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Sample records for exposure-based return-to-work programme

  1. Experiences of participating in return-to-work group programmes for people with musculoskeletal disorders: A focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamnes, Bente; Rønningen, Aud; Skarbø, Åse

    2017-09-01

    The present study aimed to explore the experiences of individuals with musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) who had participated in return-to-work group programmes (RTW-GPs) and to assess whether the programmes had had an impact on their work disability. Three focus group interviews and one individual interview were conducted involving 17 women (mean age = 47) with MSDs who had completed RTW-GPs. All interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed using thematic analyses. Participant experiences were categorised into three main themes: changed way of thinking, the importance of being able to work, and a changed lifestyle. The respondents said that participation in the RTW-GPs had enabled them to shift their focus from problems to opportunities. They had become more aware of strategies to enhance their energy levels and continue working. Several participants had reduced their work hours to achieve a better balance between work and daily life. Many participants had also changed their lifestyle habits, which had led to weight reduction, more energy and less pain. The study participants had attained a heightened awareness of what they could do to continue working. Many participants had introduced changes in their daily lives, with consequences for employment, social life and lifestyle. The findings suggest that RTW-GPs can help people with MSDs to remain in employment and prevent absenteeism. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Efficacy of Tailored Physical Activity or Chronic Pain Self-Management Programme on return to work for sick-listed citizens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lotte Nygaard; Juul-Kristensen, Birgit; Sørensen, Thomas Lund

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim was to evaluate the efficacy of 'Tailored Physical Activity' (TPA) and a 'Chronic Pain Self-management Programme' (CPSMP) compared with a reference group (REF) on return to work after 3 months as sick-listed citizens with pain related to the back or the upper body. METHODS....... In contrast, no benefit of TPA and CPSMP was evident regarding work ability, kinesiophobia or physical capacity after 3 months of follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that TPA is a promising intervention to facilitate return to work and reduce pain among sick-listed citizens with pain related...

  3. The challenges that employees who abuse substances experience when returning to work after completion of employee assistance programme (EAP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soeker, Shaheed; Matimba, Tandokazi; Machingura, Last; Msimango, Henry; Moswaane, Bobo; Tom, Sinazo

    2015-01-01

    Employee assistance programs (EAPs) are responsible for helping employees cope with problems such as: mental distress, alcoholism and other drug dependencies, marital and financial difficulties--in short, the whole host of personal and family troubles endemic to the human condition. The study explored the challenges that employees who abuse substances experience when returning to work after the completion of an employee assistance program. The study used a qualitative exploratory descriptive research design. Three male participants and two key informants participated in the study. One semi structured interview was conducted with each one of the participants and one semi structured interview with the key informants. Four themes emerged: 1) Loss of one's worker role identity, 2) Negative influences of the community continues to effect the success of EAP, 3) EAP as a vehicle for change and, 4) Healthy occupations strengthen EAP. This study portrayed the following: how substance abuse effect the worker role of individuals employed in the open labor market, the challenges and facilitators experienced by employees who abuse substances when returning to their previous work roles and how occupation based interventions can be incorporated in EAP programs. Occupational therapists could use the health promotion approach, work simplification, energy conservation techniques and ergonomic analysis techniques.

  4. Efficacy of Tailored Physical Activity or Chronic Pain Self-Management Programme on return to work for sick-listed citizens: A 3-month randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Lotte Nygaard; Juul-Kristensen, Birgit; Sørensen, Thomas Lund; Herborg, Lene Gram; Roessler, Kirsten Kaya; Søgaard, Karen

    2015-11-01

    The aim was to evaluate the efficacy of 'Tailored Physical Activity' (TPA) and a 'Chronic Pain Self-management Programme' (CPSMP) compared with a reference group (REF) on return to work after 3 months as sick-listed citizens with pain related to the back or the upper body. Using a randomised controlled trial design all participants (n= 141) received health guidance for 1.5 hours and were randomised to TPA, CPSMP or REF. Characteristics of participants were collected from a questionnaire. The primary endpoint was proportion of participants returned to work as registered by the municipality and the co-primary endpoint was duration of the sickness absence period. Secondary outcomes consisted of pain, body mass index, aerobic capacity, grip strength, work ability and kinesiophobia. The trial was conducted in Sonderborg Municipality from March 2011 to October 2013. TPA was more effective on return to work than REF, while CPSMP only tended to be more effective than REF, and the primary outcome was the only between-groups significant difference. TPA participants also reached a highly significant reduction in pain from baseline to follow-up with no similar effect seen in CPSMP or REF. In contrast, no benefit of TPA and CPSMP was evident regarding work ability, kinesiophobia or physical capacity after 3 months of follow-up. The results suggest that TPA is a promising intervention to facilitate return to work and reduce pain among sick-listed citizens with pain related to the back or upper body compared to REF. © 2015 the Nordic Societies of Public Health.

  5. Measuring return to work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasiak, Radoslaw; Young, Amanda E; Roessler, Richard T; McPherson, Kathryn M; van Poppel, Mireille N M; Anema, Johannes R

    2007-12-01

    It is argued that one of the factors limiting the understanding of return to work (RTW) following work disability is the use of measurement tools that do not capture a complete picture of workers' RTW experiences. To facilitate the investigation of RTW, the current authors proposed a developmental conceptualization of RTW, which argues for an expanded awareness that encompasses four phases: off work, work reintegration, work maintenance and advancement. This paper reports on work undertaken with the aim of operationalizing the conceptualization. A review of the RTW and related literature, with databases searched including PubMed, EconLit, and PsycInfo. We began by extracting details of RTW instruments used by previous researchers. We then interpreted these within the context of the phases of RTW. Using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) to inform our thinking and coding structure, we conceptualized phase-based RTW outcomes and categorized them as 'tasks and actions', 'contextual' or 'process driven'. Iteratively, we reviewed existing instruments for their use as measures of RTW. Where gaps in instrumentation were found, the wider vocational and career assessment literature was searched for instruments that could be adapted for use in RTW research. Results indicate that, although numerous research instruments have been used to assess RTW, within the scientific literature some important dimensions of RTW lack instrumentation. In particular, we found that outcomes such as goal setting, motivation, expectation, job seeking, work maintenance, and career advancement require operationalization. Amongst the outcomes had been operationalized, we found considerable variation in conceptual development and application. The lack of consistency and comprehensiveness of RTW measurement is one of the factors compromising the advancement of the field of RTW research. It is suggested that a more complete and psychometrically sound array of

  6. Do psychological job demands, decision control and social support predictreturn to work three months after a return-to-work (RTW) programme? The rapid-RTW cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haveraaen, Lise A; Skarpaas, Lisebet S; Berg, John E; Aas, Randi W

    2015-01-01

    Long-term sickness absence is a considerable health and economic problem in the industrialised world. Factors that might predict return to work (RTW) are therefore of interest. To examine the impact of psychosocial work characteristics on RTW three months after the end of a RTW programme. A cohort study of 251 sick-listed employees from 40 different treatment and rehabilitation services in Norway recruited from February to December 2012. The Job Content Questionnaire was used to gather information on the psychosocial work conditions. Full or partial RTW was measured three months after the end of the RTW programme, using data from the national sickness absence register. Logistic regression analyses were performed to investigate the association between the psychosocial work characteristics and RTW. Having low psychological job demands (OR = 0.4, 95% CI: 0.2-0.9), high co-worker- (OR = 3.4, 95% CI: 1.5-5.8), and supervisor support (OR = 3.4, 95% CI: 1.6-7.3), and being in a low-strain job (low job demands and high control) (OR = 4.6, 95% CI: 1.1-18.6) were predictive of being in work three months after the end of the RTW programme, after adjusting for several potential prognostic factors. Interventions aimed at returning people to work might benefit from putting more emphasise on psychosocial work characteristics in the future.

  7. Longer term follow-up on effects of Tailored Physical Activity or Chronic Pain Self-Management Programme on return-to-work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lotte Nygaard; Juul-Kristensen, Birgit; Sørensen, Thomas Lund

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the longer term efficacy of the interventions Tailored Physical Activity (TPA) and Chronic Pain Self-management Program (CPSMP) against a reference group on return-to-work for sick-listed subjects with pain in the back or upper body. DESIGN: A randomized controlled trial...... the reference group as regards return-to-work. Compared with the reference group no other benefits of TPA and CPSMP were evident regarding pain, work ability, kinesiophobia or physical capacity. CONCLUSION: After 11 months TPA, the reference group, and CPSMP show similar patterns of facilitating return-to-work...... to work and the co-primary end-point was the duration of the sickness absence period retrieved 11 months after the first day on sick leave. Secondary outcomes were pain level, body mass index, aerobic capacity, work ability and kinesiophobia. RESULTS: TPA and CPSMP were no more effective than...

  8. Return to work after lower limb amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Helena; Marincek, Crt

    2007-09-15

    To review the literature on return to work after lower limb amputation. A comprehensive review of literature on return to work after lower limb amputation was carried out, searching MEDLINE and PubMED. Most authors found return-to-work rate to be about 66%. Between 22 and 67% of the subjects retained the same occupation, while the remainder had to change occupation. Post-amputation jobs were generally more complex with a requirement for a higher level of general educational development and were physically less demanding. The return to work depends on: general factors, such as age, gender and educational level; factors related to impairments and disabilities due to amputation (amputation level, multiple amputations, comorbidity, reason for amputation, persistent stump problems, the time from the injury to obtaining a permanent prosthesis, wearing comfort of the prosthesis, walking distance and restrictions in mobility); and factors related to work and policies (salary, higher job involvement, good support from the implementing body and the employer and social support network). Subjects have problems returning to work after lower limb amputation. Many have to change their work and/or work only part-time. Vocational rehabilitation and counselling should become a part of rehabilitation programme for all subjects who are of working age after lower limb amputation. Better cooperation between professionals, such as rehabilitation team members, implementing bodies, company doctors and the employers, is necessary.

  9. Effect of a multidisciplinary stress treatment programme on the return to work rate for persons with work-related stress. A non-randomized controlled study from a stress clinic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Netterstrøm, Bo; Bech, Per

    2010-01-01

    and after four months. A specialist in occupational medicine carried out all sessions.Return To Work (RTW), defined as having a job and not being on sick leave at the census, was used as outcome measure four months after baseline, and after one and two years. RESULTS: The level of sick leave in the stress......ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: In recent years an increasing number of patients have been referred to the medical sector with stress symptoms. Moreover, these conditions imply increased sickness absence. This indicates a need for treatment programmes in general medical practice. The aim of this study...... was to test the effect of a multidisciplinary stress treatment programme on the return to work (RTW) rate in persons with work-related stress and establish predictive factors for this outcome. METHODS: During a two-year period 63 out of 73 referrals to the Stress Clinic (a section of a Clinic of Occupational...

  10. Effect of a multidisciplinary stress treatment programme on the return to work rate for persons with work-related stress. A non-randomized controlled study from a stress clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bech Per

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent years an increasing number of patients have been referred to the medical sector with stress symptoms. Moreover, these conditions imply increased sickness absence. This indicates a need for treatment programmes in general medical practice. The aim of this study was to test the effect of a multidisciplinary stress treatment programme on the return to work (RTW rate in persons with work-related stress and establish predictive factors for this outcome. Methods During a two-year period 63 out of 73 referrals to the Stress Clinic (a section of a Clinic of Occupational Medicine completed a stress treatment programme consisted of the following: 1 Identification of relevant stressors. 2. Changing the coping strategies of the participants. 3. Evaluating/changes in participant workload and tasks. 4. Relaxation techniques. 5. Physical exercise. 6. Psychiatric evaluation when indicated by depression test score. On average each patient attended six one-hour sessions over the course of four months. A group of 34 employees referred to the Clinic of Occupational Medicine by their general practitioners served as a control group. Each participant had a one-hour consultation at baseline and after four months. A specialist in occupational medicine carried out all sessions. Return To Work (RTW, defined as having a job and not being on sick leave at the census, was used as outcome measure four months after baseline, and after one and two years. Results The level of sick leave in the stress treatment group dropped from 52% to 16% during the first four months of follow-up and remained stable. In the control group, the reduction in sick leave was significantly smaller, ranging from 48% at baseline to 27% after four months and 24% after one year. No statistically significant difference between the two groups was observed after one and two years. Age below 50 years and being a manager increased the odds ratio for RTW after one and two years

  11. Effect of a multidisciplinary stress treatment programme on the return to work rate for persons with work-related stress. A non-randomized controlled study from a stress clinic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Netterstrøm, Bo; Bech, Per

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: In recent years an increasing number of patients have been referred to the medical sector with stress symptoms. Moreover, these conditions imply increased sickness absence. This indicates a need for treatment programmes in general medical practice. The aim of this study...... treatment group dropped from 52% to 16% during the first four months of follow-up and remained stable. In the control group, the reduction in sick leave was significantly smaller, ranging from 48% at baseline to 27% after four months and 24% after one year. No statistically significant difference between...... was to test the effect of a multidisciplinary stress treatment programme on the return to work (RTW) rate in persons with work-related stress and establish predictive factors for this outcome. METHODS: During a two-year period 63 out of 73 referrals to the Stress Clinic (a section of a Clinic of Occupational...

  12. Effect of a multidisciplinary stress treatment programme on the return to work rate for persons with work-related stress. A non-randomized controlled study from a stress clinic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Netterstrøm, Bo; Bech, Per

    2010-01-01

    treatment group dropped from 52% to 16% during the first four months of follow-up and remained stable. In the control group, the reduction in sick leave was significantly smaller, ranging from 48% at baseline to 27% after four months and 24% after one year. No statistically significant difference between......ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: In recent years an increasing number of patients have been referred to the medical sector with stress symptoms. Moreover, these conditions imply increased sickness absence. This indicates a need for treatment programmes in general medical practice. The aim of this study...... was to test the effect of a multidisciplinary stress treatment programme on the return to work (RTW) rate in persons with work-related stress and establish predictive factors for this outcome. METHODS: During a two-year period 63 out of 73 referrals to the Stress Clinic (a section of a Clinic of Occupational...

  13. Five-year follow-up of persons with brain injury entering the French vocational and social rehabilitation programme UEROS: Return-to-work, life satisfaction, psychosocial and community integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogné, M; Wiart, L; Simion, A; Dehail, P; Mazaux, J-M

    2017-01-01

    Social and vocational reintegration of persons with brain injury is an important element in their rehabilitation. To evaluate the 5-year outcome of persons with brain injury included in 2008 in the Aquitaine Unit for Evaluation, Training and Social and Vocational Counselling programme (UEROS). 57 persons with brain injury were recruited from those who completed the 2008 UEROS programme. Five years later, an interview was done to assess family and vocational status, autonomy and life satisfaction. These results were compared with those from persons completing the 1997-1999 programme. The typical person entered the 2008 UEROS programme 6 years after a severe brain injury (42%) and was male, single and 35 years. At the 5-year follow-up, more persons lived with a partner (+23%) and lived in their own home (+21%). 47% were working vs 11% on entering the programme. Approximately half were satisfied or very satisfied with their quality of life. Having a job in 2013 was associated with a high education level, less cognitive sequelae, having a job in 2008 and no health condition. The UEROS programme is effective with regard to return-to-work and improvement of autonomy in persons with brain injury, irrespective of length of time from injury.

  14. Protocol for a mixed-methods longitudinal study to identify factors influencing return to work in the over 50s participating in the UK Work Programme: Supporting Older People into Employment (SOPIE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Judith; Neary, Joanne; Katikireddi, Srinivasa Vittal; Thomson, Hilary; McQuaid, Ronald W; Leyland, Alastair H; Frank, John; Jeavons, Luke; de Pellette, Paul; Kiran, Sibel; Macdonald, Ewan B

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Increasing employment among older workers is a policy priority given the increase in life expectancy and the drop in labour force participation after the age of 50. Reasons for this drop are complex but include poor health, age discrimination, inadequate skills/qualifications and caring roles; however, limited evidence exists on how best to support this group back to work. The Work Programme is the UK Government's flagship policy to facilitate return to work (RTW) among those at risk of long-term unemployment. ‘Supporting Older People Into Employment’ (SOPIE) is a mixed-methods longitudinal study involving a collaboration between academics and a major Work Programme provider (Ingeus). The study will investigate the relationship between health, worklessness and the RTW process for the over 50s. Methods and analysis There are three main study components. Embedded fieldwork will document the data routinely collected by Ingeus and the key interventions/activities delivered. The quantitative study investigates approximately 14 000 individuals (aged 16–64 years, with 20% aged over 50) who entered the Ingeus Work Programme (referred to as ‘clients’) in a 16-month period in Scotland and were followed up for 2 years. Employment outcomes (including progression towards work) and how they differ by client characteristics (including health), intervention components received and external factors will be investigated. The qualitative component will explore the experiences of clients and Ingeus staff, to better understand the interactions between health and (un)employment, Work Programme delivery, and how employment services can be better tailored to the needs of the over 50s. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval was received from the University of Glasgow College of Social Sciences Research Ethics Committee (application number 400140186). Results Results will be disseminated through journal articles, national and international conferences

  15. Interventions to enhance return-to-work for cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Angela G. E. M.; Taskila, Tyna K.; Tamminga, Sietske J.; Feuerstein, Michael; Frings-Dresen, Monique H. W.; Verbeek, Jos H.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer patients are 1.4 times more likely to be unemployed than healthy people. Therefore it is important to provide cancer patients with programmes to support the return-to-work (RTW) process. This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 2011. To evaluate the effectiveness of

  16. Protocol for a mixed-methods longitudinal study to identify factors influencing return to work in the over 50s participating in the UK Work Programme: Supporting Older People into Employment (SOPIE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Judith; Neary, Joanne; Katikireddi, Srinivasa Vittal; Thomson, Hilary; McQuaid, Ronald W; Leyland, Alastair H; Frank, John; Jeavons, Luke; de Pellette, Paul; Kiran, Sibel; Macdonald, Ewan B

    2015-12-16

    Increasing employment among older workers is a policy priority given the increase in life expectancy and the drop in labour force participation after the age of 50. Reasons for this drop are complex but include poor health, age discrimination, inadequate skills/qualifications and caring roles; however, limited evidence exists on how best to support this group back to work. The Work Programme is the UK Government's flagship policy to facilitate return to work (RTW) among those at risk of long-term unemployment. 'Supporting Older People Into Employment' (SOPIE) is a mixed-methods longitudinal study involving a collaboration between academics and a major Work Programme provider (Ingeus). The study will investigate the relationship between health, worklessness and the RTW process for the over 50s. There are three main study components. Embedded fieldwork will document the data routinely collected by Ingeus and the key interventions/activities delivered. The quantitative study investigates approximately 14,000 individuals (aged 16-64 years, with 20% aged over 50) who entered the Ingeus Work Programme (referred to as 'clients') in a 16-month period in Scotland and were followed up for 2 years. Employment outcomes (including progression towards work) and how they differ by client characteristics (including health), intervention components received and external factors will be investigated. The qualitative component will explore the experiences of clients and Ingeus staff, to better understand the interactions between health and (un)employment, Work Programme delivery, and how employment services can be better tailored to the needs of the over 50s. Ethical approval was received from the University of Glasgow College of Social Sciences Research Ethics Committee (application number 400140186). Results will be disseminated through journal articles, national and international conferences. Findings will inform current and future welfare-to-work and job retention initiatives to

  17. Return to work: Police personnel and PTSD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plat, Marie-Christine J.; Westerveld, Gre J.; Hutter, Renée C.; Olff, Miranda; Frings-Dresen, Monique H. W.; Sluiter, Judith K.

    2013-01-01

    This study i) describes the number of police personnel with PTSD who are working and those who are on sick leave before and after an out-patient-clinic treatment program and ii) examines which factors are related to return to work. Police personnel treated for PTSD (n=121). In this retrospective

  18. [Psychiatric Inpatient Treatment and Return to Work].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mernyi, Lena; Hölzle, Patricia; Hamann, Johannes

    2017-05-12

    Objective People with mental diseases have a high risk of unemployment and they have only limited access to the labor market. The return to work is often associated with fears.The present study aims to provide an overview of the number of hospitalized psychiatric patients with permanent employment. Moreover it should give an insight into the process of return to work, the experiences patients gain and the support they receive. Methods In the participating clinics we measured the number of patients with permanent employment. The main inclusion criteria for further survey were the status of permanent employment and age between 18 and 65. The participating patients were interviewed on two occasions, at the time of inclusion and 3 months after the patient was discharged. The questions addressed working conditions, job satisfaction and the process of return-to-work. For statistical analysis, descriptive statistics (frequencies, means, standard deviations) were used. Results Only 21 % of n = 815 inpatients of the participating hospitals were permanently employed. Many patients did not return to work after being discharged. In many cases the interviewed patients saw a connection between their job and their current episode of illness. In this context patients reported unsatisfying workplace conditions such as long working hours, bad work organization and social conflicts. Conclusions For mentally ill patients, the employment rate in the primary labor market is devastating low. After psychiatric inpatient treatment patients are at high risk to lose their jobs. In order to prevent this development, work-related stress factors should be discussed with inpatients at an early stage and support should be provided during the return-to-work-process. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. Returning to Work After Electrical Injuries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stergiou-Kita, M.; Mansfield, E.; Bayley, M.

    2014-01-01

    were conducted with individuals who experienced an electrical injury at the workplace. Participants were recruited from specialized burns rehabilitation programs in Ontario, Canada. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and thematic analysis used to analyze the qualitative interviews. Data regarding......, and responsibility for the injury; and 3) having to return to the workplace or worksite where the injury took place. The most beneficial supports identified by the injured workers included: 1) support from family, friends, and coworkers; and 2) the receipt of rehabilitation services specialized in electrical injury...... injuries to advocate on their behalf. Immediate and persistent physical, cognitive, psychosocial, and support factors can affect individuals' abilities to successfully return to work after an electrical injury. Specialized services and advocacy were viewed as beneficial to successful return to work....

  20. Predicting non-return to work in patients attending cardiac rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samkange-Zeeb, Florence; Altenhöner, Thomas; Berg, Gabriele

    2006-01-01

    programme which can be integrated into existing rehabilitation programmes, we developed a screening instrument for the identification of persons at risk of not returning to work at the onset of the rehabilitation process. More than 65% of the participants who had not returned to work 6 and 12 months...

  1. Do expectancies of return to work and Job satisfaction predict actual return to work in workers with long lasting LBP?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opsahl, Jon; Eriksen, Hege R; Tveito, Torill H

    2016-11-17

    Musculoskeletal disorders including low back pain have major individual and socioeconomic consequences as it often leads to disability and long-term sick leave and exclusion from working life. Predictors of disability and return to work often differ, and the dominant knowledge is on predictors for prolonged sick leave and disability. Therefore it is also important to identify key predictors for return to work. The aim of the study was to assess if overall job satisfaction and expectancies of return to work predicts actual return to work after 12 months, among employees with long lasting low back pain, and to assess if there were gender differences in the predictors. Data from the Cognitive interventions and nutritional supplements trial (CINS Trial) was used. Predictors for return to work were examined in 574 employees that had been on sick leave 2-10 months for low back pain, before entering the trial. Data were analysed with multiple logistic regression models stratified by gender, and adjusted for potential confounders. Regardless of gender high expectancies were a strong and significant predictor of return to work at 12 months, while high levels of job satisfaction were not a significant predictor. There were no differences in the levels of expectancies or overall job satisfaction between men and women. However, men had in general higher odds of returning to work compared with women. Among individuals with long lasting low back pain high expectancies of returning to work were strongly associated with successful return to work. We do not know what factors influence individual expectancies of return to work. Screening expectancies and giving individuals with low expectancies interventions with a goal to change expectancies of return to work, such as CBT or self-management interventions, may contribute to increase actual return to work. http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ , with registration number NCT00463970 . The trial was registered at the 18th of April 2007.

  2. Return to work in miners following anterior cruciate ligament ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: The aim of the study is retrospectively investigated durations for returning to work following anatomic ACL reconstruction by hamstring autograft in miners and the reasons in patients who were delayed to return to work. Methods: Miners with symptomatic anterior cruciate ligament rupture underwent arthroscopic ...

  3. Return to work self efficacy and actual return to work among long-term sick-listed employees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volker, D.; Zijlstra-Vlasveld, M.C.; Brouwers, E.P.M.; van Lomwel, A.G.C.; van der Feltz-Cornelis, C.M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Considering the costs incurred by sickness absence and the implications for the workers’ quality of life, a fast return to work (RTW) is important. Self-efficacy (SE) seems to be an important predictor of RTW for employees with mental health problems. The predictive value of return-to-work

  4. Return to work in miners following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiftikci, Ugur; Serbest, Sancar; Kilinc, Cem Yalin; Karabicak, Gül Öznur; Vergili, Özge

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The aim of the study is retrospectively investigated durations for returning to work following anatomic ACL reconstruction by hamstring autograft in miners and the reasons in patients who were delayed to return to work. Methods Miners with symptomatic anterior cruciate ligament rupture underwent arthroscopic reconstruction. Patients were evaluated in terms of range of motion (ROM) values; Lysholm, Cincinati and Tegner activity scales; laxity testing and complications. By modifying the method used by Fitzgerald et al. we decided for the criteria returning to work. Results Thirty three patients were evaluated with mean followup of 22.7 ± 8.3 months (range 13-46 months). Mean age at the surgery was 27.8 (18-38) years. Lysholm, Cincinati and Tegner activity scales were signifi cantly higher from preoperative scores (Lysholm scores: preoperative: 60.7 ± 12.5, postoperative: 90.3 ± 4.8 (P postoperative: 6.2 ± 1.5 (P postoperative: 26.9 ± 1.6 (P < 0.001). The average time for returning to work was determined as 15,3 ± 4 weeks. There was no significant difference for knee scores and time for returning to work between patients with meniscal injuries and don't have meniscus lesions. Conclusion The reasons for delays in returning to work was work accident. Hematoma or effusion and pain inside the knee were the most significant reason which affected returning to work. PMID:26918069

  5. Experiences of occupational therapists returning to work after maternity leave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parcsi, Lisa; Curtin, Michael

    2013-08-01

    Returning to work after maternity leave can be a challenging, anxious and fraught experience for women, and has been portrayed in the literature as a generally negative experience. Interestingly, although occupational therapists were predominantly women, no research was found focussing on their experiences of returning to work after maternity leave. The aim of this research was to gain an insight into occupational therapists' experiences of returning to work following maternity leave. Principles of interpretive phenomenological analysis were used to explore the individual experiences of six Australian occupational therapists returning to work after a period of maternity leave. Individual semi-structured interviews lasting up to 90 minutes were conducted. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed and then analysed. Two major themes emerged from the analysis of interviews: compromise and feeling valued. The experience of returning to work was a process of compromise in which women found strategies to cope with their changing roles and demands, to find a balance between home and work life. The women wanted to feel valued by their managers and co-workers, as this enabled them to feel comfortable and confident with some of the compromises they made. Occupational therapists returning to work after maternity leave will make compromises so that they can balance their home and work life. Occupational therapists value managers and co-workers who understand the compromises women make when returning to work following maternity leave and who create a supportive workplace that acknowledges and values their contribution. © 2013 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  6. Return to work with chronic pain: employers' and employees' views.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wainwright, E; Wainwright, D; Keogh, E; Eccleston, C

    2013-10-01

    The sickness certification and return to work (RTW) of people with chronic pain are important health and economic issues for employees, employers, taxpayers and the UK government. The 'fit note' and a national educational programme promoting RTW were introduced in 2010 to curb rising rates of sickness absence. To investigate employers' and employees' experiences of managing RTW when someone has taken sick leave for chronic pain and to explore the perceived efficacy of the fit note. A qualitative study, comprising semi-structured interviews with employers who had managed sick leave cases and employees who had experienced sick leave for chronic pain. Interviews were recorded, transcribed and the data analysed using constructivist grounded theory principles. Five themes were elicited. Firstly, frequent enquiry after health status was seen as intrusive by some employees but part of good practice by employers and acknowledging this difference was useful. Secondly, being able to trust employees due to their performance track record was helpful for employers when dealing with complex chronic pain conditions. Thirdly, feeling valued increased employees' motivation to RTW. Fourthly, guidelines about maintaining contact with absent employees were useful if used flexibly. Finally, both parties valued the fit note for its positive language, interrogative format and biomedical authority. The fit note was perceived to be helpful if used in combination with other strategies for managing sick leave and RTW for people with chronic pain. These strategies may be applicable to other fluctuating, long-term conditions with medically unexplained elements.

  7. Return to Work after an Acute Coronary Syndrome: Patients’ Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frans G. Slebus

    2012-06-01

    Conclusion: Within 2 years, 36% of the patients had not returned to work at their pre-ACS levels. Disease factors, functional capacity, environmental factors, and personal factors were listed as affecting subjects’ work ability level.

  8. Returning to work after cancer: know your rights

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that help you quit smoking Working With Your Employer When returning to work, there are some things ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  9. Predictors of return-to-work in patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain: A randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randi Brendbekken

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the predictive effect of a multidisciplinary intervention programme, pain, work-related factors and health, including anxiety/depression and beliefs, on return-to-work for patients sick-listed due to musculoskeletal pain. Design: A randomized clinical study. Methods: A total of 284 patients were randomized to either a multidisciplinary intervention programme (n = 141 or to a less resource-demanding brief intervention (n = 143. Work participation was estimated monthly from register data for 12 months. Return-to-work was defined as increased work participation in 3 consecutive months. Results: In the adjusted model, return-to-work by 3 months was associated with a multidisciplinary intervention programme (odds ratio (OR = 2.7, 95% confidence interval (95% CI = 1.1–6.9, the factor “belief that work was cause of the pain” (OR = 2.2, 95% CI = 1.1–4.3, anxiety and depression (OR = 0.5, 95% CI = 0.2–0.98, and by an interaction between the multidisciplinary intervention and perceived support at work (OR = 0.3, 95% CI = 0.1–0.9. At 12 months, only duration of sick leave was associated with return-to-work (OR = 0.6, 95% CI = 0.5–0.8. Conclusion: Multidisciplinary intervention may hasten return-to-work and benefit those who perceive low support at work, but at 12 months only duration of sick leave at baseline was associated with return-to-work.

  10. Work-related predictors of not returning to work after inpatient rehabilitation in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böttcher, Hilke M; Steimann, Monika; Ullrich, Anneke; Rotsch, Martin; Zurborn, Karl-Heinz; Koch, Uwe; Bergelt, Corinna

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to explore the association between work-related factors and not returning to work in cancer patients. The identification of any special issues contributes to the development of occupation-related rehabilitation programmes. This study focused on aspects that may be influenced by patients with the help of counselling (e.g., handling occupational stress). At the beginning and one year after the end of rehabilitation, we asked patients to answer occupation-related questionnaires. We used t-tests and χ(2)-tests as well as logistic regression analyses to address our research questions. Of 333 patients, 21% had not returned to work one year after the end of rehabilitation. In comparison with working patients, patients who were not working reported poorer mental health and more occupational problems at the beginning of rehabilitation. Unemployment at the beginning of rehabilitation, an elevated risk of early retirement and limited self-assessed work ability increased the probability of not returning to work. Patients who did not return to work represent a subgroup within rehabilitation. These patients need special support and should receive counselling beyond the time of rehabilitation. This is particularly true for unemployed patients who need intensive help to return to the workforce. Furthermore, patients' estimations of their work ability and their plans for returning to work play a crucial role and should be discussed during rehabilitation.

  11. Health status and the return to work after traffic accidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiva, Luciana; Pompeo, Daniele Alcalá; Ciol, Márcia Aparecida; Arduini, Glendha Oliveira; Dantas, Rosana Aparecida Spadoti; Senne, Eva Claudia Venâncio de; Rossi, Lídia Aparecida

    2016-06-01

    to compare the health status of traffic accident victims, at hospital discharge and after six months, and to analyze the predictive variables of their health status and return to work. observational, longitudinal study. Data were collected through interviews and medical records of 102 patients with a mean age of 33 years; with the majority being men and victims of motorcycle accidents. The variables were analyzed by means of validated tools, student's t-test, multiple linear regression, and logistic regression. there was an improvement of perception in the patients' health status six months after hospital discharge and functional capacity. The individuals who returned to work showed better health-related quality of life evaluation. improvement of the perceived health status six months after hospital discharge was found. Factors that influenced the patients' return to work were not identified.

  12. Predicting return to work following a cardiac event in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafah, Nadia Mohd; Kasim, Sazzli; Isa, Mohamad Rodi; Hanapiah, Fazah Akhtar; Abdul Latif, Lydia

    2017-01-01

    Return to work is an important aspect for cardiac rehabilitation following a major cardiac event. The aim was to understand the local prevalence and factors associated with returning to work in Malaysia after a cardiac event. A cross sectional design was used. All patients attending the cardiac rehabilitation program after major cardiac event during an 11-months period (2011-2012) were included. Data relating to socio-demographic, work-related, risk factors and acute myocardial infarction were collected. The SF-36 questionnaire was used to assess quality of life. Regression analysis was used to determine the predicting factors to return to work. A total of 398 files were screened, 112 respondents agreed to participate giving a response rate of 47.3%. The prevalence of returned to work (RTW) was 66.1% [95% CI: 57.2-75.0]. Factors associated with work resumption were age (Adj. OR: 0.92 (95% CI: 0.84-0.99), diabetes mellitus (Adj. OR: 3.70, 95% CI: 1.35-10.12), Mental Component Summary (MCS) score (Adj. OR: 1.05 (95% CI: 1.01-1.09) and baseline angiography findings. Patients with single vessel and two vessel disease were 8.9 times and 3.78 times more likely to return to work compared to those with 3 vessels (Adj. OR: 8.90 (95% CI: 2.29-34.64) and Adj. OR: 3.78, (95% CI: 1.12, 12.74). We proposed a cardiac rehabilitation program to emphasize mental health as it may improve successful return to work after cardiac event.

  13. Physical exercise and return to work: cancer survivors' experiences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groeneveld, Iris F.; de Boer, Angela G. E. M.; Frings-Dresen, Monique H. W.

    2013-01-01

    In this qualitative study, we aimed to explore cancer survivors' experiences with (1) return to work (RtW) and work performance, (2) a physical exercise program after treatment, and (3) the perceived link between physical exercise and work. Semi-structured individual interviews were held with ten

  14. Enterprise size and return to work after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannerz, Harald; Ferm, Linnea; Poulsen, Otto M; Pedersen, Betina Holbæk; Andersen, Lars L

    2012-12-01

    It has been hypothesised that return to work rates among sick-listed workers increases with enterprise size. The aim of the present study was to estimate the effect of enterprise size on the odds of returning to work among previously employed stroke patients in Denmark, 2000-2006. We used a prospective design with a 2 year follow-up period. The study population consisted of 13,178 stroke patients divided into four enterprise sizes categories, according to the place of their employment prior to the stroke: micro (1-9 employees), small (10-49 employees), medium (50-249 employees) and large (>250 employees). The analysis was based on nationwide data on enterprise size from Statistics Denmark merged with data from the Danish occupational hospitalisation register. We found a statistically significant association (p = 0.034); each increase in enterprise size category was followed by an increase in the estimated odds of returning to work. The chances of returning to work after stroke increases as the size of enterprise increases. Preventive efforts and research aimed at finding ways of mitigating the effect are warranted.

  15. Predictors for earlier return to work of cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolvers, M. D. J.; Leensen, M. C. J.; Groeneveld, I. F.; Frings-Dresen, M. H. W.; de Boer, A. G. E. M.

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to investigate how perceived work ability, job self-efficacy, value of work, and fatigue predict return to work (RTW) in cancer patients who received chemotherapy. Data of a before-after study on a multidisciplinary intervention that aimed to enhance RTW was used, consisting of four

  16. Work Sustainability Among Male Cancer Survivors After Returning to Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Motoki; Haruyama, Yasuo; Muto, Go; Kiyohara, Kosuke; Mizoue, Tetsuya; Kojimahara, Noriko; Yamaguchi, Naohito

    2018-02-05

    Few studies have investigated the work continuance rate among cancer survivors after return to work (RTW). The objective of this study was to clarify work sustainability after RTW among Japanese male cancer survivors. We collected data on male cancer survivors from an occupational health register. Inclusion criteria were as follows: employees who returned to work after an episode of sick leave due to clinically certified cancer diagnosed between January 1, 2000 and December 31, 2011. Of 1,033 male employees who were diagnosed with cancer, 786 employees (76.1%) returned to work after their first episode of sick leave due to cancer. Work continuance rates among all subjects were 80.1% 1 year after RTW and 48.5% 5 years after RTW. The mean duration of work after RTW was 4.5 years. The work continuance rates varied significantly by cancer type. The "Lung" and "Hepatic, Pancreatic" cancer groups had the shortest duration of work (0.9 year after RTW). Of workers who returned to work after their first episode of leave after cancer, 50% continued to work after 5 years in large-scale companies. There was a steep decrease in work continuance rates during the first year after RTW, with considerable differences according to cancer site.

  17. Expectancies mediate the relationship between perceived injustice and return to work following whiplash injury: A 1-year prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carriere, J S; Thibault, P; Adams, H; Milioto, M; Ditto, B; Sullivan, M J L

    2017-08-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that perceived injustice is a risk factor for work disability in individuals with whiplash injury. At present, however, little is known about the processes by which perceived injustice impacts on return to work. The purpose of this study was to examine whether expectancies mediated the relationship between perceived injustice and return to work in patients with whiplash injury. One hundred and fifty-two individuals (81 men, 71 women) with a primary diagnosis of whiplash injury completed self-report measures of pain intensity, perceived injustice and return-to-work expectancies following admission to a rehabilitation programme. Work status was assessed 1 year after discharge. Consistent with previous research, high scores on a measure of perceived injustice were associated with prolonged work disability. Results indicated that high perceptions of injustice were associated with low return-to-work expectancies. Causal mediation analyses revealed that expectancies fully mediated the relationship between perceived injustice and return to work. The findings suggest that intervention techniques designed to target expectancies could improve return-to-work outcomes in patients with whiplash injury. Discussion addresses the processes by which expectancies might impact on return-to-work outcomes and the manner in which negative return-to-work expectancies might be modified through intervention. The study confirms that expectancies are the mechanism through which perceived injustice impacts return to work following whiplash injury. The findings suggest that interventions designed to specifically target return-to-work expectancies might improve rehabilitation outcomes in patients with whiplash injury. © 2017 European Pain Federation - EFIC®.

  18. [Return to Work after Fractures of the Pelvis and the Acetabulum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nusser, M; Holstiege, J; Kaluscha, R; Tepohl, L; Stuby, F; Röderer, G; Krischak, G

    2015-06-01

    Pelvic and acetabular fractures are severe injuries with serious consequences that mainly happen to young people. Therefore it is highly interesting to find out to what extent affected patients succeed in returning to work, which is an important factor concerning quality of live. Thus, the objective of this study was to estimate the "return to work" in a two-year follow-up after rehabilitative treatment of patients with pelvic and acetabular fractures and to identify influencing factors. A retrospective cohort study was conducted using population-based administrative data of the Baden-Württemberg statutory pension fund. All patients (age 18 to 63 years) who had participated in a rehabilitation programme between 2004 and 2009 due to a pelvic or acetabular fracture were included. Return to work was modelled using multivariate logistic regression analysis. Rehabilitants were classified as "returned" if they have paid at least one monthly contribution due to employment during 13 to 24 months after rehabilitation. Age, gender, diagnostic group, type of rehabilitation programme, fractures of the spine, nerve injuries of the lumbosacral area and/or the lower limb and employment status before the fractures were considered as prognostic covariates. Two-thirds of the 249 researched patients returned to work. This corresponds to a reduction of employment amounting to 16.6 % for patients with a pelvic fracture and 20.8 % for patients with an acetabular fracture. Main predictor for a return to work was the employment status before the fracture. Younger patients had a better chance to return to work than older ones. Patients with fractures of the spine or nerve injuries of the lumbosacral area and/or the lower limb had a 73 % or, respectively, 78 % higher risk of not returning to work. Fractures of the pelvis and the acetabulum currently lead in one of five patients to loss of employment. Thereby the trauma threatens the social security of the young patients. Follow

  19. Miners’ return to work following injuries in coal mines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashis Bhattacherjee

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The occupational injuries in mines are common and result in severe socio-economical consequences. Earlier studies have revealed the role of multiple factors such as demographic factors, behavioral factors, health-related factors, working environment, and working conditions for mine injuries. However, there is a dearth of information about the role of some of these factors in delayed return to work (RTW following a miner’s injury. These factors may likely include personal characteristics of injured persons and his or her family, the injured person’s social and economic status, and job characteristics. This study was conducted to assess the role of some of these factors for the return to work following coal miners’ injuries. Material and Methods: A study was conducted for 109 injured workers from an underground coal mine in the years 2000–2009. A questionnaire, which was completed by the personnel interviews, included among others age, height, weight, seniority, alcohol consumption, sleeping duration, presence of diseases, job stress, job satisfaction, and injury type. The data was analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier estimates and the Cox proportional hazard model. Results: According to Kaplan-Meier estimate it was revealed that a lower number of dependents, longer sleep duration, no job stress, no disease, no alcohol addiction, and higher monthly income have a great impact on early return to work after injury. The Cox regression analysis revealed that the significant risk factors which influenced miners’ return to work included presence of disease, job satisfaction and injury type. Conclusions: The mine management should pay attention to significant risk factors for injuries in order to develop effective preventive measures. Med Pr 2016;67(6:729–742

  20. Return to work following spinal cord injury: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidal, Ingeborg Beate; Huynh, Tuan Khai; Biering-Sørensen, Fin

    2007-09-15

    To review literature on return to work (RTW) and employment in persons with spinal cord injury (SCI), and present employment rates, factors influencing employment, and interventions aimed at helping people with SCI to obtain and sustain productive work. A systematic review for 2000 - 2006 was carried out in PubMed/Medline, AMED, (ISI) Web of Science, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycInfo and Sociological abstracts database. The keywords 'spinal cord injuries', 'spinal cord disorder', 'spinal cord lesion' or 'spinal cord disease' were cross-indexed with 'employment', 'return to work', 'occupation' or 'vocational'. Out of approximately 270 hits, 110 references were used, plus 13 more found elsewhere. Among individuals with SCI working at the time of injury 21 - 67% returned to work after injury. RTW was higher in persons injured at a younger age, had less severe injuries and higher functional independence. Employment rate improved with time after SCI. Persons with SCI employed ranged from 11.5% to 74%. Individuals who sustained SCI during childhood or adolescence had higher adult employment rates. Most common reported barriers to employment were problems with transportation, health and physical limitations, lack of work experience, education or training, physical or architectural barriers, discrimination by employers, and loss of benefits. Individuals with SCI discontinue working at younger age. This review confirmed low employment rates after SCI. Future research should explore interventions aimed at helping people with SCI to obtain and sustain productive work.

  1. Injury differences in the return-to-work process following a work-related injury: What is the role of return-to-work self-efficacy?

    OpenAIRE

    OLIVER CHARLES BLACK

    2018-01-01

    This thesis investigated the role of self-efficacy in the return-to-work process following a work-related injury. It also contributed knowledge towards understanding the measurement of return-to-work self-efficacy, the relationships between the determinants of return-to-work self-efficacy and actual return-to-work self-efficacy, and the relationship between return-to-work self-efficacy and a sustained return-to-work, across different injury types. The findings from this thesis have direct imp...

  2. Workplace disability management programs promoting return-to-work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gensby, Ulrik; Lund, Thomas; Kowalski, Krystyna

    economic and social consequences. The share of the working-age population relying on disability and sickness benefits as their main source of income has tended to increase in many OECD countries. Long-term sickness absence also represents substantial life events, where the duration of absence due to injury...... injuries or illnesses return to work. In spite of the increasing focus on RTW and work disability, there is still little evidence on the effects of workplace disability management programs. Further knowledge on workplace-based interventions that can support successful disability management practices on RTW...

  3. Workplace disability management programs promoting return-to-work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gensby, Ulrik; Lund, Thomas; Kowalski, Krystyna

    This report presents a Campbell systematic review on the effectiveness of workplace disability management programs (WPDM programs) promoting return to work (RTW), as implemented and practised by employers. The objectives of this review were to assess the effects of WPDM programs, to examine...... research ought to enlarge its perspective and refine its analytic tools to examine information that is meaningful and cost effective to those who will benefit from it, to further advance the field. The review findings might help explicate WPDM programs and their potential impact on RTW outcomes...

  4. Return to work of cancer patients after a multidisciplinary intervention including occupational counselling and physical exercise in cancer patients: a prospective study in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leensen, Monique C. J.; Groeneveld, Iris F.; van der Heide, Iris; Rejda, Tomas; van Veldhoven, Peter L. J.; van Berkel, Sietske; Snoek, Aernout; van Harten, Wim; Frings-Dresen, Monique H. W.; de Boer, Angela G. E. M.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To support return to work (RTW) among cancer patients, a multidisciplinary rehabilitation programme was developed which combined occupational counselling with a supervised physical exercise programme during chemotherapy. The aim was to investigate RTW rates of cancer patients and to

  5. Return to work of cancer patients after a multidisciplinary intervention including occupational counselling and physical exercise in cancer patients : A prospective study in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leensen, Monique C.J.; Groeneveld, Iris F.; Heide, Iris Van Der; Rejda, Tomas; Van Veldhoven, Peter L.J.; Berkel, Sietske Van; Snoek, Aernout; van Harten, Willem H.; Frings-Dresen, Monique H.W.; Boer, Angela G.E.M.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To support return to work (RTW) among cancer patients, a multidisciplinary rehabilitation programme was developed which combined occupational counselling with a supervised physical exercise programme during chemotherapy. The aim was to investigate RTW rates of cancer patients and to

  6. Important factors influencing the return to work after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying-Chih; Kapellusch, Jay; Garg, Arun

    2014-01-01

    As the field of rehabilitation shifts its focus towards improving functional capacity instead of managing disability, return to work (RTW) and return to the community emerge as key goals in a person's recovery from major disabling illness such as stroke. To compile important factors believed to influence RTW after a stroke. Based on a comprehensive literature review, we clustered similar factors and organized these factors based on the International Classification of Function, Disability and Health (ICF) framework: body functions or structure, activity participation, environmental factors and personal and psychosocial factors. Overall, stroke severity, as assessed by the degree of residual disability such as weakness, neurological deficit or impairments (speech, cognition, apraxia, agnosia), has been shown to be the most consistent negative predictor of RTW. Many factors such as the number of working years remaining until retirement, depression, medical history, and occupation need to be taken into consideration for stroke survivors, as they can influence RTW decision making. Stroke survivors who are flexible and realistic in their vocational goal and emotionally accept their disability appear more likely to return to work. There are many barriers to employment for stroke survivors ranging from physical and cognitive impairments to psychosocial and environmental factors.

  7. Return to work after vocational rehabilitation: does mindfulness matter?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vindholmen S

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Solveig Vindholmen,1 Rune Høigaard,2 Geir Arild Espnes,3 Stephen Seiler41Department of Psychosocial Health, Faculty of Health and Sport Sciences, University of Agder, Kristiansand, Norway; 2Department of Public Health, Sport and Nutrition, Faculty of Health and Sport Sciences, University of Agder, Kristiansand, Norway; 3Research Centre for Health Promotion and Resources, Department of Social Work and Health Science, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway; 4Faculty of Health and Sport Sciences, University of Agder, Kristiansand, NorwayPurpose: Mindfulness has become an important construct in return-to-work (RTW rehabilitation. The aim of this study was to investigate whether mindfulness is a predictor for RTW, and to examine the indirect effect of mindfulness on RTW and work ability through quality of life (QOL.Methods: A retrospective study was conducted among 80 former participants (71 females and seven males from age 24 to 66, in a multidisciplinary vocational rehabilitation program (MVRP. Self-report questionnaires were used to measure work status, work ability, QOL, and mindfulness. Demographic data were also collected.Results: In the current sample, 47% of participants reported having returned to ordinary work. The majority of the non-working sub-sample reported being in work-related activity or education. A bias-corrected bootstrapping technique was used to examine indirect effects. Results revealed that mindfulness was indirectly related to both RTW and work ability through QOL. There was no significant total effect of mindfulness on work ability or RTW. Logistic regression analysis was performed to assess the impact of mindfulness on the likelihood that respondents returned to work. None of the independent mindfulness variables (observe, describe, act aware, non-judge, non-react made a unique statistically significant contribution to the model. The covariates work ability and education level significantly

  8. Return-to-work intervention during cancer treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Kirsten Schultz; Momsen, A H; Stapelfeldt, C M

    2018-01-01

    To explore in-depth understanding of providers' experiences when involved in a return-to-work (RTW) intervention offered during cancer treatment. Semi-structured individual interviews and participant observations at a hospital department and two municipal job centers were carried out, including ten...... providers (physicians, nurses and social workers). A phenomenological-hermeneutic approach was applied, involving coding, identification of themes and interpretation of findings. Three major themes were identified: Treatment first, Work as an integrated component in cancer rehabilitation, and Challenges...... in bringing up work issues. Differences in providers' experiences of the RTW intervention offered to cancer patients were found: in the hospital setting RTW was a second priority, whereas in the municipality job centers it was an integrated component. Further studies are needed to investigate how and when...

  9. Factors affecting return to work after injury or illness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cancelliere, Carol; Donovan, James; Stochkendahl, Mette Jensen

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To identify common prognostic factors for return to work (RTW) across different health and injury conditions and to describe their association with RTW outcomes. Methods: Medline, Embase, PsychINFO, Cinahl, and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and the grey literature were searched...... synthesized within domains of the International Classification of Functioning and Health (ICF) model of disability. Results: Of the 36,193 titles screened and the 94 eligible studies reviewed, 56 systematic reviews were accepted as low risk of bias. Over half of these focused on musculoskeletal disorders...... and stakeholders. Common factors associated with negative RTW outcomes were older age, being female, higher pain or disability, depression, higher physical work demands, previous sick leave and unemployment, and activity limitations. Conclusions: Expectations of recovery and RTW, pain and disability levels...

  10. Models of return to work for musculoskeletal disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Izabela Z; Stowell, Anna W; Feuerstein, Michael; Gatchel, Robert J

    2007-06-01

    Musculoskeletal pain disorders are the most prevalent, costly, disabling, and commonly researched conditions in the workplace, yet the development of overarching conceptual models of return to work (RTW) in these conditions has been lagging. A critical review of the literature was performed using multiple medical and health search engines in order to provide an evaluation of the evolution and the state of the art of health and disability models with a focus on specific models of RTW. The main tenets, implications for diagnosis, treatment, and disability compensation, are the key perspectives analyzed for the following specific models of RTW: biomedical, psychosocial, forensic, ecological/case management, biopsychosocial, and two more recent models developed by the Institute of Medicine and the World Health Organization, respectively. Future development of models that are truly transdisciplinary, and address temporal and multidimensional aspects of occupational disability, remains a goal.

  11. The Danish national return-to-work program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aust, Birgit; Helverskov, Trine; Nielsen, Maj Britt Dahl

    2012-01-01

    approximately 19 500 working-age adults on long-term sickness absence, regardless of reason for sickness absence or employment status. It consists of three core elements: (i) establishment of multidisciplinary RTW teams, (ii) introduction of standardized workability assessments and sickness absence management......The Danish national return-to-work (RTW) program aims to improve the management of municipal sickness benefit in Denmark. A study is currently ongoing to evaluate the RTW program. The purpose of this article is to describe the study protocol. The program includes 21 municipalities encompassing...... procedures, and (iii) a comprehensive training course for the RTW teams. The effect evaluation is based on a parallel group randomized trial and a stratified cluster controlled trial and focuses on register-based primary outcomes – duration of sickness absence and RTW – and questionnaire-based secondary...

  12. Taliban authorities allow some women employees to return to work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, K

    2000-08-26

    Following the closure of UN-supported widows' bakeries in Kabul, Afghanistan, Taliban authorities announced that they would allow 360 female employees to return to work. This invalidation is in line with the decree that bans women from working for UN agencies and international nongovernmental organizations except in the health sector. Although no explanation for the sudden policy change has been given, Taliban's Foreign Minister stated that the government has no objection to these women working at the bakeries because they are not regular employees of the UN. According to Stephanie Bunker, spokesperson for the Office of the UN coordinator for Afghanistan, the policy change is a positive step in the right direction on the part of the local authorities in Kabul. However, the UN continues to be concerned about the impact of the decree on Afghan women overall.

  13. Return to work programs are becoming a business priority

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon

    2001-06-01

    Improved safety planning and operational procedures in the offshore industry, based on lessons learned from accidents offshore, are discussed. The emphasis in this instance is on the 'return-to-work' (RTW) program which consists of a formal set of processes whose goal is to minimize the impact of an impairment or disability on an individual's capacity to work. The program is designed to assist workers to return to their jobs or to an alternate suitable job, to mitigate the human and financial cost for both the worker and the employer. RTW programs are said to have assumed greater importance recently because of globalization of the economy and downsizing, and the increased pressure on organizations to decrease costs to stay competitive. The longer work-week for the remaining employees and increase in the average age of the workforce which tend to increase recovery time from an injury, are other factors contributing to the demand for increased safety in the work place and the increased popularity of structured and regulated return-to-work programs in all sectors of industry. Retained seniority, pay and benefits, along with maintaining self-worth, family stability, and social ties, are suggested as the principal benefit to workers. Employers would benefit from the ability to retain skilled workers, minimize production losses, and minimize the need to recruit and train new workers, or to retrain current employees to perform new tasks. To be successful, the employer must commit money and resources for the program, and employees have to be fully aware of the benefits of an RTW program. It appears that pending legislation making workplace accommodation mandatory, an RTW program will soon become a business essential for employers. At the same time, rising health care costs provide further substantiation for more structured approaches to reduce claims and absenteeism from the workplace.

  14. Return to Work After Temporary Disability Pension in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laaksonen, Mikko; Gould, Raija

    2015-09-01

    When it is possible that the employee's work ability can be restored through treatment or rehabilitation, disability pension in Finland is granted for a fixed period. We examined which factors are associated with return to work (RTW) after such temporary disability pension. The study included all Finnish residents whose temporary disability pension from the earnings-related pension system started in 2008 (N = 10,269). Competing risks regression analysis was applied to examine register-based determinants for RTW after temporary disability pension due to mental disorders, musculoskeletal diseases, other diseases, and injury over a 4-year follow-up period. The overall cumulative incidence of RTW was 25%. RTW was more probable after temporary disability pension due to injury and musculoskeletal diseases and less probable after temporary disability pension due to mental disorders. Younger age and higher education increased RTW but differences between genders, private and public sector employees, and occupational classes were relatively small. The probability of RTW was higher among those who were employed before their temporary disability pension (subhazard ratio in multivariate analysis 2.41 (95% CI 2.13-2.72) and among the 9% who participated in vocational rehabilitation during their pension [SHR 2.10 (95% CI 1.90-2.31)]. With some exceptions, the results were fairly similar for all diagnostic causes of temporary disability pension. Return to work after temporary disability pension was relatively uncommon. Nevertheless, in all diagnostic groups RTW continued for the whole follow-up period. The low educated and those not employed before temporary disability pension need more support in their RTW. The strong association between vocational rehabilitation and RTW suggests that increasing rehabilitation among those with impaired work ability may promote RTW.

  15. 20 CFR 216.24 - Relinquishment of rights to return to work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Relinquishment of rights to return to work... of rights to return to work. (a) What return to work rights must be given up. Before an individual... work for any railroad employer. (b) When right to return to work is ended. An individual's right to...

  16. Return-to-Work Self-Efficacy and Actual Return to Work Among Long-Term Sick-Listed Employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volker, D; Zijlstra-Vlasveld, M C; Brouwers, E P M; van Lomwel, A G C; van der Feltz-Cornelis, C M

    2015-06-01

    Considering the costs incurred by sickness absence and the implications for the workers' quality of life, a fast return to work (RTW) is important. Self-efficacy (SE) seems to be an important predictor of RTW for employees with mental health problems. The predictive value of return-to-work self-efficacy (RTW-SE) has not been examined in employees on long-term sickness absence due to any cause. The aim of this study is to investigate whether RTW-SE is a predictor of time to RTW in long-term sick-listed employees with all-cause sickness absence. Furthermore, the relative contribution of RTW-SE in predicting RTW will be examined compared to health-related, job-related and personal factors. In a longitudinal study, sick-listed employees who were currently on sick leave for more than 4 weeks filled out a self-report questionnaire. Demographics, health-related, personal, and job-related factors, and RTW-SE were measured. Employees were followed for 2 years to determine the duration until full RTW. Cox proportional hazards regression analyses were used to identify factors associated with time to RTW. Data were collected from 493 sick-listed employees. RTW-SE was a significant predictor of RTW. In a multivariate model, low RTW-SE, the thought of not being able to work while having symptoms (illness behaviour) and having chronic medical conditions were predictors of a longer duration until RTW. When guiding long-term sick-listed employees, it is important to focus on factors such as SE and illness behaviour, instead of just focusing on the symptoms of the sick-listed employee.

  17. Research on return to work in European Union countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollin, L; Gehanno, J-F

    2012-04-01

    Research on return to work (RTW) is increasing. It is important to benefit from studies originating from different countries since certain factors influencing the RTW process are specific to each country. To compare RTW research in Europe with the USA and to describe research on RTW in Europe. Medline was scanned with specific search strings to identify studies concerning RTW in Europe, in the USA and in the rest of the world. Characteristics of the European studies were analyzed with two specific tools for bibliometrics research. Four thousand five hundred and twenty-five studies were identified (1100, 1005 and 2420 coming from Europe, the USA and the rest of the world, respectively). The European countries producing the greatest number of research papers standardized for population of that country were Sweden, the Netherlands, Finland and Denmark. Sweden was 5.7 times more prolific than the USA. Specialties covered by the European publications included occupational medicine (the subject of 66% of the articles), neurology (36%), environment and public health (32%), physical medicine and rehabilitation (26%) and rheumatology (24%). There is a worldwide trend upwards in the number of publications on RTW. Europe recently overtook the USA in the number of publications per head of population, although there were large differences in publication rates among the European countries. The publications of European researchers on RTW are spread over a wide variety of journals, making access to this research difficult.

  18. Towards a parsimonious program theory of return to work intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claudi Jensen, Anne Grete

    2013-01-01

    Presentation of a salutogenic theory of return to work (RTW). The study group include 118 unskilled Danish public employees and privately employed house-cleaners on sick leave due to musculoskeletal and/or common mental illnesses. Theory of RTW is discussed from a theoretical and empirical viewpoint, using baseline-data from an intervention study in a longitudinal, non-randomized study design with follow-up after one year. High work ability, strong social support from colleagues and over-commitment are the most important prognostic factors for RTW. An active coping style, high self-efficacy and Sense of Coherence (SOC) are found to increase RTW and high hostility and over-commitment to decrease RTW. Besides health elements in work ability are SOC, self-efficacy, social support and physical activity. Work ability and active coping mediate positive associations between RTW and health, and a negative association with stress. Work ability seems to express the intention to work decisive for RTW, reflecting the interpretation of the work/health situation based on comprehensibility, meaningfulness and manageability. It is influenced by the personal view of life, attitudes and interaction with the workplace. An ecological theory, integrating health promotion is proposed. A later paper will present the intervention study and further validation of the theory.

  19. Impact of total laryngectomy on return to work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Jose Miguel; López, Montserrat; García, Jacinto; León, Xavier; Quer, Miquel

    Total laryngectomy is one of the most mutilating oncological operations. There are no specific studies evaluating return to work after this surgery. A cross-sectional study was performed on a sample of 116 laryngectomized patients who were disease- free and had a minimum follow-up of 2 years from total laryngectomy. A survey was conducted to find out their employment situation before and after surgery. At the time of surgery, 62 (53%) were working, 40 (35%) were retired and 14 (12%) were in a disability situation. 60% had professions with low qualification requirements, the largest group being construction workers. Of the 62 patients active at the time of total laryngectomy, 29 became inactive and 33 (53%) maintained their work activity. The most important factors in maintaining work activity were the level of professional qualification and the method of vocal rehabilitation. Eighty percent of the patients with high-intermediate qualification maintained their jobs, compared to 35% of those with low professional qualifications (Pde Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello. All rights reserved.

  20. Researcher perspectives on competencies of return-to-work coordinators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Bethany T; Pransky, Glenn; Shaw, William S; Hong, Qua Nha; Loisel, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    Return-to-work (RTW) coordination programs are successful in reducing long-term work disability, but research reports have not adequately described the role and competencies of the RTW coordinator. This study was conducted to clarify the impact of RTW coordinators, and competencies (knowledge, skills, and attitudes) required to achieve optimal RTW outcomes in injured workers. Studies involving RTW coordination for injured workers were identified through literature review. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 12 principal investigators to obtain detailed information about the RTW coordinator role and competencies not included in published articles. Interview results were synthesized into principal conceptual groups by affinity mapping. All investigators strongly endorsed the role of RTW coordinator as key to the program's success. Affinity mapping identified 10 groups of essential competencies: (1) individual traits/qualities, (2) relevant knowledge base, (3) RTW focus and attitude, (4) organizational/administrative skills, (5) assessment skills, (6) communication skills, (7) interpersonal relationship skills, (8) conflict resolution skills, (9) problem-solving skills, and (10) RTW facilitation skills. Specific consensus competencies were identified within each affinity group. Most investigators endorsed similar competencies, although there was some variation by setting or scope of RTW intervention. RTW coordinators are essential contributors in RTW facilitation programs. This study identified specific competencies required to achieve success. More emphasis on mentorship and observation will be required to develop and evaluate necessary skills in this area.

  1. Survey of survivors' perspective on return to work after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartke, Robert J; Trierweiler, Robert

    2015-10-01

    To describe the development and results of a detailed survey on return to work (RTW) after stroke completed by survivors at various stages of recovery. This study used a multi-method qualitative and quantitative research strategy to design and implement a 39-item survey for stroke survivors. Individual interviews, focus groups, and working committees were used to conceptualize the issues and translate them into a survey format. Surveys were distributed in regular and electronic mail. Groups of rehabilitation professionals, employers, and stroke survivors were assembled to review findings and obtain feedback to aide in interpretation. Overall 715 surveys were completed. The respondents were on average 54 years of age, mostly white, well-educated, urban dwelling, and in skilled occupations. Results are described in seven areas: financial, stroke impairments, organizational, work and psychological issues, interpersonal support, and therapy. Several salient findings are described including the role of fatigue, under utilization of vocational rehabilitation (VR) services, and motivational factors related to finances, self-esteem, work, and workplace relationships. Although earning an income is a strong motivation to RTW, salary decreases in importance when compared with other psychological benefits. Fatigue was rated as the second highest impairment barrier to RTW and persisted as a relevant impediment over time. Attitudes of co-workers and flexibility in work schedule were viewed as most helpful to the RTW process, whereas work stress was viewed as the greatest impediment to return. Only 24% of the sample received VR counseling with more respondents receiving counseling if they returned 6 months or longer after their stroke. Other trends and clinical and research implications are discussed.

  2. Predictors for earlier return to work of cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolvers, M D J; Leensen, M C J; Groeneveld, I F; Frings-Dresen, M H W; De Boer, A G E M

    2018-04-01

    This study aims to investigate how perceived work ability, job self-efficacy, value of work, and fatigue predict return to work (RTW) in cancer patients who received chemotherapy. Data of a before-after study on a multidisciplinary intervention that aimed to enhance RTW was used, consisting of four assessments up to 18 months. Time to partial and full RTW of 76 and 81 participants, respectively, was analyzed in Cox proportional hazard analysis with time-dependent variables. Univariate analyses of work ability, job self-efficacy, value of work, or fatigue as covariates were succeeded by multivariate analyses of work ability and either job self-efficacy, value of work, or fatigue as covariates. Participants were mostly female (93%), and diagnosed with breast cancer (87%). Most participants were permanently employed (84%) and 48% was sole breadwinner. When adjusted for timing variables and prognostic factors, all hypothesized factors were predictive for earlier RTW (p work ability, only job self-efficacy significantly predicted earlier full RTW: hazard ratio = 1.681; p = .025. Lower fatigue and higher value of work, work ability, and job self-efficacy of cancer survivors are associated with earlier RTW. Work ability and job self-efficacy seem to be key predictors. Limiting fatigue, increasing value of work, job self-efficacy, and perceived work ability are promising goals for enhancing earlier RTW. Occupational rehabilitation should empower patients to organize appropriate conditions for work and to educate them on rights and obligations during sick leave.

  3. Systematic review: Factors associated with return to work in burnout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kärkkäinen, R; Saaranen, T; Hiltunen, S; Ryynänen, O P; Räsänen, K

    2017-08-01

    Professional burnout predicts sick leave and even permanent withdrawal from the labour force. However, knowledge of the barriers to and facilitators of return to work (RTW) in such burnout is limited. To identify factors associated with RTW of burned-out individuals to inform occupational health care (OHC) RTW policy. A systematic search of peer-reviewed quantitative and mixed-method studies published from January 2005 to July 2016 in English and Finnish in ARTO, CINAHL (EBSCO), Medic, PsycINFO (ProQuest), PubMed, Scopus and Web of Science databases, followed by a manual search. We included studies that identify burnout with valid burnout measures and measure the degree of RTW or sick leave as outcomes. We excluded studies with heterogeneous samples without subgroup analyses of RTW in burnout cases. We included 10 studies (three experimental and seven observational) of the initial 1345 identified. The studies reported work-related factors; enhanced communication (positive association) and low control at work (negative association) and individual-related factors; male gender (positive association), covert coping (negative association), high over-commitment to work (positive association) and burnout-related factors; unimpaired sleep (positive association), duration of sick leave over 6 months (negative association) and part-time sick leave (positive association) associated with RTW in burnout. Associations between burnout rehabilitation and RTW, and the level of symptoms and cognitive impairment and RTW remained unclear. Few quantitative studies, of varied methodological quality, explore factors associated with RTW in burnout. Further research is needed to build an evidence base and develop guidelines for supportive OHC actions. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  4. Development and validation of competencies for return to work coordinators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pransky, Glenn; Shaw, William S; Loisel, Patrick; Hong, Quan Nha; Désorcy, Bruno

    2010-03-01

    Return to work (RTW) coordinators are a key element in programs that facilitate RTW of injured or ill workers, yet little research documents the competencies required for success in this role. Competencies were defined as knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors. Eight focus groups were conducted with 75 experienced RTW coordinators to identify 904 individual competencies. These were subsequently reduced to 234 unique items through affinity mapping, and sorted into eight groups: administration, individual personal attributes, information gathering, communication, professional credibility, evaluation, problem-solving, and conflict management. A subset of 100 items, including 88 items most often cited, were incorporated in an Internet-based survey that sampled a broad range of RTW coordinators from three countries. Eighty-three of the questionnaire items were rated 4 or 5 (very important or essential) by over half of the 148 respondents. There were no differences in affinity group mean ratings by country, employer, profession, or type of clients. The highest-rated items reflect general personal characteristics, or specific skills related to coordinating among all involved with the RTW process. RTW coordinators with nursing backgrounds provided slightly higher ratings for items related to medical knowledge, but otherwise their ratings were similar to non-nurses. These findings indicate a consensus across a wide range of RTW coordinators, and results can be applied to improve coordinator selection, training, and development. Certain key competencies may be well-established individual attributes, and others may be best developed through mentorship. Most of these competencies are probably best evaluated by direct observation.

  5. Improved work ability and return to work following vocational multidisciplinary rehabilitation of subjects on long-term sick leave

    OpenAIRE

    Braathen, Tore; Veiersted, Kaj Bo; Heggenes, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate a vocational multidisciplinary rehabilitation programme for patients on long-term sick leave with respect to their work ability and return to work. Methods: A multidisciplinary rehabilitation programme was administered to an intervention group of 183 patients on long-term sick leave (mean 12.2 months). Effects of the treatment were compared with a control group (n = 96) recruited from the national sickness insurance record of patients on sick leave of 6??2 month...

  6. Return to work or job transition? Employer dilemmas in taking social responsibility for return to work in local workplace practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seing, Ida; MacEachen, Ellen; Ekberg, Kerstin; Ståhl, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The aim was to analyze the role and activities of employers with regard to return to work (RTW), in local workplace practice. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with sick-listed workers and their supervisors in 18 workplaces (n = 36). The analytical approach to study the role of employers in RTW was based on the three-domain model of social corporate responsibility. The model illustrates the linkage between corporations and their social environment, and consists of three areas of corporate responsibility: economic, legal and ethical. Employers had difficulties in taking social responsibility for RTW, in that economic considerations regarding their business took precedence over legal and ethical considerations. Employers engaged in either "RTW activities" or "transition activities" that were applied differently depending on how valued sick-listed workers were considered to be to their business, and on the nature of the job (e.g., availability of suitable work adjustments). This study suggests that Swedish legislation and policies does not always adequately prompt employers to engage in RTW. There is a need for further attention to the organizational conditions for employers to take social responsibility for RTW in the context of business pressure and work intensification. Employers may have difficulties in taking social responsibility for RTW when economic considerations regarding their business take precedence over legal and ethical considerations. Rehabilitation professionals should be aware of that outcomes of an RTW process can be influenced by the worker's value to the employer and the nature of the job (e.g., availability of suitable work adjustments). "Low-value" workers at workplaces with limited possibilities to offer workplace adjustments may run a high risk of dismissal. Swedish legislation and policies may need reforms to put more pressure on employers to promote RTW.

  7. Trajectoires des travailleurs recevant un programme de retour au travail : étude exploratoire des discussions d’une équipe interdisciplinaire Exploratory study on the discourse of an interdisciplinary team on workers: trajectories during a return-to-work programme Trayectorias de los trabajadores beneficiarios de un programa de reinserción profesional : estudio exploratorio de los intercambios de un equipo interdisciplinar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond Baril

    2008-11-01

    éaire de la réadaptation au travail pour des individus présentant des incapacités prolongées d’origine musculo-squelettique, tel que décrit par une équipe interdisciplinaire.Purpose: Based on the viewpoint of an interdisciplinary team, this exploratory study aimed to identify different types of trajectories followed by workers with musculoskeletal disorders and the factors contributing to them.Methods: The research design used a single-case study in which the main unit of analysis was an interdisciplinary work team. This team discussed eighteen workers’ progression during a work rehabilitation programme. Analytical methods were based on phenomenology. All team discussions were audiotaped and transcribed, and two researchers completed the content analysis.Results: Four types of trajectories emerged: (1 return-to-work trajectories without obstacles; (2 return-to-work trajectories with obstacles; (3 non-return-to-work trajectories with episodes of progression; and (4 non-return-to-work trajectories without progression. Moreover, three outlines emerged from the data analysis: (1 the worker’s compliance with the programme; (2 the way the worker coped with exposure to work; and (3 stakeholder collaboration. The results of this study also suggested that the absence of a single consistent message among participating health professionals could create confusion for workers and pose a major impediment to the resumption of their activities.Conclusion: The results underscore, for clinicians, the complexity in managing this type of chronic work rehabilitation population, related to both the worker and the worker’s interactions with the stakeholders. Also, this study casts light on the non-linear work rehabilitation processes of individuals with prolonged disabilities of musculoskeletal origin, as described by an interdisciplinary team.Tema : Este estudio exploratorio se propone identificar diferentes tipos de trayectorias de trabajadores que presentan lesiones m

  8. Occupational health care return-to-work practices for workers with job burnout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kärkkäinen, Riitta; Saaranen, Terhi; Räsänen, Kimmo

    2018-02-23

    Occupational health care supports return to work in cases of burnout; however, there is little research on return-to-work practices. To describe occupational health care return-to-work practices for workers with burnout and to identify potential for the development of the practices. Open-ended interviews and essays were used to collect data from 25 occupational health care professionals. A qualitative content analysis method was used. Occupational health care was involved in the return-to-work support in the off-work, work re-entry and maintenance phases during the return-to-work process. However, occupational health care had no influence in the advancement phase. The key return-to-work actions were: (i) defining burnout, (ii) supporting disengagement from work, (iii) supporting recovery, (iv) determining the return-to-work goal, (v) supporting re-engagement with work, (vi) monitoring the job-person match, (vii) re-evaluating the return-to-work goal, (viii) supporting the maintenance of the achieved return-to-work goal, and, where appropriate, (ix) supporting an alternative return-to-work goal. There were varied return-to-work practices among the occupational health care centers evaluated. The occupational health care return-to-work practices for workers with burnout are described with recommendations to further develop common practice guidelines.

  9. Prognostic factors for return to work in patients with sciatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grøvle, Lars; Haugen, Anne J; Keller, Anne; Ntvig, Bård; Brox, Jens I; Grotle, Margreth

    2013-12-01

    Little is known about the prognostic factors for work-related outcomes of sciatica caused by disc herniation. To identify the prognostic factors for return to work (RTW) during a 2-year follow-up among sciatica patients referred to secondary care. Multicenter prospective cohort study including 466 patients. Administrative data from the National Sickness Benefit Register were accessed for 227 patients. Two samples were used. Sample A comprised patients who at the time of inclusion in the cohort reported being on partial sick leave or complete sick leave or were undergoing rehabilitation because of back pain/sciatica. Sample B comprised patients who, according to the sickness benefit register, at the time of inclusion received sickness benefits or rehabilitation allowances because of back pain/sciatica. In Sample A, the outcome was self-reported return to full-time work at the 2-year follow-up. In Sample B, the outcome was time to first sustained RTW, defined as the first period of more than 60 days without receiving benefits from the register. Significant baseline predictors of self-reported RTW at 2 years (Analysis A) were identified by multivariate logistic regression. Significant predictors of time to sustained RTW (Analysis B) were identified by multivariate Cox proportional hazard modeling. Both analyses included adjustment for age and sex. To assess the effect of surgery on the probability of RTW, analyses similar to A and B were performed, including the variable surgery (yes/no). One-fourth of the patients were still out of work at the 2-year follow-up. In Sample A (n=237), younger age, better general health, lower baseline sciatica bothersomeness, less fear-avoidance work, and a negative straight-leg-raising test result were significantly associated with a higher probability of RTW at the 2-year follow-up. Surgery was not significantly associated with the outcome. In Sample B (n=125), history of sciatica, duration of the current sciatica episode more than 3

  10. Job demands and decision control predicted return to work: the rapid-RTW cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lise Aasen Haveraaen

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In order to help workers with long-term sickness absence return to work (RTW, it is important to understand factors that either impede or facilitate employee’s reintegration into the labour force. The aim of this study was therefore to examine the impact of psychological work characteristics on time-to first RTW in sick listed employees in Norway. Methods The study was designed as a cohort study of 543 employees participating in 50 different RTW programmes. The Job Content Questionnaire (JCQ was used to gather information on the psychological work conditions. The participants were followed for up to 18 months after they started treatment in the RTW programme. Survival analyses were used to investigate the association between psychological work conditions and time-to first RTW. Results Having high psychological job demands (HR = .654; 95% CI: .513–.832 and low decision control (HR = 1.297; 95% CI: 1.010–1.666 were both independent predictors of delayed RTW. Employees in low-strain jobs (low demands/high control (HR = 1.811; 95% CI: 1.287–2.549 and passive jobs (low demands/low control (HR = 1.599; 95% CI: 1.107–2.309, returned to work earlier compared to employees in high-strain jobs (high demands/low control. No difference was found for active jobs (high demands/high control. Conclusion This study revealed that high psychological demands, low control, and being in a high strain job reduced the probability of early RTW in sick listed employees. RTW programmes should therefore increase the focus on these issues.

  11. Predictors of Return to Work for People with Psychiatric Disabilities: A Private Sector Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluta, David J.; Accordino, Michael P.

    2006-01-01

    This investigation was a baseline study to determine if the speed of return to work could be predicted for people with psychiatric disabilities in a private sector setting. Participants with psychiatric disability claims who returned to work (N = 300) were obtained from a nationwide "Fortune 500" insurance company. The authors compared the speed…

  12. Concise set of files for smooth return to work in employees with mental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshitsugu, Kiyoshi; Kuroda, Yuko; Hiroyama, Yuji; Nagano, Nobuhisa

    2013-01-01

    Sick leave due to mental disorders is a societal problem. It carries a high cost in terms of loss of labor productivity and absenteeism. Partial remission increases the risk of relapse after a return to work. There is sometimes a difference between the ability to return to work as judged by a general practitioner (GP) and the needs of the workplace. GPs are the main controllers of treatment and tend to protect their patients. Communication and agreement by GPs and occupational physicians play an effective role in the return to work. However, it requires considerable effort for both of them to make time to do this. We have developed a concise set of files for a smooth return to work. The files consist of three parts: "Suggestions for corresponding with employees taking sick leave"; "Checklist for smooth return to work"; and "Pattern of living". We put them into practice among 20 companies in Japan from January 2012 to October 2013. The companies had 8244 workers in total and 116 workers were on sick-leave due to mental disorders. Our set of files contributed to sharing the written basic policy of return to work among employees on sick leave with mental disorders, GPs, occupational physicians and personnel officers. That sharing led to facilitating a smooth return to work. Although there are differences in the legal and medical systems between Japan and other countries, our concept of sharing the written basic policy may give some help to occupational physicians in other parts of the world as well.

  13. Return-to-work coordinators' resourcefulness and the provision of suitable duties for nurses with injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Carole; Southgate, Erica; Kable, Ashley; Rivett, Darren A; Guest, Maya; Bohatko-Naismith, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    There is little health specific literature on returning nurses with injuries to work despite the high incidence of injuries and the workforce shortages of these professionals. To identify enabling factors and barriers to return-to-work for nurses with injuries from the perspective of return-to-work coordinators. Workplace return-to-workcoordinators employed in a health or disability facility who had worked on a rehabilitation case with a nurse with injuries in the past 12 months in New South Wales (NSW), Australia. Five focus groups were conducted with 25 return-to-work coordinators from 14 different organisations, representing different health sectors (aged, disability, public and private hospital and community health) in metropolitan and rural areas of NSW, Australia. This study reports findings specifically relating to the provision of suitable duties for nurses with injuries. Four key themes were identified: suitable duties; supernumerary positions; nurse specialisation and tailoring of return-to-work plans. This study identified that return-to-work coordinators were resourceful and innovative in their approach to the provision of suitable duties for nurses with injuries and highlighted the importance of including clinical duties in any return-to-work program and of tailoring the return-to-work to the nurses' work and personal circumstances.

  14. Workplace injury and nurses: Insights from focus groups with Australian return-to-work coordinators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southgate, Erica; James, Carole; Kable, Ashley; Bohatko-Naismith, Joanna; Rivett, Darren; Guest, Maya

    2011-06-01

    Few studies have examined the return-to-work process for nurses who are injured at work. The purpose of this study was to identify the factors that facilitate or impede the successful return to work of nurses who have sustained a workplace injury from the perspective of return-to-work coordinators. A qualitative, descriptive study was conducted and 25 return-to-work coordinators from 14 different organizations participated in focus group discussions. The participants were recruited from healthcare settings in metropolitan and rural areas of New South Wales, Australia. These included aged-care, residential, and community disability support services, public and private hospitals, and the community health sector. Workforce shortages, individual life circumstances and nurses' work, and nurses' qualifications, specialization, experience, and job tenure were identified as the factors that influence the timely, safe, and sustainable return to work of injured nurses. This study provides insight into how workforce shortages have driven innovative practice in accommodating a nurse's life circumstances when developing the return-to-work plan. Barriers to nurses' return to work included a lack of qualifications, specialization, and the casualization of the workforce. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  15. The structure of occupational health nurses' support for return-to-work to workers with depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatanaka, Junko

    2016-07-29

    The present study aimed to explore the structure of occupational health nurses' support for return-to-work to workers with depression. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 10 occupational health nurses who support workers returning to work. Data were analyzed using the Modified Grounded Theory Approach. The qualitatively analyzed data was grouped into 9 categories. The support for return-to-work was divided into 3 periods: (1) the first priority for recovery, (2) preparation for return-to-work, and (3) adaptation to work. There were indirect supports to workers such as "environmental arrangement for medical treatment," "connection," and "support form parties concerned about workers," and direct supports such as "readiness for medical treatment," "overcoming social and psychological problems," and "working life independence. " Direct support was facilitated by "construction of the relationship. " The occupational health nurses' philosophy was to support "profitable return-to-work for both the worker and the employer. " These processes were "support of confidence recovery process " to regain confidence lost through absence from work because of depression and to accomplish a smooth return-to-work. There were problems in each period corresponding to the return-to-work conditions, and occupational health nurses supported the employees in overcoming each problem. Moreover, it was said that cooperation with the parties concerned in the office would greatly influence the success or failure in the return-to-work support, and it was thought that direct supports and indirect supports to employees with respect to adjustment with the parties concerned in the office were necessary. The structure of occupational health nurses' supports was to support the confidence recovery process of workers by indirect and direct support at each period of return-to-work.

  16. Exploring workplace actors experiences of the social organization of return-to-work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjulin, Asa; Maceachen, Ellen; Ekberg, Kerstin

    2010-09-01

    There is a limited body of research on how the actual social exchange among workplace actors influences the practice of return-to-work. The objective of this study was to explore how workplace actors experience social relations at the workplace and how organizational dynamics in workplace-based return-to-work extends before and beyond the initial return of the sick listed worker to the workplace. An exploratory qualitative method approach was used, consisting of individual open-ended interviews with 33 workplace actors at seven worksites that had re-entering workers. The workplace actors represented in these interviews include: re-entering workers, supervisors, co-workers, and human resource managers. The analysis identified three distinct phases in the return to work process: while the worker is off work, when the worker returns back to work, and once back at work during the phase of sustainability of work ability. The two prominent themes that emerged across these phases include the theme of invisibility in relation to return-to-work effort and uncertainty, particularly, about how and when to enact return-to-work. The findings strengthen the notion that workplace-based return-to-work interventions need to take social relations amongst workplace actors into account. They also highlight the importance and relevance of the varied roles of different workplace actors during two relatively unseen or grey areas, of return-to-work: the pre-return and the post-return sustainability phase. Attention to the invisibility of return-to-work efforts of some actors and uncertainty about how and when to enact return-to-work between workplace actors can promote successful and sustainable work ability for the re-entering worker.

  17. [A new scale for measuring return-to-work motivation of mentally ill employees].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poersch, M

    2007-03-01

    A new scale "motivation for return to work" has been constructed to measure depressive patients' motivation to start working again in a stepwise process. The scale showed in 46 patients of a first case management (CM) sample with depressive employees a good correlation with the final social status of the CM. Only the motivated patients were successful returning to work and could be, separated clearly from the most demotivated one. Second, the scale correlated with the duration of sick leave and third showed an inverse correlation with the complete time of CM, suggesting that a successful stepwise return to work requires time. These first results need further examination.

  18. Return to work after lumbar disc surgery is related to the length of preoperative sick leave

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mikkel Ø; Ernst, Carsten; Rasmussen, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Lumbar disc herniation (LDH) is associated with high morbidity and significant socio-economic impact as the majority of the patients are of working age. The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of length of sick leave on the return-to-work rate after lumbar disc......% returned to work if surgically treated within three months. In contrast, only 50% of those whose sick leave exceeded three months returned to work. CONCLUSION: The present analysis suggests that the return-to-work rate after lumbar disc herniation surgery is affected by the length of sick leave. FUNDING...... herniation surgery. METHODS: This was a single-centre study of LDH patients who underwent surgery from 18 May 2009 through 28 November 2014. Data were collected prospectively from the DaneSpine database. Questions in DaneSpine include preoperative length of sick leave and working status one year post...

  19. Preoperative predictors of returning to work following primary total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Styron, Joseph F; Barsoum, Wael K; Smyth, Kathleen A; Singer, Mendel E

    2011-01-05

    There is little in the literature to guide clinicians in advising patients regarding their return to work following a primary total knee arthroplasty. In this study, we aimed to identify which factors are important in estimating a patient's time to return to work following primary total knee arthroplasty, how long patients can anticipate being off from work, and the types of jobs to which patients are able to return following primary total knee arthroplasty. A prospective cohort study was performed in which patients scheduled for a primary total knee arthroplasty completed a validated questionnaire preoperatively and at four to six weeks, three months, and six months postoperatively. The questionnaire assessed the patient's occupational physical demands, ability to perform job responsibilities, physical status, and motivation to return to work as well as factors that may impact his or her recovery and other workplace characteristics. Two survival analysis models were constructed to evaluate the time to return to work either at least part-time or full-time. Acceleration factors were calculated to indicate the relative percentage of time until the patient returned to work. The median time to return to work was 8.9 weeks. Patients who reported a sense of urgency about returning to work were found to return in half the time taken by other employees (acceleration factor = 0.468; p 360). Although the physical demands of a patient's job have a moderate influence on the patient's ability to return to work following a primary total knee arthroplasty, the patient's characteristics, particularly motivation, play a more important role.

  20. The role of communication and support in return to work following cancer-related absence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarker, J; Munir, F; Bains, M; Kalawsky, K; Haslam, C

    2010-10-01

    Many cancer survivors experience difficulties returning to work. However, there have been relatively few attempts to understand why problems with employer support and work adjustment occur. This paper aims to extend previous work in two ways: first, through exploring the way in which communication and support at work effect cancer survivors on their return to work and during the post-return period; and second, by drawing on a research sample working in the United Kingdom. In all, 26 cancer survivors took part in a semi-structured telephone interview. Interviews were transcribed and analysed using thematic analysis. The analysis revealed three key findings. First, the central role of communication and support from (and between) occupational health, line managers, and colleagues was highlighted. Second, two discrete processes or periods of return to work were identified: the experience of return to work during the initial period of return and the experiences of post-return to work. Third, during the post-return period, the importance of the delayed impact of cancer on the ability to work, the lack of follow-up and monitoring, and the wear-off effect of empathy and support were highlighted as contributing to return-to-work difficulties. This qualitative study highlights the importance of communication within the workplace with regard to the return-to-work process and the need to provide better support and guidance to cancer survivors, line managers and colleagues. Research is required in delineating how employers without occupational health or human resources support manage the return-to-work process. Copyright © 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Return to Work After Acute Myocardial Infarction: Comparison Between Young Women and Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreyer, Rachel P; Xu, Xiao; Zhang, Weiwei; Du, Xue; Strait, Kelly M; Bierlein, Maggie; Bucholz, Emily M; Geda, Mary; Fox, James; D'Onofrio, Gail; Lichtman, Judith H; Bueno, Héctor; Spertus, John A; Krumholz, Harlan M

    2016-02-01

    Return to work after acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is an important outcome and is particularly relevant to young patients. Women may be at a greater risk for not returning to work given evidence of their worse recovery after AMI than similarly aged men. However, sex differences in return to work after AMI has not been studied extensively in a young population (≤ 55 years). We analyzed data from 1680 patients with AMI aged 18 to 55 years (57% women) participating in the Variation in Recovery: Role of Gender on Outcomes of Young AMI Patients (VIRGO) study who were working full time (≥ 35 hours) before the event. Data were obtained by medical record abstraction and patient interviews. We conducted multivariable regression analyses to examine sex differences in return to work at 12 months after AMI, and the association of patient characteristics with return to work. When compared with young men, young women were less likely to return to work (89% versus 85%; 85% versus 89%, P=0.02); however, this sex difference was not significant after adjusting for patient sociodemographic characteristics, psychosocial factors, and health measures. Being married, engaging in a professional or clerical type of work, having more favorable physical health, and having no previous coronary disease or hypertension were significantly associated with a higher likelihood of return to work at 12 months. Among a young population, women are less likely to return to work after AMI than men. This disadvantage is explained by differences in demographic, occupational, and health characteristics. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. Returning to work one year after childbirth: data from the mother-child cohort EDEN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Maeve; Saurel-Cubizolles, Marie-Josèphe

    2013-10-01

    The amount of time women spend out of work postpartum has implications for both health and economic trajectories which may result in long-term social inequities or exacerbate those already existing. The purpose of this investigation was to describe the characteristics of women who return to work within the first year postpartum and to identify specific occupational and health factors associated with returning to work among women who worked during pregnancy. The EDEN cohort is comprised of pregnant women recruited in two French university hospitals before 24 weeks gestation with a singleton pregnancy. Questionnaires were administered at 4, 8, and 12 months after birth. Multivariate logistic regression was used to model the odds of returning to work within 1 year of childbirth with inclusion of sociodemographic, health, and occupational variables that were significantly related to returning to work at the level of p worked during pregnancy in our sample had resumed work before their infant's first birthday. After adjustment, occupational level, full-time work, standing position, job reward, desire to change job, education, and father's occupational level remained significantly associated with returning to work. Women's perception of their work as rewarding was the strongest predictor of resuming employment (OR comparing high reward to low reward: 2.48, 95 % CI: 1.60-3.83 for women with parity 0 or 1). Experiencing an adverse birth outcome had no relation to returning to work within 1 year postpartum. Across all indicator variables, women of higher socioeconomic status or with greater resources had greater odds of returning to work compared to those of lower status. This suggests that the crucial period of employment transition around the time of childbirth may intensify preexisting social inequalities.

  3. [Return to Work Strategies of Employees who Experienced Depression: Employers and HR's Perspectives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbière, Marc; Lecomte, Tania; Lachance, Jean-Philippe; Coutu, Marie-France; Negrini, Alessia; Laberon, Sonia

    Major depression is one of the leading causes of work disability across the world. In Canada, the lifetime prevalence of depression varies from 10 to 12%. Depression impacts not only the employee who is often stigmatized and can lose his professional identity, but also has consequences on colleagues and supervisors in organizations. In the literature, four models are described from which employers and managers use in their organizations to make decisions regarding the work disability of employees on sick leave: biomedical, financial management, personnel management, and organizational development. These models can also be supported by economic, legal and ethical interests. Even though these models are essential to better understand the decision of employers and HR regarding work disability, information remains scarce regarding the concrete strategies used by these stakeholders to facilitate the return to work for employees on sick leave due to depression.Objectives the aim of this paper is to document, considering employers' and human resources' perspectives, the best strategies to put in place to facilitate the return to work of employees on sick leave due to depression.Method This study was part of a larger study carried out in Canada to assess factors influencing the return to work after a depression-related sick leave, taking into account the viewpoint of four types of stakeholders: employers/human resources, supervisors, unions and people diagnosed with depression. 219 employers (68.5%) and human resources directors (31.5%) from 82.6% organizations having more than 100 employees accepted to answer a telephone semi-structured interview. The question of interest in this study is: In your opinion, what are the best strategies to help an employee who has had a depression to return to work? Coding was influenced by empirical findings and theories related to psychosocial risk factors that the authors use in their respective disciplines as well as return to work

  4. Return to work following road accidents: factors associated with late work resumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fort, Emmanuel; Bouffard, Emilie; Charnay, Pierrette; Bernard, Marlène; Boisson, Dominique; Laumon, Bernard; Hours, Martine

    2011-03-01

    To analyse factors associated with late return to work in road accident victims. The ESPARR cohort comprises road accident victims monitored over time from initiation of hospital care. A total of 608 ESPARR cohort subjects were working at the time of their accident and answered questionnaires at 6 months and/or 1 year. For each level of overall severity of injury (Maximum - Abbreviated Injury Scale (M-AIS) 1, 2, 3 and 4-5), a time-off-work threshold was defined, beyond which the subject was deemed to be a late returner; 179 subjects were considered to be late in returning to work, while 402 showed a normal pattern of return. Logistic regression identified factors associated with late return. Type of journey, overall injury severity and intention to press charges emerged as factors predictive of late return to work on the basis of the data collected at inclusion alone. After adjustment, pain (odds ratio (OR): 2.6; 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.0-6.7) and physical sequelae (OR: 3.8; 95% CI 1.7-8.3) at 6 months and the fact of pressing charges (OR: 2.6; 95% CI 1.2-5.5) remained significantly linked with late return to work. Impaired health status at 6 months after the initial accident (in the form of persistent pain and physical sequelae) is a determining factor delaying return to work following a road traffic accident.

  5. In-hospital Breastfeeding and Intention to Return to Work Influence Mothers' Breastfeeding Intentions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas-Jackson, Shera C; Bentley, Gail E; Keyton, Kristina; Reifman, Alan; Boylan, Mallory; Hart, Sybil L

    2016-11-01

    Research continues to demonstrate that formula feeding is associated with numerous long-term negative outcomes for a mother and her infant. However, many women cease breastfeeding sooner than intended and recommended. Breastfeeding has been found to be related to demographics, maternal mood, and returning to work outside the home. This study aimed to shed light on the woman's perception of the effect of working on intended breastfeeding duration. This study used intentions to return to work and in-hospital breastfeeding to predict breastfeeding intentions. Women (N = 160) were surveyed during the first 48 hours postdelivery of healthy, full-term infants. Survey instruments included demographics (socioeconomic status, maternal age, education, and marital status), depression, fetal attachment, current exclusive breastfeeding status, as well as breastfeeding and return-to-work intentions for the next year. A path analysis was used to explore relationships and predictors of breastfeeding intentions. The model had a good fit and breastfeeding intentions were predicted by exclusive breastfeeding in the hospital (β = 0.21, P work (β = -0.18, P work influence how long a mother intends to breastfeed. Attention to these areas can be provided immediately postpartum to support exclusive breastfeeding and provide informational support on continuing to breastfeed/express milk upon return to work if the mother intends to return to work.

  6. Negative Public Attitudes Towards Cancer Survivors Returning to Work: A Nationwide Survey in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Hye-Young; Shin, Ji-Yeon; Kim, Jong Heun; Kim, So-Young; Yang, Hyung-Kook; Park, Jong-Hyock

    2016-04-01

    Early diagnosis and an improved survival rate have emerged as important issues for cancer survivors returning to work during the prime of their working life. This study investigated the attitudes of the general public towards cancer survivors returning to work in Korea and attempted to identify the factors influencing this negative attitude. A general public perception survey regarding cancer survivors returning to work, targeting 2,000 individuals between 40-70 years of age, was conducted as face-to-face home visit. The public expressed a negative attitude towards cancer survivors returning to work, in terms of both perception and acceptance. Negative perception was higher among those in metropolitan areas compared with urban/rural areas (odds ratio [OR], 1.71), with monthly incomes $4,000 (OR, 1.54), and with patient care experience compared with those without (OR, 1.41). Negative acceptance was higher among those with monthly incomes $4,000 (OR, 1.71) and those with patient care experience compared with those without (OR, 1.54). The common factors between acceptance and perception that influenced negative attitude included area of residence, patient care experience, and monthly income. This study identified negative attitudes towards cancer survivors returning to work in South Korea and the factors influencing the reintegration of cancer survivors into society. It is necessary to promote community awareness and intervention activities to enable access to community, social, and individual units for the social reintegration of cancer survivors.

  7. Return to work after thoracic organ transplantation in a clinically-stable population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrucci, Lucia; Ricotti, Susanna; Michelini, Ilaria; Vitulo, Patrizio; Oggionni, Tiberio; Cascina, Alessandro; D'Armini, Andrea M; Goggi, Claudio; Campana, Carlo; Viganò, Mario; Dalla-Toffola, Elena; Tinelli, Carmine; Klersy, Catherine

    2007-11-01

    To evaluate the rate of return to work after transplantation and its determinants in a clinically-stable population of patients transplanted and followed-up at a single institution in Italy. 151 thoracic organ transplant recipients (72 lung, 79 heart) were examined. Patients were asked about daily activities, level of education, employment and clinical condition. A six-minute walking test was performed with measurement of dyspnoea using the Borg scale. Quality of Life was evaluated with the SF-36 and GHQ questionnaires. Before transplantation 131 patients (87%), (70 heart and 61 lung) worked. After transplantation, 51 patients (39%) went back to work and 3 more started working. We found that younger age, a better quality of life (mainly in the mental domain), having had an occupation previously (particularly as an entrepreneur/freelancer), and having been off work for less than 24 months, were independent predictors of return to work. Considering their good, objective and subjective, functional status, some patients who could have returned to work, chose not to. Identifying factors which affect return to work might help health professionals to adopt the best course of treatment and psychological support in order to fulfil this goal; however, return to work should not be considered as the only expression of a patient's real psychophysical condition.

  8. Attitudes towards disability management: A survey of employees returning to work and their supervisors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busse, Jason W; Dolinschi, Roman; Clarke, Andrew; Scott, Liz; Hogg-Johnson, Sheilah; Amick, Benjamin C; Rivilis, Irina; Cole, Donald

    2011-01-01

    Return to work after a leave on disability is a common phenomenon, but little is known about the attitudes of employees or their supervisors towards the disability management process. We report on employee and supervisor feedback from one disability management experience. 389 consecutive employees from the Ontario offices of a single private Canadian insurance company returning to work from short-term disability, and their supervisors. We surveyed employees and their supervisors about their experience with, and attitudes towards, the disability management process. Of those surveyed, 88 employees and 75 supervisors provided data (response rates of 22.6% and 19.3% respectively). The majority of respondents (79.1% of employees and supervisors) endorsed positive attitudes towards their disability management experience. More than 25% of employees disagreed with the following three items: case managers contributed to recovery, case managers removed barriers to recovery, and sufficient support was provided in the return to work process. More than 25% of employees and managers reported that a commitment to modify an unhelpful work situation was not followed through. The majority of participating employees returning to work from short-term disability, and their supervisors, reported a high level of satisfaction with the disability management process. Areas that may benefit from attention include some aspects of case manager-employee interaction and ensuring that support during the return to work process is provided, including modification to work situations when appropriate.

  9. Breastfeeding mothers returning to work: experiences of women at one university in Victoria, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmour, Carole; Monk, Hilary; Hall, Helen

    2013-07-01

    Working women need to juggle work, child care and family to continue to breastfeed. This qualitative study's aim was to explore women's experiences of returning to work following the birth of their baby. Focus groups were held with women within one multi-campus university, who had commenced breastfeeding at birth and had returned to work or study within 12 months. In addition, educators working with babies in childcare centres on two of the campuses were interviewed. Thematic analysis was employed used Rogoff's (2003) three planes of analysis, the individual, the interpersonal and the cultural-institutional. Three themes, proximity, flexibility, and communication, were identified relating to the factors impacting on women and their choices to breastfeed or wean on returning to work. From a socio-cultural perspective these themes can be understood as situated within the interrelated contexts of workplace, child care and family. Limitations of the study include the small number of participants and recruitment from one university.

  10. Trajectories of Return to Work Among People on Sick Leave with Mood or Anxiety Disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellström, Lone; Madsen, Trine; Nordentoft, Merete

    2017-01-01

    predicted trajectory membership. Methods We used data from the randomized IPS-MA trial (n = 283), evaluating a supported employment intervention for participants with recently diagnosed mood or anxiety disorders. Information on "weeks in employment in the past 6 months" was measured after 1/2, 1, 1 ½ and 2......Purpose The return to work (RTW) of people with mood and anxiety disorders is a heterogeneous process. We aimed to identify prototypical trajectories of RTW over a two-year period in people on sick leave with mood and anxiety disorders, and investigate if socio-demographic or clinical factors......-RTW [70% (196/283)] (practically no return to work); delayed-RTW [19% (56/283)] (6 months delay before full RTW); rapid-unstable-RTW [7% (19/283)] (members rapidly returned to work, but only worked half the time); and the smallest class, rapid-RTW [4% (12/283)] (members rapidly reached full employment...

  11. Factors influencing return to work after surgical treatment for carpal tunnel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Kesel, R; Donceel, P; De Smet, L

    2008-05-01

    Controversy exists regarding the factors influencing the duration of work incapacity after surgically treated carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). To determine relevant factors related to return to work. Surgical technique, clinical factors, demographic factors, other medical problems, psychosocial factors, work-related and economical factors were reviewed in patients operated on for CTS. Statistical multivariate analyses were performed to identify the baseline factors influencing the work incapacity period. A total of 107 cases were reviewed. Professional exposure to repetitive movements and heavy manual handling activity were associated with a longer return-to-work interval. The duration of work incapacity period was not significantly related to the socioprofessional category of the patient (self-employed or employee) or to the type of the procedure (open versus endoscopic surgery). Work-related features have a more important influence on return to work than personal, pathological or surgical features.

  12. Return to work after cancer and pre-cancer job dissatisfaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinesen, Eskil; Kolodziejczyk, Christophe; Ladenburg, Jacob

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the association between pre-cancer job dissatisfaction and return-to-work probability 3 years after a cancer diagnosis. We use a Danish data set combining administrative data and a survey to breast and colon cancer survivors. We find that the return-to-work probability has a negative...... correlation with pre-cancer job dissatisfaction with mental demands (where the correlation is driven by the high-educated) and with physical demands and the superior (where the correlation is driven by the low-educated). Educational gradients in the probability of returning to work after cancer...... are not significantly affected by controlling for pre-cancer job dissatisfaction and pre-cancer ability to work....

  13. Timing of return to work and women's breastfeeding practices in urban Malaysia: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaiman, Zaharah; Liamputtong, Pranee; Amir, Lisa H

    2018-01-01

    Nearly half of the working population in Malaysia are women, and with only a short period of maternity leave, they may struggle to achieve the recommended 6 months of exclusive breastfeeding. The aim of this paper was to explore the relationship between the timing of return to work and beliefs and breastfeeding practices among women in urban Malaysia. A qualitative inquiry based on a phenomenological framework and multiple methods was used: face-to-face interview, participant diary and researcher field notes. Data collection took place in Penang and the Klang Valley, Malaysia, from March to September 2011. Eligible participants were purposely identified at randomly selected recruitment sites. A thematic analysis method was used to develop the typologies and categories of the findings. A total of 40 working women with a mean age of 32 years (SD 3.4) were interviewed and 15 participated in the diary writing. Most women (75%) returned to work between 2 and 3 months. Only 10% returned to work 4 months or later postpartum, and 15% had an early return to work (defined here as less than 2 months). The women fell into three groups: Passionate women with a strong determination to breastfeed, who exclusively breastfed for 6 months; Ambivalent women, who commenced breastfeeding but were unable to sustain this after returning to work; and Equivalent women, who perceived formula feeding as equally nutritious as breast milk. Although longer maternity leave was very important for Ambivalent women to maintain breastfeeding, it was not as important for the Equivalent or Passionate women. In conclusion, returning earlier was not an absolute barrier to continuing breastfeeding. Instead, a woman's beliefs and perceptions of breastfeeding were more important than the timing of her return to work in determining her ability to maintain breastfeeding or breast milk feeding. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Union perceptions of factors related to the return to work of employees with depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbière, Marc; Renard, Marianne; St-Arnaud, Louise; Coutu, Marie-France; Negrini, Alessia; Sauvé, Geneviève; Lecomte, Tania

    2015-06-01

    Between 30 and 60% of the societal cost of depression is due to losses related to decreased work productivity. To date, only a few studies have focused on union perspectives related to factors influencing the return-to-work of employees absent due to depression, despite evidence of the importance of these perspectives. The purpose of this study is to develop a better understanding of union perspectives on the factors surrounding the return-to-work of employees who were absent from work due to depression. In this qualitative study, conducted in Canada (Québec), 23 individuals (union representatives and peer workers) from the three largest unions (mixed industries) in Quebec took part in one of three focus groups. Fourteen emerging themes (e.g., work environment, attitudes toward depression) were distributed over five categories of stakeholders involved in the return-to-work of employees on sick leave (i.e., employers and immediate supervisors, co-workers, employees on sick leave due to depression, general physicians, and unions). We observed four major cross-cutting themes that arose beyond these five categories: (1) organizational culture in which mental health issues and human aspects of work are central, (2) support and follow-up during the work absence and the return-to-work, (3) lack of resources to assist the employee in the return-to-work, and (4) stakeholders' prejudices and discomfort regarding depression. Our results clarify the factors, from a union perspective, that may facilitate or hinder the return-to-work of employees absent from work due to depression.

  15. Factors Related to Return to Work in Women After Breast Cancer in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azarkish, Fatemeh; Mirzaii Najmabadi, Khadijeh; Latifnejad Roudsari, Robab; Homaei Shandiz, Fatemeh

    2015-09-01

    Most women are diagnosed with breast cancer (BC) when they are still at the appropriate age for employment. The increasing survival rates of patients with BC call for more attention to their ability to return to work. The aim of this study was to identify factors related to the return to work in Iranian women underwent BC treatment. A total of 175 women with BC, who met the inclusion criteria, were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. The subjects were recruited from four hospitals affiliated to Mashhad university of medical sciences. These hospitals are oncology referral centers in eastern Iran. All records of employed women with BC were studied in four hospitals of Mashhad city, Iran, during 2000 - 2010. The researchers designed a questionnaire, which consisted of questions regarding social/demographic, health/disease, and work characteristics. The questionnaires were completed through interviews. Data were analyzed using SPSS software, version 11.5. The mean age of the patients at the time of interview was 44.3 ± 6.72 years. Mean age of "Return- to-work" group was 42.71 and "No return-to-work" group was 51.06. Most women (80%) were married. At the time of the interview, 80% had returned to work after a BC diagnosis. Older patients (OR = 0.796; 95% CI, 0.625 - 0.907, P = 0.002), and those with a great deal of work experience (OR = 0.861; 95% CI, 0.752 - 0.986, P = 0.030) were less likely to return to work. Also, women who had no pain or surgery scar (OR = 23.03; 95% CI, 4.53 - 117.02, P work (OR = 22.373; 95% CI, 4.04 - 23.892, P work after BC treatment in working women in Mashhad city, Iran. These predictors should be taken into account in order to improve the patient's life quality.

  16. Determinants for return to work among sickness certified patients in general practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    von Celsing Anna-Sophia

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Long-term sickness absence is one of the main risk factors for permanent exit out of the labour market. Early identification of the condition is essential to facilitate return to work. The aim of this study was to analyse possible determinants of return to work and their relative impact. Methods All 943 subjects aged 18 to 63 years, sickness certified at a Primary Health Care Centre in Sweden from 1 January until 31 August 2004, were followed up for three years. Baseline information on sex, age, sick leave diagnosis, employment status, extent of sick leave, and sickness absence during the year before baseline was obtained, as was information on all compensated days of sick leave, disability pension and death during follow-up. Results Slightly more than half the subjects were women, mean age was 39 years. Half of the study population returned to work within 14 days after baseline, and after three years only 15 subjects were still on sick leave. In multivariate proportional hazards regression analysis the extent of previous sick leave, age, being on part-time sick leave, and having a psychiatric, musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, nervous disease, digestive system, or injury or poisoning diagnosis decreased the return to work rate, while being employed increased it. Marital status, sex, being born in Sweden, citizenship, and annual salary had no influence. In logistic regression analyses across follow-up time these variables altogether explained 88-90% of return to work variation. Conclusions Return to work was positively or negatively associated by a number of variables easily accessible in the GP’s office. Track record data in the form of previous sick leave was the most influential variable.

  17. Return to work after cancer and pre-cancer job dissatisfaction

    OpenAIRE

    Heinesen, Eskil; Kolodziejczyk, Christophe; Ladenburg, Jacob; Andersen, Ingelise; Thielen, Karsten

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the association between pre-cancer job dissatisfaction and return-to-work probability 3 years after a cancer diagnosis. We use a Danish data set combining administrative data and a survey to breast and colon cancer survivors. We find that the return-to-work probability has a negative correlation with pre-cancer job dissatisfaction with mental demands (where the correlation is driven by the high-educated) and with physical demands and the superior (where the correlation is drive...

  18. Perspectives of unemployed workers with mental health problems: barriers to and solutions for return to work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Audhoe, Selwin S.; Nieuwenhuijsen, Karen; Hoving, Jan L.; Sluiter, Judith K.; Frings-Dresen, Monique H. W.

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the barriers to and solutions for return to work (RTW) from the perspective of unemployed workers who were sick-listed due to mental health problems. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 25 sick-listed unemployed workers with mental health problems. Qualitative data analysis was

  19. Determinants of return to work in patients with hand disorders and hand Injuries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Opsteegh, L.; Reinders-Messelink, H.A.; Schollier, D.; Groothoff, J.W.; Postema, K.; Dijkstra, P.U.; van der Sluis, C.K.

    Introduction Return to work (RTW) in patients with hand disorders and hand injuries is determined by several determinants not directly related to the physical situation. Besides biomedical determinants, work-related and psychosocial determinants may influence RTW as well. This study is conducted to

  20. Return to work after renal transplantation: a study of the Brazilian Public Social Security System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messias, Alexandre Augusto; Reichelt, Angela J; Dos Santos, Edson F; Albuquerque, Galton C; Kramer, José S P; Hirakata, Vania N; Garcia, Valter D

    2014-12-15

    Return to work is an objective parameter used worldwide to evaluate the success of organ transplantation and is especially feasible after renal transplantation. This study sought to describe the frequency of return to work after renal transplantation and related characteristics. Retrospective cohort of 511 isolated kidney transplant recipients was recruited from a Brazilian referral center from January 2005 to December 2009; all were matched to the public social security database to determine inclusion and benefit awards, as well as the rate of resumption of contributions to the public social security system, a surrogate marker of work rehabilitation. Characteristics associated with work return were analyzed. No social security records were found for 28 subjects. The remaining 483 subjects had a mean age of 45±13 years; 62% were male; 401 (83%) received some public social security benefit; 298 were paying dues and could, therefore, receive temporary or permanent disability benefits. Of these, 78 subjects made social security payments after transplantation, resulting in a work return rate of 26% (95% confidence interval, 21-32). Younger age, living donor graft, and chronic glomerulonephritis were significantly associated with return to work. In Brazil, most renal transplant recipients are on social security benefits, but only a small proportion return to work after surgery. Clinical characteristics may help define work resumption trends.

  1. Interventions to facilitate return to work in adults with adjustment disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arends, Iris; Bruinvels, David J.; Rebergen, David S.; Nieuwenhuijsen, Karen; Madan, Ira; Neumeyer-Gromen, Angela; Bultmann, Ute; Verbeek, Jos H.

    2012-01-01

    Background Adjustment disorders are a frequent cause of sick leave and various interventions have been developed to expedite the return to work (RTW) of individuals on sick leave due to adjustment disorders. Objectives To assess the effects of interventions facilitating RTW for workers with acute or

  2. Return to work of road accident victims claiming compensation for personal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornes, P

    1992-01-01

    Road accidents resulting in personal injury are an increasing cost to society. This study is based on 609 accident victims (of whom 521 survived injury) who were in employment when injured and whose claims for personal injury were settled for 5000 pounds or more by one insurance company over 2 years. It examines survivors' residual disablement, return to work and involvement with rehabilitation services. Data on a representative sample of 101 cases are analysed in more detail to identify possible 'predictors' of return to work. Both univariate and stepwise logistic regression analysis suggest that return to work is less associated with clinical variables, on which much medical advice on return to work is based, than with such other variables as time off work, absence of psychological problems and younger age. Very low rates of referral to rehabilitation may indicate that a rehabilitative approach to cost containment is underutilized in comparison with the traditional emphasis on preventive measures and enhanced medical treatment. More effective rehabilitation, however, may require new approaches to clinical case management, especially in orthopaedic departments where most personal injury claimants are treated.

  3. Time trend analysis of return to work after stroke in Denmark 1996-2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hannerz, Harald; Mortensen, Ole S; Poulsen, Otto M

    2012-01-01

    In the period 1997-2005, the Danish government initiated a series of legislative changes aimed at facilitating RTW (return to work) in the Danish population. In the present study, we investigated the odds of being gainfully occupied ca. two years after stroke as a function of onset calendar year...

  4. Association between attributions of responsibility for motor vehicle crashes, depressive symptoms, and return to work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Jason; O'Donnell, Meaghan; Stafford, Lesley; Nordfjaern, Trond; Berk, Michael

    2014-11-01

    Perceptions surrounding the underlying causes of accidents and injuries may be a key mechanism influencing postaccident health and functional outcomes among people injured in road crashes. In particular, attributions of responsibility may influence rates of postcrash depressive symptomatology and return-to-work. We studied a large sample of people injured in motor vehicle crashes who were working at their time of accident and needed to take time off as a result of their injuries. Interviews took place at 2 time points, 12 months apart (T1: n = 1,024, T2: n = 303). Comparisons were made between participants' levels of depressive symptoms and rates of return to work based on their assessment of responsibility for their accident. People who did not attribute responsibility to themselves for their accident were 3 times more likely to exhibit symptoms of depression at follow-up than those who attributed responsibility to themselves. People with depressive symptoms were 3.5 times less likely to have returned to work. The effect of attributions of responsibility for accidents on return to work was mediated by the presence of depressive symptoms. Functional and psychological recovery from road trauma is closely associated with the assessment of responsibility for accidents. Findings are discussed in light of established posttrauma cognitive theories, the potential explanatory power of broader, more socially oriented models, and the changing nature of road trauma populations. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. Return to work and risk of subsequent detachment from employment after myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smedegaard, Laerke; Numé, Anna Karin; Charlot, Mette

    2017-01-01

    Background--Limited data are available on return to work and subsequent detachment from employment after admission for myocardial infarction (MI). Methods and Results--Using individual-level linkage of data from nationwide registries, we identified patients of working age (30-65 years) discharged......--Despite that most patients returned to work after first-time MI, about 1 in 4 was detached from employment after 1 year. Several factors including age and lower socioeconomic status were associated with risk of detachment from employment.......Background--Limited data are available on return to work and subsequent detachment from employment after admission for myocardial infarction (MI). Methods and Results--Using individual-level linkage of data from nationwide registries, we identified patients of working age (30-65 years) discharged...... after first-time MI in the period 1997 to 2012, who were employed before admission. To assess the cumulative incidence of return to work and detachment from employment, the Aalen Johansen estimator was used. Incidences were compared with population controls matched on age and sex. Logistic regression...

  6. Healing a Vulnerable Self : Exploring Return to Work for Women With Mental Health Problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nielsen, Maj Britt D.; Rugulies, Reiner; Hjortkjaer, Charlotte; Bultmann, Ute; Christensen, Ulla

    Mental health problems (MHPs) such as stress and depression are among the leading causes of work disability. In this article we explore how women with MHPs experience sickness absence and subsequent return to work. We conducted 16 semistructured interviews and employed constructivist grounded theory

  7. Return to work and quality of life in severely injured patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Post, R. B.; Van der Sluis, C. K.; Ten Duis, H. J.

    2006-01-01

    Background. Little is known about the long-term consequences of severe injuries in terms of return to productivity and quality of life. Methods. In this study we focused on the return to work status and quality of life in 53 severely injured patients (AIS/ISS >= 16, mean ISS 24, range 16 - 54), mean

  8. The reservation wage theory, vocational rehabilitation and the return to work of disabled employees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgelund, Jan; Holm, Sociologisk Institut, KU, Anders

    Previous studies find that participation in educational measures does not increase sick-listed employees’ chance of returning to work. This is surprising because education is supposed to increase human capital and raise productivity. However, a higher productivity may make the participants raise ...

  9. Effective return-to-work interventions after acquired brain injury: A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donker-Cools, Birgit H. P. M.; Daams, Joost G.; Wind, Haije; Frings-Dresen, Monique H. W.

    2016-01-01

    To gather knowledge about effective return-to-work (RTW) interventions for patients with acquired brain injury (ABI). A database search was performed in PubMed, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL and the Cochrane Library using keywords and Medical Subject Headings. Studies were included if they met inclusion

  10. Employees Sick-Listed with Mental Disorders : Who Returns to Work and When?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelen, C. A. M.; Norder, G.; Koopmans, P. C.; van Rhenen, W.; van der Klink, J. J. L.; Bultmann, U.

    Purpose To investigate return to work (RTW) in employees sick-listed with mental disorders classified according to the International Classification of Diseases (ICD). Methods Sickness absences (SA) medically certified as emotional disturbance (ICD-10 R45) or mental and behavioral disorders (ICD-10

  11. Barriers and facilitators to return to work in mental disorders : Multi-stakeholder perspective study (poster)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosen, M.C.W.; Arends, I.; Lugtenberg, M.; van Gestel, J.A.W.M.; Schaapveld, B.C.T.M.; Terluin, B.; van Weeghel, J.; van der Klink, J.J.L.; Brouwers, E.P.M.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Common mental disorders (CMDs) are among the leading causes of disability worldwide and are a pressing issue for society. CMDs are the most prevalent causes of sickness absence and different stakeholders are involved in facilitating return to work. In this qualitative study, the

  12. Return to work after mild-to-moderate stroke: work satisfaction and predictive factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kemp, Jet; Kruithof, Willeke J.; Nijboer, Tanja C. W.; van Bennekom, Coen A. M.; van Heugten, Caroline; Visser-Meily, Johanna M. A.

    2017-01-01

    A large proportion of stroke patients are unable to return to work (RTW), although figures vary greatly. A total of 121 mild-to-moderate stroke patients, who had a paid job at the time of their stroke were included (a) to quantify RTW and work satisfaction one-year post-stroke (using the Utrecht

  13. Building blocks for return to work after sick leave due to depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, G.

    2016-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) has a high prevalence among the working population and is well known to have adverse effects on employees work performance. This thesis examines the effectiveness of an occupational therapy intervention on return to work and predictors of impaired work functioning.

  14. Predictors of return to work in employees sick-listed with mental health problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D.Nielsen, Maj Britt; Madsen, Ida E.H.; Bültmann, Ute

    2011-01-01

    Sickness absence due to mental health problems (MHPs) is increasing in several European countries. However, little is known about return to work (RTW) for employees with MHPs. This prospective study aimed to identify predictors for RTW in employees sick-listed with MHPs....

  15. Returning to Work after a Common Mental Health Disorder: a New Preoccupation for Mental Health Professionals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepièce, Brice; Reynaert, Christine; Jacques, Denis; Zdanowicz, Nicolas

    2017-09-01

    Since 2010, the Belgian mental healthcare system has been involved in a structural reform: the main objective of this reorganisation is to foster the reintegration in the community of patients suffering from a mental health disorder. In parallel, the role of mental health professionals has evolved these last years: from a strictly clinical role, to the preoccupation with the rehabilitation of social competencies such as enhancing patients' abilities to return to work. The aim of this paper is to explore, specifically for patients hospitalized for a common mental health disorder, the predictive variables of returning to work within 6 months after hospitalization (RTW6). Our sample was extracted from routinely collected data during the patients' hospital stay (10 days) at the Psychosomatic Rehabilitation Day Centre of CHU Godinne. A sample of 134 patients participated in our study. Those patients were contacted 6 months after their hospitalization to assess resumption of work. We found that a patient's sociodemographicand socioeconomic variables, and depressive symptoms at the beginning of hospitalization were not predictive of return to work within 6 months (RTW6). On the other hand, duration of absence from work before hospitalization and the diagnosis of a major depression in particular were negatively associated with RTW6, whereas improvement of depressive symptoms during hospitalization stay was positively associated to RTW6. Our study identified the diagnosis of major depression and the duration of absence from work before hospitalization as two important risk factors impeding a fast return to work for patients hospitalised for a common mental health disorder. As the preoccupation with patients' abilities to return to work is now on the agenda of mental health professionals, special support and supervision should be dedicated to the more vulnerable patients.

  16. Practices of Return-to-Work Coordinators Working in Large Organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Marie-José; Nastasia, Iuliana; Coutu, Marie-France; Bernier, Michael

    2017-03-01

    Purpose Although the role of return-to-work coordinators (RTW coordinators) is associated with reducing long-term disabilities, little has been written about their practices. The objective of this study was to clearly identify their tasks and activities and the stakeholders with whom they collaborate. Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted using a web-based self-administered questionnaire. Participant inclusion criteria were as follows: (1) working for a large organization with 500 or more employees; (2) being responsible for managing disabilities and coordinating the return-to-work process; and (3) having been involved in coordinating the return to work of at least one person in the past year. Results 195 RTW coordinators completed the questionnaire. The three tasks or activities rated as most important were applying laws, policies, and regulations related to work absences and return to work; contacting the absent worker; and planning the return to work. A nursing or occupational health and safety training background significantly influenced the RTW coordinators' practices. In addition, RTW coordinators collaborated mainly with workers and their supervisors. Conclusion Despite a wide variety of contexts and diverging definitions of competencies, a set of common RTW coordination practices appears to exist across industrialized countries. RTW coordinators with a training background in the health field seem better able to assimilate the various dimensions of work disability. Moreover, concerted action was found to be minimal and a far cry from recommendations. The practices defined could serve as a benchmark for describing RTW coordinators' responsibilities in greater detail and allow for cross-organization and cross-country comparisons.

  17. Predicting return to work for lower back pain patients receiving worker's compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancourt, J; Kettelhut, M

    1992-06-01

    The results of a prospective study of 134 patients with lower back pain suggest that nonorganic factors are better predictors of return to work than organic findings. Patients who returned to work had fewer job, personal, or family related problems. There were no significant differences between patients who returned to work and those who did not when comparing myelograms, computed tomographic scans, or roentgenographs. The only significant difference in physical organic findings was for muscle atrophy. Patients who did not return to work had a statistically higher incidence rate of muscle atrophy. Length of time off from work was significantly related to outcome, but when patients were categorized according to time off the job, different factors predicted failure to return for patients off work for less than 6 months and patients off for more than 6 months. For patients off for less than 6 months, important predictors were a high Oswestry score, history of leg pain, family relocation, short tenure on the job, verbal magnification of pain, reports of moderate to severe pain on superficial palpation, and positive reaction to a "sham" sciatic tension test. None of these was a significant predictor for the group off for more than 6 months. For the group off work for more than 6 months, previous injuries, and stability of family living arrangements were among the significant predictors not significant for the group off less than 6 months. Using 21 factors selected from a larger group of 92 factors, three statistically significant (P less than or equal to 0.001) predictive measures were developed. These measures predicted return to work for the total sample, and for the two subgroups (off more than, or less than 6 months) more accurately than did the total set of 92 factors.

  18. The Predictive Validity of the Return-to-Work Self-Efficacy Scale for Return-to-Work Outcomes in Claimants with Musculoskeletal Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwer, Sandra; Amick, Benjamin C; Lee, Hyunmi; Franche, Renée-Louise; Hogg-Johnson, Sheilah

    2015-12-01

    To examine the predictive validity of the Return-to-Work Self-Efficacy (RTWSE) Scale in terms of the scale's baseline absolute values and of changes in self-efficacy scores, with the outcome of return-to-work (RTW) status in a sample of injured workers with upper extremity and back musculoskeletal disorders. RTWSE was measured with a 10-item scale assessing Overall RTWSE and three self-efficacy subdomains: (1) ability to cope with pain, (2) ability to obtain help from supervisor and (3) ability to obtain help from co-workers. Outcome measures included RTW status (yes/no) measured at 6- and 12-month follow-up. RTWSE improvement was defined as an increase in self-efficacy scores between baseline and 6-month follow-up time points. Logistic regression analyses were performed with RTW status as the dependent variable and adjusted for age, gender, educational level, personal income, pain site, pain severity, functional status, and depressive symptoms, and for baseline RTWSE scores in the improvement score analyses. A total of 632 claimants completed the baseline telephone interview 1 month post-injury; 446 subjects completed the 6-month interview (71 %) and 383 subjects completed the 12-month interview (61 %). The baseline Pain RTWSE scores were found to be useful to predict RTW status 6 months post-injury, with a trend for baseline Overall RTWSE. Improvements over time in Overall RTWSE and in Co-worker RTWSE were found to be useful to predict 12-month RTW status, with trends for improvements in Supervisor RTWSE and Pain RTWSE. The study found evidence supporting the predictive validity of the RTWSE scale within 12 months after injury. The RTWSE scale may be a potentially valuable scale in research and in managing work disabled claimants with musculoskeletal disorders.

  19. Healing a vulnerable self: exploring return to work for women with mental health problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Maj Britt D; Rugulies, Reiner; Hjortkjaer, Charlotte; Bültmann, Ute; Christensen, Ulla

    2013-03-01

    Mental health problems (MHPs) such as stress and depression are among the leading causes of work disability. In this article we explore how women with MHPs experience sickness absence and subsequent return to work. We conducted 16 semistructured interviews and employed constructivist grounded theory for the analysis. We found that whereas sickness absence constituted a major threat to positive self-images, the experience had potential as a personal growth experience: Although some women felt handicapped, others became stronger and more self-confident. The core of the experience was not the return to work but a process of healing a vulnerable self--the ability both to refocus attention from symptoms to other life goals and to maintain or reconstruct a positive self-image. Supportive health care and acknowledgment from others facilitated the healing process.

  20. Return to work and risk of subsequent detachment from employment after myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smedegaard, Laerke; Numé, Anna Karin; Charlot, Mette

    2017-01-01

    Background--Limited data are available on return to work and subsequent detachment from employment after admission for myocardial infarction (MI). Methods and Results--Using individual-level linkage of data from nationwide registries, we identified patients of working age (30-65 years) discharged...... after first-time MI in the period 1997 to 2012, who were employed before admission. To assess the cumulative incidence of return to work and detachment from employment, the Aalen Johansen estimator was used. Incidences were compared with population controls matched on age and sex. Logistic regression...... was applied to estimate odds ratios for associations between detachment from employment and age, sex, comorbidities, income, and education level. Of 39 296 patients of working age discharged after first-time MI, 22 394 (56.9%) were employed before admission. Within 1 year 91.1% (95% confidence interval [CI...

  1. Case management interviews and the return to work of disabled employees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgelund, Jan; Holm, Anders

    on the probability of returning to work for a new employer. We argue that the effect of CMI may originate from two different sources. First, CMI may motivate sick-listed employees to resume work because it either makes continued benefit receipt appear less attractive or work resumption more attractive. Second, CMI......In response to an increasing number of sickness and disability beneficiaries, many countries have launched policies that emphasize the role of case management. This study measures the effect of case-management interview (CMI) on long-term sick-listed employees’ probability of returning to work....... It is based on combined survey and register data of 1,000 employees sick-listed for more than eight weeks. The study differs from previous CMI-studies in several respects. In contrast to previous studies, we use instrumental variables (municipal level information) to correct for selection effects in CMI...

  2. Heterogeneity in Returns to Work Experience: A Dynamic Model of Female Labor Force Participation

    OpenAIRE

    Ken Yamada

    2009-01-01

    This paper provides structural estimates of heterogeneous returns to work experience for Japanese married women. A dynamic model of labor force participation is used to account for dynamic self-selection into employment. Heterogeneity is incorporated into the model in a way that allows for the multidimensional skill heterogeneity in employment and home production and for the individual-specific slope and curvature of experience effect on earnings. The structural estimates and their comparison...

  3. Return to work after cancer in the UK: attitudes and experiences of line managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amir, Ziv; Wynn, Phil; Chan, Fong; Strauser, David; Whitaker, Stuart; Luker, Karen

    2010-12-01

    With improvements in diagnosis, treatment and survival rates, returning to work after cancer is of increasing importance to individuals and employers. Although line managers can play a potentially important role in the return to work process, research thus far has focused on the return to work process from the perspective of cancer survivors. To explore the attitudes of line managers towards employees with a cancer diagnosis. A short self-administered, on-line questionnaire was circulated to managers in the North East of England. Factorial structures of the line managers' attitudes survey was examined using exploratory factor analysis and the effect of demographic characteristics and organisational variable on the attitudes of line managers was examined using multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA). Line managers' attitudes can be conceptualized according to five empirical factors: (a) fearful attitudes towards cancer survivors, (b) supportive attitudes, (c) line-managers' perceived burden, (d) maintaining normality, and (e) financial benefits issues. Overall, line-managers hold relatively positive attitudes toward cancer survivors and are willing to support them in their effort to return to work. However, managers tend to harbour negative attitudes regarding the individual cancer survivors' ability both to engage in work related activities and in meeting the demands of employment. MANOVA results also indicated that female managers hold more positive attitudes than male managers toward cancer diagnosis, less concerned about workload burdens of working with cancer survivors, and more willing to help cancer survivors maintain normality. The results of this study suggest that employers/line-managers need to be provided with training, support, and resources to help them facilitate employment and job retention of employees diagnosed with cancer.

  4. Meta-synthesis of qualitative research on return to work among employees with common mental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Malene Friis; Nielsen, Karina M; Brinkmann, Svend

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate which opportunities and obstacles employees with common mental disorders (CMD) experience in relation to return to work (RTW) and how they perceive the process of returning to work. In addition, the study explores what characterizes an optimal RTW intervention and points to possible ways to improve future interventions for employees with CMD. A systematic literature search was conducted, and eight qualitative studies of medium or high quality published between 1995-2011 were included in this systematic review. The eight studies were synthesized using the meta-ethnographic method. This meta-synthesis found that employees with CMD identify a number of obstacles to and facilitators of returning to work related to their own personality, social support at the workplace, and the social and rehabilitation systems. The employees found it difficult to decide when they were ready to resume work and experienced difficulties implementing RTW solutions at the workplace. This study reveals that the RTW process should be seen as a continuous and coherent one where experiences of the past and present and anticipation of the future are dynamically interrelated and affect the success or failure of RTW. The meta-synthesis also illuminates insufficient coordination between the social and rehabilitation systems and suggests how an optimal RTW intervention could be designed.

  5. Return to work helps maintain treatment gains in the rehabilitation of whiplash injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Michael; Adams, Heather; Thibault, Pascal; Moore, Emily; Carriere, Junie S; Larivière, Christian

    2017-05-01

    This study examined the relation between return to work and the maintenance of treatment gains made over the course of a rehabilitation intervention. The study sample consisted of 110 individuals who had sustained whiplash injuries in rear collision motor vehicle accidents and were work-disabled at the time of enrolment in the study. Participants completed pre- and post-treatment measures of pain severity, disability, cervical range of motion, depression, posttraumatic stress symptoms, and catastrophizing. Pain severity was assessed again at 1-year follow-up. At 1-year follow-up, 73 participants had returned to work and 37 remained work-disabled. Analyses revealed that participants who returned to work were more likely to maintain treatment gains (77.5%) than participants who remained work-disabled (48%), χ = 6.3, P work and the maintenance of treatment gains remained significant (β = 0.30, P processes by which prolonged work-disability might contribute to the failure to maintain treatment gains. Important knowledge gaps still remain concerning the individual, workplace, and system variables that might play a role in whether or not the gains made in the rehabilitation of whiplash injury are maintained. Clinical implications of the findings are also addressed.

  6. Return to work outcomes following accident compensation corporation work capacity assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, Blair

    2002-05-10

    To determine the proportion of Accident Compensation Corporation (ACC) claimants who have returned to fulltime work after ceasing to receive ACC weekly compensation following Work Capacity Assessment (WCAP). To assess what factors impact on return to work. To assess whether ACC's research findings into return to work outcomes WCAP are valid. A structured questionnaire telephone follow-up survey was conducted with ACC claimants seen for WCAP. 43% of those exited from ACC weekly compensation after WCAP were currently working fulltime. Claimants who had exited ACC after WCAP were significantly more likely to be working than those remaining on ACC. Claimants over 40 years of age were significantly less likely to be working. Gender, race, length of time since injury, and retraining made no difference to return to work. 80% of claimants felt that the WCAP process was unfair. Nearly half of those claimants certified as being unfit for work but now exited from ACC via WCAP were working fulltime. This may indicate that ACC's rehabilitation is successful, or that claimants tend to remain on ACC for economic rather than injury reasons, or that WCAP results in claimants returning to physically unsuitable work putting them at risk of further injury. ACC's research finding, that 79% of claimants were working after WCAP does not appear to be valid.

  7. Return to work following an aquafitness and muscle strengthening program for the low back injured.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeFort, S M; Hannah, T E

    1994-11-01

    Our purpose, in this prospective clinical study, was to identify the best predictors of 2-month return to work or retraining for a group of low back injured subjects (n = 40) who completed at least 8 weeks of a community-based rehabilitation program that combined aerobic and flexibility exercise conducted in the water (aquafitness) with muscle strength and endurance training. Baseline demographic characteristics and changes in physical fitness, pain, disability, and psychological well-being during the course of program participation were compared between two groups of low back injured subjects: those who returned to work (RTW) [n = 24], and those who did not (N-RTW) [n = 16]. Subjects in both groups showed comparable improvement in measures of physical fitness at 8 weeks. However, multivariate analyses showed significant between-group differences in self-report measures. The RTW group showed significant improvement in measures of pain, disability, anxiety, and vigor while self-esteem and affect remained stable. The N-RTW group displayed no change in pain and disability variables and had significant deterioration in mean overall psychological well-being over time. The best predictors of return to work using logistic regression analyses were a first injury rather than a repeat injury to the lower back, and stability in self-esteem. Suggestions are offered for further research to examine the benefits of aquafit exercise for the low back injured, for additional interventions for those with a reinjury, and for maintaining or enhancing self-esteem as a treatment goal.

  8. The enablers and barriers to continue breast milk feeding in women returning to work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaiman, Zaharah; Liamputtong, Pranee; Amir, Lisa H

    2016-04-01

    To describe the enablers and barriers working women experience in continuing breast milk feeding after they return to work postpartum in urban Malaysia. In Malaysia, urban working women have low rates of breastfeeding and struggle to achieve the recommended 6 months exclusive breastfeeding. A qualitative enquiry based on a phenomenological framework and multiple methods were used to explore women's experiences in depth. Multiple qualitative methods using face-to-face interview and participant diary were used. Data collection took place in urban suburbs around Penang and Klang Valley, Malaysia from March-September 2011. Participants were 40 employed women with infants less than 24 months. Only 11 of the participants worked from home. Based on the women's experiences, we categorized them into three groups: 'Passionate' women with a strong determination and exclusively breastfed for 6 months, 'Ambivalent' women who initiated breastfeeding, but were unable to sustain exclusive breastfeeding after returning to work and 'Equivalent' women who introduced infant formula prior to returning to work. Passion and to a lesser extent intention, influenced women's choice. Women's characteristics played a greater role in their infant feeding outcomes than their work environment. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Influence of Partner Support on an Employed Mother's Intention to Breastfeed After Returning to Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Despite the increasing number of large companies complying with the demands for a breastfeeding-friendly workplace, providing on-site lactation support, some mothers still find continuing to breastfeed a challenge. We postulated that greater support and encouragement from the partner would be independently predictive of whether the mother would take advantage of workplace milk expression breaks and lactation rooms and continue to breastfeed after returning to work. To evaluate this hypothesis, we conducted a survey at a female labor-intensive electronics manufacturer in Taiwan. Subjects and Methods: Six hundred eight working mothers in an electronics manufacturing plant in Tainan Science Park in Southern Taiwan who had access to dedicated lactation rooms at the workplace were interviewed. Questionnaire content included female employee demographics, employment characteristics, partner-related characteristics, and breastfeeding behavior after returning to work following the birth of their most recently born child. Results: The partner's initial support of the choice to breastfeed and encouragement to use the lactation room and milk expression breaks and the mother's perception of the partner's support for baby care were significant predictors of the intention to continue to breastfeed after returning to work, after adjusting for the employed mother's demographics and employment characteristics, supporting our hypothesis. Conclusions: These findings suggest that antenatal education or activities provided by the workplace should include the partner, which may improve workplace breastfeeding rates. PMID:24650363

  10. Return to work after spinal stenosis surgery and the patient’s quality of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Truszczyńska

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The return to work of patients who undergo spinal surgery poses important medical and social challenge. Objectives: 1 To establish whether patients who undergo spinal stenosis surgery later return to work. 2 To establish the patient's attitude towards employment. 3 To assess the quality of life of the patients and its influence on their attitude to work. Materials and Methods: The study population consisted of 58 patients aged from 21 to 80 years (the mean age was 52.33±14.12. There were 29 women (50% and 29 men (50% in the group. The patients' quality of life was measured by the use of the WHOQOL-BREF instrument. Individual interviews were conducted 3 to 8 months (a mean of 5.72 months ±1.6 after the surgery. Results: 1 Although 13 patients (22.3% returned to work, 44 (75.9% did not, these being manual workers of vocational secondary education. 2 Almost half of the patients (27 patients, i.e. 44% intend to apply for disability pension, 16 patients (27.6% consider themselves unfit to work, 22 patients (37.9% do not feel like working again. 3 The quality of life of the patients decreased. Domain scores for the WHOQOL-BREF are transformed to a 0-100 scale. The mean physical health amounted to 60.67 (±16.31, the mean psychological health was 58.78 (±16.01, while the mean social relations with family and friends were 59.91 (±20.69, and the mean environment 59.62 (±12.48. Conclusions: 1 A total of 75% of the patients operated for lumbar spinal stenosis do not return to their preoperative work. Difficulties in returning to work and decreased quality of life are associated with female sex, lower-level education, hard physical work and low income. 2 Physical health, psychological health, social relations and environment decreased to the mean of approximately 60. 3 The quality of life of the patients who did return to work was similar to that of healthy people.

  11. Return to work after spinal stenosis surgery and the patient's quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truszczyńska, Aleksandra; Rąpała, Kazimierz; Truszczyński, Olaf; Tarnowski, Adam; Łukawski, Stanisław

    2013-06-01

    The return to work of patients who undergo spinal surgery poses important medical and social challenge. 1) To establish whether patients who undergo spinal stenosis surgery later return to work. 2) To establish the patient's attitude towards employment. 3) To assess the quality of life of the patients and its influence on their attitude to work. The study population consisted of 58 patients aged from 21 to 80 years (the mean age was 52.33±14.12). There were 29 women (50%) and 29 men (50%) in the group. The patients' quality of life was measured by the use of the WHOQOL-BREF instrument. Individual interviews were conducted 3 to 8 months (a mean of 5.72 months ±1.6) after the surgery. 1) Although 13 patients (22.3%) returned to work, 44 (75.9%) did not, these being manual workers of vocational secondary education. 2) Almost half of the patients (27 patients, i.e. 44%) intend to apply for disability pension, 16 patients (27.6%) consider themselves unfit to work, 22 patients (37.9%) do not feel like working again. 3) The quality of life of the patients decreased. Domain scores for the WHOQOL-BREF are transformed to a 0-100 scale. The mean physical health amounted to 60.67 (±16.31), the mean psychological health was 58.78 (±16.01), while the mean social relations with family and friends were 59.91 (±20.69), and the mean environment 59.62 (±12.48). 1) A total of 75% of the patients operated for lumbar spinal stenosis do not return to their preoperative work. Difficulties in returning to work and decreased quality of life are associated with female sex, lower-level education, hard physical work and low income. 2) Physical health, psychological health, social relations and environment decreased to the mean of approximately 60. 3) The quality of life of the patients who did return to work was similar to that of healthy people.

  12. Factors influencing return-to-work after cerebrovascular disease: the importance of previous cardiovascular risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalina-Romero, Carlos; Ruilope, Luis Miguel; Sánchez-Chaparro, Miguel Angel; Valdivielso, Pedro; Cabrera-Sierra, Martha; Fernández-Labandera, Carlos; Ruiz-Moraga, Montserrat; Gonzalez-Quintela, Arturo; Calvo-Bonacho, Eva

    2015-09-01

    The role of prior cardiovascular risk (CVR) in the multifactorial process of returning to work after a cerebrovascular event has not been adequately investigated. Therefore, the objective of the present study was to analyse the association between previous CVR level, cardiovascular risk factors (CVRFs) and return-to-work (RTW) following cerebrovascular disease. This was a prospective observational study. We analysed a cohort of 348 patients who had experienced an episode of cerebrovascular disease-related work absence. These individuals were selected from the ICARIA study (Ibermutuamur CArdiovascular RIsk Assessment). Global CVR was assessed using the SCORE system. We investigated the association between demographics, work-related variables, CVRFs and RTW following a cerebrovascular event. We found that a total of 254 individuals (73.0%; 95% CI: 68.3-77.7) returned to work after cerebrovascular disease. Also, we observed a median loss of 12 working years due to disability. Moreover, adjusting for potential confounders revealed that low CVR level and the absence of the following CVRFs was associated with a higher likelihood of RTW: low vs moderate-to-high CVR level (OR: 2.55; 95% CI: 1.42-4.57), no hypertension before stroke (OR: 1.95; 95% CI: 1.11-3.41), non-smoker status (OR: 2.26; 95% CI: 1.30-3.93) and no previous diabetes (OR: 2.46; 95% CI: 1.26-4.79). Low CVR, along with the absence of several CVRFs, can be used to predict RTW rates following cerebrovascular events. Therefore, controlling hypertension, tobacco consumption and diabetes might contribute to the effectiveness of multidisciplinary rehabilitation and/or secondary/tertiary prevention programs for cerebrovascular disease. © The European Society of Cardiology 2014.

  13. A Stakeholder-Based System Dynamics Model of Return-to-Work: A Research Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jetha, Arif; Pransky, Glenn; Fish, Jon; Jeffries, Susan; Hettinger, Lawrence J

    2015-07-16

    Returning to work following a job-related injury or illness can be a complex process, influenced by a range of interrelated personal, psychosocial, and organizational components. System dynamics modelling (SDM) takes a sociotechnical systems perspective to view return-to-work (RTW) as a system made up of multiple feedback relationships between influential components. To build the RTW SDM, a mixed-method approach will be used. The first stage, that has already been completed, involved creating a baseline model using key informant interviews. Second, in two manufacturing companies, stakeholder-based models will be developed through interviews and focus groups with senior management, frontline workers, and frontline supervisors. Participants will be asked about the RTW process in general and more targeted questions regarding influential components. Participants will also be led through a reference mode exercise where they will be asked to estimate the direction, shape and magnitude of relationships between influential components. Data will be entered into the software program Vensim that provides a platform for visualizing system-structure and simulating the effects of adapting components. Finally, preliminary model validity testing will be conducted to provide insights on model generalizability and sensitivity. The proposed methodology will create a SDM of the RTW process using feedback relationships of influential components. It will also provide an important simulation tool to understand system behaviour that underlies complex RTW cases, and examine anticipated and unanticipated consequences of disability management policies. Significance for public healthWhile the incidence of occupational injuries and illnesses has declined over the past two decades, the proportion resulting in sickness absence has actually increased. Implementing strategies to address sickness absences and promote return-to-work (RTW) can significantly benefit physical and mental health, and

  14. The assessment of efforts to return to work in the European Union.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muijzer, Anna; Groothoff, Johan W; de Boer, Wout E L; Geertzen, Jan H B; Brouwer, Sandra

    2010-12-01

    Assessment of efforts to promote return-to-work (RTW) includes all efforts (vocational and non-vocational) designed to improve the work ability of the sick-listed employee and increase the chance to return to work. Aim of the study was to investigate whether in 13 European countries these RTW efforts are assessed and to compare the procedures by means of six criteria. Data were gathered in the taxonomy project of the European Union of Medicine in Assurance and Social Security and by means of an additional questionnaire. In seven countries RTW efforts are subject of the assessment in relation to the application for disability benefits. Description of RTW efforts is a prerequisite in five countries. Guidelines on the assessment of RTW efforts are only available in the Netherlands and no countries report the use of the ICF model. Based on the results of the additional questionnaire, the assessor is a social scientist or a physician. The information used to assess RTW efforts differs, from a report on the RTW process to medical information. A negative outcome of the assessment leads to delay of the application for disability benefits or to application for rehabilitation subsidy. RTW efforts are assessed in half of the participating European countries. When compared, the characteristics of the assessment of RTW efforts in the participating European countries show both similarities and differences. This study may facilitate the gathering and exchange of knowledge and experience between countries on the assessment of RTW efforts.

  15. Returning to work: The cancer survivor's transformational journey of adjustment and coping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, Antoni; Clur, Loraine; Joubert, Yvonne

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore cancer survivors' return to work (RTW) experience with a specific focus on the adjustment and coping process underlying their journey. The study was conducted in the Southern Cape, South Africa, with eight cancer survivors having returned to work following successful treatment of various types of cancer. Unstructured interviews were conducted and data were analysed following the principles of hermeneutic phenomenological reflection and analysis. Four themes emerged, representing the changing adjustment responses and coping during the RTW journey. Participants evolve from being overwhelmed with emotions and applying avoidant coping to seeking understanding and positive affectivity in their attempt to comprehend the reality of their situation. Participants' external locus of control change to a more active approach and problem-solving orientation, demonstrating a need to take control and responsibility. Ultimately, adjustment and coping become most constructive when cancer survivors resolve to re-assess life and self through meaning-making, resulting in renewed appreciation of life, appropriate life style changes, and regained confidence in their relational role. A process perspective is proposed to facilitate an understanding of, and working with, cancer survivors' transition through the RTW journey towards optimal coping phases.

  16. Returning to work: The cancer survivor’s transformational journey of adjustment and coping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoni Barnard

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to explore cancer survivors’ return to work (RTW experience with a specific focus on the adjustment and coping process underlying their journey. The study was conducted in the Southern Cape, South Africa, with eight cancer survivors having returned to work following successful treatment of various types of cancer. Unstructured interviews were conducted and data were analysed following the principles of hermeneutic phenomenological reflection and analysis. Four themes emerged, representing the changing adjustment responses and coping during the RTW journey. Participants evolve from being overwhelmed with emotions and applying avoidant coping to seeking understanding and positive affectivity in their attempt to comprehend the reality of their situation. Participants’ external locus of control change to a more active approach and problem-solving orientation, demonstrating a need to take control and responsibility. Ultimately, adjustment and coping become most constructive when cancer survivors resolve to re-assess life and self through meaning-making, resulting in renewed appreciation of life, appropriate life style changes, and regained confidence in their relational role. A process perspective is proposed to facilitate an understanding of, and working with, cancer survivors’ transition through the RTW journey towards optimal coping phases.

  17. Inter-physician agreement on the readiness of sick-listed employees to return to work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreuder, Jolanda A H; Roelen, Corné A M; de Boer, Mintje; Brouwer, Sandra; Groothoff, Johan W

    2012-01-01

    To determine the agreement between occupational physician (OP) ratings of an employee's readiness to return to work (RRTW). Anonymized written vignettes of 132 employees, sick-listed for at least 3 weeks, were reviewed by 5 OPs. The OPs intuitively rated RRTW as the ability (knowledge and skills) and willingness (motivation and confidence) of sick-listed employees to resume work. Inter-OP percentages of agreement were calculated and Cohen's kappas (κ) were determined to correct for agreement by chance. The percentage of agreement between OPs was 57% (range 39-89%) on the ability and 63% (range 48-87%) on the willingness of sick-listed employees to resume work. The mean κ was 0.14 (range from -0.21 to 0.79) for ability and 0.25 (range from -0.11 to 0.74) for willingness. The OP-rating of RRTW of employees sick-listed with mental disorders did not differ from the OP-rating of RRTW of employees with musculoskeletal disorders. The inter-OP agreement on intuitively rated RRTW showed a wide variability, which accentuates the need for instruments to establish an employee's RRTW and for training in giving well founded return to work recommendations.

  18. Breast cancer survivors' views of factors that influence the return-to-work process - a qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tamminga, Sietske J.; de Boer, Angela G. E. M.; Verbeek, Jos H. A. M.; Frings-Dresen, Monique H. W.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Accumulating evidence suggests that most employed breast cancer survivors are able to return to work but often experience difficulties in the process. The objective of this study was to identify: (i) factors experienced as barriers to and facilitators of the return-to-work (RTW) process,

  19. Implementing a collaborative return-to-work program: Lessons from a qualitative study in a large Canadian healthcare organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skivington, Kathryn; Lifshen, Marni; Mustard, Cameron

    2016-11-22

    Comprehensive workplace return-to-work policies, applied with consistency, can reduce length of time out of work and the risk of long-term disability. This paper reports on the findings from a qualitative study exploring managers' and return-to-work-coordinators' views on the implementation of their organization's new return-to-work program. To provide practical guidance to organizations in designing and implementing return-to-work programs for their employees. Semi-structured qualitative interviews were undertaken with 20 managers and 10 return-to-work co-ordinators to describe participants' perspectives on the progress of program implementation in the first 18 months of adoption. The study was based in a large healthcare organization in Ontario, Canada. Thematic analysis of the data was conducted. We identified tensions evident in the early implementation phase of the organization's return-to-work program. These tensions were attributed to uncertainties concerning roles and responsibilities and to circumstances where objectives or principles appeared to be in conflict. The implementation of a comprehensive and collaborative return-to-work program is a complex challenge. The findings described in this paper may provide helpful guidance for organizations embarking on the development and implementation of a return-to-work program.

  20. Enhanced provider communication and patient education regarding return to work in cancer survivors following curative treatment: a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuijsen, Karen; Bos-Ransdorp, Brigitte; Uitterhoeve, Lon L. J.; Sprangers, Mirjam A. G.; Verbeek, Jos H. A. M.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: For employed cancer survivors, returning to work and maintaining employment is an important aspect of their quality of life. We developed an intervention aimed at enhancing this by means of (a) providing the patient with an educational leaflet on return to work and (b) enhancing

  1. Return-to-work success despite conflicts: an exploration of decision-making during a work rehabilitation program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouin, Marie-Michelle; Coutu, Marie-France; Durand, Marie-José

    2017-11-12

    Collective decision-making by stakeholders appears important to return-to-work success, yet few studies have explored the processes involved. This study aims to explore the influence of decision-making on return-to-work for workers with musculoskeletal or common mental disorders. This study is a secondary analysis using data from three earlier multiple-case studies that documented decision-making during similar and comparable work rehabilitation programs. Individual interviews were conducted at the end of the program with stakeholders, namely, the disabled workers and representatives of health care professionals, employers, unions and insurers. Verbatims were analysed inductively. The 28 decision-making processes (cases) led to 115 different decisions-making instances and included the following components: subjects of the decisions, stakeholders' concerns and powers, and types of decision-making. No differences were found in decision-making processes relative to the workers' diagnoses or return-to-work status. However, overall analysis of decision-making revealed that stakeholder agreement on a return-to-work goal and acceptance of an intervention plan in which the task demands aligned with the worker's capacities were essential for return-to-work success. These results support the possibility of return-to-work success despite conflictual decision-making processes. In addition to facilitating consensual decisions, future studies should be aimed at facilitating negotiated decisions. Implications for rehabilitation Facilitating decision-making, with the aim of obtaining agreement from all stakeholders on a return-to-work goal and their acceptance of an intervention plan that respects the worker's capacities, is important for return-to-work success. Rehabilitation professionals should constantly be on the lookout for potential conflicts, which may either complicate the reach of an agreement between the stakeholders or constrain return-to-work possibilities

  2. Cancer Survivors' Social Context in the Return to Work Process: Narrative Accounts of Social Support and Social Comparison Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armaou, M; Schumacher, L; Grunfeld, E A

    2017-10-04

    Purpose Returning to work is a process that is intertwined with the social aspects of one's life, which can influence the way in which that person manages their return to work and also determines the support available to them. This study aimed to explore cancer patients' perceptions of the role of their social context in relation to returning to work following treatment. Methods Twenty-three patients who had received a diagnosis of either urological, breast, gynaecological, or bowel cancer participated in semi-structured interviews examining general perceptions of cancer, work values and perceptions of the potential impact of their cancer diagnosis and treatment on work. Interviews were analysed using the iterative process of Framework Analysis. Results Two superordinate themes emerged as influential in the return to work process: Social support as a facilitator of return to work (e.g. co-workers' support and support outside of the workplace) and Social comparison as an appraisal of readiness to return to work (e.g. comparisons with other cancer patients, colleagues, and employees in other organisations or professions). Conclusions Two functions of the social context of returning to work after cancer were apparent in the participants' narrative: the importance of social support as a facilitator of returning to work and the utilisation of social comparison information in order to appraise one's readiness to return to work. The role of social context in returning to work has largely been absent from the research literature to date. The findings of this study suggest that social support and social comparison mechanisms may have a significant impact on an individual's successful return to the workplace.

  3. A qualitative study investigating the barriers to returning to work for breastfeeding mothers in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmond, Deirdre; Meaney, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends that mothers exclusively breastfeed for the first 6 months of an infant's life. In Ireland, currently paid maternity leave is 26 weeks and the expectant mother is required by law to finish work 2 weeks before her expected delivery date. Mothers wishing to exclusively breastfeed for 6 months or longer find themselves having to take holiday leave or unpaid leave from work in order to meet the WHO's guidelines. The aim of this study is to explore women's experiences of breastfeeding after their return to work in Ireland. This study was carried out utilizing a qualitative design. Initially 25 women who returned to the workforce while continuing to breastfeed were contacted, 16 women returned consent forms and were subsequently contacted to take part in an interview. Interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim and thematic analysis was employed to establish recurring patterns and themes throughout the interviews. Women noted that cultural attitudes in Ireland coupled with inadequate or inconsistent advice from health professionals posed the biggest challenge they had to overcome in order to achieve to 6 months exclusive breastfeeding. The findings of this study illustrate that mothers with the desire to continue to breastfeed after their return to work did so with some difficulty. Many did not disclose to their employers that they were breastfeeding and did not make enquiries about being facilitated to continue to breastfeed after their return to the workplace. The perceived lack of support from their employers as well as embarrassment about their breastfeeding status meant many women concealed that they were breastfeeding after their return to the workplace. While it has been suggested that WHO guidelines for exclusive breastfeeding for 6 months may be unattainable for many women due to work commitments, a different problem exists in Ireland. Mothers struggle to overcome cultural and societal obstacles coupled

  4. Precision and recall of search strategies for identifying studies on return-to-work in Medline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehanno, Jean-François; Rollin, Laetitia; Le Jean, Tony; Louvel, Alexandre; Darmoni, Stefan; Shaw, William

    2009-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to report on the qualities of various search strategies and keywords to find return to work (RTW) studies in the Medline bibliographic database. We searched Medline for articles on RTW published in 2003, using multiple search strings, and hand searched 16 major periodicals of rehabilitation or occupational medicine. Among the retrieved articles, those considered to be relevant, were pooled in a Gold Standard Database. From this database, we identified candidate text words or MeSH terms for search strategies using a word frequency analysis of the abstracts and a MEDLINE categorization algorithm. According to the frequency of identified terms, searches were run for each term independently and in combination. We computed Recall, Precision, and number needed to read (NNR = 1/Precision) of each keyword or combination of keywords. Among the 8,073 articles examined, 314 (3.9%) were considered relevant and included in the Gold Standard Database. The search strings ("Rehabilitation, Vocational" [MeSH]), ("Return to work"[All]) and ("Back to work"[All]) had Recall/Precision ratio of 30.46/19.11, 59.55/87.38 and 3.18/90.91%, respectively. Their combination with the Boolean operator OR yielded to a Recall/Precision ratio of 73.89/58.44% and a NNR of 1.7. For the end user requiring comprehensive literature search, the best string was ("Return to work" OR "Back to work" OR "Rehabilitation, vocational"[MeSH] OR "rehabilitation"[Subheading]), with a Recall of 88.22% and a NNR of 18. No single MeSH term is available to help the physician to identify relevant studies on RTW in Medline. Locating these types of studies requires the use of various MeSH and non-MeSH terms in combination to obtain a satisfactory Recall. Nevertheless, enhancing the Recall of search strategies may lead to lower Precision, and higher NNR, although with a non linear trend. This factor must be taken into consideration by the end user in order to improve the cost

  5. Addressing barriers to health: Experiences of breastfeeding mothers after returning to work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valizadeh, Sousan; Hosseinzadeh, Mina; Mohammadi, Eesa; Hassankhani, Hadi; M Fooladi, Marjaneh; Schmied, Virginia

    2017-03-01

    Breastfeeding mothers returning to work often feel exhausted as they must feed on demand and attend to family and employment responsibilities, leading to concerns for their personal health. This study was prompted by a desire to understand and identify barriers to mothers' health. We describe the experiences of 12 Iranian breastfeeding and employed mothers through in-depth and semi-structured interviews and thematic analysis. Two main themes emerged: (i) working and mothering alone and (ii) facing concerns about health. The findings highlight the need for a support system for breastfeeding mothers within the family and in the workplace. Family-friendly policies targeting mothers' and employers' views are needed to support working mothers and promote breastfeeding. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  6. Return to Work in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Survivors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragholm, Kristian; Wissenberg, Mads; Mortensen, Rikke Normark

    2015-01-01

    reported to the Danish Cardiac Arrest Register since 2001. During 2001-2011, we identified 4354 patients employed before arrest among 12 332 working-age patients (18-65 years), of whom 796 survived to day 30. Among 796 survivors (median age, 53 years [quartile 1-3, 46-59 years]; 81.5% men), 610 (76...... over time (66.1% in 2001-2005 versus 78.1% in 2006-2011; P=0.002). In multivariable Cox regression analysis, factors associated with return to work with ≥6 months of sustainable employment were as follows: (1) arrest during 2006-2011 versus 2001-2005, hazard ratio (HR), 1.38 (95% CI, 1.05-1.82); (2...

  7. Challenging evidence-based decision-making: a hypothetical case study about return to work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aas, Randi W; Alexanderson, Kristina

    2012-03-01

    A hypothetical case study about return to work was used to explore the process of translating research into practice. The method involved constructing a case study derived from the characteristics of a typical, sick-listed employee with non-specific low back pain in Norway. Next, the five-step evidence-based process, including the Patient, Intervention, Co-Interventions and Outcome framework (PICO), was applied to the case study. An inductive analysis produced 10 technical and more fundamental challenges to incorporate research into intervention decisions for an individual with comorbidity. A more dynamic, interactive approach to the evidence-based practice process is proposed. It is recommended that this plus the 10 challenges are validated with real life cases, as the hypothetical case study may not be replicable. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Effect of the Danish return-to-work program on long-term sickness absence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Otto M; Aust, Birgit; Bjørner, Jakob

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the Danish return-to-work (RTW) program on long-term sickness absence in a randomized controlled trial in three municipalities. METHODS: The intervention group comprised 1948 participants while the control group comprised 1157...... participant receiving ordinary sickness benefit management (OSM). Study participants were working-age adults receiving long-term (≥8 weeks or more) benefits, included regardless of reason for sickness absence or employment status. Each beneficiary was followed-up for a maximum period of 52 weeks. Cox...... increased rate of recovery from long-term sickness absence (HR 1.51, 95% CI 1.31-1.74). In the other two municipalities, the intervention did not show a statistically significant effect (HR M11.12, 95% CI 0.97-1.29, and HR M30.80, 95% CI 0.63-1.03, respectively). Adjustment for a series of possible...

  9. Screening instruments for predicting return to work in long-term sickness absence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Momsen, A.-M. H.; Stapelfeldt, C. M.; Nielsen, C. V.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Multiple somatic symptoms are common and may cause prolonged sickness absence (SA) and unsuccessful return to work (RTW). Aims: To compare three instruments and their predictive and discriminative abilities regarding RTW. Methods: A longitudinal cohort study of participants recruited...... from two municipal job centres, with at least 8 weeks of SA. The instruments used were the Symptom Check List of somatic distress (SCL-SOM) (score 0–48 points), the Bodily Distress Syndrome Questionnaire (BDSQ) (0–120 points) and the one-item self-rated health (SRH) (1–5 points). The instruments...... alternative to more time-consuming instruments such as SCL-SOM or BDSQ for estimating the chances of RTW among sickness absentees....

  10. Can we enhance the ability to return to work among workers with stress-related disorders?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lander, Flemming; Friche, Claus; Tornemand, Helle

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Stress-related disorders are widespread and responsible for high societal costs e.g. sick leave payment and reduced productivity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of an intervention program on return to work or labour market. METHODS: In a controlled interventional study...... design we compared 72 emotionally distressed patients, who received support during 2006, with 89 control individuals who had also been sick listed for emotional distress. Intervention was provided by trained psychologists and social workers who were in continuous dialog with the patients, providing...... work capability compared to usual care. Work resumption as a single outcome probably is an insensitive parameter of intervention management quality, and should be supplemented by other data on different aspects of treatment....

  11. Manager Experiences with the Return to Work Process in a Large, Publically Funded, Hospital Setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stochkendahl, Mette Jensen; Myburgh, Corrie; Young, Amanda Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Previous research on the role of managers in the return to work (RTW) process has primarily been conducted in contexts where the workplace has declared organizational responsibility for the process. While this is a common scenario, in some countries, including Denmark, there is no explicit...... legal obligation on the workplace to accommodate RTW. The aim of this study was to gain knowledge about the potential roles and contributions of managers in supporting returning employees in a context where they have no legal obligation to actively support RTW. Methods Nineteen Danish hospital managers...... participated in a one-on-one interview or focus group discussions aimed at identifying barriers and facilitators for supporting employees in their RTW. Five individual interviews and two focus group discussions were conducted. Transcripts were analysed using thematic content analysis. Results Four main themes...

  12. Return to work of cancer patients after a multidisciplinary intervention including occupational counselling and physical exercise in cancer patients: a prospective study in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leensen, Monique C J; Groeneveld, Iris F; Heide, Iris van der; Rejda, Tomas; van Veldhoven, Peter L J; Berkel, Sietske van; Snoek, Aernout; Harten, Wim van; Frings-Dresen, Monique H W; de Boer, Angela G E M

    2017-06-15

    To support return to work (RTW) among cancer patients, a multidisciplinary rehabilitation programme was developed which combined occupational counselling with a supervised physical exercise programme during chemotherapy. The aim was to investigate RTW rates of cancer patients and to evaluate changes in work-related quality of life and physical outcomes. Longitudinal prospective intervention study using a one-group design. Two hospitals in the Netherlands. Of the eligible patients, 56% participated; 93 patients with a primary diagnosis of cancer receiving chemotherapy and on sick leave were included. Patients completed questionnaires on RTW, the importance of work, work ability (WAI), RTW self-efficacy, fatigue (MFI), and quality of life (EORTC QLQ C-30) at baseline and 6, 12 and 18 months follow-up. Before and after the exercise programme 1-repetition maximum (1RM) muscle strength and cardiorespiratory fitness (VO 2 peak) were assessed. Six months after the start of a multidisciplinary rehabilitation programme that combined occupational counselling with a supervised physical exercise programme, 59% of the cancer patients returned to work, 86% at 12 months and 83% at 18 months. In addition, significant improvements (pfatigue levels were significantly reduced. After completing the exercise programme, 1RM muscle strength was significantly increased but there was no improvement in VO 2 peak level. RTW rates of cancer patients were high after completion of the multidisciplinary rehabilitation programme. A multidisciplinary rehabilitation programme which combines occupational counselling with a supervised physical exercise programme is likely to result in RTW, reduced fatigue and increased importance of work, work ability, and quality of life. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  13. A threshold regression model to predict return to work after traumatic limb injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Wen-Hsuan; Chuang, Hung-Yi; Lee, Mei-Ling Ting

    2016-02-01

    The study aims to examine the severity of initial impairment and recovery rate of return-to-work (RTW) predictors among workers with traumatic limb injury. This 2-year prospective cohort study recruited 1124 workers with traumatic limb injury during the first 2 weeks of hospital admission. Baseline data were obtained by questionnaire and chart review. Patient follow-up occurred at 1, 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months post injury. The primary outcome was the time of first RTW. The impact of potential predictors on initial impairment and rate of recovery towards RTW was estimated by threshold regression (TR). A total of 846 (75.27%) participants returned to work during the follow-up period. Our model revealed that the initial impairment level in elderly workers and lower limb injuries were 33% and 35% greater than their counterparts, respectively. Workers with >12 years of education, part-time job, and moderate and higher self-efficacy were less impaired at initial injury compared with their counterparts. In terms of the rate of recovery leading to RTW, workers with older age, part-time jobs, lower limbs, or combined injuries had a significantly slower recovery rate, while workers with 9-12 years of education and >12 years of education had a significantly faster recovery rate. Our study provides researchers and clinicians with evidence to understand the baseline impairment and rate of recovery towards RTW by explaining the predictors of RTW among workers with traumatic limb injuries. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Breast cancer survivors: return to work and wage loss in selected hospitals in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, T T; Azzani, M; Tan, F L; Loh, S Y

    2018-05-01

    This study aimed, firstly, to assess the determinants of return to work (RTW), secondly, to explore the amount of annual wage loss, and finally, to discover the determinants of wage loss among breast cancer (BC) survivors. A cross-sectional study design was used in this research. The data was collected via interview using a validated questionnaire. Logistic regression models were developed to discover the significant determinants of RTW and of wage loss among BC survivors. A total of 256 BC survivors were included in this study. The analysis showed that there was a 21% loss of or reduction in mean income within 1 year after diagnosis. The significant predictors of RTW are being a government employee, having reduced wages or wage loss, and if the case had been diagnosed 1 year or more ago. Being a private sector employee and having a late stage of cancer was a barrier to RTW. The main risk factors for reduced wages or wage loss were belonging to the age group of 40-59 years, being of Chinese or Indian ethnicity, having low educational status, and not returning to work. However, belonging to the higher monthly income group (earning > RM 2000) is a protective factor against the risk of reduced wages or wage loss. Non-RTW and wage loss after diagnosis of BC may result in the survivors experiencing a significant financial burden. Assessment of these patients is becoming more crucial because more women participate in the workforce in Malaysia nowadays and because BC is managed using multiple treatment modalities with their consequences could lead to long absences from work.

  15. Effect on return to work or education of individual placement and support modified for people with mood and anxiety disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellström, Lone; Bech, Per; Hjorthøj, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: The effect of Individual Placement and Support (IPS) on return to work or education among people with mood or anxiety disorders is unclear, while IPS increases return to work for people with severe mental illness. We examined the effect of IPS modified for people with mood and anxiety...... disorders (IPS-MA) on return to work and education compared with services as usual (SAU). Methods: In a randomised clinical superiority trial, 326 participants with mood and anxiety disorders were centrally randomised to IPS-MA, consisting of individual mentor support and career counselling (n=162) or SAU.......6 points vs SAU 48.5 points, p=0.83) at 24 months. Conclusion: The modified version of IPS, IPS-MA, was not superior to SAU in supporting people with mood or anxiety disorders in return to work at 24 months....

  16. Psychoeducation to facilitate return to work in individuals on sick leave and at risk of having a mental disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Pernille; Søgaard, Hans Jørgen; Yde, Bjarne Frostholm

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sickness absence due to poor mental health is a common problem in many Western countries. To facilitate return to work, it may be important to identify individuals on sick leave and at risk of having a mental disorder and subsequently to offer appropriate treatment. Psychoeducation...... alone has not previously been used as a return to work intervention, but may be a promising tool to facilitate return to work. Therefore, the aim of the study is to evaluate the effectiveness of psychoeducation designed specifically to facilitate return to work for individuals on sick leave and at risk...... of having a mental disorder. The psychoeducation was a supplement to the various standard offers provided by the job centres.Methods/design: The study is a randomised controlled trial, in which individuals on sick leave either receive psychoeducation and standard case management or standard case management...

  17. Return-to-work of sick-listed workers without an employment contract – what works?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schellart Antonius JM

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the past decade flexible labour market arrangements have emerged as a significant change in the European Union labour market. Studies suggest that these new types of labour arrangements may be linked to ill health, an increased risk for work disability, and inadequate vocational rehabilitation. Therefore, the objectives of this study were: 1. to examine demographic characteristics of workers without an employment contract sick-listed for at least 13 weeks, 2. to describe the content and frequency of occupational health care (OHC interventions for these sick-listed workers, and 3. to examine OHC interventions as possible determinants for return-to-work (RTW of these workers. Methods A cohort of 1077 sick-listed workers without an employment contract were included at baseline, i.e. 13 weeks after reporting sick. Demographic variables were available at baseline. Measurement of cross-sectional data took place 4–6 months after inclusion. Primary outcome measures were: frequency of OHC interventions and RTW-rates. Measured confounding variables were: gender, age, type of worker (temporary agency worker, unemployed worker, or remaining worker without employment contract, level of education, reason for absenteeism (diagnosis, and perceived health. The association between OHC interventions and RTW was analysed with a logistic multiple regression analysis. Results At 7–9 months after the first day of reporting sick only 19% of the workers had (partially or completely returned to work, and most workers perceived their health as fairly poor or poor. The most frequently reported (49% intervention was 'the OHC professional discussed RTW'. However, the intervention 'OHC professional made and discussed a RTW action plan' was reported by only 19% of the respondents. The logistic multiple regression analysis showed a significant positive association between RTW and the interventions: 'OHC professional discussed RTW'; and 'OHC

  18. Barriers and facilitators for return to work in cancer survivors with job loss experience: a focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Egmond, M P; Duijts, S F A; Loyen, A; Vermeulen, S J; van der Beek, A J; Anema, J R

    2017-09-01

    Over 50% of cancer survivors lose their job or quit working. Cancer survivors who experience job loss may face different challenges regarding return to work, compared to cancer survivors with employers. This qualitative study aimed to explore barriers and facilitators for return to work in cancer survivors with job loss and in insurance physicians who assist cancer survivors in their return to work. We conducted five focus groups and one interview (cancer survivors, N = 17; insurance physicians, N = 23). Topics included, among others, experience of job loss and barriers and facilitators for return to work. Data were audio recorded and analysed using thematic analysis. Our main finding was that cancer survivors experienced a double loss: loss of job on top of loss of health. As a result, cancer survivors feared for job applications, lacked opportunities to gradually increase work ability, and faced reluctance from employers in hiring them. Insurance physicians expressed a need for more frequent and longer consultations with cancer survivors with job loss. We conclude that cancer survivors who experience double loss encounter specific barriers in the return to work process. This calls for a tailored approach regarding return to work support. © The Authors. European Journal of Cancer Care Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Making a successful return to work: the UK burden of injury multicentre longitudinal study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendrick, Denise; Vinogradova, Yana; Coupland, Carol; Christie, Nicola; Lyons, Ronan A; Towner, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Background Injuries are common and make a significant contribution to sickness absence, but little is known about problems experienced by injured people on return to work (RTW). Aim To quantify work problems on RTW and explore predictors of such problems. Design & setting Multicentre longitudinal study in four UK hospitals. Method Prospective study of injured participants aged 16–65 years who were employed or self-employed prior to the injury and had RTW at 1 or 4 months post injury. Results At 1 month, most (59%) had only made a partial RTW. By 4 months, 80% had fully RTW. Those who had partially RTW had problems related to physical tasks (work limited for median of 25% of time at 1 month, 18% at 4 months), time management (10% at 1 month, 20% at 4 months) and output demands (10% at 1 month, 15% at 4 months). Productivity losses were significantly greater among those with partial than full RTW at 1 month (median 3.3% versus 0.9%, Pproblems and GPs should pay particular attention to identifying work problems in this group and ways of minimising such problems. PMID:22520774

  20. Return-to-work: The importance of human interactions and organizational structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesen, Margaret N.; Yassi, Annalee; Cooper, Juliette

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to gain insight into stakeholder perspectives on barriers and facilitators for return-to-work (RTW). Qualitative methodology with purposive sampling was employed. A total of 55 participants, representing a wide spectrum of stakeholders and industry, were interviewed in individual or group format. Interview transcripts were coded, categorized according to themes, and placed within a framework which reflected the dynamic interaction of individuals and the structural systems or context of those individuals. Findings indicated that perceived barriers to RTW included delays of all types in processing or delivery of information or treatment, and ineffective communication among stakeholders. Facilitators to RTW included establishment of RTW programs in the workplace, effective communication and teamwork, as well as trust and credibility among stakeholders. The interdependence of organizational structures and human interactions was evident in successful RTW programs which emphasized teamwork, early intervention, and communication. Differing stakeholder perspectives, however, especially on issues such as worker attitudes and participation, must be acknowledged and addressed if more injured workers are to be successful in returning to full employment.

  1. [Does Return to Work after Vocational Retraining Depend on Labour Market?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetzel, C; Streibelt, M

    2016-10-01

    Background: Studies about the impact of the labour market on return to work (RTW) after vocational retraining are contradictory. We examined if (1) RTW after vocational retraining depends on regional labour markets and if (2) the regional labour markets variance affects the influence of personal characteristics on RTW. Methods: The data consisted of the scientific use file (completed rehabilitation in the course of health insurance 2002-2009) of the German Federal Pension Insurance (51 626 persons of 7 year cohorts) and regional economic data (412 districts). Multilevel logistic regression models were used. Results: At the context level the logarithmic unemployment rate was the most relevant predictor. The RTW rate decreased with increasing unemployment rate, saturating at an unemployment rate of around 15%. Significant differences between the intervention types (integration, 1-year and 2-year vocational retraining programs) were observed. The effects of individual predictors were clearer with higher unemployment, e. g. education, individual unemployment, income and further vocational interventions prior to vocational retraining. Conclusion: We demonstrate that the success of vocational retraining depends on the regional labour market. Furthermore individual predictors show stronger effects on success with the context of "poor" labour markets. In addition to the existing evidence the regional unemployment rate should be taken into consideration in effectiveness research studies and benchmarking processes in quality assurance. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. Insights into workplace Return to Work Coordinator training: An Australian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohatko-Naismith, Joanna; Guest, Maya; Rivett, Darren A; James, Carole

    2016-09-27

    Following brief training, an Australian workplace Return to Work (RTW) Coordinator is expected to provide information to the injured worker, liaise with key stakeholders and maintain workplace policies and procedures in accordance with legislative requirements. The aim of this study was to provide insights into the experiences and perceptions of the Australian Workplace RTW Coordinator in relation to current training practices and to identify any existing inadequacies within the available training. Twenty-five workplace RTW Coordinators from five Australian states participated in six focus groups.Participants with a minimum of two years' experience as a workplace RTW Coordinator and involved with the development and implementation of workplace policies and procedures, were included in the study. Thematic analysis was performed to identity meaningful themes and patterns. The findings highlighted specific training requirements and additional support mechanisms recommended by current workplace RTW Coordinators. Four key themes clearly emerged: inadequate training; irrelevant content; the need for specialised trainers; and network support services. RTW Coordinators require effective training and support to ensure the appropriate and timely delivery of services to all stakeholders involved in the RTW process. The results of this study may inform future training practices for RTW Coordinators.

  3. Co-worker perceptions of return-to-work opportunities for Japanese cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eguchi, Hisashi; Wada, Koji; Higuchi, Yoshiyuki; Smith, Derek R

    2017-03-01

    This study examined workplace factors and perceptions of Return-to-Work (RTW) opportunities for colleagues with cancer-related symptoms and/or treatment side effects in Japan. We conducted an online, cross-sectional survey of 3710 employed Japanese individuals of working age. Colleagues' perceptions of RTW opportunities for cancer survivors were examined (using a Japanese questionnaire), along with workplace factors such as job demand, job control and workplace social support (using the Brief Job Stress Questionnaire). Associations between workplace factors and RTW opportunities were evaluated using multiple logistic regression analysis, with participants stratified in tertiles (low, middle and high) according to their levels of workplace social support and job control. Colleagues' perceptions of inadequate RTW opportunities were associated with low workplace social support (middle tertile: Odds Ratio [OR] 1.22, 95% Confidence Interval [CI]: 1.08-1.36; low tertile: OR 1.43, 95%CI: 1.30-1.57; p for trend working with a cancer survivor (OR 2.08, 95%CI: 1.83-2.31). This study suggests that workplace factors and prior experience of working with a cancer survivor may affect a colleagues' perception of RTW opportunities in Japanese workplaces. Consideration of workplace social factors (workplace support and job control), as well as increased openness and awareness of the particular needs of cancer survivors, is therefore essential to facilitate successful RTW in Japan, as elsewhere.Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Brazilian cross-cultural adaptation of "Return-to-work self-efficacy" questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, João Silvestre; Griep, Rosane Härter; Lagerveld, Suzanne E; Fischer, Frida Marina

    2017-03-02

    To describe the translation and early stages of cross-cultural adaptation of the questionnaire Verwachtingen over werken (or "Return-to-work self-efficacy") for workers in sick leave due to mental disorders, from the original in Dutch to the Brazilian Portuguese language. A panel gathering experts was formed to determine the questionnaire conceptual and item equivalence. For semantic equivalence, the Dutch-Portuguese Brazilian translations were consolidated and consensus meetings were held to structure versions of the instrument. Each version was back-translated from Brazilian Portuguese to Dutch and evaluated by one of the authors of the original version. The final version was submitted to two pre-tests for operational equivalence. The original questionnaire in Dutch was translated twice to Brazilian Portuguese. During the process, four consensus meetings of the experts' panel were performed to create the versions. Each version was back-translated to Dutch. One of the authors of the original questionnaire performed an evaluation on the first three versions until the definition of the final one, which was titled Expectativas sobre o trabalho (Expectations about work). Pre-tests' participants did not reported problems to fill the questionnaire. Results indicate that the Brazilian Portuguese cross-culturally adapted version maintains the original meaning of the questionnaire, while including characteristics peculiar to the Brazilian reality. Measurement and functional equivalence of this version must still be evaluated before its application can be recommended for workers who have been absent from work due to mental disorders.

  5. Experiences of professionals participating in inter-organisational cooperation aimed at promoting clients' return to work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söderberg, Elsy; Vimarlund, Vivian; Alexanderson, Kristina

    2010-01-01

    In Sweden, the activities initiated to promote return to work (RTW) are performed in parallel by four different public organisations: the health services, the social services, the employment and the social insurance authorities. The aim was to gain deeper understanding on the experiences of professionals involved in cooperative projects aimed at promoting RTW among unemployed sickness benefit recipients. Qualitative analyses were performed of transcribed data from interviews of professionals participating in cooperative projects. First, the analysis identified that the daily collaboration on the same cases enabled development of good relationships and cooperative competence, which improved the contact with clients. Second, the cooperative projects made it possible to include only clients perceived motivated for RTW measures. Third, the closer and more frequent interaction with clients proved to be constructive in that it facilitated recognition and mobilisation of strengths and abilities. Fourth, the differences in rules and regulations between the social insurance and the unemployment insurance standards were often perceived to induce problems, for example, on how to assess the work capacity of clients. The assessments of work capacity represent important and complex tasks that professionals must perform without having access to either scientific knowledge or consensus agreement on which to base their decisions.

  6. A Thematic Analysis of Career Adaptability in Retirees Who Return to Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer eLuke

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Retirement can no longer be conceptualized as disengagement, as the end of a person’s career, as it is in the life-span, life-space theory. Increasingly, retirees are returning to work, in paid and unpaid positions, in a part-time or full-time capacity, as an act of re-engagement. Vocational psychology theories are yet to adequately conceptualize the phenomenon of retirees’ re-engagement in work. The research reported in this paper is the first attempt to understand re-engagement through the theoretical lens of career construction theory and its central construct, career adaptability. The study involved intensive interviews with 22 retirees between the ages of 56 and 78 years (M = 68.24, who had retired no less than one year prior to the study. Participants were engaged in a discussion about their reasons for returning to the world of work. Thematic analysis of interview transcripts extracted evidence of the four career adaptability resources: concern, control, curiosity, and confidence. In addition, the influence of family and making a contribution were discerned as important themes. These findings are the first evidence that the career construction theory and career adaptability provide a new conceptual lens to theorize and conduct research into the phenomenon of retirement.

  7. Predictors for Return to Work in Subjects with Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

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    Eirik Vikane

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To predict return to work (RTW at 12 months for patients who either were sick-listed or were at risk to be sick-listed with persistent postconcussion symptoms (PCS at six to eight weeks after injury. Method. A prospective cohort study of 151 patients with mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI admitted consecutively to outpatient clinics at two University Hospitals in Norway. The study was conducted as part of a randomised clinical trial. Injury characteristics were obtained from the medical records. Sick leave data from one year before to one year after MTBI were obtained from the Norwegian Labour and Welfare Service. Self-report questionnaires were used to obtain demographic and symptom profiles. Results. We observed a significant negative association between RTW at 12 months and psychological distress, global functioning, and being sick-listed at two months after MTBI, as well as having been sick-listed the last year before injury. Conclusion. Psychological distress, global functioning postinjury, and the sick leave trajectory of the subjects were negative predictors for RTW. These findings should be taken into consideration when evaluating future vocational rehabilitation models.

  8. An evaluation of a coal mining company's return to work program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, R.G.

    1990-01-01

    This study consolidates and evaluates information and data obtained from a coal mining company's return to work program called the Work Therapy Program. Organizational information and economic and statistical data were available for the study based on the company's records. Analysis of the data included descriptive statistics such as total injuries, the frequency rate of injuries, total days away from work due to injury, average days away per employee, and severity rates. A cost-benefit analysis was conducted to determine if the Program was economically beneficial to the company. Data from an opinion survey of the management at the mine where the Program was first instituted was used to determine the perceptions of mine management with respect to the Work Therapy Program. Conclusions were that the Work Therapy Program was economically beneficial to the Company and that the Program resulted in a significant reduction in compensable injuries. The Program did not significantly reduce days away from work due to mine injury. Perceptions of mine management were mostly positive

  9. Can we enhance the ability to return to work among workers with stress-related disorders?

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    Andersen Johan

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stress-related disorders are widespread and responsible for high societal costs e.g. sick leave payment and reduced productivity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of an intervention program on return to work or labour market. Methods In a controlled interventional study design we compared 72 emotionally distressed patients, who received support during 2006, with 89 control individuals who had also been sick listed for emotional distress. Intervention was provided by trained psychologists and social workers who were in continuous dialog with the patients, providing counselling e.g. on decisions concerning resumption of work, support to families, participation in meetings with the workplace. Basically, the controls and the intervention group share the same access to welfare benefits. The main outcome was time to return to labour market (TTR. Results The baseline characteristics were similar in the two groups. There were no differences in the rate of resuming work between the two groups. About 80% in both groups had returned to the labour market after one year. Conclusion An intervention program with psychological stress management and case management did not improve work capability compared to usual care. Work resumption as a single outcome probably is an insensitive parameter of intervention management quality, and should be supplemented by other data on different aspects of treatment.

  10. Effective return-to-work interventions after acquired brain injury: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donker-Cools, Birgit H P M; Daams, Joost G; Wind, Haije; Frings-Dresen, Monique H W

    2016-01-01

    To gather knowledge about effective return-to-work (RTW) interventions for patients with acquired brain injury (ABI). A database search was performed in PubMed, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL and the Cochrane Library using keywords and Medical Subject Headings. Studies were included if they met inclusion criteria: adult patients with non-progressive ABI, working pre-injury and an intervention principally designed to improve RTW as an outcome. The methodological quality of included studies was determined and evidence was assessed qualitatively. Twelve studies were included, of which five were randomized controlled trials and seven were cohort studies. Nine studies had sufficient methodological quality. There is strong evidence that work-directed interventions in combination with education/coaching are effective regarding RTW and there are indicative findings for the effectiveness of work-directed interventions in combination with skills training and education/coaching. Reported components of the most effective interventions were tailored approach, early intervention, involvement of patient and employer, work or workplace accommodations, work practice and training of social and work-related skills, including coping and emotional support. Effective RTW interventions for patients with ABI are a combination of work-directed interventions, coaching/education and/or skills training. These interventions have the potential to facilitate sustained RTW for patients with ABI.

  11. Return to work: a case of PTSD, dissociative identity disorder, and satanic ritual abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Precin, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    This case study investigated an intervention that enabled an individual with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID), and satanic ritual abuse to return to work after discharge from psychiatric inpatient treatment. The Occupational Questionnaire [88] revealed past difficulties in organization, awareness of time, communication, cooperation, frustration tolerance, competition, stress management, goal setting, and amnesia resulting in incomplete tasks and sporadic attendance at work. The Role Checklist [72] identified alters valuing work and employed in the past. The Modified Interest Checklist [70] identified running as an interest that 24 alters shared. Based on the initial evaluations, three times a week treadmill running was used as an intervention that built work skills (as measured by the Clerical Work Sample of the Valpar Component Work Sample Series [97]) necessary to sustain gainful employment upon discharge. After intervention, this individual improved in awareness of time, stress management, and goal setting abilities and was less amnestic as per the Occupational Questionnaire [88] and four additional alters expressed an interest in work according to the Modified Interest Checklist [70].

  12. Early-return-to-work in the context of an intensification of working life and changing employment relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seing, Ida; MacEachen, Ellen; Ståhl, Christian; Ekberg, Kerstin

    2015-03-01

    Many Western welfare states have introduced early-return-to-work policies, in which getting sick-listed people back to work before they have fully recovered is presented as a rather unproblematic approach. This reflects a belief in the ability of employers and the labour market to solve sickness absence. Against this background, the aim of this study was to analyse return-to-work practice in local workplace contexts, in relation to Swedish early-return-to-work policy. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 18 matched pairs of workers and managers. The material, comprising a total of 36 interviews, was analysed using qualitative content analysis. Three main themes were identified: (1) intensive workplaces and work conditions (2) employer support-a function of worker value and (3) work attachment and resistance to job transition. The results reflected the intensity of modern working life, which challenged return-to-work processes. Managers had different approaches to workers' return-to-work, depending on how they valued the worker. While managers used the discourse of 'new opportunities' and 'healthy change' to describe the transition process (e.g. relocation, unemployment and retirement), workers regularly experienced transitions as difficult and unjust. In the context of early-return-to-work policy and the intensity of modern working life, a great deal of responsibility was placed on workers to be adaptable to workplace demands in order to be able to return and stay at work. Overall, this study illustrates an emerging social climate where sick-listed workers are positioned as active agents who must take responsibility for sick leave and return-to-work process.

  13. Brazilian cross-cultural adaptation of “Return-to-work self-efficacy” questionnaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Silvestre Silva Junior

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To describe the translation and early stages of cross-cultural adaptation of the questionnaire Verwachtingen over werken (or “Return-to-work self-efficacy” for workers in sick leave due to mental disorders, from the original in Dutch to the Brazilian Portuguese language. METHODS A panel gathering experts was formed to determine the questionnaire conceptual and item equivalence. For semantic equivalence, the Dutch-Portuguese Brazilian translations were consolidated and consensus meetings were held to structure versions of the instrument. Each version was back-translated from Brazilian Portuguese to Dutch and evaluated by one of the authors of the original version. The final version was submitted to two pre-tests for operational equivalence. RESULTS The original questionnaire in Dutch was translated twice to Brazilian Portuguese. During the process, four consensus meetings of the experts’ panel were performed to create the versions. Each version was back-translated to Dutch. One of the authors of the original questionnaire performed an evaluation on the first three versions until the definition of the final one, which was titled Expectativas sobre o trabalho (Expectations about work. Pre-tests’ participants did not reported problems to fill the questionnaire. CONCLUSIONS Results indicate that the Brazilian Portuguese cross-culturally adapted version maintains the original meaning of the questionnaire, while including characteristics peculiar to the Brazilian reality. Measurement and functional equivalence of this version must still be evaluated before its application can be recommended for workers who have been absent from work due to mental disorders.

  14. The impact of psychiatric comorbidity on the return to work in patients undergoing herniated disc surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zieger, Margrit; Luppa, Melanie; Meisel, Hans Jörg; Günther, Lutz; Winkler, Dirk; Toussaint, René; Stengler, Katarina; Angermeyer, Matthias C; König, Hans-Helmut; Riedel-Heller, Steffi G

    2011-03-01

    This study examines (1) return to work (RTW) and ability to work (ATW) rates, and the association with (2) psychiatric comorbidity and (3) socio-demographic, illness-related, vocational and rehabilitation-related characteristics in herniated disc surgery patients. In this longitudinal observational study 305 consecutive patients took part in face-to-face interviews during hospital stay. 277 patients also participated in a 3-month follow-up survey via telephone (drop-out rate 9%). Psychiatric comorbidity was assessed with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI-DIA-X). Calculations were conducted via Chi-Square tests, independent T-tests and binary logistic regression analyses. 40.1% of the herniated disc patients in this study were able to RTW, 44.4% had regained their ATW 3 months after surgery. Psychiatric comorbidity appeared to be an important risk factor for RTW and ATW. Other risk factors were lower educational qualification, unemployment status, a lower subjective prognosis of gainful employment, a higher number of herniated discs in medical history, cervical disc surgery, and the existence of other chronic diseases, a longer hospital stay and higher pain intensity. Patients who did not RTW, or did not regain their ATW participated more often in inpatient rehabilitation. Identifying a high risk group for RTW and ATW at an early age is of utmost importance for the purpose of improving rehabilitation effects and to make a return to the work place easier. Specific interventions, such as social-medical counselling, pain therapy and management, as well as the assistance of mental health professionals during hospital and rehabilitation treatment are recommended for this risk group.

  15. The role of the Australian workplace return to work coordinator: essential qualities and attributes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohatko-Naismith, Joanna; James, Carole; Guest, Maya; Rivett, Darren A

    2015-03-01

    In the Australian context, a return to work (RTW) Coordinator assists an injured worker with workplace-based support and regulatory guidance for the duration of their injury. Coordinating the RTW process has been considered an effective approach for managing workplace injuries, however few studies have described the skills, traits or characteristics required to fulfil the role of workplace RTW Coordinator. This study aims to provide insight as to the skills and attributes needed for the role of the workplace RTW Coordinator from their experience and perception. Focus groups were conducted with workplace RTW Coordinators from six major Australian cities. Twenty five participants were recruited through a national RTW Coordinator website, and professional RTW interest groups using a snowballing technique. Participating workplace RTW Coordinators were required to have a minimum 2 years' experience and to have been involved with the development and implementation of workplace policies and procedures. Thematic analysis was performed to identify meaningful patterns and themes. The data analysed provided clear insight as to the specific role requirements necessary for working as an Australian workplace RTW Coordinator. Three key themes clearly emerged; communication skills, RTW Coordinator characteristics, and managing the RTW process. The findings indicate that RTW Coordinators require a wide range of traits, skills, and attributes to successfully perform this role. Effective management by the RTW Coordinator of the complex RTW process is essential to facilitate a smooth transition for the injured worker, alongside maintaining a professional relationship with the employer and external stakeholders. The results of this study can be utilised to further improve the selection of future RTW Coordinators.

  16. Evaluation of a transdiagnostic psychodynamic online intervention to support return to work: A randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rüdiger Zwerenz

    Full Text Available Given their flexibility, online interventions may be useful as an outpatient treatment option to support vocational reintegration after inpatient rehabilitation. To that purpose we devised a transdiagnostic psychodynamic online intervention to facilitate return to work, focusing on interpersonal conflicts at the workplace often responsible for work-related stress.In a randomized controlled trial, we included employed patients from cardiologic, psychosomatic and orthopedic rehabilitation with work-related stress or need for support at intake to inpatient rehabilitation after they had given written consent to take part in the study. Following discharge, maladaptive interpersonal interactions at the workplace were identified via weekly blogs and processed by written therapeutic comments over 12 weeks in the intervention group (IG. The control group (CG received an augmented treatment as usual condition. The main outcome, subjective prognosis of gainful employment (SPE, and secondary outcomes (psychological complaints were assessed by means of online questionnaires before, at the end of aftercare (3 months and at follow-up (12 months. We used ITT analyses controlling for baseline scores and medical group.N = 319 patients were enrolled into IG and N = 345 into CG. 77% of the IG logged in to the webpage (CG 74% and 65% of the IG wrote blogs. Compared to the CG, the IG reported a significantly more positive SPE at follow-up. Measures of depression, anxiety and psychosocial stressors decreased from baseline to follow-up, whereas the corresponding scores increased in the CG. Correspondingly, somatization and psychological quality of life improved in the IG.Psychodynamic online aftercare was effective to enhance subjective prognosis of future employment and improved psychological complaints across a variety of chronic physical and psychological conditions, albeit with small effect sizes.

  17. Cooperation of return-to-work professionals: the challenges of multi-actor work disability management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liukko, Jyri; Kuuva, Niina

    2017-07-01

    This article explores which concrete factors hinder or facilitate the cooperation of return-to-work (RTW) professionals in a complex system of multiple stakeholders. The empirical material consists of in-depth interviews with 24 RTW professionals from various organizations involved in work disability management in Finland. The interviews were analyzed using thematic content analysis. The study revealed several kinds of challenges in the cooperation of the professionals. These were related to two partly interrelated themes: communication and distribution of responsibility. The most difficult problems were connected to the cooperation between public employment offices and other stakeholders. However, the study distinguished notable regional differences depending primarily on the scale of the local network. The main areas of improvement proposed by the interviewees were related to better networking of case managers and expansion of expertise. The article argues for the importance of systematic networking and stresses the role of public employment services in the multi-actor management of work disabilities. The article contributes to existing work disability case management models by suggesting the employment administration system as an important component in addition to health care, workplace and insurance systems. The study also highlights the need for expansion of expertise in the field. Implications for Rehabilitation Cooperation between RTW professionals in public employment offices and other organizations involved in work disability management was considered inadequate. In order to improve the cooperation of RTW professionals, the stakeholders need to create more systematic ways of communication and networking with professionals in other organizations. There is a need to expand the expertise in work disability management and rehabilitation, partly by increasing the role of other professionals than physicians.

  18. Return-to-Work Within a Complex and Dynamic Organizational Work Disability System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jetha, Arif; Pransky, Glenn; Fish, Jon; Hettinger, Lawrence J

    2016-09-01

    Background Return-to-work (RTW) within a complex organizational system can be associated with suboptimal outcomes. Purpose To apply a sociotechnical systems perspective to investigate complexity in RTW; to utilize system dynamics modeling (SDM) to examine how feedback relationships between individual, psychosocial, and organizational factors make up the work disability system and influence RTW. Methods SDMs were developed within two companies. Thirty stakeholders including senior managers, and frontline supervisors and workers participated in model building sessions. Participants were asked questions that elicited information about the structure of the work disability system and were translated into feedback loops. To parameterize the model, participants were asked to estimate the shape and magnitude of the relationship between key model components. Data from published literature were also accessed to supplement participant estimates. Data were entered into a model created in the software program Vensim. Simulations were conducted to examine how financial incentives and light duty work disability-related policies, utilized by the participating companies, influenced RTW likelihood and preparedness. Results The SDMs were multidimensional, including individual attitudinal characteristics, health factors, and organizational components. Among the causal pathways uncovered, psychosocial components including workplace social support, supervisor and co-worker pressure, and supervisor-frontline worker communication impacted RTW likelihood and preparedness. Interestingly, SDM simulations showed that work disability-related policies in both companies resulted in a diminishing or opposing impact on RTW preparedness and likelihood. Conclusion SDM provides a novel systems view of RTW. Policy and psychosocial component relationships within the system have important implications for RTW, and may contribute to unanticipated outcomes.

  19. Return to Work after a Stroke in Working Age Persons; A Six-Year Follow Up.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Westerlind

    Full Text Available Stroke is one of the most common and resource intensive diseases for society. Stroke in the working age population is increasing in different parts of the world. An incomplete return to work (RTW after sick leave post stroke entails negative consequences for the affected person and an economical burden for society. The aim of this study was to explore the RTW rate and factors associated with RTW in a six-year follow up post stroke.Data from 174 persons 63 years or younger, with first ever stroke in 2009-2010 in Gothenburg were analyzed. Baseline characteristics were collected through medical records and the Swedish Health Insurance Office provided information on sick leave up to 6 years post stroke. Time-to-event was presented and cox regression as well as logistic regression were used to analyze risk factors for no-RTW.The RTW rate was 74.7%, at the end of follow up. Participants continued to RTW until just over 3 years post stroke. Dependency at discharge (in the modified Rankin Scale and sick leave prior to the stroke were significant risk factors for no-RTW after 1 year with odds ratio 4.595 and 3.585, respectively. The same factors were significant in time-to-event within six years post stroke with hazard ratio 2.651 and 1.929, respectively.RTW after a stroke is incomplete, however RTW is possible over a longer period of time than previously thought. More severe disability at discharge from hospital and sick leave prior to the stroke were shown to be risk factors for no-RTW. This knowledge can contribute to more individualized vocational rehabilitation.

  20. Workplace managers' view of the role of co-workers in return-to-work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunstan, Debra A; MacEachen, Ellen

    2016-11-01

    Theoretical and empirical research findings attest to the workplace being a social environment in which co-workers have a critical influence on the employment outcomes and return-to-work (RTW) success of other employees. However, co-workers do not have a formal role in RTW planning. The aim of this study was to explore how managers responsible for developing and implementing RTW procedures view the role of co-workers in this process. An exploratory qualitative pilot study was conducted in Canada. Participants (1 male; 13 females; mean experience in RTW = 11.8 years) were workplace (n=8) or RTW managers (n=6) with direct oversight of RTW plans. The participants were recruited via invitation from a research institute and were drawn from three different provinces. Data were gathered via open-ended questions and were coded and subject to thematic analysis. Three key themes were identified: (1) Managers view RTW as having little relevance to co-workers but expect them to cooperate with the arrangements; (2) Formal procedures are inadequate when psychosocial barriers to work resumption are present, so managers use informal strategies to engage co-workers' emotional and social support; and (3) Managers have difficulty integrating RTW procedures with other legal obligations, such as privacy and confidentiality requirements. Existing arrangements for the development and implementation of RTW are sufficient most of the time, but may be inadequate when an injured worker presents with psychosocial barriers to work resumption. Implications for Rehabilitation Standard RTW arrangements can be inadequate when a RTW plan requires active co-worker support. Privacy and confidentiality provisions can result in managers using informal procedures for information exchange and to engage co-workers. The use of risk management strategies - assessment, consultation and communication - could be used to include co-workers when workplace issues threaten the success of a RTW plan.

  1. Recovery to Preinterventional Functioning, Return-to-Work, and Life Satisfaction After Treatment of Unruptured Aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backes, Daan; Rinkel, Gabriel J E; van der Schaaf, Irene C; Nij Bijvank, Jenny A; Verweij, Bon H; Visser-Meily, Johanna M A; Post, Marcel W; Algra, Ale; Vergouwen, Mervyn D I

    2015-06-01

    The eventual goal of preventive treatment of unruptured intracranial aneurysms is to increase the number of life years with high life satisfaction. Insight in the time with reduced functioning, working capacity, and life satisfaction after aneurysm treatment is pivotal to balance the pros and cons of preventive aneurysm occlusion. We sent a questionnaire on time-to-recovery to preintervention functioning and return-to-work and life satisfaction to patients treated for an unruptured aneurysm between 2000 and 2013. Changes in life satisfaction before treatment, during recovery, and at follow-up were assessed with Wilcoxon signed-rank tests. The questionnaire was sent to 159 patients of whom 110 (69%) responded. The mean follow-up time after aneurysm treatment was 6 years (SD 4). Fifty-four patients had endovascular and 56 had microsurgical occlusion. Complete recovery to preintervention functioning was reported by 81% (95% confidence interval [CI], 74-88) of patients, with a median time-to-recovery of 3 months (range 0-48). Complete work recovery was reported by 78% (95% CI, 66-87) of patients. The proportion of patients with high life satisfaction reduced from 76% (95% CI, 67-84) before treatment to 52% (95% CI, 43-61) during the period of recovery (P<0.01) and restored largely at long-term follow-up (67% [95% CI, 59-76], P=0.08). Life satisfaction is significantly reduced during the period of recovery after treatment of unruptured aneurysms. In the long-term, ≈1 out of 5 patients reports incomplete recovery. These treatment effects should be kept in mind when considering preventive aneurysm treatment. Prospective studies are needed to better compare these losses in patients treated for unruptured aneurysms with those who had subarachnoid hemorrhage. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. Psychological morbidity and return to work after injury: multicentre cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendrick, Denise; Dhiman, Paula; Kellezi, Blerina; Coupland, Carol; Whitehead, Jessica; Beckett, Kate; Christie, Nicola; Sleney, Judith; Barnes, Jo; Joseph, Stephen; Morriss, Richard

    2017-08-01

    The benefits of work for physical, psychological, and financial wellbeing are well documented. Return to work (RTW) after unintentional injury is often delayed, and psychological morbidity may contribute to this delay. The impact of psychological morbidity on RTW after a wide range of unintentional injuries in the UK has not been adequately quantified. To quantify the role of psychological factors, including anxiety, depression, and post-traumatic distress, on RTW following unintentional injuries. A longitudinal multicentre prospective study was undertaken in Nottingham, Bristol, Leicester, and Guildford, UK. Participants ( n = 273) were 16-69-year-olds admitted to hospital following unintentional injury, who were in paid employment prior to injury. They were surveyed at baseline, then at 1, 2, 4, and 12 months following injury; demographic data were collected along with injury characteristics, psychological morbidity, and RTW status. Associations between demographic, injury and psychological factors, and RTW between 2 and 12 months after injury were quantified using random effects logistic regression. The odds of RTW between 2 and 12 months after injury reduced as depression scores early in the recovery period (1 month after injury) increased (odds ratio [OR] 0.87, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.79 to 0.95) and as length of hospital stay increased (OR 0.91, 95% CI] = 0.86 to 0.96). For those experiencing threatening life events following injury (OR 0.27, 95% CI = 0.10 to 0.72) and with higher scores on the Crisis Support Scale (OR 0.93, 95% CI] = 0.88 to 0.99), the odds of RTW between 2 and 12 months after injury were lower. Multiple imputation analysis found similar results, but those relating to crisis support did not remain statistically significant. Primary care professionals can identify patients at risk of delayed RTW who may benefit from management of psychological morbidity and support to RTW. © British Journal of General Practice 2017.

  3. "Apping Up": Prospects for Information Technology Innovation in Return to Work Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ripdaman; O'Hagan, Fergal

    2018-03-21

    Purpose During return to work (RTW), communication between health care providers and employers largely takes place through standardize paper-based forms. Information technology (IT) platforms may provide advantages in enabling information exchange and decision-making through sharing of guidelines and resources. We investigated stakeholder perspectives on the prospect of IT use for RTW communication in Ontario, Canada. Methods Consistent with the exploratory nature of the questions, qualitative methods were used. Primary data were interviews with health care providers (HCPs), employers, and workers with experience in RTW. The first portion of initial interviews elicited general perspectives and experiences related to RTW communication. Participants were then exposed to a prototype IT communication platform and elicited their feedback. Follow-up interviews with HCP's and EMP's were used to allow further reflection and clarification of data. We used progressive, thematic coding to analyze data. Results 12 HCPs, 7 employers, and 5 workers participated in the study. Five inter-related themes were obtained. Participants expressed no absolute objection to the use of IT for RTW communication but varying degrees of support. Participants revealed how media change depended on a prospective IT innovation's perceived usefulness, fit with current practices, capacity to gain buy-in from other stakeholders, and ability to demonstrate positive performance in actual practice. Conclusions Findings suggest that a transition to an IT-mediated tool for RTW communication is supported in principle; however, major caveats exist in relation to perceived value and fit with stakeholder practice. System support and stakeholder cooperation are likely necessary to adopt the change, yet IT-mediated communication has yet to demonstrate value. To avoid circularity, proof of principal needs to be established through an implementation trial of such technology.

  4. Returning to work after suffering from burnout syndrome: Perceived changes in personality, views, values, and behaviors connected with work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boštjančič Eva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To date only a few studies have focused on returning to work after suffering from burnout syndrome. Participants were asked about their perceived work effectiveness, changes in their personal values, and obstacles and support factors that they encountered when they returned to work. Among the 27 individuals of various professions included in the study, 18 achieved an average or a high score on the Maslach Burnout Inventory, which was used to conduct a semi-structured interview. The answers were later processed by analyzing the content. The results showed that burned-out individuals only slowly return to work after recovery. When they return to work, they encounter changes in personality, personal values, and work effectiveness, and they only receive partial support from the environment. The results draw attention to insufficient detection of the disease by medical staff and employers in Slovenia. Recovering from burnout is a long-term process, which depends most on individuals themselves. At the same time, they can receive the necessary support from their family and coworkers, especially in terms of understanding them and partially adapting their responsibilities at work when they return. This study draws attention to a number of factors that can influence an individual’s process of returning to work and can be used as a basis for developing systematic rehabilitation programs.

  5. [Impact of the labour market on vocational retraining centre participants' return to work: a study on employment agencies level].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetzel, C; Flach, T; Schmidt, C

    2012-08-01

    This paper is aimed at identifying labour market factors impacting vocational retraining centre participants' return to work on Employment Agencies level and at comparing results to unemployed people's return to work (Social Code Book III). Databases are regional return to work rates of 2006 graduates, selected labour market indicators 2007, and the 2007 labour market classification of the Institute for Employment Research (IAB). The n = 75 Employment Agency districts where 74.5 % of the participants followed-up lived were analyzed using analyses of variance and multiple loglinear regression. Compared to the unemployment context (Social Code Book III), the impact of the labour market is much lower and less complex. In the multiple model, the regional unemployment rate and the regional tertiarization rate (size of the service sector) are found to be significant and superior to the IAB-classification. Hence, participants' return to work is less dependent on labour market conditions than unemployed people's return to work (Social Code Book III). © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Gender differences in work modifications and changed job characteristics during the return-to-work process: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rijk, A; Nijhuis, F; Alexanderson, K

    2009-06-01

    To describe gender differences in work modifications and changed job characteristics during return-to-work after sickness absence. A 13 month prospective cohort study was performed among 119 employees (54 women and 65 men) who had reported sick for more than 1 month due to mental or musculoskeletal disorders. Men and women were of comparable ages and educational levels, worked in similar sectors, at corresponding functional levels, and were experiencing the same types of health disorders. They were interviewed bi-monthly. Work modifications and job characteristics were assessed at return-to-work. Job characteristics were also assessed upon the employee's inclusion in the study. Work modifications occurred in 77.4% of the return-to-work attempts (no gender differences); reduced working hours, reduced work pace, or task reassignments were most frequent. Compared to men, reduced hours and pace were more often used for women between 12 and 20 weeks of absence (P > 0.001 and 0.01 different time-schedules in women. Upon return to work both women and men reported increased job autonomy and emotional demands (P job satisfaction (P gender differences may be due to male and female respondents having similar characteristics. Upon return to work some job characteristics improved.

  7. [A systematic review of the predictors of return to work following vocational retraining].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streibelt, M; Egner, U

    2013-04-01

    Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) is an essential element of interventions aimed at re-integrating people with work disability into work. In this context, vocational retraining is of special importance. However, the success of vocational retraining, represented by subsequent returning to work (RTW), is only to a limited extent attributable to intervention quality. Apart from methodical influences participant-related as well as context-related attributes are discussed as influencing factors. To know these RTW predictors is a necessary condition for a valid comparative evaluation of intervention quality. A structured literature search was conducted. All studies meeting the following criteria were included: publication between 2006 and 2011; context: German rehabilitation system and vocational retraining; multivariate analysis of RTW predictors. The evidence for or against the influence of a predictor was rated as strong if more than 75% of the models, and moderate if more than 50% of the models reported or excluded a significant relationship between predictor and RTW. All predictors included in more than 2 studies were considered in this review. 15 publications from 6 studies were included in the analysis. Due to differentiation of the models between different types of retraining the evidence was based on 9 prediction models. Strong evidence of an effect on RTW can be assumed for income before admission, subjective health rating and regular completion of retraining. There is moderate evidence for an effect of age and target job. Strong evidence against an effect on RTW is found for employment and occupational status before admission. There is moderate evidence against an RTW effect of sex, education and locus of control. Ambiguous evidence is obtained for the local job market, the type of retraining, social support and mobility. For the first time the review provides findings on the relevant influence factors of RTW following vocational retraining. These findings on the

  8. Cohort profile: workers' compensation in a changing Australian labour market: the return to work (RTW) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitriadis, Christina; LaMontagne, Anthony D; Lilley, Rebbecca; Hogg-Johnson, Sheilah; Sim, Malcolm; Smith, Peter

    2017-11-08

    Workers' compensation claims for older workers and workers who have suffered psychological injury are increasing as a proportion of total claims in many jurisdictions. In the Australian state of Victoria, claims from both these groups are associated with higher than average wage replacement and healthcare expenditures. This cohort profile describes a longitudinal study which aims to investigate differences in the return to work (RTW) process for older workers compared with younger workers and claimants with musculoskeletal injuries compared with those with psychological injuries. This prospective cohort study involved interviewing workers' compensation claimants at three time points. The cohort was restricted to psychological and musculoskeletal claims. Only claimants aged 18 and over were recruited, with no upper age limit. A total of 869 claimants completed the baseline interview, representing 36% of the eligible claimant population. Ninety-one per cent of participants agreed at baseline to have their survey responses linked to administrative workers' compensation data. Of the 869 claimants who participated at baseline, 632 (73%) took part in the 6-month follow-up interview, and 572 (66%) participated in the 12-month follow-up interview. Information on different aspects of the RTW process and important factors that may impact the RTW process was collected at the three survey periods. At baseline, participants and non-participants did not differ by injury type or age group, but were more likely to be female and from the healthcare and social assistance industry. The probability of non-participation at follow-up interviews showed younger age was a statistically significant predictor of non-participation. Analysis of the longitudinal cohort will identify important factors in the RTW process and explore differences across age and injury type groups. Ongoing linkage to administrative workers' compensation data will provide information on wage replacement and

  9. Injured workers’ perception of loss and gain in the return to work process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lai HS

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Hon Sun Lai,1,2 Grace PY Szeto,1 Chetwyn CH Chan3 1Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, 2Total Rehabilitation Management (Hong Kong Limited, 3Applied Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory, Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong Abstract: When a worker is injured at work, he has to face a tough decision-making process about when and how to return to work (RTW. This study tests how the prospect theory can be applied to influence the injured workers’ perceptions about this important choice. One hundred forty-one injured workers were presented with wage- and pain-related information in four different message framing (negatively or positively and precision (smaller or larger number conditions. After exposure to the specific combination of this wage and pain information, the participants were asked to express intentions to RTW in terms of perceived chance, confidence, and anticipated sick leave duration. When asked to predict their RTW outcome, 101 participants (72.3% responded favorably, whereas only 40 (27.7% indicated an expectation for staying on sick leave. The present results did not show significant differences in the participants’ responses to the positively and negatively framed information about wage and pain. However, it was noted that the control group that was presented with positive framing for both “wage” and “pain” information showed higher scores in expectation and confidence for RTW, whereas the Ambivalent Group that had both negative messages showed lower scores. Seventy-nine participants who had ≥60% perceived improvement in condition were selected for further analysis, and those who were presented with “wage loss” information rated significantly higher perceived chance of RTW than those in the “pain gain” group. More in-depth investigation is warranted on this topic, with a larger sample of injured workers to investigate the

  10. Emotions and encounters with healthcare professionals as predictors for the self-estimated ability to return to work: a cross-sectional study of people with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordgren, Lena; Söderlund, Anne

    2016-11-09

    To live with heart failure means that life is delimited. Still, people with heart failure can have a desire to stay active in working life as long as possible. Although a number of factors affect sick leave and rehabilitation processes, little is known about sick leave and vocational rehabilitation concerning people with heart failure. This study aimed to identify emotions and encounters with healthcare professionals as possible predictors for the self-estimated ability to return to work in people on sick leave due to heart failure. A population-based cross-sectional study design was used. The study was conducted in Sweden. Data were collected in 2012 from 3 different sources: 2 official registries and 1 postal questionnaire. A total of 590 individuals were included. Descriptive statistics, correlation analysis and linear multiple regression analysis were used. 3 variables, feeling strengthened in the situation (β=-0.21, p=0.02), feeling happy (β=-0.24, p=0.02) and receiving encouragement about work (β=-0.32, p≤0.001), were identified as possible predictive factors for the self-estimated ability to return to work. To feel strengthened, happy and to receive encouragement about work can affect the return to work process for people on sick leave due to heart failure. In order to develop and implement rehabilitation programmes to meet these needs, more research is needed. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  11. [Assessing factors that influence patients' perception in returning to work using the brief version of Burns Specific Health Scale].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowda, Deborah J; Li, Frank

    2010-12-01

    To assess the factors that influence burn patients' perception in returning to work after discharge. Twenty-four patients hospitalized from March 1, 2007 to February 28, 2009, older than 18 years, and with total burn surface area equal to or more than 10% TBSA were enrolled in the study. Data of physical and psychological health status (PPH) of in-patients including hand function, simple function abilities, heat sensitivity, treatment antipathy, body image, sexuality, interpersonal relationships, affect, and perception in returning to work at discharge and 3 and 6 months after discharge were collected using the brief version of Burns Specific Health Scale in the form of questionnaire, which were analyzed coordinately. The correlation between returning to work and demographic data of patients were analyzed too. Data were processed with t test or Pearson correlation test. Respectively 19 and 16 valid questionnaires were sent back 3 and 6 months after discharge. No statistical difference was found between at discharge and 3 months after discharge in each item concerning PPH of patients (with t values from -4.87 to -2.16, P values all above 0.05). The perception of returning to work scored significantly higher 6 months after discharge than at discharge [(9 ± 5) score vs. (6 ± 3) score, t = -4.87, P antipathy, body image, and heat sensitivity (with r value respectively 0.9256, 0.8891, 0.7502, 0.6022, P values all below 0.05), and negatively correlated with length of stay, total burn surface area, and amount of workers compensation (with r value respectively -0.7000, -0.6844, -0.8003, P values all below 0.05). Patients' perception in returning to work is correlated with heat sensitivity, treatment antipathy, body image, affect, length of stay, total burn surface area, and amount workers compensation. Health professionals need to provide patients with ongoing education and necessary information to help them return to work.

  12. Return to Learning, Return to Work: Helping Low-Qualified Adults Out of Unemployment. Briefing Note

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cedefop - European Centre for the Development of Vocational Training, 2013

    2013-01-01

    Since 2008, the question uppermost in policymakers' minds has understandably been the explosive growth of youth unemployment. But the crisis has also severely affected low-qualified adults, who face the highest rate of unemployment across Europe. A recent Cedefop study confirms that work-based training programmes can address the particular needs…

  13. Increased self-awareness in the process of returning to work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugstvedt, Karen Therese Sulheim; Hallberg, Ulrika; Graff-Iversen, Sidsel; Sørensen, Marit; Haugli, Liv

    2011-12-01

    A group of employees on sick leave, living in the Oslo area, Norway, was offered participation in a counselling programme, based on Gestalt theory, mindfulness and phenomenological understanding of the body. To explore the participants' processes of change related to their increased ability to work. METHOD DESIGN: This qualitative study is based on modified grounded theory. A total of 12 female employees, all who had increased work ability 1 year after the programme, participated in open focus-group interviews at the end of the programme. The participants' experiences from processes of change are described through the following categories: becoming more aware of one's own thoughts, emotions and bodily reactions; taking oneself seriously and accepting oneself; being secure enough to face being challenged; realizing new possibilities and choices and trying out new ways of acting. The participants further described what had been helpful in these processes. Experience of a secure setting and open-minded listening seemed important for getting the courage to open up to all reactions. Then, they could explore new ways of thinking, communicating and behaving. Discussing existential issues such as their core values was important. This, together with being allowed to take their own emotions seriously and being challenged by the counsellors, had encouraged the processes of change. The women described how experiences of increased awareness contributed to reconstruction of their self-understanding and opened up for new possibilities. This seemed to have provided them with new ways of communicating and acting, which enhanced participation in work. The context of the learning programme, the existential issues and counselling challenges appeared as essential in these processes of change. The findings give insights into aspects that may be important when designing rehabilitation programmes. © 2011 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences © 2011 Nordic College of

  14. Hospital nurses working wounded: motivations and obstacles to return to work as experienced by nurses with injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, Kathleen; Gillen, Marion; Kools, Susan; Blanc, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Despite the high rate of work-related injuries among hospital nurses, there is limited understanding of factors that serve to motivate or hinder nurses return to work following injury. Perspectives of nurses with work related injuries, as they relate to obstacles and motivations to return to work, consequences of injury, and influences of work climate were documented. This was a sub-study of nurses taken from a larger investigation of hospital workers. A purposive sample of 16 nurses was interviewed. Analysis was carried out using grounded theory as the research method. Nurses' responses fell into four concepts: organizational influences, personal conditions, costs and losses, and employee health as influenced by workers' compensation systems. Conceptualization of these concepts resulted in key categories: injury as an expected consequence of hospital work; nursing alone versus nursing together; the impact of injury on professional, family, and social roles; and nurses' understanding of and involvement with the workers' compensation system. The findings provide new perspective into features that support or hinder nurses' with injuries return to work and corroborate existing occupational health research. Consideration of these findings by hospital and employee health managers may help promote more effective return to work programs within the hospital setting.

  15. Supervisory behaviour as a predictor of return to work in employees absent from work due to mental health problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuijsen, K.; Verbeek, J.H.A.M.; Boer, A.G.E.M. de; Blonk, R.W.B.; Dijk, F.J.H. van

    2004-01-01

    Aims: To study supervisory behaviour as a predictive factor for return to work of employees absent due to mental health problems; and to explore the association between conditional factors and supervisory behaviour. Methods: Eighty five supervisors of employees were interviewed by telephone.

  16. Encounters between workers sick-listed with common mental disorders and return-to-work stakeholders. Does workers' gender matter?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nielsen, Maj Britt D.; Madsen, Ida E. H.; Bultmann, Ute; Christensen, Ulla; Diderichsen, Finn; Rugulies, Reiner

    Introduction: The aims of this paper were to examine how disabled workers assess encounters with return-to-work (RTW) stakeholders during sickness absence due to common mental disorders (CMD) and to investigate gender differences in these assessments. Method: Data on contact with and assessment of

  17. Return to work after spinal cord injury: is it related to wheelchair capacity at discharge from clinical rehabilitation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Velzen, Judith M.; de Groot, Sonja; Post, Marcel W. M.; Slootman, Johannes Hans R.; van Bennekom, Coen A. M.; van der Woude, Lucas H. V.

    2009-01-01

    To describe the number of people with spinal cord injury who returned to work (RTW) 1 yr after discharge from inpatient rehabilitation and to investigate whether RTW can be predicted from wheelchair capacity at discharge from inpatient rehabilitation, after correction for confounders. Prospective

  18. Return to work among employees with mental health problems: Development and validation of a self-efficacy questionnaire

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lagerveld, S.E.; Blonk, R.W.B.; Brenninkmeijer, V.; Schaufeli, W.B.

    2010-01-01

    Because of the costs to both the organization and the individual, it is important that employees who are sick-listed with mental health problems are facilitated in their return to work (RTW). In order to provide adequate interventions, it is necessary to obtain a better understanding of the RTW

  19. Towards a New Definition of Return-to-Work Outcomes in Common Mental Disorders from a Multi-Stakeholder Perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hees, Hiske L.; Nieuwenhuijsen, Karen; Koeter, Maarten W. J.; Bultmann, Ute; Schene, Aart H.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the perspectives of key stakeholders involved in the return-to-work (RTW) process regarding the definition of successful RTW outcome after sickness absence related to common mental disorders (CMD's). Methods: A mixed-method design was used: First, we used qualitative methods

  20. Desire, longing and vanity: emotions behind successful return to work for women on long-term sick leave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrberg, Y; Landstad, B J; Bergroth, A; Ekholm, J

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify situations and phenomena that have simplified returning to work for women on long-term sick leave. Seven women who were exposed to a relatively large number of risk factors that normally are associated with difficulties in returning to work. In-depth interviews with qualitative content analysis. The analysis indicated four main categories of factors: The Individual, Interactions, Surrounding Resources, and Situations. In each of the main categories structural factors exist and it appears that these have been of significant importance to the women in their return to work. These are presented as Key Factors and they are: clarification of--and the need for--support in the personal process of change; desire, longing, and vanity; respectful interactions between the individual and people in her surroundings; the structure and content of the rehabilitation clinic; the importance of the perceived reality; and the individual's sense of control during the work related rehabilitation process. The results mostly revealed phenomena that have been indicated and described in earlier research studies. However, emotions such as desire, longing and vanity as motivation and driving forces behind a return to work have not been earlier described.

  1. Delayed Return-to-work in Workers After Non-severe Occupational Upper Extremity Fracture in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Li Du

    2007-11-01

    Conclusion: Women workers and workers without financial help from employers are at a disadvantage with regard to early return-to-work. Other assistance besides medical treatment could be of significant help but should be cautiously exercised in extrapolating to workers who are not the main breadwinner in their household.

  2. Rehabilitation Using High-Intensity Physical Training and Long-Term Return-to-Work in Cancer Survivors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thijs, Karin M.; de Boer, Angela G. E. M.; Vreugdenhil, Gerard; van de Wouw, Agnès J.; Houterman, Saskia; Schep, Goof

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Due to large and increasing numbers of cancer survivors, long-term cancer-related health issues have become a major focus of attention. This study examined the relation between a high-intensity physical rehabilitation program and return-to-work in cancer survivors who had received

  3. Survey of return to work of head and neck cancer survivors: A report from a tertiary cancer center in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Jaiprakash; Krishnatry, Rahul; Chaturvedi, Pankaj; Ghosh-Laskar, Sarbani; Gupta, Tejpal; Budrukkar, Ashwani; Murthy, Vedang; Deodhar, Joyita; Nair, Deepa; Nair, Sudhir; Dikshit, Rajesh; D'Cruz, Anil K

    2017-05-01

    The rates and factors associated with the return to work of head and neck cancer survivors from low- and middle-income countries, such as India, are largely unknown. We conducted a preliminary cross-sectional survey of 250 consecutive eligible head and neck cancer survivors (age work rates and sociodemographic, clinical, and quality of life (QOL; European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire-Core 30-questions [EORTC-QLQ-C30] and European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire-Core 30 Head and Neck 35-questions [EORTC-QLQ-H&N35]) correlates. In our cohort, 92.4% of the patients were employed pretreatment, 65.6% and 81.2% returned to work at 6 months posttreatment and by the time of the survey (median follow-up 19 months), respectively. Family structure (work. Head and neck cancer survivors who returned to work had better global quality of life (QOL; p = .014) and less coughing (p = .001) but more problems related to sticky saliva (p = .004). Further studies are needed to address the large unmet needs regarding identification and amelioration of barriers to return to work for head and neck cancer survivors in low- and middle-income countries, such as India. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 39: 893-899, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Effectiveness of a tailored return to work program for cancer survivors with job loss: results of a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Egmond, M.P. van; Duijts, S.F.; Jonker, M.A.; Beek, A.J. van der; Anema, J.R.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Up to 53% of cancer survivors (CSs) experiences job loss during or after treatment. To support CSs with job loss in the Netherlands, a tailored return to work (RTW) program was developed. The objective of this study was to assess the effectiveness of the program on duration until

  5. 20 CFR 10.515 - What actions must the employee take with respect to returning to work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What actions must the employee take with respect to returning to work? 10.515 Section 10.515 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION PROGRAMS, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR FEDERAL EMPLOYEES' COMPENSATION ACT CLAIMS FOR COMPENSATION UNDER THE FEDERAL EMPLOYEES' COMPENSATION ACT, AS AMENDED...

  6. Implementation of the Danish return-to-work program : process evaluation of a trial in 21 Danish municipalities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aust, Birgit; Nielsen, Maj Britt D.; Grundtvig, Gry; Buchardt, Helle L.; Ferm, Linnea; Andersen, Irene; Lund, Trine L.; Jelle, Martin Ohmann Claudio; Andersen, Malene F.; Hansen, Jorgen V.; Tverborgvik, Torill; Helverskov, Trine; Bjorner, Jakob Bue; Rugulies, Reiner; Orbaek, Palle; Winzor, Glen; Bultmann, Ute; Poulsen, Otto M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the implementation of the Danish national return-to-work (RTW) program in 21 Danish municipalities. Methods We conducted a structured process evaluation on (i) reach and recruitment, (ii) fidelity, (iii) dose-delivered, (iv) dose-received, and (v)

  7. The Danish national return-to-work program - aims, content, and design of the process and effect evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aust, Birgit; Helverskov, Trine; Nielsen, Maj Britt D.; Bjorner, Jakob Bue; Rugulies, Reiner; Nielsen, Karina; Sorensen, Ole H.; Grundtvig, Gry; Andersen, Malene F.; Hansen, Jorgen V.; Buchardt, Helle L.; Nielsen, Lisbeth; Lund, Trine L.; Andersen, Irene; Andersen, Mogens H.; Clausen, Aksel S.; Heinesen, Eskil; Mortensen, Ole S.; Ektor-Andersen, John; Orbaek, Palle; Winzor, Glen; Bultmann, Ute; Poulsen, Otto M.

    The Danish national return-to-work (RTW) program aims to improve the management of municipal sickness benefit in Denmark. A study is currently ongoing to evaluate the RTW program. The purpose of this article is to describe the study protocol. The program includes 21 municipalities encompassing

  8. Prediction of return-to-work of low back pain patients sicklisted for 3-4 months

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Giezen, A M; Bouter, L M; Nijhuis, F J

    The purpose of this Dutch prospective population-based study was to identify prognostic factors for return-to-work of employees with 3-4 months sick leave due to low back pain (LBP). A cohort of 328 employees was formed and baseline data were collected. One year after the first day of the sick

  9. Return to work in people with acquired brain injury: association with observed ability to use everyday technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson-Lund, Maria; Kottorp, Anders; Malinowsky, Camilla

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to explore how the observed ability to use everyday technology (ET), intrapersonal capacities and environmental characteristics related to ET use contributes to the likelihood of return to work in people with ABI. The aim was also to explore whether these variables added to the likelihood of return to work to earlier defined significant variables in the group: age, perceived ADL ability and perceived ability in ET use. A cross-sectional study. The Management of Everyday Technology Assessment (META), the short version of the Everyday Technology Use Questionnaire (S-ETUQ) and a revised version of the ADL taxonomy were used to evaluate 74 people with ABI. Individual ability measures from all assessments were generated by Rasch analyses and used for additional statistical analysis. The univariate analyses showed that the observed ability to use ET, as well as intrapersonal capacities and environmental characteristics related to ET use were all significantly associated with returning to work. In the multivariate analyses, none of these associations remained. The explanatory precision of return to work in people with ABI increased minimally by adding the observed ability to use ET and the variables related to ET use when age, perceived ability in ET use and ADL had been taken in account.

  10. Work characteristics and return to work in long-term sick-listed employees with depressive symptoms.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijs, J.J.J.M.; Koppes, L.L.J.; Taris, T.W.; Blonk, R.W.B.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The present study investigated the relations between work characteristics, depressive symptoms and duration until full return to work (RTW) among long-term sick-listed employees. This knowledge may add to the development of effective interventions and prevention, especially since work

  11. Work characteristics and return to work in long-term sick-listed employees with depressive symptoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijs, Jenny; Koppes, L.L.J.; Taris, A.W.; Blonk, R.W.B.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The present study investigated the relations between work characteristics, depressive symptoms and duration until full return to work (RTW) among long-term sick-listed employees. This knowledge may add to the development of effective interventions and prevention, especially since work

  12. Work Characteristics and Return to Work in Long-Term Sick-Listed Employees with Depressive Symptoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijs, J.J.J.M.; Koppes, L.L.J.; Taris, T.W.; Blonk, R.WE.B.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The present study investigated the relations between work characteristics, depressive symptoms and duration until full return to work (RTW) among long-term sick-listed employees. This knowledge may add to the development of effective interventions and prevention, especially since work

  13. Identifying return-to-work trajectories using sequence analysis in a cohort of workers with work-related musculoskeletal disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McLeod, Christopher B.; Reiff, Eline; Maas, Esther; Bultmann, Ute

    2018-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to identify return-to-work (RTW) trajectories among workers with work-related musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) and examine the associations between different MSD and these RTW trajectories. Methods We used administrative workers' compensation data to identify accepted MSD

  14. Return to Work or Sport After Multiligament Knee Injury: A Systematic Review of 21 Studies and 524 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everhart, Joshua S; Du, Amy; Chalasani, Radhika; Kirven, James C; Magnussen, Robert A; Flanigan, David C

    2018-02-08

    To systematically review multiligament knee injury (MLKI) outcome studies to determine overall rates of return to work or sport after MLKI and risk factors for lack of return to work or sport after MLKI. A search was performed of MLKI outcome studies from 1950 to March 1, 2017. Ninety-two studies were identified. All included reported return to work, return to sport, or Tegner activity scores. Rates of return to work or sport were determined for overall population and by obesity status, injury severity, and presence of peroneal nerve or vascular injury. A total of 524 patients (21 studies) were included. Return to high-level sport was low (22%-33%). Return to any level of sport was 53.6% overall (178/332), with a higher rate reported in studies with all surgical patients (59.1%, 114/193 patients) versus studies with mixed surgical and nonoperative treatment (46.0%, 64/139 patients) (P = .02). Rate of return to work with little or no modifications was 62.1% (146/200) and return to any work was 88.4% (190/215). Obese patients had lower postoperative Tegner scores than a general population (obese: mean 1.7 ± 1.2; nonobese: mean 4.5 ± 1.0; P < .001). Among studies without Schenck grade IV and V injuries, return to work with no or minimal modifications (100%, 12/12 patients) was higher than studies including grade IV and V patients (66.0%, 70/106 patients) (P = .017). Return to any work was higher in studies without vascular injuries (96.3%, 105/109) versus those including them (80.2%, 85/106) (P < .001). Return to sport after MLKI occurs in approximately 60% of surgically treated patients, though return to high-level sport is lower. Return to work is frequently possible after MLKI though it may require workplace or job duty modifications. Obesity, nonoperative treatment, higher injury severity, and vascular injury are associated with poorer functional outcomes. Level IV, systematic review of level III and IV studies. Copyright © 2018 Arthroscopy Association of

  15. Decrease social inequalities return-to-work: development and design of a randomised controlled trial among women with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidor, Clémence; Leroyer, Ariane; Christophe, Véronique; Seillier, Mélanie; Foncel, Jérome; Van de Maële, Justine; Bonneterre, Jacques; Fantoni, Sophie

    2014-04-17

    Despite the improvement in the care management, women cancer patients who are still in employment find themselves for the most part obliged to stop working while they are having treatment. Their return-to-work probability is impacted by numerous psychosocial factors. The objective is to describe the development and the content of an intervention aimed to facilitate the return to work of female breast cancer patients and in particular the women in the most precarious situations through early active individualised psychosocial support (APAPI). The intervention proposed is made up of 4 interviews with a psychologist at the hospital, distributed over the year according to the diagnosis and conducted on the same day as a conventional follow-up consultation, then a consultation with a specialist job retention physician. We expect, in the first instance, that this intervention will reduce the social inequalities of the return-to-work rate at 12 months. The EPICES score will enable the population to be broken down according to the level of social precariousness. The other expected results are the reduction of the social inequalities in the quality of the return to work at 18 and 24 months and the disparities between the individual and collective resources of the patients. This intervention is assessed in the context of a controlled and randomised multi-centre study. The patients eligible are women aged between 18 and 55 years with a unilateral breast cancer with local extension exclusively, having received surgery followed by adjuvant chemotherapy, in employment at the time of the diagnosis and dealt with by one of the 2 investigating centres. It is essential to assess this type of intervention before envisaging its generalisation. The study set in place will enable us to measure the impact of this intervention aiming to facilitate the return to work of breast cancer patients, in particular for those who suffer from social fragility, compared with the standard care.

  16. Municipal return to work management in cancer survivors undergoing cancer treatment: a protocol on a controlled intervention study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapelfeldt, Christina M; Labriola, Merete; Jensen, Anders Bonde; Andersen, Niels Trolle; Momsen, Anne-Mette H; Nielsen, Claus Vinther

    2015-07-29

    Cancer survivors are often left on their own to deal with the challenges of resuming work during or after cancer treatment, mainly due to unclear agreements between stakeholders responsible for occupational rehabilitation. Social inequality exists in cancer risk, survival probability and continues with regard to the chance of being able to return to work. The aim is to apply an early, individually tailored occupational rehabilitation intervention to cancer survivors in two municipalities parallel with cancer treatment focusing on enhancing readiness for return to work. In a controlled trial municipal job consultants use acceptance and commitment therapy dialogue and individual-placement-and-support-inspired tools with cancer survivors to engage them in behaviour changes toward readiness for return to work. The workplace is involved in the return to work process. Patients referred to surgery, radiotherapy or chemotherapy at the Oncology Department, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark for the diagnoses; breast, colon-rectal, head and neck, thyroid gland, testicular, ovarian or cervix cancer are eligible for the study. Patients must be residents in the municipalities of Silkeborg or Randers, 18-60 years of age and have a permanent or temporary employment (with at least 6 months left of their contract) at inclusion. Patients, for whom the treating physician considers occupational rehabilitation to be unethical, or who are not reading or talking Danish are excluded. The control group has identical inclusion and exclusion criteria except for municipality of residence. Return to work is the primary outcome and is indentified in a social transfer payment register. Effect is assessed as relative cumulative incidences within 52 weeks and will be analysed in generalised linear regression models using the pseudo values method. As a secondary outcome; co-morbidity and socio-economic status is analysed as effect modifiers of the intervention effect on return to work. The

  17. The impact of prior psychiatric medical treatment on return to work after a diagnosis of breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Laura Schärfe; Overgaard, Charlotte; Garne, Jens Peter

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: Breast cancer and psychiatric disorders negatively impact work life, both positively associated with unemployment and early retirement. Our purpose was to assess whether being prescribed psychiatric medication, 2-4 yrs prior to a diagnosis of breast cancer, could impact the likelihood......-market participation. The association between historic psychiatric medication and return to work was estimated using a modified Poisson regression model. 'Return to work' was defined as being self-supporting one year after diagnosis of breast cancer. RESULTS: 16% of our cohort had used psychiatric medical treatment 2...... significant reduction in the resumption of working life one year after a diagnosis of breast cancer. IMPLICATIONS FOR CANCER SURVIVORS: Although historic use of psychiatric medication may incur a minor effect on working life, further research is needed on the long-term social consequences for sub-groups....

  18. Pride, empowerment, and return to work: on the significance of promoting positive social emotions among sickness absentees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Tommy; Müssener, Ulrika; Alexanderson, Kristina

    2006-01-01

    Sickness absence is a great public health problem and there is a lack of knowledge concerning the hows and whys of success or failure in promoting return to work of sick-listed persons. Discussions of and research into social and psychological aspects of this problem area are in need of theoretical contextualisation. In this paper it is suggested that theories of social emotions may be useful, and that the concept of empowerment can be applied provided that it is reasonably well defined. The notions of pride/shame and empowerment are elucidated and discussed, and it is shown that they can be related in the context of research into emotional dimensions of sickness absentees' experiences of the rehabilitation process in a way that may help to guide empirical studies. A simple model of hypothetical relations between pride/shame, empowerment/disempowerment, work ability, health, and return to work is sketched.

  19. Stability of return to work after a coordinated and tailored intervention for sickness absence compensation beneficiaries with mental health problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin, Marie H. T.; D. Nielsen, Maj Britt; Pedersen, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Mental health problems (MHPs) are increasingly common as reasons for long-term sickness absence. However, the knowledge of how to promote a stable return to work (RTW) after sickness absence due to MHPs is limited. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of a multidisciplinary...... showed no benefits in terms of improved stability of RTW, reduced sickness absence or improved labour market status after 2 years when compared to conventional case management. IMPLICATIONS FOR REHABILITATION: Evidence for effective return-to-work (RTW) interventions for people with mental health......, coordinated and tailored RTW-intervention in terms of stability of RTW, cumulative sickness absence and labour market status after 2 years among sickness absence compensation beneficiaries with MHPs. METHODS: In a quasi-randomised, controlled trial, we followed recipients of the intervention (n = 88...

  20. Physical functioning after occupational rehabilitation and returning to work among employees with chronic musculoskeletal pain and comorbid depressive symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernstsen, Linda; Lillefjell, Monica

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to assess whether measures of physical functioning after multidisciplinary rehabilitation are associated with return to work among individuals with chronic musculoskeletal pain conditions and comorbid depressive symptoms. Included were 92 employees with chronic musculoskeletal disorders who had participated in a 57- week multidisciplinary rehabilitation program. Their ages ranged from 25-59 years. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale was used to assess depressive symptoms. Different aspects of physical functioning (muscle strength, mobility, endurance capacity, and balance) were measured with single-item visual analog scales, and physical fitness was measured with the validated COOP/WONCA charts. Being on "active work strategies," such as receiving rehabilitation benefit/vocational rehabilitation or being reported partly or completely fit, was defined as "on their way into/in work". Cross-sectional associations were measured using logistic regression models, estimating odds ratio with 95% confidence intervals. There were no differences between the "on their way into/in work" group (n=70) and the "on their way out/out of work" group (n=22) regarding age, sex, or levels of anxiety or pain. Surprisingly, regression analyses showed that those with higher levels of physical functioning had significantly lower odds of returning to work. The findings of an inverse relationship between self-reported physical function and returning to work in this sample illustrate that the return-to-work process among employees with chronic musculoskeletal pain and comorbid depressive symptoms is multifactorial and influenced by factors other than physical functioning at the individual level. Further research, especially longitudinal studies, is needed to assess the occupational trajectories among employees with chronic musculoskeletal pain and comorbid depressive symptoms after participation in a multidisciplinary rehabilitation program.

  1. Physical functioning after occupational rehabilitation and returning to work among employees with chronic musculoskeletal pain and comorbid depressive symptoms

    OpenAIRE

    Ernstsen, Linda; Lillefjell,Monica

    2014-01-01

    Linda Ernstsen,1 Monica Lillefjell2 1Faculty of Nursing, Sør-Trøndelag University College, Trondheim, Norway; 2Department of Occupational Therapy, Faculty of Health Education and Social Work, Sør-Trøndelag University College, Trondheim, Norway Background: The aim of this investigation was to assess whether measures of physical functioning after multidisciplinary rehabilitation are associated with return to work among individuals with chronic muscul...

  2. The "toxic dose" of system problems: why some injured workers don't return to work as expected.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacEachen, Ellen; Kosny, Agnieszka; Ferrier, Sue; Chambers, Lori

    2010-09-01

    Introduction Most workers who incur an injury on the job follow a relatively straightforward path through a workers' compensation claim, recovery and return to work. However, a minority of compensation claims is prolonged and can be disproportionately costly. We conducted this qualitative study in order to gain an understanding of systemic, process-related problems affecting injured workers who had failed to return to work as expected. Method A total of 69 in-depth interviews were conducted with injured workers with complex and extended workers' compensation claims and with return-to-work (RTW) providers such as health care providers, insurers, legal advisors, and workplaces. The study was based in Ontario, Canada. A modified grounded theory analysis led to the identification of common mechanisms in RTW problems. Results We identify problems with return to work and extended workers' compensation claims in dysfunctions in organizational dynamics across RTW systems including the workplace, healthcare, vocational rehabilitation and workers' compensation. These system problems are difficult to identify because they appear as relatively mundane and bureaucratic. These appeared to have damaging effects on workers in the form of a 'toxic dose' affecting the worker beyond the initial injury. Conclusions Worker's problems with extended claims were linked to RTW policies that did not easily accommodate conflict or power imbalances among RTW parties and by social relations and processes that impeded communication about RTW situations and problems. Avenues for intervention are located in a shift to a critical lens to RTW process that addresses differences of knowledge, resources, and interests among different parties.

  3. Barriers and facilitators for implementation of a return-to-work intervention for sickness absence beneficiaries with mental health problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin, Marie H. T.; Moefelt, Louise; Dahl Nielsen, Maj Britt

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: Evidence for the effectiveness of return-to-work (RTW) interventions aimed at sickness absence beneficiaries with mental health problems (MHPs) is still relatively sparse and mostly inconclusive. This may in part reflect the varying settings and inconsistent implementations associated......, different interpretations of sickness absence legislation among stakeholders, competing rehabilitation alternatives, and lack of managerial support for the intervention. An important facilitator was the motivation and availability of resources to solve disagreements through extensive communication...

  4. Impact of a breastfeeding-friendly workplace on an employed mother's intention to continue breastfeeding after returning to work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Su-Ying

    2013-04-01

    Ever-increasing populations of women in their childbearing years are choosing to become employed. Breastfeeding provides unique health advantages to both the infant and mother. A breastfeeding-friendly workplace might be an important factor for predicting breastfeeding rates among working women. To explore the impact of breastfeeding-friendly support on the intention of working mothers to continue breastfeeding, we conducted a survey at a female labor-intensive electronics manufacturer in Taiwan. A structured questionnaire survey was administered to 715 working mothers employed in an electronics manufacturing plant in Tainan Science Park in Southern Taiwan. Questionnaire content included female employee demographics, employment characteristics, continued breastfeeding behavior after returning to work, access to lactation rooms, and employee perception of the breastfeeding policy and support when raising their most recently born child. A higher education level (odds ratio [OR]=2.66), lower work load (8 work hours/day) (OR=2.66), lactation room with dedicated space (OR=2.38), use of breast pumping breaks (OR=61.6), and encouragement from colleagues (OR=2.78) and supervisors (OR=2.44) to use breast pumping breaks were significant predictors of continued breastfeeding for more than 6 months after returning to work. The findings of the present study suggest that to encourage and increase the rate of continued breastfeeding, workplaces should establish dedicated breastfeeding rooms and maintain a comfortable and clean environment. Furthermore, employers should provide encouragement and support for working mothers to continue breastfeeding after returning to work.

  5. Return to Work and Multilevel Versus Single-Level Cervical Fusion for Radiculopathy in a Workers' Compensation Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faour, Mhamad; Anderson, Joshua T; Haas, Arnold R; Percy, Rick; Woods, Stephen T; Ahn, Uri M; Ahn, Nicholas U

    2017-01-15

    Retrospective comparative cohort study. Examine the impact of multilevel fusion on return to work (RTW) status and compare RTW status after multi- versus single-level cervical fusion for patients with work-related injury. Patients with work-related injuries in the workers' compensation systems have less favorable surgical outcomes. Cervical fusion provides a greater than 90% likelihood of relieving radiculopathy and stabilizing or improving myelopathy. However, more levels fused at index surgery are reportedly associated with poorer surgical outcomes than single-level fusion. Data was collected from the Ohio Bureau of Workers' Compensation (BWC) between 1993 and 2011. The study population included patients who underwent cervical fusion for radiculopathy. Two groups were constructed (multilevel fusion [MLF] vs. single-level fusion [SLF]). Outcomes measures evaluated were: RTW criteria, RTW cervical fusion for radiculopathy was associated with poor return to work profile after surgery. Multilevel cervical fusion was associated with lower RTW rates, less likelihood of achieving stable return to work, and higher rate of disability after surgery. 3.

  6. A work-directed intervention to enhance the return to work of employees with cancer: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamminga, Sietske J; Verbeek, Jos H A M; de Boer, Angela G E M; van der Bij, Ria M; Frings-Dresen, Monique H W

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this case study was to describe how the return-to-work process evolved in an employee with cancer in the Netherlands and how a work-directed intervention supported this process. The patient was a 35-year old female employee diagnosed with cervix carcinoma. After surgery, the patient experienced depression, fatigue, fear of recurrence, and low mental working capacity. Communication with the occupational physician was difficult. A social worker at the hospital provided three counselling sessions aimed to support return to work and sent letters to the occupational physician to improve the communication. The support by the social worker helped the patient to resume work gradually and the sending of information from the treating physician and social worker improved the communication with the occupational physician. This resulted in the patient being able to achieve lasting return to work. This work-directed intervention was highly valued by the patient and could be an important addition to usual psycho-oncological care for employees with cancer.

  7. Organ Support Therapy in the Intensive Care Unit and Return to Work in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Survivors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riddersholm, Signe; Kragholm, Kristian; Mortensen, Rikke Nørmark

    2018-01-01

    AIM: With increased survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), impact of the post-resuscitation course has become important. Among 30-day OHCA survivors, we investigated associations between organ support therapy in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) and return to work. METHODS: This Danish....... Return to work increased with decreasing number of organs supported, from 53.8% (95% CI: 49.5-70.1%) in patients treated with both RRT, cardiovascular support and mechanical ventilation to 88.5% (95% CI: 85.1-91.8%) in non-ICU-patients. In 732 ICU-patients, ICU-patients with support of 3 organs had...... significantly lower adjusted hazard ratios (HR) of returning to work (0.50 [95% CI: 0.30-0.85] compared to ICU-patients with support of 0-1 organ. The corresponding HR was 0.48 [95% CI: 0.30-0.78] for RRT alone. CONCLUSIONS: In 30-day survivors of OHCA, number of organ support therapies and in particular need...

  8. Return to work program efficacy with Self-Regulation Therapy (SRT®): Case study with complex trauma and concurrent disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Tara

    2017-06-16

    Background This study shows the efficacy of treating complex cases neurobiologically using Self-Regulation Therapy (SRT®) within the context of return to work goals. Case presentation This is a single case study of a 32-year-old white female. This case study follows a client with concurrent diagnoses of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), bipolar disorder I and substance abuse over the course of 2 years of treatment with SRT®. Using SRT® as primary modality and Likert Scale self-report on the Zettl Scale of Dysregulation, psychiatric medication monitoring and pharmaceutical tracking, this study shows session summaries and progress. Results After six sessions the client was cleared by her psychiatrist for return to work. Her medications were reduced and her post-traumatic symptoms abated. She no longer met diagnostic criteria for PTSD or substance abuse after nine sessions. She returned to work successfully and maintained sobriety and continued symptom reduction. Follow up over a 2-year time period showed consistency and continued improvements in both her professional and her personal life. Conclusions Clients with complex traumatic history with concurrent diagnosis are typically difficult to treat in traditional psychotherapy with limited long-term success. This creates challenges in therapy because the traumas occur during key developmental periods of life. This study shows the efficacy of treating complex cases neurobiologically using SRT®. Using SRT®, clinicians are able to address both developmental and complex trauma to reduce sympathetic arousal in the nervous system providing symptom reduction and even resolution of previous clinical diagnoses.

  9. Return to work for severely injured survivors of the Christchurch earthquake: influences in the first 2 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunnerley, Joanne; Dunn, Jennifer; McPherson, Kathryn; Hooper, Gary; Woodfield, Tim

    2016-01-01

    This study looked at the influences on the return to work (RTW) in the first 2 years for people severely injured in the 22 February 2011 Christchurch earthquake. We used a constructivist grounded theory approach using semi-structured interviews to collect data from 14 people injured in the earthquake. Analysis elicited three themes that appeared to influence the process of RTW following the Christchurch earthquake. Living the earthquake experience, the individual's experiences of the earthquake and how their injury framed their expectations; rebuilding normality, the desire of the participants to return to life as it was; while dealing with the secondary effects of the earthquake includes the earthquake specific effects which were both barriers and facilitators to returning to work. The consequences of the earthquake impacted on experience, process and outcome of RTW for those injured in the Christchurch Earthquake. Work and RTW appeared key tools to enhance recovery after serious injury following the earthquake. The altered physical, social and economic environment must be considered when working on the return to work (RTW) of individuals with earthquake injuries. Providing tangible emotional and social support so injured earthquake survivors feel safe in their workplace may facilitate RTW. Engaging early with employers may assist the RTW of injured earthquake survivors.

  10. Physical functioning after occupational rehabilitation and returning to work among employees with chronic musculoskeletal pain and comorbid depressive symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernstsen L

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Linda Ernstsen,1 Monica Lillefjell2 1Faculty of Nursing, Sør-Trøndelag University College, Trondheim, Norway; 2Department of Occupational Therapy, Faculty of Health Education and Social Work, Sør-Trøndelag University College, Trondheim, Norway Background: The aim of this investigation was to assess whether measures of physical functioning after multidisciplinary rehabilitation are associated with return to work among individuals with chronic musculoskeletal pain conditions and comorbid depressive symptoms. Methods: Included were 92 employees with chronic musculoskeletal disorders who had participated in a 57-week multidisciplinary rehabilitation program. Their ages ranged from 25–59 years. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale was used to assess depressive symptoms. Different aspects of physical functioning (muscle strength, mobility, endurance capacity, and balance were measured with single-item visual analog scales, and physical fitness was measured with the validated COOP/WONCA charts. Being on "active work strategies," such as receiving rehabilitation benefit/vocational rehabilitation or being reported partly or completely fit, was defined as "on their way into/in work". Cross-sectional associations were measured using logistic regression models, estimating odds ratio with 95% confidence intervals. Results: There were no differences between the "on their way into/in work" group (n=70 and the "on their way out/out of work" group (n=22 regarding age, sex, or levels of anxiety or pain. Surprisingly, regression analyses showed that those with higher levels of physical functioning had significantly lower odds of returning to work. Conclusion: The findings of an inverse relationship between self-reported physical function and returning to work in this sample illustrate that the return-to-work process among employees with chronic musculoskeletal pain and comorbid depressive symptoms is multifactorial and influenced by factors other than

  11. Social Anxiety, Pain Catastrophizing and Return-To-Work Self-Efficacy in chronic pain: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomtén, Johanna; Boersma, Katja; Flink, Ida; Tillfors, Maria

    2016-04-01

    Returning to work after periods of sick-leave due to chronic pain problems, involve a number of situations of interpersonal nature (e.g. meeting supervisors/insurance companies to adapt work setting to present functional level, receive help from colleagues, express pain, etc.). Since chronic pain has shown co-morbidity with social anxiety, it is of interest to investigate restraining factors in return to work among chronic pain sufferers from a social perspective. Catastrophizing is identified in both pain and social anxiety as a mechanism that might fuel a continuous bias in how situations are perceived (threat) and by hindering the development of functional behavior strategies. The presence of social anxiety in chronic pain patients might be seen as a stressor that limits the individuals' ability to effectively communicate pain-related needs to colleagues, and/or employers and therefore act as a hindering factor in return-to-work. Hence, the overall aim of this study was to examine the relationship between social anxiety, pain catastrophizing, and perceived ability to communicate pain-related needs to the work environment in a clinical pain population. The study employed a cross-sectional design and involved 247 individuals with chronic pain (82.3% women; M age =44 years). Measures included the Pain catastrophizing Scale, the Social Phobia Screening Questionnaire and the communication of pain-related needs-subscale of the Return-To-Work Self-efficacy Questionnaire. Analyzes were run to examine whether social anxiety moderated the relation between pain catastrophizing, and perceived ability to communicate pain-related needs while controlling for pain severity/interference and sick leave. Social anxiety and pain catastrophizing correlated positively with each other and negatively with perceived ability to communicate pain-related needs. No support was obtained for a moderating effect of social anxiety. However, social anxiety and pain interference were each

  12. Enhancing return-to-work in cancer patients, development of an intervention and design of a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taskila Taina

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Compared to healthy controls, cancer patients have a higher risk of unemployment, which has negative social and economic impacts on the patients and on society at large. Therefore, return-to-work of cancer patients needs to be improved by way of an intervention. The objective is to describe the development and content of a work-directed intervention to enhance return-to-work in cancer patients and to explain the study design used for evaluating the effectiveness of the intervention. Development and content of the intervention The work-directed intervention has been developed based on a systematic literature review of work-directed interventions for cancer patients, factors reported by cancer survivors as helping or hindering their return-to-work, focus group and interview data for cancer patients, health care professionals, and supervisors, and vocational rehabilitation literature. The work-directed intervention consists of: 1 4 meetings with a nurse at the treating hospital department to start early vocational rehabilitation, 2 1 meeting with the participant, occupational physician, and supervisor to make a return-to-work plan, and 3 letters from the treating physician to the occupational physician to enhance communication. Study design to evaluate the intervention The treating physician or nurse recruits patients before the start of initial treatment. Patients are eligible when they have a primary diagnosis of cancer, will be treated with curative intent, are employed at the time of diagnosis, are on sick leave, and are between 18 and 60 years old. After the patients have given informed consent and have filled out a baseline questionnaire, they are randomised to either the control group or to the intervention group and receive either care as usual or the work-directed intervention, respectively. Primary outcomes are return-to-work and quality of life. The feasibility of the intervention and direct and indirect costs will be

  13. Efficacy of 'Tailored Physical Activity' or 'Chronic Pain Self-Management Program' on return to work for sick-listed citizens: design of a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Lotte Nygaard; Juul-Kristensen, Birgit; Roessler, Kirsten Kaya; Herborg, Lene Gram; Sørensen, Thomas Lund; Søgaard, Karen

    2013-01-23

    are few evidence-based interventions for rehabilitation programmes assisting people with musculoskeletal pain-related work absence. This study will compare outcomes of interventions on return to work in order to increase the knowledge of evidence-based rehabilitation of sick-listed citizens to prevent long-term sick-leave and facilitate return to work. The trial is registered in the ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01356784.

  14. The experience of attempting to return to work following spinal cord injury: a systematic review of the qualitative literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, Gillean; Unsworth, Carolyn; Murphy, Gregory

    2017-04-11

    This review sought to answer the question "What are the barriers and facilitators influencing people's experience of return to work following spinal cord injury?" Studies that met the selection criteria were identified, presented and critically appraised using National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidelines. Thematic synthesis was completed with studies possessing strong methodological rigor. Synthesis and interpretation involved three stages; coding of primary data; development of descriptive themes reflective of the primary data; and establishment of analytical themes to answer the review question. Data from nine papers were included in the thematic synthesis. Several descriptive themes and three analytical themes were drawn from the data to answer the research question. Analytical themes included: a matrix of personal and environmental factors exists requiring complex navigation in order to create possibilities and opportunities for postinjury employment; the process of seeking or gaining employment shares a reciprocal relationship with the temporal nature of adjustment to spinal cord injury; and there is an intrinsic need for occupational engagement through paid employment. Returning to or gaining employment after spinal cord injury is a fundamentally difficult experience for people. Multiple strategies are required to support the navigation of the process. There is, however, a need in people with spinal cord injury, to be a worker, and with that comes the inherent benefits of being employed. Implications for rehabilitation Returning to work should be a significant focus of spinal cord injury rehabilitation. Employment is both possible and health promoting following spinal cord injury. Multiple strategies are required to support people to navigate the return to work process. It is important to be cognizant of the individual motivations for being a worker and the complexity of the adjustment process. Spinal cord injury centers can provide a

  15. [A Group Cognitive-Behavioural Intervention to Prevent Depression Relapse in Individuals Having Recently Returned to Work: Protocol and Feasibility].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecomte, Tania; Corbière, Marc

    Workplace depression is one of the major causes for sick leave and loss of productivity at work. Many studies have investigated factors predicting return to work for people with depression, including studies evaluating return to work programs and organizational factors. Yet, a paucity of studies have targeted the prevention of depressive relapses at work, even though more than half of those having had a depression will have a depressive relapse in the near future.Objectives This article describes a research protocol involving a novel group intervention based on cognitive behavioural principles with the aim to optimize return to work and diminish risk of depressive relapses.Method This pilot study follows a randomized controlled trial design, with half the participants (N=25) receiving the group intervention and the other half (N=25) receiving usual services. The theoretical and empirical underpinnings of the intervention are described, along with a detailed presentation of the intervention and of the study's objectives. The group intervention consists of 8 sessions whereby Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) principles and techniques are applied to the following themes: (1) Coping with stress at work; (2) Recognizing and modifying my dysfunctional beliefs linked to work; (3) Overcoming obstacles linked to work functioning and maintaining work; (4) Negotiating needed work adjustments with the support of the immediate supervisor; (5) Finding my strengths and competencies related to work; (6) Accepting criticism and asserting myself appropriately at work; (7) Uncovering my best coping strategies for work.Results Qualitative information pertaining to the first two cohorts' participants' subjective appreciation of the group experience revealed that the intervention was perceived as very useful by all, with group support, namely harmony and interpersonal support, as well as CBT strategies being mentioned specifically.Conclusion Finally, the potential relevance of the

  16. Returning to Work after Childbirth in Europe: Well-Being, Work-Life Balance, and the Interplay of Supervisor Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucia-Casademunt, Ana M.; García-Cabrera, Antonia M.; Padilla-Angulo, Laura; Cuéllar-Molina, Deybbi

    2018-01-01

    Parents returning to work after the arrival of a new son or daughter is an important question for understanding the trajectory of people's lives and professional careers amid current debates about gender equality and work-life balance (WLB). Interestingly, current research concludes that general WLB practices at the workplace may be necessary in the specific case of women returning to work after childbirth because of the particular maternal and infant factors involved. However, WLB practices as a flexible arrangement may work against women because they may be viewed as a lack of organizational commitment. Therefore, research on this topic could benefit from considering supervisor support as a complement of such practices, but previous research has analyzed WLB and supervisor support separately and scarcely. To fill this gap in the literature, we use two sub-samples of 664 female employees and 749 male employees with children under the age of one from 27 European countries participating in the 6th European Working Conditions Survey (EWCS-2015) to study the impact of perceived WLB on European women's perceived well-being after childbirth, in contrast with previous literature. We also analyze the impact of perceived supervisor support (SS) and its interaction with perceived WLB on women's well-being after childbirth, and explore differences with men after childbirth, a collective underexplored by the literature. We find significant gender differences on the relative impact of WLB, SS, and their interaction on perceived job well-being. Our results have important implications for human resource practices in organizations. In particular, they suggest that gendered WLB practices should be encouraged, and stress the relevance of the human factor over human resource practices in addressing the difficulties that women returning to work face after childbirth. PMID:29467695

  17. Returning to Work after Childbirth in Europe: Well-Being, Work-Life Balance, and the Interplay of Supervisor Support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana M. Lucia-Casademunt

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Parents returning to work after the arrival of a new son or daughter is an important question for understanding the trajectory of people's lives and professional careers amid current debates about gender equality and work-life balance (WLB. Interestingly, current research concludes that general WLB practices at the workplace may be necessary in the specific case of women returning to work after childbirth because of the particular maternal and infant factors involved. However, WLB practices as a flexible arrangement may work against women because they may be viewed as a lack of organizational commitment. Therefore, research on this topic could benefit from considering supervisor support as a complement of such practices, but previous research has analyzed WLB and supervisor support separately and scarcely. To fill this gap in the literature, we use two sub-samples of 664 female employees and 749 male employees with children under the age of one from 27 European countries participating in the 6th European Working Conditions Survey (EWCS-2015 to study the impact of perceived WLB on European women's perceived well-being after childbirth, in contrast with previous literature. We also analyze the impact of perceived supervisor support (SS and its interaction with perceived WLB on women's well-being after childbirth, and explore differences with men after childbirth, a collective underexplored by the literature. We find significant gender differences on the relative impact of WLB, SS, and their interaction on perceived job well-being. Our results have important implications for human resource practices in organizations. In particular, they suggest that gendered WLB practices should be encouraged, and stress the relevance of the human factor over human resource practices in addressing the difficulties that women returning to work face after childbirth.

  18. Returning to Work after Childbirth in Europe: Well-Being, Work-Life Balance, and the Interplay of Supervisor Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucia-Casademunt, Ana M; García-Cabrera, Antonia M; Padilla-Angulo, Laura; Cuéllar-Molina, Deybbi

    2018-01-01

    Parents returning to work after the arrival of a new son or daughter is an important question for understanding the trajectory of people's lives and professional careers amid current debates about gender equality and work-life balance (WLB). Interestingly, current research concludes that general WLB practices at the workplace may be necessary in the specific case of women returning to work after childbirth because of the particular maternal and infant factors involved. However, WLB practices as a flexible arrangement may work against women because they may be viewed as a lack of organizational commitment. Therefore, research on this topic could benefit from considering supervisor support as a complement of such practices, but previous research has analyzed WLB and supervisor support separately and scarcely. To fill this gap in the literature, we use two sub-samples of 664 female employees and 749 male employees with children under the age of one from 27 European countries participating in the 6th European Working Conditions Survey (EWCS-2015) to study the impact of perceived WLB on European women's perceived well-being after childbirth, in contrast with previous literature. We also analyze the impact of perceived supervisor support (SS) and its interaction with perceived WLB on women's well-being after childbirth, and explore differences with men after childbirth, a collective underexplored by the literature. We find significant gender differences on the relative impact of WLB, SS, and their interaction on perceived job well-being. Our results have important implications for human resource practices in organizations. In particular, they suggest that gendered WLB practices should be encouraged, and stress the relevance of the human factor over human resource practices in addressing the difficulties that women returning to work face after childbirth.

  19. The long-term prediction of return to work following serious accidental injuries: A follow up study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sensky Tom

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Considerable indirect costs are incurred by time taken off work following accidental injuries. The aim of this study was to predict return to work following serious accidental injuries. Method 121 severely injured patients were included in the study. Complete follow-up data were available for 85 patients. Two weeks post trauma (T1, patients rated their appraisal of the injury severity and their ability to cope with the injury and its job-related consequences. Time off work was assessed at one (T2 and three years (T3 post accident. The main outcome was the number of days of sick leave taken due to the accidental injury. Results The patients' appraisals a of the injury severity and b of their coping abilities regarding the accidental injury and its job-related consequences were significant predictors of the number of sick-leave days taken. Injury severity (ISS, type of accident, age and gender did not contribute significantly to the prediction. Conclusions Return to work in the long term is best predicted by the patients' own appraisal of both their injury severity and the ability to cope with the accidental injury.

  20. Effects of dynamic lumbar stabilization exercises following lumbar microdiscectomy on pain, mobility and return to work. Randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, S; Dulgeroglu, D; Cakci, A

    2014-12-01

    Various lumbar exercise programs are prescribed for rehabilitation purposes following microdiscectomy applied for the treatment of lumbar disk herniation. The literature contains several studies on this subject. However, there are no studies investigating the effects of supervised dynamic lumbar stabilization exercises on fear and fear/regression attitudes of patients and on their return to work. This study investigates the effects of supervised dynamic lumbar stabilization exercises during postoperative rehabilitation on spinal mobility, pain, functional status, return to work, quality of life, and fear/regression attitude of patients who underwent lumbar microdiscectomy for the first time. The study was conducted at physical therapy and rehabilitation clinics. A randomized clinical trial comparing exercise programs after lumbar microdiscectomy. Forty-four lumbar microdiscectomy patients were randomized into two groups. Each group was assessed in terms of low back pain, leg pain, spinal mobility, Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and Nottingham Health Profile (NHP), at the postoperative first, second, and sixth months. Fear/regression beliefs and level of pain were evaluated through the Fear Avoidance Belief Questionnaire (FABQ). Forty-four patients were randomly divided into two equal groups of 22 subjects, respectively, as a study group with Dynamic Lumbar Stabilization (DLS) exercises and home exercises, and a control group with only home exercises for a period of four weeks. Leg pain decreased more in the study group compared with the control group (P=0.004). Spinal mobility scores demonstrated greater increases in the study group (Pwork periods.

  1. The return-to-work process of individuals sick-listed because of whiplash-associated disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biering-Sørensen, Sarah; Møller, Anne; Stoltenberg, C.

    2014-01-01

    in individuals sick-listed for more than eight weeks in six Danish municipalities. RTW in individuals sick-listed due to WAD was compared to that in those sick-listed for other musculoskeletal disorders (MSD). METHODS: Information about long-term sick-listed individuals in six Danish municipalities was retrieved...... sick-listed due to WAD and 3,204 individuals were sick-listed due to other MSDs. After 6 months, the RTW was significantly lower in the WAD group. OR for RTW in the WAD group was 0.29 (0.18-0.49) compared to the MSD group. The RTW process for both groups stabilised after two years of follow-up; 44......% returned to work in the WAD group as compared to 58% in the MSD group. CONCLUSION: Sick-listed individuals with whiplash-associated disorder are less likely to return to work than individuals who are sick-listed because of other musculoskeletal disorders. In both groups, RTW stabilised after two years...

  2. Enhancing the Return to Work of Cancer Survivors: Development and Feasibility of the Nurse-Led eHealth Intervention Cancer@Work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tamminga, Sietske J.; Van Hezel, Sanne; de Boer, Angela G. E. M.; Frings-Dresen, Monique H. W.

    2016-01-01

    Background: It is important to enhance the return to work of cancer survivors with an appropriate intervention, as cancer survivors experience problems upon their return to work but consider it an essential part of their recovery. Objective: The objective of our study was to develop an eHealth

  3. Left behind in the return-to-work journey: consumer insights for policy change and practice strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korzycki, Monica; Korzycki, Martha; Shaw, Lynn

    2008-01-01

    This study examined system barriers that precluded injured workers from accessing services and supports in the return-to-work (RTW) process. A grounded theory approach was used to investigate injured worker experiences. Methods included in-depth telephone interviews and the constant comparative method to analyze the data. Findings revealed that consumers experienced tensions or a tug-of-war between the RTW system, the health care system, and in accessing and using knowledge. Over time consumers reflected upon these tensions and initiated strategies to enhance return to function and RTW. Insights from consumer-driven strategies that might inform future policy change and promote positive service delivery for injured workers are examined.

  4. The Effect of Incentive Return-to-Work Policies on Single-Parent Families: a Comparative Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir Amine

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available As part of their struggle against inequality and social exclusion, many countries are trying to reform their redistributive system and low-income support measures to encourage return to work, and reduce inactivity traps. The purpose of this article is to propose a reflection on the social and fiscal policies. The analysis focuses on three measures in three different countries: the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC in the United States, the Working Tax Credit (WTC in the UK and the Active Solidarity Income (RSA in France. The emphasis is placed on the effects of such policies on the situation of single parents, in particular as part of their transition from welfare (social assistance to the labor market.

  5. The combination of work organizational climate and individual work commitment predicts return to work in women but not in men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmgren, Kristina; Ekbladh, Elin; Hensing, Gunnel; Dellve, Lotta

    2013-02-01

    To analyze if the combination of organizational climate and work commitment can predict return to work (RTW). This prospective Swedish study was based on 2285 participants, 19 to 64 years old, consecutively selected from the employed population, newly sick-listed for more than 14 days. Data were collected in 2008 through postal questionnaire and from register data. Among women, the combination of good organizational climate and fair work commitment predicted an early RTW with an adjusted relative risk of 2.05 (1.32 to 3.18). Among men, none of the adjusted variables or combinations of variables was found significantly to predict RTW. This study demonstrated the importance of integrative effects of organizational climate and individual work commitment on RTW among women. These factors did not predict RTW in men. More research is needed to understand the RTW process among men.

  6. Health, work, and personal-related predictors of time to return to work among employees with mental health problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Maj Britt D.; Bültmann, Ute; Madsen, Ida E.H.

    2012-01-01

    absence benefits at a large Danish welfare Department (n = 721). A total of 298 employees returned the questionnaire containing information on possible predictors of RTW. We followed up all baseline responders for a maximum of one year in a national registry of social transfer payments, including sickness......Purpose: To identify health-, personal- and work-related factors predictive of return to work (RTW) in employees sick-listed due to common mental health problems, such as, stress, depression, burnout, and anxiety. Methods: We distributed a baseline questionnaire to employees applying for sickness...... absence benefits. Results: At baseline, about 9% of respondents had quit their job, 10% were dismissed and the remaining 82% were still working for the same employer. The mean time to RTW, measured from the first day of absence, was 25 weeks (median = 21) and at the end of follow-up (52 weeks) 85% had...

  7. Prognostic Factors of Returning to Work after Sick Leave due to Work-Related Common Mental Disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Netterstrøm, Bo; Eller, Nanna Hurwitz; Borritz, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to assess the prognostic factors of return to work (RTW) after one and three years among people on sick leave due to occupational stress. Methods. The study population comprised 223 completers on sick leave, who participated in a stress treatment program. Self...... decision authority, low reward, low support from leaders and colleagues, bullying, high global symptom index, length of sick leave at baseline, and stressful negative life events during the year before baseline were associated with no RTW after one year. Low work ability and full-time sick leave...... at inclusion were predictors after three years too. Being single was associated with no RTW after three years. The type of treatment, occupational position, gender, age, and degree of depression were not associated with RTW after one or three years. Conclusion. The impact of the psychosocial work environment...

  8. The Danish national return-to-work program - aims, content, and design of the process and effect evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aust, Birgit; Helverskov, Trine; Nielsen, Maj Britt D.

    2012-01-01

    approximately 19 500 working-age adults on long-term sickness absence, regardless of reason for sickness absence or employment status. It consists of three core elements: (i) establishment of multidisciplinary RTW teams, (ii) introduction of standardized workability assessments and sickness absence management......The Danish national return-to-work (RTW) program aims to improve the management of municipal sickness benefit in Denmark. A study is currently ongoing to evaluate the RTW program. The purpose of this article is to describe the study protocol. The program includes 21 municipalities encompassing...... procedures, and (iii) a comprehensive training course for the RTW teams. The effect evaluation is based on a parallel group randomized trial and a stratified cluster controlled trial and focuses on register-based primary outcomes - duration of sickness absence and RTW - and questionnaire-based secondary...

  9. Supervisors’ experiences with the return-to-work process of hospital workers absent from work due to a health problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stochkendahl, Mette Jensen; Myburgh, Corrie; Hartvigsen, Jan

    comparison analysis approach and computer assisted qualitative data analysis. Results: The study is in progress. Results will be available at the time of the conference. Conclusion: We will address questions regarding which factors supervisors feel are important to them in supporting returning workers...... context. Aim: In order to gain knowledge about the potential role of supervisors in supporting RTW of a sick listed worker in Denmark, an exploratory qualitative pilot study will be conducted. We seek to open a window of understanding into the experience of managers who have been involved in RTW...... for supporting sick listed workers in their return to work. Using an inductive approach, we will first conduct three or four individual interviews followed by two or three focus group interviews with six to ten participants in each group. Data will be transcribed verbatim and content analyzed using a constant...

  10. Predictors of delayed return to work after back injury: A case-control analysis of union carpenters in Washington State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucera, Kristen L; Lipscomb, Hester J; Silverstein, Barbara; Cameron, Wilfred

    2009-11-01

    Union administrative records identified 20,642 union carpenters who worked in Washington State from 1989 to 2003. The Department of Labor and Industries provided records of workers' compensation claims and associated medical care. Work-related back claims (n = 4,241) were identified by ANSI codes (back, trunk, or neck/back) or ICD-9 codes relevant to medical care consistent with a back injury. Cases (n = 738) were defined as back injury claims with >90 days of paid lost time; controls (n = 699) resulted in return to work within 30 days. Logistic regression models estimated odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals (OR, 95% CI) of delayed return to work (DRTW). Thirty percent of case claims and 8% of control claims were identified by an ICD-9 code. DRTW after back injury was associated with being female (2.7, 95% CI: 1.3-5.5), age 30-44 (1.2, 95% CI: 0.9-1.7) and age over 45 (1.6, 95% CI: 1.1-2.3), four or more years union experience (1.4, 95% CI: 1.1-1.8), previous paid time loss back claim (1.8, 95% CI: 1.3-2.5), and >or=30-day delay to medical care (3.6, 95% CI: 2.1, 6.1). Evidence of more acute trauma was also associated with DRTW. Use of ICD-9 codes identified claims with multiple injuries that would otherwise not be captured by ANSI codes alone. Though carpenters of younger age and inexperience were at increased risk for a paid lost time back injury claim, older carpenters and more experienced workers, once injured, were more likely to have DRTW as were those who experienced acute events. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Return to work after work-related stress: a randomized controlled trial of a work-focused cognitive behavioral intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalgaard, Vita Ligaya; Aschbacher, Kirstin; Andersen, Johan Hviid; Glasscock, David John; Willert, Morten Vejs; Carstensen, Ole; Biering, Karin

    2017-09-01

    Objectives This study aimed to evaluate the effect of a stress management intervention (SMI) on lasting return to work (RTW) among patients with work-related stress complaints. Methods Sickness benefit departments from three local municipalities referred patients on sick leave with work-related adjustment disorders or mild depression to the Department of Occupational Medicine, Regional Hospital West Jutland. A 2× randomization procedure allocated patients into one of three groups: intervention (N=58), control A (which received a clinical assessment; N=56), or control B (no assessment; N=49). Treatment comprised individual work-focused cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) with an optional workplace intervention. The outcome was time until lasting RTW (16 and 44 weeks follow-up) using register data. Results Median number of weeks until lasting RTW was 15, 19, and 32 for the intervention group, control A, and control B respectively. However, for group B, clinical assessment was not part of the inclusion process, which may have introduced selection bias. In the fully-adjusted Cox regression model, the intervention group exhibited significantly faster lasting RTW at 44 weeks; hazard ratio (HR) 1.57 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.01-2.44] relative to control group A, with a non-significant trend evident at 16 weeks; HR 1.70 (95% CI 0.94-3.10), when controlling for age, gender, occupation, sick leave during previous year, full or partial sick leave, and diagnosis. Unadjusted analyses remained directionally consistent but were reduced to marginal significance. Conclusions There was a tendency towards faster lasting RTW in the intervention group compared to control A, which received clinical assessment, in all analyses. The intervention group returned to work about 4 weeks earlier than control A, which could translate into substantial financial gains.

  12. Beneficial and limiting factors for return to work following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groot, Judith A M; Jonkers, Freerk J; Kievit, Arthur J; Kuijer, P Paul F M; Hoozemans, Marco J M

    2017-02-01

    Evidence-based advice for return to work (RTW) after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is not available. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to determine when patients achieve full RTW, and to explore the beneficial and limiting factors for fully RTW after ACL reconstruction. A retrospective cohort study was performed after ACL reconstruction among 185 patients in one hospital. Data from patient files and a questionnaire were used to explore whether patient-, injury-, surgery-, sports-, work- and rehabilitation-related factors are beneficial or limiting for fully RTW after ACL reconstruction, using a backward stepwise logistic regression analysis. Of the 125 (68%) patients that returned the questionnaire, 36 were not part of the working population. Of the remaining 89 patients, 82 patients (92%) had returned fully to work at follow-up. The median time to fully RTW was 78 days. In the final regression model, which explained 29% of the variance, a significant OR of 5.4 (90% CI 2.2-13.1) for RTW > 78 days was observed for patients performing heavy knee-demanding work compared to patients performing light knee-demanding work. In addition, a significant and positive OR (1.6, 90% CI 1.2-1.9) for the number of weeks walking with the aid of crutches for RTW > 78 days was observed in the final model. After ACL reconstruction, 92% of the patients fully return to work at a median time of 78 days. The significant predictors for fully RTW > 78 days are performing heavy knee-demanding work and a longer period of walking aided with crutches after ACL reconstruction.

  13. Environmental and personal factors that support early return-to-work: a qualitative study using the ICF as a framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoefsmit, Nicole; Houkes, Inge; Nijhuis, Frans

    2014-01-01

    Occupational health professionals such as occupational physicians (OPs) increasingly understand that in addition to health improvement, environmental factors (such as work adaptations) and personal factors (such as an employee's attitude towards return-to-work (RTW)) may stimulate employees on sick leave to return to work early. To target their professional interventions more specifically according to these factors, occupational health professionals need further insight into environmental and personal factors that stimulate RTW. The objectives of this study are (1) to identify which and how environmental and personal factors support RTW, and (2) to examine whether the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) can be used to describe these factors. We performed interviews with 14 employees, 15 employers and 4 OPs from multiple organisations with varying organisational sizes and types of industry such as healthcare and education. We used a qualitative data analysis partially based on the Qualitative Analysis Guide of Leuven. The following environmental factors were found to support early RTW: 'social support from relatives', 'belief that work stimulates health', 'adequate cooperation between stakeholders in RTW' (e.g., employees, employers and OPs) and 'the employers' communicative skills'. One personal factor stimulated RTW: 'positive perception of the working situation' (e.g. enjoyment of work). Most factors stimulated RTW directly. In addition, adequate treatment and social support stimulated medical recovery. Environmental factors can either fully (social support, belief that RTW stimulates health), partially (effective cooperation), or not (employers' communicative skills) be described using ICF codes. The personal factor could not be classified because the ICF does not contain codes for personal factors. RTW interventions should aim at the environmental and personal factors mentioned above. Professionals can use the ICF to

  14. Returning to work after long term sickness absence due to low back pain - the struggle within: a qualitative study of the patient's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Cormac G; Lauchlan, Douglas; Rooney, Leigh; Hollins Martins, Caroline; Gray, Heather

    2014-01-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is a major cause of work absence. Assisting individuals back into work is an important part of rehabilitation. To explore the experiences of individuals returning to work after an episode of sickness absence due to LBP. Five women employed by a UK University who had returned to work. In this qualitative study, participants underwent semi-structured interviews about their experiences. The transcripts were analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. Two primary themes emerged 1) perceived pressure to return to work and 2) strategies employed to relieve the pressure to return. Pressure to return to work arose from a number of sources including guilt and a personal work ethic, internally, and from colleagues and management, externally. This pressure led to the individual employing a number of strategies to reduce it. These ranged from a simple denial of health concerns and decision to return to work regardless of their condition, to placing the responsibility of the decision not to return to work onto a significant other, such as a family member or health care professional. Individuals returning to work with LBP experience considerable pressure to return and use a range of strategies to mediate that pressure.

  15. Return to work among sickness-absent Danish employees: prospective results from the Danish Work Environment Cohort Study/National Register on Social Transfer Payments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Thomas; Labriola, Merete; Christensen, Karl B

    2006-01-01

    , no post-school education, being employed by a public employer, working at a workplace with 20 or more employees, high emotional demands in work, high job insecurity and sedentary work. There were no associations between health behaviour variables and return to work. The study indicates a potential...... for promoting return to work through interventions targeting emotional job demands, job insecurity and decreasing the risks associated with sedentary work.......This study investigates the determinants within socio-demography, health behaviour, employer characteristics, and psychosocial and physical work environment for return to work. In 2000, a total of 5357 employees were interviewed regarding age, gender, family status, education, health behaviour...

  16. Return-to-work self-efficacy: development and validation of a scale in claimants with musculoskeletal disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwer, Sandra; Franche, Renée-Louise; Hogg-Johnson, Sheilah; Lee, Hyunmi; Krause, Niklas; Shaw, William S

    2011-06-01

    INTRODUCTION We report on the development and validation of a 10-item scale assessing self-efficacy within the return-to-work context, the Return-to-Work Self-Efficacy (RTWSE) scale. METHODS Lost-time claimants completed a telephone survey 1 month (n = 632) and 6 months (n = 446) after a work-related musculoskeletal injury. Exploratory (Varimax and Promax rotation) and confirmatory factor analyses of self-efficacy items were conducted with two separate subsamples at both time points. Construct validity was examined by comparing scale measurements and theoretically derived constructs, and the phase specificity of RTWSE was studied by examining changes in strength of relationships between the RTWSE Subscales and the other constructs at both time measures. RESULTS Factor analyses supported three underlying factors: (1) Obtaining help from supervisor, (2) Coping with pain (3) Obtaining help from co-workers. Internal consistency (alpha) for the three subscales ranged from 0.66 to 0.93. The total variance explained was 68% at 1-month follow-up and 76% at 6-month follow-up. Confirmatory factor analyses had satisfactory fit indices to confirm the initial model. With regard to construct validity: relationships of RTWSE with depressive symptoms, fear-avoidance, pain, and general health, were generally in the hypothesized direction. However, the hypothesis that less advanced stages of change on the Readiness for RTW scale would be associated with lower RTWSE could not be completely confirmed: on all RTWSE subscales, RTWSE decreased significantly for a subset of participants who started working again. Moreover, only Pain RTWSE was significantly associated with RTW status and duration of work disability. With regard to the phase specificity, the strength of association between RTWSE and other constructs was stronger at 6 months post-injury compared to 1 month post-injury. CONCLUSIONS A final 10-item version of the RTWSE has adequate internal consistency and validity to assess

  17. Effects of a stress management intervention on absenteeism and return to work--results from a randomized wait-list controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willert, Morten Vejs; Thulstrup, Ane Marie; Bonde, Jens Peter

    2011-01-01

    High levels of work-related stress are associated with increased absenteeism from work and reduced work ability. In this study, we investigated the effects of a stress management intervention on absenteeism and return to work.......High levels of work-related stress are associated with increased absenteeism from work and reduced work ability. In this study, we investigated the effects of a stress management intervention on absenteeism and return to work....

  18. Return to Work after a Work Accident: Is Coordination between the Occupational Physician and the Insurance Physician Possible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paggetti, Laurent; Muller, Michel; Mairiaux, Philippe

    2016-11-25

    Occupational physicians and insurance physicians each have their own roles in managing the consequences of work accidents and their interaction is pivotal in the administrative and clinical process of return to work. We wanted to analyse the barriers and facilitators of this collaboration in Belgium.A qualitative study was conducted based on individual interviews of a sample of insurance physicians and occupational physicians working in French-speaking Belgium. This sample was selected to represent all insurance companies and most prevention and protection services operating on the territory. The interview scheme was designed to explore the various dimensions of the RDIC model (Resource Dependence Institutional Collaboration) of collaboration between professionals.This study highlighted certain obstacles to collaboration, related to the mutual perception of the 2 professions, ignorance of the other profession’s work context, lack of independent resources blocking the willingness to cooperate (sufficient time, fees). Some facilitating factors were also identified : occupational physicians’ willingness to cooperate, a positive attitude towards the ability to cooperate, as well as proposals for immediate improvement of some factors. Collaboration between these 2 professions has rarely been studied and the results of the present study provide tracks for improvement that can be applied in the short or medium term to enable those two categories of physicians to be better organized and more efficient in managing disability consequences of work accidents.

  19. Not quite a win-win: the corporate agenda of the stay at work/return to work project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lax, Michael

    2015-05-01

    The idea that efforts are necessary to transform the dominant framework of workplace safety and health in the United States, from one of compensation and disability to one of stay at work/return to work (SAW/RTW) for workers injured or made ill on the job, has become increasingly widespread. SAW/RTW advocates argue that everyone "wins" when unnecessary disability is reduced. Toward this end, advocates have put forward a program and implemented a strategy with strong proponents among a coalition of corporate-connected professionals. The seemingly obvious conclusions of their arguments bear closer critical scrutiny, however. Addressing key questions-why injured workers do not SAW/RTW, who the coalition of SAW/RTW proponents includes, and what the coalition proposes-reveals that the SAW/RTW approach mainly benefits employers and the corporate-connected advocates. These assertions are detailed, and principles of an alternative approach that will serve the needs of injured workers are outlined. © The Author(s) 2015 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  20. Towards a new definition of return-to-work outcomes in common mental disorders from a multi-stakeholder perspective.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiske L Hees

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To examine the perspectives of key stakeholders involved in the return-to-work (RTW process regarding the definition of successful RTW outcome after sickness absence related to common mental disorders (CMD's. METHODS: A mixed-method design was used: First, we used qualitative methods (focus groups, interviews to identify a broad range of criteria important for the definition of successful RTW (N = 57. Criteria were grouped into content-related clusters. Second, we used a quantitative approach (online questionnaire to identify, among a larger stakeholder sample (N = 178, the clusters and criteria most important for successful RTW. RESULTS: A total of 11 clusters, consisting of 52 unique criteria, were identified. In defining successful RTW, supervisors and occupational physicians regarded "Sustainability" and "At-work functioning" most important, while employees regarded "Sustainability," "Job satisfaction," "Work-home balance," and "Mental Functioning" most important. Despite agreement on the importance of certain criteria, considerable differences among stakeholders were observed. CONCLUSIONS: Key stakeholders vary in the aspects and criteria they regard as important when defining successful RTW after CMD-related sickness absence. Current definitions of RTW outcomes used in scientific research may not accurately reflect these key stakeholder perspectives. Future studies should be more aware of the perspective from which they aim to evaluate the effectiveness of a RTW intervention, and define their RTW outcomes accordingly.

  1. Understanding and building upon effort to return to work for people with long-term disability and job loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, S L; MacEachen, E; Nedelec, B

    2015-01-01

    Effort is a concept that underlies programs assisting people with work disability to re-enter the labour force. During re-entry, attention is paid to the effort invested by the worker with an injury. However, for those with chronic work disability, the motivation to return to work (RTW) may be questioned by benefit service providers and healthcare professionals. The objective of this paper is to describe the efforts made by people with long term work-disability to regain a foothold on the labour market. This phenomenological study explored the meaning of work for people with long-term work disability and job loss. Twenty-seven interviews were conducted with nine participants. A thematic analysis was completed of the collected data. A key finding of this study is the variety and degree of effort exerted by participants to regain employment, despite time away from the workplace and system barriers. Effort was exerted to retain pre-accident employment; to obtain new work following job loss; and, to remain in a new job. This study suggests that if the RTW effort of people with long-term work disability is not fully acknowledged or supported, this population will remain unemployed where their strengths as competent, experienced workers will continue to be wasted.

  2. Manager Experiences with the Return to Work Process in a Large, Publically Funded, Hospital Setting: Walking a Fine Line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stochkendahl, Mette Jensen; Myburgh, Corrie; Young, Amanda Ellen; Hartvigsen, Jan

    2015-12-01

    Previous research on the role of managers in the return to work (RTW) process has primarily been conducted in contexts where the workplace has declared organizational responsibility for the process. While this is a common scenario, in some countries, including Denmark, there is no explicit legal obligation on the workplace to accommodate RTW. The aim of this study was to gain knowledge about the potential roles and contributions of managers in supporting returning employees in a context where they have no legal obligation to actively support RTW. Nineteen Danish hospital managers participated in a one-on-one interview or focus group discussions aimed at identifying barriers and facilitators for supporting employees in their RTW. Five individual interviews and two focus group discussions were conducted. Transcripts were analysed using thematic content analysis. Four main themes were identified: (1) 'Coordinator and collaborator'; (2) 'Dilemmas of the RTW policy enforcer'; (3) 'The right to be sick and absent'; and (4) 'Keep the machinery running…'. Our findings indicated that supervisors' capacity to support returning workers was related to individual, communication, organizational, and policy factors. Instances were observed where supervisors faced the dilemma of balancing ethical and managerial principles with requirements of keeping staffing budgets. Although it is not their legislative responsibility, Danish managers play a key role in the RTW process. As has been observed in other contexts, Danish supervisors struggle to balance considerations for the returning worker with those of their teams.

  3. Towards a new definition of return-to-work outcomes in common mental disorders from a multi-stakeholder perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hees, Hiske L; Nieuwenhuijsen, Karen; Koeter, Maarten W J; Bültmann, Ute; Schene, Aart H

    2012-01-01

    To examine the perspectives of key stakeholders involved in the return-to-work (RTW) process regarding the definition of successful RTW outcome after sickness absence related to common mental disorders (CMD's). A mixed-method design was used: First, we used qualitative methods (focus groups, interviews) to identify a broad range of criteria important for the definition of successful RTW (N = 57). Criteria were grouped into content-related clusters. Second, we used a quantitative approach (online questionnaire) to identify, among a larger stakeholder sample (N = 178), the clusters and criteria most important for successful RTW. A total of 11 clusters, consisting of 52 unique criteria, were identified. In defining successful RTW, supervisors and occupational physicians regarded "Sustainability" and "At-work functioning" most important, while employees regarded "Sustainability," "Job satisfaction," "Work-home balance," and "Mental Functioning" most important. Despite agreement on the importance of certain criteria, considerable differences among stakeholders were observed. Key stakeholders vary in the aspects and criteria they regard as important when defining successful RTW after CMD-related sickness absence. Current definitions of RTW outcomes used in scientific research may not accurately reflect these key stakeholder perspectives. Future studies should be more aware of the perspective from which they aim to evaluate the effectiveness of a RTW intervention, and define their RTW outcomes accordingly.

  4. What is the value of occupational therapy in return to work for breast cancer patients? A qualitative inquiry among experts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Désiron, H A M; Donceel, P; Godderis, L; Van Hoof, E; de Rijk, A

    2015-03-01

    An increasing number of patients are confronted with breast cancer (BC) and functional limitations after treatment. Occupational therapy (OT) is successful in return to work (RTW), but not yet available for BC patients. This paper explores experts' opinions on OT interventions for RTW in BC patients in the Belgian context. Primary data were topic-interviews with all heads of OT departments in Flemish University Hospitals (n = 5). Secondary data were four focus group interviews with care professionals in oncological rehabilitation (n = 41). All data were transcribed and thematic analysis was used. Integrated in multidisciplinary teamwork, OT interventions should have a holistic and client-centred approach, start early in the rehabilitation process, include workplace visits and contacts with relevant stakeholders, and use goal setting to start up tailor made rehabilitation, linking assessment of abilities and work. Occupational therapists are regarded as professionals who can effectively answer BC patients unmet needs regarding RTW due to their skill to bridge between care and workplace. According to the experts, OT interventions supporting RTW in BC patients are useful when integrated in regular healthcare. They agree on the components but organisational barriers should be removed, for example not providing reimbursement for including this type of support trough healthcare insurance. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Assembling the evidence jigsaw: insights from a systematic review of UK studies of individual-focused return to work initiatives for disabled and long-term ill people

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Employment rates of long-term ill and disabled people in the UK are low and 2.63 million are on disability-related state benefits. Since the mid-1990 s, UK governments have experimented with a range of active labour market policies aimed to move disabled people off benefits and into work to reduce the risk of poverty and social exclusion. This systematic review asks what employment impact have these interventions had and how might they work better? Methods A systematic review of observational and qualitative empirical studies and systematic reviews published between 2002 and mid-2008 reporting employment effects and/or process evaluations of national UK government interventions focused on helping long-term sick or disabled people (aged 16-64) into the open labour market. This built on our previous systematic review which covered the years 1970 to 2001. Results Searches identified 42 studies, 31 of which evaluated initiatives with an individual focus (improving an individual's employability or providing financial support in returning to work) while 11 evaluated initiatives with an environmental focus (directed at the employment environment or changing the behaviour of employers). This paper synthesises evidence from the 31 studies with an individual focus. The use of personal advisors and individual case management in these schemes helped some participants back to work. Qualitative studies, however, revealed that time pressures and job outcome targets influenced advisors to select 'easier-to-place' claimants into programmes and also inhibited the development of mutual trust, which was needed for individual case management to work effectively. Financial incentives can help with lasting transitions into work, but the incentives were often set too low or were too short-term to have an effect. Many of the studies suffered from selection bias into these programmes of more work-ready claimants. Even though these were national programmes, they had very low

  6. Development and Validation of a Clinical Prediction Rule of the Return-to-Work Status of Injured Employees in Minnesota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hankins, A Bentley; Reid, Christine A

    2015-09-01

    Vocational rehabilitation services can be a valuable resource to injured employees at risk for sustaining permanent disability. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a predictive model of return-to-work (RTW) status at workers' compensation claim closure that may assist rehabilitation counselors tasked with determining how to allocate such services. A cross-sectional, retrospective study was conducted using data obtained from 15,372 workers' compensation claims in Minnesota's administrative claims database. The association between a set of 15 predictor variables representing medical and contextual factors and the RTW status as of claim closure of the accessible population was assessed using backward stepwise logistic regression. The most parsimonious set of variables that reliably predicted the outcome was selected as the optimal RTW model. This model was then internally validated via a split-dataset approach. Risk factors for failure to RTW by claim closure include the following: (1) attorney involvement; (2) higher level of permanent impairment (PI); (3) shorter job tenure; (4) lower pre-injury average weekly wage (AWW); (5) injury affecting the head and neck or the back; and (6) lower level of educational attainment. The optimal RTW model included four main effects (attorney involvement; severity of PI; age; job tenure) and three first-order interaction effects (pre-injury AWW × pre-injury industry; attorney involvement × severity of PI; attorney involvement × job tenure). When applied to the full dataset, the overall classification rate was 74.7%. This study's optimal RTW model offers further support for evaluating disability from a biopsychosocial perspective. Given the model's performance, it may be of value to those assessing rehabilitation potential within Minnesota's, and possibly other, workers' compensation system(s).

  7. Management of return-to-work programs for workers with musculoskeletal disorders: a qualitative study in three Canadian provinces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baril, R; Clarke, J; Friesen, M; Stock, S; Cole, D

    2003-12-01

    In this qualitative research project, researchers in three Canadian provinces explored the perceptions of many different actors involved in return-to-work (RTW) programs for injured workers, studying their views on successful RTW strategies and barriers to/facilitators of the RTW process, then analyzing the underlying dynamics driving their different experiences. Each research team recruited actors in a variety of different workplaces and key informants in the RTW system, and used a combination of in-depth, semi-structured interviews and focus groups to collect data, which were coded using an open coding system. Analysis took a social constructionist perspective. The roles and mandates of the different groups of actors (injured workers; other workplace actors; actors outside the workplace), while sometimes complementary, could also differ, leading to tension and conflict. Characteristics of injured workers described as influencing RTW success included personal and sociodemographic factors, beliefs and attitudes, and motivation. Human resources managers and health care professionals tended to attribute workers' motivation to their individual characteristics, whereas injured workers, worker representatives and health and safety managers described workplace culture and the degree to which workers' well-being was considered as having a strong influence on workers' motivation. Some supervisors experienced role conflict when responsible for both production quotas and RTW programs, but difficulties were alleviated by innovations such as consideration of RTW program responsibilities in the determination of production quotas and in performance evaluations. RTW program success seemed related to labor-management relations and top management commitment to Health and Safety. Non-workplace issues included confusion stemming from the compensation system itself, communication difficulties with some treating physicians, and role conflict on the part of physicians wishing to

  8. Do Health Service Use and Return-to-Work Outcomes Differ with GPs' Injured-Worker Caseload?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazza, Danielle; Brijnath, Bianca; O'Hare, Mary Alice; Ruseckaite, Rasa; Kosny, Agnieszka; Collie, Alex

    2018-02-23

    Purpose To determine whether healthcare use and return-to-work (RTW) outcomes differ with GPs' injured-worker caseload. Methods Retrospective analyses of the Compensation Research Database, which captures approximately 85% of all injured worker claims in Victoria, Australia was conducted. Four injured-worker caseload groups were examined that represented the 25th, 50th, 75th, and 100th percentiles of claimants seen per GP over the 8-year study period (2003-2010): (i) 1-13 claimants; (ii) 14-26 claimants; (iii) 27-48 claimants; and (iv) 49+ claimants (total claims, n = 124,342; total GPs, n = 9748).The characteristics of claimants in each caseload group, as well as the influence of caseload on three outcomes relevant to RTW (weekly compensation paid, work incapacity days, medical-and-like costs), were examined. Results Distinct profiles for high versus low caseload groups emerged. High caseload GPs treated significantly more men in blue collar occupations and issued significantly more 'alternate duties' certificates. Conversely, low caseload GPs treated significantly more women in white collar occupations, predominantly for mental health injuries, and issued significantly more 'unfit-for-work' certificates. Few significant differences were found between the two intermediate GP caseload groups. High caseload was associated with significantly greater medical-and-like costs, however, no caseload group differences were detected for weekly compensation paid or duration of time-off-work. Conclusions Training GPs who have a low injured-worker caseload in workers' compensation processes, utilising high caseload GPs in initiatives involving peer-to-peer support, or system changes where employers are encouraged to provide preventive or rehabilitative support in the workplace may improve RTW outcomes for injured workers.

  9. Designing a workplace return-to-work program for occupational low back pain: an intervention mapping approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammendolia, Carlo; Cassidy, David; Steensta, Ivan; Soklaridis, Sophie; Boyle, Eleanor; Eng, Stephanie; Howard, Hamer; Bhupinder, Bains; Côté, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    Background Despite over 2 decades of research, the ability to prevent work-related low back pain (LBP) and disability remains elusive. Recent research suggests that interventions that are focused at the workplace and incorporate the principals of participatory ergonomics and return-to-work (RTW) coordination can improve RTW and reduce disability following a work-related back injury. Workplace interventions or programs to improve RTW are difficult to design and implement given the various individuals and environments involved, each with their own unique circumstances. Intervention mapping provides a framework for designing and implementing complex interventions or programs. The objective of this study is to design a best evidence RTW program for occupational LBP tailored to the Ontario setting using an intervention mapping approach. Methods We used a qualitative synthesis based on the intervention mapping methodology. Best evidence from systematic reviews, practice guidelines and key articles on the prognosis and management of LBP and improving RTW was combined with theoretical models for managing LBP and changing behaviour. This was then systematically operationalized into a RTW program using consensus among experts and stakeholders. The RTW Program was further refined following feedback from nine focus groups with various stakeholders. Results A detailed five step RTW program was developed. The key features of the program include; having trained personnel coordinate the RTW process, identifying and ranking barriers and solutions to RTW from the perspective of all important stakeholders, mediating practical solutions at the workplace and, empowering the injured worker in RTW decision-making. Conclusion Intervention mapping provided a useful framework to develop a comprehensive RTW program tailored to the Ontario setting. PMID:19508728

  10. Designing a workplace return-to-work program for occupational low back pain: an intervention mapping approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammendolia, Carlo; Cassidy, David; Steensta, Ivan; Soklaridis, Sophie; Boyle, Eleanor; Eng, Stephanie; Howard, Hamer; Bhupinder, Bains; Côté, Pierre

    2009-06-09

    Despite over 2 decades of research, the ability to prevent work-related low back pain (LBP) and disability remains elusive. Recent research suggests that interventions that are focused at the workplace and incorporate the principals of participatory ergonomics and return-to-work (RTW) coordination can improve RTW and reduce disability following a work-related back injury. Workplace interventions or programs to improve RTW are difficult to design and implement given the various individuals and environments involved, each with their own unique circumstances. Intervention mapping provides a framework for designing and implementing complex interventions or programs. The objective of this study is to design a best evidence RTW program for occupational LBP tailored to the Ontario setting using an intervention mapping approach. We used a qualitative synthesis based on the intervention mapping methodology. Best evidence from systematic reviews, practice guidelines and key articles on the prognosis and management of LBP and improving RTW was combined with theoretical models for managing LBP and changing behaviour. This was then systematically operationalized into a RTW program using consensus among experts and stakeholders. The RTW Program was further refined following feedback from nine focus groups with various stakeholders. A detailed five step RTW program was developed. The key features of the program include; having trained personnel coordinate the RTW process, identifying and ranking barriers and solutions to RTW from the perspective of all important stakeholders, mediating practical solutions at the workplace and, empowering the injured worker in RTW decision-making. Intervention mapping provided a useful framework to develop a comprehensive RTW program tailored to the Ontario setting.

  11. Predictors of return to work among patients in treatment for common mental disorders: a pre-post study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Victor, Mattias; Lau, Bjørn; Ruud, Torleif

    2017-07-18

    Effects of return to work (RTW) interventions vary, and more knowledge is needed about the factors that contribute to RTW. This study investigated changes in work participation and mental health, and predictors of RTW among patients being treated for common mental disorders (CMDs). The study was a prospective pre-post study of 164 patients treated at an RTW outpatient clinic for CMDs. Differences between before and after treatment were analysed using paired t tests for continuous variables and marginal homogeneity test for categorical variables. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses were used to identify factors associated with RTW. Baseline data (patient characteristics, clinical status, generalized self-efficacy, expectations of future work ability) and treatment variables were used as independent variables in logistic regressions. Further analysis investigated whether improvements in symptoms, work ability, expectations of future work ability and generalized self-efficacy were associated with RTW. Number of individuals with full work participation increased, and there were improvements in symptoms, work ability and generalized self-efficacy. In the final model for predicting RTW, baseline work ability and expectancy of future work ability, a history of psychiatric treatment and focus on RTW in the treatment predicted RTW. Improvement in expectations of future work ability at post-treatment did also predict RTW. Assessing work ability and expectations of RTW at the beginning of treatment is recommended to identify patients at risk of long-term sick leave. Individuals with a history of psychiatric treatment are also risking long-term work disability. It is essential that treatment focus not only on symptom-relief, but also on improving work ability and expectations of RTW. An RTW-focused approach in therapy is associated with RTW. ClinicalTrails.gov ID NCT01181635 . Registered 08/12/2010.

  12. Effectiveness of a tailored return to work program for cancer survivors with job loss: results of a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Egmond, M P; Duijts, S F A; Jonker, M A; van der Beek, A J; Anema, J R

    Up to 53% of cancer survivors (CSs) experiences job loss during or after treatment. To support CSs with job loss in the Netherlands, a tailored return to work (RTW) program was developed. The objective of this study was to assess the effectiveness of the program on duration until sustainable RTW in CSs with job loss. This study employed a two-armed (intervention/control) randomized controlled design with one-year follow-up. The primary outcome measure was duration until sustainable RTW. The secondary outcome measures were: rate of RTW, fatigue, quality of life, and participation in society. Descriptive analyses, Kaplan-Meier estimators and Cox regression analyses were conducted. Participants (N = 171) had a mean age of 48.4 years (SD = 8.6). The majority was female (69%) and breast cancer survivor (40%). The crude hazard ratio (HR) for duration until sustainable RTW was 0.86 (95% CI 0.46-1.62; p = 0.642). In the adjusted model, the intervention group had a slight, but statistically non-significant, improvement in duration until sustainable RTW compared to the control group (HR 1.16; 95% CI 0.59-2.31; p = 0.663). The program did not have any significant effects on secondary outcome measures. As the tailored RTW program did not demonstrate a statistically significant effect on duration until sustainable RTW in CSs with job loss, implementation of the program in its current form is not recommended.

  13. Determinants of Sickness Absence and Return to Work Among Employees with Common Mental Disorders: A Scoping Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Haitze; Fishta, Alba; Weikert, Beate; Rodriguez Sanchez, Alejandra; Wegewitz, Uta

    2017-10-04

    Purpose To present an overview of the existing evidence on prognostic factors of (recurrent) sickness absence (SA) and return to work (RTW) among workers with a common mental disorder (CMD). This scoping review provides information about determinants for SA and RTW, which could be used to develop better interventions aimed at the prevention of SA and promotion of RTW among workers with a CMD. Methods Relevant articles were identified in PubMed, Embase, PsycINFO, PSYNDEX, and SINGLE up to October 2016. In order to be included, studies should provide insight into prognostic factors of SA or RTW of workers with a CMD. We classified all factors according to the domains of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. Results Our searches identified 2447 possible relevant articles, of which 71 were included for data extraction. There is consistent evidence in ≥3 studies that previous episodes of CMD, higher symptom severity, previous absenteeism, co-morbidity, high job demands, low job control, high job strain, female gender, lower educational level, smoking behavior, and low perceived general health are predictors of SA in people with CMDs. Earlier RTW is consistently predicted by lower symptom severity, having no previous absenteeism, younger age, and positive expectations concerning sick-leave duration or RTW. Conclusions The amount of research on determinants for SA and RTW in workers with CMD has increased dramatically in recent years, although most studies are from the Netherlands and Scandinavia. There are some research gaps identified in this scoping review that need further attention in primary and secondary studies. Based on the summary of the evidence, we provide guidance for policy, practice and research.

  14. Work Characteristics and Return to Work in Long-Term Sick-Listed Employees with Depressive Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huijs, Jenny J J M; Koppes, Lando L J; Taris, Toon W; Blonk, Roland W B

    2017-12-01

    Purpose The present study investigated the relations between work characteristics, depressive symptoms and duration until full return to work (RTW) among long-term sick-listed employees. This knowledge may add to the development of effective interventions and prevention, especially since work characteristics can be subjected to interventions more easily than many disorder-related or personal factors. Methods this prospective cohort study with a two-year follow-up employs a sample of 883 Dutch employees who had been sick-listed for at least 13 weeks at baseline, who filled out three questionnaires: at 19 weeks, 1 and 2 years after the start of sick leave. The dependent measure was duration until full RTW. Results not working (partially) at baseline, low decision authority, high psychological demands, low supervisor support and low RTW self-efficacy were related to more depressive symptoms. The duration until full RTW was longer for employees with depressive symptoms. Low physical exertion, high RTW self-efficacy, working partially at baseline, being married or cohabiting, and young age were related to less time until full RTW. Other work characteristics appeared no independent predictors of RTW. Conclusions although the role of job demands and job resources in the RTW process is limited for long-term sick-listed employees with depressive symptoms, a few work characteristics are prognostic factors of full RTW. Focus on these elements in the selection or development of interventions may be helpful in preventing sickness absence, and in supporting long-term sick-listed employees towards full RTW.

  15. Return to work of workers without a permanent employment contract, sick-listed due to a common mental disorder: design of a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammerts, Lieke; Vermeulen, Sylvia J; Schaafsma, Frederieke G; van Mechelen, Willem; Anema, Johannes R

    2014-06-12

    Workers without a permanent employment contract represent a vulnerable group within the working population. Mental disorders are a major cause of sickness absence within this group. Common mental disorders are stress-related, depressive and anxiety disorders. To date, little attention has been paid to effective return to work interventions for this type of sick-listed workers. Therefore, a participatory supportive return to work program has been developed. It combines elements of a participatory return to work program, integrated care and direct placement in a competitive job.The objective of this paper is to describe the design of a randomised controlled trial to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of this program compared to care as usual. The cost-effectiveness of the participatory supportive return to work program will be examined in a randomised controlled trial with a follow-up of twelve months.The program strongly involves the sick-listed worker in the identification of obstacles for return to work and possible solutions, resulting in a consensus based action plan. This plan will be used as a starting point for the search of suitable competitive employment with support of a rehabilitation agency. During this process the insurance physician of the sick-listed worker contacts other caregivers to promote integrated care.Workers eligible to participate in this study have no permanent employment contract, have applied for a sickness benefit at the Dutch Social Security Agency and are sick-listed between two and fourteen weeks due to mental health problems.The primary outcome measure is the duration until first sustainable return to work in a competitive job. Outcomes are measured at baseline and after three, six, nine and twelve months. If the participatory supportive return to work program proves to be cost-effective, the social security system, the sick-listed worker and society as a whole will benefit. A cost-effective return to work program will lead to a

  16. Factors associated with non-return to work in the severely injured victims 3 years after a road accident: A prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pélissier, C; Fort, E; Fontana, L; Charbotel, B; Hours, M

    2017-09-01

    Road accidents may impact victims' physical and/or mental health and socio-occupational life, particularly the capacity to return to work. The purpose of our study is to assess modifiable medical and socio-occupational factors of non-return to work in the severely injured 3 years after a road accident. Among1,168 road accidents casualties in the Rhône administrative Département of France followed for five years, 141 of the 222 severely injured (Maximal Abbreviated Injury Scale ≥ 3) aged more than 16 years who were in work at the time of the accident, reported whether they had returned to work in the 3 years following the accident. The subgroups of those who had (n=113) and had not returned to work (n=28) were compared for socio-occupational (gender, age, educational level, marital status, socio-occupational group) accident-related medical factors (type of road user, type of journey, responsibility in the accident, initial care) and post-accident medical factors (pain intensity, post-traumatic stress disorder, physical sequelae, quality of life) by using standardized tools. Severity of initial head, face and lower-limb injury, intense persistent pain, post-traumatic stress disorder, poor self-assessed quality of life and health status at 3 years were associated with non-return to work on univariate analysis. On multivariate analysis, severity of initial head and lower-limb injury, intense persistent pain at 3 years and post-traumatic stress disorder were significantly associated with non-return to work 3 years following severe road-accident injury. Post-traumatic stress disorder and chronic pain were essential modifiable medical determinants of non-return to work in the severely injured after a road accident: early adapted management could promote return to work in the severely injured. Improve early adapted treatment of pain and PTSD in the rehabilitation team should help the severely injured return to work following a road accident. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier

  17. Return to work of workers without a permanent employment contract, sick-listed due to a common mental disorder: design of a randomised controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Workers without a permanent employment contract represent a vulnerable group within the working population. Mental disorders are a major cause of sickness absence within this group. Common mental disorders are stress-related, depressive and anxiety disorders. To date, little attention has been paid to effective return to work interventions for this type of sick-listed workers. Therefore, a participatory supportive return to work program has been developed. It combines elements of a participatory return to work program, integrated care and direct placement in a competitive job. The objective of this paper is to describe the design of a randomised controlled trial to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of this program compared to care as usual. Methods/Design The cost-effectiveness of the participatory supportive return to work program will be examined in a randomised controlled trial with a follow-up of twelve months. The program strongly involves the sick-listed worker in the identification of obstacles for return to work and possible solutions, resulting in a consensus based action plan. This plan will be used as a starting point for the search of suitable competitive employment with support of a rehabilitation agency. During this process the insurance physician of the sick-listed worker contacts other caregivers to promote integrated care. Workers eligible to participate in this study have no permanent employment contract, have applied for a sickness benefit at the Dutch Social Security Agency and are sick-listed between two and fourteen weeks due to mental health problems. The primary outcome measure is the duration until first sustainable return to work in a competitive job. Outcomes are measured at baseline and after three, six, nine and twelve months. Discussion If the participatory supportive return to work program proves to be cost-effective, the social security system, the sick-listed worker and society as a whole will benefit. A cost

  18. A qualitative study of perpetuating factors for long term sick leave and promoting factors for return to work: chronic work disabled patients in their own words.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekkers-Sánchez, Patricia M; Wind, Haije; Sluiter, Judith K; Frings-Dresen, Monique H W

    2010-06-01

    Chronic work disability generates high financial costs for society and causes personal suffering to patients and their families; however, crucial knowledge about the factors associated with long-term sick leave is still missing. This study provides insight, from the perspective of chronic work disabled patients, into the perpetuating factors for long-term sick leave and promoting factors for return to work. Five focus group interviews were conducted with 27 patients with different disorders who had been on long-term sickness absence (18 months or more). Qualitative data analysis was performed using a conceptual framework to identify barriers and enablers for return to work. Four main themes of important perpetuating factors for long-term sick leave were identified: health-related obstacles, personal obstacles, social obstacles, and work-related obstacles. Four main themes of important promoting factors for return to work were identified: favourable working conditions, positive personal characteristics of the employee, the influence of the social environment, and the influence of the personal economic situation. Besides sickness, several non-medical factors are recognized barriers for return to work. Factors such as illness perceptions and self-efficacy expectations are reported to be promoting factors for return to work.

  19. A review of best work-absence management and return-to-work practices for workers with musculoskeletal or common mental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Marie-José; Corbière, Marc; Coutu, Marie-France; Reinharz, Daniel; Albert, Valérie

    2014-01-01

    Workplace absenteeism is still a curse for developed countries, and more systematic practices need to be adopted to address this issue. To review the literature on best practices for managing work absences related to musculoskeletal or common mental disorders. A review was conducted by performing a search in bibliographic databases and on work-disability research institute websites. Recommendations regarding work-absence management and return-to-work practices were extracted from all the retained documents and organized within a chronological framework. In total, 17 documents were analyzed, leading to identification of common work-absence management and return-to-work practices, the importance of a worker support approach, and recommended roles and responsibilities for stakeholders. These practices were then integrated into a six-step process: (1) time off and recovery period; (2) initial contact with the worker; (3) evaluation of the worker and his job tasks; (4) development of a return-to-work plan with accommodations; (5) work resumption, and (6) follow-up of the return-to-work process. Based on this review, we constructed a comprehensive work-absence management and return-to-work process designed to assist organizations. Our results indicate that such a process must be included within a broader policy of health promotion and job retention. Adaptations will be required for implementation in the workplace.

  20. Social support outside work and return to work among women on long-term sick leave working within human service organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englund, Ann-Charlotte Dalheim; Rydström, Ingela; Dellve, Lotta; Ahlstrom, Linda

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the relationships between return to work and social support outside work among women on long-term sick leave from human service organizations. Work is an important part of life and is, in general, considered to be supportive of health and wellbeing. Few studies have thoroughly investigated the importance of aspects of social support outside work for return to work. A cohort of women on long-term sick leave was followed with questionnaires from 2005 to 2012. The availability of social attachment increased the women's work ability, return to work, and vitality significantly more over time. There were positive relationships between return to work and seeking support in terms of emotional support and comfort and expressing unpleasant feelings. Important resources to increase return to work can be found in factors outside work, such as close social relationships and support seeking. Thus, it is important to take the woman's whole life situation into account and not focus solely on aspects related to the workplace. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. What's gender got to do with it? Examining masculinities, health and safety and return to work in male dominated skilled trades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stergiou-Kita, Mary; Mansfield, Elizabeth; Colantonio, Angela; Moody, Joel; Mantis, Steve

    2016-06-16

    Electrical injuries are a common cause of work-related injury in male dominated skilled trades. In this study we explored how issues of gender, masculinities and institutional workplace practices shape expectations of men and their choices when returning to work following a workplace electrical injury. Twelve workers, who suffered an electrical injury, and twelve employer representatives, completed semi-structured interviews. Using thematic analysis we identified key themes related to how masculinities influenced men's health and safety during the return to work process. Strong identification with worker roles can influence injured workers decisions to return to work 'too early'. A desire to be viewed as a strong, responsible, resilient worker may intersect with concerns about job loss, to influence participants' decisions to not report safety issues and workplace accidents, to not disclose post-injury work challenges, and to not request workplace supports. Institutionalized workplace beliefs regarding risk, de-legitimization of the severity of injuries, and the valorization of the "tough" worker can further re-enforce dominant masculine norms and influence return to work processes and health and safety practices. Workplaces are key sites where gender identities are constructed, affirmed and institutionalized. Further research is warranted to examine how established masculine norms and gendered workplace expectations can influence workplace health and safety in male dominated high risk occupations. Future research should also evaluate strategies that encourage men to discuss post-injury work challenges and request supports when work performance or health and safety issues arise during the return to work process.

  2. Physical activity and return to work after fast-track total hip replacement with or without supervised rehabilitation. Results from a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Lone Ramer; Mechlenburg, Inger; Søballe, Kjeld

    rehabilitation affects the activity level as well as return to work after THR. Purpose/Aim of Study To investigate whether supervised progressive resistance training during the first 10 weeks after THR affects the change in physical activity level from baseline to 6 months after THR and the timing of return...... activity was measured in metabolic equivalents (MET) by Physical Activity Scale (PAS) and days until return to work for the working population. Findings / Results Follow up was completed by 62 patients (85%). Changes in PAS scores from baseline to 6 months follow up were, mean [95% CI]: IG: 6.32 [3...... their self-reported physical activity level more than patients performing home-based exercise only, during 6 months after THR however, the difference was eliminated at 1 year follow up. No significant difference was found concerning return to work....

  3. Fear of (re)injury and return to work following compensable injury: qualitative insights from key stakeholders in Victoria, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunzli, Samantha; Singh, Nabita; Mazza, Danielle; Collie, Alex; Kosny, Agnieszka; Ruseckaite, Rasa; Brijnath, Bianca

    2017-04-11

    Return to work (RTW) is important for recovery post-injury. Fear of (re)injury is a strong predictor of delayed RTW, and therefore much attention has been given to addressing injured workers' fear beliefs. However, RTW is a socially-negotiated process and it may be important to consider the wider social context of the injured worker, including the beliefs of the key people involved in their RTW journey. This paper involves data collected as part of a wider study in which semi-structured interviews explored RTW from the perspectives of 93 key stakeholders: injured workers, GPs, employers and insurance case managers in Victoria, Australia. Inductive analysis of interview transcripts identified fear of (re)injury as a salient theme across all stakeholder groups. This presented an opportunity to analyse how the wider social context of the injured worker may influence fear and avoidance behaviour. Two co-authors performed inductive analysis of the theme 'fear of (re)injury'. Codes identified in the data were grouped into five categories. Between and within category analysis revealed three themes describing the contextual factors that may influence fear avoidance and RTW behaviour. Theme one described how injured workers engaged in a process of weighing up the risk of (re)injury in the workplace against the perceived benefits of RTW. Theme two described how workplace factors could influence an injured workers' perception of the risk of (re)injury in the workplace, including confidence that the source of the injury had been addressed, the availability and suitability of alternative duties. Theme three described other stakeholders' reluctance to accept injured workers back at work because of the fear that they might reinjure themselves. Our findings illustrate the need for a contextualised perspective of fear avoidance and RTW behaviour that includes the beliefs of other important people surrounding the injured worker (e.g. employers, family members, GPs). Existing models

  4. Work resumption at the price of distrust: a qualitative study on return to work legislation in the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Return to work (RTW) after sick leave is considered necessary to support the employees’ health. Cooperation between employees and employers may encourage employees’ RTW, but is hampered by bottlenecks that we do not completely understand. Dutch legislation means to support this cooperation and allows trying RTW during two years. The Resource Dependence Institutional Cooperation (RDIC) model has been developed for studying cooperation in public health. Study aims were to get insight into the degree of cooperation between Dutch sick-listed employees and employers, how this (lack of) cooperation can be understood, and how valid the RDIC model is for understanding this (lack of) cooperation. Methods This qualitative study was based on in-depth interviews with 8 employees and 8 employers. Employees reported sick for 1.5-20 months for various reasons. Interviews were analysed using an interpretative approach and pattern matching. Results Cooperation was lacking early during sick leave. Later on there were regular meetings, but employers decided about RTW without consulting the employees. Particularly employers were motivated to cooperate during the first year, while employees were especially motivated during the second. This could be understood by experienced dependence; employees (first year) and employers (second year) did not consider cooperation to be important for achieving medical recovery (employees) or RTW (employers). These divergent goals may be understood by personal norms about the timing of medical recovery and RTW. Legislation was particularly effective regarding employer behaviour in year 1 and employee behaviour in year 2. Employees distrusted their employers during the first year, while employers reported to distrust the employees during the second year. Besides, employees and employers experienced a moderate ability to cooperate. This could be understood particularly by having moderate knowledge about legislation. The RDIC model

  5. What positive encounters with healthcare and social insurance staff promotes ability to return to work of long-term sickness absentees?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Daniel; Alexanderson, Kristina; Bottai, Matteo

    2016-02-01

    Previous studies suggest that positive encounters with healthcare and social insurance staff may be important in promoting return to work among long-term sickness absentees. This study aimed to identify more specifically what positive encounters are important for promoting ability to return to work. A questionnaire about different types of encounters was sent to 10,042 people in Sweden on sick leave for 6-8 months (58% responded). For each positive encounter, we estimated the marginal probability difference (PD) of return to work, adjusting for age, sex, education, sick-leave diagnosis, and the sum score of all other encounters. Adjusting for the other encounters is important since of the observed variables these were the strongest confounders. The positive encounters with both healthcare and social insurance staff significantly associated with promoting ability to return to work after adjusting for the other positive encounters were "Believed in my work capacity" PD=16.9 (95% CI: 12.0, 21.9) and 12.0 (6.3, 17.7), respectively; "Supported my suggestions for solutions": 9.5 (3.1, 15.9) and 11.6 (5.7, 17.4); "Was supportive and encouraging": 10.1 (3.6, 16.7) and 7.3 (1.7, 12.8). Additionally, the encounter with healthcare staff most strongly associated with promoting return to work was "Let me take responsibility" 14.8 (7.2, 22.3); and with social security staff: "Showed that she/he liked me" 10.4 (5.4, 15.4). Healthcare and social security staff being supportive, encouraging, and believing in the sickness absentee's work capacity may be very important for increasing the probability for long-term sickness absentees' ability to return to work. © 2015 the Nordic Societies of Public Health.

  6. Pre-return-to-work medical consultation for low back pain workers. Good practice recommendations based on systematic review and expert consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, A; Rozenberg, S; Fassier, J B; Rousseau, S; Mairiaux, P; Roquelaure, Y

    2015-10-01

    The pre-return-to-work medical consultation during sick leave for low back pain (LBP) aims at assessing the worker's ability to resume working without risk for his/her health, and anticipating any difficulties inherent to returning to work and job retention. This article summarizes the good practices guidelines proposed by the French Society of Occupational Medicine (SFMT) and the French National Health Authority (HAS), and published in October 2013. Good practices guidelines developed by a multidisciplinary and independent task force (24 experts) and peer review committee (50 experts) based on a literature review from 1990 to 2012, according to the HAS methodology. According to the labour regulations, workers can request a medical consultation with their occupational physician at any time. The pre-return-to-work consultation precedes the effective return-to-work and can be requested by the employee regardless of their sick leave duration. It must be scheduled early enough to: (i) deliver reassuring information regarding risks to the lower back and managing LBP; (ii) evaluate prognostic factors of chronicity and prolonged disability in relations to LBP and its physical, social and occupational consequences in order to implement the necessary conditions for returning to work; (iii) support and promote staying at work by taking into account all medical, social and occupational aspects of the situation and ensure proper coordination between the different actors. A better understanding of the pre-return-to-work consultation would improve collaboration and coordination of actions to facilitate resuming work and job retention for patients with LBP. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Factors associated with Danish cancer patients' return to work. A report from the population-based study 'The Cancer Patient's World'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ross, Lone; Petersen, Morten Aagaard; Johnsen, Anna Thit

    2012-01-01

    If patients facing difficulties in the process of returning to work after treatment of cancer could be identified, these patients could be assisted in the transition. This might help some patients to stay in work. We therefore assessed demographic and clinical factors associated with returning...

  8. Sex differences in the return-to-work process of cancer survivors 2 years after diagnosis: results from a large French population-based sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Patricia; Teyssier, Luis Sagaon; Malavolti, Laetitia; Le Corroller-Soriano, Anne-Gaelle

    2013-04-01

    To investigate the effects of clinical, sociodemographic, and occupational factors on time to return to work (RTW) during the 2 years after cancer diagnosis and to analyze whether sex differences exist. This study was based on a French national cross-sectional survey involving 4,270 cancer survivors. Time to RTW was estimated through the duration of sick leave of 801 cancer survivors younger than 58 years who were employed during the 2-year survey. Multivariate analysis of the RTW after sick leave was performed using a Weibull accelerated failure time model. We found some sex differences in the RTW process. Older men returned to work more slowly than older women (P = .013), whereas married men returned to work much faster than married women (P = .019). Duration dependence was also sex-specific. In men, the time spent on sick leave was independent of the probability of returning to work, whereas in women, this duration dependence was positive (P factors including chemotherapy, adverse effects, and cancer severity were found to delay RTW (P = .035, P = .001, and P investing most strongly in their personal lives also delayed their RTW (P = .006), as did those with a permanent work contract (P = .042). The factor found to accelerate RTW was a higher educational level (P = .014). The RTW process 2 years after cancer diagnosis differed between men and women. A better knowledge of this process should help the national implementation of more cost-effective strategies for managing the RTW of cancer survivors.

  9. Effectiveness of a blended web-based intervention on return to work for sick-listed employees with common mental disorders: results of a cluster randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volker, D.; Zijlstra-Vlasveld, M.C.; Anema, J.R.; Beekman, A.T.; Brouwers, E.P.; Emons, W.H.; van Lomwel, A.; van der Feltz-Cornelis, C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Common mental disorders are strongly associated with long-term sickness absence, which has negative consequences for the individual employee's quality of life and leads to substantial costs for society. It is important to focus on return to work (RTW) during treatment of sick-listed

  10. Effectiveness of a blended web-based intervention on return to work for sick-listed employees with common mental disorders : Results of a cluster randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volker, D.; Zijlstra-Vlasveld, M.C.; Anema, J.R.; Beekman, A.T.F.; Brouwers, E.P.M.; Emons, W.H.M.; van Lomwel, A.G.C.; van der Feltz-Cornelis, C.M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Common mental disorders are strongly associated with long-term sickness absence, which has negative consequences for the individual employee’s quality of life and leads to substantial costs for society. It is important to focus on return to work (RTW) during treatment of

  11. Interrelationship Between Organizational and Relational Aspects and the Return-to-Work Process: A Case Study with Nursing Professionals at a Teaching Hospital in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancman, S; Barros, J O; Silva, M D; Pereira, A R; Jardim, T A

    2017-03-01

    Introduction The process of returning to work, especially for individuals with labor restrictions, impacts work teams and interferes with the labor reinsertion process. In this study, we aimed to understand the impact of these situations on a nursing team from both organizational and relational perspectives. Methods We conducted a qualitative research study at a university hospital in the municipality of São Paulo using three strategies: documentary analysis; semi-structured interviews with pairs of workers returning to a labor situation; and a focus group with nursing managers. Results Medical leaves of absence overburden the employees who remain working. Regarding the return to work, the participants reported both positive and negative aspects. One positive aspect reported was that those who return to work contribute to the division of labor, generating solidarity and cooperation. The negative aspects reported were related to the return of workers with labor restrictions who do not fully resume their activities, consequently generating conflicts within the work teams that interfere with the reintegration processes. The supervisors reported difficulties reorganizing work on a broad scale and assessing the workers' diagnoses and symptoms and the workers themselves in terms of the necessity of their leaves and the validity of their labor restrictions. Conclusion The organization of labor and social relationships among peers and supervisors is a significant contributor to the success or failure of the work reintegration process and therefore should be considered. We aimed to address this issue by highlighting the complexity of the return-to-work process among health workers.

  12. Return-to-work intervention for cancer survivors: budget impact and allocation of costs and returns in the Netherlands and six major EU-countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mewes, Janne C.; Steuten, Lotte Maria Gertruda; Groeneveld, Iris F.; Boer, Angela G.E.M.; Frings-Dresen, Monique H.W.; IJzerman, Maarten Joost; van Harten, Willem H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Return-to-work (RTW)-interventions support cancer survivors in resuming work, but come at additional healthcare costs. The objective of this study was to assess the budget impact of a RTW-intervention, consisting of counselling sessions with an occupational physician and an

  13. Blended E-health module on return to work embedded in collaborative occupational health care for common mental disorders : Design of a cluster randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volker, D.; Vlasveld, M.C.; Anema, J.R.; Beekman, A.T.F.; Hakkaart-van Roijen, L.; Brouwers, E.P.M.; van Lomwel, A.G.C.; van der Feltz-Cornelis, C.M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Common mental disorders (CMD) have a major impact on both society and individual workers, so return to work (RTW) is an important issue. In The Netherlands, the occupational physician plays a central role in the guidance of sick-listed workers with respect to RTW. Evidence-based

  14. Description of an early cognitive behavioral intervention (UPFRONT-intervention) following mild traumatic brain injury to prevent persistent complaints and facilitate return to work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheenen, Myrthe E; Visser-Keizer, Annemarie C.; van der Naalt, Joukje; Spikman, Jacoba M

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Many patients with mild traumatic brain injury do not fully return to work owing to persistent posttraumatic complaints. Research suggests that preventing chronic complaints might be prevented by giving cognitive behavioral therapy early after injury. Therefore, a new cognitive behavioral

  15. Return to work among employees with common mental disorders: study design and baseline findings from a mixed-method follow-up study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Maj Britt D; Bültmann, Ute; Amby, Malene

    2010-01-01

    Most research on return-to-work (RTW) has focused on musculoskeletal disorders. To study RTW in employees sick-listed with common mental disorders (CMD), e.g., stress, depression, and anxiety, the National Research Centre for the Working Environment initiated a study on ''Common Mental Disorders...

  16. Absenteeism due to mental health problems and systems for return to work: an internet-based unmatched case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doki, Shotaro; Sasahara, Shinichiro; Hirai, Yasuhito; Oi, Yuichi; Matsuzaki, Ichiyo

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the risk factors for absenteeism due to mental health problems with regard to company characteristics and systems for return to work in Japan. This was an Internet-based unmatched case-control study. Two hundred and fifty-eight workers who experienced over 28 days of sick leave due to mental health problems (cases) and 258 workers who have not taken sick leave (controls) were recruited. Company characteristics and the awareness and presence of systems for return to work were analysed as indicators of absenteeism. A total of 501 workers were included in the analysis. Females were less likely to experience absenteeism when adjustments were made for both the awareness and presence of systems [odds ratio (OR) = 0.51 and 0.41, respectively]. Large companies showed an increased risk of having absentee workers than small companies. The awareness of a gradual resumption system and the presence of a sick pay system were related to absenteeism (OR = 2.75 and 2.40, respectively). The awareness and presence of systems for return to work are related to the long-term absenteeism. The predictors of sex and company size are also related to the experience of the long-term absenteeism. To understand the effect of systems for return to work on absenteeism due to mental problems, further studies are needed.

  17. Does self-efficacy predict return-to-work after sickness absence? A prospective study among 930 employees with sickness absence for three weeks or more.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labriola, Merete; Lund, Thomas; Christensen, Karl B; Albertsen, Karen; Bültmann, Ute; Jensen, Jette N; Villadsen, Ebbe

    2007-01-01

    To compare levels of self-efficacy among the general working population and employees with sickness absence from work, and to examine if general self-efficacy measured before occurrence of sickness absence predicted subsequent onset of sickness absence and Return-to-Work. The study follows a cohort of 5357 working employees and 106 long-term sickness absent employees in Denmark. They were interviewed in 2000 regarding self-efficacy and various co-variates, and followed for 78 weeks in a national sickness absence register. Cox regression analysis was performed in order to assess the effect of self-efficacy on Return-to-Work after sickness absence. General self-efficacy was significantly lower among those with sickness absence compared to the general working population. Self-efficacy showed no statistically significant association with later onset of sickness absence or with Return-to-Work. The results may suggest that lower self-efficacy among employees with sickness absence is a result of the sickness absence itself rather than a precursor of it. This indicates a need to investigate the potential change in self-efficacy in relation to the employee's change in labor market status; this will help to focus Return-to-Work interventions where planning has to be attentive towards the change in self-efficacy that can occur after onset of disease and sickness absence.

  18. Effect of an intervention to enhance guideline adherence of occupational physicians on return-to-work self-efficacy in workers sick-listed with common mental disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beurden, K.M.; van der Klink, J.J.L.; Brouwers, E.P.M.; Joosen, M.C.W.; Mathijssen, J.J.P.; Terluin, B.; van Weeghel, J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Since a higher level of self-efficacy in common mental disorders is associated with earlier return-to-work (RTW), it is important to know if work related self-efficacy can be increased by occupational health care. The primary aim of this study was to evaluate whether an intervention to

  19. Does self-efficacy predict return-to-work after sickness absence? A prospective study among 930 employees with sickness absence for three weeks or more

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Labriola, M.; Lund, T.; Christensen, K.B.; Albertsen, K.; Bultmann, U.; Jensen, J.N.; Villadsen, E.

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To compare levels of self-efficacy among the general working population and employees with sickness absence from work, and to examine if general self-efficacy measured before occurrence of sickness absence predicted subsequent onset of sickness absence and Return-to-Work. METHODS: The study

  20. Mastery Matters : The impact of self-efficacy and work-focused therapy on return to work among employees with common mental disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lagerveld, S.E.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Common mental disorders (CMD) such as depression, anxiety and adjustment disorder are highly prevalent and constitute a major cause of (long-term) sick leave. Considering the negative consequences of long-term sick leave it is important that effective return to work (RTW) interventions

  1. Longer Nature-Based Rehabilitation May Contribute to a Faster Return to Work in Patients with Reactions to Severe Stress and/or Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrik Grahn

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The global burden of depression and stress-related mental disorders is substantial, and constitutes a major need for effective rehabilitation. Can nature-based rehabilitation help people return to work? Objective: To study if the length of a nature-based rehabilitation program affects the outcome with regard to return to work one year after the onset of the program, in a group of patients with long-term reactions to severe stress and/or depression. Methods: A prospective, quasi-experimental study comparing results from 8-, 12-, and 24-week periods of rehabilitation. The rehabilitation of 106 participants was carried out by a multimodal rehabilitation team in a specially designed rehabilitation garden. Return to work data were collected before the intervention and one year after the start of rehabilitation. In addition, data were collected regarding self-assessed occupational competence, personal control, and sense of coherence. As many as 68% of the participants returned to work or participated in job training or work-oriented measures, full- or part-time, after one year. Participants with a longer period of rehabilitation reported better results on occupational competence, and were more likely to participate in paid work, full-time or part-time, one year after rehabilitation. Study outcomes indicate that a longer rehabilitation period in a rehabilitation garden increases the possibility of a return to paid work.

  2. Longer Nature-Based Rehabilitation May Contribute to a Faster Return to Work in Patients with Reactions to Severe Stress and/or Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grahn, Patrik; Pálsdóttir, Anna María; Ottosson, Johan; Jonsdottir, Ingibjörg H.

    2017-01-01

    The global burden of depression and stress-related mental disorders is substantial, and constitutes a major need for effective rehabilitation. Can nature-based rehabilitation help people return to work? Objective: To study if the length of a nature-based rehabilitation program affects the outcome with regard to return to work one year after the onset of the program, in a group of patients with long-term reactions to severe stress and/or depression. Methods: A prospective, quasi-experimental study comparing results from 8-, 12-, and 24-week periods of rehabilitation. The rehabilitation of 106 participants was carried out by a multimodal rehabilitation team in a specially designed rehabilitation garden. Return to work data were collected before the intervention and one year after the start of rehabilitation. In addition, data were collected regarding self-assessed occupational competence, personal control, and sense of coherence. As many as 68% of the participants returned to work or participated in job training or work-oriented measures, full- or part-time, after one year. Participants with a longer period of rehabilitation reported better results on occupational competence, and were more likely to participate in paid work, full-time or part-time, one year after rehabilitation. Study outcomes indicate that a longer rehabilitation period in a rehabilitation garden increases the possibility of a return to paid work. PMID:29076997

  3. Return to work after sick leave due to depression; A conceptual analysis based on perspectives of patients, supervisors and occupational physicians

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, G.; Koeter, M. W. J.; Nabitz, U.; Hees, H. L.; Schene, A. H.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: This study aims to investigate the most important factors facilitating a return to work after sick leave due to depression from the perspectives of patients, supervisors and occupational physicians. Methods: Concept mapping was used to develop a conceptual framework. Using purposive

  4. Economic evaluation of a multi-stage return to work program for workers on sick leave due to low back pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenstra, I.A.; Anema, J.R.; van Tulder, M.; Bongers, P.M.; de Vet, H.C.W.; van Mechelen, W.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the cost-effectiveness and cost-utility of a return to work (RTW) program for workers on sick-leave due to low back pain (LBP), comparing a workplace intervention implemented between 2 to 8 weeks of sick-leave with usual care, and a clinical intervention after 8 weeks of

  5. Return-to-work intervention versus usual care for sick-listed employees : Health-economic investment appraisal alongside a cluster randomised trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lokman, S.; Volker, D.; Zijlstra-Vlasveld, M.C.; Brouwers, E.P.M.; Boon, B.; Beekman, A.T.; Smit, F.; van der Feltz-Cornelis, C.M.

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the health-economic costs and benefits of a guided eHealth intervention (E-health module embedded in Collaborative Occupational healthcare (ECO)) encouraging sick-listed employees to a faster return to work. A two-armed cluster randomised trial with occupational physicians (OPs) (n=62),

  6. Differences in predictors of return to work among long-term sick-listed employees with different self-reported reasons for sick leave

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijs, J.J.J.M.; Koppes, L.L.J.; Taris, T.W.; Blonk, R.W.B.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The present study aimed to gain insight in the predictors of full return to work (RTW) among employees on long-term sick leave due to three different self-reported reasons for sick leave: physical, mental or comorbid physical and mental problems. This knowledge can be used to develop

  7. Faster return to work after psychiatric consultation for sicklisted employees with common mental disorders compared to care as usual. A randomized clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Feltz-Cornelis, Christina M.; Hoedeman, Rob; de Jong, Fransina J.; Meeuwissen, Jolanda A. C.; Drewes, Hanneke W.; van der Laan, Niels C.; Ader, Herman J.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Return to work (RTW) of employees on sick leave for common mental disorders may require a multidisciplinary approach. This article aims to assess time to RTW after a psychiatric consultation providing treatment advice to the occupational physician (OP) for employees on sick leave for

  8. Economic evaluation of a multi-stage return to work program for workers on sick-leave due to low back pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenstra, I.A.; Anema, J.R.; Tulder, M.W. van; Bongers, P.M.; Vet, H.C.W. de; Mechelen, W. van

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the cost-effectiveness and cost-utility of a return to work (RTW) program for workers on sick-leave due to low back pain (LBP), comparing a workplace intervention implemented between 2 to 8 weeks of sick-leave with usual care, and a clinical intervention after 8 weeks of

  9. Improving return-to-work after childbirth: design of the Mom@Work study, a randomised controlled trial and cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruinvels David J

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many women suffer from health problems after giving birth, which can lead to sick leave. About 30% of Dutch workers are on sick leave after maternity leave. Structural contact of supervisors with employees on maternity leave, supported by early medical advice of occupational physicians, may increase the chances of return-to-work after maternity leave. In addition, to understand the process of sick leave and return-to-work after childbirth it is important to gain insight into which factors hinder return-to-work after childbirth, as well, as which prognostic factors lead to the development of postpartum health complaints. In this paper, the design of the Mom@Work study is described. Methods The Mom@Work study is simultaneously a randomised controlled trial and a cohort study. Pregnant women working for at least 12 hours a week at one of the 15 participating companies are eligible to participate. The supervisors of these pregnant employees are randomised at 35 weeks pregnancy into the intervention group or control group. During maternity leave, supervisors in the intervention group contact their employee six weeks after delivery using a structured interview. When employees do not expect to return to their jobs at the end of their scheduled maternity leave due to health problems, the supervisor offers early support of the occupational physician. Supervisors in the control group have no structural contact with their employees during maternity leave. Measurements take place at 30 weeks pregnancy and at 6, 12, 24 and 52 weeks postpartum. In addition, cost data are collected. For the RCT, primary outcome measures are sick leave and return-to-work, and secondary outcome measures are costs, health, satisfaction with intervention and global feelings of recovery. Outcome measures for the cohort are pregnancy-related pelvic girdle pain, fatigue and depression. Finally, a number of prognostic factors for return-to-work and for the

  10. Return to work following robot-assisted laparoscopic and open retropubic radical prostatectomy: A single-center cohort study to compare duration of sick leave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Mechow, Stefanie; Graefen, Markus; Haese, Alexander; Tennstedt, Pierre; Pehrke, Dirk; Friedersdorff, Frank; Beyer, Burkhard

    2018-03-15

    To compare the duration of sick leave in patients with localized prostate cancer after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) and open retropubic RP (ORP) at a German high-volume prostate cancer center. The data of 1,415 patients treated with RP at Martini Klinik, Prostate Cancer Center between 2012 and 2016 were, retrospectively, analyzed. Information on employment status, monthly revenues and days of work missed due to sickness were assessed via online questionnaire. Additional data were retrieved from our institutional database. Medians and interquartile ranges (IQR) were reported for continuous data. Cox proportional hazard analysis was performed to compare both surgical techniques for return to work time after RP. Median time elapsed between surgery and return to work comprised 42 days in patients undergoing RARP (IQR: 21-70) and ORP (IQR: 28-84, P = 0.05). In Cox regression analysis, surgical approach showed no impact on return to work time (RARP vs. ORP hazard ratio = 1, 95% CI: 0.91-1.16, P = 0.69). Return to work time was significantly associated with employment status, physical workload and monthly income (all P<0.001). Limitation of this study is the nonrandomized design in a single-center. As the surgical approach did not show any influence on the number of days missed from work in patients undergoing RP, no superiority of either RARP or ORP could be identified for return to work time in a German cohort. Both surgical approaches are safe options usually allowing the patients to resume normal activities including work after an appropriate convalescence period. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A Follow-up Study on Return to Work in the Year After Reporting an Occupational Injury Stratified by Outcome of the Workers' Compensation System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudbeck, Marianne; Johansen, Jens Peter; Omland, Øyvind

    2018-01-01

    ) or slower (industrial accident) compared to claimants with recognized claim without compensation the subsequent year and at a faster rate after decision. CONCLUSIONS: Compensation claims and proceedings of the workers' compensation system probably increase time to return to work, other factors as health......OBJECTIVE: To compare return rates to work between different groups according to decision from the workers' compensation. METHOD: Register data on disability benefits were used to describe return rates to work in Kaplan-Meier curves and association with decision on compensation claims. Disability...... benefits were granted by the municipalities independently of any compensation claim if sick-listed. RESULTS: Claimants with ongoing claims were the group with the largest proportion remaining on disability benefits. Claimants with rejected claims returned to work at the same rate (occupational disease...

  12. Systematic Review of Occupational Therapy and Adult Cancer Rehabilitation: Part 2. Impact of Multidisciplinary Rehabilitation and Psychosocial, Sexuality, and Return-to-Work Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Elizabeth G; Gibson, Robert W; Arbesman, Marian; D'Amico, Mariana

    This article is the second part of a systematic review of evidence for the effectiveness of cancer rehabilitation interventions within the scope of occupational therapy that address the activity and participation needs of adult cancer survivors. This article focuses on the use of multidisciplinary rehabilitation and interventions that address psychosocial outcomes, sexuality, and return to work. Strong evidence indicates that multidisciplinary rehabilitation benefits cancer survivors and that psychosocial strategies can reduce anxiety and depression. Moderate evidence indicates that interventions can support survivors in returning to the level of sexuality desired and help with return to work. Part 1 of the review also appears in this issue. Copyright © 2017 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.

  13. Does self-efficacy predict return-to-work after sickness absence? A prospective study among 930 employees with sickness absence for three weeks or more

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Labriola, Merete; Lund, Thomas; Christensen, Karl B

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To compare levels of self-efficacy among the general working population and employees with sickness absence from work, and to examine if general self-efficacy measured before occurrence of sickness absence predicted subsequent onset of sickness absence and Return-to-Work. METHODS: The study...... follows a cohort of 5357 working employees and 106 long-term sickness absent employees in Denmark. They were interviewed in 2000 regarding self-efficacy and various co-variates, and followed for 78 weeks in a national sickness absence register. Cox regression analysis was performed in order to assess...... the effect of self-efficacy on Return-to-Work after sickness absence. RESULTS: General self-efficacy was significantly lower among those with sickness absence compared to the general working population. Self-efficacy showed no statistically significant association with later onset of sickness absence...

  14. The association of social functioning, social relationships and the receipt of compensation with time to return to work following unintentional injuries to Victorian workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clay, Fiona J; Fitzharris, Michael; Kerr, Emily; McClure, Roderick J; Watson, Wendy L

    2012-09-01

    Understanding individual factors associated with return to work (RTW) post-injury is an important goal of compensation systems research. The aim of the present study was to determine factors associated with time to return to work following acute unintentional injuries. A prospective cohort study was conducted in Victoria, Australia. The cohort comprised 133 persons who were employed at the time they were admitted to one of three study hospitals. Baseline health status data was obtained retrospectively at one-week post-injury and participants were further surveyed at 1, 6, 12, 26 and 52 weeks post-injury to measure recovery. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was used to examine the association between potential prognostic factors and time to RTW during the 12 month study. At the end of 12 months follow-up, 81.2% of the study cohort had returned to work. Older age, increased injury severity, self reported symptomatic pain and poor mental health at 1 week post-injury were associated with extended time to RTW. A significant statistical interaction between the receipt of compensation and high social functioning as measured by the SF-36 or strong social relationships as measured by the Assessment of Quality of Life was associated with earlier RTW. Participants reporting strong social relationships and high social functioning at 1 week post-injury and entitled to injury compensation returned to work 2.05 and 3.66 times earlier respectively, than similar participants with no entitlement to compensation. Both injury-related and psychosocial factors were associated with the duration of time to RTW following acute unintentional injuries. This study replicated previously reported findings on social functioning and compensation from an independent acute trauma sample. Programs or policies to improve social functioning early post-injury may provide opportunities to improve the duration of time to RTW following injury.

  15. An Exploration of the Factors Considered When Forming Expectations for Returning to Work following Sickness Absence Due to a Musculoskeletal Condition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda E Young

    Full Text Available Workers' own expectations for returning to work following a period of sickness absence have been found to be one of the best predictors of future work status; however, there is a limited understanding of why people expect what they do. The current study was undertaken with the aim of determining what people take into consideration when forming their expectations for returning to work.Thirty-four people (8 women, 26 men, who were off work due to a musculoskeletal condition, participated in one of 14 focus groups. Participants were aged 25 to 65 (M = 45, SD = 12.6, and all had been out of work for 3 months or less.All participants reported expecting to return to work, with the most common timeframe being approximately 30 days (Range = 1 day-12 months. When explaining what they thought about when forming their expectations, participants referenced numerous considerations. Much of what was spoken about could be compartmentalized to reflect features of themselves, their condition, or their broader environmental contexts. Participant's subjective experience of these features influenced his or her expectations. Prominent themes included concerns about employability, a desire to get back to normal, no job to go back to, mixed emotions, re-injury concerns, the judgments of workplace stakeholders, being needed by their employer, waiting for input, until the money runs out, and working out what was in their best interest.Indications are that many of the reported considerations are amenable to intervention, suggesting opportunities to assist workers in the process of returning to work.

  16. The development of the Model of Occupational Self Efficacy: an occupational therapy practice model to facilitate returning to work after a brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soeker, Mogammad Shaheed

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the methodology used in order to develop the Model of Occupational Self Efficacy: An occupational therapy practice model to facilitate returning to work after a brain injury. Nine males and one female participated in the study. Face to face, semi structured individual interviews were conducted and data were analyzed using a qualitative approach to explicate patterns and themes. The study was conducted in two phases, namely, Phase one described the lived experience of individuals with brain injury who had returned to work and Phase two described the development of the model by means of theory generation methodology. Four themes emerged that reflected the lived experiences for people returning to work after a brain injury. (1) A sense of loss of former self; (2) Uncertainty about the future; (3) The road to acceptance and believing in yourself; and (4) Participation in occupation enables growth. The above themes contributed to the central concept called Occupational Self Efficacy that resulted in the development of the occupational therapy practice model. The findings of the study suggest that theory generation methodology is adequate for the conceptual development of an occupational therapy practice model.

  17. Return to work after a workplace-oriented intervention for patients on sick-leave for burnout - a prospective controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larsson Britt

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the present study the effect of a workplace-oriented intervention for persons on long-term sick leave for clinical burnout, aimed at facilitating return to work (RTW by job-person match through patient-supervisor communication, was evaluated. We hypothesised that the intervention group would show a more successful RTW than a control group. Methods In a prospective controlled study, subjects were identified by the regional social insurance office 2-6 months after the first day on sick leave. The intervention group (n = 74 was compared to a control group who had declined participation, being matched by length of sick leave (n = 74. The RTW was followed up, using sick-listing register data, until 1.5 years after the time of intervention. Results There was a linear increase of RTW in the intervention group during the 1.5-year follow-up period, and 89% of subjects had returned to work to some extent at the end of the follow-up period. The increase in RTW in the control group came to a halt after six months, and only 73% had returned to work to some extent at the end of the 1.5-year follow-up. Conclusions We conclude that the present study demonstrated an improvement of long-term RTW after a workplace-oriented intervention for patients on long-term sick leave due to burnout. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials NCT01039168.

  18. Effect on return to work or education of Individual Placement and Support modified for people with mood and anxiety disorders: results of a randomised clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellström, Lone; Bech, Per; Hjorthøj, Carsten; Nordentoft, Merete; Lindschou, Jane; Eplov, Lene Falgaard

    2017-10-01

    The effect of Individual Placement and Support (IPS) on return to work or education among people with mood or anxiety disorders is unclear, while IPS increases return to work for people with severe mental illness. We examined the effect of IPS modified for people with mood and anxiety disorders (IPS-MA) on return to work and education compared with services as usual (SAU). In a randomised clinical superiority trial, 326 participants with mood and anxiety disorders were centrally randomised to IPS-MA, consisting of individual mentor support and career counselling (n=162) or SAU (n=164). The primary outcome was competitive employment or education at 24 months, while weeks of competitive employment or education, illness symptoms and level of functioning, and well-being were secondary outcomes. After 24 months, 44.4% (72/162) of the participants receiving IPS-MA had returned to work or education compared with 37.8% (62/164) following SAU (OR=1.34, 95% CI: 0.86 to 2.10, p=0.20). We found no difference in mean number of weeks in employment or education (IPS-MA 32.4 weeks vs SAU 26.7 weeks, p=0.14), level of depression (Hamilton Depression 6-Item Scale score IPS-MA 5.7 points vs SAU 5.0 points, p=0.12), level of anxiety (Hamilton Anxiety 6-Item Scale score IPS-MA 5.8 points vs SAU 5.1 points, p=0.17), level of functioning (Global Assessment of Functioning IPS-MA 59.1 points vs SAU 59.5 points, p=0.81) or well-being measured by WHO-Five Well-being Index (IPS-MA 49.6 points vs SAU 48.5 points, p=0.83) at 24 months. The modified version of IPS, IPS-MA, was not superior to SAU in supporting people with mood or anxiety disorders in return to work at 24 months. NCT01721824. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  19. Return to work after treatment for primary breast cancer over a 6-year period: results from a prospective study comparing patients with the general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noeres, Dorothee; Park-Simon, Tjoung-Won; Grabow, Jördis; Sperlich, Stefanie; Koch-Gießelmann, Heike; Jaunzeme, Jelena; Geyer, Siegfried

    2013-07-01

    Only little research has been conducted on breast cancer survivors returning to work in Germany. This paper explores two questions: (1) Does breast cancer lead to an increased drop-out of paid work? (2) Do other factors, apart from their illness, help explain breast cancer survivors' (temporary) retirement from work? To the best of our knowledge, this is the first comparative and prospective study on breast cancer survivors returning to work in Germany. We consider this work to be a relevant research for three reasons: (1) It exceeds the observation period of previous international studies by another 3 years. (2) By including the comparison with a population sample, it allows to take the specific situation of breast cancer patients into account. This refers to their illness as well as to the socio-economic context. (3) It combines qualitative and quantitative methods in order to receive patients' individual interpretations. The analysis is based on a sample of 227 breast cancer patients, participating in a prospective study on the role of psychosocial factors in the long-term course of breast cancer and a random sample of 647 age-matched women living in northern Germany. Employment and demographic data were observed directly before primary surgery (2002-2004), 1 year later (2003-2005) and again 5 years later (2008-2010). In addition, qualitative interviews at the three different observations served as a basis for quantitative data analyses, which were mainly performed by logistic regression models. One year after primary surgery, nearly three times as many cancer survivors had left their job as compared to the women in the reference group. For breast cancer survivors, a lower level of education, part-time employment, the severity of work-related difficulties and participation in inpatient rehabilitation correlated significantly with the failure to return to work. Six years after surgery, the probability of returning to work was still only half as high among breast

  20. Psychoeducation to facilitate return to work in individuals on sick leave and at risk of having a mental disorder: protocol of a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Pernille; Søgaard, Hans Jørgen; Yde, Bjarne Frostholm; Labriola, Merete; Nohr, Ellen A; Jensen, Chris

    2014-12-17

    Sickness absence due to poor mental health is a common problem in many Western countries. To facilitate return to work, it may be important to identify individuals on sick leave and at risk of having a mental disorder and subsequently to offer appropriate treatment. Psychoeducation alone has not previously been used as a return to work intervention, but may be a promising tool to facilitate return to work. Therefore, the aim of the study is to evaluate the effectiveness of psychoeducation designed specifically to facilitate return to work for individuals on sick leave and at risk of having a mental disorder. The psychoeducation was a supplement to the various standard offers provided by the job centres. The study is a randomised controlled trial, in which individuals on sick leave either receive psychoeducation and standard case management or standard case management alone. Participants were individuals with mental health symptoms, who had been on sick leave from part-time or full-time work or unemployment for about 4-8 weeks. The psychoeducational intervention was group-based and the course consisted of 2 hour sessions once a week for 6 weeks. The course was given by psychiatric nurses, a psychologist, a social worker, a physiotherapist and a person who had previously been on sick leave due to mental health problems. The sessions focused on stress and work life, and the purpose was to provide individuals on sick leave the skills to understand and improve their mental functioning.The primary outcome is the duration of sickness absence measured by register data. Secondary outcomes include psychological symptoms, mental health-related quality of life, and locus of control. These outcomes are measured by questionnaires at the start of the intervention and at 3 and 6 months follow-up. On the basis of this trial, the effect of psychoeducation for individuals on sick leave and at risk of having a mental disorder will be studied. The results will contribute to the

  1. Efficacy of ‘Tailored Physical Activity’ or ‘Chronic Pain Self-Management Program’ on return to work for sick-listed citizens: design of a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andersen Lotte Nygaard

    2013-01-01

    , kinesiophobia, physical functional status, interpersonal problems and mental disorders. Discussion There are few evidence-based interventions for rehabilitation programmes assisting people with musculoskeletal pain-related work absence. This study will compare outcomes of interventions on return to work in order to increase the knowledge of evidence-based rehabilitation of sick-listed citizens to prevent long-term sick-leave and facilitate return to work. Trial registration The trial is registered in the ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01356784.

  2. Supporting 'work-related goals' rather than 'return to work' after cancer? A systematic review and meta-synthesis of 25 qualitative studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Mary; Williams, Brian; Firnigl, Danielle; Lang, Heidi; Coyle, Joanne; Kroll, Thilo; MacGillivray, Steve

    2013-06-01

    This study aimed to systematically review and synthesise qualitative studies of employment and cancer. A rigorous systematic review and meta-synthesis process was followed. A total of 13,233 papers were retrieved from eight databases; 69 were deemed relevant following title and abstract appraisal. Four further publications were identified via contact with key authors. Screening of full texts resulted in the retention of 25 publications from six countries, which were included in the synthesis. Studies consistently indicate that for people with cancer, 'work' forms a central basis for self-identity and self-esteem, provides financial security, forms and maintains social relationships, and represents an individual's abilities, talents and health. Work is therefore more than paid employment. Its importance to individuals rests on the relative value survivors place on these constituent functions. The desirability, importance and subsequent interpretation of individuals' experience of 'return to work' appears to be influenced by the ways in which cancer affects these functions or goals of 'work'. Our synthesis draws these complex elements into a heuristic model to help illustrate and communicate these inter-relationships. The concept of 'return to work' may be overly simplistic, and as a result, misleading. The proposed benefits previously ascribed to 'return to work' may only be achieved through consideration of the specific meaning and role of work to the individual. Interventions to address work-related issues need to be person-centred, acknowledging the work-related outcomes that are important to the individual. A conceptual and operational shift towards supporting survivors to identify and achieve their 'work-related goals' may be more appropriate. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. [Return to Work from Vocational RetrainingA Long-Term Analysis of Individual Trajectories: Biografical and Structural Conditions of Success and Failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meschnig, Alexander; von Kardorff, Ernst; Klaus, Sebastian

    2018-03-28

    The study aimed at the reconstruction of the trajectories of participants of a two-year vocational-retraining into new workplaces thereby identifying favourable and risky conditions of the return-to-work process. From a practical point of view the study identified special needs and necessities for after-care facilities. A Mixed-Method-Design was used. Quantitatively the follow-up-study included 214 persons who participated for three times on filling out a questionnaire over a period of eighteen months after the end of the vocational retraining. In the qualitative part of the study thirty persons consented to participate in a narrative-episodic interview on their vocational biography, their illness experiences at work and their way back into work. The study focused on the experiences of the participants from within, on their decision-making, coping, and rearrangement processes as well as on the experienced support from family members and rehabilitation professionals. About 75% of the participants of the vocational retraining succeeded in getting a job within the range of 18 months after finishing the retraining. Indicators for successful Return to Work are a high identification with the new vocation, effective coping with the remaining health problems, and an accepted arrangement with the disabilities in the work place and in everyday-life, a positive anticipation of the health condition in the future, and last but not least a satisfying social inclusion. As specific risk constellations for Return to Work emerged a lack of partnership, unfinished mental coping with the illness, negative subjective health prognosis, and a more passive attitude to life. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. Partner relationships and long-term sick leave among female workers: consequences and impact on dimensions of health and return to work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellve, Lotta; Ahlborg, Tone

    2012-12-01

    Few efforts have been made to prospectively identify resources and obstacles outside work that may predict regained work ability and return to work when workers are on sick leave. This study investigates the association between partner relationships and sick leave. Our research questions were as follows: (i) What is the influence of sick leave, pain, stress and domestic strain on the quality of the dyadic partner relationship?, and (ii) What is the influence of the partner and social relationship on pain, stress, work ability, self-rated health and return to work? A cohort of female workers (n = 225) on long-term sick leave (>60 days), all in a partner relationship, at 6-month intervals completed a questionnaire based on the Quality of Dyadic Relationship (QDR) instrument, the Interview Schedule of Social Interaction (ISSI), the Work Ability Index (WAI) and the Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire (COPSOQ). Univariate and multivariate analyses of baseline and prospective data were performed. The results showed that decreased partner relationship quality was related to having major responsibility for household work despite being on sick leave, having pain and having decreased social integration. Among younger individuals on sick leave, a reduction in the quality of the partner relationship was shown already at the first (6-month) follow-up, while among middle-aged women, such a reduction was seen only at the 12-month follow-up. No dimensions of partner relationship quality at baseline were related to dimensions of return to work, either as a resource or as an obstacle. Consequently, our results show that a good relationship does not keep the woman from returning to work. Having main responsibility for household work, which implies domestic strain while on sick leave, predicts lower partner relationship quality. The practical implications are that healthcare professionals treating women on sick leave should emphasize the importance of keeping a social network as

  5. Effectiveness of return-to-work interventions for disabled people: a systematic review of government initiatives focused on changing the behaviour of employers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clayton, Stephen; Barr, Ben; Nylen, Lotta

    2012-01-01

    interventions to influence employers' employment practices concerning disabled and chronically ill individuals in five OECD countries. A separate paper reports on interventions to influence the behaviour of employees. METHODS: Electronic and grey literature searches to identify all empirical studies reporting...... if they are sufficiently generous. Involving employers in return-to-work planning can reduce subsequent sick leave and be appreciated by employees, but this policy has not been taken up with the level of intensity that is likely to make a difference. Some interventions favour the more advantaged disabled people and those...

  6. An analysis from the Quality Outcomes Database, Part 2. Predictive model for return to work after elective surgery for lumbar degenerative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asher, Anthony L; Devin, Clinton J; Archer, Kristin R; Chotai, Silky; Parker, Scott L; Bydon, Mohamad; Nian, Hui; Harrell, Frank E; Speroff, Theodore; Dittus, Robert S; Philips, Sharon E; Shaffrey, Christopher I; Foley, Kevin T; McGirt, Matthew J

    2017-10-01

    OBJECTIVE Current costs associated with spine care are unsustainable. Productivity loss and time away from work for patients who were once gainfully employed contributes greatly to the financial burden experienced by individuals and, more broadly, society. Therefore, it is vital to identify the factors associated with return to work (RTW) after lumbar spine surgery. In this analysis, the authors used data from a national prospective outcomes registry to create a predictive model of patients' ability to RTW after undergoing lumbar spine surgery for degenerative spine disease. METHODS Data from 4694 patients who underwent elective spine surgery for degenerative lumbar disease, who had been employed preoperatively, and who had completed a 3-month follow-up evaluation, were entered into a prospective, multicenter registry. Patient-reported outcomes-Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), numeric rating scale (NRS) for back pain (BP) and leg pain (LP), and EQ-5D scores-were recorded at baseline and at 3 months postoperatively. The time to RTW was defined as the period between operation and date of returning to work. A multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression model, including an array of preoperative factors, was fitted for RTW. The model performance was measured using the concordance index (c-index). RESULTS Eighty-two percent of patients (n = 3855) returned to work within 3 months postoperatively. The risk-adjusted predictors of a lower likelihood of RTW were being preoperatively employed but not working at the time of presentation, manual labor as an occupation, worker's compensation, liability insurance for disability, higher preoperative ODI score, higher preoperative NRS-BP score, and demographic factors such as female sex, African American race, history of diabetes, and higher American Society of Anesthesiologists score. The likelihood of a RTW within 3 months was higher in patients with higher education level than in those with less than high school

  7. Work ability in rheumatoid arthritis patients: a register study on the prospective risk of exclusion and probability of returning to work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Sofie M; Hetland, Merete Lund; Pedersen, Jacob; Østergaard, Mikkel; Rubak, Tine Steen; Bjorner, Jakob Bue

    2017-07-01

    The aim was to study work ability in patients with RA compared with the general population by investigating the rates and risks of long-term sickness absence, unemployment and disability pension, and the chance of returning to work and the changes in these risks over time (1994-2011). This was a cohort study with up to 17 years of follow-up (mean 6.95 years/person) including 6677 RA patients of working age (identified in the nationwide DANBIO registry) and 56 955 matched controls from the general population. A multi-state model was used to analyse all shifts between the work-related states (long-term sickness absence, unemployment and disability pension, as well as the chance of returning to work) and calculate hazard rates (HRs). Analyses were stratified by disease duration and controlled for socio-demographic factors, physical job exposure and somatic and psychiatric co-morbidities. RA patients had increased risk of long-term sickness absence (e.g. early RA: HR = 4.00, 95% CI: 3.64, 4.30) and disability pension (e.g. established RA: HR = 2.75, 95% CI: 2.54, 2.98) relative to controls. From 1994-99 to 2006-11, a decrease in the effect of established RA was observed [long-term sickness absence: from HR = 2.25 (95% CI: 1.99, 2.54) to 1.63 (95% CI: 1.51, 1.75); and disability pension: from HR = 3.49 (95% CI: 2.83, 4.32) to 2.40 (95% CI: 2.15, 2.69)]. RA patients had a lower chance of returning to work from long-term sickness absence or unemployment (HR = 0.60, HR=0.80), and this did not change over time. RA patients remain at high risk for long-term sickness absence and disability pension, despite a positive development between 1996-99 and 2006-11. Returning to work after sick leave or unemployment remains a challenge for RA patients. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  8. Health related quality of life and return to work after minor extremity injuries: A longitudinal study comparing upper versus lower extremity injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sluys, Kerstin Prignitz; Shults, Justine; Richmond, Therese S

    2016-04-01

    To investigate the impact on health related quality of life (HRQL) during the first year after minor extremity injury and to determine whether there is a difference in recovery patterns and return to work between upper extremity injuries (UEI) and lower extremity injuries (LEI). A total of 181 adults' age 18 years or older randomly selected from patients admitted to an emergency department with minor injuries were studied. HRQL was measured using the Functional Status Questionnaire (FSQ) at 1-2 weeks, 3, 6, and 12-months post-injury. Pre-injury FSQ scores were measured retrospectively at admission. A quasi-least square (QLS) model was constructed to examine differences of FSQ scores at each measuring point for UEI and LEI. Fractures of the knee/lower leg (25%) were the most frequently injured body area. Slips or falls (57%) and traffic-related events (22%) were the most common injury causes. The mean ISS was 4.2 (SD 0.86). Both groups had significant declines in the FSQ scores physical and social functioning at 1-2 weeks after injury. Patients with UEI made larger improvements in the first 3 months post-injury versus patients with LEI whose improvements extended over the first 6 months. None of the groups reached the pre-injury FSQ scores during the first post-injury year except in the subscale work performance where UEI exceeded the pre-injury scores. At 12 months post-injury, significant lower FSQ scores remained in the LEI group compared to the UEI group in intermediate activities of daily living (p=0.036, d 0.4) and work performance (p=0.004, d 0.7). The return to work at 3 months and 12 months were 76% and 88% for UEI and 58% and 77% for LEI. No significant differences were found between groups in the FSQ scale mental health and social interaction. LEI had the highest impact on HRQL and return to work during the first year which exceeded the consequences of UEI. These findings contribute to the information about the consequences of injury in order to give

  9. Back pain - returning to work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonspecific back pain - work; Backache - work; Lumbar pain - work; Pain - back - chronic; Low back pain - work; Lumbago - work ... Exercise helps to prevent future back pain: Exercise a little ... keep your heart healthy and your muscles strong. If walking is ...

  10. Women with Neck Pain on Long-Term Sick Leave-Approaches Used in the Return to Work Process: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlstrom, Linda; Dellve, Lotta; Hagberg, Mats; Ahlberg, Karin

    2017-03-01

    Purpose There are difficulties in the process of return to work (RTW) from long-term sick leave, both in general and regarding sick leave because of neck pain in particular. Neck pain is difficult to assess, problematic to rehabilitate, and hard to cure; and it is not always easy to decide whether the pain is work-related. The outcome of RTW could be dependent upon individuals' approaches, defensive or offensive behaviors, and choices related to their self-efficacy. The aim of this study was to identify approaches used in the RTW process among women with neck pain on long-term sick leave from human service organizations. Methods This is a qualitative descriptive study based on grounded theory. A Swedish cohort of 207 women with a history of long-term sick leave with neck pain from human service organizations answered open-ended written questions at 0, 6, and 12 months, and 6 years; and 16 women were interviewed. Results Individuals expressed their coping approaches in terms of fluctuating in work status over time: either as a strategy or as a consequence. Periods of sick leave were interwoven with periods of work. The women were either controlling the interaction or struggling in the interaction with stakeholders. Conclusions Return to work outcomes may be improved if the fluctuating work status over time is taken into account in the design of rehabilitation efforts for women with a history of long-term sick leave and with chronical musculoskeletal conditions.

  11. [Good practice in occupational health services--Certification of stroke as an accident at work. Need for secondary prevention in people returning to work after acute cerebrovascular events].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcinkiewicz, Andrzej; Walusiak-Skorupa, Jolanta

    2015-01-01

    The classification of an acute vascular episode, both heart infarct and stroke, as an accident at work poses difficulties not only for post accidental teams, but also to occupational health professionals, experts and judges at labor and social insurance courts. This article presents the case of a 41-year-old office worker, whose job involved client services. While attending a very aggressive customer she developed solid stress that resulted in symptoms of the central nervous system (headache, speech disturbances). During her hospitalisation at the neurological unit ischemic stroke with transient mixed type aphasia was diagnosed. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan of the head revealed subacute ischemia. After an analysis of the accident circumstances, the employer's post accidental team decided that ischemic stroke had been an accident at work, because it was a sudden incident due to an external cause inducing work-related traumatic stroke. As a primary cause tough stress and emotional strain due to the situation developed while attending the customer were acknowledged. During control medical check up after 5 months the patient was found to be fit for work, so she could return to work. However, it should be noted that such a check up examination of subjects returning to work after stroke must be holistic, including the evaluation of job predispositions and health education aimed at secondary prevention of heart and vascular diseases with special reference to their risk factors. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  12. Good practice in occupational health services – Certification of stroke as an accident at work. Need for secondary prevention in people returning to work after acute cerebrovascular events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Marcinkiewicz

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The classification of an acute vascular episode, both heart infarct and stroke, as an accident at work poses difficulties not only for post accidental teams, but also to occupational health professionals, experts and judges at labor and social insurance courts. This article presents the case of a 41-year-old office worker, whose job involved client services. While attending a very aggressive customer she developed solid stress that resulted in symptoms of the central nervous system (headache, speech disturbances. During her hospitalisation at the neurological unit ischemic stroke with transient mixed type aphasia was diagnosed. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI scan of the head revealed subacute ischemia. After an analysis of the accident circumstances, the employer’s post accidental team decided that ischemic stroke had been an accident at work, because it was a sudden incident due to an external cause inducing work-related traumatic stroke. As a primary cause tough stress and emotional strain due to the situation developed while attending the customer were acknowledged. During control medical check up after 5 months the patient was found to be fit for work, so she could return to work. However, it should be noted that such a check up examination of subjects returning to work after stroke must be holistic, including the evaluation of job predispositions and health education aimed at secondary prevention of heart and vascular diseases with special reference to their risk factors. Med Pr 2015;66(4:595–599

  13. Perceived difficulty in the use of everyday technology: relationships with everyday functioning in people with acquired brain injury with a special focus on returning to work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson Lund, Maria; Nygård, Louise; Kottorp, Anders

    2014-01-01

    The aim was to explore the relationships between difficulties in the use of everyday technology (ET) and the ability to perform activities of daily life (ADL) in the home and in society and in the workplace in people with acquired brain injury (ABI). The investigation comprises an explorative cross-sectional study of 74 people with ABI. The short version of the Everyday Technology Use Questionnaire (S-ETUQ) and a revised version of the ADL taxonomy were used to evaluate the participants. Rasch-generated person ability measures of ET use and ADL were used in correlation analyses, in group comparisons by ANOVA and in logistic regressions. Difficulty in the use of ET was significantly correlated with ADL limitations. People who worked full- or part-time had significantly higher ability to use ET than those with some type of full-time, long-term sickness compensation. The ability to use ET, ADL ability and age were significantly related to return to work. The ability to use ET is related to all areas of everyday functioning in people with ABI. Therefore, a patient's ability to use ET needs to be considered in rehabilitation strategies following an ABI to enhance the patient's performance of activities in the home and in society and to support his or her likelihood of returning to work.

  14. Ervaringen van werkgevers over het eigen initiatief van langdurig zieke werknemers bij hun reïntegratie [Return to work of long-term absent employees: The view of Dutch employers on the amount own initiative of these employees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vuuren, T. van; Ybema, J.F.

    2009-01-01

    Employees who are absent for a prolonged period of time are expected to actively contribute to their own return to work. The present study examines how employers rate the employees' own initiative for return to work following longterm sickness absence and how this initiative affects successful

  15. Return to work for patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and transformed indolent lymphoma undergoing autologous stem cell transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arboe B

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Bente Arboe,1,2 Maja Halgren Olsen,2 Jette Soenderskov Goerloev,1 Anne Katrine Duun-Henriksen,2 Christoffer Johansen,2,3 Susanne Oksbjerg Dalton,2 Peter de Nully Brown1 1Department of Hematology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, 2Unit of Survivorship Research, The Danish Cancer Society Research Center, 3Department of Oncology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark Background: Autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT is the standard treatment for patients with relapsed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL or transformed indolent lymphoma (TIL. The treatment is mainly considered for younger patients still available for the work market. In this study, social outcomes after ASCT in terms of return to work (RTW are described.Patients and methods: Information from national administrative registers was combined with clinical information on patients, who received ASCT for relapse of DLBCL or TIL between 2000 and 2012. A total of 164 patients were followed until RTW, disability or old-age pension, death, or December 31, 2015, whichever came first. A total of 205 patients were followed with disability pension as the event of interest. Cox models were used to determine cause-specific hazards. Results: During follow-up, 82 (50% patients returned to work. The rate of returning to work in the first year following ASCT was decreased for patients being on sick leave at the time of relapse (hazard ratio [HR] 0.3 [0.2;0.5] and increased for patients aged ≥55 years (HR 1.9 [1.1;3.3]. In all, 56 (27% patients were granted disability pension. Being on sick leave at the time of relapse was positively associated with receiving a disability pension in the first 2 years after ASCT (HR 3.7 [1.8;7.7]. Conclusion: Patients on sick leave at the time of relapse have a poorer prognosis regarding RTW and have a higher rate of disability pension. Furthermore, patients >55 are more likely to RTW compared to younger patients. These

  16. Long-term stability of return to work after a workplace-oriented intervention for patients on sick leave for burnout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlson, Björn; Jönsson, Peter; Österberg, Kai

    2014-08-09

    The period from the mid-1990s to the mid-2000s saw a rapid increase in long-term sick leave in Sweden, primarily due to mental illness and often related to job burnout. This led to an urge for effective treatment programs that could prevent the often long sick leaves. In 2010 we presented a newly developed work-place intervention method, showing that 89% of the intervention group had returned to work at a 1.5 year follow-up, compared to 73% of the control group. The main aim of this study was to assess the long-term stability of these promising results. Sick leave registry data from the Regional Social Insurance Office were analyzed for an additional year (50 weeks) beyond the original 1.5 year period (80 weeks). Data from 68 matched pairs of intervention participants (IP) and controls were available. The proportions of participants being on full-time sick leave versus having returned to work to any extent were computed for every 10th week. Generalized estimating equations were used with GROUP (IP versus controls) as between-subjects factor, WEEKS and AGE as covariates, and return-to-work (RTW) as dependent variable. Significant differences (Wald χ2 with α ≤ .05) was followed up with polynomial contrasts. Individual relapses to higher degrees of sick leave (e.g. from 50% to 100%) and whether partial RTW led to later full-time RTW, were also analyzed. The omnibus test over all 130 weeks showed a GROUP*WEEKS interaction effect (p = .02), indicating differential group developments in RTW, though similarly high at week 130 in both groups with 82.4% of the IP and 77.9% of the controls having RTW (p = .22; χ2-test). A significant interaction with age led to separate analyses of the younger and older subgroups, indicating a stable pattern of superior RTW only among younger IP (week 130: 88.6% vs. 69.7%, p = .054; χ2-test). There was no group difference in relapses into increased degree of sick leave. Part-time sick leave did not predict a later

  17. Effects of a randomized controlled intervention trial on return to work and health care utilization after long-term sickness absence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Momsen, Anne-Mette H.; Stapelfeldt, Christina Malmose; Nielsen, Claus Vinther

    2016-01-01

    ) and odds ratio (OR) were used as measures of associations. Results were adjusted for gender, age, educational level, work ability and previous sick leave. Results: Among all responders we found no effect of the intervention on RTW. Among participants with low health anxiety, the one-year probability of RTW......Background: The aim of the RCT study was to investigate if the effect of a multidisciplinary intervention on return to work (RTW) and health care utilization differed by participants’ self-reported health status at baseline, defined by a) level of somatic symptoms, b) health anxiety and c) self......-reported general health. Methods: A total of 443 individuals were randomized to the intervention (n = 301) or the control group (n = 142) and responded to a questionnaire measuring health status at baseline. Participants were followed in registries measuring RTW and health care utilization. Relative risk (RR...

  18. Integrated mental health care and vocational rehabilitation to improve return to work rates for people on sick leave because of depression and anxiety (the Danish IBBIS trial)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Rie; Hoff, Andreas; Fisker, Jonas

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Depression and anxiety are among the largest contributors to the global burden of disease and have negative effects on both the individual and society. Depression and anxiety are very likely to influence the individual's work ability, and up to 40% of the people on sick leave in Denmark...... have depression and/or anxiety. There is no clear evidence that treatment alone will provide sufficient support for vocational recovery in this group. Integrated vocational and health care services have shown good effects on return to work in other, similar welfare contexts. The purpose of the IBBIS...... (Integrated Mental Health Care and Vocational Rehabilitation to Individuals on Sick Leave Due to Anxiety and Depression) interventions is to improve and hasten the process of return to employment for people in Denmark on sick leave because of depression and anxiety. METHODS/DESIGN: This three-arm, parallel...

  19. The effects of a group based stress treatment program (the Kalmia concept) targeting stress reduction and return to work. A randomized, wait-list controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Netterstrøm, Bo; Friebel, Lene; Ladegaard, Yun Katrine

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a group based multidisciplinary stress treatment program on reductions in symptom levels and the return to work (RTW) rate. Methods General practitioners referred 199 patients with persistent work related stress symptoms...... to the project. The inclusion criteria included being employed and being on sick leave. Using a randomized wait- list control design, the participants were randomized into three groups: the intervention group (IG, 70 participants) was treated using the Stress Therapy Concept of Kalmia, which consists...... of an integrative approach of group psychotherapy for 2.5 hours per week and Basic Body Awareness Therapy (BBAT) with mindfulness meditation for 1.5 hours per week, which runs in a parallel process supplemented with workplace dialogue; the treatment-as-usual control group (TAUCG, 71 participants), who received 12...

  20. Development of the Return-to-Work Obstacles and Self-Efficacy Scale (ROSES) and Validation with Workers Suffering from a Common Mental Disorder or Musculoskeletal Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbière, Marc; Negrini, Alessia; Durand, Marie-José; St-Arnaud, Louise; Briand, Catherine; Fassier, Jean-Baptiste; Loisel, Patrick; Lachance, Jean-Philippe

    2017-09-01

    Introduction Common mental disorders (CMDs) and musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) lead the list of causes for work absence in several countries. Current research is starting to look at workers on sick leave as a single population, regardless of the nature of the disease or accident. The purpose of this study is to report the validation of the Return to Work Obstacles and Self-Efficacy Scale (ROSES) for people with MSDs and CMDs, based on the disability paradigm. Methods From a prospective design, the ROSES' reliability and validity were investigated in a Canadian sample of workers on sick leave due to MSDs (n = 206) and CMDs (n = 157). Results Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses revealed that 46 items spread out on 10 conceptual dimensions (e.g., Fears of a relapse, Job demands, Difficult relation with the immediate supervisor), with satisfactory alpha coefficients and test-retest reliability for all subscales. Finally, several dimensions of ROSES also predict the participant's RTW within 6 months for MSDs (e.g., job demands), and CMDs (e.g., difficult relation with the immediate supervisor), even when adjusted by several variables (e.g., age, severity of symptoms). Apart from the job demands dimension, when the ROSES dimension is more external to the individual, only the perception of obstacles remains significant to predict RTW whereas it is the opposite result when the dimension is more internal (e.g., fears of a relapse). Conclusion The ROSES demonstrated satisfactory results regarding its validity and reliability with people having MSDs or CMDs, at the time of the return-to-work process.

  1. The Effect of Self-Efficacy on Return-to-Work Outcomes for Workers with Psychological or Upper-Body Musculoskeletal Injuries: A Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Oliver; Keegel, Tessa; Sim, Malcolm R; Collie, Alexander; Smith, Peter

    2018-03-01

    Purpose Work absence can result in substantial losses to the economy and workers. As a result, identifying modifiable factors associated with return-to-work (RTW) following an injury or illness is the focus of many empirical investigations. Self-efficacy, the belief about one's ability to undertake behaviours to achieve desired goals, has been identified as an important factor in RTW for injured workers. This paper systematically reviewed the literature on the association between self-efficacy and RTW outcomes for workers with an upper-body musculoskeletal injury or psychological injury. Methods A systematic search was conducted across five databases using two main search concepts- 'self-efficacy' and 'RTW'. After removing duplicates, our search strategy identified 836 studies, which were screened for relevance using titles and abstracts. Results A two stage screening process reduced the study pool to six studies using psychological injury cohorts and three using upper-body musculoskeletal (UB-MSK) cohorts. Eight cohorts from seven prospective cohort studies and one sample from a randomised control trial (RCT) were subjected to a risk of bias assessment. Higher levels of self-efficacy appeared to have a consistent and positive association with RTW across return-to-work status and work absence outcomes, injury type and follow-up periods. Effect ratios ranged from 1.00 to 5.26 indicating a potentially large impact of self-efficacy on RTW outcomes. The relationship between self-efficacy and RTW strengthened as the domain of self-efficacy became more specific to RTW and job behaviours. Studies assessing workers with psychological injuries were of a lower quality compared to those assessing workers with UB-MSK injuries. Conclusions Higher self-efficacy had consistent positive associations with RTW outcomes. Further empirical research should identify the determinants of self-efficacy, and explore the processes by which higher self-efficacy improves RTW outcomes.

  2. Design of a randomized controlled trial on the effects of Counseling of mental health problems by Occupational Physicians on return to work: the CO-OP-study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Mechelen Willem

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mental health problems often lead to prolonged sick leave. In primary care, the usual approach towards these patients was the advice to take rest and not return to work before all complaints had disappeared. When complaints persist, these patients are often referred to psychologists from primary and specialized secondary care. As an alternative, ways have been sought to activate the Dutch occupational physician (OP in primary care. Early 2000, the Dutch Association of Occupational Physicians (NVAB published a guideline concerning the management by OPs of employees with mental health problems. The guideline received positive reactions from employees, employers and Dutch OPs. This manuscript describes the design of a study, which aims to assess the effects of the guideline, compared with usual care. Methods/Design In a randomized controlled trial (RCT, subjects in the intervention group were treated according to the guideline. The control group received usual care, with minimal involvement of the OP and easy access to a psychologist. Subjects were recruited from two Dutch police departments. The primary outcomes of the study are return to work and treatment satisfaction by the employee, employer, and OP. A secondary outcome is cost-effectiveness of the intervention, compared with usual care. Furthermore, prognostic measures are taken into account as potential confounders. A process evaluation will be done by means of performance indicators, based on the guideline. Discussion In this pragmatic trial, effectiveness instead of efficacy is studied. We will evaluate what is possible in real clinical practice, rather than under ideal circumstances. Many requirements for a high quality trial are being met. Results of this study will contribute to treatment options in occupational health practice for employees on sick leave due to mental health problems. Additionally, they may contribute to new and better-suited guidelines and stepped

  3. Execution of a participatory supportive return to work program within the Dutch social security sector: a qualitative evaluation of stakeholders’ perceptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lieke Lammerts

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A process evaluation of a participatory supportive return to work program, aimed at workers without a (permanent employment contract who are sick-listed due to a common mental disorder, revealed that this program was executed less successfully than similar programs evaluated in earlier studies. The program consisted of a participatory approach, integrated care and direct placement in competitive employment. Aim of this study was to get a better understanding of the execution of the program by evaluating stakeholders’ perceptions. In the absence of an employer, the program was applied by the Dutch Social Security Agency, in collaboration with vocational rehabilitation agencies. Together with the sick-listed workers, these were the main stakeholders. Our research questions involved stakeholders’ perceptions of the function(s of the program, and their perceptions of barriers and facilitators for a successful execution of the program within the Dutch social security sector. Methods Semi-structured interviews were held with five sick-listed workers, eight professionals of the Social Security Agency, and two case managers of vocational rehabilitation agencies. Interview topics were related to experiences with different components of the program. Selection of respondents was based on purposive sampling and continued until data saturation was reached. Content analysis was applied to identify patterns in the data. Two researchers developed a coding system, based on predefined topics and themes emerging from the data. Results Although perceived functions of some components of the program were as intended, all stakeholders stressed that the program often had not resulted in return to work. Perceived barriers for a successful execution were related to a poor collaboration between the Dutch Social Security Agency, vocational rehabilitation agencies and healthcare providers, the type of experienced (health problems, time constraints

  4. Effect of an intervention to enhance guideline adherence of occupational physicians on return-to-work self-efficacy in workers sick-listed with common mental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Beurden, Karlijn M; van der Klink, Jac J L; Brouwers, Evelien P M; Joosen, Margot C W; Mathijssen, Jolanda J P; Terluin, Berend; van Weeghel, Jaap

    2015-08-19

    Since a higher level of self-efficacy in common mental disorders is associated with earlier return-to-work (RTW), it is important to know if work related self-efficacy can be increased by occupational health care. The primary aim of this study was to evaluate whether an intervention to enhance guideline adherence of occupational physicians lead to an increase in RTW self-efficacy in workers three months later. The secondary aim was to evaluate whether the intervention modified the association between RTW self-efficacy and return-to-work three months later. A total of 66 occupational physicians participated in the study. They were randomized into two groups; the intervention group received a training, the control group did not. The training aimed to enhance adherence to a mental health guideline that contained strategies that are supposed to enhance RTW self-efficacy. In 128 sick-listed workers guided by these occupational physicians, RTW self-efficacy, RTW, and personal, health-related and work-related variables were measured at baseline and three months later. Generalized linear mixed models analysis and linear mixed models analysis were used for the evaluations. In workers whose occupational physicians had received the training RTW self-efficacy increased significantly more than in workers whose occupational physicians had participated in the control group (t = -2.626, p ≤ .05). Higher baseline RTW self-efficacy scores were significantly more often associated with full RTW than with no RTW three months later (OR 2.20, 95 % CI 1.18-4.07), but the intervention did not affect this association. This study showed that a training to enhance guideline adherence of occupational physicians leads to increased RTW self-efficacy in workers sick-listed with common mental disorders during the first months of sickness absence in a real-life occupational health care setting. This insight is helpful for optimizing the recovery and RTW process, and for understanding the

  5. Return-to-work intervention versus usual care for sick-listed employees: health-economic investment appraisal alongside a cluster randomised trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokman, Suzanne; Volker, Danielle; Zijlstra-Vlasveld, Moniek C; Brouwers, Evelien PM; Boon, Brigitte; Beekman, Aartjan TF; Smit, Filip; Van der Feltz-Cornelis, Christina M

    2017-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the health-economic costs and benefits of a guided eHealth intervention (E-health module embedded in Collaborative Occupational healthcare (ECO)) encouraging sick-listed employees to a faster return to work. Design A two-armed cluster randomised trial with occupational physicians (OPs) (n=62), clustered and randomised by region into an experimental and a control group, to conduct a health-economic investment appraisal. Online self-reported data were collected from employees at baseline, after 3, 6, 9 and 12 months. Setting Occupational health care in the Netherlands. Participants Employees from small-sized and medium-sized companies (≥18 years), sick-listed between 4 and 26 weeks with (symptoms of) common mental disorders visiting their OP. Interventions In the intervention group, employees (N=131) received an eHealth module aimed at changing cognitions regarding return to work, while OPs were supported by a decision aid for treatment and referral options. Employees in the control condition (N=89) received usual sickness guidance. Outcomes Measures Net benefits and return on investment based on absenteeism, presenteeism, health care use and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) gained. Results From the employer’s perspective, the incremental net benefits were €3187 per employee over a single year, representing a return of investment of €11 per invested Euro, with a break-even point at 6 months. The economic case was also favourable from the employee’s perspective, partly because of QALY health gains. The intervention was costing €234 per employee from a health service financier’s perspective. The incremental net benefits from a social perspective were €4210. This amount dropped to €3559 in the sensitivity analysis trimming the 5% highest costs. Conclusions The data suggest that the ECO intervention offers good value for money for virtually all stakeholders involved, because initial investments were more than recouped within a

  6. Execution of a participatory supportive return to work program within the Dutch social security sector: a qualitative evaluation of stakeholders' perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammerts, Lieke; Schaafsma, Frederieke G; van Mechelen, Willem; Anema, Johannes R

    2016-04-14

    A process evaluation of a participatory supportive return to work program, aimed at workers without a (permanent) employment contract who are sick-listed due to a common mental disorder, revealed that this program was executed less successfully than similar programs evaluated in earlier studies. The program consisted of a participatory approach, integrated care and direct placement in competitive employment. Aim of this study was to get a better understanding of the execution of the program by evaluating stakeholders' perceptions. In the absence of an employer, the program was applied by the Dutch Social Security Agency, in collaboration with vocational rehabilitation agencies. Together with the sick-listed workers, these were the main stakeholders. Our research questions involved stakeholders' perceptions of the function(s) of the program, and their perceptions of barriers and facilitators for a successful execution of the program within the Dutch social security sector. Semi-structured interviews were held with five sick-listed workers, eight professionals of the Social Security Agency, and two case managers of vocational rehabilitation agencies. Interview topics were related to experiences with different components of the program. Selection of respondents was based on purposive sampling and continued until data saturation was reached. Content analysis was applied to identify patterns in the data. Two researchers developed a coding system, based on predefined topics and themes emerging from the data. Although perceived functions of some components of the program were as intended, all stakeholders stressed that the program often had not resulted in return to work. Perceived barriers for a successful execution were related to a poor collaboration between the Dutch Social Security Agency, vocational rehabilitation agencies and healthcare providers, the type of experienced (health) problems, time constraints, and limited job opportunities. For future implementation

  7. Practices and Processes Used in the Return to Work of Injured New South Wales nurses: Are These Consistent With RTW Best Practice Principles?

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Carole; Antoine, Michelle; Guest, Maya; Rivett, Darren; Kable, Ashley

    2018-03-01

    Purpose Workplace injury and illness rates are high within the nursing profession, and in conjunction with current nursing shortages, low retention rates, and the high cost of workplace injury, the need for effective return to work (RTW) for injured nurses is highlighted. This study aimed to identify current practices and processes used in the RTW of injured nurses, and determine if these are consistent with the seven principles for successful RTW as described by the Canadian Institute for Work & Health. Method As part of a larger cross-sectional study, survey data were collected from New South Wales nurses who had sustained a major workplace injury or illness. Survey questions were coded and matched to the seven principles for successful RTW. Results Of the 484 surveys eligible for analysis, most were from Registered Nurses (52%) in the Public Hospital Sector (48%). Responses indicated four main areas of concern: a commitment to health and safety by the workplace; early and considerate employer contact; provision of modified work; and individual knowledge of and involvement in the RTW process. Positive participant responses to co-worker and supervisor involvement were identified as areas consistent with best practice principles. Conclusions These findings suggest the practices and processes involved in the RTW of injured nurses are inconsistent with best practice principles for RTW, highlighting the need for interventions such as targeted employer education and training for improved industry RTW outcomes.

  8. Common Psychosocial Factors Predicting Return to Work After Common Mental Disorders, Cardiovascular Diseases, and Cancers: A Review of Reviews Supporting a Cross-Disease Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gragnano, Andrea; Negrini, Alessia; Miglioretti, Massimo; Corbière, Marc

    2017-06-06

    Purpose This systematic review aimed at identifying the common psychosocial factors that facilitate or hinder the return to work (RTW) after a sick leave due to common mental disorders (CMDs), cardiovascular diseases (CVDs), or cancers (CAs). Methods We conducted a review of reviews searching 13 databases from 1994 to 2016 for peer-reviewed, quantitative, cohort studies investigating factors influencing RTW after a CMD, CVD, or CA. Then, for each disease we identified additional cohort studies published after the date of the latest review included. Data were extracted following a three steps best-evidence synthesis method: the extraction of results about each predictor from studies within each single review and in the additional papers; the synthesis of results across the reviews and additional papers investigating the same disease; and the synthesis of results across the diseases. Results The search strategy identified 1029 unique records from which 27 reviews and 75 additional studies underwent comprehensive review. 14 reviews and 32 additional cohort studies met eligibility criteria. Specific predictors of RTW with different levels of evidence are provided for each disease. We found four common facilitators of RTW (job control, work ability, perceived good health and high socioeconomic status), and six barriers of RTW (job strain, anxiety, depression, comorbidity, older age and low education). Conclusion This is the first review to systematically analyze commonalities in RTW after CMDs, CVDs, or CAs. The common factors identified indicate that the RTW process presents many similarities across various diseases, thus supporting the validity of a cross-disease approach.

  9. "From Snail Mode to Rocket Ship Mode": Adolescents and Young Adults' Experiences of Returning to Work and School After Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauer, Eden R; Pieters, Huibrie C; Ganz, Patricia A; Landier, Wendy; Pavlish, Carol; Heilemann, MarySue V

    2017-12-01

    Resuming normal activities, such as work and school, is an important dimension of psychosocial recovery in cancer survivorship. Minimal data exist regarding adolescents or young adults' experiences of returning to school or work after cancer. The purpose of this study was to explore the processes of resuming work and school among adolescents and young adults after hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). In-depth interviews were conducted with 18 adolescents and young adults, who were 15-29 years when they underwent HCT and 6-60 months post-transplant at study enrollment. Interview transcripts were systematically analyzed using Grounded Theory methodology. Participants described the context in which they attempted to return to work or school, specific challenges they faced, and strategies they developed in these environments. Feeling left behind from their peers and their pre-diagnosis selves, participants described "rushing" back to school and work impulsively, taking on too much too quickly while facing overwhelming physical and cognitive demands. Factors motivating this sense of urgency as well as barriers to successful and sustainable reentry in these settings are also addressed. Findings are discussed in the context of important opportunities for clinical management, age-appropriate interventions, and implications for future research. A better understanding of psychosocial late effects, specifically related to school and work trajectories after cancer, is critical to survivorship care for adolescent and young adult cancer survivors.

  10. Return to Work: A Cut-Off of FIM Gain with Montebello Rehabilitation Factor Score in Order to Identify Predictive Factors in Subjects with Acquired Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franceschini, Marco; Massimiani, Maria Pia; Paravati, Stefano; Agosti, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Return to work (RTW) for people with acquired brain injury (ABI) represents a main objective of rehabilitation: this work presents a strong correlation between personal well-being and quality of life. The aim of this study is to investigate the prognostic factors that can predict RTW after ABI (traumatic or non- traumatic aetiology) in patients without disorders of consciousness (e.g. coma, vegetative or minimally conscious state) at the beginning of their admission to rehabilitation. At the end of a 6-month follow-up after discharge, data were successfully collected in 69 patients. The rehabilitation effectiveness (functional Recovery) between admission and discharge was assessed by Functional Independent Measure (FIM) gain, through the Montebello Rehabilitation Factor Score (MRFS), which was obtained as follows: (discharge FIM-admission FIM)/(Maximum possible FIM-Admission FIM) x 100. The cut-off value (criterion) deriving from MRFS, which helped identify RTW patients, resulted in .659 (sn 88.9%; sp 52.4%). Considering the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) and the MRFS data, the multivariable binary logistic regression analysis presented 62.96% of correct RTW classification cases, 80.95% of non-RTW leading to an overall satisfactory predictability of 73.91%. The results of the present study suggest that occupational therapy intervention could modify cut-off in patients with an MFRS close to target at the end of an in-hospital rehabilitative program thus developing their capabilities and consequently surpassing cut-off itself.

  11. Return to Work: A Cut-Off of FIM Gain with Montebello Rehabilitation Factor Score in Order to Identify Predictive Factors in Subjects with Acquired Brain Injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Franceschini

    Full Text Available Return to work (RTW for people with acquired brain injury (ABI represents a main objective of rehabilitation: this work presents a strong correlation between personal well-being and quality of life. The aim of this study is to investigate the prognostic factors that can predict RTW after ABI (traumatic or non- traumatic aetiology in patients without disorders of consciousness (e.g. coma, vegetative or minimally conscious state at the beginning of their admission to rehabilitation. At the end of a 6-month follow-up after discharge, data were successfully collected in 69 patients. The rehabilitation effectiveness (functional Recovery between admission and discharge was assessed by Functional Independent Measure (FIM gain, through the Montebello Rehabilitation Factor Score (MRFS, which was obtained as follows: (discharge FIM-admission FIM/(Maximum possible FIM-Admission FIM x 100. The cut-off value (criterion deriving from MRFS, which helped identify RTW patients, resulted in .659 (sn 88.9%; sp 52.4%. Considering the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE and the MRFS data, the multivariable binary logistic regression analysis presented 62.96% of correct RTW classification cases, 80.95% of non-RTW leading to an overall satisfactory predictability of 73.91%. The results of the present study suggest that occupational therapy intervention could modify cut-off in patients with an MFRS close to target at the end of an in-hospital rehabilitative program thus developing their capabilities and consequently surpassing cut-off itself.

  12. Early-Claim Modifiable Factors Associated With Return-to-Work Self-Efficacy Among Workers Injured at Work: Are There Differences Between Psychological and Musculoskeletal Injuries?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Oliver; Sim, Malcolm R; Collie, Alexander; Smith, Peter

    2017-12-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate modifiable early-injury factors which are associated with self-efficacy to return-to-work (RTW-SE) and explore whether these factors are different for people with psychological or upper-body musculoskeletal (UB-MSK) injuries. The study used a sample of workers with a UB-MSK (N = 244) or psychological (N = 113) injury who were off work. Differences between injury types were investigated across variables related to: (1) communication with RTW stakeholders; and (2) components of the job itself. A stratified and multigroup analysis was conducted using structural equation modeling (SEM). Injury-stratified models revealed no significant differences. In a combined model, higher job autonomy and low-stress contact from the RTW coordinator remained significantly associated with higher RTW-SE. Job autonomy and low-stress contact from the RTW coordinator are possible areas to target to increase self-efficacy among injured workers.

  13. Perceived impeding factors for return-to-work after long-term sickness absence due to major depressive disorder: a concept mapping approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Gabe; Hees, Hiske L; Koeter, Maarten W J; Lagerveld, Suzanne E; Schene, Aart H

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to explore various stakeholder perspectives regarding factors that impede return-to-work (RTW) after long-term sickness absence related to major depressive disorder (MDD). Concept mapping was used to explore employees', supervisors' and occupational physicians' perspectives on these impeding factors. Nine perceived themes, grouped in three meta-clusters were found that might impede RTW: Person, (personality / coping problems, symptoms of depression and comorbid (health) problems, employee feels misunderstood, and resuming work too soon), Work (troublesome work situation, too little support at work, and too little guidance at work) and Healthcare (insufficient mental healthcare and insufficient care from occupational physician). All stakeholders regarded personality/coping problems and symptoms of depression as the most important impeding theme. In addition, supervisors emphasized the importance of mental healthcare underestimating the importance of the work environment, while occupational physicians stressed the importance of the lack of safety and support in the work environment. In addition to the reduction of symptoms, more attention is needed on coping with depressive symptoms and personality problems in the work environment support in the work environment and for RTW in mental healthcare, to prevent long term sickness absence.

  14. Length of sickness absence and sustained return-to-work in mental disorders and musculoskeletal diseases: a cohort study of public sector employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kausto, Johanna; Pentti, Jaana; Oksanen, Tuula; Virta, Lauri J; Virtanen, Marianna; Kivimäki, Mika; Vahtera, Jussi

    2017-07-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the association between the length of sickness absence and sustained return to work (SRTW) and the predictors of SRTW in depression, anxiety disorders, intervertebral disc disorders, and back pain in a population-based cohort of employees in the Finnish public sector. Methods We linked data from employers' registers and four national population registers. Cox proportional hazards regression analysis with a cluster option was applied. SRTW was defined as the end of the sickness benefit period not followed by a recurrent sickness benefit period in 30 days. Results For depression, the median time to SRTW was 46 and 38 days among men and women, respectively. For anxiety disorders, the figures were 24 and 22 days, for intervertebral disc disorders, 42 and 41 days, and, for back pain, 21 and 22 days among men and women respectively. Higher age and the persistence of the health problem predicted longer time to SRTW throughout the diagnostic categories. Comorbid conditions predicted longer time to SRTW in depression and back pain among women. Conclusions This large cohort study adds scientific evidence on the length of sickness absence and SRTW in four important diagnostic categories among public sector employees in Finland. Further research taking into account, eg, features of the work environment is suggested. Recommendations on the length of sickness absence at this point should be based on expert opinion and supplemented with research findings.

  15. Return to work for patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and transformed indolent lymphoma undergoing autologous stem cell transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arboe, Bente; Olsen, Maja Halgren; Goerloev, Jette Soenderskov

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) is the standard treatment for patients with relapsed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) or transformed indolent lymphoma (TIL). The treatment is mainly considered for younger patients still available for the work market. In this study...... to work. The rate of returning to work in the first year following ASCT was decreased for patients being on sick leave at the time of relapse (hazard ratio [HR] 0.3 [0.2;0.5]) and increased for patients aged ≥55 years (HR 1.9 [1.1;3.3]). In all, 56 (27%) patients were granted disability pension. Being...... on sick leave at the time of relapse was positively associated with receiving a disability pension in the first 2 years after ASCT (HR 3.7 [1.8;7.7]). CONCLUSION: Patients on sick leave at the time of relapse have a poorer prognosis regarding RTW and have a higher rate of disability pension. Furthermore...

  16. Cost-effectiveness of a participatory return-to-work intervention for temporary agency workers and unemployed workers sick-listed due to musculoskeletal disorders: design of a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schellart Antonius JM

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Within the working population there is a vulnerable group: workers without an employment contract and workers with a flexible labour market arrangement, e.g. temporary agency workers. In most cases, when sick-listed, these workers have no workplace/employer to return to. Also, for these workers access to occupational health care is limited or even absent in many countries. For this vulnerable working population there is a need for tailor-made occupational health care, including the presence of an actual return-to-work perspective. Therefore, a participatory return-to-work program has been developed based on a successful return-to-work intervention for workers, sick-listed due to low back pain. The objective of this paper is to describe the design of a randomised controlled trial to study the (cost-effectiveness of this newly developed participatory return-to-work program adapted for temporary agency workers and unemployed workers, sick-listed due to musculoskeletal disorders, compared to usual care. Methods/Design The design of this study is a randomised controlled trial with one year of follow-up. The study population consists of temporary agency workers and unemployed workers sick-listed between 2 and 8 weeks due to musculoskeletal disorders. The new return-to-work program is a stepwise program aimed at making a consensus-based return-to-work implementation plan with the possibility of a (therapeutic workplace to return-to-work. Outcomes are measured at baseline, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months. The primary outcome measure is duration of the sickness benefit period after the first day of reporting sick. Secondary outcome measures are: time until first return-to-work, total number of days of sickness benefit during follow-up; functional status; intensity of musculoskeletal pain; pain coping; and attitude, social influence and self-efficacy determinants. Cost-benefit is evaluated from an insurer's perspective. A process evaluation is

  17. How do line managers experience and handle the return to work of employees on sick leave due to work-related stress? A one-year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladegaard, Yun; Skakon, Janne; Elrond, Andreas Friis; Netterstrøm, Bo

    2017-08-28

    To examine how line managers experience and manage the return to work process of employees on sick leave due to work-related stress and to identify supportive and inhibiting factors. Semi-structured interviews with 15 line managers who have had employees on sick leave due to work-related stress. The grounded theory approach was employed. Even though managers may accept the overall concept of work-related stress, they focus on personality and individual circumstances when an employee is sick-listed due to work-related stress. The lack of a common understanding of stress creates room for this focus. Line managers experience cross-pressure, discrepancies between strategic and human-relationship perspectives and a lack of organizational support in the return to work process. Organizations should aim to provide support for line managers. Research-based knowledge and guidelines on work-related stress and return to work process are essential, as is the involvement of coworkers. A commonly accepted definition of stress and a systematic risk assessment is also important. Cross-pressure on line managers should be minimized and room for adequate preventive actions should be provided as such an approach could support both the return to work process and the implementation of important interventions in the work environment. Implication for rehabilitation Organizations should aim to provide support for line managers handling the return to work process. Cross-pressure on line managers should be minimized and adequate preventive actions should be provided in relation to the return to work process. Research-based knowledge and guidelines on work-related stress and return to work are essential. A common and formal definition of stress should be emphasized in the workplace.

  18. Symptomatic cervical disc herniation following a motor vehicle collision: return to work comparative study of workers' compensation versus personal injury insurance status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scuderi, Gaetano J; Sherman, Andrew L; Brusovanik, Georgiy V; Pahl, Michael A; Vaccaro, Alexander R

    2005-01-01

    Patients with approved workers' compensation injuries receive guaranteed compensation for the duration of their injury, whereas patients with personal injury claims are only compensated, if at all, at the time of a successful settlement or trial verdict at a time point distant from their injury. This study compares the financial impact and loss of work patterns due to a workers' compensation (WC) claim or personal injury in patients with a symptomatic cervical disc herniation resulting from a motor vehicle collision. A prospective study of patients who were seen by a single spine specialist between 1/2/96 and 9/1/01. A consecutive evaluation of 531 patients who were treated for a cervical pain syndrome caused by a motor vehicle collision. Mechanism of injury and insurance type, ie, workers' compensation or personal injury, was recorded for each patient as well as treatment response and return to work patterns. The data were analyzed using the two-way Z test. All patients were managed in a similar manner with noninvasive treatment initially, followed by injections, and finally surgical intervention in those who failed conservative measures. Return to work rates and work disability were determined at either final follow-up or at the last doctor's visit before loss to follow-up. 270 of 531 patients were diagnosed with a symptomatic one or two level disc herniation by a cervical magnetic resonance imaging scan. Fifty-four patients were insured through the workers' compensation board, and 216 reported their crash as a personal injury claim. In the WC group the work disability at 3 months follow-up revealed a cumulative 2,262 total lost days of work (average 37.1 days per person). At the point of maximal medical improvement (MMI) or 2-year follow-up, total days lost from work were 7,107 (average 131.6 days per person.) In the personal injury non-WC group, the 3-month follow-up of lost days of work was 1,093 days (average 5.1 days per person.) At 2 years follow-up, the

  19. Promoting Early, Safe Return to Work in Injured Employees: A Randomized Trial of a Supervisor Training Intervention in a Healthcare Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spector, June T; Reul, Nicholas K

    2017-03-01

    Purpose Supervisors in the healthcare sector have the potential to contribute to disability prevention in injured employees. Published data on the evaluation of return to work (RTW) interventions aimed at direct supervisors are scarce. We sought to determine the effect of a brief audiovisual supervisor training module on supervisor RTW attitudes and knowledge. Methods A parallel-group study, using equal randomization, comparing the training module intervention to usual practice in healthcare supervisors at a quaternary care hospital was conducted. Differences between groups in changes in RTW attitude and knowledge survey question scores between baseline and 3 months were assessed using the Mann-Whitney U test. The Benjamini-Hochberg-Yekutieli procedure was used to control for false discovery rate and generate adjusted p values. Results Forty supervisors were allocated to the intervention group and 41 to the usual practice group. Attitude and knowledge scores for most questions improved between baseline and immediately after intervention administration. Comparing intervention (n = 33) and usual practice groups (n = 37), there was a trend toward greater increase between baseline and 3 months follow-up in agreement that the supervisor can manage the RTW process (U = 515, adjusted p value = 0.074) and in confidence that the supervisor can answer employees' questions (U = 514, adjusted p value = 0.074) in the intervention group, although these findings were not statistically significant. Conclusions The training intervention may have provided the initial tools for supervisors to navigate the RTW process in collaboration with others in the RTW community of practice. A larger study with longer follow-up is needed to confirm results.

  20. Cranioplasty as the return-to-work factor - 112 patients with cranial defects treated in the Department of Neurosurgery at the Medical University of Lodz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasprzak, Piotr; Ormezowska, Elżbieta; Jaskólski, Dariusz

    2017-07-14

    The number of craniectomies and the consequent reconstructive procedures has grown during the past decades. Cranial defects and methods of their repair could have some influence on work capability of the patients and their employability. The authors analyzed a group of 112 patients with cranial defects treated in the Department of Neurosurgery at the Medical University of Lodz, Poland, in the course of the katamnestic period longer than 6 months after reconstructive operation, and observed them between February 2008 and February 2015. Their work capability and employment were compared, all the patients were interviewed concerning the reasons for not working according to the Social Insurance Institution predication procedure. Before the cranioplasty, all the patients were capable of working without limitations according to biological criteria and 89 of them were employed. Twenty-three not working people consisted of 6 pupils, 7 retired and 10 not working for other reasons. During the period between the craniectomy and the cranioplasty, 88 patients were capable of working and only 2 were employed. After the reconstruction, 93 were capable of working without limitations and 16 - with limitations. Forty-seven were employed during the period of the follow-up, the rest of patients consisted of 2 pupils, 13 retired and 50 not working for various reasons. Cranioplasty is a very important factor contributing to return to work. This outcome may be seen as having a great social value and be added to the functions of cranial repair as protective, esthetic and normalizing the intracranial pressure previously described in the literature. Int J Occup Med Environ Health 2017;30(5):803-809. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  1. Cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the Danish version of the 19-item return-to-work self-efficacy (RTWSE-19) questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momsen, Anne-Mette Hedeager; Rosbjerg, Rikke; Stapelfeldt, Christina Malmose; Lund, Thomas; Jensen, Chris; Johansen, Thomas; Nielsen, Claus Vinther; Labriola, Merete

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to perform a cross-cultural adaptation of the return-to-work self-efficacy (RTWSE-19) scale into Danish and test the reliability, validity and responsiveness of the final version. The adaptation process followed standard guidelines and the pretest was performed on 40 sickness absence beneficiaries. Tests of reliability, validity and responsiveness of the final version was performed on 782 participants of whom 440 (56%) responded. For the sub- and global scales, internal consistency was evaluated by Cronbach's alpha and reproducibility using paired t-test and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), respectively Responsiveness was evaluated by paired t-test and the association between RTWSE-19 and job status at ten weeks was tested in a logistic regression model, adjusted for gender, age and baseline job status. The face validity and reliability of the Danish version of the RTWSE-19 questionnaire were satisfactory. The internal consistency (alpha) for the three subscales ranged from 0.93 to 0.97. A test-retest showed no difference as well as high ICC between scale scores at baseline and one week later. The content validity of the final version was confirmed. High baseline RTWSE-19 level was associated with being at work after ten weeks odds ratio (OR) 3.24, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.48-7.07. The RTWSE-19 cross-cultural translation to Danish was performed satisfactorily. A modified final version was produced, and the test of the instrument's reliability and validity showed that the psychometric properties of the questionnaire were partly confirmed. The instrument may be useful in rehabilitation practice to guide further assessment, goal setting and RTW decision-making.

  2. Does a preoperative cognitive-behavioral intervention affect disability, pain behavior, pain, and return to work the first year after lumbar spinal fusion surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolving, Nanna; Nielsen, Claus Vinther; Christensen, Finn Bjarke; Holm, Randi; Bünger, Cody Eric; Oestergaard, Lisa Gregersen

    2015-05-01

    A randomized clinical trial including 90 patients. To examine the effect of a preoperative cognitive-behavioral intervention (CBT) for patients undergoing lumbar spinal fusion (LSF) surgery. Few published studies have looked at the potential of rehabilitation to improve outcomes after LSF. Rehabilitation programs using CBT are recommended. Furthermore, initiating interventions preoperatively seems beneficial, but only limited data exist in the field of spine surgery. Patients with degenerative disc disease or spondylolisthesis undergoing LSF were randomized to usual care (control group) or preoperative CBT and usual care (CBT group). Primary outcome was change in Oswestry Disability Index from baseline to 1-year follow-up. Secondary outcomes were catastrophizing, fear avoidance belief, work status, and back and leg pain. At 1-year follow-up, there was no statistically significant difference between the CBT group and the control group in Oswestry Disability Index score (P = 0.082). However, the CBT group had achieved a significant reduction of -15 points (-26; -4) already at 3 months (between group difference P = 0.003), and this reduction was maintained throughout the year. There were no differences between groups at 1-year follow-up with regard to any of the secondary outcomes. Participating in a preoperative CBT intervention in addition to usual care did not produce better outcomes at 1-year follow-up for patients undergoing LSF. Although the reduction in disability was achieved much faster in the CBT group, resulting in a significant difference between groups already 3 months after surgery, it did not translate into a faster return to work. Our findings support the need for further research into the use of targeted rehabilitation interventions among patients with elevated levels of catastrophizing and fear avoidance beliefs. 2.

  3. Process Evaluation of a Participatory Supportive Return to Work Program for Workers Without a Permanent Employment Contract, Sick-Listed Due to a Common Mental Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammerts, Lieke; Schaafsma, Frederieke G; van Mechelen, Willem; Anema, Johannes R

    2017-06-01

    Purpose This study aimed to perform a process evaluation of a participatory supportive return to work program for workers without a (permanent) employment contract, sick-listed due to a common mental disorder. The program consisted of a participatory approach, integrated care and direct placement in a competitive job. Our main questions were: were these components realized in practice and in accordance with the protocol? The evaluation took place alongside a randomized controlled trial. Methods The study population consisted of workers who filed a sickness benefit claim at the Dutch Social Security Agency, professionals of this agency and of vocational rehabilitation agencies. We focused on sick-listed workers and professionals who had actually participated in the intervention. Data was collected mainly by questionnaires. Results Only 36 out of 94 intervention group participants started with the program. In half of these cases application of integrated care was reported. Most other steps in the program were completed. However, fidelity to the protocol was low to reasonable. Much delay was observed in the execution of the program and only two sick-listed workers were placed in a competitive job. Still, satisfaction with the participatory approach was good. Conclusions Despite the positive evaluation of the participatory approach, the full program was executed less successfully compared to similar programs evaluated in earlier studies. This will probably affect the outcomes of our trial. Findings from this study will help to interpret these outcomes. Nevertheless, more knowledge is needed about experiences of stakeholders who participated in the program. Trial Registration NTR3563.

  4. Is temporary employment a risk factor for work disability due to depressive disorders and delayed return to work? The Finnish Public Sector Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ervasti, Jenni; Vahtera, Jussi; Virtanen, Pekka; Pentti, Jaana; Oksanen, Tuula; Ahola, Kirsi; Kivimäki, Mika; Virtanen, Marianna

    2014-07-01

    Research on temporary employment as a risk factor for work disability due to depression is mixed, and few studies have measured work disability outcome in detail. We separately examined the associations of temporary employment with (i) the onset of work disability due to depression, (ii) the length of disability episodes, and (iii) the recurrence of work disability, taking into account the possible effect modification of sociodemographic factors. We linked the prospective cohort study data of 107 828 Finnish public sector employees to national registers on work disability (>9 days) due to depression from January 2005 to December 2011. Disability episodes were longer among temporary than permanent employees after adjustment for age, sex, level of education, chronic somatic disease, and history of mental/behavioral disorders [cumulative odds ratio (COR) 1.37, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.25-51). The association between temporary employment and the length of depression-related disability episodes was more pronounced among participants with a low educational level (COR 1.95, 95% CI 1.54-2.48) and older employees (>52 years; COR 3.67, 95% CI 2.83-4.76). The association was weaker in a subgroup of employees employed for ≥ 50% of the follow-up period (95% of the original sample). Temporary employment was not associated with the onset or recurrence of depression-related work disability. Temporary employment is associated with slower return to work, indicated by longer depression-related disability episodes, especially among older workers and those with a low level of education. Continuous employment might protect temporary employees from prolonged work disability.

  5. Blended E-health module on return to work embedded in collaborative occupational health care for common mental disorders: design of a cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volker, Daniëlle; Vlasveld, Moniek C; Anema, Johannes R; Beekman, Aartjan Tf; Roijen, Leona Hakkaart-van; Brouwers, Evelien Pm; van Lomwel, A Gijsbert C; van der Feltz-Cornelis, Christina M

    2013-01-01

    Common mental disorders (CMD) have a major impact on both society and individual workers, so return to work (RTW) is an important issue. In The Netherlands, the occupational physician plays a central role in the guidance of sick-listed workers with respect to RTW. Evidence-based guidelines are available, but seem not to be effective in improving RTW in people with CMD. An intervention supporting the occupational physician in guidance of sick-listed workers combined with specific guidance regarding RTW is needed. A blended E-health module embedded in collaborative occupational health care is now available, and comprises a decision aid supporting the occupational physician and an E-health module, Return@Work, to support sick-listed workers in the RTW process. The cost-effectiveness of this intervention will be evaluated in this study and compared with that of care as usual. This study is a two-armed cluster randomized controlled trial, with randomization done at the level of occupational physicians. Two hundred workers with CMD on sickness absence for 4-26 weeks will be included in the study. Workers whose occupational physician is allocated to the intervention group will receive the collaborative occupational health care intervention. Occupational physicians allocated to the care as usual group will give conventional sickness guidance. Follow-up assessments will be done at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months after baseline. The primary outcome is duration until RTW. The secondary outcome is severity of symptoms of CMD. An economic evaluation will be performed as part of this trial. It is hypothesized that collaborative occupational health care intervention will be more (cost)-effective than care as usual. This intervention is innovative in its combination of a decision aid by email sent to the occupational physician and an E-health module aimed at RTW for the sick-listed worker.

  6. Collaborative care for sick-listed workers with major depressive disorder: a randomised controlled trial from the Netherlands Depression Initiative aimed at return to work and depressive symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlasveld, Moniek C; van der Feltz-Cornelis, Christina M; Adèr, Herman J; Anema, Johannes R; Hoedeman, Rob; van Mechelen, Willem; Beekman, Aartjan T F

    2013-04-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is associated with absenteeism. In this study, the effectiveness of collaborative care, with a focus on return to work (RTW), was evaluated in its effect on depressive symptoms and the duration until RTW in sick-listed workers with MDD in the occupational health setting. In this randomised controlled trial, 126 sick-listed workers with MDD were randomised to usual care (N=61) or collaborative care (N=65). Collaborative care was applied by the occupational physician care manager, supported by a web-based tracking system and a consultant psychiatrist. Primary outcome measure was time to response. Secondary outcome measures were time to remission, depressive symptoms as continuous measure and the duration until full RTW. Collaborative care participants had a shorter time to response, with a difference of 2.8 months. However, no difference was found on time to remission or depressive symptoms as continuous measure. With a mean of 190 days in the collaborative care group, and 210 days in the usual care group, the groups did not differ significantly from each other in the duration until full RTW. Adherence to the collaborative care intervention was low. These results do not justify a widespread implementation of collaborative care in occupational healthcare, as it was operationalised in this study. However, since the study might have been underpowered for RTW and because treatment integrity was low, further research, with larger sample sizes, is needed to develop the best fitting (collaborative care) model for addressing RTW in depressed sick-listed workers. : ISRCTN78462860.

  7. Importance of social capital at the workplace for return to work among women with a history of long-term sick leave: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydström, Ingela; Dalheim Englund, Lotta; Dellve, Lotta; Ahlstrom, Linda

    2017-01-01

    The workplace is an essential source of social capital for many people; it provides mutual support and gives meaning to life. However, few prospective studies have thoroughly investigated the importance of aspects of social capital in the workplace. The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between aspects of social capital (social support, sense of community, and quality of leadership) at the workplace, and work ability, working degree, and vitality among women with a history of long-term sick leave from human service organizations. A longitudinal cohort study was performed among women with a history of long-term sick leave. The study started in 2005, and the women were followed up at 6 months, 1 year, and 6 years using self-reported questionnaires (baseline n  = 283). Linear mixed models were used for longitudinal analysis of the repeated measurements of prospective degree of work ability, working degree, and vitality. Analyses were performed with different models; the explanatory variables for each model were social support, sense of community, and quality of leadership and time. Social capital in terms of quality of leadership (being good at solving conflicts and giving high priority to job satisfaction), sense of community (co-operation between colleagues) and social support (help and support from immediate superiors and colleagues) increased the women's work ability score (WAS) as well as working degree over time. Additionally, social capital in terms of quality of leadership increased the women's vitality score over time. A sustainable return-to-work process among individuals with a history of long-term sick leave, going in and out of work participation, could be supported with social support, good quality of leadership, and a sense of community at the workplace. The responsibility for the rehabilitation process can not be reduced to an individual problem, but ought to include all stakeholders involved in the process, such as managers

  8. Multiple transitions in sick leave, disability benefits, and return to work. - A 4-year follow-up of patients participating in a work-related rehabilitation program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Øyeflaten Irene

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Return to work (RTW after long-term sick leave can be a long-lasting process where the individual may shift between work and receiving different social security benefits, as well as between part-time and full-time work. This is a challenge in the assessment of RTW outcomes after rehabilitation interventions. The aim of this study was to analyse the probability for RTW, and the probabilities of transitions between different benefits during a 4-year follow-up, after participating in a work-related rehabilitation program. Methods The sample consisted of 584 patients (66% females, mean age 44 years (sd = 9.3. Mean duration on various types of sick leave benefits at entry to the rehabilitation program was 9.3 months (sd = 3.4]. The patients had mental (47%, musculoskeletal (46%, or other diagnoses (7%. Official national register data over a 4-year follow-up period was analysed. Extended statistical tools for multistate models were used to calculate transition probabilities between the following eight states; working, partial sick leave, full-time sick leave, medical rehabilitation, vocational rehabilitation, and disability pension; (partial, permanent and time-limited. Results During the follow-up there was an increased probability for working, a decreased probability for being on sick leave, and an increased probability for being on disability pension. The probability of RTW was not related to the work and benefit status at departure from the rehabilitation clinic. The patients had an average of 3.7 (range 0–18 transitions between work and the different benefits. Conclusions The process of RTW or of receiving disability pension was complex, and may take several years, with multiple transitions between work and different benefits. Access to reliable register data and the use of a multistate RTW model, makes it possible to describe the developmental nature and the different levels of the recovery and disability

  9. How do occupational rehabilitation clinicians approach participants on long-term sick leave in order to facilitate return to work? A focus group study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Eftedal

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of this study was to explore occupational rehabilitation clinicians’ experiences on how to approach their participants on long-term sick leave in order to facilitate return to work (RTW. Methods An exploratory qualitative design was used. Four focus groups were conducted with 29 clinicians working on interdisciplinary inpatient and outpatient occupational rehabilitation teams in Norway. The clinicians shared narratives from clinical practice. Transcripts were analysed, and results were reported by use of systematic text condensation. Results The clinicians used several approaches to facilitate RTW among individuals on sick leave. Three themes emerged as especially important in order to succeed: 1 To get a basic understanding of the participant’s life-world through a mapping process; 2 To build a therapeutic alliance through communication characterised by sensitivity to the participants’ needs and emotional concerns; and 3 To initiate processes of change that increase the possibilities for RTW. Four main areas targetable for change were identified, three directed at the individual and one encompassing the participants’ surroundings. These approaches were: a To increase feelings of confidence and coping; b To increase the participants’ awareness of their own limits; c To challenge inefficient and negative attitudes and thoughts related to the sick-role; and d Close and immediate dialogue with key stakeholders. Conclusions To increase the possibilities for RTW among individuals on long-term sick leave, a thorough mapping process and the construction of a therapeutic alliance are seen as crucial elements in approaches by occupational rehabilitation clinicians. By gaining the participants’ trust and identifying their barriers and possibilities for work, the clinicians can target modifiable factors, especially at the individual level, and obstacles for RTW in their individual surroundings. This study

  10. Workplace Social System and Sustained Return-to-Work: A Study of Supervisor and Co-worker Supportiveness and Injury Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jetha, Arif; LaMontagne, Anthony D; Lilley, Rebbecca; Hogg-Johnson, Sheilah; Sim, Malcolm; Smith, Peter

    2017-08-31

    Objective To examine the impact of the social workplace system on sustained return-to-work (SRTW). Methods A random sample of workers' compensation claimants was recruited to complete a survey following claim acceptance (baseline), and 6 months later (time 2). SRTW, at baseline and time 2, was classified as those reporting being back at work for >28 days. Co-worker and supervisor support were assessed using five and seven items, respectively, and total scores were produced. A list of potential supervisory and co-worker reactions were presented to participants who were asked whether the reaction applied to them; response were coded as positive or non-positive. Demographic and injury characteristics, and work context factors were collected. Baseline and at time 2 multivariable models were conducted to examine the impact of supervisory and coworker support and injury reaction on SRTW. Results 551 (baseline) and 403 (time 2) participants from the overall cohort met study eligibility criteria. At baseline, 59% of all participants indicated SRTW; 70% reported SRTW at time 2. Participants reported moderate support from their supervisor (mean = 8.5 ± 3.9; median = 8.2; range = 5-15) and co-workers (mean = 10.2 ± 4.5; median = 10.3; range = 5-25). Over half reported a positive supervisor (59%) or co-worker injury reaction (71%). Multivariable models found that a positive supervisor injury reaction was significantly associated with SRTW at baseline (OR 2.3; 95% CI 1.4-3.9) and time 2 (OR 1.6; 95% CI 1.1-2.3). Conclusions Promoting supervisor positivity towards an injured worker is an important organizational work disability management strategy.

  11. A process evaluation of a return-to-work intervention to improve Cooperation between Sick-listed employees and their Supervisors (COSS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoefsmit, Nicole; Boumans, Nicolle; Houkes, Inge; Nijhuis, Frans

    2016-11-22

    This is a process evaluation of an intervention to improve Cooperation regarding return-to-work (RTW) between sick-listed employees and their supervisors (COSS, which consists of a conversation roadmap, monitoring of cooperation using questionnaires and, if necessary, extra support by an occupational physician (OP). Objectives were to study (1) the adoption of COSS by a banking organization and (2) its implementation among individual employees, supervisors and OPs. We used quantitative data (online questionnaire, project administration, conversation minutes, emails) and qualitative data (semi-structured interviews). We analyzed quantitative data descriptively (by calculating sum scores, percentages, mean scores and standard deviations). The coding system to analyze the qualitative data was data-driven. The organization's representatives reported positively (e.g. fit with existing policy) and negatively (e.g. high intensity) about COSS. At least one OP (out of five) used the monitoring information. Project administration data show a modest reach of COSS among employees and supervisors. The roadmap was used by a minority (35% of the employees and 25% of the supervisors). Relatively many (40% of the employees and 100% of the supervisors who used COSS to evaluate conversations) were satisfied with COSS as a  tool to evaluate conversations with the employee/supervisor afterwards. Interview results indicate that the roadmap was considered useful in specific situations (e.g. psychological complaints). All employees and supervisors participated in the monitoring. The majority of the responding employees and supervisors received OP support and was satisfied about this support. Despite the good adoption of COSS by the organisation, it was only partially implemented by professionals, employees and supervisors. We hypothesize that our implementation approach did not fit completely with the culture at the bank. Also, the results illustrate the need for other intervention

  12. Does the knowledge-to-action (KTA) framework facilitate physical demands analysis development for firefighter injury management and return-to-work planning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinden, Kathryn; MacDermid, Joy C

    2014-03-01

    Employers are tasked with developing injury management and return-to-work (RTW) programs in response to occupational health and safety policies. Physical demands analyses (PDAs) are the cornerstone of injury management and RTW development. Synthesizing and contextualizing policy knowledge for use in occupational program development, including PDAs, is challenging due to multiple stakeholder involvement. Few studies have used a knowledge translation theoretical framework to facilitate policy-based interventions in occupational contexts. The primary aim of this case study was to identify how constructs of the knowledge-to-action (KTA) framework were reflected in employer stakeholder-researcher collaborations during development of a firefighter PDA. Four stakeholder meetings were conducted with employee participants who had experience using PDAs in their occupational role. Directed content analysis informed analyses of meeting minutes, stakeholder views and personal reflections recorded throughout the case. Existing knowledge sources including local data, stakeholder experiences, policies and priorities were synthesized and tailored to develop a PDA in response to the barriers and facilitators identified by the firefighters. The flexibility of the KTA framework and synthesis of multiple knowledge sources were identified strengths. The KTA Action cycle was useful in directing the overall process but insufficient for directing the specific aspects of PDA development. Integration of specific PDA guidelines into the process provided explicit direction on best practices in tailoring the PDA and knowledge synthesis. Although the themes of the KTA framework were confirmed in our analysis, order modification of the KTA components was required. Despite a complex context with divergent perspectives successful implementation of a draft PDA was achieved. The KTA framework facilitated knowledge synthesis and PDA development but specific standards and modifications to the KTA

  13. Development and qualitative evaluation of an adapted return to work guideline for the sick-listed unemployed and temporary agency workers with minor psychological problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audhoe Selwin S

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Among the working population, unemployed and temporary agency workers with psychological problems are a particularly vulnerable group, at risk for sickness absence and prolonged work disability. There is a need for the development of a new protocol for this group, because the existing return to work (RTW interventions, including practice guidelines, do not address the situation when there is no workplace to return to. The purpose of this study was to (1 describe the adaptations needed in the practice guideline for employed workers to enable its use by insurance physicians (IPs for counselling of sick-listed unemployed and temporary agency workers with minor psychological problems; and (2 evaluate the experiences of IPs when using the new guidance document for minor psychological problems (MPP guidance document. Methods The MPP guidance document for unemployed and temporary agency workers was developed through discussions with nine IPs and with the help of an expert. Semi-structured interviews with five IPs were then held to evaluate the IPs’ field experience using the MPP guidance document, in terms of (a feasibility and (b perceived usefulness of the MPP guidance document. Results The main adaptation introduced in the guideline is that interaction with the workplace, which is absent in this population, needed to be established in an alternative way, i.e., through the involvement of vocational rehabilitation agencies and labour experts. Overall, the guideline required minimal changes. In total, nineteen sick-listed workers were counselled using the MPP guidance document. The overall experience of the IPs was that the MPP guidance document was feasible and useful for the IP, while they had mixed responses on its usefulness for the sick-listed worker, in part due to the follow-up period of this study. Conclusions An existing practice guideline for employed workers was adapted for use as a guidance document for unemployed and

  14. Return to Work Rates After Single-level Cervical Fusion for Degenerative Disc Disease Compared With Fusion for Radiculopathy in a Workers' Compensation Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faour, Mhamad; Anderson, Joshua T; Haas, Arnold R; Percy, Rick; Woods, Stephen T; Ahn, Uri M; Ahn, Nicholas U

    2016-07-15

    A retrospective comparative cohort study. To compare return to work (RTW) rates for patients who underwent single-level cervical fusion for radiculopathy compared with fusion for degenerative disc disease (DDD) as an indication for surgery. Studies have shown that workers' compensation subjects have less favorable surgical and functional outcomes compared with the general population. Cervical decompression and fusion have provided great results with relieving radicular symptoms. Fusion for DDD, however, remains controversial. We retrospectively collected data of 21 169 subjects with cervical comorbidities who filed their claims for work-related injuries with Ohio Bureau of Workers' Compensation (BWC) between 1993 and 2011. The primary outcome was whether subjects met RTW criteria within 3-year follow-up after fusion. The secondary outcome measures and data on presurgical characteristics and secondary outcomes of each cohort were also collected. Successful RTW status was affected by a number of presurgical risk factors: DDD as an indication for surgery, age of more than 50 years, out of work for more than 6 months, psychological evaluation, opioid use, legal litigation, and permanent disability. The DDD group had lower rate of successful RTW status (50.9%) and was less likely to have a sustained RTW status (odds ratio = 0.61, 95% confidence interval: 0.48-0.79, P = 0.0001) compared with the radiculopathy group (successful RTW rate 62.9%). RTW rate within 1 year after surgery was lower in the DDD group (39.9%) compared with the radiculopathy group (53.1%; P = 0.0001). DDD patients were absent 112 days more on average after surgery compared with radiculopathy patients (P = 0.0003). Cervical fusion for DDD is associated with lower rate of successful RTW status when compared with fusion for radiculopathy in a worker's compensation setting. The decision to include surgical intervention in the management plan of cervical DDD should be approached with

  15. Effectiveness of a blended web-based intervention on return to work for sick-listed employees with common mental disorders: results of a cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volker, Daniëlle; Zijlstra-Vlasveld, Moniek C; Anema, Johannes R; Beekman, Aartjan Tf; Brouwers, Evelien Pm; Emons, Wilco Hm; van Lomwel, A Gijsbert C; van der Feltz-Cornelis, Christina M

    2015-05-13

    Common mental disorders are strongly associated with long-term sickness absence, which has negative consequences for the individual employee's quality of life and leads to substantial costs for society. It is important to focus on return to work (RTW) during treatment of sick-listed employees with common mental disorders. Factors such as self-efficacy and the intention to resume work despite having symptoms are important in the RTW process. We developed "E-health module embedded in Collaborative Occupational health care" (ECO) as a blended Web-based intervention with 2 parts: an eHealth module (Return@Work) for the employee aimed at changing cognitions of the employee regarding RTW and a decision aid via email supporting the occupational physician with advice regarding treatment and referral options based on monitoring the employee's progress during treatment. This study evaluated the effect of a blended eHealth intervention (ECO) versus care as usual on time to RTW of sick-listed employees with common mental disorders. The study was a 2-armed cluster randomized controlled trial. Employees sick-listed between 4 and 26 weeks with common mental disorder symptoms were recruited by their occupational health service or employer. The employees were followed up to 12 months. The primary outcome measures were time to first RTW (partial or full) and time to full RTW. Secondary outcomes were response and remission of the common mental disorder symptoms (self-assessed). A total of 220 employees were included: 131 participants were randomized to the ECO intervention and 89 to care as usual (CAU). The duration until first RTW differed significantly between the groups. The median duration was 77.0 (IQR 29.0-152.3) days in the CAU group and 50.0 (IQR 20.8-99.0) days in the ECO group (hazard ratio [HR] 1.390, 95% CI 1.034-1.870, P=.03). No significant difference was found for duration until full RTW. Treatment response of common mental disorder symptoms did not differ

  16. Developing a Return to Work Intervention for Breast Cancer Survivors with the Intervention Mapping Protocol: Challenges and Opportunities of the Needs Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassier, Jean-Baptiste; Lamort-Bouché, Marion; Broc, Guillaume; Guittard, Laure; Péron, Julien; Rouat, Sabrina; Carretier, Julien; Fervers, Béatrice; Letrilliart, Laurent; Sarnin, Philippe

    2018-01-01

    Return to work (RTW) is an important step for breast cancer survivors (BCSs). However, they face many barriers that affect particularly women with low socioeconomic status (SES). Health care, workplace, and insurance actors lack knowledge and collaborate poorly. No intervention to date has proven effective to reduce social disparities in employment after breast cancer. The intervention mapping (IM) protocol is being used in France to develop, implement, and evaluate an intervention to facilitate and sustain RTW after breast cancer [ FAciliter et Soutenir le retour au TRAvail après un Cancer du Sein (FASTRACS) project]. The research question of this study was to elicit the needs for RTW after breast cancer from various stakeholders' point of view. The aim of this study was to describe the process and the preliminary results of the needs assessment of the FASTRACS project. Different methods were followed to (a) establish and work with a planning group and (b) conduct a needs assessment to create a logic model of the problem. A planning group was organized to gather the stakeholders with the research team. A review of the literature and indicators was conducted to identify the magnitude of the problem and the factors influencing RTW. A qualitative inquiry was conducted with 12 focus groups and 48 individual semi-structured interviews to explore the needs and experience of the stakeholders. The results of these tasks were the proposition of a charter of partnership to structure the participative process, a review of the scientific evidence and indicators, and the description by the stakeholders of their needs and experience. Many stakeholders disagreed with the concept of "early intervention." They advocated for a better support of BCSs during their RTW, emphasized as a process. Anticipation, intersectoral collaboration, and workplace accommodation were mentioned to fit the needs of the BCS and their environment. A logic model of the problem was elaborated from these

  17. Intervention mapping for development of a participatory return-to-work intervention for temporary agency workers and unemployed workers sick-listed due to musculoskeletal disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schellart Antonius JM

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the past decade in activities aiming at return-to-work (RTW, there has been a growing awareness to change the focus from sickness and work disability to recovery and work ability. To date, this process in occupational health care (OHC has mainly been directed towards employees. However, within the working population there are two vulnerable groups: temporary agency workers and unemployed workers, since they have no workplace/employer to return to, when sick-listed. For this group there is a need for tailored RTW strategies and interventions. Therefore, this paper aims to describe the structured and stepwise process of development, implementation and evaluation of a theory- and practise-based participatory RTW program for temporary agency workers and unemployed workers, sick-listed due to musculoskeletal disorders (MSD. This program is based on the already developed and cost-effective RTW program for employees, sick-listed due to low back pain. Methods The Intervention Mapping (IM protocol was used to develop a tailor-made RTW program for temporary agency workers and unemployed workers, sick-listed due to MSD. The Attitude-Social influence-self-Efficacy (ASE model was used as a theoretical framework for determinants of behaviour regarding RTW of the sick-listed worker and development of the intervention. To ensure participation and facilitate successful adoption and implementation, important stakeholders were involved in all steps of program development and implementation. Results of semi-structured interviews and 'fine-tuning' meetings were used to design the final participatory RTW program. Results A structured stepwise RTW program was developed, aimed at making a consensus-based RTW implementation plan. The new program starts with identifying obstacles for RTW, followed by a brainstorm session in which the sick-listed worker and the labour expert of the Social Security Agency (SSA formulate solutions/possibilities for

  18. Prognostic factors for return to work, sickness benefits, and transitions between these states: a 4-year follow-up after work-related rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyeflaten, Irene; Lie, Stein Atle; Ihlebæk, Camilla M; Eriksen, Hege R

    2014-06-01

    from sickness benefits may differ between groups. Further research is required to understand more about differences in prognosis for return to work after intensive work-related rehabilitation efforts.

  19. Return-to-work for multiple jobholders with a work-related musculoskeletal disorder: A population-based, matched cohort in British Columbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maas, Esther T; Koehoorn, Mieke; McLeod, Christopher B

    2018-01-01

    Multiple jobholders (MJHs) have a higher risk of injury compared to single jobholders (SJHs), but it is unknown if return-to-work (RTW) after a work injury is affected by multiple jobholding. This study examined the association between multiple versus single jobholding and time to RTW for workers with a work-related musculoskeletal disorder (MSD). We used administrative workers' compensation data to identify injured workers with an accepted MSD lost-time claim between 2010-2014 in British Columbia, Canada (n = 125,639 SJHs and 9,029 MJHs). The outcome was days until RTW during twelve months after the first day of time-loss. The MJH and SJH cohorts were balanced using coarsened exact matching that yielded a final matched cohort of 8,389 MJHs and 8,389 SJHs. The outcome was estimated with Cox regression, using piecewise models, and the hazard ratios were stratified by type of MSD, a serious injury indicator, gender, weekly workdays preceding MSD, and wage categories. MJHs were less likely to RTW compared to SJHs within the first six months after the first time-loss day, with greater and longer lasting effects for males, workers with a serious injury, and a higher wage. No difference between MJHs and SJHs was found for workers who had a six- or seven-day work week preceding MSD, for workers with dislocations, and for workers who were still off work after six months. Overall, MJHs with a workweek of maximum five days are disadvantaged compared to SJHs in terms of RTW following a work-related MSD within the first six months after the first time-loss day. This difference might be caused by more precarious job contracts for MJHs that challenges RTW because of lack of support for modified work, higher workload, and reduced likelihood that MJHs file a workers' compensation claim. Despite adjusting for type of MSD, severity of injury and occupation, the differences persisted for the vast majority of the study sample.

  20. 3rd place, PREMUS best paper competition: development of the return-to-work self-efficacy (RTWSE-19) questionnaire--psychometric properties and predictive validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, William S; Reme, Silje Endresen; Linton, Steven J; Huang, Yueng-Hsiang; Pransky, Glenn

    2011-03-01

    The 19-item return-to-work self-efficacy (RTWSE-19) scale is a new self-report measure intended to assess workers' beliefs of their current ability to resume normal job responsibilities following pain onset. The aim of this study was to evaluate the factor structure, internal consistency, and predictive and concurrent validity of RTWSE-19 among workers with acute low-back pain. Patients (N=399, 59% male, mean age 37 years) consulting for acute, work-related low-back pain completed an original 28-item version of the new scale along with concurrent measures of pain, functional limitation, activity avoidance, workplace physical demands, and pain catastrophizing. The assessment was repeated at visit 2, and work limitations and duration of sickness absence were assessed by questionnaire at 3-month follow-up. Exploratory factor analysis (principal component analysis with varimax rotation) was used to assess content validity of the scale, and scores were compared to concurrent pain measures and with disability outcomes at 3 months. The full response range (1-10) was utilized on all 28 items, and there were no ceiling or floor effects. Mean item scores ranged from 4.9 ("reducing physical workload") to 8.3 ("describing injury to supervisor"). The exploratory factor analysis supported three underlying factors (eigenvalue >1.0): (i) meeting job demands; (ii) modifying job tasks; and (iii) communicating needs to others. Internal consistency (alpha) for the three scales were 0.98, 0.92, and 0.81 respectively. At visit 2, self-efficacy scores improved for "meeting job demands" and "modifying job tasks", but not for "communicating needs to others". After controlling for pain and functional limitation, both sickness absence and persistent work limitations were predicted by self-efficacy assessed at visit 2 (Pefficacy assessed at visit 1 did not predict sickness absence. The RTWSE-19 is a new measure with adequate reliability and validity to measure the confidence of workers to

  1. Cognitive-behavioural therapy and return-to-work intervention for patients on sick leave due to common mental disorders: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomonsson, Sigrid; Santoft, Fredrik; Lindsäter, Elin; Ejeby, Kersti; Ljótsson, Brjánn; Öst, Lars-Göran; Ingvar, Martin; Lekander, Mats; Hedman-Lagerlöf, Erik

    2017-12-01

    Common mental disorders (CMDs) cause great individual suffering and long-term sick leave. Cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) effectively treats CMDs, but sick leave is not reduced to the same extent as psychiatric symptoms. Research results regarding return-to-work interventions (RTW-Is) and their effect on sick leave are inconclusive. The aim of this study was to evaluate CBT, a RTW-I and combined CBT and RTW-I (COMBO) for primary care patients on sick leave due to CMDs. Patients with CMDs (n=211) were randomised to CBT (n=64), RTW-I (n=67) or COMBO (n=80). Sick-leave registry data after 1 year and blinded Clinician's Severity Rating (CSR) of symptoms post-treatment and at follow-ups after 6 and 12 months were primary outcomes. There was no significant difference between treatments in days on sick leave 1 year after treatment start (mean difference in sick-leave days range=9-27). CBT led to larger reduction of symptoms post-treatment (CSR; Cohen's d=0.4 (95% CI 0.1 to 0.8)) than RTW-I, whereas COMBO did not differ from CBT or RTW-I. At follow-up, after 1 year, there was no difference between groups. All treatments were associated with large pre-treatment to post-treatment improvements, and results were maintained at 1-year follow-up. No treatment was superior to the other regarding reducing sick leave. All treatments effectively reduced symptoms, CBT in a faster pace than RTW-I, but at 1-year follow-up, all groups had similar symptom levels. Further research is needed regarding how CBT and RTW-I can be combined more efficiently to produce a larger effect on sick leave while maintaining effective symptom reduction. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  2. Developing a Return to Work Intervention for Breast Cancer Survivors with the Intervention Mapping Protocol: Challenges and Opportunities of the Needs Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Baptiste Fassier

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Return to work (RTW is an important step for breast cancer survivors (BCSs. However, they face many barriers that affect particularly women with low socioeconomic status (SES. Health care, workplace, and insurance actors lack knowledge and collaborate poorly. No intervention to date has proven effective to reduce social disparities in employment after breast cancer. The intervention mapping (IM protocol is being used in France to develop, implement, and evaluate an intervention to facilitate and sustain RTW after breast cancer [FAciliter et Soutenir le retour au TRAvail après un Cancer du Sein (FASTRACS project]. The research question of this study was to elicit the needs for RTW after breast cancer from various stakeholders’ point of view. The aim of this study was to describe the process and the preliminary results of the needs assessment of the FASTRACS project. Different methods were followed to (a establish and work with a planning group and (b conduct a needs assessment to create a logic model of the problem. A planning group was organized to gather the stakeholders with the research team. A review of the literature and indicators was conducted to identify the magnitude of the problem and the factors influencing RTW. A qualitative inquiry was conducted with 12 focus groups and 48 individual semi-structured interviews to explore the needs and experience of the stakeholders. The results of these tasks were the proposition of a charter of partnership to structure the participative process, a review of the scientific evidence and indicators, and the description by the stakeholders of their needs and experience. Many stakeholders disagreed with the concept of “early intervention.” They advocated for a better support of BCSs during their RTW, emphasized as a process. Anticipation, intersectoral collaboration, and workplace accommodation were mentioned to fit the needs of the BCS and their environment. A logic model of the problem was

  3. Development and qualitative evaluation of an adapted return to work guideline for the sick-listed unemployed and temporary agency workers with minor psychological problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audhoe, Selwin S; Hoving, Jan L; Nieuwenhuijsen, Karen; Sluiter, Judith K; Frings-Dresen, Monique H W

    2012-09-26

    Among the working population, unemployed and temporary agency workers with psychological problems are a particularly vulnerable group, at risk for sickness absence and prolonged work disability. There is a need for the development of a new protocol for this group, because the existing return to work (RTW) interventions, including practice guidelines, do not address the situation when there is no workplace to return to. The purpose of this study was to (1) describe the adaptations needed in the practice guideline for employed workers to enable its use by insurance physicians (IPs) for counselling of sick-listed unemployed and temporary agency workers with minor psychological problems; and (2) evaluate the experiences of IPs when using the new guidance document for minor psychological problems (MPP guidance document). The MPP guidance document for unemployed and temporary agency workers was developed through discussions with nine IPs and with the help of an expert. Semi-structured interviews with five IPs were then held to evaluate the IPs' field experience using the MPP guidance document, in terms of (a) feasibility and (b) perceived usefulness of the MPP guidance document. The main adaptation introduced in the guideline is that interaction with the workplace, which is absent in this population, needed to be established in an alternative way, i.e., through the involvement of vocational rehabilitation agencies and labour experts. Overall, the guideline required minimal changes. In total, nineteen sick-listed workers were counselled using the MPP guidance document. The overall experience of the IPs was that the MPP guidance document was feasible and useful for the IP, while they had mixed responses on its usefulness for the sick-listed worker, in part due to the follow-up period of this study. An existing practice guideline for employed workers was adapted for use as a guidance document for unemployed and temporary agency workers with minor psychological problems. IPs

  4. Subgroup analyses on return to work in sick-listed employees with low back pain in a randomised trial comparing brief and multidisciplinary intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petersen Karin D

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multidisciplinary intervention is recommended for rehabilitation of employees sick-listed for 4-12 weeks due to low back pain (LBP. However, comparison of a brief and a multidisciplinary intervention in a randomised comparative trial of sick-listed employees showed similar return to work (RTW rates in the two groups. The aim of the present study was to identify subgroups, primarily defined by work-related baseline factors that would benefit more from the multidisciplinary intervention than from the brief intervention. Methods A total of 351 employees sick-listed for 3-16 weeks due to LBP were recruited from their general practitioners. They received a brief or a multidisciplinary intervention. Both interventions comprised clinical examination and advice by a rehabilitation doctor and a physiotherapist. The multidisciplinary intervention also comprised assignment of a case manager, who made a rehabilitation plan in collaboration with the patient and a multidisciplinary team. Using data from a national database, we defined RTW as no sickness compensation benefit disbursement for four consecutive weeks within the first year after the intervention. At the first interview in the clinic, it was ensured that sick leave was primarily due to low back problems.Questionnaires were used to obtain data on health, disability, demographic and workplace-related factors. Cox hazard regression analyses were used with RTW as outcome measure and hazard rate ratios (HRR = HRmultidisciplinary/HRbrief were adjusted for demographic and health-related variables. An interaction term consisting of a baseline variable*intervention group was added to the multivariable regression model to analyse whether the effects of the interventions were moderated by the baseline factor. Subsequently, a new study was performed that included 120 patients who followed the same protocol. This group was analyzed in the same way to verify the findings from the original

  5. What works best for whom? An exploratory, subgroup analysis in a randomized, controlled trial on the effectiveness of a workplace intervention in low back pain patients on return to work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenstra, I.A.; Knol, D.L.; Bongers, P.M.; Anema, J.R.; Mechelen, van W.; Vet, de H.C.W.

    2009-01-01

    ). A modifying effect of gender, heavy work, and pain score and functional status on the effectiveness of this intervention was not found. CONCLUSION: The findings from these exploratory analyses should be tested in future RCTs. This workplace intervention seems very suitable for return to work of

  6. A participatory supportive return to work program for workers without an employment contract, sick-listed due to a common mental disorder: an economic evaluation alongside a randomized controlled trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammerts, L.; van Dongen, J.M.; Schaafsma, F.G.; van Mechelen, W.; Anema, J.R.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mental disorders are associated with high costs for productivity loss, sickness absence and unemployment. A participatory supportive return to work (RTW) program was developed in order to improve RTW among workers without an employment contract, sick-listed due to a common mental

  7. Improving Vocational Rehabilitation Access and Return to Work and Career Outcomes among African American Wounded Warriors, Gulf War, and Vietnam War Era Veterans with Disabilities: A White Paper Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Corey L., Ed.: Johnson, Jean E., Ed.; Washington, Andre L., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this monograph is to present documents that discuss issues related to improving access to vocational rehabilitation services and return to work rates of African American Wounded Warriors, Gulf War and Vietnam War Era veterans with disabilities. This monograph also includes a review of relevant literature on barriers to employment…

  8. programme

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aid for AIDS (AfA) is a disease management programme (DIVIPI available to beneficiaries and employees of contracted medical funds and ... the challenges alluded to in the first article, including late enrolment and the measurement of survival, especially in patients with ... I the HIV prevalence and incidence (new infections].

  9. Integrated mental health care and vocational rehabilitation to improve return to work rates for people on sick leave because of exhaustion disorder, adjustment disorder, and distress (the Danish IBBIS trial)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Rie; Fisker, Jonas; Hoff, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    for people on sick leave because of exhaustion disorder, adjustment disorder or distress in Denmark. METHOD/DESIGN: This three-armed, parallel-group, randomized superiority trial is set up to investigate the effectiveness of a stepped mental health care intervention and an integrated mental health care......-based return to work at 12 months. The secondary outcome measures are self-assessed level of depression (BDI), anxiety (BAI), distress symptoms (4DSQ), work- and social functioning (WSAS), and register-based recurrent sickness absence. DISCUSSION: This study will contribute with knowledge on the consequence...... that mental health care alone will provide sufficient support for vocational recovery for this group. Integrated vocational and health care services have shown good effects on return to work in other similar welfare contexts. The purpose of the Danish IBBIS (Integreret Behandlings- og Beskæftigelses...

  10. Estimating the net benefit of a specialized return-to-work program for workers on short-term disability related to a mental disorder: an example exploring investment in collaborative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewa, Carolyn S; Hoch, Jeffrey S

    2014-06-01

    This article estimates the net benefit for a company incorporating a collaborative care model into its return-to-work program for workers on short-term disability related to a mental disorder. Employing a simple decision model, the net benefit and uncertainty were explored. The breakeven point occurs when the average short-term disability episode is reduced by at least 7 days. In addition, 85% of the time, benefits could outweigh costs. Model results and sensitivity analyses indicate that organizational benefits can be greater than the costs of incorporating a collaborative care model into a return-to-work program for workers on short-term disability related to a mental disorder. The results also demonstrate how the probability of a program's effectiveness and the magnitude of its effectiveness are key factors that determine whether the benefits of a program outweigh its costs.

  11. Employee perception of breastfeeding-friendly support and benefits of breastfeeding as a predictor of intention to use breast-pumping breaks after returning to work among employed mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Su-Ying

    2014-01-01

    Although increasing numbers of large companies are complying with demands for a breastfeeding-friendly workplace by providing lactation rooms and breast-pumping breaks, the effectiveness for intention to use breast-pumping breaks to express breast milk among employed mothers is uncertain. To explore the impact of employees' perceived breastfeeding support from the workplace and the benefits of breastfeeding on a woman's intention to use breast-pumping breaks after returning to work, we conducted a survey at a female labor-intensive electronics manufacturer in Taiwan. A structured questionnaire survey was administered to 715 working mothers employed in an electronics manufacturing plant in Tainan Science Park in Southern Taiwan. Questionnaire content included female employee demographics, employment characteristics, and breastfeeding behavior after returning to work, as well as employees' perception of breastfeeding-friendly support and awareness of the benefits of breastfeeding when raising their most recently born child. Higher education (odds ratio [OR] 2.33), non-clean room worksite (OR 1.51), awareness of breast-pumping breaks (OR 4.70), encouragement by colleagues to use breast-pumping breaks (OR 1.76), and greater awareness of the benefits of breastfeeding (OR 1.08) were significant predictors of the use of breast-pumping breaks after returning to work, whereas the perception of inefficiency when using breast-pumping breaks reduced an employed mother's intention to use breast-pumping breaks (OR 0.55). This study finds an association between an appreciation of the benefits provided by the employer and the likelihood of increased usage of breastfeeding breaks. Workplaces and employers can help employed mothers to understand the benefits of breastfeeding, which may increase the intention of the mother to take breast-pumping breaks after returning to work.

  12. Evaluation of a randomized controlled trial on the effect on return to work with coaching combined with light therapy and pulsed electromagnetic field therapy for workers with work-related chronic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieuwenhuijsen, Karen; Schoutens, Antonius M C; Frings-Dresen, Monique H W; Sluiter, Judith K

    2017-10-02

    Chronic work-related stress is quite prevalent in the working population and is in some cases accompanied by long-term sick leave. These stress complaints highly impact employees and are costly due to lost productivity and medical expenses. A new treatment platform with light therapy plus Pulsed Electro Magnetic Fields (PEMF) in combination with coaching was used to assess whether more positive effects on return to work, stress, work-related fatigue, and quality of life could be induced compared to coaching alone. A placebo-controlled trial was executed after inclusion of 96 workers, aged 18-65 with work-related chronic stress complaints and who were on sick leave (either part-time or full-time). Participants were divided into three arms at random. Group 1 (n = 28) received the treatment and coaching (Intervention group), group 2 (n = 28) received the treatment with the device turned off and coaching (Placebo group) and group 3 (n = 28) received coaching only (Control group). The data were collected at baseline, and after 6, 12 and 24 weeks. The primary outcome was % return to work, and secondary outcomes were work-related fatigue (emotional exhaustion and need for recovery after work), stress (distress and hair cortisol), and quality of life (SF-36 dimensions: vitality, emotional role limitation, and social functioning). Eighty-four workers completed all measurements, 28 in each group. All groups improved significantly over time in the level of return to work, as well as on all secondary outcomes. No statistical differences between the three groups were found either on the primary outcome or on any of the secondary outcomes. Light therapy with Pulsed Electro Magnetic Fields PEMF therapy has no additional effect on return to work, stress, fatigue, and quality of live compared to coaching alone. NTR4794 , registration date: 18-sep-2014.

  13. Evaluation of a randomized controlled trial on the effect on return to work with coaching combined with light therapy and pulsed electromagnetic field therapy for workers with work-related chronic stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Nieuwenhuijsen

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic work-related stress is quite prevalent in the working population and is in some cases accompanied by long-term sick leave. These stress complaints highly impact employees and are costly due to lost productivity and medical expenses. A new treatment platform with light therapy plus Pulsed Electro Magnetic Fields (PEMF in combination with coaching was used to assess whether more positive effects on return to work, stress, work-related fatigue, and quality of life could be induced compared to coaching alone. Methods A placebo-controlled trial was executed after inclusion of 96 workers, aged 18–65 with work-related chronic stress complaints and who were on sick leave (either part-time or full-time. Participants were divided into three arms at random. Group 1 (n = 28 received the treatment and coaching (Intervention group, group 2 (n = 28 received the treatment with the device turned off and coaching (Placebo group and group 3 (n = 28 received coaching only (Control group. The data were collected at baseline, and after 6, 12 and 24 weeks. The primary outcome was % return to work, and secondary outcomes were work-related fatigue (emotional exhaustion and need for recovery after work, stress (distress and hair cortisol, and quality of life (SF-36 dimensions: vitality, emotional role limitation, and social functioning. Results Eighty-four workers completed all measurements, 28 in each group. All groups improved significantly over time in the level of return to work, as well as on all secondary outcomes. No statistical differences between the three groups were found either on the primary outcome or on any of the secondary outcomes. Conclusions Light therapy with Pulsed Electro Magnetic Fields PEMF therapy has no additional effect on return to work, stress, fatigue, and quality of live compared to coaching alone. Trial registration NTR4794 , registration date: 18-sep-2014

  14. Influence of quality of care and individual patient characteristics on quality of life and return to work in survivors of the acute respiratory distress syndrome: protocol for a prospective, observational, multi-centre patient cohort study (DACAPO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandstetter, Susanne; Dodoo-Schittko, Frank; Blecha, Sebastian; Sebök, Philipp; Thomann-Hackner, Kathrin; Quintel, Michael; Weber-Carstens, Steffen; Bein, Thomas; Apfelbacher, Christian

    2015-12-17

    Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and return to work are important outcomes in critical care medicine, reaching beyond mortality. Little is known on factors predictive of HRQoL and return to work in critical illness, including the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), and no evidence exists on the role of quality of care (QoC) for outcomes in survivors of ARDS. It is the aim of the DACAPO study ("Surviving ARDS: the influence of QoC and individual patient characteristics on quality of life") to investigate the role of QoC and individual patient characteristics on quality of life and return to work. A prospective, observational, multi-centre patient cohort study will be performed in Germany, using hospitals from the "ARDS Network Germany" as the main recruiting centres. It is envisaged to recruit 2400 patients into the DACAPO study and to analyse a study population of 1500 survivors. They will be followed up until 12 months after discharge from hospital. QoC will be assessed as process quality, structural quality and volume at the institutional level. The main outcomes (HRQoL and return to work) will be assessed by self-report questionnaires. Further data collection includes general medical and ARDS-related characteristics of patients as well as sociodemographic and psycho-social parameters. Multilevel hierarchical modelling will be performed to analyse the effects of QoC and individual patient characteristics on outcomes, taking the cluster structure of the data into account. By obtaining comprehensive data at patient and hospital level using a prospective multi-centre design, the DACAPO-study is the first study investigating the influence of QoC on individual outcomes of ARDS survivors.

  15. Integrated mental health care and vocational rehabilitation to improve return to work rates for people on sick leave because of exhaustion disorder, adjustment disorder, and distress (the Danish IBBIS trial): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulsen, Rie; Fisker, Jonas; Hoff, Andreas; Hjorthøj, Carsten; Eplov, Lene Falgaard

    2017-12-02

    Common mental disorders are important contributors to the global burden of disease and cause negative effects on both the individual and society. Stress-related disorders influence the individual's workability and cause early retirement pensions in Denmark. There is no clear evidence that mental health care alone will provide sufficient support for vocational recovery for this group. Integrated vocational and health care services have shown good effects on return to work in other similar welfare contexts. The purpose of the Danish IBBIS (Integreret Behandlings- og BeskæftigelsesIndsats til Sygemeldte) study is to examine the efficacy of (1) a stepped mental health care intervention with individual stress coaching and/or group-based MBSR and (2) an integrated stepped mental health care with individual stress coaching and/or group-based MBSR and vocational rehabilitation intervention for people on sick leave because of exhaustion disorder, adjustment disorder or distress in Denmark. This three-armed, parallel-group, randomized superiority trial is set up to investigate the effectiveness of a stepped mental health care intervention and an integrated mental health care and vocational rehabilitation intervention for people on sick leave because of exhaustion disorder, adjustment disorder or distress in Denmark. The trial has an investigator-initiated multicenter design. Six hundred and three patients will be recruited from Danish vocational rehabilitation centers in four municipalities and randomly assigned into three groups: (1) IBBIS mental health care integrated with IBBIS vocational rehabilitation, (2) IBBIS mental health care and standard vocational rehabilitation, and (3) standard mental health care and standard vocational rehabilitation. The primary outcome is register-based return to work at 12 months. The secondary outcome measures are self-assessed level of depression (BDI), anxiety (BAI), distress symptoms (4DSQ), work- and social functioning (WSAS), and

  16. Maternity Leave: Tips for Returning to Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... day your maternity leave ends? Don't despair. Working mothers face many challenges, but with some planning you ... there is no such thing as a perfect mother. Working outside the home doesn't make you a ...

  17. Time course of upper limb function and return-to-work post-radiotherapy in young adults with breast cancer: a pilot randomized control trial on effects of targeted exercise program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Marize; Muanza, Thierry; Smirnow, Nadia; Sateren, Warren; Fournier, Beatrice; Kavan, Petr; Palumbo, Michael; Dalfen, Richard; Dalzell, Mary-Ann

    2017-12-01

    Breast cancer (BC) diagnosis in young adults (YA) is rising, and both disease and treatments are aggressive in this population. Evidence supports the use of physical activity in reducing shoulder dysfunction, which is common among BC survivors. A pilot randomized clinical trial was performed to determine the effectiveness of a 12-week post-radiation exercise program in minimizing upper extremity dysfunction in YA with BC. Participants were randomized to either an exercise arm or a control arm receiving standard care. Data was collected over six time points using: the Disability of Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH); the Metabolic Equivalent of Task-hours per week (MET-hours/week), and a post hoc questionnaire on return to work. In total, 59 young women participated in the study (n = 29 exercise; n = 30 control). No statistically significant differences were found in overall DASH results between groups; however, those who underwent total mastectomy had residual upper limb dysfunction (p breast cancer treatment and allow young adult patients to return to work.

  18. Relationship between sickness presenteeism and awareness and presence or absence of systems for return to work among workers with mental health problems in Japan: an Internet-based cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doki, Shotaro; Sasahara, Shinichiro; Suzuki, Shun; Hirai, Yasuhito; Oi, Yuichi; Usami, Kazuya; Matsuzaki, Ichiyo

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to clarify the relationship between sickness presenteeism and the degree of awareness of company regulations regarding financial compensation for absenteeism. An Internet-based survey of 258 full-time workers who had more than 28 days of sickness absence due to mental health problems was conducted. Workers were categorized as having either low or high sickness presenteeism, and awareness and presence or absence of systems for return to work and duration of financial compensation were compared between groups. The following factors were significantly related to high sickness presenteeism based on logistic regression analyses: working for a private company (odds ratio [OR]=2.57; 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.10-5.99); recognition of a gradual resumption system (OR=3.89, 95% CI=1.02-14.81); and awareness regarding the duration of financial compensation (OR=1.04, 95% CI=1.01-1.07). No relationship was found between mental sickness presenteeism and presence or absence of systems for return to work in our multivariate analysis; however, a relationship was apparent between sickness presenteeism and characteristics of the workers' companies. These results are expected to contribute to research involving human resources and occupational health.

  19. Exploring factors relevant in the assessment of the return-to-work process of employees on long-term sickness absence due to a depressive disorder: a focus group study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muijzer Anna

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Efforts undertaken during the Return-to-Work (RTW process need to be sufficient in order to optimize the quality of the RTW process. The purpose of this study was to explore factors relevant to Return-to-Work Effort Sufficiency (RTW-ES in cases of sick-listed employees with a Depressive Disorder (DD. Method A case of a long-term sick-listed employee with a DD applying for disability benefits was used to gather arguments and grounds relevant to the assessment of RTW-ES. Two focus group meetings were held, consisting of Labor Experts working at the Dutch Social Insurance Institute. Factors were collected and categorized using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF model. Results Sixteen factors relevant to RTW-ES assessment in a case of DD were found, categorized in the ICF-model under activities (e.g. functional capacity, personal (e.g. competencies, attitude and environmental domain (e.g. employer-employee relationship, or categorized under interventions, job accommodations and measures. Conclusions This study shows that 16 factors are relevant in the assessment of RTW-ES in employees sick-listed due to DD. Further research is necessary to expand this knowledge to other health conditions, and to investigate the impact of these results on the quality of the RTW-ES assessment.

  20. Integrated mental health care and vocational rehabilitation to improve return to work rates for people on sick leave because of depression and anxiety (the Danish IBBIS trial): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulsen, Rie; Hoff, Andreas; Fisker, Jonas; Hjorthøj, Carsten; Eplov, Lene Falgaard

    2017-12-02

    Depression and anxiety are among the largest contributors to the global burden of disease and have negative effects on both the individual and society. Depression and anxiety are very likely to influence the individual's work ability, and up to 40% of the people on sick leave in Denmark have depression and/or anxiety. There is no clear evidence that treatment alone will provide sufficient support for vocational recovery in this group. Integrated vocational and health care services have shown good effects on return to work in other, similar welfare contexts. The purpose of the IBBIS (Integrated Mental Health Care and Vocational Rehabilitation to Individuals on Sick Leave Due to Anxiety and Depression) interventions is to improve and hasten the process of return to employment for people in Denmark on sick leave because of depression and anxiety. This three-arm, parallel-group, randomized superiority trial has been set up to investigate the effectiveness of the IBBIS mental health care intervention and the integrated IBBIS mental health care and IBBIS vocational rehabilitation intervention for people on sick leave because of depression and/or anxiety in Denmark. The trial has an investigator-initiated multicenter design. A total of 603 patients will be recruited from Danish job centers in 4 municipalities and randomly assigned to one of 3 groups: (1) IBBIS mental health care integrated with IBBIS vocational rehabilitation, (2) IBBIS mental health care and standard vocational rehabilitation, and (3) standard mental health care and standard vocational rehabilitation. The primary outcome is register-based return to work at 12 months. The secondary outcome measures are self-assessed level of depression (Beck Depression Inventory II), anxiety (Beck Anxiety Inventory), stress symptoms (Four-Dimensional Symptom Questionnaire), work and social functioning (Work and Social Adjustment Scale), and register-based recurrent sickness absence. This study will provide new knowledge

  1. What works best for whom? An exploratory, subgroup analysis in a randomized, controlled trial on the effectiveness of a workplace intervention in low back pain patients on return to work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenstra, Ivan A; Knol, Dirk L; Bongers, Paulien M; Anema, Johannes R; van Mechelen, Willem; de Vet, Henrica C W

    2009-05-20

    Exploratory subgroup analysis in a randomized controlled trial (RCT). To detect possible moderators in the effectiveness of a workplace intervention in a population of workers with sick leave due to sub acute nonspecific low back pain. In a recently published RCT, a workplace intervention was effective on return to work, compared to usual care. Examining the heterogeneity of effect sizes within the population in this RCT (n = 196) can lead to information on the effectiveness of the intervention in subgroups of patients. A subgroup analysis was performed by adding interaction terms to the statistical model. Before analysis the following possible moderators for treatment were identified: age, gender, pain, functional status, heavy work, and sick leave in the previous 12 months. Cox regression analyses were performed and survival curves were plotted. The interaction (P = 0.02) between age (dichotomized at the median value) and the workplace intervention indicates a modifying effect. The workplace intervention is more effective for workers > or =44 years (HR, 95% CI = 2.5, [1.6, 4.1] vs. 1.2 [0.8, 1.8] for workers workplace intervention is significant (P = 0.02). The intervention is more effective for workers with previous sick leave (HR, 95% CI = 2.8 [1.7, 4.9] vs. 1.3 [0.8, 2.0]). A modifying effect of gender, heavy work, and pain score and functional status on the effectiveness of this intervention was not found. The findings from these exploratory analyses should be tested in future RCTs. This workplace intervention seems very suitable for return to work of older workers and workers with previous sick leave. Gender, perceived heavy work, and baseline scores in pain and functional status should not be a basis for assignment to this intervention.

  2. Stability of return to work after a coordinated and tailored intervention for sickness absence compensation beneficiaries with mental health problems: results of a two-year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Marie H T; Nielsen, Maj Britt D; Pedersen, Jacob; Rugulies, Reiner

    2015-01-01

    Mental health problems (MHPs) are increasingly common as reasons for long-term sickness absence. However, the knowledge of how to promote a stable return to work (RTW) after sickness absence due to MHPs is limited. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of a multidisciplinary, coordinated and tailored RTW-intervention in terms of stability of RTW, cumulative sickness absence and labour market status after 2 years among sickness absence compensation beneficiaries with MHPs. In a quasi-randomised, controlled trial, we followed recipients of the intervention (n = 88) and of conventional case management (n = 80) for 2 years to compare their risk of recurrent sickness absence and unemployment after RTW, their cumulative sickness absence and their labour market status after 2 years. We found no statistically significant intervention effect in terms of the risk of recurrent sickness absence or unemployment. Intervention recipients had more cumulated sickness absence in year one (mean difference = 58 days; p sickness absence or improved labour market status after 2 years when compared to conventional case management. Evidence for effective return-to-work (RTW) interventions for people with mental health problems is limited, as most research to date has been done in the context of musculoskeletal disorders. A complex, multidisciplinary intervention, detached from the workplace, does not appear to improve the stability of RTW and may actually lead to more sickness absence days and less self-support when compared to conventional case management of sickness absence beneficiaries in Denmark. A stronger focus on cooperation with social insurance officers and employers may produce better results.

  3. Cost-effectiveness and cost-benefit analyses of a multidisciplinary intervention compared with a brief intervention to facilitate return to work in sick-listed patients with low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Chris; Nielsen, Claus Vinther; Jensen, Ole Kudsk; Petersen, Karin Dam

    2013-06-01

    Randomized clinical trial of 2 interventions in 351 employees sick listed due to low back pain (LBP) and a subsequent validation study (n = 120) to validate results from subgroup analyses in the original study. To compose health economic analyses (cost-effectiveness- and cost-benefit analyses) of multidisciplinary versus brief intervention by calculating health care sector costs and sick leave benefits. Both brief and multidisciplinary interventions have been reported to be superior relative to usual care when comparing intervention costs with saved costs for sick leave benefits. We reported similar return to work rates in a brief and a multidisciplinary intervention group, but different return to work rates in subgroups. The brief intervention comprised clinical examination and reassuring advice. The multidisciplinary intervention was conducted by a case manager and a team of specialists. The costs of medicine, health care services, and sick leave benefits were calculated on the basis of registers. The mean intervention cost per patient was € 1377 higher in the multidisciplinary intervention (n = 176) than in the brief intervention group (n = 175), and sick leave was not averted. However, sick leave was averted in a subgroup receiving the multidisciplinary intervention and the mean incremental intervention cost for 1 saved sick leave week in this subgroup (n = 60) of patients, who thought they were at risk of losing their job or had little influence on their work situation was € 217. The latter finding was verified in the validation study (n = 28). The brief intervention resulted in fewer sick leave weeks and was less expensive than the multidisciplinary intervention. The multidisciplinary intervention only outperformed the brief intervention in terms of costs in a subgroup of sick-listed employees who thought they were at risk of losing their job or had little influence on their work situation. 2.

  4. Association between perception of fault for the crash and function, return to work and health status 1 year after road traffic injury: a registry-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabbe, Belinda J; Simpson, Pamela M; Cameron, Peter A; Ekegren, Christina L; Edwards, Elton R; Page, Richard; Liew, Susan; Bucknill, Andrew; de Steiger, Richard

    2015-11-26

    To establish the association between the patient's perception of fault for the crash and 12-month outcomes after non-fatal road traffic injury. Two adult major trauma centres, one regional trauma centre and one metropolitan trauma centre in Victoria, Australia. 2605 adult, orthopaedic trauma patients covered by the state's no-fault third party insurer for road traffic injury, injured between September 2010 and February 2014. EQ-5D-3L, return to work and functional recovery (Glasgow Outcome Scale-Extended score of upper good recovery) at 12 months postinjury. After adjusting for key confounders, the adjusted relative risk (ARR) of a functional recovery (0.57, 95% CI 0.46 to 0.69) and return to work (0.92, 95% CI 0.86 to 0.99) were lower for the not at fault compared to the at fault group. The ARR of reporting problems on EQ-5D items was 1.20-1.35 times higher in the not at fault group. Patients who were not at fault, or denied being at fault despite a police report of fault, experienced poorer outcomes than the at fault group. Attributing fault to others was associated with poorer outcomes. Interventions to improve coping, or to resolve negative feelings from the crash, could facilitate better outcomes in the future. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  5. Uso da prótese e retorno ao trabalho em amputados por acidentes de transporte Use of prosthesis and return to work by amputees involved in traffic accidents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lílian de Fátima Dornelas

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Verificar o uso de prótese de membro inferior e o retorno ao trabalho em amputados por acidentes de transporte (AT. MÉTODO: Estudo de série de casos por meio de uma entrevista, com amputados por AT, cadastrados no período de dezembro de 2002 a dezembro de 2004, após a alta da reabilitação na AACD/MG. A amostra foi composta por 26 amputados, 22 homens e quatro mulheres, com média de idade de 37,7 anos. Quinze amputações eram transfemorais e 11 transtibiais. Dezoito (69,2% pessoas tinham grau de instrução fundamental. RESULTADOS: Todos os amputados receberam a prótese e 16 (61,5% deles, relataram utilizá-la para passeio. Todos os indivíduos permaneceram afastados do trabalho após o acidente, sendo que 16 (66,7% afastaram pelo INSS, seis (25% aposentaram por invalidez e dois (8,3% por idade. Cinco das pessoas afastadas pelo INSS retornaram ao trabalho e três aposentadas por invalidez e uma por idade, declararam que praticam atividade para suplementar à aposentadoria. CONCLUSÃO: O uso da prótese é comumente para passeio e é baixa a taxa de retorno ao trabalho após a reabilitação.. O baixo nível de instrução e qualificação podem ter sido responsáveis por estes resultados.OBJECTIVE: To detect the use of a prosthetic leg and the return to work in amputees by traffic accidents (TA. METHOD: A case series by means of an interview with AT amputees who were registered between December 2002 and December 2004, after discharge from rehabilitation at the AACD/MG. The sample consisted of 26 amputees, 22 men and four women, mean age of 37.7 years. Fifteen amputations were above the knee and 11 below the knee. Eighteen (69.2% people had completed elementary education. RESULTS: All amputees received prostheses and 16 (61.5% of them reported using it for walking. All subjects remained off work after the accident, and 16 (66.7% remained off work by utilizing the INSS, six (25% retired due to disability and two (8.3% retired

  6. Exploration of the contexts surrounding the implementation of an intervention supporting return-to-work after breast cancer in a primary care setting: starting point for an intervention development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilodeau K

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Karine Bilodeau,1,2 Dominique Tremblay,2,3 Marie-José Durand4,5 1Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Université de Sherbrooke, Longueuil, QC, Canada; 2Hôpital Charles-LeMoyne Research Center, Longueuil, QC, Canada; 3School of Nursing, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Université de Sherbrooke, Longueuil, QC, Canada; 4School of Rehabilitation, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Université de Sherbrooke, Longueuil, QC, Canada; 5Centre for Action in Work Disability Prevention and Rehabilitation, Longueuil, QC, Canada Background: Many recommendations have been made regarding survivorship care provided by teams of primary care professionals. However, the nature of that follow-up, including support for return-to-work (RTW after cancer, remains largely undefined. As implementation problems are frequently context-related, a pilot study was conducted to describe the contexts, according to Grol and Wensing, in which a new intervention is to be implemented. This pilot study is the first of three steps in intervention development planning.Method: In-depth semi-structured interviews (n=6 were carried out with stakeholders selected for their knowledgeable perspective of various settings, such as hospitals, primary care, employers, and community-based organizations. Interviews focused on participants’ perceptions of key contextual facilitators and barriers to consider for the deployment of an RTW intervention in a primary care setting. Data from interviews were transcribed and analyzed. A content analysis was performed based on an iterative process.Results: An intervention supporting the process of RTW in primary care makes sense for participants. Results suggest that important levers are present in organizational, professional, and social settings. However, many barriers, mainly related to organizational settings, have been identified, eg, distribution of tasks for survivor follow-up, continuity of information, and coordination of

  7. Design of a randomized controlled trial on the effect on return to work with coaching plus light therapy and pulsed electromagnetic field therapy for workers with work-related chronic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoutens, Antonius M C; Frings-Dresen, Monique H W; Sluiter, Judith K

    2016-07-19

    Work-related chronic stress is a common problem among workers. The core complaint is that the employee feels exhausted, which has an effect on the well-being and functioning of the employee, and an impact on the employer and society. The employee's absence is costly due to lost productivity and medical expenses. The usual form of care for work-related chronic stress is coaching, using a cognitive-behavioural approach whose primary aim is to reduce symptoms and improve functioning. Light therapy and pulsed electromagnetic field therapy are used for the treatment of several mental and physical disorders. The objective of this study is to determine whether coaching combined with light therapy plus pulsed electromagnetic field therapy is an effective treatment for reducing absenteeism, fatigue and stress, and improving quality of life compared to coaching alone. The randomized placebo-controlled trial consists of three arms. The population consists of 90 participants with work-related chronic stress complaints. The research groups are: (i) intervention group; (ii) placebo group; and (iii) control group. Participants in the intervention group will be treated with light therapy/pulsed electromagnetic field therapy for 12 weeks, twice a week for 40 min, and coaching (once a fortnight for 50 min). The placebo group receives the same treatment but with the light and pulsed electromagnetic field switched to placebo settings. The control group receives only coaching for 12 weeks, a course of six sessions, once a fortnight for 50 min. The primary outcome is the level of return to work. Secondary outcomes are fatigue, stress and quality of life. Outcomes will be measured at baseline, 6 weeks, 12 and 24 weeks after start of treatment. This study will provide information about the effectiveness of coaching and light therapy plus pulsed electromagnetic field therapy on return to work, and secondly on fatigue, stress and quality of life in people with work-related chronic

  8. Design of a randomized controlled trial on the effect on return to work with coaching plus light therapy and pulsed electromagnetic field therapy for workers with work-related chronic stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonius M. C. Schoutens

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Work-related chronic stress is a common problem among workers. The core complaint is that the employee feels exhausted, which has an effect on the well-being and functioning of the employee, and an impact on the employer and society. The employee’s absence is costly due to lost productivity and medical expenses. The usual form of care for work-related chronic stress is coaching, using a cognitive-behavioural approach whose primary aim is to reduce symptoms and improve functioning. Light therapy and pulsed electromagnetic field therapy are used for the treatment of several mental and physical disorders. The objective of this study is to determine whether coaching combined with light therapy plus pulsed electromagnetic field therapy is an effective treatment for reducing absenteeism, fatigue and stress, and improving quality of life compared to coaching alone. Methods/design The randomized placebo-controlled trial consists of three arms. The population consists of 90 participants with work-related chronic stress complaints. The research groups are: (i intervention group; (ii placebo group; and (iii control group. Participants in the intervention group will be treated with light therapy/pulsed electromagnetic field therapy for 12 weeks, twice a week for 40 min, and coaching (once a fortnight for 50 min. The placebo group receives the same treatment but with the light and pulsed electromagnetic field switched to placebo settings. The control group receives only coaching for 12 weeks, a course of six sessions, once a fortnight for 50 min. The primary outcome is the level of return to work. Secondary outcomes are fatigue, stress and quality of life. Outcomes will be measured at baseline, 6 weeks, 12 and 24 weeks after start of treatment. Discussion This study will provide information about the effectiveness of coaching and light therapy plus pulsed electromagnetic field therapy on return to work, and secondly on fatigue

  9. Identifying factors relevant in the assessment of return-to-work efforts in employees on long-term sickness absence due to chronic low back pain: a focus group study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muijzer Anna

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Efforts undertaken during the return to work (RTW process need to be sufficient to prevent unnecessary applications for disability benefits. The purpose of this study was to identify factors relevant to RTW Effort Sufficiency (RTW-ES in cases of sick-listed employees with chronic low back pain (CLBP. Methods Using focus groups consisting of Labor Experts (LE's working at the Dutch Social Insurance Institute, arguments and underlying grounds relevant to the assessment of RTW-ES were investigated. Factors were collected and categorized using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF model. Results Two focus groups yielded 19 factors, of which 12 are categorized in the ICF model under activities (e.g. functional capacity and in the personal (e.g. age, tenure and environmental domain (e.g. employer-employee relationship. The remaining 7 factors are categorized under intervention, job accommodation and measures. Conclusions This focus group study shows that 19 factors may be relevant to RTW-ES in sick-listed employees with CLBP. Providing these results to professionals assessing RTW-ES might contribute to a more transparent and systematic approach. Considering the importance of the quality of the RTW process, optimizing the RTW-ES assessment is essential.

  10. Application of the Theoretical Domains Framework and the Behaviour Change Wheel to Understand Physicians' Behaviors and Behavior Change in Using Temporary Work Modifications for Return to Work: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horppu, Ritva; Martimo, K P; MacEachen, E; Lallukka, T; Viikari-Juntura, E

    2018-03-01

    Purpose Applying the theoretical domains framework (TDF) and the Behaviour Change Wheel (BCW) to understand physicians' behaviors and behavior change in using temporary work modifications (TWMs) for return to work (RTW). Methods Interviews and focus group discussions were conducted with 15 occupational physicians (OPs). Responses were coded using the TDF and the BCW. Results Key behaviors related to applying TWMs were initiating the process with the employee, making recommendations to the workplace, and following up the process. OP behaviors were influenced by several factors related to personal capability and motivation, and opportunities provided by the physical and social environment. Capability comprised relevant knowledge and skills related to applying TWMs, remembering to initiate TWMS and monitor the process, and being accustomed to reflective practice. Opportunity comprised physical resources (e.g., time, predefined procedures, and availability of modified work at companies), and social pressure from stakeholders. Motivation comprised conceptions of a proper OP role, confidence to carry out TWMs, personal RTW-related goals, beliefs about the outcomes of one's actions, feedback received from earlier cases, and feelings related to applying TWMs. OPs' perceived means to target these identified factors were linked to the following BCW intervention functions: education, training, persuasion, environmental restructuring, and enablement. The results suggest that at least these functions should be considered when designing future interventions. Conclusions Our study illustrates how theoretical frameworks TDF and BCW can be utilized in a RTW context to understand which determinants of physicians' behavior need to be targeted, and how, to promote desired behaviors.

  11. Adjuvant occupational therapy improves long-term depression recovery and return-to-work in good health in sick-listed employees with major depression: results of a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hees, Hiske L; de Vries, Gabe; Koeter, Maarten W J; Schene, Aart H

    2013-04-01

    To evaluate whether adjuvant occupational therapy (OT) can improve the effectiveness of treatment-as-usual (TAU) in sick-listed employees with major depression. In total, 117 employees sick-listed for a median duration of 4.8 months (IQR=2.6 to 10.1 months) because of major depression were randomised to TAU (n=39) or adjuvant OT (TAU+OT; n=78). OT (18 sessions) focussed on a fast return to work (RTW) and improving work-related coping and self-efficacy. The primary outcome was work participation (hours of absenteeism+duration until partial/full RTW). Secondary outcomes were depression, at-work functioning, and health-related functioning. Intermediate outcomes were work-related, coping and self-efficacy. Blinded assessments occurred at baseline and 6, 12 and 18 months follow-up. The groups did not significantly differ in their overall work participation (adjusted group difference=-1.9, 95% CI -19.9 to +16.2). However, those in TAU+OT did show greater improvement in depression symptoms (-2.8, -5.5 to -0.2), an increased probability of long-term symptom remission (+18%, +7% to +30%), and increased probability of long-term RTW in good health (GH) (+24%, 12% to 36%). There were no significant group differences in the remaining secondary/intermediate outcomes. In a highly impaired population, we could not demonstrate significant benefit of adjuvant OT for improving overall work participation. However, adjuvant OT did increase long-term depression recovery and long-term RTW in GH (ie, full RTW while being remitted, and with better work and role functioning). TRIAL REGISTRATION DUTCH TRIAL REGISTER: NTR2057.

  12. Exploration of the contexts surrounding the implementation of an intervention supporting return-to-work after breast cancer in a primary care setting: starting point for an intervention development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilodeau, Karine; Tremblay, Dominique; Durand, Marie-José

    2018-01-01

    Many recommendations have been made regarding survivorship care provided by teams of primary care professionals. However, the nature of that follow-up, including support for return-to-work (RTW) after cancer, remains largely undefined. As implementation problems are frequently context-related, a pilot study was conducted to describe the contexts, according to Grol and Wensing, in which a new intervention is to be implemented. This pilot study is the first of three steps in intervention development planning. In-depth semi-structured interviews (n=6) were carried out with stakeholders selected for their knowledgeable perspective of various settings, such as hospitals, primary care, employers, and community-based organizations. Interviews focused on participants' perceptions of key contextual facilitators and barriers to consider for the deployment of an RTW intervention in a primary care setting. Data from interviews were transcribed and analyzed. A content analysis was performed based on an iterative process. An intervention supporting the process of RTW in primary care makes sense for participants. Results suggest that important levers are present in organizational, professional, and social settings. However, many barriers, mainly related to organizational settings, have been identified, eg, distribution of tasks for survivor follow-up, continuity of information, and coordination of care between specialized oncology care and general primary care. To develop and deploy the intervention, recommendations that emerged from this pilot study for overcoming barriers were identified, eg, training (professionals, survivors, and employers), the use of communication tools, and adopting a practice guide for survivor care. The results were also helpful in focusing on the relevance of an intervention supporting the RTW process as a component of primary care for survivors.

  13. Cost effectiveness of a multi-stage return to work program for workers on sick leave due to low back pain, design of a population based controlled trial [ISRCTN60233560

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenstra, Ivan A; Anema, Johannes R; Bongers, Paulien M; de Vet, Henrica CW; van Mechelen, Willem

    2003-01-01

    Background To describe the design of a population based randomized controlled trial (RCT), including a cost-effectiveness analysis, comparing participative ergonomics interventions between 2–8 weeks of sick leave and Graded Activity after 8 weeks of sick leave with usual care, in occupational back pain management. Methods Design An RCT and cost-effectiveness evaluation in employees sick-listed for a period of 2 to 6 weeks due to low back pain. Interventions used are 1. Communication between general practitioner and occupational physician plus Participative Ergonomics protocol performed by an ergonomist. 2. Graded Activity based on cognitive behavioural principles by a physiotherapist. 3. Usual care, provided by an occupational physician according to the Dutch guidelines for the occupational health management of workers with low back pain. The primary outcome measure is return to work. Secondary outcome measures are pain intensity, functional status and general improvement. Intermediate variables are kinesiophobia and pain coping. The cost-effectiveness analysis includes the direct and indirect costs due to low back pain. The outcome measures are assessed before randomization (after 2–6 weeks on sick leave) and 12 weeks, 26 weeks and 52 weeks after first day of sick leave. Discussion The combination of these interventions has been subject of earlier research in Canada. The results of the current RCT will: 1. crossvalidate the Canadian findings in an different sociocultural environment; 2. add to the cost-effectiveness on treatment options for workers in the sub acute phase of low back pain. Results might lead to alterations of existing (inter)national guidelines. PMID:14629775

  14. A participatory supportive return to work program for workers without an employment contract, sick-listed due to a common mental disorder: an economic evaluation alongside a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammerts, Lieke; van Dongen, Johanna M; Schaafsma, Frederieke G; van Mechelen, Willem; Anema, Johannes R

    2017-02-02

    Mental disorders are associated with high costs for productivity loss, sickness absence and unemployment. A participatory supportive return to work (RTW) program was developed in order to improve RTW among workers without an employment contract, sick-listed due to a common mental disorder. The program contained a participatory approach, integrated care and direct placement in a competitive job. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness and cost-utility of this new program, compared to usual care. In addition, its return on investment was evaluated. An economic evaluation was conducted alongside a 12-month randomized controlled trial. A total of 186 participants was randomly allocated to the new program (n = 94) or to usual care (n = 92). Effect measures were the duration until sustainable RTW in competitive employment and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) gained. Costs included intervention costs, medical costs and absenteeism costs. Registered data of the Dutch Social Security Agency were used to assess the duration until sustainable RTW, intervention costs and absenteeism costs. QALYs and medical costs were assessed using three- or six-monthly questionnaires. Missing data were imputed using multiple imputations. Cost-effectiveness analysis and cost-utility analysis were conducted from the societal perspective. A return on investment analysis was conducted from the social insurer's perspective. Various sensitivity analyses were performed to assess the robustness of the results. The new program had no significant effect on the duration until sustainable RTW and QALYs gained. Intervention costs and medical costs were significantly higher in the intervention group. From the societal perspective, the maximum probability of cost-effectiveness for duration until sustainable RTW was 0.64 at a willingness to pay of about €10 000/day, and 0.27 for QALYs gained, regardless of the willingness to pay. From the social insurer's perspective, the

  15. A participatory supportive return to work program for workers without an employment contract, sick-listed due to a common mental disorder: an economic evaluation alongside a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lieke Lammerts

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mental disorders are associated with high costs for productivity loss, sickness absence and unemployment. A participatory supportive return to work (RTW program was developed in order to improve RTW among workers without an employment contract, sick-listed due to a common mental disorder. The program contained a participatory approach, integrated care and direct placement in a competitive job. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness and cost-utility of this new program, compared to usual care. In addition, its return on investment was evaluated. Methods An economic evaluation was conducted alongside a 12-month randomized controlled trial. A total of 186 participants was randomly allocated to the new program (n = 94 or to usual care (n = 92. Effect measures were the duration until sustainable RTW in competitive employment and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs gained. Costs included intervention costs, medical costs and absenteeism costs. Registered data of the Dutch Social Security Agency were used to assess the duration until sustainable RTW, intervention costs and absenteeism costs. QALYs and medical costs were assessed using three- or six-monthly questionnaires. Missing data were imputed using multiple imputations. Cost-effectiveness analysis and cost-utility analysis were conducted from the societal perspective. A return on investment analysis was conducted from the social insurer’s perspective. Various sensitivity analyses were performed to assess the robustness of the results. Results The new program had no significant effect on the duration until sustainable RTW and QALYs gained. Intervention costs and medical costs were significantly higher in the intervention group. From the societal perspective, the maximum probability of cost-effectiveness for duration until sustainable RTW was 0.64 at a willingness to pay of about €10 000/day, and 0.27 for QALYs gained, regardless of the

  16. Sustainability of return to work in sick-listed employees with low-back pain. Two-year follow-up in a randomized clinical trial comparing multidisciplinary and brief intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jensen Chris

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sick-listed employees with low back pain had similar return to work (RTW rates at one-year follow-up in a randomized trial comparing two interventions, but the effects were modified by specific workplace related factors. The present study addressed the sustainability of the intervention effects by performing a two-year follow-up and by using different outcome measures. Methods A total of 351 employees sick-listed for 3–16 weeks due to LBP were recruited from their general practitioners and were randomly allocated to a hospital-based brief or multidisciplinary intervention. Outcome measures were based on sick leave registered in a national database of social and health-related benefits. RTW rates, RTW status, sick leave weeks and sick leave relapse were studied. Results During the two-year follow-up 80.0% and 77.3% had RTW for at least four weeks continuously, and the percentages with RTW at the 104th week were 61.1% and 58.0% in the brief and multidisciplinary intervention groups, respectively. At the 104th week 16.6% and 18.8% were on sick leave in the two groups, respectively, and about 12% were employed in modified jobs or participated in job training. The number of weeks on sick leave in the first year was significantly lower in the brief intervention group (median 14 weeks than in the multidisciplinary intervention group (median 20 weeks, but during the second year the number of weeks on sick leave were not significantly different between intervention groups. Subgroups characterised by specific work related factors modified the effect of the intervention groups on RTW rates (p = 0.017. No difference in sick leave relapse was found between the intervention groups. Conclusion The effects of the brief and multidisciplinary interventions at the two-year follow-up were in general similar to the effects at one-year follow-up. Trial Registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN18609003

  17. Life Satisfaction and Return to Work After Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Passier, Patricia E. C. A.; Visser-Meily, Johanna M. A. Anne; Rinkel, Gabriel J. E.; Lindeman, Eline; Post, Marcel W. M.

    2011-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate life satisfaction and employment status after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and to explain the associations between life satisfaction and demographic, disease-related, psychological, and personality characteristics. Subjects with SAH (n = 141)

  18. Implementation of the Danish return-to-work program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aust, Birgit; D. Nielsen, Maj Britt; Grundtvig, Gry

    2015-01-01

    , and general practitioners. Only 50% of the first consultations with the RTW coordinator were conducted in time. Among participants who were employed when their sickness absence period started, only 9% had at least one meeting with their workplace. CONCLUSION: It was feasible to implement the basic features...... management system to an acceptable degree, ie, establishment of RTW teams, participation of RTW team members in the training courses, and following the general procedures of the program. However, the level of implementation varied considerably between the municipalities, particularly with respect to fidelity...... (defined as implementation consistent with the principles of the interdisciplinary RTW process). Five municipalities had high and eight had low fidelity scores. Similar large differences were found with regard to dose-delivered, particularly in the quality of cooperation with beneficiaries, employers...

  19. Leadership Effectiveness : A Supervisor's Approach to Manage Return to Work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreuder, J. A. H.; Groothoff, J. W.; Jongsma, D.; van Zweeden, N. F.; van der Klink, J. J. L.; Roelen, C. A. M.

    Purpose To investigate adaptive leadership in relation to personnel sickness absence (SA). In situational leadership, supervisors are effective if they adapt their leadership style appropriately to a given situation. Methods A managerial reorganization in a Dutch hospital with reassignment of

  20. A multidisciplinary rehabilitation programme for patients with chronic low back pain: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luk, Keith Dip Kei; Wan, Thomas Wai Man; Wong, Yat Wa; Cheung, Kenneth Man Chee; Chan, Keith Ying Kei; Cheng, Aldous Chun Shing; Kwan, Mike Wing Wang; Law, Karlen Kar Pui; Lee, Peter Wing Ho; Cheing, Gladys Lai Ying

    2010-08-01

    To examine the effectiveness of a multidisciplinary rehabilitation programme for patients with chronic low back pain in Hong Kong, and to identify factors associated with work resumption. 57 men and 8 women aged 20 to 56 (mean, 39) years who had a more than 3-month history of low back pain and were unresponsive to more than 6 months of conventional treatment participated in a 14-week multidisciplinary rehabilitation programme involving physical conditioning, work conditioning, and work readiness. Training protocols entailed flexibility and endurance training, hydrotherapy, weight lifting, and work stimulation. Patients were assessed at baseline (week 1), week 7, week 14, and month 6 with regard to the intensity of low back pain, self-perceived disability, range of lumbar motion, isoinertial performance of the trunk muscles, and depression level. Patient demographics that influenced work resumption were identified using a prediction model. Patients who did and did not return to work were compared. Of the 54 patients who completed all follow-up assessments, 28 returned to work and 26 did not. The latter was significantly older (37 vs. 42 years, p=0.038) and absent from work longer (11 vs. 22 months, p=0.029) than the former. The rehabilitation programme helped patients regain physical function and the ability to work. Patients who returned to work showed greater improvement in self-perceived disability and physical function. This rehabilitation programme facilitated regain of physical functioning and the ability to return to work. The pre-programme employment status, duration of absence from work, and patient age were the most important predictors for work resumption.

  1. Moving from Virtual Reality Exposure-Based Therapy to Augmented Reality Exposure-Based Therapy: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Baus, Oliver; Bouchard, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the move from virtual reality exposure-based therapy to augmented reality exposure-based therapy (ARET). Unlike virtual reality (VR), which entails a complete virtual environment (VE), augmented reality (AR) limits itself to producing certain virtual elements to then merge them into the view of the physical world. Although, the general public may only have become aware of AR in the last few years, AR type applications have been around since beginning of the twentieth centur...

  2. Client perceptions of a work rehabilitation programme for women: the Redesigning Daily Occupations (ReDO) project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wästberg, Birgitta A; Erlandsson, Lena-Karin; Eklund, Mona

    2013-03-01

    The Redesigning Daily Occupations programme (ReDO) is a Swedish work rehabilitation programme for women on sick leave due to stress-related disorders. The aim of the study was to investigate the participants' perceptions of taking part in the work rehabilitation programme. Seven of the 38 women who completed ReDO were interviewed during and after the programme. The interviews were analysed by manifest and latent content analysis. The informants were satisfied with the content of the programme and the support they received in the programme and when returning to work. The women thought they had become more aware of what they did during a day and how they performed their daily activities, which helped them to change their ways of performing them. The result highlighted different parts of their rehabilitation process which constituted four sub-themes: "Perceptions of the ReDO", "The intrinsic process", "Person-related changes", and "Perceptions of returning to work", and formed the core theme "Critical parts of the rehabilitation process". The findings may not be generalized to other settings and future research should further investigate work rehabilitation for the target group.

  3. Screening-level exposure-based prioritization to identify potential POPs, vPvBs and planetary boundary threats among Arctic contaminants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efstathios Reppas-Chrysovitsinos

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A report that reviews Arctic contaminants that are not currently regulated as persistent organic pollutants (POPs under international treaties was recently published by the Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme (AMAP. We evaluated 464 individual chemicals mentioned in the AMAP report according to hazard profiles for POPs, very persistent and very bioaccumulative (vPvB chemicals, and two novel and distinct hazard profiles we derived from the planetary boundary threat framework. The two planetary boundary threat profiles assign high priority to chemicals that will be mobile and poorly reversible environmental contaminants. Utilizing persistence as a proxy for poor reversibility, we defined two exposure-based hazard profiles; airborne persistent contaminants (APCs and waterborne persistent contaminants (WPCs that are potential planetary boundary threats. We used in silico estimates of physicochemical properties and multimedia models to calculate hazard metrics for persistence, bioaccumulation and long-range transport potential, then we synthesized this information into four exposure-based hazard scores of the potential of each AMAP chemical to fit each of the POP, vPvB, APC and WPC exposure-based hazard profiles. As an alternative to adopting a “bright line” score that represented cause for concern, we scored the AMAP chemicals by benchmarking against a reference set of 148 known and relatively well-studied contaminants and expressed their exposure-based hazard scores as percentile ranks against the scores of the reference set chemicals. Our results show that scores in the four exposure-based hazard profiles provide complementary information about the potential environmental exposure-based hazards of the AMAP chemicals. Our POP, vPvB, APC and WPC exposure-based hazard scores identify high priority chemicals for further study from among the AMAP contaminants.

  4. Moving from virtual reality exposure-based therapy to augmented reality exposure-based therapy: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baus, Oliver; Bouchard, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the move from virtual reality exposure-based therapy to augmented reality exposure-based therapy (ARET). Unlike virtual reality (VR), which entails a complete virtual environment (VE), augmented reality (AR) limits itself to producing certain virtual elements to then merge them into the view of the physical world. Although, the general public may only have become aware of AR in the last few years, AR type applications have been around since beginning of the twentieth century. Since, then, technological developments have enabled an ever increasing level of seamless integration of virtual and physical elements into one view. Like VR, AR allows the exposure to stimuli which, due to various reasons, may not be suitable for real-life scenarios. As such, AR has proven itself to be a medium through which individuals suffering from specific phobia can be exposed "safely" to the object(s) of their fear, without the costs associated with programing complete VEs. Thus, ARET can offer an efficacious alternative to some less advantageous exposure-based therapies. Above and beyond presenting what has been accomplished in ARET, this paper covers some less well-known aspects of the history of AR, raises some ARET related issues, and proposes potential avenues to be followed. These include the type of measures to be used to qualify the user's experience in an augmented reality environment, the exclusion of certain AR-type functionalities from the definition of AR, as well as the potential use of ARET to treat non-small animal phobias, such as social phobia.

  5. Moving from Virtual Reality Exposure-Based Therapy to Augmented Reality Exposure-Based Therapy: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baus, Oliver; Bouchard, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the move from virtual reality exposure-based therapy to augmented reality exposure-based therapy (ARET). Unlike virtual reality (VR), which entails a complete virtual environment (VE), augmented reality (AR) limits itself to producing certain virtual elements to then merge them into the view of the physical world. Although, the general public may only have become aware of AR in the last few years, AR type applications have been around since beginning of the twentieth century. Since, then, technological developments have enabled an ever increasing level of seamless integration of virtual and physical elements into one view. Like VR, AR allows the exposure to stimuli which, due to various reasons, may not be suitable for real-life scenarios. As such, AR has proven itself to be a medium through which individuals suffering from specific phobia can be exposed “safely” to the object(s) of their fear, without the costs associated with programing complete VEs. Thus, ARET can offer an efficacious alternative to some less advantageous exposure-based therapies. Above and beyond presenting what has been accomplished in ARET, this paper covers some less well-known aspects of the history of AR, raises some ARET related issues, and proposes potential avenues to be followed. These include the type of measures to be used to qualify the user’s experience in an augmented reality environment, the exclusion of certain AR-type functionalities from the definition of AR, as well as the potential use of ARET to treat non-small animal phobias, such as social phobia. PMID:24624073

  6. Moving from Virtual Reality Exposure-Based Therapy (VRET to Augmented Reality Exposure-Based Therapy (ARET: A review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver eBaus

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the move from virtual reality exposure-based therapy (VRET to augmented reality exposure-based therapy (ARET. Unlike virtual reality (VR, which entails a complete virtual environment (VE, augmented reality (AR limits itself to producing certain virtual elements to then merge them into the view of the physical world. Although the general public may only have become aware of AR in the last few years, AR type applications have been around since beginning of the 20th century. Since, then, technological developments have enabled an ever increasing level of seamless integration of virtual and physical elements into one view. Like VR, AR allows the exposure to stimuli which, due to various reasons, may not be suitable for real-life scenarios. As such, AR has proven itself to be a medium through which individuals suffering from specific phobia can be exposed safely to the object(s of their fear, without the costs associated with programming complete virtual environments. Thus, ARET can offer an efficacious alternative to some less advantageous exposure-based therapies. Above and beyond presenting what has been accomplished in ARET, this paper also raises some ARET related issues, and proposes potential avenues to be followed. These include the definition of an AR related term, the type of measures to be used to qualify the user’s experience in an augmented reality environment (ARE, the development of alternative geospatial referencing systems, as well as the potential use of ARET to treat social phobia. Overall, it may be said that the use of ARET, although promising, is still in its infancy but that, given a continued cooperation between clinical and technical teams, ARET has the potential of going well beyond the treatment of small animal phobia.

  7. Crispv programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinkovicj, N.

    CRISPV (Criticality and Spectrum code) is a multigroup neutron spectrum code for homogeneous reactor cores and is actually a somewhat modified version of the original CRISP programme. It is a combination of DATAPREP-II and BIGG-II programmes. It is assumed that the reactor cell is a cylindrical fuel rod in the light or heavy water moderator. DATEPREP-II CODE forms the multigroup data for homogeneous reactor and prepares the input parameters for the BIGG-II code. It has its own nuclear data library on a separate tape in binary mode. BIGG-II code is a multigroup neutron spectrum and criticality code for a homogenized medium. It has as well its own separate data library. In the CRISPV programme the overlay structure enables automatic handling of data calculated in the DATAPREP-II programme and needed in the BIGG-II core. Both programmes are written in FORTRAN for CDC 3600. Using the programme is very efficient and simple

  8. Monitoring programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-06-01

    Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Pollution's 1992 report on its programme of monitoring radioactive substances is presented. Site operators' returns are verified and the report provides independent data on the environmental impact of authorized disposal of radioactive wastes. Radiation doses which may have been received by members of the public, fall well below the International Commission for Radiological Protection's (ICRP) recommended annual doses. (UK)

  9. Patient perspectives of Condition Management Programmes as a route to better health, well-being and employability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, K E; Smith, K E; Henderson, G; Greig, G; Bambra, C

    2010-02-01

    Condition Management Programmes (CMPs), delivered through primary care settings, have been identified as possible vehicles to facilitate return to work for individuals with chronic health problems. There is little research, however, which examines how such programmes are received by patients. To explore patients' experiences of CMPs in terms of health, well-being and employability. Four focus groups and nine semi-structured interviews were conducted in order to capture patients' (n = 25) perceptions and experiences regarding participation in one of five different CMPs: Cardiac Rehabilitation, Counselling, Lower Back Pain Services, Smoking Cessation and a GP Exercise Referral Programme. Experiences of the CMPs were generally positive. Respondents reported improved health behaviours (specifically better diets and increased exercise), positive psychosocial outcomes (including increased self-esteem, confidence and social support) and in some cases, return to work. However, concerns were expressed about the shortness of interventions and their accessibility. Although condition management appears to have been well received by participants, the findings also illustrate that there is no 'one size fits all' template for CMPs. Rather, interventions should be adapted to take account of the dynamics of specific conditions, the context in which the intervention is based and the characteristics of the individuals involved.

  10. Technology Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batistoni, Paola; De Marco, Francesco; Pieroni, Leonardo

    2005-01-01

    The technology activities carried out by the Euratom-ENEA Association in the framework of the European Fusion Development Agreement concern the Next Step (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor - ITER), the Long-Term Programme (breeder blanket, materials, International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility - IFMIF), Power Plant Conceptual Studies and Socio-Economic Studies. The Underlying Technology Programme was set up to complement the fusion activities as well to develop technologies with a wider range of interest. The Technology Programme mainly involves staff from the Frascati laboratories of the Fusion Technical and Scientific Unit and from the Brasimone laboratories of the Advanced Physics Technologies Unit. Other ENEA units also provide valuable contributions to the programme. ENEA is heavily engaged in component development/testing and in design and safety activities for the European Fusion Technology Programme. Although the work documented in the following covers a large range of topics that differ considerably because they concern the development of extremely complex systems, the high level of integration and coordination ensures the capability to cover the fusion system as a whole. In 2004 the most significant testing activities concerned the ITER primary beryllium-coated first wall. In the field of high-heat-flux components, an important achievement was the qualification of the process for depositing a copper liner on carbon fibre composite (CFC) hollow tiles. This new process, pre-brazed casting (PBC), allows the hot radial pressing (HRP) joining procedure to be used also for CFC-based armour monoblock divertor components. The PBC and HRP processes are candidates for the construction of the ITER divertor. In the materials field an important milestone was the commissioning of a new facility for chemical vapour infiltration/deposition, used for optimising silicon carbide composite (SiCf/SiC) components. Eight patents were deposited during 2004

  11. Technology Programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batistoni, Paola; De Marco, Francesco; Pieroni, Leonardo (ed.)

    2005-07-01

    The technology activities carried out by the Euratom-ENEA Association in the framework of the European Fusion Development Agreement concern the Next Step (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor - ITER), the Long-Term Programme (breeder blanket, materials, International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility - IFMIF), Power Plant Conceptual Studies and Socio-Economic Studies. The Underlying Technology Programme was set up to complement the fusion activities as well to develop technologies with a wider range of interest. The Technology Programme mainly involves staff from the Frascati laboratories of the Fusion Technical and Scientific Unit and from the Brasimone laboratories of the Advanced Physics Technologies Unit. Other ENEA units also provide valuable contributions to the programme. ENEA is heavily engaged in component development/testing and in design and safety activities for the European Fusion Technology Programme. Although the work documented in the following covers a large range of topics that differ considerably because they concern the development of extremely complex systems, the high level of integration and coordination ensures the capability to cover the fusion system as a whole. In 2004 the most significant testing activities concerned the ITER primary beryllium-coated first wall. In the field of high-heat-flux components, an important achievement was the qualification of the process for depositing a copper liner on carbon fibre composite (CFC) hollow tiles. This new process, pre-brazed casting (PBC), allows the hot radial pressing (HRP) joining procedure to be used also for CFC-based armour monoblock divertor components. The PBC and HRP processes are candidates for the construction of the ITER divertor. In the materials field an important milestone was the commissioning of a new facility for chemical vapour infiltration/deposition, used for optimising silicon carbide composite (SiCf/SiC) components. Eight patents were deposited during 2004

  12. Return to work among employees with long-term sickness absence in eldercare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Thomas; Andersen, Malene Friis; Christensen, Karl Bang

    2011-01-01

    estos 598 empleados durante un año a partir del inicio de su ausencia por enfermedad para investigar asociaciones entre los datos de línea de base de cuestionario sobre, por un lado, las características del trabajo psicosocial y los estados psicológicos relacionados con el trabajo, y por el otro el......: el compromiso organizativo afectivo y la experiencia de motivación en el trabajo, los resultados mostraron que los empleados ausentes por enfermedad que sentían un bajo nivel de motivación en el trabajo en la línea de base tenían un ‘riesgo’ notablemente reducido de VAT al compararse con empleados...... suivis pendant un an en après le début des congés maladie en utilisant l'analyse de régression de Cox, afin d'étudier les associations entre les données du questionnaire de base sur les caractéristiques psychosociales du travail et les états psychologiques liés au travail d'une part et les risque du RAT...

  13. Employers' Importance for the Return to Work of Sick-Listed Workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Sociologisk Institut, Københavns Universitet, Anders; V Benn, Nis; Høgelund, Jan

    Using matched survey-register panel data about 419 long-term sick-listed workers and their sick leave employer, this paper assesses how sick-listed workers react to employers’ threat of dismissal. We simultaneously estimate the duration until the sick-listed worker either separate from the pre-si...

  14. Problems faced returning to work after cancer: a focus on breast cancer and its specificities

    OpenAIRE

    Asselain, David

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Life after cancer is one of the major issues of the 2nd "Cancer Plan" in France. In this context, our study aims at analyzing professional consequences of breast cancer, which has a relatively good prognosis and is the most common cancer in the working population. Methods: Medical and professional information about 402 workers from the Paris region who had cancer in 2005/2006 was collected by occupational physicians using a self-administered questionnaire. Multifactorial analysi...

  15. The return-to-work coordinator role: qualitative insights for nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Carole; Southgate, Erica; Kable, Ashley; Rivett, Darren A; Guest, Maya; Bohatko-Naismith, Joanna

    2011-06-01

    Introduction Few studies have examined the role of RTW Coordination from the perspective of RTW Coordinator's. Furthermore there is little health specific literature on returning injured nurses to work despite the critical workforce shortages of these professionals. The study aimed to examine barriers and facilitators identified by the RTW Coordinator to returning injured nurses to work and influences on specific health sector or geographic location. The study sought to gain insights into the professional backgrounds and everyday work practices of RTW Coordinators. METHOD Five focus groups were conducted in metropolitan and rural areas of NSW, Australia. Twenty-five RTW Coordinators from 14 different organisations participated in the study. The focus groups included participants representing different health sectors (aged, disability, public and private hospital and community health). RESULTS The data analysis identified information pertaining to the qualifications and backgrounds of RTW Coordinators; the role of RTW Coordinators' within organisational structures; a range of technical knowledge and personal qualities for RTW Coordination and important elements of the case management style used to facilitate RTW. CONCLUSIONS The findings identified a wide range of professional backgrounds that RTW Coordinators bring to the role and the impact of organisational structures on the ability to effectively undertake RTW responsibilities. The study found that interpersonal skills of RTW Coordinators may be more important to facilitate RTW than a healthcare background. A collaborative case management style was also highlighted and the difficulties associated with juggling conflicts of interest, multiple organisational roles and the emotional impact of the work.

  16. Dynamic intraligamentary stabilization versus conventional ACL reconstruction: A matched study on return to work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieri, Kathrin S; Scholz, Stefan M; Kohl, Sandro; Aghayev, Emin; Staub, Lukas P

    2017-06-01

    The dynamic intraligamentary stabilization (DIS) technique is based on a different treatment approach than ACL reconstruction in that it intends to promote self-healing of the ligament. It is only recommended for acute injuries (work incapacity, revision rates, secondary arthroscopies, and treatment costs during recovery. The study was a post-hoc analysis of prospectively collected data in the Swiss National Accident Insurance Fund (SUVA) database. All registered DIS cases treated until 31 December 2012 were included in the study. ACLR cases were matched to DIS cases using a propensity score approach and analysed in a follow-up period of 2 years after injury. Paired Student's T-test and the Chi-square test were used to compare the outcome measures. All 53 DIS patients were matched to an ACLR pair. The mean time period from injury to surgery was 14days for DIS and 50days for ACLR (pwork incapacity was 13% for DIS and 17% for ACLR resulting in a difference of nearly 1 month of absence from work (p=0.03). The course of postoperative work incapacity was very similar between the groups, while the work incapacity prior to surgery lower in the DIS group. We found no difference in treatment costs, secondary arthroscopies and revision rates. DIS patients benefited from nearly one month shorter absence from work than ACLR patients. This difference is likely related to the early surgical timing that is recommended for DIS. Since no differences were found between DIS and ACLR in terms of treatment costs, secondary arthroscopies and revision rates, the study supports the choice of DIS as an additional treatment option for acute ACL injuries. Further comparative studies are proposed to improve the evidence about optimal timing and best practice in ACL treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Does Graded Return to Work Improve Disabled Workers’ Labour Market Attachment?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgelund, Jan; Holm, Anders; McIntosh, James

    for the hours off work. When the worker’s health improves, working hours are increased until the sick-listed worker is able to work regular hours. Previous studies either concern specially designed pro-grams with a limited population of disabled workers or they do not take into account the unobserved...

  18. [Occupational therapy and return to work of the people with traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franceschini, M; Felzani, G; Marini, C; Pagliacci, M C

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the employment condition of persons with TSCI 4 years after discharge from rehabilitation facilities, as well as the factors related to better outcome. In the follow-up we interviewed 403 persons. We recorded the following variables: current employment status, causes of unemployment and their correlation with demographic status, clinical status and other information. In our results 51.4% of the interviewed persons were unemployed, 34.7% had a job and 7.2% were students. Among the unemployed persons 34% had suffered an accident at work, 31% had been unable to find suitable work and 31% were retired. Employment significantly correlated with younger age, single status, being paraplegic, being autonomous in bladder/bowel management, driving a car and a better quality of life. In the multivariate analysis the factors predicting better outcome were younger age, ability to drive and a better quality of life.

  19. Participatory ergonomics as a return-to-work intervention: A future challenge?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anema, J.R.; Steenstra, I.A.; Urlings, I.J.M.; Bongers, P.M.; Vroome, E.M.M. de; Mechelen, W. van

    2003-01-01

    Background: Participatory ergonomics (PE) are often applied for prevention of low back pain (LBP). In this pilot-study, a PE-program is applied to the disability management of workers sick listed due to LBP. Methods: The process, implementation, satisfaction, and barriers for implementation

  20. The role of neuropsychological functioning in cancer survivors' return to work one year after diagnosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuijsen, Karen; de Boer, Angela; Spelten, Evelien; Sprangers, Mirjam A. G.; Verbeek, Jos H. A. M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between neuropsychological functioning and the ability to work in cancer survivors. Methods: The study involved a consecutive cohort of 45 patients who had received a primary diagnosis of cancer, were gainfully employed at

  1. The Diagnostic Apathia Scale predicts the ability to return to work following depression or anxiety

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellström, Lc; Eplov, Lf; Nordentoft, M

    2014-01-01

    , tiredness/fatigue, insomnia, and reduced ability to work and engage in personal interests. The scale was analysed for psychometric validity (scalability) and for its ability to predict RTW. Finally, the predictive validity of the Diagnostic Apathia Scale regarding RTW was compared with scales measuring...

  2. [A new community-based education approach aiming at the return to work].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieker-Agranier, Annick; Golay, Alain

    2008-04-02

    Musculoskeletal disorders are the most frequent health problem (24%) linked to work in Europe and in Switzerland. PMSE, a health prevention service dealing with health at work, has developed a new patient education approach. The objectives of this approach are to anticipate chronic disorders, prevent musculoskeletal disorders, and make workers aware of risk factors. The goals and strategies of this intervention as well as both individual and group workshops are described in this article. The results are convincing since, over a period of 3 years, a 58% decrease of absenteeism due to musculoskeletal disorders as well as a 93% reduction of disability have been observed. In conclusion, these very positive results emanate from this patient education approach, a close collaboration with employees and direction and, also, from the quality of the whole health network.

  3. Short convalescence after inguinal herniorrhaphy with standardised recommendations: duration and reasons for delayed return to work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Callesen, T; Klarskov, B; Bech, K

    1999-01-01

    the general practitioner in 12. Pain was the main cause of impairment of activities of daily living. CONCLUSION: Well-defined recommendations for convalescence may, together with improved management of postoperative pain, shorten convalescence; they are essential in the evaluation of effects of different......OBJECTIVE: To provide a detailed description of post-herniorrhaphy convalescence. DESIGN: Prospective, descriptive, consecutive questionnaire case series. SETTING: Public university hospital, Denmark. PATIENTS: 100 consecutive patients treated for inguinal hernia. INTERVENTION: Elective open...... inguinal herniorrhaphy under local anaesthesia. One day convalescence for light/moderate and three weeks for strenuous physical activity was recommended. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Duration of absence from work or main recreational activity. RESULTS: Overall median absence (including the day of operation) was 6...

  4. Musculoskeletal Pain and Return to Work : A Cognitive-Behavioral Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Marhold, Charlotta

    2002-01-01

    Musculoskeltal pain is the most common diagnosis for being on sick leave two months or longer in Sweden. The societal costs have been estimated at almost 30 billion Swedish kronor per year. Research aimed at improving occupational rehabilitation is therefore crucial. In Study I a multidisciplinary cognitive-behavioral in-patient program conducted at a rehabilitation clinic was empirically evaluated. A randomized controlled trial with 36 chronic pain patients showed a difference in favor of th...

  5. Workers' beliefs and expectations affect return to work over 12 months

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heymans, M.W.; Vet, H.C.W. de; Knol, D.L.; Bongers, P.M.; Koes, B.W.; Mechelen, W. van

    2006-01-01

    Background: Successful management of workers on sick leave due to low back pain depends on the identification by the occupational physician of modifiable prognostic factors in the early phase of sick-leave. The prognostic value of factors which influence the course of low back pain and return to

  6. Return to work and sick leave after radical prostatectomy: a prospective clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Sigrun; Steinsvik, Eivind A S; Dahl, Alv A; Loge, Jon Håvard; Cvancarova, Milada; Fosså, Sophie D

    2014-06-01

    To evaluate work status at three months after radical prostatectomy (RP) in patients with prostate cancer (PCa) in relation to socio-demographics, urinary incontinence and bother, medical complications health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and surgical methods. To identify pre-RP available factors that can predict the duration of immediate post-RP sick leave. This prospective questionnaire-based study included 264 men with PCaPatients' work status was defined as either "stable/improved" or "declined" at three months compared to work status at baseline. Duration of immediate post-RP sick leave was considered as prolonged when lasting >6 weeks. Associations were analyzed using logistic regression analyses. Almost 30% of the patients had declined work status three months after RP. Change of physical HRQOL was the only factor remaining significantly associated with declined work status in the multivariate analysis. Half of the patients had prolonged immediate sick leave. Having physically strenuous work was the strongest predictor for this outcome. Long periods of sick leave and reduced workforce participation after RP should be considered potential adverse effects of this treatment.

  7. Work-Focused Treatment of Common Mental Disorders and Return to Work: A Comparative Outcome Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lagerveld, S.E.; Blonk, R.W.B.; Brenninkmeijer, V.; Wijngaards-de Meij, L.; Schaufeli, W.B.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of two individual-level psychotherapy interventions: (a) treatment as usual consisting of cognitive– behavioral therapy (CBT) and (b) work-focused CBT (W-CBT) that integrated work aspects early into the treatment. Both interventions were carried

  8. Systematic review of return to work after mild traumatic brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cancelliere, Carol; Kristman, Vicki L; Cassidy, John David

    2014-01-01

    , and limited job independence and decision-making latitude. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings are based on preliminary evidence with varied patient characteristics and MTBI definitions, thus limiting firm conclusions. More well-designed studies are required to understand RTW and sustained employment after MTBI...

  9. Recovery to Preinterventional Functioning, Return-to-Work, and Life Satisfaction After Treatment of Unruptured Aneurysms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Backes, D.; Rinkel, G.J.; Van der Schaaf, I.C.; Bijvank, J.A.; Verweij, B.H.; Visser-Meily, J.M.A.; Post, Marcel W.M.; Algra, A.; Vergouwen, M.D.

    Background and Purpose—The eventual goal of preventive treatment of unruptured intracranial aneurysms is to increase the number of life years with high life satisfaction. Insight in the time with reduced functioning, working capacity, and life satisfaction after aneurysm treatment is pivotal to

  10. Customers' perspectives on the impact of the Pathways to Work condition management programme on their health, well-being and vocational activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secker, Jenny; Pittam, Gail; Ford, Fiona

    2012-11-01

    Pathways to Work is a UK initiative aimed at supporting customers on incapacity benefits to return to work. This qualitative study complements previous evaluations of Pathways to Work by exploring customers' perceptions of the impact of the Condition Management Programme (CMP) offered to claimants with long-term health conditions. 39 customers took part in focus groups held at the seven sites where Pathways was originally piloted. The main focus of the discussions was on perceptions of the ways in which participation had impacted on health, well-being and return to work. The discussions were audio-recorded and fully transcribed for analysis using a text analysis framework to enable the development and refinement of categories and overarching patterns in the data. Perceived impacts on health and well-being included a more positive outlook, social contact, changed perceptions of conditions and improvements in health. Some customers also reported an increase in their vocational activity and others felt ready to embark on new activities. Factors associated with positive outcomes included the extent and quality of contact with CMP staff and practical advice about condition management. Factors impeding positive employment outcomes related mainly to obstacles to returning to work. The results indicated that CMP can assist customers to learn about and manage their health conditions and increase their vocational activity, and that CMP therefore provides a promising means of enabling people with long-term health conditions to regain a fulfilling, productive life.

  11. ISOLDE PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Fedosseev, V; Herfurth, F; Scheidenberger, C; Geppert, C; Gorges, C; Ratajczyk, T; Wiederhold, J C; Vogel, S; Munch, M K; Nieminen, P; Pakarinen, J J A; Lecesne, N; Bouzomita, H; Grinyer, J; Marques moreno, F M; Parlog, M; Blank, B A; Pedroza, J; Ghetta, V; Lozeva, R; Guillemaud mueller, D S; Cottereau, E; Cheikh mhamed, M; Tusseau nenez, S; Tungate, G; Walker, P M; Smith, A G; Fitzpatrick, C; Dominik, W M; Karny, M; Ciemny, A A; Nyman, G H; Thies, R M A; Lindberg, S K G; Langouche, G F; Mayet, P; Ory, G T; Kesteloot, N J K; Papuga, J; Dehairs, M H R; Callens, M; Araujo escalona, V I; Stamati, M; Boudreau, M; Domnanich, K A; Richter, D; Lutter, R J; Javaji, A; Engel, R Y; Wiehr, S; Martinez perez, T; Nacher gonzalez, E; Jungclaus, A; Ribeiro jimenez, G; Marroquin alonso, I; Cal gonzalez, J; Paziy, V; Salsac, M; Murphy, C; Podolyak, Z F; Bajoga, A D; Butler, P; Pritchard, A; Colosimo, S J; Steer, A N; Fox, S P; Wadsworth, B A; Truesdale, V L; Al monthery, M; Bracco, A; Guttormsen, M S; Badea, M N; Calinescu, S; Ujeniuc, S; Cederkall, J A; Zemlyanoy, S; Donets, E D; Golovkov, M; Schweitzer, D K; Vranicar, A; Harrichunder, S; Ncube, M; Strisovska, J; Wolf, E; Gerten, R F; Lehnert, J; Gladnishki, K A; Rainovski, G I; Pospisil, S; Datta pramanik, U; Benzoni, G; Fedorov, D; Maier, F M; Bonanni, A; Pfeiffer, B; Griesel, T; Wehner, L W; Mikkelsen, M; Recchia, F; Lenzi, S M; Smith, J F; Kelly, C M; Acosta sanchez, L A; Chavez lomeli, E R; De melo bandeira tavares, P M; Vieira, J M; Martins da silva, M A; Lima lopes, A M; Lopes leal, T J; Mader, J; Kessler, P; Laurent, B G; Schweikhard, L C; Marx, G H; Kulczycka, E; Komorowska, M; Da silva, M F; Goncalves marques, C P; Baptista peres, M A; Welander, J E; Reiter, P; Miller, C; Martin sanchez-cano, D; Wiens, A; Blazhev, A A; Braun, N; Cappellazzo, M V; Birkenbach, B; Gerst, R; Dannhoff, M F; Sithole, M J; Bilgier, B; Nardelli, S; Araujo mendes, C M; Agramunt ros, J; Valencia marin, E; Pantea, E; Hessberger, F P; Leduc, A J; Mitsuoka, S; Carbonari, A W; Buchegger, F J; Garzon camacho, A; Dapo, H; Papka, P; Stachura, M K; Stora, T; Marsh, B A; Thiboud, J A; Heylen, H; Antalic, S; Stahl, C; Bauer, C; Thurauf, M; Maass, B; Sturm, S; Boehm, C; Wolf, N R; Ways, M; Steinsberger, T P; Riisager, K; Ruotsalainen, P A; Bastin, B; Duval, F T; Penessot, G; Flechard, X D; Desrues, P; Giovinazzo, J; Kurtukian nieto, T; Ascher, P E L; Roccia, S; Matea, I; Croizet, H A G; Bonnin, C M; Morfouace, P; Smith, A J; Guin, R; Banerjee, D; Gunnlaugsson, H P; Ohtsubo, T; Zhukov, M V; Tengborn, E A; Welker, A; Giannopoulos, E; Dessagne, P; Juscamaita vivanco, Y; De rydt, M A E; Da costa pereira, L M; Vermaelen, P; Monten, R; Wursten, E J; De coster, A; Jin, H; Hustings, J; Yu, H; Kruecken, R; Nowak, A K