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Sample records for exposure matrix approach

  1. Pesticide-Exposure Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    The "Pesticide-exposure Matrix" was developed to help epidemiologists and other researchers identify the active ingredients to which people were likely exposed when their homes and gardens were treated for pests in past years.

  2. Occupation and larynx and hypopharynx cancer: a job-exposure matrix approach in an international case-control study in France, Italy, Spain and Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrino, Franco; Richiardi, Lorenzo; Boffetta, Paolo; Estève, Jacques; Belletti, Isabella; Raymond, Luc; Troschel, Loredana; Pisani, Paola; Zubiri, Lourdes; Ascunce, Nieves; Gubéran, Etienne; Tuyns, Albert; Terracini, Benedetto; Merletti, Franco

    2003-04-01

    To investigate the effect of exposure to occupational agents on the risk of hypopharyngeal/laryngeal cancer. Case-control study conducted during 1979-1982 in six centres in South Europe. An occupational history and information on exposure to non-occupational factors were collected for 1010 male cases of hypopharyngeal/ laryngeal cancer as well as for 2176 population controls. The exposure to 10 occupational agents was assessed through a job-exposure matrix. As occupational histories had been collected since 1945 major analyses were restricted to subjects aged less than 55 years (315 cases and 819 controls). Significant elevated risks adjusted for non-occupational variables (smoking, alcohol consumption and diet) and other occupational exposures were consistently found for organic solvents (odds ratio (OR) for ever-exposure: 1.7, 95% confidence interval: 1.1-2.5) and asbestos (OR: 1.6, 1.0-2.5). A significant positive trend for both probability of exposure and duration was found for exposure to solvents. A positive association between exposure to formaldehyde and laryngeal cancer was also suggested. No association was found for exposure to arsenic and compounds, chromium and compounds, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Analyses restricted to subjects aged 55 or more did not show elevated risks, with the exception of wood dust (OR: 1.8, 1.3-2.7). In our study occupational exposure to solvents was associated with an increased risk of hypopharyngeal/laryngeal cancer. Results also provide additional evidence of an excess of risk for exposure to asbestos.

  3. Matrix approach to modelling of SAR signals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lidicky, L.; Hoogeboom, P.

    2005-01-01

    The paper presents a matrix approach to implementation of SAR signal generating and processing schemes. This approach is advantageous when matrix oriented software such as Matlab is used. Algorithms written in this type of software packages run faster compared to the same algorithms written for the

  4. Recursive Approach in Sparse Matrix LU Factorization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack Dongarra

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a recursive method for the LU factorization of sparse matrices. The recursive formulation of common linear algebra codes has been proven very successful in dense matrix computations. An extension of the recursive technique for sparse matrices is presented. Performance results given here show that the recursive approach may perform comparable to leading software packages for sparse matrix factorization in terms of execution time, memory usage, and error estimates of the solution.

  5. Betatron coupling: Merging Hamiltonian and matrix approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Calaga

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Betatron coupling is usually analyzed using either matrix formalism or Hamiltonian perturbation theory. The latter is less exact but provides a better physical insight. In this paper direct relations are derived between the two formalisms. This makes it possible to interpret the matrix approach in terms of resonances, as well as use results of both formalisms indistinctly. An approach to measure the complete coupling matrix and its determinant from turn-by-turn data is presented. Simulations using methodical accelerator design MAD-X, an accelerator design and tracking program, were performed to validate the relations and understand the scope of their application to real accelerators such as the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider.

  6. Validation of a job-exposure matrix for assessment of utility worker exposure to magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Christoffer; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole; Skotte, Jørgen; Thomsen, Birthe L; Olsen, Jørgen H

    2002-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a 50-Hz electromagnetic field job-exposure matrix used in epidemiological studies of a nationwide cohort of utility workers in Denmark. We compared a job-exposure matrix that distinguished four categories of exposure to 50-Hz time-weighted average (TWA) magnetic fields: low ( 1.0 microT) of utility company employees with 196 measurements of 8-h exposure for 129 workers in this industry. The 129 workers were selected from the following five main work environments: generation facilities, transmission lines, distribution lines, substations, and other electrically and non-electrically relates jobs. This study shows that the job-exposure matrix can be expected to introduce misclassification mainly between adjacent categories of exposure. Thus, the distribution of measurements of exposure to 50-Hz magnetic fields was similar for workers in the medium and the high exposure matrix categories. But the two extreme categories satisfactorily separate low and very highly exposed workers. The study shows that epidemiological use of this job-exposure matrix might combine the two intermediate categories of exposure. If the sample size in extreme categories provides enough power, a study in which this job-exposure matrix is used should allow detection of a true association between exposure to 50-Hz magnetic field and disease.

  7. Random matrix approach to categorical data analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Aashay; Santhanam, M. S.

    2015-09-01

    Correlation and similarity measures are widely used in all the areas of sciences and social sciences. Often the variables are not numbers but are instead qualitative descriptors called categorical data. We define and study similarity matrix, as a measure of similarity, for the case of categorical data. This is of interest due to a deluge of categorical data, such as movie ratings, top-10 rankings, and data from social media, in the public domain that require analysis. We show that the statistical properties of the spectra of similarity matrices, constructed from categorical data, follow random matrix predictions with the dominant eigenvalue being an exception. We demonstrate this approach by applying it to the data for Indian general elections and sea level pressures in the North Atlantic ocean.

  8. New pole placement algorithm - Polynomial matrix approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafai, B.; Keel, L. H.

    1990-01-01

    A simple and direct pole-placement algorithm is introduced for dynamical systems having a block companion matrix A. The algorithm utilizes well-established properties of matrix polynomials. Pole placement is achieved by appropriately assigning coefficient matrices of the corresponding matrix polynomial. This involves only matrix additions and multiplications without requiring matrix inversion. A numerical example is given for the purpose of illustration.

  9. Domestic tourism in Uruguay: a matrix approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Domínguez Pérez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper domestic tourism in Uruguay is analyzed by introducing an Origin-Destination matrix approach, and an attraction coefficient is calculated. We show that Montevideo is an attractive destination to every department except itself (even if it emits more trips than it receives, and the Southeast region is the main destination. Another important outcome is the importance of intra-regional patterns, associated to trips to bordering departments. Findings provide destination managers with practical knowledge, useful for reducing seasonality and attracting more domestic tourists throughout the year, as well as to deliver a better service offer, that attracts both usual visitors and new ones from competitive destinations.

  10. Occupational exposure to potential endocrine disruptors: further development of a job exposure matrix.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwers, M.M.; Tongeren, M. van; Hirst, A.A.; Bretveld, R.W.; Roeleveld, N.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim was to develop a new up-to-date and comprehensive job exposure matrix (JEM) for estimating exposure to potential endocrine disruptors in epidemiological research. METHODS: Chemicals with endocrine disrupting properties were identified from the literature and classified into 10

  11. A random matrix approach to language acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolaidis, A.; Kosmidis, Kosmas; Argyrakis, Panos

    2009-12-01

    Since language is tied to cognition, we expect the linguistic structures to reflect patterns that we encounter in nature and are analyzed by physics. Within this realm we investigate the process of lexicon acquisition, using analytical and tractable methods developed within physics. A lexicon is a mapping between sounds and referents of the perceived world. This mapping is represented by a matrix and the linguistic interaction among individuals is described by a random matrix model. There are two essential parameters in our approach. The strength of the linguistic interaction β, which is considered as a genetically determined ability, and the number N of sounds employed (the lexicon size). Our model of linguistic interaction is analytically studied using methods of statistical physics and simulated by Monte Carlo techniques. The analysis reveals an intricate relationship between the innate propensity for language acquisition β and the lexicon size N, N~exp(β). Thus a small increase of the genetically determined β may lead to an incredible lexical explosion. Our approximate scheme offers an explanation for the biological affinity of different species and their simultaneous linguistic disparity.

  12. Job Exposure Matrix for Electric Shock Risks with Their Uncertainties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ximena P. Vergara

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We present an update to an electric shock job exposure matrix (JEM that assigned ordinal electric shocks exposure for 501 occupational titles based on electric shocks and electrocutions from two available data sources and expert judgment. Using formal expert elicitation and starting with data on electric injury, we arrive at a consensus-based JEM. In our new JEM, we quantify exposures by adding three new dimensions: (1 the elicited median proportion; (2 the elicited 25th percentile; and (3 and the elicited 75th percentile of those experiencing occupational electric shocks in a working lifetime. We construct the relative interquartile range (rIQR based on uncertainty interval and the median. Finally, we describe overall results, highlight examples demonstrating the impact of cut point selection on exposure assignment, and evaluate potential impacts of such selection on epidemiologic studies of the electric work environment. In conclusion, novel methods allowed for consistent exposure estimates that move from qualitative to quantitative measures in this population-based JEM. Overlapping ranges of median exposure in various categories reflect our limited knowledge about this exposure.

  13. Occupational exposures and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD): comparison of a COPD-specific job exposure matrix and expert-evaluated occupational exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurth, Laura; Doney, Brent; Weinmann, Sheila

    2017-03-01

    To compare the occupational exposure levels assigned by our National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health chronic obstructive pulmonary disease-specific job exposure matrix (NIOSH COPD JEM) and by expert evaluation of detailed occupational information for various jobs held by members of an integrated health plan in the Northwest USA. We analysed data from a prior study examining COPD and occupational exposures. Jobs were assigned exposure levels using 2 methods: (1) the COPD JEM and (2) expert evaluation. Agreement (Cohen's κ coefficients), sensitivity and specificity were calculated to compare exposure levels assigned by the 2 methods for 8 exposure categories. κ indicated slight to moderate agreement (0.19-0.51) between the 2 methods and was highest for organic dust and overall exposure. Sensitivity of the matrix ranged from 33.9% to 68.5% and was highest for sensitisers, diesel exhaust and overall exposure. Specificity ranged from 74.7% to 97.1% and was highest for fumes, organic dust and mineral dust. This COPD JEM was compared with exposures assigned by experts and offers a generalisable approach to assigning occupational exposure. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  14. Studying genetic code by a matrix approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowder, Tanner; Li, Chi-Kwong

    2010-05-01

    Following Petoukhov and his collaborators, we use two length n zero-one sequences, alpha and beta, to represent a length n genetic sequence (alpha/beta) so that the columns of (alpha/beta) have the following correspondence with the nucleotides: C ~ (0/0), U ~ (1/0), G ~ (1/1), A ~ (0/1). Using the Gray code ordering to arrange alpha and beta, we build a 2(n) x 2(n) matrix C(n) including all the 4(n) length n genetic sequences. Furthermore, we use the Hamming distance of alpha and beta to construct a 2(n) x 2(n) matrix D(n). We explore structures of these matrices, refine the results in earlier papers, and propose new directions for further research.

  15. [Occupational exposure to benzene in Brazil: estimates based on an occupational exposure matrix].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrêa, Maria Juliana Moura; Santana, Vilma Sousa

    2016-12-22

    This study estimates the number of exposed workers and the prevalence of occupational benzene exposure in Brazil. Due to the lack of available local measurements for the study, data were used from an occupational exposure matrix, the Finnish National Job-Exposure Matrix (FINJEM), which covers proportions of individuals exposed to benzene, calculated as environmental measures. In Brazil, the 2010 Demographic Census identified 86,353,839 workers in the workforce and employed. Applying the FINJEM parameters, an estimated 7,376,761 (8.5%) belonged to potentially exposed occupational groups, while 770,212 were considered exposed to benzene, corresponding to an occupational group-weighted prevalence of 0.9%, higher in men (1.1%) than in women (0.6%). Exposed individuals were concentrated in the category of Machine and Motor Operators and Mechanics (62%). The number of exposed and prevalence of occupational exposure to benzene are high, even when compared to Finnish parameters, suggesting the need for monitoring and control of this carcinogen in Brazil.

  16. A Random Matrix Approach to Credit Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guhr, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    We estimate generic statistical properties of a structural credit risk model by considering an ensemble of correlation matrices. This ensemble is set up by Random Matrix Theory. We demonstrate analytically that the presence of correlations severely limits the effect of diversification in a credit portfolio if the correlations are not identically zero. The existence of correlations alters the tails of the loss distribution considerably, even if their average is zero. Under the assumption of randomly fluctuating correlations, a lower bound for the estimation of the loss distribution is provided. PMID:24853864

  17. A random matrix approach to credit risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael C Münnix

    Full Text Available We estimate generic statistical properties of a structural credit risk model by considering an ensemble of correlation matrices. This ensemble is set up by Random Matrix Theory. We demonstrate analytically that the presence of correlations severely limits the effect of diversification in a credit portfolio if the correlations are not identically zero. The existence of correlations alters the tails of the loss distribution considerably, even if their average is zero. Under the assumption of randomly fluctuating correlations, a lower bound for the estimation of the loss distribution is provided.

  18. Development and validation of a job exposure matrix for physical risk factors in low back pain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Solovieva

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The aim was to construct and validate a gender-specific job exposure matrix (JEM for physical exposures to be used in epidemiological studies of low back pain (LBP. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We utilized two large Finnish population surveys, one to construct the JEM and another to test matrix validity. The exposure axis of the matrix included exposures relevant to LBP (heavy physical work, heavy lifting, awkward trunk posture and whole body vibration and exposures that increase the biomechanical load on the low back (arm elevation or those that in combination with other known risk factors could be related to LBP (kneeling or squatting. Job titles with similar work tasks and exposures were grouped. Exposure information was based on face-to-face interviews. Validity of the matrix was explored by comparing the JEM (group-based binary measures with individual-based measures. The predictive validity of the matrix against LBP was evaluated by comparing the associations of the group-based (JEM exposures with those of individual-based exposures. RESULTS: The matrix includes 348 job titles, representing 81% of all Finnish job titles in the early 2000s. The specificity of the constructed matrix was good, especially in women. The validity measured with kappa-statistic ranged from good to poor, being fair for most exposures. In men, all group-based (JEM exposures were statistically significantly associated with one-month prevalence of LBP. In women, four out of six group-based exposures showed an association with LBP. CONCLUSIONS: The gender-specific JEM for physical exposures showed relatively high specificity without compromising sensitivity. The matrix can therefore be considered as a valid instrument for exposure assessment in large-scale epidemiological studies, when more precise but more labour-intensive methods are not feasible. Although the matrix was based on Finnish data we foresee that it could be applicable, with some modifications, in

  19. A Novel Measurement Matrix Optimization Approach for Hyperspectral Unmixing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Xu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Each pixel in the hyperspectral unmixing process is modeled as a linear combination of endmembers, which can be expressed in the form of linear combinations of a number of pure spectral signatures that are known in advance. However, the limitation of Gaussian random variables on its computational complexity or sparsity affects the efficiency and accuracy. This paper proposes a novel approach for the optimization of measurement matrix in compressive sensing (CS theory for hyperspectral unmixing. Firstly, a new Toeplitz-structured chaotic measurement matrix (TSCMM is formed by pseudo-random chaotic elements, which can be implemented by a simple hardware; secondly, rank revealing QR factorization with eigenvalue decomposition is presented to speed up the measurement time; finally, orthogonal gradient descent method for measurement matrix optimization is used to achieve optimal incoherence. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed approach can lead to better CS reconstruction performance with low extra computational cost in hyperspectral unmixing.

  20. Random Vector and Matrix Theories: A Renormalization Group Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinn-Justin, Jean

    2014-09-01

    Random matrices in the large N expansion and the so-called double scaling limit can be used as toy models for quantum gravity: 2D quantum gravity coupled to conformal matter. This has generated a tremendous expansion of random matrix theory, tackled with increasingly sophisticated mathematical methods and number of matrix models have been solved exactly. However, the somewhat paradoxical situation is that either models can be solved exactly or little can be said. Since the solved models display critical points and universal properties, it is tempting to use renormalization group ideas to determine universal properties, without solving models explicitly. Initiated by Br\\'ezin and Zinn-Justin, the approach has led to encouraging results, first for matrix integrals and then quantum mechanics with matrices, but has not yet become a universal tool as initially hoped. In particular, general quantum field theories with matrix fields require more detailed investigations. To better understand some of the encountered difficulties, we first apply analogous ideas to the simpler O(N) symmetric vector models, models that can be solved quite generally in the large N limit. Unlike other attempts, our method is a close extension of Br\\'ezin and Zinn-Justin. Discussing vector and matrix models with similar approximation scheme, we notice that in all cases (vector and matrix integrals, vector and matrix path integrals in the local approximation), at leading order, non-trivial fixed points satisfy the same universal algebraic equation, and this is the main result of this work. However, its precise meaning and role have still to be better understood.

  1. Progressive delamination in polymer matrix composite laminates: A new approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamis, C. C.; Murthy, P. L. N.; Minnetyan, L.

    1992-01-01

    A new approach independent of stress intensity factors and fracture toughness parameters has been developed and is described for the computational simulation of progressive delamination in polymer matrix composite laminates. The damage stages are quantified based on physics via composite mechanics while the degradation of the laminate behavior is quantified via the finite element method. The approach accounts for all types of composite behavior, laminate configuration, load conditions, and delamination processes starting from damage initiation, to unstable propagation, and to laminate fracture. Results of laminate fracture in composite beams, panels, plates, and shells are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness and versatility of this new approach.

  2. Maximizing exposure therapy: an inhibitory learning approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craske, Michelle G; Treanor, Michael; Conway, Christopher C; Zbozinek, Tomislav; Vervliet, Bram

    2014-07-01

    Exposure therapy is an effective approach for treating anxiety disorders, although a substantial number of individuals fail to benefit or experience a return of fear after treatment. Research suggests that anxious individuals show deficits in the mechanisms believed to underlie exposure therapy, such as inhibitory learning. Targeting these processes may help improve the efficacy of exposure-based procedures. Although evidence supports an inhibitory learning model of extinction, there has been little discussion of how to implement this model in clinical practice. The primary aim of this paper is to provide examples to clinicians for how to apply this model to optimize exposure therapy with anxious clients, in ways that distinguish it from a 'fear habituation' approach and 'belief disconfirmation' approach within standard cognitive-behavior therapy. Exposure optimization strategies include (1) expectancy violation, (2) deepened extinction, (3) occasional reinforced extinction, (4) removal of safety signals, (5) variability, (6) retrieval cues, (7) multiple contexts, and (8) affect labeling. Case studies illustrate methods of applying these techniques with a variety of anxiety disorders, including obsessive-compulsive disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder, social phobia, specific phobia, and panic disorder. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Scientific and Ethical Approaches for Observational Exposure ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Researchers conduct observational human exposure studies to understand how and the extent to which people come into contact with chemicals and environmental stressors in their everyday lives, through the air they breathe, the food and liquids they consume, and the things they touch. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) has conducted observational human exposure studies for several decades and uses the information and data from these studies to improve the Agency’s understanding of human exposures to chemicals and other stressors and ultimately to support efforts to improve public health. Because these studies involve people as research participants, they are complex and raise numerous scientific and ethical issues that have to be addressed prior to and during their design and implementation. To ensure that EPA’s research continues to be based on the most up-to-date science and the highest ethical standards, the Agency has developed this document that contains state-of-the-science approaches for conducting observational human exposure studies. This document is not meant to represent an official Agency “guidance document” but, rather, serves as a resource tool and source of information for NERL and other researchers on which to rely as they develop and conduct observational human exposure studies.

  4. DEVELOPMENT OF THE STRUCTURAL MATRIX APPROACH IN ORGANIZATIONAL DIAGNOSTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mishlanova Marina Yur'evna

    2012-07-01

    The proposed approach discloses private constituents of elements, communications, organizational layers, generalized characteristics of layers, and partial effects. This approach may be used to simulate a system of forces, items of pressure, and organizational problems. The most advanced state of stability and sustainable development is now provided with the structure within which the elements remain in certain natural interdependence (symmetry, or balance. Formation of this model is based on thorough diagnostics of an organization through the employment of the structural matrix approach and the audit of the following characteristics: labour efficiency, reliability and flexibility of communications, uniformity of distribution of communications and their coordination, connectivity of elements and layers with account for their impact, degree of freedom of elements, layers and the system as a whole, reliability, rigidity, adaptability, stability of the organizational structure.

  5. Analysis of gene set using shrinkage covariance matrix approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karjanto, Suryaefiza; Aripin, Rasimah

    2013-09-01

    Microarray methodology has been exploited for different applications such as gene discovery and disease diagnosis. This technology is also used for quantitative and highly parallel measurements of gene expression. Recently, microarrays have been one of main interests of statisticians because they provide a perfect example of the paradigms of modern statistics. In this study, the alternative approach to estimate the covariance matrix has been proposed to solve the high dimensionality problem in microarrays. The extension of traditional Hotelling's T2 statistic is constructed for determining the significant gene sets across experimental conditions using shrinkage approach. Real data sets were used as illustrations to compare the performance of the proposed methods with other methods. The results across the methods are consistent, implying that this approach provides an alternative to existing techniques.

  6. MATline: a job-exposure matrix for carcinogenic chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilardi, Luisella; Falcone, Umberto; Santoro, Silvano; Coffano, Elena

    2008-01-01

    MATline is a tool that can be used to predict which industrial processes can be expected to involve the use of a substance that is considered carcinogenic as documented in the literature. The database includes agents carrying risk phrases R45, R49 and R40 according to the method of classification adopted by the EU and/or agents in categories 1, 2A and 2B as classified by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). Each agent is associated with a list of industrial processes coded according to the tariff headings used by the National Institute of Insurance against Occupational Injuries and Diseases (Istituto Nazionale per l'Assicurazione contro gli Infortuni sul Lavoro, INAIL). The main sources of information are the IARC Monographs and databases available through the National Library of Medicine's TOXNET portal. The matrix currently includes 600 carcinogenic agents, 23 classes of agents and some 7000 links between agents and industrial processes. MATline can be viewed on the www.dors.it website.

  7. Matrix converter controlled with the direct transfer function approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodriguez, J.; Silva, E.; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2005-01-01

    Power electronics is an emerging technology. New power circuits are invented and have to be introduced into the power electronics curriculum. One of the interesting new circuits is the matrix converter (MC), and this paper analyses its working principles. A simple model is proposed to represent...... the power circuit, including the input filter. The power semiconductors are modelled as ideal bidirectional switches and the MC is controlled using a direct transfer function approach. The modulation strategy of the converter is explained in a complete and clear form. The commutation problem of two switches...

  8. Distance matrix-based approach to protein structure prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloczkowski, Andrzej; Jernigan, Robert L; Wu, Zhijun; Song, Guang; Yang, Lei; Kolinski, Andrzej; Pokarowski, Piotr

    2009-03-01

    Much structural information is encoded in the internal distances; a distance matrix-based approach can be used to predict protein structure and dynamics, and for structural refinement. Our approach is based on the square distance matrix D = [r(ij)(2)] containing all square distances between residues in proteins. This distance matrix contains more information than the contact matrix C, that has elements of either 0 or 1 depending on whether the distance r (ij) is greater or less than a cutoff value r (cutoff). We have performed spectral decomposition of the distance matrices D = sigma lambda(k)V(k)V(kT), in terms of eigenvalues lambda kappa and the corresponding eigenvectors v kappa and found that it contains at most five nonzero terms. A dominant eigenvector is proportional to r (2)--the square distance of points from the center of mass, with the next three being the principal components of the system of points. By predicting r (2) from the sequence we can approximate a distance matrix of a protein with an expected RMSD value of about 7.3 A, and by combining it with the prediction of the first principal component we can improve this approximation to 4.0 A. We can also explain the role of hydrophobic interactions for the protein structure, because r is highly correlated with the hydrophobic profile of the sequence. Moreover, r is highly correlated with several sequence profiles which are useful in protein structure prediction, such as contact number, the residue-wise contact order (RWCO) or mean square fluctuations (i.e. crystallographic temperature factors). We have also shown that the next three components are related to spatial directionality of the secondary structure elements, and they may be also predicted from the sequence, improving overall structure prediction. We have also shown that the large number of available HIV-1 protease structures provides a remarkable sampling of conformations, which can be viewed as direct structural information about the

  9. Developing a job-exposure matrix with exposure uncertainty from expert elicitation and data modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Heidi J; Vergara, Ximena P; Yost, Michael; Silva, Michael; Lombardi, David A; Kheifets, Leeka

    2017-01-01

    Job exposure matrices (JEMs) are tools used to classify exposures for job titles based on general job tasks in the absence of individual level data. However, exposure uncertainty due to variations in worker practices, job conditions, and the quality of data has never been quantified systematically in a JEM. We describe a methodology for creating a JEM which defines occupational exposures on a continuous scale and utilizes elicitation methods to quantify exposure uncertainty by assigning exposures probability distributions with parameters determined through expert involvement. Experts use their knowledge to develop mathematical models using related exposure surrogate data in the absence of available occupational level data and to adjust model output against other similar occupations. Formal expert elicitation methods provided a consistent, efficient process to incorporate expert judgment into a large, consensus-based JEM. A population-based electric shock JEM was created using these methods, allowing for transparent estimates of exposure.

  10. Scattering matrix approach to non-stationary quantum transport

    CERN Document Server

    Moskalets, Michael V

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this book is to introduce the basic elements of the scattering matrix approach to transport phenomena in dynamical quantum systems of non-interacting electrons. This approach admits a physically clear and transparent description of transport processes in dynamical mesoscopic systems promising basic elements of solid-state devices for quantum information processing. One of the key effects, the quantum pump effect, is considered in detail. In addition, the theory for a recently implemented new dynamical source - injecting electrons with time delay much larger than the electron coherence time - is offered. This theory provides a simple description of quantum circuits with such a single-particle source and shows in an unambiguous way that the tunability inherent to the dynamical systems leads to a number of unexpected but fundamental effects.

  11. A flexible matrix-based human exposure assessment framework suitable for LCA and CAA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jolliet, Olivier; Ernstoff, Alexi; Huang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    this matrix yields cumulative multimedia transfer fractions and exposure pathway-specific Product Intake Fractions defined as chemical mass taken in by humans per unit mass of chemical in a product. When the chemical mass in products is unavailable from individual studies and databases, it can be estimated...

  12. Reduced density matrix hybrid approach: Application to electronic energy transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berkelbach, Timothy C.; Reichman, David R. [Department of Chemistry, Columbia University, 3000 Broadway, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Markland, Thomas E. [Department of Chemistry, Stanford University, 333 Campus Drive, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2012-02-28

    Electronic energy transfer in the condensed phase, such as that occurring in photosynthetic complexes, frequently occurs in regimes where the energy scales of the system and environment are similar. This situation provides a challenge to theoretical investigation since most approaches are accurate only when a certain energetic parameter is small compared to others in the problem. Here we show that in these difficult regimes, the Ehrenfest approach provides a good starting point for a dynamical description of the energy transfer process due to its ability to accurately treat coupling to slow environmental modes. To further improve on the accuracy of the Ehrenfest approach, we use our reduced density matrix hybrid framework to treat the faster environmental modes quantum mechanically, at the level of a perturbative master equation. This combined approach is shown to provide an efficient and quantitative description of electronic energy transfer in a model dimer and the Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex and is used to investigate the effect of environmental preparation on the resulting dynamics.

  13. Effects of LDEF flight exposure on selected polymer matrix resin composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slemp, Wayne S.; Young, Philip R.; Witte, William G., Jr.; Shen, James Y.

    1992-01-01

    The characterization of selected graphite fiber reinforced epoxy (934 and 5208) and polysulfone (P1700) matrix resin composites materials which received over five years and nine months of exposure to the low earth orbit (LEO) environment in experiment AO134 on the Long Duration Exposure Facility is reported. The changes in mechanical properties of ultimate tensile strength and tensile modulus for exposed flight specimens are compared to the three sets of control specimens. Marked changes in surface appearance are discussed, and resin loss is reported. The chemical characterization including infrared, thermal, and selected solution property measurements showed that the molecular structure of the polymetric matrix had not changed significantly in response to this exposure.

  14. Direct Carotid Exposure for Neuroendovascular Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dong Seong; Yilmaz, Ali; Ozkul, Ayca; Yeo, Dong Kyu; Hwang, Sun-Chul; Kim, Bum-Tae

    2016-11-01

    Objective The transfemoral approach is a common route for catheterization of the supra-aortic vessels in neuroendovascular therapy. However, in some cases, the patient's anatomy prevents transfemoral catheterization or distal access to the carotid s. In such cases, direct carotid exposure (DCE) for neuroendovascular approaches may be used to treat cerebrovascular diseases. Methods We present 11 cases in which we were unable to perform the distal approach and DCE was the preferred neuroendovascular treatment procedure. Results DCE was performed on 11 patients with cerebral aneurysm (n = 8), carotid cavernous fistula (CCF) (n = 1), malignant brain tumor (n = 1), and carotid angioplasty and stenting (n = 1). Ten patients were female; one was male. Ages ranged from 63 to 87 years (mean: 71.36 years). Coil embolization was performed on patients with cerebral aneurysm and CCF. The patient with a malignant brain tumor underwent polyvinyl alcohol particle embolization. The only complication was a carotid artery dissection that occurred in one patient during stenting. Conclusion DCE for neuroendovascular approaches can be used as an alternative for patients with tortuous vasculature access in the femoral route. In such patients, a combination of neuroendovascular treatment and surgery in a hybrid operating room with angiography is preferred. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. The extracellular matrix glycoprotein tenascin-C and matrix metalloproteinases modify cerebellar structural plasticity by exposure to an enriched environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamenkovic, Vera; Stamenkovic, Stefan; Jaworski, Tomasz; Gawlak, Maciej; Jovanovic, Milos; Jakovcevski, Igor; Wilczynski, Grzegorz M; Kaczmarek, Leszek; Schachner, Melitta; Radenovic, Lidija; Andjus, Pavle R

    2017-01-01

    The importance of the extracellular matrix (ECM) glycoprotein tenascin-C (TnC) and the ECM degrading enzymes, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) -2 and -9, in cerebellar histogenesis is well established. This study aimed to examine whether there is a functional relationship between these molecules in regulating structural plasticity of the lateral deep cerebellar nucleus. To this end, starting from postnatal day 21, TnC- or MMP-9-deficient mice were exposed to an enriched environment (EE). We show that 8 weeks of exposure to EE leads to reduced lectin-based staining of perineuronal nets (PNNs), reduction in the size of GABAergic and increase in the number and size of glutamatergic synaptic terminals in wild-type mice. Conversely, TnC-deficient mice showed reduced staining of PNNs compared to wild-type mice maintained under standard conditions, and exposure to EE did not further reduce, but even slightly increased PNN staining. EE did not affect the densities of the two types of synaptic terminals in TnC-deficient mice, while the size of inhibitory, but not excitatory synaptic terminals was increased. In the time frame of 4-8 weeks, MMP-9, but not MMP-2, was observed to influence PNN remodeling and cerebellar synaptic plasticity as revealed by measurement of MMP-9 activity and colocalization with PNNs and synaptic markers. These findings were supported by observations on MMP-9-deficient mice. The present study suggests that TnC contributes to the regulation of structural plasticity in the cerebellum and that interactions between TnC and MMP-9 are likely to be important for these processes to occur.

  16. Development of an agricultural job-exposure matrix for British Columbia, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, David; Astrakianakis, George; Lang, Barbara; Le, Nhu; Bert, Joel

    2002-09-01

    Farmers in British Columbia (BC), Canada have been shown to have unexplained elevated proportional mortality rates for several cancers. Because agricultural exposures have never been documented systematically in BC, a quantitative agricultural Job-exposure matrix (JEM) was developed containing exposure assessments from 1950 to 1998. This JEM was developed to document historical exposures and to facilitate future epidemiological studies. Available information regarding BC farming practices was compiled and checklists of potential exposures were produced for each crop. Exposures identified included chemical, biological, and physical agents. Interviews with farmers and agricultural experts were conducted using the checklists as a starting point. This allowed the creation of an initial or 'potential' JEM based on three axes: exposure agent, 'type of work' and time. The 'type of work' axis was determined by combining several variables: region, crop, job title and task. This allowed for a complete description of exposures. Exposure assessments were made quantitatively, where data allowed, or by a dichotomous variable (exposed/unexposed). Quantitative calculations were divided into re-entry and application scenarios. 'Re-entry' exposures were quantified using a standard exposure model with some modification while application exposure estimates were derived using data from the North American Pesticide Handlers Exposure Database (PHED). As expected, exposures differed between crops and job titles both quantitatively and qualitatively. Of the 290 agents included in the exposure axis; 180 were pesticides. Over 3000 estimates of exposure were conducted; 50% of these were quantitative. Each quantitative estimate was at the daily absorbed dose level. Exposure estimates were then rated as high, medium, or low based on comparing them with their respective oral chemical reference dose (RfD) or Acceptable Daily Intake (ADI). This data was mainly obtained from the US Environmental

  17. Evaluation of cumulative PCB exposure estimated by a job exposure matrix versus PCB serum concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruder, Avima M.; Succop, Paul; Waters, Martha A.

    2015-01-01

    Although polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) have been banned in many countries for more than three decades, exposures to PCBs continue to be of concern due to their long half-lives and carcinogenic effects. In National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health studies, we are using semiquantitative plant-specific job exposure matrices (JEMs) to estimate historical PCB exposures for workers (n=24,865) exposed to PCBs from 1938 to 1978 at three capacitor manufacturing plants. A subcohort of these workers (n=410) employed in two of these plants had serum PCB concentrations measured at up to four times between 1976 and 1989. Our objectives were to evaluate the strength of association between an individual worker’s measured serum PCB levels and the same worker’s cumulative exposure estimated through 1977 with the (1) JEM and (2) duration of employment, and to calculate the explained variance the JEM provides for serum PCB levels using (3) simple linear regression. Consistent strong and statistically significant associations were observed between the cumulative exposures estimated with the JEM and serum PCB concentrations for all years. The strength of association between duration of employment and serum PCBs was good for highly chlorinated (Aroclor 1254/HPCB) but not less chlorinated (Aroclor 1242/LPCB) PCBs. In the simple regression models, cumulative occupational exposure estimated using the JEMs explained 14–24 % of the variance of the Aroclor 1242/LPCB and 22–39 % for Aroclor 1254/HPCB serum concentrations. We regard the cumulative exposure estimated with the JEM as a better estimate of PCB body burdens than serum concentrations quantified as Aroclor 1242/LPCB and Aroclor 1254/HPCB. PMID:23475397

  18. Patch Grafting Using an Ologen Collagen Matrix to Manage Tubal Exposure in Glaucoma Tube Shunt Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaki Tanito

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To report the results using an ologen Collagen Matrix as a patch graft in eyes with tubal exposure after tube shunt surgery. Case Reports: Case 1 was an 82-year-old man with tubal exposure in his right eye 26 months after receiving a Baerveldt glaucoma implant. The tube was covered by surrounding conjunctival tissue combined with subconjunctival placement of an ologen Collagen Matrix as a patch graft. Two years after implantation, the tube was not exposed. Anterior-segment optical coherence tomography (AS-OCT showed dense conjunctival tissue over the tube. Case 2 was an 82-year-old man with peripheral keratitis, anterior scleritis, and secondary glaucoma in the right eye who underwent tube shunt surgery using an Ahmed glaucoma valve and cataract surgery. Intraoperatively, scleritis-related scleral thinning prevented the tube from being covered fully by an autologous scleral flap. An ologen Collagen Matrix was placed over the scleral flap as a patch graft. Seventeen months after implantation, the tube was not exposed. Case 3 was a 52-year-old man with diabetic maculopathy and steroid-induced glaucoma in the right eye who underwent tube shunt surgery using an Ahmed glaucoma valve. Intraoperatively, a flap defect prevented the tube from being covered fully by an autologous scleral flap. An ologen Collagen Matrix was placed over the scleral flap as a patch graft. Three weeks postoperatively, AS-OCT showed thick subconjunctival tissue over the tube. Three months after implantation, the tube was not exposed. Conclusions: The ologen Collagen Matrix can be used successfully as a patch graft to prevent and treat tubal exposure after tube shunt surgery.

  19. Calibrating a population-based job-exposure matrix using inspection measurements to estimate historical occupational exposure to lead for a population-based cohort in Shanghai, China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koh, Dong Hee; Bhatti, Parveen; Coble, Joseph B.; Stewart, Patricia A.; Lu, Wei; Shu, Xiao Ou; Ji, Bu Tian; Xue, Shouzheng; Locke, Sarah J.; Portengen, Lutzen; Yang, Gong; Chow, Wong Ho; Gao, Yu Tang; Rothman, Nathaniel; Vermeulen, Roel; Friesen, Melissa C.

    2014-01-01

    The epidemiologic evidence for the carcinogenicity of lead is inconsistent and requires improved exposure assessment to estimate risk. We evaluated historical occupational lead exposure for a population-based cohort of women (n=74,942) by calibrating a job-exposure matrix (JEM) with lead fume

  20. Supplementary Appendix for: Constrained Perturbation Regularization Approach for Signal Estimation Using Random Matrix Theory

    KAUST Repository

    Suliman, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    In this supplementary appendix we provide proofs and additional simulation results that complement the paper (constrained perturbation regularization approach for signal estimation using random matrix theory).

  1. New approach for assessing human perfluoroalkyl exposure via hair

    OpenAIRE

    Alves,Andreia; Jacobs, Griet; VANERMEN Guido; Covaci, Adrian; Voorspoels, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: In the recent years hair has been increasingly used as alternative matrix in human biomonitoring (HBM) of environmental pollutants. Sampling advantages and time integration of exposure assessment seems the most attractive features of hair matrix. In the current study, a novel miniaturized method was developed and validated for measuring 15 perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), including perfluoro n-butanoic acid (PFBA), perfluoro n-pentanoic acid (PFPeA), perfluoro n-hexanoic acid (PFHx...

  2. Strategic approaches for assessment and minimization of matrix effect in ligand-binding assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Judy Y; Patel, Vimal; Ma, Mark

    2014-04-01

    Although substantial advances have been made in ligand-binding assays (LBA) for biotherapeutics in the past decade, there are still gaps that need to be addressed, especially in the context of understanding matrix effect and its root causes. Critical and in-depth characterization of matrix effect can provide valuable knowledge of the LBA limitations for proper results interpretation. This article illustrates several strategic approaches with regard to identifying the root cause of matrix effect and practical solutions, including recognizing the confounding factors associated with matrix effect, selection of proper reagents to avoid matrix effect, and a systematic approach in dealing with matrix effect in method development and validation. These strategic approaches have enhanced the management of matrix effect in LBA.

  3. Renormalization group approach to matrix models via noncommutative space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuroki, T. [Kobayashi-Maskawa Institute for the Origin of Particles and the Universe (KMI), Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya Aichi 464-8602 (Japan); Kawamoto, S. [National Center for Theoretical Sciences, Hsinchu 30013 (China); Tomino, D. [Department of Physics, Tunghai University, Taichung 40704 (China)

    2014-09-11

    We develop a new method for analyzing the large-N limit of matrix models. We assign the concept of energy to each matrix element and integrate the most highest energy to get a new matrix model which has reduced rank. By regarding this procedure as a renormalization group, we deduce the critical exponents in the large-N limit by elaborating fixed points of renormalization group transformation. For consistency of our method, we compare our result to that obtained by another method and find nice agreement. (Copyright copyright 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  4. Random matrix theory approach to vibrations near the jamming transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltukov, Y. M.

    2015-03-01

    It has been shown that the dynamical matrix M describing harmonic oscillations in granular media can be represented in the form M = AA T, where the rows of the matrix A correspond to the degrees of freedom of individual granules and its columns correspond to elastic contacts between granules. Such a representation of the dynamical matrix makes it possible to estimate the density of vibrational states with the use of the random matrix theory. The found density of vibrational states is approximately constant in a wide frequency range ω- < ω < ω+, which is determined by the ratio of the number of degrees of freedom to the total number of contacts in the system, which is in good agreement with the results of the numerical experiments.

  5. Development of a source-exposure matrix for occupational exposure assessment of electromagnetic fields in the INTEROCC study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vila, Javier; Bowman, Joseph D; Figuerola, Jordi; Moriña, David; Kincl, Laurel; Richardson, Lesley; Cardis, Elisabeth

    2017-07-01

    To estimate occupational exposures to electromagnetic fields (EMF) for the INTEROCC study, a database of source-based measurements extracted from published and unpublished literature resources had been previously constructed. The aim of the current work was to summarize these measurements into a source-exposure matrix (SEM), accounting for their quality and relevance. A novel methodology for combining available measurements was developed, based on order statistics and log-normal distribution characteristics. Arithmetic and geometric means, and estimates of variability and maximum exposure were calculated by EMF source, frequency band and dosimetry type. The mean estimates were weighted by our confidence in the pooled measurements. The SEM contains confidence-weighted mean and maximum estimates for 312 EMF exposure sources (from 0 Hz to 300 GHz). Operator position geometric mean electric field levels for radiofrequency (RF) sources ranged between 0.8 V/m (plasma etcher) and 320 V/m (RF sealer), while magnetic fields ranged from 0.02 A/m (speed radar) to 0.6 A/m (microwave heating). For extremely low frequency sources, electric fields ranged between 0.2 V/m (electric forklift) and 11,700 V/m (high-voltage transmission line-hotsticks), whereas magnetic fields ranged between 0.14 μT (visual display terminals) and 17 μT (tungsten inert gas welding). The methodology developed allowed the construction of the first EMF-SEM and may be used to summarize similar exposure data for other physical or chemical agents.

  6. The effect of space environment exposure on the properties of polymer matrix composite materials (A0180)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennyson, R. C.; Hansen, J. S.

    1984-01-01

    The objective of this experiment is to determine the effect of various lengths of exposure to a space environment on the mechanical properties of selected commercial polymer matrix composite materials. Fiber materials will include graphite, boron, S-glass, and PRD-49. The mechanical properties to be investigated are orthotropic elastic constants, strength parameters (satisfying the tensor polynomial relation), coefficients of thermal expansion, impact resistance, crack propagation, and fracture toughness. In addition, the effect of laminate thickness on property changes will also be investigated.

  7. Development of a Job Exposure Matrix for Noise in the Swedish Soft Tissue Paper Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee Neitzel, Richard; Andersson, Marianne; Eriksson, Helena; Torén, Kjell; Andersson, Eva

    2018-02-13

    Noise exposure is a common occupational hazard, but has not been sufficiently characterized in paper mills. We developed a job-exposure matrix (JEM) for noise exposure for use in estimating exposures among Swedish soft tissue paper mill workers. We used a combination of area and personal dosimetry noise exposure measurements made at four soft tissue paper mills by industry and research staff between 1977 and 2013 to estimate noise exposures by department, location, and job title. We then utilized these estimates, in conjunction with information on process and facility changes and use of hearing protection collected via focus groups, to create a seven-category, semi-quantitative JEM for all departments, locations, and job titles spanning the years 1940-2010. The results of the 1157 area and personal dosimetry noise measurements indicated that noise levels have generally declined in Swedish paper mills over time, though these changes have been neither uniform nor monotonic within or across the four mills. Focus group results indicated that use of hearing protection has generally increased over time. The noise JEM totals 1917 cells, with each cell representing a unique combination of operation, job title, and single year. We estimated that ~50% of workers at the four mills assessed were exposed at or above the Swedish 8-h average noise exposure limit of an 85 dBA at the conclusion of the study period in 2010. Our results highlight the continuing need for hearing loss prevention and noise control efforts at these and similar mills, and the completed JEM now represents a tool for use in epidemiological studies of noise-related health outcomes.

  8. Random matrix approach to the distribution of genomic distance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexeev, Nikita; Zograf, Peter

    2014-08-01

    The cycle graph introduced by Bafna and Pevzner is an important tool for evaluating the distance between two genomes, that is, the minimal number of rearrangements needed to transform one genome into another. We interpret this distance in topological terms and relate it to the random matrix theory. Namely, the number of genomes at a given 2-break distance from a fixed one (the Hultman number) is represented by a coefficient in the genus expansion of a matrix integral over the space of complex matrices with the Gaussian measure. We study generating functions for the Hultman numbers and prove that the two-break distance distribution is asymptotically normal.

  9. Exploring multicollinearity using a random matrix theory approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feher, Kristen; Whelan, James; Müller, Samuel

    2012-01-01

    Clustering of gene expression data is often done with the latent aim of dimension reduction, by finding groups of genes that have a common response to potentially unknown stimuli. However, what is poorly understood to date is the behaviour of a low dimensional signal embedded in high dimensions. This paper introduces a multicollinear model which is based on random matrix theory results, and shows potential for the characterisation of a gene cluster's correlation matrix. This model projects a one dimensional signal into many dimensions and is based on the spiked covariance model, but rather characterises the behaviour of the corresponding correlation matrix. The eigenspectrum of the correlation matrix is empirically examined by simulation, under the addition of noise to the original signal. The simulation results are then used to propose a dimension estimation procedure of clusters from data. Moreover, the simulation results warn against considering pairwise correlations in isolation, as the model provides a mechanism whereby a pair of genes with `low' correlation may simply be due to the interaction of high dimension and noise. Instead, collective information about all the variables is given by the eigenspectrum.

  10. Matrix Models – An Approach to Understand Complex Systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Matrices with random matrix elements appear to have applications in physics, mathematics, bi- ology, telecommunications, etc. In fact, experi- mental data of many complex systems, such as the spacing distribution of energy level spectra of heavy nuclei, and the distribution of the non- real zeros of the Riemann zeta function ...

  11. A random matrix approach to RNA folding with interaction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-11-27

    Nov 27, 2015 ... In the matrix model of RNA [G Vernizzi, H Orland and A Zee, Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 168103 (2005)] we introduce external interactions on n bases in the action of the partition function where ≤ and is the length of the polymer chain. The RNA structures found in the model can be separated into two ...

  12. A random matrix approach to RNA folding with interaction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In the matrix model of RNA [G Vernizzi, H Orland and A Zee, Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 168103 (2005)] we introduce external interactions on n bases in the action of the partition function where n ≤ L and L is the length of the polymer chain. The RNA structures found in the model can be separated into two regimes: (i) 0 ...

  13. Density Functional Approach and Random Matrix Theory in Proteogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Masanori

    2017-02-01

    We study the energy-level statistics of amino acids by random matrix theory. The molecular orbital and the Kohn-Sham orbital energies are calculated using ab initio and density-functional formalisms for 20 different amino acids. To generate statistical data, we performed a multipoint calculation on 10000 molecular structures produced via a molecular dynamics simulation. For the valence orbitals, the energy-level statistics exhibit repulsion, but the universality in the random matrix cannot be determined. For the unoccupied orbitals, the energy-level statistics indicate an intermediate distribution between the Gaussian orthogonal ensemble and the semi-Poisson statistics for all 20 different amino acids. These amino acids are considered to be in a type of critical state.

  14. Stimulus threat and exposure context modulate the effect of mere exposure on approach behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Young

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Mere-exposure research has found that initially neutral objects made familiar are preferred relative to novel objects. Recent work extends these preference judgments into the behavioral domain by illustrating that mere exposure prompts approach-oriented behavior toward familiar stimuli. However, no investigations have examined the effect of mere exposure on approach-oriented behavior toward threatening stimuli. The current work examines this issue and also explores how exposure context interacts with stimulus threat to influence behavioral tendencies. In two experiments participants were presented with both mere-exposed and novel stimuli and approach speed was assessed. In the first experiment, when stimulus threat was presented in a homogeneous format (i.e., participants viewed exclusively neutral or threatening stimuli, mere-exposure potentiated approach behaviors for both neutral and threatening stimuli. However, in the second experiment, in which stimulus threat was presented in a heterogeneous fashion (i.e., participants viewed both neutral and threatening stimuli, mere exposure facilitated approach only for initially neutral stimuli. These results suggest that mere-exposure effects on approach behaviors are highly context sensitive and depend on both stimulus valence and exposure context. Further implications of these findings for the mere-exposure literature are discussed.

  15. Blind Measurement Selection: A Random Matrix Theory Approach

    KAUST Repository

    Elkhalil, Khalil

    2016-12-14

    This paper considers the problem of selecting a set of $k$ measurements from $n$ available sensor observations. The selected measurements should minimize a certain error function assessing the error in estimating a certain $m$ dimensional parameter vector. The exhaustive search inspecting each of the $n\\\\choose k$ possible choices would require a very high computational complexity and as such is not practical for large $n$ and $k$. Alternative methods with low complexity have recently been investigated but their main drawbacks are that 1) they require perfect knowledge of the measurement matrix and 2) they need to be applied at the pace of change of the measurement matrix. To overcome these issues, we consider the asymptotic regime in which $k$, $n$ and $m$ grow large at the same pace. Tools from random matrix theory are then used to approximate in closed-form the most important error measures that are commonly used. The asymptotic approximations are then leveraged to select properly $k$ measurements exhibiting low values for the asymptotic error measures. Two heuristic algorithms are proposed: the first one merely consists in applying the convex optimization artifice to the asymptotic error measure. The second algorithm is a low-complexity greedy algorithm that attempts to look for a sufficiently good solution for the original minimization problem. The greedy algorithm can be applied to both the exact and the asymptotic error measures and can be thus implemented in blind and channel-aware fashions. We present two potential applications where the proposed algorithms can be used, namely antenna selection for uplink transmissions in large scale multi-user systems and sensor selection for wireless sensor networks. Numerical results are also presented and sustain the efficiency of the proposed blind methods in reaching the performances of channel-aware algorithms.

  16. Random Matrix Theory Approach to Chaotic Coherent Perfect Absorbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huanan; Suwunnarat, Suwun; Fleischmann, Ragnar; Schanz, Holger; Kottos, Tsampikos

    2017-01-01

    We employ random matrix theory in order to investigate coherent perfect absorption (CPA) in lossy systems with complex internal dynamics. The loss strength γCPA and energy ECPA, for which a CPA occurs, are expressed in terms of the eigenmodes of the isolated cavity—thus carrying over the information about the chaotic nature of the target—and their coupling to a finite number of scattering channels. Our results are tested against numerical calculations using complex networks of resonators and chaotic graphs as CPA cavities.

  17. Spectral rigidity of vehicular streams (random matrix theory approach)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krbalek, Milan [Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering, Czech Technical University, Prague (Czech Republic); Seba, Petr [Doppler Institute for Mathematical Physics and Applied Mathematics, Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering, Czech Technical University, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2009-08-28

    Using a method originally developed for the random matrix theory, we derive an approximate mathematical formula for the number variance {delta}{sub N}(L) describing the rigidity of particle ensembles with a power-law repulsion. The resulting relation is compared with the relevant statistics of the single-vehicle data measured on the Dutch freeway A9. The detected value of the inverse temperature {beta}, which can be identified as a coefficient of the mental strain of the car drivers, is then discussed in detail with the relation to the traffic density {rho} and flow J.

  18. Controlling Light Through Optical Disordered Media : Transmission Matrix Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Popoff, Sébastien; Fink, Mathias; Boccara, A C; Gigan, Sylvain

    2011-01-01

    We experimentally measure the monochromatic transmission matrix (TM) of an optical multiple scattering medium using a spatial light modulator together with a phase-shifting interferometry measurement method. The TM contains all information needed to shape the scattered output field at will or to detect an image through the medium. We confront theory and experiment for these applications and we study the effect of noise on the reconstruction method. We also extracted from the TM informations about the statistical properties of the medium and the light transport whitin it. In particular, we are able to isolate the contributions of the Memory Effect (ME) and measure its attenuation length.

  19. Constrained Perturbation Regularization Approach for Signal Estimation Using Random Matrix Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suliman, Mohamed; Ballal, Tarig; Kammoun, Abla; Al-Naffouri, Tareq Y.

    2016-12-01

    In this supplementary appendix we provide proofs and additional extensive simulations that complement the analysis of the main paper (constrained perturbation regularization approach for signal estimation using random matrix theory).

  20. Neurotrophic Keratopathy: Therapeutic Approach Using a Novel Matrix Regenerating Agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Marta; Marques, Sara; Gil, João Quadrado; Campos, Joana; Ramos, Paula; Rosa, Andreia Martins; Quadrado, Maria João; Murta, Joaquim Neto

    2017-11-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and tolerance of a new matrix-regenerating agent (RGTA), Cacicol ® , a polymer that mimics heparan sulfates bound to extracellular matrix proteins, avoiding its proteolysis, to treat neurotrophic keratopathy (NK). Uncontrolled prospective clinical study performed between January 2014 and May 2016. Twenty-five patients (25 eyes) with corneal neurotrophic ulcers, nonresponsive to at least 2 weeks of conservative therapy, were treated with Cacicol, instilled once/twice a week. During follow-up, slit-lamp examination, anterior segment photography, fluorescein-dye testing, and best-corrected visual acuity were analyzed. Ulcer evolution was evaluated using image analysis software (ImageJ ® ) and healing defined as decrease of the corneal ulcer area. An independent observer measured ulcer area. All patients had complete corneal healing within an average of 4.13 ± 2.32 weeks. Mean ulcer area decreased significantly (P = 0.001) from 16.51% ± 18.56% (1st day) to 8.68% ± 11.25% at the 7th day and to 4.73% ± 10.75% at the 14th day. Compared with day 1, mean ulcer area decreased 60.24% after 7 days (P = 0.001), 54.92% after 14 days (P = 0.059), and 83.00% after 21 days (P = 0.003). Two cases of recurrence (8.0%) were registered. No systemic or local side effects were noticed. The new regenerating agent, Cacicol, represents an effective and safe therapy to treat NK.

  1. Random matrix approach to the dynamics of stock inventory variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wei-Xing; Mu, Guo-Hua; Kertész, János

    2012-09-01

    It is well accepted that investors can be classified into groups owing to distinct trading strategies, which forms the basic assumption of many agent-based models for financial markets when agents are not zero-intelligent. However, empirical tests of these assumptions are still very rare due to the lack of order flow data. Here we adopt the order flow data of Chinese stocks to tackle this problem by investigating the dynamics of inventory variations for individual and institutional investors that contain rich information about the trading behavior of investors and have a crucial influence on price fluctuations. We find that the distributions of cross-correlation coefficient Cij have power-law forms in the bulk that are followed by exponential tails, and there are more positive coefficients than negative ones. In addition, it is more likely that two individuals or two institutions have a stronger inventory variation correlation than one individual and one institution. We find that the largest and the second largest eigenvalues (λ1 and λ2) of the correlation matrix cannot be explained by random matrix theory and the projections of investors' inventory variations on the first eigenvector u(λ1) are linearly correlated with stock returns, where individual investors play a dominating role. The investors are classified into three categories based on the cross-correlation coefficients CV R between inventory variations and stock returns. A strong Granger causality is unveiled from stock returns to inventory variations, which means that a large proportion of individuals hold the reversing trading strategy and a small part of individuals hold the trending strategy. Our empirical findings have scientific significance in the understanding of investors' trading behavior and in the construction of agent-based models for emerging stock markets.

  2. Effects of enamel matrix genes on dental caries are moderated by fluoride exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, John R; Carlson, Jenna C; Stanley, Brooklyn O C; Feingold, Eleanor; Cooper, Margaret; Vanyukov, Michael M; Maher, Brion S; Slayton, Rebecca L; Willing, Marcia C; Reis, Steven E; McNeil, Daniel W; Crout, Richard J; Weyant, Robert J; Levy, Steven M; Vieira, Alexandre R; Marazita, Mary L

    2015-02-01

    Dental caries (tooth decay) is the most common chronic disease, worldwide, affecting most children and adults. Though dental caries is highly heritable, few caries-related genes have been discovered. We investigated whether 18 genetic variants in the group of non-amelogenin enamel matrix genes (AMBN, ENAM, TUFT1, and TFIP11) were associated with dental caries experience in 13 age- and race-stratified samples from six parent studies (N = 3,600). Linear regression was used to model genetic associations and test gene-by-fluoride interaction effects for two sources of fluoride: daily tooth brushing and home water fluoride concentration. Meta-analysis was used to combine results across five child and eight adult samples. We observed the statistically significant association of rs2337359 upstream of TUFT1 with dental caries experience via meta-analysis across adult samples (p caries experience only if they were not exposed to the source of fluoride. Altogether, these results confirm that variation in enamel matrix genes contributes to individual differences in dental caries liability, and demonstrate that the effects of these genes may be moderated by protective fluoride exposures. In short, genes may exert greater influence on dental caries in unprotected environments, or equivalently, the protective effects of fluoride may obviate the effects of genetic risk alleles.

  3. The feasibility of adapting a population-based asthma-specific job exposure matrix (JEM) to NHANES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugh, Michelle K; Symanski, Elaine; Pompeii, Lisa A; Delclos, George L

    2010-12-01

    To determine the feasibility of applying a job exposure matrix (JEM) for classifying exposures to 18 asthmagens in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), 1999-2004. We cross-referenced 490 National Center for Health Statistics job codes used to develop the 40 NHANES occupation groups with 506 JEM job titles and assessed homogeneity in asthmagen exposure across job codes within each occupation group. In total, 399 job codes corresponded to one JEM job title, 32 to more than one job title, and 59 were not in the JEM. Three occupation groups had the same asthmagen exposure across job codes, 11 had no asthmagen exposure, and 26 groups had heterogeneous exposures across jobs codes. The NHANES classification of occupations limits the use of the JEM to evaluate the association between workplace exposures and asthma and more refined occupational data are needed to enhance work-related injury/illness surveillance efforts.

  4. Risk exposure mitigation: Approaches and recognised instruments (5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matić Vesna

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The risk management function development in banks, along with the development of tools that banks can use throughout this process, has had the strong support in international standards, not only in the recommended approaches for calculating economic capital requirements, but also in the qualitatively new treatment of risk exposure mitigation instruments (Basel Accord II. The array of eligible instruments for exposure mitigation under the recommended approaches for their treatment becomes the essential element of economic capital requirements calculation, both in relation to certain types of risk, and in relation to aggregate exposure.

  5. Risk exposure mitigation: Approaches and recognised instruments (6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matić Vesna

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The risk management function development in banks, along with the development of tools that banks can use throughout this process, has had the strong support in international standards, not only in the recommended approaches for calculating economic capital requirements, but also in the qualitatively new treatment of risk exposure mitigation instruments (Basel Accord II. The array of eligible instruments for exposure mitigation under the recommended approaches for their treatment becomes the essential element of economic capital requirements calculation, both in relation to certain types of risk, and in relation to aggregate exposure.

  6. Risk exposure mitigation: Approaches and recognised instruments (9

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matić Vesna

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The risk management function development in banks, along with the development of tools that banks can use throughout this process, has had the strong support in international standards, not only in the recommended approaches for calculating economic capital requirements, but also in the qualitatively new treatment of risk exposure mitigation instruments (Basel Accord II. The array of eligible instruments for exposure mitigation under the recommended approaches for their treatment becomes the essential element of economic capital requirements calculation, both in relation to certain types of risk, and in relation to aggregate exposure.

  7. Risk exposure mitigation: Approaches and recognised instruments (3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matić Vesna

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The risk management function development in banks, along with the development of tools that banks can use throughout this process, has had the strong support in international standards, not only in the recommended approaches for calculating economic capital requirements, but also in the qualitatively new treatment of risk exposure mitigation instruments (Basel Accord II. The array of eligible instruments for exposure mitigation under the recommended approaches for their treatment becomes the essential element of economic capital requirements calculation, both in relation to certain types of risk, and in relation to aggregate exposure.

  8. Risk exposure mitigation: Approaches and recognised instruments (1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matić Vesna

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The risk management function development in banks, along with the development of tools that banks can use throughout this process, has had the strong support in the international standards, not only in the recommended approaches for calculating economic capital requirements, but also in the qualitatively new treatment of risk exposure mitigation instruments (Basel Accord II. The array of eligible instruments for exposure mitigation under the recommended approaches for their treatment becomes the essential element of economic capital requirements calculation, both in relation to certain types of risk, and in relation to aggregate exposure.

  9. A novel approach to antibiofilm susceptibility testing using a thermo-reversible matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, B J; Marsh, L L; Nosworthy, J O; Williams, D W

    2016-02-01

    Biofilm microorganisms are known to have a much higher tolerance to antimicrobials compared to their planktonic equivalents. Therefore, traditional antimicrobial susceptibility testing may not extrapolate to clinical treatment of infections of biofilm origin, and as a result, there is a need to not only develop antimicrobials with antibiofilm activity, but also suitable in vitro testing methods for their evaluation. In this study, we report on a novel method of antibiofilm testing using a thermo-reversible matrix (poloxamer 407), coupled with live/dead staining of bacteria cultured from the matrix. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (NCIMB 8626) was cultured in medium containing poloxamer 407 at 37°C for 24 hours to generate biofilms. The preparation was cooled to liquefy the poloxamer and allow recovery of the biofilm cells, which were then stained with SYTO9 to determine viability following exposure to four antimicrobials: polyhexanide, octenadine dihydrochloride, povidone-iodine and silver carbonate. Over an 8-minute time period, fluorescence levels were spectrophotometrically measured and compared with bacterial controls, cultured in the absence of poloxamer and without antimicrobial. Untreated cells showed no reduction in viability over this period. Importantly, planktonic cells were more susceptible to test agents compared with those of a 'biofilm' phenotype cultured in poloxamer. Antibiofilm activity was evident for all of the test agents, with highest relative activity seen with octenadine dihydrochloride. In summary, a novel and relatively rapid approach to screen compounds for antibiofilm activity has been described. The method uses standard laboratory equipment and can be readily adapted to test a wide range of microorganisms and other antibiofilm compounds. This research was, in part, supported by Advanced Medical Solutions in the form of a Knowledge Transfer Project. Mr J. Nosworthy was employed by Advanced Medical Solutions. There are no other conflicts of

  10. A Combinatorial Approach to Some Sparse Matrix Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-06-01

    were introduced, particularly after the advent of linear programming in 1947 ( sec Dantzig (1963)), it has been recognized that real-world problems are...COMBINATORIAL APPROACH TO SOME SPARSE Technical Report MATRX POBLES 6 PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBR 7. AUTHOR(q) 6. CONTRACT ORt GRANT NUMBER(d) S

  11. Stimulus Threat and Exposure Context Modulate the Effect of Mere Exposure on Approach Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Steven G; Jones, Isaiah F; Claypool, Heather M

    2016-01-01

    Mere-exposure (ME) research has found that initially neutral objects made familiar are preferred relative to novel objects. Recent work extends these preference judgments into the behavioral domain by illustrating that mere exposure prompts approach-oriented behavior toward familiar stimuli. However, no investigations have examined the effect of mere exposure on approach-oriented behavior toward threatening stimuli. The current work examines this issue and also explores how exposure context interacts with stimulus threat to influence behavioral tendencies. In two experiments participants were presented with both mere-exposed and novel stimuli and approach speed was assessed. In the first experiment, when stimulus threat was presented in a homogeneous format (i.e., participants viewed exclusively neutral or threatening stimuli), ME potentiated approach behaviors for both neutral and threatening stimuli. However, in the second experiment, in which stimulus threat was presented in a heterogeneous fashion (i.e., participants viewed both neutral and threatening stimuli), mere exposure facilitated approach only for initially neutral stimuli. These results suggest that ME effects on approach behaviors are highly context sensitive and depend on both stimulus valence and exposure context. Further implications of these findings for the ME literature are discussed.

  12. Effects of enamel matrix genes on dental caries are moderated by fluoride exposures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, John R.; Carlson, Jenna C.; Stanley, Brooklyn O. C.; Feingold, Eleanor; Cooper, Margaret; Vanyukov, Michael M.; Maher, Brion S.; Slayton, Rebecca L.; Willing, Marcia C.; Reis, Steven E.; McNeil, Daniel W.; Crout, Richard J.; Weyant, Robert J.; Levy, Steven M.; Vieira, Alexandre R.; Marazita, Mary L.

    2014-01-01

    Dental caries (tooth decay) is the most common chronic disease, worldwide, affecting most children and adults. Though dental caries is highly heritable, few caries-related genes have been discovered. We investigated whether 18 genetic variants in the group of nonamelogenin enamel matrix genes (AMBN, ENAM, TUFT1, and TFIP11) were associated with dental caries experience in 13 age- and race-stratified samples from six parent studies (N=3,600). Linear regression was used to model genetic associations and test gene-byfluoride interaction effects for two sources of fluoride: daily tooth brushing and home water fluoride concentration. Meta-analysis was used to combine results across five child and eight adult samples. We observed the statistically significant association of rs2337359 upstream of TUFT1 with dental caries experience via meta-analysis across adult samples (p<0.002) and the suggestive association for multiple variants in TFIP11 across child samples (p<0.05). Moreover, we discovered two genetic variants (rs2337359 upstream of TUFT1 and missense rs7439186 in AMBN) involved in gene-by-fluoride interactions. For each interaction, participants with the risk allele/genotype exhibited greater dental caries experience only if they were not exposed to the source of fluoride. Altogether, these results confirm that variation in enamel matrix genes contributes to individual differences in dental caries liability, and demonstrate that the effects of these genes may be moderated by protective fluoride exposures. In short, genes may exert greater influence on dental caries in unprotected environments, or equivalently, the protective effects of fluoride may obviate the effects of genetic risk alleles. PMID:25373699

  13. Development and validation of a physical and psychosocial job-exposure matrix in older and retired workers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijs, K.J.; van der Pas, S.; Geuskens, G.A.; Cozijnsen, M.R.; Koppes, L.L.J.; van der Beek, A.J.; Deeg, D.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives:A general population job-exposure matrix (GPJEM) including physical and psychosocial demands as well as psychosocial resources applicable to older and retired workers was developed. Its validity was evaluated by examining associations of physical demands and iso-strain (combination of

  14. Characterization of Ceramic Matrix Composite Combustor Components: Pre and Post Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojard, G.; Linsey, G.; Brennan, J.; Naik, R.; Cairo, R.; Stephan, R.; Hornick, J.; Brewer, D.

    2001-01-01

    The pursuit of lower emissions and higher performance from gas turbine engines requires the development of innovative concepts and the use of advanced materials for key engine components. One key engine component is the combustor, where innovative design and material improvements have the potential to lower emissions. Efforts to develop a High Speed Civil Transport with low emissions were focused on the evaluation of combustor concepts with liners fabricated from a ceramic matrix composite of silicon carbide fibers in a silicon carbide matrix (SiC/SiC). The evaluation of SiC/SiC composites progressed from simple coupons (to establish a first-order database and identify operant failure mechanisms and damage accumulation processes), to feature-based subelements (to assess fabricability and in situ material response), to actual components (to assess structural integrity, dimensional, and compositional fidelity) tested under simulated engine conditions. As in the case of all evolutionary material and process work, a key element to resolving fabrication issues is the evaluation of witness areas taken from fabricated components before testing the actual component. The witness material from these components allowed microstructural and mechanical testing to be performed and compared to the ideal, flat panel, conditions and data that are typical of basic characterization. This also allowed samples of similar design to be taken from components after 115 hours of combustion exposure. Testing consisted of tensile, double notch shear, ring burst, and thermal conductivity that sampled various regions of the components. The evaluation of the witness material allowed an understanding of the fabrication process, highlighting critical issues, in an early phase of the learning curve development of these configuration and material unique parts. Residual property testing, after exposure, showed if degradation of the material under actual service conditions was occurring. This paper

  15. Integrating exposure into chemical alternatives assessment using a qualitative approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greggs, Bill; Arnold, Scott; Burns, T. E.

    2016-01-01

    Sustainable Chemical Alternatives Technical Committee, which consists of scientists from academia, industry, government, and NGOs, has developed a qualitative comparative exposure approach. Conducting such a comparison can screen for alternatives that are expected to have a higher human or environmental......Most alternatives assessments (AA) published to date are largely hazard-based rankings, and as such may not represent a fully informed consideration of the advantages and disadvantages of possible alternatives. With an assessment goal of identifying an alternative chemical that is more sustainable...... exposure potential, which could trigger a higher-tiered, more quantitative exposure assessment on the alternatives being considered, minimizing the likelihood of regrettable substitution. This talk will demonstrate an approach for including chemical- and product-related exposure information...

  16. Integrating exposure into chemical alternatives assessment using a qualitative approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greggs, Bill; Arnold, Scott; Burns, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    Sustainable Chemical Alternatives Technical Committee, which consists of scientists from academia, industry, government, and NGOs, has developed a qualitative comparative exposure approach. Conducting such a comparison can screen for alternatives that are expected to have a higher exposure potential, which......Most alternatives assessments (AA) published to date are largely hazard-based rankings, and as such may not represent a fully informed consideration of the advantages and disadvantages of possible alternatives. With an assessment goal of identifying an alternative chemical that is more sustainable...... could trigger a higher-tiered, more quantitative exposure assessment on the alternatives being considered. This talk will demonstrate an approach for including chemical- and product-related exposure information in a qualitative AA comparison. Starting from existing hazard AAs, a series of four chemical...

  17. Close-Coupling R-Matrix Approach to Simulating Ion-Atom Collisions for Accelerator Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Stoltz, Peter

    2005-01-01

    We have implemented an R-matrix close coupling approach to calculate capture, ionization, stripping and excitation cross-sections for 0.5 to 8.0 MeV K+ incident on Ar. This is relevant to the High Current Experiment at Lawrence Berkley National Laboratory. These cross sections are used to model accelerator particle dynamics where background gasses can interfere with beam quality. This code is a semi-classical approach that uses quantum mechanics to describe the particle interactions and uses classical mechanics to describe the nuclei trajectories. We compare a hydrogenic approximation for K+ with a pseudo-potential approach. Further we are developing a variational approach to quickly determine the best pseudo-potential parameters. Since many R-Matrix computationalists use this pseudo-potential approach, this approach will be useful for helping generate cross sections for any collision system.

  18. Matrix approach to land carbon cycle modeling: A case study with Community Land Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuanyuan; Lu, Xingjie; Shi, Zheng; Lawrence, David; Koven, Charles; Xia, Jianyang; Du, Zhenggang; Kluzek, Erik; Luo, Yiqi

    2017-10-20

    The terrestrial carbon (C) cycle has been commonly represented by a series of C balance equations to track C influxes into and effluxes out of individual pools in earth system models (ESMs). This representation matches our understanding of C cycle processes well but makes it difficult to track model behaviors. It is also computationally expensive, limiting the ability to conduct comprehensive parametric sensitivity analyses. To overcome these challenges, we have developed a matrix approach, which reorganizes the C balance equations in the original ESM into one matrix equation without changing any modeled C cycle processes and mechanisms. We applied the matrix approach to the Community Land Model (CLM4.5) with vertically resolved biogeochemistry. The matrix equation exactly reproduces litter and soil organic carbon (SOC) dynamics of the standard CLM4.5 across different spatial-temporal scales. The matrix approach enables effective diagnosis of system properties such as C residence time and attribution of global change impacts to relevant processes. We illustrated, for example, the impacts of CO2 fertilization on litter and SOC dynamics can be easily decomposed into the relative contributions from C input, allocation of external C into different C pools, nitrogen regulation, altered soil environmental conditions, and vertical mixing along the soil profile. In addition, the matrix tool can accelerate model spin-up, permit thorough parametric sensitivity tests, enable pool-based data assimilation, and facilitate tracking and benchmarking of model behaviors. Overall, the matrix approach can make a broad range of future modeling activities more efficient and effective. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. [Update the wood dust exposure values included in the job-exposure matrix MatEmESp by making use of the WOODEX database].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramoneda Paniagua, Alex; van der Haar, Rudolf

    2016-01-01

    To revise and complete information on prevalence and intensity of wood dust exposure among Spanish workers in the MatEmESp job-exposure matrix, based on data from the WOODEX database. Exposure groups by economic activity in WOODEX were linked to the occupations in MatEmESp. The WOODEX data were then used to calculate new values of exposure prevalence and intensity for the occupations included in MatEmESp. A total of 18 occupations in MatEmESp were linked to exposure groups in the WOODEX database. This allowed estimation of new exposure intensity values for these 18 occupations and calculation of new exposure prevalence values for 16 of them. In addition, a new at-risk occupation, previously not in MatEmESp, was identified. The occupations with the highest prevalence values are sawmill operators (CNO-94 code 8141) and operators of machinery for making wood products (CNO-94 code 8340). The new calculations indicate that 10.5% of at-risk workers in MatEmESp are exposed to concentrations above 5 mg/m3. The WOODEX data provided more detailed information about exposure profiles to wood dust and are mainly based on Spanish data. In contrast, 95% of the data on wood dust exposure inMatEmESp is based on extrapolations from other countries or on expert considerations. Copyright belongs to the Societat Catalana de Salut Laboral.

  20. Developing Asbestos Job Exposure Matrix Using Occupation and Industry Specific Exposure Data (1984–2008 in Republic of Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangjun Choi

    2017-03-01

    Conclusion: The newly constructed GPJEM which is generated from actual domestic quantitative exposure data could be useful in evaluating historical exposure levels to asbestos and could contribute to improved prediction of asbestos-related diseases among Koreans.

  1. Standardized approach for developing probabilistic exposure factor distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maddalena, Randy L.; McKone, Thomas E.; Sohn, Michael D.

    2003-03-01

    The effectiveness of a probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) depends critically on the quality of input information that is available to the risk assessor and specifically on the probabilistic exposure factor distributions that are developed and used in the exposure and risk models. Deriving probabilistic distributions for model inputs can be time consuming and subjective. The absence of a standard approach for developing these distributions can result in PRAs that are inconsistent and difficult to review by regulatory agencies. We present an approach that reduces subjectivity in the distribution development process without limiting the flexibility needed to prepare relevant PRAs. The approach requires two steps. First, we analyze data pooled at a population scale to (1) identify the most robust demographic variables within the population for a given exposure factor, (2) partition the population data into subsets based on these variables, and (3) construct archetypal distributions for each subpopulation. Second, we sample from these archetypal distributions according to site- or scenario-specific conditions to simulate exposure factor values and use these values to construct the scenario-specific input distribution. It is envisaged that the archetypal distributions from step 1 will be generally applicable so risk assessors will not have to repeatedly collect and analyze raw data for each new assessment. We demonstrate the approach for two commonly used exposure factors--body weight (BW) and exposure duration (ED)--using data for the U.S. population. For these factors we provide a first set of subpopulation based archetypal distributions along with methodology for using these distributions to construct relevant scenario-specific probabilistic exposure factor distributions.

  2. Linear models in matrix form a hands-on approach for the behavioral sciences

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Jonathon D

    2014-01-01

    This textbook is an approachable introduction to statistical analysis using matrix algebra. Prior knowledge of matrix algebra is not necessary. Advanced topics are easy to follow through analyses that were performed on an open-source spreadsheet using a few built-in functions. These topics include ordinary linear regression, as well as maximum likelihood estimation, matrix decompositions, nonparametric smoothers and penalized cubic splines. Each data set (1) contains a limited number of observations to encourage readers to do the calculations themselves, and (2) tells a coherent story based on statistical significance and confidence intervals. In this way, students will learn how the numbers were generated and how they can be used to make cogent arguments about everyday matters. This textbook is designed for use in upper level undergraduate courses or first year graduate courses. The first chapter introduces students to linear equations, then covers matrix algebra, focusing on three essential operations: sum ...

  3. RNS derivation of N-point disk amplitudes from the revisited S-matrix approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barreiro, Luiz Antonio, E-mail: luiz.a.barreiro@gmail.com [Departamento de Física, UNESP, Rio Claro, São Paulo (Brazil); Instituto de Matemática e Computação, Universidade Federal de Itajubá, Itajubá, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Medina, Ricardo, E-mail: rmedina50@gmail.com [Instituto de Matemática e Computação, Universidade Federal de Itajubá, Itajubá, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    2014-09-15

    Recently, in [7] we proposed a revisited S-matrix approach to efficiently find the bosonic terms of the open superstring low energy effective lagrangian (OSLEEL). This approach allows to compute the α{sup ′N} terms of the OSLEEL using open superstring n-point amplitudes in which n is considerably lower than (N+2) (which is the order of the required amplitude to obtain those α{sup ′N} terms by means of the conventional S-matrix approach). In this work we use our revisited S-matrix approach to examine the structure of the scattering amplitudes, arriving at a closed form for them. This is a RNS derivation of the formula first found by Mafra, Schlotterer and Stieberger [21], using the pure spinor formalism. We have succeeded doing this for the 5, 6 and 7-point amplitudes. In order to achieve these results we have done a careful analysis of the kinematical structure of the amplitudes, finding as a by-product a purely kinematical derivation of the BCJ relations (for N=4,5,6 and 7). Also, following the spirit of the revisited S-matrix approach, we have found the α{sup ′} expansions for these amplitudes up to α{sup ′6} order in some cases, by only using the well known open superstring 4-point amplitude, cyclic symmetry and tree level unitarity: we have not needed to compute any numerical series or any integral involving polylogarithms, at any moment.

  4. Using the realist perspective to link theory from qualitative evidence synthesis to quantitative studies: broadening the matrix approach.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grootel, L. van; Wesel, F. van; O'Mara-Eves, A.; Thomas, J.; Hox, J.; Boeije, H.

    2017-01-01

    Background: This study describes an approach for the use of a specific type of qualitative evidence synthesis in the matrix approach, a mixed studies reviewing method. The matrix approach compares quantitative and qualitative data on the review level by juxtaposing concrete recommendations from the

  5. A Synthetic Approach to the Transfer Matrix Method in Classical and Quantum Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujol, O.; Perez, J. P.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to propose a synthetic approach to the transfer matrix method in classical and quantum physics. This method is an efficient tool to deal with complicated physical systems of practical importance in geometrical light or charged particle optics, classical electronics, mechanics, electromagnetics and quantum physics. Teaching…

  6. On the definition of the effectively unpaired electron density matrix: A similarity measure approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcoba, Diego R.; Bochicchio, Roberto C.; Lain, Luis; Torre, Alicia

    2006-09-01

    The mathematical concepts of similarity and distance in metric spaces are used to relate Takatsuka et al. and Head-Gordon definitions of the effectively unpaired electron density matrix. This approach opens the possibility of new suitable definitions of this quantity to given purposes.

  7. Using the breakage matrix approach for monitoring the break release in the wheat flour milling process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojanić, Nemanja; Fišteš, Aleksandar; Rakić, Dušan; Takači, Aleksandar; Došenović, Tatjana

    2017-05-01

    The breakage matrix approach is a mathematical tool to relate input and output particle size distribution from a milling operation. Adjustment of the break release in the flour milling process is extremely important because it affects granulation and quality characteristics of the stock and hence the total results and balance of the mill. In this study the breakage matrix approach has been used for the purpose of controlling the release on the front passages of the break system in the flour milling process. It has been established that, for any particle size distribution of wheat, it is possible to predict break releases together with the distribution of the release size fractions by using the breakage matrices. Also, the reversibility of this approach is examined, that is the possibility to identify the wheat particle size distribution that would result in desired break releases and/or the desired yields of different sized intermediate stocks under the given set of milling conditions. It is confirmed that the breakage matrix approach can be successfully used to predict the break releases. The reverse breakage matrix concept allows the determination of the wheat particle size distribution which would result in a targeted break release. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  8. New approach for assessing human perfluoroalkyl exposure via hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Andreia; Jacobs, Griet; Vanermen, Guido; Covaci, Adrian; Voorspoels, Stefan

    2015-11-01

    In the recent years hair has been increasingly used as alternative matrix in human biomonitoring (HBM) of environmental pollutants. Sampling advantages and time integration of exposure assessment seems the most attractive features of hair matrix. In the current study, a novel miniaturized method was developed and validated for measuring 15 perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), including perfluoro n-butanoic acid (PFBA), perfluoro n-pentanoic acid (PFPeA), perfluoro n-hexanoic acid (PFHxA), perfluoro n-heptanoic acid (PFHpA), perfluor n-octanoic acid (PFOA), perfluoro n-nonanoic acid (PFNA), perfluoro tetradecanoic acid (PFTeDA), perfluorobutane sulfonic acid (PFBS), perfluoro pentane sulfonic acid (PFPeS), perfluorohexane sulfonic acid (PFHxS), perfluoroheptane sulfonic acid (PFHpS), perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS), perfluorononane sulfonic acid (PFNS), perfluorodecane sulfonic acid (PFDS) and perfluorododecane sulfonic acid (PFDoS) in human hair by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). After extraction using ethyl acetate, dispersive ENVI-Carb was used for clean-up. Good intra- and inter-day precision for low (LQ 5 ng/g hair) and high spike (HQ 15n g/g) levels were achieved (in general RSD hair and 3-13 pg/g hair, respectively. The method limit of quantification (LOQm) ranged between 6 and 301 pg/g hair. The PFAS levels were measured in 30 human hair samples indicating that the levels are low (14-1534 pg/g hair). Some PFAS were not present in any hair sample (e.g. PFHpA, PFTeDA, PFNA, PFPeS, PFHpS, PFOS and PFNS), while other PFAS were frequently detected (PFBA, PFPeA, PFHxA, PFOA, PFBS, PFHxS, PFOS, PFDS and PFDoS) in human hair. Although levels in general were low, there is evidence of higher human exposure to some analytes, such as PFBA, PFPeA, PFHxA, PFOA, PFBS, PFHxS, and PFDoS. The current study shows that hair is a suitable alternative non-invasive matrix for exposure assessment of PFAS. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  9. Cloud-Based DDoS HTTP Attack Detection Using Covariance Matrix Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulaziz Aborujilah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this era of technology, cloud computing technology has become essential part of the IT services used the daily life. In this regard, website hosting services are gradually moving to the cloud. This adds new valued feature to the cloud-based websites and at the same time introduces new threats for such services. DDoS attack is one such serious threat. Covariance matrix approach is used in this article to detect such attacks. The results were encouraging, according to confusion matrix and ROC descriptors.

  10. Multi-Criteria Decision Matrix Approach for Suppliers Evaluation in Micro and Small Organisations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Madoranova

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to present an approach for supplier evaluation based on Multi-Criteria Decision Matrix adopted for specific requirements of micro and small sized organizations. Quality management system and its supply chain management are based on maintaining long-term partnerships with suppliers with a focus on their reliability. The paper contains a case study of the presented approach application in a small sized organization and a description of the software tool for supporting the process of supplier evaluation in organisations. Presented case study validated used approach in real conditions of a small sized organisation. Based on experience from the application of the approach, possible extensions of the approach for more accurate supplier evaluation are presented in the paper. Offered approach is designed for micro and small sized organization and therefore as cost and time saving. Presented approach is not suitable for larger organization or critical industries as power engineering or aviation.

  11. Early-life metal exposure and schizophrenia: A proof-of-concept study using novel tooth-matrix biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modabbernia, A; Velthorst, E; Gennings, C; De Haan, L; Austin, C; Sutterland, A; Mollon, J; Frangou, S; Wright, R; Arora, M; Reichenberg, A

    2016-08-01

    Despite evidence for the effects of metals on neurodevelopment, the long-term effects on mental health remain unclear due to methodological limitations. Our objective was to determine the feasibility of studying metal exposure during critical neurodevelopmental periods and to explore the association between early-life metal exposure and adult schizophrenia. We analyzed childhood-shed teeth from nine individuals with schizophrenia and five healthy controls. We investigated the association between exposure to lead (Pb(2+)), manganese (Mn(2+)), cadmium (Cd(2+)), copper (Cu(2+)), magnesium (Mg(2+)), and zinc (Zn(2+)), and schizophrenia, psychotic experiences, and intelligence quotient (IQ). We reconstructed the dose and timing of early-life metal exposures using laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. We found higher early-life Pb(2+) exposure among patients with schizophrenia than controls. The differences in log Mn(2+) and log Cu(2+) changed relatively linearly over time to postnatal negative values. There was a positive correlation between early-life Pb(2+) levels and psychotic experiences in adulthood. Moreover, we found a negative correlation between Pb(2+) levels and adult IQ. In our proof-of-concept study, using tooth-matrix biomarker that provides direct measurement of exposure in the fetus and newborn, we provide support for the role of metal exposure during critical neurodevelopmental periods in psychosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Refining mortality estimates in shark demographic analyses: A Bayesian inverse matrix approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, Jonathan J; Punt, André E; White, William T; Simpfendorfer, Colin A

    2018-01-18

    Leslie matrix models are an important analysis tool in conservation biology that are applied to a diversity of taxa. The standard approach estimates the finite rate of population growth (λ) from a set of vital rates. In some instances, an estimate of λ is available, but the vital rates are poorly understood and can be solved for using an inverse matrix approach. However, these approaches are rarely attempted due to pre-requisites of information on the structure of age or stage-classes. This study addressed this issue by using a combination of Monte Carlo simulations and the sample-importance-resampling (SIR) algorithm to solve the inverse matrix problem without data on population structure. This approach was applied to the grey reef shark (Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos) from the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) in Australia to determine the demography of this population. Additionally, these outputs were applied to another heavily fished population from Papua New Guinea (PNG) that requires estimates of λ for fisheries management. The SIR analysis determined that natural mortality (M) and total mortality (Z) based on indirect methods have previously been overestimated for C. amblyrhynchos, leading to an underestimated λ. The updated Z distributions determined using SIR provided λ estimates that matched an empirical λ for the GBR population and corrected obvious error in the demographic parameters for the PNG population. This approach provides opportunity for the inverse matrix approach to be applied more broadly to situations where information on population structure is lacking. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  13. Characterization of the Vibrio cholerae extracellular matrix: a top-down solid-state NMR approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichhardt, Courtney; Fong, Jiunn C N; Yildiz, Fitnat; Cegelski, Lynette

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are communities of bacterial cells surrounded by a self-secreted extracellular matrix. Biofilm formation by Vibrio cholerae, the human pathogen responsible for cholera, contributes to its environmental survival and infectivity. Important genetic and molecular requirements have been identified for V. cholerae biofilm formation, yet a compositional accounting of these parts in the intact biofilm or extracellular matrix has not been described. As insoluble and non-crystalline assemblies, determinations of biofilm composition pose a challenge to conventional biochemical and biophysical analyses. The V. cholerae extracellular matrix composition is particularly complex with several proteins, complex polysaccharides, and other biomolecules having been identified as matrix parts. We developed a new top-down solid-state NMR approach to spectroscopically assign and quantify the carbon pools of the intact V. cholerae extracellular matrix using ¹³C CPMAS and ¹³C{(¹⁵N}, ¹⁵N{³¹P}, and ¹³C{³¹P}REDOR. General sugar, lipid, and amino acid pools were first profiled and then further annotated and quantified as specific carbon types, including carbonyls, amides, glycyl carbons, and anomerics. In addition, ¹⁵N profiling revealed a large amine pool relative to amide contributions, reflecting the prevalence of molecular modifications with free amine groups. Our top-down approach could be implemented immediately to examine the extracellular matrix from mutant strains that might alter polysaccharide production or lipid release beyond the cell surface; or to monitor changes that may accompany environmental variations and stressors such as altered nutrient composition, oxidative stress or antibiotics. More generally, our analysis has demonstrated that solid-state NMR is a valuable tool to characterize complex biofilm systems. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Assessment of xenoestrogenic exposure by a biomarker approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Thomas Høj; Nielsen, Flemming; Andersen, Helle Raun

    2003-01-01

    : To determine the applicability of this approach, we assessed the estrogenicity of serum samples from 30 pregnant and 60 non-pregnant Danish women thought to be exposed only to low levels of endocrine disruptors. We also studied 211 serum samples from pregnant Faroese women, whose marine diet included whale...... with the lipid-based concentrations of individual suspected endocrine disruptors in the Faroese samples. When added along with the estradiol standard, an indication of an enhanced estrogenic response was found in most cases. Thus, the in vitro estrogenicity response offers a promising and feasible approach......BACKGROUND: Epidemiological documentation of endocrine disruption is complicated by imprecise exposure assessment, especially when exposures are mixed. Even if the estrogenic activity of all compounds were known, the combined effect of possible additive and/or inhibiting interaction...

  15. Assessment of global flood exposures - developing an appropriate approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millinship, Ian; Booth, Naomi

    2015-04-01

    Increasingly complex probabilistic catastrophe models have become the standard for quantitative flood risk assessments by re/insurance companies. On the one hand, probabilistic modelling of this nature is extremely useful; a large range of risk metrics can be output. However, they can be time consuming and computationally expensive to develop and run. Levels of uncertainty are persistently high despite, or perhaps because of, attempts to increase resolution and complexity. A cycle of dependency between modelling companies and re/insurers has developed whereby available models are purchased, models run, and both portfolio and model data 'improved' every year. This can lead to potential exposures in perils and territories that are not currently modelled being largely overlooked by companies, who may then face substantial and unexpected losses when large events occur in these areas. We present here an approach to assessing global flood exposures which reduces the scale and complexity of approach used and begins with the identification of hotspots where there is a significant exposure to flood risk. The method comprises four stages: i) compile consistent exposure information, ii) to apply reinsurance terms and conditions to calculate values exposed, iii) to assess the potential hazard using a global set of flood hazard maps, and iv) to identify potential risk 'hotspots' which include considerations of spatially and/or temporally clustered historical events, and local flood defences. This global exposure assessment is designed as a scoping exercise, and reveals areas or cities where the potential for accumulated loss is of significant interest to a reinsurance company, and for which there is no existing catastrophe model. These regions are then candidates for the development of deterministic scenarios, or probabilistic models. The key advantages of this approach will be discussed. These include simplicity and ability of business leaders to understand results, as well as

  16. Density matrix renormalization group approach for many-body open quantum systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotureau, J; Michel, N; Nazarewicz, W; Płoszajczak, M; Dukelsky, J

    2006-09-15

    The density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) approach is extended to complex-symmetric density matrices characteristic of many-body open quantum systems. Within the continuum shell model, we investigate the interplay between many-body configuration interaction and coupling to open channels in case of the unbound nucleus (7)He. It is shown that the extended DMRG procedure provides a highly accurate treatment of the coupling to the nonresonant scattering continuum.

  17. Calibrating a population-based job-exposure matrix using inspection measurements to estimate historical occupational exposure to lead for a population-based cohort in Shanghai, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Dong-Hee; Bhatti, Parveen; Coble, Joseph B.; Stewart, Patricia A; Lu, Wei; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Ji, Bu-Tian; Xue, Shouzheng; Locke, Sarah J.; Portengen, Lutzen; Yang, Gong; Chow, Wong-Ho; Gao, Yu-Tang; Rothman, Nathaniel; Vermeulen, Roel; Friesen, Melissa C.

    2012-01-01

    The epidemiologic evidence for the carcinogenicity of lead is inconsistent and requires improved exposure assessment to estimate risk. We evaluated historical occupational lead exposure for a population-based cohort of women (n=74,942) by calibrating a job-exposure matrix (JEM) with lead fume (n=20,084) and lead dust (n=5,383) measurements collected over four decades in Shanghai, China. Using mixed-effect models, we calibrated intensity JEM ratings to the measurements using fixed-effects terms for year and JEM rating. We developed job/industry-specific estimates from the random-effects terms for job and industry. The model estimates were applied to subjects’ jobs when the JEM probability rating was high for either job or industry; remaining jobs were considered unexposed. The models predicted that exposure increased monotonically with JEM intensity rating and decreased 20–50-fold over time. The cumulative calibrated JEM estimates and job/industry-specific estimates were highly correlated (Pearson correlation=0.79–0.84). Overall, 5% of the person-years and 8% of the women were exposed to lead fume; 2% of the person-years and 4% of the women were exposed to lead dust. The most common lead-exposed jobs were manufacturing electronic equipment. These historical lead estimates should enhance our ability to detect associations between lead exposure and cancer risk in future epidemiologic analyses. PMID:22910004

  18. Ecological risk assessment of agricultural soils for the definition of soil screening values: A comparison between substance-based and matrix-based approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Pivato

    2017-04-01

    The results indicate that the “matrix-based” approach can be efficiently implemented in the Italian legislation for the ERA of agricultural soils. This method, if compared to the institutionalized “substance based” approach is (i comparable in economic terms and in testing time, (ii is site specific and assesses the real effect of the investigated soil on a battery of bioassays, (iii accounts for phenomena that may radically modify the exposure of the organisms to the totality of contaminants and (iv can be considered sufficiently conservative.

  19. Transfer-matrix approach for finite-difference time-domain simulation of periodic structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deinega, Alexei; Belousov, Sergei; Valuev, Ilya

    2013-11-01

    Optical properties of periodic structures can be calculated using the transfer-matrix approach, which establishes a relation between amplitudes of the wave incident on a structure with transmitted or reflected waves. The transfer matrix can be used to obtain transmittance and reflectance spectra of finite periodic structures as well as eigenmodes of infinite structures. Traditionally, calculation of the transfer matrix is performed in the frequency domain and involves linear algebra. In this work, we present a technique for calculation of the transfer matrix using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method and show the way of its implementation in FDTD code. To illustrate the performance of our technique we calculate the transmittance spectra for opal photonic crystal slabs consisting of multiple layers of spherical scatterers. Our technique can be used for photonic band structure calculations. It can also be combined with existing FDTD methods for the analysis of periodic structures at an oblique incidence, as well as for modeling point sources in a periodic environment.

  20. An Improved DOA Estimation Approach Using Coarray Interpolation and Matrix Denoising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Muran; Chen, Tao; Wang, Ben

    2017-05-16

    Co-prime arrays can estimate the directions of arrival (DOAs) of O ( M N ) sources with O ( M + N ) sensors, and are convenient to analyze due to their closed-form expression for the locations of virtual lags. However, the number of degrees of freedom is limited due to the existence of holes in difference coarrays if subspace-based algorithms such as the spatial smoothing multiple signal classification (MUSIC) algorithm are utilized. To address this issue, techniques such as positive definite Toeplitz completion and array interpolation have been proposed in the literature. Another factor that compromises the accuracy of DOA estimation is the limitation of the number of snapshots. Coarray-based processing is particularly sensitive to the discrepancy between the sample covariance matrix and the ideal covariance matrix due to the finite number of snapshots. In this paper, coarray interpolation based on matrix completion (MC) followed by a denoising operation is proposed to detect more sources with a higher accuracy. The effectiveness of the proposed method is based on the capability of MC to fill in holes in the virtual sensors and that of MC denoising operation to reduce the perturbation in the sample covariance matrix. The results of numerical simulations verify the superiority of the proposed approach.

  1. Piezoelectric T-matrix approach and multiple scattering of electroacoustic waves in thin plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darabi, Amir; Ruzzene, Massimo; Leamy, Michael J.

    2017-12-01

    Metamaterial-enhanced harvesting (MEH) of wave energy in thin plates and other structures has appeared recently for powering small sensors and devices. To support continued MEH concept development, this paper proposes a fully coupled T-matrix formulation for analyzing scattering of incident wave energy from a piezoelectric patch attached to a thin plate. More generally, the T-matrix represents an input–output relationship between incident and reflected waves from inclusions in a host layer, and is introduced herein for a piezoelectric patch connected to an external circuit. The utility of a T-matrix formalism is most apparent in scenarios employing multiple piezoelectric harvesters, where it can be re-used with other T-matrices (such as those previously formulated for rigid, void, and elastic inclusions) in a multiple scattering context to compute the total wavefield and other response quantities, such as harvested power. Following development of the requisite T-matrix, harvesting in an example funnel-shaped metamaterial waveguide structure is predicted using the multiple scattering approach. Enhanced wave energy harvesting predictions are verified through comparisons to experimental results of a funnel-shaped waveguide formed by placing rigid aluminum inclusions in, and multiple piezoelectric harvesters on, a Lexan plate. Good agreement with predicted response quantities is noted.

  2. Ulnar neuropathy and ulnar neuropathy-like symptoms in relation to biomechanical exposures assessed by a job exposure matrix: a triple case-referent study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svendsen, Susanne Wulff; Johnsen, Birger; Fuglsang-Frederiksen, Anders; Frost, Poul

    2012-11-01

    We aimed to evaluate relations between occupational biomechanical exposures and (1) ulnar neuropathy confirmed by electroneurography (ENG) and (2) ulnar neuropathy-like symptoms with normal ENG. In this triple case-referent study, we identified all patients aged 18-65 years, examined with ENG at a neurophysiological department on suspicion of ulnar neuropathy, 2001-2007. We mailed a questionnaire to 546 patients with ulnar neuropathy, 633 patients with ulnar neuropathy-like symptoms and two separate groups of community referents, matched on sex, age and primary care centre (risk set sampling). The two patient groups were also compared to each other directly. We constructed a Job Exposure Matrix to provide estimates of exposure to non-neutral postures, repetitive movements, hand-arm vibrations and forceful work. Conditional and unconditional logistic regressions were used. The proportion who responded was 59%. Ulnar neuropathy was related to forceful work with an exposure-response pattern reaching an OR of 3.85 (95% CI 2.04 to 7.24); non-neutral postures strengthened effects of forceful work. No relation was observed with repetitive movements. Ulnar neuropathy-like symptoms were related to repetitive movements with an OR of 1.89 (95% CI 1.01 to 3.52) in the highest-exposure category (≥2.5 h/day); forceful work was unrelated to the outcome. Ulnar neuropathy and ulnar neuropathy-like symptoms differed with respect to associations with occupational biomechanical exposures. Findings suggested specific effects of forceful work on the ulnar nerve. Thus, results corroborated the importance of an electrophysiological diagnosis when evaluating risk factors for ulnar neuropathy. Preventive effects may be achieved by reducing biomechanical exposures at work.

  3. An approach to calculate and visualize intraoperative scattered radiation exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Markus; Duwenkamp, Christopher; Dresing, Klaus; Bott, Oliver J

    2009-01-01

    During the intraoperative radiograph generation process with mobile image intensifier systems (C-arm) most of the radiation exposure for patient, surgeon and operation room personal is caused by scattered radiation. The intensity and propagation of scattered radiation depend on different parameters, e.g. the intensity of the primary radiation, and the positioning of the mobile image intensifier. Exposure through scattered radiation can be minimized when all these parameters are adjusted correctly. Because radiation is potentially dangerous and could not be perceived by any human sense the current education on correct adjustment of a C-arm is designed very theoretical. This paper presents an approach of scattered radiation calculation and visualization embedded in a computer based training system for mobile image intensifier systems called virtX. With the help of this extension the virtX training system should enrich the current radiation protection training with visual and practical training aspects.

  4. Mixed Matrix Method Provides A Reliable Metabolite Exposure Comparison for Assessment of Metabolites in Safety Testing (MIST).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Ryan H; Khojasteh, Cyrus; Wright, Matthew; Hop, Cornelis E C A; Ma, Shuguang

    2017-11-17

    The regulatory guidances on metabolites in safety testing (MIST) by US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and International Conference on Harmonisation (ICH) describe the necessity to assess exposures of major circulating metabolites in humans at steady state relative to exposures achieved in nonclinical safety studies prior to the initiation of large scale clinical trials. This comparison can be accomplished by measuring metabolite concentrations in animals and humans with validated bioanalytical methods. However, bioanalysis of metabolites in multiple species and multiple studies is resource intensive and may impact the timelines of clinical studies. A simple, reliable and accurate method has been developed for quantitative assessment of metabolite coverage in preclinical safety species by mixing equal volume of human plasma with blank plasma of animal species and vice versa followed by an analysis using LC-SRM or LC-HRMS. Here, we explored the reliability and accuracy of this method in several development projects at Genentech and compared the results to those obtained from validated bioanalytical methods. The mixed-matrix method provided comparable accuracy (within ±20%) to those obtained from validated bioanalysis but does not require authentic standards or radiolabeled compounds, which could translate to time and resource savings in drug development. Quantitative assessment of metabolite coverage in safety species can be made using mixed matrix method with similar accuracy and scientific rigor to those obtained from validated bioanalytical methods. Moving forward, we are encouraging the industry and regulators to consider accepting the mixed matrix method for assessing metabolite exposure comparisons between humans and animal species used in toxicology studies. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  5. Assessing students approaches to learning using a matrix framework in a Malaysian public university.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teoh, Hee Chong; Abdullah, Maria Chong; Roslan, Samsilah; Mohd Daud, Shaffe

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the learning characteristics of students using a matrix framework of learning approaches (MFLA) in a Malaysian public university. A survey form based on Biggs's study process questionnaire (SPQ) was distributed to a total of 350 students. This study employed a descriptive correlation research design to address the research objectives. The findings revealed that Malaysian students are prone to applying the achieving approach in their studies. The achieving approach is the most preferable learning characteristic. The results also indicated that four of the nine hypothetical learning approaches exist, two of which are positive in nature. As a result, a proposed teaching method based on the MFLA was introduced to suit the needs of these major learning characteristics among students.

  6. New method for evaluation of the matrix representation of the generators in the unitary-group approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hai-Lun; Cao, Yu-Fang

    1988-01-01

    A new superposition method is presented for evaluating the matrix representation of the generators in the unitary-group approach. This superposition method is based on the Weyl graphical method for the calculation of matrix elements; the latter is an extension of Harter's jawbone formula for the evaluation of the matrix elements of Ei,i-1 to the more general case Ei,j and can also deal with both fermion and boson.

  7. Prospects for Brueckner-Hartree-Fock calculations in the Density Matrix Expansion approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yinu; Dyhdalo, Alex; Bogner, Scott; Furnstahl, Richard

    2017-09-01

    Recently, a microscopically based nuclear energy density functional was derived by applying the Density Matrix Expansion (DME) to the Hartree-Fock energy obtained from chiral effective field theory (χEFT) two- and three-nucleon interactions. The Hartree-Fock approach cannot contain the full many-body correlations. Brueckner-Hartree-Fock (BHF) theory gives an improved definition of the one-body potential U by replacing the interaction by a reaction matrix G. The central result of modern renormalization theory is that a general RG decoupling generates an infinite series of counterterms consistent with the input interaction. Then we can apply the DME at Hartree-Fock level with long-range χEFT interactions and zero-range contact interactions to model BHF correlations. This work was supported in part by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. PHY-1614460 and the NUCLEI SciDAC Collaboration under Department of Energy Grant DE-SC0008533.

  8. Scattering matrix approach to multichannel transport in many lead graphene nanoribbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mencarelli, D.; Rozzi, T.; Pierantoni, L.

    2010-04-01

    Multichannel analysis of graphene nanoribbons (GNR), often required for describing applications to practical devices, constitutes a heavy computational task, even in a simplified framework like that provided by discrete or nearest neighbour models. Scattering (S) matrix techniques, widely used for quantum transport in low dimensional systems and for the computation of electromagnetic fields, is shown here to provide a powerful formal platform for the analysis, and, in principle, the synthesis, of GNR multiport circuits. Periodic modes, solutions of GNR waveguides, are demonstrated to obey charge conservation and reciprocity constraints corresponding to unitary and symmetry properties of the S-matrix, under proper normalization conditions. We propose a systematic use of this approach to deal with problems such as scattering by lattice defects, the presence of external applied fields, crossing GNRs and T-junctions.

  9. Proteomic analysis of matrix of dental biofilm formed under dietary carbohydrate exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moi, G P; Cury, J A; Dombroski, T C D; Pauletti, B A; Paes Leme, A F

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate whether protein changes in extracellular matrix of dental biofilm are a unique property of sucrose, this in situ study was conducted using as active control glucose and fructose, the sucrose monosaccharide constituents. Proteins were analyzed by two-dimensional electrophoresis followed by LC-MS/MS after trypsin digestion. Absence or lower abundance of calcium-binding proteins and higher abundance of prolactin-induced proteins were found in biofilm formed in the presence of sucrose or its monosaccharide constituents compared with water, the negative control group. The data suggest that besides sucrose, other dietary carbohydrates may also provoke a change in the protein profile of extracellular matrix of dental biofilm formed. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. A Random Matrix Approach for Quantifying Model-Form Uncertainties in Turbulence Modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Xiao, Heng; Ghanem, Roger G

    2016-01-01

    With the ever-increasing use of Reynolds-Averaged Navier--Stokes (RANS) simulations in mission-critical applications, the quantification of model-form uncertainty in RANS models has attracted attention in the turbulence modeling community. Recently, a physics-based, nonparametric approach for quantifying model-form uncertainty in RANS simulations has been proposed, where Reynolds stresses are projected to physically meaningful dimensions and perturbations are introduced only in the physically realizable limits. However, a challenge associated with this approach is to assess the amount of information introduced in the prior distribution and to avoid imposing unwarranted constraints. In this work we propose a random matrix approach for quantifying model-form uncertainties in RANS simulations with the realizability of the Reynolds stress guaranteed. Furthermore, the maximum entropy principle is used to identify the probability distribution that satisfies the constraints from available information but without int...

  11. An Enhanced Collaborative Optimization Approach with Design Structure Matrix Algorithms to Group and Decouple Multidisciplines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xifan Yao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To improve the solution efficiency and reliability of multidisciplinary design optimization (MDO, an enhanced MDO approach, called sequenced collaborative optimization (SCO, is proposed. The proposed approach introduces the design structure matrix (DSM to describe the coupling effects among disciplines and aggregates those mutually coupling disciplines into the strong tie groups among similar ones and the weak tie among heterogeneous ones through clustering algorithms. Further, those in the same group are sequenced by the DSM division algorithm. Moreover, by adding constraints, the groups are made independent, resulting in a tree structure without loops, thus decoupling the original multidisciplinary problem into several independent collaborative optimization modules. In the end, an example is employed to verify the efficiency and reliability of the approach.

  12. Alexithymia tendencies and mere exposure alter social approachability judgments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Darren W; McKeen, Nancy A

    2011-04-01

    People have a fundamental motivation for social connection and social engagement, but how do they decide whom to approach in ambiguous social situations? Subjective feelings often influence such decisions, but people vary in awareness of their feelings. We evaluated two opposing hypotheses based on visual familiarity effects and emotional awareness on social approachability judgments. These hypotheses differ in their interpretation of the familiarity or mere exposure effect with either an affective or cognitive interpretation. The responses of our 128-student sample supported the cognitive interpretation. Lower emotional awareness or higher alexithymia was associated with higher approachability judgments to familiarized faces and lower approachability judgments to novel faces. These findings were independent of the Big Five personality factors. The results indicate that individual differences in emotional awareness should be integrated into social decision-making models. The results also suggest that cognitive-perceptual alterations may underlie the poorer social outcomes associated with alexithymia. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Personality © 2011, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Combinatorial theory of the semiclassical evaluation of transport moments. I. Equivalence with the random matrix approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berkolaiko, G., E-mail: berko@math.tamu.edu [Department of Mathematics, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843-3368 (United States); Kuipers, J., E-mail: Jack.Kuipers@physik.uni-regensburg.de [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Universität Regensburg, D-93040 Regensburg (Germany)

    2013-11-15

    To study electronic transport through chaotic quantum dots, there are two main theoretical approaches. One involves substituting the quantum system with a random scattering matrix and performing appropriate ensemble averaging. The other treats the transport in the semiclassical approximation and studies correlations among sets of classical trajectories. There are established evaluation procedures within the semiclassical evaluation that, for several linear and nonlinear transport moments to which they were applied, have always resulted in the agreement with random matrix predictions. We prove that this agreement is universal: any semiclassical evaluation within the accepted procedures is equivalent to the evaluation within random matrix theory. The equivalence is shown by developing a combinatorial interpretation of the trajectory sets as ribbon graphs (maps) with certain properties and exhibiting systematic cancellations among their contributions. Remaining trajectory sets can be identified with primitive (palindromic) factorisations whose number gives the coefficients in the corresponding expansion of the moments of random matrices. The equivalence is proved for systems with and without time reversal symmetry.

  14. Combinatorial theory of the semiclassical evaluation of transport moments. I. Equivalence with the random matrix approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkolaiko, G.; Kuipers, J.

    2013-11-01

    To study electronic transport through chaotic quantum dots, there are two main theoretical approaches. One involves substituting the quantum system with a random scattering matrix and performing appropriate ensemble averaging. The other treats the transport in the semiclassical approximation and studies correlations among sets of classical trajectories. There are established evaluation procedures within the semiclassical evaluation that, for several linear and nonlinear transport moments to which they were applied, have always resulted in the agreement with random matrix predictions. We prove that this agreement is universal: any semiclassical evaluation within the accepted procedures is equivalent to the evaluation within random matrix theory. The equivalence is shown by developing a combinatorial interpretation of the trajectory sets as ribbon graphs (maps) with certain properties and exhibiting systematic cancellations among their contributions. Remaining trajectory sets can be identified with primitive (palindromic) factorisations whose number gives the coefficients in the corresponding expansion of the moments of random matrices. The equivalence is proved for systems with and without time reversal symmetry.

  15. The effects of long-duration space exposure on the mechanical properties of some carbon-reinforced resin matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyhnal, Richard F.

    1993-01-01

    Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) Experiment A0175 involved the non-instrumented exposure of seven carbon-fiber reinforced resin-matrix advanced composite panels contained in two trays - A7 and A1. These two trays were located, respectively, on the leading and trailing faces of LDEF, obliquely oriented to the RAM (Row 9) and WAKE (Row 3) directions. The identity and location of the seven panels, which consisted of six flat laminates of the following material systems are shown: carbon/epoxy (T300/934), carbon/bismaleimide (T300/F178), and carbon/polyimide (C6000/LARC-160 and C6000/PMR-15), plus one bonded honeycomb sandwich panel (T300/934 face sheets and Nomex core) patterned after the Space Shuttle payload bay door construction. These material systems were selected to represent a range of then-available matrix resins which, by virtue of their differing polymer chemistry, could conceivably exhibit differing susceptibility to the low-earth orbit (LEO) environment. The principal exposure conditions of the LDEF environment at these tray locations are shown. Noteworthy to some of the observations discussed is the four-orders-of magnitude difference in the atomic oxygen (AO) fluence, which made a shallow incidence angle (approximately 22 deg) to Tray A7, while Tray A1 on the trailing face was essentially shielded from AO exposure. This evaluation focused on determining the individual and relative suitability of a variety of resin-matrix composite systems for long-term space structural applications. This was accomplished primarily by measuring and comparing a range of engineering mechanical properties on over 300 test coupons sectioned from the flight panels and from identical control panels, and tested at ambient and elevated temperatures. This testing was supported by limited physical characterization, involving visual examination of flight panel surface features, measurements of weight loss and warpage, and examination for changes in internal integrity (micro

  16. Matrix Population Model for Estimating Effects from Time-Varying Aquatic Exposures: Technical Documentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Office of Pesticide Programs models daily aquatic pesticide exposure values for 30 years in its risk assessments. However, only a fraction of that information is typically used in these assessments. The population model employed herein is a deterministic, density-dependent pe...

  17. Monitoring exposure to heavy metals among children in Lake Victoria, Kenya: Environmental and fish matrix

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Okoth, E.O.; Admiraal, W.; Osano, O.; Ngure, V.; Kraak, M.H.S.; Omutange, E.S.

    2010-01-01

    This study used hair and nails to biomonitor heavy metals (Pb, Cd, Cr and Cu) from geological source and exposure through regular fish consumption among children in Lake Victoria, Kenya. Concentration of Pb and Cu in water reflected anthropogenic pathways, while Cd and Cr reflected accumulation from

  18. Comparison of Matrix Cracking in High Temperature and Lower Temperature PMCs from Cryogenic Exposure (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    at -196 °C according to ASTM D3039 . III. Results A. Transverse Crack Densities T650 / AFR-PE-4 cross ply samples were thermally cycled between... Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39-18 1 Comparison of Matrix Cracking in High Temperature and Lower Temperature PMCs...toughness testing of the T650 / AFR-PE-4 unidirectional composite was conducted according to ASTM E399. The specimens were 20 mm x 20 mm square and 1.14

  19. Coordinate transformation and matrix measure approach for synchronization of complex networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juang, Jonq; Liang, Yu-Hao

    2009-09-01

    Global synchronization in complex networks has attracted considerable interest in various fields. There are mainly two analytical approaches for studying such time-varying networks. The first approach is Lyapunov function-based methods. For such an approach, the connected-graph-stability (CGS) method arguably gives the best results. Nevertheless, CGS is limited to the networks with cooperative couplings. The matrix measure approach (MMA) proposed by Chen, although having a wider range of applications in the network topologies than that of CGS, works for smaller numbers of nodes in most network topologies. The approach also has a limitation with networks having partial-state coupling. Other than giving yet another MMA, we introduce a new and, in some cases, optimal coordinate transformation to study such networks. Our approach fixes all the drawbacks of CGS and MMA. In addition, by merely checking the structure of the vector field of the individual oscillator, we shall be able to determine if the system is globally synchronized. In summary, our results can be applied to rather general time-varying networks with a large number of nodes.

  20. Combining a Job-Exposure Matrix with Exposure Measurements to Assess Occupational Exposure to Benzene in a Population Cohort in Shanghai, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesen, Melissa C.; Coble, Joseph B.; Lu, Wei; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Ji, Bu-Tian; Xue, Shouzheng; Portengen, Lutzen; Chow, Wong-Ho; Gao, Yu-Tang; Yang, Gong; Rothman, Nathaniel; Vermeulen, Roel

    2012-01-01

    Background: Generic job-exposure matrices (JEMs) are often used in population-based epidemiologic studies to assess occupational risk factors when only the job and industry information of each subject is available. JEM ratings are often based on professional judgment, are usually ordinal or semi-quantitative, and often do not account for changes in exposure over time. We present an empirical Bayesian framework that combines ordinal subjective JEM ratings with benzene measurements. Our aim was to better discriminate between job, industry, and time differences in exposure levels compared to using a JEM alone. Methods: We combined 63 221 short-term area air measurements of benzene exposure (1954–2000) collected during routine health and safety inspections in Shanghai, China, with independently developed JEM intensity ratings for each job and industry using a mixed-effects model. The fixed-effects terms included the JEM intensity ratings for job and industry (both ordinal, 0–3) and a time trend that we incorporated as a b-spline. The random-effects terms included job (n = 33) and industry nested within job (n = 399). We predicted the benzene concentration in two ways: (i) a calibrated JEM estimate was calculated using the fixed-effects model parameters for calendar year and JEM intensity ratings; (ii) a job-/industry-specific estimate was calculated using the fixed-effects model parameters and the best linear unbiased predictors from the random effects for job and industry using an empirical Bayes estimation procedure. Finally, we applied the predicted benzene exposures to a prospective population-based cohort of women in Shanghai, China (n = 74 942). Results: Exposure levels were 13 times higher in 1965 than in 2000 and declined at a rate that varied from 4 to 15% per year from 1965 to 1985, followed by a small peak in the mid-1990s. The job-/industry-specific estimates had greater differences between exposure levels than the calibrated JEM estimates (97.5th

  1. Density Matrix Renormalization Group Approach to Two-Fluid Open Many-Fermion Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rotureau, J. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) & Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Michel, N. [Kyoto University, Japan; Nazarewicz, Witold [ORNL; Ploszajczak, M. [Grand Accelerateur National d' Ions Lourds (GANIL); Dukelsky, J. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, Madrid, Spain

    2009-01-01

    We have extended the density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) approach to two-fluid open many-fermion systems governed by complex-symmetric Hamiltonians. The applications are carried out for three- and four-nucleon (proton-neutron) systems within the Gamow Shell Model (GSM) in the complex-energy plane. We study necessary and sufficient conditions for the GSM+DMRG method to yield the correct ground state eigenvalue and discuss different truncation schemes within DMRG. The proposed approach will enable configuration interaction studies of weakly bound and unbound strongly interacting complex systems which, because of a prohibitively large size of Fock space, cannot be treated by means of the direct diagonalization.

  2. Hierarchical approach to optimization of parallel matrix multiplication on large-scale platforms

    KAUST Repository

    Hasanov, Khalid

    2014-03-04

    © 2014, Springer Science+Business Media New York. Many state-of-the-art parallel algorithms, which are widely used in scientific applications executed on high-end computing systems, were designed in the twentieth century with relatively small-scale parallelism in mind. Indeed, while in 1990s a system with few hundred cores was considered a powerful supercomputer, modern top supercomputers have millions of cores. In this paper, we present a hierarchical approach to optimization of message-passing parallel algorithms for execution on large-scale distributed-memory systems. The idea is to reduce the communication cost by introducing hierarchy and hence more parallelism in the communication scheme. We apply this approach to SUMMA, the state-of-the-art parallel algorithm for matrix–matrix multiplication, and demonstrate both theoretically and experimentally that the modified Hierarchical SUMMA significantly improves the communication cost and the overall performance on large-scale platforms.

  3. A new approach to a global fit of the CKM matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoecker, A.; Lacker, H.; Laplace, S. [Laboratoire de l' Accelerateur Lineaire, 91 - Orsay (France); Le Diberder, F. [Laboratoire de Physique Nucleaire et des Hautes Energies, 75 - Paris (France)

    2001-05-01

    We report on a new approach to a global CKM matrix analysis taking into account most recent experimental and theoretical results. The statistical framework (Rfit) developed in this paper advocates frequentist statistics. Other approaches, such as Bayesian statistics or the 95% CL scan method are also discussed. We emphasize the distinction of a model testing and a model dependent, metrological phase in which the various parameters of the theory are estimated. Measurements and theoretical parameters entering the global fit are thoroughly discussed, in particular with respect to their theoretical uncertainties. Graphical results for confidence levels are drawn in various one and two-dimensional parameter spaces. Numerical results are provided for all relevant CKM parameterizations, the CKM elements and theoretical input parameters. Predictions for branching ratios of rare K and B meson decays are obtained. A simple, predictive SUSY extension of the Standard Model is discussed. (authors)

  4. Bottom-up and top-down solid-state NMR approaches for bacterial biofilm matrix composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cegelski, Lynette

    2015-04-01

    The genomics and proteomics revolutions have been enormously successful in providing crucial "parts lists" for biological systems. Yet, formidable challenges exist in generating complete descriptions of how the parts function and assemble into macromolecular complexes and whole-cell assemblies. Bacterial biofilms are complex multicellular bacterial communities protected by a slime-like extracellular matrix that confers protection to environmental stress and enhances resistance to antibiotics and host defenses. As a non-crystalline, insoluble, heterogeneous assembly, the biofilm extracellular matrix poses a challenge to compositional analysis by conventional methods. In this perspective, bottom-up and top-down solid-state NMR approaches are described for defining chemical composition in complex macrosystems. The "sum-of-the-parts" bottom-up approach was introduced to examine the amyloid-integrated biofilms formed by Escherichia coli and permitted the first determination of the composition of the intact extracellular matrix from a bacterial biofilm. An alternative top-down approach was developed to define composition in Vibrio cholerae biofilms and relied on an extensive panel of NMR measurements to tease out specific carbon pools from a single sample of the intact extracellular matrix. These two approaches are widely applicable to other heterogeneous assemblies. For bacterial biofilms, quantitative parameters of matrix composition are needed to understand how biofilms are assembled, to improve the development of biofilm inhibitors, and to dissect inhibitor modes of action. Solid-state NMR approaches will also be invaluable in obtaining parameters of matrix architecture.

  5. Shaping the Future Landscape: Catchment Systems Engineering and the Decision Support Matrix Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewett, Caspar; Quinn, Paul; Wilkinson, Mark; Wainwright, John

    2017-04-01

    Land degradation is widely recognised as one of the great environmental challenges facing humanity today, much of which is directly associated with human activity. The negative impacts of climate change and of the way in which we have engineered the landscape through, for example, agriculture intensification and deforestation, need to be addressed. However, the answer is not a simple matter of doing the opposite of current practice. Nor is non-intervention a viable option. There is a need to bring together approaches from the natural and social sciences both to understand the issues and to act to solve real problems. We propose combining a Catchment Systems Engineering (CSE) approach that builds on existing approaches such as Natural Water Retention Measures, Green infrastructure and Nature-Based Solutions with a multi-scale framework for decision support that has been successfully applied to diffuse pollution and flood risk management. The CSE philosophy follows that of Earth Systems Engineering and Management, which aims to engineer and manage complex coupled human-natural systems in a highly integrated, rational manner. CSE is multi-disciplinary, and necessarily involves a wide range of subject areas including anthropology, engineering, environmental science, ethics and philosophy. It offers a rational approach which accepts the fact that we need to engineer and act to improve the functioning of the existing catchment entity on which we rely. The decision support framework proposed draws on physical and mathematical modelling; Participatory Action Research; and demonstration sites at which practical interventions are implemented. It is predicated on the need to work with stakeholders to co-produce knowledge that leads to proactive interventions to reverse the land degradation we observe today while sustaining the agriculture humanity needs. The philosophy behind CSE and examples of where it has been applied successfully are presented. The Decision Support Matrix

  6. Matrix shaped pulsed laser deposition: New approach to large area and homogeneous deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akkan, C.K.; May, A. [INM – Leibniz Institute for New Materials, CVD/Biosurfaces Group, Campus D2 2, 66123 Saarbrücken (Germany); Hammadeh, M. [Department for Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine, IVF Laboratory, Saarland University Medical Center and Faculty of Medicine, Building 9, 66421 Homburg, Saar (Germany); Abdul-Khaliq, H. [Clinic for Pediatric Cardiology, Saarland University Medical Center and Faculty of Medicine, Building 9, 66421 Homburg, Saar (Germany); Aktas, O.C., E-mail: cenk.aktas@inm-gmbh.de [INM – Leibniz Institute for New Materials, CVD/Biosurfaces Group, Campus D2 2, 66123 Saarbrücken (Germany)

    2014-05-01

    Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) is one of the well-established physical vapor deposition methods used for synthesis of ultra-thin layers. Especially PLD is suitable for the preparation of thin films of complex alloys and ceramics where the conservation of the stoichiometry is critical. Beside several advantages of PLD, inhomogeneity in thickness limits use of PLD in some applications. There are several approaches such as rotation of the substrate or scanning of the laser beam over the target to achieve homogenous layers. On the other hand movement and transition create further complexity in process parameters. Here we present a new approach which we call Matrix Shaped PLD to control the thickness and homogeneity of deposited layers precisely. This new approach is based on shaping of the incoming laser beam by a microlens array and a Fourier lens. The beam is split into much smaller multi-beam array over the target and this leads to a homogenous plasma formation. The uniform intensity distribution over the target yields a very uniform deposit on the substrate. This approach is used to deposit carbide and oxide thin films for biomedical applications. As a case study coating of a stent which has a complex geometry is presented briefly.

  7. A TIERED APPROACH TO PERFORMING UNCERTAINTY ANALYSIS IN CONDUCTING EXPOSURE ANALYSIS FOR CHEMICALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The WHO/IPCS draft Guidance Document on Characterizing and Communicating Uncertainty in Exposure Assessment provides guidance on recommended strategies for conducting uncertainty analysis as part of human exposure analysis. Specifically, a tiered approach to uncertainty analysis ...

  8. Global financial indices and twitter sentiment: A random matrix theory approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, A.

    2016-11-01

    We use Random Matrix Theory (RMT) approach to analyze the correlation matrix structure of a collection of public tweets and the corresponding return time series associated to 20 global financial indices along 7 trading months of 2014. In order to quantify the collection of tweets, we constructed daily polarity time series from public tweets via sentiment analysis. The results from RMT analysis support the fact of the existence of true correlations between financial indices, polarities, and the mixture of them. Moreover, we found a good agreement between the temporal behavior of the extreme eigenvalues of both empirical data, and similar results were found when computing the inverse participation ratio, which provides an evidence about the emergence of common factors in global financial information whether we use the return or polarity data as a source. In addition, we found a very strong presumption that polarity Granger causes returns of an Indonesian index for a long range of lag trading days, whereas for Israel, South Korea, Australia, and Japan, the predictive information of returns is also presented but with less presumption. Our results suggest that incorporating polarity as a financial indicator may open up new insights to understand the collective and even individual behavior of global financial indices.

  9. A Poisson likelihood approach to fake lepton estimation with the matrix method

    CERN Document Server

    Varnes, Erich W

    2016-01-01

    Many high-energy physics analyses require the presence of leptons from $W$, $Z$, or $H$ boson decay. For these analyses, signatures that mimic such leptons present a `fake lepton' background that must be estimated. Since the magnitude of this background depends strongly upon details of the detector response, it can be difficult to estimate with simulation. One data-driven approach is the `matrix method', in which two categories of leptons are defined (`loose' and `tight'), with the tight category being a subset of the loose category. Using the populations of leptons in each category in the analysis sample, and the efficiencies for both real and fake leptons in the loose category to satisfy the criteria for the tight category, the fake background yield can be estimated. This paper describes a Poisson likelihood implementation of the matrix method, which provides a more precise, reliable, and robust estimate of the fake background yield compared to an analytic solution. This implementation also provides a relia...

  10. Exposure Assessment Tools by Approaches - Indirect Estimation (Scenario Evaluation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA ExpoBox is a toolbox for exposure assessors. Its purpose is to provide a compendium of exposure assessment and risk characterization tools that will present comprehensive step-by-step guidance and links to relevant exposure assessment data bases, mode

  11. Dispersion of speckle suppression efficiency for binary DOE structures: spectral domain and coherent matrix approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapchuk, Anatoliy; Prygun, Olexandr; Fu, Minglei; Le, Zichun; Xiong, Qiyuan; Kryuchyn, Andriy

    2017-06-26

    We present the first general theoretical description of speckle suppression efficiency based on an active diffractive optical element (DOE). The approach is based on spectral analysis of diffracted beams and a coherent matrix. Analytical formulae are obtained for the dispersion of speckle suppression efficiency using different DOE structures and different DOE activation methods. We show that a one-sided 2D DOE structure has smaller speckle suppression range than a two-sided 1D DOE structure. Both DOE structures have sufficient speckle suppression range to suppress low-order speckles in the entire visible range, but only the two-sided 1D DOE can suppress higher-order speckles. We also show that a linear shift 2D DOE in a laser projector with a large numerical aperture has higher effective speckle suppression efficiency than the method using switching or step-wise shift DOE structures. The generalized theoretical models elucidate the mechanism and practical realization of speckle suppression.

  12. Resistance of a 1D random chain: Hamiltonian version of the transfer matrix approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dossetti-Romero, V.; Izrailev, F. M.; Krokhin, A. A.

    2004-01-01

    We study some mesoscopic properties of electron transport by employing one-dimensional chains and Anderson tight-binding model. Principal attention is paid to the resistance of finite-length chains with disordered white-noise potential. We develop a new version of the transfer matrix approach based on the equivalency of a discrete Schrödinger equation and a two-dimensional Hamiltonian map describing a parametric kicked oscillator. In the two limiting cases of ballistic and localized regime we demonstrate how analytical results for the mean resistance and its second moment can be derived directly from the averaging over classical trajectories of the Hamiltonian map. We also discuss the implication of the single parameter scaling hypothesis to the resistance.

  13. Self-consistent RPA and the time-dependent density matrix approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuck, P. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, Orsay (France); CNRS et Universite Joseph Fourier, Laboratoire de Physique et Modelisation des Milieux Condenses, Grenoble (France); Tohyama, M. [Kyorin University School of Medicine, Mitaka, Tokyo (Japan)

    2016-10-15

    The time-dependent density matrix (TDDM) or BBGKY (Bogoliubov, Born, Green, Kirkwood, Yvon) approach is decoupled and closed at the three-body level in finding a natural representation of the latter in terms of a quadratic form of two-body correlation functions. In the small amplitude limit an extended RPA coupled to an also extended second RPA is obtained. Since including two-body correlations means that the ground state cannot be a Hartree-Fock state, naturally the corresponding RPA is upgraded to Self-Consistent RPA (SCRPA) which was introduced independently earlier and which is built on a correlated ground state. SCRPA conserves all the properties of standard RPA. Applications to the exactly solvable Lipkin and the 1D Hubbard models show good performances of SCRPA and TDDM. (orig.)

  14. Static Output-Feedback Control for Vehicle Suspensions: A Single-Step Linear Matrix Inequality Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josep Rubió-Massegú

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a new strategy to design static output-feedback controllers for a class of vehicle suspension systems is presented. A theoretical background on recent advances in output-feedback control is first provided, which makes possible an effective synthesis of static output-feedback controllers by solving a single linear matrix inequality optimization problem. Next, a simplified model of a quarter-car suspension system is proposed, taking the ride comfort, suspension stroke, road holding ability, and control effort as the main performance criteria in the vehicle suspension design. The new approach is then used to design a static output-feedback H∞ controller that only uses the suspension deflection and the sprung mass velocity as feedback information. Numerical simulations indicate that, despite the restricted feedback information, this static output-feedback H∞ controller exhibits an excellent behavior in terms of both frequency and time responses, when compared with the corresponding state-feedback H∞ controller.

  15. Application of Transfer Matrix Approach to Modeling and Decentralized Control of Lattice-Based Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Nick; Swei, Sean Shan-Min; Cheung, Kenny; Teodorescu, Mircea

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a modeling and control of aerostructure developed by lattice-based cellular materials/components. The proposed aerostructure concept leverages a building block strategy for lattice-based components which provide great adaptability to varying ight scenarios, the needs of which are essential for in- ight wing shaping control. A decentralized structural control design is proposed that utilizes discrete-time lumped mass transfer matrix method (DT-LM-TMM). The objective is to develop an e ective reduced order model through DT-LM-TMM that can be used to design a decentralized controller for the structural control of a wing. The proposed approach developed in this paper shows that, as far as the performance of overall structural system is concerned, the reduced order model can be as e ective as the full order model in designing an optimal stabilizing controller.

  16. Impact of long-term thermal exposure on a SiC fiber-reinforced copper matrix composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimmig, S.; Elgeti, S.; You, Jeong-Ha

    2013-11-01

    Silicon carbide long fiber-reinforced copper matrix composites offer huge potential as a heat sink material of divertor for applications at temperatures above 300 °C thanks to the beneficial combination of strong ceramic fibers and highly conductive copper. For applications at higher operation temperatures, long term thermal stability is an issue, as thermal exposure may cause a detrimental change in microstructure in terms of chemistry and integrity of the constituents leading to overall deterioration of composite strength. The aim of this study is to investigate the impact of long term thermal exposure at an elevated temperature on a Cu/SiCf composite material. To this end, composite samples were fabricated and subjected to a heat treatment at 550 °C for 400 h. Extensive tensile tests were conducted for a wide range of fibers volume fractions to evaluate the strength before and after the heat treatment. Acoustic emission was detected in situ during tensile tests for tracking the failure events. Microscopic analysis was carried out to capture the chemical change and damage. It turned out that the applied heat treatment caused significant reduction of strength. Microanalysis revealed that infiltration and diffusion of copper into the fibers via the cracks of the damaged fibers are the direct cause of the embrittlement.

  17. Transient coupled calculations of the Molten Salt Fast Reactor using the Transient Fission Matrix approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laureau, A., E-mail: laureau.axel@gmail.com; Heuer, D.; Merle-Lucotte, E.; Rubiolo, P.R.; Allibert, M.; Aufiero, M.

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • Neutronic ‘Transient Fission Matrix’ approach coupled to the CFD OpenFOAM code. • Fission Matrix interpolation model for fast spectrum homogeneous reactors. • Application for coupled calculations of the Molten Salt Fast Reactor. • Load following, over-cooling and reactivity insertion transient studies. • Validation of the reactor intrinsic stability for normal and accidental transients. - Abstract: In this paper we present transient studies of the Molten Salt Fast Reactor (MSFR). This generation IV reactor is characterized by a liquid fuel circulating in the core cavity, requiring specific simulation tools. An innovative neutronic approach called “Transient Fission Matrix” is used to perform spatial kinetic calculations with a reduced computational cost through a pre-calculation of the Monte Carlo spatial and temporal response of the system. Coupled to this neutronic approach, the Computational Fluid Dynamics code OpenFOAM is used to model the complex flow pattern in the core. An accurate interpolation model developed to take into account the thermal hydraulics feedback on the neutronics including reactivity and neutron flux variation is presented. Finally different transient studies of the reactor in normal and accidental operating conditions are detailed such as reactivity insertion and load following capacities. The results of these studies illustrate the excellent behavior of the MSFR during such transients.

  18. Matrix metalloproteinase inhibition after myocardial infarction: a new approach to prevent heart failure?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Creemers, E. E.; Cleutjens, J. P.; Smits, J. F.; Daemen, M. J.

    2001-01-01

    Increased activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) has been implicated in numerous disease processes, including tumor growth and metastasis, arthritis, and periodontal disease. It is now becoming increasingly clear that extracellular matrix degradation by MMPs is also involved in the

  19. The effect of obesity and tobacco smoke exposure on inflammatory mediators and matrix metalloproteinases in rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquivel, Ana Laura; Pérez-Ramos, J; Cisneros, J; Herrera, I; Rivera-Rosales, R; Montaño, M; Ramos, C

    2014-12-01

    Obesity is characterized by hypertrophy of adipose tissue and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) by lung damage; both diseases are associated with systemic low-grade inflammation. There are no animal models combining obesity and COPD; therefore, these diseases were induced simultaneously in rats to analyze their effects on the expression of inflammatory mediators and enzymes involved in lung tissue remodeling. Obesity was induced with sucrose (30%) for 4 months concomitant with tobacco smoke exposure (20 cigarettes/day, 5 days/wk) for the last 2 months. Were evaluated: body weight, abdominal fat, dyslipidemia, glucose tolerance test (GTT), histology, inflammatory mediators with qPCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-2), MMP-9, MMP-12, TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 through qRT-PCR, and MMP-2 and MMP-9 by gelatin zymography. The rats on a sucrose diet exhibited increased body weight, abdominal fat, triglycerides, GTT, and plasma levels of insulin, adiponectin, leptin, resistin, IL-6, IL-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and IFN-γ, upregulated lung IL-6, IL-1β, TNF-α and IFN-γ, showing hyperplastic bronchial and alveolar epithelium. The animals exposed to sucrose and tobacco smoke exhibited decreased body weight, abdominal fat and plasma levels of leptin, resistin, IL-1β and IFN-γ, reducing inflammation but showing emphysematous lesions. Expression of gelatinases and MMP-12 augmented in the rats exposed to tobacco smoke alone or combined with sucrose. Zymography showed prominent gelatinases activity in all the experimental groups. These results suggest that simultaneous exposure to sucrose and tobacco smoke decreases inflammation but results in emphysematous lesions similar to those observed with tobacco smoke exposure, suggesting that obesity does not confer any protective effect against lung damage.

  20. A linear matrix inequality-based approach for the computation of actuator bandwidth limits in adaptive control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Daniel Robert

    Linear matrix inequalities and convex optimization techniques have become popular tools to solve nontrivial problems in the field of adaptive control. Specifically, the stability of adaptive control laws in the presence of actuator dynamics remains as an important open control problem. In this thesis, we present a linear matrix inequalities-based hedging approach and evaluate it for model reference adaptive control of an uncertain dynamical system in the presence of actuator dynamics. The ideal reference dynamics are modified such that the hedging approach allows the correct adaptation without being hindered by the presence of actuator dynamics. The hedging approach is first generalized such that two cases are considered where the actuator output and control effectiveness are known and unknown. We then show the stability of the closed-loop dynamical system using Lyapunov based stability analysis tools and propose a linear matrix inequality-based framework for the computation of the minimum allowable actuator bandwidth limits such that the closed-loop dynamical system remains stable. The results of the linear matrix inequality-based heading approach are then generalized to multiactuator systems with a new linear matrix inequality condition. The minimum actuator bandwidth solutions for closed-loop system stability are theoretically guaranteed to exist in a convex set with a partially convex constraint and then solved numerically using an algorithm in the case where there are multiple actuators. Finally, the efficacy of the results contained in this thesis are demonstrated using several illustrative numerical examples.

  1. S-matrix decomposition, natural reaction channels, and the quantum transition state approach to reactive scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manthe, Uwe; Ellerbrock, Roman

    2016-05-28

    A new approach for the quantum-state resolved analysis of polyatomic reactions is introduced. Based on the singular value decomposition of the S-matrix, energy-dependent natural reaction channels and natural reaction probabilities are defined. It is shown that the natural reaction probabilities are equal to the eigenvalues of the reaction probability operator [U. Manthe and W. H. Miller, J. Chem. Phys. 99, 3411 (1993)]. Consequently, the natural reaction channels can be interpreted as uniquely defined pathways through the transition state of the reaction. The analysis can efficiently be combined with reactive scattering calculations based on the propagation of thermal flux eigenstates. In contrast to a decomposition based straightforwardly on thermal flux eigenstates, it does not depend on the choice of the dividing surface separating reactants from products. The new approach is illustrated studying a prototypical example, the H + CH4 → H2 + CH3 reaction. The natural reaction probabilities and the contributions of the different vibrational states of the methyl product to the natural reaction channels are calculated and discussed. The relation between the thermal flux eigenstates and the natural reaction channels is studied in detail.

  2. Rapid Chondrocyte Isolation for Tissue Engineering Applications: The Effect of Enzyme Concentration and Temporal Exposure on the Matrix Forming Capacity of Nasal Derived Chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedicherla, Srujana; Buckley, Conor Timothy

    2017-01-01

    Laboratory based processing and expansion to yield adequate cell numbers had been the standard in Autologous Disc Chondrocyte Transplantation (ADCT), Allogeneic Juvenile Chondrocyte Implantation (NuQu®), and Matrix-Induced Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation (MACI). Optimizing cell isolation is a key challenge in terms of obtaining adequate cell numbers while maintaining a vibrant cell population capable of subsequent proliferation and matrix elaboration. However, typical cell yields from a cartilage digest are highly variable between donors and based on user competency. The overall objective of this study was to optimize chondrocyte isolation from cartilaginous nasal tissue through modulation of enzyme concentration exposure (750 and 3000 U/ml) and incubation time (1 and 12 h), combined with physical agitation cycles, and to assess subsequent cell viability and matrix forming capacity. Overall, increasing enzyme exposure time was found to be more detrimental than collagenase concentration for subsequent viability, proliferation, and matrix forming capacity (sGAG and collagen) of these cells resulting in nonuniform cartilaginous matrix deposition. Taken together, consolidating a 3000 U/ml collagenase digest of 1 h at a ratio of 10 ml/g of cartilage tissue with physical agitation cycles can improve efficiency of chondrocyte isolation, yielding robust, more uniform matrix formation.

  3. The Regional-Matrix Approach to the Training of Highly Qualified Personnel for the Sustainable Development of the Mining Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhernov, Evgeny; Nehoda, Evgenia

    2017-11-01

    The state, regional and industry approaches to the problem of personnel training for building an innovative knowledge economy at all levels that ensures sustainable development of the region are analyzed in the article using the cases of the Kemerovo region and the coal industry. A new regional-matrix approach to the training of highly qualified personnel is proposed, which allows to link the training systems with the regional economic matrix "natural resources - cognitive resources" developed by the author. A special feature of the new approach is the consideration of objective conditions and contradictions of regional systems of personnel training, which have formed as part of economic systems of regions differ-entiated in the matrix. The methodology of the research is based on the statement about the interconnectivity of general and local knowledge, from which the understanding of the need for a combination of regional, indus-try and state approaches to personnel training is derived. A new form of representing such a combination is the proposed approach, which is based on matrix analysis. The results of the research can be implemented in the practice of modernization of professional education of workers in the coal industry of the natural resources extractive region.

  4. A graph-theoretic approach to sparse matrix inversion for implicit differential algebraic equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Yoshimura

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose an efficient numerical scheme to compute sparse matrix inversions for Implicit Differential Algebraic Equations of large-scale nonlinear mechanical systems. We first formulate mechanical systems with constraints by Dirac structures and associated Lagrangian systems. Second, we show how to allocate input-output relations to the variables in kinematical and dynamical relations appearing in DAEs by introducing an oriented bipartite graph. Then, we also show that the matrix inversion of Jacobian matrix associated to the kinematical and dynamical relations can be carried out by using the input-output relations and we explain solvability of the sparse Jacobian matrix inversion by using the bipartite graph. Finally, we propose an efficient symbolic generation algorithm to compute the sparse matrix inversion of the Jacobian matrix, and we demonstrate the validity in numerical efficiency by an example of the stanford manipulator.

  5. A Matrix Approach for Divisibility Properties of the Generalized Fibonacci Sequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aynur Yalçiner

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We give divisibility properties of the generalized Fibonacci sequence by matrix methods. We also present new recursive identities for the generalized Fibonacci and Lucas sequences.

  6. Matrix compatible solid phase microextraction coating, a greener approach to sample preparation in vegetable matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naccarato, Attilio; Pawliszyn, Janusz

    2016-09-01

    This work proposes the novel PDMS/DVB/PDMS fiber as a greener strategy for analysis by direct immersion solid phase microextraction (SPME) in vegetables. SPME is an established sample preparation approach that has not yet been adequately explored for food analysis in direct immersion mode due to the limitations of the available commercial coatings. The robustness and endurance of this new coating were investigated by direct immersion extractions in raw blended vegetables without any further sample preparation steps. The PDMS/DVB/PDMS coating exhibited superior features related to the capability of the external PDMS layer to protect the commercial coating, and showed improvements in terms of extraction capability and in the cleanability of the coating surface. In addition to having contributed to the recognition of the superior features of this new fiber concept before commercialization, the outcomes of this work serve to confirm advancements in the matrix compatibility of the PDMS-modified fiber, and open new prospects for the development of greener high-throughput analytical methods in food analysis using solid phase microextraction in the near future. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Predominant modes for Rayleigh wave propagation using the dynamic stiffness matrix approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naskar, Tarun; Kumar, Jyant

    2017-10-01

    In case of irregular dispersive media, a proper analysis of higher modes existing in a dispersion plot becomes essential for predicting the shear wave velocity profile of ground on the basis of surface wave tests. In such cases, an establishment of the predominant mode becomes quite important. In the current investigation for Rayleigh wave propagation, the predominant modes have been evaluated by maximizing the normalized vertical displacements along the free surface. Eigenvectors computed from the dynamic stiffness matrix (DSM) approach are analyzed to find the predominant mode. The results obtained are then compared with those reported in the literature. By varying the displacement amplitude ratios of the predominant mode to the other modes, dispersion plots have also been generated from the multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) method. The establishment of the predominant mode becomes especially significant, where usually only two to six sensors are employed and the governing (predominant) modal dispersion curve is usually observed rather than several multiple modes, which can be otherwise identified by using around 24 to 48 sensors.

  8. A novel variable selection approach that iteratively optimizes variable space using weighted binary matrix sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Bai-chuan; Yun, Yong-huan; Liang, Yi-zeng; Yi, Lun-zhao

    2014-10-07

    In this study, a new optimization algorithm called the Variable Iterative Space Shrinkage Approach (VISSA) that is based on the idea of model population analysis (MPA) is proposed for variable selection. Unlike most of the existing optimization methods for variable selection, VISSA statistically evaluates the performance of variable space in each step of optimization. Weighted binary matrix sampling (WBMS) is proposed to generate sub-models that span the variable subspace. Two rules are highlighted during the optimization procedure. First, the variable space shrinks in each step. Second, the new variable space outperforms the previous one. The second rule, which is rarely satisfied in most of the existing methods, is the core of the VISSA strategy. Compared with some promising variable selection methods such as competitive adaptive reweighted sampling (CARS), Monte Carlo uninformative variable elimination (MCUVE) and iteratively retaining informative variables (IRIV), VISSA showed better prediction ability for the calibration of NIR data. In addition, VISSA is user-friendly; only a few insensitive parameters are needed, and the program terminates automatically without any additional conditions. The Matlab codes for implementing VISSA are freely available on the website: https://sourceforge.net/projects/multivariateanalysis/files/VISSA/.

  9. A phase-synchronization and random-matrix based approach to multichannel time-series analysis with application to epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio, Ivan; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2011-09-01

    We present a general method to analyze multichannel time series that are becoming increasingly common in many areas of science and engineering. Of particular interest is the degree of synchrony among various channels, motivated by the recognition that characterization of synchrony in a system consisting of many interacting components can provide insights into its fundamental dynamics. Often such a system is complex, high-dimensional, nonlinear, nonstationary, and noisy, rendering unlikely complete synchronization in which the dynamical variables from individual components approach each other asymptotically. Nonetheless, a weaker type of synchrony that lasts for a finite amount of time, namely, phase synchronization, can be expected. Our idea is to calculate the average phase-synchronization times from all available pairs of channels and then to construct a matrix. Due to nonlinearity and stochasticity, the matrix is effectively random. Moreover, since the diagonal elements of the matrix can be arbitrarily large, the matrix can be singular. To overcome this difficulty, we develop a random-matrix based criterion for proper choosing of the diagonal matrix elements. Monitoring of the eigenvalues and the determinant provides a powerful way to assess changes in synchrony. The method is tested using a prototype nonstationary noisy dynamical system, electroencephalogram (scalp) data from absence seizures for which enhanced cortico-thalamic synchrony is presumed, and electrocorticogram (intracranial) data from subjects having partial seizures with secondary generalization for which enhanced local synchrony is similarly presumed.

  10. Evidence at a glance: error matrix approach for overviewing available evidence.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keus, F.; Wetterslev, J.; Gluud, C.; Laarhoven, C.J.H.M. van

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Clinical evidence continues to expand and is increasingly difficult to overview. We aimed at conceptualizing a visual assessment tool, i.e., a matrix for overviewing studies and their data in order to assess the clinical evidence at a glance. METHODS: A four-step matrix was constructed

  11. The effective action in 4-dim CDT. The transfer matrix approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambjørn, J. [The Niels Bohr Institute, Copenhagen University,Blegdamsvej 17, DK-2100 Copenhagen Ø (Denmark); IMAPP, Radboud University,Niemegen (Netherlands); Gizbert-Studnicki, J. [Institute of Physics, Jagellonian University,Reymonta 4, PL 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Görlich, A. [The Niels Bohr Institute, Copenhagen University,Blegdamsvej 17, DK-2100 Copenhagen Ø (Denmark); Institute of Physics, Jagellonian University,Reymonta 4, PL 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Jurkiewicz, J. [Institute of Physics, Jagellonian University,Reymonta 4, PL 30-059 Krakow (Poland)

    2014-06-06

    We measure the effective action in all three phases of 4-dimensional Causal Dynamical Triangulations (CDT) using the transfer matrix method. The transfer matrix is parametrized by the total 3-volume of the CDT universe at a given (discrete) time. We present a simple effective model based on the transfer matrix measured in the de Sitter phase. It allows us to reconstruct the results of full CDT in this phase. We argue that the transfer matrix method is valid not only inside the de Sitter phase (‘C’) but also in the other two phases. A parametrization of the measured transfer matrix/effective action in the ‘A’ and ‘B’ phases is proposed and the relation to phase transitions is explained. We discover a potentially new ‘bifurcation’ phase separating the de Sitter phase (‘C’) and the ‘collapsed’ phase (‘B’)

  12. Exposure to motor vehicle emissions: An intake fraction approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, Julian D. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2002-05-22

    Motor vehicles are a significant source of population exposure to air pollution. Focusing on California's South Coast Air Basin as a case study, the author combines ambient monitoring station data with hourly time-activity patterns to determine the population intake of motor vehicle emissions during 1996-1999. Three microenvironments are considered wherein the exposure to motor vehicle emissions is higher than in ambient air: in and near vehicles, inside a building that is near a freeway, and inside a residence with an attached garage. Total motor vehicle emissions are taken from the EMFAC model. The 15 million people in the South Coast inhale 0.0048% of primary, nonreactive compounds emitted into the basin by motor vehicles. Intake of motor vehicle emissions is 46% higher than the average ambient concentration times the average breathing rate, because of microenvironments and because of temporal and spatial correlation among breathing rates, concentrations, and population densities. Intake fraction (iF) summarizes the emissions-to-intake relationship as the ratio of population intake to total emissions. iF is a population level exposure metric that incorporates spatial, temporal, and interindividual variability in exposures. iFs can facilitate the calculation of population exposures by distilling complex emissions-transport-receptor relationships. The author demonstrates this point by predicting the population intake of various primary gaseous emissions from motor vehicles, based on the intake fraction for benzene and carbon monoxide.

  13. An improved approach to align and embed multiple brain samples in a gelatin-based matrix for simultaneous histological processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagamoto-Combs, Kumi; Manocha, Gunjan D; Puig, Kendra; Combs, Colin K

    2016-03-01

    Preparation and processing of free-floating histological sections involve a series of steps. The amount of labor, particularly sectioning and mounting, quickly multiplies as the number of samples increases. Embedding tissue samples in a flexible matrix allows simultaneous handling of multiple samples and preserves the integrity of the tissue during histological processing. However, aligning multiple asymmetrical samples, for example small-animal brains, in a particular orientation requires skillful arrangement and securing of the samples by pinning onto a solid surface. Consequently, costly technical services offered by contract research organizations are often sought. An improved approach to align and embed multiple whole or half rodent brain samples into a gelatin-based matrix is described. Using a template specifically designed to form arrayed mouse brain-shaped cavities, a "receiving matrix" is prepared. Inserting brain samples directly into the cavities allows the samples to be effortlessly positioned into a uniform orientation and embedded in a block of matrix. Multiple mouse brains were arrayed in a uniform orientation in a gelatin matrix block with ease using the receiving matrix. The gelatin-embedded brains were simultaneously sectioned and stained, and effortlessly mounted onto glass slides. The improved approach allowed multiple whole or half mouse brains to be easily arrayed without pinning the samples onto a solid surface and prevented damages or shifting of the samples during embedding. The new approach to array multiple brain samples provides a simple way to prepare gelatin-embedded whole or half brain arrays of commercial quality. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Matrix Sputtering Method: A Novel Physical Approach for Photoluminescent Noble Metal Nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Yohei; Corpuz, Ryan D; Yonezawa, Tetsu

    2017-12-19

    Noble metal nanoclusters are believed to be the transition between single metal atoms, which show distinct optical properties, and metal nanoparticles, which show characteristic plasmon absorbance. The interesting properties of these materials emerge when the particle size is well below 2 nm, such as photoluminescence, which has potential application particularly in biomedical fields. These photoluminescent ultrasmall nanoclusters are typically produced by chemical reduction, which limits their practical application because of the inherent toxicity of the reagents used in this method. Thus, alternative strategies are sought, particularly in terms of physical approaches, which are known as "greener alternatives," to produce high-purity materials at high yields. Thus, a new approach using the sputtering technique was developed. This method was initially used to produce thin films using solid substrates; now it can be applied even with liquid substrates such as ionic liquids or polyethylene glycol as long as these liquids have a low vapor pressure. This revolutionary development has opened up new areas of research, particularly for the synthesis of colloidal nanoparticles with dimensions below 10 nm. We are among the first to apply the sputtering technique to the physical synthesis of photoluminescent noble metal nanoclusters. Although typical sputtering systems have relied on the effect of surface composition and viscosity of the liquid matrix on controlling particle diameters, which only resulted in diameters ca. 3-10 nm, that were all plasmonic, our new approach introduced thiol molecules as stabilizers inspired from chemical methods. In the chemical syntheses of metal nanoparticles, controlling the concentration ratio between metal ions and stabilizing reagents is a possible means of systematic size control. However, it was not clear whether this would be applicable in a sputtering system. Our latest results showed that we were able to generically produce a

  15. Development of a job-exposure matrix for veterinary doctors for the estimation of ionizing radiation exposure during diagnosis using X-ray devices in the veterinary medicine; Entwicklung einer ''Job-Exposure-Matrix'' fuer Tieraerzte zur Abschaetzung der Exposition an ionisierender Strahlung bei der Diagnose mit Hilfe von Roentgengeraeten in der tieraerztlichen Praxis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feige, S.; Kaulard, J.; Mergel, E. [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit mbH (GRS), Koeln (Germany)

    2012-02-15

    Subject of the current project ''3605S04477 - Entwicklung einer ''Job-Exposure-Matrix'' fuer Tieraerzte zur Abschaetzung der Exposition an ionisierender Strahlung bei der Diagnose mit Hilfe von Roentgengeraeten in der tieraerztlichen Praxis'' is the analysis of the radiation exposure of medical staff due to diagnostic x-ray examinations in veterinary medicine. In detail the radiation exposure of the medical staff will be first measured and next will be analysed and transformed into a data structure, which allows an easy estimation of the radiation exposure of the medical staff due to the future execution of diagnostic x-ray examination. The measurements, this data structure (called ''Job-Exposure-Matrix'') is based on, will be taken primarily during examinations performed at two veterinary clinics of the ''Freie Universitaet Berlin (FU Berlin)'', which are linked to the project. In addition some further measurements are taken at four veterinary clinics in Germany. Finally, for some examinations measurements are performed using phantoms set up of dead animals. Due to the shielding of the x-ray protective clothing and the resulting very low values the doses are measured in front of the protective clothing. Primarily, electronic personal dosemeters are used, complemented by thermoluminescence dosemeters and an ionisation radiation chamber. The measurement and the related analysis show, that the exposure of the medical staff due to the scattered Roentgen beam during a single x-ray examination is low. However, a high frequency of examinations during a year may result in no more marginal exposure which in addition might exceed the relevant dose limits. Thus, the measurements also emphasize the importance of radiation shielding even in case of low exposure due to a single x-ray examination. The compilation of the measured data in the data structure allows an easy estimation of the radiation

  16. Population dynamics of species-rich ecosystems: the mixture of matrix population models approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortier, Frédéric; Rossi, Vivien; Guillot, Gilles

    2013-01-01

    Matrix population models are widely used to predict population dynamics, but when applied to species-rich ecosystems with many rare species, the small population sample sizes hinder a good fit of species-specific models. This issue can be overcome by assigning species to groups to increase the size...... species with similar population dynamics....... of the calibration data sets. However, the species classification is often disconnected from the matrix modelling and from the estimation of matrix parameters, thus bringing species groups that may not be optimal with respect to the predicted community dynamics. We proposed here a method that jointly classified...

  17. A novel approach for exposure assessment in air pollution epidemiological studies using neuro-fuzzy inference systems: Comparison of exposure estimates and exposure-health associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanes-Vidal, Victoria; Cantuaria, Manuella Lech; Nadimi, Esmaeil S

    2017-04-01

    Many epidemiological studies have used proximity to sources as air pollution exposure assessment method. However, proximity measures are not generally good surrogates because of their complex non-linear relationship with exposures. Neuro-fuzzy inference systems (NFIS) can be used to map complex non-linear systems, but its usefulness in exposure assessment has not been extensively explored. We present a novel approach for exposure assessment using NFIS, where the inputs of the model were easily-obtainable proximity measures, and the output was residential exposure to an air pollutant. We applied it to a case-study on NH3 pollution, and compared health effects and exposures estimated from NFIS, with those obtained from emission-dispersion models, and linear and non-linear regression proximity models, using 10-fold cross validation. The agreement between emission-dispersion and NFIS exposures was high (Root-mean-square error (RMSE) =0.275, correlation coefficient (r)=0.91) and resulted in similar health effect estimates. Linear models showed poor performance (RMSE=0.527, r=0.59), while non-linear regression models resulted in heterocedasticity, non-normality and clustered data. NFIS could be a useful tool for estimating individual air pollution exposures in epidemiological studies on large populations, when emission-dispersion data are not available. The tradeoff between simplicity and accuracy needs to be considered. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. New approach to the solution of large, full matrix equations. [Neumann problem for inviscid incompressble flow past airfoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, R. W.; James, R. M.

    1981-01-01

    A new approach to the solution of matrix equations resulting from integral equations is presented and applied to the solution of two-dimensional Neumann problems describing the inviscid, incompressible flow past an airfoil. The problem is reformulated in terms of a preselected set of mode functions giving an equivalent matrix equation to be solved for the mode-function expansion coefficients. Because of the inherent smoothness of the original problem, the coefficient problem can be solved approximately without significantly affecting the accuracy of the final solution. Very promising two-dimensional results are obtained and the extension of the method to three-dimensional problems is investigated. On the basis of these results it is shown that the computing time for the matrix solution for a large three-dimensional panel method calculation could be reduced by an order of magnitude compared with that required for a direct solution.

  19. A Comparative Study of Collagen Matrix Density Effect on Endothelial Sprout Formation Using Experimental and Computational Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamloo, Amir; Mohammadaliha, Negar; Heilshorn, Sarah C; Bauer, Amy L

    2016-04-01

    A thorough understanding of determining factors in angiogenesis is a necessary step to control the development of new blood vessels. Extracellular matrix density is known to have a significant influence on cellular behaviors and consequently can regulate vessel formation. The utilization of experimental platforms in combination with numerical models can be a powerful method to explore the mechanisms of new capillary sprout formation. In this study, using an integrative method, the interplay between the matrix density and angiogenesis was investigated. Owing the fact that the extracellular matrix density is a global parameter that can affect other parameters such as pore size, stiffness, cell-matrix adhesion and cross-linking, deeper understanding of the most important biomechanical or biochemical properties of the ECM causing changes in sprout morphogenesis is crucial. Here, we implemented both computational and experimental methods to analyze the mechanisms responsible for the influence of ECM density on the sprout formation that is difficult to be investigated comprehensively using each of these single methods. For this purpose, we first utilized an innovative approach to quantify the correspondence of the simulated collagen fibril density to the collagen density in the experimental part. Comparing the results of the experimental study and computational model led to some considerable achievements. First, we verified the results of the computational model using the experimental results. Then, we reported parameters such as the ratio of proliferating cells to migrating cells that was difficult to obtain from experimental study. Finally, this integrative system led to gain an understanding of the possible mechanisms responsible for the effect of ECM density on angiogenesis. The results showed that stable and long sprouts were observed at an intermediate collagen matrix density of 1.2 and 1.9 mg/ml due to a balance between the number of migrating and proliferating

  20. S-matrix approach to the equation of state of dilute nuclear matter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-04-01

    matrix framework, a method is presented to calculate the equation of state of dilute warm nuclear matter. The result is a model-independent virial series for the pressure and density that systematically includes contributions from ...

  1. Evidence at a glance: error matrix approach for overviewing available evidence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keus, Frederik; Wetterslev, Jørn; Gluud, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Clinical evidence continues to expand and is increasingly difficult to overview. We aimed at conceptualizing a visual assessment tool, i.e., a matrix for overviewing studies and their data in order to assess the clinical evidence at a glance....

  2. Operational matrix approach for approximate solution of fractional model of Bloch equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harendra Singh

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In present paper operational matrix of integration for Laguerre polynomial is used to solve fractional model of Bloch equation in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR. The operational matrix converts the Bloch equation in a system of linear algebraic equations. Solving system we obtain the approximate solutions for fractional Bloch equation. Results are compared with existing methods and exact solution. Graphs are plotted for different fractional values of time derivatives.

  3. HESI pilot project: Testing a qualitative approach for incorporating exposure into alternatives assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greggs, Bill; Arnold, Scott; Burns, Thomas J.

    important, including exposure, risk, life-cycle thinking, performance, cost, and social responsibility. Building on the 2014 recommendations by the US National Academy of Sciences to improve AA decisions by including comparative xposure assessment, the HESI Sustainable Chemical Alternatives Technical...... Committee, which consists of scientists from academia, industry, government, and NGOs, has developed a qualitative comparative exposure approach. Conducting such a comparison can screen for alternatives that are expected to have a higher exposure potential, which could trigger a higher-tiered, more......-quantitative exposure assessment on the alternatives being considered. This talk will demonstrate an approach for including chemical and product exposure information in a qualitative AA comparison. Starting from existing hazard AAs, a series of four exposure examples were examined to test the concept, to understand...

  4. A novel approach for FE-SEM imaging of wood-matrix polymer interface in a biocomposite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Adya P; Anderson, Ross; Park, Byung-Dae; Nuryawan, Arif

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the interface between polymer and biomass in composite products is important for developing high performance products, as the quality of adhesion at the interface determines composite properties. For example, with greater stiffness compared to polymer matrix, such as that of high density polyethylene, the wood component enhances stiffness of wood-polymer composites, provided there is good adhesion between composite components. However, in composites made from wood flour (wood particles) and synthetic resins it is often difficult to clearly resolve particle-matrix interfaces in the conventionally employed microscopy method that involves SEM examination of fractured faces of composites. We developed a novel approach, where composites made from high density polyethylene and wood flour were examined and imaged with a FE-SEM (field emission scanning electron microscope) in transverse sections cut through the composites. Improved definition of the interface was achieved using this approach, which enabled a more thorough comparison to be made of the features of the interface between wood particles and the matrix in composites with and without a coupling agent, as it was possible to clearly resolve the interfaces for particles of all sizes, from large particles consisting of many cells down to tiny cell wall fragments, particularly in composites that did not incorporate the coupling agent used to enhance particle adhesion with the matrix polymer. The method developed would be suitable particularly for high definition SEM imaging of a wide range of composites made combining wood and agricultural residues with synthetic polymers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A Unique Mathematical Derivation of the Fundamental Laws of Nature Based on a New Algebraic-Axiomatic (Matrix Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramin Zahedi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article, as a new mathematical approach to origin of the laws of nature, using a new basic algebraic axiomatic (matrix formalism based on the ring theory and Clifford algebras (presented in Section 2, “it is shown that certain mathematical forms of fundamental laws of nature, including laws governing the fundamental forces of nature (represented by a set of two definite classes of general covariant massive field equations, with new matrix formalisms, are derived uniquely from only a very few axioms.” In agreement with the rational Lorentz group, it is also basically assumed that the components of relativistic energy-momentum can only take rational values. In essence, the main scheme of this new mathematical axiomatic approach to the fundamental laws of nature is as follows: First, based on the assumption of the rationality of D-momentum and by linearization (along with a parameterization procedure of the Lorentz invariant energy-momentum quadratic relation, a unique set of Lorentz invariant systems of homogeneous linear equations (with matrix formalisms compatible with certain Clifford and symmetric algebras is derived. Then by an initial quantization (followed by a basic procedure of minimal coupling to space-time geometry of these determined systems of linear equations, a set of two classes of general covariant massive (tensor field equations (with matrix formalisms compatible with certain Clifford, and Weyl algebras is derived uniquely as well.

  6. Comparison of expert and job-exposure matrix-based retrospective exposure assessment of occupational carcinogens in the Netherlands Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Offermans, N.S.M.; Vermeulen, R.; Burdorf, A.; Peters, S.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Koeman, T.; Tongeren, M. van; Kauppinen, T.; Kant, I.; Kromhout, H.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Reliable retrospective exposure assessment continues to be a challenge in most population-based studies. Several methodologies exist for estimating exposures retrospectively, of which case-by-case expert assessment and job-exposure matrices (JEMs) are commonly used. This study evaluated

  7. Quantification of Uncertainties in Turbulence Modeling: A Comparison of Physics-Based and Random Matrix Theoretic Approaches

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Jian-Xun; Xiao, Heng

    2016-01-01

    Numerical models based on Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations are widely used in engineering turbulence modeling. However, the RANS predictions have large model-form uncertainties for many complex flows. Quantification of these large uncertainties originating from the modeled Reynolds stresses has attracted attention in turbulence modeling community. Recently, a physics-based Bayesian framework for quantifying model-form uncertainties has been proposed with successful applications to several flows. Nonetheless, how to specify proper priors without introducing unwarranted, artificial information remains challenging to the current form of the physics-based approach. Another recently proposed method based on random matrix theory provides the prior distributions with the maximum entropy, which is an alternative for model-form uncertainty quantification in RANS simulations. In this work, we utilize the random matrix theoretic approach to assess and possibly improve the specification of priors used in ...

  8. Determination of transmission and insertion loss for multi-inlet mufflers using impedance matrix and superposition approaches with comparisons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, X.; Jiang, C.; Herrin, D. W.; Wu, T. W.

    2014-10-01

    This paper details how transmission and insertion loss can be defined for the multi-inlet case. Two different procedures are used for calculations and are compared against one another. The first is an impedance matrix method that has been proposed in the past and is especially suitable for deterministic approaches like the boundary element method. The other is a superposition method that does not require assembling or inverting a matrix. Though each method can be extended to the n-inlet situation, the superposition approach is mathematically simpler but requires the source impedance to be known a priori. Transmission and insertion loss can be determined using either method, and results using both are shown to be equivalent. The methods are demonstrated and compared for a two-inlet one-outlet expansion chamber. After which, the superposition method is used to determine the insertion loss for a two-inlet one-outlet generator set muffler experimentally.

  9. Non-linear approach to the entrainment matrix of superfluid nucleon mixture at zero temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leinson, Lev B.

    2017-09-01

    The superfluid drag effect, in hydrodynamics of pulsating neutron stars, is conventionally described with the aid of the entrainment matrix relating the mass currents with the velocities of superfluid flows in the system. Equations for the entrainment matrix of a superfluid mixture of neutrons and protons are derived with allowance for the strong dependence of the energy gaps on the velocities of superfluid flows. The calculations are carried out in the frame of the Fermi-liquid theory. The equations obtained are highly non-linear. Numerical solutions to the equations for some typical cases demonstrate that the components of the entrainment matrix possess a highly non-linear dependence on the velocities of the two superflows simultaneously. This effect, previously ignored, can greatly influence the dynamics of neutron stars.

  10. A matrix approach to the statistics of longevity in heterogeneous frailty models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hal Caswell

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The gamma-Gompertz model is a fixed frailty model in which baseline mortality increasesexponentially with age, frailty has a proportional effect on mortality, and frailty at birth follows a gamma distribution. Mortality selects against the more frail, so the marginal mortality rate decelerates, eventually reaching an asymptote. The gamma-Gompertz is one of a wider class of frailty models, characterized by the choice of baseline mortality, effects of frailty, distributions of frailty, and assumptions about the dynamics of frailty. Objective: To develop a matrix model to compute all the statistical properties of longevity from thegamma-Gompertz and related models. Methods: I use the vec-permutation matrix formulation to develop a model in which individuals are jointly classified by age and frailty. The matrix is used to project the age and frailty dynamicsof a cohort and the fundamental matrix is used to obtain the statistics of longevity. Results: The model permits calculation of the mean, variance, coefficient of variation, skewness and all moments of longevity, the marginal mortality and survivorship functions, the dynamics of the frailty distribution, and other quantities. The matrix formulation extends naturally to other frailty models. I apply the analysis to the gamma-Gompertz model (for humans and laboratory animals, the gamma-Makeham model, and the gamma-Siler model, and to a hypothetical dynamic frailty model characterized by diffusion of frailty with reflecting boundaries.The matrix model permits partitioning the variance in longevity into components due to heterogeneity and to individual stochasticity. In several published human data sets, heterogeneity accounts for less than 10Š of the variance in longevity. In laboratory populations of five invertebrate animal species, heterogeneity accounts for 46Š to 83Š ofthe total variance in longevity.

  11. Harmonization of risk management approaches: radiation and chemical exposures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srinivasan, P. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Radiation Safety Systems Div., Mumbai (India)

    2006-07-01

    Assessment of occupational and public risk from the environmental pollutants like chemicals, radiation, etc demands that the effects be considered not only from each individual pollutant, but from the combination of all the pollutants. An integrated risk assessment system needs to be in place to have an overall risk perspective for the benefit of policy makers and decision takers to try to achieve risk reduction in totality. The basis for risk-based radiation dose limits is derived from epidemiological studies, which provide a rich source of data largely unavailable to chemical risk assessors. In addition, use of the principle of optimization as expressed in the ALARA concept has resulted in a safety culture, which is much more than just complying with stipulated limits. The conservative hypothesis of no-threshold dose-effect relation (ICRP) is universally assumed. The end-points and the severity of different classes of pollutants and even different pollutants in a same class vary over a wide range. Hence, it is difficult to arrive at a quantitative value for the net detriment that weighs the various types of end-points and various classes of pollutants. Once the risk due to other pollutants is quantified by some acceptable methodology, it can be expressed in terms of the Risk Equivalent Radiation Dose (R.E.R.D.) for easy comparison with options involving radiation exposure. This paper is an effort to use to quantify and present the risk due to exposure to chemicals and radiation in a common scale for the purpose of easy comparison to facilitate decision taking. (authors)

  12. Information Architecture for the Web: The IA Matrix Approach to Designing Children's Portals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Large, Andrew; Beheshti, Jamshid; Cole, Charles

    2002-01-01

    Presents a matrix that can serve as a tool for designing the information architecture of a Web portal in a logical and systematic manner. Highlights include interfaces; metaphors; navigation; interaction; information retrieval; and an example of a children's Web portal to provide access to museum information. (Author/LRW)

  13. Random-matrix-theory approach to mesoscopic fluctuations of heat current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Martin; Kottos, Tsampikos; Shapiro, Boris

    2013-08-01

    We consider an ensemble of fully connected networks of N oscillators coupled harmonically with random springs and show, using random-matrix-theory considerations, that both the average phonon heat current and its variance are scale invariant and take universal values in the large N limit. These anomalous mesoscopic fluctuations is the hallmark of strong correlations between normal modes.

  14. S-matrix approach to the equation of state of dilute nuclear matter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-04-01

    matrix. PACS Nos 12.40.Ee; 21.65.Mn; 21.65.Ef; 24.10.Pa. 1. Introduction. The nuclear equation of state (EOS) plays the central role in our understanding of the properties of supernova dynamics or of neutron star matter in the ...

  15. A Geographic Approach to Modelling Human Exposure to Traffic Air Pollution using GIS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, S. S.

    , to automatically generate street configuration data based on digital maps, the BBR and GIS; to predict the temporal variation in traffic and related parameters; and to provide hourly background levels for the OSPM model. The potentials for application of the exposure model have been discussed within air pollution......A new exposure model has been developed that is based on a physical, single media (air) and single source (traffic) microenvironmental approach that estimates traffic related exposures geographically with the postal address as exposure indicator. The microenvironments: residence, workplace...... at the address all the time, and an exposure estimate is also defined that takes into account the time the person spends at the address assuming standardised time-profiles depending on age groups. The exposure model takes advantage of a standard Geographic Information System (GIS) (ArcView and Avenue...

  16. Evaluation of the approach to respirable quartz exposure control in U.S. coal mines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joy, Gerald J

    2012-01-01

    Occupational exposure to high levels of respirable quartz can result in respiratory and other diseases in humans. The Mine Safety and Health Adminstration (MSHA) regulates exposure to respirable quartz in coal mines indirectly through reductions in the respirable coal mine dust exposure limit based on the content of quartz in the airborne respirable dust. This reduction is implemented when the quartz content of airborne respirable dust exceeds 5% by weight. The intent of this dust standard reduction is to restrict miners' exposure to respirable quartz to a time-weighted average concentration of 100 μg/m(3). The effectiveness of this indirect approach to control quartz exposure was evaluated by analyzing respirable dust samples collected by MSHA inspectors from 1995 through 2008. The performance of the current regulatory approach was found to be lacking due to the use of a variable property-quartz content in airborne dust-to establish a standard for subsequent exposures. In one situation, 11.7% (4370/37,346) of samples that were below the applicable respirable coal mine dust exposure limit exceeded 100 μg/m(3) quartz. In a second situation, 4.4% (895/20,560) of samples with 5% or less quartz content in the airborne respirable dust exceeded 100 μg/m(3) quartz. In these two situations, the samples exceeding 100 μg/m(3) quartz were not subject to any potential compliance action. Therefore, the current respirable quartz exposure control approach does not reliably maintain miner exposure below 100 μg/m(3) quartz. A separate and specific respirable quartz exposure standard may improve control of coal miners' occupational exposure to respirable quartz.

  17. Validity of a Job-Exposure Matrix for Psychosocial Job Stressors: Results from the Household Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milner, A.; Niedhammer, I.; Chastang, J.-F.; Spittal, M. J.; LaMontagne, A. D.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction A Job Exposure Matrix (JEM) for psychosocial job stressors allows assessment of these exposures at a population level. JEMs are particularly useful in situations when information on psychosocial job stressors were not collected individually and can help eliminate the biases that may be present in individual self-report accounts. This research paper describes the development of a JEM in the Australian context. Methods The Household Income Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) survey was used to construct a JEM for job control, job demands and complexity, job insecurity, and fairness of pay. Population median values of these variables for all employed people (n = 20,428) were used to define individual exposures across the period 2001 to 2012. The JEM was calculated for the Australian and New Zealand Standard Classification of Occupations (ANZSCO) at the four-digit level, which represents 358 occupations. Both continuous and binary exposures to job stressors were calculated at the 4-digit level. We assessed concordance between the JEM-assigned and individually-reported exposures using the Kappa statistic, sensitivity and specificity assessments. We conducted regression analysis using mental health as an outcome measure. Results Kappa statistics indicate good agreement between individually-reported and JEM-assigned dichotomous measures for job demands and control, and moderate agreement for job insecurity and fairness of pay. Job control, job demands and security had the highest sensitivity, while specificity was relatively high for the four exposures. Regression analysis shows that most individually reported and JEM measures were significantly associated with mental health, and individually-reported exposures produced much stronger effects on mental health than the JEM-assigned exposures. Discussion These JEM-based estimates of stressors exposure provide a conservative proxy for individual-level data, and can be applied to a range of health and

  18. Validity of a Job-Exposure Matrix for Psychosocial Job Stressors: Results from the Household Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milner, A; Niedhammer, I; Chastang, J-F; Spittal, M J; LaMontagne, A D

    2016-01-01

    A Job Exposure Matrix (JEM) for psychosocial job stressors allows assessment of these exposures at a population level. JEMs are particularly useful in situations when information on psychosocial job stressors were not collected individually and can help eliminate the biases that may be present in individual self-report accounts. This research paper describes the development of a JEM in the Australian context. The Household Income Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) survey was used to construct a JEM for job control, job demands and complexity, job insecurity, and fairness of pay. Population median values of these variables for all employed people (n = 20,428) were used to define individual exposures across the period 2001 to 2012. The JEM was calculated for the Australian and New Zealand Standard Classification of Occupations (ANZSCO) at the four-digit level, which represents 358 occupations. Both continuous and binary exposures to job stressors were calculated at the 4-digit level. We assessed concordance between the JEM-assigned and individually-reported exposures using the Kappa statistic, sensitivity and specificity assessments. We conducted regression analysis using mental health as an outcome measure. Kappa statistics indicate good agreement between individually-reported and JEM-assigned dichotomous measures for job demands and control, and moderate agreement for job insecurity and fairness of pay. Job control, job demands and security had the highest sensitivity, while specificity was relatively high for the four exposures. Regression analysis shows that most individually reported and JEM measures were significantly associated with mental health, and individually-reported exposures produced much stronger effects on mental health than the JEM-assigned exposures. These JEM-based estimates of stressors exposure provide a conservative proxy for individual-level data, and can be applied to a range of health and organisational outcomes.

  19. Chromium liquid waste inertization in an inorganic alkali activated matrix: Leaching and NMR multinuclear approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ponzoni, Chiara, E-mail: chiara.ponzoni@unimore.it [University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Department of Engineering “Enzo Ferrari”, Modena (Italy); Lancellotti, Isabella; Barbieri, Luisa [University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Department of Engineering “Enzo Ferrari”, Modena (Italy); Spinella, Alberto; Saladino, Maria Luisa [University of Palermo CGA-UniNetLab, Palermo (Italy); Martino, Delia Chillura [University of Palermo, Department STEBICEF, Palermo (Italy); Caponetti, Eugenio [University of Palermo CGA-UniNetLab, Palermo (Italy); University of Palermo, Department STEBICEF, Palermo (Italy); Armetta, Francesco [University of Palermo, Department STEBICEF, Palermo (Italy); Leonelli, Cristina [University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Department of Engineering “Enzo Ferrari”, Modena (Italy)

    2015-04-09

    Highlights: • Inertization of chromium liquid waste in aluminosilicate matrix. • Water less inertization technique exploiting the waste water content. • Liquid waste inertization without drying step. • Long term stabilization study through leaching test. • SEM analysis and {sup 29}Si and {sup 27}Al MAS NMR in relation with long curing time. - Abstract: A class of inorganic binders, also known as geopolymers, can be obtained by alkali activation of aluminosilicate powders at room temperature. The process is affected by many parameters (curing time, curing temperature, relative humidity etc.) and leads to a resistant matrix usable for inertization of hazardous waste. In this study an industrial liquid waste containing a high amount of chromium (≈2.3 wt%) in the form of metalorganic salts is inertized into a metakaolin based geopolymer matrix. One of the innovative aspects is the exploitation of the water contained in the waste for the geopolymerization process. This avoided any drying treatment, a common step in the management of liquid hazardous waste. The evolution of the process - from the precursor dissolution to the final geopolymer matrix hardening - of different geopolymers containing a waste amount ranging from 3 to 20% wt and their capability to inertize chromium cations were studied by: i) the leaching tests, according to the EN 12,457 regulation, at different curing times (15, 28, 90 and 540 days) monitoring releases of chromium ions (Cr(III) and Cr(VI)) and the cations constituting the aluminosilicate matrix (Na, Si, Al); ii) the humidity variation for different curing times (15 and 540 days); iii) SEM characterization at different curing times (28 and 540 days); iv) the trend of the solution conductivity and pH during the leaching test; v) the characterization of the short-range ordering in terms of T−O−T bonds (where T is Al or Si) by {sup 29}Si and {sup 27}Al solid state magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (ss MAS NMR) for

  20. Systematic Correlation Matrix Evaluation (SCoMaE) - a bottom-up, science-led approach to identifying indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengis, Nadine; Keller, David P.; Oschlies, Andreas

    2018-01-01

    This study introduces the Systematic Correlation Matrix Evaluation (SCoMaE) method, a bottom-up approach which combines expert judgment and statistical information to systematically select transparent, nonredundant indicators for a comprehensive assessment of the state of the Earth system. The methods consists of two basic steps: (1) the calculation of a correlation matrix among variables relevant for a given research question and (2) the systematic evaluation of the matrix, to identify clusters of variables with similar behavior and respective mutually independent indicators. Optional further analysis steps include (3) the interpretation of the identified clusters, enabling a learning effect from the selection of indicators, (4) testing the robustness of identified clusters with respect to changes in forcing or boundary conditions, (5) enabling a comparative assessment of varying scenarios by constructing and evaluating a common correlation matrix, and (6) the inclusion of expert judgment, for example, to prescribe indicators, to allow for considerations other than statistical consistency. The example application of the SCoMaE method to Earth system model output forced by different CO2 emission scenarios reveals the necessity of reevaluating indicators identified in a historical scenario simulation for an accurate assessment of an intermediate-high, as well as a business-as-usual, climate change scenario simulation. This necessity arises from changes in prevailing correlations in the Earth system under varying climate forcing. For a comparative assessment of the three climate change scenarios, we construct and evaluate a common correlation matrix, in which we identify robust correlations between variables across the three considered scenarios.

  1. Active Approach Does not Add to the Effects of in Vivo Exposure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Uijen, Sophie; van den Hout, Marcel; Engelhard, Iris

    2015-01-01

    In exposure therapy, anxiety patients actively approach feared stimuli to violate their expectations of danger and reduce fear. Prior research has shown that stimulus evaluation and behavior are reciprocally related. This suggests that approach behavior itself may decrease fear. This study tested

  2. Truncation scheme of time-dependent density-matrix approach II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tohyama, Mitsuru [Kyorin University School of Medicine, Mitaka, Tokyo (Japan); Schuck, Peter [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, IN2P3-CNRS, Universite Paris-Sud, Orsay (France); Laboratoire de Physique et de Modelisation des Milieux Condenses, CNRS et Universite Joseph Fourier, Grenoble (France)

    2017-09-15

    A truncation scheme of the Bogoliubov-Born-Green-Kirkwood-Yvon hierarchy for reduced density matrices, where a three-body density matrix is approximated by two-body density matrices, is improved to take into account a normalization effect. The truncation scheme is tested for the Lipkin model. It is shown that the obtained results are in good agreement with the exact solutions. (orig.)

  3. Chromium liquid waste inertization in an inorganic alkali activated matrix: leaching and NMR multinuclear approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponzoni, Chiara; Lancellotti, Isabella; Barbieri, Luisa; Spinella, Alberto; Saladino, Maria Luisa; Martino, Delia Chillura; Caponetti, Eugenio; Armetta, Francesco; Leonelli, Cristina

    2015-04-09

    A class of inorganic binders, also known as geopolymers, can be obtained by alkali activation of aluminosilicate powders at room temperature. The process is affected by many parameters (curing time, curing temperature, relative humidity etc.) and leads to a resistant matrix usable for inertization of hazardous waste. In this study an industrial liquid waste containing a high amount of chromium (≈ 2.3 wt%) in the form of metalorganic salts is inertized into a metakaolin based geopolymer matrix. One of the innovative aspects is the exploitation of the water contained in the waste for the geopolymerization process. This avoided any drying treatment, a common step in the management of liquid hazardous waste. The evolution of the process--from the precursor dissolution to the final geopolymer matrix hardening--of different geopolymers containing a waste amount ranging from 3 to 20%wt and their capability to inertize chromium cations were studied by: i) the leaching tests, according to the EN 12,457 regulation, at different curing times (15, 28, 90 and 540 days) monitoring releases of chromium ions (Cr(III) and Cr(VI)) and the cations constituting the aluminosilicate matrix (Na, Si, Al); ii) the humidity variation for different curing times (15 and 540 days); iii) SEM characterization at different curing times (28 and 540 days); iv) the trend of the solution conductivity and pH during the leaching test; v) the characterization of the short-range ordering in terms of TOT bonds (where T is Al or Si) by (29)Si and (27)Al solid state magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (ss MAS NMR) for geopolymers containing high amounts of waste (10-20%wt). The results show the formation of a stable matrix after only 15 days independently on the waste amount introduced; the longer curing times increase the matrices stabilities and their ability to immobilize chromium cations. The maximum amount of waste that can be inertized is around 10 wt% after a curing time of 28 days

  4. Comparison of approaches to deal with matrix effects in LC-MS/MS based determinations of mycotoxins in food and feed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fabregat-Cabello, N.; Zomer, P.; Sancho, J.V.; Roig-Navarro, A.F.; Mol, H.G.J.

    2016-01-01

    This study deals with one of the major concerns in mycotoxin determinations: The matrix effect related to LC-MS/ MS systems with electrospray ionization sources. To this end, in a first approach, the matrix effect has been evaluated in two ways: monitoring the signal of a compound (added to the

  5. Teaching the Extracellular Matrix and Introducing Online Databases within a Multidisciplinary Course with i-Cell-MATRIX: A Student-Centered Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Joao Carlos; Costa, Manuel Joao; Palha, Joana Almeida

    2010-01-01

    The biochemistry and molecular biology of the extracellular matrix (ECM) is difficult to convey to students in a classroom setting in ways that capture their interest. The understanding of the matrix's roles in physiological and pathological conditions study will presumably be hampered by insufficient knowledge of its molecular structure.…

  6. An alternative approach for assessment of liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry matrix effects using auto-sampler programmed co-injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Caitlyn A; Stockham, Peter C; Nash, Christine M; Martin, Sheridan M; Kostakis, Chris; Lenehan, Claire E

    2016-03-01

    We report the use of auto-sampler programmable functions to co-inject analyte standard solution and matrix extract to assess ion enhancement and suppression (matrix effects) in LC-MS. This is effectively an automated post-extraction addition (APEA) procedure, emulating the manual post-extraction addition (PEA) approach widely adopted for assessment of matrix effects. To verify that APEA was comparable to the conventional PEA approach, matrix effects were determined using both methods for a selection of 31 illicit and pharmaceutical drugs in 10 different human urine extracts. Matrix effects measured using APEA were statistically indistinguishable from manual PEA methodology for 27 of the 31 drugs. Of the four drugs that showed significant differences using the two methods, three differed by less than 2 %, which is within the expected accuracy limits required for matrix effect determinations. The remaining analyte, trimeprazine, was found to degrade in the spiked PEA matrix extract, accounting for the difference between matrix effects measured by the PEA and APEA approaches. APEA enables a single matrix extract to be assessed at multiple analyte concentrations, resulting in a considerable reduction in sample preparation time. In addition, APEA can reduce the quantity of analyte-free sample matrix required for matrix effect assessment, which is an important consideration in certain analytical and bioanalytical fields. This work shows that APEA may be considered as an acceptable alternative to PEA for the assessment of matrix effects in LC-MS method validation and may be applicable to a variety of matrices such as environmental samples.

  7. Comparison of the Exposure Obtained by Endoscope and Microscope in the Extended Trans-Sphenoidal Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Batay, Funda; Vural, Emre; Karasu, Aykut; Al-Mefty, Ossama

    2002-01-01

    Objective: Trans-sphenoidal surgery is often combined with other approaches for the treatment of middle cranial base tumors. By combining a maxillotomy with trans-sphenoidal approach, significantly wider exposure to these regions is gained. However, endoscope-assisted techniques have also been used for sellar and parasellar and upper clival regions. Methods: An extended trans-sphenoidal approach was performed on 10 cadaver heads using the operating microscope and was repeated with a 0-degree ...

  8. Offering pre-exposure prophylaxis for HIV prevention to pregnant and postpartum women: a clinical approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominika L Seidman

    2017-02-01

    Conclusion: Growing evidence suggests that pre-exposure prophylaxis with tenofovir/emtricitabine during pregnancy and lactation is safe and effective. Shared decision-making provides one approach to identify at-risk women and offers pre-exposure prophylaxis but requires implementation research in diverse clinical settings. Including pregnant and breastfeeding women in future HIV prevention research is critical for the creation of evidence-driven public health policies and clinical guidelines.

  9. Valuing emerging markets companies : new approaches to determine the effective exposure to country risk

    OpenAIRE

    Roggi, Oliviero; Giannozzi, Alessandro; Baglioni, Tommaso

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to propose new methods to measure the effective exposure to country risk of emerging-market companies. Starting from Damodaran (2003), we propose seven new approaches and a revised CAPM for emerging markets companies. The “Prospective Lambda” represents the effective exposure according to analysts’ estimates of growth. The “Relative Lambda” relies on the firm value estimated through a relative valuation. The “Retrospective Lambda” represents the ex-post effective expo...

  10. Accuracy enhancement of dual rotating mueller matrix imaging polarimeter by diattenuation and retardance error calibration approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Kaustav; Serrano-García, David Ignacio; Otani, Yukitoshi

    2017-06-01

    We present a new calibration method to minimize the errors due to non-ideal retarders of a dual rotating Mueller matrix polarimeter. To increase the accuracy of the dual rotating retarder polarimeter, it is necessary to compensate the errors caused by the inaccuracy of retarders. Although calibration method for retardance already exists, limitations on the accuracy have been obtained by considering only the retardance errors. In the proposed model we added the calibration of diattenuation error of the retarder along with retardance error on the standard model. An enhancement in the accuracy of the system is obtained. The proposed model is described with equations and supporting experimental results are presented.

  11. A Review of the Field on Children's Exposure to Environmental Contaminants: A Risk Assessment Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Alesia; Penney, Rosalind; Solo-Gabriele, Helena

    2017-03-04

    Background: Children must be recognized as a sensitive population based on having biological systems and organs in various stages of development. The processes of absorption, distribution, metabolism and elimination of environmental contaminants within a child's body are considered less advanced than those of adults, making them more susceptible to disease outcomes following even small doses. Children's unique activities of crawling and practicing increased hand-to-mouth ingestion also make them vulnerable to greater exposures by certain contaminants within specific environments. Approach: There is a need to review the field of children's environmental exposures in order to understand trends and identify gaps in research, which may lead to better protection of this vulnerable and sensitive population. Therefore, explored here are previously published contemporary works in the broad area of children's environmental exposures and potential impact on health from around the world. A discussion of children's exposure to environmental contaminants is best organized under the last four steps of a risk assessment approach: hazard identification, dose-response assessment, exposure assessment (including children's activity patterns) and risk characterization. We first consider the many exposure hazards that exist in the indoor and outdoor environments, and emerging contaminants of concern that may help guide the risk assessment process in identifying focus areas for children. A section on special diseases of concern is also included. Conclusions: The field of children's exposures to environmental contaminants is broad. Although there are some well-studied areas offering much insight into children exposures, research is still needed to further our understanding of exposures to newer compounds, growing disease trends and the role of gene-environment interactions that modify adverse health outcomes. It is clear that behaviors of adults and children play a role in reducing or

  12. Numerical solution of time-dependent diffusion equations with nonlocal boundary conditions via a fast matrix approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emran Tohidi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article contributes a matrix approach by using Taylor approximation to obtain the numerical solution of one-dimensional time-dependent parabolic partial differential equations (PDEs subject to nonlocal boundary integral conditions. We first impose the initial and boundary conditions to the main problems and then reach to the associated integro-PDEs. By using operational matrices and also the completeness of the monomials basis, the obtained integro-PDEs will be reduced to the generalized Sylvester equations. For solving these algebraic systems, we apply a famous technique in Krylov subspace iterative methods. A numerical example is considered to show the efficiency of the proposed idea.

  13. Electron collisions with the BeH{sup +} molecular ion in the R-matrix approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakrabarti, K. [Department of Mathematics, Scottish Church College, 1-3 Urquhart Sq., 700006 Kolbata (India); Tennyson, J. [Department of Physicas and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, WC1E 6BT London (United Kingdom)

    2012-01-15

    BeH{sup +} is formed when fusion plasma interacts with beryllium first walls, so the interaction of electrons in the plasma with BeH{sup +} needs to be understood. The R-matrix method is used to study electron collisions with the BeH{sup +} molecular ion. The diatomic version of the UK Molecular R-matrix codes is used and a configuration-interaction calculation is first performed for the BeH{sup +} target to obtain its potential energy curves for 19 lowest singlet and triplet states. Scattering calculations are then done to yield excitation and rotational excitation cross sections in the energy range 0 - 14 eV. Additionally we also obtain bound states of BeH and their quantum defects at the BeH equilibrium bond length 2.5369*a{sub 0}. Resonance positions and widths for Feshbach resonances in the e-BeH{sup +} system are also obtained and presented at the equilibrium bond length 2.5369*a{sub 0}

  14. Novel Approaches to Calculate Nuclear Matrix Elements for Double Beta Decays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horoi Mihai

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Neutrinoless double beta decay is a unique process that could reveal physics beyond the Standard Model of particle physics. If observed, it would prove that neutrinos are Majorana particles, and it could give information regarding the neutrino masses and their hierarchy, provided that reliable nuclear matrix elements (NME can be obtained. The two-neutrino double beta decay is an associate process that is allowed by the Standard Model and it was observed for about ten nuclei. The NME associated with this decay mode could be even more difficult to calculate, but they can be directly related to the experimental half-lives, and they can be constrained using data from charge-exchange reactions. Here we offer a brief overview of the theoretical challenges associated with these two processes, emphasizing the tools necessary to reliably calculate the associated nuclear matrix elements. We also emphasize the role of the competing mechanisms that could contribute to the neutrinoless double beta decay half-life.

  15. Effect of reinforcement on the cutting forces while machining metal matrix composites–An experimental approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ch. Shoba

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid metal matrix composites are of great interest for researchers in recent years, because of their attractive superior properties over traditional materials and single reinforced composites. The machinabilty of hybrid composites becomes vital for manufacturing industries. The need to study the influence of process parameters on the cutting forces in turning such hybrid composite under dry environment is essentially required. In the present study, the influence of machining parameters, e.g. cutting speed, feed and depth of cut on the cutting force components, namely feed force (Ff, cutting force (Fc, and radial force (Fd has been investigated. Investigations were performed on 0, 2, 4, 6 and 8 wt% Silicon carbide (SiC and rice husk ash (RHA reinforced composite specimens. A comparison was made between the reinforced and unreinforced composites. The results proved that all the cutting force components decrease with the increase in the weight percentage of the reinforcement: this was probably due to the dislocation densities generated from the thermal mismatch between the reinforcement and the matrix. Experimental evidence also showed that built-up edge (BUE is formed during machining of low percentage reinforced composites at high speed and high depth of cut. The formation of BUE was captured by SEM, therefore confirming the result. The decrease of cutting force components with lower cutting speed and higher feed and depth of cut was also highlighted. The related mechanisms are explained and presented.

  16. A network-based approach for estimating pedestrian journey-time exposure to air pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Gemma; Whyatt, J Duncan

    2014-07-01

    Individual exposure to air pollution depends not only upon pollution concentrations in the surrounding environment, but also on the volume of air inhaled, which is determined by an individual's physiology and activity level. This study focuses on journey-time exposure, using network analysis in a GIS environment to identify pedestrian routes between multiple origins and destinations throughout the city of Lancaster, North West England. For each segment of a detailed footpath network, exposure was calculated accounting for PM2.5 concentrations (estimated using an atmospheric dispersion model) and respiratory minute volume (varying between individuals and with slope). For each of the routes generated the cumulative exposure to PM2.5 was estimated, allowing for easy comparison between multiple routes. Significant variations in exposure were found between routes depending on their geography, as well as in response to variations in background concentrations and meteorology between days. Differences in physiological characteristics such as age or weight were also seen to impact journey-time exposure considerably. In addition to assessing exposure for a given route, the approach was used to identify alternative routes that minimised journey-time exposure. Exposure reduction potential varied considerably between days, with even subtle shifts in route location, such as to the opposite side of the road, showing significant benefits. The method presented is both flexible and scalable, allowing for the interactions between physiology, activity level, pollution concentration and journey duration to be explored. In enabling physiology and activity level to be integrated into exposure calculations a more comprehensive estimate of journey-time exposure can be made, which has potential to provide more realistic inputs for epidemiological studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Effect of space exposure of some epoxy matrix composites on their thermal expansion and mechanical properties (A0138-8)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabs, Heinrich

    1992-01-01

    Assessments of the behavior of the carbon/epoxy composites in space conditions are described. After an exposure of five years, the mechanical characteristics and the coefficient of thermal expansion are measured and compared to reference values.

  18. An enhanced matrix-free edge-based finite volume approach to model structures

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Suliman, Ridhwaan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available application to a number of test-cases. As will be demonstrated, the finite volume approach exhibits distinct advantages over the Q4 finite element formulation. This provides an alternative approach to the analysis of solid mechanics and allows...

  19. Biomaterials approaches to modeling macrophage-extracellular matrix interactions in the tumor microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Nora L; Fischbach, Claudia

    2016-08-01

    Tumors are characterized by aberrant extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling and chronic inflammation. While advances in biomaterials and tissue engineering strategies have led to important new insights regarding the role of ECM composition, structure, and mechanical properties in cancer in general, the functional link between these parameters and macrophage phenotype is poorly understood. Nevertheless, increasing experimental evidence suggests that macrophage behavior is similarly controlled by physicochemical properties of the ECM and consequential changes in mechanosignaling. Here, we will summarize the current knowledge of macrophage biology and ECM-mediated differences in mechanotransduction and discuss future opportunities of biomaterials and tissue engineering platforms to interrogate the functional relationship between these parameters and their relevance to cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Structural and dynamic studies of two antigenic loops from haemagglutinin: a relaxation matrix approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieffer, B; Koehl, P; Plaue, S; Lefèvre, J F

    1993-01-01

    We have investigated the dynamics and structural behaviour of two antigenic peptides using 1H NMR. The two cyclic peptides mimic the antigenic site A of influenza haemagglutinin protein; they only differ in the way they were cyclized and in the size of their respective linkers. Homonuclear relaxation parameters extracted from a complete NOE matrix were interpreted in terms of local dynamics. A set of distance constraints was deduced from these parameters which allowed 3D models to be constructed using distance geometry. NOE back-calculation was used to check the validity of the final models. Strong variations of internal motion amplitude have been found in both peptides along their backbone. Motions with high amplitudes have been localized in the Gly-Pro-Gly sequence which forms a beta-turn in both structures.

  1. Binary modelling the milling of UG2 ore using a matrix approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Méschac-Bill Kime

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The study reports a binary matrix modelling and simulation studies to improve the performance of the secondary grinding circuit of UG2 ores. The model developed was intended to help searching for optimal operating conditions of the secondary milling circuit so that the platinum group element (PGE recovery is increased while reducing Cr2O3 entrainment in the subsequent flotation stage. A series of laboratory batch-scale tests was carried out in order to estimate the milling kinetics parameters of the chromite and non-chromite components. Finally, two alternatives circuit configurations for a better performance were evaluated using simulations. The optimal design consisted of a conventional ball mill in closed circuit with a hydrocyclone to separate the milling product into lights (non-chromite-rich and heavies (chromite-rich fractions followed by a vibrating screen to de-slime the cyclone underflow before it is returned to the mill for further grinding.

  2. Development of a Non-Invasive Biomonitoring Approach to Determine Exposure to the Organophosphorus Insecticide Chlorpyrifos in Rat Saliva

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timchalk, Chuck; Campbell, James A.; Liu, Guodong; Lin, Yuehe; Kousba, Ahmed A.

    2007-03-01

    Abstract Non-invasive biomonitoring approaches are being developed using reliable portable analytical systems to quantify dosimetry utilizing readily obtainable body fluids, such as saliva. In the current study, rats were given single oral gavage doses (1, 10 or 50 mg/kg) of the insecticide chlorpyrifos (CPF), saliva and blood were collected from groups of animals (4/time-point) at 3, 6, and 12 hr post-dosing, and the samples were analyzed for the CPF metabolite trichlorpyridinol (TCP). Trichlorpyridinol was detected in both blood and saliva at all doses and the TCP concentration in blood exceeded saliva, although the kinetics in blood and saliva were comparable. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PBPK/PD) model for CPF incorporated a compartment model to describe the time-course of TCP in blood and saliva. The model adequately simulated the experimental results over the dose ranges evaluated. A rapid and sensitive sequential injection (SI) electrochemical immunoassay was developed to monitor TCP, and the reported detection limit for TCP in water was 6 ng/L. Computer model simulation in the range of the Allowable Daily Intake (ADI) or Reference Dose (RfD) for CPF (0.01-0.003 mg/kg/day) suggest that the electrochemical immunoassay had adequate sensitivity to detect and quantify TCP in saliva at these low exposure levels. To validate this approach further studies are needed to more fully understand the pharmacokinetics of CPF and TCP excretion in saliva. The utilization of saliva as a biomonitoring matrix, coupled to real-time quantitation and PBPK/PD modeling represents a novel approach with broad application for evaluating both occupational and environmental exposures to insecticides.

  3. [Effects of cigarette smoke exposure on pulmonary vascular intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and matrix metalloproteinase-9 in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiao-Yun; Zhang, Hong-Li; Xu, Jian-Ying; Wang, Chen

    2009-09-01

    To understand the effects of cigarette smoke exposure and smoke cessation on the structure, inflammation and remodeling of pulmonary blood vessels in rats. Thirty-two male Wistar rats were randomly divided into a control group, a smoke exposure group 1 (low dose smoke), a smoke exposure group 2 (high dose smoke) and a smoke cessation group, with 8 rats in each group. The ratio of pulmonary vascular wall thickness/vascular external diameter (WT%) and the ratio of pulmonary vascular wall area/total pulmonary vascular area (WA%) were measured by the image analysis system. The expressions of pulmonary vascular ICAM-1 and MMP-9 protein and mRNA were detected respectively by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and in situ hybridization techniques. WT% and WA% increased significantly in the smoke exposure group 1 [(15.3 +/- 2.1)%, (41 +/- 7)%] and smoke exposure group 2 [(18.0 +/- 2.0)%, (50 +/- 7)%] compared to those of the control group [(10.4 +/- 2.0)%, (30 +/- 4)%] (q = 4.93 - 11.16, P smoke cessation group [(11.0 +/- 1.3)%, (35 +/- 5)%] decreased significantly compared to those of the smoke exposure group 2 (q = 6.74 - 10.29, P pulmonary vascular ICAM-1 protein and mRNA increased significantly in the smoke cessation group, the smoke exposure group 1 and the smoke exposure group 2 [(7.9 +/- 3.2 and 6.2 +/- 3.0), (12.9 +/- 2.3 and 10.3 +/- 2.2), (19.2 +/- 2.3 and 18.3 +/- 2.4)] compared to those of the control group (4.7 +/- 2.3 and 2.7 +/- 1.7) (q = 3.28 - 15.76, P smoke cessation group compared to those of the smoke exposure groups (q = 3.85 - 12.46, P smoke cessation group, smoke exposure group 1 and smoke exposure group 2 [(12.0 +/- 2.8 and 7.0 +/- 3.4), (16.1 +/- 2.8 and 12.5 +/- 1.8), (22.5 +/- 3.5 and 20.0 +/- 3.1)] compared to those of the control group (7.8 +/- 3.0 and 3.2 +/- 2.8) (q = 3.19 - 14.22, P smoke cessation group compared to those of the smoke exposure groups (q = 3.68 - 11.03, P Cigarette smoke exposure caused pulmonary vascular wall

  4. Task to Training Matrix Design for Decommissioning Engineer on the basis of Systematic Approach to Training Methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwak, Jeong Keun [KHNP, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    In nuclear history, before Chernobyl Accident, Three Mile Island (TMI) Accident was the severest accident. For this reason, to resolve the disclosed or potential possibilities of nuclear accident, more than one hundred countermeasures were proposed by United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC). Among various recommendations by USNRC, one suggestion was related to training aspect. It was Systematic Approach to Training (SAT) and this event was the initiation of SAT methodology in the world. In Korea, upcoming June 2017, Kori Unit-1 NPP is scheduled to be shut down and it will experience NPP decommissioning for the first time. Present study aims to establish concrete training foundation for NPP decommissioning engineers based on Systematic Approach to Training (SAT) methodology, in particular, Task to Training Matrix (TTM). The objective of this paper is to organize TTM on the basis of SAT for NPP decommissioning engineer. For this reason, eighteen tasks are yielded through Job and Task Analysis (JTA) process. After that, for the settlement of Task to Training Matrix (TTM), various data are determined such as element, condition, standard, knowledge and skill, learning objective and training setting. When it comes to training in nuclear industry, SAT methodology has been the unwavering principle in Korea since NPPs export to UAE.

  5. Authorship matrix: a rational approach to quantify individual contributions and responsibilities in multi-author scientific articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, T Prabhakar

    2014-06-01

    We propose a rational method for addressing an important question-who deserves to be an author of a scientific article? We review various contentious issues associated with this question and recommend that the scientific community should view authorship in terms of contributions and responsibilities, rather than credits. We propose a new paradigm that conceptually divides a scientific article into four basic elements: ideas, work, writing, and stewardship. We employ these four fundamental elements to modify the well-known International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE) authorship guidelines. The modified ICMJE guidelines are then used as the basis to develop an approach to quantify individual contributions and responsibilities in multi-author articles. The outcome of the approach is an authorship matrix, which can be used to answer several nagging questions related to authorship.

  6. Can the CFO Trust the FX Exposure Quantification from a Stock Market Approach?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aabo, Tom; Brodin, Danielle

    This study examines the sensitivity of detected exchange rate exposures at the firm specific level to changes in methodological choices using a traditional two factor stock market approach for exposure quantification. We primarily focus on two methodological choices: the choice of market index an...... of the study are important because corporate managers, stock analysts and stock pickers are primarily interested in the sensitivity - and thus reliability - of detected exchange rate exposures for a specific firm rather than for an industry or a country as a whole.......This study examines the sensitivity of detected exchange rate exposures at the firm specific level to changes in methodological choices using a traditional two factor stock market approach for exposure quantification. We primarily focus on two methodological choices: the choice of market index...... and the choice of observation frequency. We investigate to which extent the detected exchange rate exposures for a given firm can be confirmed when the choice of market index and/or the choice of observation frequency are changed. Applying our sensitivity analysis to Scandinavian non-financial firms, we...

  7. Toward Developing a New Occupational Exposure Metric Approach for Characterization of Diesel Aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cauda, Emanuele G; Ku, Bon Ki; Miller, Arthur L; Barone, Teresa L

    2012-12-01

    The extensive use of diesel-powered equipment in mines makes the exposure to diesel aerosols a serious occupational issue. The exposure metric currently used in U.S. underground noncoal mines is based on the measurement of total carbon (TC) and elemental carbon (EC) mass concentration in the air. Recent toxicological evidence suggests that the measurement of mass concentration is not sufficient to correlate ultrafine aerosol exposure with health effects. This urges the evaluation of alternative measurements. In this study, the current exposure metric and two additional metrics, the surface area and the total number concentration, were evaluated by conducting simultaneous measurements of diesel ultrafine aerosols in a laboratory setting. The results showed that the surface area and total number concentration of the particles per unit of mass varied substantially with the engine operating condition. The specific surface area (SSA) and specific number concentration (SNC) normalized with TC varied two and five times, respectively. This implies that miners, whose exposure is measured only as TC, might be exposed to an unknown variable number concentration of diesel particles and commensurate particle surface area. Taken separately, mass, surface area, and number concentration did not completely characterize the aerosols. A comprehensive assessment of diesel aerosol exposure should include all of these elements, but the use of laboratory instruments in underground mines is generally impracticable. The article proposes a new approach to solve this problem. Using SSA and SNC calculated from field-type measurements, the evaluation of additional physical properties can be obtained by using the proposed approach.

  8. The Public Health Exposome: A Population-Based, Exposure Science Approach to Health Disparities Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul D. Juarez

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The lack of progress in reducing health disparities suggests that new approaches are needed if we are to achieve meaningful, equitable, and lasting reductions. Current scientific paradigms do not adequately capture the complexity of the relationships between environment, personal health and population level disparities. The public health exposome is presented as a universal exposure tracking framework for integrating complex relationships between exogenous and endogenous exposures across the lifespan from conception to death. It uses a social-ecological framework that builds on the exposome paradigm for conceptualizing how exogenous exposures “get under the skin”. The public health exposome approach has led our team to develop a taxonomy and bioinformatics infrastructure to integrate health outcomes data with thousands of sources of exogenous exposure, organized in four broad domains: natural, built, social, and policy environments. With the input of a transdisciplinary team, we have borrowed and applied the methods, tools and terms from various disciplines to measure the effects of environmental exposures on personal and population health outcomes and disparities, many of which may not manifest until many years later. As is customary with a paradigm shift, this approach has far reaching implications for research methods and design, analytics, community engagement strategies, and research training.

  9. The Public Health Exposome: A Population-Based, Exposure Science Approach to Health Disparities Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juarez, Paul D.; Matthews-Juarez, Patricia; Hood, Darryl B.; Im, Wansoo; Levine, Robert S.; Kilbourne, Barbara J.; Langston, Michael A.; Al-Hamdan, Mohammad Z.; Crosson, William L.; Estes, Maurice G.; Estes, Sue M.; Agboto, Vincent K.; Robinson, Paul; Wilson, Sacoby; Lichtveld, Maureen Y.

    2014-01-01

    The lack of progress in reducing health disparities suggests that new approaches are needed if we are to achieve meaningful, equitable, and lasting reductions. Current scientific paradigms do not adequately capture the complexity of the relationships between environment, personal health and population level disparities. The public health exposome is presented as a universal exposure tracking framework for integrating complex relationships between exogenous and endogenous exposures across the lifespan from conception to death. It uses a social-ecological framework that builds on the exposome paradigm for conceptualizing how exogenous exposures “get under the skin”. The public health exposome approach has led our team to develop a taxonomy and bioinformatics infrastructure to integrate health outcomes data with thousands of sources of exogenous exposure, organized in four broad domains: natural, built, social, and policy environments. With the input of a transdisciplinary team, we have borrowed and applied the methods, tools and terms from various disciplines to measure the effects of environmental exposures on personal and population health outcomes and disparities, many of which may not manifest until many years later. As is customary with a paradigm shift, this approach has far reaching implications for research methods and design, analytics, community engagement strategies, and research training. PMID:25514145

  10. Exposure Assessment for Carbon Dioxide Gas: Full Shift Average and Short-Term Measurement Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, R Jedd; Smith, Philip A

    2015-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) makes up a relatively small percentage of atmospheric gases, yet when used or produced in large quantities as a gas, a liquid, or a solid (dry ice), substantial airborne exposures may occur. Exposure to elevated CO2 concentrations may elicit toxicity, even with oxygen concentrations that are not considered dangerous per se. Full-shift sampling approaches to measure 8-hr time weighted average (TWA) CO2 exposures are used in many facilities where CO2 gas may be present. The need to assess rapidly fluctuating CO2 levels that may approach immediately dangerous to life or health (IDLH) conditions should also be a concern, and several methods for doing so using fast responding measurement tools are discussed in this paper. Colorimetric detector tubes, a non-dispersive infrared (NDIR) detector, and a portable Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy instrument were evaluated in a laboratory environment using a flow-through standard generation system and were found to provide suitable accuracy and precision for assessing rapid fluctuations in CO2 concentration, with a possible effect related to humidity noted only for the detector tubes. These tools were used in the field to select locations and times for grab sampling and personal full-shift sampling, which provided laboratory analysis data to confirm IDLH conditions and 8-hr TWA exposure information. Fluctuating CO2 exposures are exemplified through field work results from several workplaces. In a brewery, brief CO2 exposures above the IDLH value occurred when large volumes of CO2-containing liquid were released for disposal, but 8-hr TWA exposures were not found to exceed the permissible level. In a frozen food production facility nearly constant exposure to CO2 concentrations above the permissible 8-hr TWA value were seen, as well as brief exposures above the IDLH concentration which were associated with specific tasks where liquid CO2 was used. In a poultry processing facility the use of dry

  11. Basal exposure therapy: A new approach for treatment resistant patients with severe and comorbid mental disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Didrik Heggdal; Roar Fosse; Jan Hammer

    2016-01-01

    New treatment approaches are needed for patients with severe and composite mental disorders who appear resistant to conventional treatments. Such treatment resistant patients often have diagnoses of psychotic or bipolar disorders or severe personality disorders and comorbid conditions. Here we evaluate Basal Exposure Therapy (BET), a novel ward-integrated psychotherapeutic approach for these patients. Central to BET is the conceptualization of undifferentiated existential fear as basic to the...

  12. Quantification of Femoral Neck Exposure Through a Minimally Invasive Smith-Petersen Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    subcapital, mid cervical , and basicervical femoral neck fractures . Key Words: Smith Petersen, surgical exposure, anterior hip approach, femoral neck...visualization or palpation with a tonsil clamp. These landmarks exceed the border for any intracapsular hip fracture . The digital images were then analyzed...decreases the risk of muscle denervation. A technique for the reduction of displaced femoral neck fractures using the Smith-Petersen approach to the hip has

  13. Quantification of Posterior Ankle Exposure Through an Achilles Tendon-Splitting Versus Posterolateral Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    femoral neck exposure through a minimally invasive Smith-Petersen approach. J Orthop Trauma. 24:355 –358, 2010. http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/BOT...indica- tions.1−4,6,8−10,14−17 These include operative fixation of posterior ankle fracture -dislocations, tibia nonunion and malunion, pilon fractures ...approaches are advantageous in cases of large posterior fracture fragments, or in cases where a direct reduction of the posterior or central articular surface

  14. A geographic approach to modelling human exposure to traffic air pollution using GIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solvang Jensen, S.

    1998-10-01

    A new exposure model has been developed that is based on a physical, single media (air) and single source (traffic) micro environmental approach that estimates traffic related exposures geographically with the postal address as exposure indicator. The micro environments: residence, workplace and street (road user exposure) may be considered. The model estimates outdoor levels for selected ambient air pollutants (benzene, CO, NO{sub 2} and O{sub 3}). The influence of outdoor air pollution on indoor levels can be estimated using average (I/O-ratios. The model has a very high spatial resolution (the address), a high temporal resolution (one hour) and may be used to predict past, present and future exposures. The model may be used for impact assessment of control measures provided that the changes to the model inputs are obtained. The exposure model takes advantage of a standard Geographic Information System (GIS) (ArcView and Avenue) for generation of inputs, for visualisation of input and output, and uses available digital maps, national administrative registers and a local traffic database, and the Danish Operational Street Pollution Model (OSPM). The exposure model presents a new approach to exposure determination by integration of digital maps, administrative registers, a street pollution model and GIS. New methods have been developed to generate the required input parameters for the OSPM model: to geocode buildings using cadastral maps and address points, to automatically generate street configuration data based on digital maps, the BBR and GIS; to predict the temporal variation in traffic and related parameters; and to provide hourly background levels for the OSPM model. (EG) 109 refs.

  15. A geographic approach to modelling human exposure to traffic air pollution using GIS. Separate appendix report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solvang Jensen, S.

    1998-10-01

    A new exposure model has been developed that is based on a physical, single media (air) and single source (traffic) micro environmental approach that estimates traffic related exposures geographically with the postal address as exposure indicator. The micro environments: residence, workplace and street (road user exposure) may be considered. The model estimates outdoor levels for selected ambient air pollutants (benzene, CO, NO{sub 2} and O{sub 3}). The influence of outdoor air pollution on indoor levels can be estimated using average (I/O-ratios. The model has a very high spatial resolution (the address), a high temporal resolution (one hour) and may be used to predict past, present and future exposures. The model may be used for impact assessment of control measures provided that the changes to the model inputs are obtained. The exposure model takes advantage of a standard Geographic Information System (GIS) (ArcView and Avenue) for generation of inputs, for visualisation of input and output, and uses available digital maps, national administrative registers and a local traffic database, and the Danish Operational Street Pollution Model (OSPM). The exposure model presents a new approach to exposure determination by integration of digital maps, administrative registers, a street pollution model and GIS. New methods have been developed to generate the required input parameters for the OSPM model: to geocode buildings using cadastral maps and address points, to automatically generate street configuration data based on digital maps, the BBR and GIS; to predict the temporal variation in traffic and related parameters; and to provide hourly background levels for the OSPM model. (EG)

  16. Aberrant approach-avoidance conflict resolution following repeated cocaine pre-exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, David; Schumacher, Anett; Erb, Suzanne; Ito, Rutsuko

    2015-10-01

    Addiction is characterized by persistence to seek drug reinforcement despite negative consequences. Drug-induced aberrations in approach and avoidance processing likely facilitate the sustenance of addiction pathology. Currently, the effects of repeated drug exposure on the resolution of conflicting approach and avoidance motivational signals have yet to be thoroughly investigated. The present study sought to investigate the effects of cocaine pre-exposure on conflict resolution using novel approach-avoidance paradigms. We used a novel mixed-valence conditioning paradigm to condition cocaine-pre-exposed rats to associate visuo-tactile cues with either the delivery of sucrose reward or shock punishment in the arms in which the cues were presented. Following training, exploration of an arm containing a superimposition of the cues was assessed as a measure of conflict resolution behavior. We also used a mixed-valence runway paradigm wherein cocaine-pre-exposed rats traversed an alleyway toward a goal compartment to receive a pairing of sucrose reward and shock punishment. Latency to enter the goal compartment across trials was taken as a measure of motivational conflict. Our results reveal that cocaine pre-exposure attenuated learning for the aversive cue association in our conditioning paradigm and enhanced preference for mixed-valence stimuli in both paradigms. Repeated cocaine pre-exposure allows appetitive approach motivations to gain greater influence over behavioral output in the context of motivational conflict, due to aberrant positive and negative incentive motivational processing.

  17. A tiered asthma hazard characterization and exposure assessment approach for evaluation of consumer product ingredients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Andrew; Vincent, Melissa J; Parker, Ann; Gadagbui, Bernard K; Jayjock, Michael

    2015-12-01

    Asthma is a complex syndrome with significant consequences for those affected. The number of individuals affected is growing, although the reasons for the increase are uncertain. Ensuring the effective management of potential exposures follows from substantial evidence that exposure to some chemicals can increase the likelihood of asthma responses. We have developed a safety assessment approach tailored to the screening of asthma risks from residential consumer product ingredients as a proactive risk management tool. Several key features of the proposed approach advance the assessment resources often used for asthma issues. First, a quantitative health benchmark for asthma or related endpoints (irritation and sensitization) is provided that extends qualitative hazard classification methods. Second, a parallel structure is employed to include dose-response methods for asthma endpoints and methods for scenario specific exposure estimation. The two parallel tracks are integrated in a risk characterization step. Third, a tiered assessment structure is provided to accommodate different amounts of data for both the dose-response assessment (i.e., use of existing benchmarks, hazard banding, or the threshold of toxicological concern) and exposure estimation (i.e., use of empirical data, model estimates, or exposure categories). Tools building from traditional methods and resources have been adapted to address specific issues pertinent to asthma toxicology (e.g., mode-of-action and dose-response features) and the nature of residential consumer product use scenarios (e.g., product use patterns and exposure durations). A case study for acetic acid as used in various sentinel products and residential cleaning scenarios was developed to test the safety assessment methodology. In particular, the results were used to refine and verify relationships among tiered approaches such that each lower data tier in the approach provides a similar or greater margin of safety for a given

  18. Performance of hybrid nano-micro reinforced mg metal matrix composites brake calliper: simulation approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatchurrohman, N.; Chia, S. T.

    2017-10-01

    Most commercial vehicles use brake calliper made of grey cast iron (GCI) which possesses heavy weight. This contributes to the total weight of the vehicle which can lead to higher fuel consumption. Another major problem is GCI calliper tends to deflect during clamping action, known as “bending of bridge”. This will result in extended pedal travel. Magnesium metal matrix composites (Mg-MMC) has a potential application in the automotive industry since it having a lower density, higher strength and very good modulus of elasticity as compared to GCI. This paper proposed initial development of hybrid Mg-MMC brake calliper. This was achieved by analyzing the performance of hybrid nano-micro reinforced Mg-MMC and comparing with the conventional GCI brake calliper. It was performed using simulation in ANSYS, a finite element analysis (FEA) software. The results show that hybrid Mg-MMC has better performance in terms of reduction the weight of the brake calliper, reduction in total deformation/deflection and better ability to withstand equivalent elastic strain.

  19. Current state of knowledge when it comes to consumer exposure to nanomaterial embedded in a solid matrix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mackevica, Aiga; Hansen, Steffen Foss

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about consumer exposure to engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) stemming from NM-containing consumer products. Here, we focus especially on studies that have investigated the release of ENMs from consumer products, investigating to what extent the information in the open literature can...

  20. Early-life metal exposure and schizophrenia: A proof-of-concept study using novel tooth-matrix biomarkers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Modabbernia, A.; Velthorst, E.; Gennings, C.; de Haan, L.; Austin, C.; Sutterland, A.; Mollon, J.; Frangou, S.; Wright, R.; Arora, M.; Reichenberg, A.

    2016-01-01

    Despite evidence for the effects of metals on neurodevelopment, the long-term effects on mental health remain unclear due to methodological limitations. Our objective was to determine the feasibility of studying metal exposure during critical neurodevelopmental periods and to explore the association

  1. Long-term dietary exposure to lead in young European children: Comparing a pan-European approach with a national exposure assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boon, P.E.; Te Biesebeek, J.D.; van Klaveren, J.D.

    2012-01-01

    Long-term dietary exposures to lead in young children were calculated by combining food consumption data of 11 European countries categorised using harmonised broad food categories with occurrence data on lead from different Member States (pan-European approach). The results of the assessment...... in children living in the Netherlands were compared with a long-term lead intake assessment in the same group using Dutch lead concentration data and linking the consumption and concentration data at the highest possible level of detail. Exposures obtained with the pan-European approach were higher than...... the national exposure calculations. For both assessments cereals contributed most to the exposure. The lower dietary exposure in the national study was due to the use of lower lead concentrations and a more optimal linkage of food consumption and concentration data. When a pan-European approach, using...

  2. Detailed anatomy for the transoral approach to the craniovertebral junction: an exposure and safety study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiyun; Xia, Hong; Wu, Zenghui; Ai, Fuzhi; Xu, Junjie; Yin, Qingshui

    2014-04-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to demonstrate the anatomical structures of the transoral approach to the craniovertebral junction. We evaluated the necessary exposure field and the safety of this approach. Methods Surgical operations with the transoral approach were performed on 36 cadaver specimens. The special anatomical structures were measured surrounding the exposure field with priorities given to measurements relating to the vertebral artery (VA). The anatomical relationships between the VA and nerves were observed. Results The exposure field partly covered the vertebral basilar system confluent. The middle clivus to upper C3 vertebral body can be exposed by transoral approach. Cranial nerves and cervical nerves emerged from the caudal of vertebrobasilar artery and circumambulated anterolaterally, and some abnormalities were observed in the intracranial segment of vertebrobasilar artery. The safe field was in an inverted trapezoid shape, of which the widest point was 25.5 ± 4.5 mm to the midline at C1 transverse process level; the narrowest point was 11.2 ± 1.5 mm to the midline at the C2-3 level. Conclusion Because the VA is the landmark of the safe field in this approach, surgeons should be very careful to avoid injuries of the VA and nerves while operating in the intracranial field or at the C2-3 level.

  3. Fast live cell imaging at nanometer scale using annihilating filter-based low-rank Hankel matrix approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Junhong; Carlini, Lina; Unser, Michael; Manley, Suliana; Ye, Jong Chul

    2015-09-01

    Localization microscopy such as STORM/PALM can achieve a nanometer scale spatial resolution by iteratively localizing fluorescence molecules. It was shown that imaging of densely activated molecules can accelerate temporal resolution which was considered as major limitation of localization microscopy. However, this higher density imaging needs to incorporate advanced localization algorithms to deal with overlapping point spread functions (PSFs). In order to address this technical challenges, previously we developed a localization algorithm called FALCON1, 2 using a quasi-continuous localization model with sparsity prior on image space. It was demonstrated in both 2D/3D live cell imaging. However, it has several disadvantages to be further improved. Here, we proposed a new localization algorithm using annihilating filter-based low rank Hankel structured matrix approach (ALOHA). According to ALOHA principle, sparsity in image domain implies the existence of rank-deficient Hankel structured matrix in Fourier space. Thanks to this fundamental duality, our new algorithm can perform data-adaptive PSF estimation and deconvolution of Fourier spectrum, followed by truly grid-free localization using spectral estimation technique. Furthermore, all these optimizations are conducted on Fourier space only. We validated the performance of the new method with numerical experiments and live cell imaging experiment. The results confirmed that it has the higher localization performances in both experiments in terms of accuracy and detection rate.

  4. Detecting Associations between Early-Life DDT Exposures and Childhood Growth Patterns: A Novel Statistical Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heggeseth, Brianna; Harley, Kim; Warner, Marcella; Jewell, Nicholas; Eskenazi, Brenda

    2015-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that environmental exposures at key development periods such as in utero play a role in childhood growth and obesity. To investigate whether in utero exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals, dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and its metabolite, dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane (DDE), is associated with childhood physical growth, we took a novel statistical approach to analyze data from the CHAMACOS cohort study. To model heterogeneity in the growth patterns, we used a finite mixture model in combination with a data transformation to characterize body mass index (BMI) with four groups and estimated the association between exposure and group membership. In boys, higher maternal concentrations of DDT and DDE during pregnancy are associated with a BMI growth pattern that is stable until about age five followed by increased growth through age nine. In contrast, higher maternal DDT exposure during pregnancy is associated with a flat, relatively stable growth pattern in girls. This study suggests that in utero exposure to DDT and DDE may be associated with childhood BMI growth patterns, not just BMI level, and both the magnitude of exposure and sex may impact the relationship.

  5. Detecting Associations between Early-Life DDT Exposures and Childhood Growth Patterns: A Novel Statistical Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brianna Heggeseth

    Full Text Available It has been hypothesized that environmental exposures at key development periods such as in utero play a role in childhood growth and obesity. To investigate whether in utero exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals, dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT and its metabolite, dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane (DDE, is associated with childhood physical growth, we took a novel statistical approach to analyze data from the CHAMACOS cohort study. To model heterogeneity in the growth patterns, we used a finite mixture model in combination with a data transformation to characterize body mass index (BMI with four groups and estimated the association between exposure and group membership. In boys, higher maternal concentrations of DDT and DDE during pregnancy are associated with a BMI growth pattern that is stable until about age five followed by increased growth through age nine. In contrast, higher maternal DDT exposure during pregnancy is associated with a flat, relatively stable growth pattern in girls. This study suggests that in utero exposure to DDT and DDE may be associated with childhood BMI growth patterns, not just BMI level, and both the magnitude of exposure and sex may impact the relationship.

  6. Detecting Associations between Early-Life DDT Exposures and Childhood Growth Patterns: A Novel Statistical Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heggeseth, Brianna; Harley, Kim; Warner, Marcella; Jewell, Nicholas; Eskenazi, Brenda

    2015-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that environmental exposures at key development periods such as in utero play a role in childhood growth and obesity. To investigate whether in utero exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals, dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and its metabolite, dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane (DDE), is associated with childhood physical growth, we took a novel statistical approach to analyze data from the CHAMACOS cohort study. To model heterogeneity in the growth patterns, we used a finite mixture model in combination with a data transformation to characterize body mass index (BMI) with four groups and estimated the association between exposure and group membership. In boys, higher maternal concentrations of DDT and DDE during pregnancy are associated with a BMI growth pattern that is stable until about age five followed by increased growth through age nine. In contrast, higher maternal DDT exposure during pregnancy is associated with a flat, relatively stable growth pattern in girls. This study suggests that in utero exposure to DDT and DDE may be associated with childhood BMI growth patterns, not just BMI level, and both the magnitude of exposure and sex may impact the relationship. PMID:26125556

  7. Violence in context: Embracing an ecological approach to violent media exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glackin, Erin; Gray, Sarah A O

    2016-12-01

    This commentary expands on Anderson, Bushman, Donnerstein, Hummer, and Warburton's agenda for minimizing the impacts of violent media exposure (VME) on youth aggression. We argue that in order to effectively intervene in the development of aggression and other maladaptive traits, researchers and policymakers should take an ecological, developmental psychopathology approach to understanding children's exposure to VME within developmental, relational, environmental, and cultural contexts. Such a framework holds the most promise for identifying at-risk groups, establishing targets of intervention, and testing mechanisms of change.

  8. PREDICTION OF TOOL CONDITION DURING TURNING OF ALUMINIUM/ALUMINA/GRAPHITE HYBRID METAL MATRIX COMPOSITES USING MACHINE LEARNING APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. RADHIKA

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Aluminium/alumina/graphite hybrid metal matrix composites manufactured using stir casting technique was subjected to machining studies to predict tool condition during machining. Fresh tool as well as tools with specific amount of wear deliberately created prior to machining experiments was used. Vibration signals were acquired using an accelerometer for each tool condition. These signals were then processed to extract statistical and histogram features to predict the tool condition during machining. Two classifiers namely, Random Forest and Classification and Regression Tree (CART were used to classify the tool condition. Results showed that histogram features with Random Forest classifier yielded maximum efficiency in predicting the tool condition. This machine learning approach enables the prediction of tool failure in advance, thereby minimizing the unexpected breakdown of tool and machine.

  9. Polarization observables in the longitudinal basis for pseudo-scalar meson photoproduction using a density matrix approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biplab Dey, Michael E. McCracken, David G. Ireland, Curtis A. Meyer

    2011-05-01

    The complete expression for the intensity in pseudo-scalar meson photoproduction with a polarized beam, target, and recoil baryon is derived using a density matrix approach that offers great economy of notation. A Cartesian basis with spins for all particles quantized along a single direction, the longitudinal beam direction, is used for consistency and clarity in interpretation. A single spin-quantization axis for all particles enables the amplitudes to be written in a manifestly covariant fashion with simple relations to those of the well-known CGLN formalism. Possible sign discrepancies between theoretical amplitude-level expressions and experimentally measurable intensity profiles are dealt with carefully. Our motivation is to provide a coherent framework for coupled-channel partial-wave analysis of several meson photoproduction reactions, incorporating recently published and forthcoming polarization data from Jefferson Lab.

  10. A quantitative S-Matrix approach to high-order harmonic generation from multiphoton to tunneling regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaja, L; Pérez-Hernández, J A

    2007-04-02

    We present a S-matrix description of the process of high order harmonic generation during the interaction of atoms with strong electromagnetic fields. In contrast with the state-of-the-art approaches, our model does not employ the stationary phase approximation and accounts as well for the continuum-continuum transitions. Therefore we are able to reproduce quantitatively the higher frequency part of the spectrum for arbitrary pulse shapes, and for intensities corresponding to multiphoton, tunnel and soft over-the barrier ionization regimes. In addition this model can be implemented very efficiently in a Personal Computer to calculate the harmonic generation for the atom interacting with an eight-cycle pulse at lambda =800 nm in, roughly, ten minutes (a reduction of two orders of magnitude from the typical time requirements of the exact integration).

  11. The Decision Support Matrix (DSM) Approach to Reducing Risk of Flooding and Water Pollution in Farmed Landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewett, Caspar J. M.; Quinn, Paul; Wilkinson, Mark

    2014-05-01

    Intense farming plays a key role in contributing to problems such as increased flood risk, soil erosion and poor water quality. This means that there is great potential for agricultural practitioners to play a major part in reducing multiple risks through better land-use management. Greater understanding by farmers, land managers, practitioners and policy-makers of the ways in which farmed landscapes contribute to risks and the ways in which those risks might be mitigated can be an essential component in improving practice. The Decision Support Matrix (DSM) approach involves the development of a range of visualization and communication tools to help compare the risks associated with different farming practices and explore options to manage runoff. DSMs are simple decision support systems intended for use by the non-expert which combine expert hydrological evidence with local knowledge of runoff patterns. They are developed through direct engagement with stakeholders, ensuring that the examples and language used makes sense to end-users. A key element of the tools is that they show the current conditions of the land and describe extremes of land-use management within a hydrological and agricultural land-management context. The tools include conceptual models of a series of pre-determined runoff scenarios, providing the end-user with a variety of potential land management practices and runoff management options. Visual examples of different farming practices are used to illustrate the impact of good and bad practice on specific problems such as nutrient export or risk of flooding. These show both how current conditions cause problems downstream and how systems are vulnerable to changes in climate and land-use intensification. The level of risk associated with a particular land management option is represented by a mapping on a two- or three-dimensional matrix. Interactive spreadsheet-based tools are developed in which multiple questions allow the user to explore

  12. Calibration approach for extremely variable laser induced plasmas and a strategy to reduce the matrix effect in general

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazic, V.; De Ninno, A.

    2017-11-01

    The laser induced plasma spectroscopy was applied on particles attached on substrate represented by a silica wafer covered with a thin oil film. The substrate itself weakly interacts with a ns Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm) while presence of particles strongly enhances the plasma emission, here detected by a compact spectrometer array. Variations of the sample mass from one laser spot to another exceed one order of magnitude, as estimated by on-line photography and the initial image calibration for different sample loadings. Consequently, the spectral lines from particles show extreme intensity fluctuations from one sampling point to another, between the detection threshold and the detector's saturation in some cases. In such conditions the common calibration approach based on the averaged spectra, also when considering ratios of the element lines i.e. concentrations, produces errors too large for measuring the sample compositions. On the other hand, intensities of an analytical and the reference line from single shot spectra are linearly correlated. The corresponding slope depends on the concentration ratio and it is weakly sensitive to fluctuations of the plasma temperature inside the data set. A use of the slopes for constructing the calibration graphs significantly reduces the error bars but it does not eliminate the point scattering caused by the matrix effect, which is also responsible for large differences in the average plasma temperatures among the samples. Well aligned calibration points were obtained after identifying the couples of transitions less sensitive to variations of the plasma temperature, and this was achieved by simple theoretical simulations. Such selection of the analytical lines minimizes the matrix effect, and together with the chosen calibration approach, allows to measure the relative element concentrations even in highly unstable laser induced plasmas.

  13. General R-matrix approach for integrating the multiband kṡp equation in layered semiconductor structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botha, A. E.

    2012-01-01

    A Fortran 90 code is provided for calculating the electron reflection and transmission coefficients in semiconductor heterostructures within the 14-band kṡp approximation. The code may easily be adapted for use with any kṡp model, including magnetic field and/or strain effects, for example. Numerical instability, which is problematic in type-II systems due to the simultaneous presence of propagating and evanescent states, is reduced by developing a novel log-derivative R-matrix approach based on the Jost solution to the kṡp equation. Program summaryProgram title: multiband-kp Catalogue identifier: AEKG_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEKG_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 7088 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 90 237 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 90 Computer: HP 128-node cluster (8 Intel 3.0 GHz Xeon processors per node) Operating system: RedHat Enterprise Linux 5.1 RAM: 11 MB Classification: 7.3, 7.9 External routines: LAPACK [1], ODE [2] Nature of problem: Calculating the electron transmission (or reflection) coefficient for single, double or multiple semiconductor quantum wells. Solution method: Makes use of a log-derivative reflection matrix approach which is based on obtaining the Jost solution to the multiband envelope function kṡp equation. Restrictions: Accuracy depends on the limitations of the kṡp model. In this implementation a "bare" 14-band model is used. Unusual features: By default Intel's math-kernel-library (MKL) [3] runs in serial mode. MKL also has built in parallel matrix algorithms which can be invoked without explicit parallelization in the source code. In this case all of the 8 CPUs in one node are used by the LAPACK subroutines. Running

  14. A novel approach for detail-enhanced exposure fusion using guided filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Harbinder; Kumar, Vinay; Bhooshan, Sunil

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we propose a novel detail-enhancing exposure fusion approach using nonlinear translation-variant filter (NTF). With the captured Standard Dynamic Range (SDR) images under different exposure settings, first the fine details are extracted based on guided filter. Next, the base layers (i.e., images obtained from NTF) across all input images are fused using multiresolution pyramid. Exposure, contrast, and saturation measures are considered to generate a mask that guides the fusion process of the base layers. Finally, the fused base layer is combined with the extracted fine details to obtain detail-enhanced fused image. The goal is to preserve details in both very dark and extremely bright regions without High Dynamic Range Image (HDRI) representation and tone mapping step. Moreover, we have demonstrated that the proposed method is also suitable for the multifocus image fusion without introducing artifacts.

  15. Scenarios Approach to the Electromagnetic Exposure: The Case Study of a Train Compartment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Paffi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies identified the train compartment as the place where people can experience the highest exposure levels (still below the international guideline limits to electromagnetic fields in the radiofrequency range. Here a possible scenario of a train compartment has been reproduced and characterized, both numerically and experimentally. A good agreement between the simulated electric field distributions and measurements has been found. Results indicate that the higher values of exposure in specific positions inside the train compartment depend on the number of active cell phones, the bad coverage condition, the cell orientation, and the presence of metallic walls. This study shows that the proposed approach, based on the scenarios characterization, may efficiently support the assessment of the individual electromagnetic exposure.

  16. Xplicit, a novel approach in probabilistic spatiotemporally explicit exposure and risk assessment for plant protection products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schad, Thorsten; Schulz, Ralf

    2011-10-01

    The quantification of risk (the likelihood and extent of adverse effects) is a prerequisite in regulatory decision making for plant protection products and is the goal of the Xplicit project. In its present development stage, realism is increased in the exposure assessment (EA), first by using real-world data on, e.g., landscape factors affecting exposure, and second, by taking the variability of key factors into account. Spatial and temporal variability is explicitly addressed. Scale dependencies are taken into account, which allows for risk quantification at different scales, for example, at landscape scale, an overall picture of the potential exposure of nontarget organisms can be derived (e.g., for all off-crop habitats in a given landscape); at local scale, exposure might be relevant to assess recovery and recolonization potential; intermediate scales might best refer to population level and hence might be relevant for risk management decisions (e.g., individual off-crop habitats). The Xplicit approach is designed to comply with a central paradigm of probabilistic approaches, namely, that each individual case that is derived from the variability functions employed should represent a potential real-world case. This is mainly achieved by operating in a spatiotemporally explicit fashion. Landscape factors affecting the local exposure of habitats of nontarget species (i.e., receptors) are derived from geodatabases. Variability in time is resolved by operating at discrete time steps, with the probability of events (e.g., application) or conditions (e.g., wind conditions) defined in probability density functions (PDFs). The propagation of variability of parameters into variability of exposure and risk is done using a Monte Carlo approach. Among the outcomes are expectancy values on the realistic worst-case exposure (predicted environmental concentration [PEC]), the probability p that the PEC exceeds the ecologically acceptable concentration (EAC) for a given

  17. A novel approach for protein subcellular location prediction using amino acid exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Proteins perform their functions in associated cellular locations. Therefore, the study of protein function can be facilitated by predictions of protein location. Protein location can be predicted either from the sequence of a protein alone by identification of targeting peptide sequences and motifs, or by homology to proteins of known location. A third approach, which is complementary, exploits the differences in amino acid composition of proteins associated to different cellular locations, and can be useful if motif and homology information are missing. Here we expand this approach taking into account amino acid composition at different levels of amino acid exposure. Results Our method has two stages. For stage one, we trained multiple Support Vector Machines (SVMs) to score eukaryotic protein sequences for membership to each of three categories: nuclear, cytoplasmic and extracellular, plus extra category nucleocytoplasmic, accounting for the fact that a large number of proteins shuttles between those two locations. In stage two we use an artificial neural network (ANN) to propose a category from the scores given to the four locations in stage one. The method reaches an accuracy of 68% when using as input 3D-derived values of amino acid exposure. Calibration of the method using predicted values of amino acid exposure allows classifying proteins without 3D-information with an accuracy of 62% and discerning proteins in different locations even if they shared high levels of identity. Conclusions In this study we explored the relationship between residue exposure and protein subcellular location. We developed a new algorithm for subcellular location prediction that uses residue exposure signatures. Our algorithm uses a novel approach to address the multiclass classification problem. The algorithm is implemented as web server 'NYCE’ and can be accessed at http://cbdm.mdc-berlin.de/~amer/nyce. PMID:24283794

  18. Exposure to BPA in Children—Media-Based and Biomonitoring-Based Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krista L.Y. Christensen

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Bisphenol A (BPA is used in numerous industrial and consumer product applications resulting in ubiquitous exposure. Children’s exposure is of particular concern because of evidence of developmental effects. Childhood exposure is estimated for different age groups in two ways. The “forward” approach uses information on BPA concentrations in food and other environmental media (air, water, etc. combined with average contact rates for each medium. The “backward” approach relies on urinary biomonitoring, extrapolating backward to the intake which would have led to the observed biomarker level. The forward analysis shows that BPA intakes are dominated by canned food consumption, and that intakes are higher for younger ages. Mean intake estimates ranged from ~125 ng/kg-day for 1 year-olds to ~73 ng/kg-day among 16–20 years olds. Biomonitoring-based intakes show the same trend of lower intakes for older children, with an estimate of 121 (median to 153 (mean ng/kg-day for 2–6 years, compared with 33 (median to 53–66 (mean ng/kg-day for 16–20 years. Infant intakes were estimated to range from ~46 to 137 ng/kg-day. Recognizing uncertainties and limitations, this analysis suggests that the “forward” and “backward” methods provide comparable results and identify canned foods as a potentially important source of BPA exposure for children.

  19. Impacts of sporulation temperature, exposure to compost matrix and temperature on survival of Bacillus cereus spores during livestock mortality composting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanford, K; Reuter, T; Gilroyed, B H; McAllister, T A

    2015-04-01

    To investigate impact of sporulation and compost temperatures on feasibility of composting for disposal of carcasses contaminated with Bacillus anthracis. Two strains of B. cereus, 805 and 1391, were sporulated at either 20 or 37°C (Sporulation temperature, ST) and 7 Log10 CFU g(-1) spores added to autoclaved manure in nylon bags (pore size 50 μm) or in sealed vials. Vials and nylon bags were embedded into compost in either a sawdust or manure matrix each containing 16 bovine mortalities (average weight 617 ± 33 kg), retrieved from compost at intervals over 217 days and survival of B. cereus spores assessed. A ST of 20°C decreased spore survival by 1·4 log10 CFU g(-1) (P Compost temperatures >55°C reduced spore survival (P compost temperatures were key factors influencing survival of B. cereus spores in mortality compost. Composting may be most appropriate for the disposal of carcasses infected with B. anthracis at ambient temperatures ≤20°C under thermophillic composting conditions (>55°C). © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  20. An improved multi-exposure approach for high quality holographic femtosecond laser patterning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Chenchu; Hu, Yanlei, E-mail: huyl@ustc.edu.cn, E-mail: jwl@ustc.edu.cn; Li, Jiawen, E-mail: huyl@ustc.edu.cn, E-mail: jwl@ustc.edu.cn; Lao, Zhaoxin; Ni, Jincheng; Chu, Jiaru; Huang, Wenhao; Wu, Dong [Department of Precision Machinery and Precision Instrumentation, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China)

    2014-12-01

    High efficiency two photon polymerization through single exposure via spatial light modulator (SLM) has been used to decrease the fabrication time and rapidly realize various micro/nanostructures, but the surface quality remains a big problem due to the speckle noise of optical intensity distribution at the defocused plane. Here, a multi-exposure approach which used tens of computer generate holograms successively loaded on SLM is presented to significantly improve the optical uniformity without losing efficiency. By applying multi-exposure, we found that the uniformity at the defocused plane was increased from ∼0.02 to ∼0.6 according to our simulation. The fabricated two series of letters “HELLO” and “USTC” under single-and multi-exposure in our experiment also verified that the surface quality was greatly improved. Moreover, by this method, several kinds of beam splitters with high quality, e.g., 2 × 2, 5 × 5 Daman, and complex nonseperate 5 × 5, gratings were fabricated with both of high quality and short time (<1 min, 95% time-saving). This multi-exposure SLM-two-photon polymerization method showed the promising prospect in rapidly fabricating and integrating various binary optical devices and their systems.

  1. Aggregate exposure approaches for parabens in personal care products: a case assessment for children between 0 and 3 years old

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosens, Ilse; Delmaar, Christiaan J E; ter Burg, Wouter; de Heer, Cees; Schuur, A Gerlienke

    2014-01-01

    In the risk assessment of chemical substances, aggregation of exposure to a substance from different sources via different pathways is not common practice. Focusing the exposure assessment on a substance from a single source can lead to a significant underestimation of the risk. To gain more insight on how to perform an aggregate exposure assessment, we applied a deterministic (tier 1) and a person-oriented probabilistic approach (tier 2) for exposure to the four most common parabens through personal care products in children between 0 and 3 years old. Following a deterministic approach, a worst-case exposure estimate is calculated for methyl-, ethyl-, propyl- and butylparaben. As an illustration for risk assessment, Margins of Exposure (MoE) are calculated. These are 991 and 4966 for methyl- and ethylparaben, and 8 and 10 for propyl- and butylparaben, respectively. In tier 2, more detailed information on product use has been obtained from a small survey on product use of consumers. A probabilistic exposure assessment is performed to estimate the variability and uncertainty of exposure in a population. Results show that the internal exposure for each paraben is below the level determined in tier 1. However, for propyl- and butylparaben, the percentile of the population with an exposure probability above the assumed “safe” MoE of 100, is 13% and 7%, respectively. In conclusion, a tier 1 approach can be performed using simple equations and default point estimates, and serves as a starting point for exposure and risk assessment. If refinement is warranted, the more data demanding person-oriented probabilistic approach should be used. This probabilistic approach results in a more realistic exposure estimate, including the uncertainty, and allows determining the main drivers of exposure. Furthermore, it allows to estimate the percentage of the population for which the exposure is likely to be above a specific value. PMID:23801276

  2. Minimally invasive research of presigmoidal approach for exposure of jugular foramen region utilizing virtual reality system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke TANG

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To discuss minimally invasive tactics for exposure of jugular foramen region in transpetrosal-presigmoidal approach based on virtual reality image model. Methods CT and MRI scans were performed to 15 adult cadaver heads (30 sides, and image data was inputted into Vitrea virtual reality system to establish three-dimensional anatomical model of jugular foramen region. The transpetrosal-presigmoidal approach was simulated with selecting osseous landmark points to draw a cylinder. Minimally invasive simulation was performed by reducing the diameter of cylinder. Anatomic exposures in surgical trajectory following minimally invasive design were observed, measured and compared.  Results Spacial sequence of nerves and vessels of jugular foramen region was exposured clearly with the route simulating transpetrosal-presigmoidal approach. Route before and after minimally invasive design passed through the interval between vertical segment of facial nerve and sigmoid sinus. There was a part of sigmoid sinus in the route. Cerebellar hemisphere was not included in the route. Data measurement and comparative analysis showed that volume of route, petrosal osseous structure and venous sinus involved in route before minimally invasive design was more than that after minimally invasive design. The differences reached statistical significance (P = 0.000. The volumes of lower cranial nerves between routes before and after minimally invasive design did not show significant differences (P = 0.552.  Conclusions Minimally invasive route of transpetrosal-presigmoidal approach is helpful to reduce surgical injury of vital structures in effective exposure for target structures of jugular foramen region. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.04.011

  3. Transverse cervical skin incision and vertical platysma splitting approach for anterior cervical vertebral column exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agrawal Amit

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Anterior surgical approaches provide direct access to symptomatic areas of the cervical spine, allow management of the vast spectrum of cervical spine pathologies and there are many articles in the literature that discussed these techniques in detail. Cosmesis is an important issue for patients who undergone surgeryon neck structures as an improperly placed incision attracting significant morbidity and few publications discuss this issue in details. The purpose of the present article is to describe our experience with transverse cervical skin incision and vertical platysma splitting approach for anterior cervical vertebral column exposure.

  4. Developmental Programming: Gestational Exposure to Excess Testosterone Alters Expression of Ovarian Matrix Metalloproteases and Their Target Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puttabyatappa, Muraly; Irwin, Ashleigh; Martin, Jacob D; Mesquitta, Makeda; Veiga-Lopez, Almudena; Padmanabhan, Vasantha

    2017-01-01

    Prenatal testosterone (T)-treated sheep, similar to women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), manifests reproductive defects that include multifollicular ovarian phenotype. Women with PCOS manifest increased ovarian matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) activity. We tested the hypothesis that gestational T excess in sheep would alter ovarian expression of MMPs, tissue inhibitors of MMP (TIMP) and their target proteins laminin B (LAMB), collagen, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF), and connexin 43 (GJA1) consistent with increased MMP activity and that these changes are developmentally regulated. The ovarian content of these proteins was quantified by immunohistochemistry in fetal day 90, 140, and adult (21 months of age) ovaries. Prenatal T excess lowered GJA1 protein content in stroma and granulosa cells of primary follicles from fetal day 90 ovaries and decreased stromal MMP9, TIMP1, and LAMB in fetal day 140 ovaries. In the adult, prenatal T-treatment (1) increased MMP9 in theca cells of large preantral follicles and stroma, TNF in granulosa cells of small and large preantral follicles and theca cells of large preantral and antral follicles, and GJA1 in stroma, theca cells of large preantral follicles, and granulosa cells of antral follicles and (2) reduced TIMP1 in stroma, theca cells of large preantral and antral follicles, LAMB in stroma and small prenatral follicles, and collagen content in stroma and around antral follicles. These findings suggest a net increase in MMP activity and its target proteins TNF and GJA1 in prenatal T-treated adult but not in fetal ovaries and their potential involvement in the development of multifollicular morphology.

  5. New Approaches for Biomonitoring Exposure to the Human Carcinogen Aristolochic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Byeong Hwa; Sidorenko, Viktoriya S; Rosenquist, Thomas A; Dickman, Kathleen G; Grollman, Arthur P; Turesky, Robert J

    2015-07-01

    Aristolochic acids (AA) are found in all Aristolochia herbaceous plants, many of which have been used worldwide for medicinal purposes for centuries. AA are causal agents of the chronic kidney disease entity termed aristolochic acid nephropathy (AAN) and potent upper urinary tract carcinogens in humans. AAN and upper urinary tract cancers are endemic in rural areas of Croatia and other Balkan countries where exposure to AA occurs through the ingestion of home-baked bread contaminated with Aristolochia seeds. In Asia, exposure to AA occurs through usage of traditional Chinese medicinal herbs containing Aristolochia. Despite warnings from regulatory agencies, traditional Chinese herbs containing AA continue to be used world-wide. In this review, we highlight novel approaches to quantify exposure to AA, by analysis of aristolactam (AL) DNA adducts, employing ultraperformance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization/multistage mass spectrometry (UPLC-ESI/MSn). DNA adducts are a measure of internal exposure to AA and serve as an important end point for cross-species extrapolation of toxicity data and human risk assessment. The level of sensitivity of UPLC-ESI/MSn surpasses the limits of detection of AL-DNA adducts obtained by 32P-postlabeling techniques, the most widely employed methods for detecting putative DNA adducts in humans. AL-DNA adducts can be measured by UPLC-ESI/MS3, not only in fresh frozen renal tissue, but also in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples, an underutilized biospecimen for assessing chemical exposures, and in exfoliated urinary cells, a non-invasive approach. The frequent detection of AL DNA adducts in renal tissues, combined with the characteristic mutational spectrum induced by AA in TP53 and other genes provides compelling data for a role of AA in upper urothelial tract cancer.

  6. Combinational approach using solid dispersion and semi-solid matrix technology to enhance in vitro dissolution of telmisartan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Faisal Ali

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation was focused to formulate semi-solid capsules (SSCs of hydrophobic drug telmisartan (TLMS by encapsulating semi-solid matrix of its solid dispersion (SD in HPMC capsules. The combinational approach was used to reduce the lag time in drug release and improvise its dissolution. SDs of TLMS was prepared using hot fusion method by varying the combinations of Pluronic-F68, Gelucire 50/13 and Plasdone S630. A total of nine batches (SD1-SD9 were characterized for micromeritic properties, in vitro dissolution behavior and surface characterization. SD4 with 52.43% cumulative drug release (CDR in phosphate buffer, pH 7.4, in 120 min, t50% 44.2 min and DE30min 96.76% was selected for the development of semi-solid capsules. Differential scanning calorimetry of SD4 revealed molecular dispersion of TLMS in Pluronic-F68. SD4 was formulated into SSCs using Gelucire 44/14 and PEG 400 as semi-solid components and PEG 6000 as a suspending agent to achieve reduction in lag time for effective drug dissolution. SSC6 showed maximum in vitro drug dissolution 97.49 % in phosphate buffer, pH 7.4 with in 20 min that was almost a three folds reduction in the time required to achieve similar dissolution by SD. Thus, SSCs present an excellent approach to enhance in vitro dissolution as well as to reduce the lag time of dissolution for poorly water soluble drugs especially to those therapeutic classes that are intended for faster onset of action. Developed approach based on HPMC capsules provided a better alternative to target delivery of telmisartan to the vegetarian population.

  7. Offering pre-exposure prophylaxis for HIV prevention to pregnant and postpartum women: a clinical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidman, Dominika L; Weber, Shannon; Cohan, Deborah

    2017-03-08

    HIV prevention during pregnancy and lactation is critical for both maternal and child health. Pregnancy provides a critical opportunity for clinicians to elicit women's vulnerabilities to HIV and offer HIV testing, treatment and referral and/or comprehensive HIV prevention options for the current pregnancy, the postpartum period and safer conception options for future pregnancies. In this commentary, we review the safety of oral pre-exposure prophylaxis with tenofovir/emtricitabine in pregnant and lactating women and suggest opportunities to identify pregnant and postpartum women at substantial risk of HIV. We then describe a clinical approach to caring for women who both choose and decline pre-exposure prophylaxis during pregnancy and postpartum, highlighting areas for future research. Evidence suggests that pre-exposure prophylaxis with tenofovir/emtricitabine is safe in pregnancy and lactation. Identifying women vulnerable to HIV and eligible for pre-exposure prophylaxis is challenging in light of the myriad of individual, community, and structural forces impacting HIV acquisition. Validated risk calculators exist for specific populations but have not been used to screen and offer HIV prevention methods. Partner testing and engagement of men living with HIV are additional means of reaching at-risk women. However, women's vulnerabilities to HIV change over time. Combining screening for HIV vulnerability with HIV and/or STI testing at standard intervals during pregnancy is a practical way to prompt providers to incorporate HIV screening and prevention counselling. We suggest using shared decision-making to offer women pre-exposure prophylaxis as one of multiple HIV prevention strategies during pregnancy and postpartum, facilitating open conversations about HIV vulnerabilities, preferences about HIV prevention strategies, and choosing a method that best meets the needs of each woman. Growing evidence suggests that pre-exposure prophylaxis with tenofovir

  8. A regularized matrix factorization approach to induce structured sparse-low-rank solutions in the EEG inverse problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montoya-Martinez, Jair; Artes-Rodriguez, Antonio; Pontil, Massimiliano

    2014-01-01

    We consider the estimation of the Brain Electrical Sources (BES) matrix from noisy electroencephalographic (EEG) measurements, commonly named as the EEG inverse problem. We propose a new method to induce neurophysiological meaningful solutions, which takes into account the smoothness, structured...... matrix and the squared Frobenius norm of the latent source matrix. We develop an alternating optimization algorithm to solve the resulting nonsmooth-nonconvex minimization problem. We analyze the convergence of the optimization procedure, and we compare, under different synthetic scenarios...

  9. A risk-based approach to reducing exposure of staff to laboratory animal allergens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westall, Lynda; Graham, Ian R; Bussell, James

    2015-01-01

    Within the biomedical research industry, people who work with laboratory animals may be at risk of developing laboratory animal allergy, which can lead to occupational asthma. Under UK and EU laws, employers must prevent or adequately control exposure to any hazardous substance, which includes animal allergens, so far as reasonably practicable, for the protection of all people on the premises. This can be achieved in part by reviewing the risk of allergen exposure in specific areas of a facility and implementing appropriate infrastructure, environmental and performance controls to minimize that risk. The authors describe the approach used at their institution to stratify risk of allergen exposure in various areas of the animal facility and to implement appropriate controls. They also discuss their use of a monitoring program to evaluate allergen concentrations in low- and high-risk areas of the animal facility and explain how the monitoring results can be applied to determine which controls are needed to minimize risk of exposure and to provide a safe working environment.

  10. Formulation and pharmaceutical development of quetiapine fumarate sustained release matrix tablets using a QbD approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavan Alexandru

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of the present study was to apply QbD methodology in the development of once-a-day sustained release quetiapine tablets. The quality target product profile (QTPP was defined after the pharmaceutical properties and kinetic release of the innovator product, Seroquel XR 200 mg. For the D-optimal experimental design, the level and ratio of matrix forming agents and the type of extragranular diluent were chosen as independent inputs, which represented critical formulation factors. The critical quality attributes (CQAs studied were the cumulative percentages of quetiapine released after certain time intervals. After the analysis of the experimental design, optimal formulas and the design space were defined. Optimal formulas demonstrated zero-order release kinetics and a dissolution profile similar to the innovator product, with f2 values of 74.53 and 83.74. It was concluded that the QbD approach allowed fast development of sustained release tablets with similar dissolution behavior as the innovator product.

  11. Original research paper. Formulation and pharmaceutical development of quetiapine fumarate sustained release matrix tablets using a QbD approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavan, Alexandru; Porfire, Alina; Marina, Cristina; Tomuta, Ioan

    2017-03-01

    The main objective of the present study was to apply QbD methodology in the development of once-a-day sustained release quetiapine tablets. The quality target product profile (QTPP) was defined after the pharmaceutical properties and kinetic release of the innovator product, Seroquel XR 200 mg. For the D-optimal experimental design, the level and ratio of matrix forming agents and the type of extragranular diluent were chosen as independent inputs, which represented critical formulation factors. The critical quality attributes (CQAs) studied were the cumulative percentages of quetiapine released after certain time intervals. After the analysis of the experimental design, optimal formulas and the design space were defined. Optimal formulas demonstrated zero-order release kinetics and a dissolution profile similar to the innovator product, with f2 values of 74.53 and 83.74. It was concluded that the QbD approach allowed fast development of sustained release tablets with similar dissolution behavior as the innovator product.

  12. Using a matrix-analytical approach to synthesizing evidence solved incompatibility problem in the hierarchy of evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walach, Harald; Loef, Martin

    2015-11-01

    The hierarchy of evidence presupposes linearity and additivity of effects, as well as commutativity of knowledge structures. It thereby implicitly assumes a classical theoretical model. This is an argumentative article that uses theoretical analysis based on pertinent literature and known facts to examine the standard view of methodology. We show that the assumptions of the hierarchical model are wrong. The knowledge structures gained by various types of studies are not sequentially indifferent, that is, do not commute. External validity and internal validity are at least partially incompatible concepts. Therefore, one needs a different theoretical structure, typical of quantum-type theories, to model this situation. The consequence of this situation is that the implicit assumptions of the hierarchical model are wrong, if generalized to the concept of evidence in total. The problem can be solved by using a matrix-analytical approach to synthesizing evidence. Here, research methods that produce different types of evidence that complement each other are synthesized to yield the full knowledge. We show by an example how this might work. We conclude that the hierarchical model should be complemented by a broader reasoning in methodology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. From exposure to effect: a comparison of modeling approaches to chemical carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Leeuwen, I M; Zonneveld, C

    2001-10-01

    Standardized long-term carcinogenicity tests aim to reveal the relationship between exposure to a chemical and occurrence of a carcinogenic response. The analysis of such tests may be facilitated by the use of mathematical models. To what extent current models actually achieve this purpose is difficult to evaluate. Various aspects of chemically induced carcinogenesis are treated by different modeling approaches, which proceed very much in isolation of each other. With this paper we aim to provide for the non-mathematician a comprehensive and critical overview of models dealing with processes involved in chemical carcinogenesis. We cover the entire process of carcinogenesis, from exposure to effect. We succinctly summarize the biology underlying the models and emphasize the relationship between model assumptions and model formulations. The use of mathematics is restricted as far as possible with some additional information relegated to boxes.

  14. Integrated approach for characterizing and comparing exposure-based impacts with life cycle impacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fantke, Peter; Jolliet, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    ions that involve burden shifting or that result in only incremental improvement. Focusing in the life cycle impacts on widely accepted and applied impact categories like global warming potential or cumulative energy demand aggregating several impact categories will lead to underestimations of life...... to the environment from product-related processes along the product life cycle. We build on a flexible mass balance-based modeling system yielding cumulative multimedia transfer fractions and exposure pathway-specific Product Intake Fractions defined as chemical mass taken in by humans per unit mass of chemical...... in a product. When combined chemical masses in products and further with toxicity information, this approach is a resourceful way to inform CAA and minimize human exposure to toxic chemicals in consumer products through both product use and environmental emissions. We use an example of chemicals in consumer...

  15. A Coordinated Approach to Curricular Review and Development in Undergraduate Geoscience Programs: Using a Matrix to Identify and Track Skills and Skill Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, R.; Savina, M. E.

    2003-12-01

    One approach to curriculum review and development is to construct a matrix of the desired skills versus courses in the departmental curriculum. The matrix approach requires faculty to articulate their goals, identify specific skills, and assess where in the curriculum students will learn and practice these skills and where there are major skills gaps. Faculty members in the Geology Department at Carleton College developed a matrix of skills covered in geology courses with the following objectives: 1) Geology majors should begin their "senior integrative exercise" having practiced multiple times all of the formal steps in the research process (recognizing problems, writing proposals, carrying out a project, reporting a project in several ways); 2) Geology majors should learn and practice a variety of professional and life skills life (e.g. computer skills, field skills, lab skills, and interpretive skills).The matrix was used to identify where in the curriculum various research methods and skills were addressed and to map potential student experiences to the objectives. In Carleton's non-hierarchical curriculum, the matrix was used to verify that students have many opportunities to practice research and life skills regardless of the path they take to completion of the major. In William and Mary's more structured curriculum, the matrix was used to ensure that skills build upon each other from course to course. Faculty members in the Geology Department at the College of William and Mary first used this approach to focus on teaching quantitative skills across the geology curriculum, and later used it in terms of teaching research, communication, and information literacy skills. After articulating goals and skills, faculty members in both departments developed more specific skill lists within each category of skills, then described the current assignments and activities in each course relative to the specific components of the matrix and discussed whether to add

  16. Development and application of a 2-electron reduced density matrix approach to electron transport via molecular junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoy, Erik P.; Mazziotti, David A.; Seideman, Tamar

    2017-11-01

    Can an electronic device be constructed using only a single molecule? Since this question was first asked by Aviram and Ratner in the 1970s [Chem. Phys. Lett. 29, 277 (1974)], the field of molecular electronics has exploded with significant experimental advancements in the understanding of the charge transport properties of single molecule devices. Efforts to explain the results of these experiments and identify promising new candidate molecules for molecular devices have led to the development of numerous new theoretical methods including the current standard theoretical approach for studying single molecule charge transport, i.e., the non-equilibrium Green's function formalism (NEGF). By pairing this formalism with density functional theory (DFT), a wide variety of transport problems in molecular junctions have been successfully treated. For some systems though, the conductance and current-voltage curves predicted by common DFT functionals can be several orders of magnitude above experimental results. In addition, since density functional theory relies on approximations to the exact exchange-correlation functional, the predicted transport properties can show significant variation depending on the functional chosen. As a first step to addressing this issue, the authors have replaced density functional theory in the NEGF formalism with a 2-electron reduced density matrix (2-RDM) method, creating a new approach known as the NEGF-RDM method. 2-RDM methods provide a more accurate description of electron correlation compared to density functional theory, and they have lower computational scaling compared to wavefunction based methods of similar accuracy. Additionally, 2-RDM methods are capable of capturing static electron correlation which is untreatable by existing NEGF-DFT methods. When studying dithiol alkane chains and dithiol benzene in model junctions, the authors found that the NEGF-RDM predicts conductances and currents that are 1-2 orders of magnitude below

  17. Characterization of extracellular polymeric substances in biofilms under long-term exposure to ciprofloxacin antibiotic using fluorescence excitation-emission matrix and parallel factor analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Chaochao; Gao, Pin; Yang, Fan; An, Dongxuan; Munir, Mariya; Jia, Hanzhong; Xue, Gang; Ma, Chunyan

    2017-05-01

    The presence of antibiotic residues in the environment has been regarded as an emerging concern due to their potential adverse environmental consequences such as antibiotic resistance. However, the interaction between antibiotics and extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs) of biofilms in wastewater treatment systems is not entirely clear. In this study, the effect of ciprofloxacin (CIP) antibiotic on biofilm EPS matrix was investigated and characterized using fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) and parallel factor (PARAFAC) analysis. Physicochemical analysis showed that the proteins were the major EPS fraction, and their contents increased gradually with an increase in CIP concentration (0-300 μg/L). Based on the characterization of biofilm tightly bound EPS (TB-EPS) by EEM, three fluorescent components were identified by PARAFAC analysis. Component C1 was associated with protein-like substances, and components C2 and C3 belonged to humic-like substances. Component C1 exhibited an increasing trend as the CIP addition increased. Pearson's correlation results showed that CIP correlated significantly with the protein contents and component C1, while strong correlations were also found among UV254, dissolved organic carbon, humic acids, and component C3. A combined use of EEM-PARAFAC analysis and chemical measurements was demonstrated as a favorable approach for the characterization of variations in biofilm EPS in the presence of CIP antibiotic.

  18. A differentiated approach to the risk assessment from exposure to radon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Kononenko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the methods of risk assessment from exposure to radon. Proposed methods implement a differentiated approach to the risk estimates calculation procedure which depends on the purpose of risk assessment. This approach is based on the analysis of the results of practical tests of different risk assessment models on arrays Russian medical and demographic data with and without consideration of the synergistic effect of smoking, in simple and complex exposure scenarios. All of these tests were performed in previous 5 years (results are available elsewhere. In this work the evaluation of effectiveness of radon mitigation actions in schools was used as a test task and results obtained using 4 models («EPA-2003», «Wismut-2006», «FCZ» and «Tomasek-2014» were compared. If it is important to evaluate the effect of reduction of radon concentration on the health of children and adolescents in terms of lifetimelung cancer risk, «Tomasek-2014» model will be the best choice. It is as sensitive as «FCZ» model and ERR is close to that from «Wismut-2006» model, which was earlier proposed by other authors for use with some modifications in Russia. If the data on radon concentration are limited (for example data from radiation-hygienic passports of territories and constant lifelong exposure scenario is considered, it seems reasonable to apply more simple «Darby-2005» model. Thus, the proposed methods could be used by specialists in various fields in a wide range of tasks, from the risk assessment for  the purposes of radiation-hygienic certification and comparative assessment of radiation safety of the population of different regions of Russia on the basis of the generalized statistical data, to the risk assessment in practical works where large amounts of measurement data on the radon concentration and complex exposure scenarios are used.

  19. Aquatic exposures of chemical mixtures in urban environments: Approaches to impact assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Zwart, Dick; Adams, William; Galay Burgos, Malyka; Hollender, Juliane; Junghans, Marion; Merrington, Graham; Muir, Derek; Parkerton, Thomas; De Schamphelaere, Karel A C; Whale, Graham; Williams, Richard

    2017-09-01

    Urban regions of the world are expanding rapidly, placing additional stress on water resources. Urban water bodies serve many purposes, from washing and sources of drinking water to transport and conduits for storm drainage and effluent discharge. These water bodies receive chemical emissions arising from either single or multiple point sources, diffuse sources which can be continuous, intermittent, or seasonal. Thus, aquatic organisms in these water bodies are exposed to temporally and compositionally variable mixtures. We have delineated source-specific signatures of these mixtures for diffuse urban runoff and urban point source exposure scenarios to support risk assessment and management of these mixtures. The first step in a tiered approach to assessing chemical exposure has been developed based on the event mean concentration concept, with chemical concentrations in runoff defined by volumes of water leaving each surface and the chemical exposure mixture profiles for different urban scenarios. Although generalizations can be made about the chemical composition of urban sources and event mean exposure predictions for initial prioritization, such modeling needs to be complemented with biological monitoring data. It is highly unlikely that the current paradigm of routine regulatory chemical monitoring alone will provide a realistic appraisal of urban aquatic chemical mixture exposures. Future consideration is also needed of the role of nonchemical stressors in such highly modified urban water bodies. Environ Toxicol Chem 2018;9999:1-12. © 2017 The Authors. Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of SETAC. © 2017 The Authors. Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of SETAC.

  20. Occupational exposure assessment for crystalline silica dust: approach in Poland and worldwide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciejewska, Aleksandra

    2008-01-01

    Crystalline silica is a health hazard commonly encountered in work environment. Occupational exposure to crystalline silica dust concerns workers employed in such industries as mineral, fuel-energy, metal, chemical and construction industry. It is estimated that over 2 million workers in the European Union are exposed to crystalline silica. In Poland, over 50 thousand people work under conditions of silica dust exposure exceeding the occupational exposure limit. The assessment of occupational exposure to crystalline silica is a multi-phase process, primarily dependent on workplace measurements, quantitative analyses of samples, and comparison of results with respective standards. The present article summarizes the approaches to and methods used for assessment of exposure to crystalline silica as adopted in different countries in the EU and worldwide. It also compares the occupational limit values in force in almost 40 countries. Further, it points out the consequences resulting from the fact that IARC has regarded the two most common forms of crystalline silica: quartz and cristobalite as human carcinogens. The article includes an inter-country review of the methods used for air sample collection, dust concentration measurements, and determination of crystalline silica. The selection was based on the GESTIS database which lists the methods approved by the European Union for the measurements and tests regarding hazardous agents. Special attention has been paid to the methods of determining crystalline silica. The author attempts to analyze the influence of analytical techniques, sample preparation and the reference materials on determination results. Also the operating parameters of the method, including limit of detection, limit of quantification, and precision, have been compared.

  1. Surgical exposures and options for instrumentation in acetabular fracture fixation: Pararectus approach versus the modified Stoppa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastian, J D; Savic, M; Cullmann, J L; Zech, W D; Djonov, V; Keel, M J

    2016-03-01

    As an alternative to the modified Stoppa approach, the Pararectus approach is used clinically for treatment of acetabular fractures involving the anterior column. The current study assessed the surgical exposure and the options for instrumentation using both of these approaches. Surgical dissections were conducted on five human cadavers (all male, mean age 88 years (82-97)) using the modified Stoppa and the Pararectus approach, with the same skin incision length (10cm). Distal boundaries of the exposed bony surfaces were marked using a chisel. After removal of all soft-tissues, distances from the boundaries in the false and true pelvis were measured with reference to the pelvic brim. The exposed bone was coloured and calibrated digital images of each inner hemipelvis were taken. The amount of exposed surface using both approaches was assessed and represented as a percentage of the total bony surface of each hemipelvis. For instrumentation, a suprapectineal quadrilateral buttress plate was used. Screw lengths were documented, and three-dimensional CT reconstructions were performed to assess screw trajectories qualitatively. Wilcoxon's signed rank test for paired groups was used (level of significance: pfracture fixation in the posterior pelvic ring and allows for the option to extend the approach without a new incision. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Job strain and ischemic heart disease: a prospective study using a new approach for exposure assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Jens Peter; Munch-Hansen, Torsten; Agerbo, Esben

    2009-01-01

    based on the average exposure level in minor work units. METHODS: Cohort study of 18,258 Danish public service workers in 1106 work units; 79% were women; 108 subjects with history of cardiovascular disease were excluded from the follow-up. The outcome was hospitalization due to IHD (angina pectoris......BACKGROUND: Prolonged psychosocial load at the workplace may increase the risk of ischemic heart disease (IHD), but the issue is still unsettled. We analyzed the association between psychosocial workload and risk of IHD using a new approach allocating measures of psychosocial load to individuals...

  3. Case study approach to modeling historical disinfection by-product exposure in Iowa drinking waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasner, Stuart W; Cantor, Kenneth P; Weyer, Peter J; Hildesheim, Mariana; Amy, Gary

    2017-08-01

    In the 1980s, a case-control epidemiologic study was conducted in Iowa (USA) to analyze the association between exposure to disinfection by-products (DBPs) and bladder cancer risk. Trihalomethanes (THMs), the most commonly measured and dominant class of DBPs in drinking water, served as a primary metric and surrogate for the full DBP mixture. Average THM exposure was calculated, based on rough estimates of past levels in Iowa. To reduce misclassification, a follow-up study was undertaken to improve estimates of past THM levels and to re-evaluate their association with cancer risk. In addition, the risk associated with haloacetic acids, another class of DBPs, was examined. In the original analysis, surface water treatment plants were assigned one of two possible THM levels depending on the point of chlorination. The re-assessment considered each utility treating surface or groundwater on a case-by-case basis. Multiple treatment/disinfection scenarios and water quality parameters were considered with actual DBP measurements to develop estimates of past levels. The highest annual average THM level in the re-analysis was 156μg/L compared to 74μg/L for the original analysis. This allowed the analysis of subjects exposed at higher levels (>96μg/L). The re-analysis established a new approach, based on case studies and an understanding of the water quality and operational parameters that impact DBP formation, for determining historical exposure. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. A comparative study of first and all-author co-citation counting, and two different matrix generation approaches applied for author co-citation analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, Jesper Wiborg; Larsen, Birger; Ingwersen, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Aim: The present article contributes to the current methodological debate concerning author co-citation analyses. (ACA) The study compares two different units of analyses, i.e. first- versus inclusive all-author co-citation counting, as well as two different matrix generation approaches, i.......e. a conventional multivariate and the so-called Drexel approach, in order to investigate their influence upon mapping results. The aim of the present study is therefore to provide more methodological awareness and empirical evidence concerning author co-citation studies. Method: The study is based on structured...... XML documents extracted from the IEEE collection. These data allow the construction of ad-hoc citation indexes, which enables us to carry out the hitherto largest all-author co-citation study. Four ACA are made, combining the different units of analyses with the different matrix generation approaches...

  5. A grading matrix assessment approach to align student performance to Threshold Learning Outcomes (TLOs in a large first year biology class

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lesley Lluka

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In our large first year biology course, we aim to provide students with clear links between the course delivery framework and assessment. In the first semester of offering in 2008, we determined grades using the traditional weighted average of marks for the assessment tasks. However, of the 99% of students who passed with an aggregate of at least 50%, the lowest performing student obtained only 21% for the examination. Since Semester 2 2008, we have graded the course using a grading matrix approach with specified standards for all the individual assessment components. Analysis of results from this approach showed that 85-89% of students obtained a passing grade, for which a minimum score of 45% for the examination was required. The grading matrix approach provides a measure of each student’s higher order learning of concepts and skills that can be mapped to threshold learning outcomes for the students’ programs of study.

  6. The conversion of exposures due to radon into the effective dose: the epidemiological approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, T.R. [Federal Office for Radiation Protection, Berlin (Germany)

    2017-11-15

    The risks and dose conversion coefficients for residential and occupational exposures due to radon were determined with applying the epidemiological risk models to ICRP representative populations. The dose conversion coefficient for residential radon was estimated with a value of 1.6 mSv year{sup -1} per 100 Bq m{sup -3} (3.6 mSv per WLM), which is significantly lower than the corresponding value derived from the biokinetic and dosimetric models. The dose conversion coefficient for occupational exposures with applying the risk models for miners was estimated with a value of 14 mSv per WLM, which is in good accordance with the results of the dosimetric models. To resolve the discrepancy regarding residential radon, the ICRP approaches for the determination of risks and doses were reviewed. It could be shown that ICRP overestimates the risk for lung cancer caused by residential radon. This can be attributed to a wrong population weighting of the radon-induced risks in its epidemiological approach. With the approach in this work, the average risks for lung cancer were determined, taking into account the age-specific risk contributions of all individuals in the population. As a result, a lower risk coefficient for residential radon was obtained. The results from the ICRP biokinetic and dosimetric models for both, the occupationally exposed working age population and the whole population exposed to residential radon, can be brought in better accordance with the corresponding results of the epidemiological approach, if the respective relative radiation detriments and a radiation-weighting factor for alpha particles of about ten are used. (orig.)

  7. A volume of intersection approach for on-the-fly system matrix calculation in 3D PET image reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lougovski, A.; Hofheinz, F.; Maus, J.; Schramm, G.; Will, E.; van den Hoff, J.

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study is the evaluation of on-the-fly volume of intersection computation for system’s geometry modelling in 3D PET image reconstruction. For this purpose we propose a simple geometrical model in which the cubic image voxels on the given Cartesian grid are approximated with spheres and the rectangular tubes of response (ToRs) are approximated with cylinders. The model was integrated into a fully 3D list-mode PET reconstruction for performance evaluation. In our model the volume of intersection between a voxel and the ToR is only a function of the impact parameter (the distance between voxel centre to ToR axis) but is independent of the relative orientation of voxel and ToR. This substantially reduces the computational complexity of the system matrix calculation. Based on phantom measurements it was determined that adjusting the diameters of the spherical voxel size and the ToR in such a way that the actual voxel and ToR volumes are conserved leads to the best compromise between high spatial resolution, low noise, and suppression of Gibbs artefacts in the reconstructed images. Phantom as well as clinical datasets from two different PET systems (Siemens ECAT HR+ and Philips Ingenuity-TF PET/MR) were processed using the developed and the respective vendor-provided (line of intersection related) reconstruction algorithms. A comparison of the reconstructed images demonstrated very good performance of the new approach. The evaluation showed the respective vendor-provided reconstruction algorithms to possess 34-41% lower resolution compared to the developed one while exhibiting comparable noise levels. Contrary to explicit point spread function modelling our model has a simple straight-forward implementation and it should be easy to integrate into existing reconstruction software, making it competitive to other existing resolution recovery techniques.

  8. Development of a Subcell Based Modeling Approach for Modeling the Architecturally Dependent Impact Response of Triaxially Braided Polymer Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorini, Chris; Chattopadhyay, Aditi; Goldberg, Robert K.; Kohlman, Lee W.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the high velocity impact response of polymer matrix composites with complex architectures is critical to many aerospace applications, including engine fan blade containment systems where the structure must be able to completely contain fan blades in the event of a blade-out. Despite the benefits offered by these materials, the complex nature of textile composites presents a significant challenge for the prediction of deformation and damage under both quasi-static and impact loading conditions. The relatively large mesoscale repeating unit cell (in comparison to the size of structural components) causes the material to behave like a structure rather than a homogeneous material. Impact experiments conducted at NASA Glenn Research Center have shown the damage patterns to be a function of the underlying material architecture. Traditional computational techniques that involve modeling these materials using smeared homogeneous, orthotropic material properties at the macroscale result in simulated damage patterns that are a function of the structural geometry, but not the material architecture. In order to preserve heterogeneity at the highest length scale in a robust yet computationally efficient manner, and capture the architecturally dependent damage patterns, a previously-developed subcell modeling approach where the braided composite unit cell is approximated as a series of four adjacent laminated composites is utilized. This work discusses the implementation of the subcell methodology into the commercial transient dynamic finite element code LS-DYNA (Livermore Software Technology Corp.). Verification and validation studies are also presented, including simulation of the tensile response of straight-sided and notched quasi-static coupons composed of a T700/PR520 triaxially braided [0deg/60deg/-60deg] composite. Based on the results of the verification and validation studies, advantages and limitations of the methodology as well as plans for future work

  9. Matrix solid phase dispersion assisted enzymatic hydrolysis as a novel approach for cocaine and opiates isolation from human hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Míguez-Framil, Martha; Cabarcos, Pamela; Tabernero, María Jesús; Bermejo, Ana María; Bermejo-Barrera, Pilar; Moreda-Piñeiro, Antonio

    2013-11-05

    The possibility of assisting enzymatic hydrolysis (EH) procedures by sample disruption mechanisms inherent to matrix solid phase dispersion (MSPD) has been explored in the current study. EH of hair specimens from poly-drug abusers was assisted by dispersing/blending the sample (0.05 g) with alumina (2.25 g) before loading the dissolved enzyme (6 mL of 1 mg mL(-1) Pronase E in 1.4 M/1.4 M Tris/HCl, pH 7.3) through the hair-alumina solid phase packaged inside a disposable MSPD syringe. The MSPD-EH method was developed, and it proved to offer quantitative results when isolating cocaine, benzoylecgonine (BZE), codeine, morphine and 6-monoacethylmorphine (6-MAM) from human hair samples. The procedure allows an on column clean-up/pre-concentration procedure of the isolated targets by attaching a previously conditioned Oasis HLB cartridge to the end of the MSPD syringe. The EH procedure of human hair with Pronase E can therefore be shortened to approximately 30 min. Within this time, sample blending/dispersion, MSPD syringe package, elution (EH when dissolved Pronase E is passing through the sample-dispersant bed), and extract clean-up and target pre-concentration stages are achieved. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was used for determining each target after elution from the Oasis HLB cartridges with 2 mL of 2% (v/v) acetic acid in methanol, concentration by N2 stream evaporation, and dried extract derivatization with N-methyl-tert-butylsilyltrifluoroacetamide (BSTFA) and chlorotrimethylsilane (TMCS). The method was validated according to the guidance for bioanalytical method validation of the US Department of Health and Human Services, Food and Drug Administration. The simplicity of the proposed approach makes it a useful procedure for screening/quantifying drugs of abuse in hair specimens from poly-drug abusers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. MDI Biological Laboratory Arsenic Summit: Approaches to Limiting Human Exposure to Arsenic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, Bruce A; Caldwell, Kathleen; Congdon, Clare Bates; Disney, Jane; Donahue, Maria; Ferguson, Elizabeth; Flemings, Elsie; Golden, Meredith; Guerinot, Mary Lou; Highman, Jay; James, Karen; Kim, Carol; Lantz, R Clark; Marvinney, Robert G; Mayer, Greg; Miller, David; Navas-Acien, Ana; Nordstrom, D Kirk; Postema, Sonia; Rardin, Laurie; Rosen, Barry; SenGupta, Arup; Shaw, Joseph; Stanton, Elizabeth; Susca, Paul

    2015-09-01

    This report is the outcome of the meeting "Environmental and Human Health Consequences of Arsenic" held at the MDI Biological Laboratory in Salisbury Cove, Maine, August 13-15, 2014. Human exposure to arsenic represents a significant health problem worldwide that requires immediate attention according to the World Health Organization (WHO). One billion people are exposed to arsenic in food, and more than 200 million people ingest arsenic via drinking water at concentrations greater than international standards. Although the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has set a limit of 10 μg/L in public water supplies and the WHO has recommended an upper limit of 10 μg/L, recent studies indicate that these limits are not protective enough. In addition, there are currently few standards for arsenic in food. Those who participated in the Summit support citizens, scientists, policymakers, industry, and educators at the local, state, national, and international levels to (1) establish science-based evidence for setting standards at the local, state, national, and global levels for arsenic in water and food; (2) work with government agencies to set regulations for arsenic in water and food, to establish and strengthen non-regulatory programs, and to strengthen collaboration among government agencies, NGOs, academia, the private sector, industry, and others; (3) develop novel and cost-effective technologies for identification and reduction of exposure to arsenic in water; (4) develop novel and cost-effective approaches to reduce arsenic exposure in juice, rice, and other relevant foods; and (5) develop an Arsenic Education Plan to guide the development of science curricula as well as community outreach and education programs that serve to inform students and consumers about arsenic exposure and engage them in well water testing and development of remediation strategies.

  11. MDI Biological Laboratory Arsenic Summit: Approaches to Limiting Human Exposure to Arsenic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, Bruce A.

    2015-01-01

    This report is the outcome of the meeting: “Environmental and Human Health Consequences of Arsenic”, held at the MDI Biological Laboratory in Salisbury Cove, Maine, August 13–15, 2014. Human exposure to arsenic represents a significant health problem worldwide that requires immediate attention according to the World Health Organization (WHO). One billion people are exposed to arsenic in food and more than 200 million people ingest arsenic via drinking water at concentrations greater than international standards. Although the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has set a limit of 10 micrograms per liter (10 μg/L) in public water supplies and the WHO has recommended an upper limit of 10 μg/L, recent studies indicate that these limits are not protective enough. In addition, there are currently few standards for arsenic in food. Those who participated in the Summit support citizens, scientists, policymakers, industry and educators at the local, state, national and international levels to: (1) Establish science-based evidence for setting standards at the local, state, national, and global levels for arsenic in water and food; (2) Work with government agencies to set regulations for arsenic in water and food, to establish and strengthen non-regulatory programs, and to strengthen collaboration among government agencies, NGOs, academia, the private sector, industry and others; (3) Develop novel and cost-effective technologies for identification and reduction of exposure to arsenic in water; (4) Develop novel and cost-effective approaches to reduce arsenic exposure in juice, rice, and other relevant foods, and (5) Develop an Arsenic Education Plan to guide the development of science curricula as well as community outreach and education programs that serve to inform students and consumers about arsenic exposure and engage them in well water testing and development of remediation strategies. PMID:26231509

  12. Determination of mycotoxin exposure in Germany using an LC-MS/MS multibiomarker approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerding, Johannes; Cramer, Benedikt; Humpf, Hans-Ulrich

    2014-12-01

    In this study, the exposure of a German population (n = 101) to mycotoxins was assessed using an LC-MS/MS urinary multibiomarker approach. Food consumption of the participants was documented with a food frequency questionnaire to correlate mycotoxin exposure with individual nutritional habits. The presence of 23 urinary biomarkers including trichothecenes (deoxynivalenol (DON), DON-3-glucuronide (DON-3-GlcA), T-2 toxin, HT-2 toxin (HT-2, HT-2-toxin-4-glucuronide (HT-2-GlcA), fumonisins (fumonisin B1, fumonisin B2), aflatoxins (aflatoxin B1, aflatoxin G2, aflatoxin B2, aflatoxin M1), zearalenone and derivatives (zearalanone, α-zearalenol, β-zearalenol, zearalenone-14-O-glucuronide, zearalanone-14-O-glucuronide, α-zearalenol-14-O-glucuronide/β-zearalenol-14-O-glucuronide), ochratoxin A, ochratoxin alpha, enniatin B and dihydrocitrinone was evaluated using a validated, sensitive "dilute and shoot"-LC-MS/MS method applying Scheduled MRM(TM) technology. Six mycotoxins and urinary metabolites were detected (DON, DON-3-GlcA, zearalenone-14-O-glucuronide, T-2 toxin, enniatin B, and dihydrocitrinone) in 87% of the samples in single- or co-occurence. Only DON and DON-3-GlcA were detectable in quantifiable amounts. A provisional mean daily intake of 0.52 μg DON/kg body weight was calculated. No statistical evidence for the correlation of staple food intake and urinary biomarker concentration could be determined. The results of this study suggest a low everyday exposure of the investigated German population to mycotoxins, but reveal peak exposures above the widely accepted tolerable daily intake to DON in parts of the population. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Optimisation of coronary angiography exposures requires a multifactorial approach and careful procedural definition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, A; Brennan, P; Sadick, N; Kovoor, P; Lewis, S

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study investigates the factors associated with higher doses for both single-plane and biplane procedures and establishes centre-specific 75th percentile levels. Methods: 602 patients undergoing coronary angiography in a large hospital at Sydney were recruited to the study, and causal agents for high radiation doses were investigated: gender, procedural complexity, severity of coronary artery disease, presence of coronary bypass grafts, entry approach (radial or femoral), level of operator experience; and a single-plane or a biplane imaging system was employed. Results: The 75th percentile levels were calculated. The results demonstrated that, for both systems, higher exposures were associated with patients who were male (p<0.001), had coronary vessel disease (p<0.001) and had a history of coronary bypass grafts (p<0.001). In addition, for biplane systems, procedural complexity (p<0.001), types of entry approach (p<0.001) and levels of operator experience (p<0.001) significantly impacted upon the dose. Biplane examinations recorded higher doses than single-plane procedures (p<0.001) and the inclusion of left-sided ventriculography contributed to the overall dose by up to 10%. Conclusion: The 75th percentile levels in this study represent the tentative reference levels and are 48.9, 44.2 and 56 Gy cm2 for all exposures, single-plane- and biplane-specific exposures, respectively, and compare favourably with the diagnostic reference level values established elsewhere internationally, with only the UK and Irish data being lower. Advances in knowledge: Specific agents have been identified for dose-reducing strategies and the importance of operator training is highlighted. The assumption that biplane procedures may reduce the patient dose should be treated with caution. PMID:23719084

  14. Axially substituted phthalocyanine/naphthalocyanine doped in glass matrix: an approach to the practical use for optical limiting material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Hua; Chen, Jun; Zhang, Tao; Wang, Shuangqing; Hu, Rui; Li, Shayu; Yang, Guoqiang

    2016-05-02

    A novel glass matrix doped with phthalocyanine or naphthalocyanine is prepared by a modified sol-gel technique. The photophysical and optical limiting properties of the phthalocyanine compounds both in glass matrix and in THF solution were investigated. The obtained glass matrix is homogeneous and transparent, as well as mechanically and thermodynamically stable enough to withstand very high laser fluence; the optical limiting performances of these compound samples are better than that of benchmark materials like C60 in toluene, carbon black in water, and graphene oxide in water or ethanol under nanosecond pulsed laser at 532 nm. Two prototypes of optical limiters doped in the glass matrix have very good optical limiting performances, which may provide potential practical use for optical limiting materials in a near future.

  15. Modified Gillies approach for zygomatic arch fracture reduction in the setting of bicoronal exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Edward; Vercler, Christian; Yaremchuk, Michael J; Gordon, Chad R

    2012-05-01

    Zygomatic arch fractures are common injuries, occurring in isolation in 5% of all patients with facial fractures and in 10% of patients with any fracture to the zygomaticomaxillary complex. Isolated noncomminuted depressed zygomatic arch fractures are easily treated with the minimally invasive Gillies approach, which most often provides long-term stability. However, zygomatic arch fractures often occur in conjunction with zygomaticomaxillary complex, Le Fort, calvarial, and naso-orbitoethmoid fractures. In situations requiring a bicoronal incision to address concomitant injuries, zygomatic arch fractures are frequently treated with wide dissection and rigid fixation. Using principles obtained from isolated arch fractures, we present for the first time to our knowledge the use of a modified Gillies approach to noncomminuted zygomatic arch fractures in a case requiring a bicoronal incision. With the deep temporal fascia exposed from the reflected bicoronal flap, a 1-cm horizontal incision is made within the deep temporal fascia allowing a Gillies elevator to easily reduce the arch fracture in a plane between the deep layer of the deep temporal fascia and the temporalis muscle. This technique exploits the advantages of the traditional Gillies approach, preserving fascial attachments, avoiding neurovascular injury, and obviating the need for rigid fixation. Moreover, this method saves time and money and decreases morbidity. Our modified Gillies approach to zygomatic arch fractures in the setting of a bicoronal incision can be applied to a wide range of cases because of the frequency with which arch fractures occur with concomitant craniomaxillofacial injuries requiring wide exposure.

  16. Chemometrics and theoretical approaches for evaluation of matrix effect in laser ablation and ionization of metal samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Shudi; Zhang, Bochao [Department of Chemistry, The MOE Key Lab of Spectrochemical Analysis & Instrumentation, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xiamen University (China); Hang, Wei, E-mail: weihang@xmu.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, The MOE Key Lab of Spectrochemical Analysis & Instrumentation, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xiamen University (China); State Key Laboratory of Marine Environmental Science, Xiamen University (China); Huang, Benli [Department of Chemistry, The MOE Key Lab of Spectrochemical Analysis & Instrumentation, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xiamen University (China)

    2015-05-01

    Matrix effect is one of the shortcomings of direct solid analysis which makes the quantitative analysis a great challenge. All of the physical properties of solid and laser parameters could make contributions to the matrix effect. For better understanding and controlling laser ablation process, it is of great importance to investigate how and to what extent these factors would affect matrix effect, through simulation and chemometrics works. In this study, twenty-three solid standards of six types of metal matrices were analyzed, including aluminum, copper, iron, nickel, tungsten and zinc. The influence of laser pulse duration was investigated by applying nanosecond (ns) and femtosecond (fs) lasers to a buffer-gas-assisted ionization source coupled with an orthogonal time-of-flight mass spectrometer. After relative sensitivity coefficients (RSCs) of each element in different matrices were calculated, they were combined with the physical property values of the matrices to form a dataset which was analyzed by the chemometrics tool of orthogonal partial least-squares (OPLSs). The S-plot result reveals that thermal properties of solid play vital roles in the matrix effect induced by ns-laser ablation, while fs-laser could significantly reduce the thermal effect. Additionally, a theoretical model was figured out to simulate the RSCs by combining the laser–solid interaction process and plasma expansion process. The model prediction shows a relatively close agreement with experimental result, revealing that the model could reasonably explain the process of matrix effect. - Highlights: • Matrix effect is one of the obstacles in direct solid analysis. • RSCs combined with physical properties were analyzed by chemometrics tool. • S-plot reveals thermal property playing vital role in matrix effect in ns-laser ablation. • Theoretical model was built to simulate RSCs. • Model prediction of RSCs shows a relatively close agreement with experimental result.

  17. Association between Long-Term Exposure to Particulate Matter Air Pollution and Mortality in a South Korean National Cohort: Comparison across Different Exposure Assessment Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sun-Young; Kim, Ho

    2017-01-01

    Increasing numbers of cohort studies have reported that long-term exposure to ambient particulate matter is associated with mortality. However, there has been little evidence from Asian countries. We aimed to explore the association between long-term exposure to particulate matter with a diameter ≤10 µm (PM10) and mortality in South Korea, using a nationwide population-based cohort and an improved exposure assessment (EA) incorporating time-varying concentrations and residential addresses (EA1). We also compared the association across different EA approaches. We used information from 275,337 people who underwent health screening from 2002 to 2006 and who had follow-up data for 12 years in the National Health Insurance Service-National Sample Cohort. Individual exposures were computed as 5-year averages using predicted residential district-specific annual-average PM10 concentrations for 2002–2006. We estimated hazard ratios (HRs) of non-accidental and five cause-specific mortalities per 10 µg/m3 increase in PM10 using the Cox proportional hazards model. Then, we compared the association of EA1 with three other approaches based on time-varying concentrations and/or addresses: predictions in each year and addresses at baseline (EA2); predictions at baseline and addresses in each year (EA3); and predictions and addresses at baseline (EA4). We found a marginal association between long-term PM10 and non-accidental mortality. The HRs of five cause-specific mortalities were mostly higher than that of non-accidental mortality, but statistically insignificant. In the comparison between EA approaches, the HRs of EA1 were similar to those of EA2 but higher than EA3 and EA4. Our findings confirmed the association between long-term exposure to PM10 and mortality based on a population-representative cohort in South Korea, and suggested the importance of assessing individual exposure incorporating air pollution changes over time. PMID:28946613

  18. Basal exposure therapy: A new approach for treatment resistant patients with severe and comorbid mental disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Didrik Heggdal

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available New treatment approaches are needed for patients with severe and composite mental disorders who appear resistant to conventional treatments. Such treatment resistant patients often have diagnoses of psychotic or bipolar disorders or severe personality disorders and comorbid conditions. Here we evaluate Basal Exposure Therapy (BET, a novel ward-integrated psychotherapeutic approach for these patients. Central to BET is the conceptualization of undifferentiated existential fear as basic to the patients’ problem, exposure to this fear, and the therapeutic platform Complementary External Regulation (CER which integrates and governs the totality of interventions throughout the treatment process. BET is administered at a locked-door ward with six patient beds and 13.5 full time employees, including a psychiatrist and two psychologists. Thirty-eight patients who had completed BET were included, all but two being female, mean age 29.9 years. Fourteen patients had a diagnosis of schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder (F20/25, eight had bipolar disorder or recurrent depressive disorder (F31/33, eight had diagnoses in the F40-49 domain (anxiety, stress, dissociation, five were diagnosed with emotionally unstable personality disorder (F60.3, and three patients had other diagnoses. Twenty of the patients (53% had more than one ICD-10 diagnosis. Average treatment time in BET was 13 months, ranging from 2 to 72 months. Time-series data show significant improvements in symptoms and functioning from enrolment to discharge, with effect sizes at 0.76 for the Dissociation Experience Scale, 0.93 for the Brief Symptom Inventory, 1.47 for the Avoidance and Action Questionnaire, and 1.42 and 1.56, respectively for the functioning and symptom subscales of the Global Assessment of Functioning Scale. In addition, the patients used significantly less antiepileptic, antipsychotic, anxiolytic and antidepressant medications at discharge than at treatment enrolment

  19. Chemometrics and theoretical approaches for evaluation of matrix effect in laser ablation and ionization of metal samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shudi; Zhang, Bochao; Hang, Wei; Huang, Benli

    2015-05-01

    Matrix effect is one of the shortcomings of direct solid analysis which makes the quantitative analysis a great challenge. All of the physical properties of solid and laser parameters could make contributions to the matrix effect. For better understanding and controlling laser ablation process, it is of great importance to investigate how and to what extent these factors would affect matrix effect, through simulation and chemometrics works. In this study, twenty-three solid standards of six types of metal matrices were analyzed, including aluminum, copper, iron, nickel, tungsten and zinc. The influence of laser pulse duration was investigated by applying nanosecond (ns) and femtosecond (fs) lasers to a buffer-gas-assisted ionization source coupled with an orthogonal time-of-flight mass spectrometer. After relative sensitivity coefficients (RSCs) of each element in different matrices were calculated, they were combined with the physical property values of the matrices to form a dataset which was analyzed by the chemometrics tool of orthogonal partial least-squares (OPLSs). The S-plot result reveals that thermal properties of solid play vital roles in the matrix effect induced by ns-laser ablation, while fs-laser could significantly reduce the thermal effect. Additionally, a theoretical model was figured out to simulate the RSCs by combining the laser-solid interaction process and plasma expansion process. The model prediction shows a relatively close agreement with experimental result, revealing that the model could reasonably explain the process of matrix effect.

  20. An optimal sampling approach to modelling whole-body vibration exposure in all-terrain vehicle driving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Xiaoshu; Takala, Esa-Pekka; Toppila, Esko; Marjanen, Ykä; Kaila-Kangas, Leena; Lu, Tao

    2017-08-01

    Exposure to whole-body vibration (WBV) presents an occupational health risk and several safety standards obligate to measure WBV. The high cost of direct measurements in large epidemiological studies raises the question of the optimal sampling for estimating WBV exposures given by a large variation in exposure levels in real worksites. This paper presents a new approach to addressing this problem. A daily exposure to WBV was recorded for 9-24 days among 48 all-terrain vehicle drivers. Four data-sets based on root mean squared recordings were obtained from the measurement. The data were modelled using semi-variogram with spectrum analysis and the optimal sampling scheme was derived. The optimum sampling period was 140 min apart. The result was verified and validated in terms of its accuracy and statistical power. Recordings of two to three hours are probably needed to get a sufficiently unbiased daily WBV exposure estimate in real worksites. The developed model is general enough that is applicable to other cumulative exposures or biosignals. Practitioner Summary: Exposure to whole-body vibration (WBV) presents an occupational health risk and safety standards obligate to measure WBV. However, direct measurements can be expensive. This paper presents a new approach to addressing this problem. The developed model is general enough that is applicable to other cumulative exposures or biosignals.

  1. Using exposure bands for rapid decision making in the RISK21 tiered exposure assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellarco, M; Zaleski, R; Gaborek, B J; Qian, H; Bellin, C A; Egeghy, P; Heard, N; Jolliet, O; Lander, D R; Sunger, N; Stylianou, K S; Tanir, J Y

    2017-04-01

    The ILSI Health and Environmental Sciences Institute (HESI) Risk Assessment in the Twenty-first Century (RISK21) project was initiated to address and catalyze improvements in human health risk assessment. RISK21 is a problem formulation-based conceptual roadmap and risk matrix visualization tool, facilitating transparent evaluation of both hazard and exposure components. The RISK21 roadmap is exposure-driven, that is, exposure is used as the second step (after problem formulation) to define and focus the assessment. This paper describes the exposure tiers of the RISK21 matrix and the approaches to adapt readily available information to more quickly inform exposure at a screening level. In particular, exposure look-up tables were developed from available exposure tools (European Centre for Ecotoxicology and Toxicology of Chemicals (ECETOC) Targeted Risk Assessment (TRA) for worker exposure, ECETOC TRA, European Solvents Industry Group (ESIG) Generic Exposure Scenario (GES) Risk and Exposure Tool (EGRET) for consumer exposure, and USEtox(®) for indirect exposure to humans via the environment) and were tested in a hypothetical mosquito bed netting case study. A detailed WHO risk assessment for a similar mosquito net use served as a benchmark for the performance of the RISK21 approach. The case study demonstrated that the screening methodologies provided suitable conservative exposure estimates for risk assessment. The results of this effort showed that the RISK21 approach is useful for defining future assessment efforts, focusing assessment activities and visualizing results.

  2. Analytic Confusion Matrix Bounds for Fault Detection and Isolation Using a Sum-of-Squared- Residuals Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Dan; Simon, Donald L.

    2009-01-01

    Given a system which can fail in 1 or n different ways, a fault detection and isolation (FDI) algorithm uses sensor data in order to determine which fault is the most likely to have occurred. The effectiveness of an FDI algorithm can be quantified by a confusion matrix, which i ndicates the probability that each fault is isolated given that each fault has occurred. Confusion matrices are often generated with simulation data, particularly for complex systems. In this paper we perform FDI using sums of squares of sensor residuals (SSRs). We assume that the sensor residuals are Gaussian, which gives the SSRs a chi-squared distribution. We then generate analytic lower and upper bounds on the confusion matrix elements. This allows for the generation of optimal sensor sets without numerical simulations. The confusion matrix bound s are verified with simulated aircraft engine data.

  3. Biological and statistical approaches for modeling exposure to specific trihalomethanes and bladder cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas, Lucas A; Cantor, Kenneth P; Tardon, Adonina; Serra, Consol; Carrato, Alfredo; Garcia-Closas, Reina; Rothman, Nathaniel; Malats, Núria; Silverman, Debra; Kogevinas, Manolis; Villanueva, Cristina M

    2013-08-15

    Lifetime exposure to trihalomethanes (THM) has been associated with increased risk of bladder cancer. We explored methods of analyzing bladder cancer risk associated with 4 THM (chloroform, bromodichloromethane, dibromochloromethane, and bromoform) as surrogates for disinfection by-product (DBP) mixtures in a case-control study in Spain (1998-2001). Lifetime average concentrations of THM in the households of 686 incident bladder cancer cases and 750 matched hospital-based controls were calculated. Several exposure metrics were modeled through conditional logistic regression, including the following analyses: total THM (μg/L), cytotoxicity-weighted sum of total THM (pmol/L), 4 THM in separate models, 4 THM in 1 model, chloroform and the sum of brominated THM in 1 model, and a principal-components analysis. THM composition, concentrations, and correlations varied between areas. The model for total THM was stable and showed increasing dose-response trends. Models for separate THM provided unstable estimates and inconsistent dose-response relationships. Risk estimation for specific THM is hampered by the varying composition of the mixture, correlation between species, and imprecision of historical estimates. Total THM (μg/L) provided a proxy measure of DBPs that yielded the strongest dose-response relationship with bladder cancer risk. A variety of metrics and statistical approaches should be used to evaluate this association in other settings.

  4. A New Approach to Study Properties of Isolated Predipocytes Following In Vivo Exposure to Hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Helena H.; Velebit Markovic, Jelena; Radic, Natasa; Francic, Vito; Mekjavic, Igor B.; Eiken, Ola; Zorec, Robert

    2013-02-01

    In the present study we developed a novel approach to study the properties of isolated human preadipocytes from subjects exposed to conditions of hypoxia equivalent to an altitude of 4000 m. By using confocal microscopy we studied the expression of dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4) in preadipocytes from adult normal-weight males. DPP4 is a transmembrane glycoprotein with enzymatic activity that cleaves N-terminal dipeptides from a diverse range of substrates. The activity of DPP4 is implicated in immune response as well as in glucose homeostasis. To gain insights into the pathophysiological role of DPP4 in insulin resistance we here explored DPP4 expression during prolonged exposure to hypoxia, an experimental model of obesity onset. We used here a rapid method to isolate cells from biopsies and immunolabelled them with antibodies. Then cells were prepared for the analysis with confocal microscopy. The results show that a prolonged exposure to hypoxic environment appears to increases the expression of DPP4 on preadipocytes.

  5. Matrix elements in the coupled-cluster approach - With application to low-lying states in Li

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martensson-Pendrill, Ann-Marie; Ynnerman, Anders

    1990-01-01

    A procedure is suggested for evaluating matrix elements of an operator between wavefunctions in the coupled-cluster form. The use of the exponential ansatz leads to compact exponential expressions also for matrix elements. Algorithms are developed for summing all effects of one-particle clusters and certain chains of two-particle clusters (containing the well-known random-phase approximation as a subset). The treatment of one-particle perturbations in single valence states is investigated in detail. As examples the oscillator strength for the 2s-2p transition in Li as well as the hyperfine structure for the two states are studied and compared to earlier work.

  6. Assessment of exposure of Korean consumers to acesulfame K and sucralose using a stepwise approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Mi-Sun; Ha, Sang-Do; Choi, Sung-Hee; Bae, Dong-Ho

    2013-09-01

    Using a stepwise assessment of the exposure of Korean consumers to acesulfame K and sucralose, theoretical maximum daily intakes of the sweeteners were calculated using the Budget screening method, which resulted in values greater than the acceptable daily intakes (ADIs). Accordingly, the daily intakes of the sweeteners based on food consumption data and concentrations determined by instrumental analysis of 605 food samples were estimated for the more refined approach. The estimated daily intakes (EDIs) of all ordinary consumers were lower than the ADI, which was considered safe. However, for infants and 95th percentile high-level consumers (especially those who choose sucralose-containing foods), the EDIs of sucralose were very close to and higher than the ADI. Therefore, the sucralose concentration in sweetened beverages should be reduced; this would benefit the health of both high-level consumers and infants.

  7. Large object investigation by digital holography with effective spectrum multiplexing under single-exposure approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ning, E-mail: coolboy006@sohu.com; Zhang, Yingying; Xie, Jun [College of Physics and Electronics, Nanjing XiaoZhuang University, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province 211171 (China)

    2014-10-13

    We present a method to investigate large object by digital holography with effective spectrum multiplexing under single-exposure approach. This method splits the original reference beam and redirects one of its branches as a second object beam. Through the modified Mach-Zehnder interferometer, the two object beams can illuminate different parts of the large object and create a spectrum multiplexed hologram onto the focal plane array of the charge-coupled device/complementary metal oxide semiconductor camera. After correct spectrum extraction and image reconstruction, the large object can be fully observed within only one single snap-shot. The flexibility and great performance make our method a very attractive and promising technique for large object investigation under common 632.8 nm illumination.

  8. Comparative risk assessment of carcinogens in alcoholic beverages using the margin of exposure approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachenmeier, Dirk W; Przybylski, Maria C; Rehm, Jürgen

    2012-09-15

    Alcoholic beverages have been classified as carcinogenic to humans. As alcoholic beverages are multicomponent mixtures containing several carcinogenic compounds, a quantitative approach is necessary to compare the risks. Fifteen known and suspected human carcinogens (acetaldehyde, acrylamide, aflatoxins, arsenic, benzene, cadmium, ethanol, ethyl carbamate, formaldehyde, furan, lead, 4-methylimidazole, N-nitrosodimethylamine, ochratoxin A and safrole) occurring in alcoholic beverages were identified based on monograph reviews by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. The margin of exposure (MOE) approach was used for comparative risk assessment. MOE compares a toxicological threshold with the exposure. MOEs above 10,000 are judged as low priority for risk management action. MOEs were calculated for different drinking scenarios (low risk and heavy drinking) and different levels of contamination for four beverage groups (beer, wine, spirits and unrecorded alcohol). The lowest MOEs were found for ethanol (3.1 for low risk and 0.8 for heavy drinking). Inorganic lead and arsenic have average MOEs between 10 and 300, followed by acetaldehyde, cadmium and ethyl carbamate between 1,000 and 10,000. All other compounds had average MOEs above 10,000 independent of beverage type. Ethanol was identified as the most important carcinogen in alcoholic beverages, with clear dose response. Some other compounds (lead, arsenic, ethyl carbamate, acetaldehyde) may pose risks below thresholds normally tolerated for food contaminants, but from a cost-effectiveness point of view, the focus should be on reducing alcohol consumption in general rather than on mitigative measures for some contaminants that contribute only to a limited extent (if at all) to the total health risk. Copyright © 2012 UICC.

  9. Optical excitation and electron relaxation dynamics at semiconductor surfaces: a combined approach of density functional and density matrix theory applied to the silicon (001) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buecking, N.

    2007-11-05

    In this work a new theoretical formalism is introduced in order to simulate the phononinduced relaxation of a non-equilibrium distribution to equilibrium at a semiconductor surface numerically. The non-equilibrium distribution is effected by an optical excitation. The approach in this thesis is to link two conventional, but approved methods to a new, more global description: while semiconductor surfaces can be investigated accurately by density-functional theory, the dynamical processes in semiconductor heterostructures are successfully described by density matrix theory. In this work, the parameters for density-matrix theory are determined from the results of density-functional calculations. This work is organized in two parts. In Part I, the general fundamentals of the theory are elaborated, covering the fundamentals of canonical quantizations as well as the theory of density-functional and density-matrix theory in 2{sup nd} order Born approximation. While the formalism of density functional theory for structure investigation has been established for a long time and many different codes exist, the requirements for density matrix formalism concerning the geometry and the number of implemented bands exceed the usual possibilities of the existing code in this field. A special attention is therefore attributed to the development of extensions to existing formulations of this theory, where geometrical and fundamental symmetries of the structure and the equations are used. In Part II, the newly developed formalism is applied to a silicon (001)surface in a 2 x 1 reconstruction. As first step, density-functional calculations using the LDA functional are completed, from which the Kohn-Sham-wave functions and eigenvalues are used to calculate interaction matrix elements for the electron-phonon-coupling an the optical excitation. These matrix elements are determined for the optical transitions from valence to conduction bands and for electron-phonon processes inside the

  10. Interaction between paraoxonase 1 polymorphism and prenatal pesticide exposure on metabolic markers in children using a multiplex approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anne; Nellemann, Christine; Wohlfahrt-Veje, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Prenatal environmental exposures may influence the risk of cardio-metabolic diseases later in life. This study used a multiplex approach to investigate non-fasting serum levels of metabolic markers in a cohort of school-aged children for whom associations between prenatal pesticide exposure...... and body fat content and blood pressure were previously found to be dependent on paraoxonase1 (PON1) Q192R genotype. In children with the PON1 192 R-allele, leptin, glucagon, and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) were positively associated with prenatal pesticide exposure. For PON1 192 QQ......-homozygote children none of the biomarkers were significantly affected by prenatal pesticide exposure. In children with the R-allele, leptin was associated with both body fat measures and prenatal pesticide exposure and seems to mediate body fat accumulation in exposed children. These findings support our previous...

  11. Structural differences of matrix metalloproteinases with potential implications for inhibitor selectivity examined by the GRID/CPCA approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terp, Gitte Elgaard; Cruciani, Gabriele; Christensen, Inge Thøger

    2002-01-01

    The matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of proteolytic enzymes, which have been the focus of a lot of research in recent years because of their involvement in various disease conditions. In this study, structures of 10 enzymes (MMP1, MMP2, MMP3, MMP7, MMP8, MMP9, MMP12, MMP13, MMP14...

  12. Matrix-mediated biomineralization in marine mollusks: a combined transmission electron microscopy and focused ion beam approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Martin; Kong, Charlie; Shaw, Jeremy A; Clode, Peta L

    2011-04-01

    The teeth of the marine mollusk Acanthopleura hirtosa are an excellent example of a complex, organic, matrix-mediated biomineral, with the fully mineralized teeth comprising layers of iron oxide and iron oxyhydroxide minerals around a calcium apatite core. To investigate the relationship between the various mineral layers and the organic matrix fibers on which they grew, sections have been prepared from specific features in the teeth at controlled orientations using focused ion beam processing. Compositional and microstructural details of heterophase interfaces, and the fate of the organic matrix fibers within the mineral layers, can then be analyzed by a range of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques. Energy-filtered TEM highlights the interlocking nature of the various mineral phases, while high-angle annular dark-field scanning TEM imaging demonstrates that the organic matrix continues to exist in the fully mineralized teeth. These new insights into the structure of this complex biomaterial are an important step in understanding the relationship between its structural and physical properties and may help explain its high strength and crack-resistance behavior.

  13. A thermodynamic approach for assessing the environmental exposure of chemicals absorbed to microplastic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouin, Todd; Roche, Nicola; Lohmann, Rainer; Hodges, Geoff

    2011-02-15

    The environmental distribution and fate of microplastic in the marine environment represents a potential cause of concern. One aspect is the influence that microplastic may have on enhancing the transport and bioavailability of persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic substances (PBT). In this study we assess these potential risks using a thermodynamic approach, aiming to prioritize the physicochemical properties of chemicals that are most likely absorbed by microplastic and therefore ingested by biota. Using a multimedia modeling approach, we define a chemical space aimed at improving our understanding of how chemicals partition in the marine environment with varying volume ratios of air/water/organic carbon/polyethylene, where polyethylene represents a main group of microplastic. Results suggest that chemicals with log KOW > 5 have the potential to partition >1% to polyethylene. Food-web model results suggest that reductions in body burden concentrations for nonpolar organic chemicals are likely to occur for chemicals with log KOW between 5.5 and 6.5. Thus the relative importance of microplastic as a vector of PBT substances to biological organisms is likely of limited importance, relative to other exposure pathways. Nevertheless, a number of data-gaps are identified, largely associated with improving our understanding of the physical fate of microplastic in the environment.

  14. Matrix theory

    CERN Document Server

    Franklin, Joel N

    2003-01-01

    Mathematically rigorous introduction covers vector and matrix norms, the condition-number of a matrix, positive and irreducible matrices, much more. Only elementary algebra and calculus required. Includes problem-solving exercises. 1968 edition.

  15. Cell-matrix adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrier, Allison L; Yamada, Kenneth M

    2007-12-01

    The complex interactions of cells with extracellular matrix (ECM) play crucial roles in mediating and regulating many processes, including cell adhesion, migration, and signaling during morphogenesis, tissue homeostasis, wound healing, and tumorigenesis. Many of these interactions involve transmembrane integrin receptors. Integrins cluster in specific cell-matrix adhesions to provide dynamic links between extracellular and intracellular environments by bi-directional signaling and by organizing the ECM and intracellular cytoskeletal and signaling molecules. This mini review discusses these interconnections, including the roles of matrix properties such as composition, three-dimensionality, and porosity, the bi-directional functions of cellular contractility and matrix rigidity, and cell signaling. The review concludes by speculating on the application of this knowledge of cell-matrix interactions in the formation of cell adhesions, assembly of matrix, migration, and tumorigenesis to potential future therapeutic approaches. 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. A random matrix approach to detect defects in a strongly scattering polycrystal: How the memory effect can help overcome multiple scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahjahan, S.; Aubry, A.; Rupin, F.; Chassignole, B.; Derode, A.

    2014-06-01

    We report on ultrasonic imaging in a random heterogeneous medium. The goal is to detect flaws embedded deeply into a polycrystalline material. A 64-element array of piezoelectric transmitters/receivers at a central frequency of 5 MHz is used to capture the Green's matrix in a backscattering configuration. Because of multiple scattering, conventional imaging completely fails to detect the deepest flaws. We utilize a random matrix approach, taking advantage of the deterministic coherence of the backscattered wave-field which is characteristic of single scattering and related to the memory effect. This allows us to separate single and multiple scattering contributions. As a consequence, we show that flaws are detected beyond the conventional limit, as if multiple scattering had been overcome.

  17. Non-Perturbative approach to the distribution of zeros of the S-matrix of lossy chaotic cavities and its applications to coherent perfect absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fyodorov, Yan; Suwunnarat, Suwun; Kottos, Tsampikos

    We employ the Random Matrix Theory framework to calculate the scattering matrix zeros of a chaotic cavity with a localized absorber embedded in it. Our approach extends beyond the perturbative weak-coupling limit of the cavity with the continuum via a finite number M of open channels and provides an insight for the optimal amount of loss needed to realize a chaotic coherent perfect absorbing trap. Our theoretical results are tested against and found to be in excellent agreement with simulations for two types of chaotic systems: a complex network of coupled resonators and quantum graphs with one absorption center. (S.S and T.K) acknowledge partial support from AFOSR MURI FA9550-14-1-0037 and NSF-EFRI 1641109.

  18. Legislating for occupational exposure to sources of natural radiation- the UK approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higham, N.; Walker, S.; Thomas, G.

    2004-07-01

    Title VII of EC Directive 96/29/Euratom (the 1996 BSS Directive) for the first time requires Member States to take action in relation to work activities within which the presence of natural radiation sources leads to a significant increase in the exposure of workers or members of the public which cannot be disregarded from the radiation protection point of view. The UK in fact has had legal requirements relating to occupational exposure to natural radiation sources since 1985, in the Ionising Radiations Regulations 1985, made to implement the bulk of the provisions of the previous BSS Directive (80/836/Euratom, as amended by 84/467/Euratom). The Ionising Radiations Regulations 1999, that implement the worker protection requirements of the 1996 Euratom BSS Directive, include similar provisions. The definition of radioactive substance includes any substance which contains one or more radionuclides whose activity cannot be disregarded for the purposes of radiation protection. This means that some low specific activity ores and sands fall within this definition and are therefore subject to relevant requirements of the Regulations. Further advice is given on circumstances in which this may apply. Radon is covered more explicitly by applying the regulations to any work carried out in an atmosphere containing radon 222 gas at a concentration in air, averaged over any 24 hour period, exceeding 400 Bq m-3 except where the concentration of the short-lived daughters of radon 222 in air averaged over any 8 hour working period does not exceed 6.24 x 10-7Jm-3. The Health and Safety Executive pursues a policy of raising awareness of the potential for exposure to radon in the workplace and targeting those employers likely to have a radon problem (based on the use of existing information on homes). The regulatory approach has been to seek remedial building measures so that the workplace is removed from control. HSE is able to offer advice about getting their workplace tested and

  19. Use of the Materials Genome Initiative (MGI approach in the design of improved-performance fiber-reinforced SiC/SiC ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer S. Snipes

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available New materials are traditionally developed using costly and time-consuming trial-and-error experimental efforts. This is followed by an even lengthier material-certification process. Consequently, it takes 10 to 20 years before a newly-discovered material is commercially employed. An alternative approach to the development of new materials is the so-called materials-by-design approach within which a material is treated as a complex hierarchical system, and its design and optimization is carried out by employing computer-aided engineering analyses, predictive tools and available material databases. In the present work, the materials-by-design approach is utilized to design a grade of fiber-reinforced (FR SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs, the type of materials which are currently being used in stationary components, and are considered for use in rotating components, of the hot sections of gas-turbine engines. Towards that end, a number of mathematical functions and numerical models are developed which relate CMC constituents’ (fibers, fiber coating and matrix microstructure and their properties to the properties and performance of the CMC as a whole. To validate the newly-developed materials-by-design approach, comparisons are made between experimentally measured and computationally predicted selected CMC mechanical properties. Then an optimization procedure is employed to determine the chemical makeup and processing routes for the CMC constituents so that the selected mechanical properties of the CMCs are increased to a preset target level.

  20. Exposure to pesticides of fruit growers and effects on reproduction : an epidemiological approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cock, de J.S.

    1995-01-01

    In this thesis the exposure to pesticides of fruit growers in The Netherlands was studied as well as its relation to reproductive health effects. The most commonly used fungicide, captan, was used as a marker for exposure. Several exposure studies were carried out during application of

  1. An Integrated Approach to Assess Exposure and Health-Risk from Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) in a Fastener Manufacturing Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Hsin-I; Lin, Ming-Yeng; Chen, Yu-Cheng; Chen, Wang-Yi; Yoon, Chungsik; Chen, Mei-Ru; Tsai, Perng-Jy

    2014-01-01

    An integrated approach was developed to assess exposure and health-risk from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) contained in oil mists in a fastener manufacturing industry. One previously developed model and one new model were adopted for predicting oil mist exposure concentrations emitted from metal work fluid (MWF) and PAHs contained in MWF by using the fastener production rate (Pr) and cumulative fastener production rate (CPr) as predictors, respectively. By applying the annual Pr and CPr records to the above two models, long-term workplace PAH exposure concentrations were predicted. In addition, true exposure data was also collected from the field. The predicted and measured concentrations respectively served as the prior and likelihood distributions in the Bayesian decision analysis (BDA), and the resultant posterior distributions were used to determine the long-term exposure and health-risks posed on workers. Results show that long term exposures to PAHs would result in a 3.1%, 96.7%, and 73.4% chance of exceeding the PEL-TWA (0.2 mg/m3), action level (0.1 mg/m3), and acceptable health risk (10−3), respectively. In conclusion, preventive measures should be taken immediately to reduce workers’ PAH exposures. PMID:25226413

  2. Basal Exposure Therapy: A New Approach for Treatment-Resistant Patients with Severe and Composite Mental Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Heggdal, Didrik; Fosse, Roar; Hammer, Jan

    2016-01-01

    New treatment approaches are needed for patients with severe and composite mental disorders who are resistant to conventional treatments. Such treatment-resistant patients often have diagnoses of psychotic or bipolar disorders or severe personality disorders and comorbid conditions. In this study, we evaluate basal exposure therapy (BET), a novel ward-integrated psychotherapeutic approach for these patients. Central to BET is the conceptualization of undifferentiated existential fear as basic...

  3. Assessment of exposure to mercury from industrial emissions: comparing "distance as a proxy" and dispersion modelling approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgson, Susan; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J; Colvile, Roy; Jarup, Lars

    2007-06-01

    The Runcorn area, north-west England, contains many pollution sources, the health effects of which have been under discussion for over 100 years. Preliminary investigations revealed an excess risk of mortality from kidney disease in people living nearest to several point sources of pollution, using distance as a proxy for exposure. Ongoing epidemiological investigations into the effect of ambient mercury exposure on dose and renal effect required a more refined assessment of exposure. Atmospheric dispersion modelling was used to assess mercury dispersion from three mercury-emitting sources (including a large chlor alkali plant), based on knowledge of emissions, local meteorology and topography. The model was sensitive to various input parameters, with different dispersion patterns and ground-level concentrations, and therefore different exposed populations identified when different input parameters were defined. The different approaches to exposure assessment also had an impact on the epidemiological findings. The model output correlated well with weekly monitoring data collected in the local area, although the model underestimated concentrations in close proximity to the chlor alkali plant. The model identified that one point source did not contribute significantly to ground-level mercury concentrations, so that inclusion of this source when using the "distance as a proxy" approach led to significant exposure misclassification. The model output indicates that assessment of ambient exposure should give consideration to the magnitude of emissions, point source characteristics, local meteorology and topography to ensure that the most appropriate exposure classification is reached. Even if dispersion modelling cannot be undertaken, these data can be used to inform and improve the distance as a proxy approach, and improve the interpretability of the epidemiological findings.

  4. Exposure assessment approach through mycotoxin/creatinine ratio evaluation in urine by GC-MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Carrasco, Yelko; Moltó, Juan Carlos; Mañes, Jordi; Berrada, Houda

    2014-10-01

    In this pilot survey human urine samples were analyzed for presence of 15 mycotoxins and some of their metabolites using a novel urinary multi-mycotoxin GC-MS/MS method following salting-out liquid-liquid extraction. Fifty-four urine samples from children and adults residents in Valencia were analyzed for presence of urinary mycotoxin and expressed in gram of creatinine. Three out of 15 mycotoxins were detected namely, HT-2 toxin, nivalenol and deoxynivalenol (DON). 37 samples showed quantifiable values of mycotoxins. Co-occurrence of these contaminants was also observed in 20.4% of assayed samples. DON was the most frequently detected mycotoxin (68.5%) with mean levels of 23.3 μg/g creatinine (range: 2.8-69.1 μg/g creatinine). The levels of urinary DON were used to carry out an exposure assessment approach. 8.1% of total subjects were estimated to exceed the DON provisional maximum tolerable daily intake (PMTDI) (1 μg/kg b.w.). Two out of 9 exposed children exceeded the DON PMTDI thus, making them the most exposed based on the urinary results. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Electronic Cigarettes and Indoor Air Quality: A Simple Approach to Modeling Potential Bystander Exposures to Nicotine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane Colard

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available There has been rapid growth in the use of electronic cigarettes (“vaping” in Europe, North America and elsewhere. With such increased prevalence, there is currently a debate on whether the aerosol exhaled following the use of e-cigarettes has implications for the quality of air breathed by bystanders. Conducting chemical analysis of the indoor environment can be costly and resource intensive, limiting the number of studies which can be conducted. However, this can be modelled reasonably accurately based on empirical emissions data and using some basic assumptions. Here, we present a simplified model, based on physical principles, which considers aerosol propagation, dilution and extraction to determine the potential contribution of a single puff from an e-cigarette to indoor air. From this, it was then possible to simulate the cumulative effect of vaping over time. The model was applied to a virtual, but plausible, scenario considering an e-cigarette user and a non-user working in the same office space. The model was also used to reproduce published experimental studies and showed good agreement with the published values of indoor air nicotine concentration. With some additional refinements, such an approach may be a cost-effective and rapid way of assessing the potential exposure of bystanders to exhaled e-cigarette aerosol constituents.

  6. Electronic cigarettes and indoor air quality: a simple approach to modeling potential bystander exposures to nicotine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colard, Stéphane; O'Connell, Grant; Verron, Thomas; Cahours, Xavier; Pritchard, John D

    2014-12-24

    There has been rapid growth in the use of electronic cigarettes ("vaping") in Europe, North America and elsewhere. With such increased prevalence, there is currently a debate on whether the aerosol exhaled following the use of e-cigarettes has implications for the quality of air breathed by bystanders. Conducting chemical analysis of the indoor environment can be costly and resource intensive, limiting the number of studies which can be conducted. However, this can be modelled reasonably accurately based on empirical emissions data and using some basic assumptions. Here, we present a simplified model, based on physical principles, which considers aerosol propagation, dilution and extraction to determine the potential contribution of a single puff from an e-cigarette to indoor air. From this, it was then possible to simulate the cumulative effect of vaping over time. The model was applied to a virtual, but plausible, scenario considering an e-cigarette user and a non-user working in the same office space. The model was also used to reproduce published experimental studies and showed good agreement with the published values of indoor air nicotine concentration. With some additional refinements, such an approach may be a cost-effective and rapid way of assessing the potential exposure of bystanders to exhaled e-cigarette aerosol constituents.

  7. Electronic Cigarettes and Indoor Air Quality: A Simple Approach to Modeling Potential Bystander Exposures to Nicotine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colard, Stéphane; O’Connell, Grant; Verron, Thomas; Cahours, Xavier; Pritchard, John D.

    2014-01-01

    There has been rapid growth in the use of electronic cigarettes (“vaping”) in Europe, North America and elsewhere. With such increased prevalence, there is currently a debate on whether the aerosol exhaled following the use of e-cigarettes has implications for the quality of air breathed by bystanders. Conducting chemical analysis of the indoor environment can be costly and resource intensive, limiting the number of studies which can be conducted. However, this can be modelled reasonably accurately based on empirical emissions data and using some basic assumptions. Here, we present a simplified model, based on physical principles, which considers aerosol propagation, dilution and extraction to determine the potential contribution of a single puff from an e-cigarette to indoor air. From this, it was then possible to simulate the cumulative effect of vaping over time. The model was applied to a virtual, but plausible, scenario considering an e-cigarette user and a non-user working in the same office space. The model was also used to reproduce published experimental studies and showed good agreement with the published values of indoor air nicotine concentration. With some additional refinements, such an approach may be a cost-effective and rapid way of assessing the potential exposure of bystanders to exhaled e-cigarette aerosol constituents. PMID:25547398

  8. Influence of the temperature and oxygen exposure in red Port wine: A kinetic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Carla Maria; Barros, António S; Silva Ferreira, António César; Silva, Artur M S

    2015-09-01

    Although phenolics are recognized to be related with health benefits by limiting lipid oxidation, in wine, they are the primary substrates for oxidation resulting in the quinone by-products with the participation of transition metal ions. Nevertheless, high quality Port wines require a period of aging in either bottle or barrels. During this time, a modification of sensory properties of wines such as the decrease of astringency or the stabilization of color is recognized to phenolic compounds, mainly attributed to anthocyanins and derived pigments. The present work aims to illustrate the oxidation of red Port wine based on its phenolic composition by the effect of both thermal and oxygen exposures. A kinetic approach toanthocyanins degradation was also achieved. For this purpose a forced red Port wine aging protocol was performed at four different storage temperatures, respectively, 20, 30, 35 and 40°C, and two adjusted oxygen saturation levels, no oxygen addition (treatment I), and oxygen addition (treatment II). Three hydroxycinnamic esters, three hydroxycinnamic acids, three hydroxybenzoic acids, two flavan-3-ols, and six anthocyanins were quantitated weekly during 63days, along with oxygen consumption. The most relevant phenolic oxidation markers were anthocyanins and catechin-type flavonoids, which had the highest decreases during the thermal and oxidative red Port wine process. Both temperature and oxygen treatments affected the rate of phenolic degradation. In addition, temperature seems to influence mostly the phenolics kinetic degradation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Temperature dependence of persistent spin currents in a spin-orbit-coupled electron gas: A density-matrix approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencheikh, K.; Vignale, G.

    2008-04-01

    We present a simple analytical method, based on the canonical density matrix, for the calculation of the equilibrium spin current as a function of temperature in a two-dimensional electron gas with both Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling terms. We find that the persistent spin current is extremely robust against thermal disorder: its variation with temperature is exponentially small (∝e-TF/T) at temperatures much smaller than the Fermi temperature TF and changes to a power law TF/T for T≫TF .

  10. A Discrete Time Queueing Approach to Model and Evaluate Slotted Ring Network Buffer using Matrix Geometric Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Asif Ali Shah

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Assorted analytical methods have been proposed for evaluating the performance of a slotted ring network. This paper proposes MGM (Matrix Geometric Method to analyze the station buffer of a slotted ring for DT (Discrete-Time queueing. The slotted ring is analyzed for infinite station buffer as a late arrival DT system. Utilizing the characteristics of 2-D Markov chain, various performance measures are validated with their corresponding results such as, throughput and MPAD (Mean Packet Access Delay as well as the packet rejection probability for finite station buffer. The presented results prove efficacy of the method.

  11. What are Contaminants of Emerging Concern (CECs) ?Examples of Biological and Chemistry Approaches to their Detection, Exposure and Effects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    This presentation will overview what Contaminants of Emerging Concern (CECs) are, provide some examples of various CECs and some of the biological and chemistry approaches to assess their exposure and effects to aquatic life. The term CECs has been used since the 1990s to identif...

  12. Statistical Analysis of the Figure of Merit of a Two-Level Thermoelectric System: A Random Matrix Approach

    KAUST Repository

    Abbout, Adel

    2016-08-05

    Using the tools of random matrix theory we develop a statistical analysis of the transport properties of thermoelectric low-dimensional systems made of two electron reservoirs set at different temperatures and chemical potentials, and connected through a low-density-of-states two-level quantum dot that acts as a conducting chaotic cavity. Our exact treatment of the chaotic behavior in such devices lies on the scattering matrix formalism and yields analytical expressions for the joint probability distribution functions of the Seebeck coefficient and the transmission profile, as well as the marginal distributions, at arbitrary Fermi energy. The scattering matrices belong to circular ensembles which we sample to numerically compute the transmission function, the Seebeck coefficient, and their relationship. The exact transport coefficients probability distributions are found to be highly non-Gaussian for small numbers of conduction modes, and the analytical and numerical results are in excellent agreement. The system performance is also studied, and we find that the optimum performance is obtained for half-transparent quantum dots; further, this optimum may be enhanced for systems with few conduction modes.

  13. Toward Developing a New Occupational Exposure Metric Approach for Characterization of Diesel Aerosols

    OpenAIRE

    Cauda, Emanuele G.; Ku, Bon Ki; Miller, Arthur L.; Barone, Teresa L.

    2012-01-01

    The extensive use of diesel-powered equipment in mines makes the exposure to diesel aerosols a serious occupational issue. The exposure metric currently used in U.S. underground noncoal mines is based on the measurement of total carbon (TC) and elemental carbon (EC) mass concentration in the air. Recent toxicological evidence suggests that the measurement of mass concentration is not sufficient to correlate ultrafine aerosol exposure with health effects. This urges the evaluation of alternati...

  14. Children's exposure to harmful elements in toys and low-cost jewelry: characterizing risks and developing a comprehensive approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guney, Mert; Zagury, Gerald J

    2014-04-30

    Contamination problem in jewelry and toys and children's exposure possibility have been previously demonstrated. For this study, risk from oral exposure has been characterized for highly contaminated metallic toys and jewelry ((MJ), n=16) considering three scenarios. Total and bioaccessible concentrations of Cd, Cu, Ni, and Pb were high in selected MJ. First scenario (ingestion of parts or pieces) caused unacceptable risk for eight items for Cd, Ni, and/or Pb (hazard index (HI)>1, up to 75, 5.8, and 43, respectively). HI for ingestion of scraped-off material scenario was always 1 in three samples (two for Cd, one for Ni). Risk characterization identified different potentially hazardous items compared to United States, Canadian, and European Union approaches. A comprehensive approach was also developed to deal with complexity and drawbacks caused by various toy/jewelry definitions, test methods, exposure scenarios, and elements considered in different regulatory approaches. It includes bioaccessible limits for eight priority elements (As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, and Sb). Research is recommended on metals bioaccessibility determination in toys/jewelry, in vitro bioaccessibility test development, estimation of material ingestion rates and frequency, presence of hexavalent Cr and organic Sn, and assessment of prolonged exposure to MJ. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Vibration-Assisted Sputter Coating of Cenospheres: A New Approach for Realizing Cu-Based Metal Matrix Syntactic Foams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei Shishkin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The coating of hollow alumino-silicate microspheres or cenospheres with thin layers of Cu by means of vibration-assisted magnetron sputtering yields a starting material with considerable potential for the production of new types of metal matrix syntactic foams as well as optimized variants of conventional materials of this kind. This study introduces the coating process and the production of macroscopic samples from the coated spheres via spark plasma sintering (SPS. The influence of processing parameters on the coating itself, and the syntactic foams are discussed in terms of the obtained density levels as a function of sintering temperature (which was varied between 850 and 1080 °C, time (0.5 to 4 min, and surface appearance before and after SPS treatment. Sintering temperatures of 900 °C and above were found to cause breaking-up of the homogeneous sputter coating into a net-like structure. This effect is attributed to wetting behavior of Cu on the alumino-silicate cenosphere shells. Cylindrical samples were subjected to conductivity measurements and mechanical tests, and the first performance characteristics are reported here. Compressive strengths for Cu-based materials in the density range of 0.90–1.50 g/cm3 were found to lie between 8.6 and 61.9 MPa, depending on sintering conditions and density. An approximate relationship between strength and density is suggested based on the well-known Gibson–Ashby law. Density-related strength of the new material is contrasted to similar findings for several types of established metal foams gathered from the literature. Besides discussing these first experimental results, this paper outlines the potential of coated microspheres as optimized filler particles in metal matrix syntactic foams, and suggests associated directions of future research.

  16. Concentrations versus amounts of biomarkers in urine: a comparison of approaches to assess pyrethroid exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouchard Michèle

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Assessment of human exposure to non-persistent pesticides such as pyrethroids is often based on urinary biomarker measurements. Urinary metabolite levels of these pesticides are usually reported in volume-weighted concentrations or creatinine-adjusted concentrations measured in spot urine samples. It is known that these units are subject to intra- and inter-individual variations. This research aimed at studying the impact of these variations on the assessment of pyrethroid absorbed doses at individual and population levels. Methods Using data obtained from various adult and infantile populations, the intra and inter-individual variability in the urinary flow rate and creatinine excretion rate was first estimated. Individual absorbed doses were then calculated using volume-weighted or creatinine-adjusted concentrations according to published approaches and compared to those estimated from the amounts of biomarkers excreted in 15- or 24-h urine collections, the latter serving as a benchmark unit. The effect of the units of measurements (volume-weighted or creatinine adjusted concentrations or 24-h amounts on results of the comparison of pyrethroid biomarker levels between two populations was also evaluated. Results Estimation of daily absorbed doses of permethrin from volume-weighted or creatinine-adjusted concentrations of biomarkers was found to potentially lead to substantial under or overestimation when compared to doses reconstructed directly from amounts excreted in urine during a given period of time (-70 to +573% and -83 to +167%, respectively. It was also shown that the variability in creatinine excretion rate and urinary flow rate may introduce a bias in the case of between population comparisons. Conclusion The unit chosen to express biomonitoring data may influence the validity of estimated individual absorbed dose as well as the outcome of between population comparisons.

  17. A Review of the Field on Children’s Exposure to Environmental Contaminants: A Risk Assessment Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Alesia; Penney, Rosalind; Solo-Gabriele, Helena

    2017-01-01

    Background: Children must be recognized as a sensitive population based on having biological systems and organs in various stages of development. The processes of absorption, distribution, metabolism and elimination of environmental contaminants within a child’s body are considered less advanced than those of adults, making them more susceptible to disease outcomes following even small doses. Children’s unique activities of crawling and practicing increased hand-to-mouth ingestion also make them vulnerable to greater exposures by certain contaminants within specific environments. Approach: There is a need to review the field of children’s environmental exposures in order to understand trends and identify gaps in research, which may lead to better protection of this vulnerable and sensitive population. Therefore, explored here are previously published contemporary works in the broad area of children’s environmental exposures and potential impact on health from around the world. A discussion of children’s exposure to environmental contaminants is best organized under the last four steps of a risk assessment approach: hazard identification, dose-response assessment, exposure assessment (including children’s activity patterns) and risk characterization. We first consider the many exposure hazards that exist in the indoor and outdoor environments, and emerging contaminants of concern that may help guide the risk assessment process in identifying focus areas for children. A section on special diseases of concern is also included. Conclusions: The field of children’s exposures to environmental contaminants is broad. Although there are some well-studied areas offering much insight into children exposures, research is still needed to further our understanding of exposures to newer compounds, growing disease trends and the role of gene-environment interactions that modify adverse health outcomes. It is clear that behaviors of adults and children play a role in

  18. The current status of exposure-driven approaches for chemical safety assessment: A cross-sector perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sewell, Fiona; Aggarwal, Manoj; Bachler, Gerald; Broadmeadow, Alan; Gellatly, Nichola; Moore, Emma; Robinson, Sally; Rooseboom, Martijn; Stevens, Alexander; Terry, Claire; Burden, Natalie

    2017-08-15

    For the purposes of chemical safety assessment, the value of using non-animal (in silico and in vitro) approaches and generating mechanistic information on toxic effects is being increasingly recognised. For sectors where in vivo toxicity tests continue to be a regulatory requirement, there has been a parallel focus on how to refine studies (i.e. reduce suffering and improve animal welfare) and increase the value that in vivo data adds to the safety assessment process, as well as where to reduce animal numbers where possible. A key element necessary to ensure the transition towards successfully utilising both non-animal and refined safety testing is the better understanding of chemical exposure. This includes approaches such as measuring chemical concentrations within cell-based assays and during in vivo studies, understanding how predicted human exposures relate to levels tested, and using existing information on human exposures to aid in toxicity study design. Such approaches promise to increase the human relevance of safety assessment, and shift the focus from hazard-driven to risk-driven strategies similar to those used in the pharmaceutical sectors. Human exposure-based safety assessment offers scientific and 3Rs benefits across all sectors marketing chemical or medicinal products. The UK's National Centre for the Replacement, Refinement and Reduction of Animals in Research (NC3Rs) convened an expert working group of scientists across the agrochemical, industrial chemical and pharmaceutical industries plus a contract research organisation (CRO) to discuss the current status of the utilisation of exposure-driven approaches, and the challenges and potential next steps for wider uptake and acceptance. This paper summarises these discussions, highlights the challenges - particularly those identified by industry - and proposes initial steps for moving the field forward. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Approach for Estimating Exposures and Incremental Health Effects from Lead Due to Renovation Repair and Painting Activities in Public and Commercial Buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Approach for Estimating Exposures and Incremental Health Effects from Lead Due to Renovation Repair and Painting Activities in Public and Commercial Buildings: links to documents at www.regulations.gov, links to PDFs related to Approach document

  20. Approach for Estimating Exposures and Incremental Health Effects from Lead During Renovation, Repair, and Painting Activities in Public and Commercial Buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Approach for Estimating Exposures and Incremental Health Effects from Lead During Renovation, Repair, and Painting Activities in Public and Commercial Buildings” (Technical Approach Document). Also available for public review and comment are two supplementary documents: the detai...

  1. Eigenvalue-eigenvector decomposition (EED) analysis of dissimilarity and covariance matrix obtained from total synchronous fluorescence spectral (TSFS) data sets of herbal preparations: Optimizing the classification approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarai, Madhumita; Kumar, Keshav; Divya, O.; Bairi, Partha; Mishra, Kishor Kumar; Mishra, Ashok Kumar

    2017-09-01

    The present work compares the dissimilarity and covariance based unsupervised chemometric classification approaches by taking the total synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy data sets acquired for the cumin and non-cumin based herbal preparations. The conventional decomposition method involves eigenvalue-eigenvector analysis of the covariance of the data set and finds the factors that can explain the overall major sources of variation present in the data set. The conventional approach does this irrespective of the fact that the samples belong to intrinsically different groups and hence leads to poor class separation. The present work shows that classification of such samples can be optimized by performing the eigenvalue-eigenvector decomposition on the pair-wise dissimilarity matrix.

  2. A multiple objective test assembly approach for exposure control problems in Computerized Adaptive Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theo J.H.M. Eggen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Overexposure and underexposure of items in the bank are serious problems in operational computerized adaptive testing (CAT systems. These exposure problems might result in item compromise, or point at a waste of investments. The exposure control problem can be viewed as a test assembly problem with multiple objectives. Information in the test has to be maximized, item compromise has to be minimized, and pool usage has to be optimized. In this paper, a multiple objectives method is developed to deal with both types of exposure problems. In this method, exposure control parameters based on observed exposure rates are implemented as weights for the information in the item selection procedure. The method does not need time consuming simulation studies, and it can be implemented conditional on ability level. The method is compared with Sympson Hetter method for exposure control, with the Progressive method and with alphastratified testing. The results show that the method is successful in dealing with both kinds of exposure problems.

  3. Novel approach to analysing large data sets of personal sun exposure measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blesić, Suzana M; Stratimirović, Đorđe I; Ajtić, Jelena V; Wright, Caradee Y; Allen, Martin W

    2016-11-01

    Personal sun exposure measurements provide important information to guide the development of sun awareness and disease prevention campaigns. We assess the scaling properties of personal ultraviolet radiation (pUVR) sun exposure measurements using the wavelet transform (WT) spectral analysis to process long-range, high-frequency personal recordings collected by electronic UVR dosimeters designed to measure erythemal UVR exposure. We analysed the sun exposure recordings of school children, farmers, marathon runners and outdoor workers in South Africa, and construction workers and work site supervisors in New Zealand. We found scaling behaviour in all the analysed pUVR data sets. We found that the observed scaling changes from uncorrelated to long-range correlated with increasing duration of sun exposure. Peaks in the WT spectra that we found suggest the existence of characteristic times in sun exposure behaviour that were to some extent universal across our data set. Our study also showed that WT measures enable group classification, as well as distinction between individual UVR exposures, otherwise unattainable by conventional statistical methods.

  4. Elementary matrix theory

    CERN Document Server

    Eves, Howard

    1980-01-01

    The usefulness of matrix theory as a tool in disciplines ranging from quantum mechanics to psychometrics is widely recognized, and courses in matrix theory are increasingly a standard part of the undergraduate curriculum.This outstanding text offers an unusual introduction to matrix theory at the undergraduate level. Unlike most texts dealing with the topic, which tend to remain on an abstract level, Dr. Eves' book employs a concrete elementary approach, avoiding abstraction until the final chapter. This practical method renders the text especially accessible to students of physics, engineeri

  5. Advanced Computational Approaches for Characterizing Stochastic Cellular Responses to Low Dose, Low Dose Rate Exposures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, Bobby, R., Ph.D.

    2003-06-27

    OAK - B135 This project final report summarizes modeling research conducted in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Low Dose Radiation Research Program at the Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute from October 1998 through June 2003. The modeling research described involves critically evaluating the validity of the linear nonthreshold (LNT) risk model as it relates to stochastic effects induced in cells by low doses of ionizing radiation and genotoxic chemicals. The LNT model plays a central role in low-dose risk assessment for humans. With the LNT model, any radiation (or genotoxic chemical) exposure is assumed to increase one¡¯s risk of cancer. Based on the LNT model, others have predicted tens of thousands of cancer deaths related to environmental exposure to radioactive material from nuclear accidents (e.g., Chernobyl) and fallout from nuclear weapons testing. Our research has focused on developing biologically based models that explain the shape of dose-response curves for low-dose radiation and genotoxic chemical-induced stochastic effects in cells. Understanding the shape of the dose-response curve for radiation and genotoxic chemical-induced stochastic effects in cells helps to better understand the shape of the dose-response curve for cancer induction in humans. We have used a modeling approach that facilitated model revisions over time, allowing for timely incorporation of new knowledge gained related to the biological basis for low-dose-induced stochastic effects in cells. Both deleterious (e.g., genomic instability, mutations, and neoplastic transformation) and protective (e.g., DNA repair and apoptosis) effects have been included in our modeling. Our most advanced model, NEOTRANS2, involves differing levels of genomic instability. Persistent genomic instability is presumed to be associated with nonspecific, nonlethal mutations and to increase both the risk for neoplastic transformation and for cancer occurrence. Our research results, based on

  6. Urinary biomarkers of smokers’ exposure to tobacco smoke constituents in tobacco products assessment: a fit for purpose approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, Evan O.; Minet, Emmanuel

    2013-01-01

    There are established guidelines for bioanalytical assay validation and qualification of biomarkers. In this review, they were applied to a panel of urinary biomarkers of tobacco smoke exposure as part of a “fit for purpose” approach to the assessment of smoke constituents exposure in groups of tobacco product smokers. Clinical studies have allowed the identification of a group of tobacco exposure biomarkers demonstrating a good doseresponse relationship whilst others such as dihydroxybutyl mercapturic acid and 2-carboxy-1-methylethylmercapturic acid – did not reproducibly discriminate smokers and non-smokers. Furthermore, there are currently no agreed common reference standards to measure absolute concentrations and few inter-laboratory trials have been performed to establish consensus values for interim standards. Thus, we also discuss in this review additional requirements for the generation of robust data on urinary biomarkers, including toxicant metabolism and disposition, method validation and qualification for use in tobacco products comparison studies. PMID:23902266

  7. Urinary biomarkers of smokers' exposure to tobacco smoke constituents in tobacco products assessment: a fit for purpose approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, Evan O; Minet, Emmanuel; McEwan, Michael

    2013-09-01

    There are established guidelines for bioanalytical assay validation and qualification of biomarkers. In this review, they were applied to a panel of urinary biomarkers of tobacco smoke exposure as part of a "fit for purpose" approach to the assessment of smoke constituents exposure in groups of tobacco product smokers. Clinical studies have allowed the identification of a group of tobacco exposure biomarkers demonstrating a good doseresponse relationship whilst others such as dihydroxybutyl mercapturic acid and 2-carboxy-1-methylethylmercapturic acid - did not reproducibly discriminate smokers and non-smokers. Furthermore, there are currently no agreed common reference standards to measure absolute concentrations and few inter-laboratory trials have been performed to establish consensus values for interim standards. Thus, we also discuss in this review additional requirements for the generation of robust data on urinary biomarkers, including toxicant metabolism and disposition, method validation and qualification for use in tobacco products comparison studies.

  8. Quantum information aspects on bulk and nano interacting Fermi system: A spin-space density matrix approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afzali, R., E-mail: afzali@kntu.ac.ir [Department of Physics, K. N. Toosi University of Technology, Tehran, 15418 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ebrahimian, N., E-mail: n.ebrahimian@shahed.ac.ir [Department of Physics, Faculty of Basic Sciences, Shahed University, Tehran, 18155-159 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Eghbalifar, B., E-mail: b.eghbali2011@yahoo.com [Department of Agricultural Management, Marvdasht Branch, Azad University, Marvdasht (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-10-07

    Highlights: • In contrast to a s-wave superconductor, the quantum correlation of the d-wave superconductor is sensitive to the change of the gap magnitude. • Quantum discord of the d-wave superconductor oscillates. • Quantum discord becomes zero at a characteristic length of the d-wave superconductor. • Quantum correlation strongly depends on the length of grain. Length of the superconductor lower, the quantum correlation length higher. • Quantum tripartite entanglement for a nano-scale d-wave superconductor is better than for a bulk d-wave superconductor. - Abstract: By approximating the energy gap, entering nano-size effect via gap fluctuation and calculating the Green's functions and the space-spin density matrix, the dependence of quantum correlation (entanglement, discord and tripartite entanglement) on the relative distance of two electron spins forming Cooper pairs, the energy gap and the length of bulk and nano interacting Fermi system (a nodal d-wave superconductor) is determined. In contrast to a s-wave superconductor, quantum correlation of the system is sensitive to the change of the gap magnitude and strongly depends on the length of the grain. Also, quantum discord oscillates. Furthermore, the entanglement length and the correlation length are investigated. Discord becomes zero at a characteristic length of the d-wave superconductor.

  9. Internal service quality by integrated approach Performance Control Matrix (PCM & Importance-Satisfaction Model (Studied in Yazd Regional Power Company

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeid Peirow

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Today, the internal service quality as one of the most important factors affecting the recruitment and retention of staff is considered. The present study sought to examine the internal service quality of Yazd Regional Electric, finally, select appropriate strategies to improve the quality of local services in the organization. The application of this study is base on survey method.Data were collected from questionnaires to evaluate the 26 components of internal service quality of Yazd Regional Electric, has been used. Research community is the staff of the organisation.Also, the sample size, the initial questionnaire was distributed according to Cochran's formula is calculated.In order to analyze research data, the model is important - satisfaction and performance control matrix to identify those components that are used need to be improved.Also, in order to prioritize measures to improve employee satisfaction index is used. Data analysis using above tools show, 8 criteria are in improvment area. So, these criteria are prioritized with ESI.

  10. Pneumococcal Predictive Proteins Selected by Microbial Genomic Approach Are Serotype Cross-Reactive and Bind to Host Extracellular Matrix Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argondizzo, Ana Paula Corrêa; Rocha-de-Souza, Cláudio Marcos; de Almeida Santiago, Marta; Galler, Ricardo; Reis, Joice Neves; Medeiros, Marco Alberto

    2017-08-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a colonizer of the human nasopharynx, which accounts for most of the community-acquired pneumonia cases and can cause non-invasive and invasive diseases. Current available vaccines are serotype-specific and the use of recombinant proteins associated with virulence is an alternative to compose vaccines and to overcome these problems. In a previous work, we describe the identification of proteins in S. pneumoniae by reverse vaccinology and the genetic diversity of these proteins in clinical isolates. It was possible to purify a half of 20 selected proteins in soluble form. The expression of these proteins on the pneumococcal cells surface was confirmed by flow cytometry. We demonstrated that some of these proteins were able to bind to extracellular matrix proteins and were recognized by sera from patients with pneumococcal meningitis infection caused by several pneumococcal serotypes. In this context, our results suggest that these proteins may play a role in pneumococcal pathogenesis and might be considered as potential vaccine candidates.

  11. A Chain Modeling Approach To Estimate the Impact of Soil Cadmium Pollution on Human Dietary Exposure

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Franz, Eelco; Romkens, Paul; van Raamsdonk, Leo; van der Fels-Klerx, Ine

    2008-01-01

    .... The extent of accumulation depends strongly on soil type and the degree of pollution. The objective of the present study was to develop a predictive model to estimate human dietary cadmium exposure from soil characteristics...

  12. A structured approach to modelling the effects of binary exposure variables over the life course

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mishra, Gita; Nitsch, Dorothea; Black, Stephanie; De Stavola, Bianca; Kuh, Diana; Hardy, Rebecca

    2009-01-01

    .... This accumulation hypothesis is usually tested by summing indicators of binary variables across the life span to form an overall score that is then used as the exposure in regression models for health outcomes...

  13. An Engineering Approach to Management of Occupational and Community Noise Exposure at NASA Lewis Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Beth A.

    1997-01-01

    Workplace and environmental noise issues at NASA Lewis Research Center are effectively managed via a three-part program that addresses hearing conservation, community noise control, and noise control engineering. The Lewis Research Center Noise Exposure Management Program seeks to limit employee noise exposure and maintain community acceptance for critical research while actively pursuing engineered controls for noise generated by more than 100 separate research facilities and the associated services required for their operation.

  14. Chemical-induced asthma and the role of clinical, toxicological, exposure and epidemiological research in regulatory and hazard characterization approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Melissa J; Bernstein, Jonathan A; Basketter, David; LaKind, Judy S; Dotson, G Scott; Maier, Andrew

    2017-11-01

    Uncertainties in understanding all potential modes-of-action for asthma induction and elicitation hinders design of hazard characterization and risk assessment methods that adequately screen and protect against hazardous chemical exposures. To address this challenge and identify current research needs, the University of Cincinnati and the American Cleaning Institute hosted a webinar series to discuss the current state-of-science regarding chemical-induced asthma. The general consensus is that the available database, comprised of data collected from routine clinical and validated toxicological tests, is inadequate for predicting or determining causal relationships between exposures and asthma induction for most allergens. More research is needed to understand the mechanism of asthma induction and elicitation in the context of specific chemical exposures and exposure patterns, and the impact of population variability and patient phenotypes. Validated tools to predict respiratory sensitization and to translate irritancy assays to asthma potency are needed, in addition to diagnostic biomarkers that assess and differentiate allergy versus irritant-based asthmatic responses. Diagnostic methods that encompass the diverse etiologies of asthmatic responses and incorporate robust exposure measurements capable of capturing different temporal patterns of complex chemical mixtures are needed. In the absence of ideal tools, risk assessors apply hazard-based safety assessment methods, in conjunction with active risk management, to limit potential asthma concerns, proactively identify new concerns, and ensure deployment of approaches to mitigate asthma-related risks. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Occupational exposure to neurotoxic substances in Asian countries - challenges and approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-Baron, Monika; Kim, Eun A; Nuwayhid, Iman; Ichihara, Gaku; Kang, Seong-Kyu

    2012-08-01

    The fact that a conference on neurotoxicity was held in China triggered the idea to provide an insight into occupational diseases, their development and the approaches to investigate them in Asian countries. A historical review, a meta-analysis, and studies on humans and animals provide impressions on past and current problems. The Korean example showed that each newly introduced industry is accompanied by its own problems as regards occupational diseases. Mercury and carbon disulfide were of importance in the beginning, whereas solvents and manganese became important later. Outbreaks of diseases were important reasons to guide both the public and the governmental attention to prevention and allowed within a relatively short time considerable progress. As the example on the replacement of 2-bromopropane by 1-bromopropane showed, also the introduction of chemicals that are more beneficial for the environment may result in additional occupational risks. A lower mutagenicity of 1-bromopopane was shown to be associated with a greater neurotoxicity in Japanese studies. Although occupational health and diseases are commonly related to adults, child workers exposed to solvents were examined in a Lebanese study. The study started outlining the health hazards in young workers because they might be at a much greater risk due to the not yet completed maturation of their nervous system. That some occupational diseases are not yet a focus of prevention was shown by the study on pesticides. If at all, the serious health consequences resulting from excessive exposure were investigated. Research enabling precautionary actions was not available from the international literature. Despite globalization the knowledge on occupational diseases is not yet "globalized" and each country obviously undergoes its own development triggered by local experiences. Economic development that requires a healthy workforce, but also public interest that challenges governmental regulations further

  16. Inverse modeling of rainfall infiltration with a dual permeability approach using different matrix-fracture coupling variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blöcher, Johanna; Kuraz, Michal

    2017-04-01

    In this contribution we propose implementations of the dual permeability model with different inter-domain exchange descriptions and metaheuristic optimization algorithms for parameter identification and mesh optimization. We compare variants of the coupling term with different numbers of parameters to test if a reduction of parameters is feasible. This can reduce parameter uncertainty in inverse modeling, but also allow for different conceptual models of the domain and matrix coupling. The different variants of the dual permeability model are implemented in the open-source objective library DRUtES written in FORTRAN 2003/2008 in 1D and 2D. For parameter identification we use adaptations of the particle swarm optimization (PSO) and Teaching-learning-based optimization (TLBO), which are population-based metaheuristics with different learning strategies. These are high-level stochastic-based search algorithms that don't require gradient information or a convex search space. Despite increasing computing power and parallel processing, an overly fine mesh is not feasible for parameter identification. This creates the need to find a mesh that optimizes both accuracy and simulation time. We use a bi-objective PSO algorithm to generate a Pareto front of optimal meshes to account for both objectives. The dual permeability model and the optimization algorithms were tested on virtual data and field TDR sensor readings. The TDR sensor readings showed a very steep increase during rapid rainfall events and a subsequent steep decrease. This was theorized to be an effect of artificial macroporous envelopes surrounding TDR sensors creating an anomalous region with distinct local soil hydraulic properties. One of our objectives is to test how well the dual permeability model can describe this infiltration behavior and what coupling term would be most suitable.

  17. The theoretical study of passive and active optical devices via planewave based transfer (scattering) matrix method and other approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuo, Ye [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis, we theoretically study the electromagnetic wave propagation in several passive and active optical components and devices including 2-D photonic crystals, straight and curved waveguides, organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs), and etc. Several optical designs are also presented like organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells and solar concentrators. The first part of the thesis focuses on theoretical investigation. First, the plane-wave-based transfer (scattering) matrix method (TMM) is briefly described with a short review of photonic crystals and other numerical methods to study them (Chapter 1 and 2). Next TMM, the numerical method itself is investigated in details and developed in advance to deal with more complex optical systems. In chapter 3, TMM is extended in curvilinear coordinates to study curved nanoribbon waveguides. The problem of a curved structure is transformed into an equivalent one of a straight structure with spatially dependent tensors of dielectric constant and magnetic permeability. In chapter 4, a new set of localized basis orbitals are introduced to locally represent electromagnetic field in photonic crystals as alternative to planewave basis. The second part of the thesis focuses on the design of optical devices. First, two examples of TMM applications are given. The first example is the design of metal grating structures as replacements of ITO to enhance the optical absorption in OPV cells (chapter 6). The second one is the design of the same structure as above to enhance the light extraction of OLEDs (chapter 7). Next, two design examples by ray tracing method are given, including applying a microlens array to enhance the light extraction of OLEDs (chapter 5) and an all-angle wide-wavelength design of solar concentrator (chapter 8). In summary, this dissertation has extended TMM which makes it capable of treating complex optical systems. Several optical designs by TMM and ray tracing method are also given as a full complement of this

  18. Matrix calculus

    CERN Document Server

    Bodewig, E

    1959-01-01

    Matrix Calculus, Second Revised and Enlarged Edition focuses on systematic calculation with the building blocks of a matrix and rows and columns, shunning the use of individual elements. The publication first offers information on vectors, matrices, further applications, measures of the magnitude of a matrix, and forms. The text then examines eigenvalues and exact solutions, including the characteristic equation, eigenrows, extremum properties of the eigenvalues, bounds for the eigenvalues, elementary divisors, and bounds for the determinant. The text ponders on approximate solutions, as well

  19. Predicting the radiation exposure of terrestrial wildlife in the Chernobyl exclusion zone : an international comparison of approaches.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beresford, N. A.; Barnett, C. L.; Brown, J. E.; Cheng, J.-J.; Copplestone, D.; Gaschak, S.; Hosseini, A.; Howard, B. J.; Kamboj, S.; Nedveckaite, T.; Olyslaegers, G.; Smith, J. T.; Vives i Batlle, J.; Vives-Lynch, S.; Yu, C.; Environmental Science Division; Centre for Ecology and Hydrology; Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority; England and Wales Environment Agency; International Radioecology Lab.; Inst. of Physics, Radiation Protection,; Belgian Nuclear Research Centre; Univ. of Portsmouth; Westlakes Research Inst.

    2010-06-09

    There is now general acknowledgement that there is a requirement to demonstrate that species other than humans are protected from anthropogenic releases of radioactivity. A number of approaches have been developed for estimating the exposure of wildlife and some of these are being used to conduct regulatory assessments. There is a requirement to compare the outputs of such approaches against available data sets to ensure that they are robust and fit for purpose. In this paper we describe the application of seven approaches for predicting the whole-body ({sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 241}Am and Pu isotope) activity concentrations and absorbed dose rates for a range of terrestrial species within the Chernobyl exclusion zone. Predictions are compared against available measurement data, including estimates of external dose rate recorded by thermoluminescent dosimeters attached to rodent species. Potential reasons for differences between predictions between the various approaches and the available data are explored.

  20. Predicting the radiation exposure of terrestrial wildlife in the Chernobyl exclusion zone: an international comparison of approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beresford, N A; Barnett, C L; Howard, B J [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology Lancaster, Lancaster Environment Centre, Library Avenue, Bailrigg, Lancaster LA1 4AP (United Kingdom); Brown, J E; Hosseini, A [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, Department of Emergency Preparedness and Environmental Radioactivity, Grini naeringspark 13, Postbox 55, No-1332 Oesteras (Norway); Cheng, J-J; Kamboj, S; Yu, C [Argonne National Laboratory, Building 900, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439-4832 (United States); Copplestone, D [England and Wales Environment Agency, Richard Fairclough House, Knutsford Road, Warrington, Cheshire WA4 1HG (United Kingdom); Gaschak, S [International Radioecology Laboratory (Ukraine); Nedveckaite, T [Institute of Physics, Radiation Protection, Savanoriu Avenue 231, LT-02053 Vilnius (Lithuania); Olyslaegers, G [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, SCK.CEN, Radioecology Section, Radiation Protection Department, Boeretang 200, B-2400, Mol (Belgium); Smith, J T [School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Portsmouth, Burnaby Building, Burnaby Road, Portsmouth PO1 3QL (United Kingdom); Vives i Batlle, J; Vives-Lynch, S, E-mail: nab@ceh.ac.u [Westlakes Research Institute, Westlakes Scientific Consulting Ltd., The Princess Royal Building, Westlakes Science and Technology Park, Moor Row, Cumbria, CA24 3LN (United Kingdom)

    2010-06-15

    There is now general acknowledgement that there is a requirement to demonstrate that species other than humans are protected from anthropogenic releases of radioactivity. A number of approaches have been developed for estimating the exposure of wildlife and some of these are being used to conduct regulatory assessments. There is a requirement to compare the outputs of such approaches against available data sets to ensure that they are robust and fit for purpose. In this paper we describe the application of seven approaches for predicting the whole-body ({sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 241}Am and Pu isotope) activity concentrations and absorbed dose rates for a range of terrestrial species within the Chernobyl exclusion zone. Predictions are compared against available measurement data, including estimates of external dose rate recorded by thermoluminescent dosimeters attached to rodent species. Potential reasons for differences between predictions between the various approaches and the available data are explored.

  1. A quantitative screening-level approach to incorporate chemical exposure and risk into alternative assessment evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Scott M; Greggs, Bill; Goyak, Katy O; Landenberger, Bryce D; Mason, Ann M; Howard, Brett; Zaleski, Rosemary T

    2017-11-01

    As the general public and retailers ask for disclosure of chemical ingredients in the marketplace, a number of hazard screening tools were developed to evaluate the so-called "greenness" of individual chemical ingredients and/or formulations. The majority of these tools focus only on hazard, often using chemical lists, ignoring the other part of the risk equation: exposure. Using a hazard-only focus can result in regrettable substitutions, changing 1 chemical ingredient for another that turns out to be more hazardous or shifts the toxicity burden to others. To minimize the incidents of regrettable substitutions, BizNGO describes "Common Principles" to frame a process for informed substitution. Two of these 6 principles are: "reduce hazard" and "minimize exposure." A number of frameworks have emerged to evaluate and assess alternatives. One framework developed by leading experts under the auspices of the US National Academy of Sciences recommended that hazard and exposure be specifically addressed in the same step when assessing candidate alternatives. For the alternative assessment community, this article serves as an informational resource for considering exposure in an alternatives assessment using elements of problem formulation; product identity, use, and composition; hazard analysis; exposure analysis; and risk characterization. These conceptual elements build on practices from government, academia, and industry and are exemplified through 2 hypothetical case studies demonstrating the questions asked and decisions faced in new product development. These 2 case studies-inhalation exposure to a generic paint product and environmental exposure to a shampoo rinsed down the drain-demonstrate the criteria, considerations, and methods required to combine exposure models addressing human health and environmental impacts to provide a screening level hazard and exposure (risk) analysis. This article informs practices for these elements within a comparative risk context

  2. Inhibitory learning approaches to exposure therapy: A critical review and translation to obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacoby, Ryan J; Abramowitz, Jonathan S

    2016-11-01

    The majority of treatment research on OCD has focused on pre/post treatment efficacy of exposure-based interventions, with less attention directed towards (a) understanding mechanisms of change, and (b) maximizing long-term effectiveness. Inhibitory learning theory (ILT) provides a novel foundation for understanding how exposure therapy reduces fear. Moreover, ILT is consistent with empirical evidence that raises questions about the more traditional (i.e., habituation) explanation for exposure therapy's efficacy. Yet ILT has yet to be applied to understanding the treatment of OCD and its heterogeneity. The current review is an examination of human experimental research on ILT that seeks to translate laboratory findings on fear extinction to exposure therapy across empirically established OCD symptom dimensions. We provide an up-to-date critical review of the existing evidence for a series of strategies derived from ILT that have been proposed for the treatment of fear, discuss the limitations of existing studies, and provide suggestions for future research within this rapidly accelerating area of study. We also offer conceptual considerations for applying these principles to the treatment of OCD symptom dimensions. A common theme is the idea of introducing "desirable difficulties" into the implementation of exposure in order to foster more durable long-term learning. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Late health effects of radiation exposure: new statistical, epidemiological, and biological approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Peter; Stram, Daniel O

    2013-08-01

    The 2012 Conference on Radiation and Health in Kennebunkport, Maine, USA, brought together epidemiologists, statisticians, basic scientists, and clinical scientists interested in the health effects of radiation exposure due to medical, diagnostic, occupational, and non-medical sources, to review the current status of epidemiologic and clinical research on radiation exposure in relation to risk of breast, thyroid cancer, and leukemia, cardiopulmonary events, and other late effects. Topics discussed included synergy between radiation exposure and genetic background; late effects of radiation therapy in childhood cancer survivors and several other medically exposed cohorts; leukemia risk seen in Russian and Chernobyl studies, and leukemia risk from computed tomography scans in childhood. This report summarizes the presentations at the meeting and discusses their significance in light of earlier studies and of other ongoing research.

  4. Bio-inspired approach of the fluorescence emission properties in the scarabaeid beetle Hoplia coerulea (Coleoptera): Modeling by transfer-matrix optical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hooijdonk, Eloise; Berthier, Serge; Vigneron, Jean-Pol

    2012-12-01

    Scales of the scarabaeid beetle Hoplia coerulea (Coleoptera) contain fluorescent molecules embedded in a multilayer structure. The consequence of this source confinement is a modification of the fluorescence properties, i.e., an enhancement or inhibition of the emission of certain wavelengths. In this work, we propose a bio-inspired approach to this problem. In other words, we use numerical simulations based on the one-dimensional transfer-matrix formalism to investigate the influence of a Hoplia-like system on emission characteristics and, from the results, we deduce potential technical applications. We reveal that depending on the choice of some parameters (layer thickness, dielectric constant, and position of the emitting source in the structure), it is possible to enhance or inhibit the fluorescence emission for certain wavelengths. This observation could be of great interest to design new optical devices in the field of optoelectronic, solar cells, biosensors, etc.

  5. Modified Kocher-Langenbeck approach in combined surgical exposures for acetabular fractures management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narender Kumar Magu

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: We believe that modified K-L approach may be a good alternative for the standard K-L approach in the management of elementary fractures and associated fractures of the acetabulum when combined with an anterior surgical approach. It makes the procedure less invasive, shortens the operative time, minimizes blood loss and overcomes the exhaustion and fatigue of the surgical team.

  6. Stoichiometry of hydrological C, N, and P losses across climate and geology: An environmental matrix approach across New Zealand primary forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGroddy, M. E.; Baisden, W. T.; Hedin, L. O.

    2008-03-01

    Hydrologic losses can play a key role in regulating ecosystem nutrient balances, particularly in regions where baseline nutrient cycles are not augmented by industrial deposition. We used first-order streams to integrate hydrologic losses at the watershed scale across unpolluted old-growth forests in New Zealand. We employed a matrix approach to resolve how stream water concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), organic and inorganic nitrogen (DON and DIN), and organic and inorganic phosphorus (DOP and DIP) varied as a function of landscape differences in climate and geology. We found stream water total dissolved nitrogen (TDN) to be dominated by organic forms (medians for DON, 81.3%, nitrate-N, 12.6%, and ammonium-N, 3.9%). The median stream water DOC:TDN:TDP molar ratio of 1050:21:1 favored C slightly over N and P when compared to typical temperate forest foliage ratios. Using the full set of variables in a multiple regression approach explained approximately half of the variability in DON, DOC, and TDP concentrations. Building on this approach we combined a simplified set of variables with a simple water balance model in a regression designed to predict DON export at larger spatial scales. Incorporating the effects of climate and geologic variables on nutrient exports will greatly aid the development of integrated Earth-climate biogeochemical models which are able to take into account multiple element dynamics and complex natural landscapes.

  7. Bio-monitoring of mycotoxin exposure in Cameroon using a urinary multi-biomarker approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abia, Wilfred A; Warth, Benedikt; Sulyok, Michael; Krska, Rudolf; Tchana, Angele; Njobeh, Patrick B; Turner, Paul C; Kouanfack, Charles; Eyongetah, Mbu; Dutton, Mike; Moundipa, Paul F

    2013-12-01

    Bio-monitoring of human exposure to mycotoxin has mostly been limited to a few individually measured mycotoxin biomarkers. This study aimed to determine the frequency and level of exposure to multiple mycotoxins in human urine from Cameroonian adults. 175 Urine samples (83% from HIV-positive individuals) and food frequency questionnaire responses were collected from consenting Cameroonians, and analyzed for 15 mycotoxins and relevant metabolites using LC-ESI-MS/MS. In total, eleven analytes were detected individually or in combinations in 110/175 (63%) samples including the biomarkers aflatoxin M1, fumonisin B1, ochratoxin A and total deoxynivalenol. Additionally, important mycotoxins and metabolites thereof, such as fumonisin B2, nivalenol and zearalenone, were determined, some for the first time in urine following dietary exposures. Multi-mycotoxin contamination was common with one HIV-positive individual exposed to five mycotoxins, a severe case of co-exposure that has never been reported in adults before. For the first time in Africa or elsewhere, this study quantified eleven mycotoxin biomarkers and bio-measures in urine from adults. For several mycotoxins estimates indicate that the tolerable daily intake is being exceeded in this study population. Given that many mycotoxins adversely affect the immune system, future studies will examine whether combinations of mycotoxins negatively impact Cameroonian population particularly immune-suppressed individuals. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Dietary exposure of Brazilian consumers to dithiocarbamate pesticides : a probabilistic approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caldas, E.D.; Tressou, J.; Boon, P.E.

    2006-01-01

    A probabilistic estimation of the exposure of the Brazilian population to the dithiocarbamate pesticides was performed using the Monte Carlo Risk Assessment program (MCRA 3.5). Residue data, as CS(2), for 3821 samples were obtained from the Brazilian national monitoring program on pesticide residues

  9. A Chain Modeling Approach To Estimate the Impact of Soil Cadmium Pollution on Human Dietary Exposure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franz, E.; Romkens, P.F.A.M.; Raamsdonk, van L.W.D.; Fels-Klerx, van der H.J.

    2008-01-01

    Cadmium in soil poses a risk for human health, due to its accumulation in food and feed crops. The extent of accumulation depends strongly on soil type and the degree of pollution. The objective of the present study was to develop a predictive model to estimate human dietary cadmium exposure from

  10. Beyond Exposure: A Person-Oriented Approach to Adolescent Media Diets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schooler, Deborah; Sorsoli, C. Lynn; Kim, Janna L.; Tolman, Deborah L.

    2009-01-01

    Research on adolescents' use of sexual media has been dominated by a variable-oriented perspective, focusing on incremental effects of media exposure on sexual behavior. The present investigation examines the ways in which adolescents select and organize their television viewing. This study used cluster analysis to identify, validate, and describe…

  11. A global approach for assessment of exposure to road traffic noise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dittrich, M.G.

    2012-01-01

    The noise mapping performed for the Environmental Noise Directive is used to evaluate noise exposure of the population. This requires a significant effort and consistent data collection and application of calculation methods. It is well known that considerable variation in noise mapping results can

  12. Approach to setting occupational exposure limits for sensory irritants in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feron, V.J.; Arts, J.H.E.; Mojet, J.

    2001-01-01

    This article describes how scientists in the Netherlands set occupational exposure limits (OELs) for sensory irritants. When they tackle this issue, a number of key questions need to be answered. For example, did the studies indeed measure sensory irritation and not cytotoxicity? When the irritant

  13. The Heat Exposure Integrated Deprivation Index (HEIDI): A data-driven approach to quantifying neighborhood risk during extreme hot weather.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krstic, Nikolas; Yuchi, Weiran; Ho, Hung Chak; Walker, Blake B; Knudby, Anders J; Henderson, Sarah B

    2017-12-01

    Mortality attributable to extreme hot weather is a growing concern in many urban environments, and spatial heat vulnerability indexes are often used to identify areas at relatively higher and lower risk. Three indexes were developed for greater Vancouver, Canada using a pool of 20 potentially predictive variables categorized to reflect social vulnerability, population density, temperature exposure, and urban form. One variable was chosen from each category: an existing deprivation index, senior population density, apparent temperature, and road density, respectively. The three indexes were constructed from these variables using (1) unweighted, (2) weighted, and (3) data-driven Heat Exposure Integrated Deprivation Index (HEIDI) approaches. The performance of each index was assessed using mortality data from 1998-2014, and the maps were compared with respect to spatial patterns identified. The population-weighted spatial correlation between the three indexes ranged from 0.68-0.89. The HEIDI approach produced a graduated map of vulnerability, whereas the other approaches primarily identified areas of highest risk. All indexes performed best under extreme temperatures, but HEIDI was more useful at lower thresholds. Each of the indexes in isolation provides valuable information for public health protection, but combining the HEIDI approach with unweighted and weighted methods provides richer information about areas most vulnerable to heat. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Delineamento e validação de matriz de exposição ocupacional à sílica Design and validation of a job-exposure matrix to silica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fátima Sueli Neto Ribeiro

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Desenvolver matriz de exposição ocupacional de base populacional para a sílica cristalina no Brasil e estimar sua validade. MÉTODOS: A matriz de exposição ocupacional foi desenvolvida por um epidemiologista e um higienista ocupacional em quatro etapas: a codificação da variável ocupação; b codificação da variável setor econômico; c classificação da exposição por consenso entre os pesquisadores e; d estimativa do número de trabalhadores registrados, em 1995, para cada nível de exposição. As 8.675 células da matriz, formadas pela intersecção das variáveis setor econômico (25 colunas e ocupação (347 linhas, foram classificadas de acordo com a freqüência da exposição à sílica em quatro níveis: não expostos, possivelmente expostos, provavelmente expostos e definitivamente expostos. Para a validação da matriz de exposição ocupacional, cinco setores econômicos (extração mineral, construção civil, metalurgia, administração de serviços de pessoal técnico e indústria têxtil foram re-codificados quanto à exposição por peritos convidados. Avaliou-se a confiabilidade pela proporção de acordos e o grau de concordância pelo Kappa. RESULTADOS: A matriz de exposição ocupacional apresentou alta concordância geral, variando de 64,0% na metalurgia a 94,4% na extração mineral. O Kappa revelou boa concordância no setor de extração mineral (0,9 e baixa ou regular nos demais (variação de 0,1 a 0,5. A especificidade foi alta para os setores de metalurgia (86,5% e extração mineral (100,0%. A construção civil apresentou especificidade de 56,0%. CONCLUSÕES: A matriz de exposição ocupacional apresentou boa acurácia, revelando-se adequada para estimar a exposição à sílica na força de trabalho ocupada no País.OBJECTIVE: To develop a population-based matrix of job-exposure to crystalline silica in Brazil and to estimate its validity. METHODS: An epidemiologist and an industrial

  15. Tissue engineering human small-caliber autologous vessels using a xenogenous decellularized connective tissue matrix approach: preclinical comparative biomechanical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heine, Jörg; Schmiedl, Andreas; Cebotari, Serghei; Karck, Matthias; Mertsching, Heike; Haverich, Axel; Kallenbach, Klaus

    2011-10-01

    Suggesting that bioartificial vascular scaffolds cannot but tissue-engineered vessels can withstand biomechanical stress, we developed in vitro methods for preclinical biological material testings. The aim of the study was to evaluate the influence of revitalization of xenogenous scaffolds on biomechanical stability of tissue-engineered vessels. For measurement of radial distensibility, a salt-solution inflation method was used. The longitudinal tensile strength test (DIN 50145) was applied on bone-shaped specimen: tensile/tear strength (SigmaB/R), elongation at maximum yield stress/rupture (DeltaB/R), and modulus of elasticity were determined of native (NAs; n = 6), decellularized (DAs; n = 6), and decellularized carotid arteries reseeded with human vascular smooth muscle cells and human vascular endothelial cells (RAs; n = 7). Radial distensibility of DAs was significantly lower (113%) than for NAs (135%) (P caliber vascular graft testing, this study proved that revitalization of decellularized connective tissue scaffolds led to vascular graft stability able to withstand biomechanical stress mimicking the human circulation. This tissue engineering approach provides a sufficiently stable autologized graft. © 2011, Copyright the Authors. Artificial Organs © 2011, International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. A Geographic Approach to Modelling Human Exposure to Traffic Air Pollution using GIS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, S. S.

    and street (road user exposure) may be considered. The model estimates outdoor levels for selected ambient air pollutants (benzene, CO, NO2 and O3). The influence of outdoor air pollution on indoor levels can be estimated using average I/O-ratios. The model has a very high spatial resolution (the address......) for generation of inputs, for visualisation of input and output, and uses available digital maps, national administrative registers and a local traffic database, and the Danish Operational Street Pollution Model (OSPM). The Municipality of Middelfart has been used as a case study area to develop and demonstrate...... the exposure model. Input requirements are: digital maps including buildings, geocoded addresses, geocoded roads, geocoded cadastres; data from the Building and Dwelling Register (BBR); traffic data (ADT of passenger cars, van, lorries and busses) for linking to a segmented road network; population data...

  17. Forecasting human exposure to atmospheric pollutants in Portugal - A modelling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrego, C.; Sá, E.; Monteiro, A.; Ferreira, J.; Miranda, A. I.

    2009-12-01

    Air pollution has become one main environmental concern because of its known impact on human health. Aiming to inform the population about the air they are breathing, several air quality modelling systems have been developed and tested allowing the assessment and forecast of air pollution ambient levels in many countries. However, every day, an individual is exposed to different concentrations of atmospheric pollutants as he/she moves from and to different outdoor and indoor places (the so-called microenvironments). Therefore, a more efficient way to prevent the population from the health risks caused by air pollution should be based on exposure rather than air concentrations estimations. The objective of the present study is to develop a methodology to forecast the human exposure of the Portuguese population based on the air quality forecasting system available and validated for Portugal since 2005. Besides that, a long-term evaluation of human exposure estimates aims to be obtained using one-year of this forecasting system application. Additionally, a hypothetical 50% emission reduction scenario has been designed and studied as a contribution to study emission reduction strategies impact on human exposure. To estimate the population exposure the forecasting results of the air quality modelling system MM5-CHIMERE have been combined with the population spatial distribution over Portugal and their time-activity patterns, i.e. the fraction of the day time spent in specific indoor and outdoor places. The population characterization concerning age, work, type of occupation and related time spent was obtained from national census and available enquiries performed by the National Institute of Statistics. A daily exposure estimation module has been developed gathering all these data and considering empirical indoor/outdoor relations from literature to calculate the indoor concentrations in each one of the microenvironments considered, namely home, office/school, and other

  18. Effects of the Exposure to Corrosive Salts on the Frictional Behavior of Gray Cast Iron and a Titanium-Based Metal Matrix Composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blau, Peter Julian [ORNL; Truhan, Jr., John J [ORNL; Kenik, Edward A [ORNL

    2007-01-01

    The introduction of increasingly aggressive road-deicing chemicals has created significant and costly corrosion problems for the trucking industry. From a tribological perspective, corrosion of the sliding surfaces of brakes after exposure to road salts can create oxide scales on the surfaces that affect friction. This paper describes experiments on the effects of exposure to sodium chloride and magnesium chloride sprays on the transient frictional behavior of cast iron and a titanium-based composite sliding against a commercial brake lining material. Corrosion scales on cast iron initially act as abrasive third-bodies, then they become crushed, spread out, and behave as a solid lubricant. The composition and subsurface microstructures of the corrosion products on the cast iron were analyzed. Owing to its greater corrosion resistance, the titanium composite remained scale-free and its frictional response was markedly different. No corrosion scales were formed on the titanium composite after aggressive exposure to salts; however, a reduction in friction was still observed. Unlike the crystalline sodium chloride deposits that tended to remain dry, hygroscopic magnesium chloride deposits absorbed ambient moisture from the air, liquefied, and retained a persistent lubricating effect on the titanium surfaces.

  19. Wheat chronic exposure to TiO2-nanoparticles: Cyto- and genotoxic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Sónia; Craveiro, Sandra C; Oliveira, Helena; Calado, António J; Pinto, Ricardo J B; Silva, Artur M S; Santos, Conceição

    2017-12-01

    This study investigates the phytotoxicity of chronic exposure (up to 20 d) of different TiO2 nanoparticles (TiO2-NP) concentrations (5, 50, 150 mg L-1) in Triticum aestivum. Germination was not affected by TiO2-NP exposure and seedling shoot length (3 d) was enhanced. Contrarily, plants' shoot growth (20 d) was impaired. Effects on membrane permeability and total antioxidant capacity in TiO2-NP chronic exposure were organ dependent: increased in leaves and decreased in roots. Roots also showed lower levels of lipid peroxidation. Flow cytometry revealed no changes in ploidy levels as well as in the cell cycle dynamics for both organs. However, TiO2-NP induced clastogenic effects in roots with increases in micronucleated cells in root tips in a dose dependent manner. Also, increases of DNA single/double strand breaks were found in leaves, and effects were similar to all doses. Ti uptake and translocation to leaves were confirmed by ICP-MS, which was dependent on NP concentration. Overall, these data indicate that TiO2-NP phytotoxicity is more severe after longer exposure periods, higher doses and more severe for shoots than roots. The observed effects are a result of both direct and indirect (oxidative stress and/or water imbalances) action of TiO2-NP. Additionally, results highlight the negative impact that TiO2-NP may have on crop growth and production and to the risk of trophic transfer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Examining Patterns of Exposure to Family Violence in Preschool Children: A Latent Class Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasso, Damion J; Petitclerc, Amélie; Henry, David B; McCarthy, Kimberly J; Wakschlag, Lauren S; Briggs-Gowan, Margaret J

    2016-12-01

    Young children can experience violence directly or indirectly in the home, with some children exposed to multiple forms of violence. These polyvictims often experience violence that is severe, chronic, and multifaceted. The current study used latent class analysis to identify and examine the pattern of profiles of exposure to family violence (i.e., violence directed towards the child and between caregivers) among a sample of 474 children ages 3-6 year who were drawn from the Multidimensional Assessment of Preschoolers Study (Wakschlag et al., 2014). The data yielded 3 classes: a polyvictimized class (n = 72; 15.2%) with high probability of exposure to all forms of violence, a harsh parenting class (n = 235; 49.5%), distinguished mainly by child-directed physical discipline in the absence of more severe forms of violence, and a low-exposure class (n = 167; 35.2%). Classes were differentiated by contextual factors, maternal characteristics, and mother-reported and observational indicators of parenting and child functioning with most effect sizes between medium and large. These findings add to emerging evidence linking polyvictimization to impaired caregiving and adverse psychological outcomes for children and offer important insight for prevention and intervention for this vulnerable population. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies.

  1. Response of Pinus sylvestris roots to sheet-erosion exposure: an anatomical approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Diez-Herrero

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Anatomical changes of exposed tree roots are valuable tools to date erosion events, but the responses of diverse species under different types of erosion need still to be studied in detail. In this paper we analyze the histological changes that occur in roots of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L. subjected to continuous denudation. A descriptive and quantitative study was conducted in the Senda Schmidt, a popular trail located on the northern slope of the Sierra de Guadarrama (Central Iberian System, Spain. Measurement of significant parameters allowed the moment of exposure of the roots to be identified. These parameters were: a width of the growth ring; b number of cells per ring; c percentage of latewood and d diameter of cellular light in earlywood. A one-way analysis ANOVA was also carried out in order to establish statistically significant differences between homogeneous groups of measurements in pre-exposed and exposed roots. Based on these analyses, Scots pine roots show a remarkable anatomical response to sheet-erosion exposure. Increased growth in the ring is accompanied by a slight reduction of the cell lumina of the earlywood tracheids. At the end of the ring, several rows of thick-walled tracheids define latewood tissue and visible annual borders very clearly. Furthermore, resin ducts often appear in tangential rows, increasing resin density in the tissue. All of these indicators made it possible to determine with precision the first year of exposure and to estimate precisely sheet erosion rates.

  2. Effects of ethanol exposure during adolescence or in adulthood on Pavlovian conditioned approach in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClory, Alexander James; Spear, Linda Patia

    2014-12-01

    Human studies have shown that adolescents who repeatedly use alcohol are more likely to be dependent on alcohol and are more likely to suffer from psychological problems later in life. There has been limited research examining how ethanol exposure in adolescence might contribute to later abuse or addiction in adulthood. The present experiment examined effects of intermittent ethanol exposure during adolescence on sign-tracking behavior in adulthood, indexed by a Pavlovian conditioned approach (PCA) task wherein an 8s lever presentation served as a cue predicting subsequent delivery of a flavored food pellet. Although no response was required for food delivery, after multiple pairings, 1 of 2 different responses often emerged during the lever presentation: goal tracking (head entries into the food trough) or sign tracking (engagement with the lever when presented). Sign tracking is thought to reflect the attribution of incentive salience to reward-paired cues and has been previously correlated with addiction-like behaviors. Following the last PCA session, blood samples were collected for analysis of post-session corticosterone levels. Sixty-two rats (n = 10-12/group) were pseudo-randomly assigned to 1 of 2 intragastric (i.g.) exposure groups (water or 4 g/kg ethanol) or a non-manipulated (NM) control group. Animals were intubated with ethanol or water every other session from postnatal session (PND) 28-48 or PND 70-90. Rats were then tested in adulthood (PND 71-79 or PND 113-122) on the PCA task. Animals exposed chronically to ethanol during adolescence exhibited significantly higher levels of sign-tracking behavior in adulthood than NM and water-treated animals, and showed higher corticosterone than NM control animals. These effects were not seen after comparable ethanol exposure in adulthood. These results suggest that adolescent alcohol exposure has long-term consequences on the expression of potential addiction-relevant behaviors in adulthood. Copyright © 2014

  3. KANTBP: A program for computing energy levels, reaction matrix and radial wave functions in the coupled-channel hyperspherical adiabatic approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuluunbaatar, O.; Gusev, A. A.; Abrashkevich, A. G.; Amaya-Tapia, A.; Kaschiev, M. S.; Larsen, S. Y.; Vinitsky, S. I.

    2007-10-01

    A FORTRAN 77 program is presented which calculates energy values, reaction matrix and corresponding radial wave functions in a coupled-channel approximation of the hyperspherical adiabatic approach. In this approach, a multi-dimensional Schrödinger equation is reduced to a system of the coupled second-order ordinary differential equations on the finite interval with homogeneous boundary conditions of the third type. The resulting system of radial equations which contains the potential matrix elements and first-derivative coupling terms is solved using high-order accuracy approximations of the finite-element method. As a test desk, the program is applied to the calculation of the energy values and reaction matrix for an exactly solvable 2D-model of three identical particles on a line with pair zero-range potentials. Program summaryProgram title: KANTBP Catalogue identifier: ADZH_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADZH_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 4224 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 31 232 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: FORTRAN 77 Computer: Intel Xeon EM64T, Alpha 21264A, AMD Athlon MP, Pentium IV Xeon, Opteron 248, Intel Pentium IV Operating system: OC Linux, Unix AIX 5.3, SunOS 5.8, Solaris, Windows XP RAM: depends on (a) the number of differential equations; (b) the number and order of finite-elements; (c) the number of hyperradial points; and (d) the number of eigensolutions required. Test run requires 30 MB Classification: 2.1, 2.4 External routines: GAULEG and GAUSSJ [W.H. Press, B.F. Flanery, S.A. Teukolsky, W.T. Vetterley, Numerical Recipes: The Art of Scientific Computing, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1986] Nature of problem: In the hyperspherical adiabatic

  4. A multi-layered risk exposure assessment approach for the shipping industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Vander Hoorn (Stephen); S. Knapp (Sabine)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Shipping activity has increased worldwide and maritime administrations are trying to enhance risk mitigation strategies by using proactive approaches. We present and discuss a conceptual framework to minimize potential harm based on a multi-layered approach which can

  5. Primary human osteoblasts with reduced alkaline phosphatase and matrix mineralization baseline capacity are responsive to extremely low frequency pulsed electromagnetic field exposure — Clinical implication possible

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Ehnert

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available For many years electromagnetic fields (EMFs have been used clinically with various settings as an exogenous stimulation method to promote fracture healing. However, underlying mechanisms of action and EMF parameters responsible for certain effects remain unclear. Our aim was to investigate the influence of defined EMFs on human osteoblasts' and osteoclasts' viability and function. Primary human osteoblasts and osteoclasts were treated 3 times weekly for 21 days during their maturation process using the Somagen® device (Sachtleben GmbH, Hamburg, Germany, generating defined extremely low-frequency pulsed electromagnetic fields (ELF-PEMFs. Certain ELF-PEMF treatment significantly increased the total protein content (up to 66%, mitochondrial activity (up to 91.1% and alkaline phosphatase (AP activity (up to 129.9% of human osteoblasts during the entire differentiation process. Furthermore, ELF-PEMF treatment enhanced formation of mineralized matrix (up to 276%. Interestingly, ELF-PEMF dependent induction of AP activity and matrix mineralization was strongly donor dependent — only osteoblasts with a poor initial osteoblast function responded to the ELF-PEMF treatment. As a possible regulatory mechanism, activation of the ERK1/2 signaling pathway was identified. Maturation of osteoclasts from human monocytes was not affected by the ELF-PEMF treatment. In summary the results indicate that a specific ELF-PEMF treatment with the Somagen® device improves viability and maturation of osteoblasts, while osteoclast viability and maturation was not affected. Hence, ELF-PEMF might represent an interesting adjunct to conventional therapy supporting bone formation during fracture healing or even for the treatment of osteoporosis.

  6. Exposure of a tendon extracellular matrix to synovial fluid triggers endogenous and engrafted cell death: A mechanism for failed healing of intrathecal tendon injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvican, Elaine R; Salavati, Mazdak; Smith, Roger K W; Dudhia, Jayesh

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of normal synovial fluid (SF) on exposed endogenous tendon-derived cells (TDCs) and engrafted mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) within the tendon extracellular matrix. Explants from equine superficial digital flexor (extra-synovial) and deep digital flexor tendons (DDFTs) from the compressed, intra-synovial and the tensile, extra-synovial regions were cultured in allogeneic or autologous SF-media. Human hamstring explants were cultured in allogeneic SF. Explant viability was assessed by staining. Proliferation of equine monolayer MSCs and TDCs in SF-media and co-culture with DDFT explants was determined by alamarblue®. Non-viable Native Tendon matrices (NNTs) were re-populated with MSCs or TDCs and cultured in SF-media. Immunohistochemical staining of tendon sections for the apoptotic proteins caspase-3, -8, and -9 was performed. Contact with autologous or allogeneic SF resulted in rapid death of resident tenocytes in equine and human tendon. SF did not affect the viability of equine epitenon cells, or of MSCs and TDCs in the monolayer or indirect explant co-culture. MSCs and TDCs, engrafted into NNTs, died when cultured in SF. Caspase-3, -8, and -9 expression was the greatest in SDFT explants exposed to allogeneic SF. The efficacy of cells administered intra-synovially for tendon lesion repair is likely to be limited, since once incorporated into the matrix, cells become vlnerable to the adverse effects of SF. These observations could account for the poor success rate of intra-synovial tendon healing following damage to the epitenon and contact with SF, common with most soft tissue intra-synovial pathologies.

  7. Air Pollution and Lung Function in Dutch Children : A Comparison of Exposure Estimates and Associations Based on Land Use Regression and Dispersion Exposure Modeling Approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Meng; Gehring, Ulrike; Hoek, Gerard; Keuken, Menno; Jonkers, Sander; Beelen, Rob; Eeftens, Marloes; Postma, Dirkje S.; Brunekreef, Bert

    BACKGROUND: There is limited knowledge about the extent to which estimates of air pollution effects on health are affected by the choice for a specific exposure model. OBJECTIVES: We aimed to evaluate the correlation between long-term air pollution exposure estimates using two commonly used exposure

  8. Air Pollution and Lung Function in Dutch Children: A Comparison of Exposure Estimates and Associations Based on Land Use Regression and Dispersion Exposure Modeling Approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Meng; Gehring, Ulrike; Hoek, Gerard; Keuken, Menno; Jonkers, Sander; Beelen, Rob; Eeftens, Marloes; Postma, Dirkje S; Brunekreef, Bert

    BACKGROUND: There is limited knowledge about the extent to which estimates of air pollution effects on health are affected by the choice for a specific exposure model. OBJECTIVES: We aimed to evaluate the correlation between long-term air pollution exposure estimates using two commonly used exposure

  9. Immunohistochemical Approach to Study Cylindrospermopsin Distribution in Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus under Different Exposure Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remedios Guzmán-Guillén

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cylindrospermopsin (CYN is a cytotoxic cyanotoxin produced by several species of freshwater cyanobacteria (i.e., Aphanizomenon ovalisporum. CYN is a tricyclic alkaloid combined with a guanidine moiety. It is well known that CYN inhibits both protein and glutathione synthesis, and also induces genotoxicity and the alteration of different oxidative stress biomarkers. Although the liver and kidney appear to be the main target organs for this toxin based on previous studies, CYN also affects other organs. In the present study, we studied the distribution of CYN in fish (Oreochromis niloticus under two different exposure scenarios using immunohistochemical (IHC techniques. In the first method, fish were exposed acutely by intraperitoneal injection or by gavage to 200 µg pure CYN/Kg body weight (bw, and euthanized after 24 h or five days of exposure. In the second method, fish were exposed by immersion to lyophilized A. ovalisporum CYN-producing cells using two concentration levels (10 or 100 µg/L for two different exposure times (7 or 14 days. The IHC was carried out in liver, kidney, intestine, and gills of fish. Results demonstrated a similar pattern of CYN distribution in both experimental methods. The organ that presented the most immunopositive results was the liver, followed by the kidney, intestine, and gills. Moreover, the immunolabeling signal intensified with increasing time in both assays, confirming the delayed toxicity of CYN, and also with the increment of the dose, as it is shown in the sub-chronic assay. Thus, IHC is shown to be a valuable technique to study CYN distribution in these organisms.

  10. A simulation approach to assessing environmental risk of sound exposure to marine mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Carl R; Harris, Catriona M; Milazzo, Lorenzo; Harwood, John; Marshall, Laura; Williams, Rob

    2017-04-01

    Intense underwater sounds caused by military sonar, seismic surveys, and pile driving can harm acoustically sensitive marine mammals. Many jurisdictions require such activities to undergo marine mammal impact assessments to guide mitigation. However, the ability to assess impacts in a rigorous, quantitative way is hindered by large knowledge gaps concerning hearing ability, sensitivity, and behavioral responses to noise exposure. We describe a simulation-based framework, called SAFESIMM (Statistical Algorithms For Estimating the Sonar Influence on Marine Megafauna), that can be used to calculate the numbers of agents (animals) likely to be affected by intense underwater sounds. We illustrate the simulation framework using two species that are likely to be affected by marine renewable energy developments in UK waters: gray seal (Halichoerus grypus) and harbor porpoise (Phocoena phocoena). We investigate three sources of uncertainty: How sound energy is perceived by agents with differing hearing abilities; how agents move in response to noise (i.e., the strength and directionality of their evasive movements); and the way in which these responses may interact with longer term constraints on agent movement. The estimate of received sound exposure level (SEL) is influenced most strongly by the weighting function used to account for the specie's presumed hearing ability. Strongly directional movement away from the sound source can cause modest reductions (~5 dB) in SEL over the short term (periods of less than 10 days). Beyond 10 days, the way in which agents respond to noise exposure has little or no effect on SEL, unless their movements are constrained by natural boundaries. Most experimental studies of noise impacts have been short-term. However, data are needed on long-term effects because uncertainty about predicted SELs accumulates over time. Synthesis and applications. Simulation frameworks offer a powerful way to explore, understand, and estimate effects of

  11. Random matrix theory and multivariate statistics

    OpenAIRE

    Diaz-Garcia, Jose A.; Jáimez, Ramon Gutiérrez

    2009-01-01

    Some tools and ideas are interchanged between random matrix theory and multivariate statistics. In the context of the random matrix theory, classes of spherical and generalised Wishart random matrix ensemble, containing as particular cases the classical random matrix ensembles, are proposed. Some properties of these classes of ensemble are analysed. In addition, the random matrix ensemble approach is extended and a unified theory proposed for the study of distributions for real normed divisio...

  12. Dietary exposure of Brazilian consumers to dithiocarbamate pesticides--a probabilistic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldas, E D; Tressou, J; Boon, P E

    2006-09-01

    A probabilistic estimation of the exposure of the Brazilian population to the dithiocarbamate pesticides was performed using the Monte Carlo Risk Assessment program (MCRA 3.5). Residue data, as CS2, for 3821 samples were obtained from the Brazilian national monitoring program on pesticide residues and from the monitoring program conducted in the Distrito Federal on rice, beans and nine fruits and vegetables. Food consumption data were obtained from a Brazilian household budget survey conducted between 2002 and 2003. Processing factors for washing, peeling or cooking were applied to the residues found in the crops. Daily intakes at the highest percentiles for the general population reached a maximum of 2.0 microg CS2/kg body weight per day (upper band of the 95% confidence interval at P99.99). Tomato, rice, apple and lettuce were the commodities which contributed most to the intake. Based on the registered uses and the toxicological profile of dithiocarbamates, the risk from exposure was evaluated assuming that all residues came from the use of ethylene-bis-dithiocarbamate (EBDC) or that a fraction of it came from the use of propineb. For this last scenario, a cumulative risk assessment was conducted. In the first scenario, the highest intake reached up to 11.9% EBDC ADI for the general population and up to 31.1% ADI for children. When 30% of the residues were considered as coming from propineb use, the values were 15.2% and 39.7% ADI, respectively.

  13. A systematic approach to community resilience that reduces the federal fiscal exposure to climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stwertka, C.; Albert, M. R.; White, K. D.

    2016-12-01

    Despite widely available information about the adverse impacts of climate change to the public, including both private sector and federal fiscal exposure, there remain opportunities to effectively translate this knowledge into action. Further delay of climate preparedness and resilience actions imposes a growing toll on American communities and the United States fiscal budget. We hypothesize that a set of four criteria must be met before a community can translate climate disturbances into preparedness action. We examine four case studies to review these proposed criteria, we discuss the critical success factors that can build community resilience, and we define an operational strategy that could support community resilience while reducing the federal fiscal exposure to climate change. This operational strategy defines a community response system that integrates social science research, builds on the strengths of different sectors, values existing resources, and reduces the planning-to-action time. Our next steps are to apply this solution in the field, and to study the dynamics of community engagement and the circular economy.

  14. A novel approach reveals that zinc oxide nanoparticles are bioavailable and toxic after dietary exposures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croteau, M.-N.; Dybowska, A.D.; Luoma, S.N.; Valsami-Jones, E.

    2011-01-01

    If engineered nanomaterials are released into the environment, some are likely to end up associated with the food of animals due to aggregation and sorption processes. However, few studies have considered dietary exposure of nanomaterials. Here we show that zinc (Zn) from isotopically modified 67ZnO particles is efficiently assimilated by freshwater snails when ingested with food. The 67Zn from nano-sized 67ZnO appears as bioavailable as 67Zn internalized by diatoms. Apparent agglomeration of the zinc oxide (ZnO) particles did not reduce bioavailability, nor preclude toxicity. In the diet, ZnO nanoparticles damage digestion: snails ate less, defecated less and inefficiently processed the ingested food when exposed to high concentrations of ZnO. It was not clear whether the toxicity was due to the high Zn dose achieved with nanoparticles or to the ZnO nanoparticles themselves. Further study of exposure from nanoparticles in food would greatly benefit assessment of ecological and human health risks. ?? 2011 Informa UK, Ltd.

  15. Exposure to Particulate Matter and its Health Impacts (an AirQ Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Mohammad Daryanoosh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims of the Study: Recent studies indicated that particulate matter can have the lung irritation, chronic lung diseases, lung tissue, etc. The aim objective of this study was to assess the mortality associated with exposure to PM10 concentrations in Ilam, Iran, during 2013. Materials & Methods: PM10 data were taken from Ilam's Local Agency of Environment (I-LAE. The annual mortality, including total, cardiovascular, and respiratory due to PM10 were estimated, using AirQ2.2.3 software model. The relative risk (RR and baseline incidence (BI defaulted by WHO were used for this purpose. Results: The number of excess cases for total, cardiovascular and respiratory mortality was estimated 161, 85 and 17 persons, respectively for a year exposure to PM10 among the people. About 3.95% of mortalities were occurred in the days with concentration levels less than 20 μg/m3. The most percentage of person-days attributed to different levels of PM10 was found to be in concentration of 40-49 µg/m3. Conclusions: In order to diminish the health impacts of particulate matter in Ilam city, health training by health systems should be conducted to public people especially persons with chronic lung and heart diseases, elderly and children to reduce their activities in the dusty days.

  16. Social stressors and air pollution across New York City communities: a spatial approach for assessing correlations among multiple exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shmool, Jessie L C; Kubzansky, Laura D; Newman, Ogonnaya Dotson; Spengler, John; Shepard, Peggy; Clougherty, Jane E

    2014-11-06

    Recent toxicological and epidemiological evidence suggests that chronic psychosocial stress may modify pollution effects on health. Thus, there is increasing interest in refined methods for assessing and incorporating non-chemical exposures, including social stressors, into environmental health research, towards identifying whether and how psychosocial stress interacts with chemical exposures to influence health and health disparities. We present a flexible, GIS-based approach for examining spatial patterns within and among a range of social stressors, and their spatial relationships with air pollution, across New York City, towards understanding their combined effects on health. We identified a wide suite of administrative indicators of community-level social stressors (2008-2010), and applied simultaneous autoregressive models and factor analysis to characterize spatial correlations among social stressors, and between social stressors and air pollutants, using New York City Community Air Survey (NYCCAS) data (2008-2009). Finally, we provide an exploratory ecologic analysis evaluating possible modification of the relationship between nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and childhood asthma Emergency Department (ED) visit rates by social stressors, to demonstrate how the methods used to assess stressor exposure (and/or consequent psychosocial stress) may alter model results. Administrative indicators of a range of social stressors (e.g., high crime rate, residential crowding rate) were not consistently correlated (rho = - 0.44 to 0.89), nor were they consistently correlated with indicators of socioeconomic position (rho = - 0.54 to 0.89). Factor analysis using 26 stressor indicators suggested geographically distinct patterns of social stressors, characterized by three factors: violent crime and physical disorder, crowding and poor access to resources, and noise disruption and property crimes. In an exploratory ecologic analysis, these factors were differentially

  17. The Be-WetSpa-Pest modeling approach to simulate human and environmental exposure from pesticide application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, Claudia; Garcia-Santos, Glenda; Andreoli, Romano; Diaz, Jaime; Feola, Giuseppe; Wittensoeldner, Moritz; Yang, Jing

    2016-04-01

    This study presents an integrative and spatially explicit modeling approach for analyzing human and environmental exposure from pesticide application of smallholders in the potato producing Andean region in Colombia. The modeling approach fulfills the following criteria: (i) it includes environmental and human compartments; (ii) it contains a behavioral decision-making model for estimating the effect of policies on pesticide flows to humans and the environment; (iii) it is spatially explicit; and (iv) it is modular and easily expandable to include additional modules, crops or technologies. The model was calibrated and validated for the Vereda La Hoya and was used to explore the effect of different policy measures in the region. The model has moderate data requirements and can be adapted relatively easy to other regions in developing countries with similar conditions.

  18. Operator radiation exposure and physical discomfort during a right versus left radial approach for coronary interventions: a randomized evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kado, Herman; Patel, Ambar M; Suryadevara, Siva; Zenni, Martin M; Box, Lyndon C; Angiolillo, Dominick J; Bass, Theodore A; Guzman, Luis A

    2014-07-01

    This study sought to assess radiation exposure and operator discomfort when using left radial approach (LRA) versus right radial approach (RRA) for coronary diagnostic and percutaneous interventions. The transradial approach is increasingly being adopted as the preferred vascular access for coronary interventions. Currently, most are performed using an RRA. This is in part due to the perceived increased operator physical discomforts as well increased radiation exposure with an LRA. One hundred patients were randomized to an LRA or RRA. Each operator (n = 5) had an independent randomization process, and patients were stratified according to obesity status. Operator radiation was measured using separate sets of radiation dosimeter badges placed externally on the head and thyroid and internally on the sternum. Operator physical discomfort was surveyed at 2 time points: during vascular access and at the end of the procedure. Moderate to severe physical discomfort was defined as a score of >4. There were no significant differences in baseline and procedural variables between groups. There was a significant increase in external radiation exposure using the RRA versus LRA (head: median: 6.12 [interquartile range (IQR): 2.6 to 16.6] mRems vs. median: 12.0 [IQR: 6.4 to 22.0] mRems, p = 0.02; thyroid: median: 10.10 [IQR: 4.3 to 25] mRems vs. median: 18.70 [IQR: 11.0 to 38] mRems, p = 0.001). More discomfort was reported with the LRA during access (LRA: 22% vs. RRA: 4%; p = 0.017), but not during the procedure (LRA: 10.0% vs. RRA: 4.0%, p = 0.43). This difference was almost entirely noted in obese patients (LRA: 30.0% vs. RRA: 3.7%, p = 0.005). LRA is as effective as RRA, showing a safer profile with decreased radiation exposure to the operator, at the expense of more operator discomfort only during vascular access and limited to obese patients. Copyright © 2014 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. A user exposure based approach for non-structural road network vulnerability analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Jin

    Full Text Available Aiming at the dense urban road network vulnerability without structural negative consequences, this paper proposes a novel non-structural road network vulnerability analysis framework. Three aspects of the framework are mainly described: (i the rationality of non-structural road network vulnerability, (ii the metrics for negative consequences accounting for variant road conditions, and (iii the introduction of a new vulnerability index based on user exposure. Based on the proposed methodology, a case study in the Sioux Falls network which was usually threatened by regular heavy snow during wintertime is detailedly discussed. The vulnerability ranking of links of Sioux Falls network with respect to heavy snow scenario is identified. As a result of non-structural consequences accompanied by conceivable degeneration of network, there are significant increases in generalized travel time costs which are measurements for "emotionally hurt" of topological road network.

  20. Modelling chronic exposure to contaminated soil: a toxicokinetic approach with the terrestrial snail Helix aspersa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimbert, Frédéric; de Vaufleury, Annette; Douay, Francis; Scheifler, Renaud; Coeurdassier, Michaël; Badot, Pierre-Marie

    2006-09-01

    To enlarge the possibilities of using organisms of the soil fauna to assess the bioaccumulative potential of chemicals, the kinetic of soil cadmium (Cd) transfer to the terrestrial gastropod Helix aspersa was investigated under laboratory conditions during a long-term experiment (6 months). During the exposure phase (3 months), juvenile snails were subjected to three different concentrations of Cd spiked in artificial ISO soil (ISO 0, 20 and 100 mg Cd kg(-1)) and to a field soil (ME4) industrially contaminated by 20 mg Cd kg (-1). For both soils, internal steady-state Cd concentrations were reached in the viscera of the snails, the main storage organ for Cd, after 2 weeks of exposure whatever the Cd concentration in soil. The equilibrium concentrations in the viscera were 0.7 (+/-0.1), 11.3 (+/-2.4), 73.3 (+/-4.8) and 6.3 (+/-1.3) mg Cd kg(-1) dry mass for ISO 0, ISO 20, ISO 100 and ME4, respectively. During the depuration phase (3 months), from 0 to 52% of the accumulated Cd in the viscera were removed by excretion or relocation in the foot. However, the snails were not able to depurate down to initial concentrations. Data were modelled by integrating a specific growth rate constant into one-compartment toxicokinetic models. This allowed the calculation of Cd uptake rates that can be used as indicators of metal bioavailability. Since this parameter was found to be lower for snails exposed to the field soil ME4, we concluded that lower Cd bioavailability in this field soil was responsible of the lower transfer to the snails compared to the ISO 20 soil, even though they were polluted to similar extents. Internal validation showed that the toxicokinetic models could be applied for predictive purposes, promising for the development of a bioaccumulation directive for terrestrial environment.

  1. Exposure of the Distal Humerus Using a Triceps Hemi-peel Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-14

    the ulna. Closure of this approach con- sists of a single, absorbable suture placed at the tip of the anconeus, followed by closure of the skin. No... anchoring or re- pair of the triceps osteoperiosteal sleeve is performed. Study Design Twelve fresh frozen cadaveric upper extremity forequarter

  2. COMPREHENSIVE PBPK MODELING APPROACH USING THE EXPOSURE RELATED DOSE ESTIMATING MODEL (ERDEM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ERDEM, a complex PBPK modeling system, is the result of the implementation of a comprehensive PBPK modeling approach. ERDEM provides a scalable and user-friendly environment that enables researchers to focus on data input values rather than writing program code. It efficiently ...

  3. An exposure-effect approach for evaluating ecosystem-wide risks from human activities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knights, A.M.; Piet, G.J.; Jongbloed, R.H.; Tamis, J.E.; Robinson, L.A.

    2015-01-01

    Ecosystem-based management (EBM) is promoted as the solution for sustainable use. An ecosystem-wide assessment methodology is therefore required. In this paper, we present an approach to assess the risk to ecosystem components from human activities common to marine and coastal ecosystems. We build

  4. Liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method using solid-phase extraction and bead-beating-assisted matrix solid-phase dispersion to quantify the fungicide tebuconazole in controlled frog exposure study: analysis of water and animal tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Martin; Poulsen, Rikke; Luong, Xuan; Sedlak, David L; Hayes, Tyrone

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents the development, optimization, and validation of a LC-MS/MS methodology to determine the concentration of the antifungal drug and fungicide tebuconazole in a controlled exposure study of African clawed frogs (Xenopus laevis). The method is validated on animal tank water and on tissue from exposed and non-exposed adult X. laevis. Using solid-phase extraction (SPE), the analytical method allows for quantification of tebuconazole at concentrations as low as 3.89 pg mL(-1) in 10 mL water samples. Using bead-beating-assisted matrix solid-phase dispersion (MSPD), it was possible to quantify tebuconazole down to 0.63 pg mg(-1) wet weight liver using 150 mg tissue. The deuterated analogue of tebuconazole was used as internal standard, and ensured method accuracy in the range 80.6-99.7% for water and 68.1-109% for tissue samples. The developed method was successfully applied in a 4-week X. laevis repeated-exposure study, revealing high levels of tebuconazole residues in adipose and liver tissue, and with experimental bioconcentration factors up to 18,244 L kg(-1).

  5. Flexible performance design for the H∞ loop-shaping control based on the linear matrix inequality approach: Application to the coaxial rotor helicopter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiyan Dong

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This article introduces a new H ∞ loop-shaping control to decrease the complexity of the appropriate selection of the required performance for a coaxial rotor helicopter with unpredicted or unknown unstructured uncertainties. Uncertainty models are normally assumed that some knowledge of type is known. And to model a particular uncertainty as a separate model is necessary in the high-performance design of specified applications. But to model each particular uncertainty will increase the complexity of performance design for the extremely complex plant. H ∞ loop-shaping control provides a competitive and flexible choice to simultaneously represent a family of unpredicted and unconsidered unstructured uncertainty bounded by H ∞ norm. Many researches have been conducted to consider some aspects of this method, for example, the nominal stability, robustness to uncertainty, and implementation issues. However, to decrease the complexity of the appropriate selection of the required performance was not considered seriously. Therefore, a sufficient set of stable condition is derived using linear matrix inequality approach to provide the flexible performance design considering unpredicted and unknown unstructured uncertainties. Furthermore, the proposed method is applied to stabilize the attitude subsystem of a reconstructed coaxial rotor helicopter. Simulations indicate the effectiveness of the proposed method in the step response.

  6. Novel approach for differentiating Shigella species and Escherichia coli by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khot, Prasanna D; Fisher, Mark A

    2013-11-01

    Shigella species are so closely related to Escherichia coli that routine matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) cannot reliably differentiate them. Biochemical and serological methods are typically used to distinguish these species; however, "inactive" isolates of E. coli are biochemically very similar to Shigella species and thus pose a greater diagnostic challenge. We used ClinProTools (Bruker Daltonics) software to discover MALDI-TOF MS biomarker peaks and to generate classification models based on the genetic algorithm to differentiate between Shigella species and E. coli. Sixty-six Shigella spp. and 72 E. coli isolates were used to generate and test classification models, and the optimal models contained 15 biomarker peaks for genus-level classification and 12 peaks for species-level classification. We were able to identify 90% of E. coli and Shigella clinical isolates correctly to the species level. Only 3% of tested isolates were misidentified. This novel MALDI-TOF MS approach allows laboratories to streamline the identification of E. coli and Shigella species.

  7. MATLAB matrix algebra

    CERN Document Server

    Pérez López, César

    2014-01-01

    MATLAB is a high-level language and environment for numerical computation, visualization, and programming. Using MATLAB, you can analyze data, develop algorithms, and create models and applications. The language, tools, and built-in math functions enable you to explore multiple approaches and reach a solution faster than with spreadsheets or traditional programming languages, such as C/C++ or Java. MATLAB Matrix Algebra introduces you to the MATLAB language with practical hands-on instructions and results, allowing you to quickly achieve your goals. Starting with a look at symbolic and numeric variables, with an emphasis on vector and matrix variables, you will go on to examine functions and operations that support vectors and matrices as arguments, including those based on analytic parent functions. Computational methods for finding eigenvalues and eigenvectors of matrices are detailed, leading to various matrix decompositions. Applications such as change of bases, the classification of quadratic forms and ...

  8. A Stochastic Simulation Framework for the Prediction of Strategic Noise Mapping and Occupational Noise Exposure Using the Random Walk Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haron, Zaiton; Bakar, Suhaimi Abu; Dimon, Mohamad Ngasri

    2015-01-01

    Strategic noise mapping provides important information for noise impact assessment and noise abatement. However, producing reliable strategic noise mapping in a dynamic, complex working environment is difficult. This study proposes the implementation of the random walk approach as a new stochastic technique to simulate noise mapping and to predict the noise exposure level in a workplace. A stochastic simulation framework and software, namely RW-eNMS, were developed to facilitate the random walk approach in noise mapping prediction. This framework considers the randomness and complexity of machinery operation and noise emission levels. Also, it assesses the impact of noise on the workers and the surrounding environment. For data validation, three case studies were conducted to check the accuracy of the prediction data and to determine the efficiency and effectiveness of this approach. The results showed high accuracy of prediction results together with a majority of absolute differences of less than 2 dBA; also, the predicted noise doses were mostly in the range of measurement. Therefore, the random walk approach was effective in dealing with environmental noises. It could predict strategic noise mapping to facilitate noise monitoring and noise control in the workplaces. PMID:25875019

  9. An Approach to Glycobiology from Glycolipidomics: Ganglioside Molecular Scanning in the Brains of Patients with Alzheimer's Disease by TLC-Blot/Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization-Time of Flight MS

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Taki, Takao

    2012-01-01

    ...)-Blot/matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS) system. This new approach consists of a combination of a method for transferring lipids separated on a TLC-plate to a poly-vinylidene difluoride...

  10. A novel flapless approach versus minimally invasive surgery in periodontal regeneration with enamel matrix derivative proteins: a 24-month randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aimetti, Mario; Ferrarotti, Francesco; Mariani, Giulia Maria; Romano, Federica

    2017-01-01

    This investigation was designed to compare the effectiveness of enamel matrix derivative (EMD) proteins in combination with flapless or flap procedure in periodontal regeneration of deep intrabony defects. Thirty chronic periodontitis patients who had at least one residual periodontal defect with an intrabony component of ≥3 mm were consecutively enrolled. Defects were randomly assigned to test or control treatments which both consisted of the use of EMD to reach periodontal regeneration. Test sites (n = 15) were treated according to a novel flapless approach, whereas control sites (n = 15) by means of minimally invasive surgery (MIST). Clinical and radiographic parameters were recorded at baseline, 12 and 24 months post-operatively. Both therapeutic modalities yielded similar probing depth (PD) reduction and clinical attachment level (CAL) gain at 24 months. In flapless-treated sites, a mean PD reduction of 3.6 ± 1.0 mm and a CAL gain of 3.2 ± 1.1 mm were observed. In the MIST group, they were 3.7 ± 0.6 and 3.6 ± 0.9 mm. The operative chair time was twice as long in the MIST compared to the flapless group, whereas comparable patient-oriented outcomes were observed. The flapless procedure may be successfully applied in the regenerative treatment of deep intrabony defects reaching clinical outcomes comparable with those of minimally invasive surgical approaches and may present important advantages in terms of reduction of operative chair time. The use of EMD as an adjunct to non-surgical periodontal treatment may be considered a suitable option to treat defects mainly in the anterior sextants.

  11. Spatial analysis of the risk to human health from exposure to arsenic contaminated groundwater: A kriging approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Ching-Ping; Chen, Jui-Sheng; Chien, Yi-Chi; Chen, Ching-Fang

    2018-02-05

    A long-term groundwater quality survey in northeastern Taiwan's Lanyang Plain has revealed obvious contamination of the groundwater in some areas, with measured As concentrations in excess of the acceptable level of 10μg/L. Efforts for assessing the health risk associated with the intake of As through the drinking of contaminated groundwater are a necessary part of the important work of health risk management. However, the standard approach to assessing risks to human health does not adequately account for spatial heterogeneity in the measured As concentrations. Thus, this study applies two different kriging approaches to carry out a spatial analysis of the health risk associated with ingesting As through the drinking of groundwater in the Lanyang Plain. It is found that the indicator kriging (IK) approach, with occurrence probability threshold values of 0.4, 0.5 and 0.6 yields correct classification percentages of 75%, 68% and 61%, respectively, of unacceptable HQ zones. An HQ map prepared with the ordinary kriging (OK) approach shows a correct classification of unacceptable HQ zones of 80%. Considering that the OK approach does not require subjective selection of an occurrence probability threshold value as is the case with the IK approach and can yield a higher percentage of correct classification for unacceptable HQ zones, it is recommended as a more direct and reliable method for spatial analysis of human health risk due to arsenic exposure through the drinking of groundwater. The results show that the geographical distribution of unacceptable HQ zones is concentrated in the eastern part of the study area, which includes the high-population density townships. In other words, 34% of the people had access to groundwater where the HQ was >1. The results of this type of spatial health risk assessment can provide a basis for improving the decision-making process for health risk management. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. MOF-mixed matrix membranes: Precise dispersion of MOF particles with better compatibility via a particle fusion approach for enhanced gas separation properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shahid, S.; Nijmeijer, Dorothea C.; Nehache, Sabrina; Vankelecom, Ivo; Deratani, Andre; Quemener, Damien

    2015-01-01

    Mixed matrix membranes (MMMs) incorporating conventional fillers frequently suffer from insufficient adhesion between the polymer matrix and the fillers. This often results in the formation of non-selective voids at the filler/polymer interface, which decreases the performance of the membrane. A

  13. A Population Approach to Transportation Planning: Reducing Exposure to Motor-Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Fuller

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Transportation planning and public health have important historical roots. To address common challenges, including road traffic fatalities, integration of theories and methods from both disciplines is required. This paper presents an overview of Geoffrey Rose's strategy of preventive medicine applied to road traffic fatalities. One of the basic principles of Rose's strategy is that a large number of people exposed to a small risk can generate more cases than a small number exposed to a high risk. Thus, interventions should address the large number of people exposed to the fundamental causes of diseases. Exposure to moving vehicles could be considered a fundamental cause of road traffic deaths and injuries. A global reduction in the amount of kilometers driven would result in a reduction of the likelihood of collisions for all road users. Public health and transportation research must critically appraise their practice and engage in informed dialogue with the objective of improving mobility and productivity while simultaneously reducing the public health burden of road deaths and injuries.

  14. Basal Exposure Therapy: A New Approach for Treatment-Resistant Patients with Severe and Composite Mental Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heggdal, Didrik; Fosse, Roar; Hammer, Jan

    2016-01-01

    New treatment approaches are needed for patients with severe and composite mental disorders who are resistant to conventional treatments. Such treatment-resistant patients often have diagnoses of psychotic or bipolar disorders or severe personality disorders and comorbid conditions. In this study, we evaluate basal exposure therapy (BET), a novel ward-integrated psychotherapeutic approach for these patients. Central to BET is the conceptualization of undifferentiated existential fear as basic to the patients' problem, exposure to this fear, and the therapeutic platform complementary external regulation, which integrates and governs the totality of interventions throughout the treatment process. BET is administered at a locked-door ward with 6 patient beds and 13.5 full-time employees, including a psychiatrist and 2 psychologists. Thirty-eight patients who had completed BET were included, all but two being female, mean age 29.9 years. Fourteen patients had a diagnosis of schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder (F20/25), eight had bipolar disorder or recurrent depressive disorder (F31/33), eight had diagnoses in the F40-48 domain (neurotic, stress-related, and somatoform disorders), five were diagnosed with emotionally unstable personality disorder (F60.3), and three patients had other diagnoses. Twenty of the patients (53%) had more than one ICD-10 diagnosis. Average treatment time in BET was 13 months, ranging from 2 to 72 months. Time-series data show significant improvements in symptoms and functioning from enrollment to discharge, with effect sizes at 0.76 for the Dissociation Experience Scale, 0.93 for the Brief Symptom Inventory, 1.47 for the Avoidance and Action Questionnaire, and 1.42 and 1.56, respectively, for the functioning and symptom subscales of the Global Assessment of Functioning Scale. In addition, the patients used significantly less antiepileptic, antipsychotic, anxiolytic, and antidepressant medications at discharge than at treatment

  15. Kernelized Bayesian Matrix Factorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gönen, Mehmet; Kaski, Samuel

    2014-10-01

    We extend kernelized matrix factorization with a full-Bayesian treatment and with an ability to work with multiple side information sources expressed as different kernels. Kernels have been introduced to integrate side information about the rows and columns, which is necessary for making out-of-matrix predictions. We discuss specifically binary output matrices but extensions to realvalued matrices are straightforward. We extend the state of the art in two key aspects: (i) A full-conjugate probabilistic formulation of the kernelized matrix factorization enables an efficient variational approximation, whereas full-Bayesian treatments are not computationally feasible in the earlier approaches. (ii) Multiple side information sources are included, treated as different kernels in multiple kernel learning which additionally reveals which side sources are informative. We then show that the framework can also be used for supervised and semi-supervised multilabel classification and multi-output regression, by considering samples and outputs as the domains where matrix factorization operates. Our method outperforms alternatives in predicting drug-protein interactions on two data sets. On multilabel classification, our algorithm obtains the lowest Hamming losses on 10 out of 14 data sets compared to five state-of-the-art multilabel classification algorithms. We finally show that the proposed approach outperforms alternatives in multi-output regression experiments on a yeast cell cycle data set.

  16. Biosensing approaches for rapid genotoxicity and cytotoxicity assays upon nanomaterial exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xuena; Hondroulis, Evangelia; Liu, Wenjun; Li, Chen-Zhong

    2013-05-27

    The increased utilization of nanomaterials could affect human health and the environment due to increased exposure. Several mechanisms regarding the negative effects of nanomaterials have been proposed, one of the most discussed being oxidative stress. Many studies have shown that some metal oxide nanoparticles can enhance reactive oxygen species generation, inducing oxidative stress, DNA damage, and unregulated cell signaling, and eventually leading to changes in cell motility, apoptosis, and even carcinogenesis. 8-Hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) is one of the predominant forms of oxidative DNA damage, and has therefore been widely used as a biomarker for oxidative stress and carcinogenesis. Ther are two major objectives to this study. Firstly, the development of a novel lateral flow immunoassay (LFIA) is presented to measure the concentration of 8-OHdG in cells and thus reveal the nanotoxicity on the genomic level. The feasibility of this new method is validated by comparison with two other established methods: Alamar Blue assay and a recently developed electrical impedance sensing (EIS) system on the level of cell proliferation/viability. Secondly, the toxicological effects of three metallic nanoparticles (CuO, CdO, and TiO2 ) are investigated and compared using these three methods with completely different mechanisms. The results show that there is a high variation among different nanoparticles concerning their ability to cause toxic effects. CuO nanoparticles are the most potent regarding cytotoxicity and DNA damage. CdO shows a fallen cell viability as well as DNA damage, however, to a lesser extent than CuO nanoparticles. TiO2 particles only cause very limited cytotoxicity, and there is no obvious increase in 8-OHdG levels. In conclusion, LFIA as well as the EIS system are useful methods for quantitative or qualitative nanotoxicity assessments with high sensitivity, specificity, speed of performance, and simplicity. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag Gmb

  17. Court room exposure to medical students: a practical approach to legal procedures in Indian scenario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sanjay; Phatak, Ajay; Panchal, Dhara

    2013-08-01

    Education of law and bioethics has been recognized as an integral part of medical education. Medical professionals are required to contribute to the jurisprudence in various roles including the role of an 'Expert Medical Witness'. Practical knowledge of legal procedures enables the medical professional to facilitate the judiciary in delivering justice in its right spirit. Unfortunately medical students lack this practical empowerment and thus may not be able to contribute to the justice system to the fullest potential during their professional life. We offered exposure to real life courtroom procedures to medical students to enhance their knowledge and confidence. Ninety seven medical students were exposed to real courtroom visits in batches of 20. They attended the legal proceeding of a medical witness examination in real case scenario and also interacted with the judge, public prosecutor and defense lawyer. All the relevant issues were discussed thoroughly before and after the court visits. A consensually validated questionnaire was used to determine the enhancement in their knowledge whereas their experience was assessed through a semi structured questionnaire. The average knowledge level improved significantly from 34.4 (SD = 5.59) to 40.74 (SD = 5.35) [p < 0.001, 95% CI of the difference: (-7.455, -5.225)]. Only 7 students reported that they require more such visits to attain desired confidence level. The average rating for the whole process was 8.08(SD = 1.35) out of 10, with only 5 students rating the process below 5 points. The process served as an ice breaker for the doubts and fear about the court and legal procedures. This module may be refined and replicated to develop a medical professional who is confident and empowered about the legal system which will benefit the judiciary and in turn the common man of the society. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  18. An assessment of environmental and toxicological risk to pesticide exposure based on a case-based approach to computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Cristina; Vicente, Henrique; Rosário Martins, M.; Lima, Nelson; Neves, Mariana; Neves, José

    2017-01-01

    Pesticide environmental fate and toxicity depends on its physical and chemical features, the soil composition, soil adsorption, as well as residues that may be found in different soil slots. Indeed, pesticide degradation in soil may be influenced by either biotic or abiotic factors. In addition, the toxicity of pesticides for living organisms depends on their adsorption, distribution, biotransformation, dissemination of metabolites together with interaction with cellular macromolecules and excretion. Biotransformation may result in the formation of less toxic and/or more toxic metabolites, while other processes determine the balance between toxic and a nontoxic upcoming. Aggregate exposure and risk assessment involve multiple pathways and routes, including the potential for pesticide residues in food and drinking water, in addition to residues from pesticide use in residential and non-occupational environments. Therefore, this work will focus on the development of a decision support system to assess the environmental and toxicological risk to pesticide exposure, built on top of a Logic Programming approach to Knowledge Representation and Reasoning, complemented with a Case Based attitude to computing. The proposed solution is unique in itself, once it caters for the explicit treatment of incomplete, unknown, or even self-contradictory information, either in terms of a qualitative or quantitative setting.

  19. Plane-wave spectrum approach for the calculation of electromagnetic absorption under near-field exposure conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, I; Gandhi, O P; Hagmann, M J; Riazi, A

    1980-01-01

    The exposure of humans to electromagnetic near fields has not been sufficiently emphasized by researcher. We have used the plane-wave-spectrum approach to evaluate the electromagnetic field and determine the energy deposited in a lossy, homogeneous, semi-infinite slab placed in the near field of a source leaking radiation. Values of the fields and absorbed energy in the target are obtained by vector summation of the contributions of all the plane waves into which the prescribed field is decomposed. Use of a fast Fourier transform algorithm contributes to the high efficiency of the computations. The numerical results show that, for field distributions that are nearly constant over a physical extent of at least a free-space wavelength, the energy coupled into the target is approximately equal to the resulting from plane-wave exposed.

  20. The metabolomic approach identifies a biological signature of low-dose chronic exposure to cesium 137.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grison, Stéphane; Martin, Jean-Charles; Grandcolas, Line; Banzet, Nathalie; Blanchardon, Eric; Tourlonias, Elie; Defoort, Catherine; Favé, Gaëlle; Bott, Romain; Dublineau, Isabelle; Gourmelon, Patrick; Souidi, Maâmar

    2012-01-01

    Reports have described apparent biological effects of (137)Cs (the most persistent dispersed radionuclide) irradiation in people living in Chernobyl-contaminated territory. The sensitive analytical technology described here should now help assess the relation of this contamination to the observed effects. A rat model chronically exposed to (137)Cs through drinking water was developed to identify biomarkers of radiation-induced metabolic disorders, and the biological impact was evaluated by a metabolomic approach that allowed us to detect several hundred metabolites in biofluids and assess their association with disease states. After collection of plasma and urine from contaminated and non-contaminated rats at the end of the 9-months contamination period, analysis with a LC-MS system detected 742 features in urine and 1309 in plasma. Biostatistical discriminant analysis extracted a subset of 26 metabolite signals (2 urinary, 4 plasma non-polar, and 19 plasma polar metabolites) that in combination were able to predict from 68 up to 94% of the contaminated rats, depending on the prediction method used, with a misclassification rate as low as 5.3%. The difference in this metabolic score between the contaminated and non-contaminated rats was highly significant (P = 0.019 after ANOVA cross-validation). In conclusion, our proof-of-principle study demonstrated for the first time the usefulness of a metabolomic approach for addressing biological effects of chronic low-dose contamination. We can conclude that a metabolomic signature discriminated (137)Cs-contaminated from control animals in our model. Further validation is nevertheless required together with full annotation of the metabolic indicators.

  1. Matrix analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Bhatia, Rajendra

    1997-01-01

    A good part of matrix theory is functional analytic in spirit. This statement can be turned around. There are many problems in operator theory, where most of the complexities and subtleties are present in the finite-dimensional case. My purpose in writing this book is to present a systematic treatment of methods that are useful in the study of such problems. This book is intended for use as a text for upper division and gradu­ ate courses. Courses based on parts of the material have been given by me at the Indian Statistical Institute and at the University of Toronto (in collaboration with Chandler Davis). The book should also be useful as a reference for research workers in linear algebra, operator theory, mathe­ matical physics and numerical analysis. A possible subtitle of this book could be Matrix Inequalities. A reader who works through the book should expect to become proficient in the art of deriving such inequalities. Other authors have compared this art to that of cutting diamonds. One first has to...

  2. Practice-Informed Approaches to Addressing Substance Abuse and Trauma Exposure in Urban Native Families Involved with Child Welfare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucero, Nancy M; Bussey, Marian

    2015-01-01

    Similar to families from other groups, urban-based American Indian and Alaska Native ("Native") family members involved with the child welfare system due to substance abuse issues are also often challenged by untreated trauma exposure. The link between these conditions and the history of genocidal policies aimed at destroying Native family ties, as well as experiences of ongoing discrimination, bring added dimensions for consideration when pro- viding services to these families. Practice-based evidence indicates that the trauma-informed and culturally responsive model developed by the Denver Indian Family Resource Center (DIFRC) shows promise in reducing out-of-home placements and re-referrals in urban Native families with substance abuse and child welfare concerns, while also increasing caregiver capabilities, family safety, and child well-being. This article provides strategies from the DIFRC approach that non-Native caseworkers and supervisors can utilize to create an environment in their own agencies that supports culturally based practice with Native families while incorporating a trauma-informed understanding of service needs of these families. Casework consistent with this approach demonstrates actions that meet the Active Efforts requirement of the Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA) as well as sound clinical practice. Intensive and proactive case management designed specifically for families with high levels of service needs is a key strategy when combined with utilizing a caseworker brief screening tool for trauma exposure; training caseworkers to recognize trauma symptoms, making timely referrals to trauma treatment by behavioral health specialists experienced in working with Native clients, and providing a consistent service environment that focuses on client safety and worker trustworthiness. Finally, suggestions are put forth for agencies seeking to enhance their cultural responsiveness and include increasing workers' understanding of cultural values

  3. A nanomedicine approach to effectively inhibit contracture during bladder acellular matrix allograft-induced bladder regeneration by sustained delivery of vascular endothelial growth factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Qianwei; Lin, Houwei; Hua, Xiaolin; Liu, Li; Sun, Ping; Zhao, Zhen; Shen, Xiaowei; Cui, Daxiang; Xu, Maosheng; Chen, Fang; Geng, Hongquan

    2015-01-01

    Macroscopic evidence of contracture has been identified as a major issue during the regeneration process. We hypothesize that lack of angiogenesis is the primary cause of contracture and explore a nanomedicine approach to achieve sustained release of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) to stimulate angiogenesis. We evaluate the efficacy of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs) for long-term (3 months) sustained release of VEGF in bladder acellular matrix allografts (BAMA) in a swine model. We anticipate that the sustained release of VEGF could stimulate angiogenesis along the regeneration process and thereby inhibit contracture. Bladder was replaced with BAMA (5×5 cm), modified with PLGA NPs encapsulated with VEGF in a pig model. The time points chosen for sampling were 1, 2, 4, and 12 weeks. The regenerated areas were then measured to obtain the contracture rate, and the extent of revascularization was calculated using histological and morphological features. In the control group of animals, the bladder was replaced with only BAMA. The in vivo release of VEGF was evident for ∼3 months, achieving the goal of long-acting sustained release, and successfully promoted the regeneration of blood vessels and smooth muscle fibers. In addition, less collagen deposition was observed in the experimental group compared with control. Most importantly, the inhibition of contracture was highly significant, and the ultimate contracture rate decreased by ∼57% in the experimental group compared with control. In isolated strips analysis, there were no significant differences between BAMA-regenerated (either VEGF added or not) and autogenous bladder. BAMA modified with VEGF-loaded PLGA-NPs can sustainably release VEGF in vivo (>3 months) to stimulate angiogenesis leading to the inhibition of contracture. This is the first study to report a viable nanomedicine-based strategy to overcome contracture during bladder regeneration induced by BAMA. Furthermore

  4. Matrix solid-phase dispersion on column clean-up/pre-concentration as a novel approach for fast isolation of abuse drugs from human hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Míguez-Framil, Martha; Moreda-Piñeiro, Antonio; Bermejo-Barrera, Pilar; Alvarez-Freire, Iván; Tabernero, María Jesús; Bermejo, Ana María

    2010-10-08

    A simple and fast sample pre-treatment method based on matrix solid-phase dispersion (MSPD) for isolating cocaine, benzoylecgonine (BZE), codeine, morphine and 6-monoacethylmorphine (6-MAM) from human hair has been developed. The MSPD approach consisted of using alumina (1.80 g) as a dispersing agent and 0.6M hydrochloric acid (4 mL) as an extracting solvent. For a fixed hair sample mass of 0.050 g, the alumina mass to sample mass ratio obtained was 36. A previously conditioned Oasis HLB cartridge (2 mL methanol, plus 2 mL ultrapure water, plus 1 mL of 0.2M/0.2M sodium hydroxide/boric acid buffer solution at pH 9.2) was attached to the end of the MSPD syringe for on column clean-up of the hydrochloric acid extract and for transferring the target compounds to a suitable solvent for gas chromatography (GC) analysis. Therefore, the adsorbed analytes were directly eluted from the Oasis HLB cartridges with 2 mL of 2% acetic acid in methanol before concentration by N(2) stream evaporation and dry extract derivatization with N-methyl-tert-butylsilyltrifluoroacetamide (BSTFA) and chlorotrimethylsilane (TMCS). The optimization/evaluation of all the factors affecting the MSPD and on column clean-up procedures has led to a fast sample treatment, and analytes extraction and pre-concentration can be finished in approximately 30 min. The developed method has been applied to eight hair samples from poli-drug abusers and measured analyte concentrations have been found to be statistically similar (95% confidence interval) to those obtained after a conventional enzymatic hydrolysis method (Pronase E). Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Relative performance of different exposure modeling approaches for sulfur dioxide concentrations in the air in rural western Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Hyang-Mi

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The main objective of this paper is to compare different methods for predicting the levels of SO2 air pollution in oil and gas producing area of rural western Canada. Month-long average air quality measurements were collected over a two-year period (2001–2002 at multiple locations, with some side-by-side measurements, and repeated time-series at selected locations. Methods We explored how accurately location-specific mean concentrations of SO2 can be predicted for 2002 at 666 locations with multiple measurements. Means of repeated measurements on the 666 locations in 2002 were used as the alloyed gold standard (AGS. First, we considered two approaches: one that uses one measurement from each location of interest; and the other that uses context data on proximity of monitoring sites to putative sources of emission in 2002. Second, we imagined that all of the previous year's (2001's data were also available to exposure assessors: 9,464 measurements and their context (month, proximity to sources. Exposure prediction approaches we explored with the 2001 data included regression modeling using either mixed or fixed effects models. Third, we used Bayesian methods to combine single measurements from locations in 2002 (not used to calculate AGS with different priors. Results The regression method that included both fixed and random effects for prediction (Best Linear Unbiased Predictor had the best agreement with the AGS (Pearson correlation 0.77 and the smallest mean squared error (MSE: 0.03. The second best method in terms of correlation with AGS (0.74 and MSE (0.09 was the Bayesian method that uses normal mixture prior derived from predictions of the 2001 mixed effects applied in the 2002 context. Conclusion It is likely that either collecting some measurements from the desired locations and time periods or predictions of a reasonable empirical mixed effects model perhaps is sufficient in most epidemiological applications. The

  6. Cohort mortality study of roofing granule mine and mill workers. Part I: Estimation of historical crystalline silica exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewett, Paul; Morey, Sandy Z; Holen, Brian M; Logan, Perry W; Olsen, Geary W

    2012-01-01

    A study was conducted to construct a job exposure matrix for the roofing granule mine and mill workers at four U.S. plants. Each plant mined different minerals and had unique departments and jobs. The goal of the study was to generate accurate estimates of the mean exposure to respirable crystalline silica for each cell of the job exposure matrix, that is, every combination of plant, department, job, and year represented in the job histories of the study participants. The objectives of this study were to locate, identify, and collect information on all exposure measurements ever collected at each plant, statistically analyze the data to identify deficiencies in the database, identify and resolve questionable measurements, identify all important process and control changes for each plant-department-job combination, construct a time line for each plant-department combination indicating periods where the equipment and conditions were unchanged, and finally, construct a job exposure matrix. After evaluation, 1871 respirable crystalline silica measurements and estimates remained. The primary statistic of interest was the mean exposure for each job exposure matrix cell. The average exposure for each of the four plants was 0.042 mg/m(3) (Belle Mead, N.J.), 0.106 mg/m(3) (Corona, Calif.), 0.051 mg/m(3) (Little Rock, Ark.), and 0.152 mg/m(3) (Wausau, Wis.), suggesting that there may be substantial differences in the employee cumulative exposures. Using the database and the available plant information, the study team assigned an exposure category and mean exposure for every plant-department-job and time interval combination. Despite a fairly large database, the mean exposure for > 95% of the job exposure matrix cells, or specific plant-department-job-year combinations, were estimated by analogy to similar jobs in the plant for which sufficient data were available. This approach preserved plant specificity, hopefully improving the usefulness of the job exposure matrix.

  7. Percutaneous screw fixation of the iliosacral joint: A case-based preoperative planning approach reduces operating time and radiation exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ecker, T M; Jost, J; Cullmann, J L; Zech, W D; Djonov, V; Keel, M J B; Benneker, L M; Bastian, J D

    2017-08-01

    A preoperative planning approach for percutaneous screw fixation of the iliosacral joint provides specific entry points (EPs) and aiming points (APs) of intraosseous screw pathways (as defined by CT scans) for lateral fluoroscopic projections used intraoperatively. The potential to achieve the recommended EPs and APs, to obtain an ideal screw position (perpendicular to the iliosacral joint), to avoid occurrence of extraosseous screw misplacement, to reduce the operating time and the radiation exposure by utilizing this planning approach have not been described yet. On preoperative CT scans of eight human cadaveric specimen individual EPs and APs were identified and transferred to the lateral fluoroscopic projection using a coordinate system with the zero-point in the center of the posterior cortex of the S1 vertebral body (x-axis parallel to upper S1 endplate). Distances were expressed in relation to the anteroposterior distance of the S1 upper endplate (in%). In each specimen on one side a screw was placed with provided EP and AP (New Technique) whereas at the contralateral side a screw was placed without given EP and AP (Conventional Technique). Both techniques were compared using postoperative CT scans to assess distances between predefined EPs and APs and the actually obtained EPs and APs, screw angulations in relation to the iliosacral joint in coronal and axial planes and the occurrence of any extraosseous screw misplacement. The "operating time (OT)" and the "time under fluoroscopy (TUF)" were recorded. Statistical analysis was performed by the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. EPs were realized significantly more accurate using the new technique in vertical direction. The screw positions in relation to the iliosacral joint showed no significant difference between both techniques. Both techniques had one aberrantly placed screw outside the safe corridor. The (mean±SD) "OT" and the (mean±SD) "TUF" were significantly decreased using the new technique compared to

  8. Liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method using solid-phase extraction and bead-beating-assisted matrix solid-phase dispersion to quantify the fungicide tebuconazole in controlled frog exposure study: analysis of water and animal tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin; Poulsen, Rikke; Luong, Xuan

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the development, optimization, and validation of a LC-MS/MS methodology to determine the concentration of the antifungal drug and fungicide tebuconazole in a controlled exposure study of African clawed frogs (Xenopus laevis). The method is validated on animal tank water...... and on tissue from exposed and non-exposed adult X. laevis. Using solid-phase extraction (SPE), the analytical method allows for quantification of tebuconazole at concentrations as low as 3.89 pg mL(-1) in 10 mL water samples. Using bead-beating-assisted matrix solid-phase dispersion (MSPD), it was possible...... to quantify tebuconazole down to 0.63 pg mg(-1) wet weight liver using 150 mg tissue. The deuterated analogue of tebuconazole was used as internal standard, and ensured method accuracy in the range 80.6-99.7 % for water and 68.1-109 % for tissue samples. The developed method was successfully applied in a 4...

  9. An extensive cocktail approach for rapid risk assessment of in vitro CYP450 direct reversible inhibition by xenobiotic exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaggiari, Dany; Daali, Youssef; Rudaz, Serge

    2016-07-01

    Acute exposure to environmental factors strongly affects the metabolic activity of cytochrome P450 (P450). As a consequence, the risk of interaction could be increased, modifying the clinical outcomes of a medication. Because toxic agents cannot be administered to humans for ethical reasons, in vitro approaches are therefore essential to evaluate their impact on P450 activities. In this work, an extensive cocktail mixture was developed and validated for in vitro P450 inhibition studies using human liver microsomes (HLM). The cocktail comprised eleven P450-specific probe substrates to simultaneously assess the activities of the following isoforms: 1A2, 2A6, 2B6, 2C8, 2C9, 2C19, 2D6, 2E1, 2J2 and subfamily 3A. The high selectivity and sensitivity of the developed UHPLC-MS/MS method were critical for the success of this methodology, whose main advantages are: (i) the use of eleven probe substrates with minimized interactions, (ii) a low HLM concentration, (iii) fast incubation (5min) and (iv) the use of metabolic ratios as microsomal P450 activities markers. This cocktail approach was successfully validated by comparing the obtained IC50 values for model inhibitors with those generated with the conventional single probe methods. Accordingly, reliable inhibition values could be generated 10-fold faster using a 10-fold smaller amount of HLM compared to individual assays. This approach was applied to assess the P450 inhibition potential of widespread insecticides, namely, chlorpyrifos, fenitrothion, methylparathion and profenofos. In all cases, P450 2B6 was the most affected with IC50 values in the nanomolar range. For the first time, mixtures of these four insecticides incubated at low concentrations showed a cumulative inhibitory in vitro effect on P450 2B6. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Integration of biological monitoring, environmental monitoring and computational modelling into the interpretation of pesticide exposure data: introduction to a proposed approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colosio, Claudio; Rubino, Federico M; Alegakis, Athanasios; Ariano, Eugenio; Brambilla, Gabri; Mandic-Rajcevic, Stefan; Metruccio, Francesca; Minoia, Claudio; Moretto, Angelo; Somaruga, Chiara; Tsatsakis, Aristidis; Turci, Roberta; Vellere, Francesca

    2012-08-13

    Open field, variability of climatic and working conditions, and the use of complex mixtures of pesticides makes biological and environmental monitoring in agriculture, and therefore risk assessment and management, very complicated. A need of pointing out alternative risk assessment approaches, not necessarily based on measures, but simple, user-friendly and reliable, feasible also in the less advanced situations and in particular in small size enterprises, arises. This aim can be reached through a combination of environmental monitoring, biological monitoring and computational modelling. We have used this combination of methods for the creation of "exposure and risk profiles" to be applied in specific exposure scenarios, and we have tested this approach on a sample of Italian rice and maize herbicide applicators. We have given specific "toxicity scores" to the different products used and we have identified, for each of the major working phases, that is mixing and loading, spraying, maintenance and cleaning of equipment, the main variables affecting exposure and inserted them into a simple algorithm, able to produce "exposure indices". Based on the combination of toxicity indices and exposure indices it is possible to obtain semiquantitative estimates of the risk levels experienced by the workers in the exposure scenarios considered. Results of operator exposure data collected under real-life conditions can be used to validate and refine the algorithms; moreover, the AOEL derived from pre-marketing studies can be combined to estimate tentative biological exposure limits for pesticides, useful to perform individual risk assessment based on technical surveys and on simple biological monitoring. A proof of principle example of this approach is the subject of this article. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. A CFD modeling study in an urban street canyon for ultrafine particles and population exposure: The intake fraction approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habilomatis, George; Chaloulakou, Archontoula

    2015-10-15

    Air quality in street canyons is of major importance, since the highest pollution levels are often encountered in these microenvironments. The canyon effect (reduced natural ventilation) makes them "hot spots" for particulate pollution contributing to adverse health effects for the exposed population. In this study we tried to characterize the influence of UFP (ultrafine particle) emissions from traffic on population exposure in an urban street canyon, by applying the intake fraction (iF) approach. One month long measurements of UFP levels have been monitored and used for the need of this study. We applied a three dimensional computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model based on real measurements for the simulation of UFP levels. We used infiltration factors, evaluated on a daily basis for the under study area, to estimate the indoor UFP levels. As a result the intake fraction for the pedestrians, residents and office workers is in the range of (1E-5)-(1E-4). The street canyon is mostly residential justifying partially the higher value of intake fraction for residents (1E-4). The above iF value is on the same order of magnitude with the corresponding one evaluated in a relative street canyon study. The total iF value in this microenvironment is one order of magnitude higher than ours, explained partially by the different use and activities. Two specific applications of iF to assess prioritization among emission sources and environmental justice issues are also examined. We ran a scenario with diesel and gasoline cars and diesel fueled vehicle seems to be a target source to improve overall iF. Our application focus on a small residential area, typical of urban central Athens, in order to evaluate high resolution iF. The significance of source-exposure relationship study in a micro scale is emphasized by recent research. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. A multi-platform metabolomics approach demonstrates changes in energy metabolism and the transsulfuration pathway in Chironomus tepperi following exposure to zinc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, Sara M., E-mail: hoskins@unimelb.edu.au [Centre for Aquatic Pollution, Identification and Management (CAPIM), School of BioSciences, Bio21 Molecular Science and Biotechnology Institute, The University of Melbourne, 30 Flemington Road, Parkville, 3052 (Australia); Tull, Dedreia L., E-mail: dedreia@unimelb.edu.au [Metabolomics Australia, Bio21 Molecular Science and Biotechnology Institute, 30 Flemington Road, Parkville, 3052 (Australia); Jeppe, Katherine J., E-mail: k.jeppe@unimelb.edu.au [Centre for Aquatic Pollution, Identification and Management (CAPIM), School of BioSciences, Bio21 Molecular Science and Biotechnology Institute, The University of Melbourne, 30 Flemington Road, Parkville, 3052 (Australia); Centre for Aquatic Pollution, Identification and Management (CAPIM), School of BioSciences, The University of Melbourne, 3010 (Australia); De Souza, David P., E-mail: desouzad@unimelb.edu.au [Metabolomics Australia, Bio21 Molecular Science and Biotechnology Institute, 30 Flemington Road, Parkville, 3052 (Australia); Dayalan, Saravanan, E-mail: sdayalan@unimelb.edu.au [Metabolomics Australia, Bio21 Molecular Science and Biotechnology Institute, 30 Flemington Road, Parkville, 3052 (Australia); Pettigrove, Vincent J., E-mail: vpet@unimelb.edu.au [Centre for Aquatic Pollution, Identification and Management (CAPIM), School of BioSciences, The University of Melbourne, 3010 (Australia); McConville, Malcolm J., E-mail: malcolmm@unimelb.edu.au [Metabolomics Australia, Bio21 Molecular Science and Biotechnology Institute, 30 Flemington Road, Parkville, 3052 (Australia); Hoffmann, Ary A., E-mail: ary@unimelb.edu.au [Centre for Aquatic Pollution, Identification and Management (CAPIM), School of BioSciences, Bio21 Molecular Science and Biotechnology Institute, The University of Melbourne, 30 Flemington Road, Parkville, 3052 (Australia); School of BioSciences, Bio21 Molecular Science and Biotechnology Institute, The University of Melbourne, 30 Flemington Road, Parkville, 3052 (Australia)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • An integrated metabolomics approach was applied to examine zinc exposure in midges. • Changes in carbohydrate and energy metabolism were observed using GC–MS. • Transsulfuration pathway is affected by zinc exposure. • Heavy metals other than zinc affect the transsulfuration pathways differently. - Abstract: Measuring biological responses in resident biota is a commonly used approach to monitoring polluted habitats. The challenge is to choose sensitive and, ideally, stressor-specific endpoints that reflect the responses of the ecosystem. Metabolomics is a potentially useful approach for identifying sensitive and consistent responses since it provides a holistic view to understanding the effects of exposure to chemicals upon the physiological functioning of organisms. In this study, we exposed the aquatic non-biting midge, Chironomus tepperi, to two concentrations of zinc chloride and measured global changes in polar metabolite levels using an untargeted gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC–MS) analysis and a targeted liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (LC–MS) analysis of amine-containing metabolites. These data were correlated with changes in the expression of a number of target genes. Zinc exposure resulted in a reduction in levels of intermediates in carbohydrate metabolism (i.e., glucose 6-phosphate, fructose 6-phosphate and disaccharides) and an increase in a number of TCA cycle intermediates. Zinc exposure also resulted in decreases in concentrations of the amine containing metabolites, lanthionine, methionine and cystathionine, and an increase in metallothionein gene expression. Methionine and cystathionine are intermediates in the transsulfuration pathway which is involved in the conversion of methionine to cysteine. These responses provide an understanding of the pathways affected by zinc toxicity, and how these effects are different to other heavy metals such as cadmium and copper. The use of complementary

  13. Children's exposure to harmful elements in toys and low-cost jewelry: Characterizing risks and developing a comprehensive approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guney, Mert; Zagury, Gerald J., E-mail: gerald.zagury@polymtl.ca

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: • Risk for children up to 3 years-old was characterized considering oral exposure. • Saliva mobilization, ingestion of parts and of scraped-off material were considered. • Ingestion of parts caused hazard index (HI) values >>for Cd, Ni, and Pb exposure. • HI were lower (but > for saliva mobilization and <1 for scraped material ingestion. • Comprehensive approach aims to deal with drawbacks of current toy safety approaches. - Abstract: Contamination problem in jewelry and toys and children's exposure possibility have been previously demonstrated. For this study, risk from oral exposure has been characterized for highly contaminated metallic toys and jewelry ((MJ), n = 16) considering three scenarios. Total and bioaccessible concentrations of Cd, Cu, Ni, and Pb were high in selected MJ. First scenario (ingestion of parts or pieces) caused unacceptable risk for eight items for Cd, Ni, and/or Pb (hazard index (HI) > 1, up to 75, 5.8, and 43, respectively). HI for ingestion of scraped-off material scenario was always <1. Finally, saliva mobilization scenario caused HI > 1 in three samples (two for Cd, one for Ni). Risk characterization identified different potentially hazardous items compared to United States, Canadian, and European Union approaches. A comprehensive approach was also developed to deal with complexity and drawbacks caused by various toy/jewelry definitions, test methods, exposure scenarios, and elements considered in different regulatory approaches. It includes bioaccessible limits for eight priority elements (As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, and Sb). Research is recommended on metals bioaccessibility determination in toys/jewelry, in vitro bioaccessibility test development, estimation of material ingestion rates and frequency, presence of hexavalent Cr and organic Sn, and assessment of prolonged exposure to MJ.

  14. A semi-parametric approach to estimate risk functions associated with multi-dimensional exposure profiles: application to smoking and lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastie, David I; Liverani, Silvia; Azizi, Lamiae; Richardson, Sylvia; Stücker, Isabelle

    2013-10-23

    A common characteristic of environmental epidemiology is the multi-dimensional aspect of exposure patterns, frequently reduced to a cumulative exposure for simplicity of analysis. By adopting a flexible Bayesian clustering approach, we explore the risk function linking exposure history to disease. This approach is applied here to study the relationship between different smoking characteristics and lung cancer in the framework of a population based case control study. Our study includes 4658 males (1995 cases, 2663 controls) with full smoking history (intensity, duration, time since cessation, pack-years) from the ICARE multi-centre study conducted from 2001-2007. We extend Bayesian clustering techniques to explore predictive risk surfaces for covariate profiles of interest. We were able to partition the population into 12 clusters with different smoking profiles and lung cancer risk. Our results confirm that when compared to intensity, duration is the predominant driver of risk. On the other hand, using pack-years of cigarette smoking as a single summary leads to a considerable loss of information. Our method estimates a disease risk associated to a specific exposure profile by robustly accounting for the different dimensions of exposure and will be helpful in general to give further insight into the effect of exposures that are accumulated through different time patterns.

  15. Impact of Soil Cadmium on Land Snails: A Two-Stage Exposure Approach under Semi-Field Conditions Using Bioaccumulative and Conchological End-Points of Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nica, Dragos V.; Filimon, Marioara Nicoleta; Bordean, Despina-Maria; Harmanescu, Monica; Draghici, George Andrei; Dragan, Simona; Gergen, Iosif I.

    2015-01-01

    Land snails are highly tolerant to cadmium exposure and are able to accumulate soil cadmium independently of food ingestion. However, little information exists on the kinetics of cadmium retention in terrestrial gastropods exposed to an increase in the soil cadmium content, over time. There is also little knowledge about how exposure to cadmium-polluted soils influences shell growth and architecture. In this context, we examined cadmium accumulation in the hepatopancreas and shell of juvenile Cantareus aspersus exposed to elevating high levels of cadmium in soil. Also, the toxicity of cadmium to snails was assessed using a range of conchological endpoints, including shell height, width, volume, allometry and integrity. Test snails, aged three months, were reared under semi-field conditions, fed an uncontaminated diet and exposed first, for a period of 30 days, to a series of soil cadmium concentrations, and then, for a second period of 30 days, to soils with higher cadmium content. Cadmium showed a dose-dependent accumulation in both the hepatopancreas and shell. The kinetics of cadmium retention in the hepatopancreas of snails previously exposed to cadmium-spiked soils was significantly influenced by a new exposure event. The shell was not a relevant bioaccumulator for soil cadmium. Under the present experimental conditions, only high cadmium exposure significantly affected either the shell growth or snail survival. There was no consistent effect on shell allometry, but the shell integrity, especially in rapidly growing parts, appeared to be affected by high cadmium exposure. Our results attest to the value of hepatopancreas for describing cadmium retention in land snails and to the difficulty of using conchological parameters in field surveys for estimating the environmental hazard of soil cadmium. PMID:25790135

  16. Impact of soil cadmium on land snails: a two-stage exposure approach under semi-field conditions using bioaccumulative and conchological end-points of exposure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragos V Nica

    Full Text Available Land snails are highly tolerant to cadmium exposure and are able to accumulate soil cadmium independently of food ingestion. However, little information exists on the kinetics of cadmium retention in terrestrial gastropods exposed to an increase in the soil cadmium content, over time. There is also little knowledge about how exposure to cadmium-polluted soils influences shell growth and architecture. In this context, we examined cadmium accumulation in the hepatopancreas and shell of juvenile Cantareus aspersus exposed to elevating high levels of cadmium in soil. Also, the toxicity of cadmium to snails was assessed using a range of conchological endpoints, including shell height, width, volume, allometry and integrity. Test snails, aged three months, were reared under semi-field conditions, fed an uncontaminated diet and exposed first, for a period of 30 days, to a series of soil cadmium concentrations, and then, for a second period of 30 days, to soils with higher cadmium content. Cadmium showed a dose-dependent accumulation in both the hepatopancreas and shell. The kinetics of cadmium retention in the hepatopancreas of snails previously exposed to cadmium-spiked soils was significantly influenced by a new exposure event. The shell was not a relevant bioaccumulator for soil cadmium. Under the present experimental conditions, only high cadmium exposure significantly affected either the shell growth or snail survival. There was no consistent effect on shell allometry, but the shell integrity, especially in rapidly growing parts, appeared to be affected by high cadmium exposure. Our results attest to the value of hepatopancreas for describing cadmium retention in land snails and to the difficulty of using conchological parameters in field surveys for estimating the environmental hazard of soil cadmium.

  17. A Review of the Mechanism of Injury and Treatment Approaches for Illness Resulting from Exposure to Water-Damaged Buildings, Mold, and Mycotoxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janette Hope

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Physicians are increasingly being asked to diagnose and treat people made ill by exposure to water-damaged environments, mold, and mycotoxins. In addition to avoidance of further exposure to these environments and to items contaminated by these environments, a number of approaches have been used to help persons affected by exposure to restore their health. Illness results from a combination of factors present in water-damaged indoor environments including, mold spores and hyphal fragments, mycotoxins, bacteria, bacterial endotoxins, and cell wall components as well as other factors. Mechanisms of illness include inflammation, oxidative stress, toxicity, infection, allergy, and irritant effects of exposure. This paper reviews the scientific literature as it relates to commonly used treatments such as glutathione, antioxidants, antifungals, and sequestering agents such as Cholestyramine, charcoal, clay and chlorella, antioxidants, probiotics, and induced sweating.

  18. A Review of the Mechanism of Injury and Treatment Approaches for Illness Resulting from Exposure to Water-Damaged Buildings, Mold, and Mycotoxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Physicians are increasingly being asked to diagnose and treat people made ill by exposure to water-damaged environments, mold, and mycotoxins. In addition to avoidance of further exposure to these environments and to items contaminated by these environments, a number of approaches have been used to help persons affected by exposure to restore their health. Illness results from a combination of factors present in water-damaged indoor environments including, mold spores and hyphal fragments, mycotoxins, bacteria, bacterial endotoxins, and cell wall components as well as other factors. Mechanisms of illness include inflammation, oxidative stress, toxicity, infection, allergy, and irritant effects of exposure. This paper reviews the scientific literature as it relates to commonly used treatments such as glutathione, antioxidants, antifungals, and sequestering agents such as Cholestyramine, charcoal, clay and chlorella, antioxidants, probiotics, and induced sweating. PMID:23710148

  19. A new and efficient Solid Phase Microextraction approach for analysis of high fat content food samples using a matrix-compatible coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Grazia, Selenia; Gionfriddo, Emanuela; Pawliszyn, Janusz

    2017-05-15

    The current work presents the optimization of a protocol enabling direct extraction of avocado samples by a new Solid Phase Microextraction matrix compatible coating. In order to further extend the coating life time, pre-desorption and post-desorption washing steps were optimized for solvent type, time, and degree of agitation employed. Using optimized conditions, lifetime profiles of the coating related to extraction of a group of analytes bearing different physical-chemical properties were obtained. Over 80 successive extractions were carried out to establish coating efficiency using PDMS/DVB 65µm commercial coating in comparison with the PDMS/DVB/PDMS. The PDMS/DVB coating was more prone to irreversible matrix attachment on its surface, with consequent reduction of its extractive performance after 80 consecutive extractions. Conversely, the PDMS/DVB/PDMS coating showed enhanced inertness towards matrix fouling due to its outer smooth PDMS layer. This work represents the first step towards the development of robust SPME methods for quantification of contaminants in avocado as well as other fatty-based matrices, with minimal sample pre-treatment prior to extraction. In addition, an evaluation of matrix components attachment on the coating surface and related artifacts created by desorption of the coating at high temperatures in the GC-injector port, has been performed by GCxGC-ToF/MS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Olfactometric approach for the evaluation of citizens' exposure to industrial emissions in the city of Terni, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capelli, Laura; Sironi, Selena; Del Rosso, Renato; Céntola, Paolo; Rossi, Adriano; Austeri, Caterina

    2011-01-01

    Since several years odour nuisance is a serious environmental concern in the city of Terni, whose citizens are repeatedly lamenting the presence of malodours. This paper describes the olfactometric approach adopted for assessing the odour impact on the city of Terni, caused by the co-presence of three important industrial poles: the steel industry pole, the chemical pole and a third industrial pole, comprising different activities for the treatment of wastewaters and solid waste. The combination of analyses by dynamic olfactometry and dispersion modelling allowed the evaluation of the citizens' exposure to the industrial odours, resulting in both the quantification of emissions and the assessment of their impact on the territory. The overall odour emissions were estimated to be equal to 218,000 ou(E) s(-1): 51% from the steel industry pole, 29% from the chemical pole and 20% from the other plants, respectively. The simulation of the emission dispersion shows that the odour impact relevant to all three studied industrial poles is considerable, actually investing almost the whole city of Terni. The study results also enabled the identification of the most problematic odour sources, which turned out to be the primary emissions from the furnace for the steel industry pole, Treofan and the wastewater treatment plant for the chemical pole and the municipal wastewater treatment plant and the pulper incinerator as far as the other plants are concerned. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Nanoparticle exposure at nanotechnology workplaces: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Göhler Daniel

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Risk, associated with nanomaterial use, is determined by exposure and hazard potential of these materials. Both topics cannot be evaluated absolutely independently. Realistic dose concentrations should be tested based on stringent exposure assessments for the corresponding nanomaterial taking into account also the environmental and product matrix. This review focuses on current available information from peer reviewed publications related to airborne nanomaterial exposure. Two approaches to derive realistic exposure values are differentiated and independently presented; those based on workplace measurements and the others based on simulations in laboratories. An assessment of the current available workplace measurement data using a matrix, which is related to nanomaterials and work processes, shows, that data are available on the likelihood of release and possible exposure. Laboratory studies are seen as an important complementary source of information on particle release processes and hence for possible exposure. In both cases, whether workplace measurements or laboratories studies, the issue of background particles is a major problem. From this review, major areas for future activities and focal points are identified.

  2. A tiered approach for integrating exposure and dosimetry with in vitro dose-response data in the modern risk assessment paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    High-throughput (HT) risk screening approaches apply in vitro dose-response data to estimate potential health risks that arise from exposure to chemicals. However, much uncertainty is inherent in relating bioactivities observed in an in vitro system to the perturbations of biolog...

  3. Changes in the Relative Balance of Approach and Avoidance Inclinations to Use Alcohol Following Cue Exposure Vary in Low and High Risk Drinkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross C. Hollett

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available According to the ambivalence model of craving, alcohol craving involves the dynamic interplay of separate approach and avoidance inclinations. Cue-elicited increases in approach inclinations are posited to be more likely to result in alcohol consumption and risky drinking behaviors only if unimpeded by restraint inclinations. Current study aims were (1 to test if changes in the net balance between approach and avoidance inclinations following alcohol cue exposure differentiate between low and high risk drinkers, and (2 if this balance is associated with alcohol consumption on a subsequent taste test. In two experiments (N = 60; N = 79, low and high risk social drinkers were exposed to alcohol cues, and pre- and post- approach and avoidance inclinations measured. An ad libitum alcohol consumption paradigm and a non-alcohol exposure condition were also included in Study 2. Cue-elicited craving was characterized by a predominant approach inclination only in the high risk drinkers. Conversely, approach inclinations were adaptively balanced by equally strong avoidance inclinations when cue-elicited craving was induced in low risk drinkers. For these low risk drinkers with the balanced craving profile, neither approach or avoidance inclinations predicted subsequent alcohol consumption levels during the taste test. Conversely, for high risk drinkers, where the approach inclination predominated, each inclination synergistically predicted subsequent drinking levels during the taste test. In conclusion, results support the importance of assessing both approach and avoidance inclinations, and their relative balance following alcohol cue exposure. Specifically, this more comprehensive assessment reveals changes in craving profiles that are not apparent from examining changes in approach inclinations alone, and it is this shift in the net balance that distinguishes high from low risk drinkers.

  4. A margin of exposure approach to assessment of non-cancerous risk of diethyl phthalate based on human exposure from bottled water consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zare Jeddi, Maryam; Rastkari, Noushin; Ahmadkhaniha, Reza; Yunesian, Masud; Nabizadeh, Ramin; Daryabeygi, Reza

    2015-12-01

    Phthalates may be present in food due to their widespread presence as environmental contaminants or due to migration from food contact materials. Exposure to phthalates is considered to be potentially harmful to human health as well. Therefore, determining the main source of exposure is an important issue. So, the purpose of this study was (1) to measure the release of diethyl phthalate (DEP) in bottled water consumed in common storage conditions specially low temperature and freezing conditions; (2) to evaluate the intake of DEP from polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottled water and health risk assessment; and (3) to assess the contribution of the bottled water to the DEP intake against the tolerable daily intake (TDI) values. DEP migration was investigated in six brands of PET-bottled water under different storage conditions room temperature, refrigerator temperature, freezing conditions (40 °C ,0 °C and -18 °C) and outdoor] at various time intervals by magnetic solid extraction (MSPE) using gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS). Eventually, a health risk assessment was conducted and the margin of exposure (MOE) was calculated. The results indicate that contact time with packaging and storage temperatures caused DEP to be released into water from PET bottles. But, when comprising the DEP concentration with initial level, the results demonstrated that the release of phthalates were not substantial in all storage conditions especially at low temperatures (water was much lower than the reference value. However, the lowest MOE was estimated for high water consumers (preschooler > children > lactating women > teenagers > adults > pregnant women), but in all target groups, the MOE was much higher than 1000, thus, low risk is implied. Consequently, PET-bottled water is not a major source of human exposure to DEP and from this perspective is safe for consumption.

  5. Impact of longitudinal exposure to mycophenolic acid on acute rejection in renal-transplant recipients using a joint modeling approach.

    OpenAIRE

    Daher-Abdi, Zeinab; Essig, Marie; Rizopoulos, Dimitris; Le Meur, Yannick; Prémaud, Aurélie; Woillard, Jean-Baptiste; Rerolle, Jean-Philippe; Marquet, Pierre; Rousseau, Annick

    2013-01-01

    International audience; This study aimed to investigate the association between longitudinal exposure to mycophenolic acid (MPA) and acute rejection (AR) risk in the first year after renal transplantation, and to propose MPA exposure targets conditionally to this association. A joint model, adjusted for monitoring strategy (fixed-dose versus concentration-controlled) and recipient age, was developed; it combined a mixed-effects model to describe the whole pattern of MPA exposure (i.e. area un...

  6. Unified continuum damage model for matrix cracking in composite rotor blades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollayi, Hemaraju; Harursampath, Dineshkumar [Nonlinear Multifunctional Composites - Analysis and Design Lab (NMCAD Lab) Department of Aerospace Engineering Indian Institute of Science Bangalore - 560012, Karnataka (India)

    2015-03-10

    This paper deals with modeling of the first damage mode, matrix micro-cracking, in helicopter rotor/wind turbine blades and how this effects the overall cross-sectional stiffness. The helicopter/wind turbine rotor system operates in a highly dynamic and unsteady environment leading to severe vibratory loads present in the system. Repeated exposure to this loading condition can induce damage in the composite rotor blades. These rotor/turbine blades are generally made of fiber-reinforced laminated composites and exhibit various competing modes of damage such as matrix micro-cracking, delamination, and fiber breakage. There is a need to study the behavior of the composite rotor system under various key damage modes in composite materials for developing Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) system. Each blade is modeled as a beam based on geometrically non-linear 3-D elasticity theory. Each blade thus splits into 2-D analyzes of cross-sections and non-linear 1-D analyzes along the beam reference curves. Two different tools are used here for complete 3-D analysis: VABS for 2-D cross-sectional analysis and GEBT for 1-D beam analysis. The physically-based failure models for matrix in compression and tension loading are used in the present work. Matrix cracking is detected using two failure criterion: Matrix Failure in Compression and Matrix Failure in Tension which are based on the recovered field. A strain variable is set which drives the damage variable for matrix cracking and this damage variable is used to estimate the reduced cross-sectional stiffness. The matrix micro-cracking is performed in two different approaches: (i) Element-wise, and (ii) Node-wise. The procedure presented in this paper is implemented in VABS as matrix micro-cracking modeling module. Three examples are presented to investigate the matrix failure model which illustrate the effect of matrix cracking on cross-sectional stiffness by varying the applied cyclic load.

  7. A decision tree approach to screen drinking water contaminants for multiroute exposure potential in developing guideline values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Kannan; Carrier, Richard

    2017-07-03

    The consideration of inhalation and dermal routes of exposures in developing guideline values for drinking water contaminants is important. However, there is no guidance for determining the eligibility of a drinking water contaminant for its multiroute exposure potential. The objective of the present study was to develop a 4-step framework to screen chemicals for their dermal and inhalation exposure potential in the process of developing guideline values. The proposed framework emphasizes the importance of considering basic physicochemical properties prior to detailed assessment of dermal and inhalation routes of exposure to drinking water contaminants in setting guideline values.

  8. Random matrix theory

    CERN Document Server

    Deift, Percy

    2009-01-01

    This book features a unified derivation of the mathematical theory of the three classical types of invariant random matrix ensembles-orthogonal, unitary, and symplectic. The authors follow the approach of Tracy and Widom, but the exposition here contains a substantial amount of additional material, in particular, facts from functional analysis and the theory of Pfaffians. The main result in the book is a proof of universality for orthogonal and symplectic ensembles corresponding to generalized Gaussian type weights following the authors' prior work. New, quantitative error estimates are derive

  9. Matrix vector analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Eisenman, Richard L

    2005-01-01

    This outstanding text and reference applies matrix ideas to vector methods, using physical ideas to illustrate and motivate mathematical concepts but employing a mathematical continuity of development rather than a physical approach. The author, who taught at the U.S. Air Force Academy, dispenses with the artificial barrier between vectors and matrices--and more generally, between pure and applied mathematics.Motivated examples introduce each idea, with interpretations of physical, algebraic, and geometric contexts, in addition to generalizations to theorems that reflect the essential structur

  10. Quartz and respirable dust in the Dutch construction industry: a baseline exposure assessment as part of a multidimensional intervention approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Deurssen, Erik; Pronk, Anjoeka; Spaan, Suzanne; Goede, Henk; Tielemans, Erik; Heederik, Dick; Meijster, Tim

    2014-07-01

    Quartz exposure can cause several respiratory health effects. Although quartz exposure has been described in several observational workplace studies, well-designed intervention studies that investigate the effect of control strategies are lacking. This article describes a baseline exposure study that is part of a multidimensional intervention program aiming to reduce quartz exposure among construction workers. In this study, personal respirable dust and quartz exposure was assessed among 116 construction workers (bricklayers, carpenters, concrete drillers, demolishers, and tuck pointers). Possible determinants of exposure, like job, tasks, and work practices, use of control measures, and organizational and psychosocial factors, were explored using exposure models for respirable dust and quartz separately. Stratified analyses by job title were performed to evaluate the effect of control measures on exposure and to explore the association between control measures and psychosocial factors. Overall, 62% of all measurements exceeded the Dutch occupational exposure limit for quartz and 11% for respirable dust. Concrete drillers and tuck pointers had the highest exposures for quartz and respirable dust (0.20 and 3.43mg m(-3), respectively). Significant predictors of elevated quartz exposure were abrasive tasks and type of material worked on. Surprisingly, in a univariate model, an increased knowledge level was associated with an increase in exposure. Although control measures were used infrequently, if used they resulted in approximately 40% reduction in quartz exposure among concrete drillers and tuck pointers. Only among concrete drillers, the use of control measures was associated with a higher score for social influence (factor 1.6); knowledge showed an inverse association with use of control measures for concrete drillers, demolishers, and tuck pointers. In conclusion, the detailed information on determinants of exposure, use of control measures, and constraints to

  11. Application of a quantitative weight of evidence approach for ranking and prioritising occupational exposure scenarios for titanium dioxide and carbon nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hristozov, Danail R; Gottardo, Stefania; Cinelli, Marco; Isigonis, Panagiotis; Zabeo, Alex; Critto, Andrea; Van Tongeren, Martie; Tran, Lang; Marcomini, Antonio

    2014-03-01

    Substantial limitations and uncertainties hinder the exposure assessment of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs). The present deficit of reliable measurements and models will inevitably lead in the near term to qualitative and uncertain exposure estimations, which may fail to support adequate risk assessment and management. Therefore it is necessary to complement the current toolset with user-friendly methods for near-term nanosafety evaluation. This paper proposes an approach for relative exposure screening of ENMs. For the first time, an exposure model explicitly implements quantitative weight of evidence (WoE) methods and utilises expert judgement for filling data gaps in the available evidence-base. Application of the framework is illustrated for screening of exposure scenarios for nanoscale titanium dioxide, carbon nanotubes and fullerenes, but it is applicable to other nanomaterials as well. The results show that the WoE-based model overestimates exposure for scenarios where expert judgement was substantially used to fill data gaps, which suggests its conservative nature. In order to test how variations in input data influence the obtained results, probabilistic Monte Carlo sensitivity analysis was applied to demonstrate that the model performs in stable manner.

  12. The radon issue: Considerations on regulatory approaches and exposure evaluations on the basis of recent epidemiological results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bochicchio, Francesco [Italian National Institute of Health (ISS), Viale Regina Elena, 299, 00161 Roma (Italy)], E-mail: francesco.bochicchio@iss.it

    2008-11-15

    Recent epidemiological results have shown consistent statistically significant increases of lung cancer risk due to exposure to radon in dwellings at moderate levels of exposure, and a strong synergism with cigarette smoking. These results are summarized and discussed in relation to their possible implications for the regulatory control of radon and for future policies for the control of radon risk.

  13. Pathways of inhalation exposure to manganese in children living near a ferromanganese refinery: A structural equation modeling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manganese (Mn) is both essential element and neurotoxicant. Exposure to Mn can occur from various sources and routes. Structural equation modeling was used to examine routes of exposure to Mn among children residing near a ferromanganese refinery in Marietta, Ohio. An inhalation ...

  14. Issues and approaches for ensuring effective communication on acceptable daily exposure (ADE) values applied to pharmaceutical cleaning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Michael J; Faria, Ellen C; Hayes, Eileen P; Jolly, Robert A; Barle, Ester Lovsin; Molnar, Lance R; Naumann, Bruce D; Pecquet, Alison M; Shipp, Bryan K; Sussman, Robert G; Weideman, Patricia A

    2016-08-01

    This manuscript centers on communication with key stakeholders of the concepts and program goals involved in the application of health-based pharmaceutical cleaning limits. Implementation of health-based cleaning limits, as distinct from other standards such as 1/1000th of the lowest clinical dose, is a concept recently introduced into regulatory domains. While there is a great deal of technical detail in the written framework underpinning the use of Acceptable Daily Exposures (ADEs) in cleaning (for example ISPE, 2010; Sargent et al., 2013), little is available to explain how to practically create a program which meets regulatory needs while also fulfilling good manufacturing practice (GMP) and other expectations. The lack of a harmonized approach for program implementation and communication across stakeholders can ultimately foster inappropriate application of these concepts. Thus, this period in time (2014-2017) could be considered transitional with respect to influencing best practice related to establishing health-based cleaning limits. Suggestions offered in this manuscript are intended to encourage full and accurate communication regarding both scientific and administrative elements of health-based ADE values used in pharmaceutical cleaning practice. This is a large and complex effort that requires: 1) clearly explaining key terms and definitions, 2) identification of stakeholders, 3) assessment of stakeholders' subject matter knowledge, 4) formulation of key messages fit to stakeholder needs, 5) identification of effective and timely means for communication, and 6) allocation of time, energy, and motivation for initiating and carrying through with communications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A random matrix theory of decoherence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorin, T [Departamento de FIsica, Universidad de Guadalajara, Blvd Marcelino GarcIa Barragan y Calzada OlImpica, Guadalajara CP 44840, JalIsco (Mexico); Pineda, C [Institut fuer Physik und Astronomie, University of Potsdam, 14476 Potsdam (Germany); Kohler, H [Fachbereich Physik, Universitaet Duisburg-Essen, D-47057 Duisburg (Germany); Seligman, T H [Instituto de Ciencias FIsicas, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (Mexico)], E-mail: thomas.gorin@red.cucei.udg.mx, E-mail: carlospgmat03@gmail.com

    2008-11-15

    Random matrix theory is used to represent generic loss of coherence of a fixed central system coupled to a quantum-chaotic environment, represented by a random matrix ensemble, via random interactions. We study the average density matrix arising from the ensemble induced, in contrast to previous studies where the average values of purity, concurrence and entropy were considered; we further discuss when one or the other approach is relevant. The two approaches agree in the limit of large environments. Analytic results for the average density matrix and its purity are presented in linear response approximation. The two-qubit system is analysed, mainly numerically, in more detail.

  16. Supersymmetry in random matrix theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kieburg, Mario

    2010-05-04

    I study the applications of supersymmetry in random matrix theory. I generalize the supersymmetry method and develop three new approaches to calculate eigenvalue correlation functions. These correlation functions are averages over ratios of characteristic polynomials. In the first part of this thesis, I derive a relation between integrals over anti-commuting variables (Grassmann variables) and differential operators with respect to commuting variables. With this relation I rederive Cauchy- like integral theorems. As a new application I trace the supermatrix Bessel function back to a product of two ordinary matrix Bessel functions. In the second part, I apply the generalized Hubbard-Stratonovich transformation to arbitrary rotation invariant ensembles of real symmetric and Hermitian self-dual matrices. This extends the approach for unitarily rotation invariant matrix ensembles. For the k-point correlation functions I derive supersymmetric integral expressions in a unifying way. I prove the equivalence between the generalized Hubbard-Stratonovich transformation and the superbosonization formula. Moreover, I develop an alternative mapping from ordinary space to superspace. After comparing the results of this approach with the other two supersymmetry methods, I obtain explicit functional expressions for the probability densities in superspace. If the probability density of the matrix ensemble factorizes, then the generating functions exhibit determinantal and Pfaffian structures. For some matrix ensembles this was already shown with help of other approaches. I show that these structures appear by a purely algebraic manipulation. In this new approach I use structures naturally appearing in superspace. I derive determinantal and Pfaffian structures for three types of integrals without actually mapping onto superspace. These three types of integrals are quite general and, thus, they are applicable to a broad class of matrix ensembles. (orig.)

  17. Reaching Nutritional Adequacy Does Not Necessarily Increase Exposure to Food Contaminants: Evidence from a Whole-Diet Modeling Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barré, Tangui; Vieux, Florent; Perignon, Marlène; Cravedi, Jean-Pierre; Amiot, Marie-Josèphe; Micard, Valérie; Darmon, Nicole

    2016-10-01

    Dietary guidelines are designed to help meet nutritional requirements, but they do not explicitly or quantitatively account for food contaminant exposures. In this study, we aimed to test whether dietary changes needed to achieve nutritional adequacy were compatible with acceptable exposure to food contaminants. Data from the French national dietary survey were linked with food contaminant data from the French Total Diet Study to estimate the mean intake of 204 representative food items and mean exposure to 27 contaminants, including pesticides, heavy metals, mycotoxins, nondioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (NDL-PCBs) and dioxin-like compounds. For each sex, 2 modeled diets that departed the least from the observed diet were designed: 1) a diet respecting only nutritional recommendations (NUT model), and 2) a diet that met nutritional recommendations without exceeding Toxicological Reference Values (TRVs) and observed contaminant exposures (NUTOX model). Food, nutrient, and contaminant contents in observed diets and NUT and NUTOX diets were compared with the use of paired t tests. Mean observed diets did not meet all nutritional recommendations, but no contaminant was over 48% of its TRV. Achieving all the nutrient recommendations through the NUT model mainly required increases in fruit, vegetable, and fish intake and decreases in meat, cheese, and animal fat intake. These changes were associated with significantly increased dietary exposure to some contaminants, but without exceeding 57% of TRVs. The highest increases were found for NDL-PCBs (from 26% to 57% of TRV for women). Reaching nutritional adequacy without exceeding observed contaminant exposure (NUTOX model) was possible but required further departure from observed food quantities. Based on a broad range of nutrients and contaminants, this first assessment of compatibility between nutritional adequacy and toxicological exposure showed that reaching nutritional adequacy might increase exposure to food

  18. Semiconductor Nanomaterials-Based Fluorescence Spectroscopic and Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization (MALDI Mass Spectrometric Approaches to Proteome Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Kumar Kailasa

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs or nanoparticles (NPs exhibit very unusual physico-chemcial and optical properties. This review article introduces the applications of semiconductor nanomaterials (NMs in fluorescence spectroscopy and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS for biomolecule analysis. Due to their unique physico-chemical and optical properties, semiconductors NMs have created many new platforms for investigating biomolecular structures and information in modern biology. These semiconductor NMs served as effective fluorescent probes for sensing proteins and cells and acted as affinity or concentrating probes for enriching peptides, proteins and bacteria proteins prior to MALDI-MS analysis.

  19. Alveolar Ridge Preservation Using Xenogeneic Collagen Matrix and Bone Allograft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas O. Parashis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Alveolar ridge preservation (ARP has been shown to prevent postextraction bone loss. The aim of this report is to highlight the clinical, radiographic, and histological outcomes following use of a bilayer xenogeneic collagen matrix (XCM in combination with freeze-dried bone allograft (FDBA for ARP. Nine patients were treated after extraction of 18 teeth. Following minimal flap elevation and atraumatic extraction, sockets were filled with FDBA. The XCM was adapted to cover the defect and 2-3 mm of adjacent bone and flaps were repositioned. Healing was uneventful in all cases, the XCM remained in place, and any matrix exposure was devoid of further complications. Exposed matrix portions were slowly vascularized and replaced by mature keratinized tissue within 2-3 months. Radiographic and clinical assessment indicated adequate volume of bone for implant placement, with all planned implants placed in acceptable positions. When fixed partial dentures were placed, restorations fulfilled aesthetic demands without requiring further augmentation procedures. Histological and immunohistochemical analysis from 9 sites (4 patients indicated normal mucosa with complete incorporation of the matrix and absence of inflammatory response. The XCM + FDBA combination resulted in minimal complications and desirable soft and hard tissue therapeutic outcomes, suggesting the feasibility of this approach for ARP.

  20. Unpacking constructs: a network approach for studying war exposure, daily stressors and post-traumatic stress disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Maarten eDe Schryver; Sofie eVindevogel; Andrew Edward Rasmussen; Cramer, Angélique O. J.

    2015-01-01

    Conflict-affected populations are exposed to stressful events during and after war, and it is well established that both take a substantial toll on individuals’ mental health. Exactly how exposure to events during and after war affect mental health is a topic of considerable debate. Various hypotheses have been put forward on the relation between stressful war exposure (SWE), daily stressors (DS) and the development of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This paper seeks to contribute to t...

  1. Eigenvalues properties of terms correspondences matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondarchuk, Dmitry; Timofeeva, Galina

    2016-12-01

    Vector model representations of text documents are widely used in the intelligent search. In this approach a collection of documents is represented in the form of the term-document matrix, reflecting the frequency of terms. In the latent semantic analysis the dimension of the vector space is reduced by the singular value decomposition of the term-document matrix. Authors use a matrix of terms correspondences, reflecting the relationship between the terms, to allocate a semantic core and to obtain more simple presentation of the documents. With this approach, reducing the number of terms is based on the orthogonal decomposition of the matrix of terms correspondences. Properties of singular values of the term-document matrix and eigenvalues of the matrix of terms correspondences are studied in the case when documents differ substantially in length.

  2. The quasi experimental study of the influence of advertising creativity and exposure intensity toward buying action with aida approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramdan Dede Budiawan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Advertisement is one of marketing communication forms made by companies to reach sales goal of certain product. Advertising creativity is one of important factors that determines the success of television advertisement, beside that the exposure intensity also be determining factor to make the television advertisement get attention from spectators. To measure the spectators response toward advertisement in this research, the researcher used AIDA model. AIDA (attention, interest, desire, action model is one of popular response hierarchy models for marketer as guidance to implement the marketing communication activities. The thesis analyzes the influence of advertising creativity and exposure intensity toward the buying action as the final stage of consumer in deciding the decision to buy product. The research used quasi experimental study to 80 respondents as the target market of the advertised, that is ice cream of Haan brand. The experiment as done in 2 treatments, treatment 1: one advertising exposure and treatment 2: three advertising exposures. The Mann Whitney difference test with SPSS program showed no significant differences between treatment of 1 exposure and 3 exposures. The SEM PLS analysis showed that advertising creativity influenced significantly to attention, interest, desire and action in buying product.

  3. Organo-mineral fertilisers from glass-matrix and organic biomasses: a new way to release nutrients. A novel approach to fertilisation based on plant demand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinchera, Alessandra; Allegra, Maria; Rea, Elvira; Roccuzzo, Giancarlo; Rinaldi, Simona; Sequi, Paolo; Intrigliolo, Francesco

    2011-10-01

    A glass-matrix fertiliser (GMF), a by-product from ceramic industries, releases nutrients only in the presence of complexing solutions, similar to those exuded by plant roots. This ensures a slow release of nutrients over time, limiting the risk of their loss in the environment. With the aim to improve fertiliser performance, GMF was mixed with vine vinasse (DVV), pastazzo (a by-product of the citrus processing industry, PAS) or green compost (COMP) and nutrient release was evaluated by citric and chloridric acid extraction, at different concentrations. Theoretical and actual nutrients release were compared to evaluate possible synergistic effects due to the organic component added to the mineral fertiliser: phosphorus (+7.1%), K (+4.8%), Fe (+8.5%) and Zn (+5.5%) were released more efficiently by 2% citric acid from GMF + DVV, while Ca availability was increased (+5.3%) by 2% citric acid from GMF + PAS mixture. Both DVV and COMP increased by 12-18% the Fe release from GFM matrix. Organic biomasses added to GMF increased the release of some macro and micronutrients through an 'activation effect', which suggests the employment of these organo-mineral fertilisers also in short-cycle crops production. Moreover, the re-use of some agro-industrial organic residues gives another 'adding value' to this novel organo-mineral fertilfertilisers. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  4. Effects of Thermal Exposure on Properties of Al-Li Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Sandeep; Wells, Doug; Stanton, William; Lawless, Kirby; Russell, Carolyn; Wagner, John; Domack, Marcia; Babel, Henry; Farahmand, Bahram; Schwab, David; hide

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents viewgraphs on the effects of thermal exposure on the mechanical properties of both developmental and production mature Al-Li alloys. The topics include: 1) Aluminum-Lithium Alloys Composition and Features; 2) Key Characteristics of Al-Li Alloys; 3) Research Approach; 4) Available and Tested Material; and 5) Thermal Exposure Matrix. The alloy temperatures, gage thickness and product forms show that there is no deficit in mechanical properties at lower exposure temperatures in some cases, and a significant deficit in mechanical properties at higher exposure temperatures in all cases.

  5. A latent variable approach to study gene-environment interactions in the presence of multiple correlated exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Brisa N; Kang, Shan; Mukherjee, Bhramar

    2012-06-01

    Many existing cohort studies initially designed to investigate disease risk as a function of environmental exposures have collected genomic data in recent years with the objective of testing for gene-environment interaction (G × E) effects. In environmental epidemiology, interest in G × E arises primarily after a significant effect of the environmental exposure has been documented. Cohort studies often collect rich exposure data; as a result, assessing G × E effects in the presence of multiple exposure markers further increases the burden of multiple testing, an issue already present in both genetic and environment health studies. Latent variable (LV) models have been used in environmental epidemiology to reduce dimensionality of the exposure data, gain power by reducing multiplicity issues via condensing exposure data, and avoid collinearity problems due to presence of multiple correlated exposures. We extend the LV framework to characterize gene-environment interaction in presence of multiple correlated exposures and genotype categories. Further, similar to what has been done in case-control G × E studies, we use the assumption of gene-environment (G-E) independence to boost the power of tests for interaction. The consequences of making this assumption, or the issue of how to explicitly model G-E association has not been previously investigated in LV models. We postulate a hierarchy of assumptions about the LV model regarding the different forms of G-E dependence and show that making such assumptions may influence inferential results on the G, E, and G × E parameters. We implement a class of shrinkage estimators to data adaptively trade-off between the most restrictive to most flexible form of G-E dependence assumption and note that such class of compromise estimators can serve as a benchmark of model adequacy in LV models. We demonstrate the methods with an example from the Early Life Exposures in Mexico City to Neuro-Toxicants Study of lead exposure, iron

  6. Measuring the impact of manganese exposure on children's neurodevelopment: advances and research gaps in biomarker-based approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coetzee, Donna J; McGovern, Patricia M; Rao, Raghavendra; Harnack, Lisa J; Georgieff, Michael K; Stepanov, Irina

    2016-08-30

    Children's exposure to manganese (Mn) is a public health concern and consistent policy guidelines for safe levels of Mn exposure is lacking. The complexity of establishing exposure thresholds for Mn partially relates to its dual role as an essential micronutrient with low levels required for good health, but also as a neurotoxin at high levels. Questions exist about the age-related susceptibility to excess Mn, particularly for children, and how best to measure chronic exposures. To address this concern we conducted a systematic review of studies examining children's exposure to Mn and neurodevelopmental outcomes focused on selection of biomarker-based and environmental measurements of Mn exposure to identify the scientific advances and research gaps. PubMed and EMBASE databases were searched through March 2016 for studies that were published in English, used a biomarker-based or environmental measurement of Mn exposure, and measured at least one neurological outcome for children aged 0-18 years. Ultimately, thirty-six papers from 13 countries were selected. Study designs were cross-sectional (24), prospective cohorts (9), and case control (3). Neurodevelopmental outcomes were first assessed for Mn exposure in infants (6 papers), toddlers or preschoolers (3 papers) and school-age children (27 papers). Studies of school-aged children most frequently measured Intelligence Quotient (IQ) scores using Mn biomarkers of hair or blood. Higher hair concentrations of Mn were consistently associated with lower IQ scores while studies of blood biomarkers and IQ scores had inconsistent findings. Studies of infants and toddlers most frequently measured mental and psychomotor development; findings were inconsistent across biomarkers of Mn (hair, cord blood, tooth enamel, maternal or child blood and dentin). Although few studies measured environmental sources of Mn, hair biomarkers were associated with Mn in drinking water and infant formula. Only one paper quantified the

  7. The costs of smoking and secondhand smoke exposure in Taiwan: a prevalence-based annual cost approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Hai-Yen; Chang, Li-Chuan; Wen, Yu-Wen; Tsai, Yi-Wen

    2014-07-09

    To assess the costs of the health effects of cigarette smoking and secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure to society. Prevalence-based, disease-specific cost-of-illness study. We used an epidemiological population-attributable risk method to determine the costs that can be attributed to smoking and SHS exposure. Taiwan. All adult population aged 35 and older. Direct costs of healthcare expenditures spent for treating tobacco-related diseases, indirect mortality costs measured by the value of lost productivity due to tobacco-related premature deaths and indirect morbidity costs measured by the value of time lost from work due to tobacco-related illness. In 2010, direct costs of smoking and SHS exposure amounted to US$828 million, accounting for 3.4% of Taiwan's total personal healthcare expenditures. Smoking and SHS exposure also contributed to 15 555 premature deaths-corresponding to a loss of 284 765 years of life and US$820 million in productivity-and US$22 million in indirect morbidity costs. These direct and indirect costs totalled US$1670 million, representing 0.4% of Taiwan's gross domestic product and averaging about US$720/adult smoker. The share of the total costs was greater from active smoking (92%) than SHS exposure (8%), and greater for men (92%) than women (8%). Smoking and SHS exposure impose a huge financial loss in Taiwan. Sustained tobacco control efforts to encourage people to quit smoking, prevent smoking uptake by children and young adults and protect all people from SHS exposure are needed. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  8. Impact of longitudinal exposure to mycophenolic acid on acute rejection in renal-transplant recipients using a joint modeling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daher Abdi, Z; Essig, M; Rizopoulos, D; Le Meur, Y; Prémaud, A; Woillard, J B; Rérolle, J P; Marquet, P; Rousseau, A

    2013-06-01

    This study aimed to investigate the association between longitudinal exposure to mycophenolic acid (MPA) and acute rejection (AR) risk in the first year after renal transplantation, and to propose MPA exposure targets conditionally to this association. A joint model, adjusted for monitoring strategy (fixed-dose versus concentration-controlled) and recipient age, was developed; it combined a mixed-effects model to describe the whole pattern of MPA exposure (i.e. area under the concentration-time curve (AUC)) and a survival model. MPA AUC thresholds were determined using time-dependent receiver-operating characteristics (ROC) curves. Data from 490 adult renal-transplant recipients, representative of the general population of adult renal-transplant patients (i.e. including patients considered at low immunological risk-enrolled in the OPERA trial as well as second renal transplant and patients co-treated by either cyclosporine or tacrolimus), were analyzed. A significant association was found between the longitudinal exposure to MPA (MPA AUCs=f(t)) and AR (p=0.0081), and validated by bootstrapping. A significant positive correlation was observed between time post-transplantation and ROC thresholds which increased in average from 35 mg h/L in the first days to 41 mg h/L beyond six months post-transplantation (papproach which recognizes the repeated measures in a same patient, this study supports the association between MPA exposure and AR. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Endoscopic image-guided transoral approach to the craniovertebral junction: an anatomic study comparing surgical exposure and surgical freedom obtained with the endoscope and the operating microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillai, Promod; Baig, Mirza N; Karas, Chris S; Ammirati, Mario

    2009-05-01

    The transoral approach is the most direct and commonly used method to access the ventral craniocervical junction. Recently, an endonasal, endoscopic approach to the craniovertebral junction was proposed. We reasoned that the coupling of the endoscope with the direct transoral approach and image guidance could result in a minimally invasive, simple approach to the ventral craniovertebral junction. We investigated the potential usefulness of such an approach in a cadaver model. A direct transoral approach to the craniovertebral junction was performed using computed tomography-based image guidance in 9 fresh adult head specimens. Endoscopic odontoidectomy was performed in 5 specimens. In the remaining 4 specimens, the surgical working area and surgical freedom associated with an endoscopic and a microscopic approach to the ventral craniovertebral junction were evaluated and compared. In these 4 specimens, we also measured and compared the exposure of the clivus provided by the endoscope and by the operating microscope without splitting the soft palate. With variously angled endoscopic assistance and image guidance, it was possible to tailor the excision of the anterior arch of the atlas and to precisely identify the odontoid process and its related ligaments intraoperatively, resulting in a complete and controlled odontoidectomy. The surgical area exposed over the posterior pharyngeal wall was significantly improved using the endoscope (606.5 +/- 127.4 mm3) compared with the operating microscope (425.7 +/- 100.8 mm3), without any compromise of surgical freedom (P exposure of the clivus without splitting the soft palate. An endoscope-assisted transoral approach is a direct and powerful tool for the treatment of surgical pathology at the craniovertebral junction.

  10. Deterministic light focusing in space and time through multiple scattering media with a Time-Resolved Transmission Matrix approach (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mounaix, Mickael; Defienne, Hugo; Gigan, Sylvain

    2017-02-01

    When an ultrashort pulse of light propagates in a scattering medium, its spatial and temporal properties get mixed and distorted because of the scattering process. Spatially, the output pattern is the result of the multiple interference between the scattered photons. Temporally, light gets stretched within the medium due to its characteristic confinement time, thus the output pulse is broadened in the time domain. Nonetheless, as the scattering process is linear and deterministic, the spatio-temporal profile of light at the output can be controlled by shaping the input light using a single spatial light modulator (SLM). We report the first experimental measurement of the Time-Resolved Transmission Matrix of a multiple scattering medium using a coherent time-gated detection system. This operator contains the relationship between the input field, controllable with a SLM, and the output field accessible with a CCD camera for a given arrival time of photons at the output of medium. The delay line of the time-gated detection system sets the arrival time at will within the time of flight distribution of photons of the output pulse. We exploit this time-resolved matrix to achieve spatio-temporal focusing of the output pulse at any arbitrary space and time position. The pulse is recompressed in time to its original Fourier-limited temporal width and spatially to the diffraction-limited size defined by the speckle grain size. We also generate more sophisticated spatio-temporal profiles such as pump-probe like pulse, thus opening interesting perspectives in coherent control, light-matter interaction and imaging in disordered media.

  11. Exposure assessment in SMES: a low-cost approach to bring OHS services to small-scale enterprises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seneviratne, Mahinda; Phoon, Wai On

    2006-01-01

    There is increased attention to improving occupational health and safety in small to medium-sized Enterprises (SMEs). The Workers Health Centre, a not-for-profit OHS service in western Sydney, assessed workplace exposures in two SMEs following intervention by regulatory agencies. A low-cost monitoring program for noise, airbone dust, fibers and chemicals was conducted at these two metal working industry workplaces. Results showed that exposure to the hazards were above the statutory limits and there was generally an unhealthy access to OHS information by the predominantly immigrant or low literate worker population, were identified. The potential for using a program of low-cost exposure assessments, accompanied by a strategy to provide OHSs information for workers in small-scale enterprises, is discussed.

  12. Young people’s differential vulnerability to criminogenic exposure: Bridging the gap between people- and place-oriented approaches in the study of crime causation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wikström, Per-Olof H; Mann, Richard P; Hardie, Beth

    2018-01-01

    The overall purpose of this study is to contribute to bridging the gap between people- and place-oriented approaches in the study of crime causation. To achieve this we will explore some core hypotheses derived from Situational Action Theory about what makes young people crime prone and makes places criminogenic, and about the interaction between crime propensity and criminogenic exposure predicting crime events. We will also calculate the expected reduction in aggregate levels of crime that will occur as a result of successful interventions targeting crime propensity and criminogenic exposure. To test the hypotheses we will utilize a unique set of space–time budget, small area community survey, land-use and interviewer-led questionnaire data from the prospective longitudinal Peterborough Adolescent and Young Adult Development Study (PADS+) and an artificial neural network approach to modelling. The results show that people’s crime propensity (based on their personal morals and abilities to exercise self-control) has the bulk of predictive power, but also that including criminogenic exposure (being unsupervised with peers and engaged in unstructured activities in residential areas of poor collective efficacy or commercial centres) demonstrates a substantial increase in predictive power (in addition to crime propensity). Moreover, the results show that the probability of crime is strongest when a crime-prone person is in a criminogenic setting and, crucially, that the higher a person’s crime propensity the more vulnerable he or she is to influences of criminogenic exposure. Finally, the findings suggest that a reduction in people’s crime propensity has a much bigger impact on their crime involvement than a reduction in their exposure to criminogenic settings. PMID:29416442

  13. Mimicking exposures to acute and lifetime concentrations of inhaled silver nanoparticles by two different in vitro approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian Herzog

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In the emerging market of nano-sized products, silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs are widely used due to their antimicrobial properties. Human interaction with Ag NPs can occur through the lung, skin, gastrointestinal tract, and bloodstream. However, the inhalation of Ag NP aerosols is a primary concern. To study the possible effects of inhaled Ag NPs, an in vitro triple cell co-culture model of the human alveolar/airway barrier (A549 epithelial cells, human peripheral blood monocyte derived dendritic and macrophage cells together with an air–liquid interface cell exposure (ALICE system was used in order to reflect a real-life exposure scenario. Cells were exposed at the air–liquid interface (ALI to 0.03, 0.3, and 3 µg Ag/cm2 of Ag NPs (diameter 100 nm; coated with polyvinylpyrrolidone: PVP. Ag NPs were found to be highly aggregated within ALI exposed cells with no impairment of cell morphology. Furthermore, a significant increase in release of cytotoxic (LDH, oxidative stress (SOD-1, HMOX-1 or pro-inflammatory markers (TNF-α, IL-8 was absent. As a comparison, cells were exposed to Ag NPs in submerged conditions to 10, 20, and 30 µg Ag/mL. The deposited dose per surface area was estimated by using a dosimetry model (ISDD to directly compare submerged vs ALI exposure concentrations after 4 and 24 h. Unlike ALI exposures, the two highest concentrations under submerged conditions promoted a cytotoxic and pro-inflammatory response after 24 h. Interestingly, when cell cultures were co-incubated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS, no synergistic inflammatory effects were observed. By using two different exposure scenarios it has been shown that the ALI as well as the suspension conditions for the lower concentrations after 4 h, reflecting real-life concentrations of an acute 24 h exposure, did not induce any adverse effects in a complex 3D model mimicking the human alveolar/airway barrier. However, the highest concentrations used in the ALI setup, as well

  14. Retrospective exposure assessment in a chemical research and development facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Cheng; Ramachandran, Gurumurthy; Alexander, Bruce H; Mandel, Jeffrey H

    2012-02-01

    The objective of this exposure assessment was to reconstruct cumulative historical exposures for workers who have been exposed to multiple chemicals and chemical groups to better understand a cluster of brain cancers within a research and development lab. Chemicals of interest, including acrylates, bis-chloromethyl ether (BCME), chloromethyl methyl ether (CMME), isothiazolones and nitrosoamines, were selected on the basis of the plausibility of penetrating the blood-brain barrier and the uniqueness of the chemical's biological activity. In a complicated exposure setting such as a chemical R&D facility, multiple exposure estimation methods were needed. First, similarly exposure groups (SEGs) were created for these materials based on department group, time period of the department's existence and function associated with job titles. A probabilistic framework for assessing exposures was developed using Bayesian analysis of historical monitoring data, mathematical exposure modeling and professional judgments of current and former industrial hygienists at the facility were used to reconstruct the exposure history for acrylates, BCME and CMME for each SEG over the time period of interest. Since sufficient measurement data for isothiazolones and nitrosoamines were not available, the exposure histories for each SEG for these chemicals were estimated. This was done using objective formaldehyde levels and subjective employee interviews. The interviews assessed workplace determinants of exposure as distinct surrogates for estimating inhalation and dermal exposures. The exposure assessments by these methods were compared against each other to estimate the potential for exposure misclassification. A job exposure matrix (JEM) was constructed that contained the exposures obtained from above multiple approaches for each of these chemical groups for each SEG for each year of interest. The combination of methods used in this work is a unique and potentially helpful framework that

  15. Matrix completion by deep matrix factorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jicong; Cheng, Jieyu

    2017-11-03

    Conventional methods of matrix completion are linear methods that are not effective in handling data of nonlinear structures. Recently a few researchers attempted to incorporate nonlinear techniques into matrix completion but there still exists considerable limitations. In this paper, a novel method called deep matrix factorization (DMF) is proposed for nonlinear matrix completion. Different from conventional matrix completion methods that are based on linear latent variable models, DMF is on the basis of a nonlinear latent variable model. DMF is formulated as a deep-structure neural network, in which the inputs are the low-dimensional unknown latent variables and the outputs are the partially observed variables. In DMF, the inputs and the parameters of the multilayer neural network are simultaneously optimized to minimize the reconstruction errors for the observed entries. Then the missing entries can be readily recovered by propagating the latent variables to the output layer. DMF is compared with state-of-the-art methods of linear and nonlinear matrix completion in the tasks of toy matrix completion, image inpainting and collaborative filtering. The experimental results verify that DMF is able to provide higher matrix completion accuracy than existing methods do and DMF is applicable to large matrices. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Towards Google matrix of brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepelyansky, D.L., E-mail: dima@irsamc.ups-tlse.f [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique (IRSAMC), Universite de Toulouse, UPS, F-31062 Toulouse (France); LPT - IRSAMC, CNRS, F-31062 Toulouse (France); Zhirov, O.V. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2010-07-12

    We apply the approach of the Google matrix, used in computer science and World Wide Web, to description of properties of neuronal networks. The Google matrix G is constructed on the basis of neuronal network of a brain model discussed in PNAS 105 (2008) 3593. We show that the spectrum of eigenvalues of G has a gapless structure with long living relaxation modes. The PageRank of the network becomes delocalized for certain values of the Google damping factor {alpha}. The properties of other eigenstates are also analyzed. We discuss further parallels and similarities between the World Wide Web and neuronal networks.

  17. Utilising an LC-MS/MS-based multi-biomarker approach to assess mycotoxin exposure in the Bangkok metropolitan area and surrounding provinces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warth, Benedikt; Petchkongkaew, Awanwee; Sulyok, Michael; Krska, Rudolf

    2014-01-01

    Human exposures to mycotoxins through dietary intake are a major health hazard and may result in various pathophysiological effects. Although Thailand is a country at increased risk due to its climatic conditions, no comprehensive dataset is available to perform proper exposure assessment of its population with regard to mycotoxins. Therefore, this pilot study was conducted to investigate and evaluate the exposure levels of major mycotoxins (aflatoxin B₁, ochratoxin A, fumonisins, zearalenone and trichothecenes). Sixty first-morning urine samples were collected from healthy volunteers who live in the Bangkok metropolitan area and surrounding provinces (Pathumthani, Nonthaburi, Samutprakarn and Samutsakorn). Urine samples were analysed by a LC-MS/MS-based multi-biomarker method following a so-called 'dilute and shoot' approach. Results generally indicated low mycotoxin exposures in most individuals through the determination of the four biomarkers that were detected in urine samples, i.e. aflatoxin M₁, ochratoxin A (OTA), as well as the deoxynivalenol (DON) metabolites DON-3-glucuronide and DON-15-glucuronide in 10 of 60 individuals. The maximum concentrations were used to estimate the daily intake confirming that none of the individuals exceeded the tolerable daily intake (TDI) of DON (maximum 26% of TDI) or OTA (maximum 22% of TDI). However, the maximum exposure of aflatoxin B₁, estimated to be 0.91 µg (kg bw)⁻¹ day⁻¹, should raise some concerns and suggests further studies utilising a more sensitive method. Low exposure to Fusarium toxins was also confirmed by the absence of zearalenone, α-zearalanol, β-zearalanol and zearalenone-14-glucuronide as well as T-2 toxin, HT-2 toxin, nivalenol and free DON. This is the first multi-mycotoxin biomarker study performed in Southeast Asia.

  18. Diagnosis using nail matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richert, Bertrand; Caucanas, Marie; André, Josette

    2015-04-01

    Diagnosing nail matrix diseases requires knowledge of the nail matrix function and anatomy. This allows recognition of the clinical manifestations and assessment of potential surgical risk. Nail signs depend on the location within the matrix (proximal or distal) and the intensity, duration, and extent of the insult. Proximal matrix involvement includes nail surface irregularities (longitudinal lines, transverse lines, roughness of the nail surface, pitting, and superficial brittleness), whereas distal matrix insult induces longitudinal or transverse chromonychia. Clinical signs are described and their main causes are listed to enable readers to diagnose matrix disease from the nail's clinical features. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. A multidisciplinary approach unravels early and persistent effects of X-ray exposure at the onset of prenatal neurogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verreet, Tine; Quintens, Roel; Van Dam, Debby; Verslegers, Mieke; Tanori, Mirella; Casciati, Arianna; Neefs, Mieke; Leysen, Liselotte; Michaux, Arlette; Janssen, Ann; D'Agostino, Emiliano; Vande Velde, Greetje; Baatout, Sarah; Moons, Lieve; Pazzaglia, Simonetta; Saran, Anna; Himmelreich, Uwe; De Deyn, Peter Paul; Benotmane, Mohammed Abderrafi

    2015-01-01

    Background: In humans, in utero exposure to ionising radiation results in an increased prevalence of neurological aberrations, such as small head size, mental retardation and decreased IQ levels. Yet, the association between early damaging events and long-term neuronal anomalies remains largely

  20. Non-specific physical symptoms in relation to actual and perceived exposure to electromagnetic fields (EMF) : A multidisciplinary approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baliatsas, C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/323348912

    2015-01-01

    The association between non-specific physical symptoms (NSPS) such as headache, fatigue, nausea and sleep problems and exposure to electromagnetic fields (EMF) in the general population has been a subject of ongoing scientific debate and public concern. A limited number of epidemiological studies

  1. Unpacking constructs: a network approach for studying war exposure, daily stressors and post-traumatic stress disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Schryver, M.; Vindevogel, S.; Rasmussen, A.E.; Cramer, A.O.J.

    2015-01-01

    Conflict-affected populations are exposed to stressful events during and after war, and it is well established that both take a substantial toll on individuals’ mental health. Exactly how exposure to events during and after war affect mental health is a topic of considerable debate. Various

  2. Using Alternative Approaches to Prioritize Testing for the Universe of Chemicals with Potential for Human Exposure (WC9)

    Science.gov (United States)

    One use of alternative methods is to target animal use at only those chemicals and tests that are absolutely necessary. We discuss prioritization of testing based on high-throughput screening assays (HTS), QSAR modeling, high-throughput toxicokinetics (HTTK), and exposure modelin...

  3. The exposure of Sydney (Australia) to earthquake-generated tsunamis, storms and sea level rise: a probabilistic multi-hazard approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall'Osso, F; Dominey-Howes, D; Moore, C; Summerhayes, S; Withycombe, G

    2014-12-10

    Approximately 85% of Australia's population live along the coastal fringe, an area with high exposure to extreme inundations such as tsunamis. However, to date, no Probabilistic Tsunami Hazard Assessments (PTHA) that include inundation have been published for Australia. This limits the development of appropriate risk reduction measures by decision and policy makers. We describe our PTHA undertaken for the Sydney metropolitan area. Using the NOAA NCTR model MOST (Method for Splitting Tsunamis), we simulate 36 earthquake-generated tsunamis with annual probabilities of 1:100, 1:1,000 and 1:10,000, occurring under present and future predicted sea level conditions. For each tsunami scenario we generate a high-resolution inundation map of the maximum water level and flow velocity, and we calculate the exposure of buildings and critical infrastructure. Results indicate that exposure to earthquake-generated tsunamis is relatively low for present events, but increases significantly with higher sea level conditions. The probabilistic approach allowed us to undertake a comparison with an existing storm surge hazard assessment. Interestingly, the exposure to all the simulated tsunamis is significantly lower than that for the 1:100 storm surge scenarios, under the same initial sea level conditions. The results have significant implications for multi-risk and emergency management in Sydney.

  4. Lectures on matrix field theory

    CERN Document Server

    Ydri, Badis

    2017-01-01

    These lecture notes provide a systematic introduction to matrix models of quantum field theories with non-commutative and fuzzy geometries. The book initially focuses on the matrix formulation of non-commutative and fuzzy spaces, followed by a description of the non-perturbative treatment of the corresponding field theories. As an example, the phase structure of non-commutative phi-four theory is treated in great detail, with a separate chapter on the multitrace approach. The last chapter offers a general introduction to non-commutative gauge theories, while two appendices round out the text. Primarily written as a self-study guide for postgraduate students – with the aim of pedagogically introducing them to key analytical and numerical tools, as well as useful physical models in applications – these lecture notes will also benefit experienced researchers by providing a reference guide to the fundamentals of non-commutative field theory with an emphasis on matrix models and fuzzy geometries.

  5. A Current Control Approach for an Abnormal Grid Supplied Ultra Sparse Z-Source Matrix Converter with a Particle Swarm Optimization Proportional-Integral Induction Motor Drive Controller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Sina Sebtahmadi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A rotational d-q current control scheme based on a Particle Swarm Optimization- Proportional-Integral (PSO-PI controller, is used to drive an induction motor (IM through an Ultra Sparse Z-source Matrix Converter (USZSMC. To minimize the overall size of the system, the lowest feasible values of Z-source elements are calculated by considering the both timing and aspects of the circuit. A meta-heuristic method is integrated to the control system in order to find optimal coefficient values in a single multimodal problem. Henceforth, the effect of all coefficients in minimizing the total harmonic distortion (THD and balancing the stator current are considered simultaneously. Through changing the reference point of magnitude or frequency, the modulation index can be automatically adjusted and respond to changes without heavy computational cost. The focus of this research is on a reliable and lightweight system with low computational resources. The proposed scheme is validated through both simulation and experimental results.

  6. Graphene coated silica applied for high ionization matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry: A novel approach for environmental and biomolecule analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasser Abdelhamid, Hani; Wu, Bo-Sgum; Wu, Hui-Fen

    2014-08-01

    The integration of nanotechnology with mass spectrometry for sensitive and selective detection of molecules is a hot/important field of research. Synthesis of graphene (G) coated with mesoporous silica (SiO2, G@SiO2) for mass spectrometric application has been demonstrated. For the first time, we proposed the significant role of surfactant that used during the synthesis of mesorporous silicate (SiO2) in mass spectrometry. It was noticed that G could initiate SiO2 via surfactants which work as initiators for further ionization. The porosity of SiO2 trapped the analytes that was released and ionized with the surfactant fragments. Undoubtedly, strong background interferences were present in the case of organic matrix, which greatly obscured the detection of low molecular weight compounds. G@SiO2 nanocomposite affords several advantages, such as the ability to detect small molecules (silica mesoporosity, and high ionization efficiency over than G or conventional matrices. The high performance of G@SiO2 is not only due to the large surface area but also due to high desorption/ionization efficiency of inevitably surfactant (cetyltrimethylammonium chloride, CATB). Unlike the conventional MALDI-MS, the G@SiO2-MS is capable of generating multiply charged polysaccharides. The present method was validated to detect surfactants with low limits of detection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The Matrix Cookbook

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Kaare Brandt; Pedersen, Michael Syskind

    Matrix identities, relations and approximations. A desktop reference for quick overview of mathematics of matrices.......Matrix identities, relations and approximations. A desktop reference for quick overview of mathematics of matrices....

  8. Matrix 3-Lie superalgebras and BRST supersymmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramov, Viktor

    Given a matrix Lie algebra one can construct the 3-Lie algebra by means of the trace of a matrix. In the present paper, we show that this approach can be extended to the infinite-dimensional Lie algebra of vector fields on a manifold if instead of the trace of a matrix we consider a differential 1-form which satisfies certain conditions. Then we show that the same approach can be extended to matrix Lie superalgebras 𝔤𝔩(m,n) if instead of the trace of a matrix we make use of the supertrace of a matrix. It is proved that a graded triple commutator of matrices constructed with the help of the graded commutator and the supertrace satisfies a graded ternary Filippov-Jacobi identity. In two particular cases of 𝔤𝔩(1, 2) and 𝔤𝔩(2, 2), we show that the Pauli and Dirac matrices generate the matrix 3-Lie superalgebras, and we find the non-trivial graded triple commutators of these algebras. We propose a Clifford algebra approach to 3-Lie superalgebras induced by Lie superalgebras. We also discuss an application of matrix 3-Lie superalgebras in BRST-formalism.

  9. The impact of exposure route for class-based compounds: a comparative approach of lethal toxicity data in rodent models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Wang, Shuo; Feng, Xiao N; Yan, Li C; Zheng, Shan S; Wang, Yue; Zhao, Yuan H

    2018-01-01

    Relationships of toxicities from intravenous (i.v.), intraperitoneal (i.p.), subcutaneous (s.c.) and intragastric (i.g.) exposure routes to mice were investigated. Regression analysis showed that the toxicities from i.v. route is strongly correlated with i.p. and s.c. routes, but poorly with i.g. route. Close toxicities from different routes for some compounds indicate that distribution rate is the determining step and dictates chemical concentration at the target site(s). On the other hand, the absorption rate is the determining step for many compounds, which lead to different toxicities between exposure routes. The classified compounds characterized as having either absorption or distribution rate determining step were based upon the comparison of toxicities from the different routes. We found that some aliphatic acids and benzoic acids have lower toxicity values from i.g. route compared to an i.v. route because of poor absorption. Many compounds show low toxic effects from i.g. route than those from other routes because of the first-pass metabolism in the gastrointestinal tract, resulting in the poor relationship for toxicities between i.g. and i.v. or other routes. Stepwise regression analysis showed that physicochemical properties of a compound, such as molecular volume, polarizability and hydrophobicity, significantly affect adsorption rate, which leads to different toxicities based upon exposure routes. Comparison of the toxicities between mice and rats indicate that toxic effect and the toxicokinetic processes in mice are very similar to that in rats. A universal correlation equation has been developed for the toxicities between rats and mice from different exposure routes, which can be applied to predict toxicities across species.

  10. The quasi experimental study of the influence of advertising creativity and exposure intensity toward buying action with aida approach

    OpenAIRE

    Ramdan Dede Budiawan; Arif Satria; Megawati Simanjuntak

    2017-01-01

    Advertisement is one of marketing communication forms made by companies to reach sales goal of certain product. Advertising creativity is one of important factors that determines the success of television advertisement, beside that the exposure intensity also be determining factor to make the television advertisement get attention from spectators. To measure the spectators response toward advertisement in this research, the researcher used AIDA model. AIDA (attention, interest, desire, action...

  11. Matrix differentiation formulas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usikov, D. A.; Tkhabisimov, D. K.

    1983-01-01

    A compact differentiation technique (without using indexes) is developed for scalar functions that depend on complex matrix arguments which are combined by operations of complex conjugation, transposition, addition, multiplication, matrix inversion and taking the direct product. The differentiation apparatus is developed in order to simplify the solution of extremum problems of scalar functions of matrix arguments.

  12. Matrix with Prescribed Eigenvectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Faiz

    2011-01-01

    It is a routine matter for undergraduates to find eigenvalues and eigenvectors of a given matrix. But the converse problem of finding a matrix with prescribed eigenvalues and eigenvectors is rarely discussed in elementary texts on linear algebra. This problem is related to the "spectral" decomposition of a matrix and has important technical…

  13. Safety analysis of occupational exposure of healthcare workers to residual contaminations of cytotoxic drugs using FMECA security approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Laetitia Minh Mai; Reitter, Delphine; He, Sophie; Bonle, Franck Té; Launois, Amélie; Martinez, Diane; Prognon, Patrice; Caudron, Eric

    2017-12-01

    Handling cytotoxic drugs is associated with chemical contamination of workplace surfaces. The potential mutagenic, teratogenic and oncogenic properties of those drugs create a risk of occupational exposure for healthcare workers, from reception of starting materials to the preparation and administration of cytotoxic therapies. The Security Failure Mode Effects and Criticality Analysis (FMECA) was used as a proactive method to assess the risks involved in the chemotherapy compounding process. FMECA was carried out by a multidisciplinary team from 2011 to 2016. Potential failure modes of the process were identified based on the Risk Priority Number (RPN) that prioritizes corrective actions. Twenty-five potential failure modes were identified. Based on RPN results, the corrective actions plan was revised annually to reduce the risk of exposure and improve practices. Since 2011, 16 specific measures were implemented successively. In six years, a cumulative RPN reduction of 626 was observed, with a decrease from 912 to 286 (-69%) despite an increase of cytotoxic compounding activity of around 23.2%. In order to anticipate and prevent occupational exposure, FMECA is a valuable tool to identify, prioritize and eliminate potential failure modes for operators involved in the cytotoxic drug preparation process before the failures occur. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Estimates of dietary exposure to bisphenol A (BPA) from light metal packaging using food consumption and packaging usage data: a refined deterministic approach and a fully probabilistic (FACET) approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldring, P K T; Castle, L; O'Mahony, C; Dixon, J

    2014-01-01

    The FACET tool is a probabilistic model to estimate exposure to chemicals in foodstuffs, originating from flavours, additives and food contact materials. This paper demonstrates the use of the FACET tool to estimate exposure to BPA (bisphenol A) from light metal packaging. For exposure to migrants from food packaging, FACET uses industry-supplied data on the occurrence of substances in the packaging, their concentrations and construction of the packaging, which were combined with data from a market research organisation and food consumption data supplied by national database managers. To illustrate the principles, UK packaging data were used together with consumption data from the UK National Diet and Nutrition Survey (NDNS) dietary survey for 19-64 year olds for a refined deterministic verification. The UK data were chosen mainly because the consumption surveys are detailed, data for UK packaging at a detailed level were available and, arguably, the UK population is composed of high consumers of packaged foodstuffs. Exposures were run for each food category that could give rise to BPA from light metal packaging. Consumer loyalty to a particular type of packaging, commonly referred to as packaging loyalty, was set. The BPA extraction levels used for the 15 types of coating chemistries that could release BPA were in the range of 0.00005-0.012 mg dm(-2). The estimates of exposure to BPA using FACET for the total diet were 0.0098 (mean) and 0.0466 (97.5th percentile) mg/person/day, corresponding to 0.00013 (mean) and 0.00059 (97.5th percentile) mg kg(-1) body weight day(-1) for consumers of foods packed in light metal packaging. This is well below the current EFSA (and other recognised bodies) TDI of 0.05 mg kg(-1) body weight day(-1). These probabilistic estimates were compared with estimates using a refined deterministic approach drawing on the same input data. The results from FACET for the mean, 95th and 97.5th percentile exposures to BPA lay between the

  15. Accounting for Berkson and Classical Measurement Error in Radon Exposure Using a Bayesian Structural Approach in the Analysis of Lung Cancer Mortality in the French Cohort of Uranium Miners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Sabine; Rage, Estelle; Laurier, Dominique; Laroche, Pierre; Guihenneuc, Chantal; Ancelet, Sophie

    2017-02-01

    Many occupational cohort studies on underground miners have demonstrated that radon exposure is associated with an increased risk of lung cancer mortality. However, despite the deleterious consequences of exposure measurement error on statistical inference, these analyses traditionally do not account for exposure uncertainty. This might be due to the challenging nature of measurement error resulting from imperfect surrogate measures of radon exposure. Indeed, we are typically faced with exposure uncertainty in a time-varying exposure variable where both the type and the magnitude of error may depend on period of exposure. To address the challenge of accounting for multiplicative and heteroscedastic measurement error that may be of Berkson or classical nature, depending on the year of exposure, we opted for a Bayesian structural approach, which is arguably the most flexible method to account for uncertainty in exposure assessment. We assessed the association between occupational radon exposure and lung cancer mortality in the French cohort of uranium miners and found the impact of uncorrelated multiplicative measurement error to be of marginal importance. However, our findings indicate that the retrospective nature of exposure assessment that occurred in the earliest years of mining of this cohort as well as many other cohorts of underground miners might lead to an attenuation of the exposure-risk relationship. More research is needed to address further uncertainties in the calculation of lung dose, since this step will likely introduce important sources of shared uncertainty.

  16. Nanocrystal doped matrixes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parce, J. Wallace; Bernatis, Paul; Dubrow, Robert; Freeman, William P.; Gamoras, Joel; Kan, Shihai; Meisel, Andreas; Qian, Baixin; Whiteford, Jeffery A.; Ziebarth, Jonathan

    2010-01-12

    Matrixes doped with semiconductor nanocrystals are provided. In certain embodiments, the semiconductor nanocrystals have a size and composition such that they absorb or emit light at particular wavelengths. The nanocrystals can comprise ligands that allow for mixing with various matrix materials, including polymers, such that a minimal portion of light is scattered by the matrixes. The matrixes of the present invention can also be utilized in refractive index matching applications. In other embodiments, semiconductor nanocrystals are embedded within matrixes to form a nanocrystal density gradient, thereby creating an effective refractive index gradient. The matrixes of the present invention can also be used as filters and antireflective coatings on optical devices and as down-converting layers. Processes for producing matrixes comprising semiconductor nanocrystals are also provided. Nanostructures having high quantum efficiency, small size, and/or a narrow size distribution are also described, as are methods of producing indium phosphide nanostructures and core-shell nanostructures with Group II-VI shells.

  17. Sex differences in the consequences of early-life exposure to epidemiological stress--a life-history approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Störmer, Charlotte

    2011-01-01

    Exposure to infectious disease in early life has been suggested to have a negative effect on later-life survival,possibly through the induction of inflammatory responses. Although a life-course perspective emphasizes the importance of both survival and reproduction for individual fitness, to date, no studies have investigated whether early-life exposure to infectious disease has an impact on reproduction as it has been suggested for later survival. To address this question, I have used family reconstitution data from a historical (18th and 19th century) human population in the Krummhörn (Germany) comparing survival and reproduction between an exposed and a non-exposed group. The exposed group comprised those exposed to a high-infectious disease load during prenatal and early postnatal development. The results show a marked sex difference in the impact of early-life exposure to infectious disease. Exposed females show no effect on their life expectancy but significantly reduced fertility (number of children). For exposed males, however, the effect on survival is opponent over time: mortality is increased during childhood but decreased in late adulthood. Above that, exposed males reproduce earlier and have a smaller proportion of surviving children. This study does not support former studies indicating a negative association between early-life disease load and later survival. I argue that due to differences in male and female life strategies, males in general are more vulnerable especially early in life. Hence, adverse environmental conditions may have a stronger effect on male survivability and reproductive performance.

  18. A new approach to assess occupational exposure to airborne fungal contamination and mycotoxins of forklift drivers in waste sorting facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viegas, Carla; Faria, Tiago; de Oliveira, Ana Cebola; Caetano, Liliana Aranha; Carolino, Elisabete; Quintal-Gomes, Anita; Twarużek, Magdalena; Kosicki, Robert; Soszczyńska, Ewelina; Viegas, Susana

    2017-11-01

    The waste management industry is an important employer, and exposure of waste-handling workers to microorganisms is considered an occupational health problem. Besides fungal contamination, it is important to consider the co-occurrence of mycotoxins in this setting. Forklifts with closed cabinet and air conditioner are commonly used in waste industry to transport waste and other products within the facilities, possibly increasing the risk of exposure under certain conditions. The aim of this study was to assess the fungal contamination and mycotoxin levels in filters from the air conditioning system of forklift cabinets, as an indicator to assess occupational exposure of the drivers working in a waste sorting facility. Cytotoxicity was also assessed to understand and characterize the toxicity of the complex mixtures as present in the forklift filters. Aqueous extracts of filters from 11 vehicles were streaked onto 2% malt extract agar (MEA) with chloramphenicol (0.05 g/L) media, and in dichloran glycerol (DG18) agar-based media for morphological identification of the mycobiota. Real-time quantitative PCR amplification of genes from Aspergillus sections Fumigati, Flavi, Circumdati, and Versicolores was also performed. Mycotoxins were analyzed using LC-MS/MS system. Cytotoxicity of filter extracts was analyzed by using a MTT cell culture test. Aspergillus species were found most frequently, namely Aspergillus sections Circumdati (MEA 48%; DG18 41%) and Nigri (MEA 32%; DG18 17.3%). By qPCR, only Aspergillus section Fumigati species were found, but positive results were obtained for all assessed filters. No mycotoxins were detected in aqueous filter extracts, but most extracts were highly cytotoxic (n = 6) or medium cytotoxic (n = 4). Although filter service life and cytotoxicity were not clearly correlated, the results suggest that observing air conditioner filter replacement frequency may be a critical aspect to avoid worker's exposure. Further research is

  19. An approach to glycobiology from glycolipidomics: ganglioside molecular scanning in the brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease by TLC-blot/matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taki, Takao

    2012-01-01

    We have established a new approach to glyco- and lipidomics using a thin layer chromatography (TLC)-Blot/matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS) system. This new approach consists of a combination of a method for transferring lipids separated on a TLC-plate to a poly-vinylidene difluoride (PVDF) membrane and direct mass spectrometric analysis of the individual lipids on the membrane by ion trap-type MALDI-TOF MS. This technology was applied to the analysis of individual lipids from the human brain. Then, based on the results of this analysis, ganglioside molecular species in neural diseases were analyzed. The levels of gangliosides GD1b and GT1b were lower in the hippocampal gray matter of patients with Alzheimer's disease than in the hippocampal gray matter of patients with Parkinson's disease or the control patients. The molecular scanning of individual ganglioside molecular species showed a significant reduction of d20 : 1/C18 : 0 ceramide-containing gangliosides in patients with Alzheimer's disease. These findings suggest that Alzheimer's disease is a kind of ganglioside metabolic disease affecting the hippocampal area. A new approach to glycobiology by the TLC-Blot/MALDI-TOF MS system is proposed.

  20. Quantitative meta-analytic approaches for the systematic synthesis of data and hazard identification: A case study of decreased pain sensitivity due to trimethylbenzene exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, J Allen; Kraft, Andrew

    2017-10-01

    Traditionally, human health risk assessments have relied on qualitative approaches for hazard identification, which involves weight of evidence determinations that integrate evidence across multiple studies. Recently, the National Research Council has recommended the development of quantitative approaches for evidence integration, including the application of meta-analyses, to help summarize and evaluate the results of a systematic review. In the meta-analytic approach, a pooled effect size is calculated after consideration of multiple potential confounding factors in order to determine whether the entire database under consideration indicates a chemical is a hazard. The following case-study applies qualitative and quantitative approaches to determine whether trimethylbenzene (TMB) isomers represent a neurotoxic hazard, specifically focusing on pain sensitivity. Following a thorough literature search, the only pain sensitivity studies available for TMBs initially seem discordant in their results: effects on pain sensitivity are seen immediately after termination of exposure, appear to resolve 24h after exposure, and then reappear 50 days later following foot-shock. Qualitative consideration of toxicological and toxicokinetic characteristics of the TMB isomers suggests that the observed differences between studies are likely due to testing time and the application of external stressors. Meta-analyses and -regressions support this conclusion: when all studies are included and possible confounders (isomer, testing time, laboratory, etc.) are accounted for, the pooled effect sizes are statistically significant, thus supporting that TMBs are a possible neurotoxic hazard to human health. Ultimately, this case study demonstrates how qualitative and quantitative methods can be combined to provide a robust hazard identification analysis by incorporating more of the available information. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Multiple-Strain Approach and Probabilistic Modeling of Consumer Habits in Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment: A Quantitative Assessment of Exposure to Staphylococcal Enterotoxin A in Raw Milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crotta, Matteo; Rizzi, Rita; Varisco, Giorgio; Daminelli, Paolo; Cunico, Elena Cosciani; Luini, Mario; Graber, Hans Ulrich; Paterlini, Franco; Guitian, Javier

    2016-03-01

    Quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA) models are extensively applied to inform management of a broad range of food safety risks. Inevitably, QMRA modeling involves an element of simplification of the biological process of interest. Two features that are frequently simplified or disregarded are the pathogenicity of multiple strains of a single pathogen and consumer behavior at the household level. In this study, we developed a QMRA model with a multiple-strain approach and a consumer phase module (CPM) based on uncertainty distributions fitted from field data. We modeled exposure to staphylococcal enterotoxin A in raw milk in Lombardy; a specific enterotoxin production module was thus included. The model is adaptable and could be used to assess the risk related to other pathogens in raw milk as well as other staphylococcal enterotoxins. The multiplestrain approach, implemented as a multinomial process, allowed the inclusion of variability and uncertainty with regard to pathogenicity at the bacterial level. Data from 301 questionnaires submitted to raw milk consumers were used to obtain uncertainty distributions for the CPM. The distributions were modeled to be easily updatable with further data or evidence. The sources of uncertainty due to the multiple-strain approach and the CPM were identified, and their impact on the output was assessed by comparing specific scenarios to the baseline. When the distributions reflecting the uncertainty in consumer behavior were fixed to the 95th percentile, the risk of exposure increased up to 160 times. This reflects the importance of taking into consideration the diversity of consumers' habits at the household level and the impact that the lack of knowledge about variables in the CPM can have on the final QMRA estimates. The multiple-strain approach lends itself to use in other food matrices besides raw milk and allows the model to better capture the complexity of the real world and to be capable of geographical

  2. Matrix Training of Preliteracy Skills with Preschoolers with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axe, Judah B.; Sainato, Diane M.

    2010-01-01

    Matrix training is a generative approach to instruction in which words are arranged in a matrix so that some multiword phrases are taught and others emerge without direct teaching. We taught 4 preschoolers with autism to follow instructions to perform action-picture combinations (e.g., circle the pepper, underline the deer). Each matrix contained…

  3. Exposure of distal radius fractures using a direct radial approach with mobilization of the superficial branch of the radial nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirela-Cruz, Miguel A; Scher, Danielle L

    2010-12-01

    Extraarticular and simple intraarticular fractures and malunions of the distal radius can be addressed through a direct radial approach that entails careful and meticulous handling of the soft tissues. This approach involves mobilization of the superficial branch of the radial nerve (SBRN) and extensor tendons of the first dorsal compartment. A Type I SBRN pattern is when the nerve presents as a single bundle. In Type II pattern, there are 2 major nerve groups present. With Type II branching patterns of the SBRN, careful intraneural dissection is required to mobilize the nerve branches into a safe location during surgery. The primary advantage of this approach is the ease of surgical dissection and avoidance of the flexor tendons of the fingers during surgery.

  4. Quaternion from rotation matrix. [four-parameter representation of coordinate transformation matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepperd, S. W.

    1978-01-01

    A quaternion is regarded as a four-parameter representation of a coordinate transformation matrix, where the four components of the quaternion are treated on an equal basis. This leads to a unified, compact, and singularity-free approach to determining the quaternion when the matrix is given.

  5. Risk assessment of plant food supplements and other herbal products containing aristolochic acids using the margin of exposure (MOE) approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Rozaini; Diaz, Leolean Nyle; Wesseling, Sebastiaan; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M

    2017-02-01

    After the incidences of induction of aristolochic acid nephropathy after consumption of herbal weight loss preparations that accidentally contained aristolochic acids (AAs), several countries defined national restrictions on the presence of AAs in food, including plant food supplements (PFS) and herbal products. This study investigates whether the risks associated with exposure to AAs via PFS and herbal products are at present indeed negligible. Data reported in literature on AA levels in PFS and other herbal products and also obtained from a new series of PFS in the present study were used to calculate the estimated daily intakes (EDIs) and corresponding margins of exposure (MOEs). Available literature data revealed that 206 out of 573 samples were found to contain aristolochic acid I (AAI) and/or aristolochic acid II (AAII). The results obtained from recently collected PFS revealed that both AAI and AAII were detected in three out of 18 analysed PFS at levels up to 594.8 and 235.3 µg g-1, respectively, being in line with the levels reported in literature. The EDIs resulting from intake of these PFS resulted in MOEs that were generally below 10,000, corroborating the priority for risk management. Although these results refer to PFS collected by targeted sampling strategies, the data reveal that AA-containing PFS are still freely available. When considering that the use of these samples may be limited to shorter periods of time, the EDIs might be lower, but MOE values would still be lower than 10,000 for more than 50% of the AA-containing PFS and herbal products. In conclusion, the presence of AAs in PFS and herbal products even several years after instalment of the legal restrictions still raises concern, especially for people who frequently use the respective PFS and herbal products.

  6. Parallelism in matrix computations

    CERN Document Server

    Gallopoulos, Efstratios; Sameh, Ahmed H

    2016-01-01

    This book is primarily intended as a research monograph that could also be used in graduate courses for the design of parallel algorithms in matrix computations. It assumes general but not extensive knowledge of numerical linear algebra, parallel architectures, and parallel programming paradigms. The book consists of four parts: (I