mining methods, machine learning algorithms and statistical methods to reach an efficient analysis for gene expression profiles. Studying the characteristics of thousands of genes simultaneously offered a deep in...

  14. Transgenic Arabidopsis Gene Expression System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferl, Robert; Paul, Anna-Lisa

    2009-01-01

    The Transgenic Arabidopsis Gene Expression System (TAGES) investigation is one in a pair of investigations that use the Advanced Biological Research System (ABRS) facility. TAGES uses Arabidopsis thaliana, thale cress, with sensor promoter-reporter gene constructs that render the plants as biomonitors (an organism used to determine the quality of the surrounding environment) of their environment using real-time nondestructive Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) imagery and traditional postflight analyses.

  15. Gene expression profile of pulpitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galicia, Johnah C.; Henson, Brett R.; Parker, Joel S.; Khan, Asma A.

    2016-01-01

    The cost, prevalence and pain associated with endodontic disease necessitate an understanding of the fundamental molecular aspects of its pathogenesis. This study was aimed to identify the genetic contributors to pulpal pain and inflammation. Inflamed pulps were collected from patients diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis (n=20). Normal pulps from teeth extracted for various reasons served as controls (n=20). Pain level was assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS). Genome-wide microarray analysis was performed using Affymetrix GeneTitan Multichannel Instrument. The difference in gene expression levels were determined by the Significance Analysis of Microarray program using a false discovery rate (q-value) of 5%. Genes involved in immune response, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction and signaling, integrin cell surface interactions, and others were expressed at relatively higher levels in the in the pulpitis group. Moreover, several genes known to modulate pain and inflammation showed differential expression in asymptomatic and mild pain patients (≥30mm on VAS) compared to those with moderate to severe pain. This exploratory study provides a molecular basis for the clinical diagnosis of pulpitis. With an enhanced understanding of pulpal inflammation, future studies on treatment and management of pulpitis and on pain associated with it can have a biological reference to bridge treatment strategies with pulpal biology. PMID:27052691

  16. Gene Expression in Trypanosomatid Parasites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Martínez-Calvillo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The parasites Leishmania spp., Trypanosoma brucei, and Trypanosoma cruzi are the trypanosomatid protozoa that cause the deadly human diseases leishmaniasis, African sleeping sickness, and Chagas disease, respectively. These organisms possess unique mechanisms for gene expression such as constitutive polycistronic transcription of protein-coding genes and trans-splicing. Little is known about either the DNA sequences or the proteins that are involved in the initiation and termination of transcription in trypanosomatids. In silico analyses of the genome databases of these parasites led to the identification of a small number of proteins involved in gene expression. However, functional studies have revealed that trypanosomatids have more general transcription factors than originally estimated. Many posttranslational histone modifications, histone variants, and chromatin modifying enzymes have been identified in trypanosomatids, and recent genome-wide studies showed that epigenetic regulation might play a very important role in gene expression in this group of parasites. Here, we review and comment on the most recent findings related to transcription initiation and termination in trypanosomatid protozoa.

  17. Gene expression profile of pulpitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galicia, J C; Henson, B R; Parker, J S; Khan, A A

    2016-06-01

    The cost, prevalence and pain associated with endodontic disease necessitate an understanding of the fundamental molecular aspects of its pathogenesis. This study was aimed to identify the genetic contributors to pulpal pain and inflammation. Inflamed pulps were collected from patients diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis (n=20). Normal pulps from teeth extracted for various reasons served as controls (n=20). Pain level was assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS). Genome-wide microarray analysis was performed using Affymetrix GeneTitan Multichannel Instrument. The difference in gene expression levels were determined by the significance analysis of microarray program using a false discovery rate (q-value) of 5%. Genes involved in immune response, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction and signaling, integrin cell surface interactions, and others were expressed at relatively higher levels in the pulpitis group. Moreover, several genes known to modulate pain and inflammation showed differential expression in asymptomatic and mild pain patients (⩾30 mm on VAS) compared with those with moderate to severe pain. This exploratory study provides a molecular basis for the clinical diagnosis of pulpitis. With an enhanced understanding of pulpal inflammation, future studies on treatment and management of pulpitis and on pain associated with it can have a biological reference to bridge treatment strategies with pulpal biology.

  18. Children's expression through play therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljubomirović Nataša

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Play as a child's expression, is a skill through which children speaks to adults. Play therapy is a broad field of therapeutic intervention based on the play in order to help the child to cope with problems. Through play, children learn to communicate with others, to express their feelings. Through play they learn and can improve their cognitive, emotional and social capabilities. Play therapy is a nondirective technique focused on the child. It is not focused on the problem, at present even the past, but focused on the expression of the child feelings, accepting the child, rather than correction. The focus has been on the wisdom of a child, not on expertise therapists, guiding the child through play rather than instructing. The aim of play therapy is to encourage healthy growth and development, developing skills in problem solving, reduction of undesirable behavior, confidence building and the development of self-control. This method is effective for a wide range of children's problems, such as the state of stress, anxiety, problem behavior, hyperkinetic syndrome, depression, loss, trauma, the problem of bonding situations parents divorced, somatic disorders, autism spectrum disorders, social problems.

  19. Children's Representations of Facial Expression and Identity: Identity-Contingent Expression Aftereffects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vida, Mark D.; Mondloch, Catherine J.

    2009-01-01

    This investigation used adaptation aftereffects to examine developmental changes in the perception of facial expressions. Previous studies have shown that adults' perceptions of ambiguous facial expressions are biased following adaptation to intense expressions. These expression aftereffects are strong when the adapting and probe expressions share…

  20. Misrecognition of facial expressions in delinquents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matsuura Naomi

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous reports have suggested impairment in facial expression recognition in delinquents, but controversy remains with respect to how such recognition is impaired. To address this issue, we investigated facial expression recognition in delinquents in detail. Methods We tested 24 male adolescent/young adult delinquents incarcerated in correctional facilities. We compared their performances with those of 24 age- and gender-matched control participants. Using standard photographs of facial expressions illustrating six basic emotions, participants matched each emotional facial expression with an appropriate verbal label. Results Delinquents were less accurate in the recognition of facial expressions that conveyed disgust than were control participants. The delinquents misrecognized the facial expressions of disgust as anger more frequently than did controls. Conclusion These results suggest that one of the underpinnings of delinquency might be impaired recognition of emotional facial expressions, with a specific bias toward interpreting disgusted expressions as hostile angry expressions.

  1. Summer Oral Expression English course

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    An English Oral Expression course will take place this summer at some time between August 19 and October 4.   Schedule: to be determined (2 sessions of 2 hours per week). Please note that this course is for learners who have a good knowledge of English (CERN level 7 upwards). If you are interested in following this course, please enroll through this link. Please be sure to indicate your planned absences in the comments field so we can schedule the course. If you need more information please send a message to English.training@cern.ch.

  2. Summer Oral Expression English course

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    An English Oral Expression course will take place this summer from 20 August to 29 September.   Schedule: to be determined (2 sessions of 2 hours per week). Please note that this course is for learners who have a good knowledge of English (CERN level 7 upwards). If you are interested in following this course, please enroll through this link. Please be sure to indicate your planned absences in the comments field so we can schedule the course. If you need more information please send a message to English.training@cern.ch

  3. Summer Oral Expression English course

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    An English Oral Expression course will take place this summer at some time between 25 June and 28 September. The exact dates will be decided according to the preferences of the students.   Schedule: to be determined (2 sessions of 2 hours per week). Please note that this course is for learners who have a good knowledge of English (CERN level 7 upwards). If you are interested in following this course, please enroll through this link. Please be sure to indicate your planned absences in the comments field so we can schedule the course. If you need more information please send a message to English.training@cern.ch

  4. Summer Oral Expression English Course

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2011-01-01

    An English Oral Expression course will take place between 15 August and 30 September 2011. Schedule: to be determined (2 sessions of 2 hours per week). Please note that this course is for learners who have a good knowledge of English (CERN level 7 upwards). If you are interested in following this course, please enrol through the following link https://cta.cern.ch/cta2/f?p=110:9:1576796470009589::::X_STATUS,XS_COURSE_NAME,XS_PROGRAMME,XS_SUBCATEGORY,X_COURSE_ID,XS_LANGUAGE,XS_SESSION:D,,1,,4368,B, Or contact: Kerstin FUHRMEISTER (70896) Tessa OSBORNE (72957)  

  5. [Perception, expression and psychosomatic functions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bühler, K E

    1988-01-01

    The investigation starts with the mind/body-problem and with epistemological peculiarities of psychophysical processes. Every monism has to be conceived at least as a dualism of properties. As a special kind of dualism the functionalism is an example against the type/type-identity thesis but not against the token-/token-identity thesis. But the last one is no serious alternative for genuine psychological methods. But also the functionalism does not offer a complete psychological theory: there is an ambivalence concerning the secondary qualities and also concerning intentionality. Bodily expressions were analyzed according the semiotic theory of Charles Sanders Peirce.

  6. Global expression differences and tissue specific expression differences in rice evolution result in two contrasting types of differentially expressed genes

    KAUST Repository

    Horiuchi, Youko

    2015-12-23

    Background Since the development of transcriptome analysis systems, many expression evolution studies characterized evolutionary forces acting on gene expression, without explicit discrimination between global expression differences and tissue specific expression differences. However, different types of gene expression alteration should have different effects on an organism, the evolutionary forces that act on them might be different, and different types of genes might show different types of differential expression between species. To confirm this, we studied differentially expressed (DE) genes among closely related groups that have extensive gene expression atlases, and clarified characteristics of different types of DE genes including the identification of regulating loci for differential expression using expression quantitative loci (eQTL) analysis data. Results We detected differentially expressed (DE) genes between rice subspecies in five homologous tissues that were verified using japonica and indica transcriptome atlases in public databases. Using the transcriptome atlases, we classified DE genes into two types, global DE genes and changed-tissues DE genes. Global type DE genes were not expressed in any tissues in the atlas of one subspecies, however changed-tissues type DE genes were expressed in both subspecies with different tissue specificity. For the five tissues in the two japonica-indica combinations, 4.6 ± 0.8 and 5.9 ± 1.5 % of highly expressed genes were global and changed-tissues DE genes, respectively. Changed-tissues DE genes varied in number between tissues, increasing linearly with the abundance of tissue specifically expressed genes in the tissue. Molecular evolution of global DE genes was rapid, unlike that of changed-tissues DE genes. Based on gene ontology, global and changed-tissues DE genes were different, having no common GO terms. Expression differences of most global DE genes were regulated by cis-eQTLs. Expression

  7. Mediated Interactions and Musical Expression - A Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reidsma, Dennis; Radha, Mustafa; Nijholt, Antinus; Lee, Newton

    2014-01-01

    This chapter surveys the field of technologically mediated musical interaction and technologically enhanced musical expression. We look at several new technologies that enable new ways of musical expression and interaction, explore the micro-coordination that occurs in collaborative musical

  8. Expressed haplotypes and polymorphisms in prunus species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Expressed sequence tags (ESTs) represent collective and redundant gene transcripts that contain alleles and paralogs of genes expressed in various genotypes, tissues, developmental stages, and environmental conditions. The former are primarily responsible for distinct individual phenotypes in a segr...

  9. Gene Expression Analysis of Breast Cancer Progression

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gerald, Wiliam L

    2004-01-01

    ... to identify genes, gene expression profiles and molecular pathways associated with metastatic BC we have performed genome-wide gene expression analysis of a large number of breast cancer samples...

  10. Kivy and Langer on expressiveness in music

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Schoot Albert

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available From 1980 onwards, Peter Kivy has put forward that music does not so much express emotions but rather is expressive of emotions. The character of the music does not represent the character or mood of the composer, but reflects his knowledge of emotional life. Unfortunately, Kivy fails to give credit to Susanne Langer, who brought these views to the fore as early as 1942, claiming that the vitality of music lies in expressiveness, not in expression.

  11. Kivy and Langer on expressiveness in music

    OpenAIRE

    van der Schoot Albert

    2013-01-01

    From 1980 onwards, Peter Kivy has put forward that music does not so much express emotions but rather is expressive of emotions. The character of the music does not represent the character or mood of the composer, but reflects his knowledge of emotional life. Unfortunately, Kivy fails to give credit to Susanne Langer, who brought these views to the fore as early as 1942, claiming that the vitality of music lies in expressiveness, not in expression.

  12. Interaction between facial expression and color

    OpenAIRE

    Kae Nakajima; Tetsuto Minami; Shigeki Nakauchi

    2017-01-01

    Facial color varies depending on emotional state, and emotions are often described in relation to facial color. In this study, we investigated whether the recognition of facial expressions was affected by facial color and vice versa. In the facial expression task, expression morph continua were employed: fear-anger and sadness-happiness. The morphed faces were presented in three different facial colors (bluish, neutral, and reddish color). Participants identified a facial expression between t...

  13. The gene expression signatures of melanoma progression

    OpenAIRE

    Haqq, Christopher; Nosrati, Mehdi; Sudilovsky, Daniel; Crothers, Julia; Khodabakhsh, Daniel; Pulliam, Brian L.; Federman, Scot; Miller, James R.; Allen, Robert E.; Singer, Mark I.; Leong, Stanley P L; Ljung, Britt-Marie; Sagebiel, Richard W.; Kashani-Sabet, Mohammed

    2005-01-01

    Because of the paucity of available tissue, little information has previously been available regarding the gene expression profiles of primary melanomas. To understand the molecular basis of melanoma progression, we compared the gene expression profiles of a series of nevi, primary melanomas, and melanoma metastases. We found that metastatic melanomas exhibit two dichotomous patterns of gene expression, which unexpectedly reflect gene expression differences already apparent in comparing laser...

  14. Nongenomic regulation of gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias-Platas, Isabel; Monk, David

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this review is to highlight the recent advances in epigenetic regulation and chromatin biology for a better understanding of gene regulation related to human disease. Alterations to chromatin influence genomic function, including gene transcription. At its most simple level, this involves DNA methylation and posttranscriptional histone modifications. However, recent developments in biochemical and molecular techniques have revealed that transcriptional regulation is far more complex, involving combinations of histone modifications and discriminating transcription factor binding, and long-range chromatin loops with enhancers, to generate a multifaceted code. Here, we describe the most recent advances, culminating in the example of genomic imprinting, the parent-of-origin monoallelic expression that utilizes the majority of these mechanisms to attain one active and one repressed allele. It is becoming increasingly evident that epigenetic mechanisms work in unison to maintain tight control of gene expression and genome function. With the wealth of knowledge gained from recent molecular studies, future goals should focus on the application of this information in deciphering their role in developmental diseases.

  15. Systems Biophysics of Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilar, Jose M.G.; Saiz, Leonor

    2013-01-01

    Gene expression is a process central to any form of life. It involves multiple temporal and functional scales that extend from specific protein-DNA interactions to the coordinated regulation of multiple genes in response to intracellular and extracellular changes. This diversity in scales poses fundamental challenges to the use of traditional approaches to fully understand even the simplest gene expression systems. Recent advances in computational systems biophysics have provided promising avenues to reliably integrate the molecular detail of biophysical process into the system behavior. Here, we review recent advances in the description of gene regulation as a system of biophysical processes that extend from specific protein-DNA interactions to the combinatorial assembly of nucleoprotein complexes. There is now basic mechanistic understanding on how promoters controlled by multiple, local and distal, DNA binding sites for transcription factors can actively control transcriptional noise, cell-to-cell variability, and other properties of gene regulation, including precision and flexibility of the transcriptional responses. PMID:23790365

  16. Moxibustion upregulates hippocampal progranulin expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Yi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In China, moxibustion is reported to be useful and has few side effects for chronic fatigue syndrome, but its mechanisms are largely unknown. More recently, the focus has been on the wealth of information supporting stress as a factor in chronic fatigue syndrome, and largely concerns dysregulation in the stress-related hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. In the present study, we aimed to determine the effect of moxibustion on behavioral symptoms in chronic fatigue syndrome rats and examine possible mechanisms. Rats were subjected to a combination of chronic restraint stress and forced swimming to induce chronic fatigue syndrome. The acupoints Guanyuan (CV4 and Zusanli (ST36, bilateral were simultaneously administered moxibustion. Untreated chronic fatigue syndrome rats and normal rats were used as controls. Results from the forced swimming test, open field test, tail suspension test, real-time PCR, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and western blot assay showed that moxibustion treatment decreased mRNA expression of corticotropin-releasing hormone in the hypothalamus, and adrenocorticotropic hormone and corticosterone levels in plasma, and markedly increased progranulin mRNA and protein expression in the hippocampus. These findings suggest that moxibustion may relieve the behavioral symptoms of chronic fatigue syndrome, at least in part, by modulating the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and upregulating hippocampal progranulin.

  17. Control of Renin Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Sean T.; Jones, Craig A.; Gross, Kenneth W.; Pan, Li

    2015-01-01

    Renin, as part of the renin-angiotensin system, plays a critical role in the regulation of blood pressure, electrolyte homeostasis, mammalian renal development and progression of fibrotic/hypertrophic diseases. Renin gene transcription is subject to complex developmental and tissue-specific regulation. Initial studies using the mouse As4.1 cell line, which has many characteristics of the renin-expressing juxtaglomerular cells of the kidney, have identified a proximal promoter region (−197 to −50 bp) and an enhancer (−2866 to −2625 bp) upstream of the Ren-1c gene, which are critical for renin gene expression. The proximal promoter region contains several transcription factor-binding sites including a binding site for the products of the developmental control genes Hox. The enhancer consists of at least 11 transcription factor-binding sites and is responsive to various signal transduction pathways including cAMP, retinoic acid, endothelin-1, and cytokines, all of which are known to alter renin mRNA levels. Furthermore, in vivo models have validated several of these key components found within the proximal promoter region and the enhancer as well as other key sites necessary for renin gene transcription. PMID:22576577

  18. Facial displays, emotional expressions and conversational acts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heylen, Dirk K.J.; Trappl, R.

    2006-01-01

    “Emotional expression is multifaceted – expression is determined both by a person’s reaction to an event and by the attempt to manipulate this expression for strategic reasons in social interaction.��? (Scherer, 2001). In this paper we present some thoughts on the relation between emotion, facial

  19. Vocal Emotion Expressions Effects on Cooperation Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero Meneses, Jonathan Azael; Menez Díaz, Judith Marina

    2017-01-01

    Emotional expressions have been proposed to be important for regulating social interaction as they can serve as cues for behavioral intentions. The issue has been mainly addressed analyzing the effects of facial emotional expressions in cooperation behavior, but there are contradictory results regarding the impact of emotional expressions on that…

  20. Learning to Be Creatively Expressive Performers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand, Katherine; Brenner, Brenda

    2017-01-01

    Research conducted on the development of expressive performance capabilities suggests that children can learn to demonstrate expressiveness in their music-making. Expressivity includes musical interpretation, performance technique, and musical and personal creativity. This article examines creativity as an important component of musical…

  1. Generating Expressive Speech for Storytelling Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bailly, G.; Theune, Mariet; Meijs, Koen; Campbell, N.; Hamza, W.; Heylen, Dirk K.J.; Ordelman, Roeland J.F.; Hoge, H.; Jianhua, T.

    Work on expressive speech synthesis has long focused on the expression of basic emotions. In recent years, however, interest in other expressive styles has been increasing. The research presented in this paper aims at the generation of a storytelling speaking style, which is suitable for

  2. Ectopic expression of Crambe abyssinica lysophosphatidic acid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To study its function in vivo, CaLPAAT was introduced into Brassica napus by Agrobacterium. The expression profile of several genes in the glycerolipids synthesis pathway was determined by quantitative RT-PCR. Interestingly, higher expression of CaLPAAT led to elevated expression of these genes. Further analysis of ...

  3. Endogenous retrovirus sequences expressed in male mammalian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In humans, one ERV family, human endogenous retrovirus- K (HERV-K) is abundantly expressed, and is associated with germ cell tumours, while ERV3 env is expressed in normal human testis. Conclusion: The expression of ERVs in male reproductive tissues suggests a possible role in normal and disease conditions ...

  4. 7 CFR 27.99 - Values; expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Values; expression. 27.99 Section 27.99 Agriculture... CLASSIFICATION UNDER COTTON FUTURES LEGISLATION Regulations Price Quotations and Differences § 27.99 Values; expression. For the purpose of this subpart values shall be expressed in terms of cents and hundredths of a...

  5. Expression and sequence characterization of growth hormone ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An expression plasmid was constructed for the production of BbGHBP in Escherichia coli BL21 (RIPL) CodonPlus under the control of T7lac promoter. On induction with isopropyl β-D thiogalactopyranoside, the BbGHBP was expressed at levels >30% of the total E. coli proteins. The target protein expressed as inclusion ...

  6. Synthetic promoter libraries- tuning of gene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammer, Karin; Mijakovic, Ivan; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal

    2006-01-01

    The study of gene function often requires changing the expression of a gene and evaluating the consequences. In principle, the expression of any given gene can be modulated in a quasi-continuum of discrete expression levels but the traditional approaches are usually limited to two extremes: gene ...

  7. Expression, purification and characterization of the interferon ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Earlier, we had reported that expression of recombinant human RNase L caused RNA-degradation and cell-growth inhibition in E. coli without the need for exogenous 2-5A. Expression of human RNase L in E. coli usually leads to problems of leaky expression, low yield and degradation of the recombinant protein, which ...

  8. Expressiveness modulo Bisimilarity of Regular Expressions with Parallel Composition (Extended Abstract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jos C. M. Baeten

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The languages accepted by finite automata are precisely the languages denoted by regular expressions. In contrast, finite automata may exhibit behaviours that cannot be described by regular expressions up to bisimilarity. In this paper, we consider extensions of the theory of regular expressions with various forms of parallel composition and study the effect on expressiveness. First we prove that adding pure interleaving to the theory of regular expressions strictly increases its expressiveness up to bisimilarity. Then, we prove that replacing the operation for pure interleaving by ACP-style parallel composition gives a further increase in expressiveness. Finally, we prove that the theory of regular expressions with ACP-style parallel composition and encapsulation is expressive enough to express all finite automata up to bisimilarity. Our results extend the expressiveness results obtained by Bergstra, Bethke and Ponse for process algebras with (the binary variant of Kleene's star operation.

  9. Geographic variation in the rosy thrush-tanager (rhodinocichla rosea) complex of mesoamerica (aves: passeriformes)

    OpenAIRE

    Peterson, A. Townsend; Rice,Nathan H.; Navarro-Sigüenza, Adolfo G.

    2004-01-01

    Patterns of differentiation and geographic variation among populations of the Rhodinocichla complex are described. We document the existence of a heretofore unreported population in the vicinity of Acapulco, Guerrero, Mexico. The species occurs in 4-6 allopatric populations, each of which has unique characters that make it diagnosable. We recommend that the complex be considered a single biological species, but at least five phylogenetic species.

  10. Alternative extraction of alkaloid anticarcinogens from Brazilian "vinca rosea" using Ion exchange chromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Freire de Carvalhaes

    Full Text Available Extracts in ethanol and ethanol-ammonia of dried leaves from Catharanthus roseus, gathered at Rio de Janeiro state, were adsorbed in a strongly acidic cation exchange resin with sulfonic acid group, using the finite bath method, resulting in an alkaloid retained fraction and an acidic and neutral unretained fraction. High Performance Liquid Chromatography showed the isolation of the alkaloid fraction to be highly selective and with good performance, with an absence of alkaloids in the unretained fraction, while the retained fraction presented 1,54-6,35 mg/g of vindoline and 0,12-0,91 mg/g of vinblastine, common for an alkaloid-rich concentrate, usually obtained by classic extraction with several steps using solvents.

  11. Memory-enhancing effect of Rhodiola rosea L extract on aged mice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    age-related learning and memory disorders have become prevalent in the aging population, even in the absence of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. To tackle such a major global healthcare issue, it is vital to develop effective prophylactic and therapeutic agents for enhancing and.

  12. Adipocyte differentiation and leptin expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hwang, C S; Loftus, T M; Mandrup, S

    1997-01-01

    Adipose tissue has long been known to house the largest energy reserves in the animal body. Recent research indicates that in addition to this role, the adipocyte functions as a global regulator of energy metabolism. Adipose tissue is exquisitely sensitive to a variety of endocrine and paracrine...... signals, e.g. insulin, glucagon, glucocorticoids, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF), that combine to control both the secretion of other regulatory factors and the recruitment and differentiation of new adipocytes. The process of adipocyte differentiation is controlled by a cascade of transcription factors......, most notably those of the C/EBP and PPAR families, which combine to regulate each other and to control the expression of adipocyte-specific genes. One such gene, i.e. the obese gene, was recently identified and found to encode a hormone, referred to as leptin, that plays a major role in the regulation...

  13. E-mail: Outlook Express

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zainul Bakri

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Salah satu layanan Internet yang sangat penting adalah electronic mail atau sering hanya disebut sebagai e-mail. Untuk menggunakan e-mail, diperlukan piranti lunak khusus supaya pengguna dapat mengirim dan menerima e-mail. Jenis piranti lunak e-mail diantaranya adalah Outlook Express yang merupakan satu paket yang didistribusikan bersama Internet Explorer versi 4. Piranti lunak ini dijalankan pada PC yang mempunyai sistem operasi Windows 95 atau 98. Jenis piranti lunak e-mail yang lain adalah Eudora, Pegasus dan sebagainya. Bahkan ada yang diintegrasikan dengan Web Browser (alat untuk menelusuri situs Web misalnya IE,dan Netscape.Sebagai layaknya pelayanan pos, maka setiap pengguna e-mail mempunyai alamat tertentu yang tidak mungkin dipunyai oleh pengguna lainnya diseluruh dunia. Untuk keperluan pendistribusian, maka e-mail mempunyai semacam kantor pos yang ditempatkan dalam sebuah komputer server (mail server atau sering disebut sebagai host. 

  14. The SSETI-express Mission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alminde, Lars; Bisgaard, Morten; Melville, N.

    provides a description of the organisation behind the project and the mission of the satellite. Further it provides a technical overview of both the space segment and the ground segment together with key lessons learnt from the process of building a student satellite with widely distributed teams.......In January 2004 a group of students met at the European Space Technology and Research Centre (ESTEC) in Holland to discuss the feasibility of building a micro-satellite, dubbed SSETI-Express, from parts derived from other student satellite projects and launch it within one and a half year....... The project is an initiative under the ESA Education Department and the Student Space Exploration and Technology Initiative (SSETI)[3], an European student organisation. The satellite is currently scheduled for launch on the 30th of June 2005 atop a "Cosmos" launch vehicle from Plesetsk in Russia. This paper...

  15. The SSETI-Express Mission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alminde, Lars; Bisgaard, Morten; Melville, Neil

    2005-01-01

    provides a description of the organisation behind the project and the mission of the satellite. Further it provides a technical overview of both the space segment and the ground segment together with key lessons learnt from the process of building a student satellite with widely distributed teams.......In January 2004 a group of students met at the European Space Technology and Research Centre (ESTEC) in Holland to discuss the feasibility of building a micro-satellite, dubbed SSETI-Express, from parts derived from other student satellite projects and launch it within one and a half year....... The project is an initiative under the ESA Education Department and the Student Space Exploration and Technology Initiative (SSETI)[3], an European student organisation. The satellite is currently scheduled for launch on the 30th of June 2005 atop a "Cosmos" launch vehicle from Plesetsk in Russia. This paper...

  16. Genetics of human gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stranger, Barbara E; Raj, Towfique

    2013-12-01

    A steadily growing number of studies have identified and characterized expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) in human cell-lines, primary cells, and tissues. This class of variation has been shown to play a role in complex traits, including disease. Here, we discuss how eQTLs have the potential to accelerate discovery of disease genes and functional mechanisms underlying complex traits. We discuss how context-specificity of eQTLs is being characterized at an unprecedented scale and breadth, and how this both informs on the intricacy of human genome function, and has important ramifications for elucidating function of genetic variants of interest, particularly for those contributing to disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Neuroticism, extraversion, and paralinguistic expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawda, Barbara

    2007-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the associations among neuroticism, extraversion, and paralinguistic expression. The relevant literature provides ample information on the association between personality traits and voice intensity, pitch, pace of speaking, frequency of pauses, slips of the tongue, and other speech impediments. The author attempted to verify and supplement work reported previously. Scores for 100 persons (56 women, 44 men; M age =21.5 yr., SD= 1.5) were analyzed with respect to two aspects of personality, neuroticism and introversion-extraversion. To analyze the paralinguistic properties of speech, elicited oral messages were examined, i.e., a fairy tale told by the examinees. While the analysis did not give unambiguous evidence that the assumptions were correct, it indicated singular and statistically significant relations of introversion and neuroticism with speech fluency impediments.

  18. Mapping and Manipulating Facial Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theobald, Barry-John; Matthews, Iain; Mangini, Michael; Spies, Jeffrey R.; Brick, Timothy R.; Cohn, Jeffrey F.; Boker, Steven M.

    2009-01-01

    Non-verbal visual cues accompany speech to supplement the meaning of spoken words, signify emotional state, indicate position in discourse, and provide back-channel feedback. This visual information includes head movements, facial expressions and body gestures. In this paper we describe techniques for manipulating both verbal and non-verbal facial gestures in video sequences of people engaged in conversation. We are developing a system for use in psychological experiments, where the effects of manipulating individual components of non-verbal visual behaviour during live face-to-face conversation can be studied. In particular, the techniques we describe operate in real-time at video frame-rate and the manipulation can be applied so both participants in a conversation are kept blind to the experimental conditions. PMID:19624037

  19. Adaptive Evolution of Gene Expression in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armita Nourmohammad

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Gene expression levels are important quantitative traits that link genotypes to molecular functions and fitness. In Drosophila, population-genetic studies have revealed substantial adaptive evolution at the genomic level, but the evolutionary modes of gene expression remain controversial. Here, we present evidence that adaptation dominates the evolution of gene expression levels in flies. We show that 64% of the observed expression divergence across seven Drosophila species are adaptive changes driven by directional selection. Our results are derived from time-resolved data of gene expression divergence across a family of related species, using a probabilistic inference method for gene-specific selection. Adaptive gene expression is stronger in specific functional classes, including regulation, sensory perception, sexual behavior, and morphology. Moreover, we identify a large group of genes with sex-specific adaptation of expression, which predominantly occurs in males. Our analysis opens an avenue to map system-wide selection on molecular quantitative traits independently of their genetic basis.

  20. Definition, Detection and Generation of Iyashi Expressions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitaoka, Tetsuko; Diago, Luis A.; Hagiwara, Ichiro; Kitazaki, Satoshi; Yamane, Shigeru

    This paper concerns the engineering analysis of “Iyashi”, a peculiar concept to the Japanese, which affect person's heart and may change their expression and behavior. We have integrated the advocator's view of “Iyashi”, analyzed the social background of “Iyashi” and have defined Iyashi and also the Iyashi expression. As the facial expression is the special and important stimulus for both observers and people who show expressions, we want to prove the existence of expressions that change the observer's emotion with Iyashi. We have developed the system to clarify the combination of facial features important for Iyashi through the psychological experiments and the analysis by Holographic Neural Networks (HNN). HNN analysis gave the structure of the Iyashi expression, that is the important combination of the physical facial parameters contributing to the high degree of Iyashi. Based on the structure of Iyashi we are able to generate the Iyashi expression appropriate for each person.

  1. Adolescents' misinterpretation of health risk probability expressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, L D; Schydlower, M; Foley, J; Copeland, R L

    1995-05-01

    To determine if differences exist between adolescents and physicians in their numerical translation of 13 commonly used probability expressions (eg, possibly, might). Cross-sectional. Adolescent medicine and pediatric orthopedic outpatient units. 150 adolescents and 51 pediatricians, pediatric orthopedic surgeons, and nurses. Numerical ratings of the degree of certainty implied by 13 probability expressions (eg, possibly, probably). Adolescents were significantly more likely than physicians to display comprehension errors, reversing or equating the meaning of terms such as probably/possibly and likely/possibly. Numerical expressions of uncertainty (eg, 30% chance) elicited less variability in ratings than lexical expressions of uncertainty (eg, possibly). Physicians should avoid using probability expressions such as probably, possibly, and likely when communicating health risks to children and adolescents. Numerical expressions of uncertainty may be more effective for conveying the likelihood of an illness than lexical expressions of uncertainty (eg, probably).

  2. Increased fibroblast telomerase expression precedes myofibroblast α-smooth muscle actin expression in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Reis Waisberg

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study sought to identify the relationship between fibroblast telomerase expression, myofibroblasts, and telomerase-mediated regulatory signals in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. METHODS: Thirty-four surgical lung biopsies, which had been obtained from patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and histologically classified as usual interstitial pneumonia, were examined. Immunohistochemistry was used to evaluate fibroblast telomerase expression, myofibroblast α-smooth muscle actin expression and the tissue expression of inter leu kin-4, transforming growth factor-β, and basic fibroblast growth factor. The point-counting technique was used to quantify the expression of these markers in unaffected, collapsed, mural fibrosis, and honeycombing areas. The results were correlated to patient survival. RESULTS: Fibroblast telomerase expression and basic fibroblast growth factor tissue expression were higher in collapsed areas, whereas myofibroblast expression and interleukine-4 tissue expression were higher in areas of mural fibrosis. Transforming growth factor-β expression was higher in collapsed, mural fibrosis and honeycombing areas in comparison to unaffected areas. Positive correlations were found between basic fibroblast growth factor tissue expression and fibroblast telomerase expression and between interleukin-4 tissue expression and myofibroblast α-smooth muscle actin expression. Negative correlations were observed between interleukin-4 expression and basic fibroblast growth factor tissue expression in areas of mural fibrosis. Myofibroblast α-smooth muscle actin expression and interleukin-4 tissue expression in areas of mural fibrosis were negatively associated with patient survival. CONCLUSION: Fibroblast telomerase expression is higher in areas of early remodeling in lung tissues demonstrating typical interstitial pneumonia, whereas myofibroblast α-smooth muscle actin expression predominates in areas of late remodeling

  3. Cyclooxygenase-2 expression in the normal human eye and its expression pattern in selected eye tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Jinmei; Wu, Yazhen; Heegaard, Steffen

    2011-01-01

    and retina. The COX-2 expression was less in tumours deriving from the ciliary epithelium and also in retinoblastoma. Conclusion: Cyclooxygenase-2 is constitutively expressed in normal human eyes. The expression of COX-2 is much lower in selected eye tumours involving COX-2 expressing cells....

  4. Cyclooxygenase-2 expression in the normal human eye and its expression pattern in selected eye tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Jinmei; Wu, Yazhen; Heegaard, Steffen

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is an enzyme involved in neoplastic processes. The purpose of the present study is to investigate COX-2 expression in the normal human eye and the expression pattern in selected eye tumours involving COX-2 expressing cells. Methods: Immunohistochemical staining...... using antibodies against COX-2 was performed on paraffin sections of normal human eyes and selected eye tumours arising from cells expressing COX-2. Results: Cyclooxygenase-2 expression was found in various structures of the normal eye. Abundant expression was seen in the cornea, iris, ciliary body...... and retina. The COX-2 expression was less in tumours deriving from the ciliary epithelium and also in retinoblastoma. Conclusion: Cyclooxygenase-2 is constitutively expressed in normal human eyes. The expression of COX-2 is much lower in selected eye tumours involving COX-2 expressing cells....

  5. Expressiveness in musical performance: Pedagogic aspect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jović Natalija R.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The subject of our research relates to pedagogic aspects of expressive vocal-instrumental musical performance. We intended to examine: (1 how undergraduate students see/conceptualize and evaluate expressiveness in musical performance; (2 whether and how they were trained in the skill of expressive musical performance during their musical training; (3 whether and in which way they rehearse the expressive component of musical performance and interpretation and (4 whether there are any differences regarding gender, age, instrument, department, year of study and years of instrument playing in relation to the group of dependant variables related to expressiveness, tuition and practice. The sample for the research included 82 students of instrumental and theory departments at the Faculty of Music in Belgrade. Psychological and pedagogical aspects of musical expressiveness during vocal-instrumental performance were analyzed. The results show that students highly evaluate expressiveness but its place is secondary compared to mastering technical and tonal requirements. Statistically significant differences were shown regarding gender, age and departments. It can be concluded that there is a potential for the development and enhancement of expressiveness of students if we abandon the traditional view that expressiveness is linked exclusively to talent. The findings indicate that pedagogical work should be directed towards finding purposeful strategies for training individual expressiveness.

  6. Calcitonin receptor expression in medullary thyroid carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappagli, Virginia; Potes, Catarina Soares; Ferreira, Luciana Bueno; Tavares, Catarina; Eloy, Catarina; Elisei, Rossella; Sobrinho-Simões, Manuel; Wookey, Peter J; Soares, Paula

    2017-01-01

    Calcitonin expression is a well-established marker for medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC); yet the role of calcitonin receptor (CTR), its seven-transmembrane G-protein coupled receptor, remains to be established in C-cells derived thyroid tumors. The aim of this work was to investigate CTR expression in MTC and to correlate such expression with clinicopathological features in order to evaluate its possible role as a prognostic indicator of disease aggressiveness and outcome. Calcitonin receptor expression was analyzed in a series of 75 MTCs by immunohistochemistry, and by qPCR mRNA quantification in specimens from four patients. Statistical tests were used to evaluate the correlation between CTR expression and the clinicopathological and molecular characteristics of patients and tumors. Calcitonin receptor expression was detected in 62 out of 75 samples (82.7%), whereas 13 of the 75 samples (17.3%) were completely negative. CTR expression was significantly associated with expression of cytoplasmatic phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10 and osteopontin, as well as with wild type RET/RAS genes and absence of tumor stroma, suggesting that CTR expression do not associate with clinicopathological signs of worse prognosis. Calcitonin receptor expression appears to be associated in MTC with more differentiated status of the neoplastic cells.

  7. Methodological limitations in determining astrocytic gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Liang; Guo, Chuang; Wang, Tao; Li, Baoman; Gu, Li; Wang, Zhanyou

    2013-11-25

    Traditionally, astrocytic mRNA and protein expression are studied by in situ hybridization (ISH) and immunohistochemically. This led to the concept that astrocytes lack aralar, a component of the malate-aspartate-shuttle. At least similar aralar mRNA and protein expression in astrocytes and neurons isolated by fluorescence-assisted cell sorting (FACS) reversed this opinion. Demonstration of expression of other astrocytic genes may also be erroneous. Literature data based on morphological methods were therefore compared with mRNA expression in cells obtained by recently developed methods for determination of cell-specific gene expression. All Na,K-ATPase-α subunits were demonstrated by immunohistochemistry (IHC), but there are problems with the cotransporter NKCC1. Glutamate and GABA transporter gene expression was well determined immunohistochemically. The same applies to expression of many genes of glucose metabolism, whereas a single study based on findings in bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) transgenic animals showed very low astrocytic expression of hexokinase. Gene expression of the equilibrative nucleoside transporters ENT1 and ENT2 was recognized by ISH, but ENT3 was not. The same applies to the concentrative transporters CNT2 and CNT3. All were clearly expressed in FACS-isolated cells, followed by biochemical analysis. ENT3 was enriched in astrocytes. Expression of many nucleoside transporter genes were shown by microarray analysis, whereas other important genes were not. Results in cultured astrocytes resembled those obtained by FACS. These findings call for reappraisal of cellular nucleoside transporter expression. FACS cell yield is small. Further development of cell separation methods to render methods more easily available and less animal and cost consuming and parallel studies of astrocytic mRNA and protein expression by ISH/IHC and other methods are necessary, but new methods also need to be thoroughly checked.

  8. Normative data for idiomatic expressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordmann, Emily; Jambazova, Antonia A

    2017-02-01

    Idiomatic expressions such as kick the bucket or go down a storm can differ on a number of internal features, such as familiarity, meaning, literality, and decomposability, and these types of features have been the focus of a number of normative studies. In this article, we provide normative data for a set of Bulgarian idioms and their English translations, and by doing so replicate in a Slavic language the relationships between the ratings previously found in Romance and Germanic languages. Additionally, we compared whether collecting these types of ratings in between-subjects or within-subjects designs affects the data and the conclusions drawn, and found no evidence that design type affects the final outcome. Finally, we present the results of a meta-analysis that summarizes the relationships found across the literature. As in many previous individual studies, we found that familiarity correlates with a number of other features; however, such studies have shown conflicting results concerning literality and decomposability ratings. The meta-analysis revealed reliable relationships of decomposability with a number of other measures, such as familiarity, meaning, and predictability. Conversely, literality was shown to have little to no relationship with any of the other subjective ratings. The implications for these relationships in the context of the wider experimental literature are discussed, with a particular focus on the importance of attaining familiarity ratings for each sample of participants in experimental work.

  9. Physical Aggression and Facial Expression Identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alisdair James Gordon Taylor

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Social information processing theories suggest that aggressive individuals may exhibit hostile perceptual biases when interpreting other’s behaviour. This hypothesis was tested in the present study which investigated the effects of physical aggression on facial expression identification in a sample of healthy participants. Participants were asked to judge the expressions of faces presented to them and to complete a self-report measure of aggression. Relative to low physically aggressive participants, high physically aggressive participants were more likely to mistake non-angry facial expressions as being angry facial expressions (misattribution errors, supporting the idea of a hostile predisposition. These differences were not explained by gender, or response times. There were no differences in identifying angry expressions in general between aggression groups (misperceived errors. These findings add support to the idea that aggressive individuals exhibit hostile perceptual biases when interpreting facial expressions.

  10. Recognising and Interpreting Named Temporal Expressions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brucato, Matteo; Derczynski, Leon; Llorens, Hectjor

    2013-01-01

    in conventional temporally-annotated corpora – for example Michaelmas or Vasant Panchami. UsingWikipedia and linked data, we automatically construct a resource of English named temporal expressions, and use it to extract training examples from a large corpus. These examples are then used to train and evaluate......This paper introduces a new class of temporal expression – named temporal expressions – and methods for recognising and interpreting its members. The commonest temporal expressions typically contain date and time words, like April or hours. Research into recognising and interpreting these typical...... expressions is mature in many languages. However, there is a class of expressions that are less typical, very varied, and difficult to automatically interpret. These indicate dates and times, but are harder to detect because they often do not contain time words and are not used frequently enough to appear...

  11. Recognizing Facial Expressions Automatically from Video

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Caifeng; Braspenning, Ralph

    Facial expressions, resulting from movements of the facial muscles, are the face changes in response to a person's internal emotional states, intentions, or social communications. There is a considerable history associated with the study on facial expressions. Darwin [22] was the first to describe in details the specific facial expressions associated with emotions in animals and humans, who argued that all mammals show emotions reliably in their faces. Since that, facial expression analysis has been a area of great research interest for behavioral scientists [27]. Psychological studies [48, 3] suggest that facial expressions, as the main mode for nonverbal communication, play a vital role in human face-to-face communication. For illustration, we show some examples of facial expressions in Fig. 1.

  12. "Express yourself": culture and the effect of self-expression on choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Heejung S; Sherman, David K

    2007-01-01

    Whereas self-expression is valued in the United States, it is not privileged with such a cultural emphasis in East Asia. Four studies demonstrate the psychological implications of this cultural difference. Studies 1 and 2 found that European Americans value self-expression more than East Asians/East Asian Americans. Studies 3 and 4 examined the roles of expression in preference judgments. In Study 3, the expression of choice led European Americans but not East Asian Americans to be more invested in what they chose. Study 4 examined the connection between the value of expression and the effect of choice expression and showed that European Americans place greater emphasis on self-expression than East Asian Americans, and this difference explained the cultural difference in Study 3. This research highlights the importance of the cultural meanings of self-expression and the moderating role of cultural beliefs on the psychological effect of self-expression. 2007 APA, all rights reserved

  13. Methods for monitoring multiple gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berka, Randy [Davis, CA; Bachkirova, Elena [Davis, CA; Rey, Michael [Davis, CA

    2012-05-01

    The present invention relates to methods for monitoring differential expression of a plurality of genes in a first filamentous fungal cell relative to expression of the same genes in one or more second filamentous fungal cells using microarrays containing Trichoderma reesei ESTs or SSH clones, or a combination thereof. The present invention also relates to computer readable media and substrates containing such array features for monitoring expression of a plurality of genes in filamentous fungal cells.

  14. Methods for monitoring multiple gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berka, Randy; Bachkirova, Elena; Rey, Michael

    2013-10-01

    The present invention relates to methods for monitoring differential expression of a plurality of genes in a first filamentous fungal cell relative to expression of the same genes in one or more second filamentous fungal cells using microarrays containing Trichoderma reesei ESTs or SSH clones, or a combination thereof. The present invention also relates to computer readable media and substrates containing such array features for monitoring expression of a plurality of genes in filamentous fungal cells.

  15. Expression of evolutionarily novel genes in tumors

    OpenAIRE

    A. P. Kozlov

    2016-01-01

    The evolutionarily novel genes originated through different molecular mechanisms are expressed in tumors. Sometimes the expression of evolutionarily novel genes in tumors is highly specific. Moreover positive selection of many human tumor-related genes in primate lineage suggests their involvement in the origin of new functions beneficial to organisms. It is suggested to consider the expression of evolutionarily young or novel genes in tumors as a new biological phenomenon, a phenomenon of TS...

  16. Comparative gene expression between two yeast species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guan Yuanfang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Comparative genomics brings insight into sequence evolution, but even more may be learned by coupling sequence analyses with experimental tests of gene function and regulation. However, the reliability of such comparisons is often limited by biased sampling of expression conditions and incomplete knowledge of gene functions across species. To address these challenges, we previously systematically generated expression profiles in Saccharomyces bayanus to maximize functional coverage as compared to an existing Saccharomyces cerevisiae data repository. Results In this paper, we take advantage of these two data repositories to compare patterns of ortholog expression in a wide variety of conditions. First, we developed a scalable metric for expression divergence that enabled us to detect a significant correlation between sequence and expression conservation on the global level, which previous smaller-scale expression studies failed to detect. Despite this global conservation trend, between-species gene expression neighborhoods were less well-conserved than within-species comparisons across different environmental perturbations, and approximately 4% of orthologs exhibited a significant change in co-expression partners. Furthermore, our analysis of matched perturbations collected in both species (such as diauxic shift and cell cycle synchrony demonstrated that approximately a quarter of orthologs exhibit condition-specific expression pattern differences. Conclusions Taken together, these analyses provide a global view of gene expression patterns between two species, both in terms of the conditions and timing of a gene's expression as well as co-expression partners. Our results provide testable hypotheses that will direct future experiments to determine how these changes may be specified in the genome.

  17. Identification of Emotional Facial Expressions: Effects of Expression, Intensity, and Sex on Eye Gaze.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Jean Wells

    Full Text Available The identification of emotional expressions is vital for social interaction, and can be affected by various factors, including the expressed emotion, the intensity of the expression, the sex of the face, and the gender of the observer. This study investigates how these factors affect the speed and accuracy of expression recognition, as well as dwell time on the two most significant areas of the face: the eyes and the mouth. Participants were asked to identify expressions from female and male faces displaying six expressions (anger, disgust, fear, happiness, sadness, and surprise, each with three levels of intensity (low, moderate, and normal. Overall, responses were fastest and most accurate for happy expressions, but slowest and least accurate for fearful expressions. More intense expressions were also classified most accurately. Reaction time showed a different pattern, with slowest response times recorded for expressions of moderate intensity. Overall, responses were slowest, but also most accurate, for female faces. Relative to male observers, women showed greater accuracy and speed when recognizing female expressions. Dwell time analyses revealed that attention to the eyes was about three times greater than on the mouth, with fearful eyes in particular attracting longer dwell times. The mouth region was attended to the most for fearful, angry, and disgusted expressions and least for surprise. These results extend upon previous findings to show important effects of expression, emotion intensity, and sex on expression recognition and gaze behaviour, and may have implications for understanding the ways in which emotion recognition abilities break down.

  18. Automatic emotional expression analysis from eye area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkoç, Betül; Arslan, Ahmet

    2015-02-01

    Eyes play an important role in expressing emotions in nonverbal communication. In the present study, emotional expression classification was performed based on the features that were automatically extracted from the eye area. Fırst, the face area and the eye area were automatically extracted from the captured image. Afterwards, the parameters to be used for the analysis through discrete wavelet transformation were obtained from the eye area. Using these parameters, emotional expression analysis was performed through artificial intelligence techniques. As the result of the experimental studies, 6 universal emotions consisting of expressions of happiness, sadness, surprise, disgust, anger and fear were classified at a success rate of 84% using artificial neural networks.

  19. Examining emotional expressions in discourse: methodological considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hufnagel, Elizabeth; Kelly, Gregory J.

    2017-10-01

    This methodological paper presents an approach for examining emotional expressions through discourse analysis and ethnographic methods. Drawing on trends in the current literature in science education, we briefly explain the importance of emotions in science education and examine the current research methodologies used in interactional emotion studies. We put forth and substantiate a methodological approach that attends to the interactional, contextual, intertextual, and consequential aspects of emotional expressions. By examining emotional expressions in the discourse in which they are constructed, emotional expressions are identified through semantics, contextualization, and linguistic features. These features make salient four dimensions of emotional expressions: aboutness, frequency, type, and ownership. Drawing on data from a large empirical study of pre-service elementary teachers' emotional expressions about climate change in a science course, we provide illustrative examples to describe what counts as emotional expressions in situ. In doing so we explain how our approach makes salient the nuanced nature of such expressions as well as the broader discourse in which they are constructed and the implications for researching emotional expressions in science education discourse. We suggest reasons why this discourse orientated research methodology can contribute to the interactional study of emotions in science education contexts.

  20. TRPM4 protein expression in prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Kasper Drimer; Soldini, Davide; Jung, Maria

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily M, member 4 (TRPM4) messenger RNA (mRNA) has been shown to be upregulated in prostate cancer (PCa) and might be a new promising tissue biomarker. We evaluated TRPM4 protein expression and correlated the expression level.......79-2.62; p = 0.01-0.03 for the two observers) when compared to patients with a lower staining intensity. CONCLUSIONS: TRPM4 protein expression is widely expressed in benign and cancerous prostate tissue, with highest staining intensities found in PCa. Overexpression of TRPM4 in PCa (combination of high...

  1. Bit-coded regular expression parsing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lasse; Henglein, Fritz

    2011-01-01

    Regular expression parsing is the problem of producing a parse tree of a string for a given regular expression. We show that a compact bit representation of a parse tree can be produced efficiently, in time linear in the product of input string size and regular expression size, by simplifying...... the DFA-based parsing algorithm due to Dub ´e and Feeley to emit the bits of the bit representation without explicitly materializing the parse tree itself. We furthermore show that Frisch and Cardelli’s greedy regular expression parsing algorithm can be straightforwardly modified to produce bit codings...

  2. Modulation of gene expression made easy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solem, Christian; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal

    2002-01-01

    A new approach for modulating gene expression, based on randomization of promoter (spacer) sequences, was developed. The method was applied to chromosomal genes in Lactococcus lactis and shown to generate libraries of clones with broad ranges of expression levels of target genes. In one example...... that the method can be applied to modulating the expression of native genes on the chromosome. We constructed a series of strains in which the expression of the las operon, containing the genes pfk, pyk, and ldh, was modulated by integrating a truncated copy of the pfk gene. Importantly, the modulation affected...

  3. Judgments of subtle facial expressions of emotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, David; Hwang, Hyisung C

    2014-04-01

    Most studies on judgments of facial expressions of emotion have primarily utilized prototypical, high-intensity expressions. This paper examines judgments of subtle facial expressions of emotion, including not only low-intensity versions of full-face prototypes but also variants of those prototypes. A dynamic paradigm was used in which observers were shown a neutral expression followed by the target expression to judge, and then the neutral expression again, allowing for a simulation of the emergence of the expression from and then return to a baseline. We also examined how signal and intensity clarities of the expressions (explained more fully in the Introduction) were associated with judgment agreement levels. Low-intensity, full-face prototypical expressions of emotion were judged as the intended emotion at rates significantly greater than chance. A number of the proposed variants were also judged as the intended emotions. Both signal and intensity clarities were individually associated with agreement rates; when their interrelationships were taken into account, signal clarity independently predicted agreement rates but intensity clarity did not. The presence or absence of specific muscles appeared to be more important to agreement rates than their intensity levels, with the exception of the intensity of zygomatic major, which was positively correlated with agreement rates for judgments of joy.

  4. GLUT-1 Expression in Pancreatic Neoplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basturk, Olca; Singh, Rajendra; Kaygusuz, Ecmel; Balci, Serdar; Dursun, Nevra; Culhaci, Nil; Adsay, N. Volkan

    2011-01-01

    Objectives GLUT-1 has been found to have an important role in the upregulation of various cellular pathways and implicated in neoplastic transformation correlating with biological behavior in malignancies. However, literature regarding the significance of GLUT-1 expression in pancreatic neoplasia has been limited and controversial. Methods Immunohistochemical expression of GLUT-1 was tested in a variety of pancreatic neoplasia including ductal adenocarcinomas (DAs), pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasms (PanINs), intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs), and serous cystadenomas. Results There was a progressive increase in the expression of GLUT-1 from low- to higher-grade dysplastic lesions: All higher-grade PanINs/IPMNs (the ones with moderate/high-grade dysplasia) revealed noticeable GLUT-1 expression. Among the 94 DAs analyzed, there were minimal/moderate expression in 46 and significant expression in 24 DAs. However, all 4 clear-cell variants of DAs revealed significant GLUT-1 immunolabeling, as did areas of clear-cell change seen in other DAs. Moreover, all 12 serous cystadenomas expressed significant GLUT-1. GLUT-1 expression was also directly correlated with DA histological grade (P = 0.016) and tumor size (P = 0.03). Conclusions GLUT-1 may give rise to the distinctive clear-cell appearance of these tumors by inducing the accumulation of glycogen in the cytoplasm. Additionally, because GLUT-1 expression was related to histological grade and tumor size of DA, further studies are warranted to investigate the association of GLUT-1 with prognosis and tumor progression. PMID:21206329

  5. Gene expression inference with deep learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yifei; Li, Yi; Narayan, Rajiv; Subramanian, Aravind; Xie, Xiaohui

    2016-06-15

    Large-scale gene expression profiling has been widely used to characterize cellular states in response to various disease conditions, genetic perturbations, etc. Although the cost of whole-genome expression profiles has been dropping steadily, generating a compendium of expression profiling over thousands of samples is still very expensive. Recognizing that gene expressions are often highly correlated, researchers from the NIH LINCS program have developed a cost-effective strategy of profiling only ∼1000 carefully selected landmark genes and relying on computational methods to infer the expression of remaining target genes. However, the computational approach adopted by the LINCS program is currently based on linear regression (LR), limiting its accuracy since it does not capture complex nonlinear relationship between expressions of genes. We present a deep learning method (abbreviated as D-GEX) to infer the expression of target genes from the expression of landmark genes. We used the microarray-based Gene Expression Omnibus dataset, consisting of 111K expression profiles, to train our model and compare its performance to those from other methods. In terms of mean absolute error averaged across all genes, deep learning significantly outperforms LR with 15.33% relative improvement. A gene-wise comparative analysis shows that deep learning achieves lower error than LR in 99.97% of the target genes. We also tested the performance of our learned model on an independent RNA-Seq-based GTEx dataset, which consists of 2921 expression profiles. Deep learning still outperforms LR with 6.57% relative improvement, and achieves lower error in 81.31% of the target genes. D-GEX is available at https://github.com/uci-cbcl/D-GEX CONTACT: xhx@ics.uci.edu Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Expression of periostin in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratajczak-Wielgomas, Katarzyna; Grzegrzolka, Jedrzej; Piotrowska, Aleksandra; Matkowski, Rafal; Wojnar, Andrzej; Rys, Janusz; Ugorski, Maciej; Dziegiel, Piotr

    2017-10-01

    Periostin (POSTN) is a protein involved in multiple processes important for cancer development, both at the stage of cancer initiation and progression, as well as metastasis. The aim of this study was to determine the expression of POSTN in the cells of non-invasive ductal breast carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) and to correlate it with clinicopathological data. Immunohistochemical studies (IHC) were conducted on 21 cases of fibrocystic breast change (FC), 44 cases of DCIS and 92 cases of IDC. POSTN expression at mRNA (real-time PCR) and protein level (western blot analysis) was also confirmed in selected breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, SK-BR-3, MDA-MB-231 and BO2). Statistically significant higher level of POSTN expression in IDC and DCIS cancer cells compared to FC was noted. Also, the level of POSTN expression in the cytoplasm of IDC cells was shown to increase with the increasing degree of tumour malignancy (G) and significantly higher expression of POSTN was observed in each degree of tumour malignancy (G) relative to FC. Statistically significant higher POSTN expression was observed in tumours with estrogen receptor-negative (ER-) and progesterone receptor-negative (PR-) phenotypes in comparison to estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) and progesterone receptor-positive (PR+) cases, as well as significant negative correlation between POSTN expression in cancer cells and expression of ER and PR (p<0.05). Additionally, statistically significant differences in POSTN expression were shown between particular breast cancer cell lines, both at mRNA and protein level. Observed POSTN expression was the lowest in the case of MCF-7, and the highest in MDA-MB-231 and BO2 of the most aggressive potential clinically corresponding to G3 tumours. POSTN expression in the cytoplasm of IDC cancer cells may play an important role in cancer transformation mechanism.

  7. Expression of CD133 in acute leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolba, Fetnat M; Foda, Mona E; Kamal, Howyda M; Elshabrawy, Deena A

    2013-06-01

    There have been conflicting results regarding a correlation between CD133 expression and disease outcome. To assess CD133 expression in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and to evaluate its correlation with the different clinical and laboratory data as well as its relation to disease outcome, the present study included 60 newly diagnosed acute leukemic patients; 30 ALL patients with a male to female ratio of 1.5:1 and their ages ranged from 9 months to 48 years, and 30 AML patients with a male to female ratio of 1:1 and their ages ranged from 17 to 66 years. Flow cytometric assessment of CD133 expression was performed on blast cells. In ALL, no correlations were elicited between CD133 expression and some monoclonal antibodies, but in AML group, there was a significant positive correlation between CD133 and HLA-DR, CD3, CD7 and TDT, CD13 and CD34. In ALL group, patients with negative CD133 expression achieved complete remission more than patients with positive CD133 expression. In AML group, there was no statistically significant association found between positive CD133 expression and treatment outcome. The Kaplan-Meier curve illustrated a high significant negative correlation between CD133 expression and the overall survival of the AML patients. CD133 expression is an independent prognostic factor in acute leukemia, especially ALL patients and its expression could characterize a group of acute leukemic patients with higher resistance to standard chemotherapy and relapse. CD133 expression was highly associated with poor prognosis in acute leukemic patients.

  8. Adapting ASPEN for Orbital Express

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouinard, Caroline; Tran, Daniel; Jones, Grailing; Dang, Van; Knight, Russell

    2010-01-01

    By studying the Orbital Express mission, modeling the spacecraft and scenarios, and testing the system, a technique has been developed that uses recursive decomposition to represent procedural actions declaratively, schema-level uncertainty reasoning to make uncertainty reasoning tractable, and lightweight, natural language processing to automatically parse procedures to produce declarative models. Schema-level uncertainty reasoning has, at its core, the basic assumption that certain variables are uncertain, but not independent. Once any are known, then the others become known. This is important where a variable is uncertain for an action and many actions of the same type exist in the plan. For example, if the number of retries to purge pump lines was unknown (but bounded), and each attempt required a sub-plan, then, once the correct number of attempts required for a purge was known, it would likely be the same for all subsequent purges. This greatly reduces the space of plans that needs to be searched to ensure that all executions are feasible. To accommodate changing scenario procedures, each is ingested into a tabular format in temporal order, and a simple natural-language parser is used to read each step and to derive the impact of that step on memory, power, and communications. Then an ASPEN (Activity Scheduling and Planning Environment) model is produced based on this analysis. The model is tested and further changed by hand, if necessary, to reflect the actual procedure. This results in a great savings of time used for modeling procedures. Many processes that need to be modeled in ASPEN (a declarative system) are, in fact, procedural. ASPEN includes the ability to model activities in a hierarchical fashion, but this representation breaks down if there is a practically unbounded number of sub-activities and decomposition topologies. However, if recursive decomposition is allowed, HTN-like encodings are enabled to represent most procedural phenomena. For

  9. Experimental Aerobraking with Venus Express

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svedhem, Hakan

    2013-10-01

    Venus Express has successfully orbited Venus in its polar 24 hour, 250km by 66000 km, orbit since April 2006 and has provided a wealth of new data from our sister planet. Approaching the end of the mission we are now planning an experimental campaign dedicated to aerobraking at altitudes down to as low as about 130km. These low pericentre passes will provide direct measurements of density, temperature, magnetic field and energetic particles in a region not accessible by other methods. Experience of operations and studies of spacecraft responses will be valuable knowledge for possible future missions that might need this techniques as a part of its nominal operations. Aerobraking was considered in the early design phase of the mission but it was fairly soon realised that the nominal mission would not need this. However, a few important design features were maintained in order to allow for this in case it should be needed at a later stage. The inherently stable geometry of the spacecraft configuration and the inclusion of a software mode for aerobraking are the two most important elements from this early design phase. An recent study by industry has determined the constraints for the spacecraft and identified several potential scenarios. The present highly elliptical orbit has as one of its inherent features a downward drift of the pericentre altitude of between 1 and 4 km/day. However, at certain times, when the Sun is in the orbital plane, this drift disappears for a period of up to two weeks. This is a very well suited time to carry out these initial experiments as it is makes operations safer and it reduces the heat input on the spacecraft as the solar panels will be edge-on towards the sun during the aerobraking. Already a number of low altitude operations have been carried out during the so called atmospheric drag campaigns. The spacecraft has then dipped down to altitudes as low as 165 km and a good characterisation of this region has been performed. This

  10. Teachers' Emotional Expression about Disruptive Boys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daley, D.; Renyard, L.; Sonuga-Barke, E. J. S.

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To assess teachers' emotional expression about pupils using the Five Minute Speech Sample (FMSS) and coding procedures for parental expressed emotion (EE). To compare EE for disruptive and non-disruptive pupils. Method: Twenty-one teachers provided speech samples for both a disruptive and a non-disruptive pupil in their class selected…

  11. Original article Semiquantitative Smoothelin Expression in Detection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    mn

    ABSTRACT. Objectives: To examine the usefulness of smoothelin - a new immunohistochemical (IHC) marker that is expressed predominantly in visceral smooth muscle - in recognizing muscularis propria. (MP) in transurethral resection (TUR) and matched cystectomy specimens and to compare the pattern of its expression ...

  12. Factorising a Quadratic Expression with Geometric Insights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joarder, Anwar H.

    2015-01-01

    An algorithm is presented for factorising a quadratic expression to facilitate instruction and learning. It appeals to elementary geometry which may provide better insights to some students or teachers. There have been many methods for factorising a quadratic expression described in school text books. However, students often seem to struggle with…

  13. Intrahepatic expression of interferon alpha & interferon alpha ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The current study aimed to investigate the expression IFN-αand IFN-αReceptor genes in liver biopsies from patients with HCV and HCC. Correlation of their expression with the clinical, histopathological progress of the disease and the effectiveness of IFN therapy in HCV patients after a period of 6 months follow-up was ...

  14. Express Routing Transportation Surveys. Research Department Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Peter D.

    Express routing, under consideration by San Diego (California) Public Schools, is a form of bus transportation that picks up and drops off students at centralized points instead of driving through residential neighborhoods. This report examines other, similar districts' experiences in applying express routing in integration and other school…

  15. Cerebral expression of drug transporters in epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aronica, E.; Sisodiya, S.M.; Gorter, J.A.

    2012-01-01

    Over-expression of drug efflux transporters at the level of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) has been proposed as a mechanism responsible for multidrug resistance. Drug transporters in epileptogenic tissue are not only expressed in endothelial cells at the BBB, but also in other brain parenchymal

  16. An expression analysis package for REDUCE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hulzen, J.A.; Hulshof, B.J.A.

    1982-01-01

    An expression analysis package for REDUCE 2 is presented. This package, completely written in Standard LISP, can be considered as an extension of the algebraic mode. It allows to interactively dismantled and/or modify the last output expression as it is desplayed or printed. An interface with the

  17. Sad Facial Expressions Increase Choice Blindness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yajie Wang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have discovered a fascinating phenomenon known as choice blindness—individuals fail to detect mismatches between the face they choose and the face replaced by the experimenter. Although previous studies have reported a couple of factors that can modulate the magnitude of choice blindness, the potential effect of facial expression on choice blindness has not yet been explored. Using faces with sad and neutral expressions (Experiment 1 and faces with happy and neutral expressions (Experiment 2 in the classic choice blindness paradigm, the present study investigated the effects of facial expressions on choice blindness. The results showed that the detection rate was significantly lower on sad faces than neutral faces, whereas no significant difference was observed between happy faces and neutral faces. The exploratory analysis of verbal reports found that participants who reported less facial features for sad (as compared to neutral expressions also tended to show a lower detection rate of sad (as compared to neutral faces. These findings indicated that sad facial expressions increased choice blindness, which might have resulted from inhibition of further processing of the detailed facial features by the less attractive sad expressions (as compared to neutral expressions.

  18. Predictable tuning of protein expression in bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Mads; Pedersen, Margit; Klausen, Michael Schantz

    2016-01-01

    We comprehensively assessed the contribution of the Shine-Dalgarno sequence to protein expression and used the data to develop EMOPEC (Empirical Model and Oligos for Protein Expression Changes; http://emopec.biosustain.dtu.dk). EMOPEC is a free tool that makes it possible to modulate the expressi...

  19. Advanced Stellar Compass - Alenia Mars Express

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kilsgaard, Søren; Betto, Maurizio; Jørgensen, John Leif

    1998-01-01

    This document, submitted in reply to an Alenia R.f.P., is a proposal to implement the Advanced Stellar Compass (ASC) in the Mars Express mission.The Mars Express is an ESA dedicated mission to Mars scientific investigation.The ASC is a very advanced instrument designed by the Space Instrumentation...

  20. Biased Facial Expression Interpretation in Shy Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokin, Jessica; Younger, Alastair; Gosselin, Pierre; Vaillancourt, Tracy

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between shyness and the interpretations of the facial expressions of others was examined in a sample of 123 children aged 12 to 14?years. Participants viewed faces displaying happiness, fear, anger, disgust, sadness, surprise, as well as a neutral expression, presented on a computer screen. The children identified each expression…

  1. Comparative genomics: Difference of expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rasmus

    2006-01-01

    Evolutionary studies tend to focus on alterations in proteins. But evolutionary change can often occur through modified gene expression, a process that is now under investigation with species-specific microarrays.......Evolutionary studies tend to focus on alterations in proteins. But evolutionary change can often occur through modified gene expression, a process that is now under investigation with species-specific microarrays....

  2. Automating InDesign with Regular Expressions

    CERN Document Server

    Kahrel, Peter

    2006-01-01

    If you need to make automated changes to InDesign documents beyond what basic search and replace can handle, you need regular expressions, and a bit of scripting to make them work. This Short Cut explains both how to write regular expressions, so you can find and replace the right things, and how to use them in InDesign specifically.

  3. Children's Expressed Emotions when Disclosing Maltreatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayfan, Liat; Mitchell, Emilie B.; Goodman, Gail S.; Eisen, Mitchell L.; Qin, Jianjian

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Our goal was to examine children's expressed emotions when they disclose maltreatment. Little scientific research exists on this topic, and yet children's emotional expressions at disclosure may inform psychological theory and play a crucial role in legal determinations. Method: One hundred and twenty-four videotaped forensic interviews…

  4. Construction of expression vectors carrying mouse peroxisomal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pUcD3 eukaryotic expression vector to express tagged-PEP protein for transient transfection analysis and identifying intracellular localization of PEP protein in future experiments. PEP-cDNA was amplified in different PCR reactions using pEGFP-PEP vector and 2 sets of primers introducing specific restriction sites at the ...

  5. Kivy and Langer on expressiveness in music

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Schoot, A.

    2013-01-01

    From 1980 onwards, Peter Kivy has put forward that music does not so much express emotions but rather is expressive of emotions. The character of the music does not represent the character or mood of the composer, but reflects his knowledge of emotional life. Unfortunately, Kivy fails to give credit

  6. Promoting Self-Expression in Classroom Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baraldi, Claudio

    2008-01-01

    Self-expression is a key concept for sociological studies on childhood since it is the cue for children's self-socialization and agency. Hence promoting children's agency and social participation requires their self-expression to be facilitated in their interaction with adults. The analysis in this article of a set of interactions in Italian…

  7. Processing Idiomatic Expressions: Effects of Semantic Compositionality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabossi, Patrizia; Fanari, Rachele; Wolf, Kinou

    2008-01-01

    Three experiments tested the main claims of the idiom decomposition hypothesis: People have clear intuitions on the semantic compositionality of idiomatic expressions, which determines the syntactic behavior of these expressions and how they are recognized. Experiment 1 showed that intuitions are clear only for a very restricted number of…

  8. Expressions Shared by Vietnamese in America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Carole

    This document is a collection of a list of expressions shared by Vietnamese immigrants who have entered the United States. The expressions concern the following topics: names, formality, cultural influences, touching, tact and diplomacy, shared life, open houses, social standards, manual labor, fatalism, and adaptability. (Author/AM)

  9. Artistic Expression: Another Challenge for Rural Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Álvarez-Castro

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper identifies the parameters required to create opportunities that would strengthen the social fabric and would promote a comprehensive development through the artistic expression as a method for expressing feelings and constructing –cultural and social– identities as individuals, which, in our global context have been eroded by the homogenization of experiences.

  10. Recognition of 3D facial expression dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sandbach, G.; Zafeiriou, S.; Pantic, Maja; Rueckert, D.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we propose a method that exploits 3D motion-based features between frames of 3D facial geometry sequences for dynamic facial expression recognition. An expressive sequence is modelled to contain an onset followed by an apex and an offset. Feature selection methods are applied in order

  11. Fermionic expressions for minimal model virasoro characters

    CERN Document Server

    Welsh, Trevor A

    2005-01-01

    Fermionic expressions for all minimal model Virasoro characters $\\chi^{p, p'}_{r, s}$ are stated and proved. Each such expression is a sum of terms of {\\em fundamental fermionic form} type. In most cases, all these terms are written down using certain trees which are constructed for $s$ and $r$ from the Takahashi lengths and truncated Takahashi lengths associated with the continued fraction of $p'/p$. In the remaining cases, in addition to such terms, the fermionic expression for $\\chi^{p, p'}_{r, s}$ contains a different character $\\chi^{\\hat p, \\hat p'}_{\\hat r,\\hat s}$, and is thus recursive in nature. Bosonic-fermionic $q$-series identities for all characters $\\chi^{p, p'}_{r, s}$ result from equating these fermionic expressions with known bosonic expressions. In the cases for which $p=2r$, $p=3r$, $p'=2s$ or $p'=3s$, Rogers-Ramanujan type identities result from equating these fermionic expressions with known product expressions for $\\chi^{p, p'}_{r, s}$. The fermionic expressions are proved by first obta...

  12. Expression and Purification of Soluble, Biologically Active ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate Pichia pastoris expression system for producing clinically usable, high-quality dipeptidyl peptidase 4 recombinant protein. Methods: The yeast, Pichia pastoris, expression system was used for the production of the human recombinant dipeptidyl peptidase 4 as a secreted form. The full-length human ...

  13. Molecular cloning, characterization and expression of phenylalanine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2008-03-18

    Mar 18, 2008 ... 1College of Horticulture Science and Engineering, Shandong Agricultural University, Tai'an 271018, China. 2College of Horticulture and Gardening, Yangtze ... Tissue expression analysis by real-time PCR revealed that GbPAL constitutively expressed in all the tested tissues, especially highly in leaf and ...

  14. Physiological and Cognitive Effects of Expressive Dissonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Jennifer L.; Demaree, Heath A.

    2007-01-01

    Emotional well-being depends in part on affect modulation. The present study extends research on emotion regulation by assessing the physiological and cognitive effects of a novel response-focused regulation strategy, termed "expressive dissonance." Expressive dissonance refers to the incongruence between an emotional state (e.g., sadness) and a…

  15. Positron emission tomography : measurement of transgene expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, EFJ; Vaalburg, W

    Noninvasive and repetitive imaging of transgene expression can play a pivotal role in the development of gene therapy strategies, as it offers investigators a means to determine the effectiveness of their gene transfection protocols. In the last decade, imaging of transgene expression using positron

  16. Gene Expression and Microarray Investigation of Dendrobium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: Progressive therapy with Dendrobium mixture, which has glucose- and lipid-lowering effects, is associated with multi-gene expression pathways. By treating diabetic r and wild-type rats with the mixture, the disorder is further understood at the transcriptomic level. Keywords: Diabetes, Gene expression, ...

  17. A Robot with Complex Facial Expressions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Takeno

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The authors believe that the consciousness of humans basically originates from languages and their association-like flow of consciousness, and that feelings are generated accompanying respective languages. We incorporated artificial consciousness into a robot; achieved an association flow of language like flow of consciousness; and developed a robot called Kansei that expresses its feelings according to the associations occurring in the robot. To be able to fully communicate with humans, robots must be able to display complex expressions, such as a sense of being thrilled. We therefore added to the Kansei robot a device to express complex feelings through its facial expressions. The Kansei robot is actually an artificial skull made of aluminum, with servomotors built into it. The face is made of relatively soft polyethylene, which is formed to appear like a human face. Facial expressions are generated using 19 servomotors built into the skull, which pull metal wires attached to the facial “skin” to create expressions. The robot at present is capable of making six basic expressions as well as complex expressions, such as happiness and fear combined.

  18. Does inbreeding affect gene expression in birds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansson, Bengt; Naurin, Sara; Hasselquist, Dennis

    2014-09-01

    Inbreeding increases homozygosity, exposes genome-wide recessive deleterious alleles and often reduces fitness. The physiological and reproductive consequences of inbreeding may be manifested already during gene regulation, but the degree to which inbreeding influences gene expression is unknown in most organisms, including in birds. To evaluate the pattern of inbreeding-affected gene expression over the genome and in relation to sex, we performed a transcriptome-wide gene expression (10 695 genes) study of brain tissue of 10-day-old inbred and outbred, male and female zebra finches. We found significantly lower gene expression in females compared with males at Z-linked genes, confirming that dosage compensation is incomplete in female birds. However, inbreeding did not affect gene expression at autosomal or sex-linked genes, neither in males nor in females. Analyses of single genes again found a clear sex-biased expression at Z-linked genes, whereas only a single gene was significantly affected by inbreeding. The weak effect of inbreeding on gene expression in zebra finches contrasts to the situation, for example, in Drosophila where inbreeding has been found to influence gene expression more generally and at stress-related genes in particular. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  19. Recombinant E. coli expressing Vitreoscilla haemoglobin prefers ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Under these conditions, the expression levels of proteins involved in central metabolic pathways, cellular adaptation and cell division were also found to be altered. These results imply that Vitreoscilla haemoglobin expression alters aerobic metabolism specifically, in addition to altering proteins involved in other pathways, ...

  20. Recombinant E. coli expressing Vitreoscilla haemoglobin prefers ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Supplementary section 2. KEGG pathway analysis of proteins that were differentially expressed under aerobic and micro- aerobic conditions in VHb expressing E. coli. Pathway. Aerobiosis. Up. Down. Up. Microaerobiosis. Down. Biosynthesis of secondary metabolites (ecx01110). sdhB, pckA, gnd, icdA. purC, glyA. pckA ...

  1. Expressing Model Constraints Visually with VMQL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Störrle, Harald

    2011-01-01

    OCL is the de facto standard language for expressing constraints and queries on UML models. However, OCL expressions are very difficult to create, understand, and maintain, even with the sophisticated tool support now available. In this paper, we propose to use the Visual Model Query Language (VMQL...

  2. Altered aquaporin expression in glaucoma eyes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tran, Thuy Linh; Bek, Toke; Cour, Morten la

    2014-01-01

    Aquaporins (AQP) are channels in the cell membrane that mainly facilitate a passive transport of water. In the eye, AQPs are expressed in the ciliary body and retina and may contribute to the pathogenesis of glaucoma and optic neuropathy. We investigated the expression of AQP1, AQP3, AQP4, AQP5...

  3. Serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ruissen, Fred; Baas, Frank

    2007-01-01

    In 1995, serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) was developed as a versatile tool for gene expression studies. SAGE technology does not require pre-existing knowledge of the genome that is being examined and therefore SAGE can be applied to many different model systems. In this chapter, the SAGE

  4. Facial expression recognition as a creative interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valenti, R.; Jaimes, A.; Sebe, N.; Bradshaw, J.; Lieberman, H.; Staab, S.

    2008-01-01

    We present an audiovisual creativity tool that automatically recognizes facial expressions in real time, producing sounds in combination with images. The facial expression recognition component detects and tracks a face and outputs a feature vector of motions of specific locations in the face. The

  5. Heterologous expression of biologically active chicken granulocyte ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2012-02-07

    Feb 7, 2012 ... inserting the reformed cytokines genes in pPICZαA. The pPICZαA-rchGM-CSF was expressed in ... crucial immune cytokine, the GM-CSF can stimulate leucocyte to express major histocompatibility .... B, The result of western blot; M, marker; 1, eluent passed no column; 2, the second column long eluent.

  6. Freedom of Expression in the Arts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Focke, Anne

    This report describes the process used by the Arts Midwest task force on freedom of artistic expression along with their findings and recommendations as they examined issues surrounding freedom of expression at the beginning of the decade. At a time when the National Endowment for the Arts was struggling through rigorous congressional…

  7. Mutual information-based facial expression recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazar, Mliki; Hammami, Mohamed; Hanêne, Ben-Abdallah

    2013-12-01

    This paper introduces a novel low-computation discriminative regions representation for expression analysis task. The proposed approach relies on interesting studies in psychology which show that most of the descriptive and responsible regions for facial expression are located around some face parts. The contributions of this work lie in the proposition of new approach which supports automatic facial expression recognition based on automatic regions selection. The regions selection step aims to select the descriptive regions responsible or facial expression and was performed using Mutual Information (MI) technique. For facial feature extraction, we have applied Local Binary Patterns Pattern (LBP) on Gradient image to encode salient micro-patterns of facial expressions. Experimental studies have shown that using discriminative regions provide better results than using the whole face regions whilst reducing features vector dimension.

  8. Expression of Sox genes in tooth development

    Science.gov (United States)

    KAWASAKI, KATSUSHIGE; KAWASAKI, MAIKO; WATANABE, MOMOKO; IDRUS, ERIK; NAGAI, TAKAHIRO; OOMMEN, SHELLY; MAEDA, TAKEYASU; HAGIWARA, NOBUKO; QUE, JIANWEN; SHARPE, PAUL T.; OHAZAMA, ATSUSHI

    2017-01-01

    Members of the Sox gene family play roles in many biological processes including organogenesis. We carried out comparative in situ hybridization analysis of seventeen sox genes (Sox1-14, 17, 18, 21) during murine odontogenesis from the epithelial thickening to the cytodifferentiation stages. Localized expression of five Sox genes (Sox6, 9, 13, 14 and 21) was observed in tooth bud epithelium. Sox13 showed restricted expression in the primary enamel knots. At the early bell stage, three Sox genes (Sox8, 11, 17 and 21) were expressed in pre-ameloblasts, whereas two others (Sox5 and 18) showed expression in odontoblasts. Sox genes thus showed a dynamic spatio-temporal expression during tooth development. PMID:26864488

  9. Personality expression in Chinese language use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Lin; Lu, Jiahui; Ramsay, Jonathan; Yang, Shanshan; Qu, Weina; Zhu, Tingshao

    2017-12-01

    To date, little research has investigated personality expressions in languages other than English. Given that the Chinese language has the largest number of native speakers in the world, it is vitally important to examine the associations between personality and Chinese language use. In this research, we analysed Chinese microblogs and identified word categories and factorial structures associated with personality traits. We also compared our results with previous findings in English and showed that linguistic expression of personality has both universal- and language-specific aspects. Expression of personality via content words is more likely to be consistent across languages than expression via function words. This makes an important step towards uncovering universal patterns of personality expression in language. © 2016 International Union of Psychological Science.

  10. Expression of Sox genes in tooth development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Katsushige; Kawasaki, Maiko; Watanabe, Momoko; Idrus, Erik; Nagai, Takahiro; Oommen, Shelly; Maeda, Takeyasu; Hagiwara, Nobuko; Que, Jianwen; Sharpe, Paul T; Ohazama, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    Members of the Sox gene family play roles in many biological processes including organogenesis. We carried out comparative in situ hybridization analysis of seventeen sox genes (Sox1-14, 17, 18, 21) during murine odontogenesis from the epithelial thickening to the cytodifferentiation stages. Localized expression of five Sox genes (Sox6, 9, 13, 14 and 21) was observed in tooth bud epithelium. Sox13 showed restricted expression in the primary enamel knots. At the early bell stage, three Sox genes (Sox8, 11, 17 and 21) were expressed in pre-ameloblasts, whereas two others (Sox5 and 18) showed expression in odontoblasts. Sox genes thus showed a dynamic spatio-temporal expression during tooth development.

  11. PRAME gene expression profile in medulloblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tânia Maria Vulcani-Freitas

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant tumors of central nervous system in the childhood. The treatment is severe, harmful and, thus, has a dismal prognosis. As PRAME is present in various cancers, including meduloblastoma, and has limited expression in normal tissues, this antigen can be an ideal vaccine target for tumor immunotherapy. In order to find a potential molecular target, we investigated PRAME expression in medulloblastoma fragments and we compare the results with the clinical features of each patient. Analysis of gene expression was performed by real-time quantitative PCR from 37 tumor samples. The Mann-Whitney test was used to analysis the relationship between gene expression and clinical characteristics. Kaplan-Meier curves were used to evaluate survival. PRAME was overexpressed in 84% samples. But no statistical association was found between clinical features and PRAME overexpression. Despite that PRAME gene could be a strong candidate for immunotherapy since it is highly expressed in medulloblastomas.

  12. HTEL: a HyperText Expression Language

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steensgaard-Madsen, Jørgen

    1999-01-01

    been submitted.A special tool has been used to build the HTEL-interpreter, as an example belonging a family of interpreters for domain specific languages. Members of that family have characteristics that are closely related to structural patterns found in the mark-ups of HTML. HTEL should also be seen......In general, an expression language provides a means to indicate non-constant values in expressions. It includes operations to combine values, but these will normally disappear when the expression is evaluated.HTEL is an expression language to produce HTML-documents. It is presented to stimulate...... a discussion about the structure of hypertext expression languages. The operations have been chosen in agreement with what is strongly suggested, but not defined, by the HTML-standard. The HTEL-interpreter can be used for cgi-programs, i.e. to describe reactions when data from a `form' in an HTML-document has...

  13. Transitional cell carcinoma express vitamin D receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermann, G G; Andersen, C B

    1997-01-01

    Recently, vitamin D analogues have shown antineoplastic effect in several diseases. Vitamin D analogues exert its effect by interacting with the vitamin D receptor (VDR). Studies of VDR in transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) have not been reported. The purpose of the present study was therefore...... to examine whether human bladder tumor cells express VDR. Tumor biopsies were obtained from 26 patients with TCC. Expression of VDR was examined by immunohistochemical experiments. All tumors expressed VDR. Biopsies from advanced disease contained more VDR positive cells than low stage disease (p ....05). Similarly, also tumor grade appeared to be related to the number of cells expressing the receptor. Normal urothlium also expressed VDR but only with low intensity. Our study shows that TCC cells possess the VDR receptor which may make them capable to respond to stimulation with vitamin D, but functional...

  14. Wavelet based approach for facial expression recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaenal Abidin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Facial expression recognition is one of the most active fields of research. Many facial expression recognition methods have been developed and implemented. Neural networks (NNs have capability to undertake such pattern recognition tasks. The key factor of the use of NN is based on its characteristics. It is capable in conducting learning and generalizing, non-linear mapping, and parallel computation. Backpropagation neural networks (BPNNs are the approach methods that mostly used. In this study, BPNNs were used as classifier to categorize facial expression images into seven-class of expressions which are anger, disgust, fear, happiness, sadness, neutral and surprise. For the purpose of feature extraction tasks, three discrete wavelet transforms were used to decompose images, namely Haar wavelet, Daubechies (4 wavelet and Coiflet (1 wavelet. To analyze the proposed method, a facial expression recognition system was built. The proposed method was tested on static images from JAFFE database.

  15. The MPI Facial Expression Database — A Validated Database of Emotional and Conversational Facial Expressions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaulard, Kathrin; Cunningham, Douglas W.; Bülthoff, Heinrich H.; Wallraven, Christian

    2012-01-01

    The ability to communicate is one of the core aspects of human life. For this, we use not only verbal but also nonverbal signals of remarkable complexity. Among the latter, facial expressions belong to the most important information channels. Despite the large variety of facial expressions we use in daily life, research on facial expressions has so far mostly focused on the emotional aspect. Consequently, most databases of facial expressions available to the research community also include only emotional expressions, neglecting the largely unexplored aspect of conversational expressions. To fill this gap, we present the MPI facial expression database, which contains a large variety of natural emotional and conversational expressions. The database contains 55 different facial expressions performed by 19 German participants. Expressions were elicited with the help of a method-acting protocol, which guarantees both well-defined and natural facial expressions. The method-acting protocol was based on every-day scenarios, which are used to define the necessary context information for each expression. All facial expressions are available in three repetitions, in two intensities, as well as from three different camera angles. A detailed frame annotation is provided, from which a dynamic and a static version of the database have been created. In addition to describing the database in detail, we also present the results of an experiment with two conditions that serve to validate the context scenarios as well as the naturalness and recognizability of the video sequences. Our results provide clear evidence that conversational expressions can be recognized surprisingly well from visual information alone. The MPI facial expression database will enable researchers from different research fields (including the perceptual and cognitive sciences, but also affective computing, as well as computer vision) to investigate the processing of a wider range of natural facial expressions

  16. The MPI facial expression database--a validated database of emotional and conversational facial expressions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathrin Kaulard

    Full Text Available The ability to communicate is one of the core aspects of human life. For this, we use not only verbal but also nonverbal signals of remarkable complexity. Among the latter, facial expressions belong to the most important information channels. Despite the large variety of facial expressions we use in daily life, research on facial expressions has so far mostly focused on the emotional aspect. Consequently, most databases of facial expressions available to the research community also include only emotional expressions, neglecting the largely unexplored aspect of conversational expressions. To fill this gap, we present the MPI facial expression database, which contains a large variety of natural emotional and conversational expressions. The database contains 55 different facial expressions performed by 19 German participants. Expressions were elicited with the help of a method-acting protocol, which guarantees both well-defined and natural facial expressions. The method-acting protocol was based on every-day scenarios, which are used to define the necessary context information for each expression. All facial expressions are available in three repetitions, in two intensities, as well as from three different camera angles. A detailed frame annotation is provided, from which a dynamic and a static version of the database have been created. In addition to describing the database in detail, we also present the results of an experiment with two conditions that serve to validate the context scenarios as well as the naturalness and recognizability of the video sequences. Our results provide clear evidence that conversational expressions can be recognized surprisingly well from visual information alone. The MPI facial expression database will enable researchers from different research fields (including the perceptual and cognitive sciences, but also affective computing, as well as computer vision to investigate the processing of a wider range of natural

  17. Gene expression profiling during murine tooth development

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    Maria A dos Santos silva Landin

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to describe the expression of genes, including ameloblastin (Ambn, amelogenin X chromosome (Amelx and enamelin (Enam during early (pre-secretory tooth development. The expression of these genes has predominantly been studied at post-secretory stages. Deoxyoligonucleotide microarrays were used to study gene expression during development of the murine first molar tooth germ at 24h intervals, starting at the eleventh embryonic day (E11.5 and up to the seventh day after birth (P7. The profile search function of Spotfire software was used to select genes with similar expression profile as the enamel genes (Ambn, Amelx and Enam. Microarray results where validated using real-time Reverse Transcription-Polymerase Chain Reaction (real-time RT-PCR, and translated proteins identified by Western blotting. In situ localisation of the Ambn, Amelx and Enam mRNAs were monitored from E12.5 to E17.5 using deoxyoligonucleotide probes. Bioinformatics analysis was used to associate biological functions with differentially (p ≤0.05 expressed (DE genes.Microarray results showed a total of 4362 genes including Ambn, Amelx and Enam to be significant differentially expressed throughout the time-course. The expression of the three enamel genes was low at pre-natal stages (E11.5-P0 increasing after birth (P1-P7. Profile search lead to isolation of 87 genes with significantly similar expression to the three enamel proteins. The mRNAs expressed in dental epithelium and epithelium derived cells. Although expression of Ambn, Amelx and Enam were lower during early tooth development compared to secretory stages enamel proteins were detectable by Western blotting. Bioinformatic analysis associated the 87 genes with multiple biological functions. Around thirty-five genes were associated with fifteen transcription factors.

  18. Characterization of differentially expressed genes using high-dimensional co-expression networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coelho Goncalves de Abreu, Gabriel; Labouriau, Rodrigo S.

    2010-01-01

    We present a technique to characterize differentially expressed genes in terms of their position in a high-dimensional co-expression network. The set-up of Gaussian graphical models is used to construct representations of the co-expression network in such a way that redundancy and the propagation...

  19. Recognition, Expression, and Understanding Facial Expressions of Emotion in Adolescents with Nonverbal and General Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Elana; Heath, Nancy

    2010-01-01

    Children with nonverbal learning disabilities (NVLD) have been found to be worse at recognizing facial expressions than children with verbal learning disabilities (LD) and without LD. However, little research has been done with adolescents. In addition, expressing and understanding facial expressions is yet to be studied among adolescents with LD…

  20. ["Les Impatients": expression through art].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamontagne, Céline; Palardy, Lorraine

    2015-01-01

    The organization called "Les Impatients" was founded in 1992. Using a unique model, Les Impatients welcomes those with mental health issues who would like to express themselves through art. Les Impatients offers free creative workshops and encourages exchanges with the community through the sharing of its participants' creations. The name Les Impatients reinforces the idea that the organization does not consider those attending its workshops as patients, but rather creators who are eager to heal, develop their craft and find their place in society. The participants contribute to the collective objective of breaking down the stigma that surrounds mental illness.Les Impatients collaborates with various mental health organizations in Quebec, such as the Institut universitaire en santé mentale de Montréal (IUSMM) affiliated to the Université de Montréal, Douglas Mental Health University Institute (DMHUI), the Centre de santé et services sociaux Drummond (CSSS Drummond) and the Centre de santé et services sociaux Pierre-Boucher (CSSS Pierre-Boucher). Les Impatients offers more than 48 workshops in eight different locations to around 450 participants each week.Dissemination activities, remarkable events, original projects: Les Impatients stands out through its realizations. Examples are exhibitions, collections of love letters, comic books, CD, concerts, and reading nights. The organization's originality resides in the exploration of the links between the work of the participants and that of professional artists. An illustration of this interest is the annual Parle-moi d'amour auction-exhibition, which has been one of Les Impatients' major events since 1999.As part of its mission, Les Impatients conserves the works of art created by the participants during the workshops. Its collection includes more than 15,000 works of art from Les Impatients as well as pieces donated by collectors of unconventional art, commonly known as "art brut" or "outsider art". The

  1. Soybean physiology and gene expression during drought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolf-Moreira, R; Medri, M E; Neumaier, N; Lemos, N G; Pimenta, J A; Tobita, S; Brogin, R L; Marcelino-Guimarães, F C; Oliveira, M C N; Farias, J R B; Abdelnoor, R V; Nepomuceno, A L

    2010-10-05

    Soybean genotypes MG/BR46 (Conquista) and BR16, drought-tolerant and -sensitive, respectively, were compared in terms of morphophysiological and gene-expression responses to water stress during two stages of development. Gene-expression analysis showed differential responses in Gmdreb1a and Gmpip1b mRNA expression within 30 days of water-deficit initiation in MG/BR46 (Conquista) plants. Within 45 days of initiating stress, Gmp5cs and Gmpip1b had relatively higher expression. Initially, BR16 showed increased expression only for Gmdreb1a, and later (45 days) for Gmp5cs, Gmdefensin and Gmpip1b. Only BR16 presented down-regulated expression of genes, such as Gmp5cs and Gmpip1b, 30 days after the onset of moisture stress, and Gmgols after 45 days of stress. The faster perception of water stress in MG/BR46 (Conquista) and the better maintenance of up-regulated gene expression than in the sensitive BR16 genotype imply mechanisms by which the former is better adapted to tolerate moisture deficiency.

  2. The Communicative Function of Sad Facial Expressions

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    Lawrence Ian Reed

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available What are the communicative functions of sad facial expressions? Research shows that people feel sadness in response to losses but it’s unclear whether sad expressions function to communicate losses to others and if so, what makes these signals credible. Here we use economic games to test the hypothesis that sad expressions lend credibility to claims of loss. Participants play the role of either a proposer or recipient in a game with a fictional backstory and real monetary payoffs. The proposers view a (fictional video of the recipient’s character displaying either a neutral or sad expression paired with a claim of loss. The proposer then decided how much money to give to the recipient. In three experiments, we test alternative theories by using situations in which the recipient’s losses were uncertain (Experiment 1, the recipient’s losses were certain (Experiment 2, or the recipient claims failed gains rather than losses (Experiment 3. Overall, we find that participants gave more money to recipients who displayed sad expressions compared to neutral expressions, but only under conditions of uncertain loss. This finding supports the hypothesis that sad expressions function to increase the credibility of claims of loss.

  3. A comparative gene expression database for invertebrates

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    Ormestad Mattias

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As whole genome and transcriptome sequencing gets cheaper and faster, a great number of 'exotic' animal models are emerging, rapidly adding valuable data to the ever-expanding Evo-Devo field. All these new organisms serve as a fantastic resource for the research community, but the sheer amount of data, some published, some not, makes detailed comparison of gene expression patterns very difficult to summarize - a problem sometimes even noticeable within a single lab. The need to merge existing data with new information in an organized manner that is publicly available to the research community is now more necessary than ever. Description In order to offer a homogenous way of storing and handling gene expression patterns from a variety of organisms, we have developed the first web-based comparative gene expression database for invertebrates that allows species-specific as well as cross-species gene expression comparisons. The database can be queried by gene name, developmental stage and/or expression domains. Conclusions This database provides a unique tool for the Evo-Devo research community that allows the retrieval, analysis and comparison of gene expression patterns within or among species. In addition, this database enables a quick identification of putative syn-expression groups that can be used to initiate, among other things, gene regulatory network (GRN projects.

  4. Expression and Function of NUMB in Odontogenesis

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    Haitao Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available NUMB is a multifunctional protein implicated to function in self-renewal and differentiation of progenitors in several tissues. To characterize the transcripts and to analyze the expression pattern of NUMB in odontogenesis, we isolated 2 full-length clones for NUMB from mouse dental pulp mRNA. One novel sequence contained 200 bp insertion in the phosphotyrosine binding domain (PTB. Confocal microscopy analysis showed strong NUMB expression in human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSC and preameloblasts. Western blot analysis indicated that NUMB isoforms were differentially expressed in various dental tissues. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that in postnatal mouse tooth germs, NUMB was differentially expressed in the preameloblasts, odontoblasts, cervical loop region, and in the dental pulp stem cells during development. Interestingly, overexpression of NUMB in HAT-7, a preameloblast cell line, had dramatic antagonizing effects on the protein expression level of activated Notch 1. Further analysis of the Notch signaling pathway showed that NUMB significantly downregulates sonic hedgehog (Shh expression in preameloblasts. Therefore, we propose that NUMB maintains ameloblast progenitor phenotype at the cervical loop by downregulating the activated Notch1 protein and thereby inhibiting the mRNA expression of Shh.

  5. Expression and function of NUMB in odontogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haitao; Ramachandran, Amsaveni; Gao, Qi; Ravindran, Sriram; Song, Yiqiang; Evans, Carla; George, Anne

    2013-01-01

    NUMB is a multifunctional protein implicated to function in self-renewal and differentiation of progenitors in several tissues. To characterize the transcripts and to analyze the expression pattern of NUMB in odontogenesis, we isolated 2 full-length clones for NUMB from mouse dental pulp mRNA. One novel sequence contained 200 bp insertion in the phosphotyrosine binding domain (PTB). Confocal microscopy analysis showed strong NUMB expression in human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSC) and preameloblasts. Western blot analysis indicated that NUMB isoforms were differentially expressed in various dental tissues. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that in postnatal mouse tooth germs, NUMB was differentially expressed in the preameloblasts, odontoblasts, cervical loop region, and in the dental pulp stem cells during development. Interestingly, overexpression of NUMB in HAT-7, a preameloblast cell line, had dramatic antagonizing effects on the protein expression level of activated Notch 1. Further analysis of the Notch signaling pathway showed that NUMB significantly downregulates sonic hedgehog (Shh) expression in preameloblasts. Therefore, we propose that NUMB maintains ameloblast progenitor phenotype at the cervical loop by downregulating the activated Notch1 protein and thereby inhibiting the mRNA expression of Shh.

  6. Expression of cathepsin K in chordoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeckel, C; Krueger, S; Kuester, D; Ostertag, H; Samii, M; Buehling, F; Broemme, D; Czerniak, B; Roessner, A

    2000-07-01

    Invasive growth of chordoma is accompanied by severe destruction of adjacent bone tissue, a fact that requires high proteolytic activity at the tumor invasion fronts. In this context, cathepsin K is a candidate molecule. It is a protease with high collagenolytic and elastinolytic activity and previously thought to be restricted to osteoclasts and osteoclast-mediated bone resorption. In this study, 44 cases of chordoma of sphenooccipital localization, and 10 embryo-fetal specimens including chorda dorsalis were studied immunohistochemically for their expression of cathepsin K. In 4 additional snap-frozen chordoma cases, the enzyme expression was investigated by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and enzyme histochemistry. Ten chondrosarcomas of the skull base served as controls. Various concentrations of cathepsin K mRNA could be seen in all snap-frozen chordoma specimens. The protease was immunohistochemically expressed by the tumor cells. The immunoreactions were accentuated at the tumor invasion fronts. Enzyme histochemistry indicated a strong tumor cell-associated cathepsin K activity in invasive tumor components. In contrast to chordoma, cathepsin K was not significantly expressed in chorda dorsalis and chondrosarcoma of the skull base. In chondrosarcoma, protease expression was limited to osteoclastic cells localized between infiltrative tumor components and regular bone trabeculae. This study shows the significant expression and activity of cathepsin K in chordoma and implicates an important and direct role of this protease in the infiltrative growth of this tumor. This protease expression occurred during neoplastic transformation and did not appear in chorda dorsalis.

  7. Hereditary family signature of facial expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peleg, Gili; Katzir, Gadi; Peleg, Ofer; Kamara, Michal; Brodsky, Leonid; Hel-Or, Hagit; Keren, Daniel; Nevo, Eviatar

    2006-10-24

    Although facial expressions of emotion are universal, individual differences create a facial expression "signature" for each person; but, is there a unique family facial expression signature? Only a few family studies on the heredity of facial expressions have been performed, none of which compared the gestalt of movements in various emotional states; they compared only a few movements in one or two emotional states. No studies, to our knowledge, have compared movements of congenitally blind subjects with their relatives to our knowledge. Using two types of analyses, we show a correlation between movements of congenitally blind subjects with those of their relatives in think-concentrate, sadness, anger, disgust, joy, and surprise and provide evidence for a unique family facial expression signature. In the analysis "in-out family test," a particular movement was compared each time across subjects. Results show that the frequency of occurrence of a movement of a congenitally blind subject in his family is significantly higher than that outside of his family in think-concentrate, sadness, and anger. In the analysis "the classification test," in which congenitally blind subjects were classified to their families according to the gestalt of movements, results show 80% correct classification over the entire interview and 75% in anger. Analysis of the movements' frequencies in anger revealed a correlation between the movements' frequencies of congenitally blind individuals and those of their relatives. This study anticipates discovering genes that influence facial expressions, understanding their evolutionary significance, and elucidating repair mechanisms for syndromes lacking facial expression, such as autism.

  8. DDIT3 Expression in Liposarcoma Development

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    Christina Kåbjörn Gustafsson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Liposarcomas are mesenchymal tumors containing variable numbers of lipoblasts or adipocytes. The most common entities, well differentiated/dedifferentiated liposarcoma (WDLS/DDLS and myxoid/round cell liposarcoma (MLS/RCLS, are both characterized by genetic rearrangements that affect the expression of the transcription factor DDIT3. DDIT3 induces liposarcoma morphology when ectopically expressed in a human fibrosarcoma. The role of DDIT3 in lipomatous tumors is, however, unclear. We have analyzed the expression of DDIT3 in 37 cases of liposarcoma (WDLS/DDLS n = 10, MLS/RCLS n = 16, and pleomorphic liposarcomas (PLS n = 11 and 11 cases of common benign lipomas. Major cell subpopulations of WDLS/DDLS and MLS/RCLS tumors were found to express DDIT3 or the derived fusion protein, whereas PLS cases showed only a few positive cells. The lipomas contained large subpopulations expressing DDIT3. No correlation between numbers of DDIT3 expressing cells and numbers of lipoblasts/adipocytes was found. In vitro adipogenic treatment of two DDIT3 expressing cell lines induced lipid accumulation in small subpopulations only. Our results suggest a dual, promoting and limiting, role for DDIT3 in the formation of lipoblasts and liposarcoma morphology.

  9. Isoprenaline Induces Periostin Expression in Gastric Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guo-Xiao; Xi, Hong-Qing; Sun, Xiao-Yan; Geng, Zhi-Jun; Yang, Shao-Wei; Lu, Yan-Jie; Wei, Bo; Chen, Lin

    2016-05-01

    Periostin mediates critical steps in gastric cancer and is involved in various signaling pathways. However, the roles of periostin in promoting gastric cancer metastasis are not clear. The aim of this study was to investigate the relevance between periostin expression and gastric cancer progression and the role of stress-related hormones in the regulation of cancer development and progression. Normal, cancerous and metastatic gastric tissues were collected from patients diagnosed with advanced gastric cancer. The in vivo expression of periostin was evaluated by in situ hybridization and immunofluorescent staining. Meanwhile, human gastric adenocarcinoma cell lines MKN-45 and BGC-803 were used to detect the in vitro expression of periostin by using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and western blotting. Periostin is expressed in the stroma of the primary gastric tumors and metastases, but not in normal gastric tissue. In addition, we observed that periostin is located mainly in pericryptal fibroblasts, but not in the tumor cells, and strongly correlated to the expression of α-smooth muscle actin (SMA). Furthermore, the distribution patterns of periostin were broader as the clinical staging of tumors progressed. We also identified a role of stress-related signaling in promoting cancer development and progression, and found that isoprenaline upregulated expression levels of periostin in gastric cancer cells. These findings suggest that the distribution pattern of periostin was broader as the clinical staging of the tumor progressed and found that isoprenaline upregulated expression levels of periostin in gastric cancer cells.

  10. Evolution of gene expression after gene amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Nelson; Zhang, Wei; Wu, Yongrui; Messing, Joachim

    2015-04-24

    We took a rather unique approach to investigate the conservation of gene expression of prolamin storage protein genes across two different subfamilies of the Poaceae. We took advantage of oat plants carrying single maize chromosomes in different cultivars, called oat-maize addition (OMA) lines, which permitted us to determine whether regulation of gene expression was conserved between the two species. We found that γ-zeins are expressed in OMA7.06, which carries maize chromosome 7 even in the absence of the trans-acting maize prolamin-box-binding factor (PBF), which regulates their expression. This is likely because oat PBF can substitute for the function of maize PBF as shown in our transient expression data, using a γ-zein promoter fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP). Despite this conservation, the younger, recently amplified prolamin genes in maize, absent in oat, are not expressed in the corresponding OMAs. However, maize can express the oldest prolamin gene, the wheat high-molecular weight glutenin Dx5 gene, even when maize Pbf is knocked down (through PbfRNAi), and/or another maize transcription factor, Opaque-2 (O2) is knocked out (in maize o2 mutant). Therefore, older genes are conserved in their regulation, whereas younger ones diverged during evolution and eventually acquired a new repertoire of suitable transcriptional activators. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  11. CNPase Expression in Olfactory Ensheathing Cells

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    Christine Radtke

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A large body of work supports the proposal that transplantation of olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs into nerve or spinal cord injuries can promote axonal regeneration and remyelination. Yet, some investigators have questioned whether the transplanted OECs associate with axons and form peripheral myelin, or if they recruit endogenous Schwann cells that form myelin. Olfactory bulbs from transgenic mice expressing the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP under the control of the 2-3-cyclic nucleotide 3-phosphodiesterase (CNPase promoter were studied. CNPase is expressed in myelin-forming cells throughout their lineage. We examined CNPase expression in both in situ in the olfactory bulb and in vitro to determine if OECs express CNPase commensurate with their myelination potential. eGFP was observed in the outer nerve layer of the olfactory bulb. Dissociated OECs maintained in culture had both intense eGFP expression and CNPase immunostaining. Transplantation of OECs into transected peripheral nerve longitudinally associated with the regenerated axons. These data indicate that OECs in the outer nerve layer of the olfactory bulb of CNPase transgenic mice express CNPase. Thus, while OECs do not normally form myelin on olfactory nerve axons, their expression of CNPase is commensurate with their potential to form myelin when transplanted into injured peripheral nerve.

  12. Expression of multidrug resistance proteins in retinoblastoma

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    Swati Shukla

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To elucidate the mechanism of multidrug resistance in retinoblastoma, and to acquire more insights into in vivo drug resistance. METHODS: Three anticancer drug resistant Y79 human RB cells were generated against vincristine, etoposide or carboplatin, which are used for conventional chemotherapy in RB. Primary cultures from enucleated eyes after chemotherapy (PCNC were also prepared. Their chemosensitivity to chemotherapeutic agents (vincristine, etoposide and carboplatin were measured using MTT assay. Western blot analysis was performed to evaluate the expression of p53, Bcl-2 and various multidrug resistant proteins in retinoblastoma cells. RESULTS: Following exposure to chemotherapeutic drugs, PCNC showed less sensitivity to drugs. No significant changes observed in the p53 expression, whereas Bcl-2 expression was found to be increased in the drug resistant cells as well as in PCNC. Increased expression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp was observed in drug resistant Y79 cells; however there was no significant change in the expression of P-gp found between primary cultures of primarily enucleated eyes and PCNC. Multidrug resistance protein 1 (Mrp-1 expression was found to be elevated in the drug resistant Y79 cells as well as in PCNC. No significant change in the expression of lung resistance associated protein (Lrp was observed in the drug resistant Y79 cells as well as in PCNC. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that multidrug resistant proteins are intrinsically present in retinoblastoma which causes treatment failure in managing retinoblastoma with chemotherapy.

  13. Expression of multidrug resistance proteins in retinoblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Swati; Srivastava, Arpna; Kumar, Sunil; Singh, Usha; Goswami, Sandeep; Chawla, Bhavna; Bajaj, Mandeep Singh; Kashyap, Seema; Kaur, Jasbir

    2017-01-01

    To elucidate the mechanism of multidrug resistance in retinoblastoma, and to acquire more insights into in vivo drug resistance. Three anticancer drug resistant Y79 human RB cells were generated against vincristine, etoposide or carboplatin, which are used for conventional chemotherapy in RB. Primary cultures from enucleated eyes after chemotherapy (PCNC) were also prepared. Their chemosensitivity to chemotherapeutic agents (vincristine, etoposide and carboplatin) were measured using MTT assay. Western blot analysis was performed to evaluate the expression of p53, Bcl-2 and various multidrug resistant proteins in retinoblastoma cells. Following exposure to chemotherapeutic drugs, PCNC showed less sensitivity to drugs. No significant changes observed in the p53 expression, whereas Bcl-2 expression was found to be increased in the drug resistant cells as well as in PCNC. Increased expression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) was observed in drug resistant Y79 cells; however there was no significant change in the expression of P-gp found between primary cultures of primarily enucleated eyes and PCNC. Multidrug resistance protein 1 (Mrp-1) expression was found to be elevated in the drug resistant Y79 cells as well as in PCNC. No significant change in the expression of lung resistance associated protein (Lrp) was observed in the drug resistant Y79 cells as well as in PCNC. Our results suggest that multidrug resistant proteins are intrinsically present in retinoblastoma which causes treatment failure in managing retinoblastoma with chemotherapy.

  14. Differential expression of granulopoiesis related genes in neutrophil subsets distinguished by membrane expression of CD177

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Nan; Mora-Jensen, Helena; Theilgaard-Mønch, Kim

    2014-01-01

    quantitative-PCR. CD177 expression on neutrophil precursors in bone marrow was analyzed using quantitative PCR and flowcytometry. RESULTS: The proportion of CD177+ cells increased during neutrophil maturation in bone marrow. Fold change analysis of gene expression profile of sorted CD177+ and CD177......-genes was increased, possibly due to activation. CONCLUSION: The neutrophil population can be distinguished by membrane expression of CD177 into subsets that are different in expression of GP mRNA but not in GP protein production. GP gene expression is also elevated in AAV patients, which is not explained by skewed...

  15. Expression of Hyaluronan in human tumor progression

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    Boregowda Rajeev K

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development and progression of human tumors is accompanied by various cellular, biochemical and genetic alterations. These events include tumor cells interaction with extracellular matrix molecules including hyaluronan (HA. Hyaluronan is a large polysaccharide associated with pericellular matrix of proliferating, migrating cells. Its implication in malignant transformation, tumor progression and with the degree of differentiation in various invasive tumors has well accepted. It has been well known the role HA receptors in tumor growth and metastasis in various cancer tissues. Previously we have observed the unified over expression of Hyaluronic Acid Binding Protein (HABP, H11B2C2 antigen by the tumor cells in various types progressing tumor tissues with different grades. However, the poor understanding of relation between HA and HA-binding protein expression on tumor cells during tumor progression as well as the asymmetric observations of the role of HA expression in tumor progression prompted us to examine the degree of HA expression on tumor cells vs. stroma in various types of human tumors with different grades. Methods In the present study clinically diagnosed tumor tissue samples of different grades were used to screen the histopathological expression of hyaluronan by using b-PG (biotinylated proteoglycan as a probe and we compared the relative HA expression on tumor cells vs. stroma in well differentiated and poorly differentiated tumors. Specificity of the reaction was confirmed either by pre-digesting the tissue sections with hyaluronidase enzyme or by staining the sections with pre-absorbed complex of the probe and HA-oligomers. Results We show here the down regulation of HA expression in tumor cells is associated with progression of tumor from well differentiated through poorly differentiated stage, despite the constant HA expression in the tumor associated stroma. Conclusion The present finding enlighten the

  16. Cyclin D1 expression in prostate carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, R.A.; Ravinal, R.C.; Costa, R.S.; Lima, M.S. [Universidade de São Paulo, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Departamento de Patologia, Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brasil, Departamento de Patologia, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Tucci, S. [Universidade de São Paulo, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Departamento de Cirurgia e Anatomia, Divisão de Urologia, Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brasil, Divisão de Urologia, Departamento de Cirurgia e Anatomia, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Muglia, V.F. [Universidade de São Paulo, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Departamento de Medicina Interna (Centro de Ciência da Imagem), Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brasil, Departamento de Medicina Interna (Centro de Ciência da Imagem), Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Reis, R.B. Dos [Universidade de São Paulo, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Departamento de Cirurgia e Anatomia, Divisão de Urologia, Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brasil, Divisão de Urologia, Departamento de Cirurgia e Anatomia, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Silva, G.E.B. [Universidade de São Paulo, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Departamento de Patologia, Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brasil, Departamento de Patologia, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2014-05-09

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between cyclin D1 expression and clinicopathological parameters in patients with prostate carcinoma. We assessed cyclin D1 expression by conventional immunohistochemistry in 85 patients who underwent radical prostatectomy for prostate carcinoma and 10 normal prostate tissue samples retrieved from autopsies. We measured nuclear immunostaining in the entire tumor area and based the results on the percentage of positive tumor cells. The preoperative prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level was 8.68±5.16 ng/mL (mean±SD). Cyclin D1 staining was positive (cyclin D1 expression in >5% of tumor cells) in 64 cases (75.4%) and negative (cyclin D1 expression in ≤5% of tumor cells) in 21 cases (including 15 cases with no immunostaining). Normal prostate tissues were negative for cyclin D1. Among patients with a high-grade Gleason score (≥7), 86% of patients demonstrated cyclin D1 immunostaining of >5% (P<0.05). In the crude analysis of cyclin D1 expression, the high-grade Gleason score group showed a mean expression of 39.6%, compared to 26.9% in the low-grade Gleason score group (P<0.05). Perineural invasion tended to be associated with cyclin D1 expression (P=0.07), whereas cyclin D1 expression was not associated with PSA levels or other parameters. Our results suggest that high cyclin D1 expression could be a potential marker for tumor aggressiveness.

  17. Effects of Expressive Writing on Psychological and Physical Health: The Moderating Role of Emotional Expressivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haltom, Kate E.; Mulvenna, Catherine M.; Lieberman, Matthew D.; Stanton, Annette L.

    2013-01-01

    The current study assessed main effects and moderators (including emotional expressiveness, emotional processing and ambivalence over emotional expression) of the effects of expressive writing in a sample of healthy adults. Young adult participants (N = 116) were randomly assigned to write for 20 minutes on four occasions about deepest thoughts and feelings regarding their most stressful/traumatic event in the past five years (expressive writing) or about a control topic (control). Dependent variables were indicators of anxiety, depression, and physical symptoms. No significant effects of writing condition were evident on anxiety, depressive symptoms, or physical symptoms. Emotional expressiveness emerged as a significant moderator of anxiety outcomes, however. Within the expressive writing group, participants high in expressiveness evidenced a significant reduction in anxiety at three-month follow-up, and participants low in expressiveness showed a significant increase in anxiety. Expressiveness did not predict change in anxiety in the control group. These findings on anxiety are consistent with the matching hypothesis, which suggests that matching a person’s naturally elected coping approach with an assigned intervention is beneficial. These findings also suggest that expressive writing about a stressful event may be contraindicated for individuals who do not typically express emotions. PMID:23742666

  18. Human Facial Expressions as Adaptations:Evolutionary Questions in Facial Expression Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    SCHMIDT, KAREN L.; COHN, JEFFREY F.

    2007-01-01

    The importance of the face in social interaction and social intelligence is widely recognized in anthropology. Yet the adaptive functions of human facial expression remain largely unknown. An evolutionary model of human facial expression as behavioral adaptation can be constructed, given the current knowledge of the phenotypic variation, ecological contexts, and fitness consequences of facial behavior. Studies of facial expression are available, but results are not typically framed in an evolutionary perspective. This review identifies the relevant physical phenomena of facial expression and integrates the study of this behavior with the anthropological study of communication and sociality in general. Anthropological issues with relevance to the evolutionary study of facial expression include: facial expressions as coordinated, stereotyped behavioral phenotypes, the unique contexts and functions of different facial expressions, the relationship of facial expression to speech, the value of facial expressions as signals, and the relationship of facial expression to social intelligence in humans and in nonhuman primates. Human smiling is used as an example of adaptation, and testable hypotheses concerning the human smile, as well as other expressions, are proposed. PMID:11786989

  19. New Expression for Collisionless Magnetic Reconnection Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimas, Alexander J.

    2014-01-01

    For 2D, symmetric, anti-parallel, collisionless magnetic reconnection, a new expression for the reconnection rate in the electron diffusion region is introduced. It is shown that this expression can be derived in just a few simple steps from a physically intuitive starting point; the derivation is given in its entirety and the validity of each step is confirmed. The predictions of this expression are compared to the results of several long-duration, open-boundary PIC reconnection simulations to demonstrate excellent agreement.

  20. Expression of eukaryotic polypeptides in chloroplasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayfield, Stephen P.

    2013-06-04

    The present invention relates to a gene expression system in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells, preferably plant cells and intact plants. In particular, the invention relates to an expression system having a RB47 binding site upstream of a translation initiation site for regulation of translation mediated by binding of RB47 protein, a member of the poly(A) binding protein family. Regulation is further effected by RB60, a protein disulfide isomerase. The expression system is capable of functioning in the nuclear/cytoplasm of cells and in the chloroplast of plants. Translation regulation of a desired molecule is enhanced approximately 100 fold over that obtained without RB47 binding site activation.

  1. New explicit expressions for Dirac bilinears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorcé, Cédric

    2018-01-01

    We derive new explicit expressions for the Dirac bilinears based on a generic representation of the massive Dirac spinors with canonical polarization. These bilinears depend on a direction n in Minkowski space which specifies the form of dynamics. We argue that such a dependence is unavoidable in a relativistic theory with spin, since it originates from Wigner rotation effects. Contrary to most of the expressions found in the literature, ours are valid for all momenta and canonical polarizations of the spinors. As a byproduct, we also obtain a generic explicit expression for the covariant spin vector.

  2. A Note on the Expressiveness of BIP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduard Baranov

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We extend our previous algebraic formalisation of the notion of component-based framework in order to formally define two forms–strong and weak–of the notion of full expressiveness. Our earlier result shows that the BIP (Behaviour-Interaction-Priority framework does not possess the strong full expressiveness. In this paper, we show that BIP has the weak form of this notion and provide results detailing weak and strong full expressiveness for classical BIP and several modifications, obtained by relaxing the constraints imposed on priority models.

  3. On the sign of a trigonometric expression

    OpenAIRE

    Koseleff, Pierre-Vincent; Rouillier, Fabrice; Tran, Cuong

    2015-01-01

    We propose a set of simple and fast algorithms for evalu-ating and using trigonometric expressions in the form F = d k=0 f k cos k π n , f k ∈ Q, d 0: comput-ing the sign of such an expression, evaluating it numerically and computing its minimal polynomial in Q[x]. As critical byproducts, we propose simple and efficient algorithms for performing arithmetic operations (multiplication, division, gcd) on polynomials expressed in a Chebyshev basis (with the same bit-complexi...

  4. [Construction of eucaryotic expression plasmid carrying the BMP7 gene and expression in mesenchymal stem cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Shu-xun; Sun, Da-ming; Du, Gui-xin; Tong, Yi-gang; Fu, Xiao-bing

    2003-06-01

    To construct an eucaryotic expression plasmid carrying the BMP7 gene and express in MSCs. The BMP7 gene was cloned into the eucaryotic expression vector pcDNA3.1. At the same time, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were isolated and cultured in vitro. The plasmid carrying the BMP7 gene was transfected into MSCs. PCR and digesting demonstrated that the eucaryotic expression plasmid -pcDNA-BMP7 was obtained. RT-PCR and immunohistochemical methods showed that the BMP7 gene was expressed in MSCs. Construction of an eucaryotic expression plasmid carrying BMP7 gene and expression in MSCs provide a sound basis for gene therapy using the BMP7 gene and the ideal seeds for tissue engineering.

  5. Osteopontin expression in salivary gland carcinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørndal, Kristine; Larsen, Stine R; Godballe, Christian

    2011-01-01

    J Oral Pathol Med (2010) Background:  In several cancer types, osteopontin (OPN) expression has been correlated with tumor progression and prognosis. Two earlier studies have examined OPN expression in salivary gland carcinomas with contradictory results. Methods:  One hundred and seventy......-five patients with a primary salivary gland carcinoma diagnosed from January 1, 1990 to December 31, 2005 were identified in the local pathology register, Odense University Hospital. Criteria as documented by Allred et al. were used to assess OPN immunostaining that was performed on surgical specimens. Results......:  Osteopontin was expressed in all salivary gland carcinomas. Adenoid cystic carcinomas had the highest mean sum score (7.3) and a significantly higher proportion of carcinomas with high OPN sum score than both mucoepidermoid carcinoma and acinic cell carcinoma. Correlation of OPN expression with known...

  6. Freedom of Expression, No Matter What?

    OpenAIRE

    Riordan, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Jesuit philosopher Patrick Riordan probes the question of limits to freedom of speech and freedom of expression and the rational foundation on which such freedoms and their possible restriction might be based.

  7. REX XML shallow parsing with regular expressions

    CERN Document Server

    Cameron, R D

    1999-01-01

    The syntax of XML is simple enough that it is possible to parse an XML document into a list of its markup and text items using a single regular expression. Such a shallow parse of an XML document can be very useful for the construction of a variety of lightweight XML processing tools. However, complex regular expressions can be difficult to construct and even more difficult to read. Using a form of literate programming for regular expressions, this paper documents a set of XML shallow parsing expressions that can be used a basis for simple, correct, efficient, robust and language-independent XML shallow parsing. Complete shallow parser implementations of less than 50 lines each in Perl, JavaScript and Lex/Flex are also given. (0 refs).

  8. Regulation of gene expression in human tendinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archambault Joanne M

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic tendon injuries, also known as tendinopathies, are common among professional and recreational athletes. These injuries result in a significant amount of morbidity and health care expenditure, yet little is known about the molecular mechanisms leading to tendinopathy. Methods We have used histological evaluation and molecular profiling to determine gene expression changes in 23 human patients undergoing surgical procedures for the treatment of chronic tendinopathy. Results Diseased tendons exhibit altered extracellular matrix, fiber disorientation, increased cellular content and vasculature, and the absence of inflammatory cells. Global gene expression profiling identified 983 transcripts with significantly different expression patterns in the diseased tendons. Global pathway analysis further suggested altered expression of extracellular matrix proteins and the lack of an appreciable inflammatory response. Conclusions Identification of the pathways and genes that are differentially regulated in tendinopathy samples will contribute to our understanding of the disease and the development of novel therapeutics.

  9. Dynamic modeling of gene expression data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holter, N. S.; Maritan, A.; Cieplak, M.; Fedoroff, N. V.; Banavar, J. R.

    2001-01-01

    We describe the time evolution of gene expression levels by using a time translational matrix to predict future expression levels of genes based on their expression levels at some initial time. We deduce the time translational matrix for previously published DNA microarray gene expression data sets by modeling them within a linear framework by using the characteristic modes obtained by singular value decomposition. The resulting time translation matrix provides a measure of the relationships among the modes and governs their time evolution. We show that a truncated matrix linking just a few modes is a good approximation of the full time translation matrix. This finding suggests that the number of essential connections among the genes is small.

  10. Expression and subcellular localization of antiporter regulating ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Expression and subcellular localization of antiporter regulating protein OsARP in rice induced by submergence, salt and drought stresses. Md Imtiaz Uddin, Maki Kihara, Lina Yin, Mst Farida Perveen, Kiyoshi Tanaka ...

  11. Gearbox gene expression and growth rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldea, M; Garrido, T; Tormo, A

    1993-07-01

    Regulation of gene expression in prokaryotic cells usually takes place at the level of transcription initiation. Different forms of RNA polymerase recognizing specific promoters are engaged in the control of many prokaryotic regulons. This also seems to be the case for some Escherichia coli genes that are induced at low growth rates and by nutrient starvation. Their gene products are synthesized at levels inversely proportional to growth rate, and this mode of regulation has been termed gearbox gene expression. This kind of growth-rate modulation is exerted by specific transcriptional initiation signals, the gearbox promoters, and some of them depend on a putative new σ factor (RpoS). Gearbox promoters drive expression of morphogenetic and cell division genes at constant levels per cell and cycle to meet the demands of cell division and septum formation. A mechanism is proposed that could sense the growth rate of the cell to alter gene expression by the action of specific σ factors.

  12. Mindfulness as a moderator in expressive writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Alvin; Danoff-Burg, Sharon

    2011-09-01

    Randomized, controlled studies have documented positive physical and psychological effects of writing about traumatic stress. Some of these studies have shown that individual differences play an important role, with participants responding differently to the intervention based on their personal characteristics. In the present expressive writing experiment, the trait of mindfulness was examined as a potential moderator. Seventy-six undergraduates were randomly assigned to either expressive writing (n = 37) or a control group (n = 39). Main effects favoring expressive writing were found, and these were qualified by significant interactions with mindfulness. Specifically, individuals with higher mindfulness scores responded better to expressive writing, experiencing greater physical and psychological benefits than individuals with lower mindfulness scores. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Epigenetic regulation of monoallelic gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiba, Hiroshi; Takayama, Seiji

    2012-01-01

    Monoallelic expression from biallelic genes is frequently observed in diploid eukaryotic organisms. Classic examples of this phenomenon include the well-characterized cases of genomic imprinting and X-chromosome inactivation. However, recent studies have shown that monoallelic expression is widespread in autosomal genes. This discovery was met with great interest because it represents another mechanism to generate diversity in gene expression that can affect cell fate and physiology. To date, the molecular mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are largely unknown. In our original study describing the dominant ⁄ recessive relationships of pollen- determinant alleles in Brassica self-incompatibility, we found that the recessive allele was specifically methylated and silenced through the action of small RNA derived from the dominant allele. In this review, we focus on recent studies of monoallelic expression in autosomal genes, and discuss the possible mechanisms driving this form of monoallelic gene suppression.

  14. An atlas of Caenorhabditis elegans chemoreceptor expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Berta; Aghayeva, Ulkar; Sun, Haosheng; Wang, Chen; Glenwinkel, Lori; Bayer, Emily A.

    2018-01-01

    One goal of modern day neuroscience is the establishment of molecular maps that assign unique features to individual neuron types. Such maps provide important starting points for neuron classification, for functional analysis, and for developmental studies aimed at defining the molecular mechanisms of neuron identity acquisition and neuron identity diversification. In this resource paper, we describe a nervous system-wide map of the potential expression sites of 244 members of the largest gene family in the C. elegans genome, rhodopsin-like (class A) G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) chemoreceptors, using classic gfp reporter gene technology. We cover representatives of all sequence families of chemoreceptor GPCRs, some of which were previously entirely uncharacterized. Most reporters are expressed in a very restricted number of cells, often just in single cells. We assign GPCR reporter expression to all but two of the 37 sensory neuron classes of the sex-shared, core nervous system. Some sensory neurons express a very small number of receptors, while others, particularly nociceptive neurons, coexpress several dozen GPCR reporter genes. GPCR reporters are also expressed in a wide range of inter- and motorneurons, as well as non-neuronal cells, suggesting that GPCRs may constitute receptors not just for environmental signals, but also for internal cues. We observe only one notable, frequent association of coexpression patterns, namely in one nociceptive amphid (ASH) and two nociceptive phasmid sensory neurons (PHA, PHB). We identified GPCRs with sexually dimorphic expression and several GPCR reporters that are expressed in a left/right asymmetric manner. We identified a substantial degree of GPCR expression plasticity; particularly in the context of the environmentally-induced dauer diapause stage when one third of all tested GPCRs alter the cellular specificity of their expression within and outside the nervous system. Intriguingly, in a number of cases, the dauer

  15. Oxygen tension affects lubricin expression in chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatta, Taku; Kishimoto, Koshi N; Okuno, Hiroshi; Itoi, Eiji

    2014-10-01

    We assessed the effects of oxygen tension on lubricin expression in bovine chondrocytes and cartilage explants and a role for hypoxia-inducible transcription factor (HIF)-1α in regulating lubricin expression was investigated using a murine chondroprogenitor cell line, ATDC5, and bovine chondrocytes isolated from superficial and middle/deep zones of femoral cartilage. ATDC5 cells and bovine chondrocytes were cultured in micromass under different oxygen tensions (21%, 5%, and 1%). ATDC5 cells and middle/deep zone chondrocytes that initially had low lubricin expression levels were also cultured with or without transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1. Quantitative reverse transcription (RT)-PCR was used to determine lubricin and chondrogenic marker gene mRNA levels and immunohistochemistry was used to assess lubricin protein expression. Explant cartilage plugs cultured under different oxygen tensions were also subjected to immunohistological analysis for lubricin. HIF-1α gene silencing was achieved by electroporatic transfer into ATDC5 cells. A low oxygen tension reduced lubricin gene expression levels in bovine superficial chondrocytes, TGF-β1-treated middle/deep zone chondrocytes, and TGF-β1-treated ATDC5 cells. Lubricin expression in explant cartilage was also suppressed under hypoxia. HIF-1α gene silencing in ATDC5 cells attenuated the lubricin expression response to the oxygen tension. These results corroborate with previous studies that the oxygen tension regulates lubricin gene expression and suggest that HIF-1α plays an important role in this regulation. The normal distribution of lubricin in articular cartilage may be due to the hypoxic oxygen environment of cartilage as it is an avascular tissue. An oxygen tension gradient may be a key factor for engineering cartilage tissue with a layered morphology.

  16. Fast and compact regular expression matching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Farach-Colton, Martin

    2008-01-01

    We study 4 problems in string matching, namely, regular expression matching, approximate regular expression matching, string edit distance, and subsequence indexing, on a standard word RAM model of computation that allows logarithmic-sized words to be manipulated in constant time. We show how to ...... to improve the space and/or remove a dependency on the alphabet size for each problem using either an improved tabulation technique of an existing algorithm or by combining known algorithms in a new way....

  17. Methylomics of gene expression in human monocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yongmei; Ding, Jingzhong; Reynolds, Lindsay M.; Lohman, Kurt; Register, Thomas C.; De La Fuente, Alberto; Howard, Timothy D.; Hawkins, Greg A.; Cui, Wei; Morris, Jessica; Smith, Shelly G.; Barr, R. Graham; Kaufman, Joel D.; Burke, Gregory L.; Post, Wendy; Shea, Steven; Mccall, Charles E.; Siscovick, David; Jacobs, David R.; Tracy, Russell P.; Herrington, David M.; Hoeschele, Ina

    2013-01-01

    DNA methylation is one of several epigenetic mechanisms that contribute to the regulation of gene expression; however, the extent to which methylation of CpG dinucleotides correlates with gene expression at the genome-wide level is still largely unknown. Using purified primary monocytes from subjects in a large community-based cohort (n = 1264), we characterized methylation (>485 000 CpG sites) and mRNA expression (>48K transcripts) and carried out genome-wide association analyses of 8370 expression phenotypes. We identified 11 203 potential cis-acting CpG loci whose degree of methylation was associated with gene expression (eMS) at a false discovery rate threshold of 0.001. Most of the associations were consistent in effect size and direction of effect across sex and three ethnicities. Contrary to expectation, these eMS were not predominately enriched in promoter regions, or CpG islands, but rather in the 3′ UTR, gene bodies, CpG shores or ‘offshore’ sites, and both positive and negative correlations between methylation and expression were observed across all locations. eMS were enriched for regions predicted to be regulatory by ENCODE (Encyclopedia of DNA Elements) data in multiple cell types, particularly enhancers. One of the strongest association signals detected (P < 2.2 × 10−308) was a methylation probe (cg17005068) in the promoter/enhancer region of the glutathione S-transferase theta 1 gene (GSTT1, encoding the detoxification enzyme) with GSTT1 mRNA expression. Our study provides a detailed description of the epigenetic architecture in human monocytes and its relationship to gene expression. These data may help prioritize interrogation of biologically relevant methylation loci and provide new insights into the epigenetic basis of human health and diseases. PMID:23900078

  18. Allele-specific gene expression in carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. M. Krivtsova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent large-scale genomic studies established the occurrence of multiple DNA sequence variants in genomes of healthy individuals that differ from the reference sequence. Among these variants mostly represented by germline single nucleotide polymorphisms disease-related alleles are detected including alleles which are associated with monogenic disorders, and putative deleterious genetic variants. Apart from functional significance of a particular variant and of a gene harboring it, the penetrance of these allelic variants depends on their expression level and can be determined by preferential expression of a particular allele, or allele-specific expression. It is estimated that 20–30 % of genes present in the human genome display allelic bias in a tissue-specific manner. Allele-specific expression is defined by a range of genetic and epigenetic mechanisms including cis-regulatory polymorphisms, allele-specific binding of transcription factors, allele-specific DNA methylation and regulation through non-coding RNA.Although the data on the issue are scarce, allele-specific expression has been reported to be implicated in several hereditary disorders including benign and malignant tumors of the large intestine. Recent studies that estimate allele-specific expression incidence in tumors and identify wide range of genes displaying allelic imbalance indicate that allele-specific expression might play a significant role in carcinogenesis. Eventually, estimation of transcriptional rate of allelic variants which cause dysfunction of oncogenes and tumor suppressors may prove to be essential for rational choice of antitumor therapeutic strategy. In this review, we outline the main concepts and mechanisms of allele-specific expression and the data on allelic imbalance in tumors.

  19. Digital gene expression signatures for maize development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eveland, Andrea L; Satoh-Nagasawa, Namiko; Goldshmidt, Alexander; Meyer, Sandra; Beatty, Mary; Sakai, Hajime; Ware, Doreen; Jackson, David

    2010-11-01

    Genome-wide expression signatures detect specific perturbations in developmental programs and contribute to functional resolution of key regulatory networks. In maize (Zea mays) inflorescences, mutations in the RAMOSA (RA) genes affect the determinacy of axillary meristems and thus alter branching patterns, an important agronomic trait. In this work, we developed and tested a framework for analysis of tag-based, digital gene expression profiles using Illumina's high-throughput sequencing technology and the newly assembled B73 maize reference genome. We also used a mutation in the RA3 gene to identify putative expression signatures specific to stem cell fate in axillary meristem determinacy. The RA3 gene encodes a trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase and may act at the interface between developmental and metabolic processes. Deep sequencing of digital gene expression libraries, representing three biological replicate ear samples from wild-type and ra3 plants, generated 27 million 20- to 21-nucleotide reads with frequencies spanning 4 orders of magnitude. Unique sequence tags were anchored to 3'-ends of individual transcripts by DpnII and NlaIII digests, which were multiplexed during sequencing. We mapped 86% of nonredundant signature tags to the maize genome, which associated with 37,117 gene models and unannotated regions of expression. In total, 66% of genes were detected by at least nine reads in immature maize ears. We used comparative genomics to leverage existing information from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and rice (Oryza sativa) in functional analyses of differentially expressed maize genes. Results from this study provide a basis for the analysis of short-read expression data in maize and resolved specific expression signatures that will help define mechanisms of action for the RA3 gene.

  20. On written expression of primary school pupils

    OpenAIRE

    Stevanović Jelena; Maksić Slavica; Tenjović Lazar

    2009-01-01

    Normative rules of standard Serbian language are acquired during primary and secondary education through curriculum demands of Serbian language instruction, which takes place in three fields: grammar, orthography and culture of expression. Topic of interest in this paper is the quality of written expression of 6th and 7th grade pupils, in the context of all three fields specified to be mastered by the curriculum of Serbian language. Research comprised 148 primary school pupils from Belgrade. ...