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Sample records for exposure immune gene

  1. Cord blood gene expression supports that prenatal exposure to perfluoroalkyl substances causes depressed immune functionality in early childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennings, Jeroen L A; Jennen, Danyel G J; Nygaard, Unni C; Namork, Ellen; Haug, Line S; van Loveren, Henk; Granum, Berit

    2016-01-01

    Perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) are a class of synthetic compounds that have widespread use in consumer and industrial applications. PFAS are considered environmental pollutants that have various toxic properties, including effects on the immune system. Recent human studies indicate that prenatal exposure to PFAS leads to suppressed immune responses in early childhood. In this study, data from the Norwegian BraMat cohort was used to investigate transcriptomics profiles in neonatal cord blood and their association with maternal PFAS exposure, anti-rubella antibody levels at 3 years of age and the number of common cold episodes until 3 years. Genes associated with PFAS exposure showed enrichment for immunological and developmental functions. The analyses identified a toxicogenomics profile of 52 PFAS exposure-associated genes that were in common with genes associated with rubella titers and/or common cold episodes. This gene set contains several immunomodulatory genes (CYTL1, IL27) as well as other immune-associated genes (e.g. EMR4P, SHC4, ADORA2A). In addition, this study identified PPARD as a PFAS toxicogenomics marker. These markers can serve as the basis for further mechanistic or epidemiological studies. This study provides a transcriptomics connection between prenatal PFAS exposure and impaired immune function in early childhood and supports current views on PPAR- and NF-κB-mediated modes of action. The findings add to the available evidence that PFAS exposure is immunotoxic in humans and support regulatory policies to phase out these substances.

  2. Immune-related genes expression profile in orange-spotted grouper during exposure to Cryptocaryon irritans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y W; Dan, X M; Zhang, T W; Luo, X C; Li, A X

    2011-12-01

    Cryptocaryon irritans is one of the most important ectoparasites of marine fish. To identify the potential role of immune-related genes in antiparasitic immune responses in fish, we monitored the expression change of IL-8, COX-2, C-type lectin and transferrin in local and systemic immune organs of orange-spotted grouper post-C. irritans infection. IL-8 expression was up-regulated during the course of infection in the skin, while COX-2 and transferrin expression was up-regulated in the gill. COX-2 expression was significantly down-regulated in the spleen (0·7-5% of its control) and head kidney (0·5-4% of its control) post-primary infection. Transferrin expression was also down-regulated in the spleen and head kidney from 6 h to 5 days post-primary infection. However, C-type lectin expression was up-regulated in all tested organs post-infection, with the exception of day 7 in the spleen post-primary infection where the expression level was slightly down-regulated (44% of its control). These results suggest that these four immune-related genes play an important role in grouper anti-C. irritans infection and that local immune organs as the active organs contribute more than systemic immune organs to this course. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. Effects of chronic produced water exposure on the expression of some immune-related genes of juvenile Atlantic cod

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez Casanova, J.; Hamoutene, D.; Samuelson, S.; Burt, K.; King, T. [Fisheries and Oceans Canada, St. John' s, NL (Canada); Lee, K. [Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Dartmouth, NS (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    This study assessed the impacts of exposure to processed water produced by offshore oil operators on immune-related genes of juvenile Atlantic cod exposed to processed water for a period of 22 weeks. The study investigated the influence of processed water concentrations on growth parameters; food consumption; plasma cortisol; respiratory burst activity (RB); and mRNA expression. The study showed that the RB of circulating leukocytes was significantly elevated. Significant up-regulation of the mRNA expression of microglobulin, immunoglobulin light chain, and interleukins was observed in some fish. The down-regulation of the interferon stimulated gene was also observed. The study indicated that chronic exposure to significant amounts of processed water causes modulations of the immune system of juvenile Atlantic cod.

  4. Ammonia exposure alters the expression of immune-related and antioxidant enzymes-related genes and the gut microbial community of crucian carp (Carassius auratus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Xiao-Zhou; Xue, Ming-Yang; Yang, Shi-Bo; Zha, Ji-Wei; Wang, Gao-Xue; Ling, Fei

    2017-11-01

    Chronic exposure of ammonia in fish can affect the activities of antioxidant enzymes but few studies investigate the influence of ammonia exposure on the expression of immune-related and antioxidant enzymes-related genes. Also, there is no study demonstrates the effect of ammonia exposure on gut microbial community of fish. In this study, crucian carp (Carassius auratus) were exposed to the ammonia concentrations, 0 (control), 10 mg L-1 (low) or 50 mg L-1 (high) for consecutive 30 days at 25 ± 1 °C temperature, respectively, and after that, the fish from all exposure groups were maintained in control conditions for another 15 days. The results showed that low concentration ammonia increased the expression of immune-related genes and antioxidant enzymes-related genes, but high concentration ammonia inhibited the expression of immune-related genes and antioxidant enzymes-related genes. After a 15-day treatment without ammonia, the expression of antioxidant enzymes-related genes and immune-related genes showed no significant changes compared with control. The results of high-throughput sequencing showed that gut microbial communities were significantly differentiated following ammonia exposure. The abundance of Bacteroides and Cetobacterium (two kinds of potential probiotics) increased while fish exposed to 10 mg L-1 ammonia. The Flavobacterium (a potential fish pathogen) showed increasing trends when the exposure dose reached 50 mg L-1, while the Bacteroides and Cetobacterium showed almost no abundance. The results also revealed that ammonia exposure concentration or time can alter the intestinal microbial community. In conclusion, ammonia exposure could induce the immune response in crucian carp, and alter the gut microbial community. The results may help us understand the correlations of gut microbial community shift and ammonia exposure and extend our knowledge to comprehend the effects of environmental factors on intestinal microbial community

  5. Characterisation of immune-related gene expression in clam (Venerupis philippinarum) under exposure to di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yali; Zhang, Peng; Li, Chenghua; Su, Xiurong; Jin, Chunhua; Li, Ye; Xu, Yongjian; Li, Taiwu

    2013-01-01

    Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) mediates the immune system mainly by triggering the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) in higher animals. In the present study, spatial variation in the expression of immune-related genes in clam (Venerupis philippinarum) under acute short-term DEHP treatment was assessed by qPCR. The expression of six genes including glutamine synthetase (GS), IkB (IK), transcription factor activator protein-1 (AP-1), cyclophilin A-1 (CypA-1), heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) was dose-dependent. A negative correlation between expression and DEHP treatment was observed for big defensin (BD), glutathione S-transferase (GST), and thioredoxin peroxidase (TP). Surprisingly, lysozyme (LYZ) exhibited two distinct expression patterns at two DEHP doses. Significant differences between the experimental and control groups were observed for all tested genes at the various time points. Overall, our results revealed that DEHP mediates immune responses in clams by various means, and certain genes are promising candidate for biomarkers in DEHP monitoring. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Oligo-microarray analysis and identification of stress-immune response genes from manila clam (Ruditapes philippinarum) exposure to heat and cold stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menike, Udeni; Lee, Youngdeuk; Oh, Chulhong; Wickramaarachchi, W D N; Premachandra, H K A; Park, Se Chang; Lee, Jehee; De Zoysa, Mahanama

    2014-10-01

    Thermal stress regulates the complex system of gene expression and downstream biochemical and physiological responses in aquatic species. To identify genes involved in heat stress responses in manila clam (Ruditapes philippinarum), microarray analysis was conducted using clam transcriptome generated by pyrosequencing of cDNA library. Manila clams were exposed to heat (30 ± 1 °C) and cold (4 ± 1 °C) stresses and compared with control animals (18 ± 1 °C). Heat stressed animals have changed greater number of transcripts (8,306) than cold stress (7,573). Results of both heat and cold exposure has shown that over 2-fold up-regulated or down regulated (>2-or <2-fold) transcripts were higher at 24 h than at 6 h. It suggests that silent and constitutive express genes can activate at critical stage of thermal stress which could be between 6 and 24 h post stresses. We identified wide range of stress-immune response genes such as transcription factors, heat shock proteins, antioxidant and detoxification enzymes, inflammatory and apoptosis related genes, cell adhesion molecules, cytokines, and IFN regulatory proteins. Histological results revealed that non-specific cellular alterations such as lesions, hypertrophy, and necrosis in stressed gills could be due to decrease of gas exchange rate which may cause hypoxia.

  7. Comparative transcriptomics reveals genes involved in metabolic and immune pathways in the digestive gland of scallop Chlamys farreri following cadmium exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Zhai, Yuxiu; Yao, Lin; Jiang, Yanhua; Li, Fengling

    2017-05-01

    Chlamys farreri is an economically important mollusk that can accumulate excessive amounts of cadmium (Cd). Studying the molecular mechanism of Cd accumulation in bivalves is difficult because of the lack of genome background. Transcriptomic analysis based on high-throughput RNA sequencing has been shown to be an efficient and powerful method for the discovery of relevant genes in non-model and genome reference-free organisms. Here, we constructed two cDNA libraries (control and Cd exposure groups) from the digestive gland of C. farreri and compared the transcriptomic data between them. A total of 227 673 transcripts were assembled into 105 071 unigenes, most of which shared high similarity with sequences in the NCBI non-redundant protein database. For functional classification, 24 493 unigenes were assigned to Gene Ontology terms. Additionally, EuKaryotic Ortholog Groups and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes analyses assigned 12 028 unigenes to 26 categories and 7 849 unigenes to five pathways, respectively. Comparative transcriptomics analysis identified 3 800 unigenes that were differentially expressed in the Cd-treated group compared with the control group. Among them, genes associated with heavy metal accumulation were screened, including metallothionein, divalent metal transporter, and metal tolerance protein. The functional genes and predicted pathways identified in our study will contribute to a better understanding of the metabolic and immune system in the digestive gland of C. farreri. In addition, the transcriptomic data will provide a comprehensive resource that may contribute to the understanding of molecular mechanisms that respond to marine pollutants in bivalves.

  8. Childhood immune maturation and allergy development: regulation by maternal immunity and microbial exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenmalm, Maria C

    2011-07-01

    The increasing allergy prevalence in affluent countries may be caused by reduced microbial stimulation, resulting in an abnormal post-natal immune maturation. Most studies investigating the underlying mechanisms have focused on post-natal microbial exposure. Also, the maternal microbial environment during pregnancy may program the immune development of the child, however. This review focuses on how maternal immunity and microbial exposures regulate childhood immune and allergy development. Prenatal environmental exposures may alter gene expression via epigenetic mechanisms, aiming to induce physiological adaptations to the anticipated post-natal environment, but potentially also increasing disease susceptibility in the offspring. Although the importance of fetal programming mostly has been studied in cardiovascular and metabolic disease, this hypothesis is also very attractive in the context of environmentally influenced immune-mediated diseases. Efficacious preventive measures, required to combat the allergy epidemic, may be identified by determining how the immune interaction between mother and child is influenced by microbial factors. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  9. Addiction, adolescence, and innate immune gene induction

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    Fulton T Crews

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Repeated drug use/abuse amplifies psychopathology, progressively reducing frontal lobe behavioral control and cognitive flexibility while simultaneously increasing limbic temporal lobe negative emotionality. The period of adolescence is a neurodevelopmental stage characterized by poor behavioral control as well as strong limbic reward and thrill seeking. Repeated drug abuse and/or stress during this stage increase the risk of addiction and elevate activator innate immune signaling in the brain. Nuclear factor-kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB is a key glial transcription factor that regulates proinflammatory chemokines, cytokines, oxidases, proteases, and other innate immune genes. Induction of innate brain immune gene expression (e.g., NF-κB facilitates negative affect, depression-like behaviors, and inhibits hippocampal neurogenesis. In addition, innate immune gene induction alters cortical neurotransmission consistent with loss of behavioral control. Studies with anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-depressant drugs as well as opiate antagonists link persistent innate immune gene expression to key behavioral components of addiction, e.g. negative affect-anxiety and loss of frontal cortical behavioral control. This review suggests that persistent and progressive changes in innate immune gene expression contribute to the development of addiction. Innate immune genes may represent a novel new target for addiction therapy.

  10. Royal Decree: Gene Expression in Trans-Generationally Immune Primed Bumblebee Workers Mimics a Primary Immune Response.

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    Seth M Barribeau

    Full Text Available Invertebrates lack the cellular and physiological machinery of the adaptive immune system, but show specificity in their immune response and immune priming. Functionally, immune priming is comparable to immune memory in vertebrates. Individuals that have survived exposure to a given parasite are better protected against subsequent exposures. Protection may be cross-reactive, but demonstrations of persistent and specific protection in invertebrates are increasing. This immune priming can cross generations ("trans-generational" immune priming, preparing offspring for the prevailing parasite environment. While these phenomena gain increasing support, the mechanistic foundations underlying such immune priming, both within and across generations, remain largely unknown. Using a transcriptomic approach, we show that exposing bumblebee queens with an injection of heat-killed bacteria, known to induce trans-generational immune priming, alters daughter (worker gene expression. Daughters, even when unexposed themselves, constitutively express a core set of the genes induced upon direct bacterial exposure, including high expression of antimicrobial peptides, a beta-glucan receptor protein implicated in bacterial recognition and the induction of the toll signaling pathway, and slit-3 which is important in honeybee immunity. Maternal exposure results in a distinct upregulation of their daughters' immune system, with a signature overlapping with the induced individual response to a direct exposure. This will mediate mother-offspring protection, but also associated costs related to reconfiguration of constitutive immune expression. Moreover, identification of conserved immune pathways in memory-like responses has important implications for our understanding of the innate immune system, including the innate components in vertebrates, which share many of these pathways.

  11. Immune genes undergo more adaptive evolution than non-immune system genes in Daphnia pulex

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    McTaggart Seanna J

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding which parts of the genome have been most influenced by adaptive evolution remains an unsolved puzzle. Some evidence suggests that selection has the greatest impact on regions of the genome that interact with other evolving genomes, including loci that are involved in host-parasite co-evolutionary processes. In this study, we used a population genetic approach to test this hypothesis by comparing DNA sequences of 30 putative immune system genes in the crustacean Daphnia pulex with 24 non-immune system genes. Results In support of the hypothesis, results from a multilocus extension of the McDonald-Kreitman (MK test indicate that immune system genes as a class have experienced more adaptive evolution than non-immune system genes. However, not all immune system genes show evidence of adaptive evolution. Additionally, we apply single locus MK tests and calculate population genetic parameters at all loci in order to characterize the mode of selection (directional versus balancing in the genes that show the greatest deviation from neutral evolution. Conclusions Our data are consistent with the hypothesis that immune system genes undergo more adaptive evolution than non-immune system genes, possibly as a result of host-parasite arms races. The results of these analyses highlight several candidate loci undergoing adaptive evolution that could be targeted in future studies.

  12. Persistent Activation of the Innate Immune Response in Adult Drosophila Following Radiation Exposure During Larval Development.

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    Sudmeier, Lisa J; Samudrala, Sai-Suma; Howard, Steven P; Ganetzky, Barry

    2015-09-01

    Cranial radiation therapy (CRT) is an effective treatment for pediatric central nervous system malignancies, but survivors often suffer from neurological and neurocognitive side effects that occur many years after radiation exposure. Although the biological mechanisms underlying these deleterious side effects are incompletely understood, radiation exposure triggers an acute inflammatory response that may evolve into chronic inflammation, offering one avenue of investigation. Recently, we developed a Drosophila model of the neurotoxic side effects of radiation exposure. Here we use this model to investigate the role of the innate immune system in response to radiation exposure. We show that the innate immune response and NF-ĸB target gene expression is activated in the adult Drosophila brain following radiation exposure during larval development, and that this response is sustained in adult flies weeks after radiation exposure. We also present preliminary data suggesting that innate immunity is radioprotective during Drosophila development. Together our data suggest that activation of the innate immune response may be beneficial initially for survival following radiation exposure but result in long-term deleterious consequences, with chronic inflammation leading to impaired neuronal function and viability at later stages. This work lays the foundation for future studies of how the innate immune response is triggered by radiation exposure and its role in mediating the biological responses to radiation. These studies may facilitate the development of strategies to reduce the deleterious side effects of CRT. Copyright © 2015 Sudmeier et al.

  13. Modulation of airway epithelial antiviral immunity by fungal exposure

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhu, Lingxiang; Lee, Boram; Zhao, Fangkun; Zhou, Xu; Chin, Vanessa; Ling, Serena C; Chen, Yin

    2014-01-01

    .... However, their interactions have not been investigated. In the present study, we tested the effect of Alt exposure on virus-induced airway epithelial immunity using live virus and a synthetic viral mimicker, double-stranded RNA (dsRNA...

  14. Developmental Bisphenol A Exposure Modulates Immune-Related Diseases

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    Joella Xu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Bisphenol A (BPA, used in polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins, has a widespread exposure to humans. BPA is of concern for developmental exposure resulting in immunomodulation and disease development due to its ability to cross the placental barrier and presence in breast milk. BPA can use various mechanisms to modulate the immune system and affect diseases, including agonistic and antagonistic effects on many receptors (e.g., estrogen receptors, epigenetic modifications, acting on cell signaling pathways and, likely, the gut microbiome. Immune cell populations and function from the innate and adaptive immune system are altered by developmental BPA exposure, including decreased T regulatory (Treg cells and upregulated pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Developmental BPA exposure can also contribute to the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus, allergy, asthma and mammary cancer disease by altering immune function. Multiple sclerosis and type 1 diabetes mellitus may also be exacerbated by BPA, although more research is needed. Additionally, BPA analogs, such as bisphenol S (BPS, have been increasing in use, and currently, little is known about their immune effects. Therefore, more studies should be conducted to determine if developmental exposure BPA and its analogs modulate immune responses and lead to immune-related diseases.

  15. Gene Expression Profiling of Biological Pathway Alterations by Radiation Exposure

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    Kuei-Fang Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Though damage caused by radiation has been the focus of rigorous research, the mechanisms through which radiation exerts harmful effects on cells are complex and not well-understood. In particular, the influence of low dose radiation exposure on the regulation of genes and pathways remains unclear. In an attempt to investigate the molecular alterations induced by varying doses of radiation, a genome-wide expression analysis was conducted. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were collected from five participants and each sample was subjected to 0.5 Gy, 1 Gy, 2.5 Gy, and 5 Gy of cobalt 60 radiation, followed by array-based expression profiling. Gene set enrichment analysis indicated that the immune system and cancer development pathways appeared to be the major affected targets by radiation exposure. Therefore, 1 Gy radioactive exposure seemed to be a critical threshold dosage. In fact, after 1 Gy radiation exposure, expression levels of several genes including FADD, TNFRSF10B, TNFRSF8, TNFRSF10A, TNFSF10, TNFSF8, CASP1, and CASP4 that are associated with carcinogenesis and metabolic disorders showed significant alterations. Our results suggest that exposure to low-dose radiation may elicit changes in metabolic and immune pathways, potentially increasing the risk of immune dysfunctions and metabolic disorders.

  16. Impact of cigarette smoke exposure on innate immunity: a Caenorhabditis elegans model.

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    Rebecca M Green

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cigarette smoking is the major cause of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and lung cancer. Respiratory bacterial infections have been shown to be involved in the development of COPD along with impaired airway innate immunity. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To address the in vivo impact of cigarette smoke (CS exclusively on host innate defense mechanisms, we took advantage of Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans, which has an innate immune system but lacks adaptive immune function. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA clearance from intestines of C. elegans was dampened by CS. Microarray analysis identified 6 candidate genes with a 2-fold or greater reduction after CS exposure, that have a human orthologue, and that may participate in innate immunity. To confirm a role of CS-down-regulated genes in the innate immune response to PA, RNA interference (RNAi by feeding was carried out in C. elegans to inhibit the gene of interest, followed by PA infection to determine if the gene affected innate immunity. Inhibition of lbp-7, which encodes a lipid binding protein, resulted in increased levels of intestinal PA. Primary human bronchial epithelial cells were shown to express mRNA of human Fatty Acid Binding Protein 5 (FABP-5, the human orthologue of lpb-7. Interestingly, FABP-5 mRNA levels from human smokers with COPD were significantly lower (p = 0.036 than those from smokers without COPD. Furthermore, FABP-5 mRNA levels were up-regulated (7-fold after bacterial (i.e., Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection in primary human bronchial epithelial cell culture (air-liquid interface culture. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that the C. elegans model offers a novel in vivo approach to specifically study innate immune deficiencies resulting from exposure to cigarette smoke, and that results from the nematode may provide insight into human airway epithelial cell biology and cigarette smoke exposure.

  17. Impact of cigarette smoke exposure on innate immunity: a Caenorhabditis elegans model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Rebecca M; Gally, Fabienne; Keeney, Jonathon G; Alper, Scott; Gao, Bifeng; Han, Min; Martin, Richard J; Weinberger, Andrew R; Case, Stephanie R; Minor, Maisha N; Chu, Hong Wei

    2009-08-31

    Cigarette smoking is the major cause of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and lung cancer. Respiratory bacterial infections have been shown to be involved in the development of COPD along with impaired airway innate immunity. To address the in vivo impact of cigarette smoke (CS) exclusively on host innate defense mechanisms, we took advantage of Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans), which has an innate immune system but lacks adaptive immune function. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) clearance from intestines of C. elegans was dampened by CS. Microarray analysis identified 6 candidate genes with a 2-fold or greater reduction after CS exposure, that have a human orthologue, and that may participate in innate immunity. To confirm a role of CS-down-regulated genes in the innate immune response to PA, RNA interference (RNAi) by feeding was carried out in C. elegans to inhibit the gene of interest, followed by PA infection to determine if the gene affected innate immunity. Inhibition of lbp-7, which encodes a lipid binding protein, resulted in increased levels of intestinal PA. Primary human bronchial epithelial cells were shown to express mRNA of human Fatty Acid Binding Protein 5 (FABP-5), the human orthologue of lpb-7. Interestingly, FABP-5 mRNA levels from human smokers with COPD were significantly lower (p = 0.036) than those from smokers without COPD. Furthermore, FABP-5 mRNA levels were up-regulated (7-fold) after bacterial (i.e., Mycoplasma pneumoniae) infection in primary human bronchial epithelial cell culture (air-liquid interface culture). Our results suggest that the C. elegans model offers a novel in vivo approach to specifically study innate immune deficiencies resulting from exposure to cigarette smoke, and that results from the nematode may provide insight into human airway epithelial cell biology and cigarette smoke exposure.

  18. Insect Innate Immunity Database (IIID: an annotation tool for identifying immune genes in insect genomes.

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    Robert M Brucker

    Full Text Available The innate immune system is an ancient component of host defense. Since innate immunity pathways are well conserved throughout many eukaryotes, immune genes in model animals can be used to putatively identify homologous genes in newly sequenced genomes of non-model organisms. With the initiation of the "i5k" project, which aims to sequence 5,000 insect genomes by 2016, many novel insect genomes will soon become publicly available, yet few annotation resources are currently available for insects. Thus, we developed an online tool called the Insect Innate Immunity Database (IIID to provide an open access resource for insect immunity and comparative biology research (http://www.vanderbilt.edu/IIID. The database provides users with simple exploratory tools to search the immune repertoires of five insect models (including Nasonia, spanning three orders, for specific immunity genes or genes within a particular immunity pathway. As a proof of principle, we used an initial database with only four insect models to annotate potential immune genes in the parasitoid wasp genus Nasonia. Results specify 306 putative immune genes in the genomes of N. vitripennis and its two sister species N. giraulti and N. longicornis. Of these genes, 146 were not found in previous annotations of Nasonia immunity genes. Combining these newly identified immune genes with those in previous annotations, Nasonia possess 489 putative immunity genes, the largest immune repertoire found in insects to date. While these computational predictions need to be complemented with functional studies, the IIID database can help initiate and augment annotations of the immune system in the plethora of insect genomes that will soon become available.

  19. Insect Innate Immunity Database (IIID): an annotation tool for identifying immune genes in insect genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brucker, Robert M; Funkhouser, Lisa J; Setia, Shefali; Pauly, Rini; Bordenstein, Seth R

    2012-01-01

    The innate immune system is an ancient component of host defense. Since innate immunity pathways are well conserved throughout many eukaryotes, immune genes in model animals can be used to putatively identify homologous genes in newly sequenced genomes of non-model organisms. With the initiation of the "i5k" project, which aims to sequence 5,000 insect genomes by 2016, many novel insect genomes will soon become publicly available, yet few annotation resources are currently available for insects. Thus, we developed an online tool called the Insect Innate Immunity Database (IIID) to provide an open access resource for insect immunity and comparative biology research (http://www.vanderbilt.edu/IIID). The database provides users with simple exploratory tools to search the immune repertoires of five insect models (including Nasonia), spanning three orders, for specific immunity genes or genes within a particular immunity pathway. As a proof of principle, we used an initial database with only four insect models to annotate potential immune genes in the parasitoid wasp genus Nasonia. Results specify 306 putative immune genes in the genomes of N. vitripennis and its two sister species N. giraulti and N. longicornis. Of these genes, 146 were not found in previous annotations of Nasonia immunity genes. Combining these newly identified immune genes with those in previous annotations, Nasonia possess 489 putative immunity genes, the largest immune repertoire found in insects to date. While these computational predictions need to be complemented with functional studies, the IIID database can help initiate and augment annotations of the immune system in the plethora of insect genomes that will soon become available.

  20. Immune-related gene polymorphisms in pulmonary diseases.

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    Singh, Dhirendra P; Bagam, Prathyusha; Sahoo, Malaya K; Batra, Sanjay

    2017-05-15

    Between the DNA sequences of two randomly-selected human genomes, which consist of over 3 billion base pairs and twenty five thousand genes, there exists only 0.1% variation and 99.9% sequence identity. During the last couple of decades, extensive genome-wide studies have investigated the association between single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), the most common DNA variations, and susceptibility to various diseases. Because the immune system's primary function is to defend against myriad infectious agents and diseases, the large number of people who escape serious infectious diseases underscores the tremendous success of this system at this task. In fact, out of the third of the global human population infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis during their lifetime, only a few people develop active disease, and a heavy chain smoker may inexplicably escape all symptoms of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), lung cancer, and other smoke-associated lung diseases. This may be attributable to the genetic makeup of the individual(s), including their SNPs, which provide some resistance to the disease. Pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), transcription factors, cytokines and chemokines all play critical roles in orchestrating immune responses and their expression/activation is directly linked to human disease tolerance. Moreover, genetic variations present in the immune-response genes of various ethnicities may explain the huge differences in individual outcomes to various diseases and following exposure to infectious agents. The current review focuses on recent advances in our understanding of pulmonary diseases and the relationship of genetic variations in immune response genes to these conditions. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Female immune system is protected from effects of prenatal exposure to mercury

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    Kayla L. Penta

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Mercury is a ubiquitous environmental toxicant which bioaccumulates and has many biological effects, including detrimental effects on the nervous and immune systems. Because mercury can cross the placenta and concentrates in the fetal compartment, the developing fetus is particularly vulnerable. We hypothesize that developmental exposure to mercury will cause immunological changes, leading to an increased susceptibility to, or exacerbation of, immune disorders later in life. To better understand these changes, we exposed pregnant female mice to low doses of mercury for a short duration and examined the genetic effects related to immune function in the adult offspring. Pregnant BALB/c mice were exposed to mercury (200 µg/kg HgCl2 in PBS by subcutaneous injection or vehicle control every other day from gestation day 5 to 15. Offspring remained with the dam until weaning and were euthanized at 8 weeks of age with no further exposures to mercury. Splenic RNA was isolated and gene expression changes examined by microarray in a non-random subset of samples and changes confirmed by quantitative PCR. Epigenetic changes were also examined in terms of miRNA levels in the spleen. Although male and female offspring were exposed to mercury in the same in utero environment, the effects on expression of immune-related genes and immune-regulatory epigenetic signals were different dependent upon the sex of the offspring with males, but not females, displaying up-regulation at least two-fold of arginase, interferon-γ, STAT1, vitronectin, and TNFSF18. Epigenetic changes in miRNA levels were differentially expressed in males and females with in utero mercury exposure; miR-191-5p was decreased in males, while miR-1188-3p was increased in females. These gene expression and gene regulation changes modulate the baseline immune response and may impact risks for autoimmunity later in life.

  2. Immune-mediated diseases and microbial exposure in early life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, H; Bønnelykke, K; Stokholm, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    The non-communicable disease pandemic includes immune-mediated diseases such as asthma and allergy, which are likely originating in early life where the immature immune system is prone to alterations caused by the exposome. The timing of exposure seems critical for the developing immune system......, and certain exposures may have detrimental effects in the earliest life, but no or even beneficial effects later. The human microbiome and infections are candidates as intermediary in the interaction between the host and the environment. The evidence seems inconsistent as infections as well as particular...... colonization patterns in neonates drive both short-term and long-term asthma symptoms, while, on the other hand, the composition of the microbiome in early life may protect against asthma and allergy in later life. This apparent contradiction may be explained by a deeper disease heterogeneity than we...

  3. A multiplex bead-based assay for immune gene expression analysis in shrimp.

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    Arayamethakorn, Sopacha; Karoonuthaisiri, Nitsara; Rungrassamee, Wanilada

    2017-10-20

    Here, we developed a 9-plex bead-based array as a tool to evaluate molecular effects on transcription levels of immune-related genes in the black tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon). The bead array technology allows simultaneous detection of multiple target genes in a single sample, reducing time, labor and cost. The oligonucleotide probes were designed to target eight immune-related genes that involve in antimicrobial activity, melanization, pathogen pattern recognition proteins, lysozyme and one housekeeping gene as an internal control. The nine probes were coupled to carboxylated-magnetic bead sets. The 9-plex PCR primers were designed and optimized for conditions to allow multiplex detection. The specificity of the assay was validated and the sensitivity was determined to be 10(3) copies/μL for all target genes. The 9-plex immune gene expression assay was applied to determine transcript levels in gills of P. monodon under exposure to a shrimp pathogen, Vibrio harveyi, and gene expression patterns were consistent to patterns observed under a traditional realtime PCR method. While realtime PCR method gave a better sensitivity but limited multiplexity, our 9-plex immune gene expression assay was able to simultaneously measure expression of multiple target genes, providing useful alternative assay in the need of higher-throughput gene expression analysis such as evaluation of immune stimulatory effects in different feed additives under various dosages and time points in shrimp. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Hepatitis B Virus Infection and Immunizations among Asian American College Students: Infection, Exposure, and Immunity Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Haeok; Kiang, Peter; Watanabe, Paul; Halon, Patricia; Shi, Ling; Church, Daniel R.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the prevalence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, exposure, and immunity among Asian American college students as a basis for evaluating HBV screening and vaccination policy. Participants and Methods: Self-identified Asian American college students aged 18 years or older were examined. Serological tests of HBV surface…

  5. Insect Innate Immunity Database (IIID): An Annotation Tool for Identifying Immune Genes in Insect Genomes

    OpenAIRE

    Brucker, Robert M; Lisa J Funkhouser; Shefali Setia; Rini Pauly; Bordenstein, Seth R.

    2012-01-01

    The innate immune system is an ancient component of host defense. Since innate immunity pathways are well conserved throughout many eukaryotes, immune genes in model animals can be used to putatively identify homologous genes in newly sequenced genomes of non-model organisms. With the initiation of the "i5k" project, which aims to sequence 5,000 insect genomes by 2016, many novel insect genomes will soon become publicly available, yet few annotation resources are currently available for insec...

  6. Modulation of Airway Epithelial Antiviral Immunity by Fungal Exposure

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Lingxiang; Lee, Boram; Zhao, Fangkun; Zhou, Xu; Chin, Vanessa; Ling, Serena C.; Chen, Yin

    2014-01-01

    Multiple pathogens, such as bacteria, fungi, and viruses, have been frequently found in asthmatic airways and are associated with the pathogenesis and exacerbation of asthma. Among these pathogens, Alternaria alternata (Alt), a universally present fungus, and human rhinovirus have been extensively studied. However, their interactions have not been investigated. In the present study, we tested the effect of Alt exposure on virus-induced airway epithelial immunity using live virus and a synthet...

  7. Chlorpyrifos exposure in common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.) leads to oxidative stress and immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ziwei; Liu, Qi; Cai, Jingzeng; Yang, Jie; Shen, Qiang; Xu, Shiwen

    2017-08-01

    Chlorpyrifos (CPF) is an environmental pollutant with increasing importance due to its high toxicity to fish and aquatic animals. To understand how CPF impacts immune response and oxidative stress in common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.), we investigated the transcriptomic profiles of the head kidneys from common carp exposed to CPF for 15days. A total of 52, 297, 928 and 52, 273, 784 high quality clean reads were obtained from CPF exposure groups, 44,677,578 and 44,106,696 high quality clean reads were obtained from corresponding control groups. Among them, 456 genes were differentially expressed, including 246 up-regulated genes and 210 down-regulated genes identified and enriched in databases of Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG). Antioxidant systems, and immune response genes and pathways were verified by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. We found that CPF-induced ROS regulates immune response by stimulating the antigen-presenting ability of head kidney in carp. These results provide new insights for unveiling the biological effects of CPF in common carp. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Cervical Carcinogenesis and Immune Response Gene Polymorphisms: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akash M. Mehta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The local immune response is considered a key determinant in cervical carcinogenesis after persistent infection with oncogenic, high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV infections. Genetic variation in various immune response genes has been shown to influence risk of developing cervical cancer, as well as progression and survival among cervical cancer patients. We reviewed the literature on associations of immunogenetic single nucleotide polymorphism, allele, genotype, and haplotype distributions with risk and progression of cervical cancer. Studies on HLA and KIR gene polymorphisms were excluded due to the abundance on literature on that subject. We show that multiple genes and loci are associated with variation in risk of cervical cancer. Rather than one single gene being responsible for cervical carcinogenesis, we postulate that variations in the different immune response genes lead to subtle differences in the effectiveness of the antiviral and antitumour immune responses, ultimately leading to differences in risk of developing cervical cancer and progressive disease after HPV infection.

  9. Constant light exposure impairs immune tolerance development in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizutani, Hiromi; Tamagawa-Mineoka, Risa; Minami, Yoichi; Yagita, Kazuhiro; Katoh, Norito

    2017-04-01

    An intrinsic daily physiological rhythm called circadian rhythm has been indicated to affect the immune system and its related diseases. Immune tolerance development is closely associated with the onset of immunological disorders. However, the effect of circadian rhythm in the mechanisms of immune tolerance development has not yet been fully understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of circadian rhythm disruption on the development of immune tolerance by the perturbation of light environment, using a mouse model of neonatally induced cutaneous tolerance. Mice were kept under constant light (LL) or light-dark (LD) conditions, and hapten was applied at 2days after birth. Six weeks later, hapten was reapplied to abdominal skin, followed by hapten application to ear skin 5days later. The ear-swelling responses and cell infiltration into inflamed skin significantly increased in LL mice compared with those in LD mice. Interestingly, the percentage and the number of Foxp3(+)-regulatory T cells notably decreased in inflamed skin and draining lymph nodes of LL mice compared with that in LD mice. Loss-of-function mutation of a key circadian gene, Bmal1, also exacerbated the ear-swelling responses and cell infiltration into inflamed skin in mice. These results suggest that circadian rhythm may be implicated in immune tolerance development in allergic inflammation. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Psoriasis, innate immunity, and gene pools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, Jan D.

    2007-01-01

    Recently, emphasis has shifted from T cells to innate (natural) immunity as the possible major culprit in psoriasis. All known elements of innate immune responses are up-regulated in psoriasis lesions, which must have a polygenetic origin. We hypothesize that urbanized populations have been under

  11. Effects of brevetoxin exposure on the immune system of loggerhead sea turtles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Catherine J; Leggett, Stephanie R; Carter, Barbara J; Colle, Clarence

    2010-05-10

    Blooms of the toxic dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis, occur almost annually off the Florida coast. These blooms, commonly called "red tides", produce a group of neurotoxins collectively termed brevetoxins. Many species of sealife, including sea turtles, are severely impacted by brevetoxin exposure. Effects of brevetoxins on immune cells were investigated in rescued loggerhead sea turtles, Caretta caretta, as well as through in vitro experiments using peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) collected from captive sea turtles. In rescued animals, plasma brevetoxin concentrations were measured using a competitive ELISA. Plasma lysozyme activity was measured using a turbidity assay. Lysozyme activity correlated positively with plasma brevetoxin concentrations. Differential expression of genes affected by brevetoxin exposure was determined using two separate suppression subtractive hybridization experiments. In one experiment, genes from PBL collected from sea turtles rescued from red tide toxin exposure were compared to genes from PBL collected from healthy captive loggerhead sea turtles. In the second experiment, PBL from healthy captive loggerhead sea turtles were exposed to brevetoxin (500 ng PbTx-2/ml) in vitro for 18 h and compared to unexposed PBL. Results from the subtraction hybridization experiment conducted with red tide rescued sea turtle PBL indicated that genes involved in oxidative stress or xenobiotic metabolism were up-regulated. Using quantitative real-time PCR, a greater than 2-fold increase in superoxide dismutase and thioredoxin and greater than 10-fold increase in expression of thiopurine S-methyltransferase were observed. Results from the in vitro subtraction hybridization experiment indicated that genes coding for cytochrome c oxidases were the major up-regulated genes. Using quantitative real-time PCR, a greater than 8-fold increase in expression of beta-tubulin and greater than 3-fold increase in expression of ubiquinol were observed. Brevetoxin

  12. Modulation of airway epithelial antiviral immunity by fungal exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lingxiang; Lee, Boram; Zhao, Fangkun; Zhou, Xu; Chin, Vanessa; Ling, Serena C; Chen, Yin

    2014-06-01

    Multiple pathogens, such as bacteria, fungi, and viruses, have been frequently found in asthmatic airways and are associated with the pathogenesis and exacerbation of asthma. Among these pathogens, Alternaria alternata (Alt), a universally present fungus, and human rhinovirus have been extensively studied. However, their interactions have not been investigated. In the present study, we tested the effect of Alt exposure on virus-induced airway epithelial immunity using live virus and a synthetic viral mimicker, double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). Alt treatment was found to significantly enhance the production of proinflammatory cytokines (e.g., IL-6 and IL-8) induced by virus infection or dsRNA treatment. In contrast to this synergistic effect, Alt significantly repressed type I and type III IFN production, and this impairment led to elevated viral replication. Mechanistic studies suggested the positive role of NF-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways in the synergism and the attenuation of the TBK1-IRF3 pathway in the inhibition of IFN production. These opposite effects are caused by separate fungal components. Protease-dependent and -independent mechanisms appear to be involved. Thus, Alt exposure alters the airway epithelial immunity to viral infection by shifting toward more inflammatory but less antiviral responses.

  13. Developmental exposure to bisphenol A modulates innate but not adaptive immune responses to influenza A virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anirban Roy

    Full Text Available Bisphenol A (BPA is used in numerous products, such as plastic bottles and food containers, from which it frequently leaches out and is consumed by humans. There is a growing public concern that BPA exposure may pose a significant threat to human health. Moreover, due to the widespread and constant nature of BPA exposure, not only adults but fetuses and neonates are also exposed to BPA. There is mounting evidence that developmental exposures to chemicals from our environment, including BPA, contribute to diseases late in life; yet, studies of how early life exposures specifically alter the immune system are limited. Herein we report an examination of how maternal exposure to a low, environmentally relevant dose of BPA affects the immune response to infection with influenza A virus. We exposed female mice during pregnancy and through lactation to the oral reference dose for BPA listed by the US Environmental Protection Agency, and comprehensively examined immune parameters directly linked to disease outcomes in adult offspring following infection with influenza A virus. We found that developmental exposure to BPA did not compromise disease-specific adaptive immunity against virus infection, or reduce the host's ability to clear the virus from the infected lung. However, maternal exposure to BPA transiently reduced the extent of infection-associated pulmonary inflammation and anti-viral gene expression in lung tissue. From these observations, we conclude that maternal exposure to BPA slightly modulates innate immunity in adult offspring, but does not impair the anti-viral adaptive immune response, which is critical for virus clearance and survival following influenza virus infection.

  14. UV and hydrogen peroxide treatment restores changes in innate immunity caused by exposure of fish to reuse water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Arvinder; Havixbeck, Jeffrey J; Smith, Matthew K; Shu, Zengquan; Tierney, Keith B; Barreda, Daniel R; El-Din, Mohamed Gamal; Belosevic, Miodrag

    2015-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the innate immunity of goldfish exposed to reuse water, and UV/H2O2-treated reuse water, using a real-time flow-through exposure system. The reuse water generated by ultrafiltration of finished wastewater from the municipal wastewater treatment plant was analyzed for the presence of a panel of 20 herbicides/fungicides and 46 pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCP). There was a seasonal variation in the profile and concentrations of xenobiotics in reuse water with lowest levels occurring in the summer. The innate immunity parameters assessed were cytokine (IFNγ, IL-1β, IL-10, TNFα2), and cytokine receptor (TNFR1, TNFR2, IFNGR1, IFNGR2) gene expression, and phagocytosis of kidney leukocyte subpopulations. Assessment of innate immunity parameters was done after acute (7 days) and sub chronic (30 and 60 days) exposure to reuse water, UV/H2O2-treated reuse water, and activated carbon-treated reuse water (ACT; control), during spring, summer and fall of 2012. Temporal (acute versus sub chronic) as well as seasonal differences in innate immunity of fish exposed to reuse water were observed. The acute exposure of fish to reuse water caused significant down-regulation in cytokine gene expression in different organs of fish (kidney, spleen, liver) and phagocytic ability of different kidney leukocyte subpopulations. The immune gene expression and phagocytosis of kidney leukocytes of fish returned to ACT control levels after sub chronic exposure suggesting that fish have habituated to the reuse water exposure. The changes in gene expression after acute exposure were related to variations in the profile of xenobiotics in reuse water during different seasons. The efficiency of xenobiotic removal using UV/H2O2 ranged between 1.6 and 100% indicating that treatment of reuse water using high dose UV/H2O2 was only partially effective in removing the xenobiotics, as assessed by both chemical analyses and measurement of innate immune

  15. Expression profile of immune-related genes in Lates calcarifer infected by Cryptocaryon irritans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd-Shaharuddin, Norashikin; Mohd-Adnan, Adura; Kua, Beng-Chu; Nathan, Sheila

    2013-03-01

    Cryptocaryon irritans causes Cyptocaryonosis or white spot disease in a wide range of marine fish including Lates calcarifer (Asian seabass). However, the immune response of this fish to the parasite is still poorly understood. In this study, quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) was performed to assess the expression profile of immune-related genes in L. calcarifer infected by C. irritans. A total of 21 immune-related genes encoding various functions in the fish immune system were utilized for the qPCR analysis. The experiment was initiated with the infection of juvenile fish by exposure to theronts from 200 C. irritans cysts, and non-infected juvenile fish were used as controls. Spleen, liver, gills and kidney tissues were harvested at three days post-infection from control and infected fish. In addition, organs were also harvested on day-10 post-infection from fish that had been allowed to recover from day-4 up to day-10 post-infection. L. calcarifer exhibited pathological changes on day-3 post-infection with the characteristic presence of white spots on the entire fish body, excessive mucus production and formation of a flap over the fish eye. High quality total RNA was extracted from all tissues and qPCR was performed. The qPCR analysis on the cohort of 21 immune-related genes of the various organs harvested on day-3 post-infection demonstrated that most genes were induced significantly (p irritans infection (10 days post-infection), expression of the immune-related genes was down-regulated to levels similar to the control fish. These results provide insights into the interaction between C. irritans and L. calcarifer and suggest that the innate immune system plays an important role in early defence against parasite infection allowing the fish to eventually recover from the infection. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Immune responses and immune-related gene expression profile in orange-spotted grouper after immunization with Cryptocaryon irritans vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan, Xue-Ming; Zhang, Tuan-Wei; Li, Yan-Wei; Li, An-Xing

    2013-03-01

    In order to elucidate the immune-protective mechanisms of inactivated Cryptocaryon irritans vaccine, different doses of C. irritans theronts were used to immunize orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides). We measured serum immobilization titer, blood leukocyte respiratory burst activity, serum alternative complement activity, and serum lysozyme activity weekly. In addition, the expression levels of immune-related genes such as interleukin-1β (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), major histocompatibility complexes I and II (MHC I and II), and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) were determined in spleen and gills. The results showed that the immobilization titer, respiratory burst activity, and alternative complement activity of immunized fish were significantly increased, and the levels of the last two immune parameters in the high-dose vaccine group were significantly higher than in the low-dose vaccine group. Serum lysozyme activity in the high-dose vaccine group was significantly higher than in the PBS control group. Vaccination also regulated host immune-related gene expression. For example, at 2- and 3- weeks post immunization, IL-1β expression in the high-dose vaccine group spleen was significantly increased. At 4-weeks post immunization, the fish were challenged with a lethal dose of parasite, and the survival rates of high-dose vaccine group, low-dose vaccine group, PBS control group, and adjuvant control group were 80%, 40%, 0%, and 10% respectively. These results demonstrate that inactivated C. irritans vaccination improves specific and nonspecific immune responses in fish, enhancing their anti-parasite ability. These effects are vaccine antigen dose-dependent. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Pathways and Genes Associated with Immune Dysfunction in Sheep Paratuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gossner, Anton; Watkins, Craig; Chianini, Francesca; Hopkins, John

    2017-01-01

    Multibacillary and paucibacillary paratuberculosis are both caused by Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis. Multibacillary lesions are composed largely of infected epithelioid macrophages and paucibacillary lesions contain T cells but few bacteria. Multibacillary disease is similar to human lepromatous leprosy, with variable/high levels of antibody and a dysfunctional immune response. Animals with paucibacillary disease have high cell-mediated immunity and variable levels of antibody. This study aims to characterize the immunological dysfunction using TruSeq analysis of the ileocaecal lymph node that drains disease lesions. Immune dysfunction is highlighted by repression of TCR/CD3 genes, T cell co-receptors/co-stimulators, T cell activation and signal-transduction genes. Inflammation was an acute phase response and chronic inflammation, with little evidence of acute inflammation. The high levels of immunoglobulin and plasma cell transcripts is consistent with the anti-MAP antibody responses in paratuberculosis sheep. Also notable was the overwhelming reduction in mast cell transcripts, potentially affecting DC activation of the immune response. This study also shows that there were no fundamental differences in the gene expression patterns in multibacillary and paucibacillary disease, no shift in T cell genes from Th1 to Th2 pattern but rather an incremental decline into immune dysfunction leading to multibacillary pathology. PMID:28436433

  18. big bang gene modulates gut immune tolerance in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnay, François; Cohen-Berros, Eva; Hoffmann, Martine; Kim, Sabrina Y; Boulianne, Gabrielle L; Hoffmann, Jules A; Matt, Nicolas; Reichhart, Jean-Marc

    2013-02-19

    Chronic inflammation of the intestine is detrimental to mammals. Similarly, constant activation of the immune response in the gut by the endogenous flora is suspected to be harmful to Drosophila. Therefore, the innate immune response in the gut of Drosophila melanogaster is tightly balanced to simultaneously prevent infections by pathogenic microorganisms and tolerate the endogenous flora. Here we describe the role of the big bang (bbg) gene, encoding multiple membrane-associated PDZ (PSD-95, Discs-large, ZO-1) domain-containing protein isoforms, in the modulation of the gut immune response. We show that in the adult Drosophila midgut, BBG is present at the level of the septate junctions, on the apical side of the enterocytes. In the absence of BBG, these junctions become loose, enabling the intestinal flora to trigger a constitutive activation of the anterior midgut immune response. This chronic epithelial inflammation leads to a reduced lifespan of bbg mutant flies. Clearing the commensal flora by antibiotics prevents the abnormal activation of the gut immune response and restores a normal lifespan. We now provide genetic evidence that Drosophila septate junctions are part of the gut immune barrier, a function that is evolutionarily conserved in mammals. Collectively, our data suggest that septate junctions are required to maintain the subtle balance between immune tolerance and immune response in the Drosophila gut, which represents a powerful model to study inflammatory bowel diseases.

  19. Dualistic immunomodulation of sub-chronic microcystin-LR exposure on the innate-immune defense system in male zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wang; Hou, Jie; Guo, Honghui; Qiu, Yuming; Li, Li; Li, Dapeng; Tang, Rong

    2017-09-01

    Microcystins (MCs), produced by toxic cyanobacterial blooms that appeared world wildly in eutrophication waters, have often caused fish illness and even massive death cases. Among at least 90 structural variants, microcystin-LR (MC-LR) is the most common and toxic variant. In order to better understand innate immune responses in fish disrupted by environmental concentrations of MC-LR, male zebrafish (Danio rerio) were exposed to 0, 0.3, 1, 3, 10 and 30 μg/L MC-LR for 30 d, and the changes in splenic pathology and immunological gene expression as well as serum immune parameters were studied. In the low concentration groups (0.3, 1 and 3 μg/L), zebrafish displayed splenic inflammatory changes including the formation of melano-macrophage centers and the increase of macrophage pseudopodia, remarkable elevation of serum C3 levels, and significantly upregulated expression of innate immune-related genes (c3b, lyz, il1β, tnfα and ifnγ). In contrast, high concentrations of MC-LR (10 and 30 μg/L) resulted in the degeneration of splenic lymphocytes and macrophages, and down-regulation of immune-related genes as well as significant decreases in the level of serum C3. Furthermore, significant increases in the activity of serum ACP and ALP suggested that high concentrations of MC-LR increased permeability of macrophage plasma membrane or cellular necrosis, and subsequently decreased innate immune function. Our findings illustrated that sub-chronic exposure of MC-LR has dualistic influences on fish innate immune system with inflammatory activation at low exposure concentrations but turned to immune inhibition with the increases of exposure concentration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Development of gene expression assays measuring immune ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Whole blood from five Mycobacterium bovis-sensitised hyenas was incubated in Nil and TB antigen tubes of the QuantiFERON®-TB Gold (QFT) system. Using qPCR, the relative expression stability of the reference genes ACTB, GAPDH, YWHAZ and TBP in these samples was determined as well as the mean fold change in ...

  1. Immune stimulation following dermal exposure to unsintered indium tin oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, Kristie; Anderson, Stacey E; Lukomska, Ewa; Long, Carrie; Anderson, Katie; Marshall, Nikki; Meade, B Jean

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, several types of pulmonary pathology, including alveolar proteinosis, fibrosis, and emphysema, have been reported in workers in the indium industry. To date, there remains no clear understanding of the underlying mechanism(s). Pulmonary toxicity studies in rats and mice have demonstrated the development of mediastinal lymph node hyperplasia and granulomas of mediastinal lymph nodes and bronchus-associated lymphoid tissues following exposure to indium tin oxide. Given the association between exposure to other metals and the development of immune-mediated diseases, these studies were undertaken to begin to investigate the immuno-modulatory potential of unsintered indium tin oxide (uITO) in a mouse model. Using modifications of the local lymph node assay, BALB/c mice (five animals/group) were exposed topically via intact or breached skin or injected intradermally at the base of the ear pinnae with either vehicle or increasing concentrations 2.5-10% uITO (90:10 indium oxide/tin oxide, particle size <50 nm). Dose-responsive increases in lymphocyte proliferation were observed with a calculated EC3 of 4.7% for the intact skin study. Phenotypic analysis of draining lymph node cells following intradermal injection with 5% uITO yielded a profile consistent with a T-cell-mediated response. These studies demonstrate the potential for uITO to induce sensitization and using lymphocyte proliferation as a biomarker of exposure, and demonstrate the potential for uITO to penetrate both intact and breached skin.

  2. Chronic ethanol exposure produces time- and brain region-dependent changes in gene coexpression networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A Osterndorff-Kahanek

    Full Text Available Repeated ethanol exposure and withdrawal in mice increases voluntary drinking and represents an animal model of physical dependence. We examined time- and brain region-dependent changes in gene coexpression networks in amygdala (AMY, nucleus accumbens (NAC, prefrontal cortex (PFC, and liver after four weekly cycles of chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE vapor exposure in C57BL/6J mice. Microarrays were used to compare gene expression profiles at 0-, 8-, and 120-hours following the last ethanol exposure. Each brain region exhibited a large number of differentially expressed genes (2,000-3,000 at the 0- and 8-hour time points, but fewer changes were detected at the 120-hour time point (400-600. Within each region, there was little gene overlap across time (~20%. All brain regions were significantly enriched with differentially expressed immune-related genes at the 8-hour time point. Weighted gene correlation network analysis identified modules that were highly enriched with differentially expressed genes at the 0- and 8-hour time points with virtually no enrichment at 120 hours. Modules enriched for both ethanol-responsive and cell-specific genes were identified in each brain region. These results indicate that chronic alcohol exposure causes global 'rewiring' of coexpression systems involving glial and immune signaling as well as neuronal genes.

  3. Gene therapy for immune tolerance induction in hemophilia with inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arruda, V R; Samelson-Jones, B J

    2016-06-01

    The development of inhibitors, i.e. neutralizing alloantibodies against factor (F) VIII or FIX, is the most significant complication of protein replacement therapy for patients with hemophilia, and is associated with both increased mortality and substantial physical, psychosocial and financial morbidity. Current management, including bypassing agents to treat and prevent bleeding, and immune tolerance induction for inhibitor eradication, is suboptimal for many patients. Fortunately, there are several emerging gene therapy approaches aimed at addressing these unmet clinical needs of patients with hemophilia and inhibitors. Herein, we review the mounting evidence from preclinical hemophilia models that the continuous uninterrupted expression of FVIII or FIX delivered as gene therapy can bias the immune system towards tolerance induction, and even promote the eradication of pre-existing inhibitors. We also discuss several gene transfer approaches that directly target immune cells in order to promote immune tolerance. These preclinical findings also shed light on the immunologic mechanisms that underlie tolerance induction. © 2016 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  4. The evolution of secondary organization in immune system gene libraries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hightower, R.; Forrest, S. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Computer Science; Perelson, A.S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1993-02-01

    A binary model of the immune system is used to study the effects of evolution on the genetic encoding for antibody molecules. We report experiments which show that the evolution of immune system genes, simulated by the genetic algorithm, can induce a high degree of genetic organization even though that organization is not explicitly required by the fitness function. This secondary organization is related to the true fitness of an individual, in contrast to the sampled fitness which is the explicit fitness measure used to drive the process of evolution.

  5. Restricting microbial exposure in early life negates the immune benefits associated with gut colonization in environments of high microbial diversity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imke E Mulder

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Acquisition of the intestinal microbiota in early life corresponds with the development of the mucosal immune system. Recent work on caesarean-delivered infants revealed that early microbial composition is influenced by birthing method and environment. Furthermore, we have confirmed that early-life environment strongly influences both the adult gut microbiota and development of the gut immune system. Here, we address the impact of limiting microbial exposure after initial colonization on the development of adult gut immunity. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Piglets were born in indoor or outdoor rearing units, allowing natural colonization in the immediate period after birth, prior to transfer to high-health status isolators. Strikingly, gut closure and morphological development were strongly affected by isolator-rearing, independent of indoor or outdoor origins of piglets. Isolator-reared animals showed extensive vacuolation and disorganization of the gut epithelium, inferring that normal gut closure requires maturation factors present in maternal milk. Although morphological maturation and gut closure were delayed in isolator-reared animals, these hard-wired events occurred later in development. Type I IFN, IL-22, IL-23 and Th17 pathways were increased in indoor-isolator compared to outdoor-isolator animals during early life, indicating greater immune activation in pigs originating from indoor environments reflecting differences in the early microbiota. This difference was less apparent later in development due to enhanced immune activation and convergence of the microbiota in all isolator-reared animals. This correlated with elevation of Type I IFN pathways in both groups, although T cell pathways were still more affected in indoor-reared animals. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Environmental factors, in particular microbial exposure, influence expression of a large number of immune-related genes. However, the homeostatic effects of

  6. Benzo[a]pyrene exposure under future ocean acidification scenarios weakens the immune responses of blood clam, Tegillarca granosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Wenhao; Zha, Shanjie; Wang, Yichen; Shi, Wei; Xiao, Guoqiang; Chai, Xueliang; Wu, Hongxi; Liu, Guangxu

    2017-04-01

    Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) are known to converge into the ocean and accumulate in the sediment, posing great threats to marine organisms such as the sessile bottom burrowing bivalves. However, the immune toxicity of POPs, such as B[a]P, under future ocean acidification scenarios remains poorly understood to date. Therefore, in the present study, the impacts of B[a]P exposure on the immune responses of a bivalve species, Tegillarca granosa, under present and future ocean acidification scenarios were investigated. Results obtained revealed an increased immune toxicity of B[a]P under future ocean acidification scenarios in terms of reduced THC, altered haemocyte composition, and hampered phagocytosis, which may attribute to the synergetic effects of B[a]P and ocean acidification. In addition, the gene expressions of pathogen pattern recognition receptors (TLR1, TLR2, TLR4, TLR6), pathway mediators (TRAF6, TAK1, TAB2, IKKα and Myd88), and effectors (NF-ĸB) of the important immune related pathways were significantly down-regulated upon exposure to B[a]P under future ocean acidification scenarios. Results of the present study suggested an increased immune toxicity of B[a]P under future ocean acidification scenarios, which will significantly hamper the immune responses of T. granosa and subsequently render individuals more susceptible to pathogens challenges. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of ammonia exposure on apoptosis, oxidative stress and immune response in pufferfish (Takifugu obscurus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chang-Hong; Yang, Fang-Fang; Ling, Ren-Zhi; Liao, Shao-An; Miao, Yu-Tao; Ye, Chao-Xia; Wang, An-Li

    2015-07-01

    Ammonia is one of major environmental pollutants in the freshwater aquatic system that affects the survival and growth of organisms. In the present study, we investigated the effects of ammonia exposure on apoptosis, oxidative stress and immune response in pufferfish (Takifugu obscurus). Fish were exposed to various concentrations of ammonia (0, 1.43, 3.57, 7.14mM) for 72h. The date showed that ammonia exposure could induce intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), interrupt intracellular Ca(2+) (cf-Ca(2+)) homeostasis, and subsequently lead to DNA damage and cell apoptosis. To test the apoptotic pathway, the expression patterns of some key apoptotic related genes including P53, Bax Bcl2, Caspase 9, Caspase 8 and Caspase 3 in the liver were examined. The results showed that ammonia stress could change these genes transcription, associated with increasing of cell apoptosis, suggesting that the P53-Bax-Bcl2 pathway and caspase-dependent apoptotic pathway could be involved in cell apoptosis induced by ammonia stress. In addition, ammonia stress could induced up-regulation of inflammatory cytokines (BAFF, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-12) transcription, indicating that innate immune system play important roles in ammonia-induced toxicity in fish. Furthermore, the gene expressions of antioxidant enzymes (Mn-SOD, CAT, GPx, and GR) and heat shock proteins (HSP90 and HSP70) in the liver were induced by ammonia stress, suggesting that antioxidant system and heat shock proteins tried to protect cells from oxidative stress and apoptosis induced by ammonia stress. Our results will be helpful to understand the mechanism of aquatic toxicology induced by ammonia in fish. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Importance of immune response genes in hemophilia A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josiane Bazzo de Alencar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemophilia A is a disease caused by a deficiency of coagulation factor VIII resulting from genetic inheritance linked to chromosome X. One treatment option is the administration of plasma or recombinant FVIII. However, some patients develop inhibitors or antibodies against this factor. Inhibitors are alloantibodies that bind to the epitope of factor VIII causing it to be recognized by the immune system as a foreign peptide. This is the most serious complication in hemophilia patients in respect to replacement therapy. Some studies have suggested that genetic factors influence the development of factor VIII inhibitors such as ethnicity, family history, mutations in the factor VIII gene and in genes of the immune system. The aim of this study was to conduct a literature review to assess the influence of genetic factors of immune response genes, especially genes of the major histocompatibility complex and cytokines, which may be related to the development of factor VIII inhibitors in hemophilia A patients. Understanding these risk factors will help to determine future differential treatment in the control and prevention of the development of inhibitors.

  9. Improving Adenovirus Based Gene Transfer: Strategies to Accomplish Immune Evasion

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    Andrea Amalfitano

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Adenovirus (Ad based gene transfer vectors continue to be the platform of choice for an increasing number of clinical trials worldwide. In fact, within the last five years, the number of clinical trials that utilize Ad based vectors has doubled, indicating growing enthusiasm for the numerous positive characteristics of this gene transfer platform. For example, Ad vectors can be easily and relatively inexpensively produced to high titers in a cGMP compliant manner, can be stably stored and transported, and have a broad applicability for a wide range of clinical conditions, including both gene therapy and vaccine applications. Ad vector based gene transfer will become more useful as strategies to counteract innate and/or pre-existing adaptive immune responses to Ads are developed and confirmed to be efficacious. The approaches attempting to overcome these limitations can be divided into two broad categories: pre-emptive immune modulation of the host, and selective modification of the Ad vector itself. The first category of methods includes the use of immunosuppressive drugs or specific compounds to block important immune pathways, which are known to be induced by Ads. The second category comprises several innovative strategies inclusive of: (1 Ad-capsid-display of specific inhibitors or ligands; (2 covalent modifications of the entire Ad vector capsid moiety; (3 the use of tissue specific promoters and local administration routes; (4 the use of genome modified Ads; and (5 the development of chimeric or alternative serotype Ads. This review article will focus on both the promise and the limitations of each of these immune evasion strategies, and in the process delineate future directions in developing safer and more efficacious Ad-based gene transfer strategies.

  10. Expression of immune genes in systemic and mucosal immune tissues of channel catfish vaccinated with live theronts of Ichthyophthirius multifiliis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, De-Hai; Moreira, Gabriel S A; Shoemaker, Craig A; Zhang, Dunhua; Beck, Benjamin H

    2017-07-01

    Ichthyophthiriasis caused by Ichthyophthirius multifiliis (Ich) has a worldwide distribution and affects most freshwater fishes. Fish surviving natural infection and/or immunized with Ich develop strong innate and adaptive immune responses. However, there is a lack of the knowledge regarding immune gene expression patterns in systemic and mucosal immune tissues, and how immune genes interact and lead to innate and adaptive immune protection against Ich infection in fish. The objective of this study was to investigate the expression of innate and adaptive immune-related genes in systemic (liver, spleen) and mucosal (gill, intestine) tissues of channel catfish over time following vaccination with live Ich theronts. The vaccinated fish showed significantly higher antibody titers and survival (95%) than those of mock immunized fish. Expression of IgM and IgD heavy chain genes exhibited a rapid increase from 4 h (h4) to 2 days (d2) post-vaccination in systemic immune tissues. Immune cell receptor genes (CD4, CD8-α, MHC I, MHC II β, TcR-α, and TcR-β) were more highly upregulated and remained upregulated for longer duration in systemic tissues than in mucosal tissues of the vaccinated fish. The cytokine genes IL-1βa and IFN-γ were rapidly upregulated in both systemic and mucosal tissues of vaccinated fish, with peak expression from h4 to d1 post-vaccination. Toll-like receptor genes TLR-1 and TLR-9 showed relatively stable upregulation in the gill of immunized fish following vaccination. Results of this study revealed the molecular immune responses in mucosal and systemic tissues of vaccinated fish and demonstrated that Ich vaccination resulted in innate and adaptive immune responses against Ich infection. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Molecular evolution of immune genes in the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae.

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    Tovi Lehmann

    Full Text Available As pathogens that circumvent the host immune response are favoured by selection, so are host alleles that reduce parasite load. Such evolutionary processes leave their signature on the genes involved. Deciphering modes of selection operating on immune genes might reveal the nature of host-pathogen interactions and factors that govern susceptibility in host populations. Such understanding would have important public health implications.We analyzed polymorphisms in four mosquito immune genes (SP14D1, GNBP, defensin, and gambicin to decipher selection effects, presumably mediated by pathogens. Using samples of Anopheles arabiensis, An. quadriannulatus and four An. gambiae populations, as well as published sequences from other Culicidae, we contrasted patterns of polymorphisms between different functional units of the same gene within and between populations. Our results revealed selection signatures operating on different time scales. At the most recent time scale, within-population diversity revealed purifying selection. Between populations and between species variation revealed reduced differentiation (GNBP and gambicin at coding vs. noncoding- regions, consistent with balancing selection. McDonald-Kreitman tests between An. quadriannulatus and both sibling species revealed higher fixation rate of synonymous than nonsynonymous substitutions (GNBP in accordance with frequency dependent balancing selection. At the longest time scale (>100 my, PAML analysis using distant Culicid taxa revealed positive selection at one codon in gambicin. Patterns of genetic variation were independent of exposure to human pathogens.Purifying selection is the most common form of selection operating on immune genes as it was detected on a contemporary time scale on all genes. Selection for "hypervariability" was not detected, but negative balancing selection, detected at a recent evolutionary time scale between sibling species may be rather common. Detection of positive

  12. Identifying genes that mediate anthracyline toxicity in immune cells

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    Amber eFrick

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The role of the immune system in response to chemotherapeutic agents remains elusive. The interpatient variability observed in immune and chemotherapeutic cytotoxic responses is likely, at least in part, due to complex genetic differences. Through the use of a panel of genetically diverse mouse inbred strains, we developed a drug screening platform aimed at identifying genes underlying these chemotherapeutic cytotoxic effects on immune cells. Using genome-wide association studies (GWAS, we identified four genome-wide significant quantitative trait loci (QTL that contributed to the sensitivity of doxorubicin and idarubicin in immune cells. Of particular interest, a locus on chromosome 16 was significantly associated with cell viability following idarubicin administration (p = 5.01x10-8. Within this QTL lies App, which encodes amyloid beta precursor protein. Comparison of dose-response curves verified that T-cells in App knockout mice were more sensitive to idarubicin than those of C57BL/6J control mice (p < 0.05.In conclusion, the cellular screening approach coupled with GWAS led to the identification and subsequent validation of a gene involved in T-cell viability after idarubicin treatment. Previous studies have suggested a role for App in in vitro and in vivo cytotoxicity to anticancer agents; the overexpression of App enhances resistance, while the knockdown of this gene is deleterious to cell viability. Thus, further investigations should include performing mechanistic studies, validating additional genes from the GWAS, including Ppfia1 and Ppfibp1, and ultimately translating the findings to in vivo and human studies.

  13. Use of exposure history to identify patterns of immunity to pneumonia in bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis.

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    Raina K Plowright

    Full Text Available Individual host immune responses to infectious agents drive epidemic behavior and are therefore central to understanding and controlling infectious diseases. However, important features of individual immune responses, such as the strength and longevity of immunity, can be challenging to characterize, particularly if they cannot be replicated or controlled in captive environments. Our research on bighorn sheep pneumonia elucidates how individual bighorn sheep respond to infection with pneumonia pathogens by examining the relationship between exposure history and survival in situ. Pneumonia is a poorly understood disease that has impeded the recovery of bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis following their widespread extirpation in the 1900s. We analyzed the effects of pneumonia-exposure history on survival of 388 radio-collared adults and 753 ewe-lamb pairs. Results from Cox proportional hazards models suggested that surviving ewes develop protective immunity after exposure, but previous exposure in ewes does not protect their lambs during pneumonia outbreaks. Paradoxically, multiple exposures of ewes to pneumonia were associated with diminished survival of their offspring during pneumonia outbreaks. Although there was support for waning and boosting immunity in ewes, models with consistent immunizing exposure were similarly supported. Translocated animals that had not previously been exposed were more likely to die of pneumonia than residents. These results suggest that pneumonia in bighorn sheep can lead to aging populations of immune adults with limited recruitment. Recovery is unlikely to be enhanced by translocating naïve healthy animals into or near populations infected with pneumonia pathogens.

  14. Use of exposure history to identify patterns of immunity to pneumonia in bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plowright, Raina K.; Manlove, Kezia; Cassirer, E. Frances; Besser, Thomas H.; Hudson, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    Individual host immune responses to infectious agents drive epidemic behavior and are therefore central to understanding and controlling infectious diseases. However, important features of individual immune responses, such as the strength and longevity of immunity, can be challenging to characterize, particularly if they cannot be replicated or controlled in captive environments. Our research on bighorn sheep pneumonia elucidates how individual bighorn sheep respond to infection with pneumonia pathogens by examining the relationship between exposure history and survival in situ. Pneumonia is a poorly understood disease that has impeded the recovery of bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) following their widespread extirpation in the 1900s. We analyzed the effects of pneumonia-exposure history on survival of 388 radio-collared adults and 753 ewe-lamb pairs. Results from Cox proportional hazards models suggested that surviving ewes develop protective immunity after exposure, but previous exposure in ewes does not protect their lambs during pneumonia outbreaks. Paradoxically, multiple exposures of ewes to pneumonia were associated with diminished survival of their offspring during pneumonia outbreaks. Although there was support for waning and boosting immunity in ewes, models with consistent immunizing exposure were similarly supported. Translocated animals that had not previously been exposed were more likely to die of pneumonia than residents. These results suggest that pneumonia in bighorn sheep can lead to aging populations of immune adults with limited recruitment. Recovery is unlikely to be enhanced by translocating nai¨ve healthy animals into or near populations infected with pneumonia pathogens.

  15. Gene networks specific for innate immunity define post-traumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breen, M S; Maihofer, A X; Glatt, S J; Tylee, D S; Chandler, S D; Tsuang, M T; Risbrough, V B; Baker, D G; O'Connor, D T; Nievergelt, C M; Woelk, C H

    2015-12-01

    The molecular factors involved in the development of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) remain poorly understood. Previous transcriptomic studies investigating the mechanisms of PTSD apply targeted approaches to identify individual genes under a cross-sectional framework lack a holistic view of the behaviours and properties of these genes at the system-level. Here we sought to apply an unsupervised gene-network based approach to a prospective experimental design using whole-transcriptome RNA-Seq gene expression from peripheral blood leukocytes of U.S. Marines (N=188), obtained both pre- and post-deployment to conflict zones. We identified discrete groups of co-regulated genes (i.e., co-expression modules) and tested them for association to PTSD. We identified one module at both pre- and post-deployment containing putative causal signatures for PTSD development displaying an over-expression of genes enriched for functions of innate-immune response and interferon signalling (Type-I and Type-II). Importantly, these results were replicated in a second non-overlapping independent dataset of U.S. Marines (N=96), further outlining the role of innate immune and interferon signalling genes within co-expression modules to explain at least part of the causal pathophysiology for PTSD development. A second module, consequential of trauma exposure, contained PTSD resiliency signatures and an over-expression of genes involved in hemostasis and wound responsiveness suggesting that chronic levels of stress impair proper wound healing during/after exposure to the battlefield while highlighting the role of the hemostatic system as a clinical indicator of chronic-based stress. These findings provide novel insights for early preventative measures and advanced PTSD detection, which may lead to interventions that delay or perhaps abrogate the development of PTSD.

  16. Ocean acidification and pathogen exposure modulate the immune response of the edible mussel Mytilus chilensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Nicole; Saavedra, Luisa M; Vargas, Cristian A; Gallardo-Escárate, Cristian; Détrée, Camille

    2017-11-01

    Ocean acidification (OA) is one of the main consequences of increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2), impacting key biological processes of marine organisms such as development, growth and immune response. However, there are scarce studies on the influence of OA on marine invertebrates' ability to cope with pathogens. This study evaluated the single and combined effects of OA and bacterial infection on the transcription expression of genes related to antioxidant system, antimicrobial peptides and pattern recognition receptors in the edible mussel Mytilus chilensis. Individuals of M. chilensis were exposed during 60 days at two concentrations of pCO2 (550 and 1200 μatm) representing respectively current and future scenario of OA and were then injected with the pathogenic bacterium Vibrio anguillarum. Results evidenced an immunomodulation following the OA exposure with an up-regulation of C-type Lectin and Mytilin B and a down-regulation of Myticin A and PGRP. This immunomodulation pattern is partially counteracted after challenge with V. anguillarum with a down-regulation of the C-type lectin and Mytilin B and the up-regulation of Myticin A. In turn, these results evidence that pCO2-driven OA scenarios might triggers specific immune-related genes at early stages of infection, promoting the transcription of antimicrobial peptides and patterns recognition receptors. This study provides new evidence of how the immune response of bivalves is modulated by higher CO2 conditions in the ocean, as well one factor for the resilience of marine population upon global change scenarios. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Immune gene expression in Bombus terrestris: signatures of infection despite strong variation among populations, colonies, and sister workers.

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    Franziska S Brunner

    Full Text Available Ecological immunology relies on variation in resistance to parasites. Colonies of the bumblebee Bombus terrestris vary in their susceptibility to the trypanosome gut parasite Crithidia bombi, which reduces colony fitness. To understand the possible origin of this variation in resistance we assayed the expression of 28 immunologically important genes in foraging workers. We deliberately included natural variation of the host "environment" by using bees from colonies collected in two locations and sampling active foraging workers that were not age controlled. Immune gene expression patterns in response to C. bombi showed remarkable variability even among genetically similar sisters. Nevertheless, expression varied with parasite exposure, among colonies and, perhaps surprisingly, strongly among populations (collection sites. While only the antimicrobial peptide abaecin is universally up regulated upon exposure, linear discriminant analysis suggests that the overall exposure effect is driven by a combination of several immune pathways and further immune functions such as ROS regulation. Also, the differences among colonies in their immune gene expression profiles provide clues to the mechanistic basis of well-known inter-colony variation in susceptibility to this parasite. Our results show that transcriptional responses to parasite exposure can be detected in ecologically heterogeneous groups despite strong background noise.

  18. Continuous and Discontinuous Cigarette Smoke Exposure Differentially Affects Protective Th1 Immunity against Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaler, Christopher R.; Horvath, Carly N.; McCormick, Sarah; Jeyanathan, Mangalakumari; Khera, Amandeep; Zganiacz, Anna; Kasinska, Joanna; Stampfli, Martin R.; Xing, Zhou

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary tuberculosis (TB), caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is the leading cause of death due to a bacterial pathogen. Emerging epidemiologic evidence suggests that the leading risk factor associated with TB mortality is cigarette smoke exposure. Despite this, it remains poorly understood what is the effect of cigarette smoke exposure on anti-TB immunity and whether its potential detrimental effect can be reversed by cigarette smoking cessation. In our current study, we have investigated the impact of both continuous and discontinuous cigarette smoke exposure on the development of anti-mycobacterial type 1 immunity in murine models. We find that while continuous cigarette smoke exposure severely impairs type 1 immunity in the lung, a short-term smoking cessation allows rapid restoration of anti-mycobacterial immunity. The ability of continuous cigarette smoke exposure to dampen type 1 protective immunity is attributed locally to its affects on innate immune cells in the lung. Continuous cigarette smoke exposure locally, by not systemically, impairs APC accumulation and their production of TNF, IL-12, and RANTES, blunts the recruitment of CD4+IFN-γ+ T cells to the lung, and weakens the formation of granuloma. On the other hand, smoking cessation was found to help restore type 1 immunity by rapidly improving the functionality of lung APCs, enhancing the recruitment of CD4+IFN-γ+ T cells to the lung, and promoting the formation of granuloma. Our study for the first time demonstrates that continuous, but not discontinuous, cigarette smoke exposure severely impedes the lung expression of anti-TB Th1 immunity via inhibiting innate immune activation and lung T cell recruitment. Our findings thus suggest cigarette smoking cessation to be beneficial to the control of pulmonary TB. PMID:23527127

  19. Epigenetic regulation of inducible gene expression in the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Pek Siew; Li, Jasmine; Holloway, Adele F; Rao, Sudha

    2013-07-01

    T cells are exquisitely poised to respond rapidly to pathogens and have proved an instructive model for exploring the regulation of inducible genes. Individual genes respond to antigenic stimulation in different ways, and it has become clear that the interplay between transcription factors and the chromatin platform of individual genes governs these responses. Our understanding of the complexity of the chromatin platform and the epigenetic mechanisms that contribute to transcriptional control has expanded dramatically in recent years. These mechanisms include the presence/absence of histone modification marks, which form an epigenetic signature to mark active or inactive genes. These signatures are dynamically added or removed by epigenetic enzymes, comprising an array of histone-modifying enzymes, including the more recently recognized chromatin-associated signalling kinases. In addition, chromatin-remodelling complexes physically alter the chromatin structure to regulate chromatin accessibility to transcriptional regulatory factors. The advent of genome-wide technologies has enabled characterization of the chromatin landscape of T cells in terms of histone occupancy, histone modification patterns and transcription factor association with specific genomic regulatory regions, generating a picture of the T-cell epigenome. Here, we discuss the multi-layered regulation of inducible gene expression in the immune system, focusing on the interplay between transcription factors, and the T-cell epigenome, including the role played by chromatin remodellers and epigenetic enzymes. We will also use IL2, a key inducible cytokine gene in T cells, as an example of how the different layers of epigenetic mechanisms regulate immune responsive genes during T-cell activation. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Impact of in utero Exposure to Malaria on Fetal T cell Immunity

    OpenAIRE

    Odorizzi, Pamela M.; Feeney, Margaret E.

    2016-01-01

    Pregnancy-associated malaria, including placental malaria, causes significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Recently, it has been suggested that in utero exposure of the fetus to malaria antigens may negatively impact the developing immune system and result in tolerance to malaria. Here, we review our current knowledge of fetal immunity to malaria, focusing on the dynamic interactions between maternal malaria infection, placental development and the fetal immune system. A better understa...

  1. Prenatal arachidonic acid exposure and selected immune-related variables in childhood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dirix, Chantal E. H.; Hogervorst, Janneke G. F.; Rump, Patrick; Hendriks, Johannes J. E.; Bruins, Maaike; Hornstra, Gerard

    2009-01-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA) is considered essential in fetal development and some of its metabolites are thought to be important mediators of the immune responses. Therefore, we studied whether prenatal exposure to AA is associated with some immune-related clinical conditions and plasma markers in

  2. Gene Expression by PBMC in Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis: Evidence for Dysregulation of Immune Mediated Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher A. Aoki

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC is a chronic disease of the bile ducts characterized by an inflammatory infiltrate and obliterative fibrosis. The precise role of the immune system in the pathogenesis of PSC remains unknown. We used RNA microarray analysis to identify immune-related genes and pathways that are differentially expressed in PSC. Messenger RNA (mRNA from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC was isolated from both patients with PSC and age and sex matched healthy controls. Samples from 5 PSC patients and 5 controls were analyzed by microarray and based upon rigorous statistical analysis of the data, relevant genes were chosen for confirmation by RT-PCR in 10 PSC patients and 10 controls. Using unsupervised hierarchical clustering, gene expression in PSC was statistically different from our control population. Interestingly, genes within the IL-2 receptor beta, IL-6 and MAP Kinase pathways were found to be differently expressed in patients with PSC compared to controls. Further, individual genes, TNF-α induced protein 6 (TNFaip6 and membrane-spanning 4-domains, subfamily A (ms4a were found to be upregulated in PSC while similar to Mothers against decapentaplegic homolog 5 (SMAD 5 was downregulated. In conclusion, several immune-related pathways and genes were differentially expressed in PSC compared to control patients, giving further evidence that this disease is systemic and immune-mediated.

  3. Gene expression and reproductive abilities of male Drosophila melanogaster subjected to ELF-EMF exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Si-Si; Zhang, Zi-Yan; Yang, Chuan-Jun; Lian, Hui-Yong; Cai, Peng

    2013-12-12

    Extremely low frequency electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF) exposure is attracting increased attention as a possible disease-inducing factor. The in vivo effects of short-term and long-term ELF-EMF exposure on male Drosophila melanogaster were studied using transcriptomic analysis for preliminary screening and QRT-PCR for further verification. Transcriptomic analysis indicated that 439 genes were up-regulated and 874 genes were down-regulated following short-term exposures and that 514 genes were up-regulated and 1206 genes were down-regulated following long-term exposures (expression >2- or 2- or EMF effects on reproduction, some experiments on male reproduction ability were performed. Their results indicated that short-term ELF-EMF exposure may decrease the reproductive ability of males, but long-term exposures had no effect on reproductive ability. Down-regulation of ark gene in the exposed males suggests that the decrease in reproductive capacity may be induced by the effects of ELF-EMF exposure on spermatogenesis through the caspase pathway. QRT-PCR analysis confirmed that jra, ark and decay genes were down regulated in males exposed for 1 Generation (1G) and 72 h, which suggests that apoptosis may be inhibited in vivo. ELF-EMF exposure may have accelerated cell senescence, as suggested by the down-regulation of both cat and jra genes and the up-regulation of hsp22 gene. Up-regulation of totA and hsp22 genes during exposure suggests that exposed flies might induce an in vivo immune response to counter the adverse effects encountered during ELF-EMF exposure. Down-regulation of cat genes suggests that the partial oxidative protection system might be restrained, especially during short-term exposures. This study demonstrates the bioeffects of ELF-EMF exposure and provides evidence for understanding the in vivo mechanisms of ELF-EMF exposure on male D. melanogaster. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Immune Activities of Polycationic Vectors for Gene Delivery

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    Xiaotian Zhao

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Polycationic vectors are used widely in the field of gene delivery, while currently their immune activities in vivo are poorly understood. In this comprehensive review, we aim to present an overview of existing mechanisms of adverse immune responses induced by the polycation/gene complexes, which includes the polycations themselves, the gene sequences and the ROS produced by them. These causes can induce pro-inflammatory cytokines, hypersensitivity as well as the activation of toll-like receptors, and finally the immunostimulation occur. In addition, we introduce some different opinions and research results on the immunogenicity of classical polycations such as polylysine (PLL, polyethyleneimine (PEI, polyamidoamine dendrimers (PAMAM, chitosan and gelatin, most of which have immunogenicity and can induce immunoreactions in vivo. The methods now used to adjust their immunogenicity are shown in the final part of this review. Nowadays, there is still no accurate conclusion on immunogenicity of polycations, which confuses researchers seriously in in vivo test. We conclude that further research is needed in order to skillfully utilize or inhibit the immunogenicity of these polycationic vectors.

  5. impact of aluminum exposure on the immune system: a mini review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Y Z; Liu, D W; Liu, Z Y; Li, Y F

    2013-01-01

    Aluminum (Al) is widely used in daily life and will lead to environmental release and exposure. The toxicity of Al had been documented, and which attracted a growing concern on human and animal health. The immune system appears to be sensitive to Al exposure. But few studies focused on the potential immunological responses induced by Al. It is imperative to study the effects of Al on the immune function and this review discusses the effects of Al on autoimmunity, oral tolerance, expression of the immune cells, hypersensitivity and erythrocyte immune function. It will provide evidence to study the association between Al and immune function. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Multiple common variants for celiac disease influencing immune gene expression

    OpenAIRE

    MCMANUS, ROSS; KELLEHER, DERMOT

    2010-01-01

    PUBLISHED We performed a second-generation genome-wide association study of 4,533 individuals with celiac disease (cases) and 10,750 control subjects. We genotyped 113 selected SNPs with P(GWAS) < 10(-4) and 18 SNPs from 14 known loci in a further 4,918 cases and 5,684 controls. Variants from 13 new regions reached genome-wide significance (P(combined) < 5 x 10(-8)); most contain genes with immune functions (BACH2, CCR4, CD80, CIITA-SOCS1-CLEC16A, ICOSLG and ZMIZ1), with ETS1, RUNX3, THEMI...

  7. Functional programming of the autonomic nervous system by early life immune exposure: implications for anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sominsky, Luba; Fuller, Erin A; Bondarenko, Evgeny; Ong, Lin Kooi; Averell, Lee; Nalivaiko, Eugene; Dunkley, Peter R; Dickson, Phillip W; Hodgson, Deborah M

    2013-01-01

    Neonatal exposure of rodents to an immune challenge alters a variety of behavioural and physiological parameters in adulthood. In particular, neonatal lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 0.05 mg/kg, i.p.) exposure produces robust increases in anxiety-like behaviour, accompanied by persistent changes in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis functioning. Altered autonomic nervous system (ANS) activity is an important physiological contributor to the generation of anxiety. Here we examined the long term effects of neonatal LPS exposure on ANS function and the associated changes in neuroendocrine and behavioural indices. ANS function in Wistar rats, neonatally treated with LPS, was assessed via analysis of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) in the adrenal glands on postnatal days (PNDs) 50 and 85, and via plethysmographic assessment of adult respiratory rate in response to mild stress (acoustic and light stimuli). Expression of genes implicated in regulation of autonomic and endocrine activity in the relevant brain areas was also examined. Neonatal LPS exposure produced an increase in TH phosphorylation and activity at both PNDs 50 and 85. In adulthood, LPS-treated rats responded with increased respiratory rates to the lower intensities of stimuli, indicative of increased autonomic arousal. These changes were associated with increases in anxiety-like behaviours and HPA axis activity, alongside altered expression of the GABA-A receptor α2 subunit, CRH receptor type 1, CRH binding protein, and glucocorticoid receptor mRNA levels in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus and hypothalamus. The current findings suggest that in addition to the commonly reported alterations in HPA axis functioning, neonatal LPS challenge is associated with a persistent change in ANS activity, associated with, and potentially contributing to, the anxiety-like phenotype. The findings of this study reflect the importance of changes in the perinatal microbial environment on the ontogeny of physiological processes.

  8. Continuous exposure to Plasmodium results in decreased susceptibility and transcriptomic divergence of the Anopheles gambiae immune system

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    Dimopoulos George

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plasmodium infection has been shown to compromise the fitness of the mosquito vector, reducing its fecundity and longevity. However, from an evolutionary perspective, the impact of Plasmodium infection as a selective pressure on the mosquito is largely unknown. Results In the present study we have addressed the effect of a continuous Plasmodium berghei infection on the resistance to infection and global gene expression in Anopheles gambiae. Exposure of A. gambiae to P. berghei-infected blood and infection for 16 generations resulted in a decreased susceptibility to infection, altered constitutive expression levels for approximately 2.4% of the mosquito's total transcriptome and a lower basal level of immune genes expression, including several anti-Plasmodium factors. The infection-responsiveness for several defense genes was elevated in the P. berghei exposed mosquito colonies. Conclusion Our study establishes the existence of a selective pressure exerted by the parasite P. berghei on the malaria vector A. gambiae that results in a decreased permissiveness to infection and changes in the mosquito transcriptome regulation that suggest a decreased constitutive immune gene activity but a more potent immune response upon Plasmodium challenge.

  9. Intercellular Communication of Tumor Cells and Immune Cells after Exposure to Different Ionizing Radiation Qualities

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    Sebastian Diegeler

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Ionizing radiation can affect the immune system in many ways. Depending on the situation, the whole body or parts of the body can be acutely or chronically exposed to different radiation qualities. In tumor radiotherapy, a fractionated exposure of the tumor (and surrounding tissues is applied to kill the tumor cells. Currently, mostly photons, and also electrons, neutrons, protons, and heavier particles such as carbon ions, are used in radiotherapy. Tumor elimination can be supported by an effective immune response. In recent years, much progress has been achieved in the understanding of basic interactions between the irradiated tumor and the immune system. Here, direct and indirect effects of radiation on immune cells have to be considered. Lymphocytes for example are known to be highly radiosensitive. One important factor in indirect interactions is the radiation-induced bystander effect which can be initiated in unexposed cells by expression of cytokines of the irradiated cells and by direct exchange of molecules via gap junctions. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge about the indirect effects observed after exposure to different radiation qualities. The different immune cell populations important for the tumor immune response are natural killer cells, dendritic cells, and CD8+ cytotoxic T-cells. In vitro and in vivo studies have revealed the modulation of their functions due to ionizing radiation exposure of tumor cells. After radiation exposure, cytokines are produced by exposed tumor and immune cells and a modulated expression profile has also been observed in bystander immune cells. Release of damage-associated molecular patterns by irradiated tumor cells is another factor in immune activation. In conclusion, both immune-activating and -suppressing effects can occur. Enhancing or inhibiting these effects, respectively, could contribute to modified tumor cell killing after radiotherapy.

  10. [Poliomyelitis in The Netherlands, 1979-1991: immunity and exposure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rümke, H C; Oostvogel, P M; van der Veer, M; van Steenis, G; van Loon, A M

    1993-07-10

    An overview is presented of serological and virological studies on poliovirus immunization and circulation in the Netherlands, performed between 1979 and 1991. In this period, only three patients with poliomyelitis were notified. All had acquired the infection abroad. The vaccinations in the national immunization programme, using inactivated poliovirus vaccine, build a strong immunity. This can also be seen in age-stratified serological profiles of the Dutch population. In these surveys, persons from the time at which vaccination was offered have neutralizing antibodies. Older persons, especially those born between 1930 and 1945, sometimes lack antibodies. However, 85-90% of them show a rapid booster response upon vaccination, demonstrating immunological memory. Hence, they will be protected against poliomyelitis upon contact with wild poliovirus. Virological data show a regular import of poliovirus, especially in adoptive children tested on entry into the Netherlands, coming from developing countries. Nearly all other virus isolates in Dutchmen were related to import from such countries. None of the imported patients or other persons in whom poliovirus was detected spread the virus over the country. It demonstrates that as a rule the herd immunity of the well-vaccinated Dutch population is good. Exceptions occur, however, as demonstrated by the epidemics in 1978 and 1992. Large socio-geographic clusters of susceptible people who refuse vaccinations are not sufficiently protected.

  11. Microgravity and Immunity: Changes in Lymphocyte Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risin, D.; Pellis, N. R.; Ward, N. E.; Risin, S. A.

    2006-01-01

    Earlier studies had shown that modeled and true microgravity (MG) cause multiple direct effects on human lymphocytes. MG inhibits lymphocyte locomotion, suppresses polyclonal and antigen-specific activation, affects signal transduction mechanisms, as well as activation-induced apoptosis. In this study we assessed changes in gene expression associated with lymphocyte exposure to microgravity in an attempt to identify microgravity-sensitive genes (MGSG) in general and specifically those genes that might be responsible for the functional and structural changes observed earlier. Two sets of experiments targeting different goals were conducted. In the first set, T-lymphocytes from normal donors were activated with antiCD3 and IL2 and then cultured in 1g (static) and modeled MG (MMG) conditions (Rotating Wall Vessel bioreactor) for 24 hours. This setting allowed searching for MGSG by comparison of gene expression patterns in zero and 1 g gravity. In the second set - activated T-cells after culturing for 24 hours in 1g and MMG were exposed three hours before harvesting to a secondary activation stimulus (PHA) thus triggering the apoptotic pathway. Total RNA was extracted using the RNeasy isolation kit (Qiagen, Valencia, CA). Affymetrix Gene Chips (U133A), allowing testing for 18,400 human genes, were used for microarray analysis. In the first set of experiments MMG exposure resulted in altered expression of 89 genes, 10 of them were up-regulated and 79 down-regulated. In the second set, changes in expression were revealed in 85 genes, 20 were up-regulated and 65 were down-regulated. The analysis revealed that significant numbers of MGS genes are associated with signal transduction and apoptotic pathways. Interestingly, the majority of genes that responded by up- or down-regulation in the alternative sets of experiments were not the same, possibly reflecting different functional states of the examined T-lymphocyte populations. The responder genes (MGSG) might play an

  12. Immuno-Oncology-The Translational Runway for Gene Therapy: Gene Therapeutics to Address Multiple Immune Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weß, Ludger; Schnieders, Frank

    2017-12-01

    Cancer therapy is once again experiencing a paradigm shift. This shift is based on extensive clinical experience demonstrating that cancer cannot be successfully fought by addressing only single targets or pathways. Even the combination of several neo-antigens in cancer vaccines is not sufficient for successful, lasting tumor eradication. The focus has therefore shifted to the immune system's role in cancer and the striking abilities of cancer cells to manipulate and/or deactivate the immune system. Researchers and pharma companies have started to target the processes and cells known to support immune surveillance and the elimination of tumor cells. Immune processes, however, require novel concepts beyond the traditional "single-target-single drug" paradigm and need parallel targeting of diverse cells and mechanisms. This review gives a perspective on the role of gene therapy technologies in the evolving immuno-oncology space and identifies gene therapy as a major driver in the development and regulation of effective cancer immunotherapy. Present challenges and breakthroughs ranging from chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy, gene-modified oncolytic viruses, combination cancer vaccines, to RNA therapeutics are spotlighted. Gene therapy is recognized as the most prominent technology enabling effective immuno-oncology strategies.

  13. Next-Generation Sequencing and the Crustacean Immune System: The Need for Alternatives in Immune Gene Annotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, K F; Greenwood, Spencer J

    2016-12-01

    Next-generation sequencing has been a huge benefit to investigators studying non-model species. High-throughput gene expression studies, which were once restricted to animals with extensive genomic resources, can now be applied to any species. Transcriptomic studies using RNA-Seq can discover hundreds of thousands of transcripts from any species of interest. The power and limitation of these techniques is the sheer size of the dataset that is acquired. Parsing these large datasets is becoming easier as more bioinformatic tools are available for biologists without extensive computer programming expertise. Gene annotation and physiological pathway tools such as Gene Ontology and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) Orthology enable the application of the vast amount of information acquired from model organisms to non-model species. While noble in nature, utilization of these tools can inadvertently misrepresent transcriptomic data from non-model species via annotation omission. Annotation followed by molecular pathway analysis highlights pathways that are disproportionately affected by disease, stress, or the physiological condition being examined. Problems occur when gene annotation procedures only recognizes a subset, often 50% or less, of the genes differently expressed from a non-model organisms. Annotated transcripts normally belong to highly conserved metabolic or regulatory genes that likely have a secondary or tertiary role, if any at all, in immunity. They appear to be disproportionately affected simply because conserved genes are most easily annotated. Evolutionarily induced specialization of physiological pathways is a driving force of adaptive evolution, but it results in genes that have diverged sufficiently to prevent their identification and annotation through conventional gene or protein databases. The purpose of this manuscript is to highlight some of the challenges faced when annotating crustacean immune genes by using an American lobster

  14. Cellular immune response to cryptic epitopes during therapeutic gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chengwen; Goudy, Kevin; Hirsch, Matt; Asokan, Aravind; Fan, Yun; Alexander, Jeff; Sun, Junjiang; Monahan, Paul; Seiber, David; Sidney, John; Sette, Alessandro; Tisch, Roland; Frelinger, Jeff; Samulski, R Jude

    2009-06-30

    The immune response has been implicated as a critical factor in determining the success or failure of clinical gene therapy trials. Generally, such a response is elicited by the desired transgene product or, in some cases, the delivery system. In the current study, we report the previously uncharacterized finding that a therapeutic cassette currently being used for human investigation displays alternative reading frames (ARFs) that generate unwanted protein products to induce a cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response. In particular, we tested the hypothesis that antigenic epitopes derived from an ARF in coagulation factor IX (F9) cDNA can induce CTL reactivity, subsequently killing F9-expressing hepatocytes. One peptide (p18) of 3 candidates from an ARF of the F9 transgene induced CD8(+) T cell reactivity in mice expressing the human MHC class I molecule B0702. Subsequently, upon systemic administration of adeno-associated virus (AAV) serotype 2 vectors packaged with the F9 transgene (AAV2/F9), a robust CD8(+) CTL response was elicited against peptide p18. Of particular importance is that the ARF epitope-specific CTLs eliminated AAV2/F9-transduced hepatocytes but not AAV2/F9 codon-optimized (AAV2/F9-opt)-transduced liver cells in which p18 epitope was deleted. These results demonstrate a previously undiscovered mechanism by which CTL responses can be elicited by cryptic epitopes generated from a therapeutic transgene and have significant implications for all gene therapy modalities. Such unforeseen epitope generation warrants careful analysis of transgene sequences for ARFs to reduce the potential for adverse events arising from immune responses during clinical gene therapy protocols.

  15. Early Life Wildfire Smoke Exposure Is Associated with Immune Dysregulation and Lung Function Decrements in Adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Carolyn; Gerriets, Joan E; Fontaine, Justin H; Harper, Richart W; Kenyon, Nicholas J; Tablin, Fern; Schelegle, Edward S; Miller, Lisa A

    2017-05-01

    The long-term health effects of wildfire smoke exposure in pediatric populations are not known. The objectives of this study were to determine if early life exposure to wildfire smoke can affect parameters of immunity and airway physiology that are detectable with maturity. We studied a mixed-sex cohort of rhesus macaque monkeys that were exposed as infants to ambient wood smoke from a series of Northern California wildfires in the summer of 2008. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and pulmonary function measures were obtained when animals were approximately 3 years of age. PBMCs were cultured with either LPS or flagellin, followed by measurement of secreted IL-8 and IL-6 protein. PBMCs from a subset of female animals were also evaluated by Toll-like receptor (TLR) pathway mRNA analysis. Induction of IL-8 protein synthesis with either LPS or flagellin was significantly reduced in PBMC cultures from wildfire smoke-exposed female monkeys. In contrast, LPS- or flagellin-induced IL-6 protein synthesis was significantly reduced in PBMC cultures from wildfire smoke-exposed male monkeys. Baseline and TLR ligand-induced expression of the transcription factor, RelB, was globally modulated in PBMCs from wildfire smoke-exposed monkeys, with additional TLR pathway genes affected in a ligand-dependent manner. Wildfire smoke-exposed monkeys displayed significantly reduced inspiratory capacity, residual volume, vital capacity, functional residual capacity, and total lung capacity per unit of body weight relative to control animals. Our findings suggest that ambient wildfire smoke exposure during infancy results in sex-dependent attenuation of systemic TLR responses and reduced lung volume in adolescence.

  16. Genes related to immunity, as expressed in the alfalfa leafcutting bee, Megachile rotundata, during pathogen challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, J; James, R

    2009-11-01

    Virtually nothing is known about disease resistance in solitary bees, so expressed sequence tag (EST) databases were developed to search for immune response genes in the alfalfa leafcutting bee. We identified 104 putative immunity-related genes from both healthy and pathogen-challenged bee larvae, and 12 more genes using PCR amplification. The genes identified coded for proteins with a wide variety of innate immune response functions, including pathogen recognition, phagocytosis, the prophenoloxidase cascade, melanization, coagulation and several signalling pathways. Some immune response genes were highly conserved with honey bee genes, and more distantly related to other insects. The data presented provides the first analysis of immune function in a solitary bee and provides a foundation for the further analysis of gene expression patterns in bees.

  17. Parental vitamin deficiency affects the embryonic gene expression of immune-, lipid transport- and apolipoprotein genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skjærven, Kaja H.; Jakt, Lars Martin; Dahl, John Arne; Espe, Marit; Aanes, Håvard; Hamre, Kristin; Fernandes, Jorge M. O.

    2016-10-01

    World Health Organization is concerned for parental vitamin deficiency and its effect on offspring health. This study examines the effect of a marginally dietary-induced parental one carbon (1-C) micronutrient deficiency on embryonic gene expression using zebrafish. Metabolic profiling revealed a reduced 1-C cycle efficiency in F0 generation. Parental deficiency reduced the fecundity and a total of 364 genes were differentially expressed in the F1 embryos. The upregulated genes (53%) in the deficient group were enriched in biological processes such as immune response and blood coagulation. Several genes encoding enzymes essential for the 1-C cycle and for lipid transport (especially apolipoproteins) were aberrantly expressed. We show that a parental diet deficient in micronutrients disturbs the expression in descendant embryos of genes associated with overall health, and result in inherited aberrations in the 1-C cycle and lipid metabolism. This emphasises the importance of parental micronutrient status for the health of the offspring.

  18. The identification of immune genes in the milk transcriptome of the Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rehana V. Hewavisenti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii pouch young, like other marsupials, are born underdeveloped and immunologically naïve, and are unable to mount an adaptive immune response. The mother’s milk provides nutrients for growth and development as well as providing passive immunity. To better understand immune response in this endangered species, we set out to characterise the genes involved in passive immunity by sequencing and annotating the transcriptome of a devil milk sample collected during mid-lactation. At mid-lactation we expect the young to have heightened immune responses, as they have emerged from the pouch, encountering new pathogens. A total of 233,660 transcripts were identified, including approximately 17,827 unique protein-coding genes and 846 immune genes. The most highly expressed transcripts were dominated by milk protein genes such as those encoding early lactation protein, late lactation proteins, α-lactalbumin, α-casein and β-casein. There were numerous highly expressed immune genes including lysozyme, whey acidic protein, ferritin and major histocompatibility complex I and II. Genes encoding immunoglobulins, antimicrobial peptides, chemokines and immune cell receptors were also identified. The array of immune genes identified in this study reflects the importance of the milk in providing immune protection to Tasmanian devil young and provides the first insight into Tasmanian devil milk.

  19. Critical disease windows shaped by stress exposure alter allocation trade-offs between development and immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschman, Lucas J; Crespi, Erica J; Warne, Robin W

    2018-01-01

    Ubiquitous environmental stressors are often thought to alter animal susceptibility to pathogens and contribute to disease emergence. However, duration of exposure to a stressor is likely critical, because while chronic stress is often immunosuppressive, acute stress can temporarily enhance immune function. Furthermore, host susceptibility to stress and disease often varies with ontogeny; increasing during critical developmental windows. How the duration and timing of exposure to stressors interact to shape critical windows and influence disease processes is not well tested. We used ranavirus and larval amphibians as a model system to investigate how physiological stress and pathogenic infection shape development and disease dynamics in vertebrates. Based on a resource allocation model, we designed experiments to test how exposure to stressors may induce resource trade-offs that shape critical windows and disease processes because the neuroendocrine stress axis coordinates developmental remodelling, immune function and energy allocation in larval amphibians. We used wood frog larvae (Lithobates sylvaticus) to investigate how chronic and acute exposure to corticosterone, the dominant amphibian glucocorticoid hormone, mediates development and immune function via splenocyte immunohistochemistry analysis in association with ranavirus infection. Corticosterone treatments affected immune function, as both chronic and acute exposure suppressed splenocyte proliferation, although viral replication rate increased only in the chronic corticosterone treatment. Time to metamorphosis and survival depended on both corticosterone treatment and infection status. In the control and chronic corticosterone treatments, ranavirus infection decreased survival and delayed metamorphosis, although chronic corticosterone exposure accelerated rate of metamorphosis in uninfected larvae. Acute corticosterone exposure accelerated metamorphosis increased survival in infected larvae. Interactions

  20. Comprehensive immune transcriptomic analysis in bladder cancer reveals subtype specific immune gene expression patterns of prognostic relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Runhan; Tyryshkin, Kathrin; Graham, Charles H; Koti, Madhuri; Siemens, D Robert

    2017-09-19

    Recent efforts on genome wide profiling of muscle invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) have led to its classification into distinct genomic and transcriptomic molecular subtypes that exhibit variability in prognosis. Evolving evidence from recent immunotherapy trials has demonstrated the significance of pre-existing tumour immune profiles that could guide treatment decisions. To identify immune gene expression patterns associated with the molecular subtypes, we performed a comprehensive in silico immune transcriptomic profiling, utilizing transcriptomic data from 347 MIBC cases from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). To investigate subtype-associated immune gene expression patterns, we assembled 924 immune response genes and specifically those involved in T-cell cytotoxicity and the Type I/II interferon pathways. A set of 157 ranked genes was able to distinguish the four subtypes in an unsupervised analysis in an original training cohort (n=122) and an expanded, validation cohort (n=225). The most common overrepresented pathways distinguishing the four molecular subtypes, included JAK/STAT signaling, Toll-like receptor signaling, interleukin signaling, and T-cell activation. Some of the most enriched biological processes were responses to IFN-γ, antigen processing and presentation, cytokine mediated signaling, hemopoeisis, cell proliferation and cellular defense response in the TCGA cluster IV. Our novel findings provide further insights into the association between genomic subtypes and immune activation in MIBC and may open novel opportunities for their exploitation towards precise treatment with immunotherapy.

  1. Identification of upregulated immune-related genes in Vibrio harveyi challenged Penaeus monodon postlarvae

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nayak, S.; Singh, S.K.; Ramaiah, N.; Sreepada, R.A.

    were single pass sequenced. Forty five genes and 20 hypothetical proteins were identified, a few being first reports from shrimps. The most abundant immune relevant genes were ferritin, hemocyanin, and TCTP (translationally controlled tumor protein...

  2. Finding immune gene expression differences induced by marine bacterial pathogens in the Deep-sea hydrothermal vent mussel Bathymodiolus azoricus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, E.; Queiroz, A.; Serrão Santos, R.; Bettencourt, R.

    2013-11-01

    The deep-sea hydrothermal vent mussel Bathymodiolus azoricus lives in a natural environment characterised by extreme conditions of hydrostatic pressure, temperature, pH, high concentrations of heavy metals, methane and hydrogen sulphide. The deep-sea vent biological systems represent thus the opportunity to study and provide new insights into the basic physiological principles that govern the defense mechanisms in vent animals and to understand how they cope with microbial infections. Hence, the importance of understanding this animal's innate defense mechanisms, by examining its differential immune gene expressions toward different pathogenic agents. In the present study, B. azoricus mussels were infected with single suspensions of marine bacterial pathogens, consisting of Vibrio splendidus, Vibrio alginolyticus, or Vibrio anguillarum, and a pool of these Vibrio bacteria. Flavobacterium suspensions were also used as a non-pathogenic bacterium. Gene expression analyses were carried out using gill samples from infected animals by means of quantitative-Polymerase Chain Reaction aimed at targeting several immune genes. We also performed SDS-PAGE protein analyses from the same gill tissues. We concluded that there are different levels of immune gene expression between the 12 h to 24 h exposure times to various bacterial suspensions. Our results from qPCR demonstrated a general pattern of gene expression, decreasing from 12 h over 24 h post-infection. Among the bacteria tested, Flavobacterium is the bacterium inducing the highest gene expression level in 12 h post-infections animals. The 24 h infected animals revealed, however, greater gene expression levels, using V. splendidus as the infectious agent. The SDS-PAGE analysis also pointed at protein profile differences between 12 h and 24 h, particularly evident for proteins of 18-20 KDa molecular mass, where most dissimilarity was found. Multivariate analyses demonstrated that immune genes, as well as experimental

  3. Vaccination Enhances Early Immune Responses in White Shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei after Secondary Exposure to Vibrio alginolyticus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yong-Chin; Chen, Jiann-Chu; Morni, Wan Zabidii W.; Putra, Dedi Fazriansyah; Huang, Chien-Lun; Li, Chang-Che; Hsieh, Jen-Fang

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent work suggested that the presence of specific memory or some form of adaptive immunity occurs in insects and shrimp. Hypervariable pattern recognition molecules, known as Down syndrome cell adhesion molecules, are able to mount specific recognition, and immune priming in invertebrates. In the present study, we attempted to understand the immune response pattern of white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei which received primary (PE) and secondary exposure (SE) to Vibrio alginolyticus. Methodology Immune parameters and proliferation of haematopoietic tissues (HPTs) of shrimp which had received PE and SE to V. alginolyticus were measured. In the PE trial, the immune parameters and proliferation of HPTs of shrimp that received heat-killed V. alginolyticus (HVa) and formalin-inactivated V. alginolyticus (FVa) were measured. Mortality, immune parameters and proliferation of HPTs of 7-day-HVa-PE shrimp (shrimp that received primary exposure to HVa after 7 days) and 7-day-FVa-PE shrimp (shrimp that received primary exposure to FVa after 7 days) following SE to live V. alginolyticus (LVa) were measured. Phagocytic activity and clearance efficiency were examined for the 7∼35-day-HVa-PE and FVa-PE shrimp. Results HVa-receiving shrimp showed an earlier increase in the immune response on day 1, whereas FVa-receiving shrimp showed a late increase in the immune response on day 5. The 7-day-FVa-PE shrimp showed enhancement of immunity when encountering SE to LVa, whereas 7-day-HVa-PE shrimp showed a minor enhancement in immunity. 7-day-FVa-PE shrimp showed higher proliferation and an HPT mitotic index. Both phagocytic activity and clearance maintained higher for both HVa-PE and FVa-PE shrimp after 28 days. Conclusions HVa- and FVa-receiving shrimp showed the bacteria agglutinated prior to being phagocytised. FVa functions as a vaccine, whereas HVa functions as an inducer and can be used as an immune adjuvant. A combined mixture of FVa and HVa can serve as a

  4. Toll-like receptors and microbial exposure : gene-gene and gene-environment interaction in the development of atopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijmerink, N. E.; Kerkhof, M.; Bottema, R. W. B.; Gerritsen, J.; Stelma, F. F.; Thijs, C.; van Schayck, C. P.; Smit, H. A.; Brunekreef, B.; Postma, D. S.; Koppelman, G. H.

    2011-01-01

    Environmental and genetic factors contribute to atopy development. High microbial exposure may confer a protective effect on atopy. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) bind microbial products and are important in activating the immune system. To assess whether interactions between microbial exposures and

  5. Toll-like receptors and microbial exposure: gene-gene and gene-environment interaction in the development of atopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijmerink, N.E.; Kerkhof, M. van de; Bottema, R.W.; Gerritsen, J.; Stelma, F.F.; Thijs, C.; Schayck, C.P. van; Smit, H.A.; Brunekreef, B.; Postma, D.S.; Koppelman, G.H.

    2011-01-01

    Environmental and genetic factors contribute to atopy development. High microbial exposure may confer a protective effect on atopy. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) bind microbial products and are important in activating the immune system. To assess whether interactions between microbial exposures and

  6. Differential expression of immune and stress genes in the skin of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caipang, C.M.A.; Lazado, C.C.; Brinchmann, M.; Rombout, J.H.W.M.; Kiron, V.

    2011-01-01

    The present study describes the transcriptional profiles of selected immune and stress genes with putative important roles in the cutaneous immune defense of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua). In addition it shows differential expression of many genes at the dorsal and ventral sides of fish, in general

  7. Waves of change: immunomodulation of the innate immune response by low frequency electromagnetic field exposure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golbach, L.A.

    2015-01-01

      In this thesis we investigated possible modulatory roles of low frequency electromagnetic fields (LF EMFs) exposure on the innate immune system. Recent decades have seen a huge increase in the use of electronic devices that nowadays enable us to communicate with distant family, enjoy music

  8. Effect of feeding Lipopolysaccharide as an immunostimulant on immune response and immune gene expression of Labeo bata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Lopamudra; Parhi, Janmejay; Debnath, Chandan; Prasad, Kurcheti Pani

    2017-06-01

    This study investigates the effects of dietary lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as an immunostimulant on hematology, innate immunity, immune gene expression and protection against Edwardsiella tarda on Labeo bata. A basal diet supplemented with 0, 50, 100 and 150mg LPS kg(-1)diet was fed to the four different groups for 30days. The haematological (total erythrocyte count, total leukocyte count, total serum protein, albumin and globulin), innate immune parameters (respiratory burst, serum lysozyme, myeloperoxidase and serum bactericidal activity), immune gene expression (C3, β-2 microglobulin, lysozyme g, transferrin, IFN-1, IFN-γ) were monitored at 7th, 15th, 30th day and one day post challenge (DPC) with E. tarda. All the studied haematological, innate immune parameters and expression of immune gene increased significantly (p≤0.05) in LPS fed group in comparison with control. However the group fed 100mgkg(-1) LPS in feed showed highest activity on 7th day and 1DPC. The group fed 100mgkg(-1) LPS also recorded highest relative percent survivability after challenge with E. tarda. Therefore this study suggests that LPS at 100mgkg(-1) could be used as an immunostimulant in feed to enhance the protection of bata during periods of increased disease risk. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Efficacy of Spirulina platensis diet supplements on disease resistance and immune-related gene expression in Cyprinus carpio L. exposed to herbicide atrazine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Samah R; Reda, Rasha M; Awad, Ashraf

    2017-08-01

    The present study evaluated the immunotoxicological effects of the herbicide atrazine (ATZ) at sub-lethal concentrations and the potential ameliorative influence of Spirulina platensis (SP) over a sub-chronic exposure period on Cyprinus carpio L., also known as common carp. Common carp was sampled after a 40-days exposure to ATZ (428 μg/L) and SP (1%), individually or in combination to assess the non-specific immune response, changes in mRNA expression of immune-related genes [lysozyme (LYZ), immunoglobulin M (IgM), and complement component 3 (C3)] in the spleen, and inflammatory cytokines (interleukins IL-1ß and IL-10) in the head kidney using real-time PCR. Additionally, disease resistance to Aeromonas sobria was evaluated. The results revealed that ATZ exposure caused a significant decline in most of the hematological variables, lymphocyte viability, and lysozyme and bactericidal activity. Moreover, ATZ increased the susceptibility to disease, reflected by a significantly lower post-challenge survival rate of the carp. ATZ may induce dysregulated expression of immune-related genes leading to downregulation of mRNA levels of IgM and LYZ in the spleen. However, expression of C3 remained unaffected. Of the cytokine-related genes examined, IL-1B was up-regulated in the head kidney. In contrast, the expression of IL-10 gene was down-regulated in the ATZ-exposed group. The SP supplementation resulted in a significant improvement in most indices; however, these values did not match with that of the controls. These results may conclude that ATZ affects both innate and adaptive immune responses through the negative transcriptional effect on genes involved in immunity and also due to the inflammation of the immune organs. In addition, dietary supplements with SP could be useful for modulation of the immunity in response to ATZ exposure, thereby presenting a promising feed additive for carps in aquaculture. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Thermoregulatory and Immune Responses During Cold Exposure: Effects of Repeated Cold Exposure and Acute Exercise

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Castellani, John

    2000-01-01

    .... This information will be used in developing thermoregulatory models during cold exposure. During these studies several unanswered questions regarding thermoregulation in the cold were also addressed: (1...

  11. Effects of in utero arsenic exposure on child immunity and morbidity in rural Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raqib, Rubhana; Ahmed, Sultan; Sultana, Rokeya; Wagatsuma, Yukiko; Mondal, Dinesh; Hoque, A M Waheedul; Nermell, Barbro; Yunus, Mohammed; Roy, Shantonu; Persson, Lars Ake; Arifeen, Shams El; Moore, Sophie; Vahter, Marie

    2009-03-28

    Chronic exposure to arsenic, a potent carcinogen and toxicant, via drinking water is a worldwide public health problem. Because little is known about early-life effects of arsenic on immunity, we evaluated the impact of in utero exposure on infant immune parameters and morbidity in a pilot study. Pregnant women were enrolled at 6-10 weeks of gestation in Matlab, a rural area of Bangladesh, extensively affected by arsenic contamination of tubewell water. Women (n=140) delivering at local clinics were included in the study. Anthropometry and morbidity data of the pregnant women and their children, as well as infant thymic size by sonography were collected. Maternal urine and breast milk were collected for immune marker and arsenic assessment. Maternal urinary arsenic during pregnancy showed significant negative correlation with interleukin-7 (IL-7) and lactoferrin (Ltf) in breast milk and child thymic index (TI). Urinary arsenic was also positively associated with fever and diarrhea during pregnancy and acute respiratory infections (ARI) in the infants. The effect of arsenic exposure on ARI was only evident in male children. The findings suggest that in utero arsenic exposure impaired child thymic development and enhanced morbidity, probably via immunosuppression. The effect seemed to be partially gender dependent. Arsenic exposure also affected breast milk content of trophic factors and maternal morbidity.

  12. Fight or flight? - Flight increases immune gene expression but does not help to fight an infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woestmann, L; Kvist, J; Saastamoinen, M

    2017-03-01

    Flight represents a key trait in most insects, being energetically extremely demanding, yet often necessary for foraging and reproduction. Additionally, dispersal via flight is especially important for species living in fragmented landscapes. Even though, based on life-history theory, a negative relationship may be expected between flight and immunity, a number of previous studies have indicated flight to induce an increased immune response. In this study, we assessed whether induced immunity (i.e. immune gene expression) in response to 15-min forced flight treatment impacts individual survival of bacterial infection in the Glanville fritillary butterfly (Melitaea cinxia). We were able to confirm previous findings of flight-induced immune gene expression, but still observed substantially stronger effects on both gene expression levels and life span due to bacterial infection compared to flight treatment. Even though gene expression levels of some immunity-related genes were elevated due to flight, these individuals did not show increased survival of bacterial infection, indicating that flight-induced immune activation does not completely protect them from the negative effects of bacterial infection. Finally, an interaction between flight and immune treatment indicated a potential trade-off: flight treatment increased immune gene expression in naïve individuals only, whereas in infected individuals no increase in immune gene expression was induced by flight. Our results suggest that the up-regulation of immune genes upon flight is based on a general stress response rather than reflecting an adaptive response to cope with potential infections during flight or in new habitats. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Evolutionary Biology Published by John Wiley & Sons ltd on behalf of European Society for Evolutionary Biology.

  13. Effects of gene disruptions in the nisin gene cluster of Lactococcus lactis on nisin production and producer immunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ra, Runar; Beerthuyzen, Marke M.; Vos, Willem M. de; Saris, Per E.J.; Kuipers, Oscar P.

    1999-01-01

    The lantibiotic nisin is produced by several strains of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis. The chromosomally located gene cluster nisABTCIPRKFEG is required for biosynthesis, development of immunity, and regulation of gene expression. In-frame deletions in the nisB and nisT genes, and disruption of

  14. Heightened exposure to parasites favors the evolution of immunity in brood parasitic cowbirds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Caldwell; Reisen, William K.

    2011-01-01

    Immunologists and evolutionary biologists are interested in how the immune system evolves to fit an ecological niche. We studied the relationship between exposure to parasites and strength of immunity by investigating the response of two species of New World cowbirds (genus Molothrus, Icteridae), obligate brood parasites with contrasting life history strategies, to experimental arboviral infection. The South American shiny cowbird (M. bonariensis) is an extreme host-generalist that lays its eggs in the nests of >225 different avian species. The Central American bronzed cowbird (M. aeneus) is a relative host-specialist that lays its eggs preferentially in the nests of approximately 12 orioles in a single sister genus. West Nile virus provided a strong challenge and delineated immune differences between these species. The extreme host-generalist shiny cowbird, like the North American host-generalist, the brown-headed cowbird, showed significantly lower viremia to three arboviruses than related icterid species that were not brood parasites. The bronzed cowbird showed intermediate viremia. These findings support the interpretation that repeated exposure to a high diversity of parasites favors the evolution of enhanced immunity in brood parasitic cowbirds and makes them useful models for future studies of innate immunity.

  15. Environmental Exposures and Neuropsychiatric Disorders: What Role Does the Gut-Immune-Brain Axis Play?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, Shannon; Hornig, Mady

    2018-02-08

    Evidence is growing that environmental exposures-including xenobiotics as well as microbes-play a role in the pathogenesis of many neuropsychiatric disorders. Underlying mechanisms are likely to be complex, involving the developmentally sensitive interplay of genetic/epigenetic, detoxification, and immune factors. Here, we review evidence supporting a role for environmental factors and disrupted gut-immune-brain axis function in some neuropsychiatric conditions. Studies suggesting the involvement of an altered microbiome in triggering CNS-directed autoimmunity and neuropsychiatric disturbances are presented as an intriguing example of the varied mechanisms by which environmentally induced gut-immune-brain axis dysfunction may contribute to adverse brain outcomes. The gut-immune-brain axis is a burgeoning frontier for investigation of neuropsychiatric illness. Future translational research to define individual responses to exogenous exposures in terms of microbiome-dependent skew of the metabolome, immunity, and brain function may serve as a lens for illumination of pathways involved in the development of CNS disease and fuel discovery of novel interventions.

  16. Immunization of rabbits with cottontail rabbit papillomavirus E1 and E2 genes: protective immunity induced by gene gun-mediated intracutaneous delivery but not by intramuscular injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, R; Reed, C A; Cladel, N M; Christensen, N D

    2000-07-01

    We previously demonstrated that gene gun-based intracutaneous vaccination of rabbits with a combination of, but not with individual papillomavirus E1, E2, E6 and E7 genes provided complete protection against cottontail rabbit papillomavirus (CRPV) infection. In the present study, we tested whether vaccination of inbred and outbred rabbits with a combination of CRPV E1 and E2 genes could provide complete protection against virus infection. In the first experiment, gene gun-based intracutaneous vaccination with E1 and E2 genes prevented papilloma formation in the majority of inbred rabbits and promoted systemic papilloma regression in one non-protected rabbit. In contrast, needle-mediated intramuscular injection of E1 and E2 genes did not prevent papilloma formation nor promoted systemic papilloma regression, indicating an absence of strong protective immunity. In the second experiment, six outbred rabbits were immunized by gene gun-based intracutaneous administration of the E1 and E2 genes. Prevention of papilloma formation or systemic papilloma regression was observed in three vaccinated rabbits. Papillomas persisted on the remaining three rabbits, but were significantly smaller than that on control rabbits. These results suggested that gene gun-based intracutaneous vaccination with the combination of papillomavirus E1 and E2 genes induced strong protective antivirus immunity but may be insufficient for complete protection in an outbred population.

  17. Microarray expression analysis of genes involved in innate immune memory in peritoneal macrophages

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    Keisuke Yoshida

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Immunological memory has been believed to be a feature of the adaptive immune system for long period, but recent reports suggest that the innate immune system also exhibits memory-like reaction. Although evidence of innate immune memory is accumulating, no in vivo experimental data has clearly implicated a molecular mechanism, or even a cell-type, for this phenomenon. In this study of data deposited into Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO under GSE71111, we analyzed the expression profile of peritoneal macrophages isolated from mice pre-administrated with toll-like receptor (TLR ligands, mimicking pathogen infection. In these macrophages, increased expression of a group of innate immunity-related genes was sustained over a long period of time, and these genes overlapped with ATF7-regulated genes. We conclude that ATF7 plays an important role in innate immune memory in macrophages.

  18. Effects of simultaneous combined exposure to CDMA and WCDMA electromagnetic field on immune functions in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yeung Bae; Pyun, Bo-Jeong; Jin, Hee; Choi, Hyung-Do; Pack, Jeong-Ki; Kim, Nam; Lee, Yun-Sil

    2012-11-01

    Despite the importance of the immune system in defending the body against infection and cancer, little research on the possible effects of radiofrequency electromagnetic field (RF-EMF) signals on immune functions exists, and, in the case of simultaneous combined exposure of RF-EMF, to the best of our knowledge no work has been done. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of simultaneous exposure to two types of RF-EMF signals, single code division multiple access (CDMA) and wideband code division multiple access (WCDMA) signals on the immune system of rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to RF-EMF for 45 min/day, 5 days/week for up to 8 weeks. The whole body average specific absorption rate (SAR) of CDMA or WCDMA was 2.0 W/kg. Every 2 weeks after the experiment began, 20 rats were autopsied. Blood hematology, subtype population of splenocytes and cytokine production or mRNA expressions, interleukin (IL)-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, IL-1β, interferon (IFN)-γ and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β from the splenocytes or IL-6, TNF-α, and immunoglobulin (Ig) of IgG and IgM from blood serum, were examined. The results suggest that 8-week exposure to CDMA (849 MHz) and WCDMA (1.95 GHz) RF simultaneously at 2.0 W/kg each for 45-min RF-EMF exposure (total, 4 W/kg) did not affect these immune parameters. The present experiments suggest that simultaneous combined exposure of CDMA and WCDMA with total SAR dose of 4.0 W/kg for 45 min/day for 8 weeks, which is a relatively high SAR level compared to the exposure levels for the human system recommended by International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP, 0.4W/kg for whole body exposure levels and 2.0 W/kg for local exposure levels of general public), did not have any detectable effects on immune function in rats.

  19. Alcohol exposure differentially effects anti-tumor immunity in females by altering dendritic cell function.

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    Thompson, Matthew G; Navarro, Flor; Chitsike, Lennox; Ramirez, Luis; Kovacs, Elizabeth J; Watkins, Stephanie K

    2016-12-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are a critical component of anti-tumor immunity due to their ability to induce a robust immune response to antigen (Ag). Alcohol was previously shown to reduce DC ability to present foreign Ag and promote pro-inflammatory responses in situations of infection and trauma. However the impact of alcohol exposure on generation of an anti-tumor response, especially in the context of generation of an immune vaccine has not been examined. In the clinic, DC vaccines are typically generated from autologous blood, therefore prior exposure to substances such as alcohol may be a critical factor to consider regarding the effectiveness in generating an immune response. In this study, we demonstrate for the first time that ethanol differentially affects DC and tumor Ag-specific T cell responses depending on sex. Signaling pathways were found to be differentially regulated in DC in females compared to males and these differences were exacerbated by ethanol treatment. DC from female mice treated with ethanol were unable to activate Ag-specific cytotoxic T cells (CTL) as shown by reduced expression of CD44, CD69, and decreased production of granzyme B and IFNγ. Furthermore, although FOXO3, an immune suppressive mediator of DC function, was found to be upregulated in DC from female mice, ethanol related suppression was independent of FOXO3. These findings demonstrate for the first time differential impacts of alcohol on the immune system of females compared to males and may be a critical consideration for determining the effectiveness of an immune based therapy for cancer in patients that consume alcohol. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Comparative Analysis of Immune Cells Activation and Cytotoxicity upon Exposure Pathogen and Glycoconjugates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saheb, Entsar; Tarasenko, Olga

    2010-04-01

    Peripheral mononuclear cells (PMNC) including macrophages are key players in the immune responses against pathogens. Any infection could be attenuated if PMNC would be activated and capable to kill pathogen on exposure. It was shown that glycoconjugates (GCs) play an important role in adhesion to, activation, and recognition of pathogens. Nitric oxide (NO) is a regulatory molecule released by immune cells against pathogens that include bacteria, protozoa, helminthes, and fungi. NO is a highly reactive and diffusible molecule that controls replication or intracellular killing of pathogens during infection and immune responses against infections caused by pathogens. Avirulent Bacillus anthracis Sterne spores were used as a model in our study. The purpose of this study was two-fold: A) to analyze PMNC activation through NO production and B) to determine the cytotoxicity effect based on lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) upon exposure to pathogen exerted by GCs. The latter were used "prior to," "during," and "following" PMNC exposure to pathogen in order to modulate immune responses to spores during phagocytosis. Post-phagocytosis study involved the assessment of NO and LDH release by macrophages upon exposure to spores. Results have shown that untreated PMNC released low levels of NO. However, in the presence of GCs, PMNC were activated and produced high levels of NO under all experimental conditions. In addition, the results showed that GC1, GC3 are capable of increasing PMNC activity as evidenced by higher NO levels under the "prior," "during" and "following" to pathogen exposure conditions. On the other hand, GCs were capable of controlling cytotoxicity and decreased LDH levels during phagocytosis of spores. Our findings suggest that GCs stimulate NO production by activating PMNC and decrease cytotoxicity caused by pathogens on PMNC.

  1. Identification of the Weevil immune genes and their expression in the bacteriome tissue

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    Moya Andrés

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Persistent infections with mutualistic intracellular bacteria (endosymbionts are well represented in insects and are considered to be a driving force in evolution. However, while pathogenic relationships have been well studied over the last decades very little is known about the recognition of the endosymbionts by the host immune system and the mechanism that limits their infection to the bacteria-bearing host tissue (the bacteriome. Results To study bacteriome immune specificity, we first identified immune-relevant genes of the weevil Sitophilus zeamais by using suppressive subtractive hybridization (SSH and then analyzed their full-length coding sequences obtained by RACE-PCR experiments. We then measured immune gene expression in the bacteriome, and in the aposymbiotic larvae following S. zeamais primary endosymbiont (SZPE injection into the hemolymph, in order to consider the questions of bacteriome immune specificity and the insect humoral response to symbionts. We show that larval challenge with the endosymbiont results in a significant induction of antibacterial peptide genes, providing evidence that, outside the bacteriome, SZPE are recognized as microbial intruders by the host. In the bacteriome, gene expression analysis shows the overexpression of one antibacterial peptide from the coleoptericin family and, intriguingly, homologs to genes described as immune modulators (that is, PGRP-LB, Tollip were also shown to be highly expressed in the bacteriome. Conclusion The current data provide the first description of immune gene expression in the insect bacteriome. Compared with the insect humoral response to SZPE, the bacteriome expresses few genes among those investigated in this work. This local immune gene expression may help to maintain the endosymbiont in the bacteriome and prevent its invasion into insect tissues. Further investigations of the coleoptericin, the PGRP and the Tollip genes should elucidate the role

  2. Lung Adenocarcinoma and Squamous Cell Carcinoma Gene Expression Subtypes Demonstrate Significant Differences in Tumor Immune Landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faruki, Hawazin; Mayhew, Gregory M; Serody, Jonathan S; Hayes, D Neil; Perou, Charles M; Lai-Goldman, Myla

    2017-06-01

    Molecular subtyping of lung adenocarcinoma (AD) and lung squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) reveal biologically diverse tumors that vary in their genomic and clinical attributes. Published immune cell signatures and several lung AD and SCC gene expression data sets, including The Cancer Genome Atlas, were used to examine immune response in relation to AD and SCC expression subtypes. Expression of immune cell populations and other immune related genes, including CD274 molecule gene (CD274) (programmed death ligand 1), was investigated in the tumor microenvironment relative to the expression subtypes of the AD (terminal respiratory unit, proximal proliferative, and proximal inflammatory) and SCC (primitive, classical, secretory, and basal) subtypes. Lung AD and SCC expression subtypes demonstrated significant differences in tumor immune landscape. The proximal proliferative subtype of AD demonstrated low immune cell expression among ADs whereas the secretory subtype showed elevated immune cell expression among SCCs. Tumor expression subtype was a better predictor of immune cell expression than CD274 (programmed death ligand 1) in SCC tumors but was a comparable predictor in AD tumors. Nonsilent mutation burden was not correlated with immune cell expression across subtypes; however, major histocompatibility complex class II gene expression was highly correlated with immune cell expression. Increased immune and major histocompatibility complex II gene expression was associated with improved survival in the terminal respiratory unit and proximal inflammatory subtypes of AD and in the primitive subtype of SCC. Molecular expression subtypes of lung AD and SCC demonstrate key and reproducible differences in immune host response. Evaluation of tumor expression subtypes as potential biomarkers for immunotherapy should be investigated. Copyright © 2017 International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Caffeine exposure alters cardiac gene expression in embryonic cardiomyocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xiefan; Mei, Wenbin; Barbazuk, William B.; Rivkees, Scott A.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that in utero caffeine treatment at embryonic day (E) 8.5 alters DNA methylation patterns, gene expression, and cardiac function in adult mice. To provide insight into the mechanisms, we examined cardiac gene and microRNA (miRNA) expression in cardiomyocytes shortly after exposure to physiologically relevant doses of caffeine. In HL-1 and primary embryonic cardiomyocytes, caffeine treatment for 48 h significantly altered the expression of cardiac structural genes (Myh6, Myh7, Myh7b, Tnni3), hormonal genes (Anp and BnP), cardiac transcription factors (Gata4, Mef2c, Mef2d, Nfatc1), and microRNAs (miRNAs; miR208a, miR208b, miR499). In addition, expressions of these genes were significantly altered in embryonic hearts exposed to in utero caffeine. For in utero experiments, pregnant CD-1 dams were treated with 20–60 mg/kg of caffeine, which resulted in maternal circulation levels of 37.3–65.3 μM 2 h after treatment. RNA sequencing was performed on embryonic ventricles treated with vehicle or 20 mg/kg of caffeine daily from E6.5-9.5. Differential expression (DE) analysis revealed that 124 genes and 849 transcripts were significantly altered, and differential exon usage (DEU) analysis identified 597 exons that were changed in response to prenatal caffeine exposure. Among the DE genes identified by RNA sequencing were several cardiac structural genes and genes that control DNA methylation and histone modification. Pathway analysis revealed that pathways related to cardiovascular development and diseases were significantly affected by caffeine. In addition, global cardiac DNA methylation was reduced in caffeine-treated cardiomyocytes. Collectively, these data demonstrate that caffeine exposure alters gene expression and DNA methylation in embryonic cardiomyocytes. PMID:25354728

  4. Honey constituents up-regulate detoxification and immunity genes in the western honey bee Apis mellifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Wenfu; Schuler, Mary A; Berenbaum, May R

    2013-05-28

    As a managed pollinator, the honey bee Apis mellifera is critical to the American agricultural enterprise. Recent colony losses have thus raised concerns; possible explanations for bee decline include nutritional deficiencies and exposures to pesticides and pathogens. We determined that constituents found in honey, including p-coumaric acid, pinocembrin, and pinobanksin 5-methyl ether, specifically induce detoxification genes. These inducers are primarily found not in nectar but in pollen in the case of p-coumaric acid (a monomer of sporopollenin, the principal constituent of pollen cell walls) and propolis, a resinous material gathered and processed by bees to line wax cells. RNA-seq analysis (massively parallel RNA sequencing) revealed that p-coumaric acid specifically up-regulates all classes of detoxification genes as well as select antimicrobial peptide genes. This up-regulation has functional significance in that that adding p-coumaric acid to a diet of sucrose increases midgut metabolism of coumaphos, a widely used in-hive acaricide, by ∼60%. As a major component of pollen grains, p-coumaric acid is ubiquitous in the natural diet of honey bees and may function as a nutraceutical regulating immune and detoxification processes. The widespread apicultural use of honey substitutes, including high-fructose corn syrup, may thus compromise the ability of honey bees to cope with pesticides and pathogens and contribute to colony losses.

  5. Identification and functional analysis of antifungal immune response genes in Drosophila.

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    Li Hua Jin

    Full Text Available Essential aspects of the innate immune response to microbial infection appear to be conserved between insects and mammals. Although signaling pathways that activate NF-kappaB during innate immune responses to various microorganisms have been studied in detail, regulatory mechanisms that control other immune responses to fungal infection require further investigation. To identify new Drosophila genes involved in antifungal immune responses, we selected genes known to be differentially regulated in SL2 cells by microbial cell wall components and tested their roles in antifungal defense using mutant flies. From 130 mutant lines, sixteen mutants exhibited increased sensitivity to fungal infection. Examination of their effects on defense against various types of bacteria and fungi revealed nine genes that are involved specifically in defense against fungal infection. All of these mutants displayed defects in phagocytosis or activation of antimicrobial peptide genes following infection. In some mutants, these immune deficiencies were attributed to defects in hemocyte development and differentiation, while other mutants showed specific defects in immune signaling required for humoral or cellular immune responses. Our results identify a new class of genes involved in antifungal immune responses in Drosophila.

  6. Contrasting patterns of selection and drift between two categories of immune genes in prairie-chickens.

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    Bateson, Zachary W; Whittingham, Linda A; Johnson, Jeff A; Dunn, Peter O

    2015-12-01

    Immune-receptor genes of the adaptive immune system, such as the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), are involved in recognizing specific pathogens and are known to have high rates of adaptive evolution, presumably as a consequence of rapid co-evolution between hosts and pathogens. In contrast, many 'mediating' genes of the immune system do not interact directly with specific pathogens and are involved in signalling (e.g. cytokines) or controlling immune cell growth. As a consequence, we might expect stronger selection at immune-receptor than mediating genes, but these two types of genes have not been compared directly in wild populations. Here, we tested the hypothesis that selection differs between MHC (class I and II) and mediating genes by comparing levels of population differentiation across the range of greater prairie-chickens (Tympanuchus cupido). As predicted, there was stronger population differentiation and isolation by distance at immune receptor (MHC) than at either mediating genes or neutral microsatellites, suggesting a stronger role of local adaptation at the MHC. In contrast, mediating genes displayed weaker differentiation between populations than neutral microsatellites, consistent with selection favouring similar alleles across populations for mediating genes. In addition to selection, drift also had a stronger effect on immune receptor (MHC) than mediating genes as indicated by the stronger decline of MHC variation in relation to population size. This is the first study in the wild to show that the effects of selection and drift on immune genes vary across populations depending on their functional role. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Immune genes are associated with human glioblastoma pathology and patient survival

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    Vauléon Elodie

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glioblastoma (GBM is the most common and lethal primary brain tumor in adults. Several recent transcriptomic studies in GBM have identified different signatures involving immune genes associated with GBM pathology, overall survival (OS or response to treatment. Methods In order to clarify the immune signatures found in GBM, we performed a co-expression network analysis that grouped 791 immune-associated genes (IA genes in large clusters using a combined dataset of 161 GBM specimens from published databases. We next studied IA genes associated with patient survival using 3 different statistical methods. We then developed a 6-IA gene risk predictor which stratified patients into two groups with statistically significantly different survivals. We validated this risk predictor on two other Affymetrix data series, on a local Agilent data series, and using RT-Q-PCR on a local series of GBM patients treated by standard chemo-radiation therapy. Results The co-expression network analysis of the immune genes disclosed 6 powerful modules identifying innate immune system and natural killer cells, myeloid cells and cytokine signatures. Two of these modules were significantly enriched in genes associated with OS. We also found 108 IA genes linked to the immune system significantly associated with OS in GBM patients. The 6-IA gene risk predictor successfully distinguished two groups of GBM patients with significantly different survival (OS low risk: 22.3 months versus high risk: 7.3 months; p  Conclusions This study demonstrates the immune signatures found in previous GBM genomic analyses and suggests the involvement of immune cells in GBM biology. The robust 6-IA gene risk predictor should be helpful in establishing prognosis in GBM patients, in particular in those with a proneural GBM subtype, and even in the well-known good prognosis group of patients with methylated MGMT promoter-bearing tumors.

  8. Astrocyte-specific overexpressed gene signatures in response to methamphetamine exposure in vitro

    KAUST Repository

    Bortell, Nikki

    2017-03-09

    BackgroundAstrocyte activation is one of the earliest findings in the brain of methamphetamine (Meth) abusers. Our goal in this study was to identify the characteristics of the astrocytic acute response to the drug, which may be critical in pathogenic outcomes secondary to the use.MethodsWe developed an integrated analysis of gene expression data to study the acute gene changes caused by the direct exposure to Meth treatment of astrocytes in vitro, and to better understand how astrocytes respond, what are the early molecular markers associated with this response. We examined the literature in search of similar changes in gene signatures that are found in central nervous system disorders.ResultsWe identified overexpressed gene networks represented by genes of an inflammatory and immune nature and that are implicated in neuroactive ligand-receptor interactions. The overexpressed networks are linked to molecules that were highly upregulated in astrocytes by all doses of methamphetamine tested and that could play a role in the central nervous system. The strongest overexpressed signatures were the upregulation of MAP2K5, GPR65, and CXCL5, and the gene networks individually associated with these molecules. Pathway analysis revealed that these networks are involved both in neuroprotection and in neuropathology. We have validated several targets associated to these genes.ConclusionsGene signatures for the astrocytic response to Meth were identified among the upregulated gene pool, using an in vitro system. The identified markers may participate in dysfunctions of the central nervous system but could also provide acute protection to the drug exposure. Further in vivo studies are necessary to establish the role of these gene networks in drug abuse pathogenesis.

  9. Supplementary Material for: Astrocyte-specific overexpressed gene signatures in response to methamphetamine exposure in vitro

    KAUST Repository

    Bortell, Nikki

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background Astrocyte activation is one of the earliest findings in the brain of methamphetamine (Meth) abusers. Our goal in this study was to identify the characteristics of the astrocytic acute response to the drug, which may be critical in pathogenic outcomes secondary to the use. Methods We developed an integrated analysis of gene expression data to study the acute gene changes caused by the direct exposure to Meth treatment of astrocytes in vitro, and to better understand how astrocytes respond, what are the early molecular markers associated with this response. We examined the literature in search of similar changes in gene signatures that are found in central nervous system disorders. Results We identified overexpressed gene networks represented by genes of an inflammatory and immune nature and that are implicated in neuroactive ligand-receptor interactions. The overexpressed networks are linked to molecules that were highly upregulated in astrocytes by all doses of methamphetamine tested and that could play a role in the central nervous system. The strongest overexpressed signatures were the upregulation of MAP2K5, GPR65, and CXCL5, and the gene networks individually associated with these molecules. Pathway analysis revealed that these networks are involved both in neuroprotection and in neuropathology. We have validated several targets associated to these genes. Conclusions Gene signatures for the astrocytic response to Meth were identified among the upregulated gene pool, using an in vitro system. The identified markers may participate in dysfunctions of the central nervous system but could also provide acute protection to the drug exposure. Further in vivo studies are necessary to establish the role of these gene networks in drug abuse pathogenesis.

  10. Burkholderia pseudomallei Differentially Regulates Host Innate Immune Response Genes for Intracellular Survival in Lung Epithelial Cells.

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    Kumutha Malar Vellasamy

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis poses a serious threat to humankind. B. pseudomallei secretes numerous virulence proteins that alter host cell functions to escape from intracellular immune sensors. However, the events underlying disease pathogenesis are poorly understood.We determined the ability of B. pseudomallei to invade and survive intracellularly in A549 human lung epithelial cells, and also investigated the early transcriptional responses using an Illumina HumanHT-12 v4 microarray platform, after three hours of exposure to live B. pseudomallei (BCMS and its secreted proteins (CCMS.We found that the ability of B. pseudomallei to invade and survive intracellularly correlated with increase of multiplicity of infection and duration of contact. Activation of host carbohydrate metabolism and apoptosis as well as suppression of amino acid metabolism and innate immune responses both by live bacteria and its secreted proteins were evident. These early events might be linked to initial activation of host genes directed towards bacterial dissemination from lungs to target organs (via proposed in vivo mechanisms or to escape potential sensing by macrophages.Understanding the early responses of A549 cells toward B. pseudomallei infection provide preliminary insights into the likely pathogenesis mechanisms underlying melioidosis, and could contribute to development of novel intervention strategies to combat B. pseudomallei infections.

  11. Innate immune dysfunction in the neonatal rat following prenatal endotoxin exposure.

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    Hodyl, Nicolette A; Krivanek, Klara M; Clifton, Vicki L; Hodgson, Deborah M

    2008-11-15

    The efficacy of the neonatal innate immune system to respond to bacterial exposure following maternal infection is of great interest, as the neonatal period is one of relative immune immaturity, and is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. This study aimed to determine the response to an in-vivo endotoxin challenge in the neonatal period following prenatal exposure to bacterial endotoxin. Pregnant Fischer 344 dams received either endotoxin or the vehicle on gestational days 16, 18 and 20 (term=23 days). The neonatal (5 day) offspring were then exposed to an endotoxin challenge; blood was collected at baseline or at 4 h for analysis of blood cell counts, corticosterone, TNF alpha and IL-1 beta, levels. The neonatal rat pups responded to the challenge with significantly reduced corticosterone, TNF alpha and IL-1 beta levels compared to controls (p<0.003). Monocyte, neutrophil and eosinophil counts were also significantly reduced in the prenatal endotoxin offspring compared to controls (p<0.02). While the immune system is functionally immature in the neonatal period, these results suggest that prenatal infection may further reduce the capacity of the innate neonatal immune system to respond to endotoxin, leaving offspring more vulnerable to pathogenic invasion in neonatal life.

  12. SOME ASPECTS OF IMMUNE SYSTEM FUNCTIONING IN HEALTHY DONORS SUBJECTED TO XENOGENOUS EXPOSURE

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    O. O. Obukhova

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. In present work, we studied some interrelations between tobacco smoking and the processes of immune system stimulation in healthy blood donors. In our opinion, this issue is especially important for the big industrial center, with rather strong antigenic exposure of the organism. The levels of circulating immune complexes (CIC were used as a marker index which reflects specific antigen-antibody interactions during inflammation. According to the results obtained, the majority of persons who have high CIC levels were tobacco smokers (53.76%. Moreover, the percentage of persons with high CIC content, like as the mean values of this index is increased proportionally to the duration of smoking. A mixture of tobacco smoke components seems to exert direct toxic effect upon various compartments of the immune system and causes local irritation of bronchial tree, thus producing local and systemic inflammatory reaction. It is, possibly, an additional factor which determines activation of immune system, with a background of adverse antropogenic exposures typical to industrial centers. The data obtained allow us to affirm a toxic action of tobacco smoke upon the organism of smokers, with development of inflammatory reactions that are displayed as increased CIC levels at preclinical stage.

  13. The immune gene repertoire of an important viral reservoir, the Australian black flying fox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papenfuss, Anthony T; Baker, Michelle L; Feng, Zhi-Ping; Tachedjian, Mary; Crameri, Gary; Cowled, Chris; Ng, Justin; Janardhana, Vijaya; Field, Hume E; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2012-06-20

    Bats are the natural reservoir host for a range of emerging and re-emerging viruses, including SARS-like coronaviruses, Ebola viruses, henipaviruses and Rabies viruses. However, the mechanisms responsible for the control of viral replication in bats are not understood and there is little information available on any aspect of antiviral immunity in bats. Massively parallel sequencing of the bat transcriptome provides the opportunity for rapid gene discovery. Although the genomes of one megabat and one microbat have now been sequenced to low coverage, no transcriptomic datasets have been reported from any bat species. In this study, we describe the immune transcriptome of the Australian flying fox, Pteropus alecto, providing an important resource for identification of genes involved in a range of activities including antiviral immunity. Towards understanding the adaptations that have allowed bats to coexist with viruses, we have de novo assembled transcriptome sequence from immune tissues and stimulated cells from P. alecto. We identified about 18,600 genes involved in a broad range of activities with the most highly expressed genes involved in cell growth and maintenance, enzyme activity, cellular components and metabolism and energy pathways. 3.5% of the bat transcribed genes corresponded to immune genes and a total of about 500 immune genes were identified, providing an overview of both innate and adaptive immunity. A small proportion of transcripts found no match with annotated sequences in any of the public databases and may represent bat-specific transcripts. This study represents the first reported bat transcriptome dataset and provides a survey of expressed bat genes that complement existing bat genomic data. In addition, these data provide insight into genes relevant to the antiviral responses of bats, and form a basis for examining the roles of these molecules in immune response to viral infection.

  14. The immune gene repertoire of an important viral reservoir, the Australian black flying fox

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    Papenfuss Anthony T

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bats are the natural reservoir host for a range of emerging and re-emerging viruses, including SARS-like coronaviruses, Ebola viruses, henipaviruses and Rabies viruses. However, the mechanisms responsible for the control of viral replication in bats are not understood and there is little information available on any aspect of antiviral immunity in bats. Massively parallel sequencing of the bat transcriptome provides the opportunity for rapid gene discovery. Although the genomes of one megabat and one microbat have now been sequenced to low coverage, no transcriptomic datasets have been reported from any bat species. In this study, we describe the immune transcriptome of the Australian flying fox, Pteropus alecto, providing an important resource for identification of genes involved in a range of activities including antiviral immunity. Results Towards understanding the adaptations that have allowed bats to coexist with viruses, we have de novo assembled transcriptome sequence from immune tissues and stimulated cells from P. alecto. We identified about 18,600 genes involved in a broad range of activities with the most highly expressed genes involved in cell growth and maintenance, enzyme activity, cellular components and metabolism and energy pathways. 3.5% of the bat transcribed genes corresponded to immune genes and a total of about 500 immune genes were identified, providing an overview of both innate and adaptive immunity. A small proportion of transcripts found no match with annotated sequences in any of the public databases and may represent bat-specific transcripts. Conclusions This study represents the first reported bat transcriptome dataset and provides a survey of expressed bat genes that complement existing bat genomic data. In addition, these data provide insight into genes relevant to the antiviral responses of bats, and form a basis for examining the roles of these molecules in immune response to viral infection.

  15. Transcriptome mining of immune-related genes in the muricid snail Concholepas concholepas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Détrée, Camille; López-Landavery, Edgar; Gallardo-Escárate, Cristian; Lafarga-De la Cruz, Fabiola

    2017-12-01

    The population of the Chilean endemic marine gastropod Concholepas concholepas locally called "loco" has dramatically decreased in the past 50 years as a result of intense activity of local fisheries and high environmental variability observed along the Chilean coast, including episodes of hypoxia, changes in sea surface temperature, ocean acidification and diseases. In this study, we set out to explore the molecular basis of C. concholepas to cope with biotic stressors such as exposure to the pathogenic bacterium Vibrio anguillarum. Here, 454pyrosequencing was conducted and 61 transcripts related to the immune response in this muricid species were identified. Among these, the expression of six genes (CcNFκβ, CcIκβ, CcLITAF, CcTLR, CcCas8 and CcCath) involved in the regulation of inflammatory, apoptotic and immune processes upon stimuli, were evaluated during the first 33 h post challenge (hpc). The results showed that CcTLR, CcCas8 and CcCath have an initial response at 4 hpc, evidencing an up-regulation from 4 to 24 hpc. Notably, the response of CcNFKB occurred 2 h later with a statistically significant up-regulation at 6 hpc and 10 hpc. Furthermore, the challenge with V. anguillarum induced a statistically significant down-regulation of CcIKB between 2 and 10 hpc as well as a down-regulation of CcLITAF between 2 and 4 hpc followed in both cases by an up-regulation between 24 and 33 hpc. This work describes the first transcriptomic effort to characterize the immune response of C. concholepas and constitutes a valuable transcriptomic resource for future efforts to develop sustainable aquaculture and conservations tools for this endemic marine snail species. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Early exposure to ultraviolet-B radiation decreases immune function later in life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceccato, Emma; Cramp, Rebecca L; Seebacher, Frank; Franklin, Craig E

    2016-01-01

    Amphibians have declined dramatically worldwide. Many of these declines are occurring in areas where no obvious anthropogenic stressors are present. It is proposed that in these areas, environmental factors such as elevated solar ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation could be responsible. Ultraviolet-B levels have increased in many parts of the world as a consequence of the anthropogenic destruction of the ozone layer. Amphibian tadpoles are particularly sensitive to the damaging effects of UV-B radiation, with exposure disrupting growth and fitness in many species. Given that UV-B can disrupt immune function in other animals, we tested the hypothesis that early UV-B exposure suppresses the immune responses of amphibian tadpoles and subsequent juvenile frogs. We exposed Limnodynastes peronii tadpoles to sublethal levels of UV-B radiation for 6 weeks after hatching, then examined indices of immune function in both the tadpoles and the subsequent metamorphs. There was no significant effect of UV-B on tadpole leucocyte counts or on their response to an acute antigen (phytohaemagglutinin) challenge. However, early UV-B exposure resulted in a significant reduction in both metamorph leucocyte abundance and their response to an acute phytohaemagglutinin challenge. These data demonstrate that early UV-B exposure can have carry-over effects on later life-history traits even if the applied stressor has no immediately discernible effect. These findings have important implications for our understanding of the effects of UV-B exposure on amphibian health and susceptibility to diseases such as chytridiomycosis.

  17. Identification of immunity related genes to study the Physalis peruviana--Fusarium oxysporum pathosystem.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix E Enciso-Rodríguez

    Full Text Available The Cape gooseberry (Physalisperuviana L is an Andean exotic fruit with high nutritional value and appealing medicinal properties. However, its cultivation faces important phytosanitary problems mainly due to pathogens like Fusarium oxysporum, Cercosporaphysalidis and Alternaria spp. Here we used the Cape gooseberry foliar transcriptome to search for proteins that encode conserved domains related to plant immunity including: NBS (Nucleotide Binding Site, CC (Coiled-Coil, TIR (Toll/Interleukin-1 Receptor. We identified 74 immunity related gene candidates in P. peruviana which have the typical resistance gene (R-gene architecture, 17 Receptor like kinase (RLKs candidates related to PAMP-Triggered Immunity (PTI, eight (TIR-NBS-LRR, or TNL and nine (CC-NBS-LRR, or CNL candidates related to Effector-Triggered Immunity (ETI genes among others. These candidate genes were categorized by molecular function (98%, biological process (85% and cellular component (79% using gene ontology. Some of the most interesting predicted roles were those associated with binding and transferase activity. We designed 94 primers pairs from the 74 immunity-related genes (IRGs to amplify the corresponding genomic regions on six genotypes that included resistant and susceptible materials. From these, we selected 17 single band amplicons and sequenced them in 14 F. oxysporum resistant and susceptible genotypes. Sequence polymorphisms were analyzed through preliminary candidate gene association, which allowed the detection of one SNP at the PpIRG-63 marker revealing a nonsynonymous mutation in the predicted LRR domain suggesting functional roles for resistance.

  18. Starvation and Imidacloprid Exposure Influence Immune Response by Anoplophora glabripennis (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) to a Fungal Pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Joanna J; Castrillo, Louela A; Donzelli, Bruno G G; Hajek, Ann E

    2017-08-01

    In several insect systems, fungal entomopathogens synergize with neonicotinoid insecticides which results in accelerated host death. Using the Asian longhorned beetle, Anoplophora glabripennis (Motschulsky), an invasive woodborer inadvertently introduced into North America and Europe, we investigated potential mechanisms in the synergy between the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium brunneum Petch and the insecticide imidacloprid. A potential mechanism underlying this synergy could be imidacloprid's ability to prevent feeding shortly after administration. We investigated whether starvation would have an impact similar to imidacloprid exposure on the mortality of fungal-inoculated beetles. Using real-time PCR to quantify fungal load in inoculated beetles, we determined how starvation and pesticide exposure impacted beetles' ability to tolerate or resist a fungal infection. The effect of starvation and pesticide exposure on the encapsulation and melanization immune responses of the beetles was also quantified. Starvation had a similar impact on the survival of M. brunneum-inoculated beetles compared to imidacloprid exposure. The synergy, however, was not completely due to starvation, as imidacloprid reduced the beetles' melanotic encapsulation response and capsule area, while starvation did not significantly reduce these immune responses. Our results suggest that there are multiple interacting mechanisms involved in the synergy between M. brunneum and imidacloprid. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Gene Expression Profile of the Hypothalamus in DNP-KLH Immunized Mice Following Electroacupuncture Stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Kwang Kim

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical evidence indicates that electroacupuncture (EA is effective for allergic disorder. Recent animal studies have shown that EA treatment reduces levels of IgE and Th2 cytokines in BALB/c mice immunized with 2,4-dinitrophenylated keyhole limpet protein (DNP-KLH. The hypothalamus, a brain center of the neural-immune system, is known to be activated by EA stimulation. This study was performed to identify and characterize the differentially expressed genes in the hypothalamus of DNP-KLH immunized mice that were stimulated with EA or only restrained. To this aim, we conducted a microarray analysis to evaluate the global gene expression profiles, using the hypothalamic RNA samples taken from three groups of mice: (i normal control group (no treatments; (ii IMH group (DNP-KLH immunization + restraint; and (iii IMEA group (immunization + EA stimulation. The microarray analysis revealed that total 39 genes were altered in their expression levels by EA treatment. Ten genes, including T-cell receptor alpha variable region family 13 subfamily 1 (Tcra-V13.1, heat shock protein 1B (Hspa1b and 2′–5′ oligoadenylate synthetase 1F (Oas1f, were up-regulated in the IMEA group when compared with the IMH group. In contrast, 29 genes, including decay accelerating factor 2 (Daf2, NAD(PH dehydrogenase, quinone 1 (Nqo1 and programmed cell death 1 ligand 2 (Pdcd1lg2 were down-regulated in the IMEA group as compared with the IMH group. These results suggest that EA treatment can modulate immune response in DNP-KLH immunized mice by regulating expression levels of genes that are associated with innate immune, cellular defense and/or other kinds of immune system in the hypothalamus.

  20. The AVR2-SIX5 gene pair is required to activate I-2-mediated immunity in tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Lisong; Houterman, Petra M; Gawehns, Fleur; Cao, Lingxue; Sillo, Fabiano; Richter, Hanna; Clavijo-Ortiz, Myriam J; Schmidt, Sarah M; Boeren, Sjef; Vervoort, Jacques; Cornelissen, Ben J C; Rep, Martijn; Takken, Frank L W

    2015-10-01

    Plant-invading microbes betray their presence to a plant by exposure of antigenic molecules such as small, secreted proteins called 'effectors'. In Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (Fol) we identified a pair of effector gene candidates, AVR2-SIX5, whose expression is controlled by a shared promoter. The pathogenicity of AVR2 and SIX5 Fol knockouts was assessed on susceptible and resistant tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants carrying I-2. The I-2 NB-LRR protein confers resistance to Fol races carrying AVR2. Like Avr2, Six5 was found to be required for full virulence on susceptible plants. Unexpectedly, each knockout could breach I-2-mediated disease resistance. So whereas Avr2 is sufficient to induce I-2-mediated cell death, Avr2 and Six5 are both required for resistance. Avr2 and Six5 interact in yeast two-hybrid assays as well as in planta. Six5 and Avr2 accumulate in xylem sap of plants infected with the reciprocal knockouts, showing that lack of I-2 activation is not due to a lack of Avr2 accumulation in the SIX5 mutant. The effector repertoire of a pathogen determines its host specificity and its ability to manipulate plant immunity. Our findings challenge an oversimplified interpretation of the gene-for-gene model by showing requirement of two fungal genes for immunity conferred by one resistance gene. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  1. Immunization

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a lot worse. Some are even life-threatening. Immunization shots, or vaccinations, are essential. They protect against ... B, polio, tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis (whooping cough). Immunizations are important for adults as well as children. ...

  2. Impact of Neutron Exposure on Global Gene Expression in a Human Peripheral Blood Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broustas, Constantinos G; Xu, Yanping; Harken, Andrew D; Chowdhury, Mashkura; Garty, Guy; Amundson, Sally A

    2017-04-01

    The detonation of an improvised nuclear device would produce prompt radiation consisting of both photons (gamma rays) and neutrons. While much effort in recent years has gone into the development of radiation biodosimetry methods suitable for mass triage, the possible effect of neutrons on the endpoints studied has remained largely uninvestigated. We have used a novel neutron irradiator with an energy spectrum based on that 1-1.5 km from the epicenter of the Hiroshima blast to begin examining the effect of neutrons on global gene expression, and the impact this may have on the development of gene expression signatures for radiation biodosimetry. We have exposed peripheral blood from healthy human donors to 0.1, 0.3, 0.5 or 1 Gy of neutrons ex vivo using our neutron irradiator, and compared the transcriptomic response 24 h later to that resulting from sham exposure or exposure to 0.1, 0.3, 0.5, 1, 2 or 4 Gy of photons (X rays). We identified 125 genes that responded significantly to both radiation qualities as a function of dose, with the magnitude of response to neutrons generally being greater than that seen after X-ray exposure. Gene ontology analysis suggested broad involvement of the p53 signaling pathway and general DNA damage response functions across all doses of both radiation qualities. Regulation of immune response and chromatin-related functions were implicated only following the highest doses of neutrons, suggesting a physiological impact of greater DNA damage. We also identified several genes that seem to respond primarily as a function of dose, with less effect of radiation quality. We confirmed this pattern of response by quantitative real-time RT-PCR for BAX, TNFRSF10B, ITLN2 and AEN and suggest that gene expression may provide a means to differentiate between total dose and a neutron component.

  3. Multiplexed Component Analysis to Identify Genes Contributing to the Immune Response during Acute SIV Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iraj Hosseini

    Full Text Available Immune response genes play an important role during acute HIV and SIV infection. Using an SIV macaque model of AIDS and CNS disease, our overall goal was to assess how the expression of genes associated with immune and inflammatory responses are longitudinally changed in different organs or cells during SIV infection. To compare RNA expression of a panel of 88 immune-related genes across time points and among three tissues - spleen, mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC - we designed a set of Nanostring probes. To identify significant genes during acute SIV infection and to investigate whether these genes are tissue-specific or have global roles, we introduce a novel multiplexed component analysis (MCA method. This combines multivariate analysis methods with multiple preprocessing methods to create a set of 12 "judges"; each judge emphasizes particular types of change in gene expression to which cells could respond, for example, the absolute or relative size of expression change from baseline. Compared to bivariate analysis methods, our MCA method improved classification rates. This analysis allows us to identify three categories of genes: (a consensus genes likely to contribute highly to the immune response; (b genes that would contribute highly to the immune response only if certain assumptions are met - e.g. that the cell responds to relative expression change rather than absolute expression change; and (c genes whose contribution to immune response appears to be modest. We then compared the results across the three tissues of interest; some genes are consistently highly-contributing in all tissues, while others are specific for certain tissues. Our analysis identified CCL8, CXCL10, CXCL11, MxA, OAS2, and OAS1 as top contributing genes, all of which are stimulated by type I interferon. This suggests that the cytokine storm during acute SIV infection is a systemic innate immune response against viral

  4. Immunizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Why Exercise Is Wise Are Detox Diets Safe? Immunizations KidsHealth > For Teens > Immunizations Print A A A What's in this article? ... fault if you don't have all the immunizations (vaccinations) you need. Shots that doctors recommend today ...

  5. Immunity-related genes in Ixodes scapularis – perspectives from genome information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexis A. Smith

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Ixodes scapularis, commonly known as the deer tick, transmits a wide array of human and animal pathogens including Borrelia burgdorferi. Despite substantial advances in our understanding of immunity in model arthropods, including other disease vectors, precisely how I. scapularis immunity functions and influences persistence of invading pathogens remains largely unknown. This review provides a comprehensive analysis of the recently sequenced I. scapularis genome for the occurrence of immune-related genes and related pathways. We will also discuss the potential influence of immunity-related genes on the persistence of tick-borne pathogens with an emphasis on the Lyme disease pathogen B. burgdorferi. Further enhancement of our knowledge of tick immune responses is critical to understanding the molecular basis of the persistence of tick-borne pathogens and development of novel interventions against the relevant infections.

  6. Effects of heterogeneity in infection-exposure history and immunity on the dynamics of a protozoan parasite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Severins, M.; Klinkenberg, D.; Heesterbeek, J.A.P.

    2007-01-01

    Infection systems where traits of the host, such as acquired immunity, interact with the infection process can show complex dynamic behaviour with counter-intuitive results. In this study, we consider the traits ‘immune status’ and ‘exposure history’, and our aim is to assess the influence of

  7. Quantifying the relative immune cell activation from whole tissue/organ-derived differentially expressed gene data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijaya, Edward; Igarashi, Yoshinobu; Nakatsu, Noriyuki; Haseda, Yasunari; Billaud, Joel; Chen, Yi-An; Mizuguchi, Kenji; Yamada, Hiroshi; Ishii, Ken; Aoshi, Taiki

    2017-10-09

    Evaluation of immune responses in individual immune cell types is important for the development of new medicines. Here, we propose a computational method designated ICEPOP (Immune CEll POPulation) to estimate individual immune cell type responses from bulk tissue and organ samples. The relative gene responses are scored for each cell type by using the data from differentially expressed genes derived from control- vs drug-treated sample pairs, and the data from public databases including ImmGen and IRIS, which contain gene expression profiles of a variety of immune cells. By ICEPOP, we analysed cell responses induced by vaccine-adjuvants in the mouse spleen, and extended the analyses to human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and gut biopsy samples focusing on human papilloma virus vaccination and inflammatory bowel disease treatment with Infliximab. In both mouse and human datasets, our method reliably quantified the responding immune cell types and provided insightful information, demonstrating that our method is useful to evaluate immune responses from bulk sample-derived gene expression data. ICEPOP is available as an interactive web site ( https://vdynamics.shinyapps.io/icepop/ ) and Python package ( https://github.com/ewijaya/icepop ).

  8. Active Immunity Induced by Passive IgG Post-Exposure Protection against Ricin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Chen Hu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Therapeutic antibodies can confer an instant protection against biothreat agents when administered. In this study, intact IgG and F(ab’2 from goat anti-ricin hyperimmune sera were compared for the protection against lethal ricin mediated intoxication. Similar ricin-binding affinities and neutralizing activities in vitro were observed between IgG and F(ab’2 when compared at the same molar concentration. In a murine ricin intoxication model, both IgG and F(ab’2 could rescue 100% of the mice by one dose (3 nmol administration of antibodies 1 hour after 5 × LD50 ricin challenge. Nine days later, when the rescued mice received a second ricin challenge (5 × LD50, only the IgG-treated mice survived; the F(ab’2-treated mice did not. The experimental design excluded the possibility of residual goat IgG responsible for the protection against the second ricin challenge. Results confirmed that the active immunity against ricin in mice was induced quickly following the passive delivery of a single dose of goat IgG post-exposure. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that the induced active immunity against ricin in mice lasted at least 5 months. Therefore, passive IgG therapy not only provides immediate protection to the victim after ricin exposure, but also elicits an active immunity against ricin that subsequently results in long term protection.

  9. Analysis of stop-gain and frameshift variants in human innate immunity genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Rausell

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Loss-of-function variants in innate immunity genes are associated with Mendelian disorders in the form of primary immunodeficiencies. Recent resequencing projects report that stop-gains and frameshifts are collectively prevalent in humans and could be responsible for some of the inter-individual variability in innate immune response. Current computational approaches evaluating loss-of-function in genes carrying these variants rely on gene-level characteristics such as evolutionary conservation and functional redundancy across the genome. However, innate immunity genes represent a particular case because they are more likely to be under positive selection and duplicated. To create a ranking of severity that would be applicable to innate immunity genes we evaluated 17,764 stop-gain and 13,915 frameshift variants from the NHLBI Exome Sequencing Project and 1,000 Genomes Project. Sequence-based features such as loss of functional domains, isoform-specific truncation and nonsense-mediated decay were found to correlate with variant allele frequency and validated with gene expression data. We integrated these features in a Bayesian classification scheme and benchmarked its use in predicting pathogenic variants against Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM disease stop-gains and frameshifts. The classification scheme was applied in the assessment of 335 stop-gains and 236 frameshifts affecting 227 interferon-stimulated genes. The sequence-based score ranks variants in innate immunity genes according to their potential to cause disease, and complements existing gene-based pathogenicity scores. Specifically, the sequence-based score improves measurement of functional gene impairment, discriminates across different variants in a given gene and appears particularly useful for analysis of less conserved genes.

  10. Inducible defenses stay up late: temporal patterns of immune gene expression in Tenebrio molitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Paul R; Makarova, Olga; Rolff, Jens

    2013-12-06

    The course of microbial infection in insects is shaped by a two-stage process of immune defense. Constitutive defenses, such as engulfment and melanization, act immediately and are followed by inducible defenses, archetypically the production of antimicrobial peptides, which eliminate or suppress the remaining microbes. By applying RNAseq across a 7-day time course, we sought to characterize the long-lasting immune response to bacterial challenge in the mealworm beetle Tenebrio molitor, a model for the biochemistry of insect immunity and persistent bacterial infection. By annotating a hybrid de novo assembly of RNAseq data, we were able to identify putative orthologs for the majority of components of the conserved insect immune system. Compared with Tribolium castaneum, the most closely related species with a reference genome sequence and a manually curated immune system annotation, the T. molitor immune gene count was lower, with lineage-specific expansions of genes encoding serine proteases and their countervailing inhibitors accounting for the majority of the deficit. Quantitative mapping of RNAseq reads to the reference assembly showed that expression of genes with predicted functions in cellular immunity, wound healing, melanization, and the production of reactive oxygen species was transiently induced immediately after immune challenge. In contrast, expression of genes encoding antimicrobial peptides or components of the Toll signaling pathway and iron sequestration response remained elevated for at least 7 days. Numerous genes involved in metabolism and nutrient storage were repressed, indicating a possible cost of immune induction. Strikingly, the expression of almost all antibacterial peptides followed the same pattern of long-lasting induction, regardless of their spectra of activity, signaling possible interactive roles in vivo. Copyright © 2014 Johnston et al.

  11. Association of brain immune genes with social behavior of inbred mouse strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Li; Piirainen, Sami; Kulesskaya, Natalia; Rauvala, Heikki; Tian, Li

    2015-04-18

    Social deficit is one of the core symptoms of neuropsychiatric diseases, in which immune genes play an important role. Although a few immune genes have been shown to regulate social and emotional behaviors, how immune gene network(s) may jointly regulate sociability has not been investigated so far. To decipher the potential immune-mediated mechanisms underlying social behavior, we first studied the brain microarray data of eight inbred mouse strains with known variations in social behavior and retrieved the differentially expressed immune genes. We then made a protein-protein interaction analysis of them to find the major networks and explored the potential association of these genes with the behavior and brain morphology in the mouse phenome database. To validate the expression and function of the candidate immune genes, we selected the C57BL/6 J and DBA/2 J strains among the eight inbred strains, compared their social behaviors in resident-intruder and 3-chambered social tests and the mRNA levels of these genes, and analyzed the correlations of these genes with the social behaviors. A group of immune genes were differentially expressed in the brains of these mouse strains. The representative C57BL/6 J and DBA/2 J strains displayed significant differences in social behaviors, DBA/2 J mice being less active in social dominance and social interaction than C57BL/6 J mice. The mRNA levels of H2-d1 in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, and hypothalamus and C1qb in the hippocampus of the DBA/2 J strain were significantly down-regulated as compared to those in the C57BL/6 J strain. In contrast, Polr3b in the hippocampus and Tnfsf13b in the prefrontal cortex of the DBA/2 J strain were up-regulated. Furthermore, C1qb, Cx3cl1, H2-d1, H2-k1, Polr3b, and Tnfsf13b were predicted to be associated with various behavioral and brain morphological features across the eight inbred strains. Importantly, the C1qb mRNA level was confirmed to be significantly correlated with the

  12. Occupational exposure to high frequency electromagnetic fields and its effect on human immune parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuschl, H; Neubauer, G; Garn, H; Duftschmid, K; Winker, N; Brusl, H

    1999-01-01

    The present study recorded a considerable excess of recommended exposure limits in the vicinity of shortwave diathermy devices used for medical treatment of patients. Different kinds of field probes were used to measure electric and magnetic field strength and the whole body exposure of medical personnel operating shortwave, decimeter wave and microwave units was calculated. To investigate the influence of chronic exposure on the immune system of operators, blood was sampled from physiotherapists working at the above mentioned devices. Eighteen exposed and thirteen control persons, matched by sex and age, were examined. Total leucocyte and lymphocyte counts were performed and leucocytic subpopulations determined by flow cytometry and monoclonal antibodies against surface antigens. In addition, to quantify subpopulations of immunocompetent cells, the activity of lymphocytes was measured. Lymphocytes were stimulated by mitogen phytohemagglutinin and their proliferation measured by a flow cytometric method. No statistically significant differences between the control and exposed persons were found. In both study groups all immune parameters were within normal ranges.

  13. Protective immunity in grouper (Epinephelus coioides) following exposure to or injection with Cryptocaryon irritans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiao-Chun; Xie, Ming-Quan; Zhu, Xing-Quan; Li, An-Xing

    2007-04-01

    The protective immunity of grouper (Epinephelus coioides) against Cryptocaryon irritans was determined after immunisation by surface exposure or intraperitoneal injection. Specific antibody titres of immunised fish serum and skin culture supernatant were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immobilisation assays. Specific antibody can be detected in some immunised fish at Week 1 and in all immunised fish at Week 2, and the peaks were between Weeks 4-6. Specific antibody was still evident in the serum and skin of immunised fish at Week 8, and provided good protection against challenge with C. irritans. These findings indicated that humoral and skin mucosal immunity play important roles in fish against C. irritans infection.

  14. Radiation Exposure Alters Expression of Metabolic Enzyme Genes In Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wotring, Virginia E.; Mangala, L. S.; Zhang, Y.; Wu, H.

    2010-01-01

    Most pharmaceuticals are metabolized by the liver. The health of the liver, especially the rate of its metabolic enzymes, determines the concentration of circulating drugs as well as the duration of their efficacy. Because of the importance of the liver in drug metabolism it is important to understand the effects of spaceflight on the enzymes of the liver. Exposure to cosmic radiation is one aspect of spaceflight that can be modeled in ground experiments. This study is an effort to examine the effects of adaptive mechanisms that may be triggered by early exposure to low radiation doses. Using procedures approved by the JSC Animal Care & Use Committee, C57 male mice were exposed to Cs-137 in groups: controls, low dose (50 mGy), high dose (6Gy) and a fourth group that received both radiation doses separated by 24 hours. Animals were anesthetized and sacrificed 4 hours after their last radiation exposure. Livers were removed immediately and flash-frozen in liquid nitrogen. Tissue was homogenized, RNA extracted and purified (Absolutely RNA, Agilent). Quality of RNA samples was evaluated (Agilent Bioanalyzer 2100). Complementary DNA was prepared from high-quality RNA samples, and used to run RT-qPCR screening arrays for DNA Repair and Drug Metabolism (SuperArray, SABiosciences/Qiagen; BioRad Cfx96 qPCR System). Of 91 drug metabolism genes examined, expression of 7 was altered by at least one treatment condition. Genes that had elevated expression include those that metabolize promethazine and steroids (4-8-fold), many that reduce oxidation products, and one that reduces heavy metal exposure (greater than 200-fold). Of the 91 DNA repair and general metabolism genes examined, expression of 14 was altered by at least one treatment condition. These gene expression changes are likely homeostatic and could lead to development of new radioprotective countermeasures.

  15. Impact of fetal and childhood mercury exposure on immune status in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Lai Ling; Chan, Michael Ho Ming; Lam, Hugh Simon; Chan, Peggy Hiu Ying; Kwok, Ka Ming; Chan, Iris Hiu Shuen; Li, Albert Martin; Fok, Tai Fai

    2016-01-01

    Mercury exposure have been shown to affect immune status in animals as reflected by cytokine expression. It is unclear whether low levels of exposure during fetal and/or childhood periods could impact on immune status in humans. To test the hypothesis that fetal and childhood mercury exposure is associated with childhood cytokine profiles and to investigate whether childhood selenium levels interact with any of the associations found. Children were recruited from a previously established birth cohort between the ages of 6-9 years for assessment and measurement of blood mercury, selenium and cytokine profile (interleukin (IL)-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-13 and TNF-alpha). Multivariable linear regression models were used to assess the adjusted association of cord blood mercury concentration and current mercury concentrations with levels of the cytokine levels. We tested whether the association with current mercury level varied by current selenium level and cord blood mercury level. IL-10 was negatively associated with current blood mercury concentration. The effect was greatest in cases with low cord blood mercury and low current selenium concentrations. None of the other cytokine levels were associated with either cord blood or current blood mercury concentrations, except that cord blood mercury was negatively associated with IL-6. Childhood mercury exposure was negatively associated with childhood IL-10 levels. It is postulated that while selenium is protective, low levels of fetal mercury exposure may increase the degree of this negative association during childhood. Further studies into the clinical significance of these findings are required. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Genomic Signatures of Selective Pressures and Introgression from Archaic Hominins at Human Innate Immunity Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deschamps, Matthieu; Laval, Guillaume; Fagny, Maud; Itan, Yuval; Abel, Laurent; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Patin, Etienne; Quintana-Murci, Lluis

    2016-01-07

    Human genes governing innate immunity provide a valuable tool for the study of the selective pressure imposed by microorganisms on host genomes. A comprehensive, genome-wide study of how selective constraints and adaptations have driven the evolution of innate immunity genes is missing. Using full-genome sequence variation from the 1000 Genomes Project, we first show that innate immunity genes have globally evolved under stronger purifying selection than the remainder of protein-coding genes. We identify a gene set under the strongest selective constraints, mutations in which are likely to predispose individuals to life-threatening disease, as illustrated by STAT1 and TRAF3. We then evaluate the occurrence of local adaptation and detect 57 high-scoring signals of positive selection at innate immunity genes, variation in which has been associated with susceptibility to common infectious or autoimmune diseases. Furthermore, we show that most adaptations targeting coding variation have occurred in the last 6,000-13,000 years, the period at which populations shifted from hunting and gathering to farming. Finally, we show that innate immunity genes present higher Neandertal introgression than the remainder of the coding genome. Notably, among the genes presenting the highest Neandertal ancestry, we find the TLR6-TLR1-TLR10 cluster, which also contains functional adaptive variation in Europeans. This study identifies highly constrained genes that fulfill essential, non-redundant functions in host survival and reveals others that are more permissive to change-containing variation acquired from archaic hominins or adaptive variants in specific populations-improving our understanding of the relative biological importance of innate immunity pathways in natural conditions. Copyright © 2016 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Genomic Signatures of Selective Pressures and Introgression from Archaic Hominins at Human Innate Immunity Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deschamps, Matthieu; Laval, Guillaume; Fagny, Maud; Itan, Yuval; Abel, Laurent; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Patin, Etienne; Quintana-Murci, Lluis

    2016-01-01

    Human genes governing innate immunity provide a valuable tool for the study of the selective pressure imposed by microorganisms on host genomes. A comprehensive, genome-wide study of how selective constraints and adaptations have driven the evolution of innate immunity genes is missing. Using full-genome sequence variation from the 1000 Genomes Project, we first show that innate immunity genes have globally evolved under stronger purifying selection than the remainder of protein-coding genes. We identify a gene set under the strongest selective constraints, mutations in which are likely to predispose individuals to life-threatening disease, as illustrated by STAT1 and TRAF3. We then evaluate the occurrence of local adaptation and detect 57 high-scoring signals of positive selection at innate immunity genes, variation in which has been associated with susceptibility to common infectious or autoimmune diseases. Furthermore, we show that most adaptations targeting coding variation have occurred in the last 6,000–13,000 years, the period at which populations shifted from hunting and gathering to farming. Finally, we show that innate immunity genes present higher Neandertal introgression than the remainder of the coding genome. Notably, among the genes presenting the highest Neandertal ancestry, we find the TLR6-TLR1-TLR10 cluster, which also contains functional adaptive variation in Europeans. This study identifies highly constrained genes that fulfill essential, non-redundant functions in host survival and reveals others that are more permissive to change—containing variation acquired from archaic hominins or adaptive variants in specific populations—improving our understanding of the relative biological importance of innate immunity pathways in natural conditions. PMID:26748513

  18. A Functional Genomic Screen for Evolutionarily Conserved Genes Required for Lifespan and Immunity in Germline-Deficient C. elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Amit; Rae, Robbie

    2014-01-01

    The reproductive system regulates lifespan in insects, nematodes and vertebrates. In Caenorhabditis elegans removal of germline increases lifespan by 60% which is dependent upon insulin signaling, nuclear hormone signaling, autophagy and fat metabolism and their microRNA-regulators. Germline-deficient C. elegans are also more resistant to various bacterial pathogens but the underlying molecular mechanisms are largely unknown. Firstly, we demonstrate that previously identified genes that regulate the extended lifespan of germline-deficient C. elegans (daf-2, daf-16, daf-12, tcer-1, mir-7.1 and nhr-80) are also essential for resistance to the pathogenic bacterium Xenorhabdus nematophila. We then use a novel unbiased approach combining laser cell ablation, whole genome microarrays, RNAi screening and exposure to X. nematophila to generate a comprehensive genome-wide catalog of genes potentially required for increased lifespan and innate immunity in germline-deficient C. elegans. We find 3,440 genes to be upregulated in C. elegans germline-deficient animals in a gonad dependent manner, which are significantly enriched for genes involved in insulin signaling, fatty acid desaturation, translation elongation and proteasome complex function. Using RNAi against a subset of 150 candidate genes selected from the microarray results, we show that the upregulated genes such as transcription factor DAF-16/FOXO, the PTEN homolog lipid phosphatase DAF-18 and several components of the proteasome complex (rpn-6.1, rpn-7, rpn-9, rpn-10, rpt-6, pbs-3 and pbs-6) are essential for both lifespan and immunity of germline deficient animals. We also identify a novel role for genes including par-5 and T12G3.6 in both lifespan-extension and increased survival on X. nematophila. From an evolutionary perspective, most of the genes differentially expressed in germline deficient C. elegans also show a conserved expression pattern in germline deficient Pristionchus pacificus, a nematode species

  19. Comparative tissue expression of American lobster (Homarus americanus) immune genes during bacterial and scuticociliate challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, K Fraser; Acorn, Adam R; Wang, Haili; Greenwood, Spencer J

    2015-12-01

    The American lobster (Homarus americanus) fishery is the most economically significant fishery in Canada; although comparatively little is known about the lobsters' response to pathogenic challenge. This is the first study to investigate the expression of immune genes in tissues outside of the lobster hepatopancreas in response to challenges by the Gram-positive bacteria, Aerococcus viridans var. homari or the scuticociliate parasite, Anophryoides haemophila. The hepatopancreas has been regarded as the major humoral immune organ in crustaceans, but the contribution of other organs and tissues to the molecular immune response has largely been overlooked. This study used RT-qPCR to monitor the gene expression of several immune genes including three anti-lipopolysaccharide isoforms (ALF) Homame ALF-B1, Homame ALF-C1 and ALFHa-1, acute phase serum amyloid protein A (SAA), as well as thioredoxin and hexokinase, in antennal gland and gill tissues. Our findings indicate that the gene expression of the SAA and all ALF isoforms in the antennal gland and gill tissues increased in response to pathogenic challenge. However, there was differential expression of individual ALF isoforms that were dependent on both the tissue, and the pathogen used in the challenge. The gene expression changes of several immune genes were found to be higher in the antennal gland than have been previously reported for the hepatopancreas. This study demonstrates that increased immune gene expression from the gill and antennal gland over the course of pathogen induced disease contributes to the immune response of H. americanus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. E-cigarette use results in suppression of immune and inflammatory-response genes in nasal epithelial cells similar to cigarette smoke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Elizabeth M; Clapp, Phillip W; Rebuli, Meghan E; Pawlak, Erica A; Glista-Baker, Ellen; Benowitz, Neal L; Fry, Rebecca C; Jaspers, Ilona

    2016-07-01

    Exposure to cigarette smoke is known to result in impaired host defense responses and immune suppressive effects. However, the effects of new and emerging tobacco products, such as e-cigarettes, on the immune status of the respiratory epithelium are largely unknown. We conducted a clinical study collecting superficial nasal scrape biopsies, nasal lavage, urine, and serum from nonsmokers, cigarette smokers, and e-cigarette users and assessed them for changes in immune gene expression profiles. Smoking status was determined based on a smoking history and a 3- to 4-wk smoking diary and confirmed using serum cotinine and urine 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol (NNAL) levels. Total RNA from nasal scrape biopsies was analyzed using the nCounter Human Immunology v2 Expression panel. Smoking cigarettes or vaping e-cigarettes resulted in decreased expression of immune-related genes. All genes with decreased expression in cigarette smokers (n = 53) were also decreased in e-cigarette smokers. Additionally, vaping e-cigarettes was associated with suppression of a large number of unique genes (n = 305). Furthermore, the e-cigarette users showed a greater suppression of genes common with those changed in cigarette smokers. This was particularly apparent for suppressed expression of transcription factors, such as EGR1, which was functionally associated with decreased expression of 5 target genes in cigarette smokers and 18 target genes in e-cigarette users. Taken together, these data indicate that vaping e-cigarettes is associated with decreased expression of a large number of immune-related genes, which are consistent with immune suppression at the level of the nasal mucosa. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  1. Consequences of bisphenol a perinatal exposure on immune responses and gut barrier function in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaisé, Yann; Ménard, Sandrine; Cartier, Christel; Lencina, Corinne; Sommer, Caroline; Gaultier, Eric; Houdeau, Eric; Guzylack-Piriou, Laurence

    2017-07-21

    The potent immunomodulatory effect of the endocrine disruptor bisphenol A during development and consequences during life span are of increasing concern. Particular interests have been raised from animal studies regarding the risk of developing food intolerance and infection. We aimed to identify immune disorders in mice triggered by perinatal exposure to bisphenol A. Gravid mice were orally exposed to bisphenol (50 μg/kg body weight/day) from day 15 of pregnancy until weaning. Gut barrier function, local and systemic immunity were assessed in adult female offspring. Mice perinatally exposed to bisphenol showed a decrease in ileal lysozyme expression and a fall of fecal antimicrobial activity. In offspring mice exposed to bisphenol, an increase in colonic permeability was observed associated with an increase in interferon-γ level and a drop of colonic IgA+ cells and fecal IgA production. Interestingly, altered frequency of innate lymphoid cells type 3 occurred in the small intestine, with an increase in IgG response against commensal bacteria in sera. These effects were related to a defect in dendritic cell maturation in the lamina propria and spleen. Activated and regulatory T cells were decreased in the lamina propria. Furthermore, perinatal exposure to bisphenol promoted a sharp increase in interferon-γ and interleukin-17 production in the intestine and elicited a T helper 17 profile in the spleen. To conclude, perinatal exposure to bisphenol weakens protective and regulatory immune functions in the intestine and at systemic level in adult offspring. The increased susceptibility to inflammatory response is an interesting lead supporting bisphenol-mediated adverse consequences on food reactions and infections.

  2. Tissue-Specific Immune Gene Expression in the Migratory Locust, Locusta Migratoria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Pulpitel

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The ability of hosts to respond to infection involves several complex immune recognition pathways. Broadly conserved pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs allow individuals to target a range of invading microbes. Recently, studies on insect innate immunity have found evidence that a single pathogen can activate different immune pathways across species. In this study, expression changes in immune genes encoding peptidoglycan-recognition protein SA (PGRP-SA, gram-negative binding protein 1 (GNBP1 and prophenoloxidase (ProPO were investigated in Locusta migratoria, following an immune challenge using injected lipopolysaccharide (LPS solution from Escherichia coli. Since immune activation might also be tissue-specific, gene expression levels were followed across a range of tissue types. For PGRP-SA, expression increased in response to LPS within all seven of the tissue-types assayed and differed significantly between tissues. Expression of GNBP1 similarly varied across tissue types, yet showed no clear expression difference between LPS-injected and uninfected locusts. Increases in ProPO expression in response to LPS, however, could only be detected in the gut sections. This study has revealed tissue-specific immune response to add a new level of complexity to insect immune studies. In addition to variation in recognition pathways identified in previous works, tissue-specificity should be carefully considered in similar works.

  3. Immune related gene expression in worker honey bee (Apis mellifera carnica) pupae exposed to neonicotinoid thiamethoxam and Varroa mites (Varroa destructor)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesovnik, Tanja; Zorc, Minja; Čitar, Manuela; Božič, Janko; Glavan, Gordana; Narat, Mojca

    2017-01-01

    Varroa destructor is one of the most common parasites of honey bee colonies and is considered as a possible co-factor for honey bee decline. At the same time, the use of pesticides in intensive agriculture is still the most effective method of pest control. There is limited information about the effects of pesticide exposure on parasitized honey bees. Larval ingestion of certain pesticides could have effects on honey bee immune defense mechanisms, development and metabolic pathways. Europe and America face the disturbing phenomenon of the disappearance of honey bee colonies, termed Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD). One reason discussed is the possible suppression of honey bee immune system as a consequence of prolonged exposure to chemicals. In this study, the effects of the neonicotinoid thiamethoxam on honey bee, Apis mellifera carnica, pupae infested with Varroa destructor mites were analyzed at the molecular level. Varroa-infested and non-infested honey bee colonies received protein cakes with or without thiamethoxam. Nurse bees used these cakes as a feed for developing larvae. Samples of white-eyed and brown-eyed pupae were collected. Expression of 17 immune-related genes was analyzed by real-time PCR. Relative gene expression in samples exposed only to Varroa or to thiamethoxam or simultaneously to both Varroa and thiamethoxam was compared. The impact from the consumption of thiamethoxam during the larval stage on honey bee immune related gene expression in Varroa-infested white-eyed pupae was reflected as down-regulation of spaetzle, AMPs abaecin and defensin-1 and up-regulation of lysozyme-2. In brown-eyed pupae up-regulation of PPOact, spaetzle, hopscotch and basket genes was detected. Moreover, we observed a major difference in immune response to Varroa infestation between white-eyed pupae and brown-eyed pupae. The majority of tested immune-related genes were upregulated only in brown-eyed pupae, while in white-eyed pupae they were downregulated. PMID

  4. Immune related gene expression in worker honey bee (Apis mellifera carnica) pupae exposed to neonicotinoid thiamethoxam and Varroa mites (Varroa destructor).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesovnik, Tanja; Cizelj, Ivanka; Zorc, Minja; Čitar, Manuela; Božič, Janko; Glavan, Gordana; Narat, Mojca

    2017-01-01

    Varroa destructor is one of the most common parasites of honey bee colonies and is considered as a possible co-factor for honey bee decline. At the same time, the use of pesticides in intensive agriculture is still the most effective method of pest control. There is limited information about the effects of pesticide exposure on parasitized honey bees. Larval ingestion of certain pesticides could have effects on honey bee immune defense mechanisms, development and metabolic pathways. Europe and America face the disturbing phenomenon of the disappearance of honey bee colonies, termed Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD). One reason discussed is the possible suppression of honey bee immune system as a consequence of prolonged exposure to chemicals. In this study, the effects of the neonicotinoid thiamethoxam on honey bee, Apis mellifera carnica, pupae infested with Varroa destructor mites were analyzed at the molecular level. Varroa-infested and non-infested honey bee colonies received protein cakes with or without thiamethoxam. Nurse bees used these cakes as a feed for developing larvae. Samples of white-eyed and brown-eyed pupae were collected. Expression of 17 immune-related genes was analyzed by real-time PCR. Relative gene expression in samples exposed only to Varroa or to thiamethoxam or simultaneously to both Varroa and thiamethoxam was compared. The impact from the consumption of thiamethoxam during the larval stage on honey bee immune related gene expression in Varroa-infested white-eyed pupae was reflected as down-regulation of spaetzle, AMPs abaecin and defensin-1 and up-regulation of lysozyme-2. In brown-eyed pupae up-regulation of PPOact, spaetzle, hopscotch and basket genes was detected. Moreover, we observed a major difference in immune response to Varroa infestation between white-eyed pupae and brown-eyed pupae. The majority of tested immune-related genes were upregulated only in brown-eyed pupae, while in white-eyed pupae they were downregulated.

  5. Immune related gene expression in worker honey bee (Apis mellifera carnica pupae exposed to neonicotinoid thiamethoxam and Varroa mites (Varroa destructor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja Tesovnik

    Full Text Available Varroa destructor is one of the most common parasites of honey bee colonies and is considered as a possible co-factor for honey bee decline. At the same time, the use of pesticides in intensive agriculture is still the most effective method of pest control. There is limited information about the effects of pesticide exposure on parasitized honey bees. Larval ingestion of certain pesticides could have effects on honey bee immune defense mechanisms, development and metabolic pathways. Europe and America face the disturbing phenomenon of the disappearance of honey bee colonies, termed Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD. One reason discussed is the possible suppression of honey bee immune system as a consequence of prolonged exposure to chemicals. In this study, the effects of the neonicotinoid thiamethoxam on honey bee, Apis mellifera carnica, pupae infested with Varroa destructor mites were analyzed at the molecular level. Varroa-infested and non-infested honey bee colonies received protein cakes with or without thiamethoxam. Nurse bees used these cakes as a feed for developing larvae. Samples of white-eyed and brown-eyed pupae were collected. Expression of 17 immune-related genes was analyzed by real-time PCR. Relative gene expression in samples exposed only to Varroa or to thiamethoxam or simultaneously to both Varroa and thiamethoxam was compared. The impact from the consumption of thiamethoxam during the larval stage on honey bee immune related gene expression in Varroa-infested white-eyed pupae was reflected as down-regulation of spaetzle, AMPs abaecin and defensin-1 and up-regulation of lysozyme-2. In brown-eyed pupae up-regulation of PPOact, spaetzle, hopscotch and basket genes was detected. Moreover, we observed a major difference in immune response to Varroa infestation between white-eyed pupae and brown-eyed pupae. The majority of tested immune-related genes were upregulated only in brown-eyed pupae, while in white-eyed pupae they were

  6. Genetic variation and haplotype structures of innate immunity genes in eastern India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bairagya, Bijan B.; Bhattacharya, Paramita; Bhattacharya, Sujit K.; Dey, Biplab; Dey, Uposoma; Ghosh, Trina; Maiti, Sujit; Majumder, Partha P.; Mishra, Kankadeb; Mukherjee, Sinchita; Mukherjee, Souvik; Narayanasamy, K.; Poddar, Sonia; Roy, Neeta Sarkar; Sengupta, Priya; Sharma, Sangeeta; Sur, Dipika; Sutradhar, Debabrata; Wagener, Diane K.

    2009-01-01

    This study reports results of an extensive and comprehensive study of genetic diversity in 12 genes of the innate immune system in a population of eastern India. Genomic variation was assayed in 171 individuals by resequencing ~75 kb of DNA comprising these genes in each individual. Almost half of the 548 DNA variants discovered was novel. DNA sequence comparisons with human and chimpanzee reference sequences revealed evolutionary features indicative of natural selection operating among individuals, who are residents of an area with a high load of microbial and other pathogens. Significant differences in allele and haplotype frequencies of the study population were observed with the HapMap populations. Gene and haplotype diversities were observed to be high. The genetic positioning of the study population among the HapMap populations based on data of the innate immunity genes substantially differed from what has been observed for Indian populations based on data of other genes. The reported range of variation in SNP density in the human genome is one SNP per 1.19 kb (chromosome 22) to one SNP per 2.18 kb (chromosome 19). The SNP density in innate immunity genes observed in this study (>3 SNPs kb−1) exceeds the highest density observed for any autosomal chromosome in the human genome. The extensive genomic variation and the distinct haplotype structure of innate immunity genes observed among individuals have possibly resulted from the impact of natural selection. PMID:18396467

  7. Clustering of Drosophila melanogaster immune genes in interplay with recombination rate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Mathias Wegner

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Gene order in eukaryotic chromosomes is not random and has been linked to coordination of gene expression, chromatin structure and also recombination rate. The evolution of recombination rate is especially relevant for genes involved in immunity because host-parasite co-evolution could select for increased recombination rate (Red Queen hypothesis. To identify patterns left by the intimate interaction between hosts and parasites, I analysed the genomic parameters of the immune genes from 24 gene families/groups of Drosophila melanogaster. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Immune genes that directly interact with the pathogen (i.e. recognition and effector genes clustered in regions of higher recombination rates. Out of these, clustered effector genes were transcribed fastest indicating that transcriptional control might be one major cause for cluster formation. The relative position of clusters to each other, on the other hand, cannot be explained by transcriptional control per se. Drosophila immune genes that show epistatic interactions can be found at an average distance of 15.44+/-2.98 cM, which is considerably closer than genes that do not interact (30.64+/-1.95 cM. CONCLUSIONS: Epistatically interacting genes rarely belong to the same cluster, which supports recent models of optimal recombination rates between interacting genes in antagonistic host-parasite co-evolution. These patterns suggest that formation of local clusters might be a result of transcriptional control, but that in the condensed genome of D. melanogaster relative position of these clusters may be a result of selection for optimal rather than maximal recombination rates between these clusters.

  8. Additive effects of HLA alleles and innate immune genes determine viral outcome in HCV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzmaurice, Karen; Hurst, Jacob; Dring, Megan; Rauch, Andri; McLaren, Paul J; Günthard, Huldrych F; Gardiner, Clair; Klenerman, Paul

    2015-05-01

    Chronic HCV infection is a leading cause of liver-related morbidity globally. The innate and adaptive immune responses are thought to be important in determining viral outcomes. Polymorphisms associated with the IFNL3 (IL28B) gene are strongly associated with spontaneous clearance and treatment outcomes. This study investigates the importance of HLA genes in the context of genetic variation associated with the innate immune genes IFNL3 and KIR2DS3. We assess the collective influence of HLA and innate immune genes on viral outcomes in an Irish cohort of women (n=319) who had been infected from a single source as well as a more heterogeneous cohort (Swiss Cohort, n=461). In the Irish cohort, a number of HLA alleles are associated with different outcomes, and the impact of IFNL3-linked polymorphisms is profound. Logistic regression was performed on data from the Irish cohort, and indicates that the HLA-A*03 (OR 0.36 (0.15 to 0.89), p=0.027) -B*27 (OR 0.12 (0.03 to 0.45), p=HLA Class I, II and IFNL3 genes in their prediction of viral outcome. This data supports a critical role for the adaptive immune response in the control of HCV in concert with the innate immune response. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  9. Achilles is a circadian clock-controlled gene that regulates immune function in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiajia; Terry, Erin E; Fejer, Edith; Gamba, Diana; Hartmann, Natalie; Logsdon, Joseph; Michalski, Daniel; Rois, Lisa E; Scuderi, Maria J; Kunst, Michael; Hughes, Michael E

    2017-03-01

    The circadian clock is a transcriptional/translational feedback loop that drives the rhythmic expression of downstream mRNAs. Termed "clock-controlled genes," these molecular outputs of the circadian clock orchestrate cellular, metabolic, and behavioral rhythms. As part of our on-going work to characterize key upstream regulators of circadian mRNA expression, we have identified a novel clock-controlled gene in Drosophila melanogaster, Achilles (Achl), which is rhythmic at the mRNA level in the brain and which represses expression of antimicrobial peptides in the immune system. Achilles knock-down in neurons dramatically elevates expression of crucial immune response genes, including IM1 (Immune induced molecule 1), Mtk (Metchnikowin), and Drs (Drosomysin). As a result, flies with knocked-down Achilles expression are resistant to bacterial challenges. Meanwhile, no significant change in core clock gene expression and locomotor activity is observed, suggesting that Achilles influences rhythmic mRNA outputs rather than directly regulating the core timekeeping mechanism. Notably, Achilles knock-down in the absence of immune challenge significantly diminishes the fly's overall lifespan, indicating a behavioral or metabolic cost of constitutively activating this pathway. Together, our data demonstrate that (1) Achilles is a novel clock-controlled gene that (2) regulates the immune system, and (3) participates in signaling from neurons to immunological tissues. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. In vitro PFOS exposure on immune endpoints in bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) and mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Jena R; Peden-Adams, Margie M; White, Natasha D; Bossart, Gregory D; Fair, Patricia A

    2014-06-01

    Previous studies in our lab have shown that perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) modulates immune function in mice and correlates with many immune parameters in bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus). In this study, bottlenose dolphin peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs) and adult female B6C3F1 mouse splenocytes were exposed to environmentally relevant PFOS concentrations (0-5 µg ml(-1)) in vitro; and natural killer (NK) cell activity and lymphocyte proliferation (T and B cell) were assessed using the parallelogram approach for risk assessment. The objectives were: to corroborate results from the correlative studies in bottlenose dolphins with in vitro PFOS exposures; to evaluate the sensitivity of the mouse model as compared with bottlenose dolphins; and to assess risk using the parallelogram approach. In mouse cells, NK cell activity was decreased at in vitro doses of 0.01, 0.5, 0.1, 0.5 and 1 µg PFOS ml(-1) and increased at 5 µg ml(-1). Additionally, B cell proliferation was not altered, but T cell proliferation was decreased at all in vitro PFOS exposures. In dolphin cells, NK cell activity and T cell proliferation were not altered by in vitro PFOS exposure, but B cell proliferation exhibited a positive association in relation to PFOS dose. Overall, the data indicates that: the in vitro exposures of bottlenose dolphin PBLs exhibited results similar to reported correlative fields studies; that mice were generally more sensitive (for these selected endpoints) than were dolphins; and that the parallelogram approach could be used two-thirds of the time to predict the effects in bottlenose dolphins. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Identification of novel immune and barrier genes in atopic dermatitis by laser capture micro-dissection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esaki, H.; Ewald, David Adrian; Ungar, B.

    2014-01-01

    and normal skin from healthy volunteers, followed by gene expression (microarrays and real-time PCR) and immunostaining studies. RESULTS: Our study identified novel immune and barrier genes, including the IL-34 cytokine and claudins 4 and 8, and showed increased detection of key AD genes usually undetectable...... on arrays (ie, IL22, thymic stromal lymphopoietin [TSLP], CCL22, and CCL26). Overall, the combined epidermal and dermal transcriptomes enlarged the AD transcriptome, adding 674 upregulated and 405 downregulated differentially expressed genes between lesional and nonlesional skin to the AD transcriptome. We...... molecules and enabling detection of gene products usually not detected on arrays....

  12. Characterization of the rainbow trout spleen transcriptome and identification of immune-related genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali eAli

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Resistance against diseases affects profitability of rainbow trout. Limited information is available about functions and mechanisms of teleost immune pathways. Immunogenomics provides powerful tools to determine disease resistance genes/gene pathways and develop genetic markers for genomic selection.RNA-Seq sequencing of the rainbow trout spleen yielded 93,532,200 reads (100bp. High quality reads were assembled into 43,047 contigs. 26,333 (61.17% of the contigs had hits to the NR protein database and 7,024 (16.32% had hits to the KEGG database. Gene ontology showed significant percentages of transcripts assigned to binding (51%, signaling (7%, response to stimuli (9% and receptor activity (4% suggesting existence of many immune-related genes. KEGG annotation revealed 2,825 sequences belonging to organismal systems with the highest number of sequences, 842 (29.81%, assigned to immune system. A number of sequences were identified for the first time in rainbow trout belonging to Toll-like receptor signaling (25, B cell receptor signaling pathway (28, T cell receptor signaling pathway (33, chemokine signaling pathway (44, Fc gamma R-mediated phagocytosis (23, leukocyte transendothelial migration (34 and NK cell mediated cytotoxicity (21. In addition, 51 transcripts were identified as spleen-specific genes. The list includes 277 full-length cDNAs.The presence of a large number of immune-related genes and pathways similar to other vertebrates suggests that innate and adaptive immunity in fish are conserved. This study provides deep-sequence data of rainbow trout spleen transcriptome and identifies many new immune-related genes and full-length cDNAs. This data will help identify allelic variations suitable for genomic selection and genetic manipulation in aquaculture.

  13. Selective Landscapes in newt Immune Genes Inferred from Patterns of Nucleotide Variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fijarczyk, Anna; Dudek, Katarzyna; Babik, Wieslaw

    2016-12-31

    Host-pathogen interactions may result in either directional selection or in pressure for the maintenance of polymorphism at the molecular level. Hence signatures of both positive and balancing selection are expected in immune genes. Because both overall selective pressure and specific targets may differ between species, large-scale population genomic studies are useful in detecting functionally important immune genes and comparing selective landscapes between taxa. Such studies are of particular interest in amphibians, a group threatened worldwide by emerging infectious diseases. Here, we present an analysis of polymorphism and divergence of 634 immune genes in two lineages of Lissotriton newts: L. montandoni and L. vulgaris graecus Variation in newt immune genes has been shaped predominantly by widespread purifying selection and strong evolutionary constraint, implying long-term importance of these genes for functioning of the immune system. The two evolutionary lineages differ in the overall strength of purifying selection which can partially be explained by demographic history but may also signal differences in long-term pathogen pressure. The prevalent constraint notwithstanding, 23 putative targets of positive selection and 11 putative targets of balancing selection were identified. The latter were detected by composite tests involving the demographic model and further validated in independent population samples. Putative targets of balancing selection encode proteins which may interact closely with pathogens but include also regulators of immune response. The identified candidates will be useful for testing whether genes affected by balancing selection are more prone to interspecific introgression than other genes in the genome. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  14. Extensive shared polymorphism at non-MHC immune genes in recently diverged North American prairie grouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minias, Piotr; Bateson, Zachary W; Whittingham, Linda A; Johnson, Jeff A; Oyler-McCance, Sara J.; Dunn, Peter O

    2017-01-01

    Gene polymorphisms shared between recently diverged species are thought to be widespread and most commonly reflect introgression from hybridization or retention of ancestral polymorphism through incomplete lineage sorting. Shared genetic diversity resulting from incomplete lineage sorting is usually maintained for a relatively short period of time, but under strong balancing selection it may persist for millions of years beyond species divergence (balanced trans-species polymorphism), as in the case of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes. However, balancing selection is much less likely to act on non-MHC immune genes. The aim of this study was to investigate the patterns of shared polymorphism and selection at non-MHC immune genes in five grouse species from Centrocercus and Tympanuchus genera. For this purpose, we genotyped five non-MHC immune genes that do not interact directly with pathogens, but are involved in signaling and regulate immune cell growth. In contrast to previous studies with MHC, we found no evidence for balancing selection or balanced trans-species polymorphism among the non-MHC immune genes. No haplotypes were shared between genera and in most cases more similar allelic variants sorted by genus. Between species within genera, however, we found extensive shared polymorphism, which was most likely attributable to introgression or incomplete lineage sorting following recent divergence and large ancestral effective population size (i.e., weak genetic drift). Our study suggests that North American prairie grouse may have attained relatively low degree of reciprocal monophyly at nuclear loci and reinforces the rarity of balancing selection in non-MHC immune genes.

  15. Contrasting invertebrate immune defense behaviors caused by a single gene, the Caenorhabditis elegans neuropeptide receptor gene npr-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakad, Rania; Snoek, L Basten; Yang, Wentao; Ellendt, Sunna; Schneider, Franziska; Mohr, Timm G; Rösingh, Lone; Masche, Anna C; Rosenstiel, Philip C; Dierking, Katja; Kammenga, Jan E; Schulenburg, Hinrich

    2016-04-11

    The invertebrate immune system comprises physiological mechanisms, physical barriers and also behavioral responses. It is generally related to the vertebrate innate immune system and widely believed to provide nonspecific defense against pathogens, whereby the response to different pathogen types is usually mediated by distinct signalling cascades. Recent work suggests that invertebrate immune defense can be more specific at least at the phenotypic level. The underlying genetic mechanisms are as yet poorly understood. We demonstrate in the model invertebrate Caenorhabditis elegans that a single gene, a homolog of the mammalian neuropeptide Y receptor gene, npr-1, mediates contrasting defense phenotypes towards two distinct pathogens, the Gram-positive Bacillus thuringiensis and the Gram-negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Our findings are based on combining quantitative trait loci (QTLs) analysis with functional genetic analysis and RNAseq-based transcriptomics. The QTL analysis focused on behavioral immune defense against B. thuringiensis, using recombinant inbred lines (RILs) and introgression lines (ILs). It revealed several defense QTLs, including one on chromosome X comprising the npr-1 gene. The wildtype N2 allele for the latter QTL was associated with reduced defense against B. thuringiensis and thus produced an opposite phenotype to that previously reported for the N2 npr-1 allele against P. aeruginosa. Analysis of npr-1 mutants confirmed these contrasting immune phenotypes for both avoidance behavior and nematode survival. Subsequent transcriptional profiling of C. elegans wildtype and npr-1 mutant suggested that npr-1 mediates defense against both pathogens through p38 MAPK signaling, insulin-like signaling, and C-type lectins. Importantly, increased defense towards P. aeruginosa seems to be additionally influenced through the induction of oxidative stress genes and activation of GATA transcription factors, while the repression of oxidative stress genes

  16. Mechanisms of immunity in post-exposure vaccination against Ebola virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven B Bradfute

    Full Text Available Ebolaviruses can cause severe hemorrhagic fever that is characterized by rapid viral replication, coagulopathy, inflammation, and high lethality rates. Although there is no clinically proven vaccine or treatment for Ebola virus infection, a virus-like particle (VLP vaccine is effective in mice, guinea pigs, and non-human primates when given pre-infection. In this work, we report that VLPs protect Ebola virus-infected mice when given 24 hours post-infection. Analysis of cytokine expression in serum revealed a decrease in pro-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine levels in mice given VLPs post-exposure compared to infected, untreated mice. Using knockout mice, we show that VLP-mediated post-exposure protection requires perforin, B cells, macrophages, conventional dendritic cells (cDCs, and either CD4+ or CD8+ T cells. Protection was Ebola virus-specific, as marburgvirus VLPs did not protect Ebola virus-infected mice. Increased antibody production in VLP-treated mice correlated with protection, and macrophages were required for this increased production. However, NK cells, IFN-gamma, and TNF-alpha were not required for post-exposure-mediated protection. These data suggest that a non-replicating Ebola virus vaccine can provide post-exposure protection and that the mechanisms of immune protection in this setting require both increased antibody production and generation of cytotoxic T cells.

  17. Genes involved in immunity and apoptosis are associated with human presbycusis based on microarray analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yang; Li, Ming; Liu, Puzhao; Song, Haiyan; Zhao, Yuping; Shi, Jianrong

    2014-06-01

    Genes involved in immunity and apoptosis were associated with human presbycusis. CCR3 and GILZ played an important role in the pathogenesis of presbycusis, probably through regulating chemokine receptor, T-cell apoptosis, or T-cell activation pathways. To identify genes associated with human presbycusis and explore the molecular mechanism of presbycusis. Hearing function was tested by pure-tone audiometry. Microarray analysis was performed to identify presbycusis-correlated genes by Illumina Human-6 BeadChip using the peripheral blood samples of subjects. To identify biological process categories and pathways associated with presbycusis-correlated genes, bioinformatics analysis was carried out by Gene Ontology Tree Machine (GOTM) and database for annotation, visualization, and integrated discovery (DAVID). Quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) was used to validate the microarray data. Microarray analysis identified 469 up-regulated genes and 323 down-regulated genes. Both the dominant biological processes by Gene Ontology (GO) analysis and the enriched pathways by Kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes (KEGG) and BIOCARTA showed that genes involved in immunity and apoptosis were associated with presbycusis. In addition, CCR3, GILZ, CXCL10, and CX3CR1 genes showed consistent difference between groups for both the gene chip and qRT-PCR data. The differences of CCR3 and GILZ between presbycusis patients and controls were statistically significant (p < 0.05).

  18. Influence of Immune Responses in Gene/Stem Cell Therapies for Muscular Dystrophies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Farini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Muscular dystrophies (MDs are a heterogeneous group of diseases, caused by mutations in different components of sarcolemma, extracellular matrix, or enzymes. Inflammation and innate or adaptive immune response activation are prominent features of MDs. Various therapies under development are directed toward rescuing the dystrophic muscle damage using gene transfer or cell therapy. Here we discussed current knowledge about involvement of immune system responses to experimental therapies in MDs.

  19. Systemic protein delivery by muscle-gene transfer is limited by a local immune response

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Lixin; Dobrzynski, Eric; Schlachterman, Alexander; Cao, Ou; Herzog, Roland W.

    2005-01-01

    Adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors have been successfully used for therapeutic expression of systemic transgene products (such as factor IX or erythropoietin) following in vivo administration to skeletal muscle of animal models of inherited hematologic disorders. However, an immune response may be initiated if the transgene product represents a neoantigen. Here, we use ovalbumin (OVA) as a model antigen and demonstrate immune-mediated elimination of expression on muscle-directed AAV-2 gene ...

  20. Respiratory and immune response to maximal physical exertion following exposure to secondhand smoke in healthy adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas D Flouris

    Full Text Available We assessed the cardiorespiratory and immune response to physical exertion following secondhand smoke (SHS exposure through a randomized crossover experiment. Data were obtained from 16 (8 women non-smoking adults during and following a maximal oxygen uptake cycling protocol administered at baseline and at 0-, 1-, and 3- hours following 1-hour of SHS set at bar/restaurant carbon monoxide levels. We found that SHS was associated with a 12% decrease in maximum power output, an 8.2% reduction in maximal oxygen consumption, a 6% increase in perceived exertion, and a 6.7% decrease in time to exhaustion (P<0.05. Moreover, at 0-hours almost all respiratory and immune variables measured were adversely affected (P<0.05. For instance, FEV(1 values at 0-hours dropped by 17.4%, while TNF-α increased by 90.1% (P<0.05. At 3-hours mean values of cotinine, perceived exertion and recovery systolic blood pressure in both sexes, IL4, TNF-α and IFN-γ in men, as well as FEV(1/FVC, percent predicted FEV(1, respiratory rate, and tidal volume in women remained different compared to baseline (P<0.05. It is concluded that a 1-hour of SHS at bar/restaurant levels adversely affects the cardiorespiratory and immune response to maximal physical exertion in healthy nonsmokers for at least three hours following SHS.

  1. UK vaccination schedule: persistence of immunity to hepatitis B in children vaccinated after perinatal exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Tom A; Paranthaman, Karthikeyan; Yu, Ly-Mee; Davis, Elizabeth; Lang, Sarah; Hackett, Scott J; Welch, Steven B; Pollard, Andrew J; Snape, Matthew D

    2013-06-01

    To assess persistence of immunity to hepatitis B (HBV) in primary school children vaccinated following perinatal exposure. Serological survey. Five UK sites (Berkshire East, Birmingham, Buckinghamshire, Milton Keynes and Oxfordshire). Children from 3 years 4 months to 10 years of age (mean age 6.2 years), vaccinated against HBV from birth following perinatal exposure. A single booster dose of the paediatric formulation of a recombinant HBV vaccine. Titres of antibody against hepatitis B Surface Antigen (anti-HBs) measured immediately before and 21-35 days after the HBV vaccine booster. Prebooster anti-HBs titres were >10 mIU/ml in 84.6% of children (n=26; 95% CI 65.1 to 95.6%). All children (n=25, 95% CI 86.3 to 100%) had titres >100 mIU/ml after the booster. This study of antibody persistence among UK children born to hepatitis B infected women, immunised with a 3-dose infant schedule with a toddler booster suggests sustained immunity through early childhood. These data should prompt further studies to address the need for a preschool booster. Eudract Number 2008-004785-98.

  2. Systemic protein delivery by muscle-gene transfer is limited by a local immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lixin; Dobrzynski, Eric; Schlachterman, Alexander; Cao, Ou; Herzog, Roland W

    2005-06-01

    Adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors have been successfully used for therapeutic expression of systemic transgene products (such as factor IX or erythropoietin) following in vivo administration to skeletal muscle of animal models of inherited hematologic disorders. However, an immune response may be initiated if the transgene product represents a neoantigen. Here, we use ovalbumin (OVA) as a model antigen and demonstrate immune-mediated elimination of expression on muscle-directed AAV-2 gene transfer. Administration to immune competent mice resulted in transient systemic OVA expression. Within 10 days, OVA-specific T-helper cells had been activated in draining lymph nodes, an inflammatory immune response ensued, and OVA-expressing muscle fibers were destroyed by a cytotoxic CD8(+) T-cell response. Use of a muscle-specific promoter did not prevent this immune response. Adoptively transferred CD4(+) cells transgenic for a T-cell receptor specific to OVA peptide-major histocompatibility complex class II showed antigen-specific, vector dose-dependent proliferation confined to the draining lymph nodes of AAV-OVA-transduced muscle within 5 days after gene transfer and subsequently participated in lymphocytic infiltration of transduced muscle. This study documents that a local immune response limits sustained expression of a secreted protein in muscle gene transfer, a finding that may have consequences for design of clinical protocols.

  3. Balancing selection on immunity genes: review of the current literature and new analysis in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croze, Myriam; Živković, Daniel; Stephan, Wolfgang; Hutter, Stephan

    2016-08-01

    Balancing selection has been widely assumed to be an important evolutionary force, yet even today little is known about its abundance and its impact on the patterns of genetic diversity. Several studies have shown examples of balancing selection in humans, plants or parasites, and many genes under balancing selection are involved in immunity. It has been proposed that host-parasite coevolution is one of the main forces driving immune genes to evolve under balancing selection. In this paper, we review the literature on balancing selection on immunity genes in several organisms, including Drosophila. Furthermore, we performed a genome scan for balancing selection in an African population of Drosophila melanogaster using coalescent simulations of a demographic model with and without selection. We find very few genes under balancing selection and only one novel candidate gene related to immunity. Finally, we discuss the possible causes of the low number of genes under balancing selection. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier GmbH.. All rights reserved.

  4. Relative sensitivity of developmental and immune parameters in juvenile versus adult male rats after exposure to di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonk, Elisa C.M., E-mail: ilse.tonk@rivm.nl [Department of Toxicogenomics, Maastricht University, Maastricht (Netherlands); Laboratory for Health Protection Research, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven (Netherlands); Verhoef, Aart; Gremmer, Eric R. [Laboratory for Health Protection Research, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven (Netherlands); Loveren, Henk van [Department of Toxicogenomics, Maastricht University, Maastricht (Netherlands); Laboratory for Health Protection Research, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven (Netherlands); Piersma, Aldert H. [Laboratory for Health Protection Research, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven (Netherlands); Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences, Veterinary Faculty, Utrecht University, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2012-04-01

    The developing immune system displays a relatively high sensitivity as compared to both general toxicity parameters and to the adult immune system. In this study we have performed such comparisons using di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) as a model compound. DEHP is the most abundant phthalate in the environment and perinatal exposure to DEHP has been shown to disrupt male sexual differentiation. In addition, phthalate exposure has been associated with immune dysfunction as evidenced by effects on the expression of allergy. Male wistar rats were dosed with corn oil or DEHP by gavage from postnatal day (PND) 10–50 or PND 50–90 at doses between 1 and 1000 mg/kg/day. Androgen-dependent organ weights showed effects at lower dose levels in juvenile versus adult animals. Immune parameters affected included TDAR parameters in both age groups, NK activity in juvenile animals and TNF-α production by adherent splenocytes in adult animals. Immune parameters were affected at lower dose levels compared to developmental parameters. Overall, more immune parameters were affected in juvenile animals compared to adult animals and effects were observed at lower dose levels. The results of this study show a relatively higher sensitivity of juvenile versus adult rats. Furthermore, they illustrate the relative sensitivity of the developing immune system in juvenile animals as compared to general toxicity and developmental parameters. This study therefore provides further argumentation for performing dedicated developmental immune toxicity testing as a default in regulatory toxicology. -- Highlights: ► In this study we evaluate the relative sensitivities for DEHP induced effects. ► Results of this study demonstrate the age-dependency of DEHP toxicity. ► Functional immune parameters were more sensitive than structural immune parameters. ► Immune parameters were affected at lower dose levels than developmental parameters. ► Findings demonstrate the susceptibility of the

  5. Prognostic immune-related gene models for breast cancer: a pooled analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jianli; Wang, Ying; Lao, Zengding; Liang, Siting; Hou, Jingyi; Yu, Yunfang; Yao, Herui; You, Na; Chen, Kai

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer, the most common cancer among women, is a clinically and biologically heterogeneous disease. Numerous prognostic tools have been proposed, including gene signatures. Unlike proliferation-related prognostic gene signatures, many immune-related gene signatures have emerged as principal biology-driven predictors of breast cancer. Diverse statistical methods and data sets were used for building these immune-related prognostic models, making it difficult to compare or use them in clinically meaningful ways. This study evaluated successfully published immune-related prognostic gene signatures through systematic validations of publicly available data sets. Eight prognostic models that were built upon immune-related gene signatures were evaluated. The performances of these models were compared and ranked in ten publicly available data sets, comprising a total of 2,449 breast cancer cases. Predictive accuracies were measured as concordance indices (C-indices). All tests of statistical significance were two-sided. Immune-related gene models performed better in estrogen receptor-negative (ER-) and lymph node-positive (LN+) breast cancer subtypes. The three top-ranked ER- breast cancer models achieved overall C-indices of 0.62-0.63. Two models predicted better than chance for ER+ breast cancer, with C-indices of 0.53 and 0.59, respectively. For LN+ breast cancer, four models showed predictive advantage, with C-indices between 0.56 and 0.61. Predicted prognostic values were positively correlated with ER status when evaluated using univariate analyses in most of the models under investigation. Multivariate analyses indicated that prognostic values of the three models were independent of known clinical prognostic factors. Collectively, these analyses provided a comprehensive evaluation of immune-related prognostic gene signatures. By synthesizing C-indices in multiple independent data sets, immune-related gene signatures were ranked for ER+, ER-, LN+, and LN- breast

  6. The Effects of Destruxin A on Relish and Rel Gene Regulation to the Suspected Immune-Related Genes of Silkworm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Weina; He, Guangwei; Wang, Jingjing; Hu, Qiongbo

    2016-12-29

    Destruxin A (DA), a cyclodepsipeptidic mycotoxin of entomopathogenic fungus, Metarhizium anisopliae, has anti-immunity activity against insects, but the mechanism of immune regulation is not clear yet. In our previous experiment, the significant expression changes of Bm_nscaf2838_045, Bm_nscaf2674_066, and Bm_nscaf2767_133 genes in a silkworm's hemocytes were found, which suggested that these genes might be involved in insect's innate immunity. In the current experiment, the silkworm cell line Bm12 was used to survey the expression levels of these genes after the cells were treated with DA and the transcription factors BmRel, BmRelish1 and BmRelish2 were silenced by specific siRNA. The results indicated that, after the cells were treated by DA, the gene expression level of BmRelish2 was significantly downregulated, but BmRel and BmRelish1 were not changed. The results also showed that the gene expression levels of Bm_nscaf2838_045 and Bm_nscaf2674_066 had similar phenomena, i.e., downregulation with individual BmRelish1 gene silence or DA treatment, upregulation with combination of BmRelish1 gene silence and DA treatment, upregulation with individual BmRelish2 gene silence, and downregulation with combination of BmRelish2 gene silence plus DA treatment, but no changes in the BmRel gene silence combined with DA treatment. For the Bm_nscaf2767_133 gene, the downregulated expressions were found in individual BmRelish2 gene silence or DA treatment, upregulation in the combination treatment of BmRelish2 gene silence plus DA, and the individual treatment of BmRel or BmRelish1 silence. It is suggested that expressions of the Bm_nscaf2838_045 and Bm_nscaf2674_066 genes are closely related to the Imd signal pathway, but Bm_nscaf2767_133 genes might involve in both Toll and Imd pathways. Furthermore, the BmRelish1 gene acts as an activator and the BmRelish2 gene acts as a repressor for both Bm_nscaf2838_045 and Bm_nscaf2674_066 gene expressions. It also implies that DA may

  7. Selection and Evaluation of Tissue Specific Reference Genes in Lucilia sericata during an Immune Challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Andre; Lehmann, Rüdiger; Beckert, Annika; Vilcinskas, Andreas; Franta, Zdeněk

    2015-01-01

    The larvae of the common green bottle fly Lucilia sericata (Diptera: Calliphoridae) have been used for centuries to promote wound healing, but the molecular basis of their antimicrobial, debridement and healing functions remains largely unknown. The analysis of differential gene expression in specific larval tissues before and after immune challenge could be used to identify key molecular factors, but the most sensitive and reproducible method qRT-PCR requires validated reference genes. We therefore selected 10 candidate reference genes encoding products from different functional classes (18S rRNA, 28S rRNA, actin, β-tubulin, RPS3, RPLP0, EF1α, PKA, GAPDH and GST1). Two widely applied algorithms (GeNorm and Normfinder) were used to analyze reference gene candidates in different larval tissues associated with secretion, digestion, and antimicrobial activity (midgut, hindgut, salivary glands, crop and fat body). The Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa was then used to boost the larval immune system and the stability of reference gene expression was tested in comparison to three immune genes (lucimycin, defensin-1 and attacin-2), which target different pathogen classes. We observed no differential expression of the antifungal peptide lucimycin, whereas the representative targeting Gram-positive bacteria (defensin-1) was upregulated in salivary glands, crop, nerve ganglion and reached its maximum in fat body (up to 300-fold). The strongest upregulation in all immune challenged tissues (over 50,000-fold induction in the fat body) was monitored for attacin-2, the representative targeting Gram-negative bacteria. Here we identified and validated a set of reference genes that allows the accurate normalization of gene expression in specific tissues of L. sericata after immune challenge.

  8. Selection and Evaluation of Tissue Specific Reference Genes in Lucilia sericata during an Immune Challenge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre Baumann

    Full Text Available The larvae of the common green bottle fly Lucilia sericata (Diptera: Calliphoridae have been used for centuries to promote wound healing, but the molecular basis of their antimicrobial, debridement and healing functions remains largely unknown. The analysis of differential gene expression in specific larval tissues before and after immune challenge could be used to identify key molecular factors, but the most sensitive and reproducible method qRT-PCR requires validated reference genes. We therefore selected 10 candidate reference genes encoding products from different functional classes (18S rRNA, 28S rRNA, actin, β-tubulin, RPS3, RPLP0, EF1α, PKA, GAPDH and GST1. Two widely applied algorithms (GeNorm and Normfinder were used to analyze reference gene candidates in different larval tissues associated with secretion, digestion, and antimicrobial activity (midgut, hindgut, salivary glands, crop and fat body. The Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa was then used to boost the larval immune system and the stability of reference gene expression was tested in comparison to three immune genes (lucimycin, defensin-1 and attacin-2, which target different pathogen classes. We observed no differential expression of the antifungal peptide lucimycin, whereas the representative targeting Gram-positive bacteria (defensin-1 was upregulated in salivary glands, crop, nerve ganglion and reached its maximum in fat body (up to 300-fold. The strongest upregulation in all immune challenged tissues (over 50,000-fold induction in the fat body was monitored for attacin-2, the representative targeting Gram-negative bacteria. Here we identified and validated a set of reference genes that allows the accurate normalization of gene expression in specific tissues of L. sericata after immune challenge.

  9. Methylation and Expression of Immune and Inflammatory Genes in the Offspring of Bariatric Bypass Surgery Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric Guénard

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Maternal obesity, excess weight gain and overnutrition during pregnancy increase risks of obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and cardiovascular disease in the offspring. Maternal biliopancreatic diversion is an effective treatment for severe obesity and is beneficial for offspring born after maternal surgery (AMS. These offspring exhibit lower severe obesity prevalence and improved cardiometabolic risk factors including inflammatory marker compared to siblings born before maternal surgery (BMS. Objective. To assess relationships between maternal bariatric surgery and the methylation/expression of genes involved in the immune and inflammatory pathways. Methods. A differential gene methylation analysis was conducted in a sibling cohort of 25 BMS and 25 AMS offspring from 20 mothers. Following differential gene expression analysis (23 BMS and 23 AMS, pathway analysis was conducted. Correlations between gene methylation/expression and circulating inflammatory markers were computed. Results. Five immune and inflammatory pathways with significant overrepresentation of both differential gene methylation and expression were identified. In the IL-8 pathway, gene methylation correlated with both gene expression and plasma C-reactive protein levels. Conclusion. These results suggest that improvements in cardiometabolic risk markers in AMS compared to BMS offspring may be mediated through differential methylation of genes involved in immune and inflammatory pathways.

  10. Expression profile of immune response genes in patients with Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tai Dessmon

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS emerged in later February 2003, as a new epidemic form of life-threatening infection caused by a novel coronavirus. However, the immune-pathogenesis of SARS is poorly understood. To understand the host response to this pathogen, we investigated the gene expression profiles of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs derived from SARS patients, and compared with healthy controls. Results The number of differentially expressed genes was found to be 186 under stringent filtering criteria of microarray data analysis. Several genes were highly up-regulated in patients with SARS, such as, the genes coding for Lactoferrin, S100A9 and Lipocalin 2. The real-time PCR method verified the results of the gene array analysis and showed that those genes that were up-regulated as determined by microarray analysis were also found to be comparatively up-regulated by real-time PCR analysis. Conclusions This differential gene expression profiling of PBMCs from patients with SARS strongly suggests that the response of SARS affected patients seems to be mainly an innate inflammatory response, rather than a specific immune response against a viral infection, as we observed a complete lack of cytokine genes usually triggered during a viral infection. Our study shows for the first time how the immune system responds to the SARS infection, and opens new possibilities for designing new diagnostics and treatments for this new life-threatening disease.

  11. Altered expression of immune-related genes in children with Down syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna Lancia Zampieri

    Full Text Available Individuals with Down syndrome (DS have a high incidence of immunological alterations with increased susceptibility to bacterial and viral infections and high frequency of different types of hematologic malignancies and autoimmune disorders. In the current study, we profiled the expression pattern of 92 immune-related genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs of two different groups, children with DS and control children, to identify differentially expressed genes that might be of pathogenetic importance for the development and phenotype of the immunological alterations observed in individuals with DS. PBMCs samples were obtained from six DS individuals with karyotypically confirmed full trisomy 21 and six healthy control individuals (ages 2-6 years. Gene expression was profiled in duplicate according to the manufacturer's instructions provided by commercially available TaqMan Human Immune Array representing 92 immune function genes and four reference genes on a 96-plex gene card. A set of 17 differentially expressed genes, not located on chromosome 21 (HSA21, involved in immune and inflammatory pathways was identified including 13 genes (BCL2, CCL3, CCR7, CD19, CD28, CD40, CD40LG, CD80, EDN1, IKBKB, IL6, NOS2 and SKI significantly down-regulated and four genes (BCL2L1, CCR2, CCR5 and IL10 significantly up-regulated in children with DS. These findings highlight a list of candidate genes for further investigation into the molecular mechanism underlying DS pathology and reinforce the secondary effects of the presence of a third copy of HSA21.

  12. Toxicity and immune system effects of dietary deltamethrin exposure in tiger salamanders (Ambystoma tigrinum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froese, Jennifer M W; Smits, Judit E G; Forsyth, Douglas J; Wickstrom, Mark L

    2009-01-01

    One theory proposed to explain the global declines in amphibian populations involves contaminant-induced immune alteration and subsequent increased susceptibility to infectious disease. The goal of this study was twofold, to (1) study acute oral toxicity of deltamethrin (cyclopropanecarboxylic acid, 3-(2,2-dibromoethenyl)-2,2-dimethyl cyano(3-phenoxyphenyl)methyl ester) in tiger salamanders (Ambystoma tigrinum), and (2) evaluate whether the insecticide deltamethrin produces immunosuppression in these animals. In the acute toxicity study, tiger salamanders receiving single doses of deltamethrin ranging from 1 to 35 mg/kg displayed intention tremors, hypersalivation, ataxia, choreoathetosis (writhing), severe depression (immobility with minimal response to stimuli), and death. For acute effects, based on clinical signs, the median lethal dose (LD(50)) and lowest observed adverse effect level (LOAEL) were estimated to be 5 to 10 mg/kg and 1 mg/kg, respectively. The LOAEL in animals dosed 3 times per week for 4 wk was 400 microg/kg/d. The endpoints for the immunotoxicity study included lymphoid organ mass and histopathology, hematological variables, and functional assays of phagocytosis, oxidative burst, and lymphoblastic transformation. Tiger salamanders in 4 treatment groups (0, 4, 40, or 400 microg/kg/d) were dosed with deltamethrin via the diet 3 times per week for 4 wk. Deltamethrin exposure resulted in increased liver mass, packed cell volume, and total plasma protein concentration, but these effects were not dose dependent. The relative mass of kidney and spleen, plasma albumin and globulin concentrations, and circulating leukocyte numbers were not affected by deltamethrin exposure, nor were phagocytosis, oxidative burst, and lymphoblastic transformation. This study shows that at moderate levels of exposure, deltamethrin may be neurotoxic to tiger salamanders. However, based on the immune assays considered in this study there was no evidence of immunosuppression

  13. Forager bees (Apis mellifera) highly express immune and detoxification genes in tissues associated with nectar processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannette, Rachel L; Mohamed, Abbas; Johnson, Brian R

    2015-11-09

    Pollinators, including honey bees, routinely encounter potentially harmful microorganisms and phytochemicals during foraging. However, the mechanisms by which honey bees manage these potential threats are poorly understood. In this study, we examine the expression of antimicrobial, immune and detoxification genes in Apis mellifera and compare between forager and nurse bees using tissue-specific RNA-seq and qPCR. Our analysis revealed extensive tissue-specific expression of antimicrobial, immune signaling, and detoxification genes. Variation in gene expression between worker stages was pronounced in the mandibular and hypopharyngeal gland (HPG), where foragers were enriched in transcripts that encode antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and immune response. Additionally, forager HPGs and mandibular glands were enriched in transcripts encoding detoxification enzymes, including some associated with xenobiotic metabolism. Using qPCR on an independent dataset, we verified differential expression of three AMP and three P450 genes between foragers and nurses. High expression of AMP genes in nectar-processing tissues suggests that these peptides may contribute to antimicrobial properties of honey or to honey bee defense against environmentally-acquired microorganisms. Together, these results suggest that worker role and tissue-specific expression of AMPs, and immune and detoxification enzymes may contribute to defense against microorganisms and xenobiotic compounds acquired while foraging.

  14. Immune response to helper dependent adenoviral mediated liver gene therapy: challenges and prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiler, Michael P; Cerullo, Vincenzo; Lee, Brendan

    2007-10-01

    Adenovirus-mediated gene therapy holds significant potential especially for applications requiring high levels of target tissue transduction. While significant advances in clinical adenoviral gene therapy applications have been made in cancer, the clinical translation of adenoviral gene replacement therapy for genetic disease has lagged. Encouragingly, advances in vector production have led to the development of Helper-Dependent ("gutted" or "high capacity") adenoviral vectors (HDV) deleted of all viral coding genes. HDV significantly reduces the chronic toxicity associated with early generation adenoviral vectors that has been most significant after systemic administration in both small and large animal models. However, the field remains confounded by innate immune responses inherent to adenovirus, and more generally, to the adaptive immune response to transgene. Together they decrease the effective therapeutic index for any particular treatment. This review summarizes the current advances toward understanding the decisive cell and molecular mechanisms underlying the acute toxicity to systemic HDV administration. We focus on the complex immune response and consequences of systemic vector delivery in the context of liver-directed monogenic disease therapy. Future development of interventions to avoid the innate immune response, including vector and pharmacologic manipulations, should further contribute to minimizing vector toxicity while maximizing the efficacy of systemic HDV gene transfer.

  15. Induction of immune tolerance to coagulation factor IX antigen by in vivo hepatic gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mingozzi, Federico; Liu, Yi-Lin; Dobrzynski, Eric; Kaufhold, Antje; Liu, Jian Hua; Wang, YuQin; Arruda, Valder R; High, Katherine A; Herzog, Roland W

    2003-05-01

    Gene replacement therapy is an attractive approach for treatment of genetic disease, but may be complicated by the risk of a neutralizing immune response to the therapeutic gene product. There are examples of humoral and cellular immune responses against the transgene product as well as absence of such responses, depending on vector design and the underlying mutation in the dysfunctional gene. It has been unclear, however, whether transgene expression can induce tolerance to the therapeutic antigen. Here, we demonstrate induction of immune tolerance to a secreted human coagulation factor IX (hF.IX) antigen by adeno-associated viral gene transfer to the liver. Tolerized mice showed absence of anti-hF.IX and substantially reduced in vitro T cell responses after immunization with hF.IX in adjuvant. Tolerance induction was antigen specific, affected a broad range of Th cell subsets, and was favored by higher levels of transgene expression as determined by promoter strength, vector dose, and mouse strain. Hepatocyte-derived hF.IX expression induced regulatory CD4(+) T cells that can suppress anti-hF.IX formation after adoptive transfer. With a strain-dependent rate of success, tolerance to murine F.IX was induced in mice with a large F.IX gene deletion, supporting the relevance of these data for treatment of hemophilia B and other genetic diseases.

  16. p38 MAPK regulates expression of immune response genes and contributes to longevity in C. elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily R Troemel

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available The PMK-1 p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway and the DAF-2-DAF-16 insulin signaling pathway control Caenorhabditis elegans intestinal innate immunity. pmk-1 loss-of-function mutants have enhanced sensitivity to pathogens, while daf-2 loss-of-function mutants have enhanced resistance to pathogens that requires upregulation of the DAF-16 transcription factor. We used genetic analysis to show that the pathogen resistance of daf-2 mutants also requires PMK-1. However, genome-wide microarray analysis indicated that there was essentially no overlap between genes positively regulated by PMK-1 and DAF-16, suggesting that they form parallel pathways to promote immunity. We found that PMK-1 controls expression of candidate secreted antimicrobials, including C-type lectins, ShK toxins, and CUB-like genes. Microarray analysis demonstrated that 25% of PMK-1 positively regulated genes are induced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. Using quantitative PCR, we showed that PMK-1 regulates both basal and infection-induced expression of pathogen response genes, while DAF-16 does not. Finally, we used genetic analysis to show that PMK-1 contributes to the enhanced longevity of daf-2 mutants. We propose that the PMK-1 pathway is a specific, indispensable immunity pathway that mediates expression of secreted immune response genes, while the DAF-2-DAF-16 pathway appears to regulate immunity as part of a more general stress response. The contribution of the PMK-1 pathway to the enhanced lifespan of daf-2 mutants suggests that innate immunity is an important determinant of longevity.

  17. The Entomopathogenic Fungi Isaria fumosorosea Plays a Vital Role in Suppressing the Immune System of Plutella xylostella: RNA-Seq and DGE Analysis of Immunity-Related Genes

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    Jin Xu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Most, if not all, entomopathogenic fungi have been used as alternative control agents to decrease the insect resistance and harmful effects of the insecticides on the environment. Among them, Isaria fumosorosea has also shown great potential to control different insect pests. In the present study, we explored the immune response of P. xylostella to the infection of I. fumosorosea at different time points by using RNA-Sequencing and differential gene expression technology at the genomic level. To gain insight into the host-pathogen interaction at the genomic level, five libraries of P. xylostella larvae at 12, 18, 24, and 36 h post-infection and a control were constructed. In total, 161 immunity-related genes were identified and grouped into four categories; immune recognition families, toll and Imd pathway, melanization, and antimicrobial peptides (AMPs. The results of differentially expressed immunity-related genes depicted that 15, 13, 53, and 14 up-regulated and 38, 51, 56, and 49 were down-regulated in P. xylostella at 12, 18, 24, and 36 h post-treatment, respectively. RNA-Seq results of immunity-related genes revealed that the expression of AMPs was reduced after treatment with I. fumosorosea. To validate RNA-Seq results by RT-qPCR, 22 immunity-related genes were randomly selected. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that I. fumosorosea has the potential to suppress the immune response of P. xylostella and can become a potential biopesticide for controlling P. xylostella.

  18. Genome-Wide Association Studies Suggest Limited Immune Gene Enrichment in Schizophrenia Compared to 5 Autoimmune Diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pouget, Jennie G; Gonçalves, Vanessa F; Spain, Sarah L

    2016-01-01

    in immune genes contributes to schizophrenia. We show that there is no enrichment of immune loci outside of the MHC region in the largest genetic study of schizophrenia conducted to date, in contrast to 5 diseases of known immune origin. Among 108 regions of the genome previously associated...

  19. Tissue Phthalate Levels Correlate With Changes in Immune Gene Expression in a Population of Juvenile Wild Salmon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Kelly; Hagedorn, Birgit; Ali, Shareen; Kennish, John; Applegate, Ben; Leu, Matthias; Epp, Lidia; Pallister, Chris; Zwollo, Patty

    2016-07-01

    Phthalates have detrimental effects on health and have been shown to dysregulate the immune system of mammals, birds, and fish. We recently reported that di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate exposure reduces the abundance and inhibits the proliferation of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) IgM(+) B lymphocytes and expression of secreted immunoglobulin heavy-chain mu transcripts in an in vitro culture system. We proposed that phthalates act as immunomodulators by modifying the normal B cell-activation pathways by accelerating B cell differentiation while suppressing plasmablast expansion, thus resulting in fewer IgM-secreting plasma cells. This hypothesis was tested here in an in vivo field study of juvenile Dolly Varden (Salvelinus malma) from a plastic-polluted lake in the Gulf of Alaska. Fish tissues were analyzed for both phthalate levels using liquid chromatography-coupled tandem mass spectrometry and for changes in immune gene expression using reverse transcriptase-real time polymerase chain reaction. Results showed that fish with higher tissue levels of di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate, di(n-butyl) phthalate, and/or dimethyl phthalate expressed significantly fewer secreted and membrane-bound immunoglobulin heavy-chain mu and Blimp1 transcripts in their hematopoietic tissue. This suggests that in vivo uptake of phthalates in fish changes the expression of B cell-specific genes. Chronic exposure to phthalates likely dysregulates normal B-lymphoid development and antibody responses in salmonids and may increase susceptibility to infection. Given the conserved nature of B-lineage cells in vertebrate animals, other marine species may be similarly affected by chronic phthalate exposure.

  20. Pre-Exposure Gene Expression in Baboons with and without Pancytopenia after Radiation Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Port

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Radiosensitivity differs in humans and likely among primates. The reasons are not well known. We examined pre-exposure gene expression in baboons (n = 17 who developed haematologic acute radiation syndrome (HARS without pancytopenia or a more aggravated HARS with pancytopenia after irradiation. We evaluated gene expression in a two stage study design where stage I comprised a whole genome screen for messenger RNAs (mRNA (microarray and detection of 667 microRNAs (miRNA (real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR platform. Twenty candidate mRNAs and nine miRNAs were selected for validation in stage II (qRT-PCR. None of the mRNA species could be confirmed during the validation step, but six of the nine selected candidate miRNA remained significantly different during validation. In particular, miR-425-5p (receiver operating characteristic = 0.98; p = 0.0003 showed nearly complete discrimination between HARS groups with and without pancytopenia. Target gene searches of miR-425-5p identified new potential mRNAs and associated biological processes linked with radiosensitivity. We found that one miRNA species examined in pre-exposure blood samples was associated with HARS characterized by pancytopenia and identified new target mRNAs that might reflect differences in radiosensitivity of irradiated normal tissue.

  1. Sexual dimorphism in immune response genes as a function of puberty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosen Antony

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Autoimmune diseases are more prevalent in females than in males, whereas males have higher mortality associated with infectious diseases. To increase our understanding of this sexual dimorphism in the immune system, we sought to identify and characterize inherent differences in immune response programs in the spleens of male and female mice before, during and after puberty. Results After the onset of puberty, female mice showed a higher expression of adaptive immune response genes, while males had a higher expression of innate immune genes. This result suggested a requirement for sex hormones. Using in vivo and in vitro assays in normal and mutant mouse strains, we found that reverse signaling through FasL was directly influenced by estrogen, with downstream consequences of increased CD8+ T cell-derived B cell help (via cytokines and enhanced immunoglobulin production. Conclusion These results demonstrate that sexual dimorphism in innate and adaptive immune genes is dependent on puberty. This study also revealed that estrogen influences immunoglobulin levels in post-pubertal female mice via the Fas-FasL pathway.

  2. Construction of an integrated gene regulatory network link to stress-related immune system in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behdani, Elham; Bakhtiarizadeh, Mohammad Reza

    2017-10-01

    The immune system is an important biological system that is negatively impacted by stress. This study constructed an integrated regulatory network to enhance our understanding of the regulatory gene network used in the stress-related immune system. Module inference was used to construct modules of co-expressed genes with bovine leukocyte RNA-Seq data. Transcription factors (TFs) were then assigned to these modules using Lemon-Tree algorithms. In addition, the TFs assigned to each module were confirmed using the promoter analysis and protein-protein interactions data. Therefore, our integrated method identified three TFs which include one TF that is previously known to be involved in immune response (MYBL2) and two TFs (E2F8 and FOXS1) that had not been recognized previously and were identified for the first time in this study as novel regulatory candidates in immune response. This study provides valuable insights on the regulatory programs of genes involved in the stress-related immune system.

  3. Candidate gene approach for parasite resistance in sheep--variation in immune pathway genes and association with fecal egg count.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathiravan Periasamy

    Full Text Available Sheep chromosome 3 (Oar3 has the largest number of QTLs reported to be significantly associated with resistance to gastro-intestinal nematodes. This study aimed to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs within candidate genes located in sheep chromosome 3 as well as genes involved in major immune pathways. A total of 41 SNPs were identified across 38 candidate genes in a panel of unrelated sheep and genotyped in 713 animals belonging to 22 breeds across Asia, Europe and South America. The variations and evolution of immune pathway genes were assessed in sheep populations across these macro-environmental regions that significantly differ in the diversity and load of pathogens. The mean minor allele frequency (MAF did not vary between Asian and European sheep reflecting the absence of ascertainment bias. Phylogenetic analysis revealed two major clusters with most of South Asian, South East Asian and South West Asian breeds clustering together while European and South American sheep breeds clustered together distinctly. Analysis of molecular variance revealed strong phylogeographic structure at loci located in immune pathway genes, unlike microsatellite and genome wide SNP markers. To understand the influence of natural selection processes, SNP loci located in chromosome 3 were utilized to reconstruct haplotypes, the diversity of which showed significant deviations from selective neutrality. Reduced Median network of reconstructed haplotypes showed balancing selection in force at these loci. Preliminary association of SNP genotypes with phenotypes recorded 42 days post challenge revealed significant differences (P<0.05 in fecal egg count, body weight change and packed cell volume at two, four and six SNP loci respectively. In conclusion, the present study reports strong phylogeographic structure and balancing selection operating at SNP loci located within immune pathway genes. Further, SNP loci identified in the study were found to have

  4. Autologous haematopoietic stem cell transplantation reduces abnormalities in the expression of immune genes in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Paula A Sousa, Alessandra; Malmegrim, Kelen C R; Panepucci, Rodrigo A; Brum, Doralina S; Barreira, Amilton A; Carlos Dos Santos, Antonio; Araújo, Amélia G; Covas, Dimas Tadeu; Oliveira, Maria C; Moraes, Daniela A; Pieroni, Fabiano; Barros, George M; Simões, Belinda P; Nicholas, Richard; Burt, Richard K; Voltarelli, Júlio C; Muraro, Paolo A

    2015-01-01

    Autologous haematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (AHSCT) has been experimented as a treatment in patients affected by severe forms of multiple sclerosis (MS) who failed to respond to standard immunotherapy. The rationale of AHSCT is to 'reboot' the immune system and reconstitute a new adaptive immunity. The aim of our study was to identify, through a robust and unbiased transcriptomic analysis, any changes of gene expression in T-cells potentially underlying the treatment effect in patients who underwent non-myeloablative AHSCT for treatment of MS. We evaluated by microarray DNA-chip technology the gene expression of peripheral CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell subsets sorted from patients with MS patients before AHSCT, at 6 months, 1 year and 2 years after AHSCT and from healthy control subjects. Hierarchical clustering analysis revealed that reconstituted CD8+ T-cells of MS patients at 2 years post-transplantation, aggregated together with healthy controls, suggesting a normalization of gene expression in CD8+ cells post-therapy. When we compared the gene expression in MS patients before and after therapy, we detected a large number of differentially expressed genes (DEG) in both CD8+ and CD4+ T-cell subsets at all time points after transplantation. We catalogued the biological function of DEG and we selected 27 genes known to be involved in immune function for accurate quantification of gene expression by real-time PCR. The analysis confirmed and extended with quantitative data, a number of significant changes in both the CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells subsets from MS post-transplant. Notably, CD8+ T-cells revealed more extensive changes in the expression of genes involved in effector immune responses.

  5. Impact of cytokine and cytokine receptor gene polymorphisms on cellular immunity after smallpox vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovsyannikova, Inna G; Haralambieva, Iana H; Kennedy, Richard B; Pankratz, V Shane; Vierkant, Robert A; Jacobson, Robert M; Poland, Gregory A

    2012-11-15

    We explored associations between SNPs in cytokine/cytokine receptor genes and cellular immunity in subjects following primary smallpox vaccination. We also analyzed the genotype-phenotype associations discovered in the Caucasian subjects among a cohort of African-Americans. In Caucasians we found 277 associations (psmallpox vaccine-induced cytokine responses are modulated by genetic polymorphisms in cytokine and cytokine receptor genes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Introduction of optical reporter gene into cancer and immune cells using lentiviral vector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Jung Joon; Le, Uyenchi N.; Moon, Sung Min; Heo, Young Jun; Song, Ho Chun; Bom, Hee Seung [School of Medicine, Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yeon Soo [Schoole of Medicine, Inje University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    For some applications such as gene therapy or reporter gene imaging, a gene has to be introduced into the organism of interest. Adenoviral vectors are capable of transducing both replicating and non-dividing cells. The adenoviral vectors do not integrate their DNA into host DNA, but do lead to an immune response. Lentiviruses belong to the retrovirus family and are capable of infecting both dividing and non-dividing cells. The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is an example of a lentavirus. A disabled HIV virus has been developed and could be used for in vivo gene delivery. A portion of the viral genome which encodes for accessory proteins canbe deleted without affecting production of the vector and efficiency of infection. Lentiviral delivery into various rodent tissues shows sustained expression of the transgene of up to six months. Furthermore, there seems to be little or no immune response with these vectors. These lentiviral vectors hold significant promise for in vivo gene delivery. We constructed lentiviral vector encoding firefly luciferase (Fluc) and eGFP. Fluc-eGFP fusion gene was inserted into multiple cloning sites of pLentiM1.3 vector. Reporter gene (Fluc-eGFP) was designed to be driven by murine CMV promoter with enhanced efficacy of transgene expression as compared to human CMV promoter. We transfected pLenti1.3-Fluc into human cervix cancer cell line (HeLa) and murine T lymphocytes. We also constructed adenovirus encoding Fluc and transfected to HeLa and T cells. This LentiM1.3-Fluc was transfected into HeLa cells and murine T lymphocytes in vitro, showing consistent expression of eGFP under the fluorescence microscopy from the 2nd day of transfection. Firefly luciferase reporter gene was not expressed in immune cells when it is mediated by adenovirus. Lentivirus was validated as a useful vector for both immune and cancer cells.

  7. An Organismal Model for Gene Regulatory Networks in the Gut-Associated Immune Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine M. Buckley

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The gut epithelium is an ancient site of complex communication between the animal immune system and the microbial world. While elements of self-non-self receptors and effector mechanisms differ greatly among animal phyla, some aspects of recognition, regulation, and response are broadly conserved. A gene regulatory network (GRN approach provides a means to investigate the nature of this conservation and divergence even as more peripheral functional details remain incompletely understood. The sea urchin embryo is an unparalleled experimental model for detangling the GRNs that govern embryonic development. By applying this theoretical framework to the free swimming, feeding larval stage of the purple sea urchin, it is possible to delineate the conserved regulatory circuitry that regulates the gut-associated immune response. This model provides a morphologically simple system in which to efficiently unravel regulatory connections that are phylogenetically relevant to immunity in vertebrates. Here, we review the organism-wide cellular and transcriptional immune response of the sea urchin larva. A large set of transcription factors and signal systems, including epithelial expression of interleukin 17 (IL17, are important mediators in the activation of the early gut-associated response. Many of these have homologs that are active in vertebrate immunity, while others are ancient in animals but absent in vertebrates or specific to echinoderms. This larval model provides a means to experimentally characterize immune function encoded in the sea urchin genome and the regulatory interconnections that control immune response and resolution across the tissues of the organism.

  8. Differential Gene Expression Analysis of Bovine Macrophages after Exposure to the Penicillium Mycotoxins Citrinin and/or Ochratoxin A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen M. Brennan

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Mycotoxins produced by fungal species commonly contaminate livestock feedstuffs, jeopardizing their health and diminishing production. Citrinin (CIT and ochratoxin A (OTA are mycotoxins produced by Penicillium spp. and commonly co-occur. Both CIT and OTA can modulate immune response by inhibiting cell proliferation and differentiation, altering cell metabolism, and triggering programmed cell death. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of sublethal exposure (i.e., the concentration that inhibited cell proliferation by 25% (IC25 to CIT, OTA or CIT + OTA on the bovine macrophage transcriptome. Gene expression was determined using the Affymetrix Bovine Genome Array. After 6 h of exposure to CIT, OTA or CIT + OTA, the number of differentially expressed genes (DEG, respectively, was as follows: 1471 genes (822 up-regulated, 649 down-regulated, 5094 genes (2611 up-regulated, 2483 down-regulated and 7624 genes (3984 up-regulated, 3640 down-regulated. Of these, 179 genes (88 up-regulated, 91 down-regulated were commonly expressed between treatments. After 24 h of exposure to CIT, OTA or CIT + OTA the number of DEG, respectively, was as follows: 3230 genes (1631 up-regulated, 1599 down-regulated, 8558 genes (4167 up-regulated, 4391 down-regulated, and 10,927 genes (6284 up-regulated, 4643 down-regulated. Of these, 770 genes (247 up-regulated, 523 down-regulated were commonly expressed between treatments. The categorization of common biological functions and pathway analysis suggests that the IC25 of both CIT and OTA, or their combination, induces cellular oxidative stress, a slowing of cell cycle progression, and apoptosis. Collectively, these effects contribute to inhibiting bovine macrophage proliferation.

  9. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors in gene therapy: immune challenges and strategies to circumvent them.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hareendran, Sangeetha; Balakrishnan, Balaji; Sen, Dwaipayan; Kumar, Sanjay; Srivastava, Alok; Jayandharan, Giridhara R

    2013-11-01

    AAV-based gene transfer protocols have shown remarkable success when directed to immune-privileged sites such as for retinal disorders like Lebers congenital amaurosis. In contrast, AAV-mediated gene transfer into liver or muscle tissue for diseases such as hemophilia B, α1 anti-trypsin deficiency and muscular dystrophy has demonstrated a decline in gene transfer efficacy over time. It is now known that in humans, AAV triggers specific pathways that recruit immune sensors. These factors initiate an immediate reaction against either the viral capsid or the vector encoded protein as part of innate immune response or to produce a more specific adaptive response that generates immunological memory. The vector-transduced cells are then rapidly destroyed due to this immune activation. However, unlike other viral vectors, AAV is not immunogenic in murine models. Its immunogenicity becomes apparent only in large animal models and human subjects. Moreover, humans are natural hosts to AAV and exhibit a high seroprevalence against AAV vectors. This limits the widespread application of AAV vectors into patients with pre-existing neutralising antibodies or memory T cells. To address these issues, various strategies are being tested. Alternate serotype vectors (AAV1-10), efficient expression cassettes, specific tissue targeting, immune-suppression and engineered capsid variants are some approaches proposed to minimise this immune stimulation. In this review, we have summarised the nature of the immune response documented against AAV in various pre-clinical and clinical settings and have further discussed the strategies to evade them. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Immune responses of a wall lizard to whole-body exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mina, Despoina; Sagonas, Kostas; Fragopoulou, Adamantia F; Pafilis, Panayiotis; Skouroliakou, Aikaterini; Margaritis, Lukas H; Tsitsilonis, Ourania E; Valakos, Efstratios D

    2016-01-01

    During the last three decades, the number of devices that emit non-ionizing electromagnetic radiation (EMR) at the wireless communication spectrum has rapidly increased and possible effects on living organisms have become a major concern. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of radiofrequency EMR emitted by a widely used wireless communication device, namely the Digital Enhanced Communication Telephony (DECT) base, on the immune responses of the Aegean wall lizard (Podarcis erhardii). Adult male lizards were exposed 24 h/day for 8 weeks to 1880-1900 MHz DECT base radiation at average electric field intensity of 3.2 V/m. Immune reactivity was assessed using the phytohemagglutinin (PHA) skin swelling and mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) tests. Our results revealed a noticeable suppression (approximately 45%) of inflammatory responses in EMR-exposed lizards compared to sham-exposed animals. T cell-mediated responses were marginally affected. Daily radiofrequency EMR exposure seems to affect, at least partially, the immunocompetence of the Aegean wall lizard.

  11. Generation of antigen-specific T cell immunity through T cell receptor gene transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coccoris, Miriam

    2009-01-01

    Cancer cells often escape the attack of immune cells because they originate from self-tissue. Through T cell receptor gene transfer it is possible to equip peripheral T cells with a desired specificity, and this strategy may be useful to generate tumor-specific T cells for the treatment of cancer in

  12. Serpent regulates Drosophila immunity genes in the larval fat body through an essential GATA motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, U M; Kadalayil, L; Rehorn, K P; Hoshizaki, D K; Reuter, R; Engström, Y

    1999-01-01

    Insects possess a powerful immune system, which in response to infection leads to a vast production of different antimicrobial peptides. The regulatory regions of many immunity genes contain a GATA motif in proximity to a kappaB motif. Upon infection, Rel proteins enter the nucleus and activate transcription of the immunity genes. High levels of Rel protein-mediated Cecropin A1 expression previously have been shown to require the GATA site along with the kappaB site. We provide evidence demonstrating that the GATA motif is needed for expression of the Cecropin A1 gene in larval fat body, but is dispensable in adult fat body. A nuclear DNA-binding activity interacts with the Cecropin A1 GATA motif with the same properties as the Drosophila GATA factor Serpent. The GATA-binding activity is recognized by Serpent-specific antibodies, demonstrating their identity. We show that Serpent is nuclear in larval fat body cells and haemocytes both before and after infection. After overexpression, Serpent increases Cecropin A1 transcription in a GATA-dependent manner. We propose that Serpent plays a key role in tissue-specific expression of immunity genes, by priming them for inducible activation by Rel proteins in response to infection. PMID:10406806

  13. Effect of water pollution on expression of immune response genes of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-05-16

    May 16, 2008 ... This research was aimed to study quality of water in Lake Qarun and effects of pollution on expression of immune genes in Egyptian ... Heavy metals toxicity has been extensively studied in fish (Chan et al., 1999; Heing ..... wastewater from the drains and the restaurants along the beach. The results for the ...

  14. Changes of the expressions of immune-related genes after ventromedial hypothalamic lesioning. Systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiba, Takayoshi; Yagyu, Kiyomi

    2013-04-15

    Over the past 20 years, the functional autonomy of both the immune and central nervous systems has been successfully challenged. Although the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH) is one of the centers of parasympathetic nervous system, to date, there has been little reported regarding the role of the hypothalamus in directly changing the expression of immune-related genes. Recently, it has been reported that VMH lesions can directly change the expression of immune-related gene families. The present review focuses on the relationships between the VMH and the expressions of immune-related genes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. High amino acid diversity and positive selection at a putative coral immunity gene (tachylectin-2

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    Hellberg Michael E

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genes involved in immune functions, including pathogen recognition and the activation of innate defense pathways, are among the most genetically variable known, and the proteins that they encode are often characterized by high rates of amino acid substitutions, a hallmark of positive selection. The high levels of variation characteristic of immunity genes make them useful tools for conservation genetics. To date, highly variable immunity genes have yet to be found in corals, keystone organisms of the world's most diverse marine ecosystem, the coral reef. Here, we examine variation in and selection on a putative innate immunity gene from Oculina, a coral genus previously used as a model for studies of coral disease and bleaching. Results In a survey of 244 Oculina alleles, we find high nonsynonymous variation and a signature of positive selection, consistent with a putative role in immunity. Using computational protein structure prediction, we generate a structural model of the Oculina protein that closely matches the known structure of tachylectin-2 from the Japanese horseshoe crab (Tachypleus tridentatus, a protein with demonstrated function in microbial recognition and agglutination. We also demonstrate that at least three other genera of anthozoan cnidarians (Acropora, Montastrea and Nematostella possess proteins structurally similar to tachylectin-2. Conclusions Taken together, the evidence of high amino acid diversity, positive selection and structural correspondence to the horseshoe crab tachylectin-2 suggests that this protein is 1 part of Oculina's innate immunity repertoire, and 2 evolving adaptively, possibly under selective pressure from coral-associated microorganisms. Tachylectin-2 may serve as a candidate locus to screen coral populations for their capacity to respond adaptively to future environmental change.

  16. Regulatory T Cells and Immune Tolerance to Coagulation Factor IX in the Context of Intramuscular AAV1 Gene Transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly, Meagan; Bharadwaj, Arpita S.; Tacke, Frank; Chao, Hengjun

    2009-01-01

    Regulatory T cells play a major role in induction and maintenance of immune tolerance and immunological homeostasis. A variety of strategies have been attempted to induce regulatory T cells for control of unwanted, adverse immunity in autoimmune diseases, transplantation as well as gene transfer. We recently reported efficient induction of immune tolerance to coagulation factor IX (FIX) following intramuscular AAV1 gene transfer. In the current study, we performed a systematic and comprehensi...

  17. Innate immune-stimulating and immune genes up-regulating activities of three types of alginate from Sargassum siliquosum in Pacific white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yudiati, Ervia; Isnansetyo, Alim; Murwantoko; Ayuningtyas; Triyanto; Handayani, Christina Retna

    2016-07-01

    The Total Haemocyte Count (THC), phenoloxidase (PO), Superoxide Dismutase (SOD) activity, Phagocytic Activity/Index and Total Protein Plasma (TPP) were examined after feeding the white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei with diets supplemented with three different types of alginates (acid, calcium and sodium alginates). Immune-related genes expression was evaluated by quantitative Real Time PCR (qRT-PCR). Results indicated that the immune parameters directly increased according to the doses of alginates and time. The 2.0 g kg(-1) of acid and sodium alginate treatments were gave better results. Four immune-related genes expression i.e. LGBP, Toll, Lectin, proPO were up regulated. It is therefore concluded that the supplementation of alginate of Sargassum siliquosum on the diet of L. vannamei enhanced the innate immunity as well as the expression of immune-related genes. It is the first report on the simultaneous evaluation of three alginate types to enhance innate immune parameters and immune-related genes expression in L. vannamei. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Long-term effects of di-octyl phthalate on the expression of immune-related genes in Tegillarca granosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ji; Li, Ye; Dai, Juan; Su, Xiurong; Li, Chenghua; Shen, Lingling

    2016-05-01

    Di-octyl phthalate (DOP) is widely used as a plasticizer in the plastics industry. As a result, DOP is often found in marine water ecosystems where many species are exposed to it. Our objective was to evaluate the effect of long-term (14 d) DOP exposure (2.6, 7.8, or 31.2 mg/L) on the expression of immunerelated genes in Tegillarca granosa. The expression of small heat shock protein (sHSPs) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP) were highest in clams exposed to 31.2 mg/L DOP on days 7 and 14. The relative expression of Tg-ferritin, superoxide dismutase (SOD), and metallothionein (MT) increased initially then decreased as the concentration of DOP increased. The hemoglobin of T. granosa (Tg-HbI) exhibited two distinct expression patterns at two time points. Our results suggest that the immune response of T. granosa against DOP pollution varies depending on the dose. Additionally, we identified some immune-related genes that are promising candidates for biomarkers of DOP.

  19. A comprehensive transcriptome and immune-gene repertoire of the lepidopteran model host Galleria mellonella

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The larvae of the greater wax moth Galleria mellonella are increasingly used (i) as mini-hosts to study pathogenesis and virulence factors of prominent bacterial and fungal human pathogens, (ii) as a whole-animal high throughput infection system for testing pathogen mutant libraries, and (iii) as a reliable host model to evaluate the efficacy of antibiotics against human pathogens. In order to compensate for the lack of genomic information in Galleria, we subjected the transcriptome of different developmental stages and immune-challenged larvae to next generation sequencing. Results We performed a Galleria transcriptome characterization on the Roche 454-FLX platform combined with traditional Sanger sequencing to obtain a comprehensive transcriptome. To maximize sequence diversity, we pooled RNA extracted from different developmental stages, larval tissues including hemocytes, and from immune-challenged larvae and normalized the cDNA pool. We generated a total of 789,105 pyrosequencing and 12,032 high-quality Sanger EST sequences which clustered into 18,690 contigs with an average length of 1,132 bases. Approximately 40% of the ESTs were significantly similar (E ≤ e-03) to proteins of other insects, of which 45% have a reported function. We identified a large number of genes encoding proteins with established functions in immunity related sensing of microbial signatures and signaling, as well as effector molecules such as antimicrobial peptides and inhibitors of microbial proteinases. In addition, we found genes known as mediators of melanization or contributing to stress responses. Using the transcriptomic data, we identified hemolymph peptides and proteins induced upon immune challenge by 2D-gelelectrophoresis combined with mass spectrometric analysis. Conclusion Here, we have developed extensive transcriptomic resources for Galleria. The data obtained is rich in gene transcripts related to immunity, expanding remarkably our knowledge about immune and

  20. A comprehensive transcriptome and immune-gene repertoire of the lepidopteran model host Galleria mellonella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Heiko; Altincicek, Boran; Glöckner, Gernot; Vilcinskas, Andreas

    2011-06-11

    The larvae of the greater wax moth Galleria mellonella are increasingly used (i) as mini-hosts to study pathogenesis and virulence factors of prominent bacterial and fungal human pathogens, (ii) as a whole-animal high throughput infection system for testing pathogen mutant libraries, and (iii) as a reliable host model to evaluate the efficacy of antibiotics against human pathogens. In order to compensate for the lack of genomic information in Galleria, we subjected the transcriptome of different developmental stages and immune-challenged larvae to next generation sequencing. We performed a Galleria transcriptome characterization on the Roche 454-FLX platform combined with traditional Sanger sequencing to obtain a comprehensive transcriptome. To maximize sequence diversity, we pooled RNA extracted from different developmental stages, larval tissues including hemocytes, and from immune-challenged larvae and normalized the cDNA pool. We generated a total of 789,105 pyrosequencing and 12,032 high-quality Sanger EST sequences which clustered into 18,690 contigs with an average length of 1,132 bases. Approximately 40% of the ESTs were significantly similar (E ≤ e-03) to proteins of other insects, of which 45% have a reported function. We identified a large number of genes encoding proteins with established functions in immunity related sensing of microbial signatures and signaling, as well as effector molecules such as antimicrobial peptides and inhibitors of microbial proteinases. In addition, we found genes known as mediators of melanization or contributing to stress responses. Using the transcriptomic data, we identified hemolymph peptides and proteins induced upon immune challenge by 2D-gelelectrophoresis combined with mass spectrometric analysis. Here, we have developed extensive transcriptomic resources for Galleria. The data obtained is rich in gene transcripts related to immunity, expanding remarkably our knowledge about immune and stress-inducible genes in

  1. Immune disease-associated variants in gene enhancers point to BET epigenetic mechanisms for therapeutic intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tough, David F; Prinjha, Rab K

    2017-04-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified thousands of single nucleotide polymorphisms in the human genome that are statistically associated with particular disease traits. In this Perspective, we review emerging data suggesting that most single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with immune-mediated diseases are found in regulatory regions of the DNA - parts of the genome that control expression of the protein encoding genes - rather than causing mutations in proteins. We discuss how the emerging understanding of particular gene regulatory regions, gene enhancers and the epigenetic mechanisms by which they are regulated is opening up new opportunities for the treatment of immune-mediated diseases, focusing particularly on the BET family of epigenetic reader proteins as potential therapeutic targets.

  2. DNA Vaccines: Protective Immunizations by Parenteral, Mucosal, and Gene-Gun Inoculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fynan, Ellen F.; Webster, Robert G.; Fuller, Deborah H.; Haynes, Joel R.; Santoro, Joseph C.; Robinson, Harriet L.

    1993-12-01

    Plasmid DNAs expressing influenza virus hemagglutinin glycoproteins have been tested for their ability to raise protective immunity against lethal influenza challenges of the same subtype. In trials using two inoculations of from 50 to 300 μg of purified DNA in saline, 67-95% of test mice and 25-63% of test chickens have been protected against a lethal influenza challenge. Parenteral routes of inoculation that achieved good protection included intramuscular and intravenous injections. Successful mucosal routes of vaccination included DNA drops administered to the nares or trachea. By far the most efficient DNA immunizations were achieved by using a gene gun to deliver DNA-coated gold beads to the epidermis. In mice, 95% protection was achieved by two immunizations with beads loaded with as little as 0.4 μg of DNA. The breadth of routes supporting successful DNA immunizations, coupled with the very small amounts of DNA required for gene-gun immunizations, highlight the potential of this remarkably simple technique for the development of subunit vaccines.

  3. Immune dysregulation and tumor-associated gene changes in recurrent respiratory papillomatosis: a paired microarray analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVoti, James A; Rosenthal, David W; Wu, Rong; Abramson, Allan L; Steinberg, Bettie M; Bonagura, Vincent R

    2008-01-01

    Recurrent respiratory papillomas (RRP) are benign airway tumors, caused primarily by human papillomaviruses (HPV) types 6 and 11. The disease is characterized by multiple recurrences after surgical removal, with limited effective therapy. To identify novel targets for future therapy, we established transcriptional profiles for actively growing papillomas compared with autologous, clinically normal, laryngeal epithelia (adjacent tissue). Total ribonucleic acid (RNA) from 12 papillomas and 12 adjacent tissues were analyzed by microarray, and the matched sets of tissues compared by paired t test, to identify differentially expressed genes in papilloma tissues while minimizing variations intrinsic to individual patients. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to confirm the relative expression levels for a subset of genes. Within the 109 differentially expressed transcripts whose expression varied at least three-fold were two large groups of genes with related functions. The first group consisted of 18 genes related to host defense, including both innate and adaptive immunity. The second group contained 37 genes that likely contribute to growth of papillomas as benign tumors, since the altered pattern of expression also had been reported previously in many cancers. Our results support our previous studies that document a systemic T(H)2-like adaptive immune response in RRP, and suggest that there is a role for altered innate immunity in RRP as well. We propose that HPV 6 and 11 infection establishes a tumorigenic microenvironment characterized by alteration of both innate inflammatory signals and adaptive immune responses that prevent effective T(H)1-like response, in conjunction with altered expression of numerous genes that regulate cellular growth and differentiation.

  4. Protein poly(ADP-ribosylation regulates arabidopsis immune gene expression and defense responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baomin Feng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Perception of microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs elicits transcriptional reprogramming in hosts and activates defense to pathogen attacks. The molecular mechanisms underlying plant pattern-triggered immunity remain elusive. A genetic screen identified Arabidopsis poly(ADP-ribose glycohydrolase 1 (atparg1 mutant with elevated immune gene expression upon multiple MAMP and pathogen treatments. Poly(ADP-ribose glycohydrolase (PARG is predicted to remove poly(ADP-ribose polymers on acceptor proteins modified by poly(ADP-ribose polymerases (PARPs with three PARPs and two PARGs in Arabidopsis genome. AtPARP1 and AtPARP2 possess poly(ADP-ribose polymerase activity, and the activity of AtPARP2 was enhanced by MAMP treatment. AtPARG1, but not AtPARG2, carries glycohydrolase activity in vivo and in vitro. Importantly, mutation (G450R in atparg1 blocks its activity and the corresponding residue is highly conserved and essential for human HsPARG activity. Consistently, mutant atparp1atparp2 plants exhibited compromised immune gene activation and enhanced susceptibility to pathogen infections. Our study indicates that protein poly(ADP-ribosylation plays critical roles in plant immune gene expression and defense to pathogen attacks.

  5. Protein poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation regulates arabidopsis immune gene expression and defense responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Baomin; Liu, Chenglong; de Oliveira, Marcos V V; Intorne, Aline C; Li, Bo; Babilonia, Kevin; de Souza Filho, Gonçalo A; Shan, Libo; He, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Perception of microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) elicits transcriptional reprogramming in hosts and activates defense to pathogen attacks. The molecular mechanisms underlying plant pattern-triggered immunity remain elusive. A genetic screen identified Arabidopsis poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase 1 (atparg1) mutant with elevated immune gene expression upon multiple MAMP and pathogen treatments. Poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG) is predicted to remove poly(ADP-ribose) polymers on acceptor proteins modified by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) with three PARPs and two PARGs in Arabidopsis genome. AtPARP1 and AtPARP2 possess poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase activity, and the activity of AtPARP2 was enhanced by MAMP treatment. AtPARG1, but not AtPARG2, carries glycohydrolase activity in vivo and in vitro. Importantly, mutation (G450R) in atparg1 blocks its activity and the corresponding residue is highly conserved and essential for human HsPARG activity. Consistently, mutant atparp1atparp2 plants exhibited compromised immune gene activation and enhanced susceptibility to pathogen infections. Our study indicates that protein poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation plays critical roles in plant immune gene expression and defense to pathogen attacks.

  6. Major role of local immune responses in antibody formation to factor IX in AAV gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L; Cao, O; Swalm, B; Dobrzynski, E; Mingozzi, F; Herzog, R W

    2005-10-01

    The risk of an immune response to the coagulation factor IX (F.IX) transgene product is a concern in gene therapy for the X-linked bleeding disorder hemophilia B. In order to investigate the mechanism of F.IX-specific lymphocyte activation in the context of adeno-associated viral (AAV) gene transfer to skeletal muscle, we injected AAV-2 vector expressing human F.IX (hF.IX) into outbred immune-competent mice. Systemic hF.IX levels were transiently detected in the circulation, but diminished concomitant with activation of CD4+ T and B cells. ELISPOT assays documented robust responses to hF.IX in the draining lymph nodes of injected muscle by day 14. Formation of inhibitory antibodies to hF.IX was observed over a wide range of vector doses, with increased doses causing stronger immune responses. A prolonged inflammatory reaction in muscle started at 1.5-2 months, but ultimately failed to eliminate transgene expression. By 1.5 months, hF.IX antigen re-emerged in circulation in approximately 70% of animals injected with high vector dose. Hepatic gene transfer elicited only infrequent and weaker immune responses, with higher vector doses causing a reduction in T-cell responses to hF.IX. In summary, the data document substantial influence of target tissue, local antigen presentation, and antigen levels on lymphocyte responses to F.IX.

  7. PAMP induced expression of immune relevant genes in head kidney leukocytes of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chettri, Jiwan Kumar; Raida, Martin Kristian; Holten-Andersen, Lars

    2011-01-01

    ) on the surface of the invader. Phagocytic cells are known to initiate a respiratory burst following an exposure to the pathogen, but the underlying and associated specific elements are poorly elucidated in fish. The present study describes the differential response of head kidney leukocytes from rainbow trout...... effect of high concentrations of LPS and zymosan became evident after 4 h exposure. This study suggests that rainbow trout leukocytes respond differently to viral, bacterial and fungal PAMPs, which may reflect activation of specific signaling cascades eventually leading to activation of different immune...

  8. PAMP INDUCED EXPRESSION OF IMMUNE RELEVANT GENES IN HEAD KIDNEY LEUKOCYTES OF RAINBOW TROUT (ONCORHYNCHUS MYKISS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chettri, Jiwan Kumar; Holten-Andersen, Lars; Kania, Per Walter

    of the invader. Phagocytic cells are known to initiate a respiratory burst following an exposure to the pathogen, but the underlying and associated specific elements are poorly elucidated in fish. The present study describes the differential response of head kidney leukocytes from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus...... of LPS and zymosan became evident after 4 h exposure. This study suggests that rainbow trout leukocytes respond differently to viral, bacterial and fungal PAMPs, which may reflect activation of specific signaling cascades eventually leading to activation of different immune effector molecules....

  9. Exposure to neighborhood immigrant concentration from adolescence to young adulthood and immune function among Latino young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Jodi L; Browning, Christopher R

    2015-03-01

    The immune system plays a critical role in the prevention of infectious and chronic disease. We investigate associations between exposure to neighborhood immigrant concentration across the transition from adolescence to adulthood and immune function among Latino young adults, including moderation by nativity. Data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (1994-2008) were analyzed. Immune function was measured via Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) antibody levels (higher levels indicate impaired immune function) among EBV-positive Latino adults (N=1130). Results indicated the averaged individual exposure to immigrant concentration (mean % of foreign-born residents in the census tract across waves 1-4) was associated with immune function for foreign-born Latinos only (b=-0.37, Pimmigrant enclave (census tracts with ≥40% foreign-born residents) across all waves was associated with immune function and only for foreign-born Latinos (b=-0.22, Pimmigrant concentration confers salubrious physiological outcomes for foreign-born Latinos is needed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Immune-Related Gene Expression Patterns in GPV- or H9N2-Infected Goose Spleens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shun Chen

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Goose parvovirus (GPV and avian influenza virus subtype H9N2 are single-stranded DNA (ssDNA and single-stranded RNA (ssRNA viruses, respectively, both of which can spread in goslings and cause a significant economic loss. To explore the comprehensive transcriptome of GPV- or H9N2-infected goose spleens and to understand the immune responses induced by a DNA virus (GPV or a RNA virus (H9N2, RNA-seq was performed on the spleens of goslings at the fifth day post infection. In the present study, 2604 and 2409 differentially expressed unigenes were identified in the GPV- and H9N2-infected groups, respectively. Through KEGG pathway enrichment analyses, the up-regulated transcripts in the two virus-infected groups were mainly involved in immune-related pathways. In addition, the two virus-infected groups displayed similar expression patterns in the immune response pathways, including pattern-recognition receptor signaling pathways, the antigen processing and presentation pathway, the NF-κB signaling pathway and the JAK-STAT signaling pathway, as well as cytokines. Furthermore, most of the immune-related genes, particularly TLR7, TRAF3, Mx, TRIM25, CD4, and CD8α, increased in response to GPV and H9N2 infection. However, the depression of NF-κB signaling may be a mechanism by which the viruses evade the host immune system or a strategy to achieve immune homeostasis.

  11. [State of cellular immunity effectors of the lung in inhalation exposure to low-transportable Pu-239].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokol'nikov, M E; Kirillova, E N; Muksinova, K N; Smirnov, D G; Sokhranich, A L

    1995-01-01

    The reduction of populations of lung cell immunity effectors as well as changes in their cytotoxic and phagocytic activity was observed in rats after inhalation exposure to polymeric 239Pu. Dose-response curves described as a function of absorbed dose of alpha-irradiation in lung.

  12. Blood gene expression profiles suggest altered immune function associated with symptoms of generalized anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingo, Aliza P; Gibson, Greg

    2015-01-01

    Prospective epidemiological studies found that generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) can impair immune function and increase risk for cardiovascular disease or events. Mechanisms underlying the physiological reverberations of anxiety, however, are still elusive. Hence, we aimed to investigate molecular processes mediating effects of anxiety on physical health using blood gene expression profiles of 336 community participants (157 anxious and 179 control). We examined genome-wide differential gene expression in anxiety, as well as associations between nine major modules of co-regulated transcripts in blood gene expression and anxiety. No significant differential expression was observed in women, but 631 genes were differentially expressed between anxious and control men at the false discovery rate of 0.1 after controlling for age, body mass index, race, and batch effect. Gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) revealed that genes with altered expression levels in anxious men were involved in response of various immune cells to vaccination and to acute viral and bacterial infection, and in a metabolic network affecting traits of metabolic syndrome. Further, we found one set of 260 co-regulated genes to be significantly associated with anxiety in men after controlling for the relevant covariates, and demonstrate its equivalence to a component of the stress-related conserved transcriptional response to adversity profile. Taken together, our results suggest potential molecular pathways that can explain negative effects of GAD observed in epidemiological studies. Remarkably, even mild anxiety, which most of our participants had, was associated with observable changes in immune-related gene expression levels. Our findings generate hypotheses and provide incremental insights into molecular mechanisms mediating negative physiological effects of GAD. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Potent cross-reactive immune response against the wild-type and drug-resistant forms of HIV reverse transcriptase after the chimeric gene immunization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starodubova, Elizaveta; Boberg, Andreas; Ivanov, Alexander; Latyshev, Oleg; Petrakova, Natalia; Kuzmenko, Yulia; Litvina, Marina; Chernousov, Alexander; Kochetkov, Sergey; Karpov, Vadim; Wahren, Britta; Isaguliants, Maria G

    2010-02-23

    HIV reverse transcriptase (RT) can be considered as a target and an instrument of immunotherapy aimed at limiting the emergence and spread of drug-resistant HIV. The chimeric genes coding for the wild-type and multi-drug-resistant RT (RT1.14) fused to lysosome-associated membrane protein 1 (LAMP-1) were injected intramuscularly into BALB/c mice. The immune response was assessed by ELISpot, cytokine ELISA intracellular IFN-gamma staining, and antibody ELISA. The genes for RT- and RT1.14-LAMP fusions (RT-LAMP and RT1.14-LAMP) were immunogenic generating a mixed Th1/Th2-profile of immune response, while the wild-type RT gene induced only weak immune response. Specific secretion of Th1-cytokines increased with increasing level of RT modification: RTgene fusions generated a cross-reactive T-cell response against epitopes harboring drug-resistance mutations and their wild-type variants. Gene immunization induced specific IgG (10(3)), and transient serum IgA (10(2)). Low immunogenicity of the parental RT may be explained by tolerance to the enzyme that is a common endogenous retroviral antigen. Potent immune recognition of RT after immunization with chimeric RT genes indicates that this tolerance could be overcome. Immunization with mutant HIV genes may represent an immunotherapeutical supplement to antiretroviral treatment preventing the emergence of drug resistance. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Functional analysis of an immune gene of Spodoptera littoralis by RNAi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Lelio, Ilaria; Varricchio, Paola; Di Prisco, Gennaro; Marinelli, Adriana; Lasco, Valentina; Caccia, Silvia; Casartelli, Morena; Giordana, Barbara; Rao, Rosa; Gigliotti, Silvia; Pennacchio, Francesco

    2014-05-01

    Insect immune defences rely on cellular and humoral responses targeting both microbial pathogens and metazoan parasites. Accumulating evidence indicates functional cross-talk between these two branches of insect immunity, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are still largely unknown. We recently described, in the tobacco budworm Heliothis virescens, the presence of amyloid fibers associated with melanogenesis in immune capsules formed by hemocytes, and identified a protein (P102) involved in their assembly. Non-self objects coated by antibodies directed against this protein escaped hemocyte encapsulation, suggesting that P102 might coordinate humoral and cellular defence responses at the surface of foreign invaders. Here we report the identification of a cDNA coding for a protein highly similar to P102 in a related Lepidoptera species, Spodoptera littoralis. Its transcript was abundant in the hemocytes and the protein accumulated in large cytoplasmic compartments, closely resembling the localization pattern of P102 in H. virescens. RNAi-mediated gene silencing provided direct evidence for the role played by this protein in the immune response. Oral delivery of dsRNA molecules directed against the gene strongly suppressed the encapsulation and melanization response, while hemocoelic injections did not result in evident phenotypic alterations. Shortly after their administration, dsRNA molecules were found in midgut cells, en route to the hemocytes where the target gene was significantly down-regulated. Taken together, our data demonstrate that P102 is a functionally conserved protein with a key role in insect immunity. Moreover, the ability to target this gene by dsRNA oral delivery may be exploited to develop novel technologies of pest control, based on immunosuppression as a strategy for enhancing the impact of natural antagonists. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Immune sensitization to methylene diphenyl diisocyanate (MDI resulting from skin exposure: albumin as a carrier protein connecting skin exposure to subsequent respiratory responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redlich Carrie A

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methylene diphenyl diisocyanate (MDI, a reactive chemical used for commercial polyurethane production, is a well-recognized cause of occupational asthma. The major focus of disease prevention efforts to date has been respiratory tract exposure; however, skin exposure may also be an important route for inducing immune sensitization, which may promote subsequent airway inflammatory responses. We developed a murine model to investigate pathogenic mechanisms by which MDI skin exposure might promote subsequent immune responses, including respiratory tract inflammation. Methods Mice exposed via the skin to varying doses (0.1-10% w/v of MDI diluted in acetone/olive oil were subsequently evaluated for MDI immune sensitization. Serum levels of MDI-specific IgG and IgE were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA, while respiratory tract inflammation, induced by intranasal delivery of MDI-mouse albumin conjugates, was evaluated based on bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL. Autologous serum IgG from "skin only" exposed mice was used to detect and guide the purification/identification of skin proteins antigenically modified by MDI exposure in vivo. Results Skin exposure to MDI resulted in specific antibody production and promoted subsequent respiratory tract inflammation in animals challenged intranasally with MDI-mouse albumin conjugates. The degree of (secondary respiratory tract inflammation and eosinophilia depended upon the (primary skin exposure dose, and was maximal in mice exposed to 1% MDI, but paradoxically limited in mice receiving 10-fold higher doses (e.g. 10% MDI. The major antigenically-modified protein at the local MDI skin exposure site was identified as albumin, and demonstrated biophysical changes consistent with MDI conjugation. Conclusions MDI skin exposure can induce MDI-specific immune sensitivity and promote subsequent respiratory tract inflammatory responses and thus, may play an important role in MDI asthma

  16. Construction and comparison of gene co-expression networks shows complex plant immune responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Guillermo Leal

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Gene co-expression networks (GCNs are graphic representations that depict the coordinated transcription of genes in response to certain stimuli. GCNs provide functional annotations of genes whose function is unknown and are further used in studies of translational functional genomics among species. In this work, a methodology for the reconstruction and comparison of GCNs is presented. This approach was applied using gene expression data that were obtained from immunity experiments in Arabidopsis thaliana, rice, soybean, tomato and cassava. After the evaluation of diverse similarity metrics for the GCN reconstruction, we recommended the mutual information coefficient measurement and a clustering coefficient-based method for similarity threshold selection. To compare GCNs, we proposed a multivariate approach based on the Principal Component Analysis (PCA. Branches of plant immunity that were exemplified by each experiment were analyzed in conjunction with the PCA results, suggesting both the robustness and the dynamic nature of the cellular responses. The dynamic of molecular plant responses produced networks with different characteristics that are differentiable using our methodology. The comparison of GCNs from plant pathosystems, showed that in response to similar pathogens plants could activate conserved signaling pathways. The results confirmed that the closeness of GCNs projected on the principal component space is an indicative of similarity among GCNs. This also can be used to understand global patterns of events triggered during plant immune responses.

  17. Construction and comparison of gene co-expression networks shows complex plant immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, Luis Guillermo; López, Camilo; López-Kleine, Liliana

    2014-01-01

    Gene co-expression networks (GCNs) are graphic representations that depict the coordinated transcription of genes in response to certain stimuli. GCNs provide functional annotations of genes whose function is unknown and are further used in studies of translational functional genomics among species. In this work, a methodology for the reconstruction and comparison of GCNs is presented. This approach was applied using gene expression data that were obtained from immunity experiments in Arabidopsis thaliana, rice, soybean, tomato and cassava. After the evaluation of diverse similarity metrics for the GCN reconstruction, we recommended the mutual information coefficient measurement and a clustering coefficient-based method for similarity threshold selection. To compare GCNs, we proposed a multivariate approach based on the Principal Component Analysis (PCA). Branches of plant immunity that were exemplified by each experiment were analyzed in conjunction with the PCA results, suggesting both the robustness and the dynamic nature of the cellular responses. The dynamic of molecular plant responses produced networks with different characteristics that are differentiable using our methodology. The comparison of GCNs from plant pathosystems, showed that in response to similar pathogens plants could activate conserved signaling pathways. The results confirmed that the closeness of GCNs projected on the principal component space is an indicative of similarity among GCNs. This also can be used to understand global patterns of events triggered during plant immune responses.

  18. Long-term exposure to arsenic affects head kidney and impairs humoral immune responses of Clarias batrachus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Debabrata [Immunobiology Laboratory, School of Life Sciences, Visva-Bharati University, Santiniketan 731235 (India); Datta, Soma [Immunobiology Laboratory, School of Life Sciences, Visva-Bharati University, Santiniketan 731235 (India); Bhattacharya, Shelley [Environmental Toxicology Laboratory, School of Life Sciences, Visva-Bharati University, Santiniketan 731235 (India); Mazumder, Shibnath [Immunobiology Laboratory, School of Life Sciences, Visva-Bharati University, Santiniketan 731235 (India)]. E-mail: shibnath1@yahoo.co.in

    2007-02-15

    The present study was aimed at determining the effects of long-term arsenic exposure on the head kidney (HK) and ensuing humoral immune responses in Clarias batrachus L. Long-term exposure (150 days) to non-lethal concentrations of arsenic (42.42 {mu}M) resulted in significant time-dependent alterations in HK cell number eventually affecting the HK somatic index. Prolonged exposure to arsenic also suppressed HK-B cell proliferation and led to significant reduction in serum immunoglobulin levels and antigen-specific serum bacterial agglutinin titers. A decline in the number of antigen-specific plaque-forming cells with duration of arsenic exposure was noted in the HK. Enzyme linked immunosorbent assays further revealed that arsenic exposure inhibited the release of 'IL-4 like factors' from HK-T cells. Histological studies documented time-dependent changes in the structure and cellular composition of HK characterized by extensive lymphocytopenia, decrease in melano-macrophage population and hemosiderin accumulation. From exposure-challenge studies with Aeromonas hydrophila it was evident that pathogens could efficiently disseminate and colonize distant host tissues in the exposed fish. Moreover, the ability to decrease the pathogen load was also significantly reduced in the arsenic-exposed fish. Thus long-term exposure to non-lethal concentrations of arsenic affects HK and interferes with the humoral immune system of C. batrachus rendering them immunocompromised and susceptible to pathogenic challenge.

  19. SARS-CoV regulates immune function-related gene expression in human monocytic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wanchung; Yen, Yu-Ting; Singh, Sher; Kao, Chuan-Liang; Wu-Hsieh, Betty A

    2012-08-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is characterized by acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and pulmonary fibrosis, and monocytes/macrophages are the key players in the pathogenesis of SARS. In this study, we compared the transcriptional profiles of SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV)-infected monocytic cells against that infected by coronavirus 229E (CoV-229E). Total RNA was extracted from infected DC-SIGN-transfected monocytes (THP-1-DC-SIGN) at 6 and 24 h after infection, and the gene expression was profiled in oligonucleotide-based microarrays. Analysis of immune-related gene expression profiles showed that at 24 h after SARS-CoV infection: (1) IFN-α/β-inducible and cathepsin/proteasome genes were downregulated; (2) hypoxia/hyperoxia-related genes were upregulated; and (3) TLR/TLR-signaling, cytokine/cytokine receptor-related, chemokine/chemokine receptor-related, lysosome-related, MHC/chaperon-related, and fibrosis-related genes were differentially regulated. These results elucidate that SARS-CoV infection regulates immune-related genes in monocytes/macrophages, which may be important to the pathogenesis of SARS.

  20. Suppression of plant resistance gene-based immunity by a fungal effector.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra M Houterman

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The innate immune system of plants consists of two layers. The first layer, called basal resistance, governs recognition of conserved microbial molecules and fends off most attempted invasions. The second layer is based on Resistance (R genes that mediate recognition of effectors, proteins secreted by pathogens to suppress or evade basal resistance. Here, we show that a plant-pathogenic fungus secretes an effector that can both trigger and suppress R gene-based immunity. This effector, Avr1, is secreted by the xylem-invading fungus Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. lycopersici (Fol and triggers disease resistance when the host plant, tomato, carries a matching R gene (I or I-1. At the same time, Avr1 suppresses the protective effect of two other R genes, I-2 and I-3. Based on these observations, we tentatively reconstruct the evolutionary arms race that has taken place between tomato R genes and effectors of Fol. This molecular analysis has revealed a hitherto unpredicted strategy for durable disease control based on resistance gene combinations.

  1. AAV2-mediated in vivo immune gene therapy of solid tumours

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Collins, Sara A

    2010-12-20

    Abstract Background Many strategies have been adopted to unleash the potential of gene therapy for cancer, involving a wide range of therapeutic genes delivered by various methods. Immune therapy has become one of the major strategies adopted for cancer gene therapy and seeks to stimulate the immune system to target tumour antigens. In this study, the feasibility of AAV2 mediated immunotherapy of growing tumours was examined, in isolation and combined with anti-angiogenic therapy. Methods Immune-competent Balb\\/C or C57 mice bearing subcutaneous JBS fibrosarcoma or Lewis Lung Carcinoma (LLC) tumour xenografts respectively were treated by intra-tumoural administration of AAV2 vector encoding the immune up-regulating cytokine granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and the co-stimulatory molecule B7-1 to subcutaneous tumours, either alone or in combination with intra-muscular (IM) delivery of AAV2 vector encoding Nk4 14 days prior to tumour induction. Tumour growth and survival was monitored for all animals. Cured animals were re-challenged with tumourigenic doses of the original tumour type. In vivo cytotoxicity assays were used to investigate establishment of cell-mediated responses in treated animals. Results AAV2-mediated GM-CSF, B7-1 treatment resulted in a significant reduction in tumour growth and an increase in survival in both tumour models. Cured animals were resistant to re-challenge, and induction of T cell mediated anti-tumour responses were demonstrated. Adoptive transfer of splenocytes to naïve animals prevented tumour establishment. Systemic production of Nk4 induced by intra-muscular (IM) delivery of Nk4 significantly reduced subcutaneous tumour growth. However, combination of Nk4 treatment with GM-CSF, B7-1 therapy reduced the efficacy of the immune therapy. Conclusions Overall, this study demonstrates the potential for in vivo AAV2 mediated immune gene therapy, and provides data on the inter-relationship between tumour

  2. Immune-related gene expression in nurse honey bees (Apis mellifera) exposed to synthetic acaricides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido, Paula Melisa; Antúnez, Karina; Martín, Mariana; Porrini, Martín Pablo; Zunino, Pablo; Eguaras, Martín Javier

    2013-01-01

    The mite Varroa destructor is an ectoparasite affecting honey bees worldwide. Synthetic acaricides have been among the principal tools available to beekeepers for its control, although several studies have shown its negative effects on honey bee physiology. Recent research suggests that those molecules strongly impact on immune signaling cascades and cellular immunity. In the present work, LC(50) in six-day-old bees were determined for the following acaricides: tau-fluvalinate, flumethrin, amitraz and coumaphos. According to this obtained value, a group of individuals was treated with each acaricide and then processed for qPCR analysis. Transcript levels for genes encoding antimicrobial peptides and immune-related proteins were assessed. Flumethrin increased the expression of hymenoptaecin when comparing treated and control bees. Significant differences were recorded between coumaphos and flumethrin treatments, while the first one reduced the expression of hymenoptaecin and abaecin, the last one up-regulated their expressions. No significant statistically changes were recorded in the expression levels of vitellogenin, lysozyme or glucose dehydrogenase among bees treated with acaricides and control bees. This work constitutes the first report, under laboratory conditions, about induction of immune related genes in response to synthetic miticides. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Immune response to dna vaccine expressing transferrin binding protein a gene of Pasteurella multocida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satparkash Singh

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Haemorrhagic Septicaemia (HS, an acute and fatal disease of cattle and buffalo is primarily caused by serotype B:2 or E:2 of Pasteurella multocida. The transferrin binding protein A (TbpA has been found to act as immunogen and potent vaccine candidate in various Gram negative bacteria including P. multocida. The present study was carried out to evaluate the potential of this antigen as a DNA vaccine against HS in mice model. The tbpA gene of P. multocida serotype B:2 was cloned in a mammalian expression vector alone and along with murine IL2 gene as immunological adjuvant to produce monocistronic and bicistronic DNA vaccine constructs, respectively. The immune response to DNA vaccines was evaluated based on serum antibody titres and lymphocyte proliferation assay. A significant increase in humoral and cell mediated immune responses was observed in mice vaccinated with DNA vaccines as compared to non immunized group. Additionally, the bicistronic DNA vaccine provided superior immune response and protection level following challenge as compared to monocistronic construct. The study revealed that DNA vaccine presents a promising approach for the prevention of HS.

  4. The molecular evolution of four anti-malarial immune genes in the Anopheles gambiae species complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simard Frederic

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background If the insect innate immune system is to be used as a potential blocking step in transmission of malaria, then it will require targeting one or a few genes with highest relevance and ease of manipulation. The problem is to identify and manipulate those of most importance to malaria infection without the risk of decreasing the mosquito's ability to stave off infections by microbes in general. Molecular evolution methodologies and concepts can help identify such genes. Within the setting of a comparative molecular population genetic and phylogenetic framework, involving six species of the Anopheles gambiae complex, we investigated whether a set of four pre-selected immunity genes (gambicin, NOS, Rel2 and FBN9 might have evolved under selection pressure imposed by the malaria parasite. Results We document varying levels of polymorphism within and divergence between the species, in all four genes. Introgression and the sharing of ancestral polymorphisms, two processes that have been documented in the past, were verified in this study in all four studied genes. These processes appear to affect each gene in different ways and to different degrees. However, there is no evidence of positive selection acting on these genes. Conclusion Considering the results presented here in concert with previous studies, genes that interact directly with the Plasmodium parasite, and play little or no role in defense against other microbes, are probably the most likely candidates for a specific adaptive response against P. falciparum. Furthermore, since it is hard to establish direct evidence linking the adaptation of any candidate gene to P. falciparum infection, a comparative framework allowing at least an indirect link should be provided. Such a framework could be achieved, if a similar approach like the one involved here, was applied to all other anopheline complexes that transmit P. falciparum malaria.

  5. Involvement of the Anopheles gambiae Nimrod gene family in mosquito immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estévez-Lao, Tania Y; Hillyer, Julián F

    2014-01-01

    Insects fight infection using a variety of signaling pathways and immune effector proteins. In Drosophila melanogaster, three members of the Nimrod gene family (draper, nimC1 and eater) bind bacteria, and this binding leads to phagocytosis by hemocytes. The Nimrod gene family has since been identified in other insects, but their function in non-drosophilids remains unknown. The purpose of this study was to identify the members of the Nimrod gene family in the malaria mosquito, Anopheles gambiae, and to assess their role in immunity. We identified and sequenced three members of this gene family, herein named draper, nimrod and eater, which are the orthologs of D. melanogaster draper, nimB2 and eater, respectively. The three genes are preferentially expressed in hemocytes and their peak developmental expression is in pupae and young adults. Infection induces the transcriptional upregulation of all three genes, but the magnitude of this upregulation becomes more attenuated as mosquitoes become older. RNAi-based knockdown of eater, but not draper or nimrod, decreased a mosquito's ability to kill Escherichia coli in the hemocoel. Knockdown of draper, eater, or any combination of Nimrod family genes rendered mosquitoes more likely to die from Staphylococcus epidermidis. Finally, knockdown of Nimrod family genes did not impact mRNA levels of the antimicrobial peptides defensin (def1), cecropin (cecA) or gambicin (gam1), but eater knockdown led to a decrease in mRNA levels of nitric oxide synthase. Together, these data show that members of the A. gambiae Nimrod gene family are positive regulators of the mosquito antibacterial response. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Age, pathogen exposure, but not maternal care shape offspring immunity in an insect with facultative family life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogelweith, Fanny; Körner, Maximilian; Foitzik, Susanne; Meunier, Joël

    2017-03-07

    To optimize their resistance against pathogen infection, individuals are expected to find the right balance between investing into the immune system and other life history traits. In vertebrates, several factors were shown to critically affect the direction of this balance, such as the developmental stage of an individual, its current risk of infection and/or its access to external help such as parental care. However, the independent and/or interactive effects of these factors on immunity remain poorly studied in insects. Here, we manipulated maternal presence and pathogen exposure in families of the European earwig Forficula auricularia to measure whether and how the survival rate and investment into two key immune parameters changed during offspring development. The pathogen was the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium brunneum and the immune parameters were hemocyte concentration and phenol/pro-phenoloxidase enzyme activity (total-PO). Our results surprisingly showed that maternal presence had no effect on offspring immunity, but reduced offspring survival. Pathogen exposure also lowered the survival of offspring during their early development. The concentration of hemocytes and the total-PO activity increased during development, to be eventually higher in adult females compared to adult males. Finally, pathogen exposure overall increased the concentration of hemocytes-but not the total-PO activity-in adults, while it had no effect on these measures in offspring. Our results show that, independent of their infection risk and developmental stage, maternal presence does not shape immune defense in young earwigs. This reveals that pathogen pressure is not a universal evolutionary driver of the emergence and maintenance of post-hatching maternal care in insects.

  7. Predicting plant immunity gene expression by identifying the decoding mechanism of calcium signatures.

    OpenAIRE

    Lenzoni, G.; Liu, J.; Knight, M.R.

    2018-01-01

    Calcium plays a key role in determining the specificity of a vast array of signalling pathways in plants. Cellular calcium elevations with different characteristics (calcium signatures) carry information on the identity of the primary stimulus, ensuring appropriate downstream responses. However, the mechanism for decoding calcium signatures is unknown. To determine this, decoding of the salicylic acid (SA)-mediated plant immunity signalling network controlling gene expression was examined. ...

  8. Trans-species polymorphism at antimicrobial innate immunity cathelicidin genes of Atlantic cod and related species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halldórsdóttir, Katrín; Árnason, Einar

    2015-01-01

    Natural selection, the most important force in evolution, comes in three forms. Negative purifying selection removes deleterious variation and maintains adaptations. Positive directional selection fixes beneficial variants, producing new adaptations. Balancing selection maintains variation in a population. Important mechanisms of balancing selection include heterozygote advantage, frequency-dependent advantage of rarity, and local and fluctuating episodic selection. A rare pathogen gains an advantage because host defenses are predominantly effective against prevalent types. Similarly, a rare immune variant gives its host an advantage because the prevalent pathogens cannot escape the host's apostatic defense. Due to the stochastic nature of evolution, neutral variation may accumulate on genealogical branches, but trans-species polymorphisms are rare under neutrality and are strong evidence for balancing selection. Balanced polymorphism maintains diversity at the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in vertebrates. The Atlantic cod is missing genes for both MHC-II and CD4, vital parts of the adaptive immune system. Nevertheless, cod are healthy in their ecological niche, maintaining large populations that support major commercial fisheries. Innate immunity is of interest from an evolutionary perspective, particularly in taxa lacking adaptive immunity. Here, we analyze extensive amino acid and nucleotide polymorphisms of the cathelicidin gene family in Atlantic cod and closely related taxa. There are three major clusters, Cath1, Cath2, and Cath3, that we consider to be paralogous genes. There is extensive nucleotide and amino acid allelic variation between and within clusters. The major feature of the results is that the variation clusters by alleles and not by species in phylogenetic trees and discriminant analysis of principal components. Variation within the three groups shows trans-species polymorphism that is older than speciation and that is suggestive of

  9. Adult Drosophila melanogaster evolved for antibacterial defense invest in infection-induced expression of both humoral and cellular immunity genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGraw Elizabeth A

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While the transcription of innate immunity genes in response to bacterial infection has been well-characterised in the Drosophila model, we recently demonstrated the capacity for such transcription to evolve in flies selected for improved antibacterial defense. Here we use this experimental system to examine how insects invest in constitutive versus infection-induced transcription of immunity genes. These two strategies carry with them different consequences with respect to energetic and pleiotropic costs and may be more or less effective in improving defense depending on whether the genes contribute to humoral or cellular aspects of immunity. Findings Contrary to expectation we show that selection preferentially increased the infection-induced expression of both cellular and humoral immunity genes. Given their functional roles, infection induced increases in expression were expected for the humoral genes, while increases in constitutive expression were expected for the cellular genes. We also report a restricted ability to improve transcription of immunity genes that is on the order of 2-3 fold regardless of total transcription level of the gene. Conclusions The evolved increases in infection-induced expression of the cellular genes may result from specific cross talk with humoral pathways or from generalised strategies for enhancing immunity gene transcription. A failure to see improvements in constitutive expression of the cellular genes suggests either that increases might come at too great a cost or that patterns of expression in adults are decoupled from the larval phase where increases would be most effective. The similarity in fold change increase across all immunity genes may suggest a shared mechanism for the evolution of increased transcription in small, discrete units such as duplication of cis-regulatory elements.

  10. Immune responses to AAV vectors: overcoming barriers to successful gene therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mingozzi, Federico

    2013-01-01

    Gene therapy products for the treatment of genetic diseases are currently in clinical trials, and one of these, an adeno-associated viral (AAV) product, has recently been licensed. AAV vectors have achieved positive results in a number of clinical and preclinical settings, including hematologic disorders such as the hemophilias, Gaucher disease, hemochromatosis, and the porphyrias. Because AAV vectors are administered directly to the patient, the likelihood of a host immune response is high, as shown by human studies. Preexisting and/or recall responses to the wild-type virus from which the vector is engineered, or to the transgene product itself, can interfere with therapeutic efficacy if not identified and managed optimally. Small-scale clinical studies have enabled investigators to dissect the immune responses to the AAV vector capsid and to the transgene product, and to develop strategies to manage these responses to achieve long-term expression of the therapeutic gene. However, a comprehensive understanding of the determinants of immunogenicity of AAV vectors, and of potential associated toxicities, is still lacking. Careful immunosurveillance conducted as part of ongoing clinical studies will provide the basis for understanding the intricacies of the immune response in AAV-mediated gene transfer, facilitating safe and effective therapies for genetic diseases. PMID:23596044

  11. Corticosteroids are associated with repression of adaptive immunity gene programs in pediatric septic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Hector R; Cvijanovich, Natalie Z; Allen, Geoffrey L; Thomas, Neal J; Freishtat, Robert J; Anas, Nick; Meyer, Keith; Checchia, Paul A; Weiss, Scott L; Shanley, Thomas P; Bigham, Michael T; Banschbach, Sharon; Beckman, Eileen; Harmon, Kelli; Zimmerman, Jerry J

    2014-04-15

    Corticosteroids are prescribed commonly for patients with septic shock, but their use remains controversial and concerns remain regarding side effects. To determine the effect of adjunctive corticosteroids on the genomic response of pediatric septic shock. We retrospectively analyzed an existing transcriptomic database of pediatric septic shock. Subjects receiving any formulation of systemic corticosteroids at the time of blood draw for microarray analysis were classified in the septic shock corticosteroid group. We compared normal control subjects (n = 52), a septic shock no corticosteroid group (n = 110), and a septic shock corticosteroid group (n = 70) using analysis of variance. Genes differentially regulated between the no corticosteroid group and the corticosteroid group were analyzed using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. The two study groups did not differ with respect to illness severity, organ failure burden, mortality, or mortality risk. There were 319 gene probes differentially regulated between the no corticosteroid group and the corticosteroid group. These genes corresponded predominately to adaptive immunity-related signaling pathways, and were down-regulated relative to control subjects. Notably, the degree of down-regulation was significantly greater in the corticosteroid group, compared with the no corticosteroid group. A similar pattern was observed for genes corresponding to the glucocorticoid receptor signaling pathway. Administration of corticosteroids in pediatric septic shock is associated with additional repression of genes corresponding to adaptive immunity. These data should be taken into account when considering the benefit to risk ratio of adjunctive corticosteroids for septic shock.

  12. Mechanisms of HO-1 mediated attenuation of renal immune injury: a gene profiling study.

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    Duann, Pu; Lianos, Elias A

    2011-10-01

    Using a mouse model of immune injury directed against the renal glomerular vasculature and resembling human forms of glomerulonephritis (GN), we assessed the effect of targeted expression of the cytoprotective enzyme heme oxygenase (HO)-1. A human (h) HO-1 complementary DNAN (cDNA) sequence was targeted to glomerular epithelial cells (GECs) using a GEC-specific murine nephrin promoter. Injury by administration of antibody against the glomerular basement membrane (anti-GBM) to transgenic (TG) mice with GEC-targeted hHO-1 was attenuated compared with wild-type (WT) controls. To explore changes in the expression of genes that could mediate this salutary effect, we performed gene expression profiling using a microarray analysis of RNA isolated from the renal cortex of WT or TG mice with or without anti-GBM antibody-induced injury. Significant increases in expression were detected in 9 major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-class II genes, 2 interferon-γ (IFN-γ)-inducible guanosine triphosphate (GTP)ases, and 3 genes of the ubiquitin-proteasome system. The increase in MHC-class II and proteasome gene expression in TG mice with injury was validated by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or Western blot analysis. The observations point to novel mechanisms underlying the cytoprotective effect of HO-1 in renal immune injury. Copyright © 2011. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  13. Immune gene expression for diverse haemocytes derived from pacific white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chih-Chiu; Lu, Chung-Lun; Chen, Sherwin; Liao, Wen-Liang; Chen, Shiu-Nan

    2015-05-01

    In this study, diverse haemocytes from Pacific white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei were spread by flow cytometer sorting system. Using the two commonly flow cytometric parameters FSC and SSC, the haemocytes could be divided into three populations. Microscopy observation of L. vannamei haemocytes in anticoagulant buffer revealed three morphologically distinct cell types designated as granular cell, hyaline cell and semigranular cell. Immune genes, which includes prophenoloxidase (proPO), lipopolysaccharide-β-glucan binding protein (LGBP), peroxinectin, crustin, lysozyme, penaeid-3a and transglutaminase (TGase), expressed from different haemocyte were analysed by quantitative real time PCR (qPCR). Results from the mRNA expression was estimated by relative level of each gene to β-actin gene. Finally, the seven genes could be grouped by their dominant expression sites. ProPO, LGBP and peroxinectin were highly expressed in granular cells, while LGBP, crustin, lysozyme and P-3a were highly expressed in semigranular cells and TGase was highly expressed in hyaline cells. In this study, L. vannamei haemocytes were firstly grouped into three different types and the immune related genes expression in grouped haemocytes were estimated. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. A Computational Gene Expression Score for Predicting Immune Injury in Renal Allografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigdel, Tara K; Bestard, Oriol; Tran, Tim Q; Hsieh, Szu-Chuan; Roedder, Silke; Damm, Izabella; Vincenti, Flavio; Sarwal, Minnie M

    2015-01-01

    Whole genome microarray meta-analyses of 1030 kidney, heart, lung and liver allograft biopsies identified a common immune response module (CRM) of 11 genes that define acute rejection (AR) across different engrafted tissues. We evaluated if the CRM genes can provide a molecular microscope to quantify graft injury in acute rejection (AR) and predict risk of progressive interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy (IFTA) in histologically normal kidney biopsies. Computational modeling was done on tissue qPCR based gene expression measurements for the 11 CRM genes in 146 independent renal allografts from 122 unique patients with AR (n = 54) and no-AR (n = 92). 24 demographically matched patients with no-AR had 6 and 24 month paired protocol biopsies; all had histologically normal 6 month biopsies, and 12 had evidence of progressive IFTA (pIFTA) on their 24 month biopsies. Results were correlated with demographic, clinical and pathology variables. The 11 gene qPCR based tissue CRM score (tCRM) was significantly increased in AR (5.68 ± 0.91) when compared to STA (1.29 ± 0.28; p data mining has supported the development of a tCRM-qPCR based assay for evaluating graft immune inflammation. The tCRM score quantifies injury in AR and stratifies patients at increased risk of future pIFTA prior to any perturbation of graft function or histology.

  15. Extensive innate immune gene activation accompanies brain aging, increasing vulnerability to cognitive decline and neurodegeneration: a microarray study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cribbs, David H; Berchtold, Nicole C; Perreau, Victoria; Coleman, Paul D; Rogers, Joseph; Tenner, Andrea J; Cotman, Carl W

    2012-07-23

    This study undertakes a systematic and comprehensive analysis of brain gene expression profiles of immune/inflammation-related genes in aging and Alzheimer's disease (AD). In a well-powered microarray study of young (20 to 59 years), aged (60 to 99 years), and AD (74 to 95 years) cases, gene responses were assessed in the hippocampus, entorhinal cortex, superior frontal gyrus, and post-central gyrus. Several novel concepts emerge. First, immune/inflammation-related genes showed major changes in gene expression over the course of cognitively normal aging, with the extent of gene response far greater in aging than in AD. Of the 759 immune-related probesets interrogated on the microarray, approximately 40% were significantly altered in the SFG, PCG and HC with increasing age, with the majority upregulated (64 to 86%). In contrast, far fewer immune/inflammation genes were significantly changed in the transition to AD (approximately 6% of immune-related probesets), with gene responses primarily restricted to the SFG and HC. Second, relatively few significant changes in immune/inflammation genes were detected in the EC either in aging or AD, although many genes in the EC showed similar trends in responses as in the other brain regions. Third, immune/inflammation genes undergo gender-specific patterns of response in aging and AD, with the most pronounced differences emerging in aging. Finally, there was widespread upregulation of genes reflecting activation of microglia and perivascular macrophages in the aging brain, coupled with a downregulation of select factors (TOLLIP, fractalkine) that when present curtail microglial/macrophage activation. Notably, essentially all pathways of the innate immune system were upregulated in aging, including numerous complement components, genes involved in toll-like receptor signaling and inflammasome signaling, as well as genes coding for immunoglobulin (Fc) receptors and human leukocyte antigens I and II. Unexpectedly, the extent of

  16. Extensive innate immune gene activation accompanies brain aging, increasing vulnerability to cognitive decline and neurodegeneration: a microarray study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cribbs David H

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study undertakes a systematic and comprehensive analysis of brain gene expression profiles of immune/inflammation-related genes in aging and Alzheimer’s disease (AD. Methods In a well-powered microarray study of young (20 to 59 years, aged (60 to 99 years, and AD (74 to 95 years cases, gene responses were assessed in the hippocampus, entorhinal cortex, superior frontal gyrus, and post-central gyrus. Results Several novel concepts emerge. First, immune/inflammation-related genes showed major changes in gene expression over the course of cognitively normal aging, with the extent of gene response far greater in aging than in AD. Of the 759 immune-related probesets interrogated on the microarray, approximately 40% were significantly altered in the SFG, PCG and HC with increasing age, with the majority upregulated (64 to 86%. In contrast, far fewer immune/inflammation genes were significantly changed in the transition to AD (approximately 6% of immune-related probesets, with gene responses primarily restricted to the SFG and HC. Second, relatively few significant changes in immune/inflammation genes were detected in the EC either in aging or AD, although many genes in the EC showed similar trends in responses as in the other brain regions. Third, immune/inflammation genes undergo gender-specific patterns of response in aging and AD, with the most pronounced differences emerging in aging. Finally, there was widespread upregulation of genes reflecting activation of microglia and perivascular macrophages in the aging brain, coupled with a downregulation of select factors (TOLLIP, fractalkine that when present curtail microglial/macrophage activation. Notably, essentially all pathways of the innate immune system were upregulated in aging, including numerous complement components, genes involved in toll-like receptor signaling and inflammasome signaling, as well as genes coding for immunoglobulin (Fc receptors and human

  17. High-throughput sequencing reveals key genes and immune homeostatic pathways activated in myeloid dendritic cells by Porphyromonas gingivalis 381 and its fimbrial mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjunan, P; El-Awady, A; Dannebaum, R O; Kunde-Ramamoorthy, G; Cutler, C W

    2016-02-01

    The human microbiome consists of highly diverse microbial communities that colonize our skin and mucosal surfaces, aiding in maintenance of immune homeostasis. The keystone pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis induces a dysbiosis and disrupts immune homeostasis through as yet unclear mechanisms. The fimbrial adhesins of P. gingivalis facilitate biofilm formation, invasion of and dissemination by blood dendritic cells; hence, fimbriae may be key factors in disruption of immune homeostasis. In this study we employed RNA-sequencing transcriptome profiling to identify differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDCs) in response to in vitro infection/exposure by Pg381 or its isogenic mutant strains that solely express minor-Mfa1 fimbriae (DPG3), major-FimA fimbriae (MFI) or are deficient in both fimbriae (MFB) relative to uninfected control. Our results yielded a total of 479 DEGs that were at least two-fold upregulated and downregulated in MoDCs significantly (P ≤ 0.05) by all four strains and certain DEGs that were strain-specific. Interestingly, the gene ontology biological and functional analysis shows that the upregulated genes in DPG3-induced MoDCs were more significant than other strains and associated with inflammation, immune response, anti-apoptosis, cell proliferation, and other homeostatic functions. Both transcriptome and quantitative polymerase chain reaction results show that DPG3, which solely expresses Mfa1, increased ZNF366, CD209, LOX1, IDO1, IL-10, CCL2, SOCS3, STAT3 and FOXO1 gene expression. In conclusion, we have identified key DC-mediated immune homeostatic pathways that could contribute to dysbiosis in periodontal infection with P. gingivalis. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. The immune response induced by DNA vaccine expressing nfa1 gene against Naegleria fowleri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong-Hyun; Lee, Sang-Hee; Sohn, Hae-Jin; Lee, Jinyoung; Chwae, Yong-Joon; Park, Sun; Kim, Kyongmin; Shin, Ho-Joon

    2012-12-01

    The pathogenic free-living amoeba, Naegleria fowleri, causes fatal primary amoebic meningoencephalitis in experimental animals and in humans. The nfa1 gene that was cloned from N. fowleri is located on pseudopodia, especially amoebic food cups and plays an important role in the pathogenesis of N. fowleri. In this study, we constructed and characterized retroviral vector and lentiviral vector systems for nfa1 DNA vaccination in mice. We constructed the retroviral vector (pQCXIN) and the lentiviral vector (pCDH) cloned with the egfp-nfa1 gene. The expression of nfa1 gene in Chinese hamster ovary cell and human primary nasal epithelial cell transfected with the pQCXIN/egfp-nfa1 vector or pCDH/egfp-nfa1 vector was observed by fluorescent microscopy and Western blotting analysis. Our viral vector systems effectively delivered the nfa1 gene to the target cells and expressed the Nfa1 protein within the target cells. To evaluate immune responses of nfa1-vaccinated mice, BALB/c mice were intranasally vaccinated with viral particles of each retro- or lentiviral vector expressing nfa1 gene. DNA vaccination using viral vectors expressing nfa1 significantly stimulated the production of Nfa1-specific IgG subclass, as well as IgG levels. In particular, both levels of IgG2a (Th1) and IgG1 (Th2) were significantly increased in mice vaccinated with viral vectors. These results show the nfa1-vaccination induce efficiently Th1 type, as well as Th2 type immune responses. This is the first report to construct viral vector systems and to evaluate immune responses as DNA vaccination in N. fowleri infection. Furthermore, these results suggest that nfal vaccination may be an effective method for treatment of N. fowleri infection.

  19. Human papillomavirus type 16 E6 and NFX1-123 mislocalize immune signaling proteins and downregulate immune gene expression in keratinocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justine Levan

    Full Text Available Human papillomavirus (HPV is the most prevalent sexually transmitted infection, affecting an estimated 11% of the world's population. The high-risk HPV types (HR HPV account for approximately 5% of the global burden of cancer and thus cause high morbidity and mortality. Although it is known that persistent infection with HR HPV is the greatest risk factor for developing HPV-associated cancer, and that the HPV early proteins E6 and E7 dysregulate immune detection by its host cells, the mechanisms of immune evasion by HR HPV are not well understood. Previous work in the laboratory identified the endogenous cytoplasmic host protein NFX1-123 as a binding partner of the HR HPV type 16 oncoprotein E6 (16E6. Together NFX1-123 and 16E6 affect cellular growth, differentiation, and immortalization genes and pathways. In a whole genome microarray, human foreskin keratinocytes (HFKs stably expressing 16E6 and overexpressing NFX1-123 showed a diverse set of innate immune genes downregulated two-fold or more when compared to 16E6 cells with endogenous NFX1-123. We demonstrated that 16E6 and NFX1-123 decreased expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs in 16E6 HFKs at the mRNA and protein level. Knock down of NFX1-123 in 16E6 HFKs resulted in a derepression of innate immune genes, pointing to the requirement of NFX1-123 for immune regulation in the context of 16E6. Studies using immunofluorescent microscopy revealed that 16E6 and NFX1-123 disturbed the normal localization of signaling proteins involved in initiating the immune response. This study identifies NFX1-123 as a critical host protein partner through which 16E6 is able to subvert the immune response and in turn permit a long-lived HR HPV infection.

  20. Human papillomavirus type 16 E6 and NFX1-123 mislocalize immune signaling proteins and downregulate immune gene expression in keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levan, Justine; Vliet-Gregg, Portia A; Robinson, Kristin L; Katzenellenbogen, Rachel A

    2017-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most prevalent sexually transmitted infection, affecting an estimated 11% of the world's population. The high-risk HPV types (HR HPV) account for approximately 5% of the global burden of cancer and thus cause high morbidity and mortality. Although it is known that persistent infection with HR HPV is the greatest risk factor for developing HPV-associated cancer, and that the HPV early proteins E6 and E7 dysregulate immune detection by its host cells, the mechanisms of immune evasion by HR HPV are not well understood. Previous work in the laboratory identified the endogenous cytoplasmic host protein NFX1-123 as a binding partner of the HR HPV type 16 oncoprotein E6 (16E6). Together NFX1-123 and 16E6 affect cellular growth, differentiation, and immortalization genes and pathways. In a whole genome microarray, human foreskin keratinocytes (HFKs) stably expressing 16E6 and overexpressing NFX1-123 showed a diverse set of innate immune genes downregulated two-fold or more when compared to 16E6 cells with endogenous NFX1-123. We demonstrated that 16E6 and NFX1-123 decreased expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) in 16E6 HFKs at the mRNA and protein level. Knock down of NFX1-123 in 16E6 HFKs resulted in a derepression of innate immune genes, pointing to the requirement of NFX1-123 for immune regulation in the context of 16E6. Studies using immunofluorescent microscopy revealed that 16E6 and NFX1-123 disturbed the normal localization of signaling proteins involved in initiating the immune response. This study identifies NFX1-123 as a critical host protein partner through which 16E6 is able to subvert the immune response and in turn permit a long-lived HR HPV infection.

  1. The gastrointestinal nematode Trichostrongylus colubriformis down-regulates immune gene expression in migratory cells in afferent lymph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hein Wayne R

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gastrointestinal nematode (GIN infections are the predominant cause of economic losses in sheep. Infections are controlled almost exclusively by the use of anthelmintics which has lead to the selection of drug resistant nematode strains. An alternative control approach would be the induction of protective immunity to these parasites. This study exploits an ovine microarray biased towards immune genes, an artificially induced immunity model and the use of pseudo-afferent lymphatic cannulation to sample immune cells draining from the intestine, to investigate possible mechanisms involved in the development of immunity. Results During the development of immunity to, and a subsequent challenge infection with Trichostrongylus colubriformis, the transcript levels of 2603 genes of cells trafficking in afferent intestinal lymph were significantly modulated (P Conclusions This report describes gene expression profiles of afferent lymph cells in sheep developing immunity to nematode infection. Results presented show a global down-regulation of the expression of immune genes which may be reflective of the natural temporal response to nematode infections in livestock.

  2. Pathway-focused genetic evaluation of immune and inflammation related genes with chronic fatigue syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajeevan, Mangalathu S; Dimulescu, Irina; Murray, Janna; Falkenberg, Virginia R; Unger, Elizabeth R

    2015-08-01

    Recent evidence suggests immune and inflammatory alterations are important in chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). This study was done to explore the association of functionally important genetic variants in inflammation and immune pathways with CFS. Peripheral blood DNA was isolated from 50 CFS and 121 non-fatigued (NF) control participants in a population-based study. Genotyping was performed with the Affymetrix Immune and Inflammation Chip that covers 11K single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) following the manufacturer's protocol. Genotyping accuracy for specific genes was validated by pyrosequencing. Golden Helix SVS software was used for genetic analysis. SNP functional annotation was done using SPOT and GenomePipe programs. CFS was associated with 32 functionally important SNPs: 11 missense variants, 4 synonymous variants, 11 untranslated regulatory region (UTR) variants and 6 intronic variants. Some of these SNPs were in genes within pathways related to complement cascade (SERPINA5, CFB, CFH, MASP1 and C6), chemokines (CXCL16, CCR4, CCL27), cytokine signaling (IL18, IL17B, IL2RB), and toll-like receptor signaling (TIRAP, IRAK4). Of particular interest is association of CFS with two missense variants in genes of complement activation, rs4151667 (L9H) in CFB and rs1061170 (Y402H) in CFH. A 5' UTR polymorphism (rs11214105) in IL18 also associated with physical fatigue, body pain and score for CFS case defining symptoms. This study identified new associations of CFS with genetic variants in pathways including complement activation providing additional support for altered innate immune response in CFS. Additional studies are needed to validate the findings of this exploratory study. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. The effects of dietary Myrtle (Myrtus communis) on skin mucus immune parameters and mRNA levels of growth, antioxidant and immune related genes in zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safari, Roghieh; Hoseinifar, Seyed Hossein; Van Doan, Hien; Dadar, Maryam

    2017-07-01

    Myrtle (Myrtus communis L., Myrtaceae) is a significant plant which naturally distributed around the globe. Although numerous studies have demonstrated the benefits of myrtle in different species, studies using the oral route are rare in the literature. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of myrtle intake on the antioxidant, immune, appetite and growth related genes as well as mucosal immune responses in zebrafish (Danio rerio) model. Zebrafish were fed control or myrtle (5, 10 and 20 g kg(-1) myrtle) supplemented diets for sixty days. The results showed that, oral administration of Myrtle significantly improved mucosal immune responses (the activity of lysozyme, total Ig and protease). Furthermore, fish fed 20 g kg(-1) showed remarkably higher antioxidant (sod and cat) enzymes gene expression compared other treatment. There were significant difference between myrtle fed fish and control group regarding tnf-alpha and lyz expression. Also, evaluation of growth (gh and igf1) related genes revealed remarkable upregulation in 20 g kg(-1) myrtle treatment compared other myrtle treatments and control group. Similar results was observed regarding the mRNA levels of appetite related genes (ghrl) in zebrafish fed 20 g kg(-1) myrtle. The present results indicated that dietary administration of myrtle improved mucosal immune parameters and altered mRNA levels of selected genes. These results on zebrafish model also highlights the potential use of Myrtle supplements as additive in human diets. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Route-dependent systemic and local immune effects following exposure to solutions prepared from titanium dioxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auttachoat, Wimolnut; McLoughlin, Colleen E; White, Kimber L; Smith, Matthew J

    2014-01-01

    Nanoparticle titanium dioxide (nano-TiO2) is a white pigment widely used in foods, sunscreens, and other cosmetic products. However, it remains unclear whether exposure to nano-TiO2 results in immunosuppressive effects or induces a contact hypersensitivity response. To address these data gaps, studies were conducted with the hypothesis that nano-TiO2 exposure could alter immune responses. After 28 days of oral gavage, nano-TiO2 (1.25-250 mg/kg in 0.5% methylcellulose) produced no significant effects on innate, humoral, or cell-mediated immune functions in female B6C3F1 mice. Furthermore, there were no effects on the weights of selected organs (spleen, thymus, liver, lung, and kidneys with adrenals). Following dermal exposure on the ears for 3 days, nano-TiO2 (2.5-10% w/v in 4:1 acetone:olive oil) did not affect auricular lymph node cell proliferation, although an irritancy response was observed following treatment with 5% and 10% nano-TiO2. Dermal sensitization (2.5-10%) on the back and subsequent challenge (10%) on the right ear with nano-TiO2 produced no significant effects on percentage ear swelling in the Mouse Ear Swelling Test (MEST). However, when nano-TiO2 was injected subcutaneously along the mid-line on top of the head at 125-250 mg/kg (in 0.5% methylcellulose), significant increases in auricular lymph node cell proliferation resulted. These results demonstrate that immune effects of nano-TiO2 exposure are route-of-exposure dependent, and they suggest that irritancy and/or potential hypersensitivity responses may occur following parenteral exposure or dermal administration of nano-TiO2 to compromised skin.

  5. Perforin gene transfer into hematopoietic stem cells improves immune dysregulation in murine models of perforin deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmo, Marlene; Risma, Kimberly A; Arumugam, Paritha; Tiwari, Swati; Hontz, Adrianne E; Montiel-Equihua, Claudia A; Alonso-Ferrero, Maria E; Blundell, Michael P; Schambach, Axel; Baum, Christopher; Malik, Punam; Thrasher, Adrian J; Jordan, Michael B; Gaspar, H Bobby

    2015-04-01

    Defects in perforin lead to the failure of T and NK cell cytotoxicity, hypercytokinemia, and the immune dysregulatory condition known as familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (FHL). The only curative treatment is allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation which carries substantial risks. We used lentiviral vectors (LV) expressing the human perforin gene, under the transcriptional control of the ubiquitous phosphoglycerate kinase promoter or a lineage-specific perforin promoter, to correct the defect in different murine models. Following LV-mediated gene transfer into progenitor cells from perforin-deficient mice, we observed perforin expression in mature T and NK cells, and there was no evidence of progenitor cell toxicity when transplanted into irradiated recipients. The resulting perforin-reconstituted NK cells showed partial recovery of cytotoxicity, and we observed full recovery of cytotoxicity in polyclonal CD8(+) T cells. Furthermore, reconstituted T cells with defined antigen specificity displayed normal cytotoxic function against peptide-loaded targets. Reconstituted CD8(+) lymphoblasts had reduced interferon-γ secretion following stimulation in vitro, suggesting restoration of normal immune regulation. Finally, upon viral challenge, mice with >30% engraftment of gene-modified cells exhibited reduction of cytokine hypersecretion and cytopenias. This study demonstrates the potential of hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy as a curative treatment for perforin-deficient FHL.

  6. Gene therapy for hemophilia "A" and "B": efficacy, safety and immune consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuah, M; Vandendriessche, T

    2007-01-01

    The first successful gene therapy trials for the treatment of hereditary disorders underscore the potential of gene therapy to combat disease and alleviate human suffering. The development of gene therapy for hemophilia is not only a research priority in its own right but also serves as an ideal trailblazer for many different diseases. Significant progress has recently been made in the development of gene therapy for the treatment of hemophilia A and B. Long-term therapeutic levels of factor VIII and IX could be expressed following gene therapy in hemophilic mice, stably correcting the bleeding diathesis. These advances parallel the development of improved gene delivery systems. The induction of neutralizing antibodies (inhibitors) to the clotting factors could potentially preclude stable phenotypic correction. The risk of inhibitor formation varied, depending at least in part on the type of vector used and its in vivo tropism. We also demonstrated that the risk of immune responses to the vector particles, the clotting factors and/or transduced cells can be reduced by using vectors that only minimally interact with antigen presenting cells. In hemophilic mice, robust and stable clotting factor expression levels were achieved using adeno-associated viral vectors based on the newly disovered serotypes AAV8 and AAV9 which can efficient deliver the clotting factor genes into hepatocytes without triggering any inflammatory responses or adverse events. Pre-clinical studies in large animal models will be initiated to further validate these improved AAV vectors to ultimately justify a clinical trial in patients with severe hemophilia.

  7. Common Genetic Variants Found in HLA and KIR Immune Genes in Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Anthony R; Sweeten, Thayne L; Johnson, Randall C; Odell, Dennis; Westover, Jonna B; Bray-Ward, Patricia; Ward, David C; Davies, Christopher J; Thomas, Aaron J; Croen, Lisa A; Benson, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The "common variant-common disease" hypothesis was proposed to explain diseases with strong inheritance. This model suggests that a genetic disease is the result of the combination of several common genetic variants. Common genetic variants are described as a 5% frequency differential between diseased vs. matched control populations. This theory was recently supported by an epidemiology paper stating that about 50% of genetic risk for autism resides in common variants. However, rare variants, rather than common variants, have been found in numerous genome wide genetic studies and many have concluded that the "common variant-common disease" hypothesis is incorrect. One interpretation is that rare variants are major contributors to genetic diseases and autism involves the interaction of many rare variants, especially in the brain. It is obvious there is much yet to be learned about autism genetics. Evidence has been mounting over the years indicating immune involvement in autism, particularly the HLA genes on chromosome 6 and KIR genes on chromosome 19. These two large multigene complexes have important immune functions and have been shown to interact to eliminate unwanted virally infected and malignant cells. HLA proteins have important functions in antigen presentation in adaptive immunity and specific epitopes on HLA class I proteins act as cognate ligands for KIR receptors in innate immunity. Data suggests that HLA alleles and KIR activating genes/haplotypes are common variants in different autism populations. For example, class I allele (HLA-A2 and HLA-G 14 bp-indel) frequencies are significantly increased by more than 5% over control populations (Table 2). The HLA-DR4 Class II and shared epitope frequencies are significantly above the control populations (Table 2). Three activating KIR genes: 3DS1, 2DS1, and 2DS2 have increased frequencies of 15, 22, and 14% in autism populations, respectively. There is a 6% increase in total activating KIR genes in autism over

  8. Common Genetic Variants Found in HLA and KIR Immune Genes in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony R Torres

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The common variant - common disease hypothesis was proposed to explain diseases with strong inheritance. This model suggests that a genetic disease is the result of the combination of several common genetic variants. Common genetic variants are described as a 5% frequency differential between diseased versus matched control populations. This theory was recently supported by an epidemiology paper stating that about 50% of genetic risk for autism resides in common variants. However, rare variants, rather than common variants, have been found in numerous genome wide genetic studies and many have concluded that the common variant—common disease hypothesis is incorrect. One interpretation is that rare variants are major contributors to genetic diseases and autism involves the interaction of many rare variants, especially in the brain. It is obvious there is much yet to be learned about autism genetics.Evidence has been mounting over the years indicating immune involvement in autism, particularly the HLA genes on chromosome 6 and KIR genes on chromosome 19. These two large multigene complexes have important immune functions and have been shown to interact to eliminate unwanted virally infected and malignant cells. HLA proteins have important functions in antigen presentation in adaptive immunity and specific epitopes on HLA class I proteins act as cognate ligands for KIR receptors in innate immunity. Data suggests that HLA alleles and KIR activating genes/haplotypes are common variants in different autism populations. For example, class I allele (HLA-A2 and HLA-G 14bp-indel frequencies are significantly increased by more than 5% over control populations (Table2. The HLA-DR4 Class II and shared epitope frequencies are significantly above the control populations (Table 2. Three activating KIR genes: 3DS1, 2DS1 and 2DS2 have increased frequencies of 15%, 22% and 14% in autism populations, respectively. There is a 6% increase in total activating KIR

  9. Immune gene discovery by expressed sequence tag (EST) analysis of hemocytes in the ridgetail white prawn Exopalaemon carinicauda

    OpenAIRE

    Duan, Yafei; Liu, Ping; Li, Jitao; Li, Jian; Chen, Ping

    2013-01-01

    The ridgetail white prawn Exopalaemon carinicauda is one of the most important commercial species in eastern China. However, little information of immune genes in E.?carinicauda has been reported. To identify distinctive genes associated with immunity, an expressed sequence tag (EST) library was constructed from hemocytes of E.?carinicauda. A total of 3411 clones were sequenced, yielding 2853 ESTs and the average sequence length is 436 bp. The cluster and assembly analysis yielded 1053 unique...

  10. Effects of date palm fruit extracts on skin mucosal immunity, immune related genes expression and growth performance of common carp (Cyprinus carpio) fry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoseinifar, Seyed Hossein; Khalili, Mohsen; Rufchaei, Rudabeh; Raeisi, Mojtaba; Attar, Marzieh; Cordero, Héctor; Esteban, M Ángeles

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of date palm fruit extracts (DPFE) on skin mucosal immunity, immune related genes expression and growth performance of fry common carp (Cyprinus carpio). One hundred and twenty specimens (4.06 ± 0.13 g) were supplied and allocated into six aquaria; specimens in three aquaria were fed non-supplemented diet (control) while the fish in the other 3 aquaria were fed with DPFE at 200 ml kg(-1). At the end of feeding trial (8 weeks) skin mucus immune parameters (total immunoglobulins, lysozyme, protease and alkaline phosphatase activity) and immune related gene expression (tumor necrosis factor α [tnfa], lysozyme [ly] and interleukin-1-beta, [il1b]) in the head-kidney were studied. The results revealed that feeding carp fry with 200 ml kg(-1) DPFE remarkably elevated the three skin mucus immune parameters tested (P 0.05) compared to control fish (fed control diet). Furthermore, growth performance parameters were significantly improved in fry fed DPFE (P < 0.05). More studies are needed to understand different aspects of DPFE administration in fry mucosal immunity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Expression of Immune-Related Genes of Ducks Infected with Avian Pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rong; Li, Ning; Zhang, Jinzhou; Wang, Yao; Liu, Jiyuan; Cai, Yumei; Chai, Tongjie; Wei, Liangmeng

    2016-01-01

    Avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) can cause severe disease in ducks, characterized by perihepatitis, pericarditis, and airsacculitis. Although the studies of bacteria isolation and methods of detection have been reported, host immune responses to APEC infection remain unclear. In response, we systemically examined the expression of immune-related genes and bacteria distribution in APEC-infected ducks. Results demonstrated that APEC can quickly replicate in the liver, spleen, and brain, with the highest bacteria content at 2 days post infection. The expression of toll-like receptors (TLRs), avian β-defensins (AvBDs) and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) were tested in the liver, spleen, and brain of infected ducks. TLR2, TLR4, TLR5, and TLR15 showed different expression patterns, which indicated that they all responded to APEC infection. The expression of AvBD2 was upregulated in all tested tissues during the 3 days of testing, whereas the expression of AvBD4, AvBD5, AvBD7, and AvBD9 were downregulated, and though MHC-I was upregulated on all test days, MHC-II was dramatically downregulated. Overall, our results suggest that APEC can replicate in various tissues in a short time, and the activation of host immune responses begins at onset of infection. These findings thus clarify duck immune responses to APEC infection and offer insights into its pathogenesis.

  12. Quantitative dynamic imaging of immune cell signalling using lentiviral gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagnall, J; Boddington, C; Boyd, J; Brignall, R; Rowe, W; Jones, N A; Schmidt, L; Spiller, D G; White, M R H; Paszek, P

    2015-06-01

    Live-cell imaging of fluorescent fusion proteins has transformed our understanding of mammalian cell signalling and function. However, some cellular systems such as immune cells are unsuitable or refractory to many existing transgene delivery methods thus limiting systematic analyses. Here, a flexible lentiviral gene transfer platform for dynamic time-lapse imaging has been developed and validated with single-molecule spectroscopy, mathematical modelling and transcriptomics and used for analysis of a set of inflammation-related signalling networks. Time-lapse imaging of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), signal transducer and activator of transcription (STATs) and nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) in mammalian immune cell lines provided evidence for heterogeneous temporal encoding of inflammatory signals. In particular, the absolute quantification of single-cell responses over time via fluorescent correlation spectroscopy (FCS) showed that NF-κB p65 activation in response to tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα) was differentially encoded in variable amplitude of nuclear translocation between immune and non-immune cells. The absolute number of activated molecules was dictated in part by the cell size, suggesting a morphology-dependent regulatory mechanism. The developed platform will enable further absolute quantitative analyses of the dynamic interactions between signalling networks, in and between individual cells, allowing better integration with mathematical models of signalling networks.

  13. Immune reactivity to type VII collagen: implications for gene therapy of recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendaries, V; Gasc, G; Titeux, M; Leroux, C; Vitezica, Z G; Mejía, J E; Décha, A; Loiseau, P; Bodemer, C; Prost-Squarcioni, C; Hovnanian, A

    2010-07-01

    Recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) is a severe genodermatosis caused by loss-of-function mutations in COL7A1 encoding type VII collagen, the component of anchoring fibrils. As exogenous type VII collagen may elicit a deleterious immune response in RDEB patients during upcoming clinical trials of gene therapies or protein replacement therapies, we developed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot (ELISPOT) assays to analyze B- and T-cell responses, to the full-length type VII collagen. The ELISA was highly sensitive and specific when tested against sera from 41 patients with epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA), and the IFN-gamma ELISPOT detected a cellular response that correlated with ongoing EBA manifestations. Both tests were next applied to assess the risk of an immune response to type VII collagen in seven RDEB patients with a range of type VII collagen expression profiles. Immune responses against type VII collagen were dependent on the expression of type VII collagen protein, and consequently on the nature and position of the respective COL7A1 mutations. These immunologic tests will be helpful for the selection of RDEB patients for future clinical trials aiming at restoring type VII collagen expression, and in monitoring their immune response to type VII collagen after treatment.

  14. Expression of Immune-Related Genes of Ducks Infected with Avian Pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong eLi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC can cause severe disease in ducks, characterized by perihepatitis, pericarditis and airsacculitis. Although the studies of bacteria isolation and methods of detection have been reported, host immune responses to APEC infection remain unclear. In response, we systemically examined the expression of immune-related genes and bacteria distribution in APEC-infected ducks. Results demonstrated that APEC can quickly replicate in the liver, spleen and brain, with the highest bacteria content at 2 day post infection. The expression of Toll-like receptors (TLRs, avian β-defensins (AvBDs and major histocompatibility complex (MHC were tested in the liver, spleen and brain of infected ducks. TLR2, TLR4, TLR5 and TLR15 showed different expression patterns, which indicated that they all responded to APEC infection. The expression of AvBD2 was upregulated in all tested tissues during the 3 days of testing, whereas the expression of AvBD4, AvBD5, AvBD7 and AvBD9 were downregulated, and though MHC-I was upregulated on all test days, MHC-II was dramatically downregulated. Overall, our results suggest that APEC can replicate in various tissues in a short time, and the activation of host immune responses begins at onset of infection. These findings thus clarify duck immune responses to APEC infection and offer insights into its pathogenesis.

  15. Exposure to heat-inactivated Trichophyton rubrum resulting in a limited immune response of human keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiao-Qiang; Yi, Jin-Ling; Yin, Song-Chao; Chen, Rong-Zhang; Li, Mei-Rong; Gong, Zi-Jian; Lai, Wei; Chen, Jian

    2013-01-01

    Trichophyton rubrum (T. rubrum) represents the most important agent of dermatophytosis in humans. T. rubrum infection causes slight inflammation, and tends to be chronic and recurrent. It is suggested that it may result from the failure of epithelial cells to recognize T. rubrum effectively and initiate effective immune responses. The C-type lectin receptors (CLR) and toll-like receptors (TLR) are the two major pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) that recognize fungal components. Therefore, the purpose of the study was to analyze the expression of those PRRs and the cytokines in HaCaT cells stimulated with heat-inactivated T. rubrum conidia and hyphae, respectively. HaCaT cells were unstimulated or stimulated with heat-inactivated T. rubrum conidia and hyphae (1×10(6) and 1.5×10(5) colony-forming unit (CFU) in 2 ml medium, respectively) for 6, 12 and 24 hours. The mRNA expression of PRRs involved in recognizing fungal pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and signaling molecules were measured by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Meanwhile, surface toll-like receptor (TLR) 2, TLR4 and Dectin-1 were analyzed by fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) 24 hours after treatment. The cytokines were detected in cell culture supernatants of HaCaT cells in 12 and 24 hours after treatment. HaCaT cells constitutively expressed mRNA of membrane-bound TLR1, 2, 4 and 6, Dectin1 and DC-SIGN, but not Dectin-2 or Mincle. Heat-killed T. rubrum did not significantly upregulate gene transcriptions of the PRRs of HaCaT cells. Heat-inactivated T. rubrum conidia significantly reduced the surface expression of TLR2 and Dectin-1, and suppressed the secretions of interferon-inducible protein-10 (IP-10) and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) of HaCaT cells, while heat-killed T. rubrum hyphae significantly induced the secretions of IP-10 and MCP-1. The cell-wall antigens of T. rubrum fail to activate transcriptional expression of PRRs and

  16. Improved induction of immune tolerance to factor IX by hepatic AAV-8 gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Mario; Nayak, Sushrusha; Hoffman, Brad E; Terhorst, Cox; Cao, Ou; Herzog, Roland W

    2009-07-01

    Gene therapy for hemophilia B has been shown to result in long-term expression and immune tolerance to factor IX (F.IX) after in vivo transduction of hepatocytes with adeno-associated viral (AAV-2) vectors in experimental animals. An optimized protocol was effective in several strains of mice with a factor 9 gene deletion (F9(-/-)). However, immune responses against F.IX were repeatedly observed in C3H/HeJ F9(-/-) mice. We sought to establish a gene transfer protocol that results in sustained expression without a requirement for additional manipulation of the immune system. Compared with AAV-2, AAV-8 was more efficient in transgene expression and induction of tolerance to F.IX in three different strains of wild-type mice. At equal vector doses, AAV-8 induced transgene product-specific regulatory CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+) T cells at significantly higher frequency. Moreover, sustained correction of hemophilia B in C3H/HeJ F9(-/-) mice without antibody formation was documented in all animals treated with > or =4 x 10(11) vector genomes (VG)/kg and in 80% of mice treated with 8 x 10(10) VG/kg. Therefore, it is possible to develop a gene transfer protocol that reliably induces tolerance to F.IX largely independent of genetic factors. A comparison with other studies suggests that additional parameters besides plateau levels of F.IX expression contributed to the improved success rate of tolerance induction.

  17. Associations between SNPs in candidate immune-relevant genes and rubella antibody levels: a multigenic assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ovsyannikova Inna G

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mechanisms of immune response are structured within a highly complex regulatory system. Genetic associations with variation in the immune response to rubella vaccine have typically been assessed one locus at a time. We simultaneously assessed the associations between 726 SNPs tagging 84 candidate immune response genes and rubella-specific antibody levels. Blood samples were obtained from 714 school-aged children who had received two doses of MMR vaccine. Associations between rubella-specific antibody levels and 726 candidate tagSNPs were assessed both one SNP at a time and in a variety of multigenic analyses. Results Single-SNP assessments identified 4 SNPs that appeared to be univariately associated with rubella antibody levels: rs2844482 (p = 0.0002 and rs2857708 (p = 0.001 in the 5'UTR of the LTA gene, rs7801617 in the 5'UTR of the IL6 gene (p = 0.0005, and rs4787947 in the 5'UTR of the IL4R gene (p = 0.002. While there was not significant evidence in favor of epistatic genetic associations among the candidate SNPs, multigenic analyses identified 29 SNPs significantly associated with rubella antibody levels when selected as a group (p = 0.017. This collection of SNPs included not only those that were significant univariately, but others that would not have been identified if only considered in isolation from the other SNPs. Conclusions For the first time, multigenic assessment of associations between candidate SNPs and rubella antibody levels identified a broad number of genetic associations that would not have been deemed important univariately. It is important to consider approaches like those applied here in order to better understand the full genetic complexity of response to vaccination.

  18. Activation of innate immune genes in caprine blood leukocytes after systemic endotoxin challenge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salvesen, Øyvind; Reiten, Malin R; Heegaard, Peter M. H.

    2016-01-01

    , and blood samples were collected throughout the trial. Characteristic signs of acute sepsis, such as sickness behavior, fever, and leukopenia were observed within 1 h of LPS administration. A high-throughput longitudinal gene expression analysis of circulating leukocytes was performed, and genes associated...... in leukocytes in response to LPS supporting a link between the interferon system and defense against bacterial infections. The extrahepatic expression of APPs suggests that leukocytes contribute to synthesis of these proteins at the beginning of a systemic inflammation. Taken together, these findings provide...... insights into the dynamic regulation of innate immune genes, as well as raising new questions regarding the importance of ISGs and extrahepatic APPs in leukocytes after systemic endotoxin challenge....

  19. A Three-Gene Assay for Monitoring Immune Quiescence in Kidney Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roedder, Silke; Li, Li; Alonso, Michael N.; Hsieh, Szu-Chuan; Vu, Minh Thien; Dai, Hong; Sigdel, Tara K.; Bostock, Ian; Macedo, Camila; Metes, Diana; Zeevi, Adrianna; Shapiro, Ron; Salvatierra, Oscar; Scandling, John; Alberu, Josefina; Engleman, Edgar

    2015-01-01

    Organ transplant recipients face life-long immunosuppression and consequently are at high risk of comorbidities. Occasionally, kidney transplant recipients develop a state of targeted immune quiescence (operational tolerance) against an HLA-mismatched graft, allowing them to withdraw all immunosuppression and retain stable graft function while resuming immune responses to third-party antigens. Methods to better understand and monitor this state of alloimmune quiescence by transcriptional profiling may reveal a gene signature that identifies patients for whom immunosuppression could be titrated to reduce patient and graft morbidities. Therefore, we investigated 571 unique peripheral blood samples from 348 HLA-mismatched renal transplant recipients and 101 nontransplant controls in a four-stage study including microarray, quantitative PCR, and flow cytometry analyses. We report a refined and highly validated (area under the curve, 0.95; 95% confidence interval, 0.92 to 0.97) peripheral blood three-gene assay (KLF6, BNC2, CYP1B1) to detect the state of operational tolerance by quantitative PCR. The frequency of predicted alloimmune quiescence in stable renal transplant patients receiving long-term immunosuppression (n=150) was 7.3% by the three-gene assay. Targeted cell sorting of peripheral blood from operationally tolerant patients showed a significant shift in the ratio of circulating monocyte-derived dendritic cells with significantly different expression of the genes constituting the three-gene assay. Our results suggest that incorporation of patient screening by specific cellular and gene expression assays may support the safety of drug minimization trials and protocols. PMID:25429124

  20. Dietary supplementation of mannan-oligosaccharide enhances neonatal immune responses in chickens during natural exposure to Eimeria spp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nava Gerardo M

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Control and eradication of intestinal infections caused by protozoa are important biomedical challenges worldwide. Prophylactic control of coccidiosis has been achieved with the use of anticoccidial drugs; however, the increase in anticoccidial resistance has raised concerns about the need for new alternatives for the control of coccidial infections. In fact, new strategies are needed to induce potent protective immune responses in neonatal individuals. Methods The effects of a dietary supplementation of mannan-oligosaccharide (yeast cell wall; YCW on the local, humoral and cell-mediated immune responses, and intestinal replication of coccidia were evaluated in a neonatal animal model during natural exposure to Eimeria spp. A total of 840 one-day-old chicks were distributed among four dietary regimens: A Control diet (no YCW plus anticoccidial vaccine; B Control diet plus coccidiostat; C YCW diet plus anticoccidial vaccination; and D YCW diet plus coccidiostat. Weight gain, feed consumption and immunological parameters were examined within the first seven weeks of life. Results Dietary supplementation of 0.05% of YCW increased local mucosal IgA secretions, humoral and cell-mediated immune responses, and reduced parasite excretion in feces. Conclusion Dietary supplementation of yeast cell wall in neonatal animals can enhance the immune response against coccidial infections. The present study reveals the potential of YCW as adjuvant for modulating mucosal immune responses.

  1. Transcriptomic analysis in the developing zebrafish embryo after compound exposure: Individual gene expression and pathway regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermsen, Sanne A.B., E-mail: Sanne.Hermsen@rivm.nl [Centre for Health Protection, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), P.O. Box 1, 3720 BA Bilthoven (Netherlands); Department of Toxicogenomics, Maastricht University, P.O. Box 616, 6200 MD, Maastricht (Netherlands); Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences (IRAS), Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80.178, 3508 TD, Utrecht (Netherlands); Pronk, Tessa E. [Centre for Health Protection, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), P.O. Box 1, 3720 BA Bilthoven (Netherlands); Department of Toxicogenomics, Maastricht University, P.O. Box 616, 6200 MD, Maastricht (Netherlands); Brandhof, Evert-Jan van den [Centre for Environmental Quality, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), P.O. Box 1, 3720 BA Bilthoven (Netherlands); Ven, Leo T.M. van der [Centre for Health Protection, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), P.O. Box 1, 3720 BA Bilthoven (Netherlands); Piersma, Aldert H. [Centre for Health Protection, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), P.O. Box 1, 3720 BA Bilthoven (Netherlands); Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences (IRAS), Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80.178, 3508 TD, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2013-10-01

    The zebrafish embryotoxicity test is a promising alternative assay for developmental toxicity. Classically, morphological assessment of the embryos is applied to evaluate the effects of compound exposure. However, by applying differential gene expression analysis the sensitivity and predictability of the test may be increased. For defining gene expression signatures of developmental toxicity, we explored the possibility of using gene expression signatures of compound exposures based on commonly expressed individual genes as well as based on regulated gene pathways. Four developmental toxic compounds were tested in concentration-response design, caffeine, carbamazepine, retinoic acid and valproic acid, and two non-embryotoxic compounds, D-mannitol and saccharin, were included. With transcriptomic analyses we were able to identify commonly expressed genes, which were mostly development related, after exposure to the embryotoxicants. We also identified gene pathways regulated by the embryotoxicants, suggestive of their modes of action. Furthermore, whereas pathways may be regulated by all compounds, individual gene expression within these pathways can differ for each compound. Overall, the present study suggests that the use of individual gene expression signatures as well as pathway regulation may be useful starting points for defining gene biomarkers for predicting embryotoxicity. - Highlights: • The zebrafish embryotoxicity test in combination with transcriptomics was used. • We explored two approaches of defining gene biomarkers for developmental toxicity. • Four compounds in concentration-response design were tested. • We identified commonly expressed individual genes as well as regulated gene pathways. • Both approaches seem suitable starting points for defining gene biomarkers.

  2. Expression profiling of autism candidate genes during human brain development implicates central immune signaling pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark N Ziats

    Full Text Available The Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD represent a clinically heterogeneous set of conditions with strong hereditary components. Despite substantial efforts to uncover the genetic basis of ASD, the genomic etiology appears complex and a clear understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying Autism remains elusive. We hypothesized that focusing gene interaction networks on ASD-implicated genes that are highly expressed in the developing brain may reveal core mechanisms that are otherwise obscured by the genomic heterogeneity of the disorder. Here we report an in silico study of the gene expression profile from ASD-implicated genes in the unaffected developing human brain. By implementing a biologically relevant approach, we identified a subset of highly expressed ASD-candidate genes from which interactome networks were derived. Strikingly, immune signaling through NFκB, Tnf, and Jnk was central to ASD networks at multiple levels of our analysis, and cell-type specific expression suggested glia--in addition to neurons--deserve consideration. This work provides integrated genomic evidence that ASD-implicated genes may converge on central cytokine signaling pathways.

  3. Expression profiling of autism candidate genes during human brain development implicates central immune signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziats, Mark N; Rennert, Owen M

    2011-01-01

    The Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) represent a clinically heterogeneous set of conditions with strong hereditary components. Despite substantial efforts to uncover the genetic basis of ASD, the genomic etiology appears complex and a clear understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying Autism remains elusive. We hypothesized that focusing gene interaction networks on ASD-implicated genes that are highly expressed in the developing brain may reveal core mechanisms that are otherwise obscured by the genomic heterogeneity of the disorder. Here we report an in silico study of the gene expression profile from ASD-implicated genes in the unaffected developing human brain. By implementing a biologically relevant approach, we identified a subset of highly expressed ASD-candidate genes from which interactome networks were derived. Strikingly, immune signaling through NFκB, Tnf, and Jnk was central to ASD networks at multiple levels of our analysis, and cell-type specific expression suggested glia--in addition to neurons--deserve consideration. This work provides integrated genomic evidence that ASD-implicated genes may converge on central cytokine signaling pathways.

  4. Flagellin Encoded in Gene-Based Vector Vaccines Is a Route-Dependent Immune Adjuvant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamada F Rady

    Full Text Available Flagellin has been tested as a protein-based vaccine adjuvant, with the majority of studies focused on antibody responses. Here, we evaluated the adjuvant activity of flagellin for both cellular and humoral immune responses in BALB/c mice in the setting of gene-based immunization, and have made several novel observations. DNA vaccines and adenovirus (Ad vectors were engineered to encode mycobacterial protein Ag85B, with or without flagellin of Salmonella typhimurium (FliC. DNA-encoded flagellin given IM enhanced splenic CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses to co-expressed vaccine antigen, including memory responses. Boosting either IM or intranasally with Ad vectors expressing Ag85B without flagellin led to durable enhancement of Ag85B-specific antibody and CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses in both spleen and pulmonary tissues, correlating with significantly improved protection against challenge with pathogenic aerosolized M. tuberculosis. However, inclusion of flagellin in both DNA prime and Ad booster vaccines induced localized pulmonary inflammation and transient weight loss, with route-dependent effects on vaccine-induced T cell immunity. The latter included marked reductions in levels of mucosal CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses following IM DNA/IN Ad mucosal prime-boosting, although antibody responses were not diminished. These findings indicate that flagellin has differential and route-dependent adjuvant activity when included as a component of systemic or mucosally-delivered gene-based prime-boost immunization. Clear adjuvant activity for both T and B cell responses was observed when flagellin was included in the DNA priming vaccine, but side effects occurred when given in an Ad boosting vector, particularly via the pulmonary route.

  5. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium lacking hfq gene confers protective immunity against murine typhoid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uday Shankar Allam

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica is an important enteric pathogen and its various serovars are involved in causing both systemic and intestinal diseases in humans and domestic animals. The emergence of multidrug-resistant strains of Salmonella leading to increased morbidity and mortality has further complicated its management. Live attenuated vaccines have been proven superior over killed or subunit vaccines due to their ability to induce protective immunity. Of the various strategies used for the generation of live attenuated vaccine strains, focus has gradually shifted towards manipulation of virulence regulator genes. Hfq is a RNA chaperon which mediates the binding of small RNAs to the mRNA and assists in post-transcriptional gene regulation in bacteria. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of the Salmonella Typhimurium Δhfq strain as a candidate for live oral vaccine in murine model of typhoid fever. Salmonella hfq deletion mutant is highly attenuated in cell culture and animal model implying a significant role of Hfq in bacterial virulence. Oral immunization with the Salmonella hfq deletion mutant efficiently protects mice against subsequent oral challenge with virulent strain of Salmonella Typhimurium. Moreover, protection was induced upon both multiple as well as single dose of immunizations. The vaccine strain appears to be safe for use in pregnant mice and the protection is mediated by the increase in the number of CD4(+ T lymphocytes upon vaccination. The levels of serum IgG and secretory-IgA in intestinal washes specific to lipopolysaccharide and outer membrane protein were significantly increased upon vaccination. Furthermore, hfq deletion mutant showed enhanced antigen presentation by dendritic cells compared to the wild type strain. Taken together, the studies in murine immunization model suggest that the Salmonella hfq deletion mutant can be a novel live oral vaccine candidate.

  6. Associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms and haplotypes in cytokine and cytokine receptor genes and immunity to measles vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haralambieva, Iana H; Ovsyannikova, Inna G; Kennedy, Richard B; Vierkant, Robert A; Pankratz, V Shane; Jacobson, Robert M; Poland, Gregory A

    2011-10-19

    Identification of host genetic determinants of measles vaccine-induced immunity can be used to design better vaccines and ultimately predict immune responses to vaccination. We performed a comprehensive candidate gene association study across 801 genetic markers in 56 cytokine/cytokine receptor genes, in a racially diverse cohort of 745 schoolchildren after two doses of MMR vaccine. Using linear regression methodologies we examined associations between SNPs/haplotypes and measles virus-specific immunity. Forty-eight significant SNP associations with variations in neutralizing antibodies and measles-specific IFNγ Elispot responses were identified (pvaccine-induced immunity in the Caucasian group (global p-value=0.003). Our results validate previous findings and identify new plausible genetic determinants, including IL7R polymorphisms, regulating measles vaccine-induced immunity in a race-specific manner. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Genome-wide analysis of immune activation in human T and B cells reveals distinct classes of alternatively spliced genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yevgeniy A Grigoryev

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing of pre-mRNA is a mechanism that increases the protein diversity of a single gene by differential exon inclusion/exclusion during post-transcriptional processing. While alternative splicing is established to occur during lymphocyte activation, little is known about the role it plays during the immune response. Our study is among the first reports of a systematic genome-wide analysis of activated human T and B lymphocytes using whole exon DNA microarrays integrating alternative splicing and differential gene expression. Purified human CD2(+ T or CD19(+ B cells were activated using protocols to model the early events in post-transplant allograft immunity and sampled as a function of time during the process of immune activation. Here we show that 3 distinct classes of alternatively spliced and/or differentially expressed genes change in an ordered manner as a function of immune activation. We mapped our results to function-based canonical pathways and demonstrated that some are populated by only one class of genes, like integrin signaling, while other pathways, such as purine metabolism and T cell receptor signaling, are populated by all three classes of genes. Our studies augment the current view of T and B cell activation in immunity that has been based exclusively upon differential gene expression by providing evidence for a large number of molecular networks populated as a function of time and activation by alternatively spliced genes, many of which are constitutively expressed.

  8. Neurotoxicity and gene-expressed profile in brain-injured mice caused by exposure to titanium dioxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ze, Yuguan; Hu, Renping; Wang, Xiaochun; Sang, Xuezi; Ze, Xiao; Li, Bi; Su, Junju; Wang, Yuan; Guan, Ning; Zhao, Xiaoyang; Gui, Suxin; Zhu, Liyuan; Cheng, Zhe; Cheng, Jie; Sheng, Lei; Sun, Qingqing; Wang, Ling; Hong, Fashui

    2014-02-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) are widely used in toothpastes, sunscreens, and products for cosmetic purpose that the human use daily. Although the neurotoxicity induced by TiO2 NPs has been demonstrated, very little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying the brain cognition and behavioral injury. In this study, mice were exposed to 2.5, 5, and 10 mg/kg body weight (BW) TiO2 NPs by nasal administration for 90 consecutive days, respectively, and their brains' injuries and brain gene-expressed profile were investigated. Our findings showed that TiO2 NPs could be translocated and accumulated in brain, led to oxidative stress, overproliferation of all glial cells, tissue necrosis as well as hippocampal cell apoptosis. Furthermore, microarray data showed significant alterations in the expression of 249 known function genes, including 113 genes upregulation and 136 genes downregulation following exposure to 10 mg/kg BW TiO2 NPs, which were associated with oxidative stress, immune response, apoptosis, memory and learning, brain development, signal transduction, metabolic process, DNA repair, response to stimulus, and cellular process. Especially, significant increases in Col1a1, serine/threonine-protein kinase 1, Ctnnb1, cysteine-serine-rich nuclear protein-1, Ddit4, Cyp2e1, and Krev interaction trapped protein 1 (Krit1) expressions and great decreases in DA receptor D2, Neu1, Fc receptor-like molecules, and Dhcr7 expressions following long-term exposure to TiO2 NPs resulted in neurogenic disease states in mice. Therefore, these genes may be potential biomarkers of brain toxicity caused by TiO2 NPs exposure, and the application of TiO2 NPs should be carried out cautiously. © 2013 Society of Plastics Engineers.

  9. Prenatal cadmium exposure produces persistent changes to thymus and spleen cell phenotypic repertoire as well as the acquired immune response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holásková, Ida; Elliott, Meenal; Hanson, Miranda L.; Schafer, Rosana [Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Cell Biology, West Virginia University School of Medicine, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Barnett, John B., E-mail: jbarnett@hsc.wvu.edu [Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Cell Biology, West Virginia University School of Medicine, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Mary Babb Randolph Cancer Center, West Virginia University School of Medicine, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)

    2012-12-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a common environmental contaminant. Adult exposure to Cd alters the immune system, however, there are limited studies on the effects of prenatal exposure to Cd. Pregnant C57Bl/6 mice were exposed to an environmentally relevant dose of CdCl{sub 2} (10 ppm) and the effects on the immune system of the offspring were assessed at 20 weeks of age. Prenatal Cd exposure caused an increase in the percent of CD4{sup −}CD8{sup −}CD44{sup +}CD25{sup −} (DN1) thymocytes in both sexes and a decrease in the percent of CD4{sup −}CD8{sup −}CD44{sup −}CD25{sup +} (DN3) thymocytes in females. Females had an increase in the percent of splenic CD4{sup +} T cells, CD8{sup +} T cells, and CD45R/B220{sup +} B cells and a decrease in the percent of NK cells and granulocytes (Gr-1{sup +}). Males had an increase in the percent of splenic CD4{sup +} T cells and CD45R/B220{sup +} B cells and a decrease in the percent of CD8{sup +} T cells, NK cells, and granulocytes. The percentage of neutrophils and myeloid-derived suppressor cells were reduced in both sexes. The percent of splenic nTreg cells was decreased in all Cd-exposed offspring. Cd-exposed offspring were immunized with a streptococcal vaccine and the antibody response was determined. PC-specific serum antibody titers were decreased in Cd exposed female offspring but increased in the males. PspA-specific serum IgG titers were increased in both females and males compared to control animals. Females had a decrease in PspA-specific serum IgM antibody titers. Females and males had a decrease in the number of splenic anti-PspA antibody-secreting cells when standardized to the number of B cells. These findings demonstrate that very low levels of Cd exposure during gestation can result in long term sex-specific alterations on the immune system of the offspring. -- Highlights: ► Prenatal exposure to cadmium alters the immune system of 20 week old offspring. ► The percentage of DN1 and DN3 thymocytes was changed

  10. Association study of functional genetic variants of innate immunity related genes in celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martín J

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent evidence suggest that the innate immune system is implicated in the early events of celiac disease (CD pathogenesis. In this work for the first time we have assessed the relevance of different proinflammatory mediators typically related to innate immunity in CD predisposition. Methods We performed a familial study in which 105 celiac families characterized by the presence of an affected child with CD were genotyped for functional polymorphisms located at regulatory regions of IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-1RN, IL-18, RANTES and MCP-1 genes. Familial data was analysed with a transmission disequilibrium test (TDT that revealed no statistically significant differences in the transmission pattern of the different genetic markers considered. Results The TDT analysis for IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-1RN, IL-18, and MCP-1 genes genetic variants did not reveal biased transmission to the affected offspring. Only a borderline association of RANTES promoter genetic variants with CD predisposition was observed. Conclusion Our results suggest that the analysed polymorphisms of IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-1RN, IL-18, RANTES and MCP-1 genes do not seem to play a major role in CD genetic predisposition in our population.

  11. Strategy to detect pre-existing immunity to AAV gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falese, L; Sandza, K; Yates, B; Triffault, S; Gangar, S; Long, B; Tsuruda, L; Carter, B; Vettermann, C; Zoog, S J; Fong, S

    2017-11-06

    Gene therapy may offer a new treatment option, particularly for patients with severe hemophilia, based on recent research. However, individuals with pre-existing immunity to adeno-associated viruses (AAVs) may be less likely to benefit from AAV vector-based therapies. To study pre-existing AAV5 immunity in humans, we validated two complementary, sensitive, and scalable in vitro assays to detect AAV5 total antibodies and transduction inhibition (TI). Using these two assays, we found that 53% of samples from 100 healthy male individuals were negative in both assays, 18% were positive in both assays, 5% were positive for total antibodies but negative for TI and, of interest, 24% were negative for total antibodies but positive for TI activity, suggesting the presence of non-antibody‒based neutralizing factors in human plasma. Similar findings were obtained with 24 samples from individuals with hemophilia A. Based on these results, we describe the development of a dual-assay strategy to identify individuals without total AAV5 antibodies or neutralizing factors who may be more likely to respond to AAV5-directed gene therapy. These assays offer a universal, transferrable platform across laboratories to assess the global prevalence of AAV5 antibodies and neutralizing factors in large patient populations to help inform clinical development strategies.Gene Therapy accepted article preview online, 06 November 2017. doi:10.1038/gt.2017.95.

  12. A recombinant varicella vaccine harboring a respiratory syncytial virus gene induces humoral immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Kouki; Matsuura, Masaaki; Ota, Megumi; Gomi, Yasuyuki; Yamanishi, Koichi; Mori, Yasuko

    2015-11-09

    The varicella-zoster virus (VZV) Oka vaccine strain (vOka) is highly efficient and causes few adverse events; therefore, it is used worldwide. We previously constructed recombinant vOka (rvOka) harboring the mumps virus gene. Immunizing guinea pigs with rvOka induced the production of neutralizing antibodies against the mumps virus and VZV. Here, we constructed recombinant vOka viruses containing either the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) subgroup A fusion glycoprotein (RSV A-F) gene or RSV subgroup B fusion glycoprotein (RSV B-F) gene (rvOka-RSV A-F or rvOka-RSV B-F). Indirect immunofluorescence and Western blot analyses confirmed the expression of each recombinant RSV protein in virus-infected cells. Immunizing guinea pigs with rvOka-RSV A-F or rvOka-RSV B-F led to the induction of antibodies against RSV proteins. These results suggest that the current varicella vaccine genome can be used to generate custom-made vaccine vectors to develop the next generation of live vaccines. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Exposure to Deepwater Horizon oil and Corexit 9500 at low concentrations induces transcriptional changes and alters immune transcriptional pathways in sheepshead minnows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Elizabeth R; Martyniuk, Christopher J; Morris, Jeffrey M; Krasnec, Michelle O; Griffitt, Robert J

    2017-09-01

    The 2010 Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill caused the release of 4.9 million barrels of crude oil into the Gulf of Mexico, followed by the application of 2.9 million L of the dispersant, Corexit™ to mitigate the spread of oil. The spill resulted in substantial shoreline oiling, potentially exposing coastal organisms to polyaromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and dispersant contaminants. To investigate molecular effects in fish following exposure to environmentally relevant concentrations of DWH oil and dispersants, we exposed adult sheepshead minnows (Cyprinodon variegatus) to two concentrations of high-energy water-accommodated fraction (HEWAF), chemically enhanced water-accommodated fraction (CEWAF) or Corexit 9500™ for 7 and 14days. Resulting changes in hepatic gene expression were measured using 8×15K microarrays. Analytical chemistry confirmed PAH concentrations in HEWAF and CEWAF treatments were low (ranging from 0.26 to 5.98μg/L), and likely representative of post-spill environmental concentrations. We observed significant changes to gene expression in all treatments (relative to controls), with Corexit and CEWAF having a greater effect on expression patterns in the liver than HEWAF treatments. Sub-network enrichment analysis of biological pathways revealed that the greatest number of altered pathways in high dose HEWAF and CEWAF treatments occurred following a 7-day exposure. Pathways related to immunity comprised the majority of pathways affected in each treatment, followed by pathways related to blood and circulation processes. Our results indicate that oil composition, concentration, and exposure duration all affect molecular responses in exposed fish, and suggest that low-concentration exposures may result in sub-lethal adverse effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Elevated Immune Gene Expression Is Associated with Poor Reproductive Success of Urban Blue Tits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Capilla-Lasheras

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Urban and forest habitats differ in many aspects that can lead to modifications of the immune system of wild animals. Altered parasite communities, pollution, and artificial light at night in cities have been associated with exacerbated inflammatory responses, with possibly negative fitness consequences, but few data are available from free-living animals. Here, we investigate how urbanization affects major immune pathways and experimentally test potentially contributing factors in blue tits (Cyanistes caeruleus from an urban and forest site. We first compared breeding adults by quantifying the mRNA transcript levels of proteins associated with anti-bacterial, anti-malarial (TLR4, LY86 and anti-helminthic (Type 2 transcription factor GATA3 immune responses. Adult urban and forest blue tits differed in gene expression, with significantly increased TLR4 and GATA3, but not LY86, in the city. We then experimentally tested whether these differences were environmentally induced by cross-fostering eggs between the sites and measuring mRNA transcripts in nestlings. The populations differed in reduced reproductive success, with a lower fledging success and lower fledgling weight recorded at the urban site. This mirrors the findings of our twin study reporting that the urban site was severely resource limited when compared to the forest. Because of low urban survival, robust gene expression data were only obtained from nestlings reared in the forest. Transcript levels in these nestlings showed no (TLR4, LY86, or weak (GATA3, differences according to their origin from forest or city nests, suggesting little genetic or maternal contribution to nestling immune transcript levels. Lastly, to investigate differences in parasite pressure between urban and forest sites, we measured the prevalence of malaria in adult and nestling blood. Prevalence was invariably high across environments and not associated with the transcript levels of the studied immune genes. Our

  15. [Study on the preparing of polyclonal antibodies against plant-selected maker gene hpt expression protein by DNA immunization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Li-Chen; Zhu, Zhen; Yang, Xiao-Guang

    2003-05-01

    To prepare the polyclonal antibodies (pAbs) against HPT, a kind of plant-selected maker gene encoding protein, by DNA immunization technique and explore the influencing factors for this gene immunization. The coding sequence of hpt was cloned into eukaryotic expression vector pCDNA3. The sequence of the plasmid pCDNA3-HPT was demonstrated by restricting enzyme digestion analysis and DNA sequencing. The sequence-correct recombinant plasmids were purified and used to immunize BALB/c mice. The titer and specificity of antisera were detected by ELISA and Western blot, respecitively. No pAb against HPT was detected following three immunization with hpt genes. Then mice were divided into three groups when the forth booster immunization was carried out: 1st group (immunization with the endotoxin-free recombinant plasmids), 2nd group (immunization with (His)(6)-HPT fusion protein expressed in E.coli) and 3rd group (immunization with the same plasmids as before mentioned). As a result, the pAb titer of the 1st group mice increased to 1:200, and the that of 2nd group was up to 1:2 000. Yet the 3rd group detected no anti-HPT antibody. Western blot analysis had proved that antisera of the first two groups could produce specific binding reaction to the purified GST-HPT, (His)(6)-HPT protein and their expressed product (bacterial protein). We have got successfully the specific pAb against HPT by DNA immunization, but its titer is yet unsatisfactory, inferring that the character of the hpt gene self and its expression level may play an important role. In order to raise level of serum antibody prepared by DNA immunization, the farther study on various influencing factors still need to be performed.

  16. Altered miRNAs expression profiles and modulation of immune response genes and proteins during neonatal sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiande; Jiang, Siyuan; Cao, Yun; Yang, Yi

    2014-04-01

    The dysregulated expression of miRNAs in the immune system may be critical for immune responses to pathogens and evolve into the inflammation seen in sepsis. The aim of this study is to explore the important role of miRNAs in the regulation of the immune response during neonatal sepsis. Using a microarray we performed the miRNA expression profiling of peripheral blood leukocytes from neonates with sepsis and uninfected neonates. Based on the predicted target genes of these miRNAs we selected 26 immune-related miRNAs out of the differentially expressed miRNAs for further testing by quantitative PCR. We simultaneously detected the immune response genes by PCR array and plasma cytokine levels using a protein chip to investigate the effect of the altered miRNAs on the immune response in neonatal sepsis. There were 10 immune regulatory miRNAs whose expression was significantly changed more than two fold in the neonates with sepsis compared with the uninfected neonates. The expression levels of 11 immune response genes and the plasma levels of 15 cytokines or receptors were significantly up- or down-regulated in the neonates with sepsis compared to the uninfected neonates. This comprehensive analysis suggests that the altered miRNAs modulate the immune response during neonatal sepsis in a way that represses the inflammatory response. Our investigation demonstrated some miRNAs with altered expression levels and their probable association with the regulation of immune response during neonatal sepsis. The characteristics of the neonatal inflammatory response could be attributed to immature immune function of neonates.

  17. Effects of active immunization against cholecystokinin 8 on performance, contents of serum hormones, and expressions of CCK gene and CCK receptor gene in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Keying; Yuan, Zhongbiao; Bing, Yu; Chen, Xiaoling; Ding, Xuemei; Chen, Daiwen

    2007-12-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of active immunization against cholecystokinin 8 (CCK(8)) on the content of serum CCK, expression of CCK, and CCK receptor gene in pigs. The subjects for this experiment were 15 pigs divided into three groups (5 pigs per group). The treated groups were immunized with CCK(8) conjugated to human serum albumin (HSA). The control group was immunized with same dosage of HSA. The average daily gain of pig fed with 250 microg CCK was significantly increased (P active immunization against CCK(8) could increase the content of CCK antibody and suppress CCK gene and CCK receptor gene expressions and in result improve feed intake and growth performance of pigs.

  18. Genome-wide gene by lead exposure interaction analysis identifies UNC5D as a candidate gene for neurodevelopment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhaoxi; Claus Henn, Birgit; Wang, Chaolong; Wei, Yongyue; Su, Li; Sun, Ryan; Chen, Han; Wagner, Peter J; Lu, Quan; Lin, Xihong; Wright, Robert; Bellinger, David; Kile, Molly; Mazumdar, Maitreyi; Tellez-Rojo, Martha Maria; Schnaas, Lourdes; Christiani, David C

    2017-07-28

    Neurodevelopment is a complex process involving both genetic and environmental factors. Prenatal exposure to lead (Pb) has been associated with lower performance on neurodevelopmental tests. Adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes are more frequent and/or more severe when toxic exposures interact with genetic susceptibility. To explore possible loci associated with increased susceptibility to prenatal Pb exposure, we performed a genome-wide gene-environment interaction study (GWIS) in young children from Mexico (n = 390) and Bangladesh (n = 497). Prenatal Pb exposure was estimated by cord blood Pb concentration. Neurodevelopment was assessed using the Bayley Scales of Infant Development. We identified a locus on chromosome 8, containing UNC5D, and demonstrated evidence of its genome-wide significance with mental composite scores (rs9642758, p meta = 4.35 × 10-6). Within this locus, the joint effects of two independent single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, rs9642758 and rs10503970) had a p-value of 4.38 × 10-9 for mental composite scores. Correlating GWIS results with in vitro transcriptomic profiles identified one common gene, SLC1A5, which is involved in synaptic function, neuronal development, and excitotoxicity. Further analysis revealed interconnected interactions that formed a large network of 52 genes enriched with oxidative stress genes and neurodevelopmental genes. Our findings suggest that certain genetic polymorphisms within/near genes relevant to neurodevelopment might modify the toxic effects of Pb exposure via oxidative stress.

  19. The nuclear IκB family of proteins controls gene regulation and immune homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MaruYama, Takashi

    2015-10-01

    The inhibitory IκB family of proteins is subdivided into two groups based on protein localization in the cytoplasm or in the nucleus. These proteins interact with NF-κB, a major transcription factor regulating the expression of many inflammatory cytokines, by modulating its transcriptional activity. However, nuclear IκB family proteins not only interact with NF-κB to change its transcriptional activity, but they also bind to chromatin and control gene expression. This review provides an overview of nuclear IκB family proteins and their role in immune homeostasis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Trans-species polymorphism at antimicrobial innate immunity cathelicidin genes of Atlantic cod and related species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrín Halldórsdóttir

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Natural selection, the most important force in evolution, comes in three forms. Negative purifying selection removes deleterious variation and maintains adaptations. Positive directional selection fixes beneficial variants, producing new adaptations. Balancing selection maintains variation in a population. Important mechanisms of balancing selection include heterozygote advantage, frequency-dependent advantage of rarity, and local and fluctuating episodic selection. A rare pathogen gains an advantage because host defenses are predominantly effective against prevalent types. Similarly, a rare immune variant gives its host an advantage because the prevalent pathogens cannot escape the host’s apostatic defense. Due to the stochastic nature of evolution, neutral variation may accumulate on genealogical branches, but trans-species polymorphisms are rare under neutrality and are strong evidence for balancing selection. Balanced polymorphism maintains diversity at the major histocompatibility complex (MHC in vertebrates. The Atlantic cod is missing genes for both MHC-II and CD4, vital parts of the adaptive immune system. Nevertheless, cod are healthy in their ecological niche, maintaining large populations that support major commercial fisheries. Innate immunity is of interest from an evolutionary perspective, particularly in taxa lacking adaptive immunity. Here, we analyze extensive amino acid and nucleotide polymorphisms of the cathelicidin gene family in Atlantic cod and closely related taxa. There are three major clusters, Cath1, Cath2, and Cath3, that we consider to be paralogous genes. There is extensive nucleotide and amino acid allelic variation between and within clusters. The major feature of the results is that the variation clusters by alleles and not by species in phylogenetic trees and discriminant analysis of principal components. Variation within the three groups shows trans-species polymorphism that is older than speciation and that

  1. Association between selected antimicrobial resistance genes and antimicrobial exposure in Danish pig farms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkegård, Anna Camilla; Hisham Beshara Halasa, Tariq; Græsbøll, Kaare

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in pigs is an important public health concern due to its possible transfer to humans. We aimed at quantifying the relationship between the lifetime exposure of antimicrobials and seven antimicrobial resistance genes in Danish slaughter pig farms. AMR gene...... levels were quantified by qPCR of total-community DNA in faecal samples obtained from 681 batches of slaughter pigs. The lifetime exposure to antimicrobials was estimated at batch level for the piglet, weaner, and finisher periods individually for the sampled batches. We showed that the effect...... of antimicrobial exposure on the levels of AMR genes was complex and unique for each individual gene. Several antimicrobial classes had both negative and positive correlations with the AMR genes. From 10-42% of the variation in AMR gene levels could be explained in the final regression models, indicating...

  2. Zebra Fish Lacking Adaptive Immunity Acquire an Antiviral Alert State Characterized by Upregulated Gene Expression of Apoptosis, Multigene Families, and Interferon-Related Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Valtanen, Pablo; Martínez-López, Alicia; López-Muñoz, Azucena; Bello-Perez, Melissa; Medina-Gali, Regla M; Ortega-Villaizán, María Del Mar; Varela, Monica; Figueras, Antonio; Mulero, Víctoriano; Novoa, Beatriz; Estepa, Amparo; Coll, Julio

    2017-01-01

    To investigate fish innate immunity, we have conducted organ and cell immune-related transcriptomic as well as immunohistologic analysis in mutant zebra fish (Danio rerio) lacking adaptive immunity (rag1-/-) at different developmental stages (egg, larvae, and adult), before and after infection with spring viremia carp virus (SVCV). The results revealed that, compared to immunocompetent zebra fish (rag1+/+ ), rag1-/- acquired increased resistance to SVCV with age, correlating with elevated transcript levels of immune genes in skin/fins and lymphoid organs (head kidney and spleen). Gene sets corresponding to apoptotic functions, immune-related multigene families, and interferon-related genes were constitutively upregulated in uninfected adult rag1-/- zebra fish. Overexpression of activated CASPASE-3 in different tissues before and after infection with SVCV further confirmed increased apoptotic function in rag1-/- zebra fish. Concurrently, staining of different tissue samples with a pan-leukocyte antibody marker showed abundant leukocyte infiltrations in SVCV-infected rag1-/- fish, coinciding with increased transcript expression of genes related to NK-cells and macrophages, suggesting that these genes played a key role in the enhanced immune response of rag1-/- zebra fish to SVCV lethal infection. Overall, we present evidence that indicates that rag1-/- zebra fish acquire an antiviral alert state while they reach adulthood in the absence of adaptive immunity. This antiviral state was characterized by (i) a more rapid response to viral infection, which resulted in increased survival, (ii) the involvement of NK-cell- and macrophage-mediated transcript responses rather than B- and/or T-cell dependent cells, and (iii) enhanced apoptosis, described here for the first time, as well as the similar modulation of multigene family/interferon-related genes previously associated to fish that survived lethal viral infections. From this and other studies, it might be concluded that

  3. Extremely low-level microwaves attenuate immune imbalance induced by inhalation exposure to low-level toluene in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novoselova, Elena G; Glushkova, Olga V; Khrenov, Maxim O; Novoselova, Tatyana V; Lunin, Sergey M; Fesenko, Eugeny E

    2017-05-01

    To clarify whether extremely low-level microwaves (MW) alone or in combination with p38 inhibitor affect immune cell responses to inhalation exposure of mice to low-level toluene. The cytokine profile, heat shock proteins expression, and the activity of several signal cascades, namely, NF-κB, SAPK/JNK, IRF-3, p38 MAPK, and TLR4 were measured in spleen lymphocytes of mice treated to air-delivered toluene (0.6 mg/m 3 ) or extremely low-level microwaves (8.15-18 GHz, 1μW/cm 2 , 1 Hz swinging frequency) or combined action of these two factors. A single exposure to air-delivered low-level toluene induced activation of NF-κB, SAPK/JNK, IFR-3, p38 MAPK and TLR4 pathways. Furthermore, air toluene induced the expression of Hsp72 and enhanced IL-1, IL-6, and TNF-α in blood plasma, which is indicative of a pro-inflammatory response. Exposure to MW alone also resulted in the enhancement of the plasma cytokine values (e.g. IL-6, TNF-α, and IFN-γ) and activation of the NF-κB, MAPK p38, and especially the TLR4 pathways in splenic lymphocytes. Paradoxically, pre-exposure to MW partially recovered or normalized the lymphocyte parameters in the toluene-exposed mice, while the p38 inhibitor XI additionally increased protective activity of microwaves by down regulating MAPKs (JNK and p38), IKK, as well as expression of TLR4 and Hsp90-α. The results suggest that exposure to low-intensity MW at specific conditions may recover immune parameters in mice undergoing inhalation exposure to low-level toluene via mechanisms involving cellular signaling.

  4. De novo transcriptomic analysis of peripheral blood lymphocytes from the Chinese goose: gene discovery and immune system pathway description.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansoor Tariq

    Full Text Available The Chinese goose is one of the most economically important poultry birds and is a natural reservoir for many avian viruses. However, the nature and regulation of the innate and adaptive immune systems of this waterfowl species are not completely understood due to limited information on the goose genome. Recently, transcriptome sequencing technology was applied in the genomic studies focused on novel gene discovery. Thus, this study described the transcriptome of the goose peripheral blood lymphocytes to identify immunity relevant genes.De novo transcriptome assembly of the goose peripheral blood lymphocytes was sequenced by Illumina-Solexa technology. In total, 211,198 unigenes were assembled from the 69.36 million cleaned reads. The average length, N50 size and the maximum length of the assembled unigenes were 687 bp, 1,298 bp and 18,992 bp, respectively. A total of 36,854 unigenes showed similarity by BLAST search against the NCBI non-redundant (Nr protein database. For functional classification, 163,161 unigenes were comprised of three Gene Ontology (Go categories and 67 subcategories. A total of 15,334 unigenes were annotated into 25 eukaryotic orthologous groups (KOGs categories. Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG database annotated 39,585 unigenes into six biological functional groups and 308 pathways. Among the 2,757 unigenes that participated in the 15 immune system KEGG pathways, 125 of the most important immune relevant genes were summarized and analyzed by STRING analysis to identify gene interactions and relationships. Moreover, 10 genes were confirmed by PCR and analyzed. Of these 125 unigenes, 109 unigenes, approximately 87%, were not previously identified in the goose.This de novo transcriptome analysis could provide important Chinese goose sequence information and highlights the value of new gene discovery, pathways investigation and immune system gene identification, and comparison with other avian species as useful

  5. Effects of microwave exposure on the hamster immune system. III. Macrophage resistance to vesicular stomatitis virus infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, G.R.; Cain, C.A.; Tompkins, W.A.

    1984-01-01

    Exposure of hamsters to microwave (MW) energy (2.45 GHz, 25 mW/cm2, 1 h) resulted in activation of peritoneal macrophages (PM) to a viricidal state restricting the replication of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). The PM from MW-exposed hamsters were viricidal as early as 1 day after exposure and remained active for 5 days. Immunization of hamsters with vaccinia virus induced viricidal PM by 3 to 4 days and they remained active for 7 days. To test the hypothesis that thermogenic MW exposure results in the release of endotoxin across the intestinal epithelium which subsequently activates PM, hamsters were injected with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and their viricidal activity was studied. Lipopolysaccharide in vitro (0.2 microgram) and in vivo (0.5 microgram) activated macrophages to a viricidal state. When administered in vivo, LPS (0.5 microgram) activated macrophages as early as 1 day and the activity remained for 3 days. While MW exposure of PM in vitro failed to induce viricidal activity, exposure of PM to LPS in vitro induced strong viricidal activity. This suggests that the in vivo response of PM to MW is an indirect one, which is consistent with the hypothesis that MW-induced PM viricidal activity may be mediated via LPS. In preliminary experiments, MW exposure resulted in extended survival time for hamsters challenged with a lethal dose of vesicular stomatitis virus, supporting the concept that MW-activated PM may be a useful therapeutic modality.

  6. The evolution of TEP1, an exceptionally polymorphic immunity gene in Anopheles gambiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Guiyun

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Host-parasite coevolution can result in balancing selection, which maintains genetic variation in the susceptibility of hosts to parasites. It has been suggested that variation in a thioester-containing protein called TEP1 (AGAP010815 may alter the ability of Anopheles mosquitoes to transmit Plasmodium parasites, and high divergence between alleles of this gene suggests the possible action of long-term balancing selection. We studied whether TEP1 is a case of an ancient balanced polymorphism in an animal immune system. Results We found evidence that the high divergence between TEP1 alleles is the product of genetic exchange between TEP1 and other TEP loci, i.e. gene conversion. Additionally, some TEP1 alleles showed unexpectedly low variability. Conclusion The TEP1 gene appears to be a chimera produced from at least two other TEP loci, and the divergence between TEP1 alleles is probably not caused by long-term balancing selection, but is instead due to two independent gene conversion events from one of these other genes. Nevertheless, TEP1 still shows evidence of natural selection, in particular there appears to have been recent changes in the frequency of alleles that has diminished polymorphism within each allelic class. Although the selective force driving this dynamic was not identified, given that susceptibility to Plasmodium parasites is known to be associated with allelic variation in TEP1, these changes in allele frequencies could alter the vectoring capacity of populations.

  7. Immune deviation by mucosal antigen administration suppresses gene-transfer-induced inhibitor formation to factor IX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Ou; Armstrong, Elina; Schlachterman, Alexander; Wang, Lixin; Okita, David K; Conti-Fine, Bianca; High, Katherine A; Herzog, Roland W

    2006-07-15

    Formation of inhibitory antibodies is a serious complication of protein or gene replacement therapy for hemophilias, congenital X-linked bleeding disorders. In hemophilia B (coagulation factor IX [F.IX] deficiency), lack of endogenous F.IX antigen expression and other genetic factors may increase the risk of antibody formation to functional F.IX. Here, we developed a protocol for reducing inhibitor formation in gene therapy by prior mucosal (intranasal) administration of a peptide representing a human F.IX-specific CD4(+) T-cell epitope in hemophilia B mice. C3H/HeJ mice with a F.IX gene deletion produced inhibitory IgG to human F.IX after hepatic gene transfer with an adeno-associated viral vector. These animals subsequently lost systemic F.IX expression. In contrast, repeated intranasal administration of the specific peptide resulted in reduced inhibitor formation, sustained circulating F.IX levels, and sustained partial correction of coagulation following hepatic gene transfer. This was achieved through immune deviation to a T-helper-cell response with increased IL-10 and TGF-beta production and activation of regulatory CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells.

  8. Dynamic expression of leukocyte innate immune genes in whole blood from horses with lipopolysaccharide-induced acute systemic inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, Anne Mette L.; Skovgaard, Kerstin; Heegaard, Peter M. H.

    2015-01-01

    ) and sepsis. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the expression of 31 selected blood leukocyte immune genes in an equine model of acute systemic inflammation to identify significantly regulated genes and to describe their expression dynamics during a 24-h experimental period. Systemic...

  9. Evaluation of immune and apoptosis related gene responses using an RNAi approach in vaccinated Penaeus monodon during oral WSSV infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kulkarni, A.D.; Caipang, C.M.A.; Kiron, V.; Rombout, J.H.W.M.; Fernandes, J.M.O.; Brinchmann, M.

    2014-01-01

    In the present study RNA interference was used to elucidate the connection between two endogenous genes [Penaeus monodon Rab7 (PmRab7) or P. monodon inhibitor of apoptosis (PmIAP)], and selected immune/apoptosis-related genes in orally ‘vaccinated’ shrimp after white spot syndrome virus (WSSV)

  10. Effects of FVIII immunity on hepatocyte and hematopoietic stem cell–directed gene therapy of murine hemophilia A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lytle, Allison M; Brown, Harrison C; Paik, Na Yoon; Knight, Kristopher A; Wright, J Fraser; Spencer, H Trent; Doering, Christopher B

    2016-01-01

    Immune responses to coagulation factors VIII (FVIII) and IX (FIX) represent primary obstacles to hemophilia treatment. Previously, we showed that hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) retroviral gene therapy induces immune nonresponsiveness to FVIII in both naive and preimmunized murine hemophilia A settings. Liver-directed adeno-associated viral (AAV)-FIX vector gene transfer achieved similar results in preclinical hemophilia B models. However, as clinical immune responses to FVIII and FIX differ, we investigated the ability of liver-directed AAV-FVIII gene therapy to affect FVIII immunity in hemophilia A mice. Both FVIII naive and preimmunized mice were administered recombinant AAV8 encoding a liver-directed bioengineered FVIII expression cassette. Naive animals receiving high or mid-doses subsequently achieved near normal FVIII activity levels. However, challenge with adjuvant-free recombinant FVIII induced loss of FVIII activity and anti-FVIII antibodies in mid-dose, but not high-dose AAV or HSC lentiviral (LV) vector gene therapy cohorts. Furthermore, unlike what was shown previously for FIX gene transfer, AAV-FVIII administration to hemophilia A inhibitor mice conferred no effect on anti-FVIII antibody or inhibitory titers. These data suggest that functional differences exist in the immune modulation achieved to FVIII or FIX in hemophilia mice by gene therapy approaches incorporating liver-directed AAV vectors or HSC-directed LV. PMID:26909355

  11. Effects of FVIII immunity on hepatocyte and hematopoietic stem cell-directed gene therapy of murine hemophilia A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lytle, Allison M; Brown, Harrison C; Paik, Na Yoon; Knight, Kristopher A; Wright, J Fraser; Spencer, H Trent; Doering, Christopher B

    2016-01-01

    Immune responses to coagulation factors VIII (FVIII) and IX (FIX) represent primary obstacles to hemophilia treatment. Previously, we showed that hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) retroviral gene therapy induces immune nonresponsiveness to FVIII in both naive and preimmunized murine hemophilia A settings. Liver-directed adeno-associated viral (AAV)-FIX vector gene transfer achieved similar results in preclinical hemophilia B models. However, as clinical immune responses to FVIII and FIX differ, we investigated the ability of liver-directed AAV-FVIII gene therapy to affect FVIII immunity in hemophilia A mice. Both FVIII naive and preimmunized mice were administered recombinant AAV8 encoding a liver-directed bioengineered FVIII expression cassette. Naive animals receiving high or mid-doses subsequently achieved near normal FVIII activity levels. However, challenge with adjuvant-free recombinant FVIII induced loss of FVIII activity and anti-FVIII antibodies in mid-dose, but not high-dose AAV or HSC lentiviral (LV) vector gene therapy cohorts. Furthermore, unlike what was shown previously for FIX gene transfer, AAV-FVIII administration to hemophilia A inhibitor mice conferred no effect on anti-FVIII antibody or inhibitory titers. These data suggest that functional differences exist in the immune modulation achieved to FVIII or FIX in hemophilia mice by gene therapy approaches incorporating liver-directed AAV vectors or HSC-directed LV.

  12. Effects of FVIII immunity on hepatocyte and hematopoietic stem cell–directed gene therapy of murine hemophilia A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison M Lytle

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Immune responses to coagulation factors VIII (FVIII and IX (FIX represent primary obstacles to hemophilia treatment. Previously, we showed that hematopoietic stem cell (HSC retroviral gene therapy induces immune nonresponsiveness to FVIII in both naive and preimmunized murine hemophilia A settings. Liver-directed adeno-associated viral (AAV-FIX vector gene transfer achieved similar results in preclinical hemophilia B models. However, as clinical immune responses to FVIII and FIX differ, we investigated the ability of liver-directed AAV-FVIII gene therapy to affect FVIII immunity in hemophilia A mice. Both FVIII naive and preimmunized mice were administered recombinant AAV8 encoding a liver-directed bioengineered FVIII expression cassette. Naive animals receiving high or mid-doses subsequently achieved near normal FVIII activity levels. However, challenge with adjuvant-free recombinant FVIII induced loss of FVIII activity and anti-FVIII antibodies in mid-dose, but not high-dose AAV or HSC lentiviral (LV vector gene therapy cohorts. Furthermore, unlike what was shown previously for FIX gene transfer, AAV-FVIII administration to hemophilia A inhibitor mice conferred no effect on anti-FVIII antibody or inhibitory titers. These data suggest that functional differences exist in the immune modulation achieved to FVIII or FIX in hemophilia mice by gene therapy approaches incorporating liver-directed AAV vectors or HSC-directed LV.

  13. A Computational Gene Expression Score for Predicting Immune Injury in Renal Allografts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tara K Sigdel

    Full Text Available Whole genome microarray meta-analyses of 1030 kidney, heart, lung and liver allograft biopsies identified a common immune response module (CRM of 11 genes that define acute rejection (AR across different engrafted tissues. We evaluated if the CRM genes can provide a molecular microscope to quantify graft injury in acute rejection (AR and predict risk of progressive interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy (IFTA in histologically normal kidney biopsies.Computational modeling was done on tissue qPCR based gene expression measurements for the 11 CRM genes in 146 independent renal allografts from 122 unique patients with AR (n = 54 and no-AR (n = 92. 24 demographically matched patients with no-AR had 6 and 24 month paired protocol biopsies; all had histologically normal 6 month biopsies, and 12 had evidence of progressive IFTA (pIFTA on their 24 month biopsies. Results were correlated with demographic, clinical and pathology variables.The 11 gene qPCR based tissue CRM score (tCRM was significantly increased in AR (5.68 ± 0.91 when compared to STA (1.29 ± 0.28; p < 0.001 and pIFTA (7.94 ± 2.278 versus 2.28 ± 0.66; p = 0.04, with greatest significance for CXCL9 and CXCL10 in AR (p <0.001 and CD6 (p<0.01, CXCL9 (p<0.05, and LCK (p<0.01 in pIFTA. tCRM was a significant independent correlate of biopsy confirmed AR (p < 0.001; AUC of 0.900; 95% CI = 0.705-903. Gene expression modeling of 6 month biopsies across 7/11 genes (CD6, INPP5D, ISG20, NKG7, PSMB9, RUNX3, and TAP1 significantly (p = 0.037 predicted the development of pIFTA at 24 months.Genome-wide tissue gene expression data mining has supported the development of a tCRM-qPCR based assay for evaluating graft immune inflammation. The tCRM score quantifies injury in AR and stratifies patients at increased risk of future pIFTA prior to any perturbation of graft function or histology.

  14. Gene expression and pathologic alterations in juvenile rainbow trout due to chronic dietary TCDD exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Qing [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Lapham Hall, 3209 N. Maryland Ave., Milwaukee, WI 53211 (United States); School of Freshwater Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, 600 E Greenfield Ave, Milwaukee, WI 53204 (United States); Rise, Matthew L. [Ocean Sciences Centre, Memorial University of Newfoundland, 1 Marine Lab Road, St. John' s, NL, A1C 5S7 (Canada); Spitsbergen, Jan M. [Department of Microbiology, Oregon State University, 220 Nash Hall, Corvallis, OR 97331 (United States); Hori, Tiago S. [Ocean Sciences Centre, Memorial University of Newfoundland, 1 Marine Lab Road, St. John' s, NL, A1C 5S7 (Canada); Mieritz, Mark; Geis, Steven [Wisconsin State Laboratory of Hygiene, 465 Henry Mall, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); McGraw, Joseph E. [School of Pharmacy, Concordia University Wisconsin, 12800 North Lake Shore Drive, Mequon, WI 53097 (United States); Goetz, Giles [School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, University of Washington, 1122 Northeast Boat Street, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Larson, Jeremy; Hutz, Reinhold J. [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Lapham Hall, 3209 N. Maryland Ave., Milwaukee, WI 53211 (United States); Carvan, Michael J., E-mail: carvanmj@uwm.edu [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Lapham Hall, 3209 N. Maryland Ave., Milwaukee, WI 53211 (United States); School of Freshwater Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, 600 E Greenfield Ave, Milwaukee, WI 53204 (United States)

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: •First report of the effects of dietary TCDD in juvenile trout smaller than 20 g. •TCDD uptake was estimated using published models and confirmed by GC. •First report of dietary TCDD-induced lesions in nasal epithelium in any species. •Several useful biomarkers are identified from microarray-based transcriptomics analysis. -- Abstract: The goal of this project was to use functional genomic methods to identify molecular biomarkers as indicators of the impact of TCDD exposure in rainbow trout. Specifically, we investigated the effects of chronic dietary TCDD exposure on whole juvenile rainbow trout global gene expression associated with histopathological analysis. Juvenile rainbow trout were fed Biodiet starter with TCDD added at 0, 0.1, 1, 10 and 100 ppb (ng TCDD/g food), and fish were sampled from each group at 7, 14, 28 and 42 days after initiation of feeding. 100 ppb TCDD caused 100% mortality at 39 days. Fish fed with 100 ppb TCDD food had TCDD accumulation of 47.37 ppb (ng TCDD/g fish) in whole fish at 28 days. Histological analysis from TCDD-treated trout sampled from 28 and 42 days revealed that obvious lesions were found in skin, oropharynx, liver, gas bladder, intestine, pancreas, nose and kidney. In addition, TCDD caused anemia in peripheral blood, decreases in abdominal fat, increases of remodeling of fin rays, edema in pericardium and retrobulbar hemorrhage in the 100 ppb TCDD-treated rainbow trout compared to the control group at 28 days. Dose- and time-dependent global gene expression analyses were performed using the cGRASP 16,000 (16K) cDNA microarray. TCDD-responsive whole body transcripts identified in the microarray experiments have putative functions involved in various biological processes including growth, cell proliferation, metabolic process, and immune system processes. Nine microarray-identified genes were selected for QPCR validation. CYP1A3 and CYP1A1 were common up-regulated genes and HBB1 was a common down

  15. The association of innate immune response gene polymorphisms and puerperal group A streptococcal sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Sarah M; Clark, Erin A S; Nelson, Lesa T; Silver, Robert M

    2010-03-01

    The objective of the study was to determine whether single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that influence the maternal innate immune response are associated with puerperal group A streptococcal sepsis. Subjects with confirmed puerperal group A streptococal infection were prospectively identified in 2 tertiary care hospitals over 18 years. Controls were racially matched subjects with term, uncomplicated deliveries. Thirty-eight polymorphisms associated with the innate immune response to bacterial infection were analyzed. Allele and genotype frequencies for subjects and controls were compared. Forty-eight women with puerperal group A streptococcal infection were identified. DNA was obtained for 28 subjects and 54 controls. Allele frequencies were significantly different between subjects and controls for polymorphisms in Toll-like receptor (TLR) 9-1486 (P = .03) and heat shock protein (HSP) 70-2 1267 (P = .003). Genotype frequencies were significantly different between subjects and controls for TLR9-1486 (P = .025), HSP70-2 1267 (P = .02), and interleukin (IL)-1beta-511 (P = .016). Puerperal group A streptococcal sepsis may be associated with innate immune response gene polymorphisms in TLR9, HSP70-2, and IL1beta. Copyright 2010 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Rapid identification of genes controlling virulence and immunity in malaria parasites

    KAUST Repository

    Abkallo, Hussein M.

    2017-07-13

    Identifying the genetic determinants of phenotypes that impact disease severity is of fundamental importance for the design of new interventions against malaria. Here we present a rapid genome-wide approach capable of identifying multiple genetic drivers of medically relevant phenotypes within malaria parasites via a single experiment at single gene or allele resolution. In a proof of principle study, we found that a previously undescribed single nucleotide polymorphism in the binding domain of the erythrocyte binding like protein (EBL) conferred a dramatic change in red blood cell invasion in mutant rodent malaria parasites Plasmodium yoelii. In the same experiment, we implicated merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP1) and other polymorphic proteins, as the major targets of strain-specific immunity. Using allelic replacement, we provide functional validation of the substitution in the EBL gene controlling the growth rate in the blood stages of the parasites.

  17. Preterm Birth Reduces Nutrient Absorption With Limited Effect on Immune Gene Expression and Gut Colonization in Pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mette V; Cilieborg, Malene S.; Skovgaard, Kerstin

    2015-01-01

    reduced 5 of 30 intestinal genes related to nutrient absorption and innate immunity, relative to near-term pigs, whereas 2 genes were upregulated. Preterm birth also reduced ex vivo intestinal glucose and leucine uptake (40%-50%), but failed to increase cytokine secretions from intestinal explants......The primary risk factors for necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) are preterm birth, enteral feeding, and gut colonization. It is unclear whether feeding and colonization induce excessive expression of immune genes that lead to NEC. Using a pig model, we hypothesized that reduced gestational age would...... upregulate immune-related genes and cause bacterial imbalance after birth. Preterm (85%-92% gestation, n = 53) and near-term (95%-99% gestation, n = 69) pigs were delivered by cesarean section and euthanized at birth or after 2 days of infant formula or bovine colostrum feeding. At birth, preterm delivery...

  18. Temperature influences the expression profiling of immune response genes in rainbow trout following DNA vaccination and VHS virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Einer-Jensen, Katja; Gautier, Laurent; Rasmussen, Jesper Skou

    -PCR. The expression profiles appeared similar for the two genes in terms of temperature dependency with a faster induction and shorter duration at the higher temperature. In order to analyze the temperature effect on the relative expression profiles across a larger set of immune genes time points displaying similar...... an early unspecific antiviral response as well as a long-lasting specific protection. However, temperature appears to influence immune response with respect to the nature and duration of the protective mechanisms. In this study, groups of fish were temperature acclimated, vaccinated and challenged at three...... different temperatures (5, 10 and 15ºC). Tissue and organ samples were collected at numerous time points post vaccination (pv) and post viral challenge (pch). Then, gene expression levels of a two immune genes (Vig-1 and Mx3) involved in unspecific antiviral response mechanisms were determined by Q...

  19. Gene expression profiling of coelomic cells and discovery of immune-related genes in the earthworm, Eisenia andrei, using expressed sequence tags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tak, Eun Sik; Cho, Sung-Jin; Park, Soon Cheol

    2015-01-01

    The coelomic cells of the earthworm consist of leukocytes, chlorogocytes, and coelomocytes, which play an important role in innate immunity reactions. To gain insight into the expression profiles of coelomic cells of the earthworm, Eisenia andrei, we analyzed 1151 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) derived from the cDNA library of the coelomic cells. Among the 1151 ESTs analyzed, 493 ESTs (42.8%) showed a significant similarity to known genes and represented 164 unique genes, of which 93 ESTs were singletons and 71 ESTs manifested as two or more ESTs. From the 164 unique genes sequenced, we found 24 immune-related and cell defense genes. Furthermore, real-time PCR analysis showed that levels of lysenin-related proteins mRNA in coelomic cells of E. andrei were upregulated after the injection of Bacillus subtilis bacteria. This EST data-set would provide a valuable resource for future researches of earthworm immune system.

  20. Characterization of changes in gene expression and biochemical pathways at low levels of benzene exposure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomas, Reuben; Hubbard, Alan E.; McHale, Cliona M.; Zhang, Luoping; Rappaport, Stephen M.; Lan, Qing; Rothman, Nathaniel; Vermeulen, Roel|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/216532620; Guyton, Kathryn Z.; Jinot, Jennifer; Sonawane, Babasaheb R.; Smith, Martyn T.

    2014-01-01

    Benzene, a ubiquitous environmental pollutant, causes acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Recently, through transcriptome profiling of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), we reported dose-dependent effects of benzene exposure on gene expression and biochemical pathways in 83 workers exposed across

  1. Efficient induction of immune tolerance to coagulation factor IX following direct intramuscular gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, E F; Zhuo, J; Kelly, M E; Chao, H J

    2007-06-01

    The formation of inhibitory anti-factor IX (anti-FIX) antibodies is a major complication of FIX protein replacement-based treatment for hemophilia B. It is difficult to treat patients with anti-FIX antibodies. Gene therapy is emerging as a potentially effective treatment for hemophilia. Direct i.m. injection of adeno-associated virus (AAV) is a safe and efficient procedure for hemophilia B gene therapy. However, the development of anti-FIX antibodies following i.m. of AAV may impede its application to patients. We aimed to investigate induction of immune tolerance to human FIX (hFIX) by i.m. of AAV1, further validating i.m. of AAV1 for hemophilia B gene therapy. Cohorts of hemostatically normal and hemophilia B mice with diverse genetic and MHC backgrounds received i.m. of AAV-hFIX. Human FIX antigen and anti-hFIX antibodies were examined. I.m. of 1 x 10(11) vector genomes (VG) of AAV2 elicits formation of anti-hFIX antibodies comparable to those by hFIX protein replacement. I.m. of 1 x 10(11) VG of AAV1 results in expression of therapeutic levels of hFIX (up to 950 ng mL(-1), mean = 772 ng mL(-1), SEM +/- 35.7) and hFIX-specific immune tolerance in C57BL/6 mice. A single i.m. of AAV1 can result in efficient expression of therapeutic levels of hFIX and induction of hFIX tolerance in hemostatically normal and hemophilic B mice. Our results substantiate the prospect of i.m. of AAV1 for hemophilia B gene therapy and FIX tolerance induction.

  2. Transcriptome analysis of the white body of the squid Euprymna tasmanica with emphasis on immune and hematopoietic gene discovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla A Salazar

    Full Text Available In the mutualistic relationship between the squid Euprymna tasmanica and the bioluminescent bacterium Vibrio fischeri, several host factors, including immune-related proteins, are known to interact and respond specifically and exclusively to the presence of the symbiont. In squid and octopus, the white body is considered to be an immune organ mainly due to the fact that blood cells, or hemocytes, are known to be present in high numbers and in different developmental stages. Hence, the white body has been described as the site of hematopoiesis in cephalopods. However, to our knowledge, there are no studies showing any molecular evidence of such functions. In this study, we performed a transcriptomic analysis of white body tissue of the Southern dumpling squid, E. tasmanica. Our primary goal was to gain insights into the functions of this tissue and to test for the presence of gene transcripts associated with hematopoietic and immune processes. Several hematopoiesis genes including CPSF1, GATA 2, TFIID, and FGFR2 were found to be expressed in the white body. In addition, transcripts associated with immune-related signal transduction pathways, such as the toll-like receptor/NF-κβ, and MAPK pathways were also found, as well as other immune genes previously identified in E. tasmanica's sister species, E. scolopes. This study is the first to analyze an immune organ within cephalopods, and to provide gene expression data supporting the white body as a hematopoietic tissue.

  3. Transcriptome analysis of the white body of the squid Euprymna tasmanica with emphasis on immune and hematopoietic gene discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Karla A; Joffe, Nina R; Dinguirard, Nathalie; Houde, Peter; Castillo, Maria G

    2015-01-01

    In the mutualistic relationship between the squid Euprymna tasmanica and the bioluminescent bacterium Vibrio fischeri, several host factors, including immune-related proteins, are known to interact and respond specifically and exclusively to the presence of the symbiont. In squid and octopus, the white body is considered to be an immune organ mainly due to the fact that blood cells, or hemocytes, are known to be present in high numbers and in different developmental stages. Hence, the white body has been described as the site of hematopoiesis in cephalopods. However, to our knowledge, there are no studies showing any molecular evidence of such functions. In this study, we performed a transcriptomic analysis of white body tissue of the Southern dumpling squid, E. tasmanica. Our primary goal was to gain insights into the functions of this tissue and to test for the presence of gene transcripts associated with hematopoietic and immune processes. Several hematopoiesis genes including CPSF1, GATA 2, TFIID, and FGFR2 were found to be expressed in the white body. In addition, transcripts associated with immune-related signal transduction pathways, such as the toll-like receptor/NF-κβ, and MAPK pathways were also found, as well as other immune genes previously identified in E. tasmanica's sister species, E. scolopes. This study is the first to analyze an immune organ within cephalopods, and to provide gene expression data supporting the white body as a hematopoietic tissue.

  4. Regulatory T cells and immune tolerance to coagulation factor IX in the context of intramuscular AAV1 gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Meagan; Bharadwaj, Arpita S; Tacke, Frank; Chao, Hengjun

    2010-02-01

    Regulatory T cells play a major role in induction and maintenance of immune tolerance and immunological homeostasis. A variety of strategies have been attempted to induce regulatory T cells for control of unwanted, adverse immunity in autoimmune diseases, transplantation as well as gene transfer. We recently reported efficient induction of immune tolerance to coagulation factor IX (FIX) following intramuscular AAV1 gene transfer. In the current study, we performed a systematic and comprehensive examination of the role and function of regulatory T cells in induction and maintenance of FIX tolerance in the context of intramuscular AAV1 gene transfer. We observed no significant upregulation of regulatory T cells in the FIX-tolerant mice. In addition, adoptive transfer of splenocytes from FIX-tolerant mice did not suppress anti-hFIX immunity in recipient mice. Both in vitro and in vivo depletion of regulatory T cells failed to reverse FIX tolerance. These observations revealed that regulatory T cells do not play a significant role in the maintenance/protection of the established FIX tolerance. Our results provide critical insight into the role and function of regulatory T cells in induction and maintenance/protection of immune tolerance in gene transfer, complementing the current paradigm of immune tolerance mechanism.

  5. Immune function genes CD99L2, JARID2 and TPO show association with autism spectrum disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramos Paula S

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A growing number of clinical and basic research studies have implicated immunological abnormalities as being associated with and potentially responsible for the cognitive and behavioral deficits seen in autism spectrum disorder (ASD children. Here we test the hypothesis that immune-related gene loci are associated with ASD. Findings We identified 2,012 genes of known immune-function via Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. Family-based tests of association were computed on the 22,904 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs from the 2,012 immune-related genes on 1,510 trios available at the Autism Genetic Resource Exchange (AGRE repository. Several SNPs in immune-related genes remained statistically significantly associated with ASD after adjusting for multiple comparisons. Specifically, we observed significant associations in the CD99 molecule-like 2 region (CD99L2, rs11796490, P = 4.01 × 10-06, OR = 0.68 (0.58-0.80, in the jumonji AT rich interactive domain 2 (JARID2 gene (rs13193457, P = 2.71 × 10-06, OR = 0.61 (0.49-0.75, and in the thyroid peroxidase gene (TPO (rs1514687, P = 5.72 × 10-06, OR = 1.46 (1.24-1.72. Conclusions This study suggests that despite the lack of a general enrichment of SNPs in immune function genes in ASD children, several novel genes with known immune functions are associated with ASD.

  6. Transportin-SR is required for proper splicing of resistance genes and plant immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaohua Xu

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Transportin-SR (TRN-SR is a member of the importin-β super-family that functions as the nuclear import receptor for serine-arginine rich (SR proteins, which play diverse roles in RNA metabolism. Here we report the identification and cloning of mos14 (modifier of snc1-1, 14, a mutation that suppresses the immune responses conditioned by the auto-activated Resistance (R protein snc1 (suppressor of npr1-1, constitutive 1. MOS14 encodes a nuclear protein with high similarity to previously characterized TRN-SR proteins in animals. Yeast two-hybrid assays showed that MOS14 interacts with AtRAN1 via its N-terminus and SR proteins via its C-terminus. In mos14-1, localization of several SR proteins to the nucleus was impaired, confirming that MOS14 functions as a TRN-SR. The mos14-1 mutation results in altered splicing patterns of SNC1 and another R gene RPS4 and compromised resistance mediated by snc1 and RPS4, suggesting that nuclear import of SR proteins by MOS14 is required for proper splicing of these two R genes and is important for their functions in plant immunity.

  7. Genome-Wide Association Studies Suggest Limited Immune Gene Enrichment in Schizophrenia Compared to 5 Autoimmune Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouget, Jennie G; Gonçalves, Vanessa F; Spain, Sarah L; Finucane, Hilary K; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Kennedy, James L; Knight, Jo

    2016-09-01

    There has been intense debate over the immunological basis of schizophrenia, and the potential utility of adjunct immunotherapies. The major histocompatibility complex is consistently the most powerful region of association in genome-wide association studies (GWASs) of schizophrenia and has been interpreted as strong genetic evidence supporting the immune hypothesis. However, global pathway analyses provide inconsistent evidence of immune involvement in schizophrenia, and it remains unclear whether genetic data support an immune etiology per se. Here we empirically test the hypothesis that variation in immune genes contributes to schizophrenia. We show that there is no enrichment of immune loci outside of the MHC region in the largest genetic study of schizophrenia conducted to date, in contrast to 5 diseases of known immune origin. Among 108 regions of the genome previously associated with schizophrenia, we identify 6 immune candidates (DPP4, HSPD1, EGR1, CLU, ESAM, NFATC3) encoding proteins with alternative, nonimmune roles in the brain. While our findings do not refute evidence that has accumulated in support of the immune hypothesis, they suggest that genetically mediated alterations in immune function may not play a major role in schizophrenia susceptibility. Instead, there may be a role for pleiotropic effects of a small number of immune genes that also regulate brain development and plasticity. Whether immune alterations drive schizophrenia progression is an important question to be addressed by future research, especially in light of the growing interest in applying immunotherapies in schizophrenia. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center.

  8. Identification of Aadnr1, a novel gene related to innate immunity and apoptosis in Aedes albopictus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaomei; Meng, Kun; Qiao, Jialu; Liu, Hao; Zhong, Chunyan; Liu, Qingzhen

    2016-08-01

    Innate immunity and apoptosis play critical roles in defending pathogens in insects. In Drosophila, Dnr1 was reported as a negative regulator of apoptosis and immune deficiency (Imd) pathway which belongs to innate immunity. Aedes albopictus is an important kind of arbovirus vector and becoming a significant threat to public health due to its rapid global expansion. Here we identified an ortholog of dnr1 from A. albopictus, named as Aadnr1. Aadnr1 encoded a putative protein containing an N-terminal FERM domain and a C-terminal RING domain. AaDnr1 shared high identity with dipteran insects Dnr1 orthologs. Phylogenetic analyses showed that the closest relative of AaDnr1 was Aedes aegypti Dnr1. Real-time PCR proved that Aadnr1 mRNA was expressed ubiquitously during developmental and adult stages. Transcriptional levels of Aadnr1 were decreased drastically in C6/36 cells underwent apoptosis induced by Actinomycin D (Act D) treatment. Partial silence of Aadnr1 enhanced Act D-induced caspase activity. When challenged by heat-inactivated E. coli, transcriptional level of Aadnr1 was also decreased dramatically in C6/36 cells. While when C6/36 cells were infected with Sindbis virus TE/GFP, transcriptional level of Aadnr1 was reduced and recovered repeatedly, with an overall decreasing trend. It was also shown in this study that similar to Drosophila Dnr1, RING domain destabilized AaDnr1 protein. Taken together, the study identified an innate immunity and apoptosis related gene Aadnr1 in A. albopictus. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Wolbachia-mediated antibacterial protection and immune gene regulation in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhee Sheen Wong

    Full Text Available The outcome of microbial infection of insects is dependent not only on interactions between the host and pathogen, but also on the interactions between microbes that co-infect the host. Recently the maternally inherited endosymbiotic bacteria Wolbachia has been shown to protect insects from a range of microbial and eukaryotic pathogens. Mosquitoes experimentally infected with Wolbachia have upregulated immune responses and are protected from a number of pathogens including viruses, bacteria, Plasmodium and filarial nematodes. It has been hypothesised that immune upregulation underpins Wolbachia-mediated protection. Drosophila is a strong model for understanding host-Wolbachia-pathogen interactions. Wolbachia-mediated antiviral protection in Drosophila has been demonstrated for a number of different Wolbachia strains. In this study we investigate whether Wolbachia-infected flies are also protected against pathogenic bacteria. Drosophila simulans lines infected with five different Wolbachia strains were challenged with the pathogenic bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA01, Serratia marcescens and Erwinia carotovora and mortality compared to paired lines without Wolbachia. No difference in mortality was observed in the flies with or without Wolbachia. Similarly no antibacterial protection was observed for D. melanogaster infected with Wolbachia. Interestingly, D. melanogaster Oregon RC flies which are naturally infected with Wolbachia showed no upregulation of the antibacterial immune genes TepIV, Defensin, Diptericin B, PGRP-SD, Cecropin A1 and Attacin D compared to paired flies without Wolbachia. Taken together these results indicate that Wolbachia-mediated antibacterial protection is not ubiquitous in insects and furthermore that the mechanisms of antibacterial and antiviral protection are independent. We suggest that the immune priming and antibacterial protection observed in Wolbachia-infected mosquitoes may be a consequence of the recent

  10. Innate Immunity and the Inter-exposure Interval Determine the Dynamics of Secondary Influenza Virus Infection and Explain Observed Viral Hierarchies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Pengxing; Yan, Ada W C; Heffernan, Jane M; Petrie, Stephen; Moss, Robert G; Carolan, Louise A; Guarnaccia, Teagan A; Kelso, Anne; Barr, Ian G; McVernon, Jodie; Laurie, Karen L; McCaw, James M

    2015-08-01

    Influenza is an infectious disease that primarily attacks the respiratory system. Innate immunity provides both a very early defense to influenza virus invasion and an effective control of viral growth. Previous modelling studies of virus-innate immune response interactions have focused on infection with a single virus and, while improving our understanding of viral and immune dynamics, have been unable to effectively evaluate the relative feasibility of different hypothesised mechanisms of antiviral immunity. In recent experiments, we have applied consecutive exposures to different virus strains in a ferret model, and demonstrated that viruses differed in their ability to induce a state of temporary immunity or viral interference capable of modifying the infection kinetics of the subsequent exposure. These results imply that virus-induced early immune responses may be responsible for the observed viral hierarchy. Here we introduce and analyse a family of within-host models of re-infection viral kinetics which allow for different viruses to stimulate the innate immune response to different degrees. The proposed models differ in their hypothesised mechanisms of action of the non-specific innate immune response. We compare these alternative models in terms of their abilities to reproduce the re-exposure data. Our results show that 1) a model with viral control mediated solely by a virus-resistant state, as commonly considered in the literature, is not able to reproduce the observed viral hierarchy; 2) the synchronised and desynchronised behaviour of consecutive virus infections is highly dependent upon the interval between primary virus and challenge virus exposures and is consistent with virus-dependent stimulation of the innate immune response. Our study provides the first mechanistic explanation for the recently observed influenza viral hierarchies and demonstrates the importance of understanding the host response to multi-strain viral infections. Re-exposure

  11. Innate Immunity and the Inter-exposure Interval Determine the Dynamics of Secondary Influenza Virus Infection and Explain Observed Viral Hierarchies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengxing Cao

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Influenza is an infectious disease that primarily attacks the respiratory system. Innate immunity provides both a very early defense to influenza virus invasion and an effective control of viral growth. Previous modelling studies of virus-innate immune response interactions have focused on infection with a single virus and, while improving our understanding of viral and immune dynamics, have been unable to effectively evaluate the relative feasibility of different hypothesised mechanisms of antiviral immunity. In recent experiments, we have applied consecutive exposures to different virus strains in a ferret model, and demonstrated that viruses differed in their ability to induce a state of temporary immunity or viral interference capable of modifying the infection kinetics of the subsequent exposure. These results imply that virus-induced early immune responses may be responsible for the observed viral hierarchy. Here we introduce and analyse a family of within-host models of re-infection viral kinetics which allow for different viruses to stimulate the innate immune response to different degrees. The proposed models differ in their hypothesised mechanisms of action of the non-specific innate immune response. We compare these alternative models in terms of their abilities to reproduce the re-exposure data. Our results show that 1 a model with viral control mediated solely by a virus-resistant state, as commonly considered in the literature, is not able to reproduce the observed viral hierarchy; 2 the synchronised and desynchronised behaviour of consecutive virus infections is highly dependent upon the interval between primary virus and challenge virus exposures and is consistent with virus-dependent stimulation of the innate immune response. Our study provides the first mechanistic explanation for the recently observed influenza viral hierarchies and demonstrates the importance of understanding the host response to multi-strain viral infections

  12. Effects of dietary polyvinylchloride microparticles on general health, immune status and expression of several genes related to stress in gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa, Cristóbal; Cuesta, Alberto; Esteban, María Ángeles

    2017-09-01

    It is a long-recognized fact that marine plastic debris contaminates the oceans and seas of the entire world. Even though their effects on the aquatic biota are not well documented or understood. The effects of dietary polyvinylchloride microparticles (PVC-MPs) on the general health, immune status and some stress markers were studied using gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata) as a model of marine fish. Thirty specimens were randomly placed in three running sea water aquaria and fish in each aquarium received an experimental diet containing 0 (control), 100 or 500 mg kg-1 of PVC-MPs for 30 days. Metabolic parameters in serum indicated that the dietary intake of PVC-MPs negatively affected several vital organs. Humoral immune parameters were determined in serum and skin mucus. Cellular immune parameters were determined in head-kidney leucocytes. Concomitantly, the expression of different genes related to stress was studied in head-kidney and liver. Regarding head-kidney gene expression, prdx5 was significantly decreased by PVC-MPs intake for 15 and 30 days, respect to the values found in control fish. On the other hand, the expression of prdx1 and prdx3 were significantly increased by the PVC-MPs intake during 15 and 30 days, compared with the values found in control fish. Furthermore, the expression of hsp90 and ucp1 genes decreased and increased, respectively, in the liver of fish fed 500 mg kg-1 of PVC-MPs for 30 days. Although ingestion of PVC-MPs provoked few significant effects (mostly increases) in the main immune activities of gilthead seabream compared with the values found in control fish, PVC-MPs are recognized by the fish as stressors. Continued exposure of fish to high concentrations of PVC-MPs could have a negative impact on fish physiology due to the chronic stress produced. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Chemotherapy modulates intestinal immune gene expression including surfactant Protein-D and deleted in malignant brain tumors 1 in piglets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rathe, Mathias; Thomassen, Mads; Shen, René L.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Information about chemotherapy-induced intestinal gene expression may provide insight into the mechanisms underlying gut toxicity and help identify biomarkers and targets for intervention. Methods: We analyzed jejunal tissue from piglets subjected to two different, clinically relevant...... the upregulated genes for both treatments. Conclusion: In the developing intestine, chemotherapy increases the expression of genes related to innate immune functions involved in surveillance, protection, and homeostasis of mucosal surfaces....

  14. Local Gene Delivery System by Bubble Liposomes and Ultrasound Exposure into Joint Synovium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoichi Negishi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, we have developed novel polyethylene glycol modified liposomes (bubble liposomes; BL entrapping an ultrasound (US imaging gas, which can work as a gene delivery tool with US exposure. In this study, we investigated the usefulness of US-mediated gene transfer systems with BL into synoviocytes in vitro and joint synovium in vivo. Highly efficient gene transfer could be achieved in the cultured primary synoviocytes transfected with the combination of BL and US exposure, compared to treatment with plasmid DNA (pDNA alone, pDNA plus BL, or pDNA plus US. When BL was injected into the knee joints of mice, and US exposure was applied transcutaneously to the injection site, highly efficient gene expression could be observed in the knee joint transfected with the combination of BL and US exposure, compared to treatment with pDNA alone, pDNA plus BL, or pDNA plus US. The localized and prolonged gene expression was also shown by an in vivo luciferase imaging system. Thus, this local gene delivery system into joint synovium using the combination of BL and US exposure may be an effective means for gene therapy in joint disorders.

  15. Systemic immune cell response in rats after pulmonary exposure to manganese-containing particles collected from welding aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonini, James M; Zeidler-Erdely, Patti C; Young, Shih-Houng; Roberts, Jenny R; Erdely, Aaron

    2012-01-01

    Welding fume inhalation affects the immune system of exposed workers. Manganese (Mn) in welding fume may induce immunosuppressive effects. The goal was to determine if Mn in welding fume alters immunity by reducing the number of circulating total leukocytes and specific leukocyte sub-populations. Sprague-Dawley rats were treated by intratracheal instillation (ITI) with either a single dose (2.00 mg/rat) or repeated doses (0.125 or 2.00 mg/rat for 7 weeks) with welding fumes that contained different levels of Mn. Additional rats were treated by ITI once a week for 7 weeks with the two doses of manganese chloride (MnCl₂). Bronchoalveolar lavage was performed to assess lung inflammation. Also, whole blood was recovered, and the number of circulating total leukocytes, as well as specific lymphocyte subsets, was determined by flow cytometry. The welding fume highest in Mn content significantly increased lung inflammation, injury, and production of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines compared to all other treatment groups. In addition, the same group expressed significant decreases in the number of circulating CD4⁺ and CD8⁺ T-lymphocytes after a single exposure, and significant reductions in the number of circulating total lymphocytes, primarily CD4⁺ and CD8⁺ T-lymphocytes, after repeated exposures (compared to control values). Repeated MnCl₂ exposure led to a trend of a reduction (but not statistically significant) in circulating total lymphocytes, attributable to the changes in the CD4⁺ T-lymphocyte population levels. The welding fume with the lower concentration of Mn had no significant effect on the numbers of blood lymphocytes and lymphocyte subsets compared to control values. Evidence from this study indicates that pulmonary exposure to certain welding fumes cause decrements in systemic immune cell populations, specifically circulating T-lymphocytes, and these alterations in immune cell number are not dependent exclusively on Mn, but likely a

  16. Intracutaneous DNA Vaccination with the E8 Gene of Cottontail Rabbit Papillomavirus Induces Protective Immunity against Virus Challenge in Rabbits

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Jiafen; Han, Ricai; Cladel, Nancy M.; Pickel, Martin D; Christensen, Neil D.

    2002-01-01

    The cottontail rabbit papillomavirus (CRPV)-rabbit model has been used in several studies for testing prophylactic and therapeutic papillomavirus vaccines. Earlier observations had shown that the CRPV nonstructural genes E1, E2, and E6 induced strong to partial protective immunity against CRPV infection. In this study, we found that CRPV E8 immunization eliminated virus-induced papillomas in EIII/JC inbred rabbits (100%) and provided partial protection (55%) against virus challenge in outbred...

  17. Characterization of type IV antifreeze gene in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) and influence of cold and hot weather on its expression and some immune-related genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammar, Asmma Y; El Nahas, Abeer F; Mahmoud, Shawky; Barakat, Mohamed E; Hassan, Asmaa M

    2017-12-12

    The aim of this work is to study the effect of the thermal stress of ambient temperature during winter and summer on the expression of type IV antifreeze gene (ANF IV) in different tissues of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) as well as some immune-related genes. At first, genomic ANF IV gene was characterized from one fish; 124 amino acids were identified with 92.7% similarity with that on the gene bank. Expression of ANF IV and immune-related genes were done twice, once at the end of December (winter sample, temperature 14 °C) and the other at August (summer sample, temperature 36 °C). Assessment of ANF IV gene expression in different organs of fish was done; splenic mRNA was used for assessment of immune-related gene transcripts (CXCl2 chemokine, cc-chemokine, INF-3A, and MHC IIβ). Winter expression analysis of AFP IV in O. niloticus revealed significant upregulation of mRNA transcript levels in the intestine, gills, skin, spleen, liver, and brain with 324.03-, 170.06-, 107.63-, 97.61-, 94.35-, and 27.85-folds, respectively. Furthermore, upregulation in the gene was observed in some organs during summer: in the liver, gills, skin, intestine, and brain with lower levels compared with winter. The level of expression of immune-related genes in winter is significantly higher than summer in all assessed genes. Cc-chemokine gene expression was the most affected in both winter and summer. Variable expression profile of ANF IV in different organs and in different seasons together with its amino acid similarity of N-terminal and C-terminal with apolipoprotein (lipid binder) and form of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) suggests a different role for this protein which may be related to lipid metabolism.

  18. Polymorphisms in inflammatory and immune response genes associated with cerebral cavernous malformation type 1 severity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choquet, Hélène; Pawlikowska, Ludmila; Nelson, Jeffrey; McCulloch, Charles E.; Akers, Amy; Baca, Beth; Khan, Yasir; Hart, Blaine; Morrison, Leslie; Kim, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Background Familial cerebral cavernous malformation type 1 (CCM1) is an autosomal dominant disease caused by mutations in the Krev Interaction Trapped 1 (KRIT1/CCM1) gene, and characterized by multiple brain lesions that often result in intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), seizures, and neurological deficits. Carriers of the same genetic mutation can present with variable symptoms and severity of disease, suggesting the influence of modifier factors. Evidence is emerging that inflammation and immune response play a role in the pathogenesis of CCM. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether common variants in inflammatory and immune response genes influence the severity of familial CCM1 disease, as manifested by ICH and greater brain lesion count. Methods Hispanic CCM1 patients (n=188) harboring the founder Q455X ‘common Hispanic mutation’ (CHM) in the KRIT1 gene were analyzed at baseline. Participants were enrolled between June 2010 and March 2014 either through the Brain Vascular Malformation Consortium (BVMC) study or through the Angioma Alliance organization. Clinical assessment and cerebral susceptibility-weighted magnetic resonance imaging were performed to determine ICH as well as total and large (≥5 mm in diameter) lesion counts. Samples were genotyped on the Affymetrix Axiom Genome-Wide LAT1 Human Array. We analyzed 830 variants in 56 inflammatory and immune response genes for association with ICH and residuals of log-transformed total or large lesion count adjusted for age at enrollment and gender. Variants were analyzed individually, grouped by sub-pathways or whole pathway. Results At baseline, 30.3% of CCM1-CHM subjects had ICH, with a mean ± standard deviation (SD) of 60.1 ± 115.0 (range 0 to 713) for total lesions and 4.9 ± 8.7 (range 0 to 104) for large lesions. The heritability estimates explained by all autosomal variants were 0.20 (SE=0.31), 0.81 (SE=0.17) and 0.48 (SE=0.19), for ICH, total lesion count and large lesion count

  19. Environmental exposures and gene regulation in disease etiology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thea M. Edwards; John Peterson Myers

    2008-01-01

    .... Exactly how the environment changes gene expression and how this can lead to disease are being explored in a fruitful new approach to environmental health research, representative studies of which are reviewed here...

  20. De Novo assembly of the Japanese flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus spleen transcriptome to identify putative genes involved in immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Huang

    Full Text Available Japanese flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus is an economically important marine fish in Asia and has suffered from disease outbreaks caused by various pathogens, which requires more information for immune relevant genes on genome background. However, genomic and transcriptomic data for Japanese flounder remain scarce, which limits studies on the immune system of this species. In this study, we characterized the Japanese flounder spleen transcriptome using an Illumina paired-end sequencing platform to identify putative genes involved in immunity.A cDNA library from the spleen of P. olivaceus was constructed and randomly sequenced using an Illumina technique. The removal of low quality reads generated 12,196,968 trimmed reads, which assembled into 96,627 unigenes. A total of 21,391 unigenes (22.14% were annotated in the NCBI Nr database, and only 1.1% of the BLASTx top-hits matched P. olivaceus protein sequences. Approximately 12,503 (58.45% unigenes were categorized into three Gene Ontology groups, 19,547 (91.38% were classified into 26 Cluster of Orthologous Groups, and 10,649 (49.78% were assigned to six Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathways. Furthermore, 40,928 putative simple sequence repeats and 47, 362 putative single nucleotide polymorphisms were identified. Importantly, we identified 1,563 putative immune-associated unigenes that mapped to 15 immune signaling pathways.The P. olivaceus transciptome data provides a rich source to discover and identify new genes, and the immune-relevant sequences identified here will facilitate our understanding of the mechanisms involved in the immune response. Furthermore, the plentiful potential SSRs and SNPs found in this study are important resources with respect to future development of a linkage map or marker assisted breeding programs for the flounder.

  1. Oxidative stress induced by HIV-1 reverse transcriptase modulates the enzyme's performance in gene immunization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaguliants, Maria; Smirnova, Olga; Ivanov, Alexander V; Kilpelainen, Athina; Kuzmenko, Yulia; Petkov, Stefan; Latanova, Anastasia; Krotova, Olga; Engström, Gunnel; Karpov, Vadim; Kochetkov, Sergey; Wahren, Britta; Starodubova, Elizaveta

    2013-10-01

    HIV-1 infection induces chronic oxidative stress. The resultant neurotoxicity has been associated with Tat protein. Here, we for the first time describe the induction of oxidative stress by another HIV-1 protein, reverse transcriptase (RT). Expression of HIV-1 RT in human embryonic kidney cells generated potent production of the reactive oxygen species (ROS), detected by the fluorescence-based probes. Quantitative RT-PCR demonstrated that expression of RT in HEK293 cells induced a 10- to 15-fold increased transcription of the phase II detoxifying enzymes human quinone oxidoreductase (Nqo1) and heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1), indicating the induction of oxidative stress response. The capacity to induce oxidative stress and stress response appeared to be an intrinsic property of a vast variety of RTs: enzymatically active and inactivated, bearing mutations of drug resistance, following different routes of processing and presentation, expressed from viral or synthetic expression-optimized genes. The total ROS production induced by RT genes of the viral origin was found to be lower than that induced by the synthetic/expression-optimized or chimeric RT genes. However, the viral RT genes induced higher levels of ROS production and higher levels of HO-1 mRNA than the synthetic genes per unit of protein in the expressing cell. The capacity of RT genes to induce the oxidative stress and stress response was then correlated with their immunogenic performance. For this, RT genes were administered into BALB/c mice by intradermal injections followed by electroporation. Splenocytes of immunized mice were stimulated with the RT-derived and control antigens and antigen-specific proliferation was assessed by IFN-γ/IL-2 Fluorospot. RT variants generating high total ROS levels induced significantly stronger IFN-γ responses than the variants inducing lower total ROS, while high levels of ROS normalized per unit of protein in expressing cell were associated with a weak IFN-γ response. Poor

  2. Induction of immune tolerance to FIX by intramuscular AAV gene transfer is independent of the activation status of dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharadwaj, Arpita S; Kelly, Meagan; Kim, Dongsoo; Chao, Hengjun

    2010-01-21

    The nature of viral vectors is suggested to be a significant contributor to undesirable immune responses subsequent to gene transfer. Such viral vectors, recognized as danger signals by the host immune system, activate dendritic cells (DCs), causing unwanted antivector and/or transgene product immunity. We recently reported efficient induction of immune tolerance to coagulation factor IX (FIX) by direct intramuscular injection of adeno-associated virus (AAV)-FIX. AAV vectors are nonpathogenic and elicit minimal inflammatory response. We hypothesized that the nonpathogenic nature of AAV plays a critical role in induction of tolerance after AAV gene transfer. We observed inefficient recruitment and activation of DCs subsequent to intramuscular injection of AAV. To further validate our hypothesis, we examined immune responses to FIX after intramuscular injection of AAV with simultaneous activation of DCs. We were able to achieve phenotypic and functional activation of DCs after administration of lipopolysaccharide and anti-CD40 antibody. However, we observed efficient induction of FIX tolerance irrespective of DC activation in mice with different genetic and major histocompatibility complex backgrounds. Furthermore, activation of DCs did not exaggerate the immune response induced after intramuscular injection of AAV serotype 2 vector. Our results demonstrate that induction of FIX tolerance after AAV gene transfer is independent of DC activation status.

  3. Transcriptomics of the late gestation ovine fetal brain: modeling the co-expression of immune marker genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabaglino, Maria B; Keller-Wood, Maureen; Wood, Charles E

    2014-11-19

    Major changes in gene expression occur in the fetal brain to modulate the function of this organ postnatally. Thus, factors can alter the genomics of the fetal brain, predisposing to neurological disorders later in life. We hypothesized that the physiological dynamics of the immune system transcriptome of the fetal brain during the last stage of gestation will reveal patterns of immune function and development in the developing brain. In this study we applied weighted gene co-expression analysis of microarrays performed on ovine fetal brain samples, to model the changes in gene expression throughout the second half of gestation. Clusters of co-expressed genes that strongly increase in expression toward the first day of extra-uterine life are related to the hematopoietic lineage, while activation of immune pathways is induced after birth. Moreover, the pattern of gene expression suggests induction of tolerance mechanisms, probably necessary to protect highly produced proteins--such as myelin basic protein--from an autoimmune attack. This study provides insight into the dramatic changes in gene expression that take place in the brain during the fetal life, especially during the last stage of gestation, and suggests that the immune system may have an important role in maturation of the fetal brain, which if disrupted or altered, could have negative consequences in postnatal life.

  4. Analysis of polymorphisms in 16 genes in type 1 diabetes that have been associated with other immune-mediated diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walker Neil M

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The identification of the HLA class II, insulin (INS, CTLA-4 and PTPN22 genes as determinants of type 1 diabetes (T1D susceptibility indicates that fine tuning of the immune system is centrally involved in disease development. Some genes have been shown to affect several immune-mediated diseases. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that alleles of susceptibility genes previously associated with other immune-mediated diseases might perturb immune homeostasis, and hence also associate with predisposition to T1D. Methods We resequenced and genotyped tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs from two genes, CRP and FCER1B, and genotyped 27 disease-associated polymorphisms from thirteen gene regions, namely FCRL3, CFH, SLC9A3R1, PADI4, RUNX1, SPINK5, IL1RN, IL1RA, CARD15, IBD5-locus (including SLC22A4, LAG3, ADAM33 and NFKB1. These genes have been associated previously with susceptibility to a range of immune-mediated diseases including rheumatoid arthritis (RA, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, Graves' disease (GD, psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis (PA, atopy, asthma, Crohn disease and multiple sclerosis (MS. Our T1D collections are divided into three sample subsets, consisting of set 1 families (up to 754 families, set 2 families (up to 743 families, and a case-control collection (ranging from 1,500 to 4,400 cases and 1,500 to 4,600 controls. Each SNP was genotyped in one or more of these subsets. Our study typically had approximately 80% statistical power for a minor allele frequency (MAF >5% and odds ratios (OR of 1.5 with the type 1 error rate, α = 0.05. Results We found no evidence of association with T1D at most of the loci studied 0.02 P ADAM33, rs2787094, was any evidence of association obtained, P = 0.0004 in set 1 families (relative risk (RR = 0.78, but further support was not observed in the 4,326 cases and 4,610 controls, P = 0.57 (OR = 1.02. Conclusion Polymorphisms in a variety of genes previously associated with

  5. Deletion of the K1L Gene Results in a Vaccinia Virus That Is Less Pathogenic Due to Muted Innate Immune Responses, yet Still Elicits Protective Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo Cruz, Ariana G; Han, Aiguo; Roy, Edward J; Guzmán, Arielle B; Miller, Rita J; Driskell, Elizabeth A; O'Brien, William D; Shisler, Joanna L

    2017-08-01

    All viruses strategically alter the antiviral immune response to their benefit. The vaccinia virus (VACV) K1 protein has multiple immunomodulatory effects in tissue culture models of infection, including NF-κB antagonism. However, the effect of K1 during animal infection is poorly understood. We determined that a K1L-less vaccinia virus (vΔK1L) was less pathogenic than wild-type VACV in intranasal and intradermal models of infection. Decreased pathogenicity was correlated with diminished virus replication in intranasally infected mice. However, in intradermally inoculated ears, vΔK1L replicated to levels nearly identical to those of VACV, implying that the decreased immune response to vΔK1L infection, not virus replication, dictated lesion size. Several lines of evidence support this theory. First, vΔK1L induced slightly less edema than vK1L, as revealed by histopathology and noninvasive quantitative ultrasound technology (QUS). Second, infiltrating immune cell populations were decreased in vΔK1L-infected ears. Third, cytokine and chemokine gene expression was decreased in vΔK1L-infected ears. While these results identified the biological basis for smaller lesions, they remained puzzling; because K1 antagonizes NF-κB in vitro, antiviral gene expression was expected to be higher during vΔK1L infection. Despite these diminished innate immune responses, vΔK1L vaccination induced a protective VACV-specific CD8+ T cell response and protected against a lethal VACV challenge. Thus, vΔK1L is the first vaccinia virus construct reported that caused a muted innate immune gene expression profile and decreased immune cell infiltration in an intradermal model of infection yet still elicited protective immunity.IMPORTANCE The vaccinia virus (VACV) K1 protein inhibits NF-κB activation among its other antagonistic functions. A virus lacking K1 (vΔK1L) was predicted to be less pathogenic because it would trigger a more robust antiviral immune response than VACV. Indeed

  6. Intragastric exposure to titanium dioxide nanoparticles induced nephrotoxicity in mice, assessed by physiological and gene expression modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Suxin; Sang, Xuezi; Zheng, Lei; Ze, Yuguan; Zhao, Xiaoyang; Sheng, Lei; Sun, Qingqing; Cheng, Zhe; Cheng, Jie; Hu, Renping; Wang, Ling; Hong, Fashui; Tang, Meng

    2013-02-13

    Numerous studies have demonstrated that titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) induced nephrotoxicity in animals. However, the nephrotoxic multiple molecular mechanisms are not clearly understood. Mice were exposed to 2.5, 5 and 10 mg/kg TiO2 NPs by intragastric administration for 90 consecutive days, and their growth, element distribution, and oxidative stress in kidney as well as kidney gene expression profile were investigated using whole-genome microarray analysis technique. Our findings suggest that TiO2 NPs resulted in significant reduction of renal glomerulus number, apoptosis, infiltration of inflammatory cells, tissue necrosis or disorganization of renal tubules, coupled with decreased body weight, increased kidney indices, unbalance of element distribution, production of reactive oxygen species and peroxidation of lipid, protein and DNA in mouse kidney tissue. Furthermore, microarray analysis showed significant alterations in the expression of 1, 246 genes in the 10 mg/kg TiO2 NPs-exposed kidney. Of the genes altered, 1006 genes were associated with immune/inflammatory responses, apoptosis, biological processes, oxidative stress, ion transport, metabolic processes, the cell cycle, signal transduction, cell component, transcription, translation and cell differentiation, respectively. Specifically, the vital up-regulation of Bcl6, Cfi and Cfd caused immune/ inflammatory responses, the significant alterations of Axud1, Cyp4a12a, Cyp4a12b, Cyp4a14, and Cyp2d9 expression resulted in severe oxidative stress, and great suppression of Birc5, Crap2, and Tfrc expression led to renal cell apoptosis. Axud1, Bcl6, Cf1, Cfd, Cyp4a12a, Cyp4a12b, Cyp2d9, Birc5, Crap2, and Tfrc may be potential biomarkers of kidney toxicity caused by TiO2 NPs exposure.

  7. Radiation Exposure Alters Expression of Metabolic Enzyme Genes in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wotring, V. E.; Mangala, L. S.; Zhang, Y.; Wu, H.

    2011-01-01

    Most administered pharmaceuticals are metabolized by the liver. The health of the liver, especially the rate of its metabolic enzymes, determines the concentration of circulating drugs as well as the duration of their efficacy. Most pharmaceuticals are metabolized by the liver, and clinically-used medication doses are given with normal liver function in mind. A drug overdose can result in the case of a liver that is damaged and removing pharmaceuticals from the circulation at a rate slower than normal. Alternatively, if liver function is elevated and removing drugs from the system more quickly than usual, it would be as if too little drug had been given for effective treatment. Because of the importance of the liver in drug metabolism, we want to understand the effects of spaceflight on the enzymes of the liver and exposure to cosmic radiation is one aspect of spaceflight that can be modeled in ground experiments. Additionally, it has been previous noted that pre-exposure to small radiation doses seems to confer protection against later and larger radiation doses. This protective power of pre-exposure has been called a priming effect or radioadaptation. This study is an effort to examine the drug metabolizing effects of radioadaptation mechanisms that may be triggered by early exposure to low radiation doses.

  8. Differential expression of ozone-induced gene during exposures to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-08-16

    Aug 16, 2010 ... exposures to salt stress in Polygonum sibiricum Laxm leaves, stem and underground stem. Shou-Hai Na1, Chun-Pu ... environmental stresses such as salt stress is characterized by a number of physiological and biochemical .... It showed a higher conservation of the. PcOZI-1 with the Populus and Ricinus.

  9. Pulmonary exposure to single-walled carbon nanotubes does not affect the early immune response against Toxoplasma gondii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swedin Linda

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT trigger pronounced inflammation and fibrosis in the lungs of mice following administration via pharyngeal aspiration or inhalation. Human exposure to SWCNT in an occupational setting may occur in conjunction with infections and this could yield enhanced or suppressed responses to the offending agent. Here, we studied whether the sequential exposure to SWCNT via pharyngeal aspiration and infection of mice with the ubiquitous intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii would impact on the immune response of the host against the parasite. Methods C57BL/6 mice were pre-exposed by pharyngeal administration of SWCNT (80 + 80 μg/mouse for two consecutive days followed by intravenous injection with either 1x103 or 1x104 green fluorescence protein and luciferase-expressing T. gondii tachyzoites. The dissemination of T. gondii was monitored by in vivo bioluminescence imaging in real time for 7 days and by plaque formation. The inflammatory response was analysed in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL fluid, and by assessment of morphological changes and immune responses in lung and spleen. Results There were no differences in parasite distribution between mice only inoculated with T. gondii or those mice pre-exposed for 2 days to SWCNT before parasite inoculum. Lung and spleen histology and inflammation markers in BAL fluid reflected the effects of SWCNT exposure and T. gondii injection, respectively. We also noted that CD11c positive dendritic cells but not F4/80 positive macrophages retained SWCNT in the lungs 9 days after pharyngeal aspiration. However, co-localization of T. gondii with CD11c or F4/80 positive cells could not be observed in lungs or spleen. Pre-exposure to SWCNT did not affect the splenocyte response to T. gondii. Conclusions Taken together, our data indicate that pre-exposure to SWCNT does not enhance or suppress the early immune response to T. gondii in mice.

  10. Effects of repeated handling and air exposure on the immune response and the disease resistance of gibel carp (Carassius auratus gibelio) over winter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bingyuan; Wang, Cuicui; Tu, Yongqin; Hu, Huihua; Han, Dong; Zhu, Xiaoming; Jin, Junyan; Yang, Yunxia; Xie, Shouqi

    2015-12-01

    High mortalities and suppressed immune functions of farmed fish over winter are the universal problems in aquaculture. It is necessary to improve the immune response and disease resistance in the overwintering fish. A recent study suggested that repeated handling increased innate immune mechanisms and disease resistance in Senegalese sole. Therefore, the present study evaluated the hypothesis that appropriate repeated handling could compromise the immune depression and increase the disease resistance in gibel carp over winter. The experiment was executed in field net cages (2 m × 2 m × 2 m) from Dec. 4, 2012 to Apr. 2, 2013. Three cages with 50 fish per cage were randomly designed as the control group and did not receive any interfere over winter. The other three cages received repeated handling with an air exposure for 5 min every week during the experiment. Fish were not fed over winter. At the end of the trial, fish were challenged with Aeromonas hydrophila at a dose of 1.5 × 10(8) CFU ml(-1). The results showed that no significant difference of final body weight was found between groups. The spleen and kidney somatic index increased in the control fish after bacterial challenge and showed a rising trend but not a statistical change in repeated handled fish. Plasma cortisol levels significantly increased in the control fish at 6 h post bacterial challenge and then declined. However, repeated handled fish did not show any significant change in plasma cortisol levels after challenge. The reduced inducement of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) expressions by repeated handling was found in gibel carp post bacterial challenge. After overwintering, the repeated handled fish exhibited increased catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities. Enhanced plasma CAT activities and reduced plasma malondialdehyde (MDA) contents were found in repeated handled fish over time against invading bacteria. Up-regulation of myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88

  11. Effects of Occupational Silica Exposure on OXIDATIVE Stress and Immune System Parameters in Ceramic Workers in TURKEY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anlar, Hatice Gul; Bacanli, Merve; İritaş, Servet; Bal, Ceylan; Kurt, Türker; Tutkun, Engin; Hinc Yilmaz, O; Basaran, Nursen

    2017-01-01

    Silica is the second most common element after oxygen, and therefore, exposures to crystalline silica dust occur in a large variety of occupations such as metal foundries, constructions, and ceramic, quarry, and pottery industries. Since crystalline silica exposure has been linked with silicosis, lung cancer, and other pulmonary diseases, adverse effect attributed to this element has be a cause for concern worldwide. Silica dust exposure in workers is still considered to be important health problem especially in developing countries. The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of occupational silica exposure on oxidative stress parameters including the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and levels of total glutathione (GSH) and thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) as well as immune system parameters such as interleukin (IL)-1α, IL-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, and IL-10 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in Turkish ceramic workers. In this study, nearly 50% of Turkish ceramic workers were diagnosed with silicosis. Eighty-four percent of these silicotic workers were found to present with profusion category 1 silicosis, whereas controls (n = 81) all displayed normal chest radiographs. Data demonstrated a significant decrease in levels of GSH and activities of CAT, SOD, and GPx, but a significant increase in MDA levels and activity of GR in all workers. Further, workers possessed significantly higher levels of IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, and TNF-α. These observations suggest that ceramic workers may have impaired antioxidant/oxidant status and activated immune system indicative of inflammatory responses.

  12. Coregulation of host-response genes in integument: switchover of gene expression correlation pattern and impaired immune responses induced by dipteran parasite infection in the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaram, Anitha; Pradeep, Appukuttan Nair R; Awasthi, Arvind K; Murthy, Geetha N; Ponnuvel, Kangayam M; Sasibhushan, Sirigineedi; Rao, Guruprasad C

    2014-05-01

    The activation of host response proteins against parasitic infection is dependent on the coregulation of immune gene expression. The infection of commercially important silkworm Bombyx mori through endoparasite Exorista bombycis enhanced host-response gene expression in integument early in the infection and was lowered asymptotically. Principal component analysis (PCA) showed heterogeneity while explaining ∼80 % variance among expression timings. PCA showed positive and negative correlation with gene expression and differentiated transcriptional timings, and revealed cross talk within the immune system. Pearson correlation analysis showed significant linear correlation (mean R (2) = >0.7; P parasitism. The genes showed pleiotropic interaction among them, with four genes each for prophenoloxidase activating enzyme (PPAE) and caspase. Besides, after parasitism, exclusive correlation of five gene pairs including PPAE-Spatzle pair (R (2) = 0.9; P parasitized integument revealed deviation from gene coregulation, leading to impaired immune responses, characterized by lowered gene expression and varied phenotypic consequences.

  13. Expressional regulation of genes linked to immunity & programmed development in human early placental villi

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    M A Khan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: During 6 to 8 wk of gestation, human placental villi show a complex pattern of morphogenesis. There is however, no large scale gene expression study exploring the temporal pattern of the developmental molecular networks in placental villi during the early weeks of gestation. We evaluated the transcriptome profiling of humn placental villus samples obtained from fertile women with voluntarily terminated normal pregnancies between 6-8 wk of gestation. Methods: Transcriptomic profiles of individual human placental villous samples from 25 women with normal pregnancies during 6 to 8 wk of gestation were examined using human whole genome expression arrays. Quantitative RT-PCR validation of copy numbers of transcripts for selected 15 genes and exploratory analysis of the microarray data revealed a high degree of quality assurance supportive of further clustering and differential analyses. Immunoblot and immunohistochemical analysis of selected five candidate proteins (CAGE1, CD9, SLC6A2, TANK and VEGFC based on transcript profiles were done to assess the pattern of down stream informational flow. Results: A large number (~9K of genes with known functions were expressed in the experimental samples. The clustering analysis identified three major expression clusters with gestational age, and four co-expressional clusters. Differential analysis identified a highly discrete regulatory process involving only about 160 genes. Immunochemical analysis of selected candidate proteins based on transcript profiles revealed generally synchronous expression in human early placental villi. Interpretation & conclusions: Several signaling pathways linked to immunity (COL1, JAK2, JAK3, IL12, IL13, IL15, IL27, STAT3 and STAT5 were downregulated, while genes of the enriched category of antiviral immunity (ATF/AP1, IL10R and OAS were clearly over-expressed. Transcriptional integration supportive of programmed development was observed in first

  14. A sulfated galactans supplemented diet enhances the expression of immune genes and protects against Vibrio parahaemolyticus infection in shrimp.

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    Rudtanatip, Tawut; Boonsri, Nantavadee; Asuvapongpatana, Somluk; Withyachumnarnkul, Boonsirm; Wongprasert, Kanokpan

    2017-06-01

    A sulfated galactans (SG) supplemented diet was evaluated for the potential to stimulate immune activity in shrimp Penaeus vannamei (P. vannamei). Shrimp given the SG supplemented diet (0.5, 1 and 2% w/w) for 7 days showed enhanced expression of the downstream signaling mediator of lipopolysaccharide and β-1,3-glucan binding protein (LGBP) and immune related genes including p-NF-κB, IMD, IKKβ and IKKε, antimicrobial peptide PEN-4, proPO-I and II. Following immersion with Vibrio parahaemolyticus (V. parahaemolyticus) for 14 days, the shrimp given the SG supplemented diet (1 and 2% w/w) showed a decrease in bacterial colonies and bacterial toxin gene expression, compared to shrimp given a normal diet, and they reached 50% mortality at day 14. However, shrimp given the normal diet and challenged with the bacteria reached 100% mortality at day 6. SG-fed shrimp increased expression of immune genes related to LGBP signaling at day 1 after the bacterial immersion compared to control (no immersion), which later decreased to control levels. Shrimp on the normal diet also increased expression of immune related genes at day 1 after immersion which however decreased below control levels by day 3. Taken together, the results indicate the efficacy of the SG supplemented diet to enhance the immune activity in shrimp which could offer protection from V. parahaemolyticus infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Identification and isolation of stimulator of interferon genes (STING): an innate immune sensory and adaptor gene from camelids.

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    Premraj, A; Aleyas, A G; Nautiyal, B; Rasool, T J

    2013-10-01

    The mechanism by which type I interferon-mediated antiviral response is mounted by hosts against invading pathogen is an intriguing one. Of late, an endoplasmic reticulum transmembrane protein encoded by a gene called stimulator of interferon genes (STING) is implicated in the innate signalling pathways and has been identified and cloned in few mammalian species including human, mouse and pig. In this article, we report the identification of STING from three different species of a highly conserved family of mammals - the camelids. cDNAs encoding the STING of Old World camels - dromedary camel (Camelus dromedarius) and bactrian camel (Camelus bactrianus) and a New World camel - llama (Llama glama) were amplified using conserved primers and RACE. The complete STING cDNA of dromedary camel is 2171 bp long with a 706-bp 5' untranslated regions (UTR), an 1137-bp open reading frame (ORF) and a 328-bp 3' UTR. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis of the ORF of STING from these three camelids indicate high level of similarity among camelids and conservation of critical amino acid residues across different species. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis revealed high levels of STING mRNA expression in blood, spleen, lymph node and lung. The identification of camelid STING will help in better understanding of the role of this molecule in the innate immunity of the camelids and other mammals. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Prenatal androgen exposure modulates cellular and humoral immune function of black-headed gull chicks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mueller, Wendt; Groothuis, TGG; Kasprzik, A; Dijkstra, C; Alatalo, RV; Siitari, H

    2005-01-01

    Avian eggs contain considerable amounts of maternal yolk androgens, which have been shown to beneficially influence the physiology and behaviour of the chick. As androgens may suppress immune functions, they may also entail costs for the chick. This is particularly relevant for colonial species,

  17. In vivo exposure of Mytilus edulis to living enteric bacteria: a threat for immune competency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier-Clerc, Sophie; Boily, Isabelle; Fournier, Michel; Lemarchand, Karine

    2013-02-01

    Mussels are widespread in coastal environments and experience various physical, chemical, and bacteriological conditions. Owing to the increase of coastal urbanization, mussels are now commonly exposed not only to indigenous bacteria, but also to enteric bacteria originating from pulsed and chronic sewage discharges into coastal environments. Due to its broad resilience to environmental variations, the blue mussel Mytilus edulis is commonly used as an indicator of environmental quality in bio-monitoring programs. However, since mussel immune system capabilities may be affected by the presence of exogenous fecal bacteria in coastal seawater subjected to sewage discharges, we aimed to determine the effect of in vivo bacterial challenges on mussels' immune competency by using two exogenous enteric bacterial strains, Escherichia coli and Enterococcus faecalis, and an indigenous bacterial strain Vibrio splendidus (as control). Bacterial strains were tested individually, by injection into the posterior adductor muscle at three different cell densities (10(2), 10(3), and 10(4) cells). Unlike classic in vitro experiments using higher bacterial concentrations, neither the enteric bacteria nor the indigenous strain induced significant increase or decrease of either cell-mediated (phagocytosis, reactive oxygen species, and NO(x) production) or humoral components (prophenoloxidase-like, acid phosphatase, and L-leucine-aminopeptidase production) of the immune system. This study demonstrates that, at low concentrations, E. coli and E. faecalis do not represent an additional threat that could impair M. edulis immune competency and, as a consequence, its potential of survival in coastal areas subjected to sewage discharges.

  18. Multiple Exposures to Ascaris suum Induce Tissue Injury and Mixed Th2/Th17 Immune Response in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Denise Silva; Gazzinelli-Guimarães, Pedro Henrique; Barbosa, Fernando Sérgio; Resende, Nathália Maria; Silva, Caroline Cavalcanti; de Oliveira, Luciana Maria; Amorim, Chiara Cássia Oliveira; Oliveira, Fabrício Marcus Silva; Mattos, Matheus Silvério; Kraemer, Lucas Rocha; Caliari, Marcelo Vidigal; Gaze, Soraya; Bueno, Lilian Lacerda; Russo, Remo Castro; Fujiwara, Ricardo Toshio

    2016-01-01

    Ascaris spp. infection affects 800 million people worldwide, and half of the world population is currently at risk of infection. Recurrent reinfection in humans is mostly due to the simplicity of the parasite life cycle, but the impact of multiple exposures to the biology of the infection and the consequences to the host's homeostasis are poorly understood. In this context, single and multiple exposures in mice were performed in order to characterize the parasitological, histopathological, tissue functional and immunological aspects of experimental larval ascariasis. The most important findings revealed that reinfected mice presented a significant reduction of parasite burden in the lung and an increase in the cellularity in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) associated with a robust granulocytic pulmonary inflammation, leading to a severe impairment of respiratory function. Moreover, the multiple exposures to Ascaris elicited an increased number of circulating inflammatory cells as well as production of higher levels of systemic cytokines, mainly IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-10, IL-17A and TNF-α when compared to single-infected animals. Taken together, our results suggest the intense pulmonary inflammation associated with a polarized systemic Th2/Th17 immune response are crucial to control larval migration after multiple exposures to Ascaris.

  19. Multiple Exposures to Ascaris suum Induce Tissue Injury and Mixed Th2/Th17 Immune Response in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Silva Nogueira

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ascaris spp. infection affects 800 million people worldwide, and half of the world population is currently at risk of infection. Recurrent reinfection in humans is mostly due to the simplicity of the parasite life cycle, but the impact of multiple exposures to the biology of the infection and the consequences to the host's homeostasis are poorly understood. In this context, single and multiple exposures in mice were performed in order to characterize the parasitological, histopathological, tissue functional and immunological aspects of experimental larval ascariasis. The most important findings revealed that reinfected mice presented a significant reduction of parasite burden in the lung and an increase in the cellularity in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL associated with a robust granulocytic pulmonary inflammation, leading to a severe impairment of respiratory function. Moreover, the multiple exposures to Ascaris elicited an increased number of circulating inflammatory cells as well as production of higher levels of systemic cytokines, mainly IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-10, IL-17A and TNF-α when compared to single-infected animals. Taken together, our results suggest the intense pulmonary inflammation associated with a polarized systemic Th2/Th17 immune response are crucial to control larval migration after multiple exposures to Ascaris.

  20. Expression of immune-related genes in larval stages of the giant tiger shrimp, Penaeus monodon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiravanichpaisal, Pikul; Puanglarp, Narongsak; Petkon, Sasithon; Donnuea, Seri; Söderhäll, Irene; Söderhäll, Kenneth

    2007-10-01

    Shrimp undergo several morphologically different stages during development and therefore the expression of some immune-related genes such as prophenoloxidase (proPO), peroxinectin (Prx), crustin (Crus), penaeidin (Pen), transglutaminase (TGase), haemocyanin (Hc) and astakine (Ak) were determined during larval development of the shrimp (Penaeus monodon), i.e. nauplius 4 (N4), protozoea 1 and 3 (Z1 and 3), mysis 3 (My 3), post-larvae 3 (PL3) and also in haemocytes of juveniles. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that all transcripts were already present in the early larval stage of N4 but at different levels. The transcript of proPO was found to be extremely low or even absent at N4, whereas Prx, Crus, Pen, TGase, Hc and Ak were significantly expressed at all larval stages. Up to now expression of proPO and Prx has only been reported from haemocytes in crustaceans and in this study Prx also appeared to be expressed in stages which appear to lack haemocytes. Thus, this may suggest that Prx is expressed in other cells than haemocytes. It is well known among invertebrates that the proPO system plays a crucial role as an immune effector molecule against microbes. However, in this study, the transcript of proPO was low during the larval stages and hardly present at all at N4. This might indicate that the development of immune-competent haemocytes during the larval stages is not completed and as a consequence they are likely to be more susceptible to infectious diseases during these stages.

  1. Venom of parasitoid, Pteromalus puparum, suppresses host, Pieris rapae, immune promotion by decreasing host C-type lectin gene expression.

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    Qi Fang

    Full Text Available Insect hosts have evolved immunity against invasion by parasitoids, and in co-evolutionary response parasitoids have also developed strategies to overcome host immune systems. The mechanisms through which parasitoid venoms disrupt the promotion of host immunity are still unclear. We report here a new mechanism evolved by parasitoid Pteromalus puparum, whose venom inhibited the promotion of immunity in its host Pieris rapae (cabbage white butterfly.A full-length cDNA encoding a C-type lectin (Pr-CTL was isolated from P. rapae. Quantitative PCR and immunoblotting showed that injection of bacterial and inert beads induced expression of Pr-CTL, with peaks of mRNA and Pr-CTL protein levels at 4 and 8 h post beads challenge, respectively. In contrast, parasitoid venom suppressed Pr-CTL expression when co-injected with beads, in a time and dose-dependent manner. Immunolocalization and immunoblotting results showed that Pr-CTL was first detectable in vesicles present in cytoplasm of granulocytes in host hemolymph, and was then secreted from cells into circulatory fluid. Finally, the secreted Pr-CTL bound to cellular membranes of both granulocytes and plasmatocytes. Injection of double-stranded RNA specific for target gene decreased expression of Pr-CTL, and a few other host immune-related genes. Suppression of Pr-CTL expression also down-regulated antimicrobial and phenoloxidase activities, and reducing phagocytotic and encapsulation rates in host. The inhibitory effect of parasitoid venom on host encapsulation is consistent with its effect in suppressing Pr-CTL expression. Binding assay results showed that recombinant Pr-CTL directly attached to the surface of P. puparum egges. We infer that Pr-CTL may serve as an immune signalling co-effector, first binding to parasitoid eggs, regulating expression of a set of immune-related genes and promoting host immunity.P. puparum venom inhibits promotion of host immune responses by silencing expression of host C

  2. Digital quantification of gene expression in sequential breast cancer biopsies reveals activation of an immune response.

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    Rinath M Jeselsohn

    Full Text Available Advancements in molecular biology have unveiled multiple breast cancer promoting pathways and potential therapeutic targets. Large randomized clinical trials remain the ultimate means of validating therapeutic efficacy, but they require large cohorts of patients and are lengthy and costly. A useful approach is to conduct a window of opportunity study in which patients are exposed to a drug pre-surgically during the interval between the core needle biopsy and the definitive surgery. These are non-therapeutic studies and the end point is not clinical or pathological response but rather evaluation of molecular changes in the tumor specimens that can predict response. However, since the end points of the non-therapeutic studies are biologic, it is critical to first define the biologic changes that occur in the absence of treatment. In this study, we compared the molecular profiles of breast cancer tumors at the time of the diagnostic biopsy versus the definitive surgery in the absence of any intervention using the Nanostring nCounter platform. We found that while the majority of the transcripts did not vary between the two biopsies, there was evidence of activation of immune related genes in response to the first biopsy and further investigations of the immune changes after a biopsy in early breast cancer seem warranted.

  3. Rotavirus nonstructural protein 1 antagonizes innate immune response by interacting with retinoic acid inducible gene I

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    Qin Lan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The nonstructural protein 1 (NSP1 of rotavirus has been reported to block interferon (IFN signaling by mediating proteasome-dependent degradation of IFN-regulatory factors (IRFs and (or the β-transducin repeat containing protein (β-TrCP. However, in addition to these targets, NSP1 may subvert innate immune responses via other mechanisms. Results The NSP1 of rotavirus OSU strain as well as the IRF3 binding domain truncated NSP1 of rotavirus SA11 strain are unable to degrade IRFs, but can still inhibit host IFN response, indicating that NSP1 may target alternative host factor(s other than IRFs. Overexpression of NSP1 can block IFN-β promoter activation induced by the retinoic acid inducible gene I (RIG-I, but does not inhibit IFN-β activation induced by the mitochondrial antiviral-signaling protein (MAVS, indicating that NSP1 may target RIG-I. Immunoprecipitation experiments show that NSP1 interacts with RIG-I independent of IRF3 binding domain. In addition, NSP1 induces down-regulation of RIG-I in a proteasome-independent way. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate that inhibition of RIG-I mediated type I IFN responses by NSP1 may contribute to the immune evasion of rotavirus.

  4. Widespread seasonal gene expression reveals annual differences in human immunity and physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dopico, Xaquin Castro; Evangelou, Marina; Ferreira, Ricardo C; Guo, Hui; Pekalski, Marcin L; Smyth, Deborah J; Cooper, Nicholas; Burren, Oliver S; Fulford, Anthony J; Hennig, Branwen J; Prentice, Andrew M; Ziegler, Anette-G; Bonifacio, Ezio; Wallace, Chris; Todd, John A

    2015-05-12

    Seasonal variations are rarely considered a contributing component to human tissue function or health, although many diseases and physiological process display annual periodicities. Here we find more than 4,000 protein-coding mRNAs in white blood cells and adipose tissue to have seasonal expression profiles, with inverted patterns observed between Europe and Oceania. We also find the cellular composition of blood to vary by season, and these changes, which differ between the United Kingdom and The Gambia, could explain the gene expression periodicity. With regards to tissue function, the immune system has a profound pro-inflammatory transcriptomic profile during European winter, with increased levels of soluble IL-6 receptor and C-reactive protein, risk biomarkers for cardiovascular, psychiatric and autoimmune diseases that have peak incidences in winter. Circannual rhythms thus require further exploration as contributors to various aspects of human physiology and disease.

  5. Dietary sodium propionate affects mucosal immune parameters, growth and appetite related genes expression: Insights from zebrafish model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoseinifar, Seyed Hossein; Safari, Roghieh; Dadar, Maryam

    2017-03-01

    Propionate is a short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) that improves physiological and pathophysiological properties. However, there is limited information available about the effects of SCFAs on mucosal immune parameters as well as growth and appetite related genes expression. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of sodium propionate (SP) intake on the mucosal immune parameters, growth and appetite related genes expression using zebrafish (Danio rerio) as model organism. Zebrafish fed control or diet supplemented with different levels (0.5, 1 and 2%) of SP for 8weeks. At the end of feeding trial, the expression of the key genes related to growth and appetite (GH, IGF1, MYSTN and Ghrl) was evaluated. Also, mucosal immune parameters (Total Ig, lysozyme and protease activity) were studied in skin mucus of zebrafish. The results showed that dietary administration of SP significantly (P<0.05) up-regulated the expression of GH, IGF1 and down-regulated MYSTN gene. Also, feeding zebrafish with SP supplemented diet significantly increased appetite related gene expression (P<0.05) with a more pronounced effect in higher inclusion levels. Compared with control group, the expression of appetite related gene (Ghrl) was remarkably (P<0.05) higher in SP fed zebrafish. Also, elevated mucosal immune parameters was observed in zebrafish fed SP supplemented diet. The present results revealed beneficial effects of dietary SP on mucosal immune response and growth and appetite related genes expression. These results also highlighted the potential use of SP as additive in human diets. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Frequency of single nucleotide polymorphisms of some immune response genes in a population sample from São Paulo, Brazil

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    Léa Campos de Oliveira

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To present the frequency of single nucleotide polymorphismsof a few immune response genes in a population sample from SãoPaulo City (SP, Brazil. Methods: Data on allele frequencies ofknown polymorphisms of innate and acquired immunity genes werepresented, the majority with proven impact on gene function. Datawere gathered from a sample of healthy individuals, non-HLA identicalsiblings of bone marrow transplant recipients from the Hospital dasClínicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo,obtained between 1998 and 2005. The number of samples variedfor each single nucleotide polymorphism analyzed by polymerasechain reaction followed by restriction enzyme cleavage. Results:Allele and genotype distribution of 41 different gene polymorphisms,mostly cytokines, but also including other immune response genes,were presented. Conclusion: We believe that the data presentedhere can be of great value for case-control studies, to define whichpolymorphisms are present in biologically relevant frequencies and toassess targets for therapeutic intervention in polygenic diseases witha component of immune and inflammatory responses.

  7. Oral-tolerization Prevents Immune Responses and Improves Transgene Persistence Following Gene Transfer Mediated by Adeno-associated Viral Vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardet, Romain; Chevalier, Benjamin; Dupaty, Léa; Naïmi, Yassine; Riou, Gaëtan; Drouot, Laurent; Jean, Laetitia; Salvetti, Anna; Boyer, Olivier; Adriouch, Sahil

    2016-02-01

    Gene therapy represents a feasible strategy to treat inherited monogenic diseases and intramuscular (i.m.) injection of recombinant adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector is now recognized as a convenient and safe method of gene transfer. However, this approach is hampered by immune responses directed against the vector and against the transgenic protein. We used here to reproduce this situation a mouse model where robust immune responses are induced following injection of an AAV vector coding for an immunogenic transgenic protein. We show that prophylactic oral administration of the immunogenic protein before AAV-mediated gene transfer completely prevented antibody formation and cytotoxic CD8(+) T-cell response. Consistently, prophylactic oral-tolerization considerably improved long-term transgene persistence and expression. Mechanistically, inhibition of the cytotoxic immune response involved abortive proliferation of antigen-specific cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells, upregulation of the PD-1 immunoregulatory molecule, downregulation of the Bcl-2 antiapoptotic factor, and their deletion in the context of AAV-mediated gene transfer. Hence, gene therapy may represent an ideal situation where oral-tolerization can be adopted before or at the same time as vector injection to efficiently prevent deleterious immune responses directed against the transgenic protein.

  8. Evidence of inflammatory immune signaling in chronic fatigue syndrome: A pilot study of gene expression in peripheral blood

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    Vernon Suzanne D

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomic profiling of peripheral blood reveals altered immunity in chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS however interpretation remains challenging without immune demographic context. The object of this work is to identify modulation of specific immune functional components and restructuring of co-expression networks characteristic of CFS using the quantitative genomics of peripheral blood. Methods Gene sets were constructed a priori for CD4+ T cells, CD8+ T cells, CD19+ B cells, CD14+ monocytes and CD16+ neutrophils from published data. A group of 111 women were classified using empiric case definition (U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and unsupervised latent cluster analysis (LCA. Microarray profiles of peripheral blood were analyzed for expression of leukocyte-specific gene sets and characteristic changes in co-expression identified from topological evaluation of linear correlation networks. Results Median expression for a set of 6 genes preferentially up-regulated in CD19+ B cells was significantly lower in CFS (p = 0.01 due mainly to PTPRK and TSPAN3 expression. Although no other gene set was differentially expressed at p Conclusion Dissection of blood microarray profiles points to B cell dysfunction with coordinated immune activation supporting persistent inflammation and antibody-mediated NK cell modulation of T cell activity. This has clinical implications as the CD19+ genes identified could provide robust and biologically meaningful basis for the early detection and unambiguous phenotyping of CFS.

  9. Gene expression network analyses in response to air pollution exposures in the trucking industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Jen-Hwa; Hart, Jaime E; Chhabra, Divya; Garshick, Eric; Raby, Benjamin A; Laden, Francine

    2016-11-03

    Exposure to air pollution, including traffic-related pollutants, has been associated with a variety of adverse health outcomes, including increased cardiopulmonary morbidity and mortality, and increased lung cancer risk. To better understand the cellular responses induced by air pollution exposures, we performed genome-wide gene expression microarray analysis using whole blood RNA sampled at three time-points across the work weeks of 63 non-smoking employees at 10 trucking terminals in the northeastern US. We defined genes and gene networks that were differentially activated in response to PM2.5 (particulate matter ≤ 2.5 microns in diameter) and elemental carbon (EC) and organic carbon (OC). Multiple transcripts were strongly associated (padj pollutant levels (48, 260, and 49 transcripts for EC, OC, and PM2.5, respectively), including 63 that were statistically significantly correlated with at least two out of the three exposures. These genes included many that have been implicated in ischemic heart disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), lung cancer, and other pollution-related illnesses. Through the combination of Gene Set Enrichment Analysis and network analysis (using GeneMANIA), we identified a core set of 25 interrelated genes that were common to all three exposure measures and were differentially expressed in two previous studies assessing gene expression attributable to air pollution. Many of these are members of fundamental cancer-related pathways, including those related to DNA and metal binding, and regulation of apoptosis and also but include genes implicated in chronic heart and lung diseases. These data provide a molecular link between the associations of air pollution exposures with health effects.

  10. Prenatal exposure to a pro-inflammatory stimulus causes delays in the development of the innate immune response to LPS in the offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodyl, Nicolette A; Krivanek, Klara M; Lawrence, Elizabeth; Clifton, Vicki L; Hodgson, Deborah M

    2007-10-01

    Growing evidence suggests that maternal health during the prenatal period is a critical determinant of adult immuno-competence. This study aimed to characterise the innate immune response to bacterial exposure in rat offspring following maternal exposure to a pro-inflammatory stimulus. The offspring's innate immune responses were investigated at four developmental timepoints in the rat by determination of immune cell subtypes and TNF-alpha and IL-1beta response to in-vivo LPS exposure. The pre-weaned offspring of exposed dams demonstrated no immune response to the LPS challenge, whereas control offspring responded with a typical elevation in cytokine levels. In pubescence no differences were observed between the responses of the control and exposed offspring. In adulthood and senescence, offspring of endotoxin treated dams had significantly less monocytes in circulation than control offspring and differential sex effects were only evident in these older animals. The developmental profile of immune functioning following prenatal immune activation has not previously been demonstrated. This study highlights the prenatal period as one of importance in determining later immune function.

  11. Perinatal exposure to a low dose of bisphenol A impaired systemic cellular immune response and predisposes young rats to intestinal parasitic infection.

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    Sandrine Ménard

    Full Text Available Perinatal exposure to the food contaminant bisphenol A (BPA in rats induces long lasting adverse effects on intestinal immune homeostasis. This study was aimed at examining the immune response to dietary antigens and the clearance of parasites in young rats at the end of perinatal exposure to a low dose of BPA. Female rats were fed with BPA [5 µg/kg of body weight/day] or vehicle from gestational day 15 to pup weaning. Juvenile female offspring (day (D25 were used to analyze immune cell populations, humoral and cellular responses after oral tolerance or immunization protocol to ovalbumin (OVA, and susceptibility to infection by the intestinal nematode Nippostrongylus brasiliensis (N. brasiliensis. Anti-OVA IgG titers following either oral tolerance or immunization were not affected after BPA perinatal exposure, while a sharp decrease in OVA-induced IFNγ secretion occurred in spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN of OVA-immunized rats. These results are consistent with a decreased number of helper T cells, regulatory T cells and dendritic cells in spleen and MLN of BPA-exposed rats. The lack of cellular response to antigens questioned the ability of BPA-exposed rats to clear intestinal infections. A 1.5-fold increase in N. brasiliensis living larvae was observed in the intestine of BPA-exposed rats compared to controls due to an inappropriate Th1/Th2 cytokine production in infected jejunal tissues. These results show that perinatal BPA exposure impairs cellular response to food antigens, and increases susceptibility to intestinal parasitic infection in the juveniles. This emphasized the maturing immune system during perinatal period highly sensitive to low dose exposure to BPA, altering innate and adaptative immune response capacities in early life.

  12. Gene expression changes in the olfactory bulb of mice induced by exposure to diesel exhaust are dependent on animal rearing environment.

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    Satoshi Yokota

    Full Text Available There is an emerging concern that particulate air pollution increases the risk of cranial nerve disease onset. Small nanoparticles, mainly derived from diesel exhaust particles reach the olfactory bulb by their nasal depositions. It has been reported that diesel exhaust inhalation causes inflammation of the olfactory bulb and other brain regions. However, these toxicological studies have not evaluated animal rearing environment. We hypothesized that rearing environment can change mice phenotypes and thus might alter toxicological study results. In this study, we exposed mice to diesel exhaust inhalation at 90 µg/m(3, 8 hours/day, for 28 consecutive days after rearing in a standard cage or environmental enrichment conditions. Microarray analysis found that expression levels of 112 genes were changed by diesel exhaust inhalation. Functional analysis using Gene Ontology revealed that the dysregulated genes were involved in inflammation and immune response. This result was supported by pathway analysis. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis confirmed 10 genes. Interestingly, background gene expression of the olfactory bulb of mice reared in a standard cage environment was changed by diesel exhaust inhalation, whereas there was no significant effect of diesel exhaust exposure on gene expression levels of mice reared with environmental enrichment. The results indicate for the first time that the effect of diesel exhaust exposure on gene expression of the olfactory bulb was influenced by rearing environment. Rearing environment, such as environmental enrichment, may be an important contributive factor to causation in evaluating still undefined toxic environmental substances such as diesel exhaust.

  13. IMMUNE RESPONSE AND COST ANALYSIS OF INTRADERMAL RABIES VACCINATION FOR POST-EXPOSURE PROPHYLAXIS REGIMEN IN HUMAN

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    N. S. Budayanti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe outbreak of rabies in human in Bali-Indonesia is causing an extraordinary pressure for the government in providing adequate doses of anti-rabies vaccine for post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP. Here, we directly compare the immune response and benefit of the intradermal (ID protocol for rabies vaccine delivery with the intramuscular (IM route. Methods: Sixty health workers who were willing to participate in this study have been randomly selected and grouped into ID, IM, and control groups, each with 20 volunteers. The Thai Red Cross ID- and Zangreb IM-protocols have been applied to the respective group. The sera of the volunteers were collected at day 0, week 1, week 3, week 4, month 3, month 6, month 9, and month 12 after the first vaccination. Anti-rabies virus IgG was detected using PlateliaTM Rabies II Kit (Bio-Rad. Results: Anti-rabies IgG could be detected in the ID-group at one week. The ID-vaccine delivery induced a slightly higher maximum antibody titer compared to IM, though not statistically significant (p>0.05. ID vaccination caused less adverse reactions and produces longer lasting protective immune response.  Cost minimization analysis (CMA on the provincial and national PEP data in 2009-2011 shows that the ID-delivery will reduce the total cost for a completed regimen by USD 28.5, and would have saved the Indonesian government budget approximately USD 3.6 and 4.3 million for complete regimens in Bali and Indonesia, respectively. Conclusion: The ID administration of anti-rabies vaccine induces a similar immune response compared to that of intramuscular injection. It also produces longer lasting protective immune response. It offers additional advantages of potential net cost savings as well as decreasing the pressure on vaccine availability due to the high number of dog bite cases.

  14. Effects of in ovo exposure to PCBs (coplanar congener, kanechlor mixture, hydroxylated metabolite) on the developing cell-mediated immunity in chickens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, J.; Matsuda, M.; Kawano, M.; Wakimoto, T. [Faculty of Agriculture, Ehime Univ., Matsuyama, Ehime (Japan); Kashima, Y. [Dept. of Hygiene, Yokohama City Univ. School of Medicine, Yokohama (Japan)

    2004-09-15

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are wide spread environmental contaminants and known to cause various adverse effects on health of human and wildlife. Immune system is one of the several targets for toxic effects of PCBs and its normal balance is often disrupted by the exposure of the compounds. For example, PCBs may induce immune suppression and result in increased susceptibility to bacterial and viral infections, or conversely, excessive immune enhancement may cause adverse outcomes including as autoimmune disease and anergy. Therefore immune function is regarded as one of an important endpoint in toxicological risk assessment. There are a number of studies shown that neonatal organisms perinatally exposed to polyhalogenated aromatic hydrocarbons (PHAHs) such as PCBs have severer effects on their immune system than adult. Dioxins and coplanar PCB congeners, structurally planar PHAHs are known to have high affinity for aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) have the strongest affinity among such compounds and these are considered to act on immune system through AhR. On the other hand, such as non-planar PCB congeners with low affinity for AhR, which are abundantly contained in commercial PCB preparations have non-additive (antagonistic) effects on immune function. Prenatal exposure of TCDD to rodent induced abnormal lymphoid development in the thymus and thymus-dependent immune functions were remarkably disturbed. Although several experimental studies in mammals have been carried out on the developmental immunotoxicity of PCBs, there are still limited information available on avian species. Thus in this study, prenatal exposure to low level of PCBs and the effects on the developing immune system were investigated with chicken as a model animal of avian species, especially it is focused on the cell-mediated immune function.

  15. Ambient PM exposure and DNA methylation in tumor suppressor genes: a cross-sectional study

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    Cantone Laura

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Exposure to ambient air particles matter (PM has been associated with increased risk of lung cancer. Aberrant tumor suppressor gene promoter methylation has emerged as a promising biomarker for cancers, including lung cancer. Whether exposure to PM is associated with peripheral blood leukocyte (PBL DNA methylation in tumor suppressor genes has not been evaluated. In 63 male healthy steel workers with well-characterized exposure to metal-rich particles nearby Brescia, Italy, we evaluated whether exposure to PM and metal components was associated with PBL DNA methylation in 4 tumor suppressor genes (i.e., APC, p16, p53 and RASSF1A. Blood samples were obtained on the 1st (baseline and 4th day (post-exposure of the same work week and DNA methylation was measured using pyrosequencing. A linear mixed model was used to examine the correlations of the exposure with promoter methylation levels. Mean promoter DNA methylation levels of APC or p16 were significantly higher in post-exposure samples compared to that in baseline samples (p-values = 0.005 for APC, and p-value = 0.006 for p16. By contrast, the mean levels of p53 or RASSF1A promoter methylation was decreased in post-exposure samples compared to that in baseline samples (p-value = 0.015 for p53; and p-value 10 (β = 0.27, 95% CI: 0.13-0.40, and PM1 (β = 0.23, 95% CI: 0.09-0.38. In summary, ambient PM exposure was associated with PBL DNA methylation levels of tumor suppressor genes of APC, p16, p53 and RASSF1A, suggesting that such methylation alterations may reflect processes related to PM-induced lung carcinogenesis.

  16. Expression of immune-response genes in lepidopteran host is suppressed by venom from an endoparasitoid, Pteromalus puparum

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    Fang Qi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The relationships between parasitoids and their insect hosts have attracted attention at two levels. First, the basic biology of host-parasitoid interactions is of fundamental interest. Second, parasitoids are widely used as biological control agents in sustainable agricultural programs. Females of the gregarious endoparasitoid Pteromalus puparum (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae inject venom along with eggs into their hosts. P. puparum does not inject polydnaviruses during oviposition. For this reason, P. puparum and its pupal host, the small white butterfly Pieris rapae (Lepidoptera: Pieridae, comprise an excellent model system for studying the influence of an endoparasitoid venom on the biology of the pupal host. P. puparum venom suppresses the immunity of its host, although the suppressive mechanisms are not fully understood. In this study, we tested our hypothesis that P. puparum venom influences host gene expression in the two main immunity-conferring tissues, hemocytes and fat body. Results At 1 h post-venom injection, we recorded significant decreases in transcript levels of 217 EST clones (revealing 113 genes identified in silico, including 62 unknown contigs derived from forward subtractive libraries of host hemocytes and in transcript levels of 288 EST clones (221 genes identified in silico, including 123 unknown contigs from libraries of host fat body. These genes are related to insect immune response, cytoskeleton, cell cycle and apoptosis, metabolism, transport, stress response and transcriptional and translational regulation. We verified the reliability of the suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH data with semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis of a set of randomly selected genes. This analysis showed that most of the selected genes were down-regulated after venom injection. Conclusions Our findings support our hypothesis that P. puparum venom influences gene expression in host hemocytes and fat body. Specifically

  17. Repeated Mouse Lung Exposures to Stachybotrys chartarum Shift Immune Response from Type 1 to Type 2.

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    Rosenblum Lichtenstein, Jamie H; Molina, Ramon M; Donaghey, Thomas C; Hsu, Yi-Hsiang H; Mathews, Joel A; Kasahara, David I; Park, Jin-Ah; Bordini, André; Godleski, John J; Gillis, Bruce S; Brain, Joseph D

    2016-10-01

    After a single or multiple intratracheal instillations of Stachybotrys chartarum (S. chartarum or black mold) spores in BALB/c mice, we characterized cytokine production, metabolites, and inflammatory patterns by analyzing mouse bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), lung tissue, and plasma. We found marked differences in BAL cell counts, especially large increases in lymphocytes and eosinophils in multiple-dosed mice. Formation of eosinophil-rich granulomas and airway goblet cell metaplasia were prevalent in the lungs of multiple-dosed mice but not in single- or saline-dosed groups. We detected changes in the cytokine expression profiles in both the BAL and plasma. Multiple pulmonary exposures to S. chartarum induced significant metabolic changes in the lungs but not in the plasma. These changes suggest a shift from type 1 inflammation after an acute exposure to type 2 inflammation after multiple exposures to S. chartarum. Eotaxin, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), MIP-1α, MIP-1β, TNF-α, and the IL-8 analogs macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) and keratinocyte chemoattractant (KC), had more dramatic changes in multiple- than in single-dosed mice, and parallel the cytokines that characterize humans with histories of mold exposures versus unexposed control subjects. This repeated exposure model allows us to more realistically characterize responses to mold, such as cytokine, metabolic, and cellular changes.

  18. Tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate perturbs the expression of genes involved in immune response and lipid and steroid metabolism in chicken embryos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farhat, Amani [Department of Biology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5 (Canada); National Wildlife Research Centre, Environment Canada, Ottawa, ON K1A 0H3 (Canada); Buick, Julie K.; Williams, Andrew; Yauk, Carole L.; O' Brien, Jason M. [Environmental Health Science and Research Bureau, Health Canada, Ottawa, ON K1A 0K9 (Canada); Crump, Doug; Williams, Kim L.; Chiu, Suzanne [National Wildlife Research Centre, Environment Canada, Ottawa, ON K1A 0H3 (Canada); Kennedy, Sean W., E-mail: sean.kennedy@ec.gc.ca [Department of Biology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5 (Canada); National Wildlife Research Centre, Environment Canada, Ottawa, ON K1A 0H3 (Canada)

    2014-03-01

    We previously demonstrated that in ovo exposure to the flame retardant tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TDCPP) decreased plasma thyroxine levels, reduced growth parameters, and decreased gallbladder size in chicken embryos. In the current study DNA microarrays were used to evaluate global mRNA expression in liver tissue of male chicken embryos that exhibited the above mentioned effects. Injected doses were dimethyl sulfoxide vehicle control, 7.6 or 45 μg TDCPP/g egg. TDCPP caused significant changes in the expression of five genes at the low dose and 47 genes at the high dose (False Discovery Rate p ≤ 0.1, fold change ≥ 1.5). The gene expression analysis suggested a compromised immune function, a state of cholestatic liver/biliary fibrosis, and disrupted lipid and steroid metabolism. Circulating bile acid levels were elevated, which is an indication of liver dysfunction, and plasma cholesterol levels were reduced; however, hepatic bile acid and cholesterol levels were unaltered. Interactome analyses identified apolipoprotein E, hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha as key regulatory molecules involved in the effects of TDCPP. Our results demonstrate a targeted effect of TDCPP toxicity on lipid metabolism, including cholesterol, that helps explain the aforementioned phenotypic effects, as chicken embryos are highly dependent on yolk lipids for growth and maintenance throughout development. Finally, our results are in concordance with the literature that describes TDCPP as a cancer-causing agent, since the majority of dysregulated genes were involved in cancer pathways. - Highlights: • TDCPP dysregulates genes involved in immune function and lipid metabolism. • A targeted effect of TDCPP toxicity on cholesterol metabolism is apparent. • A state of cholestatic liver fibrosis is suggested by the expression profile. • Elevated plasma bile acids suggest that TDCPP causes liver dysfunction.

  19. Impact of date palm fruits extracts and probiotic enriched diet on antioxidant status, innate immune response and immune-related gene expression of European seabass (Dicentrarchus labrax).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guardiola, F A; Porcino, C; Cerezuela, R; Cuesta, A; Faggio, C; Esteban, M A

    2016-05-01

    The application of additives in the diet as plants or extracts of plants as natural and innocuous compounds has potential in aquaculture as an alternative to antibiotics and immunoprophylactics. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the potential effects of dietary supplementation of date palm fruit extracts alone or in combination with Pdp11 probiotic on serum antioxidant status, on the humoral and cellular innate immune status, as well as, on the expression levels of some immune-related genes in head-kidney and gut of European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) after 2 and 4 weeks of administration. This study showed for the first time in European sea bass an immunostimulation in several of the parameters evaluated in fish fed with date palm fruits extracts enriched diet or fed with this substance in combination with Pdp 11 probiotic, mainly after 4 weeks of treatment. In the same way, dietary supplementation of mixture diet has positive effects on the expression levels of immune-related genes, chiefly in head-kidney of Dicentrarchus labrax. Therefore, the combination of both could be considered of great interest as potential additives for farmed fish. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Impact of exposure time, particle size and uptake pathway on silver nanoparticle effects on circulating immune cells in mytilus galloprovincialis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouallegui, Younes; Ben Younes, Ridha; Turki, Faten; Oueslati, Ridha

    2017-12-01

    Nanomaterials have increasingly emerged as potential pollutants to aquatic organisms. Nanomaterials are known to be taken up by hemocytes of marine invertebrates including Mytilus galloprovincialis. Indeed, assessments of hemocyte-related parameters are a valuable tool in the determination of potentials for nanoparticle (NP) toxicity. The present study assessed the effects from two size types of silver nanoparticles (AgNP: <50 nm and <100 nm) on the frequency of hemocytes subpopulations as immunomodulation biomarkers exposed in a mollusk host. Studies were performed using exposures prior to and after inhibition of potential NP uptake pathways (i.e. clathrin- and caveolae-mediated endocytosis) and over different durations of exposure (3, 6 and 12 h). Differential hemocyte counts (DHC) revealed significant variations in frequency of different immune cells in mussels exposed for 3 hr to either AgNP size. However, as exposure duration progressed cell levels were subsequently differentially altered depending on particle size (i.e. no significant effects after 3 h with larger AgNP). AgNP effects were also delayed/varied after blockade of either clathrin- or caveolae-mediated endocytosis. The results also noted significant negative correlations between changes in levels hyalinocytes and acidophils or in levels basophils and acidophils as a result of AgNP exposure. From these results, we concluded AgNP effects on mussels were size and duration of exposure dependent. This study highlighted how not only was NP size important, but that differing internalization mechanisms could be key factors impacting on the potential for NP in the environment to induce immunomodulation in a model/test sentinel host like M. galloprovincialis.

  1. In Utero Exposure to a High-Fat Diet Programs Hepatic Hypermethylation and Gene Dysregulation and Development of Metabolic Syndrome in Male Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seki, Yoshinori; Suzuki, Masako; Guo, Xingyi; Glenn, Alan Scott; Vuguin, Patricia M; Fiallo, Ariana; Du, Quan; Ko, Yi-An; Yu, Yiting; Susztak, Katalin; Zheng, Deyou; Greally, John M; Katz, Ellen B; Charron, Maureen J

    2017-09-01

    Exposure to a high-fat (HF) diet in utero is associated with increased incidence of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome later in life. However, the molecular basis of this enhanced susceptibility for metabolic disease is poorly understood. Gene expression microarray and genome-wide DNA methylation analyses of mouse liver revealed that exposure to a maternal HF milieu activated genes of immune response, inflammation, and hepatic dysfunction. DNA methylation analysis revealed 3360 differentially methylated loci, most of which (76%) were hypermethylated and distributed preferentially to hotspots on chromosomes 4 [atherosclerosis susceptibility quantitative trait loci (QTLs) 1] and 18 (insulin-dependent susceptibility QTLs 21). Interestingly, we found six differentially methylated genes within these hotspot QTLs associated with metabolic disease that maintain altered gene expression into adulthood (Arhgef19, Epha2, Zbtb17/Miz-1, Camta1 downregulated; and Ccdc11 and Txnl4a upregulated). Most of the hypermethylated genes in these hotspots are associated with cardiovascular system development and function. There were 140 differentially methylated genes that showed a 1.5-fold increase or decrease in messenger RNA levels. Many of these genes play a role in cell signaling pathways associated with metabolic disease. Of these, metalloproteinase 9, whose dysregulation plays a key role in diabetes, obesity, and cardiovascular disease, was upregulated 1.75-fold and hypermethylated in the gene body. In summary, exposure to a maternal HF diet causes DNA hypermethylation, which is associated with long-term gene expression changes in the liver of exposed offspring, potentially contributing to programmed development of metabolic disease later in life. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society.

  2. DNA methylation patterns of genes related to immune response in the different clinical forms of oral lichen planus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Aline Fernanda; de Resende, Renata Gonçalves; de Lacerda, Júlio César Tanos; Pereira, Núbia Braga; Melo, Leonardo Augusto; Diniz, Marina Gonçalves; Gomes, Carolina Cavalieri; Gomez, Ricardo Santiago

    2017-10-04

    The oral lichen planus is a chronic inflammatory disease. Although its aetiology is not well understood, the role of T lymphocytes in its inflammatory events is recognised. Identifying the epigenetic mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of this immune-mediated condition is fundamental for understanding the inflammatory reaction that occurs in the disease. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the methylation pattern of 21 immune response-related genes in the different clinical forms of oral lichen planus. A cross-sectional study was performed to analyse the DNA methylation patterns in three distinct groups of oral lichen planus: (i) reticular/plaque lesions; (ii) erosive lesions; (iii) normal oral mucosa (control group). After DNA extraction from biopsies, the samples were submitted to digestions by methylation-sensitive and methylation-dependent enzymes and double digestion. The relative percentage of methylated DNA for each gene was provided using real-time polymerase chain reaction arrays. Hypermethylation of the STAT5A gene was observed only in the control group (59.0%). A higher hypermethylation of the ELANE gene was found in reticular/plaque lesions (72.1%) compared to the erosive lesions (50.0%). Our results show variations in the methylation profile of immune response-related genes, according to the clinical type of oral lichen planus after comparing with the normal oral mucosa. Further studies are necessary to validate these findings using gene expression analysis. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Diversity and evolutionary patterns of immune genes in free-ranging Namibian leopards (Panthera pardus pardus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Prieto, Aines; Wachter, Bettina; Melzheimer, Joerg; Thalwitzer, Susanne; Sommer, Simone

    2011-01-01

    The genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) are a key component of the mammalian immune system and have become important molecular markers for fitness-related genetic variation in wildlife populations. Currently, no information about the MHC sequence variation and constitution in African leopards exists. In this study, we isolated and characterized genetic variation at the adaptively most important region of MHC class I and MHC class II-DRB genes in 25 free-ranging African leopards from Namibia and investigated the mechanisms that generate and maintain MHC polymorphism in the species. Using single-stranded conformation polymorphism analysis and direct sequencing, we detected 6 MHC class I and 6 MHC class II-DRB sequences, which likely correspond to at least 3 MHC class I and 3 MHC class II-DRB loci. Amino acid sequence variation in both MHC classes was higher or similar in comparison to other reported felids. We found signatures of positive selection shaping the diversity of MHC class I and MHC class II-DRB loci during the evolutionary history of the species. A comparison of MHC class I and MHC class II-DRB sequences of the leopard to those of other felids revealed a trans-species mode of evolution. In addition, the evolutionary relationships of MHC class II-DRB sequences between African and Asian leopard subspecies are discussed.

  4. Gene expression in the mouse brain following early pregnancy exposure to ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Christine R; Chong, Suyinn

    2016-12-01

    Exposure to alcohol during early embryonic or fetal development has been linked with a variety of adverse outcomes, the most common of which are structural and functional abnormalities of the central nervous system [1]. Behavioural and cognitive deficits reported in individuals exposed to alcohol in utero include intellectual impairment, learning and memory difficulties, diminished executive functioning, attention problems, poor motor function and hyperactivity [2]. The economic and social costs of these outcomes are substantial and profound [3], [4]. Improvement of neurobehavioural outcomes following prenatal alcohol exposure requires greater understanding of the mechanisms of alcohol-induced damage to the brain. Here we use a mouse model of relatively moderate ethanol exposure early in pregnancy and profile gene expression in the hippocampus and caudate putamen of adult male offspring. The effects of offspring sex and age on ethanol-sensitive hippocampal gene expression were also examined. All array data are available at the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) repository under accession number GSE87736.

  5. Expression of immune system-related genes during ontogeny in experimentally wounded common carp (Cyprinus carpio) larvae and juveniles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Jacob; Nielsen, Michael Engelbrecht

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the effect of full-thickness incisional wounding on expression of genes related to the immune system in larvae and juveniles of common carp (Cyprinus carpio). The wounds were inflicted by needle puncture immediately below the anterior part of the dorsal fin on days 7, 14, 28 and 49...

  6. SNP discovery and development of genetic markers for mapping immune response genes in common carp (Cyprinus carpio)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in immune response genes have been reported as markers for susceptibility to infectious diseases in human and livestock. A disease caused by cyprinid herpesvirus 3 (CyHV-3) is highly contagious and virulent in common carp (Cyprinus carpio). With the aim to de...

  7. Overwintering Is Associated with Reduced Expression of Immune Genes and Higher Susceptibility to Virus Infection in Honey Bees.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadja Steinmann

    Full Text Available The eusocial honey bee, Apis mellifera, has evolved remarkable abilities to survive extreme seasonal differences in temperature and availability of resources by dividing the worker caste into two groups that differ in physiology and lifespan: summer and winter bees. Most of the recent major losses of managed honey bee colonies occur during the winter, suggesting that winter bees may have compromised immune function and higher susceptibility to diseases. We tested this hypothesis by comparing the expression of eight immune genes and naturally occurring infection levels of deformed wing virus (DWV, one of the most widespread viruses in A. mellifera populations, between summer and winter bees. Possible interactions between immune response and physiological activity were tested by measuring the expression of vitellogenin and methyl farnesoate epoxidase, a gene coding for the last enzyme involved in juvenile hormone biosynthesis. Our data show that high DWV loads in winter bees correlate with reduced expression of genes involved in the cellular immune response and physiological activity and high expression of humoral immune genes involved in antibacterial defense compared with summer bees. This expression pattern could reflect evolutionary adaptations to resist bacterial pathogens and economize energy during the winter under a pathogen landscape with reduced risk of pathogenic viral infections. The outbreak of Varroa destructor infestation could have overcome these adaptations by promoting the transmission of viruses. Our results suggest that reduced cellular immune function during the winter may have increased honey bee's susceptibility to DWV. These results contribute to our understanding of honey bee colony losses in temperate regions.

  8. Changes in Liver Metabolic Gene Expression after Radiation Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, C. P.; Wotring, Virginia E.

    2012-01-01

    The health of the liver, especially the rate of its metabolic enzymes, determines the concentration of circulating drugs as well as the duration of their efficacy. Most pharmaceuticals are metabolized by the liver, and clinically-used medication doses are given with normal liver function in mind. A drug overdose can result in the case of a liver that is damaged and removing pharmaceuticals from the circulation at a rate slower than normal. Alternatively, if liver function is elevated and removing drugs from the system more quickly than usual, it would be as if too little drug had been given for effective treatment. Because of the importance of the liver in drug metabolism, we want to understand any effects of spaceflight on the enzymes of the liver. Exposure to cosmic radiation is one aspect of spaceflight that can be modeled in ground experiments.

  9. Multiple isoforms of immune-related genes from hemocytes and eyestalk cDNA libraries of swimming crab Portunus trituberculatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuan; Cui, Zhaoxia; Song, Chengwen; Wang, Shuangyan; Li, Qianqian

    2011-07-01

    Expressed sequence tags (ESTs) analysis has been shown to be an efficient approach not only for gene discovery, but also for gene expression profiles performance. Two full-length enriched cDNA libraries were constructed from hemocytes and eyestalk of Portunus trituberculatus, respectively, and randomly sequenced to collect genomic information and identify genes involved in immune defense response. A total of 99 unigenes including 64 unigenes (6.00% of 1066 unigenes) in hemocytes library and 35 unigens (6.86% of 510 unigenes) in eyestalk library are identified to be immune genes. These genes are categorized into six classes, viz. antimicrobial peptides, redox proteins, melanization related proteins, chaperone proteins, clottable proteins and other immune factors. The content and category of immune genes in eyestalk library indicate eyestalk might have unrecognized role in crab immunity. Five immune genes containing multiple protein isoforms are identified and characterized, including anti-lipopolysaccharide factor (PtALF1-7), crustin (PtCrustin1-3), thioredoxin (PtTrx1-2), clip domain serine proteinase (PtcSP1-5) and kazal-type proteinase inhibitor (PtKPI1-4). Sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis reveal PtALF1-7 contain two conserved cysteine residues and might be encoded by multiple genomic loci. PtCrustin1-3 share the consensus cysteine motif and are considered as Type I crustins. PtTrx1 possesses the critical structural cysteine residue C⁷³ of Trx-1, while PtTrx2 has the N-terminal mitochondrial translocation signal of Trx-2. Sequence analysis shows PtcSP1-5 contain one clip domain and one partial SP catalytic triad domain. PtKPI1-4 present one typical Kazal domain consisting of six conserved cysteine residues. Some protein isoforms are tissue-specific, which might suggest they have different origins and perform diverse functions. Except PtALF1-3 and PtCrustin1, the other isoformes in this study are firstly identified from P. trituberculatus

  10. Specific immune priming in the invasive ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolte, Sören; Roth, Olivia; Philipp, Eva E R; Saphörster, Julia; Rosenstiel, Philip; Reusch, Thorsten B H

    2013-01-01

    Specific immune priming enables an induced immune response upon repeated pathogen encounter. As a functional analogue to vertebrate immune memory, such adaptive plasticity has been described, for instance, in insects and crustaceans. However, towards the base of the metazoan tree our knowledge about the existence of specific immune priming becomes scattered. Here, we exposed the invasive ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi repeatedly to two different bacterial epitopes (Gram-positive or -negative) and measured gene expression. Ctenophores experienced either the same bacterial epitope twice (homologous treatments) or different bacterial epitopes (heterologous treatments). Our results demonstrate that immune gene expression depends on earlier bacterial exposure. We detected significantly different expression upon heterologous compared with homologous bacterial treatment at three immune activator and effector genes. This is the first experimental evidence for specific immune priming in Ctenophora and generally in non-bilaterian animals, hereby adding to our growing notion of plasticity in innate immune systems across all animal phyla.

  11. Disparity of innate immunity-related gene effects on asthma and allergy on Karelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guicheng; Candelaria, Pierre; Mäkelä, J Mika; Khoo, Siew-Kim; Hayden, M Catherine; von Hertzen, Leena; Laatikainen, Tiina; Vartiainen, Erkki; Goldblatt, Jack; Haahtela, Tari; LeSouëf, N Peter

    2011-09-01

    We investigated the interactive effects of 11 innate immunity-related genes (IL10, IL12b, IL8, TLR2, TLR4, CD14, IFNGR, CC16, IFNg, CMA1, and TGFB) and four IgE response genes (IL4, IL13, IL4RA, and STAT6) with 'Western' or 'Eastern' environments/lifestyles on asthma and allergy in Karelian children. Karelian children (412 Finnish and 446 Russian) were recruited and assessed for a range of allergic conditions, with 24 single-nucleotide polymorphisms genotyped in 15 genes. The genotype-phenotype relationships differed in Finnish and Russian Karelian children. The interaction between polymorphisms and the variable representing 'Western' and 'Eastern' environments/ lifestyles was significant for IL10-1082 (p = 0.0083) on current rhinitis, IL12b 6408 on current conjunctivitis (p = 0.016) and atopy (p = 0.034), IL8 781 on atopic eczema (p = 0.0096), CD14 -550 on current rhinitis (p = 0.022), IFNgR1 -56 on atopic eczema(p = 0.038), and STAT6 2964 on current itchy rash (p = 0.037) and total serum IgE (p = 0.042). In addition, the G allele of IL13 130 was associated with a lower level of total serum IgE in Finnish (p = 0.003) and Russian (p = 0.01) children and overall (pooling the two populations together, p = 0.00006). After adjusting for multiple tests, the association between IL13 130 and IgE and the interactive effects of IL10-1082 on current rhinitis and IL8 781 on atopic eczema were significant by controlling a false-positive rate of 0.05 and 0.10, respectively. Living in an Eastern vs. Western environment was associated with a different genetic profile associated with asthma and allergy in the Karelian populations. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  12. Expression of Vibrio salmonicida virulence genes and immune response parameters in experimentally challenged Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ane Mohn Bjelland

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The Gram-negative bacterium Vibrio salmonicida is the causative agent of cold-water vibriosis (CV, a hemorrhagic septicemia that primarily affects farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.. The mechanisms of disease development, host specificity and adaptation, as well as the immunogenic properties of V. salmonicida are largely unknown. Therefore, to gain more knowledge on the pathogenesis of CV, 90 Atlantic salmon parr were injected intraperitonellay with 6 x 106 CFU of V. salmonicida LFI1238. Samples from blood and spleen tissue were taken at different time points throughout the challenge for gene expression analysis by two-step reverse transcription quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Out of a panel of six housekeeping genes, accD, gapA and 16S rDNA were found to be the most suitable references for expression analysis in Vibrio salmonicida. The bacterial proliferation during challenge was monitored based on the expression of the 16S rRNA encoding gene. Before day 4, the concentrations of V. salmonicida in blood and spleen tissue demonstrated a lag phase. From day 4, the bacterial proliferation was exponential. The expression profiles of eight genes encoding potential virulence factors of V. salmonicida were studied. Surprisingly, all tested virulence genes were generally highest expressed in broth cultures compared to the in vivo samples. We hypothesize that this general muting of gene expression in vivo may be a strategy for V. salmonicida to hide from the host immune system. To further investigate this hypothesis, the expression profiles of eight genes encoding innate immune factors were analyzed. The results demonstrated a strong and rapid, but short-lasting innate immune response against V. salmonicida. These results suggest that the bacterium possesses mechanisms that inhibit and/or resist the salmon innate immune system until the host becomes exhausted of fighting the on-going and eventually overwhelming infection.

  13. Exposure to ambient ultrafine particulate matter alters the expression of genes in primary human neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solaimani, Parrisa; Saffari, Arian; Sioutas, Constantinos; Bondy, Stephen C; Campbell, Arezoo

    2017-01-01

    Exposure to ambient particulate matter (PM) has been associated with the onset of neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disorders, but the mechanism of toxicity remains unclear. To gain insight into this neurotoxicity, this study sought to examine global gene expression changes caused by exposure to ambient ultrafine PM. Microarray analysis was performed on primary human neurons derived from fetal brain tissue after a 24h exposure to 20μg/mL of ambient ultrafine particles. We found a majority of the changes in noncoding RNAs, which are involved in epigenetic regulation of gene expression, and thereby could impact the expression of several other protein coding gene targets. Although neurons from biologically different lot numbers were used, we found a significant increase in the expression of metallothionein 1A and 1F in all samples after exposure to particulate matter as confirmed by quantitative PCR. These metallothionein 1 proteins are responsible for neuroprotection after exposure to environmental insult but prolonged induction can be toxic. Epidemiological studies have reported that in utero exposure to ultrafine PM not only leads to neurodevelopmental and behavioral abnormalities, but may also predispose the progeny to neurodegenerative disease later in life by genetic imprinting. Our results pinpoint some of the PM-induced genetic changes that may underlie these findings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Elimination of contaminating cap genes in AAV vector virions reduces immune responses and improves transgene expression in a canine gene therapy model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z; Halbert, C L; Lee, D; Butts, T; Tapscott, S J; Storb, R; Miller, A D

    2014-04-01

    Animal and human gene therapy studies utilizing AAV vectors have shown that immune responses to AAV capsid proteins can severely limit transgene expression. The main source of capsid antigen is that associated with the AAV vectors, which can be reduced by stringent vector purification. A second source of AAV capsid proteins is that expressed from cap genes aberrantly packaged into AAV virions during vector production. This antigen source can be eliminated by the use of a cap gene that is too large to be incorporated into an AAV capsid, such as a cap gene containing a large intron (captron gene). Here, we investigated the effects of elimination of cap gene transfer and of vector purification by CsCl gradient centrifugation on AAV vector immunogenicity and expression following intramuscular injection in dogs. We found that both approaches reduced vector immunogenicity and that combining the two produced the lowest immune responses and highest transgene expression. This combined approach enabled the use of a relatively mild immunosuppressive regimen to promote robust micro-dystrophin gene expression in Duchenne muscular dystrophy-affected dogs. Our study shows the importance of minimizing AAV cap gene impurities and indicates that this improvement in AAV vector production may benefit human applications.

  15. Immune and inflammatory responses of Australian firefighters after repeated exposures to the heat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Anthony; Keene, Toby; Argus, Christos; Driller, Matthew; Guy, Joshua H; Rattray, Ben

    2015-01-01

    When firefighters work in hot conditions, altered immune and inflammatory responses may increase the risk of a cardiac event. The present study aimed to establish the time course of such responses. Forty-two urban firefighters completed a repeat work protocol in a heat chamber (100 ± 5°C). Changes to leukocytes, platelets, TNFα, IL-6, IL-10, LPS and CRP were evaluated immediately post-work and also after 1 and 24 h of rest. Increases in core temperatures were associated with significant increases in leukocytes, platelets and TNFα directly following work. Further, platelets continued to increase at 1 h (+31.2 ± 31.3 × 10(9) l, p work tasks in the heat. This is particularly relevant during multi-day deployments following natural disasters. Practitioner Summary: Firefighters regularly re-enter fire affected buildings or are redeployed to further operational tasks. Should work in the heat lead to sustained immune and inflammatory changes following extended rest periods, incident controllers should plan appropriate work/rest cycles to minimise these changes and any subsequent risks of cardiac events.

  16. Polymorphisms of Selected DNA Repair Genes and Lung Cancer in Chromium Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halasova, E; Matakova, T; Skerenova, M; Krutakova, M; Slovakova, P; Dzian, A; Javorkova, S; Pec, M; Kypusova, K; Hamzik, J

    2016-01-01

    Chromium is a well-known mutagen and carcinogen involved in lung cancer development. DNA repair genes play an important role in the elimination of genetic changes caused by chromium exposure. In the present study, we investigated the polymorphisms of the following DNA repair genes: XRCC3, participating in the homologous recombination repair, and hMLH1 and hMSH2, functioning in the mismatch repair. We focused on the risk the polymorphisms present in the development of lung cancer regarding the exposure to chromium. We analyzed 106 individuals; 45 patients exposed to chromium with diagnosed lung cancer and 61 healthy controls. Genotypes were determined by a PCR-RFLP method. We unravelled a potential for increased risk of lung cancer development in the hMLH1 (rs1800734) AA genotype in the recessive model. In conclusion, gene polymorphisms in the DNA repair genes underscores the risk of lung cancer development in chromium exposed individuals.

  17. Gene expression changes in female zebrafish (Danio rerio) brain in response to acute exposure to methylmercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Catherine A.; Garcia-Reyero, Natàlia; Martyniuk, Chris; Knoebl, Iris; Pope, Marie; Wright-Osment, Maureen K.; Denslow, Nancy D.; Tillitt, Donald E.

    2011-01-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a potent neurotoxicant and endocrine disruptor that accumulates in aquatic systems. Previous studies have shown suppression of hormone levels in both male and female fish, suggesting effects on gonadotropin regulation in the brain. The gene expression profile in adult female zebrafish whole brain induced by acute (96 h) MeHg exposure was investigated. Fish were exposed by injection to 0 or 0.5(mu or u)g MeHg/g. Gene expression changes in the brain were examined using a 22,000-feature zebrafish microarray. At a significance level of pfemale brain. Future studies will compare the gene expression profile induced in response to MeHg with that induced by other toxicants and will investigate responsive genes as potential biomarkers of MeHg exposure.

  18. Metabolic gene expression changes in astrocytes in Multiple Sclerosis cerebral cortex are indicative of immune-mediated signaling

    KAUST Repository

    Zeis, T.

    2015-04-01

    Emerging as an important correlate of neurological dysfunction in Multiple Sclerosis (MS), extended focal and diffuse gray matter abnormalities have been found and linked to clinical manifestations such as seizures, fatigue and cognitive dysfunction. To investigate possible underlying mechanisms we analyzed the molecular alterations in histopathological normal appearing cortical gray matter (NAGM) in MS. By performing a differential gene expression analysis of NAGM of control and MS cases we identified reduced transcription of astrocyte specific genes involved in the astrocyte–neuron lactate shuttle (ANLS) and the glutamate–glutamine cycle (GGC). Additional quantitative immunohistochemical analysis demonstrating a CX43 loss in MS NAGM confirmed a crucial involvement of astrocytes and emphasizes their importance in MS pathogenesis. Concurrently, a Toll-like/IL-1β signaling expression signature was detected in MS NAGM, indicating that immune-related signaling might be responsible for the downregulation of ANLS and GGC gene expression in MS NAGM. Indeed, challenging astrocytes with immune stimuli such as IL-1β and LPS reduced their ANLS and GGC gene expression in vitro. The detected upregulation of IL1B in MS NAGM suggests inflammasome priming. For this reason, astrocyte cultures were treated with ATP and ATP/LPS as for inflammasome activation. This treatment led to a reduction of ANLS and GGC gene expression in a comparable manner. To investigate potential sources for ANLS and GGC downregulation in MS NAGM, we first performed an adjuvant-driven stimulation of the peripheral immune system in C57Bl/6 mice in vivo. This led to similar gene expression changes in spinal cord demonstrating that peripheral immune signals might be one source for astrocytic gene expression changes in the brain. IL1B upregulation in MS NAGM itself points to a possible endogenous signaling process leading to ANLS and GGC downregulation. This is supported by our findings that, among others

  19. Exposure risks and tetanus immunization in women of family owned farms. Implications for occupational and environmental health nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, C; Carruth, A K

    2001-03-01

    A sampling pool of 4,808 farms in 10 parishes across southeast Louisiana was used to examine the risk factors of farm women who engage in activities putting them at risk for tetanus and to examine the circumstances related to vaccination. Data were collected, via stratified random sampling, in summer 1998 resulting in 657 completed interviews. Only 53.6% of women were current with a tetanus booster, having received their immunization within the past 10 years. Just as many women received tetanus vaccination following an injury or accident as for prevention. As women aged, they were less likely to be compliant. In the South, a number of environmental factors contribute to the risk for tetanus exposure and infection. These risk factors were examined in light of compliance with tetanus booster compliance. Increasing awareness of risk is essential because although tetanus is uncommon, the death rate from tetanus is greater than 30%.

  20. Microarray Analysis of Mercury-Induced Changes in Gene Expression in Human Liver Carcinoma (HepG2 Cells: Importance in Immune Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul B. Tchounwou

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Mercury is widely distributed in the biosphere, and its toxic effects have been associated with human death and several ailments that include cardiovascular diseases, anemia, kidney and liver damage, developmental abnormalities, neurobehavioral disorders, autoimmune diseases, and cancers in experimental animals. At the cellular level, mercury has been shown to interact with sulphydryl groups of proteins and enzymes, to damage DNA, and to modulate cell cycle progression and/or apoptosis. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of mercury toxicity remain to be elucidated. Our laboratory has demonstrated that mercury exposure induces cytotoxicity and apoptosis, modulates cell cycle, and transcriptionally activates specific stress genes in human liver carcinoma cells. The liver is one of the few organs capable of regeneration from injury. Dormant genes in the liver are therefore capable of reactivation. In this research, we hypothesize that mercury-induced hepatotoxicity is associated with the modulation of specific gene expressions in liver cells that can lead to several disease states involving immune system dysfunctions. In testing this hypothesis, we used an Affymetrix oligonucleotide microarray with probe sets complementary to more than 20,000 genes to determine whether patterns of gene expressions differ between controls and mercury (1-3μg/mL treated cells. There was a clear separation in gene expression profiles between controls and mercury-treated cells. Hierarchical cluster analysis identified 2,211 target genes that were affected. One hundred and thirty-eight of these genes were up-regulated, among which forty three were significantly over-expressed (p = 0.001 with greater than a two-fold change, and ninety five genes were moderately over-expressed with an increase of more than one fold (p = 0.004. Two thousand and twentythree genes were down-regulated with only forty five of them reaching a statistically significant decline at

  1. Protein Phosphatase 2A Regulates Innate Immune and Proteolytic Responses to Cigarette Smoke Exposure in the Lung

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Alison M.; Hardigan, Andrew; Geraghty, Patrick; Salim, Shaneeza; Gaffney, Adam; Thankachen, Jincy; Arellanos, Leo; D'Armiento, Jeanine M.; Foronjy, Robert F.

    2012-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is the primary serine-threonine phosphatase of eukaryotic cells, and changes in its activity have been linked to neoplastic and neurodegenerative diseases. However, the role of PP2A in noncancerous lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has not been previously examined. This study determined that PP2A activity was significantly increased in the lungs of advanced emphysema subjects compared with age-matched controls. Furthermore, we found that cigarette smoke exposure increases PP2A activity in mouse lung in vivo and in primary human small airway epithelial (SAE) cells in vitro. In mice, intratracheal transfection of PP2A protein prior to cigarette smoke exposure prevented acute smoke–induced lung inflammation. Conversely, inhibiting PP2A activity during smoke exposure exacerbated inflammatory responses in the lung. To further determine how PP2A modulates the responses to cigarette smoke in the lung, enzyme levels were manipulated in SAE cells using protein transfection and short hairpin RNA (shRNA) techniques. Increasing PP2A activity in SAE cells via PP2A protein transfection downregulated cytokine expression and prevented the induction of proteases following cigarette smoke extract (CSE) treatment. Conversely, decreasing enzymatic activity by stably transfecting SAE cells with shRNA for the A subunit of PP2A exacerbated these smoke-mediated responses. This study establishes that PP2A induction by cigarette smoke modulates immune and proteolytic responses to cigarette smoke exposure. Together, these findings suggest that manipulation of PP2A activity may be a plausible means to treat COPD and other inflammatory diseases. PMID:22223484

  2. Association of the Porcine Cluster of Differentiation 4 Gene with T Lymphocyte Subpopulations and Its Expression in Immune Tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingen Xu

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Cluster of differentiation 4 (CD4 is mainly expressed on CD4+ T cells, which plays an important role in immune response. The aim of this study was to detect the association between polymorphisms of the CD4 gene and T lymphocyte subpopulations in pigs, and to investigate the effects of genetic variation on the CD4 gene expression level in immune tissues. Five missense mutations in the CD4 gene were identified using DNA pooling sequencing assays, and two main haplotypes (CCTCC and AGCTG in strong linkage disequilibrium (with frequencies of 50.26% and 46.34%, respectively were detected in the population of Large White pigs. Our results indicated that the five SNPs and the two haplotypes were significantly associated with the proportions of CD4−CD8−, CD4+CD8+, CD4+CD8−, CD4+ and CD4+/CD8+ in peripheral blood (p0.05. These results indicate that the CD4 gene may influence T lymphocyte subpopulations and can be considered as a candidate gene affecting immunity in pigs.

  3. The effects of feeding β-glucan to Pangasianodon hypophthalmus on immune gene expression and resistance to Edwardsiella ictaluri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirimanapong, Wanna; Thompson, Kim D; Ooi, Ei Lin; Bekaert, Michaël; Collet, Bertrand; Taggart, John B; Bron, James E; Green, Darren M; Shinn, Andrew P; Adams, Alexandra; Leaver, Michael J

    2015-11-01

    Pangasianodon hypophthalmus (striped catfish) is an important aquaculture species and intensification of farming has increased disease problems, particularly Edwardsiella ictaluri. The effects of feeding β-glucans on immune gene expression and resistance to E. ictaluri in P. hypophthalmus were explored. Fish were fed 0.1% fungal-derived β-glucan or 0.1% commercial yeast-derived β-glucan or a basal control diet without glucan. After 14 days of feeding, the mRNA expression of immune genes (transferrin, C-reactive protein, precerebellin-like protein, Complement C3 and factor B, 2a MHC class II and interleukin-1 beta) in liver, kidney and spleen were determined. Following this fish from each of the three diet treatment groups were infected with E. ictaluri and further gene expression measured 24 h post-infection (h.p.i.), while the remaining fish were monitored over 2 weeks for mortalities. Cumulative percentage mortality at 14 days post-infection (d.p.i.) was less in β-glucan fed fish compared to controls. There was no difference in gene expression between dietary groups after feeding for 14 days, but there was a clear difference between infected and uninfected fish at 24 h.p.i., and based on principal component analysis β-glucans stimulated the overall expression of immune genes in the liver, kidney and spleen at 24 h.p.i. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Interleukin 10-Dominant Immune Response and Increased Risk of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis After Natural Exposure to Lutzomyia intermedia Sand Flies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Augusto M; Cristal, Juqueline R; Muniz, Aline C; Carvalho, Lucas P; Gomes, Regis; Miranda, José C; Barral, Aldina; Carvalho, Edgar M; de Oliveira, Camila I

    2015-07-01

    Leishmaniasis is caused by parasites transmitted to the vertebrate host by infected sand flies. During transmission, the vertebrate host is also inoculated with sand fly saliva, which exerts powerful immunomodulatory effects on the host's immune response. We conducted a prospective cohort analysis to characterize the human immune response to Lutzomyia intermedia saliva in 264 individuals, from an area for cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) caused by Leishmania braziliensis. Antibodies were found in 150 individuals (56.8%); immunoglobulin G1 and G4 were the predominant subclasses. Recall responses to salivary gland sonicate showed elevated production of interleukin 10 (IL-10), interleukin 13, interferon γ, CXCL9, and CCL2 compared with controls. CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells, including Foxp3(+) cells, were the main source of IL-10. L. braziliensis replication was increased (P < .05) in macrophages cocultured with saliva-stimulated lymphocytes from exposed individuals and addition of anti-IL-10 reverted this effect. Positive correlation between antibody response to saliva and cellular response to Leishmania was not found. Importantly, individuals seropositive to saliva are 2.1 times more likely to develop CL (relative risk, 2.1; 95% confidence interval, 1.07-4.2; P < .05). Exposure to L. intermedia sand flies skews the human immune response, facilitating L. braziliensis survival in vitro, and increases the risk of developing CL. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Interleukin 35 and Hepatocyte Growth Factor; as a novel combined immune gene therapy for Multiple Sclerosis disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghadam, Samira; Erfanmanesh, Maryam; Esmaeilzadeh, Abdolreza

    2017-11-01

    An autoimmune demyelination disease of the Central Nervous System, Multiple Sclerosis, is a chronic inflammation which mostly involves young adults. Suffering people face functional loss with a severe pain. Most current MS treatments are focused on the immune response suppression. Approved drugs suppress the inflammatory process, but factually, there is no definite cure for Multiple Sclerosis. Recently developed knowledge has demonstrated that gene and cell therapy as a hopeful approach in tissue regeneration. The authors propose a novel combined immune gene therapy for Multiple Sclerosis treatment using anti-inflammatory and remyelination of Interleukine-35 and Hepatocyte Growth Factor properties, respectively. In this hypothesis Interleukine-35 and Hepatocyte Growth Factor introduce to Mesenchymal Stem Cells of EAE mouse model via an adenovirus based vector. It is expected that Interleukine-35 and Hepatocyte Growth Factor genes expressed from MSCs could effectively perform in immunotherapy of Multiple Sclerosis. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Identification and expression of antioxidant and immune defense genes in the surf clam Mesodesma donacium challenged with Vibrio anguillarum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado-Aguayo, W; Lafarga-De la Cruz, F; Gallardo-Escárate, C

    2015-02-01

    The immune system in marine invertebrates is mediated through cellular and humoral components, which act together to address the action of potential pathogenic microorganisms. In bivalve mollusks biomolecules implicated in oxidative stress and recognition of pathogens have been involved in the innate immune response. To better understand the molecular basis of the immune response of surf clam Mesodesma donacium, qPCR approaches were used to identify genes related to its immune response against Vibrio anguillarum infection. Genes related to oxidative stress response and recognition of pathogens like superoxide dismutase (MdSOD), catalase (MdCAT), ferritin (MdFER) and filamin (MdFLMN) were identified from 454-pyrosequencing cDNA library of M. donacium and were evaluated in mantle, adductor muscle and gills. The results for transcripts expression indicated that MdSOD, MdFLMN and MdFER were primarily expressed in the muscle, while MdCAT was more expressed in gills. Challenge experiments with the pathogen V. anguillarum had showed that levels of transcript expression for MdSOD, MdCAT, MdFER, and MdFLMN were positively regulated by pathogen, following a time-dependent expression pattern with significant statistical differences between control and challenge group responses (p<0.05). These results suggest that superoxide dismutase, catalase, ferritin and filamin, could be contributing to the innate immune response of M. donacium against the pathogen V. anguillarum. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of oral antigen and antibody exposure at birth on subsequent immune status. A study in neonatal pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haverson, Karin; Corfield, Gaynor; Jones, Philip H; Kenny, Martin; Fowler, Jenny; Bailey, Mick; Stokes, Christopher R; Miller, Bevis G

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate the effects of early low-level exposure to either antigen or antibody alone on subsequent immune responses in entirely immunologically naïve animals. This is impossible in species with a permeable placenta such as rodents or humans, where both antigen and antibody can be transferred in utero. It is, however, possible in pigs, due to the impermeable placenta of the sow. Thus, neonatal piglets were used for this study. Newborn piglets were exposed to ovalbumin (OVA) at dosages similar to those used in rodents to sensitise, as well as to serum containing anti-OVA antibodies. Both single low doses of OVA (10 and 1,000 mg per animal) induced classical oral tolerance following a systemic challenge: both doses reduced specific systemic IgG responses and tertiary in vitro recall proliferative responses by splenocytes and especially by mesenteric lymph node (MLN) cells. Additionally, dietary challenge had phenotypic effects on helper T cells in MLN, which could be reversed by OVA at birth. In contrast, giving antibody as serum collected from hyperimmune or orally tolerant pigs had no functional effects. Overall, our data support the hypothesis that contrary to previous work in rodents, very early exposure of neonatal pigs to a single small dose of antigen can reduce subsequent immune responses. This may have implications for human health. However, although these data point to a reducing/regulatory effect of low doses of antigen in very young animals, they cannot be extrapolated directly to allergy. (c) 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Immune-gene therapy for renal cancer: chimeric receptor-mediated lysis of tumor cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.E.M. Weijtens (Mo)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractThe immune system serves as a protective system against infectious agents such as bacteria, viruses and parasites. Foreign molecules (antigens) can be recognized by the immune system and induce an immune response resulting in destruction and elimination of the pathogens. In addition to

  9. Evaluation of the immune response in rainbow trout fry, Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walbaum), after waterborne exposure to Flavobacterium psychrophilum and/or hydrogen peroxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Maya Maria Mihályi; Kania, P. W.; Buchmann, Kurt

    2015-01-01

    O2 influenced the response to infection with F. psychrophilum. Pre-treatment with H2O2 also affected correlation between gene regulation and pathogen load for several genes. A delay in antibody production in H2O2-treated fish in the early phase of infection was indicated, but H2O2 exposure did......The immune response in rainbow trout fry against Flavobacterium psychrophilum was elucidated using an immersion-based challenge with or without prior exposure to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Samples were taken from the head kidney 4, 48, 125 and 192 h after immersion, and the regulation of several...... genes was examined. Bacterial load was assessed based on the presence of 16S rRNA and correlated with gene expression, and the levels of specific antibodies in the blood were measured 50 days post-infection. Separately, both H2O2 and F. psychrophilum influenced gene expression, and pre-treatment with H2...

  10. Cellular immunity and target cell susceptibility in persons with repeated HIV-1 exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akridge, R; Hladik, F; Markee, J; Alef, C; Kelley, H; Collier, A; Collier, A; McElrath, M J

    1999-03-01

    We prospectively studied 37 HIV-1 uninfected persons engaging in repeated high risk sexual activity with an HIV-1 infected partner, as well as 18 of their infected partners. Only one subject (3%) demonstrated the homozygous 32-bp deletion delta32delta32 of the HIV-1 co-receptor CCR5. CD4+ cells from all high risk subjects except the delta32delta32 CCR5 homozygote were susceptible in vitro to both CCR5-dependent and CXCR4-dependent HIV-1 strains. Median HIV-1 plasma RNA levels of the infected partners were not significantly different from levels of matched infected controls. Thirteen subjects demonstrated HIV-1 specific CTL at one or more visits, and these activities were more commonly observed in persons with the wild type CCR5 genotype. These results indicate that cellular immunity rather than inheritance of the delta32 CCR5 mutation accounts more often for persistently HIV-1-resistant cases.

  11. Intratumoral Immunization by p19Arf and Interferon-β Gene Transfer in a Heterotopic Mouse Model of Lung Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Paulo Portela Catani

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Therapeutic strategies that act by eliciting and enhancing antitumor immunity have been clinically validated as an effective treatment modality but may benefit from the induction of both cell death and immune activation as primary stimuli. Using our AdRGD-PG adenovector platform, we show here for the first time that in situ gene transfer of p19Arf and interferon-β (IFNβ in the LLC1 mouse model of lung carcinoma acts as an immunotherapy. Although p19Arf is sufficient to induce cell death, only its pairing with IFNβ significantly induced markers of immunogenic cell death. In situ gene therapy with IFNβ, either alone or in combination with p19Arf, could retard tumor progression, but only the combined treatment was associated with a protective immune response. Specifically in the case of combined intratumoral gene transfer, we identified 167 differentially expressed genes when using microarray to evaluate tumors that were treated in vivo and confirmed the activation of CCL3, CXCL3, IL1α, IL1β, CD274, and OSM, involved in immune response and chemotaxis. Histologic evaluation revealed significant tumor infiltration by neutrophils, whereas functional depletion of granulocytes ablated the antitumor effect of our approach. The association of in situ gene therapy with cisplatin resulted in synergistic elimination of tumor progression. In all, in situ gene transfer with p19Arf and IFNβ acts as an immunotherapy involving recruitment of neutrophils, a desirable but previously untested outcome, and this approach may be allied with chemotherapy, thus providing significant antitumor activity and warranting further development for the treatment of lung carcinoma.

  12. Evidence of inflammatory immune signaling in chronic fatigue syndrome: A pilot study of gene expression in peripheral blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspler, Anne L; Bolshin, Carly; Vernon, Suzanne D; Broderick, Gordon

    2008-09-26

    Genomic profiling of peripheral blood reveals altered immunity in chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) however interpretation remains challenging without immune demographic context. The object of this work is to identify modulation of specific immune functional components and restructuring of co-expression networks characteristic of CFS using the quantitative genomics of peripheral blood. Gene sets were constructed a priori for CD4+ T cells, CD8+ T cells, CD19+ B cells, CD14+ monocytes and CD16+ neutrophils from published data. A group of 111 women were classified using empiric case definition (U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) and unsupervised latent cluster analysis (LCA). Microarray profiles of peripheral blood were analyzed for expression of leukocyte-specific gene sets and characteristic changes in co-expression identified from topological evaluation of linear correlation networks. Median expression for a set of 6 genes preferentially up-regulated in CD19+ B cells was significantly lower in CFS (p = 0.01) due mainly to PTPRK and TSPAN3 expression. Although no other gene set was differentially expressed at p fatigue phenotype groups. Also in CFS was a significant negative correlation between CD8+ and both CD19+ up-regulated (p = 0.02) and NK gene sets (p = 0.08). These patterns were absent in controls. Dissection of blood microarray profiles points to B cell dysfunction with coordinated immune activation supporting persistent inflammation and antibody-mediated NK cell modulation of T cell activity. This has clinical implications as the CD19+ genes identified could provide robust and biologically meaningful basis for the early detection and unambiguous phenotyping of CFS.

  13. Transcriptome Analysis and Identification of Differentially Expressed Transcripts of Immune-Related Genes in Spleen of Gosling and Adult Goose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anqi Wang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The goose (Anser cygnoides, having high nutritional value, high-quality feathers and high economic benefit, is an economically important poultry species. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the higher susceptibility to pathogens in goslings than in adult geese remains poorly understood. In this study, the histological sections of spleen tissue from a two-week-old gosling and an adult goose, respectively, were subjected to comparative analysis. The spleen of gosling was mainly composed of mesenchyma, accompanied by scattered lymphocytes, whereas the spleen parenchyma was well developed in the adult goose. To investigate goose immune-related genes, we performed deep transcriptome and gene expression analyses of the spleen samples using paired-end sequencing technology (Illumina. In total, 50,390 unigenes were assembled using Trinity software and TGICL software. Moreover, these assembled unigenes were annotated with gene descriptions and gene ontology (GO analysis was performed. Through Kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes (KEGG analysis, we investigated 558 important immune-relevant unigenes and 23 predicted cytokines. In addition, 22 immune-related genes with differential expression between gosling and adult goose were identified, among which the three genes showing largest differences in expression were immunoglobulin alpha heavy chain (IgH, mannan-binding lectin serine protease 1 isoform X1 (MASP1 and C–X–C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4. Finally, of these 22 differentially expressed immune-related genes, seven genes, including tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily member 13B (TNFRSF13B, C-C motif chemokine 4-like (CCL4, CXCR4, interleukin 2 receptor alpha (IL2RA, MHC class I heavy chain (MHCIα, transporter of antigen processing 2 (TAP2, IgH, were confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR. The expression levels of all the candidate unigenes were up-regulated in adult geese other than that of TNFRSF13B. The

  14. Characterization of Changes in Gene Expression and Biochemical Pathways at Low Levels of Benzene Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Reuben; Hubbard, Alan E.; McHale, Cliona M.; Zhang, Luoping; Rappaport, Stephen M.; Lan, Qing; Rothman, Nathaniel; Vermeulen, Roel; Guyton, Kathryn Z.; Jinot, Jennifer; Sonawane, Babasaheb R.; Smith, Martyn T.

    2014-01-01

    Benzene, a ubiquitous environmental pollutant, causes acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Recently, through transcriptome profiling of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), we reported dose-dependent effects of benzene exposure on gene expression and biochemical pathways in 83 workers exposed across four airborne concentration ranges (from 10 ppm) compared with 42 subjects with non-workplace ambient exposure levels. Here, we further characterize these dose-dependent effects with continuous benzene exposure in all 125 study subjects. We estimated air benzene exposure levels in the 42 environmentally-exposed subjects from their unmetabolized urinary benzene levels. We used a novel non-parametric, data-adaptive model selection method to estimate the change with dose in the expression of each gene. We describe non-parametric approaches to model pathway responses and used these to estimate the dose responses of the AML pathway and 4 other pathways of interest. The response patterns of majority of genes as captured by mean estimates of the first and second principal components of the dose-response for the five pathways and the profiles of 6 AML pathway response-representative genes (identified by clustering) exhibited similar apparent supra-linear responses. Responses at or below 0.1 ppm benzene were observed for altered expression of AML pathway genes and CYP2E1. Together, these data show that benzene alters disease-relevant pathways and genes in a dose-dependent manner, with effects apparent at doses as low as 100 ppb in air. Studies with extensive exposure assessment of subjects exposed in the low-dose range between 10 ppb and 1 ppm are needed to confirm these findings. PMID:24786086

  15. Characterization of changes in gene expression and biochemical pathways at low levels of benzene exposure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reuben Thomas

    Full Text Available Benzene, a ubiquitous environmental pollutant, causes acute myeloid leukemia (AML. Recently, through transcriptome profiling of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC, we reported dose-dependent effects of benzene exposure on gene expression and biochemical pathways in 83 workers exposed across four airborne concentration ranges (from 10 ppm compared with 42 subjects with non-workplace ambient exposure levels. Here, we further characterize these dose-dependent effects with continuous benzene exposure in all 125 study subjects. We estimated air benzene exposure levels in the 42 environmentally-exposed subjects from their unmetabolized urinary benzene levels. We used a novel non-parametric, data-adaptive model selection method to estimate the change with dose in the expression of each gene. We describe non-parametric approaches to model pathway responses and used these to estimate the dose responses of the AML pathway and 4 other pathways of interest. The response patterns of majority of genes as captured by mean estimates of the first and second principal components of the dose-response for the five pathways and the profiles of 6 AML pathway response-representative genes (identified by clustering exhibited similar apparent supra-linear responses. Responses at or below 0.1 ppm benzene were observed for altered expression of AML pathway genes and CYP2E1. Together, these data show that benzene alters disease-relevant pathways and genes in a dose-dependent manner, with effects apparent at doses as low as 100 ppb in air. Studies with extensive exposure assessment of subjects exposed in the low-dose range between 10 ppb and 1 ppm are needed to confirm these findings.

  16. Genomics study of the exposure effect of Gymnodinium catenatum, a paralyzing toxin producer, on Crassostrea gigas' defense system and detoxification genes.

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    Norma García-Lagunas

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Crassostrea gigas accumulates paralytic shellfish toxins (PST associated with red tide species as Gymnodinium catenatum. Previous studies demonstrated bivalves show variable feeding responses to toxic algae at physiological level; recently, only one study has reported biochemical changes in the transcript level of the genes involved in C. gigas stress response. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We found that 24 h feeding on toxic dinoflagellate cells (acute exposure induced a significant decrease in clearance rate and expression level changes of the genes involved in antioxidant defense (copper/zinc superoxide dismutase, Cu/Zn-SOD, cell detoxification (glutathione S-transferase, GST and cytochrome P450, CPY450, intermediate immune response activation (lipopolysaccharide and beta glucan binding protein, LGBP, and stress responses (glutamine synthetase, GS in Pacific oysters compared to the effects with the non-toxic microalga Isochrysis galbana. A sub-chronic exposure feeding on toxic dinoflagellate cells for seven and fourteen days (30×10³ cells mL⁻¹ showed higher gene expression levels. A significant increase was observed in Cu/Zn-SOD, GST, and LGBP at day 7 and a major increase in GS and CPY450 at day 14. We also observed that oysters fed only with G. catenatum (3×10³ cells mL⁻¹ produced a significant increase on the transcription level than in a mixed diet (3×10³ cells mL⁻¹ of G. catenatum+0.75×10⁶ cells mL⁻¹ I. galbana in all the analyzed genes. CONCLUSIONS: Our results provide gene expression data of PST producer dinoflagellate G. catenatum toxic effects on C. gigas, a commercially important bivalve. Over expressed genes indicate the activation of a potent protective mechanism, whose response depends on both cell concentration and exposure time against these toxic microalgae. Given the importance of dinoflagellate blooms in coastal environments, these results provide a more comprehensive overview of how oysters respond to

  17. Functional similarities between pigeon 'milk' and mammalian milk: induction of immune gene expression and modification of the microbiota.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meagan J Gillespie

    Full Text Available Pigeon 'milk' and mammalian milk have functional similarities in terms of nutritional benefit and delivery of immunoglobulins to the young. Mammalian milk has been clearly shown to aid in the development of the immune system and microbiota of the young, but similar effects have not yet been attributed to pigeon 'milk'. Therefore, using a chicken model, we investigated the effect of pigeon 'milk' on immune gene expression in the Gut Associated Lymphoid Tissue (GALT and on the composition of the caecal microbiota. Chickens fed pigeon 'milk' had a faster rate of growth and a better feed conversion ratio than control chickens. There was significantly enhanced expression of immune-related gene pathways and interferon-stimulated genes in the GALT of pigeon 'milk'-fed chickens. These pathways include the innate immune response, regulation of cytokine production and regulation of B cell activation and proliferation. The caecal microbiota of pigeon 'milk'-fed chickens was significantly more diverse than control chickens, and appears to be affected by prebiotics in pigeon 'milk', as well as being directly seeded by bacteria present in pigeon 'milk'. Our results demonstrate that pigeon 'milk' has further modes of action which make it functionally similar to mammalian milk. We hypothesise that pigeon 'lactation' and mammalian lactation evolved independently but resulted in similarly functional products.

  18. Expression Profiling of Innate Immune Genes in Milk Somatic Cells During Subclinical Mastitis in Crossbred Dairy Cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthikeyan, A; Radhika, G; Aravindhakshan, T V; Anilkumar, K

    2016-10-01

    Innate immune mechanism plays a key role in mammary defense, from recognition of pathogens to activation of nonspecific and specific immunity involved in elimination of pathogens. Expression profiles of innate immune response genes namely Toll like receptor 2 (TLR-2), Peptidoglycan recognition protein 1 (PGLYRP-1), Interleukin 8 receptor (IL-8 R), L-Selectin (SELL), and Osteopontin (OPN) in milk somatic cells of subclinical mastitis (SCM) affected crossbred cows were investigated under this study at transcript level using quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Dairy cows in mid lactation were screened for SCM using California Mastitis Test (CMT), Somatic Cell Count (SCC) and Electrical Conductivity test (EC). Based on results of SCM screening tests, crossbred cows were clustered into two groups with four Staphylococcus aureus infected SCM cows and four apparently healthy cows. The expressions levels of TLR-2, PGLYRP-1, IL-8 R, SELL, and OPN in milk somatic cells of SCM affected cows were significantly higher (p < 0.05) than healthy cows. These genes could be considered as candidate genes for innate immune response against S. aureus SCM infection.

  19. Induction of immune tolerance to FIX following muscular AAV gene transfer is AAV-dose/FIX-level dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Meagan E; Zhuo, Jiacai; Bharadwaj, Arpita S; Chao, Hengjun

    2009-05-01

    Direct intramuscular injection (IM) of adeno-associated virus (AAV) has been proven a safe and potentially efficient procedure for gene therapy of many genetic diseases including hemophilia B. It is, however, contentious whether high antigen level induces tolerance or immunity to coagulation factor IX (FIX) following IM of AAV. We recently reported induction of FIX-specific immune tolerance by IM of AAV serotype one (AAV1) vector in mice. We hypothesize that the expression of high levels of FIX is critical to induction of FIX tolerance. In this study, we investigated the correlation among AAV dose, FIX expression, and tolerance induction. We observed that induction of immune tolerance or immunity to FIX was dependent on the dose of AAV1-human FIX (hFIX) given and the level of FIX antigen expressed in both normal and hemophilia mice. We then defined the minimum AAV1-hFIX dose and the lowest level of FIX needed for FIX tolerance. Different from hepatic AAV-hFIX gene transfer, we found that FIX tolerance induced by IM of AAV1 was not driven by regulatory T cells. These results provided further insight into the mechanism(s) of FIX tolerance, contributing to development of hemophilia gene therapy, and optimization of FIX tolerance induction protocols.

  20. Functional Similarities between Pigeon ‘Milk’ and Mammalian Milk: Induction of Immune Gene Expression and Modification of the Microbiota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Meagan J.; Stanley, Dragana; Chen, Honglei; Donald, John A.; Nicholas, Kevin R.; Moore, Robert J.; Crowley, Tamsyn M.

    2012-01-01

    Pigeon ‘milk’ and mammalian milk have functional similarities in terms of nutritional benefit and delivery of immunoglobulins to the young. Mammalian milk has been clearly shown to aid in the development of the immune system and microbiota of the young, but similar effects have not yet been attributed to pigeon ‘milk’. Therefore, using a chicken model, we investigated the effect of pigeon ‘milk’ on immune gene expression in the Gut Associated Lymphoid Tissue (GALT) and on the composition of the caecal microbiota. Chickens fed pigeon ‘milk’ had a faster rate of growth and a better feed conversion ratio than control chickens. There was significantly enhanced expression of immune-related gene pathways and interferon-stimulated genes in the GALT of pigeon ‘milk’-fed chickens. These pathways include the innate immune response, regulation of cytokine production and regulation of B cell activation and proliferation. The caecal microbiota of pigeon ‘milk’-fed chickens was significantly more diverse than control chickens, and appears to be affected by prebiotics in pigeon ‘milk’, as well as being directly seeded by bacteria present in pigeon ‘milk’. Our results demonstrate that pigeon ‘milk’ has further modes of action which make it functionally similar to mammalian milk. We hypothesise that pigeon ‘lactation’ and mammalian lactation evolved independently but resulted in similarly functional products. PMID:23110233

  1. Effects of active immunization against myostatin on carcass quality and expression of the myostatin gene in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Ding-biao; Zhang, Ke-ying; Chen, Dai-wen; Ding, Xue-mei; Yu, Bing

    2009-10-01

    The study was conducted to investigate the effects of active immunization against myostatin on the titer of myostatin antibody, carcass evaluation, activity of creatine kinase and the expression of the myostatin gene in pigs. Eighteen pigs were allotted into three groups (six pigs per group), and pigs in treatment 1, 2 and 3 were immunized with physiological saline, 1 mg or 4 mg myostatin per pig, respectively. Six pigs were killed by electrical stunning followed by exsanguination at BW of 100 kg. The results indicated that the titer of myostatin antibody was increased in treated groups compared to the control group on day 42 (P activity of pigs treated with 1 mg and 4 mg myostatin was lower than the control group. The immunization of myostatin significantly decreased the myostatin gene expression levels in muscle. It was concluded that optimal active immunization against myostatin could increase the content of myostatin antibody, suppress the activity of creatine kinase and the expression of myostatin gene, and therefore improve the carcass lean percentage for pigs.

  2. Expression of Innate Immune Response Genes in Liver and Three Types of Adipose Tissue in Cloned Pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højbøge, Tina Rødgaard; Skovgaard, Kerstin; Stagsted, Jan

    2012-01-01

    The pig has been proposed as a relevant model for human obesity-induced inflammation, and cloning may improve the applicability of this model. We tested the assumptions that cloning would reduce interindividual variation in gene expression of innate immune factors and that their expression would...... remain unaffected by the cloning process. We investigated the expression of 40 innate immune factors by high-throughput quantitative real-time PCR in samples from liver, abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT), visceral adipose tissue (VAT), and neck SAT in cloned pigs compared to normal outbred pigs...

  3. Identification of Gene Transcription Start Sites and Enhancers Responding to Pulmonary Carbon Nanotube Exposure in Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornholdt, Jette; Saber, Anne Thoustrup; Lilje, Berit; Boyd, Mette; Jørgensen, Mette; Chen, Yun; Vitezic, Morana; Jacobsen, Nicklas Raun; Poulsen, Sarah Søs; Berthing, Trine; Bressendorff, Simon; Vitting-Seerup, Kristoffer; Andersson, Robin; Hougaard, Karin Sørig; Yauk, Carole L; Halappanavar, Sabina; Wallin, Håkan; Vogel, Ulla; Sandelin, Albin

    2017-04-25

    Increased use of nanomaterials in industry, medicine, and consumer products has raised concerns over their toxicity. To ensure safe use of nanomaterials, understanding their biological effects at the molecular level is crucial. In particular, the regulatory mechanisms responsible for the cascade of genes activated by nanomaterial exposure are not well-characterized. To this end, we profiled the genome-wide usage of gene transcription start sites and linked active enhancer regions in lungs of C57BL/6 mice 24 h after intratracheal instillation of a single dose of the multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) Mitsui-7. Our results revealed a massive gene regulatory response, where expression of key inflammatory genes (e.g., Csf3, Il24, and Fgf23) was increased >100-fold 24 h after Mitsui-7 exposure. Many of the Mitsui-7-responsive transcription start sites were alternative transcription start sites for known genes, and the number of alternative transcription start sites used in a given gene was correlated with overall Mitsui-7 response. Strikingly, genes that were up-regulated after Mitsui-7 exposure only through their main annotated transcription start site were linked to inflammatory and defense responses, while genes up-regulated only through alternative transcription start sites were functionally heterogeneous and not inflammation-associated. Furthermore, we identified almost 12 000 active enhancers, many of which were Mitsui-7-responsive, and we identified similarly responding putative target genes. Overall, our study provides the location and activity of Mitsui-7-induced enhancers and transcription start sites, providing a useful resource for targeted experiments elucidating the biological effects of nanomaterials and the identification of biomarkers for early detection of MWCNT-induced inflammation.

  4. Development of immunity against viral and bacterial antigens after repeated exposures to suberythemal doses of ultraviolet light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Snopov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of ultraviolet (UV radiation on human infectious immunity are not well studied. On the one hand, solar and artificial UU sources have been shown to change cytokine levels in human skin, lymphocyte subpopulation counts in parepheral blood, lymphocyte DNA synthesis and prolifarative response to mitogens. On the other hand, there are just only one or two observations suggesting an influence of UV radiation on human infection course. For instance, UV irradiations have been reported to induce a reccurence of orofacial vesicular lesions caused by herpes siplex virus. Moreover, there is a lack of data concerning immune effects of suberythtemal doses of UV in spite of a long history of using them by Russian prophylactic medicine. In this work we questioned whether such suberythemal UV exposures can affect the immune responses of children to infectious conjunctivitis, to simultaneous measles and polio vaccinations and to simultaneous polio and diphtheria-tetanus vaccinations. In peripheral blood of vaccinated children we examined leukocyte counts (monocytes, neutrophils, eosinophils, lymphocytes, percentages of lymphocyte subpopulations (CD3+, CD20+, CD4+, CD8+, CD25+, HLADR+, concentrations of cytokines (IL-1 beta, TNF-alpha, IFN- amma и IL-10, DNA-synthetic activity of lymphocytes and titres of antibodies against measles and diphtheria toxin. We observed no local or systemic reactions to the vaccines in the UV-group while a moderate rise in body temperature occured in several children from unexposed group. In the blood of childeren from UV-group we found increases in CD25+ и HLADR+ cell percentages, IL- 1 beta and IL-10 concentrations, PWMinduced DNA synthesis in mononuclears, and no decreases in formation of antibodies against measles and diphreria. We concluded that suberythemal UV exposures of children modulated their further responses to imminisations perhaps through the activation of a T helper 2-like

  5. Sublethal red tide toxin exposure in free-ranging manatees (Trichechus manatus) affects the immune system through reduced lymphocyte proliferation responses, inflammation, and oxidative stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, Catherine J., E-mail: cjwalsh@mote.org [Marine Immunology Program, Mote Marine Laboratory, 1600 Ken Thompson Parkway, Sarasota, FL 34236 (United States); Butawan, Matthew, E-mail: mattbutawan@outlook.com [Marine Immunology Program, Mote Marine Laboratory, 1600 Ken Thompson Parkway, Sarasota, FL 34236 (United States); Yordy, Jennifer, E-mail: jennifer.e.balmer@gmail.com [Marine Immunology Program, Mote Marine Laboratory, 1600 Ken Thompson Parkway, Sarasota, FL 34236 (United States); Ball, Ray, E-mail: Ray.Ball@lowryparkzoo.com [Lowry Park Zoo, 1101 W Sligh Ave, Tampa, FL 33604 (United States); Flewelling, Leanne, E-mail: Leanne.Flewelling@MyFWC.com [Fish and Wildlife Research Institute, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, 100 8th Ave SE, St. Petersburg, FL 33701 (United States); Wit, Martine de, E-mail: Martine.deWit@MyFWC.com [Fish and Wildlife Research Institute, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, 100 8th Ave SE, St. Petersburg, FL 33701 (United States); Bonde, Robert K., E-mail: rbonde@usgs.gov [U.S. Geological Survey, Sirenia Project, 7920 NE 71st Street, Gainesville, FL 32653 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • Sublethal brevetoxin exposure affects manatee immune function. • Plasma brevetoxin levels correlate with oxidative stress in rescued manatees. • Brevetoxin exposure affects lymphocyte proliferation in rescued manatees. • Plasma brevetoxin concentrations ranged from 0 to 19 ng PbTx-3 eq/mL. - Abstract: The health of many Florida manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris) is adversely affected by exposure to blooms of the toxic dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis. K. brevis blooms are common in manatee habitats of Florida’s southwestern coast and produce a group of cyclic polyether toxins collectively referred to as red tide toxins, or brevetoxins. Although a large number of manatees exposed to significant levels of red tide toxins die, several manatees are rescued from sublethal exposure and are successfully treated and returned to the wild. Sublethal brevetoxin exposure may potentially impact the manatee immune system. Lymphocyte proliferative responses and a suite of immune function parameters in the plasma were used to evaluate effects of brevetoxin exposure on health of manatees rescued from natural exposure to red tide toxins in their habitat. Blood samples were collected from rescued manatees at Lowry Park Zoo in Tampa, FL and from healthy, unexposed manatees in Crystal River, FL. Peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) isolated from whole blood were stimulated with T-cell mitogens, ConA and PHA. A suite of plasma parameters, including plasma protein electrophoresis profiles, lysozyme activity, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, and reactive oxygen/nitrogen (ROS/RNS) species, was also used to assess manatee health. Significant decreases (p < 0.05) in lymphocyte proliferation were observed in ConA and PHA stimulated lymphocytes from rescued animals compared to non-exposed animals. Significant correlations were observed between oxidative stress markers (SOD, ROS/RNS) and plasma brevetoxin concentrations. Sublethal exposure to brevetoxins in the

  6. Reported rabies pre-exposure immunization of students at US Colleges of Veterinary Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindenmayer, Joann M; Wright, James C; Nusbaum, Kenneth E; Saville, William J A; Evanson, Timothy C; Pappaioanou, Marguerite

    2013-01-01

    In 2008, the US experienced a disruption in human rabies vaccine supplies, leading public health authorities to prioritize vaccine release for post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) and limit vaccine supplies for pre-exposure prophylaxis (PreEP) in high-risk groups. In 2008, the Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges (AAVMC) surveyed its member institutions on rabies vaccination policies and practices. Senior administrators at Colleges of Veterinary Medicine (CVMs) and departments of veterinary science and comparative medicine were asked to identify the person most knowledgeable about their institution's student rabies vaccination program. Respondents were asked to describe their policies and procedures for administering PreEP to veterinary medical students and staff and to estimate the annual demand for student and staff PreEP vaccine. Twenty-one CVMs responded. Twenty (95%) reported requiring PreEP of veterinary medical students and 16 (80%) of those 20 required vaccination upon matriculation. An estimated 7,309 doses of vaccine were required for PreEP of an estimated 2,436 first-year US veterinary medical students. Seventy-two percent of respondents administered PreEP in August, September, and October, coinciding with the highest public demand for PEP. CVMs should consider altering the timing of rabies vaccine administration to veterinary medical students and staff to other months, thereby helping to ensure that PEP rabies vaccine will be available to people with validated rabies exposures and to ensure that supplies will be available for PreEP of students and staff. AAVMC may wish to identify and support a point of coordination to facilitate the purchase and distribution of human rabies vaccine among its US member CVMs.

  7. Physiologic cold shock of Moraxella catarrhalis affects the expression of genes involved in the iron acquisition, serum resistance and immune evasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schaller André

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Moraxella catarrhalis, a major nasopharyngeal pathogen of the human respiratory tract, is exposed to rapid downshifts of environmental temperature when humans breathe cold air. It was previously shown that the prevalence of pharyngeal colonization and respiratory tract infections caused by M. catarrhalis are greatest in winter. The aim of this study was to investigate how M. catarrhalis uses the physiologic exposure to cold air to upregulate pivotal survival systems in the pharynx that may contribute to M. catarrhalis virulence. Results A 26°C cold shock induces the expression of genes involved in transferrin and lactoferrin acquisition, and enhances binding of these proteins on the surface of M. catarrhalis. Exposure of M. catarrhalis to 26°C upregulates the expression of UspA2, a major outer membrane protein involved in serum resistance, leading to improved binding of vitronectin which neutralizes the lethal effect of human complement. In contrast, cold shock decreases the expression of Hemagglutinin, a major adhesin, which mediates B cell response, and reduces immunoglobulin D-binding on the surface of M. catarrhalis. Conclusion Cold shock of M. catarrhalis induces the expression of genes involved in iron acquisition, serum resistance and immune evasion. Thus, cold shock at a physiologically relevant temperature of 26°C induces in M. catarrhalis a complex of adaptive mechanisms that enables the bacterium to target their host cellular receptors or soluble effectors and may contribute to enhanced growth, colonization and virulence.

  8. Antiacrosin antibodies and infertility. II. Gene immunization with human proacrosin to assess the effect of immunity toward proacrosin/acrosin upon protein activities and animal fertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veaute, Carolina; Furlong, Laura I; Cameo, Mónica; Harris, Jeffrey D; Vazquez-Levin, Mónica H

    2009-04-01

    To assess the effect of antiacrosin antibodies upon proacrosin/acrosin activities and animal fertility. Prospective study. Basic research laboratory. A gene immunization (GI) model was developed; mice were injected with the sequence encoding human proacrosin (h-proacrosin), cloned in an expression vector. Subcloning of h-proacrosin in a eukaryotic expression vector (promoter, CMV; leader sequence, alpha-1 antitrypsin; pSF2-Acro); GI of female mice with this plasmid. The following parameters were evaluated: [1] adequate conditions for GI protocols, [2] humoral response to GI with pSF2-Acro, [3] protein regions recognized by the antibodies, and [4] effect of antibodies upon proacrosin/acrosin-ZPA binding and amidase activity, and animal fertility. Conditions of female mice GI with the proacrosin sequence were established (plasmid purification with anion exchange chromatography and 40 microg of pSF2-Acro per dose) to trigger an immune response, reaching maximum levels at week 9 after the first injection. Antibodies produced by GI recognized human and mouse sperm acrosin systems, inhibited human proacrosin/acrosin interaction with recombinant human ZPA and protease activity, and negatively affected mouse IVF and early embryonic development. In addition, mice immunized with SF2-Acro exhibited a significantly lower size of fetuses. Antiacrosin antibodies developed by using GI inhibit human proacrosin/acrosin activities and impair mouse fertility.

  9. Carriers of filaggrin gene (FLG) mutations avoid professional exposure to irritants in adulthood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bandier, Josefine; Ross-Hansen, Katrine; Carlsen, Berit C

    2013-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in the filaggrin gene (FLG) are associated with xerosis, atopic dermatitis, and early onset of hand eczema. Irritant exposure is a risk factor for occupational hand eczema, and FLG mutations increase the risk of occupational irritant contact dermatitis on the hands in h...

  10. C60 exposure induced tissue damage and gene expression alterations in the earthworm Lumbricus rubellus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ploeg, van der M.J.C.; Handy, R.D.; Heckmann, L.H.; Hout, van der A.; Brink, van den N.W.

    2013-01-01

    Effects of C60 exposure (0, 15 or 154 mg/kg soil) on the earthworm Lumbricus rubellus were assessed at the tissue and molecular level, in two experiments. In the first experiment, earthworms were exposed for four weeks, and in the second lifelong. In both experiments, gene expression of heat shock

  11. DNA Methyltransferase 3B Gene Promoter and Interleukin-1 Receptor Antagonist Polymorphisms in Childhood Immune Thrombocytopenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Pesmatzoglou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary immune thrombocytopenia (ITP is one of the most common blood diseases as well as the commonest acquired bleeding disorder in childhood. Although the etiology of ITP is unclear, in the pathogenesis of the disease, both environmental and genetic factors including polymorphisms of TNF-a, IL-10, and IL-4 genes have been suggested to be involved. In this study, we investigated the rs2424913 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP (C46359T in DNA methyltransferase 3B (DNMT3B gene promoter and the VNTR polymorphism of IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1 Ra intron-2 in 32 children (17 boys with the diagnosis of ITP and 64 healthy individuals. No significant differences were found in the genotype distribution of DNMT3B polymorphism between the children with ITP and the control group, whereas the frequency of allele T appeared significantly increased in children with ITP (P = 0.03, OR = 2, 95% CI: 1.06–3.94. In case of IL-1 Ra polymorphism, children with ITP had a significantly higher frequency of genotype I/II, compared to control group (P = 0.043, OR = 2.60, 95% CI: 1.02–6.50. Moreover, genotype I/I as well as allele I was overrepresented in the control group, suggesting that allele I may have a decreased risk for development of ITP. Our findings suggest that rs2424913 DNMT3B SNP as well as IL-1 Ra VNTR polymorphism may contribute to the susceptibility to ITP.

  12. VACCINATION OF HYBRID STRIPED BASS: GROWTH, IMMUNE REACTION AND GENE EXPRESSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Westerman

    2012-10-01

    -points revealed differences (P < 0.05 between 11 and 25 days post-vaccination. Examination of the hepatic microarray datasets revealed only four immune-discrete genes that were impacted 53-days following vaccination when compared against control fish. These included the up-regulated TCIRG1, or T-cell immune regulator 1 (P < 0.0467 and IL20RA, or interleukin 20 receptor alpha (P < 0.0433, and down-regulated cytokine inducible kinase, plk3 (P < 0.01 and mouse immune responsive protein, IRG1 (P < 0.01.

  13. Effect of exposure time, particle size and uptake pathways in immune cell lysosomal cytotoxicity of mussels exposed to silver nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouallegui, Younes; Ben Younes, Ridha; Turki, Faten; Mezni, Amine; Oueslati, Ridha

    2018-04-01

    Cytotoxicity evaluation of hemocytes (lysosomal membrane stability [LMS] assay) from Mytilus galloprovincialis Lamarck, exposed to a sublethal dose (100 μg/L) of two size of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs: <50 nm and <100 nm) - prior to and after inhibition of potential uptake pathways (i.e., clathrin- and caveolae-mediated endocytosis) within different times of exposure (3, 6, 12 h) - showed that there was a significant cytotoxic effect on immune cells of mussels exposed for different times to either AgNP size (p < 0.01); the greater effect was with the smaller size. However, hemocytes seemed more sensitive to the larger AgNP after clathrin-mediated endocytosis was blocked (p < 0.01); this was not so with inhibition of caveolae-mediated endocytosis. Dimethyl-sulfoxide (DMSO) did not impart a carrier-mediated effect despite an enhanced cytotoxicity when DMSO was present with AgNP. From these results, it is concluded that the immunotoxicity of AgNP in mussels was size-dependent as well as length of exposure-dependent. It was also clear that nanoparticles (NP) internalization mechanisms were a major factor underlying any toxicity.

  14. Comparative study of two immunity-related GTPase genes in Chinese soft-shell turtle reveals their molecular characteristics and functional activity in immune defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yan; Shen, Sixian; Hu, Sufei; Ding, Tie; Hong, Xiaoyou; Chen, Chen; Zhu, Xinping; Zhao, Zhe

    2018-04-01

    The immunity-related GTPases (IRGs) are a family of proteins that play critical roles in innate resistance to intracellular pathogens. The number and diversity of IRG genes differ greatly in different species. Although IRG proteins have been well studies in mammals, they remain poorly characterized in lower vertebrates. In this study, we cloned two IRG genes, PsIRG5 and PsIRG8, from the Chinese soft-shelled turtle and compared their characterization and functional activity with mammalian IRGs. The PsIRG5 is a gene of 1896 bp that encodes a protein of 413 amino acid and PsIRG8 is 1543 bp in length encoding another 413 aa protein. Sequence alignment between all turtle IRG-like genes and mammalian IRGs showed that both PsIRG5 and PsIRG8 were conserved with mammalian GKS IRGs, while PsIRG5 appeared a closer evolutionary relationship with mammalian GMS IRGs. The expression and subcellular characterization revealed that PsIRG5 was dramatically upregulated under Aeromonas hydrophila challenge and exhibited co-localization with lysosomes in cells; whereas PsIRG8 was downregulated and has no distinct localization. Functional activity assay demonstrated that PsIRG5 plays a role in autophagy induction and IFN-γ contributes to enhance the induction, since it has IFN-inducible elements in its promoter region. These data above unravel the molecular characterization and functional activity of IRGs in lower vertebrate for the first time and will provide insights into the comparative immunity and evolutionary relationships of IRGs between mammals and reptiles. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A peripheral epigenetic signature of immune system genes is linked to neocortical thickness and memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freytag, Virginie; Carrillo-Roa, Tania; Milnik, Annette; Sämann, Philipp G.; Vukojevic, Vanja; Coynel, David; Demougin, Philippe; Egli, Tobias; Gschwind, Leo; Jessen, Frank; Loos, Eva; Maier, Wolfgang; Riedel-Heller, Steffi G.; Scherer, Martin; Vogler, Christian; Wagner, Michael; Binder, Elisabeth B.; de Quervain, Dominique J. -F.; Papassotiropoulos, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Increasing age is tightly linked to decreased thickness of the human neocortex. The biological mechanisms that mediate this effect are hitherto unknown. The DNA methylome, as part of the epigenome, contributes significantly to age-related phenotypic changes. Here, we identify an epigenetic signature that is associated with cortical thickness (P=3.86 × 10−8) and memory performance in 533 healthy young adults. The epigenetic effect on cortical thickness was replicated in a sample comprising 596 participants with major depressive disorder and healthy controls. The epigenetic signature mediates partially the effect of age on cortical thickness (P<0.001). A multilocus genetic score reflecting genetic variability of this signature is associated with memory performance (P=0.0003) in 3,346 young and elderly healthy adults. The genomic location of the contributing methylation sites points to the involvement of specific immune system genes. The decomposition of blood methylome-wide patterns bears considerable potential for the study of brain-related traits. PMID:28443631

  16. Polymorphisms of immunity genes and susceptibility to otitis media in children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Nokso-Koivisto

    Full Text Available Acute otitis media (OM is a common disease which often develops through complex interactions between the host, the pathogen and environmental factors. We studied single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs of genes involved in innate and adaptive immunity, and other host and environmental factors for their role in OM.Using Sequenom Massarray platform, 21 SNPs were studied in 653 children from prospective (n = 202 and retrospective (n = 451 cohorts. Data were analyzed for the relationship between SNPs and upper respiratory infection (URI frequency, risk of acute OM during URI episodes, and proneness to recurrent OM.Increased risk for OM proneness was associated with CX3CR1 (Thr280Met SNP and with a jointly interactive group of IL-10 (-1082 SNP, IL-1β (-511 wild type genotype and white race. Family history of OM proneness independently increased the risk for frequent URIs, OM occurrence during URI, and OM proneness. Additionally, IL-1β (-31 SNP was associated with increased risk for frequent URIs, but IL-10 (-592, IL-1β (-511, IL-5 (-746 and IL-8 (-251 SNPs were associated with decreased risk of URI.IL-1β (-31, CX3CR1 (Thr280Met, IL-10 (-1082 and IL-1β (-511 SNPs were associated with increased risk for frequent URIs or OM proneness.

  17. Induction of specific immunity against Schistosoma japonicum by exposure of mice to ultraviolet attenuated cercariae

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    Moloney, N.A.; Bickle, Q.D.; Webbe, G. (London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, St. Albans (UK). Winches Farm Field Station)

    1985-01-01

    Mice can be partially protected against Schistosoma japonicum by prior exposure to ultraviolet (UV)-attenuated infections which fail to survive to the adult stage and produce no overt pathology in the host. Optimum resistance was induced by parasites exposed to 40 seconds of UV, significantly lower levels of resistance being stimulated by both shorter and longer exposures. No consistent relationship between the degree of resistance induced and the number of irradiated cercariae given could be demonstrated and equivocal results were obtained when comparing the efficacy of single and multiple vaccinations. Vaccinations with UV-attenuated cercariae given intraperitoneally (i.p.) were as efficacious as those given percutaneously but mice were as or more resistant to challenges given by the i.p. route, the possible reasons are discussed. There was no observed delay in the migration of the challenge, vaccinated mice being as resistant when perfused 6 or 3.5 weeks after challenge. Vaccination was species specific since mice exposed to either UV-attenuated S. japonicum cercariae or gamma-attenuated S. mansoni cercariae were resistant to homologous but not heterologous challenge.