WorldWideScience

Sample records for exposure dose reduction

  1. 1. Dose reduction of occupational exposure in cardiac catheterization and angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, Yoshimi [Kyushu Kosei Nenkin Hospital, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka (Japan); Matsumoto, Kunihiro; Fujihashi, Hiroshi; Umeda, Kazuhiro

    2000-08-01

    Occupational exposure to scattered radiation and protective equipment was assessed in 4 medical institutions in Kyushu, Japan. The areas where scattered radiation occurred, the scattered radiation dose in the operator's position, fluoroscopy time, the number of cinematography sessions, and annual number of patients were assessed, and the annual scattered radiation dose to the operator was estimated. Approximately 90% of scattered radiation was generated by the subject and the collimator. Measurement of scattered radiation during coronary arteriography yielded a dose of 255-1200 [{mu}Sv/hr.] during fluoroscopy and 3.8-26.7 [{mu}Sv/10 sec.] during radiography. The duration of fluoroscopy for ablation was much longer than during general examinations and PTCA, suggesting a possible contribution to occupational exposure. The data for the past 5 years show no marked change in total number of catheterizations, but the number of ablations has rapidly increased. Ablation requires specific skills, and thus it is frequently performed by only a few staff members, resulting in exposure being concentrated in a few specific persons. The estimated doses of scattered radiation to the eyes and thyroid gland, which are assumed to be the most highly exposed sites, were 116.2 [mSv/year] during fluoroscopy and 8.9 [mSv/year] during radiography, for a total of 125.1 [mSv/year]. This dose is very close to the maximum occupational exposure dose recommended by International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), i.e., 150 [mSv/year]. A protective device that does not impose a burden on the operator or limit the functions of x-ray units was installed on top of the examining table as a measure to reduce the occupational dose. In an experiment using this device the scattered radiation dose during inguinal puncture decreased from 0.8 [mSv/hr.] to 0.02 [mSv/hr.], and the shielding rate was 2.5%. The dose was reduced 97.5%. The authors conclude that radiological personnel must make

  2. Dose reduction according to the exposure condition in intervention procedure: Focus on the change of dose area and image quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Jun Ho; Jung, Ku Min; Lee, Kyung Bae [Dept. of Radiology, Kyunghee University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyun Soo; Kang, Byung Sam [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Shingu University, Seungnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    The purpose of this study is to suggest a method to reduce the dose by Analyzing the dose area product (DAP) and image quality according to the change of tube current using NEMA Phantom. The spatial resolution and low contrast resolution were used as evaluation criteria in addition to signal to noise ratio (SNR) and contrast to noise ratio (CNR), which are important image quality parameters of intervention. Tube voltage was fixed at 80 kVp and the amount of tube current was changed to 20, 30, 40, and 50 mAs, and the dose area product and image quality were compared and analyzed. As a result, the dose area product increased from 1066 mGycm2 to 6160 mGycm2 to 6 times as the condition increased, while the spatial resolution and low contrast resolution were higher than 20 mAs and 30 mAs, Spatial resolution and low contrast resolution were observed below the evaluation criteria. In addition, the SNR and CNR increased up to 30 mAs, slightly increased at 40 mAs, but not significantly different from the previous one, and decreased at 50 mAs. As a result, the exposure dose significantly increased due to overexposure of the test conditions and the image quality deteriorated in all areas of spatial resolution, low contrast resolution, SNR and CNR.

  3. Reduction of microbial Toxin producting capacity by low-dose radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konuma, Hirotaka; Takatori, Kosuke; Kikuchi, Yutaka; Suzuki, Akiko; Narita, Noriko [National Inst. of Health Sciences, Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-02-01

    The changes in pathogenicity and toxin producing capacity by radiation exposure were investigated with Vero toxin producing E coli O157 and mycotoxin producing eumycetes including A. flavus, A. parasiticus and A. ochraceus and A. usamii. Each cell suspension was exposed to {gamma}-ray ({sup 60}Co, 150 kCi) at 0-2.0 kGy and an aliquot of the suspension was cultured on agar plate for counting the living cell number. The producing ability of Vero toxin was determined according to reverse passive latex agglutination. Analysis of aflatoxin and ochratoxin were performed using HPLC. It was demonstrated that E.coli O157:H7 could be sterilized by {gamma}-ray exposed at a lower dose than that of ordinary strain of E.coli and Vero toxin producing ability were higher in the cells exposed to 0.1 kGy than non-exposed cells. In addition, the aflatoxin productions of A. flavus and A. parasiticus were slightly increased by {gamma}-ray exposure at a low dose, whereas A. ochraceus showed comparatively higher resistance to {gamma}-ray exposure, but its producing ability for ochratoxin A was reduced and the producing ability of A. usamii was slightly increased. (M.N.)

  4. Minimizing exposure to radiation in invasive cardiology using modern dose-reduction technology: evaluation of the real-life effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faroux, Laurent; Blanpain, Thierry; Nazeyrollas, Pierre; Tassan-Mangina, Sophie; Herce, Benoît; Tourneux, Christophe; Metz, Damien

    2017-09-01

    We aimed to measure the reduction in the estimated dose of radiation received by patients that can be achieved using dose-reduction technology (ClarityIQ, Philips Healthcare, The Netherlands), among all patients undergoing invasive cardiology procedures. Medical procedures remain the primary source of exposure to ionizing radiation in the general population. The study population comprised all patients (without exclusion criteria) undergoing invasive coronary procedures over a 1-year study period in a large referral centre equipped with two catheterization laboratories (cathlabs). Both cathlabs (A and B) were equipped with the Allura Xper FD10 imaging system (Philips Healthcare, The Netherlands), but only Cathlab B was equipped with ClarityIQ technology. The primary endpoint was the estimated total dose of radiation received by the patient, as assessed by Air Kerma (AK) and dose area product (DAP). In total, 2095 invasive coronary procedures were analyzed. The patients who underwent procedures in Cathlab B received an average estimated dose that was 23% (AK) and 43% (DAP) lower than the dose received by patients undergoing procedures in Cathlab A (P age. In our study, the ClarityIQ technology reduced the estimated radiation dose received by patients by 23-43%, according to the method of measurement. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Is weight-based adjustment of automatic exposure control necessary for the reduction of chest CT radiation dose?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Priyanka; Kalra, Mannudeep K; Gilman, Matthew D; Shepard, Jo-Anne O; Digumarthy, Subba R

    2010-01-01

    To assess the effects of radiation dose reduction in the chest CT using a weight-based adjustment of the automatic exposure control (AEC) technique. With Institutional Review Board Approval, 60 patients (mean age, 59.1 years; M:F = 35:25) and 57 weight-matched patients (mean age, 52.3 years, M:F = 25:32) were scanned using a weight-adjusted AEC and non-weight-adjusted AEC, respectively on a 64-slice multidetector CT with a 0.984:1 pitch, 0.5 second rotation time, 40 mm table feed/rotation, and 2.5 mm section thickness. Patients were categorized into 3 weight categories; 90 kg (n = 48). Patient weights, scanning parameters, CT dose index volumes (CTDIvol) and dose length product (DLP) were recorded, while effective dose (ED) was estimated. Image noise was measured in the descending thoracic aorta. Data were analyzed using a standard statistical package (SAS/STAT) (Version 9.1, SAS institute Inc, Cary, NC). Compared to the non-weight-adjusted AEC, the weight-adjusted AEC technique resulted in an average decrease of 29% in CTDIvol and a 27% effective dose reduction (p 91 kg weight groups, respectively, compared to 20.3, 27.9 and 32.8 mGy, with non-weight-adjusted AEC. No significant difference was observed for objective image noise between the chest CT acquired with the non-weight-adjusted (15.0 +/- 3.1) and weight-adjusted (16.1 +/- 5.6) AEC techniques (p > 0.05). The results of this study suggest that AEC should be tailored according to patient weight. Without weight-based adjustment of AEC, patients are exposed to a 17 - 43% higher radiation-dose from a chest CT.

  6. Adaptive Iterative Dose Reduction Using Three Dimensional Processing (AIDR3D improves chest CT image quality and reduces radiation exposure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuneo Yamashiro

    Full Text Available To assess the advantages of Adaptive Iterative Dose Reduction using Three Dimensional Processing (AIDR3D for image quality improvement and dose reduction for chest computed tomography (CT.Institutional Review Boards approved this study and informed consent was obtained. Eighty-eight subjects underwent chest CT at five institutions using identical scanners and protocols. During a single visit, each subject was scanned using different tube currents: 240, 120, and 60 mA. Scan data were converted to images using AIDR3D and a conventional reconstruction mode (without AIDR3D. Using a 5-point scale from 1 (non-diagnostic to 5 (excellent, three blinded observers independently evaluated image quality for three lung zones, four patterns of lung disease (nodule/mass, emphysema, bronchiolitis, and diffuse lung disease, and three mediastinal measurements (small structure visibility, streak artifacts, and shoulder artifacts. Differences in these scores were assessed by Scheffe's test.At each tube current, scans using AIDR3D had higher scores than those without AIDR3D, which were significant for lung zones (p<0.0001 and all mediastinal measurements (p<0.01. For lung diseases, significant improvements with AIDR3D were frequently observed at 120 and 60 mA. Scans with AIDR3D at 120 mA had significantly higher scores than those without AIDR3D at 240 mA for lung zones and mediastinal streak artifacts (p<0.0001, and slightly higher or equal scores for all other measurements. Scans with AIDR3D at 60 mA were also judged superior or equivalent to those without AIDR3D at 120 mA.For chest CT, AIDR3D provides better image quality and can reduce radiation exposure by 50%.

  7. Dose reduction and image quality assessment in 64-detector row computed tomography of the coronary arteries using an automatic exposure control system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francone, Marco; Di Castro, Elisabetta; Napoli, Alessandro; Bolzan, Chiara; Carbone, Iacopo; Bertoletti, Linda; Iuliano, Luigi; Catalano, Carlo; Passariello, Roberto

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate dose reduction and image quality in coronary 64-slice multidetector computed tomography using an automatic exposure control system (AECs). A total of 101 patients were divided into 4 groups. Tube current was 600 and 800 mAs in groups A and B and adapted at 600 and 800 quality-reference mAs using an AECs in groups C and D. Effective dose and organ-equivalent dose were evaluated. Image noise was quantified as standard deviation of air-space attenuation. Two observers assessed technical adequacy and image quality using a 4-point scale. Effective dose ranged from 8.6 mSv (group C) to 15 mSv (group B) with significant dose reduction for examinations performed at 600 mAs (21.7%) and 800 mAs (29.4%). Contribution of organ-equivalent doses showed higher exposure for lungs (42%) and breast (22%). Noise was significantly higher in groups studied with AECs. Larger coronary segments resulted in higher image quality scores without differences between groups. Automatic exposure control systems provides images of diagnostic quality with substantial dose reduction.

  8. A study on the dependence of exposure dose reduction and image evaluation on the distance from the dental periapical X-ray machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Kyu-Ji; Shin, Jae-Woo; Dong, Kyung-Rae; Lim, Chang-Seon; Chung, Woon-Kwan; Kim, Young-Jae

    2013-11-01

    Reducing the exposure dose from a periapical X-ray machine is an important aim in dental radiography. Although the radiation exposure dose is generally low, any radiation exposure is harmful to the human body. Therefore, this study developed a method that reduces the exposure dose significantly compared to that encountered in a normal procedure, but still produces an image with a similar resolution. The correlation between the image resolution and the exposure dose of the proposed method was examined with increasing distance between the dosimeter and the X-ray tube. The results were compared with those obtained from the existing radiography method. When periapical radiography was performed once according to the recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), the measured skin surface dose was low at 7 mGy or below. In contrast, the skin surface dose measured using the proposed method was only 1.57 mGy, showing a five-fold reduction. These results suggest that further decreases in dose might be achieved using the proposed method.

  9. Doses from radiation exposure

    CERN Document Server

    Menzel, H G

    2012-01-01

    Practical implementation of the International Commission on Radiological Protection's (ICRP) system of protection requires the availability of appropriate methods and data. The work of Committee 2 is concerned with the development of reference data and methods for the assessment of internal and external radiation exposure of workers and members of the public. This involves the development of reference biokinetic and dosimetric models, reference anatomical models of the human body, and reference anatomical and physiological data. Following ICRP's 2007 Recommendations, Committee 2 has focused on the provision of new reference dose coefficients for external and internal exposure. As well as specifying changes to the radiation and tissue weighting factors used in the calculation of protection quantities, the 2007 Recommendations introduced the use of reference anatomical phantoms based on medical imaging data, requiring explicit sex averaging of male and female organ-equivalent doses in the calculation of effecti...

  10. Dose Reduction Techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Waggoner, L O

    2000-01-01

    As radiation safety specialists, one of the things we are required to do is evaluate tools, equipment, materials and work practices and decide whether the use of these products or work practices will reduce radiation dose or risk to the environment. There is a tendency for many workers that work with radioactive material to accomplish radiological work the same way they have always done it rather than look for new technology or change their work practices. New technology is being developed all the time that can make radiological work easier and result in less radiation dose to the worker or reduce the possibility that contamination will be spread to the environment. As we discuss the various tools and techniques that reduce radiation dose, keep in mind that the radiological controls should be reasonable. We can not always get the dose to zero, so we must try to accomplish the work efficiently and cost-effectively. There are times we may have to accept there is only so much you can do. The goal is to do the sm...

  11. Dose reduction at nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baum, J.W.; Dionne, B.J.

    1983-01-01

    The collective dose equivalent at nuclear power plants increased from 1250 rem in 1969 to nearly 54,000 rem in 1980. This rise is attributable primarily to an increase in nuclear generated power from 1289 MW-y to 29,155 MW-y; and secondly, to increased average plant age. However, considerable variation in exposure occurs from plant to plant depending on plant type, refueling, maintenance, etc. In order to understand the factors influencing these differences, an investigation was initiated to study dose-reduction techniques and effectiveness of as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) planning at light water plants. Objectives are to: identify high-dose maintenance tasks and related dose-reduction techniques; investigate utilization of high-reliability, low-maintenance equipment; recommend improved radioactive waste handling equipment and procedures; examine incentives for dose reduction; and compile an ALARA handbook.

  12. Adaptive iterative dose reduction (AIDR) 3D in low dose CT abdomen-pelvis: Effects on image quality and radiation exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, W. C.; Hashim, S.; Karim, M. K. A.; Bahruddin, N. A.; Salehhon, N.; Musa, Y.

    2017-05-01

    The widespread use of computed tomography (CT) has increased the medical radiation exposure and cancer risk. We aimed to evaluate the impact of AIDR 3D in CT abdomen-pelvic examinations based on image quality and radiation dose in low dose (LD) setting compared to standard dose (STD) with filtered back projection (FBP) reconstruction. We retrospectively reviewed the images of 40 patients who underwent CT abdomen-pelvic using a 80 slice CT scanner. Group 1 patients (n=20, mean age 41 ± 17 years) were performed at LD with AIDR 3D reconstruction and Group 2 patients (n=20, mean age 52 ± 21 years) were scanned with STD using FBP reconstruction. Objective image noise was assessed by region of interest (ROI) measurements in the liver and aorta as standard deviation (SD) of the attenuation value (Hounsfield Unit, HU) while subjective image quality was evaluated by two radiologists. Statistical analysis was used to compare the scan length, CT dose index volume (CTDIvol) and image quality of both patient groups. Although both groups have similar mean scan length, the CTDIvol significantly decreased by 38% in LD CT compared to STD CT (psuperior image quality in LD CT abdomen-pelvis.

  13. Dose reduction during CT coronary angiography; La reduction de dose en coroscanographie

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    Willoteaux, S.; Sibileau, E.; Caroff, J.; Nedelcu, C.; Thouveny, F. [Service de Radiologie, Hopital Larrey, CHU d' Angers, 49 - Angers (France); Abi Kalil, W.; Delepine, S. [Service de Cardiologie, Hopital Larrey, CHU d' Angers, 49 - Angers (France)

    2010-11-15

    Dose delivery during CT coronary angiography with retrospective ECG gating is high especially due to the important slice overlapping. Optimization of the acquisition parameters is necessary to reduce patient exposure. First, the height of the scan field should be limited to the heart. Both kV and mA should be adjusted based on patient morphology. ECG gated exposure modulation with mA reduction during systole, a technique most applicable for patients with slow and regular heart rate, can result in a dose reduction up to 50%. The use of prospective ECG gating can also reduce patient dose. This technique also requires patients with slow and regular heart rate. (authors)

  14. Dose Reduction of Caspofungin in Intensive Care Unit Patients with Child Pugh B Will Result in Suboptimal Exposure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martial, L.C.; Bruggemann, R.J.M.; Schouten, J.A.; Leeuwen, H.J. van; Zanten, A.R. van; Lange, D.W. de; Muilwijk, E.W.; Verweij, P.E.; Burger, D.M.; Aarnoutse, R.E.; Pickkers, P.; Dorlo, T.P.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Caspofungin is an echinocandin antifungal agent used as first-line therapy for the treatment of invasive candidiasis. The maintenance dose is adapted to body weight (BW) or liver function (Child-Pugh score B or C). We aimed to study the pharmacokinetics of caspofungin and

  15. Dose Reduction of Caspofungin in Intensive Care Unit Patients with Child Pugh B Will Result in Suboptimal Exposure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martial, Lisa C; Brüggemann, Roger J M; Schouten, Jeroen A; van Leeuwen, Henk J; van Zanten, Arthur R; de Lange, Dylan W; Muilwijk, Eline W; Verweij, Paul E; Burger, David M; Aarnoutse, Rob E; Pickkers, Peter; Dorlo, Thomas P C

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Caspofungin is an echinocandin antifungal agent used as first-line therapy for the treatment of invasive candidiasis. The maintenance dose is adapted to body weight (BW) or liver function (Child-Pugh score B or C). We aimed to study the pharmacokinetics of caspofungin and

  16. SU-E-I-33: Advances in Dose Metrics and Dose Reduction Strategies for Interventional Fluoroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, V; Zhang, J; Bruner, A

    2012-06-01

    To explore recent advances in available dose metrics and dose reduction features and their impacts during various fluoroscopy procedures. Besides traditional dose metrics (cumulative dose, DAP, etc), recent methods such as real time dose mapping and dose calculation from DICOM information and their relevance to entrance skin exposure (ESE) are demonstrated. Dose reduction features and their potential effects on ESE are explored for different interventional procedures, including dose setting options, frame rate settings, wedges, software options and how these help reduce patient dose, etc. Real time dose monitoring techniques such as DoseAware are investigated. Dose alert such as flagging higher doses at about half of the Joint Commission sentinel event limit, Dose Index Registry and their impacts are discussed. Habit related practices, such as a physician leaning over patients, are highlighted, also taking foot off the fluoroscopy pedal when not needed, and best places to stand are illustrated. A practice improvement procedure involving measurement, analysis and improvement actions is instituted. We also discuss the impact of physician follow up letters to patients who might not have reached the JC Sentinel Event limits but may still have skin issues. In our institutes, these efforts have led to reduction of both patient dose and personnel exposure for interventional procedures. The recording of technical parameters and fluoroscopy dose by the staff has led to a better understanding of appropriate dose levels and technique settings for each procedure. This article can serve as a refresher for radiological staff on how to protect patients and themselves from high doses, while providing the best care possible. It can also serve as criteria for health care providers to institute changes and make quality improvement in interventional practices. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  17. Low-dose radiation exposure and carcinogenesis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Suzuki, Keiji; Yamashita, Shunichi

    2012-01-01

    .... Epidemiological studies have demonstrated the dose-response relationships for cancer induction and quantitative evaluations of cancer risk following exposure to moderate to high doses of low-linear...

  18. Effects of Exposure Imprecision on Estimation of the Benchmark Dose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Budtz-Jørgensen, Esben; Keiding, Niels; Grandjean, Philippe

    Environmental epidemiology; exposure measurement error; effect of prenatal mercury exposure; exposure standards; benchmark dose......Environmental epidemiology; exposure measurement error; effect of prenatal mercury exposure; exposure standards; benchmark dose...

  19. Adaption By Low Dose Radiation Exposure

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchel, Ron E.J.

    2015-01-01

    The procedures and dose limitations used for radiation protection in the nuclear industry are founded on the assumption that risk is directly proportional to dose, without a threshold. Based on this idea that any dose, no matter how small, will increase risk, radiation protection regulations generally attempt to reduce any exposure to ?as low as reasonably achievable? (ALARA). We know however, that these regulatory assumptions are inconsistent with the known biological effects of low doses. L...

  20. Dose reduction improvements in storage basins of spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Fan-Hsiung F.

    1997-08-13

    Spent nuclear fuel in storage basins at the Hanford Site has corroded and contaminated basin water, which has leaked into the soil; the fuel also had deposited a layer of radioactive sludge on basin floors. The SNF is to be removed from the basins to protect the nearby Columbia River. Because the radiation level is high, measures have been taken to reduce the background dose rate to as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) to prevent radiation doses from becoming the limiting factor for removal of the SW in the basins to long-term dry storage. All activities of the SNF Project require application of ALARA principles for the workers. On the basis of these principles dose reduction improvements have been made by first identifying radiological sources. Principal radiological sources in the basin are basin walls, basin water, recirculation piping and equipment. Dose reduction activities focus on cleaning and coating basin walls to permit raising the water level, hydrolasing piping, and placing lead plates. In addition, the transfer bay floor will be refinished to make decontamination easier and reduce worker exposures in the radiation field. The background dose rates in the basin will be estimated before each task commences and after it is completed; these dose reduction data will provide the basis for cost benefit analysis.

  1. Biological Effects of Low-Dose Exposure

    CERN Document Server

    Komochkov, M M

    2000-01-01

    On the basis of the two-protection reaction model an analysis of stochastic radiobiological effects of low-dose exposure of different biological objects has been carried out. The stochastic effects are the results published in the last decade: epidemiological studies of human cancer mortality, the yield of thymocyte apoptosis of mice and different types of chromosomal aberrations. The results of the analysis show that as dependent upon the nature of biological object, spontanous effect, exposure conditions and radiation type one or another form dose - effect relationship is realized: downwards concave, near to linear and upwards concave with the effect of hormesis included. This result testifies to the incomplete conformity of studied effects of 1990 ICRP recomendations based on the linear no-threshold hypothesis about dose - effect relationship. Because of this the methodology of radiation risk estimation recomended by ICRP needs more precisian and such quantity as collective dose ought to be classified into...

  2. Towards tracer dose reduction in PET studies: Simulation of dose reduction by retrospective randomized undersampling of list-mode data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatidis, Sergios; Würslin, Christian; Seith, Ferdinand; Schäfer, Jürgen F; la Fougère, Christian; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Schwenzer, Nina F; Schmidt, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Optimization of tracer dose regimes in positron emission tomography (PET) imaging is a trade-off between diagnostic image quality and radiation exposure. The challenge lies in defining minimal tracer doses that still result in sufficient diagnostic image quality. In order to find such minimal doses, it would be useful to simulate tracer dose reduction as this would enable to study the effects of tracer dose reduction on image quality in single patients without repeated injections of different amounts of tracer. The aim of our study was to introduce and validate a method for simulation of low-dose PET images enabling direct comparison of different tracer doses in single patients and under constant influencing factors. (18)F-fluoride PET data were acquired on a combined PET/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner. PET data were stored together with the temporal information of the occurrence of single events (list-mode format). A predefined proportion of PET events were then randomly deleted resulting in undersampled PET data. These data sets were subsequently reconstructed resulting in simulated low-dose PET images (retrospective undersampling of list-mode data). This approach was validated in phantom experiments by visual inspection and by comparison of PET quality metrics contrast recovery coefficient (CRC), background-variability (BV) and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of measured and simulated PET images for different activity concentrations. In addition, reduced-dose PET images of a clinical (18)F-FDG PET dataset were simulated using the proposed approach. (18)F-PET image quality degraded with decreasing activity concentrations with comparable visual image characteristics in measured and in corresponding simulated PET images. This result was confirmed by quantification of image quality metrics. CRC, SNR and BV showed concordant behavior with decreasing activity concentrations for measured and for corresponding simulated PET images. Simulation of dose

  3. Radiation dose reduction in parasinus CT by spectral shaping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, Matthias S.; Brand, Michael; Lell, Michael M.; Uder, Michael; Wuest, Wolfgang [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Radiology, Erlangen (Germany); Sedlmair, Martin; Allmendinger, Thomas [Siemens Healthcare GmbH, Forchheim (Germany)

    2017-02-15

    Spectral shaping aims to narrow the X-ray spectrum of clinical CT. The aim of this study was to determine the image quality and the extent of radiation dose reduction that can be achieved by tin prefiltration for parasinus CT. All scans were performed with a third generation dual-source CT scanner. A study protocol was designed using 100 kV tube voltage with tin prefiltration (200 mAs) that provides image noise levels comparable to a low-dose reference protocol using 100 kV without spectral shaping (25 mAs). One hundred consecutive patients were prospectively enrolled and randomly assigned to the study or control group. All patients signed written informed consent. The study protocol was approved by the local Institutional Review Board and applies to the HIPAA. Subjective and objective image quality (attenuation values, image noise, and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR)) were assessed. Radiation exposure was assessed as volumetric CT dose index, and effective dose was estimated. Mann-Whitney U test was performed for radiation exposure and for image noise comparison. All scans were of diagnostic image quality. Image noise in air, in the retrobulbar fat, and in the eye globe was comparable between both groups (all p > 0.05). CNR{sub eye} {sub globe/air} did not differ significantly between both groups (p = 0.7). Radiation exposure (1.7 vs. 2.1 mGy, p < 0.01) and effective dose (0.055 vs. 0.066 mSv, p < 0.01) were significantly reduced in the study group. Radiation dose can be further reduced by 17% for low-dose parasinus CT by tin prefiltration maintaining diagnostic image quality. (orig.)

  4. Radiation dose reduction in parasinus CT by spectral shaping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Matthias S; Brand, Michael; Lell, Michael M; Sedlmair, Martin; Allmendinger, Thomas; Uder, Michael; Wuest, Wolfgang

    2017-02-01

    Spectral shaping aims to narrow the X-ray spectrum of clinical CT. The aim of this study was to determine the image quality and the extent of radiation dose reduction that can be achieved by tin prefiltration for parasinus CT. All scans were performed with a third generation dual-source CT scanner. A study protocol was designed using 100 kV tube voltage with tin prefiltration (200 mAs) that provides image noise levels comparable to a low-dose reference protocol using 100 kV without spectral shaping (25 mAs). One hundred consecutive patients were prospectively enrolled and randomly assigned to the study or control group. All patients signed written informed consent. The study protocol was approved by the local Institutional Review Board and applies to the HIPAA. Subjective and objective image quality (attenuation values, image noise, and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR)) were assessed. Radiation exposure was assessed as volumetric CT dose index, and effective dose was estimated. Mann-Whitney U test was performed for radiation exposure and for image noise comparison. All scans were of diagnostic image quality. Image noise in air, in the retrobulbar fat, and in the eye globe was comparable between both groups (all p > 0.05). CNReye globe/air did not differ significantly between both groups (p = 0.7). Radiation exposure (1.7 vs. 2.1 mGy, p image quality.

  5. Dose and dose reduction in computed tomography; Dosis und Dosisreduktion in der Computertomografie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lell, Michael [Klinikum Nuernberg (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin; Paracelsus Medical Univ. Nuernberg (Germany); Wucherer, Michael [Klinikum Nuernberg (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizinische Physik; Kachelriess, Marc [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany)

    2017-06-15

    CT is widely used in medical imaging due to high availability, relatively low cost, and excellent diagnostic yield. Newer applications like coronary CTA, CT colonography, and CT perfusion imaging are integrated in clinical pathways. Although there is a high level of consensus that the benefits of CT exceeds the risks of radiation exposure for appropriate indications, concerns have been raised regarding the potential of cancer induction. Keeping dose as low as reasonably achievable remains the most important task. Dose reduction strategies are presented and discussed.

  6. Order of magnitude reduction of fluoroscopic x-ray dose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bal, Abhinav; Robert, Normand; Machan, Lindsay; Deutsch, Meir; Kisselgoff, David; Babyn, Paul; Rowlands, John A.

    2012-03-01

    The role of fluoroscopic imaging is critical for diagnostic and image guided therapy. However, fluoroscopic imaging can require significant radiation leading to increased cancer risk and non-stochastic effects such as radiation burns. Our purpose is to reduce the exposure and dose to the patient by an order of magnitude in these procedures by use of the region of interest method. Method and Materials: Region of interest fluoroscopy (ROIF) uses a partial attenuator. The central region of the image has full exposure while the image periphery, there to provide context only, has a reduced exposure rate. ROIF using a static partial attenuator has been shown in our previous studies to reduce the dose area product (DAP) to the patient by at least 2.5 times. Significantly greater reductions in DAP would require improvements in flat panel detectors performance at low x-ray exposures or a different x-ray attenuation strategy. Thus we have investigated a second, dynamic, approach. We have constructed an x-ray shutter system allowing a normal x-ray exposure in the region of interest while reducing the number of x-ray exposures in the periphery through the rapid introduction, positioning and removal of an x-ray attenuating shutter to block radiation only for selected frames. This dynamic approach eliminates the DQE(0) loss associated with the use of static partial attenuator applied to every frame thus permitting a greater reduction in DAP. Results: We have compared the two methods by modeling and determined their fundamental limits.

  7. Digital chest radiography: collimation and dose reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debess, Jeanne; Johnsen, Karen Kirstine; Vejle-Sørensen, Jens Kristian

    Purpose: Quality improvement of basic radiography focusing on collimation and dose reduction in digital chest radiography Methods and Materials:A retrospective study of digital chest radiography is performed to evaluate the primary x-ray tube collimation of the PA and lateral radiographs. Data from...... one hundred fifty self-reliant female patients between 15 and 55 years of age are included in the study. The clinical research is performed between September and November 2014 where 3rd year Radiography students collect data on four Danish x-ray departments using identical procedures under guidance...... of clinical supervisors. Optimal collimation is determined by European and Regional Danish guidelines. The areal between current and optimal collimation is calculated. The experimental research is performed in September - October 2014 Siemens Axiom Aristos digital radiography system DR using 150 kV, 1,25 -3...

  8. Patient radiation dose reduction using an X-ray imaging noise reduction technology for cardiac angiography and intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Shigeru; Kobayashi, Tomoko; Funatsu, Atsushi; Okada, Tadahisa; Mauti, Maria; Waizumi, Yuki; Yamada, Shinichi

    2016-05-01

    Coronary angiography and intervention can expose patients to high radiation dose. This retrospective study quantifies the patient dose reduction due to the introduction of a novel X-ray imaging noise reduction technology using advanced real-time image noise reduction algorithms and optimized acquisition chain for fluoroscopy and exposure in interventional cardiology. Patient, procedure and radiation dose data were retrospectively collected in the period August 2012-August 2013 for 883 patients treated with the image noise reduction technology (referred as "new system"). The same data were collected for 1083 patients in the period April 2011-July 2012 with a system using state-of-the-art image processing and reference acquisition chain (referred as "reference system"). Procedures were divided into diagnostic (CAG) and intervention (PCI). Acquisition parameters such as fluoroscopy time, volume of contrast medium, number of exposure images and number of stored fluoroscopy images were collected to classify procedure complexity. The procedural dose reduction was investigated separately for three main cardiologists. The new system provides significant dose reduction compared to the reference system. Median DAP values decreased for all procedures (p X-ray imaging technology combining advanced real-time image noise reduction algorithms and anatomy-specific optimized fluoroscopy and cine acquisition chain provides 66 % patient dose reduction in interventional cardiology.

  9. Dose Reduction in Tomosynthesis of the Wrist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Anton S; Martini, Katharina; Higashigaito, Kai; Guggenberger, Roman; Andreisek, Gustav; Frauenfelder, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantitatively and qualitatively determine the impact of radiation dose reduction on the image noise and quality of tomosynthesis studies of the wrist. Imaging of six cadaver wrists was performed with tomosynthesis in anteroposterior position at a tube voltage of 60 kV and tube current of 80 mA and subsequently at 60 or 50 kV with different tube currents of 80, 40, or 32 mA. Dose-area products (DAP) were obtained from the electronically logged protocol. Image noise was measured with an ROI. Two independent and blinded readers evaluated all images. Interreader agreement was measured with a Cohen kappa. Readers assessed overall quality and delineation of soft tissue, cortical bone, and trabecular bone on a 4-point Likert scale. The highest DAP (3.892 ± 0.432 Gy · cm(2)) was recorded for images obtained with 60 kV and 80 mA; the lowest (0.857 ± 0.178 Gy · cm(2)) was recorded for images obtained with 50 kV and 32 mA. Noise was highest when a combination of 50 kV and 32 mA (389 ± 26.6) was used and lowest when a combination of 60 kV and 80 mA (218 ± 12.3) was used. The amount of noise on images acquired using 60 kV and 80 mA was statistically significantly different from the amount measured on all other images (p wrist is possible while image quality and delineation of anatomic structures remain preserved.

  10. Six steps to a successful dose-reduction strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, M. [Rolls-Royce & Associates Ltd., Derby (United Kingdom)

    1995-03-01

    The increased importance of demonstrating achievement of the ALARA principle has helped produce a proliferation of dose-reduction ideas. Across a company there may be many dose-reduction items being pursued in a variety of areas. However, companies have a limited amount of resource and, therefore, to ensure funding is directed to those items which will produce the most benefit and that all areas apply a common policy, requires the presence of a dose-reduction strategy. Six steps were identified in formulating the dose-reduction strategy for Rolls-Royce and Associates (RRA): (1) collating the ideas; (2) quantitatively evaluating them on a common basis; (3) prioritizing the ideas in terms of cost benefit, (4) implementation of the highest priority items; (5) monitoring their success; (6) periodically reviewing the strategy. Inherent in producing the dose-reduction strategy has been a comprehensive dose database and the RRA-developed dose management computer code DOMAIN, which allows prediction of dose rates and dose. The database enabled high task dose items to be identified, assisted in evaluating dose benefits, and monitored dose trends once items had been implemented. The DOMAIN code was used both in quantifying some of the project dose benefits and its results, such as dose contours, used in some of the dose-reduction items themselves. In all, over fifty dose-reduction items were evaluated in the strategy process and the items which will give greatest benefit are being implemented. The strategy has been successful in giving renewed impetus and direction to dose-reduction management.

  11. Radiation dose reduction efficiency of buildings after the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoru Monzen

    Full Text Available Numerous radionuclides were released from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (F1-NPS in Japan following the magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami on March 11, 2011. Local residents have been eager to calculate their individual radiation exposure. Thus, absorbed dose rates in the indoor and outdoor air at evacuation sites in the Fukushima Prefecture were measured using a gamma-ray measuring devices, and individual radiation exposure was calculated by assessing the radiation dose reduction efficiency (defined as the ratio of absorbed dose rate in the indoor air to the absorbed dose rate in the outdoor air of wood, aluminum, and reinforced concrete buildings. Between March 2011 and July 2011, dose reduction efficiencies of wood, aluminum, and reinforced concrete buildings were 0.55 ± 0.04, 0.15 ± 0.02, and 0.19 ± 0.04, respectively. The reduction efficiency of wood structures was 1.4 times higher than that reported by the International Atomic Energy Agency. The efficiency of reinforced concrete was similar to previously reported values, whereas that of aluminum structures has not been previously reported. Dose reduction efficiency increased in proportion to the distance from F1-NPS at 8 of the 18 evacuation sites. Time variations did not reflect dose reduction efficiencies at evacuation sites although absorbed dose rates in the outdoor air decreased. These data suggest that dose reduction efficiency depends on structure types, levels of contamination, and evacuee behaviors at evacuation sites.

  12. Filter materials for dose reduction in screen-film radiography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koedooder, K.; Venema, H. W.

    1986-01-01

    A computer program was developed to calculate both integral absorbed dose in a water phantom and entrance exposure, for the imaging of iodine contrast with x-ray intensifying screens. The effect of filtration of the x-ray beam on integral absorbed dose and entrance exposure was studied for 27

  13. Reduction of extremity dose in the radiopharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, A

    1997-06-01

    With the future introduction of legislation originating from ICRP60 in mind, the operating procedures for the radiopharmacy were reviewed, with the intention of reducing extremity radiation dose. The radiopharmacist's index fingertip dose was measured using TLDs. The radiopharmacist received a mean dose of 0.7 mSv per 10 GBq of administered activity for the right (non-dominant hand) index finger and 0.2 mSv per 10 GBq for the left (dominant hand) index finger. These doses were comparable with other publications. The radiopharmacist received the largest part of the radiation dose during the preparation of 99Tc(m)-MDP. During this preparation, the saline was withdrawn into a syringe already containing 99Tc(m)-eluate, which results in a dose to the fingers. The technique was changed so that the saline and 99Tc(m)-eluate were withdrawn and injected separately into a MDP kit. This reduced the right finger radiation dose to 0.4 mSv per 10 GBq, while the left finger radiation dose remained at 0.2 mSv per 10 GBq. This shows that radiation doses can be effectively reduced using simple changes in procedure.

  14. Analysis of Radiation Doses and Dose Reduction Strategies During Cerebral Digital Subtraction Angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Ho Jun; Sung, Jae Hoon; Lee, Dong Hoon; Kim, Sang Wook; Lee, Sang Won

    2017-04-01

    Adverse effects of increased use of cerebral digital subtraction angiography (DSA) include radiation-induced skin reactions and increased risk of malignancy. This study aimed to identify a method for reducing radiation exposure during routine cerebral DSA. A retrospective review of 138 consecutive adult patients who underwent DSA with a biplane angiography system (Artis Zee, Siemens, Germany) from September 2015 to February 2016 was performed. In January 2016, the dose parameter was reset by the manufacturer from 2.4 μGy to 1.2 μGy. Predose (group 1) and postdose parameter reduction (group 2) groups were established. Angiograms and procedure examination protocols were reviewed according to patient age, gender, and diagnosis and angiography techniques were reviewed on the basis of the following radiation dose parameters: fluoroscopy time, reference point air kerma (Ka,r; in mGy), and kerma-area product (PKA; in μGym2). The mean Ka,r values in groups 1 and 2 were 1841.5 mGy and 1274.8 mGy, respectively. The mean PKA values in groups 1 and 2 were 23212.5 μGym2 and 14854.0 μGym2, respectively. Ka,r and PKA values were significantly lower in group 2 compared with group 1 (P strategies to reduce radiation dose, led to lower radiation doses for DSA. The use of appropriate examinations and low-dose parameters in fluoroscopy contributed significantly to the radiation dose reductions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. From dermal exposure to internal dose

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sandt, J.J.M. van de; Dellarco, M.; Hemmen, J.J. van

    2007-01-01

    Exposure scenarios form an essential basis for chemical risk assessment reports under the new EU chemicals regulation REACH (Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and restriction of Chemicals). In case the dermal route of exposure is predominant, information on both exposure and dermal

  16. Implication of fractionated dose exposures in therapeutic gain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hye-Jin; Lee, Min-Ho; Kim, Eun-Hee [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Radiation therapy pursues killing tumor cells while sparing normal cells from the radiation exposure. Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is a cancer treatment modality that delivers a high dose in a single operation. This high-dose single operation shortens the treatment course, but can increase the risk of normal cell damage. Normal cell damage can be reduced by employing multi-directional exposures for an increasing number of isocenters. In this study, we investigated whether therapeutic benefits would be expected by employing new dose fractionation patterns at a high-dose single operation. The conventional single-dose operation in brain tumor radiosurgery is performed by delivering fractionated uniform doses. According to Figs. 2 and 3, the conventional radiosurgery might have obtained some therapeutic benefit by employing the fractionated uniform-dose exposures instead of a single-dose exposure. We suggest that further therapeutic gain be expected by employing the fractionated radiation exposures in an increasing dose pattern. Until ensuring our suggestion, the significance in gain of cell surviving should be verified for all three dose patterns with both normal and tumor cells. The investigation whether normal and tumor cells show the same responses to the fractionated dose exposures at lower and higher than 15 Gy of total dose is also reserved for future work.

  17. Shaped, lead-loaded acrylic filters for patient exposure reduction and image-quality improvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, J.E.; Stears, J.G.; Frank, E.D.

    1983-03-01

    Shaped filters that are constructed of lead-loaded acrylic material for use in patient radiography are discussed. Use of the filters will result in improved overall image quality with significant exposure reduction to the patient (approximately a 2X reduction in breast exposure and a 3X reduction in thyroid gland exposure). Detailed drawings of the shaped filters for scoliosis radiography, cervical spine radiography, and for long film changers in special procedures are provided. The use of the scoliosis filters is detailed and includes phantom and patient radiographs and dose reduction information.

  18. Reduction of uterus dose in clinical thoracic computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danova, D; Keil, B; Kästner, B; Wulff, J; Fiebich, M; Zink, K; Klose, K J; Heverhagen, J T

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the potential dose reduction in the uterus as a result of lead apron protection during thoracic CT scans. Moreover, the distribution of the radiation dose in the uterus was determined in order to obtain information about the ratio of internally and externally scattered radiation. The uterus doses during thoracic CT were determined by measuring organ doses using an Alderson-RANDO®-Phantom and thermoluminescent dosimeters. A 0.25 mm lead equivalent protective apron was used to shield the abdominal area. Three measurement conditions were evaluated: without lead apron, covered with lead apron and wrapped with lead apron. The uterus dose with and without shielding describes the mean value and standard deviation of all examinations and all measurement points in the organ. The uterus dose by thoracic CT was measured to be approximately 66.5 ± 3.1 µGy. If the abdomen is covered with a 0.25 mm Pb equivalent lead apron in the front area and on both sides, the uterus dose is reduced to 49.4 ± 2.8 µGy (26% reduction, p lead apron is wrapped around the abdomen, providing 0.50 mm Pb shielding in the anterior section due to overlap, and 0.25 mm Pb in the posterior section and on both sides, the uterus dose is reduced even more to 43.8 ± 2.5 µGy (34% reduction, p lead apron covers the abdomen shows that the shielding is effective for the scatter radiation that comes from the anterior part. Moreover, the wrapped apron protects the uterus from all directions and is even more effective for dose reduction than the covering apron. Our findings demonstrate that protective aprons are an effective dose reduction technique without additional costs and little effect on patient examination time. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. Paediatric x-ray radiation dose reduction and image quality analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, L; Ruddlesden, R; Makepeace, C; Robinson, L; Mistry, T; Starritt, H

    2013-09-01

    Collaboration of multiple staff groups has resulted in significant reduction in the risk of radiation-induced cancer from radiographic x-ray exposure during childhood. In this study at an acute NHS hospital trust, a preliminary audit identified initial exposure factors. These were compared with European and UK guidance, leading to the introduction of new factors that were in compliance with European guidance on x-ray tube potentials. Image quality was assessed using standard anatomical criteria scoring, and visual grading characteristics analysis assessed the impact on image quality of changes in exposure factors. This analysis determined the acceptability of gradual radiation dose reduction below the European and UK guidance levels. Chest and pelvis exposures were optimised, achieving dose reduction for each age group, with 7%-55% decrease in critical organ dose. Clinicians confirmed diagnostic image quality throughout the iterative process. Analysis of images acquired with preliminary and final exposure factors indicated an average visual grading analysis result of 0.5, demonstrating equivalent image quality. The optimisation process and final radiation doses are reported for Carestream computed radiography to aid other hospitals in minimising radiation risks to children.

  20. Exposure- and Dose-response Analyses in Dose Selection and Labeling of FDA-approved Biologics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogasawara, Ken; Breder, Christopher D; Lin, Dora H; Alexander, G Caleb

    2018-01-01

    Biological drug products, or products derived from living cells, represent an increasingly important part of the pharmaceutical market. Despite this, little is known about how sponsors determine the dose to be studied in registrational trials or to be proposed in labeling for biologics. We examined how exposure-response and dose-response analyses were used to determine dosing in pivotal trials or the labeling for all biologics approved by the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) between 2003 and 2016. We extracted relevant characteristics of each biologic from its review package by FDA. We used descriptive statistics to characterize the rationale for the selected dose(s) in registration trials, with a particular focus on the role of exposure-response/dose-response analyses. We also examined how exposure-response/dose-response analyses were used to support the labeling dose and the basis for postmarketing requirements or commitments related to dose optimization. A total of 79 biologics license applications were examined. Dose selection in registrational trials was more often attributed to clinical efficacy (73% of applications) than to clinical safety (42%). The dosing of products whose dose was apparently selected based on clinical efficacy was often (72%) determined by the dose-response relationship. In support of doses that were described in labeling, exposure-response analyses for efficacy were performed more commonly (53%) than dose-response analyses (21%). This trend was apparent after 2012. This is the first study to summarize the justification of dose selection and the labeled dose of biologics approved by the FDA. Dose-response analyses have been often used as the rationale for dose selection of registrational studies, although exposure-response analyses are becoming more prevalent in support of the dosing guidelines in labeling. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Intussusception reduction: Effect of air vs. liquid enema on radiation dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, Summer L.; Edgar, J.C.; Anupindi, Sudha A.; Zhu, Xiaowei [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); University of Pennsylvania, Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Magill, Dennise; Felice, Marc A. [University of Pennsylvania, Environmental Health and Radiation Safety, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2017-10-15

    Both air and radiopaque liquid contrast are used to reduce ileocolic intussusception under fluoroscopy. Some suggest air lowers radiation dose due to shorter procedure times. However, air enema likely lowers radiation dose regardless of fluoroscopy time due to less density over the automatic exposure control cells. We test the hypothesis that air enema reduction of ileocolic intussusception results in lower radiation dose than liquid contrast enema independent of fluoroscopy time. We describe a role for automatic exposure control in this dose difference. We retrospectively evaluated air and liquid intussusception reductions performed on a single digital fluoroscopic unit during a 26-month period. We compared patient age, weight, gender, exam time of day and year, performing radiologist(s), radiographic image acquisitions, grid and magnification use, fluoroscopy time and dose area product. We compared categorical and continuous variables statistically using chi-square and Mann-Whitney U tests, respectively. The mean dose area product was 2.7-fold lower for air enema, 1.3 ± 0.9 dGy.cm{sup 2}, than for liquid, 3.5 ± 2.5 dGy.cm{sup 2} (P<0.005). The mean fluoroscopy time was similar between techniques. The mean dose area product/min was 2.3-fold lower for air, 0.6 ± 0.2 dGy.cm{sup 2}/min, than for liquid, 1.4 ± 0.5 dGy.cm{sup 2}/min (P<0.001). No group differences were identified in other measured dose parameters. Fluoroscopic intussusception reduction using air enema uses less than half the radiation dose of liquid contrast enema. Dose savings are independent of fluoroscopy time and are likely due to automatic exposure control interaction. (orig.)

  2. Method for simulating dose reduction in digital mammography using the Anscombe transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Lucas R; Oliveira, Helder C R de; Nunes, Polyana F; Bakic, Predrag R; Maidment, Andrew D A; Vieira, Marcelo A C

    2016-06-01

    This work proposes an accurate method for simulating dose reduction in digital mammography starting from a clinical image acquired with a standard dose. The method developed in this work consists of scaling a mammogram acquired at the standard radiation dose and adding signal-dependent noise. The algorithm accounts for specific issues relevant in digital mammography images, such as anisotropic noise, spatial variations in pixel gain, and the effect of dose reduction on the detective quantum efficiency. The scaling process takes into account the linearity of the system and the offset of the detector elements. The inserted noise is obtained by acquiring images of a flat-field phantom at the standard radiation dose and at the simulated dose. Using the Anscombe transformation, a relationship is created between the calculated noise mask and the scaled image, resulting in a clinical mammogram with the same noise and gray level characteristics as an image acquired at the lower-radiation dose. The performance of the proposed algorithm was validated using real images acquired with an anthropomorphic breast phantom at four different doses, with five exposures for each dose and 256 nonoverlapping ROIs extracted from each image and with uniform images. The authors simulated lower-dose images and compared these with the real images. The authors evaluated the similarity between the normalized noise power spectrum (NNPS) and power spectrum (PS) of simulated images and real images acquired with the same dose. The maximum relative error was less than 2.5% for every ROI. The added noise was also evaluated by measuring the local variance in the real and simulated images. The relative average error for the local variance was smaller than 1%. A new method is proposed for simulating dose reduction in clinical mammograms. In this method, the dependency between image noise and image signal is addressed using a novel application of the Anscombe transformation. NNPS, PS, and local noise

  3. Radiation Dose Reduction in Computed Tomography-Guided Lung Interventions using an Iterative Reconstruction Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, D H; Hiss, S; Mueller, D; Hellmich, M; Borggrefe, J; Bunck, A C; Maintz, D; Hackenbroch, M

    2015-10-01

    To compare the radiation doses and image qualities of computed tomography (CT)-guided interventions using a standard-dose CT (SDCT) protocol with filtered back projection and a low-dose CT (LDCT) protocol with both filtered back projection and iterative reconstruction. Image quality and radiation doses (dose-length product and CT dose index) were retrospectively reviewed for 130 patients who underwent CT-guided lung interventions. SDCT at 120 kVp and automatic mA modulation and LDCT at 100 kVp and a fixed exposure were each performed for 65 patients. Image quality was objectively evaluated as the contrast-to-noise ratio and subjectively by two radiologists for noise impression, sharpness, artifacts and diagnostic acceptability on a four-point scale. The groups did not significantly differ in terms of diagnostic acceptability and complication rate. LDCT yielded a median 68.6% reduction in the radiation dose relative to SDCT. In the LDCT group, iterative reconstruction was superior to filtered back projection in terms of noise reduction and subjective image quality. The groups did not differ in terms of beam hardening artifacts. LDCT was feasible for all procedures and yielded a more than two-thirds reduction in radiation exposure while maintaining overall diagnostic acceptability, safety and precision. The iterative reconstruction algorithm is preferable according to the objective and subjective image quality analyses. Implementation of a low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) protocol for lung interventions is feasible and safe. LDCT protocols yield a significant reduction (more than 2/3) in radiation exposure. Iterative reconstruction algorithms considerably improve the image quality in LDCT protocols. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. Risk equivalent of exposure versus dose of radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bond, V.P.

    1986-01-01

    This report describes a risk analysis study of low-dose irradiation and the resulting biological effects on a cell. The author describes fundamental differences between the effects of high-level exposure (HLE) and low-level exposure (LLE). He stresses that the concept of absorbed dose to an organ is not a dose but a level of effect produced by a particular number of particles. He discusses the confusion between a linear-proportional representation of dose limits and a threshold-curvilinear representation, suggesting that a LLE is a composite of both systems. (TEM)

  5. Rapid Chemical Exposure and Dose Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA evaluates the potential risks of the manufacture and use of thousands of chemicals. To assist with this evaluation, EPA scientists developed a rapid, automated model using off the shelf technology that predicts exposures for thousands of chemicals.

  6. Effects of exposure imprecision on estimation of the benchmark dose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Budtz-Jørgensen, Esben; Keiding, Niels; Grandjean, Philippe

    2004-01-01

    In regression analysis failure to adjust for imprecision in the exposure variable is likely to lead to underestimation of the exposure effect. However, the consequences of exposure error for determination of safe doses of toxic substances have so far not received much attention. The benchmark...... approach is one of the most widely used methods for development of exposure limits. An important advantage of this approach is that it can be applied to observational data. However, in this type of data, exposure markers are seldom measured without error. It is shown that, if the exposure error is ignored......, then the benchmark approach produces results that are biased toward higher and less protective levels. It is therefore important to take exposure measurement error into account when calculating benchmark doses. Methods that allow this adjustment are described and illustrated in data from an epidemiological study...

  7. Monitoring of radiation exposure and registration of doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-10-01

    The guide defines the concepts relevant to the monitoring of radiation exposure and working conditions and provides guidelines for determining the necessity of monitoring and subsequently organizing it. In addition, instructions are given for reporting doses to the Dose Register of the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK). Also the procedures are described for situations leading to exceptional exposures. (10 refs., 1 tab.).

  8. Dose Effects of Ion Beam Exposure on Deinococcus Radiodurans: Survival and Dose Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Dao-jun; Wu, Li-fang; Wu, Li-jun; Yu, Zeng-liang

    2001-02-01

    To explore the survival and dose response of organism for different radiation sources is of great importance in the research of radiobiology. In this study, the survival-dose response of Deinococcus radiodurans (E.coli, as the control) for ultra-violet (UV), γ-rays radiation and ion beam exposure was investigated. The shoulder type of survival curves were found for both UV and γ-ray ionizing radiation, but the saddle type of survival curves were shown for H+, N+(20keV and 30keV) and Ar+ beam exposure. This dose effect of the survival initially decreased with the increase in dose and then increased in the high dose range and finally decreased again in the higher dose range. Our experimental results suggest that D. radiodurans, which is considerably radio-resistant to UV and x-ray and γ-ray ionizing radiation, do not resist ion beam exposure.

  9. Efficacy of high-pitch CT protocols for radiation dose reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guberina, N; Lechel, U; Forsting, M; Ringelstein, A

    2016-12-01

    Various strategies have been developed to reduce radiation exposure of patients in CT examinations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of high pitch in representative CT protocols examining lung embolism. We performed thermoluminescence measurements with an anthropomorphic phantom exposing it to CT algorithms for lung embolism in a 128-multislice, dual-source CT scanner: a standard CT protocol (sCT) and a CT protocol with a high pitch (+ F). Radiation doses for both CT algorithms were compared and the dose reduction potential of high pitch for individual organs was evaluated. As expected, the  +F mode reduced the effective dose and organ doses in the primary beam of radiation (namely, lung, bone marrow, heart, breast, skin and skeleton) compared with sCT by up to 52% for an equivalent image quality. On the contrary, for organs at the margin of the primary beam (thymus, thyroid, liver, pancreas, kidneys, colon and small intestine), the  +F mode reduced effective radiation doses by only 0-30%, compared with sCT. The dose reduction potential of the  +F mode greatly depends on the position of the organ in the scan field. While for organs in the primary beam  + F leads to a considerable dose reduction, it is less effective for tissues at the margin of the scanned area.

  10. interactive effect of cowpea variety, dose and exposure time on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    INTERACTIVE EFFECT OF COWPEA VARIETY, DOSE AND EXPOSURE TIME ON. BRUCHID .... of cowpea variety as well as its interactive effect with exposure .... RESULTS. Seed morphometrics and characteristics. Table. 1 shows seed morphometrics and characteristics of the cowpea varieties used for this study. KDV.

  11. Low-dose Radiation Exposure and Carcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Suzuki, Keiji; Yamashita, Shunichi

    2012-01-01

    Absorption of energy from ionizing radiation by the genetic material in the cell leads to damage to DNA, which in turn leads to cell death, chromosome aberrations and gene mutations. While early or deterministic effects result from organ and tissue damage caused by cell killing, latter two are considered to be involved in the initial events that lead to the development of cancer. Epidemiological studies have demonstrated the dose-2013;response relationships for cancer induction and quantitati...

  12. Dose reduction in radiography of the spine in scoliosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, P.E. Jr.; Andersen, P.E.; van der Kooy, P. (Department of Diagnostic Radiology and the Radiation Physics Laboratory, University Hospital, Odense, Denmark)

    1982-01-01

    Measurements of skin doses during radiography in scoliosis have been performed with a.p. and p.a. direction of the beam. In order to keep the doses to the patients low, high kV, a film-focus distance of at least 3 m, a fast screen-film combination, lead shielding, a collimator with rotating compensating filter, and a grid of the moving anti-scatter type are recommended. By using the p.a. direction the dose to the breast is reduced by a factor in the range of 88 to 97 per cent. Further dose reduction might be achieved by removal of the anti-scatter grid and use of the air gap technique. Relinquishment of the radiographic principle of bringing the object to be examined as near the film as possible did not reduce the diagnostic information.

  13. Dose reduction factors from a radioactive cloud for large buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grand, J. le; Roux, Y.; Patau, J.P.

    1986-01-01

    A set of complex and accurate computer codes has been established to determine the transport of photons emitted from a radioactive cloud through various media. The geometrical and physical description of large buildings with various numbers of floors and rooms can be done by the user. The codes can calculate, in any room or apartment, the characteristics of the photon fields (photon flux, energy flux and distribution, direction distribution) and whole-body absorbed dose rates in a phantom standing or lying on the floor. The dose reduction factor is then the quotient of the mean absorbed dose rate in the apartment to the absorbed dose rate in the phantom standing on the ground outdoors. Applications to several modern multistorey buildings are presented. The results show the influence of various parameters such as density and composition of building materials, the fraction of the external building surface containing apertures and initial photon energy.

  14. Patient radiation exposure in uterine artery embolization of leiomyomata: calculation of organ doses and effective dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vetter, S.; Strecker, E.P. [Department of Radiology, Diakonissenkrankenhaus, Diakonissenstrasse 28, 76199, Karlsruhe (Germany); Schultz, F.W.; Zoetelief, J. [Interfaculty Reactor Institute, Medical Physics, Delft University of Technology, 2629 JB, Delft (Netherlands)

    2004-05-01

    The goal of this study was estimation of patient effective dose from uterine artery embolization of leiomyomata. Parameters and data relevant to patient dose were recorded for 33 consecutive procedures. Using Monte Carlo simulation of radiation transport, organ and effective doses were calculated in detail for a subset of five procedures, to estimate the effective dose for all procedures. Mean dose area product was 59.9, median 23.4, and range 8.8-317.5 Gycm{sup 2}. Mean absorbed ovarian dose was calculated as 51 mGy in the five procedures. Using the dose conversion factor estimated from the Monte Carlo simulation for all procedures a mean estimated effective dose of 34 mSv (median 13 mSv, range 5-182 mSv) results, with a tendency to lower values regarding the succession of the procedures. Patients' radiation exposure level is up to twice of that of an abdominal CT examination. Angiographic equipment related dose-reducing features and radiographic technique essentially influence organ doses and effective dose. Consistent application of dose-reducing techniques and awareness of radiation exposure justifies uterine artery embolization as a therapeutic option for the treatment of uterine fibroids. (orig.)

  15. Assessment of exposure dose to workers in virtual decommissioning environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, KwanSeong; Moon, JeiKwon; Choi, ByungSeon; Hyun, Dongjun; Lee, Jonghwan; Kim, Ikjune; Kim, GeunHo; Seo, JaeSeok [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    This paper is intended to suggest the method analyze and assess the exposure dose to workers in virtual decommissioning environments. To simulate a lot of decommissioning scenarios, decommissioning environments were designed in virtual reality. To simulate and assess the exposure dose to workers, human model also was designed in virtual environments. These virtual decommissioning environments made it possible to real-time simulate and assess the exposure dose to workers. This work was to be able to simulate scenarios of decommissioning so that exposure dose to workers could be measured and assessed. To establish the plan of exposure dose to workers during decommissioning of nuclear facilities before decommissioning activities are accomplished, the method of simulation assessment was developed in virtual radiological environments. But this work was developed as a tool of simulation for single subject mode. Afterwards, the simulation environment for multi-subjects mode will be upgraded by simultaneous modules with networking environments. Then the much more practical method will be developed by changing number of workers and duration of time under any circumstances of decommissioning.

  16. Patient doses and occupational exposure in a hybrid operating room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrés, C; Pérez-García, H; Agulla, M; Torres, R; Miguel, D; Del Castillo, A; Flota, C M; Alonso, D; de Frutos, J; Vaquero, C

    2017-05-01

    This study aimed to characterize the radiation exposure to patients and workers in a new vascular hybrid operating room during X-ray-guided procedures. During one year, data from 260 interventions performed in a hybrid operating room equipped with a Siemens Artis Zeego angiography system were monitored. The patient doses were analysed using the following parameters: radiation time, kerma-area product, patient entrance reference point dose and peak skin dose. Staff radiation exposure and ambient dose equivalent were also measured using direct reading dosimeters and thermoluminescent dosimeters. The radiation time, kerma-area product, patient entrance reference point dose and peak skin dose were, on average, 19:15min, 67Gy·cm(2), 0.41Gy and 0.23Gy, respectively. Although the contribution of the acquisition mode was smaller than 5% in terms of the radiation time, this mode accounted for more than 60% of the effective dose per patient. All of the worker dose measurements remained below the limits established by law. The working conditions in the hybrid operating room HOR are safe in terms of patient and staff radiation protection. Nevertheless, doses are highly dependent on the workload; thus, further research is necessary to evaluate any possible radiological deviation of the daily working conditions in the HOR. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Strategies for Computed Tomography Radiation Dose Reduction in Pediatric Neuroimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Gregory W; Glasier, Charles M

    2015-08-01

    Radiation exposure from diagnostic imaging is a significant concern, particularly in the care of pediatric patients. Computed tomography (CT) scanning is a significant source of radiation. To demonstrate that diagnostic quality CT images can be obtained while minimizing the effective radiation dose to the patient. In this retrospective cross-sectional study, noncontrast head CT scan data were reviewed, and indications for scans and estimated radiation dose delivered were recorded. The estimated effective radiation dose (EERD) for each CT protocol was reviewed. We identified 251 head CT scans in a single month. Of these, 96 scans were using a low-dose shunt protocol with a mean EERD of 0.82 mSv. The remaining 155 scans were performed using the standard protocol, and the mean EERD was 1.65 mSv. Overall, the EERD was minimized while maintaining diagnostic scan quality. Although replacing a CT with magnetic resonance imaging is ideal to completely avoid ionizing radiation, this is not always practical or preferred. Therefore, it is important to have CT protocols in place that minimize radiation dose without sacrificing diagnostic quality. The protocols in place at our institution could be replicated at other academic and community hospitals and imaging centers.

  18. Student's music exposure: Full-day personal dose measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washnik, Nilesh Jeevandas; Phillips, Susan L; Teglas, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that collegiate level music students are exposed to potentially hazardous sound levels. Compared to professional musicians, collegiate level music students typically do not perform as frequently, but they are exposed to intense sounds during practice and rehearsal sessions. The purpose of the study was to determine the full-day exposure dose including individual practice and ensemble rehearsals for collegiate student musicians. Sixty-seven college students of classical music were recruited representing 17 primary instruments. Of these students, 57 completed 2 days of noise dose measurements using Cirrus doseBadge programed according to the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health criterion. Sound exposure was measured for 2 days from morning to evening, ranging from 7 to 9 h. Twenty-eight out of 57 (49%) student musicians exceeded a 100% daily noise dose on at least 1 day of the two measurement days. Eleven student musicians (19%) exceeded 100% daily noise dose on both days. Fourteen students exceeded 100% dose during large ensemble rehearsals and eight students exceeded 100% dose during individual practice sessions. Approximately, half of the student musicians exceeded 100% noise dose on a typical college schedule. This finding indicates that a large proportion of collegiate student musicians are at risk of developing noise-induced hearing loss due to hazardous sound levels. Considering the current finding, there is a need to conduct hearing conservation programs in all music schools, and to educate student musicians about the use and importance of hearing protection devices for their hearing.

  19. Clinical utility of ultra-low-dose pre-test exposure to avoid unnecessary patient exposure due to positioning errors: a simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nose, Hideo; Shiraishi, Junji

    2017-12-01

    The use of digital radiographic systems has decreased the frequency of image retakes due to over/underexposure in general radiography. However, image retakes owing to patient positioning errors are likely to increase because of the convenience of a real-time image check on a console table. The purpose of the present study is to propose a novel radiographic examination procedure with an ultra-low-dose pre-test exposure that may be utilized to check patient positioning prior to taking an actual image, thereby reducing unnecessary patient exposure owing to image retakes. In this study, examination data from 714 knee joint radiographs, both submitted and retaken images, were included. Twelve radiological technologists (RTs) took all images. The actual total exposure dose for each patient was compared with simulated total doses utilized in the proposed procedure. The simulation assumed that each examination was completed following pre-test exposure. Therefore, this method did not involve retaking images although at least one pre-test exposure had been applied to all patients. Pre-test exposures at four dose levels corresponding to 25, 10, 5, and 2% of the actual exposure dose were evaluated to determine whether each dose level could be used to check patient positioning. The results indicated that when the pre-test exposure dose rate was 10% or lower, the total exposure dose reduction equaled or exceeded 8% for all patients. The use of the proposed procedure reduced the total exposure dose for all patients when compared to the exposure dose calculated from records.

  20. Preemptive dose reduction of warfarin in patients initiating metronidazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Ryan K; Anderson, Erin A; Cantrell, Matthew A; Shaw, Robert F; Egge, Jason A

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine if preemptive dose reduction (PDR) of warfarin is effective in maintaining therapeutic anticoagulation in patients initiating metronidazole. This is a retrospective, single-center, cohort study in a pharmacist-managed anticoagulation clinic of a university affiliated Veteran's Affairs (VA) Medical Center. Subjects were anticoagulation patients initiating metronidazole between 1 January 2002 and 30 March 2009. At the time of metronidazole initiation, patients were managed with PDR of warfarin or no dose reduction. The primary outcome was the average change in International Normalized Ratio (INR) between patients that received PDR vs. those that did not. In total, 20 patients met inclusion criteria with seven patients receiving PDR at the time of initiation of metronidazole, whereas 13 did not. Patients managed with PDR and those that were not were similar in age (mean±SD 69.4±12.9 years vs. 72.1±9.9 years, p=0.61), mean baseline INR before metronidazole (2.58±0.49 vs. 2.57±0.66, p=0.98), and mean time to follow-up after initiation of metronidazole (5.6±2.9 days vs. 7.0±3.7 days, p=0.40), respectively. The primary outcome was statistically significant with a mean difference in INR of 1.28 (p=0.01) between patients manag-ed with PDR vs. those that were not. The mean preemptive warfarin dose reduction was 34.6%±13.4% which resulted in no significant increase in INR (p=0.61). Secondary outcomes including INR values >4.0 (0% vs. 46%, p=0.05), the average number of warfarin doses omitted (0.43±0.79 vs. 1.15±1.27, p=0.17), use of phytonadione or fresh frozen plasma, and rates of bleeding events were not significantly different be-tween groups. No thromboembolic events occurred during the 30 days following metronidazole therapy. In patients determined to be appropriate candidates for PDR, a 30%-35% reduction in mean daily warfarin dose was effective in maintaining therapeutic anticoagulation in patients started on

  1. Effective dose rate coefficients for exposure to contaminated soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veinot, K.G. [Easterly Scientific, Knoxville, TN (United States); Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Eckerman, K.F.; Easterly, C.E. [Easterly Scientific, Knoxville, TN (United States); Bellamy, M.B.; Hiller, M.M.; Dewji, S.A. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Center for Radiation Protection Knowledge, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hertel, N.E. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Center for Radiation Protection Knowledge, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Manger, R. [University of California San Diego, Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2017-08-15

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Center for Radiation Protection Knowledge has undertaken calculations related to various environmental exposure scenarios. A previous paper reported the results for submersion in radioactive air and immersion in water using age-specific mathematical phantoms. This paper presents age-specific effective dose rate coefficients derived using stylized mathematical phantoms for exposure to contaminated soils. Dose rate coefficients for photon, electron, and positrons of discrete energies were calculated and folded with emissions of 1252 radionuclides addressed in ICRP Publication 107 to determine equivalent and effective dose rate coefficients. The MCNP6 radiation transport code was used for organ dose rate calculations for photons and the contribution of electrons to skin dose rate was derived using point-kernels. Bremsstrahlung and annihilation photons of positron emission were evaluated as discrete photons. The coefficients calculated in this work compare favorably to those reported in the US Federal Guidance Report 12 as well as by other authors who employed voxel phantoms for similar exposure scenarios. (orig.)

  2. Radiation dose reduction with hybrid iterative reconstruction for pediatric CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sarabjeet; Kalra, Mannudeep K; Shenoy-Bhangle, Anuradha S; Saini, Aashna; Gervais, Debra A; Westra, Sjirk J; Thrall, James H

    2012-05-01

    To assess image quality and radiation dose reduction with hybrid iterative reconstruction of pediatric chest and abdominal computed tomographic (CT) data compared with conventional filtered back projection (FBP). A total of 234 patients (median age, 12 years; age range, 6 weeks to 18 years) underwent chest and abdominal CT in this institutional review board-approved HIPAA-compliant retrospective study. CT was performed with a hybrid adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR)-enabled 64-detector row CT scanner. Scanning protocols were adjusted for clinical indication and patient weight to enable acquisition of reduced-dose CT images in all patients, and tube current was further lowered for ASIR protocols. Weight, age, and sex were recorded, and objective noise was measured in the descending thoracic aorta for chest CT and in the liver for abdominal CT. Of the 234 consecutive patients who underwent ASIR-enabled CT (115 chest and 119 abdominal examinations), 70 patients had undergone prior FBP CT. ASIR and FBP CT studies (29 chest and 41 abdominal studies) in these 70 patients were reviewed for image quality, artifacts, and diagnostic confidence by two pediatric radiologists working independently. Data were analyzed with multiple paired t tests. Compared with FBP, ASIR enabled dose reduction of 46.4% (3.7 vs 6.9 mGy) for chest CT and 38.2% (5.0 vs 8.1 mGy) for abdominal CT (P ASIR and FBP CT images as acceptable, without any artifacts. Despite the lower radiation dose used, ASIR images (chest, 10.7 ± 2.5 [mean ± standard deviation]; abdomen, 11.8 ± 3.4) had substantially less objective noise than did FBP images (chest, 13.3 ± 3.8; abdomen, 13.8 ± 5.2) (P = .001, P =.006, respectively). Use of a hybrid iterative reconstruction technique, such as ASIR, enables substantial radiation dose reduction for pediatric CT when compared with FBP and maintains image quality and diagnostic confidence.

  3. Reduction of radiation exposure during radiography for scoliosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, J.E.; Hoffman, A.D.; Peterson, H.A.

    1983-01-01

    To reduce the radiation exposure received by young scoliosis patients during treatment, six changes in technique were instituted: (1) a posteroanterior projection, (2) specially designed leaded acrylic filters, (3) a high-speed screen-film system, (4) a specially designed cassette-holder and grid, (5) a breast-shield, and (6) additional filtration in the x-ray tube the thyroid, breast, and abdominal areas were made on an Alderson phantom. They revealed an eightfold reduction in abdominal exposure for both the posteroanterior and the lateral radiographys. There was a twentyfold reduction in exposure to the thyroid for the posteroanterior radiography from 100 to less than five milliroentgens and for the lateral radiograph there was a 100-fold reduction from 618 to six milliroentgens. For the breasts there was a sixty-ninefold reduction from 344 to less than five milliroentgens for the posteroanterior radiography and a fifty-fivefold reduction from 277 to less than five milliroentgens for the lateral radiograph. These reductions in exposure were obtained without significant loss in the quality of the radiographs and in most instances with an improvement in the over-all quality of the radiograph due to the more uniform exposure.

  4. Dose optimization for different medical imaging tasks from exposure index, exposure control factor, and MAS in digital radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Menglong; Zhao, Bin; Wang, Yaying; Chen, Weixia; Hou, Lixia

    2012-09-01

    In radiographic examination, not all medical imaging tasks require the same level of image quality or diagnostic information. Criteria should be established for different imaging tasks to avoid excessive doses where there is no clear net benefit in the diagnosis or the image quality. An exposure index provided by manufacturers would be a useful tool for this purpose. This study aims to establish an optimum exposure index to be used as a guideline for clinical imaging tasks to minimize radiation exposure for chest digital radiography. A three-level classification of image quality (high, medium, and low) for chest imaging tasks was carried out. An anthropomorphic phantom was employed to establish minimum exposure index and exposure (mAs) for clinical imaging task type I (corresponding to high image quality). The exposures of medium and low quality images derived from it. Thirty patients were exposed consecutively with these optimized exposure factors, and clinical tasks were considered, while another 30 patients were exposed with the exposure factors routinely used in practice. Image quality was assessed objectively by a consensus panel. The optimized exposure provided a significant reduction of the mean exposure index from 1,556 to 1,207 (p < 0.0001) and mean patient's entrance surface dose from 0.168 mGy to 0.092 mGy (p < 0.0001). The results show that a clinical-task-determined radiographic procedure is more conducive to radiation protection of patients. In this study, the posteroanterior chest imaging examination was chosen as an example. This procedure can also apply to other body parts and views.

  5. Dose assessment of an accidental exposure at the IPNS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos Torres, M.M.

    1995-02-01

    Seven different methods were used to estimate the dose rate to a female worker who was accidentally exposed in the neutron PHOENIX beamline at the IPNS. Theoretical and measured entrance dose ranged from 550 mrem/min to 2850 mrem/min. Theoretical estimates were based on a Monte Carlo simulation of a spectrum provided by IPNS (Crawford Spectrum). Dose measurements were made with TLDs on phantoms and with ionization chambers in a water phantom. Estimates of the whole body total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) rate ranged from 5.2 mrem/min to 840 mrem/min. Assumed and measured quality factors ranged from 2.6 to 11.8. Cytogenetic analyses of blood samples detected no positive exposure. The recommended TEDE rate was 158 mrem/min. The TEDE was 750 mrem.

  6. Molecular targets for radioprotection by low dose radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Hang Rhan; Lee, Yoon Jin; Cho, Chul Koo; Lee, Su Jae; Bae, Sang woo; Lee, Yun Sil [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    Adaptive response is a reduced effect from a higher challenging dose of a stressor after a smaller inducing dose had been applied a few hrs earlier. Radiation induced fibrosarcoma (RIF) cells did not show such an adaptive response, i.e. a reduced effect from a higher challenging dose (2 Gy) of a radiation after a priming dose (1 cGy) had been applied 4 or 7 hrs earlier, but its thermoresistant clone (TR) did. Since inducible HSP70 and HSP25 expressions were different between these two cell lines, the role of inducible HSP70 and HSP25 in adaptive response was examined. When inducible hsp70 or hsp25 genes were transfected to RIF cells, radioresistance in clonogenic survival and reduction of apoptosis was detected. The adaptive response was also acquired in these two cell lines, and inducible hsp70 transfectant showed more pronounced adaptive response than hsp25 transfectant. From these results, inducible HSP70 and HSP25 are at least partly responsible for the induction of adaptive response in these cells. Moreover, when inducible HSP70 or HSP25 genes were transfected to RIF cells, coregulation of each gene was detected and heat shock factor (HSF) was found to be responsible for these phenomena. In continuation of our earlier study on the involvement of heat shock protein (HSP) 25 and HSP70 in the induction of adaptive response, we have now examined the involvement of these proteins in the induction of the adaptive response, using an animal model system. C57BL6 mice were irradiated with 5 cGy of gamma radiation 3 times for a week (total of 15cGy) and a high challenge dose (6Gy) was given on the day following the last low dose irradiation. Survival rate of the low dose pre-irradiated mice was increased to 30%. Moreover, high dose-mediated induction of apoptosis was also reduced by low dose pre-irradiation. To elucidate any link existing between HSP and induction of the adaptive response, reverse transcriptase (RT)-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis was performed

  7. Particle exposure and inhaled dose during commuting in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Sok Huang; Roth, Matthias; Velasco, Erik

    2017-12-01

    Exposure concentration and inhaled dose of particles during door-to-door trips walking and using motorized transport modes (subway, bus, taxi) are evaluated along a selected route in a commercial district of Singapore. Concentrations of particles smaller than 2.5 μm in size (PM2.5), black carbon, particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, number of particles, active surface area and carbon monoxide have been measured in-situ using portable instruments. Simultaneous measurements were conducted at a nearby park to capture the background concentrations. The heart rate of the participants was monitored during the measurements as a proxy of the inhalation rate used to calculate the inhaled dose of particles. All measured metrics were highest and well above background levels during walking. No significant difference was observed in the exposure concentration of PM2.5 for the three motorized transport modes, unlike for the metrics associated with ultrafine particles (UFP). The concentration of these freshly emitted particles was significantly lower on subway trips. The absence of combustion sources, use of air conditioning and screen doors at station platforms are effective measures to protect passengers' health. For other transport modes, sections of trips close to accelerating and idling vehicles, such as bus stops, traffic junctions and taxi stands, represent hotspots of particles. Reducing the waiting time at such locations will lower pollutants exposure and inhaled dose during a commute. After taking into account the effect of inhalation and travel duration when calculating dose, the health benefit of commuting by subway for this particular district of Singapore became even more evident. For example, pedestrians breathe in 2.6 and 3.2 times more PM2.5 and UFP, respectively than subway commuters. Public buses were the second best alternative. Walking emerged as the worst commuting mode in terms of particle exposure and inhaled dose.

  8. Characterization of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction algorithm for dose reduction in CT: A pediatric oncology perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brady, S. L.; Yee, B. S.; Kaufman, R. A. [Department of Radiological Sciences, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee 38105 (United States)

    2012-09-15

    smoothed appearance than the pre-ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign 100% FBP image. Finally, relative to non-ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign images with 100% of standard dose across the pediatric phantom age spectrum, similar noise levels were obtained in the images at a dose reduction of 48% with 40% ASIR Trade-Mark-Sign and a dose reduction of 82% with 100% ASIR Trade-Mark-Sign . Conclusions: The authors' work was conducted to identify the dose reduction limits of ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign for a pediatric oncology population using automatic tube current modulation. Improvements in noise levels from ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign reconstruction were adapted to provide lower radiation exposure (i.e., lower mA) instead of improved image quality. We have demonstrated for the image quality standards required at our institution, a maximum dose reduction of 82% can be achieved using 100% ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign ; however, to negate changes in the appearance of reconstructed images using ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign with a medium to low frequency noise preserving reconstruction filter (i.e., standard), 40% ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign was implemented in our clinic for 42%-48% dose reduction at all pediatric ages without a visually perceptible change in image quality or image noise.

  9. Effects of radiation dose reduction in Volume Perfusion CT imaging of acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, Ahmed E; Brockmann, Carolin; Yang, Zepa; Kim, Changwon; Afat, Saif; Pjontek, Rastislav; Nikobashman, Omid; Brockmann, Marc A; Kim, Jong Hyo; Wiesmann, Martin

    2015-12-01

    To examine the influence of radiation dose reduction on image quality and sensitivity of Volume Perfusion CT (VPCT) maps regarding the detection of ischemic brain lesions. VPCT data of 20 patients with suspected ischemic stroke acquired at 80 kV and 180 mAs were included. Using realistic reduced-dose simulation, low-dose VPCT datasets with 144 mAs, 108 mAs, 72 mAs and 36 mAs (80 %, 60 %, 40 % and 20 % of the original levels) were generated, resulting in a total of 100 datasets. Perfusion maps were created and signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) measurements were performed. Qualitative analyses were conducted by two blinded readers, who also assessed the presence/absence of ischemic lesions and scored CBV and CBF maps using a modified ASPECTS-score. SNR of all low-dose datasets were significantly lower than those of the original datasets (p < .05). All datasets down to 72 mAs (40 %) yielded sufficient image quality and high sensitivity with excellent inter-observer-agreements, whereas 36 mAs datasets (20 %) yielded poor image quality in 15 % of the cases with lower sensitivity and inter-observer-agreements. Low-dose VPCT using decreased tube currents down to 72 mAs (40 % of original radiation dose) produces sufficient perfusion maps for the detection of ischemic brain lesions. • Perfusion CT is highly accurate for the detection of ischemic brain lesions • Perfusion CT results in high radiation exposure, therefore low-dose protocols are required • Reduction of tube current down to 72 mAs produces sufficient perfusion maps.

  10. Impact of view reduction in CT on radiation dose for patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parcero, E.; Flores, L.; Sánchez, M. G.; Vidal, V.; Verdú, G.

    2017-08-01

    Iterative methods have become a hot topic of research in computed tomography (CT) imaging because of their capacity to resolve the reconstruction problem from a limited number of projections. This allows the reduction of radiation exposure on patients during the data acquisition. The reconstruction time and the high radiation dose imposed on patients are the two major drawbacks in CT. To solve them effectively we adapted the method for sparse linear equations and sparse least squares (LSQR) with soft threshold filtering (STF) and the fast iterative shrinkage-thresholding algorithm (FISTA) to computed tomography reconstruction. The feasibility of the proposed methods is demonstrated numerically.

  11. Primary water chemistry improvement for radiation exposure reduction at Japanese PWR Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishizawa, Eiichi [Omiya Technical Institute, Saitama-ken (Japan)

    1995-03-01

    Radiation exposure during the refueling outages at Japanese Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Plants has been gradually decreased through continuous efforts keeping the radiation dose rates at relatively low level. The improvement of primary water chemistry in respect to reduction of the radiation sources appears as one of the most important contributions to the achieved results and can be classified by the plant operation conditions as follows

  12. Bisphenol A: a body of evidence supporting exposure reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    The "tolerable daily intake" of bisphenol A, established by the European and US regulatory agencies, is based on a small number of reproductive toxicity studies in animals, mostly funded by industry, using protocols that adhere to regulatory guidelines. Many scientists consider these regulatory toxicology tests unsuitable for the evaluation of endocrine disrupters, because they cannot be used to demonstrate the effects of low doses of bisphenol A, observed in dozens of independent studies. Results obtained in studies of high doses of bisphenol A have been extrapolated to predict the effects of low-dose exposure, according to the principle that "the dose makes the poison". The validity of this extrapolation is disputed. Some human studies suggest that bisphenol A causes coronary heart disease, increases the risk of type 2 diabetes, and has harmful effects on reproduction and development. Considerable data from rodent studies suggest that low doses of bisphenol A affect reproduction, lipid metabolism and neurological development, usually following intrauterine or postnatal exposure. In France, the use of bisphenol A in infant feeding bottles has been banned since 30 June 2010, and in food packaging intended for children aged 0 to 3 years since 1 January 2013. The ban is due to be extended to all food packaging as of 1 January 2015. Bisphenol A is not the only substance present in food packaging that could interfere with endocrine function. Too little is known yet about the toxicology of bisphenol A substitutes. Several studies have shown that exposure to bisphenol A in adults and children can be greatly reduced by choosing a varied diet based on fresh foods, and by avoiding the use of plastic tableware. To reduce exposure to bisphenol A and other chemicals with hormonal activity that are present in food packaging, it seems reasonable to encourage the consumption of fresh foods, avoiding canned food and plastic packaging for storing and reheating food and beverages

  13. A Reduction in Radiographic Exposure and Image Quality in Film ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To develop a protocol for the optimization of diagnostic chest radiography examination, the effect of radiographic exposure reduction on image quality is investigated. Procedure: Fourty-eight adult patients presenting for posterior-anterior (PA) chest radiography in a tertiary health care centre were categorized into 3 ...

  14. Radiation dose reduction in scoliosis patients: low-dose full-spine radiography with digital flat panel detector and image stitching system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieser, T; Baldauf, A Q; Ludwig, K

    2011-07-01

    To evaluate the exposure dose reduction with a digital flat panel detector (FPD) and an image stitching system (ISS) in full-spine radiography for scoliosis patients. During a 6-month period, all consecutive scoliosis patients with a clinical indication for full-spine radiography (n = 50) were examined with an FPD and ISS. Automatic exposure control adjusted to speed class 1600 was used together with age-adjusted tube voltage and filtration. Dose area products were recorded for all images (antero-posterior n = 50, lateral n = 18). Images were evaluated by two radiologists for the possibility (possible, impossible) of typical scoliosis measurements (Cobb angle, Stagnara angle, lateral deviation, Risser stage). All measurements assessed as impossible underwent a second evaluation categorizing the reason why a measurement was impossible (underlying pathology, projection, image quality). Patient characteristics influencing exposure were recorded (sex, age, weight, height). Mean dose area products were compared to the literature with consideration of patient group and image quality. The mean dose area product was 16.8 µGy m (2) for antero-posterior images and 26.6 µGy m (2) for lateral images. A comparison to published values showed an exposure dose reduction of 47 % to 93 %. Measurement of the Cobb and Stagnara angle, lateral deviation and Risser stage was possible in 96 % (n = 50), 83 % (n = 18), 100 % (n = 50) and 100 % (n = 50) of cases. The reasons for impossible measurements were independent of image quality (underlying pathologies, projection). When imaging scoliosis patients, an FPD combined with an ISS can substantially reduce the exposure dose. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Radiation dose reduction in scoliosis patients. Low-dose full-spine radiography with digital flat panel detector and image stitching system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grieser, T. [Klinikum Augsburg (Germany). Klinik fuer Diagnostische Radiologie und Neuroradiologie; Baldauf, A.Q. [Theresienkrankenhaus Mannheim (Germany). Abt. fuer Radiologie; Ludwig, K. [Klinikum Herford (Germany). Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the exposure dose reduction with a digital flat panel detector (FPD) and an image stitching system (ISS) in full-spine radiography for scoliosis patients. Materials and Methods: During a 6-month period, all consecutive scoliosis patients with a clinical indication for full-spine radiography (n = 50) were examined with an FPD and ISS. Automatic exposure control adjusted to speed class 1600 was used together with age-adjusted tube voltage and filtration. Dose area products were recorded for all images (antero-posterior n = 50, lateral n = 18). Images were evaluated by two radiologists for the possibility (possible, impossible) of typical scoliosis measurements (Cobb angle, Stagnara angle, lateral deviation, Risser stage). All measurements assessed as impossible underwent a second evaluation categorizing the reason why a measurement was impossible (underlying pathology, projection, image quality). Patient characteristics influencing exposure were recorded (sex, age, weight, height). Mean dose area products were compared to the literature with consideration of patient group and image quality. Results: The mean dose area product was 16.8 {mu}Gy m{sup 2} for antero-posterior images and 26.6 {mu}Gy m{sup 2} for lateral images. A comparison to published values showed an exposure dose reduction of 47 % to 93 %. Measurement of the Cobb and Stagnara angle, lateral deviation and Risser stage was possible in 96 % (n = 50), 83 % (n = 18), 100 % (n = 50) and 100 % (n = 50) of cases. The reasons for impossible measurements were independent of image quality (underlying pathologies, projection). Conclusion: When imaging scoliosis patients, an FPD combined with an ISS can substantially reduce the exposure dose. (orig.)

  16. Lung cancer incidence after exposure of rats to low doses of radon: influence of dose rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morlier, J.P.; Morin, M.; Monchaux, G.; Fritsch, P.; Lafuma, J.; Masse, R. [CEA Centre d`Etudes Nucleaires de Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (France). Dept. de Protection Technique; Pineau, J.F. [ALGADE, Bessines (France); Chameaud, J. [Compagnie Generale des Matieres Nucleaires (COGEMA), 87 - Razes (France)

    1994-12-31

    To study the effect on lung cancer incidence of a long exposure to low levels of radon, 500 male 3-months-old Sprague-Dawley rats, were exposed to a cumulative dose of 25 WLM of radon and its daughters, 6 hours a day, 5 days a week, during 18 months. Exposure conditions were controlled in order to maintain a defined PAEC: 42 x 10{sup 6} J.m{sup -3} (2 WL), in the range of domestic and environmental exposures. Animals were kept until they died or given euthanasia when moribund. Mean survival times were similar in both irradiated and control groups: 828 days (SD = 169) and 830 days (SD = 137), as well as lung cancer incidence, 0.60% at 25 WLM and 0.63% for controls. The incidence of lung lesions was compared statistically with controls and those previously obtained at cumulative exposures of 25 and 50 WLM delivered over a 4-6 month period, inducing a significant increase of lung cancer, 2.2% and 3.8% respectively. Such a comparison showed a decreased lung cancer incidence related to a decrease in the dose rate for low levels of radon exposure. (author).

  17. Initial experience with adaptive iterative dose reduction 3D to reduce radiation dose in computed tomographic urography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juri, Hiroshi; Matsuki, Mitsuru; Itou, Yasushi; Inada, Yuki; Nakai, Go; Azuma, Haruhito; Narumi, Yoshifumi

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the feasibility of low-dose computed tomographic (CT) urography with adaptive iterative dose reduction 3D (AIDR 3D). Thirty patients underwent routine-dose CT scans with filtered back projection and low-dose CT scans with AIDR 3D in the excretory phase of CT urography. Visual evaluations were performed with respect to internal image noises, sharpness, streak artifacts, and diagnostic acceptability. Quantitative measures of the image noise and radiation dose were also obtained. All results were compared on the basis of body mass index (BMI). At visual evaluations, streak artifacts in the urinary bladder were statistically weaker on low-dose CT than on routine-dose CT in the axial and coronal images (P urography with AIDR 3D allows 45% reduction of radiation dose without degenerating of the image quality in the excretory phase independently to a BMI.

  18. A simple phantom study of the effects of dose reduction (by kVp increment) below current dose levels on CR chest image quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egbe, N.O., E-mail: nneoyiegbe@yahoo.co [Department of Biomedical Physics and Bioengineering, University of Aberdeen, Forresterhill (United Kingdom); Heaton, B.; Sharp, P.F. [Department of Biomedical Physics and Bioengineering, University of Aberdeen, Forresterhill (United Kingdom)

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: To assess the applicability of a simple commercial chest phantom incorporating a quasi anthropomorphic insert, in image quality and dose optimisation studies in computed radiography (CR). Methods: Lung and mediastinal lesions simulated with gelatine were positioned on the chest phantom and exposures made at the current chest radiography dose, set as D{sub ref} in the study. Further exposures were made at doses below D{sub ref} to study the effect of reducing patient dose below current dose levels, on the clarity and detectability of lung lesions in computed radiography. Lesion detectability and clarity was assessed by four observers using a commercial image viewing software without image manipulation, and a local image viewing software that allowed image contrast enhancement. The possibility of extending dose reduction below current dose levels (D{sub ref}) was assessed for both unmanipulated and manipulated images, from comparison of doses that produced statistically significant differences in image quality from D{sub ref}. Results: Results show that as the dose was decreased below D{sub ref}, both the clarity and detectability of lesions in the lung images worsened when there was no facility to manipulate the image. The onset of a significant difference in image clarity in the lung area occurred at 0.06 mGy while significant detectability changes were observed at 0.04 mGy. Similar changes in image quality were observed with the use of image manipulation. However, dose reduction produced statistically significant differences (p < 0.05) in both image clarity and detectability at 0.10 mGy. Image clarity and detectability in the mediastinal area showed no statistical difference at all doses (p > 0.05) with and without image manipulation. Conclusion: The clarity and detectability of lesion images as a function of patient doses in computed radiography may be dependent on whether or not contrast enhancement techniques are employed. There is also evidence to

  19. Prenatal radiation exposure. Dose calculation; Praenatale Strahlenexposition. Dosisermittlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scharwaechter, C.; Schwartz, C.A.; Haage, P. [University Hospital Witten/Herdecke, Wuppertal (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Roeser, A. [University Hospital Witten/Herdecke, Wuppertal (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radio-Oncology

    2015-05-15

    The unborn child requires special protection. In this context, the indication for an X-ray examination is to be checked critically. If thereupon radiation of the lower abdomen including the uterus cannot be avoided, the examination should be postponed until the end of pregnancy or alternative examination techniques should be considered. Under certain circumstances, either accidental or in unavoidable cases after a thorough risk assessment, radiation exposure of the unborn may take place. In some of these cases an expert radiation hygiene consultation may be required. This consultation should comprise the expected risks for the unborn while not perturbing the mother or the involved medical staff. For the risk assessment in case of an in-utero X-ray exposition deterministic damages with a defined threshold dose are distinguished from stochastic damages without a definable threshold dose. The occurrence of deterministic damages depends on the dose and the developmental stage of the unborn at the time of radiation. To calculate the risks of an in-utero radiation exposure a three-stage concept is commonly applied. Depending on the amount of radiation, the radiation dose is either estimated, roughly calculated using standard tables or, in critical cases, accurately calculated based on the individual event. The complexity of the calculation thereby increases from stage to stage. An estimation based on stage one is easily feasible whereas calculations based on stages two and especially three are more complex and often necessitate execution by specialists. This article demonstrates in detail the risks for the unborn child pertaining to its developmental phase and explains the three-stage concept as an evaluation scheme. It should be noted, that all risk estimations are subject to considerable uncertainties.

  20. Effect of real-time radiation dose feedback on pediatric interventional radiology staff radiation exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racadio, John; Nachabe, Rami; Carelsen, Bart; Racadio, Judy; Hilvert, Nicole; Johnson, Neil; Kukreja, Kamlesh; Patel, Manish

    2014-01-01

    To measure and compare individual staff radiation dose levels during interventional radiologic (IR) procedures with and without real-time feedback to evaluate whether it has any impact on staff radiation dose. A prospective trial was performed in which individuals filling five different staff roles wore radiation dosimeters during all IR procedures during two phases: a 12-week "closed" phase (measurements recorded but display was off, so no feedback was provided) and a 17-week "open" phase (display was on and provided real-time feedback). Radiation dose rates were recorded and compared by Mann-Whitney U test. There was no significant difference in median procedure time, fluoroscopy time, or patient dose (dose-area product normalized to fluoroscopy time) between the two phases. Overall, the median staff dose was lower in the open phase (0.56 µSv/min of fluoroscopy time) than in the closed phase (3.01 µSv/min; P staff can significantly reduce radiation exposure to the primary operator, most likely by increasing staff compliance with use of radiation protection equipment and dose reduction techniques. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Reduction of radiation exposure in Japanese BWR Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morikawa, Yoshitake [ISOGO Nuclear Engineering Center, Yokohama (Japan)

    1995-03-01

    The reduction of occupational exposure to radiation during the annual inspection and maintenance outages of Japanese boiling water reactors (BWR) is one of the most important objectives for stable and reliable operation. It was shown that this radiation exposure is caused by radionuclides, such as Co-60, Co-58 and Mn-54 which are produced from the metal elements Co, Ni, and Fe present in the corrosion products of structural materials that had been irradiated by neutrons. Therefore, to reduce radiation sources and exposures in Japanese BWRs, attempts have been reinforced to remove corrosion products and activated corrosion products from the primary coolant system. This paper describes the progress of the application of these measures to Japanese BWRs. Most Japanese BWR-4 and BWR-5 type nuclear power plants started their commercial operations during the 1970s. With the elapse of time during operations, a problem came to the forefront, namely that occupational radiation exposure during plant outages gradually increased, which obstructed the smooth running of inspections and maintenance work. To overcome this problem, extensive studies to derive effective countermeasures for radiation exposure reduction were undertaken, based on the evaluation of the plants operation data.

  2. Effects of dose reduction on the detectability of standardized radiolucent lesions in digital panoramic radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dula, K; Sanderink, G; van der Stelt, P F; Mini, R; Buser, D

    1998-08-01

    Dose reduction in digital panoramic radiography was studied. Intentional underexposure was performed with the Orthophos DS while six different human mandibles were radiographed. Exposure settings were 69 kV/15 mA (standard), 64 kV/16 mA, and 60 kV/16 mA. Standardized spherical defects, each either 1 or 1.25 mm in diameter, were simulated in 288 of 432 images, and seven observers decided whether defects were present or not. Areas under the receiver operating characteristics curves were calculated. They showed no significant differences in the detectability of the 1-mm defect at 69, 64, or 60 kV. For the 1.25-mm defect, no difference was found between the 69 and 60 kV images, but a statistically significant different detectability was found for 64 kV images in comparison with both 69 and 60 kV images. A dose reduction of up to 43% was ascertained with a Pedo-RT-Humanoid phantom when panoramic radiography was performed at 60 kV/16 mA. The conclusion is that with the Orthophos DS, it seems possible to reduce the dose rate of x-rays without loss of diagnostic quality in the case of radiolucent changes.

  3. Reducing an already low dental diagnostic X-ray dose: does it make sense? Comparison of three cost-utility analysis methods used to assess two dental dose-reduction measures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogeveen, R.C.; Sanderink, G.C.H.; van der Stelt, P.F.; Berkhout, W.E.R.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To find a method that is suitable for providing an objective assessment of the cost effectiveness of a dose-reducing measure used for diagnostic dental X-ray exposures. Methods: Three cost-utility analysis (CUA) methods were evaluated by comparing their assessments of two dose-reduction

  4. Advanced Computational Approaches for Characterizing Stochastic Cellular Responses to Low Dose, Low Dose Rate Exposures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, Bobby, R., Ph.D.

    2003-06-27

    OAK - B135 This project final report summarizes modeling research conducted in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Low Dose Radiation Research Program at the Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute from October 1998 through June 2003. The modeling research described involves critically evaluating the validity of the linear nonthreshold (LNT) risk model as it relates to stochastic effects induced in cells by low doses of ionizing radiation and genotoxic chemicals. The LNT model plays a central role in low-dose risk assessment for humans. With the LNT model, any radiation (or genotoxic chemical) exposure is assumed to increase one¡¯s risk of cancer. Based on the LNT model, others have predicted tens of thousands of cancer deaths related to environmental exposure to radioactive material from nuclear accidents (e.g., Chernobyl) and fallout from nuclear weapons testing. Our research has focused on developing biologically based models that explain the shape of dose-response curves for low-dose radiation and genotoxic chemical-induced stochastic effects in cells. Understanding the shape of the dose-response curve for radiation and genotoxic chemical-induced stochastic effects in cells helps to better understand the shape of the dose-response curve for cancer induction in humans. We have used a modeling approach that facilitated model revisions over time, allowing for timely incorporation of new knowledge gained related to the biological basis for low-dose-induced stochastic effects in cells. Both deleterious (e.g., genomic instability, mutations, and neoplastic transformation) and protective (e.g., DNA repair and apoptosis) effects have been included in our modeling. Our most advanced model, NEOTRANS2, involves differing levels of genomic instability. Persistent genomic instability is presumed to be associated with nonspecific, nonlethal mutations and to increase both the risk for neoplastic transformation and for cancer occurrence. Our research results, based on

  5. Progressive Commercial Cigarette Yield Reduction: Biochemical Exposure and Behavioral Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benowitz, Neal L.; Dains, Katherine M.; Hall, Sharon M.; Stewart, Susan; Wilson, Margaret; Dempsey, Delia; Jacob, Peyton

    2009-01-01

    Background Mandated reduction of exposure to nicotine and other cigarette toxins has been proposed as a possible national regulatory strategy. However, tapering using lower yield commercial cigarettes may not be effective in reducing nicotine or tar exposure due to compensatory smoking behavior. We examined the effects of gradual reduction of nicotine yield in commercial cigarettes on smoking behavior, with an assessment of nicotine intake and exposure to tobacco smoke toxins. Methods This 10-week longitudinal study of 20 smokers involved smoking the usual brand followed by different brands with progressively lower machine-determined yields, ranging from 0.9 to 0.1 mg nicotine, each smoked for 1 week. Subjects were followed for 4 weeks after returning to smoking the usual brand (or quitting). Smoking behaviors, biomarkers of tobacco smoke exposure, and cardiovascular effects were measured. Findings Cotinine and other biomarkers of smoke exposure remained unchanged comparing the usual brand with the 0.4 mg nicotine brands. A 30% to 40% decrease in nicotine, carbon monoxide, and carcinogen exposure comparing 0.1 mg nicotine cigarettes with baseline was observed. Self-efficacy was significantly increased and dependence decreased after tapering. Implications We confirm prior cross-sectional population and experimental studies showing complete compensation for cigarettes down to the 0.4 mg nicotine range. Nicotine and tobacco toxin exposure were substantially reduced while smoking 0.1 mg nicotine cigarettes. Our data suggest that the degree of nicotine dependence of smokers may be lowered with progressive yield tapering. Gradual tapering of smokers from regular to ultralow nicotine yield commercial cigarettes might facilitate smoking cessation and warrants future research. PMID:19258480

  6. Consequences of low dose ionizing radiation exposure on the hippocampal microenvironment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munjal M Acharya

    Full Text Available The response of the brain to irradiation is complex, involving a multitude of stress inducible pathways that regulate neurotransmission within a dynamic microenvironment. While significant past work has detailed the consequences of CNS radiotherapy following relatively high doses (≥ 45 Gy, few studies have been conducted at much lower doses (≤ 2 Gy, where the response of the CNS (like many other tissues may differ substantially from that expected from linear extrapolations of high dose data. Low dose exposure could elicit radioadaptive modulation of critical CNS processes such as neurogenesis, that provide cellular input into hippocampal circuits known to impact learning and memory. Here we show that mice deficient for chemokine signaling through genetic disruption of the CCR2 receptor exhibit a neuroprotective phenotype. Compared to wild type (WT animals, CCR2 deficiency spared reductions in hippocampal neural progenitor cell survival and stabilized neurogenesis following exposure to low dose irradiation. While radiation-induced changes in microglia levels were not found in WT or CCR2 deficient animals, the number of Iba1+ cells did differ between each genotype at the higher dosing paradigms, suggesting that blockade of this signaling axis could moderate the neuroinflammatory response. Interestingly, changes in proinflammatory gene expression were limited in WT animals, while irradiation caused significant elevations in these markers that were attenuated significantly after radioadaptive dosing paradigms in CCR2 deficient mice. These data point to the importance of chemokine signaling under low dose paradigms, findings of potential significance to those exposed to ionizing radiation under a variety of occupational and/or medical scenarios.

  7. Exposure Scenarios and Unit Dose Factors for the Hanford Immobilized Low Activity Tank Waste Performance Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RITTMANN, P.D.

    1999-12-29

    Exposure scenarios are defined to identify potential pathways and combinations of pathways that could lead to radiation exposure from immobilized tank waste. Appropriate data and models are selected to permit calculation of dose factors for each exposure

  8. Facial exposure dose assessment during intraoral radiography by radiological technologists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Hwan; Yang, Han Joon [Dept. of International Radiological Science, Hallym University of Graduate Studies, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    The study examined the changes in the decreased facial exposure dose for radiological technologists depending on increased distance between the workers and the X-ray tube head during intraoral radiography. First, the facial phantom similar to the human tissues was manufactured. The shooting examination was configured to the maxillary molars for adults (60 kVp, 10 mA, 50 msec) and for children (60 kVp, 10 mA, 20 msec), and the chamber was fixed where the facial part of the radiation worker would be placed using the intraoral radiography equipment. The distances between the X-ray tube head and the phantom were set to 10 cm, 15 cm, 20 cm, 25 cm, 30 cm, 35 cm, and 40 cm. The phantom was radiated 20 times with each examination condition and the average scattered doses were examined. The rate at the distance of 40 cm decreased by about 92.6% to 7.43% based on the scattered rays radiated at the distance of 10 cm under the adult conditions. The rate at the distance of 40 cm decreased by about 97.6% to 2.58% based on the scattered rays radiated at the distance of 10 cm under the children conditions. Protection from the radiation exposure was required during the dental radiographic examination.

  9. Application of a simple phantom in assessing the effects of dose reduction on image quality in chest radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egbe, N.O. [Biomedical Physics and Bioengineering, University of Aberdeen, Foresterhill, AB25 2ZD, Aberdeen (United Kingdom)], E-mail: nneoyiegbe@yahoo.com; Heaton, B.; Sharp, P.F. [Biomedical Physics and Bioengineering, University of Aberdeen, Foresterhill, AB25 2ZD, Aberdeen (United Kingdom)

    2010-05-15

    Purpose: Firstly, to evaluate a commercial chest phantom incorporating a quasi anthropomorphic insert by comparing exposure measurements on the phantom with those of actual patients and, secondly, to assess the value of the phantom for image quality and dose optimisation. Methods: In the first part of the study entrance surface doses (ESD), Beam transmission (BT), and optical density (OD) were obtained for 77 chest radiography patients and compared with measurements made from exposures of the phantom using the respective patient exposure factors from chest examination. Differences were assessed with a student t-test, while the Pearson's linear correlation coefficient was used to test for any linear relationship. The second part assessed the applicability of the phantom to image quality studies by investigating the effect, on the clarity and detectability of lung lesions made from gelatine, of reducing patient dose below current dose levels. Clarity of linear objects of different dimensions was also studied. Lesion detectability and clarity was assessed by four observers. The possibility of extending dose reduction below current dose levels (D{sub ref}) was assessed from comparison of doses that produced statistically significant differences in image quality from D{sub ref}. Results: Results show that, with the exception of entrance doses and beam transmission through the diaphragm (P > 0.05), differences in OD and beam transmission between patients and phantom were statistically significant (P < 0.05). A Pearson's correlation test showed good positive correlation in ESD (r = 0.9) and beam transmission (r = 0.8) for all regions and a weaker positive correlation (r = 0.3) for OD in all areas. In both cases the correlation was statistically significant (P < 0.05). Extending dose reduction by between 41 and 65% below D{sub ref} produced significant changes in both clarity and detectability. Conclusion: Within limits posed by the observed differences, the

  10. Paediatric entrance doses from exposure index in computed radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vano, E.; Martinez, D.; Fernandez, J. M.; Ordiales, J. M.; Prieto, C.; Floriano, A.; Ten, J. I.

    2008-06-01

    Over the last two years we have evaluated paediatric patient doses in projection radiography derived from exposure level (EL) in computed radiography (CR) in a large university hospital. Entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) for 3501 paediatric examinations was calculated from the EL, which is a dose index parameter related to the light emitted by the phosphor-stimulable plate, archived in the Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) header of the images and automatically transferred to a database using custom-built dedicated software. Typical mean thicknesses for several age bands of paediatric patients was estimated to calculate ESAK from the EL values, using results of experimental measurements with phantoms for the typical x-ray beam qualities used in paediatric examinations. Mean/median ESAK values (in µGy) for the age bands of images used for the (indirect) measurements were 1724 for chest without a bucky, 799 for chest with a bucky, 337 for abdomen and 641 for pelvis. The methodology we describe could be applicable to other centres using CR as an imaging modality for paediatrics. Presently, this method is the only practical approach to automatically extract parameters contained in the DICOM header, for the calculation of patient dose values for the CR modality.

  11. Comparison of image quality in head CT studies with different dose-reduction strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Jeppe; Nielsen, Rikke; Fink-Jensen, Vibeke

    account to a considerable radiation dose as many patients undergo repeated studies. Therefore, various dose-reduction strategies are applied such as automated tube current and voltage modulation and recently different iterative reconstruction algorithms. However, the trade-off of all dose......-reduction maneuvers is reduction of image quality due to image noise or artifacts. The aim of our study was therefore to find the best diagnostic images with lowest possible dose. We present results of dose- and image quality optimizing strategies of brain CT examinations at our institution. We compare sequential...

  12. The effect of dose reduction on the detection of anatomical structures on panoramic radiographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaeppler, G; Dietz, K; Reinert, S

    2006-07-01

    The aim was to evaluate the effect of dose reduction on diagnostic accuracy using different screen-film combinations and digital techniques for panoramic radiography. Five observers assessed 201 pairs of panoramic radiographs (a total of 402 panoramic radiographs) taken with the Orthophos Plus (Sirona, Bensheim, Germany), for visualization of 11 anatomical structures on each side, using a 3-point scale -1, 0 and 1. Two radiographs of each patient were taken at two different times (conventional setting and setting with decreased dose, done by increasing tube potential settings or halving tube current). To compare the dose at different tube potential settings dose-length product was measured at the secondary collimator. Films with medium and regular intensifying screens (high and low tube potential settings) and storage phosphor plates (low tube potential setting, tube current setting equivalent to regular intensifying screen and halved) were compared. The five observers made 27 610 assessments. Intrarater agreement was expressed by Cohen's kappa coefficient. The results demonstrated an equivalence of regular screens (low tube potential setting) and medium screens (high and low tube potential settings). A significant difference existed between medium screens (low tube potential setting, mean score 0.92) and the group of regular film-screen combinations at high tube potential settings (mean score 0.89) and between all film-screen combinations and the digital system irrespective of exposure (mean score below 0.82). There were no significant differences between medium and regular screens (mean score 0.88 to 0.92) for assessment of the periodontal ligament space, but there was a significant difference compared with the digital system (mean score below 0.76). The kappa coefficient for intrarater agreement was moderate (0.55). New regular intensifying screens can replace medium screens at low tube potential settings. Digital panoramic radiographs should be taken at low

  13. Optimization of dental CBCT exposures through mAs reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauwels, R; Seynaeve, L; Henriques, J C G; de Oliveira-Santos, C; Souza, P C; Westphalen, F H; Rubira-Bullen, I R F; Ribeiro-Rotta, R F; Rockenbach, M I B; Haiter-Neto, F; Pittayapat, P; Bosmans, H; Bogaerts, R; Jacobs, R

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the effect of tube current-exposure time (mAs) reduction on clinical and technical image quality for different CBCT scanners, and to determine preliminary minimally acceptable values for the mAs and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in CBCT. A polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantom and an anthropomorphic skull phantom, containing a human skeleton embedded in polyurethane, were scanned using four CBCT devices, including seven exposure protocols. For all protocols, the mAs was varied within the selectable range. Using the PMMA phantom, the CNRAIR was measured and corrected for voxel size. Eight axial slices and one coronal slice showing various anatomical landmarks were selected for each CBCT scan of the skull phantom. The slices were presented to six dentomaxillofacial radiologists, providing scores for various anatomical and diagnostic parameters. A hyperbolic relationship was seen between CNRAIR and mAs. Similarly, a gradual reduction in clinical image quality was seen at lower mAs values; however, for several protocols, image quality remained acceptable for a moderate or large mAs reduction compared with the standard exposure setting, depending on the clinical application. The relationship between mAs, CNRAIR and observer scores was different for each CBCT device. Minimally acceptable values for mAs were between 9 and 70, depending on the criterion and clinical application. Although noise increased at a lower mAs, clinical image quality often remained acceptable at exposure levels below the manufacturer's recommended setting, for certain patient groups. Currently, it is not possible to determine minimally acceptable values for image quality that are applicable to multiple CBCT models.

  14. The dose-response relationship between in-ear occupational noise exposure and hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinowitz, Peter M; Galusha, Deron; Dixon-Ernst, Christine; Clougherty, Jane E; Neitzel, Richard L

    2013-10-01

    Current understanding of the dose-response relationship between occupational noise and hearing loss is based on cross-sectional studies prior to the widespread use of hearing protection, and with limited data regarding noise exposures below 85 dBA. We report on the hearing loss experience of a unique cohort of industrial workers, with daily monitoring of noise inside of hearing protection devices. At an industrial facility, workers exhibiting accelerated hearing loss were enrolled in a mandatory programme to monitor daily noise exposures inside of hearing protection. We compared these noise measurements (as time-weighted LAVG) to interval rates of high-frequency hearing loss over a 6-year period using a mixed-effects model, adjusting for potential confounders. Workers' high-frequency hearing levels at study inception averaged more than 40 dB Hearing threshold level (HTL). Most noise exposures were less than 85 dBA (mean LAVG 76 dBA, IQR 74-80 dBA). We found no statistical relationship between LAvg and high-frequency hearing loss (p=0.53). Using a metric for monthly maximum noise exposure did not improve model fit. At-ear noise exposures below 85 dBA did not show an association with risk of high-frequency hearing loss among workers with substantial past noise exposure and hearing loss at baseline. Therefore, effective noise control to below 85 dBA may lead to significant reduction in occupational hearing loss risk in such individuals. Further research is needed on the dose-response relationship of noise and hearing loss in individuals with normal hearing and little prior noise exposure.

  15. Reduction of outdoor and indoor ambient dose equivalent after decontamination in the Fukushima evacuation zones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida-Ohuchi, Hiroko; Kanagami, Takashi [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Tohoku University, Miyagi (Japan); Naitoh, Yutaka; Kameyama, Mizuki [Japan Environment Research Co., Ltd., Miyagi (Japan); Hosoda, Masahiro [Dept. of Radiological Life Sciences, Hirosaki University Graduate School of Health Sciences, Aomori (Japan)

    2017-03-15

    One of the most urgent issues following the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant (FDNPP) was the remediation of the land, in particular, for residential area contaminated by the radioactive materials discharged. In this study, the effect of decontamination on reduction of ambient dose equivalent outdoors and indoors was evaluated. The latter is essential for residents as most individuals spend a large portion of their time indoors. From December 2012 to November 2014, thirty-seven Japanese single-family detached wooden houses were investigated before and after decontamination in evacuation zones. Outdoor and indoor dose measurements (n=84 and 114, respectively) were collected based on in situ measurements using the NaI (Tl) scintillation surveymeter. The outdoor ambient dose equivalents [H{sup *}(10){sub out}] ranged from 0.61 to 3.71 μSv h{sup -1} and from 0.23 to 1.32 μSv h{sup -1} before and after decontamination, respectively. The indoor ambient dose equivalents [H{sup *}(10){sup in}] ranged from 0.29 to 2.53 μSv h{sup -1} and from 0.16 to 1.22 μSv h{sup -1} before and after decontamination, respectively. The values of reduction efficiency (RE), defined as the ratio by which the radiation dose has been reduced via decontamination, were evaluated as 0.47±0.13, 0.51±0.13, and 0.58±0.08 (average±σ) when H{sup *}(10){sub out} <1.0 μSv h{sup -1}, 1.0 μSv h{sup -1} dose is essential as most individuals spend a large portion of their time indoors. The difference between outdoors and indoors should be considered carefully in order to estimate residents’ exposure dose before their returning home.

  16. Radiation dose reduction at a price: the effectiveness of a male gonadal shield during helical CT scans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdi Yusuf E

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is estimated that 60 million computed tomography (CT scans were performed during 2006, with approximately 11% of those performed on children age 0–15 years. Various types of gonadal shielding have been evaluated for reducing exposure to the gonads. The purpose of this study was to quantify the radiation dose reduction to the gonads and its effect on image quality when a wrap-around male pediatric gonad shield was used during CT scanning. This information is obtained to assist the attending radiologist in the decision to utilize such male gonadal shields in pediatric imaging practice. Methods The dose reduction to the gonads was measured for both direct radiation and for indirect scattered radiation from the abdomen. A 6 cm3 ion chamber (Model 10X5-6, Radcal Corporation, Monrovia, CA was placed on a Humanoid real bone pelvic phantom at a position of the male gonads. When exposure measurements with shielding were made, a 1 mm lead wrap-around gonadal shield was placed around the ion chamber sensitive volume. Results The use of the shields reduced scatter dose to the gonads by a factor of about 2 with no appreciable loss of image quality. The shields reduced the direct beam dose by a factor of about 35 at the expense of extremely poor CT image quality due to severe streak artifacts. Conclusion Images in the direct exposure case are not useful due to these severe artifacts and the difficulties in positioning these shields on patients in the scatter exposure case may not be warranted by the small absolute reduction in scatter dose unless it is expected that the patient will be subjected to numerous future CT scans.

  17. In?vitro evaluation of a new iterative reconstruction algorithm for dose reduction in coronary artery calcium scoring

    OpenAIRE

    Gassenmaier, Tobias; Allmendinger, Thomas; Kunz, Andreas S; Veyhl-Wichmann, Maike; Erg?n, S?leyman; Bley, Thorsten A.; Petritsch, Bernhard

    2017-01-01

    Background Coronary artery calcium (CAC) scoring is a widespread tool for cardiac risk assessment in asymptomatic patients and accompanying possible adverse effects, i.e. radiation exposure, should be as low as reasonably achievable. Purpose To evaluate a new iterative reconstruction (IR) algorithm for dose reduction of in?vitro coronary artery calcium scoring at different tube currents. Material and Methods An anthropomorphic calcium scoring phantom was scanned in different configurations si...

  18. Breathing adapted radiotherapy for reduction of cardiac exposure using deep inspiration breath-hold technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min Joo; Jung, Joo Young; Woong, Cho; Suh, Tae Suk [Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Jae Hong [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, College of Medicine, Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    Most of breast cancer patient has suffered from unnecessary radiation exposure to heart, lung. Low radiation dose to the heart could lead to the worsening of preexisting cardiovascular lesions caused by radiation-induced pneumonitis. Also, several studies have demonstrated the dose to heart and artery, especially the dose to left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery were maximized for left-sided breast cancer patient and could cause the subsequent risk causing more severe myocardial infarction than the other coronary artery. Several effective treatment techniques for breast cancer patient have been reported that partial breast irradiation technique for early stage breast cancer patient an alternative to whole breast irradiation, is a beam delivery method that uses a limited range of treatment volume to minimize Organ At Risks (OARs) and Computed Tomography (CT) images from several breathing control technique during treatment time could reduce the delivered dose to heart, lung. Particularly, Deep Inspiration Breath Hold (DIBH) technique which the patient takes a deep inspiration and holds during treatment and could move the heart away from the chest wall and lung, has showed to lead to reduction in cardiac volume and to minimize the unnecessary radiation exposure to heart during treatment. In this study, we investigated the displacement of heart using DIBH CT data compared to free-breathing (FB) CT data and radiation exposure to heart, lung. The present study demonstrates that cardiac dose during left-sided breast treatment can be reduced by applying DIBH breathing control technique. Also, RHC could help assess the risk of radiation induced cardiac dose, toxicity.

  19. Selective CT for PET/CT: dose reduction in Langerhans cell histiocytosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gelfand, Michael J.; Sharp, Susan E. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Section of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Palumbo, Joseph S. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Cancer and Blood Diseases Institute, Department of Pediatrics, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2014-08-23

    In Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH), FDG PET demonstrates active disease in bone. Other imaging modalities show the effects of bone destruction by LCH. To evaluate a selective CT method for reducing effective dose from FDG PET/CT in LCH, using whole-body modified attenuation correction CT at extremely low exposure settings, with repeat selective limited-volume CT at typical localization settings. Fifty-one PET/CT scans were performed in 23 LCH patients, median patient age 8.5 years (range: 1-25 years). Thirty-four were performed with modified attenuation correction CT settings, with bed positions (excluding head and neck) repeated at localization CT settings in regions with abnormal or difficult to interpret PET findings. Of 34 modified attenuation correction PET/CT scans, 10 required repeat localization CT of 1 to 3 bed positions (total: 17 bed positions). Lytic bone lesions were easily recognized at modified attenuation correction settings. Calculated average effective dose for the 34 whole-body CT scans at modified attenuation correction settings was 1.65 mSv. Average effective dose per patient for repeat imaging of 17 bed positions at localization settings was 1.19 mSv. Average total effective dose from CT for all 34 scans performed at the modified attenuation correction CT settings, including the 10 repeat localization CT scans, was 2.0 mSv. High-quality PET scans were consistently obtained with reduced FDG-administered activities of 3.7 MBq/kg (0.10 mCi/kg). In active LCH, abnormal FDG uptake was seen in all lytic bone lesions ≥9 mm, including cranial vault lesions. Substantial reduction in effective dose is possible using selective CT techniques for FDG PET/CT. (orig.)

  20. Radiation dose reduction without compromise to image quality by alterations of filtration and focal spot size in cerebral angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Joon; Park, Min Keun; Jung, Da Eun; Kang, Jung Han; Kim, Byung Moon [Dept. of Radiology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-08-01

    Different angiographic protocols may influence the radiation dose and image quality. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effects of filtration and focal spot size on radiation dose and image quality for diagnostic cerebral angiography using an in-vitro model and in-vivo patient groups. Radiation dose and image quality were analyzed by varying the filtration and focal spot size on digital subtraction angiography exposure protocols (1, inherent filtration + large focus; 2, inherent + small; 3, copper + large; 4, copper + small). For the in-vitro analysis, a phantom was used for comparison of radiation dose. For the in-vivo analysis, bilateral paired injections, and patient cohort groups were compared for radiation dose and image quality. Image quality analysis was performed in terms of contrast, sharpness, noise, and overall quality. In the in-vitro analysis, the mean air kerma (AK) and dose area product (DAP)/frame were significantly lower with added copper filtration (protocols 3 and 4). In the in-vivo bilateral paired injections, AK and DAP/frame were significantly lower with filtration, without significant difference in image quality. The patient cohort groups with added filtration (protocols 3 and 4) showed significant reduction of total AK and DAP/patient without compromise to the image quality. Variations in focal spot size showed no significant differences in radiation dose and image quality. Addition of filtration for angiographic exposure studies can result in significant total radiation dose reduction without loss of image quality. Focal spot size does not influence radiation dose and image quality. The routine angiographic protocol should be judiciously investigated and implemented.

  1. Low-dose computed tomographic urography using adaptive iterative dose reduction 3-dimensional: comparison with routine-dose computed tomography with filtered back projection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juri, Hiroshi; Matsuki, Mitsuru; Inada, Yuki; Tsuboyama, Takahiro; Kumano, Seishi; Azuma, Haruhito; Narumi, Yoshifumi

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the image quality of low-dose computed tomographic (CT) urography using adaptive iterative dose reduction 3-dimensional (AIDR 3D) compared with routine-dose CT using filtered back projection (FBP). Thirty patients underwent low- and routine-dose CT scans in the nephrographic and excretory phases of CT urography. Low-dose CT was reconstructed with AIDR 3D, and routine-dose CT was reconstructed with FBP. In quantitative analyses, image noises were measured on the renal cortex, aorta, retroperitoneal fat, and psoas muscle in both CT scans and compared. Qualitative analyses of the urinary system were performed in both CT scans and compared. These results were compared on the basis of the body mass index (BMI) of the patients. The CT dose index (CTDIvol) was measured, and the dose reduction was calculated. In quantitative analyses, image noises in all organs on low-dose CT were less than those on routine-dose CT in both phases independently of the patient's BMI. There were no statistical differences between low- and routine-dose CT for diagnostic acceptability on all urinary systems in both phases independently of the patient's BMI. The average CTDIvol on routine-dose CT was 14.5 mGy in the nephrographic phase and 9.2 mGy in the excretory phase. The average CTDIvol on low-dose CT was 4.2 mGy in the nephrographic phase and 2.7 mGy in the excretory phase. Low-dose CT urography using AIDR 3D can offer diagnostic acceptability comparable with routine-dose CT urography with FBP with approximately 70% dose reduction.

  2. Dose reduction in pediatric abdominal CT: use of iterative reconstruction techniques across different CT platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khawaja, Ranish Deedar Ali; Singh, Sarabjeet; Otrakji, Alexi; Padole, Atul; Lim, Ruth; Nimkin, Katherine; Westra, Sjirk; Kalra, Mannudeep K; Gee, Michael S

    2015-07-01

    Dose reduction in children undergoing CT scanning is an important priority for the radiology community and public at large. Drawbacks of radiation reduction are increased image noise and artifacts, which can affect image interpretation. Iterative reconstruction techniques have been developed to reduce noise and artifacts from reduced-dose CT examinations, although reconstruction algorithm, magnitude of dose reduction and effects on image quality vary. We review the reconstruction principles, radiation dose potential and effects on image quality of several iterative reconstruction techniques commonly used in clinical settings, including 3-D adaptive iterative dose reduction (AIDR-3D), adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR), iDose, sinogram-affirmed iterative reconstruction (SAFIRE) and model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR). We also discuss clinical applications of iterative reconstruction techniques in pediatric abdominal CT.

  3. Dose reduction in pediatric abdominal CT: use of iterative reconstruction techniques across different CT platforms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khawaja, Ranish Deedar Ali; Singh, Sarabjeet; Otrakji, Alexi; Padole, Atul; Lim, Ruth; Nimkin, Katherine; Westra, Sjirk; Kalra, Mannudeep K.; Gee, Michael S. [MGH Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Dose reduction in children undergoing CT scanning is an important priority for the radiology community and public at large. Drawbacks of radiation reduction are increased image noise and artifacts, which can affect image interpretation. Iterative reconstruction techniques have been developed to reduce noise and artifacts from reduced-dose CT examinations, although reconstruction algorithm, magnitude of dose reduction and effects on image quality vary. We review the reconstruction principles, radiation dose potential and effects on image quality of several iterative reconstruction techniques commonly used in clinical settings, including 3-D adaptive iterative dose reduction (AIDR-3D), adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR), iDose, sinogram-affirmed iterative reconstruction (SAFIRE) and model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR). We also discuss clinical applications of iterative reconstruction techniques in pediatric abdominal CT. (orig.)

  4. Assessment of Effective Dose Equivalent from Internal Exposure to 222Rn in Ramsar City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tayyeb Allahverdi Pourfallah

    2015-05-01

    It is clear that the annual effective dose from internal exposure to 222Rn in areas of Ramsar with high levels of natural radiation was significantly higher than the maximum annual effective dose permissible for public.

  5. Link between low-dose environmentally relevant cadmium exposures and asthenozoospermia in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoff, Susan; Auborn, Karen; Marmar, Joel L; Hurley, Ian R

    2008-02-01

    To define the mechanism(s) underlying an association between asthenozoospermia and elevated blood, seminal plasma, and testicular cadmium levels in infertile human males using a rat model of environmentally relevant cadmium exposures. University medical center andrology research laboratory. Male Wistar rats (n = 60), documented to be sensitive to the testicular effects of cadmium. Rats were given ad libitum access to water supplemented with 14% sucrose and 0 mg/L, 5 mg/L, 50 mg/L, or 100 mg/L cadmium for 1, 4, or 8 weeks beginning at puberty. Testicular cadmium levels were determined by atomic absorption, cauda epididymal sperm motility by visual inspection, and testicular gene expression by DNA microarray hybridization. Chronic, low-dose cadmium exposures produced a time- and dose-dependent reduction in sperm motility. Transcription of genes regulated by calcium and expression of L-type voltage-dependent calcium channel mRNA splicing variants were altered by cadmium exposure. Expression of calcium binding proteins involved in modulation of sperm motility was unaffected. A causal relationship between elevated testicular cadmium and asthenozoospermia was identified. Aberrrant sperm motility was correlated with altered expression of L-type voltage-dependent calcium channel isoforms found on the sperm tail, which regulate calcium and cadmium influx.

  6. Evaluation of dose reduction and image quality in CT colonography: comparison of low-dose CT with iterative reconstruction and routine-dose CT with filtered back projection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Koichi; Fujiwara, Masanori; Kanazawa, Hidenori; Mogi, Tomohiro; Iida, Nao; Mitsushima, Toru; Lefor, Alan T; Sugimoto, Hideharu

    2015-01-01

    To prospectively evaluate the radiation dose and image quality comparing low-dose CT colonography (CTC) reconstructed using different levels of iterative reconstruction techniques with routine-dose CTC reconstructed with filtered back projection. Following institutional ethics clearance and informed consent procedures, 210 patients underwent screening CTC using automatic tube current modulation for dual positions. Examinations were performed in the supine position with a routine-dose protocol and in the prone position, randomly applying four different low-dose protocols. Supine images were reconstructed with filtered back projection and prone images with iterative reconstruction. Two blinded observers assessed the image quality of endoluminal images. Image noise was quantitatively assessed by region-of-interest measurements. The mean effective dose in the supine series was 1.88 mSv using routine-dose CTC, compared to 0.92, 0.69, 0.57, and 0.46 mSv at four different low doses in the prone series (p iterative reconstruction were significantly improved compared to routine-dose CTC using filtered back projection. The lowest dose group had image quality comparable to routine-dose images. Low-dose CTC with iterative reconstruction reduces the radiation dose by 48.5 to 75.1% without image quality degradation compared to routine-dose CTC with filtered back projection. • Low-dose CTC reduces radiation dose ≥ 48.5% compared to routine-dose CTC. • Iterative reconstruction improves overall CTC image quality compared with FBP. • Iterative reconstruction reduces overall CTC image noise compared with FBP. • Automated exposure control with iterative reconstruction is useful for low-dose CTC.

  7. Strategy for the reduction of radon exposure in Norway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-05-15

    caused by radon if you have lived in a house for 30 years, compared to if you lived in the same house (with the same radon levels) for 3 years. The above relationships are especially important when considering which mitigation measures should be implemented. All reduction of radon concentration and exposure time will have a favourable impact on health. Taking the population as a whole, the health benefit will be appreciable, even if the exposure reduction that is achieved from the measures is modest - so long as the reduction applies to a large number of buildings. The risk of radon induced lung cancer increases with exposure and is proportional to the indoor radon concentration and the exposure time. Moreover, there is no lowest threshold radon concentration where no risk occurs. The risk is greatest for smokers and ex-smokers, though never-smokers can also develop lung cancer as a result of radon exposure. In recent years, three important large-scale international pooled analyses of available reliable data have confirmed earlier risk estimates. (Author)

  8. Decreasing Methadone Dose Via Anxiety Reduction: A Treatment Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushner, Marlene; And Others

    This manual describes a Relaxation-Information Presentation program based on the clinical observation that anxiety is a serious barrier to detoxification for many methadone clients, and on experimental evidence indicating that expectations may play a greater role in the discomfort experienced during detoxification than the actual methadone dose.…

  9. Injury of the blood-testies barrier after low-dose-rate chronic radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, Young Hoon; Bae Min Ji; Lee, Chang Geun; Yang, Kwang Mo; Jur, Kyu; Kim, Jong Sun [Dongnam Institute of Radiological and Medical Science, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    The systemic effect of radiation increases in proportionally with the dose and dose rate. Little is known concerning the relationships between harmful effects and accumulated dose, which is derived from continuous low-dose rate radiation exposure. Recent our studies show that low-dose-rate chronic radiation exposure (3.49 mGy/h) causes adverse effects in the testis at a dose of 2 Gy (6 mGy/h). However, the mechanism of the low-dose-rate 2 Gy irradiation induced testicular injury remains unclear. The present results indicate that low-dose rate chronic radiation might affect the BTB permeability, possibly by decreasing levels of ZO-1, Occludin-1, and NPC-2. Furthermore, our results suggest that there is a risk of male infertility through BTB impairment even with low-dose-rate radiation if exposure is continuous.

  10. Effect of automatic exposure control marker with chest radiography in radiation reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Ji Sang; Choi, Byoung Wook; Shim, Ji Na; Ahn, Ho Sik; Jin, Duk Eun; Liml, Jae Sik; Kang, Sung Ho [Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung Ho [LISTEM, Woonju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Mo [Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, Konyang University, Nonsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    This study focused on effects of patient exposure dose reduction with AEC (Auto Exposure Control) marker that is designed for showing location of AEC in X-ray Chest radiography. It included 880 adults who have to use Chest X-ray Digital Radiography system (DRS, LISTEM, Korea). AEC (Ion chambers are posited in top of both sides) are used to every adult and set X-ray system as Field size 17 x 17 inch, 120 kVp, FFD 180 cm. 440 people of control group are posited on detector to include both sides of lung field and the other 440 people of experimental group are set to contact their lung directly to Ion chamber (making marker to shows location). Then, measured every DAP and, estimated patient effective dose by using PCXMC 2.0. The average age of control group (M:F=245:195) is 53.9 and the average BMI is 23.4. BMI ranges from under weight: 35, normal range: 279, over weight: 106 to obese: 20 and average DAP is 223.56 mGycm2, Mean effective dose is 0.045 mSv. The average age of experimental group (M:F=197:243) is 53.7 and the average BMI is 22.7. BMI ranges from under weight: 34, normal range: 315, over weight: 85 to obese: 6 and average DAP is 207.36 mGycm2, Mean effective dose is 0.041 mSv. Experimental group shows less Mean effective dose as 0.004mSv (9.7%) than control group. Also, patient numbers who got over exposure more than 0.056 mSv (limit point to know efficiency of AEC marker) is 65 in control group(14.7%), 19 in experimental group (4.3%) and take statistics with t-Test. The statistical difference between two groups is 0.006. In order to use proper amount of X-ray in auto exposure controlled chest X-ray system, matching location between ion chamber and body part is needed, and using AEC marker (designed for showing location of ion chamber) is a way to reduce unnecessary patient exposure dose.

  11. Reduction of levels of radiation exposure over patients and medical staff by using additional filters of copper and aluminum on the outputs of X-ray tubes in hemodynamic equipment; Reducao da dose de radiacao em pacientes e equipes medicas pelo uso de filtros adicionais de cobre e aluminio nas saidas de tubos de raios X em equipamentos de hemodinamica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weis, Guilherme L.; Müller, Felipe M.; Schuch, Luiz A., E-mail: glweis@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Santa Maria (UFSM), Santa Maria, RS (Brazil)

    2013-12-15

    Radioprotection in hemodynamic services is extremely important. Decrease of total exposition time, better positioning of medical staff in the room, use of individual and collective protection equipment and shorter distance between the patient and the image intensifier tube are, among others, some ways to reduce the levels of radiation. It is noted that these possible forms of reducing the radiation exposition varies depending on the medical staff. Hence, the purpose of the present paper is to reduce such levels of radiation exposition in a way apart from medical staffs. It is proposed, therefore, the use of additional filters on the output of the X-ray tube in three hemodynamic equipment from different generations: detector with a flat panel of amorphous selenium, image intensifier tube with charge coupled device, and image intensifier tube with video camera. In order to quantify the quality of the images generated, a simulator made of aluminum plates and other devices was set up, so it was possible to measure and compare the acquired images. Methods of images analysis (threshold, histogram, 3D surface) were used to measure the signal/noise ratio, the spatial resolution, the contrast and the definition of the signal area, thus doubts regarding the analysis of the images among observers (inter-observers) and even for a single observer (intra-observer) can be avoided. Ionization chambers were also used in order to quantify the doses of radiation that penetrated the skin of the patients with and without the use of the filters. In all cases was found an arrangement of filters that combines quality of the images with a significant reduction of the levels of exposure to ionizing radiation, concerning both the patient and the medical staff. (author)

  12. Ultra-Low-Dose CT of the Thorax Using Iterative Reconstruction: Evaluation of Image Quality and Radiation Dose Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yookyung; Kim, Yoon Kyung; Lee, Bo Eun; Lee, Seok Jeong; Ryu, Yon Ju; Lee, Jin Hwa; Chang, Jung Hyun

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the image quality and radiation dose reduction of ultra-low-dose CT using sinogram-affirmed iterative reconstruction (SAFIRE). This prospective study enrolled 25 patients who underwent three consecutive unenhanced CT scans including low-dose CT (120 kVp and 30 mAs) and two ultra-low-dose CT protocols (protocol A, 100 kVp and 20 mAs; protocol B, 80 kVp and 30 mAs) with image reconstruction using SAFIRE. The image quality and radiation dose reduction were assessed. The mean (± SD) effective radiation dose was 1.06 ± 0.11, 0.44 ± 0.05, and 0.31 ± 0.03 mSv for low-dose CT, ultra-low-dose CT protocol A, and ultra-low-dose CT protocol B, respectively. Overall image quality was determined as diagnostic in 100% of low-dose CT scans, 96% of ultra-low-dose CT protocol A scans, and 88% of ultra-low-dose CT protocol B scans. All patients with nondiagnostic quality images had a body mass index (weight in kilograms divided by the square of height in meters) greater than 25. There was no statistically significant difference in detection frequencies of 14 lesion types among the three CT protocols, but pulmonary emphysema was detected in fewer patients (3/25) in ultra-low-dose CT protocol B scans compared with ultra-low-dose CT protocol A scans (5/25) or low-dose CT scans (6/25). We measured the longest dimensions of 33 small solid nodules (3.8-12.4 mm in long diameter) and found no statistically significant difference in the values afforded by the three CT protocols (p = 0.135). Iterative reconstruction allows ultra-low-dose CT and affords acceptable image quality, allowing size measurements of solid pulmonary nodules to be made.

  13. The effects of Fhit on tumorigenesis after multi-exposure to low-dose radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiaoyan; Lu, Lin; Wen, Siyuan; Wang, Ya

    2009-01-01

    Low-dose (≤ 0.1 Gy) radiation could reduce high-dose induced damage including tumorigenesis. However, it remains unclear whether multi-exposure to low-dose radiation at a high dose rate has any risk for increasing tumorigenesis, and whether Fhit plays any role in the process. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of multi-exposure to low-dose radiation at a high dose rate on tumorigenesis, and the role of Fhit in it. We irradiated Fhit+/+ and Fhit-/- mice with 1 Gy/1 or 0.1 Gy × 10 exposures at a dose rate of 1 Gy/min, sacrificed the mice at 1.5 years after radiation and observed multi-organ tumorigenesis. The results showed that although the spontaneous tumorigenesis in these mice was relatively high, 1 Gy/1-exposure dramatically increased the tumorigenesis including lung and liver tumor. Fhit-/- mice showed more tumorigenesis than Fhit+/+ mice after 1 Gy/1-exposure. However, 0.1 Gy × 10 exposures did not increase tumorigenesis, and there was no statistical difference in tumorigenesis between Fhit+/+ mice and Fhit-/- mice following 0.1 Gy × 10 exposures. Our results suggest that 0.1 Gy, even after multiple exposures, does not increase tumorigenesis, and Fhit could prevent high-dose radiation-induced tumors but has no effect in a low-dose environment. PMID:20057978

  14. No reduction of radiation dose following the introduction of dose-area product measurement in endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruit, A.S.; Vleggaar, F.P.; Erpecum, K.J. van; Timmerman, A.M.D.E.; Siersema, P.D.; Oldenburg, B.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: During radiological examinations such as endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), it is recommended to record the dose-area product (DAP) to reduce the patient's and the physician's exposure to ionizing radiation. However, the effect of DAP measurement on the total

  15. Conditioned placebo dose reduction: a new treatment in attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandler, Adrian D; Glesne, Corrine E; Bodfish, James W

    2010-06-01

    This study examined if pairing a placebo with stimulant medication produces a placebo response that allows children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) to be maintained on a lower dose of stimulant medication. The primary aim was to determine the efficacy, side effects, and acceptability of a novel conditioned placebo dose reduction procedure. Participants included 99 children ages 6 to 12 years with ADHD. After an initial double-blind dose finding to identify optimal dose of mixed amphetamine salts, subjects were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 treatments of 8-week duration: (a) conditioned placebo dose reduction condition (50% reduced dose/placebo [RD/P]) or (b) a dose reduction only condition (RD) or (c) a no reduction condition (full dose). The innovative conditioned placebo dose reduction procedure involved daily pairing of mixed amphetamine salts dose with a visually distinctive placebo capsule administered in open label, with full disclosure of placebo use to subjects and parents. Seventy children completed the study. There were no differences in subject retention among the 3 groups. Most subjects in the RD/P group remained stable during the treatment phase, whereas most in the RD group deteriorated. There was no difference in control of ADHD symptoms between the RD/P group and the full dose group, and both RD/P and full dose groups showed better ADHD control than the RD group. Treatment emergent side effects were lowest in the RD/P group. Pairing placebos with stimulant medication elicits a placebo response that allows children with ADHD to be effectively treated on 50% of their optimal stimulant dose.

  16. Reduction of operator radiation dose by a pelvic lead shield during cardiac catheterization by radial access: comparison with femoral access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Helmut W; von Boetticher, Heiner

    2012-04-01

    This study sought to determine the efficacy of patient pelvic lead shielding for the reduction of operator radiation exposure during cardiac catheterization via the radial access in comparison with the femoral access. Cardiac catheterization via the radial access is associated with significantly increased radiation dose to the patient and the operator. Improvements in radiation protection are needed to minimize this drawback. Pelvic lead shielding has the potential to reduce operator radiation dose. We randomly assigned 210 patients undergoing elective coronary angiography by the same operator to a radial and femoral access with and without pelvic lead shielding of the patient. Operator radiation dose was measured by a radiation dosimeter attached to the outside breast pocket of the lead apron. For radial access, operator dose decreased from 20.9 ± 13.8 μSv to 9.0 ± 5.4 μSv, p lead shielding. For femoral access, it decreased from 15.3 ± 10.4 μSv to 2.9 ± 2.7 μSv, p lead shielding significantly decreased the dose-area product-normalized operator dose (operator dose divided by the dose-area product) by the same amount for radial and femoral access (0.94 ± 0.28 to 0.39 ± 0.19 μSv × Gy(-1) × cm(-2) and 0.70 ± 0.26 to 0.16 ± 0.13 μSv × Gy(-1) × cm(-2), respectively). Pelvic lead shielding is highly effective in reducing operator radiation exposure for radial as well as femoral procedures. However, despite its use, radial access remains associated with a higher operator radiation dose. Copyright © 2012 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Intensive care unit: evaluation of the radiological activity and criteria for reduction of patient and worker exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magri, S.; Arisi, M. [POC, Cremona (Italy). Health Physics Dept.; Camerini, S.; Nolli, M. [POC, Cremona (Italy). Intensive Care Dept.; Marini, P.U.; Rozzi, G. [POC, Cremona (Italy). Radiology Dept.

    1995-12-31

    During a period of seven months data were collected regarding radiological activity (CT, radiographic and fluoroscopic procedures, and scintigraphies) at the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of Cremona Hospital. Radiological activity is related to the clinical data of patients. The patient exposure burden due to each type of examination was evaluated. Personnel exposure is mainly due to radiological activity at the patient`s bedside. Estimation of patient dose, in bedside examinations and CT procedures, is based on experimental measurements on a phantom and on patients; patient dose in nuclear medicine procedures is calculated on the basis of ICRP 53. Personnel exposure evaluations are based on experimental dosimetry, performed in simulated working conditions. Results are compared with staff routine personal dosimetry. Patient and personnel exposure reduction is related to changes in techniques, involving both radiological and protective equipment. (Author).

  18. Evaluation of occupational exposure in intraoral radiography; Avaliacao da dose ocupacional em radiografia intraoral

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miguel, Cristiano; Barros, Frieda S.; Rocha, Anna S.P.S.; Godoi, Walmor C., E-mail: miguel_cristianoch@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: saicla@utfpr.edu.br, E-mail: annarocha@yahoo.com, E-mail: walmor.godoi@gmail.com [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Tilly Junior, Joao G., E-mail: joao.tilly@derax.com.br [Universidade Federal do Parana (HC/UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas

    2014-07-01

    The intraoral radiography is widely performed in the dental office due to low cost and agility. The doses in intraoral radiology are considered low, however it is known that doses below the threshold for deterministic radiation has the potential to induce stochastic effects. An intraoral radiography has a risk of inducing fatal cancer or serious in order of 1:10,000,000. Besides the patient, the dentist may also be being exposed to radiation during the work with the radiographics practices. The bibliographies demonstrates the lack of information on radiation protection of dentists, however, the occupational dose reduction was observed in radiology over the past 14 years. This work aims to evaluate the effective dose of radiation to which workers can be exposed dentists in dental offices to perform intraoral radiographs. In this context, a study was be conducted between June 2013 and May 2014 with 44 professionals in Curitiba city. For each dentist was given a personal dosimeter to be used for 30 days. During this period, the number of radiographies and the length of the cable triggers of the X-ray equipment was registered and, the dosimeter´s dose was read. It was observed that the cables triggers meet regulatory standards and allow dentists to get the mean minimum distance of two meters from the radiation source in 93% of cases. Through analysis of the doses, it was concluded that occupational exposures of these workers are within the recommended threshold by regulatory 453/1998 of the Ministry of Health from Brazil. (author)

  19. A dose of nature: Tree cover, stress reduction, and gender differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bin Jiang; Chun-Yen Chang; William C. Sullivan

    2014-01-01

    Although it is well established that exposure to nearby nature can help reduce stress in individuals, the shape of the dose-response curve is entirely unclear. To establish this dose-response curve, we recruited 160 individuals for a laboratory experiment. Participants engaged in the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST) to induce psychological stress, and were then randomly...

  20. Radiation exposure and reduction in the operating room: Perspectives and future directions in spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narain, Ankur S; Hijji, Fady Y; Yom, Kelly H; Kudaravalli, Krishna T; Haws, Brittany E; Singh, Kern

    2017-07-18

    Intraoperative imaging is vital for accurate placement of instrumentation in spine surgery. However, the use of biplanar fluoroscopy and other intraoperative imaging modalities is associated with the risk of significant radiation exposure in the patient, surgeon, and surgical staff. Radiation exposure in the form of ionizing radiation can lead to cellular damage via the induction of DNA lesions and the production of reactive oxygen species. These effects often result in cell death or genomic instability, leading to various radiation-associated pathologies including an increased risk of malignancy. In attempts to reduce radiation-associated health risks, radiation safety has become an important topic in the medical field. All practitioners, regardless of practice setting, can practice radiation safety techniques including shielding and distance to reduce radiation exposure. Additionally, optimization of fluoroscopic settings and techniques can be used as an effective method of radiation dose reduction. New imaging modalities and spinal navigation systems have also been developed in an effort to replace conventional fluoroscopy and reduce radiation doses. These modalities include Isocentric Three-Dimensional C-Arms, O-Arms, and intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging. While this influx of new technology has advanced radiation safety within the field of spine surgery, more work is still required to overcome specific limitations involving increased costs and inadequate training.

  1. Effects of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction on radiation dose reduction and diagnostic accuracy of pediatric abdominal CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Sohi; Kim, Myung-Joon; Lee, Mi-Jung [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, Severance Children' s Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Choon-Sik [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong Wook; Hong, Jung Hwa [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Biostatistics Collaboration Unit, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    Since children are more radio-sensitive than adults, there is a need to minimize radiation exposure during CT exams. To evaluate the effects of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) on radiation dose reduction, image quality and diagnostic accuracy in pediatric abdominal CT. We retrospectively reviewed the abdominal CT examinations of 41 children (24 boys and 17 girls; mean age: 10 years) with a low-dose radiation protocol and reconstructed with ASIR (the ASIR group). We also reviewed routine-dose abdominal CT examinations of 41 age- and sex-matched controls reconstructed with filtered-back projection (control group). Image quality was assessed objectively as noise measured in the liver, spleen and aorta, as well as subjectively by three pediatric radiologists for diagnostic acceptability using a four-point scale. Radiation dose and objective image qualities of each group were compared with the paired t-test. Diagnostic accuracy was evaluated by reviewing follow-up imaging studies and medical records in 2012 and 2013. There was 46.3% dose reduction of size-specific dose estimates in ASIR group (from 13.4 to 7.2 mGy) compared with the control group. Objective noise was higher in the liver, spleen and aorta of the ASIR group (P < 0.001). However, the subjective image quality was average or superior in 84-100% of studies. Only one image was subjectively rated as unacceptable by one reviewer. There was only one case with interpretational error in the control group and none in the ASIR group. Use of the ASIR technique resulted in greater than a 45% reduction in radiation dose without impairing subjective image quality or diagnostic accuracy in pediatric abdominal CT, despite increased objective image noise. (orig.)

  2. Fetal shielding combined with state of the art CT dose reduction strategies during maternal chest CT

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    Chatterson, Leslie C., E-mail: lch088@mail.usask.ca [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, University of Saskatchewan (Canada); Leswick, David A.; Fladeland, Derek A. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, University of Saskatchewan (Canada); Hunt, Megan M.; Webster, Stephen [Saskatchewan Ministry of Labour Relations and Workplace Safety (Canada); Lim, Hyun [Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan (Canada)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Custom bismuth-antimony shields were previously shown to reduce fetal dose by 53% on an 8DR (detector row) CT scanner without dynamic adaptive section collimation (DASC), automatic tube current modulation (ATCM) or adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR). The purpose of this study is to compare the effective maternal and average fetal organ dose reduction both with and without bismuth-antimony shields on a 64DR CT scanner using DASC, ATCM and ASiR during maternal CTPA. Materials and methods: A phantom with gravid prosthesis and a bismuth-antimony shield were used. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) measured fetal radiation dose. The average fetal organ dose and effective maternal dose were determined using 100 kVp, scanning from the lung apices to the diaphragm utilizing DASC, ATCM and ASiR on a 64DR CT scanner with and without shielding in the first and third trimester. Isolated assessment of DASC was done via comparing a new 8DR scan without DASC to a similar scan on the 64DR with DASC. Results: Average third trimester unshielded fetal dose was reduced from 0.22 mGy ± 0.02 on the 8DR to 0.13 mGy ± 0.03 with the conservative 64DR protocol that included 30% ASiR, DASC and ATCM (42% reduction, P < 0.01). Use of a shield further reduced average third trimester fetal dose to 0.04 mGy ± 0.01 (69% reduction, P < 0.01). The average fetal organ dose reduction attributable to DASC alone was modest (6% reduction from 0.17 mGy ± 0.02 to 0.16 mGy ± 0.02, P = 0.014). First trimester fetal organ dose on the 8DR protocol was 0.07 mGy ± 0.03. This was reduced to 0.05 mGy ± 0.03 on the 64DR protocol without shielding (30% reduction, P = 0.009). Shields further reduced this dose to below accurately detectable levels. Effective maternal dose was reduced from 4.0 mSv on the 8DR to 2.5 mSv on the 64DR scanner using the conservative protocol (38% dose reduction). Conclusion: ASiR, ATCM and DASC combined significantly reduce effective maternal and fetal

  3. Comparative response of dogs and monkeys to sublethal acute and continuous low dose-rate gamma-ray exposure

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    Spalding, J.F.; Holland, L.M.; Johnson, O.S.; LaBauve, P.M.; London, J.E.; Prine, J.R.; Vigil, E.A.

    1977-02-01

    Monkeys (Macaca mulatta) and dogs (beagle) were given thirteen 100-rad gamma-ray doses at 28-day intervals. The comparative response (injury and recovery) of the hematopoietic system of the two species was observed at 7-day intervals during the exposure regime. At 84 days after the thirteenth gamma-ray dose, the 1300-rad conditioned and control dogs and monkeys were challenged continuously with 35 R/day until death to determine the amount of radiation-induced injury remaining in conditioned animals as a reduction in mean survival time. Dogs (50 percent) and monkeys (8 percent) died from injury incurred during the conditioning exposures. Thus, the comparative response of dogs and monkeys to dose protraction by acute dose fractionation was similar to what might be expected from a single acute dose. Mean survival times for nonconditioned dogs and monkeys during continuous exposure at 35 R/day were the same (approximately 1400 h). Thus, hematopoietic response of the two species by this method of dose protraction was not significantly different. Mean survival times of conditioned dogs and monkeys during the continuous 35 R/day gamma-ray challenge exposure were greater than for their control counterparts. Thus, the long-term radiation-induced injury was not measurable by this method. Conditioning doses of more than four times the acute LD/sub 50/-/sub 30/ in dogs and approximately two times that of monkeys served only to increase both mean survival time and variance in a gamma-ray stress environment with a dose rate of 35 R/day.

  4. Dose Finding of Lenvatinib in Subjects With Advanced Hepatocellular Carcinoma Based on Population Pharmacokinetic and Exposure-Response Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamai, Toshiyuki; Hayato, Seiichi; Hojo, Seiichiro; Suzuki, Takuya; Okusaka, Takuji; Ikeda, Kenji; Kumada, Hiromitsu

    2017-09-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) accounts for up to 90% of primary liver cancer occurrences worldwide. Lenvatinib, a multikinase inhibitor, was approved in radioiodine-refractory differentiated thyroid cancer. In this phase 2 study (study 202), we aimed to identify the lenvatinib optimal dose for subjects with advanced HCC Child-Pugh class A. Pooled data from phase 1 studies in healthy adults and in subjects with mixed tumor types, and from study 202 in subjects with HCC, were analyzed using a population pharmacokinetic approach. The relationship between treatment-emergent adverse events leading to withdrawal or dose reduction during cycle 1 and lenvatinib exposure was explored by logistic regression analysis. A receiver operating characteristics analysis was used to investigate the best cutoff values of lenvatinib exposure and body weight to identify a high-risk group for early dose modification. The final pharmacokinetic model included body-weight effects on apparent clearance and volume. The relationship between the lenvatinib area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) at steady state and body weight demonstrated an increase in AUC as body weight decreased in subjects with HCC. An exposure-response relationship was observed, with higher lenvatinib AUC and lower body weight resulting in earlier drug withdrawal or dose reduction. The best cutoff values for body weight and lenvatinib AUC were 57.8 kg and 2430 ng·h/mL, respectively, to predict the group at high risk for early drug withdrawal or dose reduction. We therefore recommend 12-mg and 8-mg starting doses for subjects ≥60 kg and <60 kg, respectively, in subjects with HCC Child-Pugh class A. © 2017, The Authors. The Journal of Clinical Pharmacology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  5. Dose reduction and cost-benefit analysis at Japan`s Tokai No. 2 Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humamoto, Hisao; Suzuki, Seishiro; Taniguchi, Kazufumi [Japan Atomic Power Co., Otemachi (Japan)

    1995-03-01

    In the Tokai No. 2 power plant of the Japan Atomic Power Company, about 80% of the annual dose equivalent is received during periodic maintenance outages. A project group for dose reduction was organized at the company`s headquarters in 1986; in 1988, they proposed a five-year program to reduce by half the collective dose of 4 person-Sv per normal outage work. To achieve the target dose value, some dose-reduction measures were undertaken, namely, permanent radiation shielding, decontamination, automatic, operating machines, and ALARA organization. As the result, the collective dose from normal outage work was 1.6 person-Sv in 1992, which was less than the initial target value.

  6. Gamma-H2AX-based dose estimation for whole and partial body radiation exposure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Horn

    Full Text Available Most human exposures to ionising radiation are partial body exposures. However, to date only limited tools are available for rapid and accurate estimation of the dose distribution and the extent of the body spared from the exposure. These parameters are of great importance for emergency triage and clinical management of exposed individuals. Here, measurements of γ-H2AX immunofluorescence by microscopy and flow cytometry were compared as rapid biodosimetric tools for whole and partial body exposures. Ex vivo uniformly X-irradiated blood lymphocytes from one donor were used to generate a universal biexponential calibration function for γ-H2AX foci/intensity yields per unit dose for time points up to 96 hours post exposure. Foci--but not intensity--levels remained significantly above background for 96 hours for doses of 0.5 Gy or more. Foci-based dose estimates for ex vivo X-irradiated blood samples from 13 volunteers were in excellent agreement with the actual dose delivered to the targeted samples. Flow cytometric dose estimates for X-irradiated blood samples from 8 volunteers were in excellent agreement with the actual dose delivered at 1 hour post exposure but less so at 24 hours post exposure. In partial body exposures, simulated by mixing ex vivo irradiated and unirradiated lymphocytes, foci/intensity distributions were significantly over-dispersed compared to uniformly irradiated lymphocytes. For both methods and in all cases the estimated fraction of irradiated lymphocytes and dose to that fraction, calculated using the zero contaminated Poisson test and γ-H2AX calibration function, were in good agreement with the actual mixing ratios and doses delivered to the samples. In conclusion, γ-H2AX analysis of irradiated lymphocytes enables rapid and accurate assessment of whole body doses while dispersion analysis of foci or intensity distributions helps determine partial body doses and the irradiated fraction size in cases of partial body

  7. Scatter radiation breast exposure during head CT: impact of scanning conditions and anthropometric parameters on shielded and unshielded breast dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klasic, B. [Hospital for pulmonary diseases, Zagreb (Croatia); Knezevic, Z.; Vekic, B. [Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Zagreb (Croatia); Brnic, Z.; Novacic, K. [Merkur Univ. Hospital, Zagreb (Croatia)

    2006-07-01

    Constantly increasing clinical requests for CT scanning of the head on our facility continue to raise concern regarding radiation exposure of patients, especially radiosensitive tissues positioned close to the scanning plane. The aim of our prospective study was to estimate scatter radiation doses to the breast from routine head CT scans, both with and without use of lead shielding, and to establish influence of various technical and anthropometric factors on doses using statistical data analysis. In 85 patient referred to head CT for objective medical reasons, one breast was covered with lead apron during CT scanning. Radiation doses were measured at skin of both breasts and over the apron simultaneously, by the use of thermo luminescent dosimeters. The doses showed a mean reduction by 37% due to lead shielding. After we statistically analyzed our data, we observed significant correlation between under-the-shield dose and values of technical parameters. We used multiple linear regression model to describe the relationships of doses to unshielded and shielded breast respectively, with anthropometric and technical factors. Our study proved lead shielding of the breast to be effective, easy to use and leading to a significant reduction in scatter dose. (author)

  8. High dose alcohol consumption predicts less reduction in post-traumatic stress symptoms after a campus mass shooting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzman, Jacob B; Valentiner, David P; Hannan, Susan M; Wallace, Douglas G; Orcutt, Holly K

    2017-11-01

    Recognizing that alcohol might affect subsequent processing of trauma-related information, this study examined whether high dose alcohol consumption (HDAC) following a campus mass shooting affected the relation between shooting exposure and post-traumatic stress symptoms (PTSS). Female participants (N = 691) recorded levels of physical exposure to the shooting event, alcohol use, and PTSS 1 month following the shooting event and 8 months later. No evidence was found to suggest that pre-shooting HDAC moderated the relationship between trauma exposure and PTSS 1 month following the shooting. HDAC in the month following the shooting predicted less resolution of PTSS 8 months later. Specifically, at higher (but not lower) levels of HDAC, shooting exposure was associated with less reduction in PTSS from 1 to 8 months post-trauma. Several alternate explanations were ruled out. Less reduction in PTSS seems to occur at high levels of both shooting exposure and HDAC. Theoretical implications and directions for future research are discussed.

  9. Effect of postnatal low-dose exposure to environmental chemicals on the gut microbiome in a rodent model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jianzhong; Raikhel, Vincent; Gopalakrishnan, Kalpana; Fernandez-Hernandez, Heriberto; Lambertini, Luca; Manservisi, Fabiana; Falcioni, Laura; Bua, Luciano; Belpoggi, Fiorella; L Teitelbaum, Susan; Chen, Jia

    2016-06-14

    This proof-of-principle study examines whether postnatal, low-dose exposure to environmental chemicals modifies the composition of gut microbiome. Three chemicals that are widely used in personal care products-diethyl phthalate (DEP), methylparaben (MPB), triclosan (TCS)-and their mixture (MIX) were administered at doses comparable to human exposure to Sprague-Dawley rats from birth through adulthood. Fecal samples were collected at two time points: postnatal day (PND) 62 (adolescence) and PND 181 (adulthood). The gut microbiome was profiled by 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing, taxonomically assigned and assessed for diversity. Metagenomic profiling revealed that the low-dose chemical exposure resulted in significant changes in the overall bacterial composition, but in adolescent rats only. Specifically, the individual taxon relative abundance for Bacteroidetes (Prevotella) was increased while the relative abundance of Firmicutes (Bacilli) was reduced in all treated rats compared to controls. Increased abundance was observed for Elusimicrobia in DEP and MPB groups, Betaproteobacteria in MPB and MIX groups, and Deltaproteobacteria in TCS group. Surprisingly, these differences diminished by adulthood (PND 181) despite continuous exposure, suggesting that exposure to the environmental chemicals produced a more profound effect on the gut microbiome in adolescents. We also observed a small but consistent reduction in the bodyweight of exposed rats in adolescence, especially with DEP and MPB treatment (p gut microbiota in adolescent rats; whether these changes lead to downstream health effects requires further investigation.

  10. Dose reduction in spiral CT angiography of thoracic outlet syndrome by anatomically adapted tube current modulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mastora, I.; Remy-Jardin, M.; Remy, J. [Dept. of Radiology, University Center Hospital Calmette, Lille (France); Medical Research Group, Lille (France); Suess, C.; Scherf, C. [Siemens Medical Systems, Forcheim (Germany); Guillot, J.P. [Dept. of Radiology, University Center Hospital Calmette, Lille (France)

    2001-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate dose reduction in spiral CT angiography of the thoracic outlet by on-line tube-current control. Prospectively, 114 patients undergoing spiral CT angiography of the subclavian artery for thoracic outlet arterial syndromes were evaluated with and without tube-current modulation at the same session (scanning parameters for the two successive angiograms, one in the neutral position and one after the postural maneuver): 140 kV; 206 mA; scan time 0.75 s; collimation 3 mm; pitch = (1). The dose reduction system was applied in the neutral position in the first 92 consecutive patients and after postural maneuver in the remaining 22 consecutive patients. Dose reduction and image quality were analyzed in the overall study group (group 1; n = 114). The influence of the arm position was assessed in 44 of the 114 patients (group 2), matched by the transverse diameter of the upper thorax. The mean dose reduction was 33 % in group 1 (range 22-40 %) and 34 % in group 2 (range 26-40 %). In group 2 the only difference in image quality was a significantly higher frequency of graininess on low-dose scans compared with reference scans whatever the patient's arm position, graded as minimal in 38 of the 44 patients (86 %). When the low-dose technique was applied after postural maneuver in group 2: (a) the mean dose reduction was significantly higher (35 vs 32 % in the neutral position; p = 0.006); (b) graininess was less frequent (82 vs 91 % in the neutral position); and (c) the percentage of graininess graded as minimal was significantly higher (83 vs 70 % in the neutral position; p = 0.2027). On-line tube-current modulation enables dose reduction on high-quality, diagnostic spiral CT angiograms of the thoracic outlet and should be applied during data acquisition in the neutral position and after postural maneuver for optimal use. (orig.)

  11. Dose Response for Chromosome Aberrations in Human Lymphocytes and Fibroblasts After Exposure to Very Low Dose of High Let Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hada, M.; George, K.; Chappell, L.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between biological effects and low doses of absorbed radiation is still uncertain, especially for high LET radiation exposure. Estimates of risks from low-dose and low-dose-rates are often extrapolated using data from Japanese atomic bomb survivor with either linear or linear quadratic models of fit. In this study, chromosome aberrations were measured in human peripheral blood lymphocytes and normal skin fibroblasts cells after exposure to very low dose (0.01 - 0.20 Gy) of 170 MeV/u Si-28 ions or 600 MeV/u Fe-56 ions, including doses where on average less than one direct ion traversal per cell nucleus occurs. Chromosomes were analyzed using the whole-chromosome fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique during the first cell division after irradiation, and chromosome aberrations were identified as either simple exchanges (translocations and dicentrics) or complex exchanges (involving >2 breaks in 2 or more chromosomes). The responses for doses above 0.1 Gy (more than one ion traverses a cell) showed linear dose responses. However, for doses less than 0.1 Gy, both Si-28 ions and Fe-56 ions showed a dose independent response above background chromosome aberrations frequencies. Possible explanations for our results are non-targeted effects due to aberrant cell signaling [1], or delta-ray dose fluctuations [2] where a fraction of cells receive significant delta-ray doses due to the contributions of multiple ion tracks that do not directly traverse cell nuclei where chromosome aberrations are scored.

  12. Patient Outcomes in Dose Reduction or Discontinuation of Long-Term Opioid Therapy: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Joseph W; Lovejoy, Travis I; Becker, William C; Morasco, Benjamin J; Koenig, Christopher J; Hoffecker, Lilian; Dischinger, Hannah R; Dobscha, Steven K; Krebs, Erin E

    2017-08-01

    Expert guidelines recommend reducing or discontinuing long-term opioid therapy (LTOT) when risks outweigh benefits, but evidence on the effect of dose reduction on patient outcomes has not been systematically reviewed. To synthesize studies of the effectiveness of strategies to reduce or discontinue LTOT and patient outcomes after dose reduction among adults prescribed LTOT for chronic pain. MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and the Cochrane Library from inception through April 2017; reference lists; and expert contacts. Original research published in English that addressed dose reduction or discontinuation of LTOT for chronic pain. Two independent reviewers extracted data and assessed study quality using the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force quality rating criteria. All authors assessed evidence quality using the GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation) system. Prespecified patient outcomes were pain severity, function, quality of life, opioid withdrawal symptoms, substance use, and adverse events. Sixty-seven studies (11 randomized trials and 56 observational studies) examining 8 intervention categories, including interdisciplinary pain programs, buprenorphine-assisted dose reduction, and behavioral interventions, were found. Study quality was good for 3 studies, fair for 13 studies, and poor for 51 studies. Many studies reported dose reduction, but rates of opioid discontinuation ranged widely across interventions and the overall quality of evidence was very low. Among 40 studies examining patient outcomes after dose reduction (very low overall quality of evidence), improvement was reported in pain severity (8 of 8 fair-quality studies), function (5 of 5 fair-quality studies), and quality of life (3 of 3 fair-quality studies). Heterogeneous interventions and outcome measures; poor-quality studies with uncontrolled designs. Very low quality evidence suggests that several types of interventions may be effective to reduce or

  13. Evaluation of contrast dose reduction for excretory urography using computed radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strautman, P.R.; Fajardo, L.L.; Hillman, B.J.; Yoshino, M.T.; Boyle, R.R. Jr.; Fritz, H.; Mockbee, W.B.

    1989-02-01

    Sixty sequential patients were randomly assigned to undergo computed urography with either our full (282 mg I/kg body weight) or half our usual dose (141 mg I/kg body weight) of intraveneous 60% diatrizoate meglumine. Three blinded observers judged automatically post-processed full dose tomograms and KUBs as qualitatively superior to both automatically post-processed and individually, interactively post-processed half dose images. Thus, post-acquisition image manipulation could not fully compensate for diminished image quality due to contrast dose reduction. (orig./HP).

  14. Radiation dose reduction for chest CT with non-linear adaptive filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sarabjeet; Digumarthy, Subba R; Back, Anni; Shepard, Jo-anne O; Kalra, Mannudeep K

    2013-03-01

    CT radiation dose reduction results in increased noise or graininess of images which affects the diagnostic information. One of the approaches to lower radiation exposure to patients is to reduce image noise with the use of image processing software in low radiation dose images. To assess image quality and accuracy of non-linear adaptive filters (NLAF) at low dose chest CT. In an IRB approved prospective study, 24 patients (mean age, 63 ± 7.3 years; M:F ratio, 11:13) gave informed consent for acquisition of four additional chest CT image series at 150, 110, 75, and 40 mAs (baseline image series) on a 64-slice MDCT over an identical 10-cm length. NLAF was used to process three low dose (110, 75, and 40 mAs) image series (postprocessed image series). Two radiologists reviewed baseline and postprocessed images in a blinded manner for image quality. Objective noise, CT attenuation values, patient weight, transverse diameters, CTDIvol, and DLP were recorded. Statistical analysis was performed using parametric and non-parametric tests for comparing postprocessed and baseline images. No lesions were missed on baseline or postprocessed CT images (n = 80 lesions, 73 lesions hardening artifacts not affecting diagnostic decision-making (14/22) in both baseline and postprocessed image series. Diagnostic confidence for chest CT was improved to fully confident in postprocessed images at 40 mAs. Compared to baseline images, postprocessing reduced objective noise by 26% (14.2 ± 4.7/19.2 ± 6.4), 31.5% (15.2 ± 4.7/22.2 ± 5.7), and 41.5% (16.9 ± 6/28.9 ± 10.2) at 110 mAs, 75 mAs, and 40 mAs tube current-time product levels. Applications of NLAF can help reduce tube current down to 40 mAs for chest CT while maintaining lesion conspicuity and image quality.

  15. Dose and dose rate extrapolation factors for malignant and non-malignant health endpoints after exposure to gamma and neutron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tran, Van; Little, Mark P. [National Cancer Institute, Radiation Epidemiology Branch, Rockville, MD (United States)

    2017-11-15

    non-malignant, show downward curvature in the dose response, and for most endpoints this is statistically significant (p < 0.05). Associated with this, the low-dose extrapolation factor associated with neutron exposure is generally statistically significantly less than 1 for most malignant and non-malignant endpoints, with central estimates mostly in the range 0.1-0.9. In contrast to the situation at higher dose rates, there are statistically non-significant decreases of risk per unit dose at gamma dose rates of less than or equal to 5 mGy/h for most malignant endpoints, and generally non-significant increases in risk per unit dose at gamma dose rates ≤5 mGy/h for most non-malignant endpoints. Associated with this, the dose-rate extrapolation factor, the ratio of high dose-rate to low dose-rate (≤5 mGy/h) gamma dose response slopes, for many tumour sites is in the range 1.2-2.3, albeit not statistically significantly elevated from 1, while for most non-malignant endpoints the gamma dose-rate extrapolation factor is less than 1, with most estimates in the range 0.2-0.8. After neutron exposure there are non-significant indications of lower risk per unit dose at dose rates ≤5 mGy/h compared to higher dose rates for most malignant endpoints, and for all tumours (p = 0.001), and respiratory tumours (p = 0.007) this reduction is conventionally statistically significant; for most non-malignant outcomes risks per unit dose non-significantly increase at lower dose rates. Associated with this, the neutron dose-rate extrapolation factor is less than 1 for most malignant and non-malignant endpoints, in many cases statistically significantly so, with central estimates mostly in the range 0.0-0.2. (orig.)

  16. Determination of the optimal dose reduction level via iterative reconstruction using 640-slice volume chest CT in a pig model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingli Liu

    Full Text Available To determine the optimal dose reduction level of iterative reconstruction technique for paediatric chest CT in pig models.27 infant pigs underwent 640-slice volume chest CT with 80kVp and different mAs. Automatic exposure control technique was used, and the index of noise was set to SD10 (Group A, routine dose, SD12.5, SD15, SD17.5, SD20 (Groups from B to E to reduce dose respectively. Group A was reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP, and Groups from B to E were reconstructed using iterative reconstruction (IR. Objective and subjective image quality (IQ among groups were compared to determine an optimal radiation reduction level.The noise and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR in Group D had no significant statistical difference from that in Group A (P = 1.0. The scores of subjective IQ in Group A were not significantly different from those in Group D (P>0.05. There were no obvious statistical differences in the objective and subjective index values among the subgroups (small, medium and large subgroups of Group D. The effective dose (ED of Group D was 58.9% lower than that of Group A (0.20±0.05mSv vs 0.48±0.10mSv, p <0.001.In infant pig chest CT, using iterative reconstruction can provide diagnostic image quality; furthermore, it can reduce the dosage by 58.9%.

  17. Dose Response for Chromosome Aberrations in Human Lymphocytes and Fibroblasts after Exposure to Very Low Doses of High LET Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hada, M.; George, Kerry; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between biological effects and low doses of absorbed radiation is still uncertain, especially for high LET radiation exposure. Estimates of risks from low-dose and low-dose-rates are often extrapolated using data from Japanese atomic bomb survivors with either linear or linear quadratic models of fit. In this study, chromosome aberrations were measured in human peripheral blood lymphocytes and normal skin fibroblasts cells after exposure to very low dose (1-20 cGy) of 170 MeV/u Si-28- ions or 600 MeV/u Fe-56-ions. Chromosomes were analyzed using the whole chromosome fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique during the first cell division after irradiation, and chromosome aberrations were identified as either simple exchanges (translocations and dicentrics) or complex exchanges (involving greater than 2 breaks in 2 or more chromosomes). The curves for doses above 10 cGy were fitted with linear or linear-quadratic functions. For Si-28- ions no dose response was observed in the 2-10 cGy dose range, suggesting a non-target effect in this range.

  18. Dose-time-response association between occupational asbestos exposure and pleural mesothelioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacourt, Aude; Lévêque, Emilie; Guichard, Elie; Gilg Soit Ilg, Anabelle; Sylvestre, Marie-Pierre; Leffondré, Karen

    2017-09-01

    Early occupational exposure to asbestos has been shown to be associated with an increased risk of pleural mesothelioma (PM), which suggests that the timing of exposure might play a role in the dose-response relationship. However, none studies has evaluated the relative impact of increasing the annual intensity of occupational exposure to asbestos at each time of the whole exposure history. Yet such evaluation would allow the comparison of the risks of PM associated with different longitudinal profiles of occupational exposure to asbestos. Our objective was to estimate the time-dependent relative impact of asbestos exposure intensity over the whole occupational history and to compare the resulting estimated risks of PM associated with different profiles of exposure, using data from a large French case-control study. This study included 1196 male cases recruited in 1987-2006 and 2369 matched controls on birth year. Occupational exposure to asbestos was assessed using a job exposure matrix and represented in logistic regression models using a flexible weighted cumulative index of exposure. Due to much stronger weights of early doses of asbestos exposure, subjects who accumulated 20 fibres/mL over their entire job history with high doses during the first years and low doses thereafter were at higher risk of PM than those who accumulated most of the doses later (OR=2.37 (95% CI 2.01 to 2.87)). This study provides new insights on the dose-time-response relationship between occupational asbestos and PM and illustrates the importance of considering timing of exposure in its association with cancer risk. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  19. Relative Pesticide and Exposure Route Contribution to Aggregate and Cumulative Dose in Young Farmworker Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asa Bradman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Child-Specific Aggregate Cumulative Human Exposure and Dose (CACHED framework integrates micro-level activity time series with mechanistic exposure equations, environmental concentration distributions, and physiologically-based pharmacokinetic components to estimate exposure for multiple routes and chemicals. CACHED was utilized to quantify cumulative and aggregate exposure and dose estimates for a population of young farmworker children and to evaluate the model for chlorpyrifos and diazinon. Micro-activities of farmworker children collected concurrently with residential measurements of pesticides were used in the CACHED framework to simulate 115,000 exposure scenarios and quantify cumulative and aggregate exposure and dose estimates. Modeled metabolite urine concentrations were not statistically different than concentrations measured in the urine of children, indicating that CACHED can provide realistic biomarker estimates. Analysis of the relative contribution of exposure route and pesticide indicates that in general, chlorpyrifos non-dietary ingestion exposure accounts for the largest dose, confirming the importance of the micro-activity approach. The risk metrics computed from the 115,000 simulations, indicate that greater than 95% of these scenarios might pose a risk to children’s health from aggregate chlorpyrifos exposure. The variability observed in the route and pesticide contributions to urine biomarker levels demonstrate the importance of accounting for aggregate and cumulative exposure in establishing pesticide residue tolerances in food.

  20. Major cost savings associated with biologic dose reduction in patients with inflammatory arthritis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, C L

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore whether patients with Inflammatory Arthritis (IA) (Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA), Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA) or Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS)) would remain in remission following a reduction in biologic dosing frequency and to calculate the cost savings associated with dose reduction. This prospective non-blinded non-randomised study commenced in 2010. Patients with Inflammatory Arthritis being treated with a biologic agent were screened for disease activity. A cohort of those in remission according to standardized disease activity indices (DAS28 < 2.6, BASDAI < 4) was offered a reduction in dosing frequency of two commonly used biologic therapies (etanercept 50 mg once per fortnight instead of weekly, adalimumab 40 mg once per month instead of fortnightly). Patients were assessed for disease activity at 3, 6, 12, 18 and 24 months following reduction in dosing frequency. Cost saving was calculated. 79 patients with inflammatory arthritis in remission were recruited. 57% had rheumatoid arthritis (n = 45), 13% psoriatic arthritis (n = 10) and 30% ankylosing spondylitis (n = 24). 57% (n = 45) were taking etanercept and 43% (n = 34) adalimumab. The percentage of patients in remission at 24 months was 56% (n = 44). This resulted in an actual saving to the state of approximately 600,000 euro over two years. This study demonstrates the reduction in biologic dosing frequency is feasible in Inflammatory Arthritis. There was a considerable cost saving at two years. The potential for major cost savings in biologic usage should be pursued further.

  1. Effects of a radiation dose reduction strategy for computed tomography in severely injured trauma patients in the emergency department: an observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Soo Hyun

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Severely injured trauma patients are exposed to clinically significant radiation doses from computed tomography (CT imaging in the emergency department. Moreover, this radiation exposure is associated with an increased risk of cancer. The purpose of this study was to determine some effects of a radiation dose reduction strategy for CT in severely injured trauma patients in the emergency department. Methods We implemented the radiation dose reduction strategy in May 2009. A prospective observational study design was used to collect data from patients who met the inclusion criteria during this one year study (intervention group from May 2009 to April 2010. The prospective data were compared with data collected retrospectively for one year prior to the implementation of the radiation dose reduction strategy (control group. By comparison of the cumulative effective dose and the number of CT examinations in the two groups, we evaluated effects of a radiation dose reduction strategy. All the patients met the institutional adult trauma team activation criteria. The radiation doses calculated by the CT scanner were converted to effective doses by multiplication by a conversion coefficient. Results A total of 118 patients were included in this study. Among them, 33 were admitted before May 2009 (control group, and 85 were admitted after May 2009 (intervention group. There were no significant differences between the two groups regarding baseline characteristics, such as injury severity and mortality. Additionally, there was no difference between the two groups in the mean number of total CT examinations per patient (4.8 vs. 4.5, respectively; p = 0.227. However, the mean effective dose of the total CT examinations per patient significantly decreased from 78.71 mSv to 29.50 mSv (p Conclusions The radiation dose reduction strategy for CT in severely injured trauma patients effectively decreased the cumulative effective dose of the total

  2. Assessment of human exposure doses received by activation of medical linear accelerator components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, D.-Y.; Kim, J.-H.; Park, E.-T.

    2017-08-01

    This study analyzes the radiation exposure dose that an operator can receive from radioactive components during maintenance or repair of a linear accelerator. This study further aims to evaluate radiological safety. Simulations are performed on 10 MV and 15 MV photon beams, which are the most frequently used high-energy beams in clinics. The simulation analyzes components in order of activity and the human exposure dose based on the amount of neutrons received. As a result, the neutron dose, radiation dose, and human exposure dose are ranked in order of target, primary collimator, flattening filter, multi-leaf collimator, and secondary collimator, where the minimum dose is 9.34E-07 mSv/h and the maximum is 1.71E-02 mSv/h. When applying the general dose limit (radiation worker 20 mSv/year, pubic 1 mSv/year) in accordance with the Nuclear Safety Act, all components of a linear accelerator are evaluated as below the threshold value. Therefore, the results suggest that there is no serious safety issue for operators in maintaining and repairing a linear accelerator. Nevertheless, if an operator recognizes an exposure from the components of a linear accelerator during operation and considers the operating time and shielding against external exposure, exposure of the operator is expected to be minimized.

  3. A study on the indirect urea dosing method in the Selective Catalytic Reduction system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzeżański, M.; Sala, R.

    2016-09-01

    This article presents the results of studies on concept solution of dosing urea in a gas phase in a selective catalytic reduction system. The idea of the concept was to heat-up and evaporate the water urea solution before introducing it into the exhaust gas stream. The aim was to enhance the processes of urea converting into ammonia, what is the target reductant for nitrogen oxides treatment. The study was conducted on a medium-duty Euro 5 diesel engine with exhaust line consisting of DOC catalyst, DPF filter and an SCR system with a changeable setup allowing to dose the urea in liquid phase (regular solution) and to dose it in a gas phase (concept solution). The main criteria was to assess the effect of physical state of urea dosed on the NOx conversion ratio in the SCR catalyst. In order to compare both urea dosing methods a special test procedure was developed which consisted of six test steps covering a wide temperature range of exhaust gas generated at steady state engine operation condition. Tests were conducted for different urea dosing quantities defined by the a equivalence ratio. Based on the obtained results, a remarkable improvement in NOx reduction was found for gas urea application in comparison to the standard liquid urea dosing. Measured results indicate a high potential to increase an efficiency of the SCR catalyst by using a gas phase urea and provide the basis for further scientific research on this type of concept.

  4. A comparative analysis of exposure doses between the radiation workers in dental and general hospital

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Nam Hee; Chung, Woon Kwan; Dong, Kyung Rae; Ju, Yong Jin; Song, Ha Jin [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Eun Jin [Dept. of Public Health and Medicine, Dongshin University, Naju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    Research and investigation is required for the exposure dose of radiation workers to work in the dental hospital as increasing interest in exposure dose of the dental hospital recently accordingly, study aim to minimize radiation exposure by making a follow-up study of individual exposure doses of radiation workers, analyzing the status on individual radiation exposure management, prediction the radiation disability risk levels by radiation, and alerting the workers to the danger of radiation exposure. Especially given the changes in the dental hospital radiation safety awareness conducted the study in order to minimize radiation exposure. This study performed analyses by a comparison between general and dental hospital, comparing each occupation, with the 116,220 exposure dose data by quarter and year of 5,811 subjects at general and dental hospital across South Korea from January 1, 2008 through December 31, 2012. The following are the results obtained by analyzing average values year and quarter. In term of hospital, average doses were significantly higher in general hospitals than detal ones. In terms of job, average doses were higher in radiological technologists the other workers. Especially, they showed statistically significant differences between radiological technologists than dentists. The above-mentioned results indicate that radiation workers were exposed to radiation for the past 5 years to the extent not exceeding the dose limit (maximum 50 mSv y{sup -1}). The limitation of this study is that radiation workers before 2008 were excluded from the study. Objective evaluation standards did not apply to the work circumstance or condition of each hospital. Therefore, it is deemed necessary to work out analysis criteria that will be used as objective evaluation standard. It will be necessary to study radiation exposure in more precise ways on the basis of objective analysis standard in the future. Should try to minimize the radiation individual dose of

  5. Organ and effective dose reduction for region-of-interest (ROI) CBCT and fluoroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Zhenyu; Vijayan, Sarath; Rudin, Stephen; Bednarek, Daniel R.

    2017-03-01

    In some medical-imaging procedures using CBCT and fluoroscopy, it may be needed to visualize only the center of the field-of-view with optimal quality. To reduce the dose to the patient as well as enable increased contrast in the region of interest (ROI) during CBCT and fluoroscopy procedures, a 0.7 mm thick Cu ROI attenuator with a circular aperture 12% of the FOV was used. The aim of this study was to quantify the dose-reduction benefit of ROI imaging during a typical CBCT and interventional fluoroscopy procedures in the head and torso. The Toshiba Infinix C-Arm System was modeled in BEAMnrc/EGSnrc with and without the ROI attenuator. Patient organ and effective doses were calculated in DOSXYZnrc/EGSnrc Monte-Carlo software for CBCT and interventional procedures. We first compared the entrance dose with and without the ROI attenuator on a 20 cm thick solid-water block. Then we simulated a CBCT scan and an interventional fluoroscopy procedure on the head and torso with and without an ROI attenuator. The results showed that the entrance-surface dose reduction in the solid water is about 85.7% outside the ROI opening and 10.5% in the ROI opening. The results showed a reduction in most organ doses of 45%-70% and in effective dose of 46%-66% compared to the dose in a CBCT scan and in an interventional procedure without the ROI attenuator. This work provides evidence of substantial reduction of organ and effective doses when using an ROI attenuator during CBCT and fluoroscopic procedures.

  6. Reduction of radiation dose in adult CT-guided musculoskeletal procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rawson C

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We examine the effect of manually reducing CT scanner tube voltage (kVp and current (mA on patient radiation dose and procedural success during CT-guided musculoskeletal procedures on adults. We hypothesize that patient radiation dose can be reduced while maintaining procedural success. Materials and methods: This project was performed as an operational test of change. Scanner kVp and mA were manually reduced during CT-guided musculoskeletal procedures over a 6-month period (n = 20. Bilateral cases served as their own controls. The remaining control cases were obtained by retrospective review of our picture archiving and communication system. Default scanner voltage and current were recorded for all dose reduced cases. Using an experimentally derived formula, we calculated what the total exam DLP would have been had the default settings been used. In addition, a 32 cm acrylic body phantom was scanned using the recorded default and reduced settings for the dose reduced cases. Results: Radiation dose reduction for all procedures vs. control cases was statistically significant at 68% (p < 0.001. Average dose reduction for all procedures vs. calculated normal dose was statistically significant at 69% (p < 0.001. Average radiation dose for all cases using phantom scans was statistically significant at 72% (p < 0.001. All procedures were successful. Conclusion: Our study shows that significant reduction in radiation dose without reduction in procedural accuracy can be achieved by simply lowering the CT scanner voltage and current from their default settings.

  7. Novel X-ray imaging technology enables significant patient dose reduction in interventional cardiology while maintaining diagnostic image quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eloot, Liesbeth; Thierens, Hubert; Taeymans, Yves; Drieghe, Benny; De Pooter, Jan; Van Peteghem, Sylvie; Buytaert, Dimitri; Gijs, Thomas; Lapere, Régine; Bacher, Klaus

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the reduction in patient radiation dose during coronary angiography (CA) by a new X-ray technology, and to assess its impact on diagnostic image quality. Recently, a novel X-ray imaging technology has become available for interventional cardiology, using advanced image processing and an optimized acquisition chain for radiation dose reduction. 70 adult patients were randomly assigned to a reference X-ray system or the novel X-ray system. Patient demographics were registered and exposure parameters were recorded for each radiation event. Clinical image quality was assessed for both patient groups. With the same angiographic technique and a comparable patient population, the new imaging technology was associated with a 75% reduction in total kerma-area product (KAP) value (decrease from 47 Gycm2 to 12 Gycm2, Pimage quality showed an equivalent detail and contrast for both imaging systems. On the other hand, the subjective appreciation of noise was more apparent in images of the new image processing system, acquired at lower doses, compared to the reference system. However, the higher noise content did not affect the overall image quality score, which was adequate for diagnosis in both systems. For the first time, we present a new X-ray imaging technology, combining advanced noise reduction algorithms and an optimized acquisition chain, which reduces patient radiation dose in CA drastically (75%), while maintaining diagnostic image quality. Use of this technology may further improve the radiation safety of cardiac angiography and interventions. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Radiation dose reduction strategy for CT protocols: successful implementation in neuroradiology section.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Alice B; Dillon, William P; Lau, Benison C; Gould, Robert; Verdun, Francis R; Lopez, Edward B; Wintermark, Max

    2008-05-01

    To retrospectively quantify the effect of systematic use of tube current modulation for neuroradiology computed tomographic (CT) protocols on patient dose and image quality. This HIPAA-compliant study had institutional review board approval, with waiver of informed consent. The authors evaluated the effect of dose modulation on four types of neuroradiologic CT studies: brain CT performed without contrast material (unenhanced CT) in adult patients, unenhanced brain CT in pediatric patients, adult cervical spine CT, and adult cervical and intracranial CT angiography. For each type of CT study, three series of 100 consecutive studies were reviewed: 100 studies performed without dose modulation, 100 studies performed with z-axis dose modulation, and 100 studies performed with x-y-z-axis dose modulation. For each examination, the weighted volume CT dose index (CTDI(vol)) and dose-length product (DLP) were recorded and noise was measured. Each study was also reviewed for image quality. Continuous variables (CTDI(vol), DLP, noise) were compared by using t tests, and categorical variables (image quality) were compared by using Wilcoxon rank-sum tests. For unenhanced CT of adult brains, the CTDI(vol) and DLP, respectively, were reduced by 60.9% and 60.3%, respectively, by using z-axis dose modulation and by 50.4% and 22.4% by using x-y-z-axis dose modulation. Significant dose reductions (P .05). Use of dose-modulation techniques for neuroradiology CT examinations affords significant dose reduction while image quality is maintained. (c) RSNA, 2008.

  9. SU-D-209-03: Radiation Dose Reduction Using Real-Time Image Processing in Interventional Radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanal, K; Moirano, J; Zamora, D; Stewart, B [University Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To characterize changes in radiation dose after introducing a new real-time image processing technology in interventional radiology systems. Methods: Interventional radiology (IR) procedures are increasingly complex, at times requiring substantial time and radiation dose. The risk of inducing tissue reactions as well as long-term stochastic effects such as radiation-induced cancer is not trivial. To reduce this risk, IR systems are increasingly equipped with dose reduction technologies.Recently, ClarityIQ (Philips Healthcare) technology was installed in our existing neuroradiology IR (NIR) and vascular IR (VIR) suites respectively. ClarityIQ includes real-time image processing that reduces noise/artifacts, enhances images, and sharpens edges while also reducing radiation dose rates. We reviewed 412 NIR (175 pre- and 237 post-ClarityIQ) procedures and 329 VIR (156 preand 173 post-ClarityIQ) procedures performed at our institution pre- and post-ClarityIQ implementation. NIR procedures were primarily classified as interventional or diagnostic. VIR procedures included drain port, drain placement, tube change, mesenteric, and implanted venous procedures. Air Kerma (AK in units of mGy) was documented for all the cases using a commercial radiation exposure management system. Results: When considering all NIR procedures, median AK decreased from 1194 mGy to 561 mGy. When considering all VIR procedures, median AK decreased from 49 to 14 mGy. Both NIR and VIR exhibited a decrease in AK exceeding 50% after ClarityIQ implementation, a statistically significant (p<0.05) difference. Of the 5 most common VIR procedures, all median AK values decreased, but significance (p<0.05) was only reached in venous access (N=53), angio mesenteric (N=41), and drain placement procedures (N=31). Conclusion: ClarityIQ can reduce dose significantly for both NIR and VIR procedures. Image quality was not assessed in conjunction with the dose reduction.

  10. Iterative reconstruction techniques for computed tomography part 2: initial results in dose reduction and image quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willemink, Martin J.; Leiner, Tim; Jong, Pim A. de; Nievelstein, Rutger A.J.; Schilham, Arnold M.R. [Utrecht University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Heer, Linda M. de [Cardiothoracic Surgery, Utrecht (Netherlands); Budde, Ricardo P.J. [Utrecht University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Gelre Hospital, Department of Radiology, Apeldoorn (Netherlands)

    2013-06-15

    To present the results of a systematic literature search aimed at determining to what extent the radiation dose can be reduced with iterative reconstruction (IR) for cardiopulmonary and body imaging with computed tomography (CT) in the clinical setting and what the effects on image quality are with IR versus filtered back-projection (FBP) and to provide recommendations for future research on IR. We searched Medline and Embase from January 2006 to January 2012 and included original research papers concerning IR for CT. The systematic search yielded 380 articles. Forty-nine relevant studies were included. These studies concerned: the chest(n = 26), abdomen(n = 16), both chest and abdomen(n = 1), head(n = 4), spine(n = 1), and no specific area (n = 1). IR reduced noise and artefacts, and it improved subjective and objective image quality compared to FBP at the same dose. Conversely, low-dose IR and normal-dose FBP showed similar noise, artefacts, and subjective and objective image quality. Reported dose reductions ranged from 23 to 76 % compared to locally used default FBP settings. However, IR has not yet been investigated for ultra-low-dose acquisitions with clinical diagnosis and accuracy as endpoints. Benefits of IR include improved subjective and objective image quality as well as radiation dose reduction while preserving image quality. Future studies need to address the value of IR in ultra-low-dose CT with clinically relevant endpoints. (orig.)

  11. Double dose: High family conflict enhances the effect of media violence exposure on adolescents’ aggression

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fikkers, K.M; Piotrowski, J.T; Weeda, W.D; Vossen, H.G.M; Valkenburg, P.M

    2013-01-01

    ...’ subsequent aggressive behavior. We expected a double dose effect, meaning that high media violence exposure would lead to higher levels of aggression for adolescents in high conflict families compared to low conflict families...

  12. Dose reduction in CT using bismuth shielding: measurements and Monte Carlo simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Kyung-Hwan; Lee, Wonho; Choo, Dong-Myung; Lee, Choon-Sik; Kim, Youhyun

    2010-03-01

    In this research, using direct measurements and Monte Carlo calculations, the potential dose reduction achieved by bismuth shielding in computed tomography was evaluated. The patient dose was measured using an ionisation chamber in a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) phantom that had five measurement points at the centre and periphery. Simulations were performed using the MCNPX code. For both the bare and the bismuth-shielded phantom, the differences of dose values between experiment and simulation were within 9%. The dose reductions due to the bismuth shielding were 1.2-55% depending on the measurement points, X-ray tube voltage and the type of shielding. The amount of dose reduction was significant for the positions covered by the bismuth shielding (34 - 46% for head and 41 - 55% for body phantom on average) and negligible for other peripheral positions. The artefact on the reconstructed images were minimal when the distance between the shielding and the organs was >1 cm, and hence the shielding should be selectively located to protect critical organs such as the eye lens, thyroid and breast. The simulation results using the PMMA phantom was compared with those using a realistically voxelised phantom (KTMAN-2). For eye and breast, the simulation results using the PMMA and KTMAN-2 phantoms were similar with each other, while for thyroid the simulation results were different due to the discrepancy of locations and the sizes of the phantoms. The dose reductions achieved by bismuth and lead shielding were compared with each other and the results showed that the difference of the dose reductions achieved by the two materials was less than 2-3%.

  13. Dose reduction in CT using bismuth shielding: measurements and Monte Carlo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Kyung-Hwan; Lee, Wonho; Choo, Dong-Myung; Lee, Choon-Sik; Kim, Youhyun

    2010-01-01

    In this research, using direct measurements and Monte Carlo calculations, the potential dose reduction achieved by bismuth shielding in computed tomography was evaluated. The patient dose was measured using an ionisation chamber in a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) phantom that had five measurement points at the centre and periphery. Simulations were performed using the MCNPX code. For both the bare and the bismuth-shielded phantom, the differences of dose values between experiment and simulation were within 9 %. The dose reductions due to the bismuth shielding were 1.2–55 % depending on the measurement points, X-ray tube voltage and the type of shielding. The amount of dose reduction was significant for the positions covered by the bismuth shielding (34 − 46 % for head and 41 − 55 % for body phantom on average) and negligible for other peripheral positions. The artefact on the reconstructed images were minimal when the distance between the shielding and the organs was >1 cm, and hence the shielding should be selectively located to protect critical organs such as the eye lens, thyroid and breast. The simulation results using the PMMA phantom was compared with those using a realistically voxelised phantom (KTMAN-2). For eye and breast, the simulation results using the PMMA and KTMAN-2 phantoms were similar with each other, while for thyroid the simulation results were different due to the discrepancy of locations and the sizes of the phantoms. The dose reductions achieved by bismuth and lead shielding were compared with each other and the results showed that the difference of the dose reductions achieved by the two materials was less than 2–3 %. PMID:19959602

  14. Adverse events are rare after single-dose montelukast exposures in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Donald H; Bowman, Nena; Reiss, Theodore F; Hartert, Tina V; Seger, Donna L

    2018-01-01

    Montelukast sodium is a leukotriene-receptor antagonist approved as a controller medication for chronic asthma and allergic rhinitis in children and adults. We sought to characterize adverse events associated with single montelukast exposures in children ages 5-17 years and to determine whether adverse events were dose related for all-dose and for ultra-high-dose (≥50 mg) exposures. This is a retrospective analysis of data from the National Poison Data System for exposures that included montelukast in individuals aged 5-17 years for calendar years 2000-2016. Filters were applied to identify exposure events in which montelukast was the primary exposure and for which the exact or lowest-possible ingested dose was recorded. Characteristics of adverse events were examined using descriptive statistics and multivariable logistic models were used to examine whether associations of montelukast and adverse events were dose related. During the 17-year study period, there were 17,069 montelukast exposures available for analyses. Patients were median [interquartile range] age 7 (5, 9) years, and 10,907 (64%) male gender. Abdominal pain was the most common adverse event (0.23%). There were 618 ultra-high-dose exposures (≥50 mg). These patients had median age 6 (5, 8) years, and 347 (56%) male gender. Abdominal pain was the most common adverse event (1.46%). Increasing ingested dose was associated with abdominal pain (adjusted odds ratio, 1.01, 95% confidence interval 1.01, 1.02) after adjustment for age and gender. No serious or life-threatening events were reported. Single-dose exposures of montelukast up to 445 mg are rarely associated with any adverse events and are not associated with serious or life-threatening adverse events in children aged 5-17 years.

  15. Emergency unenhanced multi-slice computed tomography in suspected urinary calculi—with dose reduction method (care dose 4D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Nabir

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To assess urinary calculi and the secondary signs of obstruction, in patients referred from the accident and emergency department, by unenhanced computed tomography examination and to review the radiation dose the patients received with the use of automatic dose modulation technique, care dose 4D. Material and methods: Medical records of unenhanced multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT examinations for 114 patients referred to the emergency department for analysis of suspected urinary calculi were reviewed retrospectively. Their treatment involved automatic tube current modulation, a dose reduction method (care dose 4D, in Hamad General Hospital. The cases were analyzed for the presence of stones, size, site, density and the secondary signs of obstruction, namely hydronephrosis, hydroureter, perinephric fat stranding, peri-ureteric fat stranding and renal enlargement. A search for alternate diagnosis was made if no stone was found. The final diagnosis was noted from the discharge summary in medical records. The radiation dose, Computed Tomographic Dose Index volume (CTDI and Dose Length Product (DLP in each patient was recorded from patient protocol. Results: Of 114 patients referred to CT scan for suspected urinary calculi, between March and June 2008, urinary calculi were noted in 75.4 %. An alternate diagnosis was offered to 5.3 % and a diagnosis of normal was given to 19.3 %. The size of stones detected varied from 2mm-35mm. Density of stones varied from 110-1250 hounsfield units (HU. Solitary stones were seen in 54.4 % of cases observed and multiple stones in 22 %. Renal stones were observed in 6.1 % of cases, urteric stones in 26.3%, vesico-uretric junction stones in 18.4%, multiple sites in 23.7%. Hydronephrosis was seen in 68% of cases, hydroureter in 63%, perinephric fat stranding in 51%, periureteral fat stranding in 34%, ureteric rim sign in 28% and renomegaly in 24%. Time interval between onset of symptoms to imaging

  16. Radiation dose reduction: comparative assessment of publication volume between interventional and diagnostic radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansmann, Jan; Henzler, Thomas; Gaba, Ron C; Morelli, John N

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to quantify and compare awareness regarding radiation dose reduction within the interventional radiology and diagnostic radiology communities. Abstracts accepted to the annual meetings of the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR), the Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe (CIRSE), the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA), and the European Congress of Radiology (ECR) between 2005 and 2015 were analyzed using the search terms "interventional/computed tomography" and "radiation dose/radiation dose reduction." A PubMed query using the above-mentioned search terms for the years of 2005-2015 was performed. Between 2005 and 2015, a total of 14 520 abstracts (mean, 660±297 abstracts) and 80 614 abstracts (mean, 3664±1025 abstracts) were presented at interventional and diagnostic radiology meetings, respectively. Significantly fewer abstracts related to radiation dose were presented at the interventional radiology meetings compared with the diagnostic radiology meetings (162 abstracts [1% of total] vs. 2706 [3% of total]; P radiology abstracts (range, 6-27) and 246±105 diagnostic radiology abstracts (range, 112-389) pertaining to radiation dose were presented at each meeting. The PubMed query revealed an average of 124±39 publications (range, 79-187) and 1205±307 publications (range, 829-1672) related to interventional and diagnostic radiology dose reduction per year, respectively (P radiology community over the past 10 years has not mirrored the increased volume seen within diagnostic radiology, suggesting that increased education and discussion about this topic may be warranted.

  17. Usefulness of CRT system on mass survey for GI tract. Dose reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asazaki, Manabu; Chiyasu, Shikibu; Tanaka, Takao [Tsurugamine Hospital, Yokohama (Japan)

    1998-09-01

    For the purpose of dose reduction, authors have utilized digital imaging and CRT (cathode ray tube) system in mass survey of the stomach. This paper described a comparison of results obtained by CRT system and CR film on 7,752 examinees in whom 3,600 cases were subjected to the dose reduction by using CRT. Imaging apparatus was Toshiba DBW220A with Fuji FCR9000 and HI-C654 for reading and displaying the image, respectively. The imaging plate was ST-Va and the dosimeter, Swedish UNFORS. At the S values, which, in Fuji FCR, being displayed as a measure of imaging dose, of 250, 1000, and 3000, the grain size and diagnostic utility were compared between CRT system and CR film. The surface dose was measured to see its relation to the S value. At S value 250 (surface dose: 2.3 mGy), no difference was recognized; at 1000 (0.8 mGy), grains in CR film were somewhat inferior; and at 3000, both grains and utility were inferior in CR film, which indicating that dose reduction to about 1/4 was possible when CRT system was used. Further, there was no difference in the diagnostic rates of stomach cancer. (K.H.)

  18. Radiation dose reduction in fluoroscopic procedures: left varicocele embolization as a model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verstandig, Anthony G.; Shraibman, Vladimir [Shaare Zedek Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Interventional Radiology Unit, POB 3235, Jerusalem (Israel); Shamieh, Bashar [St. Joseph Hospital, Department of Radiology, Jerusalem (Israel); Raveh, David [Shaare Zedek Medical Center, Infectious Diseases Unit, POB 3235, Jerusalem (Israel)

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the effect of a radiation reduction program on total dose, fluoroscopy dose per second corrected for body habitus and degree of collimation in left varicocele embolizations (LVE). A radiation reduction program for LVE was implemented, consisting of a technique minimizing fluoroscopy time, using low-dose presets, virtual collimation, and virtual patient positioning. Height, weight, fluoroscopy time, kerma area product (KAP) and reference air kerma (Ka,r) were recorded for 100 consecutive cases satisfying the inclusion criteria. For each patient, a device specific dose correction factor, determined using a phantom, was used to standardize the KAP to that of the cylindrical diameter of the standard man and a collimation index was derived from the KAP and Ka,r. Median fluoroscopy time was 3 minutes (mean 4.5, range 1-23.8). Median KAP was 0.54 Gy/cm{sup 2} (mean 0.82, range 0.12-6.52). There was a significant decrease in KAP/second corrected for cylindrical diameter (p < 0.001) and the collimation index (p < 0.001) over time. This study shows that a dedicated dose reduction program can achieve very low total radiation dose rates for LVE. The significant decrease in collimation index and standardized KAP per second during this study suggest a learning curve for collimation. (orig.)

  19. Patient dose, gray level and exposure index with a computed radiography system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, T. R.; Yoshimura, E. M.

    2014-02-01

    Computed radiography (CR) is gradually replacing conventional screen-film system in Brazil. To assess image quality, manufactures provide the calculation of an exposure index through the acquisition software of the CR system. The objective of this study is to verify if the CR image can be used as an evaluator of patient absorbed dose too, through a relationship between the entrance skin dose and the exposure index or the gray level values obtained in the image. The CR system used for this study (Agfa model 30-X with NX acquisition software) calculates an exposure index called Log of the Median (lgM), related to the absorbed dose to the IP. The lgM value depends on the average gray level (called Scan Average Level (SAL)) of the segmented pixel value histogram of the whole image. A Rando male phantom was used to simulate a human body (chest and head), and was irradiated with an X-ray equipment, using usual radiologic techniques for chest exams. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (LiF, TLD100) were used to evaluate entrance skin dose and exit dose. The results showed a logarithm relation between entrance dose and SAL in the image center, regardless of the beam filtration. The exposure index varies linearly with the entrance dose, but the angular coefficient is beam quality dependent. We conclude that, with an adequate calibration, the CR system can be used to evaluate the patient absorbed dose.

  20. Low-Dose Radiation Exposure and Atherosclerosis in ApoE(-/-) Mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mitchel, R. E. J.; Hasu, M.; Bugden, M.; Wyatt, H.; Little, M. P.; Gola, A.; Hildebrandt, G.; Priest, N. D.; Whitman, S. C.

    The hypothesis that single low-dose exposures (0.025-0.5 Gy) to low-LET radiation given at either high (about 150 mGy/min) or low (1 mGy/min) dose rate would promote aortic atherosclerosis was tested in female C57BL/6J mice genetically predisposed to this disease (ApoE(-/-)). Mice were exposed

  1. Does Fear Reactivity during Exposure Predict Panic Symptom Reduction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meuret, Alicia E.; Seidel, Anke; Rosenfield, Benjamin; Hofmann, Stefan G.; Rosenfield, David

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Fear reactivity during exposure is a commonly used indicator of learning and overall therapy outcome. The objective of this study was to assess the predictive value of fear reactivity during exposure using multimodal indicators and an advanced analytical design. We also investigated the degree to which treatment condition (cognitive…

  2. Proteomic Analysis of Low Dose Arsenic and Ionizing Radiation Exposure on Keratinocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Berglund, Susanne R.; Santana, Alison R.; Li, Dan; Rice, Robert H.; Rocke, David M; Goldberg, Zelanna

    2009-01-01

    Human exposure to arsenic and ionizing radiation occur environmentally at low levels. While the human health effects of arsenic and ionizing radiation have been examined separately, there is little information regarding their combined effects at doses approaching environmental levels. Arsenic toxicity may be affected by concurrent ionizing radiation especially given their known individual carcinogenic actions at higher doses. We found that keratinocytes responded to either low dose arsenic an...

  3. Double dose: High family conflict enhances the effect of media violence exposure on adolescents’ aggression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fikkers, K.M.; Piotrowski, J.T.; Weeda, W.D.; Vossen, H.G.M.; Valkenburg, P.M.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated how exposure to media violence and family conflict affects adolescents’ subsequent aggressive behavior. We expected a double dose effect, meaning that high media violence exposure would lead to higher levels of aggression for adolescents in high conflict families compared to low

  4. Determinants of personal ultraviolet-radiation exposure doses on a sun holiday

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, B; Thieden, E; Philipsen, P A

    2013-01-01

    A great number of journeys to sunny destinations are sold to the Danish population every year. We suspect that this travel considerably increases personal annual ultraviolet-radiation (UVR) exposure doses. This is important because such exposure is the main cause of skin cancer, and studies have ...

  5. Suggestion of the manual exposure condition guideline for reducing patient dose in digital breast tomosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Eun Ae [Dept. of Radiology, Korea University Guro Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, In Ja [Dept. of Radiologic Technology, Dongnam Health University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    The conditions after exposure to digital mammography and digital breast tomosynthesis were analyzed. The examinations for the ACR phantom were done using manual exposure, not auto exposure, to examine image discrimination and patient dose. As a result, the following results were derived: In the CC exposure , the kVp was 2kVp higher while mAs decreased to 58.6% for the 3D tomography. Such result showed an approximate decrease of 60mAs. At that time, the patients Average Glandular Dose (AGD) was 1.65mGy in 2D and 1.87mGy in 3D; thus, AGD of 3D was shown to have about 1.13 times higher. The result of the manual exposure revealed a reduced mAs of up to 80%; there was no effect in the assessment standard in terms of image discrimination, resulting in more than 10 points. When mAs was reduced to 80% in the manual exposure for ACR phantom, AGD was decreased to 0.66mGy. The diagnostic values of images were maintained and patients dose was reduced in the manual exposure in the AEC condition for 3D. Since the use of 3D has recently increased, using the manual exposure has been recommended in this study to improve the diagnostic value, while, simultaneously reducing patients dose.

  6. New image-processing and noise-reduction software reduces radiation dose during complex endovascular procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkwood, Melissa L; Guild, Jeffrey B; Arbique, Gary M; Tsai, Shirling; Modrall, J Gregory; Anderson, Jon A; Rectenwald, John; Timaran, Carlos

    2016-11-01

    A new proprietary image-processing system known as AlluraClarity, developed by Philips Healthcare (Best, The Netherlands) for radiation-based interventional procedures, claims to lower radiation dose while preserving image quality using noise-reduction algorithms. This study determined whether the surgeon and patient radiation dose during complex endovascular procedures (CEPs) is decreased after the implementation of this new operating system. Radiation dose to operators, procedure type, reference air kerma, kerma area product, and patient body mass index were recorded during CEPs on two Philips Allura FD 20 fluoroscopy systems with and without Clarity. Operator dose during CEPs was measured using optically stimulable, luminescent nanoDot (Landauer Inc, Glenwood, Ill) detectors placed outside the lead apron at the left upper chest position. nanoDots were read using a microStar ii (Landauer Inc) medical dosimetry system. For the CEPs in the Clarity group, the radiation dose to surgeons was also measured by the DoseAware (Philips Healthcare) personal dosimetry system. Side-by-side measurements of DoseAware and nanoDots allowed for cross-calibration between systems. Operator effective dose was determined using a modified Niklason algorithm. To control for patient size and case complexity, the average fluoroscopy dose rate and the dose per radiographic frame were adjusted for body mass index differences and then compared between the groups with and without Clarity by procedure. Additional factors, for example, physician practice patterns, that may have affected operator dose were inferred by comparing the ratio of the operator dose to procedural kerma area product with and without Clarity. A one-sided Wilcoxon rank sum test was used to compare groups for radiation doses, reference air kermas, and operating practices for each procedure type. The analysis included 234 CEPs; 95 performed without Clarity and 139 with Clarity. Practice patterns of operators during

  7. Population exposure dose reconstruction for the Urals Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degteva, M.O.; Kozheurov, V.P.; Vorobiova, M.I.; Burmistrov, D.S. [Urals Research Center for Radiation Medicine, Chelyabinsk (Russian Federation); Khokhryakov, V.V. [Mayak Production Assn., Ozyorsk (Russian Federation); Suslova, K.G. [Moscow Biophysics Inst., Ozyorsk (Russian Federation); Anspaugh, L.R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Napier, B.A. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Bouville, A. [National Cancer Inst., Bethesda, MD (United States)

    1996-06-01

    This presentation describes the first preliminary results of an ongoing joint Russian-US pilot feasibility study. Many people participated in workshops to determine what Russian and United States scientists could do together in the area of dose reconstruction in the Urals population. Most of the results presented here came from a joint work shop in St. Petersburg, Russia (11-13 July 1995). The Russians at the workshop represented the Urals Research Center for Radiation Medicine (URCRM), the Mayak Industrial Association, and Branch One of the Moscow Biophysics Institute. The US Collaborators were Dr. Anspaugh of LLNL, Dr. Nippier of PNL, and Dr. Bouville of the National Cancer Institute. The objective of the first year of collaboration was to look at the source term and levels of radiation contamination, the historical data available, and the results of previous work carried out by Russian scientists, and to determine a conceptual model for dose reconstruction.

  8. Targeted computerised tomography scanning of the ankle syndesmosis with low dose radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotwal, Rahul [Princess of Wales Hospital, Bridgend (United Kingdom); Rath, Narendra [Royal Gwent Hospital, Newport (United Kingdom); Paringe, Vishal; Hemmadi, Sandeep; Thomas, Rhys; Lyons, Kath [University Hospital of Wales, Cardiff (United Kingdom)

    2016-03-15

    To devise a new protocol for targeted CT scanning of the distal tibiofibular syndesmosis with minimal radiation exposure to patients. We also aimed to correlate the reduction of the syndesmosis as seen on CT scans with the functional outcome of patients. Prospective study. Forty adults undergoing surgical stabilisation of an acute distal tibiofibular syndesmosis injury were recruited. A targeted five-cut computerised tomography scan protocol was developed. The radiation exposure to the patient with this protocol was only 0.002 mSv. Scans were performed 12 weeks after surgery. The contralateral ankle of every patient was used as a control to determine the accuracy of the reduction of the syndesmosis for that individual patient. American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) scores were obtained at a minimum of 1 year after surgery. After considering the exclusions, 36 patients formed the study group. A wide variation was observed in the anatomy of the normal syndesmosis. If we considered a difference of more than 2 mm between the normal and injured syndesmosis relationship as significant, 15 (41.6 %) of our patients had a significant difference between the injured and normal sides. AOFAS scores were available for 13 of these patients and were good to excellent in 11(84.6 %). Our study describes a reliable new CT scanning technique for the distal tibiofibular syndesmosis using only five cuts and a low-radiation-dose protocol. Clinical correlation of the findings on the scan with functional outcomes suggests that routine post-operative CT of the syndesmosis is probably not justified. (orig.)

  9. Nimodipine Dose Reductions in the Treatment of Patients with Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandow, Nora; Diesing, Dominik; Sarrafzadeh, Asita; Vajkoczy, Peter; Wolf, Stefan

    2016-08-01

    The incidence of cerebral infarction and poor outcome in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) is reduced by oral nimodipine but acute effects of the drug may include a significant decrease in mean arterial blood pressure (MAP). A dose reduction or discontinuation of the drug is recommended if recurrent MAP drops occur. The aim of our study was to evaluate the frequency and clinical significance of nimodipine dose modifications in patients suffering from aSAH. 270 patients were included in our retrospective analysis of consecutively collected data of patients suffering from aSAH. The local treatment protocol was in accordance to national and international guidelines. Nimodipine was intended to be applied orally with a dosage of 60 mg every 4 h. Only 43.6 % of patients eligible for vasospasm prophylaxis with nimodipine received the full daily dose of 60 mg every 4 h. In 28.6 %, the dose had to be reduced by 50 % due to a significant reduction in blood pressure after administration and/or high dose of catecholamines. In 27.7 % of patients, oral administration of the drug was discontinued for the same reason. Dose reduction and discontinuation occurred with a significantly higher frequency in patients in poor clinical condition. Application of the full nimodipine dosage decreased the risk of unfavorable clinical outcome in multivariate analysis (OR 0.895, p = 0.029). Our results show that dose reduction or discontinuation of nimodipine due to changes in MAP occur frequently in clinical routine and may be associated with unfavorable clinical outcome.

  10. Acute Exposure to High Dose γ-Radiation Results in Transient Activation of Bone Lining Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Russell T.; Iwaniec, Urszula T.; Wong, Carmen P.; Lindenmaier, Laurence B.; Wagner, Lindsay A.; Branscum, Adam J.; Menn, Scott A.; Taylor, James; Zhang, Ye; Wu, Honglu; Sibonga, Jean D.

    2014-01-01

    The present studies investigated the cellular mechanisms for the detrimental effects of high dose whole body γ-irradiation on bone. In addition, radioadaptation and bone marrow transplantation were assessed as interventions to mitigate the skeletal complications of irradiation. Increased trabecular thickness and separation and reduced fractional cancellous bone volume, connectivity density, and trabecular number were detected in proximal tibia and lumbar vertebra 14 days following γ-irradiation with 6 Gy. To establish the cellular mechanism for the architectural changes, vertebrae were analyzed by histomorphometry 1, 3, and 14 days following irradiation. Marrow cell density decreased within 1 day (67% reduction, pbone perimeter was increased by 290% (1 day, p=0.04), 1230% (3 days, pmarrow cell death and activation of bone lining cells to express the osteoblast phenotype (Pearson correlation −0.85, pbone perimeter was also detected with irradiation. A priming dose of γ-radiation (0.5 mGy), previously shown to reduce mortality, had minimal effect on the cellular responses to radiation and did not prevent detrimental changes in bone architecture. Bone marrow transplantation normalized marrow cell density, bone turnover, and most indices of bone architecture following irradiation. In summary, radiation-induced death of marrow cells is associated with 1) a transient increase in bone formation due, at least in part, to activation of bone lining cells, and 2) an increase in bone resorption due to increased osteoclast perimeter. Bone marrow transplantation is effective in mitigating the detrimental effects of acute exposure to high dose whole body γ-radiation on bone turnover. PMID:23954507

  11. Non linear processes modulated by low doses of radiation exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariotti, Luca; Ottolenghi, Andrea; Alloni, Daniele; Babini, Gabriele; Morini, Jacopo; Baiocco, Giorgio

    The perturbation induced by radiation impinging on biological targets can stimulate the activation of several different pathways, spanning from the DNA damage processing to intra/extra -cellular signalling. In the mechanistic investigation of radiobiological damage this complex “system” response (e.g. omics, signalling networks, micro-environmental modifications, etc.) has to be taken into account, shifting from a focus on the DNA molecule solely to a systemic/collective view. An additional complication comes from the finding that the individual response of each of the involved processes is often not linear as a function of the dose. In this context, a systems biology approach to investigate the effects of low dose irradiations on intra/extra-cellular signalling will be presented, where low doses of radiation act as a mild perturbation of a robustly interconnected network. Results obtained through a multi-level investigation of both DNA damage repair processes (e.g. gamma-H2AX response) and of the activation kinetics for intra/extra cellular signalling pathways (e.g. NFkB activation) show that the overall cell response is dominated by non-linear processes - such as negative feedbacks - leading to possible non equilibrium steady states and to a poor signal-to-noise ratio. Together with experimental data of radiation perturbed pathways, different modelling approaches will be also discussed.

  12. SparseCT: interrupted-beam acquisition and sparse reconstruction for radiation dose reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koesters, Thomas; Knoll, Florian; Sodickson, Aaron; Sodickson, Daniel K.; Otazo, Ricardo

    2017-03-01

    State-of-the-art low-dose CT methods reduce the x-ray tube current and use iterative reconstruction methods to denoise the resulting images. However, due to compromises between denoising and image quality, only moderate dose reductions up to 30-40% are accepted in clinical practice. An alternative approach is to reduce the number of x-ray projections and use compressed sensing to reconstruct the full-tube-current undersampled data. This idea was recognized in the early days of compressed sensing and proposals for CT dose reduction appeared soon afterwards. However, no practical means of undersampling has yet been demonstrated in the challenging environment of a rapidly rotating CT gantry. In this work, we propose a moving multislit collimator as a practical incoherent undersampling scheme for compressed sensing CT and evaluate its application for radiation dose reduction. The proposed collimator is composed of narrow slits and moves linearly along the slice dimension (z), to interrupt the incident beam in different slices for each x-ray tube angle (θ). The reduced projection dataset is then reconstructed using a sparse approach, where 3D image gradients are employed to enforce sparsity. The effects of the collimator slits on the beam profile were measured and represented as a continuous slice profile. SparseCT was tested using retrospective undersampling and compared against commercial current-reduction techniques on phantoms and in vivo studies. Initial results suggest that SparseCT may enable higher performance than current-reduction, particularly for high dose reduction factors.

  13. Double Dose: High Family Conflict Enhances the Effect of Media Violence Exposure on Adolescents’ Aggression

    OpenAIRE

    Valkenburg, Patti M.; Vossen, Helen G. M.; Weeda, Wouter D.; Jessica Taylor Piotrowski; Karin M. Fikkers

    2013-01-01

    We investigated how exposure to media violence and family conflict affects adolescents’ subsequent aggressive behavior. We expected a double dose effect, meaning that high media violence exposure would lead to higher levels of aggression for adolescents in high conflict families compared to low conflict families. A total of 499 adolescents (aged 10 to 14, 48% girls) participated in a two-wave longitudinal survey (4-month interval). Survey questions assessed their exposure to violence on telev...

  14. Dose reduction with adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction for paediatric CT: phantom study and clinical experience on chest and abdomen CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay, F; Pavia, Y; Pierrat, N; Lasalle, S; Neuenschwander, S; Brisse, H J

    2014-01-01

    To assess the benefit and limits of iterative reconstruction of paediatric chest and abdominal computed tomography (CT). The study compared adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) with filtered back projection (FBP) on 64-channel MDCT. A phantom study was first performed using variable tube potential, tube current and ASIR settings. The assessed image quality indices were the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), the noise power spectrum, low contrast detectability (LCD) and spatial resolution. A clinical retrospective study of 26 children (M:F = 14/12, mean age: 4 years, range: 1-9 years) was secondarily performed allowing comparison of 18 chest and 14 abdominal CT pairs, one with a routine CT dose and FBP reconstruction, and the other with 30 % lower dose and 40 % ASIR reconstruction. Two radiologists independently compared the images for overall image quality, noise, sharpness and artefacts, and measured image noise. The phantom study demonstrated a significant increase in SNR without impairment of the LCD or spatial resolution, except for tube current values below 30-50 mA. On clinical images, no significant difference was observed between FBP and reduced dose ASIR images. Iterative reconstruction allows at least 30 % dose reduction in paediatric chest and abdominal CT, without impairment of image quality. • Iterative reconstruction helps lower radiation exposure levels in children undergoing CT. • Adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) significantly increases SNR without impairing spatial resolution. • For abdomen and chest CT, ASIR allows at least a 30 % dose reduction.

  15. Effect of copper dosing on sulfide inhibited reduction of nitric and nitrous oxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manconi, I.; Maas, van der P.M.F.; Lens, P.N.L.

    2006-01-01

    The stimulating effect of copper addition on the reduction rate of nitrous oxide (N2O) to dinitrogen (N2) in the presence of sulfide was investigated in batch experiments (pH 7.0; 55 °C). N2O was dosed either directly as a gas to the headspace of the bottles or formed as intermediate during the

  16. Effects of Low-Dose Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR-ld) on Working Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klatt, Maryanna D.; Buckworth, Janet; Malarkey, William B.

    2009-01-01

    Mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) has produced behavioral, psychological, and physiological benefits, but these programs typically require a substantial time commitment from the participants. This study assessed the effects of a shortened (low-dose [ld]) work-site MBSR intervention (MBSR-ld) on indicators of stress in healthy working…

  17. Exposure to low dose ionising radiation: Molecular and clinical consequences.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Martin, Lynn M

    2014-07-10

    This review article provides a comprehensive overview of the experimental data detailing the incidence, mechanism and significance of low dose hyper-radiosensitivity (HRS). Important discoveries gained from past and present studies are mapped and highlighted to illustrate the pathway to our current understanding of HRS and the impact of HRS on the cellular response to radiation in mammalian cells. Particular attention is paid to the balance of evidence suggesting a role for DNA repair processes in the response, evidence suggesting a role for the cell cycle checkpoint processes, and evidence investigating the clinical implications\\/relevance of the effect.

  18. Exposure of luminous marine bacteria to low-dose gamma-radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryasheva, N S; Petrova, A S; Dementyev, D V; Bondar, A A

    2017-04-01

    The study addresses biological effects of low-dose gamma-radiation. Radioactive 137Cs-containing particles were used as model sources of gamma-radiation. Luminous marine bacterium Photobacterium phosphoreum was used as a bioassay with the bioluminescent intensity as the physiological parameter tested. To investigate the sensitivity of the bacteria to the low-dose gamma-radiation exposure (≤250 mGy), the irradiation conditions were varied as follows: bioluminescence intensity was measured at 5, 10, and 20°С for 175, 100, and 47 h, respectively, at different dose rates (up to 4100 μGy/h). There was no noticeable effect of gamma-radiation at 5 and 10°С, while the 20°С exposure revealed authentic bioluminescence inhibition. The 20°С results of gamma-radiation exposure were compared to those for low-dose alpha- and beta-radiation exposures studied previously under comparable experimental conditions. In contrast to ionizing radiation of alpha and beta types, gamma-emission did not initiate bacterial bioluminescence activation (adaptive response). As with alpha- and beta-radiation, gamma-emission did not demonstrate monotonic dose-effect dependencies; the bioluminescence inhibition efficiency was found to be related to the exposure time, while no dose rate dependence was found. The sequence analysis of 16S ribosomal RNA gene did not reveal a mutagenic effect of low-dose gamma radiation. The exposure time that caused 50% bioluminescence inhibition was suggested as a test parameter for radiotoxicity evaluation under conditions of chronic low-dose gamma irradiation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Application of maximum values for radiation exposure and principles for the calculation of radiation dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    The guide sets out the mathematical definitions and principles involved in the calculation of the equivalent dose and the effective dose, and the instructions concerning the application of the maximum values of these quantities. further, for monitoring the dose caused by internal radiation, the guide defines the limits derived from annual dose limits (the Annual Limit on Intake and the Derived Air Concentration). Finally, the guide defines the operational quantities to be used in estimating the equivalent dose and the effective dose, and also sets out the definitions of some other quantities and concepts to be used in monitoring radiation exposure. The guide does not include the calculation of patient doses carried out for the purposes of quality assurance.

  20. Effects of a radiation dose reduction strategy for computed tomography in severely injured trauma patients in the emergency department: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo Hyun; Jung, Seung Eun; Oh, Sang Hoon; Park, Kyu Nam; Youn, Chun Song

    2011-11-03

    Severely injured trauma patients are exposed to clinically significant radiation doses from computed tomography (CT) imaging in the emergency department. Moreover, this radiation exposure is associated with an increased risk of cancer. The purpose of this study was to determine some effects of a radiation dose reduction strategy for CT in severely injured trauma patients in the emergency department. We implemented the radiation dose reduction strategy in May 2009. A prospective observational study design was used to collect data from patients who met the inclusion criteria during this one year study (intervention group) from May 2009 to April 2010. The prospective data were compared with data collected retrospectively for one year prior to the implementation of the radiation dose reduction strategy (control group). By comparison of the cumulative effective dose and the number of CT examinations in the two groups, we evaluated effects of a radiation dose reduction strategy. All the patients met the institutional adult trauma team activation criteria. The radiation doses calculated by the CT scanner were converted to effective doses by multiplication by a conversion coefficient. A total of 118 patients were included in this study. Among them, 33 were admitted before May 2009 (control group), and 85 were admitted after May 2009 (intervention group). There were no significant differences between the two groups regarding baseline characteristics, such as injury severity and mortality. Additionally, there was no difference between the two groups in the mean number of total CT examinations per patient (4.8 vs. 4.5, respectively; p = 0.227). However, the mean effective dose of the total CT examinations per patient significantly decreased from 78.71 mSv to 29.50 mSv (p trauma patients effectively decreased the cumulative effective dose of the total CT examinations in the emergency department. But not effectively decreased the number of CT examinations.

  1. Patient dose reduction by changing the amount of {sup 18}F-FDG radiopharmaceutical injected

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paiva, Fernanda G. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear. Programa de Pós Graduação em Ciências e Técnicas Nucleares; Santana, Priscila C. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Anatomia e Imagem; Mourão Filho, Arnaldo P., E-mail: fgpaiva92@gmail.com, E-mail: pridili@gmail.com, E-mail: apratabhz@gmail.com [Centro Federal de Educação Tecnológica de Minas Gerais (CEFET-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Centro de Engenharia Biomédica

    2017-07-01

    Images of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) associated with Computed Tomography (CT) have important diagnostic applications, mainly for oncology. These compound tomographic devices allow the overlapping of functional images obtained from the administration of radiopharmaceuticals and anatomical images generated by X-ray beam attenuation. This work evaluated the impact of reducing the effective dose by reducing the activity injected into the patient using the ICRP 106 biokinetic model. The activity to be injected may vary according to the patient mass and the detector sensitivity. In this work was used the fixed mass of Alderson phantoms, as a standard adult, this mass is 73.5 kg for the male, and 50 kg for the female. Different values of activity to be injected were simulated, from 0.07 mCi to 0.15 mCi, and with 10 mCi, protocol used in some services. Thus, for the acquisition of PET scans, any reduction of the administered activity implies a proportional reduction of the effective dose in patient. The effective dose may vary up to 114% altering the injected activity between 0.07 and 0.15 mCi. Comparing the results found for the effective dose range using 10 mCi the effective dose may vary by up to approximately 14000%. It is expected that the PET/CT scans protocols are changed at the end of the study, so that the absorbed and effective dose received by the patient decreases. (author)

  2. Successful Dose Reduction Using Reduced Tube Voltage With Hybrid Iterative Reconstruction in Pediatric Abdominal CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlin, Sheila C; Weinert, Dayna M; Vasavada, Pauravi S; Martinez-Rios, Claudia; Parikh, Roshni A; Wien, Michael A; Jordan, David W; Novak, Ronald D

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this article is to assess radiation dose reduction, image quality, and diagnostic confidence using low tube voltage in combination with hybrid iterative reconstruction in contrast-enhanced pediatric abdominal CT. CT examinations of 133 patients (median age, 10 years) were performed at sequentially reduced doses. The first group (group 1) was scanned using dimension-based protocols at 120 kV for all patient sizes. The optimized group (group 5) was scanned at 80 kV for less than 18 cm in the lateral dimension and 100 kV in the 19-30 cm lateral dimension. CT examinations reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP) and four levels of hybrid iterative reconstruction were reviewed by four blinded readers for subjective image quality and diagnostic confidence. Objective noise, volume CT dose index (CTDIvol), and size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) were recorded. Data were analyzed using t tests, one and two-way ANOVA, and the intraclass correlation coefficient. Compared with group 1, the radiation dose was reduced for group 5 by 63% measured by SSDE (4.69 vs 10.00 mGy; p iterative reconstruction; artifacts were reduced and visibility of small structures was improved (both p iterative reconstruction with low-tube-voltage protocols enables substantial radiation dose reduction for pediatric abdominal CT with equivalent to improved subjective image quality and diagnostic confidence.

  3. Evaluation of the use of automatic exposure control and automatic tube potential selection in low-dose cerebrospinal fluid shunt head CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Adam N; Vyhmeister, Ross; Bagade, Swapnil; Chatterjee, Arindam; Hicks, Brandon; Ramirez-Giraldo, Juan Carlos; McKinstry, Robert C

    2015-06-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid shunts are primarily used for the treatment of hydrocephalus. Shunt complications may necessitate multiple non-contrast head CT scans resulting in potentially high levels of radiation dose starting at an early age. A new head CT protocol using automatic exposure control and automated tube potential selection has been implemented at our institution to reduce radiation exposure. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reduction in radiation dose achieved by this protocol compared with a protocol with fixed parameters. A retrospective sample of 60 non-contrast head CT scans assessing for cerebrospinal fluid shunt malfunction was identified, 30 of which were performed with each protocol. The radiation doses of the two protocols were compared using the volume CT dose index and dose length product. The diagnostic acceptability and quality of each scan were evaluated by three independent readers. The new protocol lowered the average volume CT dose index from 15.2 to 9.2 mGy representing a 39 % reduction (P automatic exposure control and automated tube potential selection reduced patient radiation dose compared with a fixed parameter protocol while producing diagnostic images of comparable quality.

  4. DOE program--developing a scientific basis for responses to low-dose exposures: impact on dose-response relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Antone L; Couch, Lezlie

    2006-09-23

    The DOE Low Dose Radiation Research Program focuses on biological mechanisms involved in response to low doses of both low and high-LET radiation (merger enables observation of radiation-induced cellular and molecular changes previously undetectable. These low-dose responses define mechanisms of interaction of radiation with living systems, and characterize the shape of dose-response. The research from this program suggests radiation paradigms regarding the involvement of radiation in the carcinogenic process. New biological phenomena observed at low doses include initial radiation-induced DNA damage and repair, changes in gene expression, adaptive responses and bystander effects. However, information from this cellular-molecular level cannot be directly extrapolated to risks in human populations. Links must be carefully developed between dose-response relationships at the cell and tissue levels and risk to human populations. The challenge and the ultimate goal of the Program is to determine if basic scientific data can be combined with more traditional epidemiological methods to improve the estimation of radiation risk from low level radiation exposures.

  5. Occupational Exposure to Diesel Motor Exhaust and Lung Cancer: A Dose-Response Relationship Hidden by Asbestos Exposure Adjustment? The ICARE Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matrat, Mireille; Guida, Florence; Cénée, Sylvie; Févotte, Joelle; Carton, Matthieu; Cyr, Diane; Menvielle, Gwenn; Paget-Bailly, Sophie; Radoï, Loredana; Schmaus, Annie; Bara, Simona; Velten, Michel; Luce, Danièle; Stücker, Isabelle; The Icare Study Group

    2015-01-01

    Background. In a French large population-based case-control study we investigated the dose-response relationship between lung cancer and occupational exposure to diesel motor exhaust (DME), taking into account asbestos exposure. Methods. Exposure to DME was assessed by questionnaire. Asbestos was taken into account through a global indicator of exposure to occupational carcinogens or by a specific JEM. Results. We found a crude dose response relationship with most of the indicators of DME exposure, including with the cumulative exposure index. All results were affected by adjustment for asbestos exposure. The dose response relationships between DME and lung cancer were observed among subjects never exposed to asbestos. Conclusions. Exposure to DME and to asbestos is frequently found among the same subjects, which may explain why dose-response relationships in previous studies that adjusted for asbestos exposure were inconsistent. PMID:26425123

  6. Changes in anti-viral effectiveness of interferon after dose reduction in chronic hepatitis c patients: a case control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levi-Drummer Rachel S

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High dose interferon induction treatment of hepatitis C viral infection blocks viral production over 95%. Since dose reduction is often performed due to clinical considerations, the effect of dose reduction on hepatitis C virus kinetics was studied. Methods A new model that allowed longitudinal changes in the parameters of viral dynamics was used in a group of genotype-1 patients (N = 15 with dose reduction from 10 to 3 million units of interferon daily in combination with ribavirin, in comparison to a control group (N = 9 with no dose reduction. Results Dose reduction gave rise to a complex viral kinetic pattern, which could be only explained by a decrease in interferon effectiveness in blocking virion production. The benefit of the rapid initial viral decline following the high induction dose is lost after dose reduction. In addition, in some patients also the second phase viral decline slope, which is highly predictive of success of treatment, was impaired by the dose reduction resulting in smaller percentage of viral clearance in the dose reduction group. Conclusions These findings, while explaining the failure of many induction schedules, suggest that for genotype-1 patients induction therapy should be continued till HCVRNA negativity in serum in order to increase the sustained response rate for chronic hepatitis C.

  7. Collimation and Image Quality of C-Arm Computed Tomography: Potential of Radiation Dose Reduction While Maintaining Equal Image Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werncke, Thomas; von Falck, Christian; Luepke, Matthias; Stamm, Georg; Wacker, Frank K; Meyer, Bernhard Christian

    2015-08-01

    .3). Low-contrast resolution of the standard (D100) FFOV acquisition was achieved for the CFOV at 84% D100 of the FFOV and 54% D100 of the CFOV. Therefore, collimation up to 33% of the FFOV combined with the lower detector dose allows overall reduction of a patient's radiation exposure to 33% × 84% = 28% compared with FFOV acquisition. In the upper abdomen, this results in a nearly 50% reduction of the mean effective radiation dose (male, 2.0 mSv; female, 2.2 mSv) without loss of image quality compared with the standard FFOV acquisition. Craniocaudal collimation in CACT should be used whenever possible to increase the image quality and reduce the patient's overall radiation exposure. Therefore, new smart acquisition protocols are required for collimated CACT to improve the trade-off between radiation exposure and image quality requirements considering the collimation used.

  8. Study of the response reduction of LiF:Mg, Ti dosimeter for high dose dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torkzadeh, Falamarz [Nuclear Sciences and Technology Research Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Radiation Applications Research School; AEOI, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Faripour, Heidar [Nuclear Sciences and Technology Research Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Laser and Optics Research School; AEOI, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mardashti, Forough; Manouchehri, Farhad [Nuclear Sciences and Technology Research Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Radiation Applications Research School

    2017-07-15

    A single crystal and 5 polycrystalline samples of LiF:Mg, Ti and their pellets were prepared and investigated so as to apply thermoluminescence high gamma dose dosimetry. Three zones of single crystal with dopant concentrations of 200 ppm of Mg and 20 ppm of Ti were also used to prepare the single crystal samples. For polycrystalline samples, dopant concentrations of 0.062 mol% Mg and Ti concentrations in the range of 0.016 and 0.046 mol% were used. All the samples were exposed to gamma doses of 1 kGy to 700 kGy and their response changes were determined by a gamma dose test of about 60 mGy. According to the results obtained, the use of response reduction by curve-fitting up to about 300 kGy can be performed reliably for high dose gamma dosimetry.

  9. Nurse exposure doses resulted from bone scintigraphy patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunçman, Duygu; Kovan, Bilal; Poyraz, Leyla; ćapali, Veli; Demir, Bayram; Türkmen, Cüneyt

    2016-03-01

    Bone scintigraphy is used for displaying the radiologic undiagnosed bone lesions in nuclear medicine. It's general indications are researching bone metastases, detection of radiographically occult fractures, staging and follow-up in primary bone tumors, diagnosis of paget's disease, investigation of loosening and infection in orthopedic implants. It is applied with using 99mTc labeled radiopharmaceuticals (e.g 99m Tc MDP,99mTc HEDP and 99mTc HMDP). 20 -25 mCi IV radiotracer was injected into vein and radiotracer emits gamma radiation. Patient waits in isolated room for about 3 hours then a gamma camera scans radiation area and creates an image. When some patient's situation is not good, patients are hospitalized until the scanning because of patients' close contact care need. In this study, measurements were taken from ten patients using Geiger Muller counter. After these measurements, we calculated nurse's exposure radiations from patient's routine treatment, examination and emergency station.

  10. Proteomic analysis of low dose arsenic and ionizing radiation exposure on keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berglund, Susanne R; Santana, Alison R; Li, Dan; Rice, Robert H; Rocke, David M; Goldberg, Zelanna

    2009-04-01

    Human exposure to arsenic and ionizing radiation (IR) occur environmentally at low levels. While the human health effects of arsenic and IR have been examined separately, there is little information regarding their combined effects at doses approaching environmental levels. Arsenic toxicity may be affected by concurrent IR especially given their known individual carcinogenic actions at higher doses. We found that keratinocytes responded to either low dose arsenic and/or low dose IR exposure, resulting in differential proteomic expression based on 2-DE, immunoblotting and statistical analysis. Seven proteins were identified that passed a rigorous statistical screen for differential expression in 2-DE and also passed a strict statistical screen for follow-up immunoblotting. These included: alpha-enolase, epidermal-fatty acid binding protein, heat shock protein 27, histidine triad nucleotide-binding protein 1, lactate dehydrogenase A, protein disulfide isomerase precursor, and S100A9. Four proteins had combined effects that were different than would be expected based on the response to either individual toxicant. These data demonstrate a possible reaction to the combined insult that is substantially different from that of either separate treatment. Several proteins had different responses than what has been seen from high dose exposures, adding to the growing literature suggesting that the cellular responses to low dose exposures are distinct.

  11. Achieving consistent multiple daily low-dose Bacillus anthracis spore inhalation exposures in the rabbit model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy E Barnewall

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Repeated low-level exposures to Bacillus anthracis could occur before or after the remediation of an environmental release. This is especially true for persistent agents such as Bacillus anthracis spores, the causative agent of anthrax. Studies were conducted to examine aerosol methods needed for consistent daily low aerosol concentrations to deliver a low-dose (less than 106 colony forming units (CFU of B. anthracis spores and included a pilot feasibility characterization study, acute exposure study, and a multiple fifteen day exposure study. This manuscript focuses on the state-of-the-science aerosol methodologies used to generate and aerosolize consistent daily low aerosol concentrations and resultant low inhalation doses. The pilot feasibility characterization study determined that the aerosol system was consistent and capable of producing very low aerosol concentrations. In the acute, single day exposure experiment, targeted inhaled doses of 1 x 102, 1 x 103, 1 x 104, and 1 x 105 CFU were used. In the multiple daily exposure experiment, rabbits were exposed multiple days to targeted inhaled doses of 1 x 102, 1 x 103, and 1 x 104 CFU. In all studies, targeted inhaled doses remained fairly consistent from rabbit to rabbit and day to day. The aerosol system produced aerosolized spores within the optimal mass median aerodynamic diameter particle size range to reach deep lung alveoli. Consistency of the inhaled dose was aided by monitoring and recording respiratory parameters during the exposure with real-time plethysmography. Overall, the presented results show that the animal aerosol system was stable and highly reproducible between different studies and multiple exposure days.

  12. Exposure and dose assessment to particle components among an elderly population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida-Silva, M.; Almeida, S. M.; Pegas, P. N.; Nunes, T.; Alves, C. A.; Wolterbeek, H. T.

    2015-02-01

    People spend the majority of their time indoors and the composition and toxicity of indoor particles is very complex and present significant differences comparing with outdoor aerosols. Consequently, ambient particles cannot represent a real exposure. The aim of this work was to determine the daily exposure and the daily inhaled dose to particle components of elders living in Elderly Care Centers. A questionnaire was applied to 193 institutionalized elders in order to achieve their daily time pattern and to define the micro-environments where PM10 and its components (carbonaceous components and trace elements) were assessed. Daily exposure was calculated by integrating the elder's time spend in each micro-environment and the concentration of the pollutants for the period of interest. This parameter, together with the inhalation rate and the standard body weight, were used to calculate the daily inhaled dose. PM10 daily exposure and daily inhaled dose ranged between 11 - 16 μg m-3 and 20 × 10-3 - 28 × 10-3 μg kg-1, respectively. This work not only allowed a fully quantification of the magnitude of the elders exposure, but also showed that the assessment of the integrated exposure to PM components is determinant to accomplish the dose inhaled by elders living in ECCs.

  13. Model-based iterative reconstruction for reduction of radiation dose in abdominopelvic CT: comparison to adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction

    OpenAIRE

    Yasaka, Koichiro; Katsura, Masaki; Akahane, Masaaki; Sato, Jiro; Matsuda, Izuru; Ohtomo, Kuni

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate dose reduction and image quality of abdominopelvic computed tomography (CT) reconstructed with model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) compared to adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR). Materials and methods In this prospective study, 85 patients underwent referential-, low-, and ultralow-dose unenhanced abdominopelvic CT. Images were reconstructed with ASIR for low-dose (L-ASIR) and ultralow-dose CT (UL-ASIR), and with MBIR for ultralow-dose CT (UL-MBIR...

  14. Substantial dose reduction in modern multi-slice spiral computed tomography (MSCT)-guided craniofacial and skull base surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widmann, G.; Fasser, M.; Jaschke, W.; Bale, R. [Innsbruck Medical Univ. (Austria). Dept. of Radiology; Schullian, P.; Zangerl, A.; Puelacher, W. [Innsbruck Medical Univ. (Austria). Dept. of Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery; Kral, F.; Riechelmann, H. [Innsbruck Medical Univ. (Austria). Dept. of Otorhinolaryngology

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: Reduction of the radiation exposure involved in image-guided craniofacial and skull base surgery is an important goal. The purpose was to evaluate the influence of low-dose protocols in modern multi-slice spiral computed tomography (MSCT) on target registration errors (TREs). Materials and Methods: An anthropomorphic skull phantom with target markers at the craniofacial bone and the anterior skull base was scanned in Sensation Open (40-slice), LightSpeed VCT (64-slice) and Definition Flash (128-slice). Identical baseline protocols (BP) at 120 kV/100 mAs were compared to the following low-dose protocols (LD) in care dose/dose modulation: (LD-I) 100 kV/35ref. mAs, (LD-II) 80 kV/40 - 41ref. mAs, and (LD-III) 80 kV/15 - 17ref. mAs. CTDIvol and DLP were obtained. TREs using an optical navigation system were calculated for all scanners and protocols. Results were statistically analyzed in SPSS and compared for significant differences (p {<=} 0.05). Results: CTDIvol for the Sensation Open/LightSpeed VCT/Definition Flash showed: (BP) 22.24 /32.48 /14.32 mGy; (LD-I) 4.61 /3.52 /1,62 mGy; (LD-II) 3.15 /2.01 /0.87 mGy; and (LD-III) na/0.76 /0.76 mGy. Differences between the BfS (Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz) reference CTDIvol of 9 mGy and the lowest CTDIvol were approximately 3-fold for Sensation Open, and 12-fold for the LightSpeed VCT and Definition Flash. A total of 33 registrations and 297 TRE measurements were performed. In all MSCT scanners, the TREs did not significantly differ between the low-dose and the baseline protocols. Conclusion: Low-dose protocols in modern MSCT provided substantial dose reductions without significant influence on TRE and should be strongly considered in image-guided surgery. (orig.)

  15. Nurse exposure doses resulted from bone scintigraphy patient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tunçman, Duygu, E-mail: duygutuncman@gmail.com; Demir, Bayram [Istanbul University, Science Faculty, Physics Department, Istanbul (Turkey); Kovan, Bilal; Poyraz, Leyla; Türkmen, Cüneyt [Istanbul University, Medicine Faculty, Nuclear Medicine Department, Istanbul (Turkey); Çapali, Veli [Physics Department, Arts and Sciences Faculty, Süleyman Demirel University, Isparta (Turkey)

    2016-03-25

    Bone scintigraphy is used for displaying the radiologic undiagnosed bone lesions in nuclear medicine. It’s general indications are researching bone metastases, detection of radiographically occult fractures, staging and follow-up in primary bone tumors, diagnosis of paget’s disease, investigation of loosening and infection in orthopedic implants. It is applied with using {sup 99m}Tc labeled radiopharmaceuticals (e.g {sup 99m} Tc MDP,{sup 99m}Tc HEDP and {sup 99m}Tc HMDP). 20 -25 mCi IV radiotracer was injected into vein and radiotracer emits gamma radiation. Patient waits in isolated room for about 3 hours then a gamma camera scans radiation area and creates an image. When some patient’s situation is not good, patients are hospitalized until the scanning because of patients’ close contact care need. In this study, measurements were taken from ten patients using Geiger Muller counter. After these measurements, we calculated nurse’s exposure radiations from patient’s routine treatment, examination and emergency station.

  16. Dose reduction and image quality optimizations in CT of pediatric and adult patients: phantom studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, P.-H.; Lee, C.-L.; Kim, D.-H.; Lee, Y.-J.; Jeon, S.-S.; Kim, H.-J.

    2014-03-01

    Multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) can be used to easily and rapidly perform numerous acquisitions, possibly leading to a marked increase in the radiation dose to individual patients. Technical options dedicated to automatically adjusting the acquisition parameters according to the patient's size are of specific interest in pediatric radiology. A constant tube potential reduction can be achieved for adults and children, while maintaining a constant detector energy fluence. To evaluate radiation dose, the weighted CT dose index (CTDIw) was calculated based on the CT dose index (CTDI) measured using an ion chamber, and image noise and image contrast were measured from a scanned image to evaluate image quality. The dose-weighted contrast-to-noise ratio (CNRD) was calculated from the radiation dose, image noise, and image contrast measured from a scanned image. The noise derivative (ND) is a quality index for dose efficiency. X-ray spectra with tube voltages ranging from 80 to 140 kVp were used to compute the average photon energy. Image contrast and the corresponding contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were determined for lesions of soft tissue, muscle, bone, and iodine relative to a uniform water background, as the iodine contrast increases at lower energy (i.e., k-edge of iodine is 33 keV closer to the beam energy) using mixed water-iodine contrast normalization (water 0, iodine 25, 100, 200, and 1000 HU, respectively). The proposed values correspond to high quality images and can be reduced if only high-contrast organs are assessed. The potential benefit of lowering the tube voltage is an improved CNRD, resulting in a lower radiation dose and optimization of image quality. Adjusting the tube potential in abdominal CT would be useful in current pediatric radiography, where the choice of X-ray techniques generally takes into account the size of the patient as well as the need to balance the conflicting requirements of diagnostic image quality and radiation dose

  17. [Radiation exposure of radiologists during angiography: dose measurements outside the lead apron].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, H; Przetak, C; Teubert, G; Ewen, K; Mödder, U

    1995-02-01

    The aim of this study was to provide practical information to angiographers concerning radiation exposure to body parts not covered by lead aprons. Individual doses to the neck and hands of radiologists measured in micro-Sieverts were obtained during the course of 80 angiographies of various types. The number of diagnostic and interventional procedures, which might lead to exceeding permissible doses, have been calculated. Possibilities of estimating doses during angiography by means of parameters such as screening times were examined statistically. Especially with regard to the hands, estimations of the doses are insufficient (correlation r = 0.21). Radiologists who undertake much angiographic and particularly interventional work may reach exposure levels requiring protective measures in addition to lead aprons.

  18. Dose estimate of exposure to radioisotopes in molecular and cellular biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onado, C.; Faretta, M.; Ubezio, P. [Unitadi Biofisica, Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche ' Mario Negri' , Milano (Italy)

    1999-06-01

    A method for prospectively evaluating the annual equivalent doses and effective dose to biomedical researchers working with unsealed radioisotopes, and their classification, is presented here. Simplified formulae relate occupational data to a reasonable overestimate of the annual effective dose, and the equivalent doses to the hands and to the skin. The procedure, up to the classification of personnel and laboratories, can be made fully automatic, using a common spreadsheet on a personal computer. The method is based on occupational data, accounting for the amounts of each radioisotope used by a researcher, the time of exposure and the overall amounts employed in the laboratories where experiments are performed. The former data serve to forecast a contribution to the dose arising from a researcher's own work, the latter to a forecast of an 'environmental' contribution deriving simply from the presence in a laboratory where other people are working with radioisotopes. The estimates of the doses due to one's own radioisotope handling and to 'environment' were corrected for accidental exposure, considered as a linear function of the manipulated activity or of the time spent in the laboratories respectively, and summed up to give the effective dose. The effective dose associated with some common experiments in molecular and cellular biology is pre-evaluated by this method. (author)

  19. Exposure to low-dose barium by drinking water causes hearing loss in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohgami, Nobutaka; Hori, Sohjiro; Ohgami, Kyoko; Tamura, Haruka; Tsuzuki, Toyonori; Ohnuma, Shoko; Kato, Masashi

    2012-10-01

    We continuously ingest barium as a general element by drinking water and foods in our daily life. Exposure to high-dose barium (>100mg/kg/day) has been shown to cause physiological impairments. Direct administration of barium to inner ears by vascular perfusion has been shown to cause physiological impairments in inner ears. However, the toxic influence of oral exposure to low-dose barium on hearing levels has not been clarified in vivo. We analyzed the toxic influence of oral exposure to low-dose barium on hearing levels and inner ears in mice. We orally administered barium at low doses of 0.14 and 1.4 mg/kg/day to wild-type ICR mice by drinking water. The doses are equivalent to and 10-fold higher than the limit level (0.7 mg/l) of WHO health-based guidelines for drinking water, respectively. After 2-week exposure, hearing levels were measured by auditory brain stem responses and inner ears were morphologically analyzed. After 2-month exposure, tissue distribution of barium was measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Low-dose barium in drinking water caused severe hearing loss in mice. Inner ears including inner and outer hair cells, stria vascularis and spiral ganglion neurons showed severe degeneration. The Barium-administered group showed significantly higher levels of barium in inner ears than those in the control group, while barium levels in bone did not show a significant difference between the two groups. Barium levels in other tissues including the cerebrum, cerebellum, heart, liver and kidney were undetectably low in both groups. Our results demonstrate for the first time that low-dose barium administered by drinking water specifically distributes to inner ears resulting in severe ototoxicity with degeneration of inner ears in mice. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Chronic Low Dose Chlorine Exposure Aggravates Allergic Inflammation and Airway Hyperresponsiveness and Activates Inflammasome Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sae-Hoon; Park, Da-Eun; Lee, Hyun-Seung; Kang, Hye-Ryun; Cho, Sang-Heon

    2014-01-01

    Background Epidemiologic clinical studies suggested that chronic exposure to chlorine products is associated with development of asthma and aggravation of asthmatic symptoms. However, its underlying mechanism was not clearly understood. Studies were undertaken to define the effects and mechanisms of chronic low-dose chlorine exposure in the pathogenesis of airway inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). Methods Six week-old female BALB/c mice were sensitized and challenged with OVA in the presence and absence of chronic low dose chlorine exposure of naturally vaporized gas of 5% sodium hypochlorite solution. Airway inflammation and AHR were evaluated by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cell recovery and non-invasive phlethysmography, respectively. Real-time qPCR, Western blot assay, and ELISA were used to evaluate the mRNA and protein expressions of cytokines and other inflammatory mediators. Human A549 and murine epithelial (A549 and MLE12) and macrophage (AMJ2-C11) cells were used to define the responses to low dose chlorine exposure in vitro. Results Chronic low dose chlorine exposure significantly augmented airway inflammation and AHR in OVA-sensitized and challenged mice. The expression of Th2 cytokines IL-4 and IL-5 and proinflammatory cytokine IL-1β and IL-33 were significantly increased in OVA/Cl group compared with OVA group. The chlorine exposure also activates the major molecules associated with inflammasome pathway in the macrophages with increased expression of epithelial alarmins IL-33 and TSLP in vitro. Conclusion Chronic low dose exposure of chlorine aggravates allergic Th2 inflammation and AHR potentially through activation of inflammasome danger signaling pathways. PMID:25202911

  1. [Modern digital plain-radiography of the whole spine in scoliosis patients--dose reduction and quality criteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloth, J K; Wiedenhoefer, B; Stiller, W; Burkholder, I; Kauczor, H-U; Ewerbeck, V; Weber, M-A

    2013-01-01

    To reduce the radiation exposure of plain radiographs of the entire spine depending on specific indications, since these are frequently performed examinations of children and young adults with scoliosis and to determine objective quality control criteria to ensure accurate assessment. In this prospective randomized study 323 patients underwent plain-radiography of the entire spine with standard and 50 % reduced dose. In an experimental pilot-study this target-dose was determined using an Alderson-Phantom. The evaluation of the experimental radiographs, as well as, the randomized plain-radiographs was conducted using the following criteria: endplates (Cobb-angle), spinal process and pedicel (rotation), lateral margin of the vertebral body (lateral alignment), identification of C7 / S1 (perpendicular). Two radiologists evaluated these criteria using a score ranging from 1 (definitely assessable) to 4 (not assessable). If one single criteria was evaluated with a score of 3 or more points or more than 2 criteria with 2 points, the radiograph was scored as "not assessable". The statistical analysis was conducted as a non-inferiority-trial. Seven (2.4 %) of the 290 examined x-rays were scored as not assessable. There was no statistic inferiority between the examinations with standard or reduced dose, while singular assessment of the defined criteria was likewise dose-independent. Plain-radiography of the total spine in patients with scoliosis can be performed with a dose reduction of 50% without a loss of validity. The obtained quality control criteria were clinically applicable. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. Split-bolus CT-urography using dual-energy CT: Feasibility, image quality and dose reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeuchi, Mitsuru, E-mail: m2rbimn@gmail.com [Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Department of Radiology, 1 Kawasumi Mizuho-cho, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya, 467-8601 (Japan); Kawai, Tatsuya; Ito, Masato; Ogawa, Masaki [Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Department of Radiology, 1 Kawasumi Mizuho-cho, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya, 467-8601 (Japan); Ohashi, Kazuya [Nagoya City University Hospital, Department of Radiology, 1 Kawasumi Mizuho-cho, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya, 467-8601 (Japan); Hara, Masaki; Shibamoto, Yuta [Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Department of Radiology, 1 Kawasumi Mizuho-cho, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya, 467-8601 (Japan)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To prospectively evaluate the feasibility of dual-energy (DE) split-bolus CT-urography (CTU) and the quality of virtual non-enhanced images (VNEI) and DE combined nephrographic-excretory phase images (CNEPI), and to estimate radiation dose reduction if true non-enhanced images (TNEI) could be omitted. Patients and methods: Between August and September 2011, 30 consecutive patients with confirmed or suspected urothelial cancer or with hematuria underwent DE CT. Single-energy TNEI and DE CNEPI were obtained. VNEI was reconstructed from CNEPI. Image quality of CNEPI and VNEI was evaluated using a 5-point scale. The attenuation of urine in the bladder on TNEI and VNEI was measured. The CT dose index volume (CTDI (vol)) of the two scans was recorded. Results: The mean image quality score of CNEPI and VNEI was 4.7 and 3.3, respectively. The mean differences in urine attenuation between VNEI and TNEI were 14 {+-} 15 [SD] and -16 {+-} 29 in the anterior and posterior parts of the bladder, respectively. The mean CTDI (vol) for TNEI and CNEPI was 11.8 and 10.9 mGy, respectively. Omission of TNEI could reduce the total radiation dose by 52%. Conclusion: DE split-bolus CTU is technically feasible and can reduce radiation exposure; however, an additional TNEI scan is necessary when the VNEI quality is poor or quantitative evaluation of urine attenuation is required.

  3. Radiation dose reduction in the neonatal intensive care unit. Comparison of three gadolinium oxysulfide screen-film combinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smathers, R.L.; Alford, B.A.; Messenger, J.; Agarwal, S.K.; Taylor, T.S.

    Infant radiation exposure in the neonatal intensive care unit was quantitated by thermoluminescent dosimetry in 513 mobile unit roentgen examinations of the chest and abdomen. Three combinations of gadolinium oxysulfide intensifying screens and radiographic films were compared. The skin entrance dose in millirads at the mid-chest, mid-abdomen and symphysis pubis levels was measured. Radiation dose reductions of 52% and 68% were achieved using the intermediate and fast combinations relative to the near par speed standard combination. Comparison of the relative line pair resolution of the three combinations under clinical conditions was done and subjective comparison of image detail and image mottle was made by two radiologists. The standard and intermediate speed combinations were considered very acceptable for general neonatal diagnostic interpretation but the fastest combination was not considered acceptable for general purposes. Because of the decreased radiation dose, the intermediate speed combination is now used for all routine neonatal radiography at our institution. The near par speed combination is now used only occasionally for high-detail examinations. The fastest combination has a limited role for frequently repeated, less critical studies, such as tube or catheter placement or routine follow-up examinations.

  4. Split-bolus CT-urography using dual-energy CT: feasibility, image quality and dose reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Mitsuru; Kawai, Tatsuya; Ito, Masato; Ogawa, Masaki; Ohashi, Kazuya; Hara, Masaki; Shibamoto, Yuta

    2012-11-01

    To prospectively evaluate the feasibility of dual-energy (DE) split-bolus CT-urography (CTU) and the quality of virtual non-enhanced images (VNEI) and DE combined nephrographic-excretory phase images (CNEPI), and to estimate radiation dose reduction if true non-enhanced images (TNEI) could be omitted. Between August and September 2011, 30 consecutive patients with confirmed or suspected urothelial cancer or with hematuria underwent DE CT. Single-energy TNEI and DE CNEPI were obtained. VNEI was reconstructed from CNEPI. Image quality of CNEPI and VNEI was evaluated using a 5-point scale. The attenuation of urine in the bladder on TNEI and VNEI was measured. The CT dose index volume (CTDI (vol)) of the two scans was recorded. The mean image quality score of CNEPI and VNEI was 4.7 and 3.3, respectively. The mean differences in urine attenuation between VNEI and TNEI were 14±15 [SD] and -16±29 in the anterior and posterior parts of the bladder, respectively. The mean CTDI (vol) for TNEI and CNEPI was 11.8 and 10.9 mGy, respectively. Omission of TNEI could reduce the total radiation dose by 52%. DE split-bolus CTU is technically feasible and can reduce radiation exposure; however, an additional TNEI scan is necessary when the VNEI quality is poor or quantitative evaluation of urine attenuation is required. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Effects of radiation dose reduction in Volume Perfusion CT imaging of acute ischemic stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Othman, Ahmed E. [RWTH Aachen University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Aachen (Germany); Eberhard Karls University Tuebingen, University Hospital Tuebingen, Department for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Brockmann, Carolin; Afat, Saif; Pjontek, Rastislav; Nikobashman, Omid; Brockmann, Marc A.; Wiesmann, Martin [RWTH Aachen University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Aachen (Germany); Yang, Zepa; Kim, Changwon [Seoul National University, Department of Transdisciplinary Studies, Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong Hyo [Seoul National University, Department of Transdisciplinary Studies, Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Center for Medical-IT Convergence Technology Research, Advanced Institute of Convergence Technology, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    To examine the influence of radiation dose reduction on image quality and sensitivity of Volume Perfusion CT (VPCT) maps regarding the detection of ischemic brain lesions. VPCT data of 20 patients with suspected ischemic stroke acquired at 80 kV and 180 mAs were included. Using realistic reduced-dose simulation, low-dose VPCT datasets with 144 mAs, 108 mAs, 72 mAs and 36 mAs (80 %, 60 %, 40 % and 20 % of the original levels) were generated, resulting in a total of 100 datasets. Perfusion maps were created and signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) measurements were performed. Qualitative analyses were conducted by two blinded readers, who also assessed the presence/absence of ischemic lesions and scored CBV and CBF maps using a modified ASPECTS-score. SNR of all low-dose datasets were significantly lower than those of the original datasets (p <.05). All datasets down to 72 mAs (40 %) yielded sufficient image quality and high sensitivity with excellent inter-observer-agreements, whereas 36 mAs datasets (20 %) yielded poor image quality in 15 % of the cases with lower sensitivity and inter-observer-agreements. Low-dose VPCT using decreased tube currents down to 72 mAs (40 % of original radiation dose) produces sufficient perfusion maps for the detection of ischemic brain lesions. (orig.)

  6. Increased radiation dose at mammography due to prolonged exposure, delayed processing, and increased film darkening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimme-Smith, C; Bassett, L W; Gold, R H; Chow, S

    1991-02-01

    Four single-emulsion films introduced over the past 2 years--Du Pont Microvision, Fuji MiMa, Konica CM, and Eastman Kodak OM--were compared with Eastman Kodak OM SO-177 (Min-RE) film to evaluate their varying effects on mean glandular dose of reciprocity law failure due to prolonged exposure, delayed processing, and increased film darkening as a result of increased radiation exposure to improve penetration of glandular tissue. Exposures over 1.3 seconds led to increased radiation doses of 20%-30%. Delays in processing of 6 hours decreased processing speed by 11%-32% for all films except Du Pont Microvision. Optical density increases of 0.40 required 20%-30% more skin exposure for all five films. Optimal viewing densities were also evaluated and found to be different for each of the five films. Mammographers need to be aware of these differences in mammographic films to achieve maximum contrast at mammography.

  7. Increased radiation dose at mammography due to prolonged exposure, delayed processing, and increased film darkening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimme-Smith, C.; Bassett, L.W.; Gold, R.H.; Chow, S. (UCLA Medical Center (USA))

    1991-02-01

    Four single-emulsion films introduced over the past 2 years--Du Pont Microvision, Fuji MiMa, Konica CM, and Eastman Kodak OM--were compared with Eastman Kodak OM SO-177 (Min-RE) film to evaluate their varying effects on mean glandular dose of reciprocity law failure due to prolonged exposure, delayed processing, and increased film darkening as a result of increased radiation exposure to improve penetration of glandular tissue. Exposures over 1.3 seconds led to increased radiation doses of 20%-30%. Delays in processing of 6 hours decreased processing speed by 11%-32% for all films except Du Pont Microvision. Optical density increases of 0.40 required 20%-30% more skin exposure for all five films. Optimal viewing densities were also evaluated and found to be different for each of the five films. Mammographers need to be aware of these differences in mammographic films to achieve maximum contrast at mammography.

  8. Double Dose: High Family Conflict Enhances the Effect of Media Violence Exposure on Adolescents’ Aggression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patti M. Valkenburg

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We investigated how exposure to media violence and family conflict affects adolescents’ subsequent aggressive behavior. We expected a double dose effect, meaning that high media violence exposure would lead to higher levels of aggression for adolescents in high conflict families compared to low conflict families. A total of 499 adolescents (aged 10 to 14, 48% girls participated in a two-wave longitudinal survey (4-month interval. Survey questions assessed their exposure to violence on television and in electronic games, family conflict, and aggressive behavior. Analyses revealed a significant interaction between media violence and family conflict. In families with higher conflict, higher media violence exposure was related to increased subsequent aggression. This study is the first to show a double dose effect of media violence and family conflict on adolescents’ aggression. These findings underscore the important role of the family in shaping the effects of adolescents’ media use on their social development.

  9. Dose - response relationship between noise exposure and the risk of occupational injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jin-Ha; Hong, Jeong-Suk; Roh, Jaehoon; Kim, Chi-Nyon; Won, Jong-Uk

    2015-01-01

    Many workers worldwide experience fatality and disability caused by occupational injuries. This study examined the relationship between noise exposure and occupational injuries at factories in Korea. A total of 1790 factories located in northern Gyeonggi Province, Korea was evaluated. The time-weighted average levels of dust and noise exposure were taken from Workplace Exposure Assessment data. Apart occupational injuries, sports events, traffic accidents, and other accidents occurring outside workplaces were excluded. The incidences of occupational injury in each factory were calculated by data from the Korea Workers' Compensation and Welfare Services. Workplaces were classified according to the incidence of any occupational injuries (incident or nonincident workplaces, respectively). Workplace dust exposure was classified as noise exposure as 90 dB. Workplaces with high noise exposure were significantly associated with being incident workplaces, whereas workplaces with high dust exposure were not. The odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) derived from a logistic regression model were 1.68 (1.27-2.24) and 3.42 (2.26-5.17) at 80-89 dB and ≥ 90 dB versus exposure level. Noise exposure increases the risk of occupational injury in the workplace. Furthermore, the risk of occupational injury increases with noise exposure level in a dose-response relationship. Therefore, strategies for reducing noise exposure level are required to decrease the risk of occupational injury.

  10. Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects: Evidence for an Adaptive Response to Low Dose Exposures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mothersill, Carmel; Seymour, Colin

    2006-01-01

    This paper reviews our current knowledge of the mechanisms underlying the induction of bystander effects by low dose, low-LET ionizing radiation and discusses how they may be related to observed adaptive responses or other protective effects of low dose exposures. Bystander effects appear to be the result of a generalized stress response in tissues or cells. The signals may be produced by all exposed cells, but the response appears to require a quorum in order to be expressed. The major response involving low LET radiation exposure discussed in the existing literature is a death response. This has many characteristics of apoptosis but is p53 independent. While a death response might appear to be adverse, the position is argued in this paper that it is in fact protective and removes damaged cells from the population. Since many cell populations carry damaged cells without being exposed to radiation, so called “background damage”, it is possible that low doses exposures cause removal of cells damaged by agents other than the test dose of radiation. This mechanism would lead to the production of “U-shaped” dose response curves. In this scenario, the level of “adaptive” or beneficial response will be related to the background damage carried by the cell population. This model may be important when attempting to predict the consequences of mixed exposures involving radiation and other environmental stressors. PMID:18648593

  11. Study on the method or reducing the operator's exposure dose from a C-Arm system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ki Sik; Song, Jong Nam [Dept. of Radiological Science, Dongshin University, Naju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seung Ok [Dept. of Radiology, Catholic Kwangdong Universty International ST.Mary' s Hospital, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    In this study, C-Arm equipment is being used as we intend to verify the exposure dose on the operator by the scattering rays during the operation of the C-Arm equipment and to provide an effective method of reducing the exposure dose. Exposure dose is less than the Over Tube method utilizes the C-arm equipment Under Tube the scheme, The result showed that the exposure dose on the operator decreased with a thicker shield, and as the operator moved away from the center line. Moreover, as the research time prolongated, the exposure dose increased, and among the three affixed location of the dosimeter, the most exposure dose was measured at gonadal, then followed by chest and thyroid. However, in consideration of the relationship between the operator and the patient, the distance cannot be increased infinitely and the research time cannot be decreased infinitely in order to reduce the exposure dose. Therefore, by changing the thickness of the radiation shield, the exposure dose on the operator was able to be reduced. If you are using a C-Arm equipment discomfort during surgery because the grounds that the procedure is neglected and close to the dose of radiation shielding made can only increase. Because a separate control room cannot be used for the C-Arm equipment due to its characteristic, the exposure dose on the operator needs to be reduced by reinforcing the shield through an appropriate thickness of radiation shield devices, such as apron, etc. during a treatment.

  12. The usefulness of Al face block fabrication for reducing exposure dose of thyroid glands in mammography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Eun Ae [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Korea University Guro Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, In Ja [Dept. of Radiologic Technology, Dongnam Health College, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-03-15

    Currently, there are many studies being conducted around the world to reduce exposure dose to radiation for patients to receive medical treatments in a safe environment. We developed and fabricated of this shield that the patients are protected from the radiation and are need of safety control during breast imaging. In this study, for breast imaging, GE Senography 2000D were used and set at SID 65 cm, 28 kVp, and 63 mAs. The measuring instrument was Flukes Victoreen 6000-529. And we performed Face Block on with 30 patients. The chamber on the actual thyroid glands to take CC and MLO and measure the dosage before and after wearing the Face Block. For the results, after wearing the Face Block, exposure was decreased by 53.8%-100% and 65.8% in average in CC View and by 50%-100% and 60.7% in average in MLO View. The development of the Face Block that practically decreased the exposure dose of thyroid glands, crystalline eyes during breast imaging and reduced the patients anxiety during breast imaging. The Face Block is expected to improve patients satisfaction and contribute to reducing patients exposure dose, but more efforts should be made to reduce exposure dose to medical radiation.

  13. Estimation of Nicotine Dose after Low Level Exposure Using Plasma and Urine Nicotine Metabolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benowitz, Neal L.; Dains, Katherine M.; Dempsey, Delia; Yu, Lisa; Jacob, Peyton

    2010-01-01

    Background We sought to determine the optimal plasma and urine nicotine metabolites, alone or in combination, to estimate the systemic dose of nicotine after low level exposure. Methods We dosed 36 nonsmokers with 100, 200 or 400 μg deuterium-labeled nicotine (doses similar to exposure to secondhand smoke, SHS) by mouth daily for 5 days and then measured plasma and urine nicotine metabolites at various intervals over 24 hours. Results The strongest correlations with nicotine dose were seen for the sum of four [cotinine + cotinine-glucuronide + trans-3′-hydroxycotinine + 3HC-glucuronide] or six [ including also nicotine + nicotine-glucuronide] of the major nicotine metabolites in 24 hour urine collection (r = 0.96), with lesser correlations for these metabolites using spot urines corrected for creatinine at various times of day (r = 0.72 – 0.80). Plasma [cotinine + trans 3′ hydroxycotine] was more highly correlated with nicotine dose than plasma cotinine alone (r = 0.82 vs 0.75). Conclusions Our results provide guidance for selection of biomarkers to estimate the dose of nicotine taken in low level (SHS) tobacco exposure. Impact This is probably relevant to active smoking as well. PMID:20447913

  14. Establishment of exposure dose assessment laboratory in National Radiation Emergency Medical Center (NREMC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Jae Ryong; Ha, Wi Ho; Yoon, Seok Won; Han, Eun Ae; Lee, Seung Sook [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    As unclear industry grown, 432 of the nuclear power plants are operating and 52 of NPPs are under construction currently. Increasing use of radiation or radioisotopes in the field of industry, medical purpose and research such as non-destructive examination, computed tomography and x-ray, etc. constantly. With use of nuclear or radiation has incidence possibility for example the Fukushima NPP incident, the Goiania accident and the Chernobyl Nuclear accident. Also the risk of terror by radioactive material such as Radiological Dispersal Device(RDD) etc. In Korea, since the 'Law on protection of nuclear facilities and countermeasure for radioactive preparedness was enacted in 2003, the Korean institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences(KIRAMS) was established for the radiation emergency medical response in radiological disaster due to nuclear accident, radioactive terror and so on. Especially National Radiation Emergency Medical Center(NREMC) has the duty that is protect citizens from nuclear, radiological accidents or radiological terrors through the emergency medical preparedness. The NREMC was established by the 39-article law on physical protection of nuclear material and facilities and measures for radiological emergencies. Dose assessment or contamination survey should be performed which provide the radiological information for medical response. For this reason, the NREMC establish and re-organized dose assessment system based on the existing dose assessment system of the NREMC recently. The exposure dose could be measured by physical and biological method. With these two methods, we can have conservative dose assessment result. Therefore the NREMC established the exposure dose assessment laboratory which was re-organized laboratory space and introduced specialized equipment for dose assessment. This paper will report the establishment and operation of exposure dose assessment laboratory for radiological emergency response and discuss how to enhance

  15. [Dose reduction in high-resolution MSCT examinations of the chest for early detection of pneumonia in immunocompromised patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamura, J; Wildberger, J E; Nagel, H-D; Dichtl, D; Adam, G; Wedegärtner, U

    2009-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to optimize high-resolution MSCT chest protocols for the evaluation of symptomatic immunosuppressed patients with suspected pneumonia using a dose-simulating program. Using the MSCT (Siemens, Erlangen, Germany), 30 immunosuppressed patients with suspected pneumonia were examined with a low-dose HRCT of the chest (120 kV, 100 eff.mAs and collimation of 4 x 1 mm). A dose-simulating program was used to reconstruct the raw data at four different dose levels (70, 50, 35 und 25 mAs). For dose simulation for each mAs product, the correspondent noise level was added to the data. Images were generated with a slice thickness of 1 mm and 5 mm in the lung window. The images were then evaluated independently by two radiologists and graded on a scale of 1 to 3 points: 1 = no pneumonia, 2 = unclear, 3 = pneumonia. A receiver operating curve (ROC) analysis was performed to calculate the area under the curve (AUC). The actual dosage in mSv was calculated. The sensitivity and specificity were evaluated. Out of 30 patients, 7 had a normal chest finding and 23 had pneumonia. The area under the ROC curve (AUC) was 1.0 for every dosage and slice thickness. Infiltrates were detected correctly for all dosage levels. The sensitivity was 100 % for all dose levels and slice thicknesses. There was one false positive finding at 35 mAs and 1 mm slice thickness. At this dose level the specificity was reduced to 93 %. A reduction to 25 mAs had no influence on the detection of pneumonia. Thus, MSCT examinations of the chest can be performed with 25 mAs without missing the right diagnosis, resulting in an effective dose of 1.15 mSv (men), 1.5 mSv (women) and a CTDIvol of 2.5 mGy. For the evaluation of pneumonia in immunocompromised patients, MSCT examination of the chest can be performed with 25 mAs. Thus, radiation exposure was reduced to a quarter compared to the standard protocol.

  16. Data base on dose reduction research projects for nuclear power plants. Volume 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, T.A.; Yu, C.K.; Roecklein, A.K. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1994-05-01

    This is the fifth volume in a series of reports that provide information on dose reduction research and health physics technology or nuclear power plants. The information is taken from two of several databases maintained by Brookhaven National Laboratory`s ALARA Center for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The research section of the report covers dose reduction projects that are in the experimental or developmental phase. It includes topics such as steam generator degradation, decontamination, robotics, improvements in reactor materials, and inspection techniques. The section on health physics technology discusses dose reduction efforts that are in place or in the process of being implemented at nuclear power plants. A total of 105 new or updated projects are described. All project abstracts from this report are available to nuclear industry professionals with access to a fax machine through the ACEFAX system or a computer with a modem and the proper communications software through the ACE system. Detailed descriptions of how to access all the databases electronically are in the appendices of the report.

  17. Utilization of radiation protection gear for absorbed dose reduction: an integrative literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares, Flavio Augusto Penna; Flor, Rita de Cassia [Instituto Federal de Santa Catarina (IFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Pereira, Aline Garcia, E-mail: aalinegp@gmail.co [Sinan Project - Sistema de Informacao de Agravos de Notificacao, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil)

    2011-03-15

    Objective: The present study was aimed at evaluating the relation between the use of radiation protection gear and the decrease in absorbed dose of ionizing radiation, thereby reinforcing the efficacy of its use by both the patients and occupationally exposed personnel. Materials and Methods: The integrative literature review method was utilized to analyze 21 articles, 2 books, 1 thesis, 1 monograph, 1 computer program, 4 pieces of database research (Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e Estatistica and Departamento de Informatica do Sistema Unico de Saude) and 2 sets of radiological protection guidelines. Results: Theoretically, a reduction of 86% to 99% in the absorbed dose is observed with the use of radiation protection gear. In practice, however, the reduction may achieve 88% in patients submitted to conventional radiology, and 95% in patients submitted to computed tomography. In occupationally exposed individuals, the reduction is around 90% during cardiac catheterization, and 75% during orthopedic surgery. Conclusion: According to findings of several previous pieces of research, the use of radiation protection gear is a low-cost and effective way to reduce absorbed dose both for patients and occupationally exposed individuals. Thus, its use is necessary for the implementation of effective radioprotection programs in radiodiagnosis centers. (author)

  18. Measurement of dose reductions for superficial x-rays backscattered from bone interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butson, Martin J; Cheung, Tsang; Yu, Peter K N

    2008-09-07

    Accurate measurement and knowledge of dose delivered during superficial x-ray radiotherapy is required for patient dose assessment. Some tumours treated near the surface (within the first few centimetres) can have large posterior bone structures. This can cause perturbations to dose delivered due to changed backscatter contributions from the bony structure as compared to full water or tissue scattering conditions. Measured results have shown that up to 7.5% of Dmax reductions in dose can occur near the water/bone interface for 100 kVp, using 10 cm diameter field sizes when a 1 cm thick slab of bone is located at 2 cm depth. At smaller field sizes such as 2 cm diameter these values reduce to 2% for the same energy. Larger variations (up to 12.5% of maximum) have been seen at the phantom surface when the bone layer is directly behind the point of interest (within 0.5 mm) and smaller effects (up to 5% of maximum) at depths down to 5 cm. Interesting to note is the fact that for larger field sizes, an increase in percentage dose is found at the water/bone interface due to the production of low energy backscattered electrons similar to the effect found in lead. However, they are much smaller in magnitude and thus would not cause any significant dosimetric effects. In the case where large bony structures lie relatively close to the surface and the tissue above this region is being treated, a dosimeter such as radiochromic film can be used to estimate the dose reduction that may occur due to the changed backscatter conditions.

  19. NOTE: Measurement of dose reductions for superficial x-rays backscattered from bone interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butson, Martin J.; Cheung, Tsang; Yu, Peter K. N.

    2008-09-01

    Accurate measurement and knowledge of dose delivered during superficial x-ray radiotherapy is required for patient dose assessment. Some tumours treated near the surface (within the first few centimetres) can have large posterior bone structures. This can cause perturbations to dose delivered due to changed backscatter contributions from the bony structure as compared to full water or tissue scattering conditions. Measured results have shown that up to 7.5% of Dmax reductions in dose can occur near the water/bone interface for 100 kVp, using 10 cm diameter field sizes when a 1 cm thick slab of bone is located at 2 cm depth. At smaller field sizes such as 2 cm diameter these values reduce to 2% for the same energy. Larger variations (up to 12.5% of maximum) have been seen at the phantom surface when the bone layer is directly behind the point of interest (within 0.5 mm) and smaller effects (up to 5% of maximum) at depths down to 5 cm. Interesting to note is the fact that for larger field sizes, an increase in percentage dose is found at the water/bone interface due to the production of low energy backscattered electrons similar to the effect found in lead. However, they are much smaller in magnitude and thus would not cause any significant dosimetric effects. In the case where large bony structures lie relatively close to the surface and the tissue above this region is being treated, a dosimeter such as radiochromic film can be used to estimate the dose reduction that may occur due to the changed backscatter conditions.

  20. Quality-controlled dose reduction of full-leg radiography in patients with knee malalignment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kloth, Jost Karsten; Neumann, Regina; Stiller, Wolfram; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Weber, Marc-Andre [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Stillfried, Eva von; Ewerbeck, Volker [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Orthopedic and Trauma Surgery, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-12-05

    Digital plain radiographs of the full leg are frequently performed examinations of children and young adults. Thus, the objective of this work was to reduce the radiation exposure dependent on specific indications, and to determine objective quality-control criteria to ensure accurate assessment. Institutional review board approval and informed consent of all participants were obtained. In this prospective, randomized controlled, blinded, two-armed single-center study, 288 evaluable patients underwent plain radiography of the full leg with standard and reduced doses. The evaluation of the plain radiographs was conducted using the following criteria: mechanical axis, leg length, and maturation of the epiphyseal plate. Two blinded radiologists evaluated these criteria using a score ranging from 1 (definitely assessable) to 4 (not assessable). If a single criterion had been evaluated with a score of 3 or more points or all criteria with 2 points, the radiograph was scored as ''not assessable''. The study was designed as a non-inferiority trial. Eleven (3.8 %) examined X-rays were scored as not assessable. The rate of non-assessable radiographs with 33 % reduced dose was significantly not inferior to the rate of non-assessable radiographs with standard dose. The evaluation of the quality criteria was dose independent. Full-leg plain radiography in patients with knee malalignment can be performed at 33 % reduced dose without loss of relevant diagnostic information. (orig.)

  1. Noise exposure reduction of advanced high-lift systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haffner, Stephen W.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of NASA Contract NAS1-20090 Task 3 was to investigate the potential for noise reduction that would result from improving the high-lift performance of conventional subsonic transports. The study showed that an increase in lift-to-drag ratio of 15 percent would reduce certification noise levels by about 2 EPNdB on approach, 1.5 EPNdB on cutback, and zero EPNdB on sideline. In most cases, noise contour areas would be reduced by 10 to 20 percent.

  2. Repeated low-dose exposures to sarin, soman, or VX affect acoustic startle in guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, C D; Lee, R B; Moran, A V; Sipos, M L

    2016-01-01

    Chemical warfare nerve agents (CWNAs) are known to cause behavioral abnormalities in cases of human exposures and in animal models. The behavioral consequences of single exposures to CWNAs that cause observable toxic signs are particularly well characterized in animals; however, less is known regarding repeated smaller exposures that may or may not cause observable toxic signs. In the current study, guinea pigs were exposed to fractions (0.1, 0.2, or 0.4) of a medial lethal dose (LD50) of sarin, soman, or VX for two weeks. On each exposure day, and for a post-exposure period, acoustic startle response (ASR) was measured in each animal. Although relatively few studies use guinea pigs to measure behavior, this species is ideal for CWNA-related experiments because their levels of carboxylesterases closely mimic those of humans, unlike rats or mice. Results showed that the 0.4 LD50 doses of soman and VX transiently increased peak startle amplitude by the second week of injections, with amplitude returning to baseline by the second week post-exposure. Sarin also increased peak startle amplitude independent of week. Latencies to peak startle and PPI were affected by agent exposure but not consistently among the three agents. Most of the changes in startle responses returned to baseline following the cessation of exposures. These data suggest that doses of CWNAs not known to produce observable toxic signs in guinea pigs can affect behavior in the ASR paradigm. Further, these deficits are transient and usually return to baseline shortly after the end of a two-week exposure period. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Low Dose Gamma Irradiation Potentiates Secondary Exposure to Gamma Rays or Protons in Thyroid Tissue Analogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, Lora M

    2006-05-25

    We have utilized our unique bioreactor model to produce three-dimensional thyroid tissue analogs that we believe better represent the effects of radiation in vivo than two-dimensional cultures. Our thyroid model has been characterized at multiple levels, including: cell-cell exchanges (bystander), signal transduction, functional changes and modulation of gene expression. We have significant preliminary data on structural, functional, signal transduction and gene expression responses from acute exposures at high doses (50-1000 rads) of gamma, protons and iron (Green et al., 2001a; 2001b; 2002a; 2002b; 2005). More recently, we used our DOE funding (ending Feb 06) to characterize the pattern of radiation modulated gene expression in rat thyroid tissue analogs using low-dose/low-dose rate radiation, plus/minus acute challenge exposures. Findings from these studies show that the low-dose/low-dose rate “priming” exposures to radiation invoked changes in gene expression profiles that varied with dose and time. The thyrocytes transitioned to a “primed” state, so that when the tissue analogs were challenged with an acute exposure to radiation they had a muted response (or an increased resistance) to cytopathological changes relative to “un-primed” cells. We measured dramatic differences in the primed tissue analogs, showing that our original hypothesis was correct: that low dose gamma irradiation will potentiate the repair/adaptation response to a secondary exposure. Implications from these findings are that risk assessments based on classical in vitro tissue culture assays will overestimate risk, and that low dose rate priming results in a reduced response in gene expression to a secondary challenge exposure, which implies that a priming dose provides enhanced protection to thyroid cells grown as tissue analogs. If we can determine that the effects of radiation on our tissue analogs more closely resemble the effects of radiation in vivo, then we can better

  4. Dose - response relationship between noise exposure and the risk of occupational injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Ha Yoon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Many workers worldwide experience fatality and disability caused by occupational injuries. This study examined the relationship between noise exposure and occupational injuries at factories in Korea. A total of 1790 factories located in northern Gyeonggi Province, Korea was evaluated. The time-weighted average levels of dust and noise exposure were taken from Workplace Exposure Assessment data. Apart occupational injuries, sports events, traffic accidents, and other accidents occurring outside workplaces were excluded. The incidences of occupational injury in each factory were calculated by data from the Korea Workers′ Compensation and Welfare Services. Workplaces were classified according to the incidence of any occupational injuries (incident or nonincident workplaces, respectively. Workplace dust exposure was classified as 90 dB. Workplaces with high noise exposure were significantly associated with being incident workplaces, whereas workplaces with high dust exposure were not. The odds ratios (95% confidence intervals derived from a logistic regression model were 1.68 (1.27-2.24 and 3.42 (2.26-5.17 at 80-89 dB and ≥90 dB versus <80 dB. These associations remained significant when in a separate analysis according to high or low dust exposure level. Noise exposure increases the risk of occupational injury in the workplace. Furthermore, the risk of occupational injury increases with noise exposure level in a dose-response relationship. Therefore, strategies for reducing noise exposure level are required to decrease the risk of occupational injury.

  5. Evaluation of exposure dose to patients undergoing catheter ablation procedures - a phantom study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seguchi, S. [Nagoya University, Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Nagoya Daini Red Cross Hospital, Division of Radiology, Department of Medical Technology, Nagoya (Japan); Aoyama, T.; Koyama, S.; Kawaura, C. [Nagoya University, Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Fujii, K. [Nagoya University, Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Section of Radiological Protection, Chiba (Japan)

    2008-11-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate entrance skin dose (ESD), organ dose and effective dose to patients undergoing catheter ablation for cardiac arrhythmias, based on the dosimetry in an anthropomorphic phantom. ESD values associated with mean fluoroscopy time and digital cine frames were in a range of 0.12-0.30 Gy in right anterior oblique (RAO) and 0.05-0.40 Gy in left anterior oblique (LAO) projection, the values which were less than a threshold dose of 2 Gy for the onset of skin injury. Organs that received high doses in ablation procedures were lung, followed by bone surface, esophagus, liver and red bone marrow. Doses for lung were 24.8-122.7 mGy, and effective doses were 7.9-34.8 mSv for mean fluoroscopy time of 23.4-92.3 min and digital cine frames of 263-511. Conversion coefficients of dose-area product (DAP) to ESD were 8.7 mGy/(Gy.cm{sup 2}) in RAO and 7.4 mGy/(Gy.cm{sup 2}) in LAO projection. The coefficients of DAP to the effective dose were 0.37 mSv/(Gy.cm{sup 2}) in RAO, and 0.41 mSv/(Gy.cm{sup 2}) in LAO projection. These coefficients enabled us to estimate patient exposure in real time by using monitored values of DAP. (orig.)

  6. Adaption By Low Dose Radiation Exposure: A Look at Scope and Limitations for Radioprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchel, Ron E J

    2015-01-01

    The procedures and dose limitations used for radiation protection in the nuclear industry are founded on the assumption that risk is directly proportional to dose, without a threshold. Based on this idea that any dose, no matter how small, will increase risk, radiation protection regulations generally attempt to reduce any exposure to "as low as reasonably achievable" (ALARA). We know however, that these regulatory assumptions are inconsistent with the known biological effects of low doses. Low doses induce protective effects, and these adaptive responses are part of a general response to low stress. Adaptive responses have been tightly conserved during evolution, from single celled organisms up to humans, indicating their importance. Here we examine cellular and animal studies that show the influence of radiation induced protective effects on diverse diseases, and examine the radiation dose range that is effective for different tissues in the same animal. The concept of a dose window, with upper and lower effective doses, as well as the effect of multiple stressors and the influence of genetics will also be examined. The effect of the biological variables on low dose responses will be considered from the point of view of the limitations they may impose on any revised radiation protection regulations.

  7. Radiation dose reduction in CT-guided sacroiliac joint injections to levels of pulsed fluoroscopy: a comparative study with technical considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artner J

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Juraj Artner, Balkan Cakir, Heiko Reichel, Friederike LattigDepartment of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Ulm, RKU, GermanyBackground: The sacroiliac (SI joint is frequently the primary source of low back pain. Over the past decades, a number of different SI injection techniques have been used in its diagnosis and therapy. Despite the concerns regarding exposure to radiation, image-guided injection techniques are the preferred method to achieve safe and precise intra-articular needle placement. The following study presents a comparison of radiation doses, calculated for fluoroscopy and CT-guided SI joint injections in standard and low-dose protocol and presents the technical possibility of CT-guidance with maximum radiation dose reduction to levels of fluoroscopic-guidance for a precise intra-articular injection technique.Objective: To evaluate the possibility of dose reduction in CT-guided sacroiliac joint injections to pulsed-fluoroscopy-guidance levels and to compare the doses of pulsed-fluoroscopy-, CT-guidance, and low-dose CT-guidance for intra-articular SI joint injections.Study design: Comparative study with technical considerations.Methods: A total of 30 CT-guided intra-articular SI joint injections were performed in January 2012 in a developed low-dose mode and the radiation doses were calculated. They were compared to 30 pulsed-fluoroscopy-guided SI joint injections, which were performed in the month before, and to five injections, performed in standard CT-guided biopsy mode for spinal interventions. The statistical significance was calculated with the SPSS software using the Mann–Whitney U-Test. Technical details and anatomical considerations were provided.Results: A significant dose reduction of average 94.01% was achieved using the low-dose protocol for CT-guided SI joint injections. The radiation dose could be approximated to pulsed-fluoroscopy-guidance levels.Conclusion: Radiation dose of CT-guided SI joint injections can be

  8. Cancer dose-response modeling of epidemiological data on worker exposures to aldrin and dieldrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sielken, R L; Bretzlaff, R S; Valdez-Flores, C; Stevenson, D E; de Jong, G

    1999-12-01

    The paper applies classical statistical principles to yield new tools for risk assessment and makes new use of epidemiological data for human risk assessment. An extensive clinical and epidemiological study of workers engaged in the manufacturing and formulation of aldrin and dieldrin provides occupational hygiene and biological monitoring data on individual exposures over the years of employment and provides unusually accurate measures of individual lifetime average daily doses. In the cancer dose-response modeling, each worker is treated as a separate experimental unit with his own unique dose. Maximum likelihood estimates of added cancer risk are calculated for multistage, multistage-Weibull, and proportional hazards models. Distributional characterizations of added cancer risk are based on bootstrap and relative likelihood techniques. The cancer mortality data on these male workers suggest that low-dose exposures to aldrin and dieldrin do not significantly increase human cancer risk and may even decrease the human hazard rate for all types of cancer combined at low doses (e.g., 1 microgram/kg/day). The apparent hormetic effect in the best fitting dose-response models for this data set is statistically significant. The decrease in cancer risk at low doses of aldrin and dieldrin is in sharp contrast to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's upper bound on cancer potency based on mouse liver tumors. The EPA's upper bound implies that lifetime average daily doses of 0.0000625 and 0.00625 microgram/kg body weight/day would correspond to increased cancer risks of 0.000001 and 0.0001, respectively. However, the best estimate from the Pernis epidemiological data is that there is no increase in cancer risk in these workers at these doses or even at doses as large as 2 micrograms/kg/day.

  9. Exposure to Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation from Medical Imaging Procedures in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazel, Reza; Krumholz, Harlan M.; Wang, Yongfei; Ross, Joseph S.; Chen, Jersey; Ting, Henry H.; Shah, Nilay D.; Nasir, Khurram; Einstein, Andrew J.; Nallamothu, Brahmajee K.

    2013-01-01

    Background Growing use of imaging procedures in the United States has raised concerns about exposure to low-dose ionizing radiation in the general population. Methods We identified 952,420 non-elderly adults in 5 healthcare markets across the United States between July 1, 2005 and December 31, 2007. Utilization data were used to determine cumulative effective doses of radiation from imaging procedures in millisieverts (mSv) and to calculate population-based rates of “moderate” (>3 to 20 mSv per year), “high” (>20 to 50 mSv per year) and “very-high” (>50 mSv per year) doses. Results During the study period, 655,613 (68.8%) individuals underwent at least 1 imaging procedure associated with radiation exposure. The mean effective dose from imaging procedures was 2.4 mSv per person per year (std dev, 6.0 mSv); however, a wide distribution was noted with a median effective dose of 0.1 mSv per person per year (interquartile range, 0.0 to 1.7). Overall, the annual rate for moderate effective doses in the study population was 193.8 per 1000 enrollees, while high and very-high doses occurred at annual rates of 18.6 per 1000 enrollees and 1.9 per 1000 enrollees, respectively. In general, effective doses of radiation from imaging procedures increased with advancing age and were higher in women. Computed tomography and nuclear medicine scans accounted for 75.4% of the total effective dose and 81.8% occurred in non-hospitalized settings. Conclusions Imaging procedures are an important source of ionizing radiation in the United States and can lead to high radiation doses in patients. PMID:19710483

  10. Estimation of radiation exposure in low-dose multislice computed tomography of the heart and comparison with a calculation program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hohl, C.; Muehlenbruch, G.; Wildberger, J.E.; Schmidt, T.; Guenther, R.W.; Mahnken, A.H. [University of Technology of Aachen, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Aachen (Germany); Leidecker, C. [University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Institute of Medical Physics, Erlangen (Germany); Suess, C. [Siemens Medical Solutions Computed Tomography, Forchheim (Germany)

    2006-08-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the achievable organ dose savings in low-dose multislice computed tomography (MSCT) of the heart using different tube voltages (80 kVp, 100 kVp, 120 kVp) and compare it with calculated values. A female Alderson-Rando phantom was equipped with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) in five different positions to assess the mean doses within representative organs (thyroid gland, thymus, oesophagus, pancreas, liver). Radiation exposure was performed on a 16-row MSCT scanner with six different routine scan protocols: a 120-kV and a 100-kV CT angiography (CTA) protocol with the same collimation, two 120-kV Ca-scoring (CS) protocols with different collimations and two 80-kV CS protocols with the same collimation as the 120-kV CS protocols. Each scan protocol was repeated five times. The measured dose values for the organs were compared with the values calculated by a commercially available computer program. Directly irradiated organs, such as the esophagus, received doses of 34.7 mSv (CTA 16 x 0.75 120 kVp), 21.9 mSv (CTA 16 x 0.75 100 kVp) and 4.96 mSv (CS score 12 x 1.5 80 kVp), the thyroid as an organ receiving only scattered radiation collected organ doses of 2.98 mSv (CTA 16 x 0.75 120 kVp), 1.97 mSv (CTA 16 x 0.75 100 kVp) and 0.58 mSv (CS score 12 x 1.5 80 kVp). The measured relative organ dose reductions from standard to low-kV protocols ranged from 30.9% to 55.9% and were statistically significant (P<0.05). The comparison with the calculated organ doses showed that the calculation program can predict the relative dose reduction of cardiac low photon-energy protocols precisely. (orig.)

  11. Breast dose reduction for chest CT by modifying the scanning parameters based on the pre-scan size-specific dose estimate (SSDE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kidoh, Masafumi; Utsunomiya, Daisuke; Oda, Seitaro; Nakaura, Takeshi; Yuki, Hideaki; Hirata, Kenichiro; Namimoto, Tomohiro; Sakabe, Daisuke; Hatemura, Masahiro; Yamashita, Yasuyuki [Kumamoto University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Faculty of Life Sciences, Honjo, Kumamoto (Japan); Funama, Yoshinori [Kumamoto University, Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Life Sciences, Honjo, Kumamoto (Japan)

    2017-06-15

    To investigate the usefulness of modifying scanning parameters based on the size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) for a breast-dose reduction for chest CT. We scanned 26 women with a fixed volume CT dose index (CTDI{sub vol}) (15 mGy) and another 26 with a fixed SSDE (15 mGy) protocol (protocol 1 and 2, respectively). In protocol 2, tube current was calculated based on the patient habitus obtained on scout images. We compared the mean breast dose and the inter-patient breast dose variability and performed linear regression analysis of the breast dose and the body mass index (BMI) of the two protocols. The mean breast dose was about 35 % lower under protocol 2 than protocol 1 (10.9 mGy vs. 16.8 mGy, p < 0.01). The inter-patient breast dose variability was significantly lower under protocol 2 than 1 (1.2 mGy vs. 2.5 mGy, p < 0.01). We observed a moderate negative correlation between the breast dose and the BMI under protocol 1 (r = 0.43, p < 0.01); there was no significant correlation (r = 0.06, p = 0.35) under protocol 2. The SSDE-based protocol achieved a reduction in breast dose and in inter-patient breast dose variability. (orig.)

  12. The Impact of Dosing Interval in a Novel Tandem Oral Dosing Strategy: Enhancing the Exposure of Low Solubility Drug Candidates in a Preclinical Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po-Chang Chiang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In drug discovery, time and resource constraints necessitate increasingly early decision making to accelerate or stop preclinical programs. Early discovery drug candidates may be potent inhibitors of new targets, but all too often exhibit poor pharmaceutical or pharmacokinetic properties that limit the in vivo exposure. Low solubility of a drug candidate often leads to poor oral bioavailability and poor dose linearity. This issue is more significant for efficacy and target safety studies where high drug exposures are desired. When solubility issues are confronted, enabling formulations are often required to improve the exposure. However, this approach often requires a substantial and lengthy investment to develop the formulation. Previously, we introduced a gastrointestinal (GI transit time-based novel oral tandem dosing strategy that enhanced in vivo exposures in rats. In this study, a refined time interval versus dose theory was tested. The resulting in vivo exposures based on altering frequency and doses were compared, and significant impacts were found.

  13. Radiation exposure dose and health management history during 50 years of x-ray working

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, T. (Hashimura Daini Hospital, Osaka (Japan))

    1981-01-01

    My X-ray working history has become 50 years at the end of April, 1980. At this chance, the following data were summarized; the case numbers of X-ray photographs (517,132 cases), total amounts of radiation exposure dose (66.85 roentgen) and the results of blood test, which were experienced during past 50 years. The amounts of exposure dose during 35 years till 1965 were measured using my own method, which measured the film blackening as 30 milli-roentgen per week by certain standard method. After 1966 till 1980, the exposure dose were recorded using that of the film-badge service of Nippon Hoan Yohin Kyokai. The total amounts of exposure dose during 50 years were about 1/4 of D = 5 (N - 18). The results of blood test during last 27 years were found to be normal values. Then, it is happy to say that my body has been protected completely, from radiation hazard as a result of taking radiation protection and checking blood test always at my daily radiation works. The data of my own experiences during 50 years are summarized and reported in this paper.

  14. Dose response association of pregnancy cigarette smoke exposure, childhood stature, overweight and obesity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koshy, Gibby; Delpisheh, Ali; Brabin, Bernard J.

    2011-01-01

    The combined dose response effects of pregnancy cigarette smoke exposure on childhood overweight, obesity and short stature have not been reported. A community based cross-sectional survey of 3038 children aged 5-11 years from 15 primary schools in Merseyside, UK. Self-completed parental

  15. Detection of parathyroid adenomas using a monophasic dual-energy computed tomography acquisition: diagnostic performance and potential radiation dose reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leiva-Salinas, Carlos; Flors, Lucia; Durst, Christopher R.; Hou, Qinghua; Mukherjee, Sugoto [University of Virginia, Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Patrie, James T. [University of Virginia, Department of Public Health Sciences, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Wintermark, Max [Stanford University, Department of Radiology, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    2016-11-15

    The aims of the study were to compare the diagnostic performance of a combination of virtual non-contrast (VNC) images and arterial images obtained from a single-phase dual-energy CT (DECT) acquisition and standard non-contrast and arterial images from a biphasic protocol and to study the potential radiation dose reduction of the former approach. All DECT examinations performed for evaluation of parathyroid adenomas during a 13-month period were retrospectively reviewed. An initial single-energy unenhanced acquisition was followed by a dual-energy arterial phase acquisition. ''Virtual non-contrast images'' were generated from the dual-energy acquisition. Two independent and blinded radiologists evaluated three different sets of images during three reading sessions: single arterial phase, single-phase DECT (virtual non-contrast and arterial phase), and standard biphasic protocol (true non-contrast and arterial phase). The accuracy of interpretation in lateralizing an adenoma to the side of the neck and localizing it to a quadrant in the neck was evaluated. Sixty patients (mean age, 65.5 years; age range, 38-87 years) were included in the study. The lateralization and localization accuracy, sensitivity, and positive predicted value (PPV) and negative predicted value (NPV) of the different image datasets were comparable. The combination of VNC and arterial images was more specific than arterial images alone to lateralize a parathyroid lesion (OR = 1.93, p = 0.043). The use of the single-phase protocol resulted in a calculated radiation exposure reduction of 52.8 %. Virtual non-contrast and arterial images from a single DECT acquisition showed similar diagnostic accuracy than a biphasic protocol, providing a significant dose reduction. (orig.)

  16. Detection of parathyroid adenomas using a monophasic dual-energy computed tomography acquisition: diagnostic performance and potential radiation dose reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiva-Salinas, Carlos; Flors, Lucia; Durst, Christopher R; Hou, Qinghua; Patrie, James T; Wintermark, Max; Mukherjee, Sugoto

    2016-11-01

    The aims of the study were to compare the diagnostic performance of a combination of virtual non-contrast (VNC) images and arterial images obtained from a single-phase dual-energy CT (DECT) acquisition and standard non-contrast and arterial images from a biphasic protocol and to study the potential radiation dose reduction of the former approach. All DECT examinations performed for evaluation of parathyroid adenomas during a 13-month period were retrospectively reviewed. An initial single-energy unenhanced acquisition was followed by a dual-energy arterial phase acquisition. "Virtual non-contrast images" were generated from the dual-energy acquisition. Two independent and blinded radiologists evaluated three different sets of images during three reading sessions: single arterial phase, single-phase DECT (virtual non-contrast and arterial phase), and standard biphasic protocol (true non-contrast and arterial phase). The accuracy of interpretation in lateralizing an adenoma to the side of the neck and localizing it to a quadrant in the neck was evaluated. Sixty patients (mean age, 65.5 years; age range, 38-87 years) were included in the study. The lateralization and localization accuracy, sensitivity, and positive predicted value (PPV) and negative predicted value (NPV) of the different image datasets were comparable. The combination of VNC and arterial images was more specific than arterial images alone to lateralize a parathyroid lesion (OR = 1.93, p = 0.043). The use of the single-phase protocol resulted in a calculated radiation exposure reduction of 52.8 %. Virtual non-contrast and arterial images from a single DECT acquisition showed similar diagnostic accuracy than a biphasic protocol, providing a significant dose reduction.

  17. Performance evaluation of iterative reconstruction algorithms for achieving CT radiation dose reduction - a phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodge, Cristina T; Tamm, Eric P; Cody, Dianna D; Liu, Xinming; Jensen, Corey T; Wei, Wei; Kundra, Vikas; Rong, X John

    2016-03-08

    The purpose of this study was to characterize image quality and dose performance with GE CT iterative reconstruction techniques, adaptive statistical iterative recontruction (ASiR), and model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR), over a range of typical to low-dose intervals using the Catphan 600 and the anthropomorphic Kyoto Kagaku abdomen phantoms. The scope of the project was to quantitatively describe the advantages and limitations of these approaches. The Catphan 600 phantom, supplemented with a fat-equivalent oval ring, was scanned using a GE Discovery HD750 scanner at 120 kVp, 0.8 s rotation time, and pitch factors of 0.516, 0.984, and 1.375. The mA was selected for each pitch factor to achieve CTDIvol values of 24, 18, 12, 6, 3, 2, and 1 mGy. Images were reconstructed at 2.5 mm thickness with filtered back-projection (FBP); 20%, 40%, and 70% ASiR; and MBIR. The potential for dose reduction and low-contrast detectability were evaluated from noise and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) measurements in the CTP 404 module of the Catphan. Hounsfield units (HUs) of several materials were evaluated from the cylinder inserts in the CTP 404 module, and the modulation transfer function (MTF) was calculated from the air insert. The results were con-firmed in the anthropomorphic Kyoto Kagaku abdomen phantom at 6, 3, 2, and 1mGy. MBIR reduced noise levels five-fold and increased CNR by a factor of five compared to FBP below 6mGy CTDIvol, resulting in a substantial improvement in image quality. Compared to ASiR and FBP, HU in images reconstructed with MBIR were consistently lower, and this discrepancy was reversed by higher pitch factors in some materials. MBIR improved the conspicuity of the high-contrast spatial resolution bar pattern, and MTF quantification confirmed the superior spatial resolution performance of MBIR versus FBP and ASiR at higher dose levels. While ASiR and FBP were relatively insensitive to changes in dose and pitch, the spatial resolution for MBIR

  18. Influence of dose reduction and iterative reconstruction on CT calcium scores: a multi-manufacturer dynamic phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Werf, N R; Willemink, M J; Willems, T P; Greuter, M J W; Leiner, T

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the influence of dose reduction in combination with iterative reconstruction (IR) on coronary calcium scores (CCS) in a dynamic phantom on state-of-the-art CT systems from different manufacturers. Calcified inserts in an anthropomorphic chest phantom were translated at 20 mm/s corresponding to heart rates between 60 and 75 bpm. The inserts were scanned five times with routinely used CCS protocols at reference dose and 40 and 80% dose reduction on four high-end CT systems. Filtered back projection (FBP) and increasing levels of IR were applied. Noise levels were determined. CCS, quantified as Agatston and mass scores, were compared to physical mass and scores at FBP reference dose. For the reference dose in combination with FBP, noise level variation between CT systems was less than 18%. Decreasing dose almost always resulted in increased CCS, while at increased levels of IR, CCS decreased again. The influence of IR on CCS was smaller than the influence of dose reduction. At reference dose, physical mass was underestimated 3-30%. All CT systems showed similar CCS at 40% dose reduction in combinations with specific reconstructions. For some CT systems CCS was not affected at 80% dose reduction, in combination with IR. This multivendor study showed that radiation dose reductions of 40% did not influence CCS in a dynamic phantom using state-of-the-art CT systems in combination with specific reconstruction settings. Dose reduction resulted in increased noise and consequently increased CCS, whereas increased IR resulted in decreased CCS.

  19. Assessment of clinical occupational dose reduction effect of a new interventional cardiology shield for radial access combined with a scatter reducing drape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilligan, Paddy; Lynch, J; Eder, H; Maguire, S; Fox, E; Doyle, B; Casserly, I; McCann, H; Foley, D

    2015-11-01

    To assess the occupational dose reduction effect of a new interventional cardiology shield for radial access combined with a scatter reducing drape. Transradial access for catheterization has been shown to increase occupational radiation dose. Current shielding techniques are primarily based on the femoral access. This article looks at the clinical occupational combined dose reduction effect of a commercially available shield and drape which is specific to access type. The evaluation took place in a busy interventional cardiology laboratory, with a single plane 30×40 cm flat panel detector (Siemens Artis Zee, Germany). Radiation exposure to staff was measured using electronic personal dosimeters (Unfors RaysafeAB, Sweden) placed at the collar. Patient radiation exposure was assessed using screening time and dose area product per case. Both staff and patient radiation exposure were monitored for a number of case types and operators before, during, and after deployment of the new shield and drapes. The cardiologists' overall median collar badge reading per case reduced from 15.4 μSv per case without the shield/drape combination to 7.3 μSv per case with the shield drape combination in situ (P<0.001). The radiographers badge reading was reduced from 4.2 μSv per case without to 2.5 μSv per case with the shield drape combination in situ (P<0.001). There was no statistical difference in the cardiac technician's badge reading. Patient's dose area product was not significantly affected by the placement of the shield and drape combination. The shield/drape combination can significantly reduce operator exposure in a cardiac catheterization laboratory. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Exposure-Response Analyses Supporting Ticagrelor Dosing Recommendation in Patients With Prior Myocardial Infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röshammar, Daniel; Nyberg, Joakim; Andersson, Tomas; Stanski, Donald; Storey, Robert F; Hamrén, Bengt

    2017-05-01

    The relationships between drug exposure and the composite risk of cardiovascular (CV) death, myocardial infarction (MI), and stroke as well as the risk of TIMI major bleeding were estimated following long-term treatment with ticagrelor 60 or 90 mg twice daily in 20,942 patients with prior MI. These analyses support the primary reported efficacy and safety evaluations by showing that there were clear separations from placebo early in treatment with both doses, regardless of ticagrelor exposure, for both endpoints. In addition, the exposure-response analyses provided new insight into the contribution of individual exposure levels, rather than dose, as a predictor of events and accounted for differences in the baseline risk between patients. The predicted risks of CV death/MI/stroke were similar despite an increase in the median predicted ticagrelor average steady-state concentration from 606 nmol/L with ticagrelor 60 mg to 998 nmol/L with ticagrelor 90 mg (hazard ratios vs placebo of 0.83 and 0.81, respectively). The corresponding predicted risk of TIMI major bleeding slightly increased (hazard ratios vs placebo of 2.4 and 2.6, respectively). Apart from Japanese patients, showing a lower risk of CV death/MI/stroke, the response to ticagrelor was consistent across the study population, as supported by the combination of relatively flat exposure-response relationships in the studied exposure range, similar sensitivity to ticagrelor exposure, and small exposure differences. Consequently, the present analyses support the selection of the 60-mg dose for all demographic subgroups of patients studied. © 2016, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  1. Exposure dose response relationships of the freshwater bivalve Hyridella australis to cadmium spiked sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marasinghe Wadige, Chamani P.M., E-mail: chamani.marasinghe.wadige@canberra.edu.au; Maher, William A.; Taylor, Anne M.; Krikowa, Frank

    2014-07-01

    Highlights: • The exposure–dose–response approach was used to assess cadmium exposure and toxicity. • Accumulated cadmium in H. australis reflected the sediment cadmium exposure. • Spill over of cadmium into the biologically active pool was observed. • Increased cadmium resulted in measurable biological effects. • H. australis has the potential to be a cadmium biomonitor in freshwater environments. - Abstract: To understand how benthic biota may respond to the additive or antagonistic effects of metal mixtures in the environment it is first necessary to examine their responses to the individual metals. In this context, laboratory controlled single metal-spiked sediment toxicity tests are useful to assess this. The exposure–dose–response relationships of Hyridella australis to cadmium-spiked sediments were, therefore, investigated in laboratory microcosms. H. australis was exposed to individual cadmium spiked sediments (<0.05 (control), 4 ± 0.3 (low) and 15 ± 1 (high) μg/g dry mass) for 28 days. Dose was measured as cadmium accumulation in whole soft body and individual tissues at weekly intervals over the exposure period. Dose was further examined as sub-cellular localisation of cadmium in hepatopancreas tissues. The biological responses in terms of enzymatic and cellular biomarkers were measured in hepatopancreas tissues at day 28. H. australis accumulated cadmium from spiked sediments with an 8-fold (low exposure organisms) and 16-fold (high exposure organisms) increase at day 28 compared to control organisms. The accumulated tissue cadmium concentrations reflected the sediment cadmium exposure at day 28. Cadmium accumulation in high exposure organisms was inversely related to the tissue calcium concentrations. Gills of H. australis showed significantly higher cadmium accumulation than the other tissues. Accumulated cadmium in biologically active and biologically detoxified metal pools was not significantly different in cadmium exposed

  2. In vitro evaluation of a new iterative reconstruction algorithm for dose reduction in coronary artery calcium scoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gassenmaier, Tobias; Allmendinger, Thomas; Kunz, Andreas S; Veyhl-Wichmann, Maike; Ergün, Süleyman; Bley, Thorsten A; Petritsch, Bernhard

    2017-05-01

    Coronary artery calcium (CAC) scoring is a widespread tool for cardiac risk assessment in asymptomatic patients and accompanying possible adverse effects, i.e. radiation exposure, should be as low as reasonably achievable. To evaluate a new iterative reconstruction (IR) algorithm for dose reduction of in vitro coronary artery calcium scoring at different tube currents. An anthropomorphic calcium scoring phantom was scanned in different configurations simulating slim, average-sized, and large patients. A standard calcium scoring protocol was performed on a third-generation dual-source CT at 120 kVp tube voltage. Reference tube current was 80 mAs as standard and stepwise reduced to 60, 40, 20, and 10 mAs. Images were reconstructed with weighted filtered back projection (wFBP) and a new version of an established IR kernel at different strength levels. Calcifications were quantified calculating Agatston and volume scores. Subjective image quality was visualized with scans of an ex vivo human heart. In general, Agatston and volume scores remained relatively stable between 80 and 40 mAs and increased at lower tube currents, particularly in the medium and large phantom. IR reduced this effect, as both Agatston and volume scores decreased with increasing levels of IR compared to wFBP (P tube current of 10 mAs with resulting Agatston levels close to the reference settings. New iterative reconstruction kernels may allow for reduction in tube current for established Agatston scoring protocols and consequently for substantial reduction in radiation exposure.

  3. Reversal of neuromuscular blockade by sugammadex in laparoscopic bariatric surgery: In support of dose reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badaoui, Rachid; Cabaret, Aurélie; Alami, Youssef; Zogheib, Elie; Popov, Ivan; Lorne, Emmanuel; Dupont, Hervé

    2016-02-01

    Sugammadex is the first molecule able to antagonize steroidal muscle relaxants with few adverse effects. Doses are adjusted to body weight and the level of neuromuscular blockade. Sleeve gastrectomy is becoming a very popular form of bariatric surgery. It requires deep muscle relaxation followed by complete and rapid reversal to decrease postoperative and especially post-anaesthetic morbidity. Sugammadex is therefore particularly indicated in this setting. The objective of this study was to evaluate the deep neuromuscular blockade reversal time after administration of various doses of sugammadex (based on real weight or at lower doses). Secondary endpoints were the interval between the sugammadex injection and extubation and transfer from the operating room to the recovery room. We then investigated any complications observed in the recovery room. This pilot, prospective, observational, clinical practice evaluation study was conducted in the Amiens University Hospital. Neuromuscular blockade was induced by rocuronium. At the end of the operation, deep neuromuscular blockade was reversed by sugammadex at the dose of 4mg/kg. Sixty-four patients were included: 31 patients received sugammadex at a dosage based on their real weight (RW) and 33 patients received a lower dose (based on ideal weight [IW]). For identical rocuronium doses calculated based on IBW, sugammadex doses were significantly lower in the IW group: 349 (± 65) mg versus 508 (± 75) mg (P<0.0001). Despite this dose reduction, neuromuscular blockade reversal took 115 (± 69) s in the IW group versus 87 (± 40) s in the RW group, but with no significant difference between the two groups (P=0.08). The intervals between injection of sugammadex and extubation (P=0.07) and transfer from the operating room to the recovery room (P=0.68) were also non-significantly longer in the IW group. The mean dose of sugammadex used by anaesthetists in the IW group was 4mg/kg of ideal weight increased by 35% to 50% (n

  4. Biofilm formation of Clostridium perfringens and its exposure to low-dose antimicrobials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey eCharlebois

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium perfringens is an opportunistic pathogen that can cause food poisoning in humans and various enterotoxemia in animal species. Very little is known on the biofilm of C. perfringens and its exposure to subminimal inhibitory concentrations of antimicrobials. This study was undertaken to address these issues. Most of the C. perfringens human and animal isolates tested in this study were able to form biofilm (230/277. Porcine clinical isolates formed significantly more biofilm than the porcine commensal isolates. A subgroup of clinical and commensal C. perfringens isolates was randomly selected for further characterization. Biofilm was found to protect C. perfringens bacterial cells from exposure to high concentrations of tested antimicrobials. Exposure to low doses of some of these antimicrobials tended to lead to a diminution of the biofilm formed. However, a few isolates showed an increase in biofilm formation when exposed to low doses of tylosin, bacitracin, virginiamycin and monensin. Six isolates were randomly selected for biofilm analysis using scanning laser confocal microscopy. Of those, four produced more biofilm in presence of low doses of bacitracin whereas biofilms formed without bacitracin were thinner and less elevated. An increase in the area occupied by bacteria in the biofilm following exposure to low doses of bacitracin was also observed in the majority of isolates. Morphology examination revealed flat biofilms with the exception of one isolate that demonstrated a mushroom-like biofilm. Matrix composition analysis showed the presence of proteins, beta 1-4 linked polysaccharides and extracellular DNA, but no poly-beta-1,6-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (PNAG. This study brings new information on the biofilm produced by C. perfringens and its exposure to low doses of antimicrobials.

  5. Dose-response relations for occupational exposure to arsenic and cadmium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaerup, L. [Dept. of Environmental Hygiene and Inst. of Environmental Medicine, Dept. of Epidemiology, Karolinska Inst. and Dept. of Occupational Medicine, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1992-12-31

    The dose-response relationship between arsenic exposure and lung cancer in occupationally exposed workers and between occupational cadmium exposure and various kidney effects was studied. A cohort of 3916 Swedish smelter workers showed an increased over-all mortality as well as excess relative risks of deaths due to cancer of the lung and stomach, cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease, compared with the Swedish general population, When a regional reference population was used, only lung cancer mortality remained significantly elevated. A positive dose-response relation was found between cumulative arsenic exposure and lung cancer risk, the relative risk among the highest exposed workers being more than ten-fold (SMR=1137) (95% confidence interval=588-1986). The dose-response relation was further strengthened when smoking data was added in a nested case-referent study within the smelter cohort. The interaction between arsenic and smoking appeared to be more than additive, but less than multiplicative. Cadmium in the blood has been considered to reflect recent exposure. It was shown in a group of cadmium copper alloy workers that the decay of cadmium in blood followed a two-exponential model. Blood cadmium can thus also be regarded as an estimate of the body burden after cessation of exposure. The use of blood cadmium as a dose estimate was further explored in a group of 440 cadmium exposed battery workers. A clear dose-response relation was found between cumulative blood cadmium and tubular proteinuria. It is recognised that highly exposed workers may develop a glomerula dysfunction in addition to their tubular damage. A questionnaire including questions of the history of kidney stones was sent to the living individuals and the next of kin to the deceased workers in a cohort of 902 cadmium exposed battery workers. There was in increased incidence of renal stones among the medium and highly exposed workers.

  6. Organ and effective dose rate coefficients for submersion exposure in occupational settings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veinot, K.G. [Easterly Scientific, Knoxville, TN (United States); Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Dewji, S.A.; Hiller, M.M. [Center for Radiation Protection Knowledge, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Eckerman, K.F.; Easterly, C.E. [Easterly Scientific, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2017-11-15

    External dose coefficients for environmental exposure scenarios are often computed using assumption on infinite or semi-infinite radiation sources. For example, in the case of a person standing on contaminated ground, the source is assumed to be distributed at a given depth (or between various depths) and extending outwards to an essentially infinite distance. In the case of exposure to contaminated air, the person is modeled as standing within a cloud of infinite, or semi-infinite, source distribution. However, these scenarios do not mimic common workplace environments where scatter off walls and ceilings may significantly alter the energy spectrum and dose coefficients. In this paper, dose rate coefficients were calculated using the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) reference voxel phantoms positioned in rooms of three sizes representing an office, laboratory, and warehouse. For each room size calculations using the reference phantoms were performed for photons, electrons, and positrons as the source particles to derive mono-energetic dose rate coefficients. Since the voxel phantoms lack the resolution to perform dose calculations at the sensitive depth for the skin, a mathematical phantom was developed and calculations were performed in each room size with the three source particle types. Coefficients for the noble gas radionuclides of ICRP Publication 107 (e.g., Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe, and Rn) were generated by folding the corresponding photon, electron, and positron emissions over the mono-energetic dose rate coefficients. Results indicate that the smaller room sizes have a significant impact on the dose rate per unit air concentration compared to the semi-infinite cloud case. For example, for Kr-85 the warehouse dose rate coefficient is 7% higher than the office dose rate coefficient while it is 71% higher for Xe-133. (orig.)

  7. Evaluation of the medical exposure doses regarding dental examinations with different X-ray instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi-Chi; Chuang, Keh-Shih; Yu, Cheng-Ching; Chao, Jiunn-Hsing; Hsu, Fang-Yuh

    2015-11-01

    Modern dental X-ray examination that consists of traditional form, panorama, and cone-beamed 3D technologies is one of the most frequent diagnostic applications nowadays. This study used the Rando Phantom and thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD) to measure the absorbed doses of radiosensitive organs recommended by International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), and whole body effective doses which were delivered due to dental X-ray examination performed with different types of X-ray instrument. Besides, enamel samples which performed reading with Electronic Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) procedure were also used to estimate the tooth doses. EPR is a dose reconstruction method of measuring free radicals induced by radiation exposure to the calcified tissue (mainly in the tooth enamel or bone) to evaluate the accepted high dose. The tooth doses estimated by TLD and EPR methods were compared. Relationships between the tooth doses and effective doses by dental X-ray examinations with different types of X-ray equipment were investigated in this work.

  8. Characterization of a lead breast shielding for dose reduction in computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correia, Paula Duarte; Brochi, Marco Aurelio Corte; Azevedo-Marques, Paulo Mazzoncini de, E-mail: pauladuarte@usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FM/RSP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina; Granzotti, Cristiano Roberto Fabri; Santos, Yago da Silva [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FFCLRP/RSP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras

    2014-07-15

    Objective: several studies have been published regarding the use of bismuth shielding to protect the breast in computed tomography (CT) scans and, up to the writing of this article, only one publication about barium shielding was found. The present study was aimed at characterizing, for the first time, a lead breast shielding. Materials and methods: the percentage dose reduction and the influence of the shielding on quantitative imaging parameters were evaluated. Dose measurements were made on a CT equipment with the aid of specific phantoms and radiation detectors. A processing software assisted in the qualitative analysis evaluating variations in average CT number and noise on images. Results: the authors observed a reduction in entrance dose by 30% and in CTDIvol by 17%. In all measurements, in agreement with studies in the literature, the utilization of cotton fiber as spacer object reduced significantly the presence of artifacts on the images. All the measurements demonstrated increase in the average CT number and noise on the images with the presence of the shielding. Conclusion: as expected, the data observed with the use of lead shielding were of the same order as those found in the literature about bismuth shielding. (author)

  9. Evaluation of the stepwise collimation method for the reduction of the patient dose in full spine radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Boram [Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Sun Medical Center, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sunyoung [Sun Medical Center, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Injeong [Seoul National University Hospital Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Myeonggeun [Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the dose reduction when using the stepwise collimation method for scoliosis patients undergoing full spine radiography. A Monte Carlo simulation was carried out to acquire dose vs. volume data for organs at risk (OAR) in the human body. While the effective doses in full spine radiography were reduced by 8, 15, 27 and 44% by using four different sizes of the collimation, the doses to the skin were reduced by 31, 44, 55 and 66%, indicating that the reduction of the dose to the skin is higher than that to organs inside the body. Although the reduction rates were low for the gonad, being 9, 14, 18 and 23%, there was more than a 30% reduction in the dose to the heart, suggesting that the dose reduction depends significantly on the location of the OARs in the human body. The reduction rate of the secondary cancer risk based on the excess absolute risk (EAR) varied from 0.6 to 3.4 per 10,000 persons, depending on the size of the collimation. Our results suggest that the stepwise collimation method in full spine radiography can effectively reduce the patient dose and the radiation-induced secondary cancer risk.

  10. Radiation dose reduction in the evaluation of scoliosis: an application of digital radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kushner, D.C.; Cleveland, R.H.; Herman, T.E.; Zaleske, D.J.; Ehrlich, M.G.; Correia, J.A.

    1986-10-01

    This report documents the clinical testing of scanning beam digital radiography as an imaging method in patients with scoliosis. This type of digital imaging requires a skin exposure of only 2.4 mR (0.619 microC/kg) per image, compared with the lowest possible posteroanterior screen-film exposure of 10 mR (2.58 microC/kg) at the chest and 60 mR (15.48 microC/kg) at the lumbar spine. Digital radiographic and screen-film images were obtained on multiple test objects and 273 patients. Scoliosis measurements using screen-film radiographs and digital radiographs were comparable to within a mean difference of 1 degrees at many different degrees of severity. The low-dose digital images were found to be useful and accurate for the detection and measurement of scoliosis after the first screen-film radiographs have excluded tumors and structural abnormalities.

  11. CT-guided brachytherapy of prostate cancer: reduction of effective dose from X-ray examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanin, Dmitriy B.; Biryukov, Vitaliy A.; Rusetskiy, Sergey S.; Sviridov, Pavel V.; Volodina, Tatiana V.

    2014-03-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is one of the most effective and informative diagnostic method. Though the number of CT scans among all radiographic procedures in the USA and European countries is 11% and 4% respectively, CT makes the highest contribution to the collective effective dose from all radiographic procedures, it is 67% in the USA and 40% in European countries [1-5]. Therefore it is necessary to understand the significance of dose value from CT imaging to a patient . Though CT dose from multiple scans and potential risk is of great concern in pediatric patients, this applies to adults as well. In this connection it is very important to develop optimal approaches to dose reduction and optimization of CT examination. International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) in its publications recommends radiologists to be aware that often CT image quality is higher than it is necessary for diagnostic confidence[6], and there is a potential to reduce the dose which patient gets from CT examination [7]. In recent years many procedures, such as minimally invasive surgery, biopsy, brachytherapy and different types of ablation are carried out under guidance of computed tomography [6;7], and during a procedures multiple CT scans focusing on a specific anatomic region are performed. At the Clinics of MRRC different types of treatment for patients with prostate cancer are used, incuding conformal CT-guided brachytherapy, implantation of microsources of I into the gland under guidance of spiral CT [8]. So, the purpose of the study is to choose optimal method to reduce radiation dose from CT during CT-guided prostate brachytherapy and to obtain the image of desired quality.

  12. European annual cosmic-ray dose map and estimation of population exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinelli, Giorgia; Gruber, Valeria; De Felice, Luca; Bossew, Peter; Hernández-Ceballos, Miguel Angel; Tollefsen, Tore; Mundigl, Stefan; De Cort, Marc

    2017-04-01

    The Earth is continually bombarded by high energy cosmic-ray particles and the worldwide average exposure to cosmic rays represents about 13% of the total annual effective dose received by the population. Therefore assessment of cosmic-ray exposure at ground level is of great interest to better understand population exposure to ionizing radiation. In the present work the annual effective dose resulting from cosmic radiation (photons, direct ionizing and neutron components) at ground level has been calculated following a simple methodology based only on elevation data. The European annual cosmic-ray dose map, at 1 km resolution, is presented and described. It reports the annual effective dose that a person may receive from cosmic rays at ground level, and it ranges from about 300 to 4000 microSv. The spatial distribution of the cosmic-ray dose rate over Europe obviously reflects the elevation map. The map shows that for half of the considered territory the annual cosmic-ray dose is below 360 microSv and for less than 1% above 1000 μmicroSv. The highest values are obtained at the highest places of Europe, such as the Alps, the Pyrenees and in eastern Turkey (with mountains above 3000 masl), in the latter reaching the maximum value of 4000 microSv. On the contrary, the minimum value of 300 microSv at sea level coincides mainly with coastal locations. The map is part of the European Atlas of Natural Radiation, and it will be useful to estimate the annual dose that the public may receive from natural radioactivity. Moreover, thanks to the availability of population data, the annual cosmic-ray collective dose has been evaluated and population-weighted average annual effective dose (per capita) due to cosmic ray has been estimated for each European country considered. The values range from about 300 microSv (Iceland) to 400 microSv (Turkey) per capita. The average value for all the countries considered is 330 microSv per capita. This work represents a starting point in

  13. The 1997 determination of the Australian standards of exposure and absorbed dose at {sup 60}Co

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huntley, R.B.; Boas, J.F. [Australian Radiation Laboratory, Yallambie, VIC (Australia); Van der Gaast, H. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia)

    1998-05-01

    The arrangements for the maintenance of the Australian standards for {sup 60}Co are described in detail. The primary standards are a graphite cavity chamber for exposure/air kerma and a graphite calorimeter for absorbed dose. These secondary standards are described and their responses in corresponding {sup 90}Sr reference sources are reported. Accurate ratios between the Australian Radiation Laboratory (ARL) and Australian Nuclear Science and Technology (ANSTO) {sup 90}Sr reference sources are derived for use in future calibrations. The value of 28.8 years for the half-life of {sup 90}Sr is confirmed. The usefulness of {sup 90}Sr reference source measurements in quality assurance is discussed. The charge sensitivity and linearity of the ANSTO electrometers are reported by two different methods and are compared with previous results. Calibration factors for all the secondary standard ionization chambers are given, in terms of exposure, air kerma and absorbed dose to water. Calibration factors are also given for most of the chambers in terms of absorbed dose to graphite. The methods of deriving the calibration factors are explained in detail, including all the corrections applied to both the primary and secondary standard measurements. Three alternative methods of deriving the absorbed dose to water calibration factors are compared. The reported calibration factors are compared with previous results. Changes in the Australian units of exposure, air kerma and absorbed dose to graphite and water are derived from changes in the corresponding calibration factors. The Australian units of exposure and air kerma have not changed significantly since 1990. The Australian unit of absorbed dose to graphite is now 1.1 % smaller than in 1993 and 1.3 % smaller than in 1990. The Australian unit of absorbed dose to water is now 1.4 % smaller than in 1993, but is only 0.9 % smaller than in 1990. Comparisons of the Australian standards of exposure/air kerma and absorbed dose with

  14. A model of cardiovascular disease giving a plausible mechanism for the effect of fractionated low-dose ionizing radiation exposure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark P Little

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is the main cause of coronary heart disease and stroke, the two major causes of death in developed society. There is emerging evidence of excess risk of cardiovascular disease at low radiation doses in various occupationally exposed groups receiving small daily radiation doses. Assuming that they are causal, the mechanisms for effects of chronic fractionated radiation exposures on cardiovascular disease are unclear. We outline a spatial reaction-diffusion model for atherosclerosis and perform stability analysis, based wherever possible on human data. We show that a predicted consequence of multiple small radiation doses is to cause mean chemo-attractant (MCP-1 concentration to increase linearly with cumulative dose. The main driver for the increase in MCP-1 is monocyte death, and consequent reduction in MCP-1 degradation. The radiation-induced risks predicted by the model are quantitatively consistent with those observed in a number of occupationally-exposed groups. The changes in equilibrium MCP-1 concentrations with low density lipoprotein cholesterol concentration are also consistent with experimental and epidemiologic data. This proposed mechanism would be experimentally testable. If true, it also has substantive implications for radiological protection, which at present does not take cardiovascular disease into account. The Japanese A-bomb survivor data implies that cardiovascular disease and cancer mortality contribute similarly to radiogenic risk. The major uncertainty in assessing the low-dose risk of cardiovascular disease is the shape of the dose response relationship, which is unclear in the Japanese data. The analysis of the present paper suggests that linear extrapolation would be appropriate for this endpoint.

  15. Dose reduction in multidetector CT of the urinary tract. Studies in a phantom model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coppenrath, E.; Meindl, T.; Herzog, P.; Khalil, R.; Mueller-Lisse, U.; Krenn, L.; Reiser, M.; Mueller-Lisse, U.G. [Ludwig-Maximilians University of Munich, Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany)

    2006-09-15

    A novel ureter phantom was developed for investigations of image quality and dose in CT urography. The ureter phantom consisted of a water box (14 cm x 32 cm x 42 cm) with five parallel plastic tubes (diameter 2.7 mm) filled with different concentrations of contrast media (1.88-30 mg iodine/ml). CT density of the tubes and noise of the surrounding water were determined using two multidetector scanners (Philips MX8000 with four rows, Siemens Sensation 16 with 16 rows) with varying tube current-time product (15-100 mAs per slice), voltage (90 kV, 100 kV, 120 kV), pitch (0.875-1.75), and slice thickness (1 mm, 2 mm, 3.2 mm). Contrast-to-noise ratio as a parameter of image quality was correlated with dose (CTDI) and was compared with image evaluation by two radiologists. The CT densities of different concentrations of contrast media and contrast-to-noise ratio were significantly higher when low voltages (90 kV versus 120 kV, 100 kV versus 120 kV) were applied. Smaller slice thickness (1 mm versus 2 mm) did not change CT density but decreased contrast-to-noise ratio due to increased noise. Contrast phantom studies showed favourable effects of low tube voltage on image quality in the low dose range. This may facilitate substantial dose reduction in CT urography. (orig.)

  16. Student′s music exposure: Full-day personal dose measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilesh Jeevandas Washnik

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown that collegiate level music students are exposed to potentially hazardous sound levels. Compared to professional musicians, collegiate level music students typically do not perform as frequently, but they are exposed to intense sounds during practice and rehearsal sessions. The purpose of the study was to determine the full-day exposure dose including individual practice and ensemble rehearsals for collegiate student musicians. Sixty-seven college students of classical music were recruited representing 17 primary instruments. Of these students, 57 completed 2 days of noise dose measurements using Cirrus doseBadge programed according to the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health criterion. Sound exposure was measured for 2 days from morning to evening, ranging from 7 to 9 h. Twenty-eight out of 57 (49% student musicians exceeded a 100% daily noise dose on at least 1 day of the two measurement days. Eleven student musicians (19% exceeded 100% daily noise dose on both days. Fourteen students exceeded 100% dose during large ensemble rehearsals and eight students exceeded 100% dose during individual practice sessions. Approximately, half of the student musicians exceeded 100% noise dose on a typical college schedule. This finding indicates that a large proportion of collegiate student musicians are at risk of developing noise-induced hearing loss due to hazardous sound levels. Considering the current finding, there is a need to conduct hearing conservation programs in all music schools, and to educate student musicians about the use and importance of hearing protection devices for their hearing.

  17. Radiation dose reduction in soft tissue neck CT using adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vachha, Behroze; Brodoefel, Harald; Wilcox, Carol; Hackney, David B; Moonis, Gul

    2013-12-01

    To compare objective and subjective image quality in neck CT images acquired at different tube current-time products (275 mAs and 340 mAs) and reconstructed with filtered-back-projection (FBP) and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR). HIPAA-compliant study with IRB approval and waiver of informed consent. 66 consecutive patients were randomly assigned to undergo contrast-enhanced neck CT at a standard tube-current-time-product (340 mAs; n = 33) or reduced tube-current-time-product (275 mAs, n = 33). Data sets were reconstructed with FBP and 2 levels (30%, 40%) of ASIR-FBP blending at 340 mAs and 275 mAs. Two neuroradiologists assessed subjective image quality in a blinded and randomized manner. Volume CT dose index (CTDIvol), dose-length-product (DLP), effective dose, and objective image noise were recorded. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was computed as mean attenuation in a region of interest in the sternocleidomastoid muscle divided by image noise. Compared with FBP, ASIR resulted in a reduction of image noise at both 340 mAs and 275 mAs. Reduction of tube current from 340 mAs to 275 mAs resulted in an increase in mean objective image noise (p=0.02) and a decrease in SNR (p = 0.03) when images were reconstructed with FBP. However, when the 275 mAs images were reconstructed using ASIR, the mean objective image noise and SNR were similar to those of the standard 340 mAs CT images reconstructed with FBP (p>0.05). Subjective image noise was ranked by both raters as either average or less-than-average irrespective of the tube current and iterative reconstruction technique. Adapting ASIR into neck CT protocols reduced effective dose by 17% without compromising image quality. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Assessment of the exposure to and dose from radon decay products in normally occupied homes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopke, P.K.; Jensen, B.; Li, C.S.; Montassier, N.; Wasiolek, P. [Clarkson Univ., Potsdam, NY (United States); Cavallo, A.J.; Gatsby, K.; Socolow, R.H. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); James, A.C. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-05-01

    The exposure to radon decay products has been assessed in seven homes in the northeastern United States and southeastern Canada. In two of the houses, there was a single individual who smoked cigarettes. There were a variety of heating and cooking appliances among these homes. These studies have provide 565 measurements of the activity-weighted size distributions in these houses. The median value for the equilibrium factor was 0.408 as compared with the previously employed value of 0.50. Using the recently adopted ICRP lung deposition and dosimetry model, the hourly equivalent lung dose rate per unit, radon exposure was estimated for each measured size distribution. Differences between houses with smokers present and absent were noted in the exposure conditions, but the resulting dose rate per unit of radon gas concentration was essentially the same for the two groups. Expressed in terms of ICRP`s unit of effective dose for members of the public, the mean dose rate conversion coefficient with respect to radon gas concentration found in this study was 3.8 nSv h{sup -} Bq{sup -} m{sup -3}. 26 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Assessment of Effective Dose Equivalent from Internal Exposure to 222Rn in Ramsar City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tayyeb Allahverdi Pourfallah

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction In this study, effective dose equivalent for the public due to internal exposure to 222radon (222Rn was evaluated in three regions of Ramsar, a northern coastal city in Iran.                                Materials and Methods Measurements were carried out using a radon monitoring device. Outdoor and indoor radon concentrations were measured within 24 hours with an integration interval of 3 hours. Regions were selected with respect to our previous study on areas of Ramsar with high levels of environmental background radiation. Results This study showed that indoor 222Rn concentration reached to 465 Bq/m3 in one of the selected regions (Talesh Mahalleh in early morning (5-8 a.m.. Our study also showed that the average effective dose equivalents (due to both indoor and outdoor exposures in the selected regions (Talesh Mahalleh, Sadat Mahalleh, and Chaparsar were 9.5±2.8, 5.1±2.1, and 3.2±1.2 mSv/y, respectively. Conclusion It is clear that the annual effective dose from internal exposure to 222Rn in areas of Ramsar with high levels of natural radiation was significantly higher than the maximum annual effective dose permissible for public.

  20. Monte Carlo 20 and 45 MeV Bremsstrahlung and dose-reduction calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goosman, D.R.

    1984-08-14

    The SANDYL electron-photon coupled Monte Carlo code has been compared with previously published experimental bremsstrahlung data at 20.9 MeV electron energy. The code was then used to calculate forward-directed spectra, angular distributions and dose-reduction factors for three practical configurations. These are: 20 MeV electrons incident on 1 mm of W + 59 mm of Be, 45 MeV electrons of 1 mm of W and 45 MeV electrons on 1 mm of W + 147 mm of Be. The application of these results to flash radiography is discussed. 7 references, 12 figures, 1 table.

  1. Radiation dose reduction in CT-guided periradicular injections in lumbar spine: Feasibility of a new institutional protocol for improved patient safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artner Juraj

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Image guided spinal injections are successfully used in the management of low back pain and sciatica. The main benefit of CT-guided injections is the safe, fast and precise needle placement, but the radiation exposure remains a serious concern. The purpose of the study was to test a new institutional low-dose protocol for CT-guided periradicular injections in lumbar spine to reduce radiation exposure while increasing accuracy and safety for the patients. Methods We performed a retrospective analysis of a prospective database during a 4-month period (Oct-Dec 2011 at a German University hospital using a newly established low-dose-CT-protocol for periradicular injections in patients suffering from lumbar disc herniation and nerve root entrapment. Inclusion criteria were acute or chronic nerve root irritation due to lumbar disc hernia, age over 18, compliance and informed consent. Excluded were patients suffering from severe obesity (BMI > 30, coagulopathy, allergy to injected substances, infection and non-compliant patients. Outcome parameters consisted of the measured dose length product (mGycm2, the amount of scans, age, gender, BMI and the peri-interventional complications. The results were compared to 50 patients, treated in the standard-interventional CT-protocol for spinal injections, performed in June-Oct 2011, who met the above mentioned inclusion criteria. Results A total amount of 100 patients were enrolled in the study. A significant radiation dose reduction (average 85.31% was achieved using the institutional low-dose protocol compared to standard intervention mode in CT-guided periradicular injections in lumbar spine. Using the low-dose protocol did not increase the complications rate in the analyzed cohort. Conclusions Low-dose-CT-protocols for lumbar perineural injections significantly reduce the exposure to radiation of non-obese patients without an increase of complications. This increases long-time patient

  2. Estimation of Effective Dose from External Exposure in The Six Prefectures adjacent to Fukushima Prefecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miyatake Hirokazu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident caused a release of radionuclides. Radionuclides were deposited on the ground not only in Fukushima prefecture but also in nearby prefectures. Since the accident, measurement of radiation in environment such as air dose rate and deposition density of radionuclides has been performed by many organizations and universities. In particular, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA has been performing observations of air dose rate using a car-borne survey system continuously and over wide areas. In our study, using the data measured by JAEA, we estimated effective dose from external exposure in the six prefectures adjacent to Fukushima prefecture. Since car-borne survey was started a few months later after the accident, measured air dose rate in this method is mainly contributed by 137Cs and 134Cs whose half-lives are relatively long. Therefore, based on air dose rate of 137Cs and 134Cs and the ratio of deposition density of short-half-life nuclides to that of 137Cs and 134Cs, we also estimated effective dose contributed from not only 137Cs and 134Cs but also other short-half-life nuclides. We compared the effective dose estimated by the method above with that of UNSCEAR and measured data using personal dosimeters in some areas.

  3. Estimation of Effective Dose from External Exposure in The Six Prefectures adjacent to Fukushima Prefecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyatake, Hirokazu; Yoshizawa, Nobuaki; Hirakawa, Sachiko; Murakami, Kana; Takizawa, Mari; Kawai, Masaki; Sato, Osamu; Takagi, Shunji; Suzuki, Gen

    2017-09-01

    The Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident caused a release of radionuclides. Radionuclides were deposited on the ground not only in Fukushima prefecture but also in nearby prefectures. Since the accident, measurement of radiation in environment such as air dose rate and deposition density of radionuclides has been performed by many organizations and universities. In particular, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has been performing observations of air dose rate using a car-borne survey system continuously and over wide areas. In our study, using the data measured by JAEA, we estimated effective dose from external exposure in the six prefectures adjacent to Fukushima prefecture. Since car-borne survey was started a few months later after the accident, measured air dose rate in this method is mainly contributed by 137Cs and 134Cs whose half-lives are relatively long. Therefore, based on air dose rate of 137Cs and 134Cs and the ratio of deposition density of short-half-life nuclides to that of 137Cs and 134Cs, we also estimated effective dose contributed from not only 137Cs and 134Cs but also other short-half-life nuclides. We compared the effective dose estimated by the method above with that of UNSCEAR and measured data using personal dosimeters in some areas.

  4. CHANGES IN THE RAT EEG SPECTRA AND CORE TEMPERATURE AFTER EXPOSURE TO DIFFERENT DOSES OF CHLORPYRIFOS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our previous study showed that single exposure to 25 mg/kg (p.o.) of organophsphate pesticide chlorpyrifos (CHP) led to significant alterations in all EEG frequency bands within 0.1-50 Hz range, reduction in core temperature (Tc) and motor activity (MA). The alterations in EEG pe...

  5. Dose reduction in abdominal computed tomography: intraindividual comparison of image quality of full-dose standard and half-dose iterative reconstructions with dual-source computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Matthias S; Wüst, Wolfgang; Brand, Michael; Stahl, Christian; Allmendinger, Thomas; Schmidt, Bernhard; Uder, Michael; Lell, Michael M

    2011-07-01

    We sought to evaluate the image quality of iterative reconstruction in image space (IRIS) in half-dose (HD) datasets compared with full-dose (FD) and HD filtered back projection (FBP) reconstruction in abdominal computed tomography (CT). To acquire data with FD and HD simultaneously, contrast-enhanced abdominal CT was performed with a dual-source CT system, both tubes operating at 120 kV, 100 ref.mAs, and pitch 0.8. Three different image datasets were reconstructed from the raw data: Standard FD images applying FBP which served as reference, HD images applying FBP and HD images applying IRIS. For the HD data sets, only data from 1 tube detector-system was used. Quantitative image quality analysis was performed by measuring image noise in tissue and air. Qualitative image quality was evaluated according to the European Guidelines on Quality criteria for CT. Additional assessment of artifacts, lesion conspicuity, and edge sharpness was performed. : Image noise in soft tissue was substantially decreased in HD-IRIS (-3.4 HU, -22%) and increased in HD-FBP (+6.2 HU, +39%) images when compared with the reference (mean noise, 15.9 HU). No significant differences between the FD-FBP and HD-IRIS images were found for the visually sharp anatomic reproduction, overall diagnostic acceptability (P = 0.923), lesion conspicuity (P = 0.592), and edge sharpness (P = 0.589), while HD-FBP was rated inferior. Streak artifacts and beam hardening was significantly more prominent in HD-FBP while HD-IRIS images exhibited a slightly different noise pattern. Direct intrapatient comparison of standard FD body protocols and HD-IRIS reconstruction suggest that the latest iterative reconstruction algorithms allow for approximately 50% dose reduction without deterioration of the high image quality necessary for confident diagnosis.

  6. High interindividual variability in dose-dependent reduction in speed of movement after exposing C. elegans to shock waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Baker Angstman

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In blast-related mild traumatic brain injury (br-mTBI little is known about the connections between initial trauma and expression of individual clinical symptoms. Partly due to limitations of current in vitro and in vivo models of br-mTBI, reliable prediction of individual short- and long-term symptoms based on known blast input has not yet been possible. Here we demonstrate a dose-dependent effect of shock wave exposure on C. elegans using shock waves that share physical characteristics with those hypothesized to induce br-mTBI in humans. Increased exposure to shock waves resulted in decreased mean speed of movement while increasing the proportion of worms rendered paralyzed. Recovery of these two behavioral symptoms was observed during increasing post-traumatic waiting periods. Although effects were observed on a population-wide basis, large interindividual variability was present between organisms exposed to the same highly controlled conditions. Reduction of cavitation by exposing worms to shock waves in polyvinyl alcohol resulted in reduced effect, implicating primary blast effects as damaging components in shock wave induced trauma. Growing worms on NGM agar plates led to the same general results in initial shock wave effect in a standard medium, namely dose-dependence and high interindividual variability, as raising worms in liquid cultures. Taken together, these data indicate that reliable prediction of individual clinical symptoms based on known blast input as well as drawing conclusions on blast input from individual clinical symptoms is not feasible in br-mTBI.

  7. Effect of dose timing in relation to food intake on systemic exposure to blonanserin

    OpenAIRE

    Saruwatari, Junji; Yasui-Furukori, Norio; Inoue, Yoshimasa; Kaneko, Sunao; サルワタリ, ジュンジ; フルコオリ, ノリオ; イノウエ, ヨシマサ; カネコ, スナオ; 猿渡, 淳二; 古郡, 規雄

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Blonanserin is a novel potent dopamine D2 and serotonin 5-HT2 antagonist for treating schizophrenia. The aim of this study was to investigate prandial effects on systemic exposure to blonanserin in healthy volunteers, with particular attention paid to the effect of dose timing relative to meal intake.Methods Volunteers received a single 2-mg oral dose of blonanserin under the following conditions: fasting, 30 min before eating a standard meal; or 30 min or 2 or 4 h after eating the ...

  8. Improved image quality and radiation dose reduction in liver dynamic CT scan with the protocol change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Yu Jin; Cho, Pyong Kon [Radiological Science, Catholic University of Daegu, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    The purpose is reducing radiation dose while maintaining of image quality in liver dynamic CT(LDCT) scan, by protocols generally used and the tube voltage set at a low level protocol compared to the radiation dose and image quality. The target is body mass index, 18.5-24 patients out of 40 patients who underwent the ACT(abdominal CT). Group A(tube voltage : 120 kVp, SAFIRE strength 1) of 20 people among 40 people, to apply the general abdominal CT scan protocol, group B(tube voltage : 100 kVp, apply SAFIRE strength 0-5) was 20 people, set a lower tube voltage. Image quality evaluation was setting a region of interest(ROI) in the liver parenchyma, aorta, superior mesenteric artery (SMA), celiac trunk, visceral fat of arterial phase. In the ROI were compared by measuring the noise, signal to noise ratio(SNR), contrast to noise ratio(CNR), CT number. In addition, qualitative assessments to evaluate two people in the rich professional experience in Radiology by 0-3 points. We compared the total radiation dose, dose length product(DLP) and effective dose, volume computed tomography dose index(CTDIvol). The higher SAFIRE in the tube voltage 100 kVp, noise is reduced, CT number was increased. Thus, SNR and CNR was increased higher the SAFIRE step. Compared with the tube voltage 120 kVp, noise, SNR, CNR was most similar in SAFIRE strength 2 and 3. Qualitative assessment SAFIRE strength 2 is the most common SAFIRE strength 2 the most common qualitative assessment, if the tube voltage of 100 kVp when the quality of the images better evaluated was SAFIRE strength 1. Dose was reduced from 21.69%, in 100 kVp than 120 kVp. In the case of a relatively high BMI is not LDCT scan, When it is shipped from the factory tube voltage is set higher, unnecessary radiation exposure when considering the reality that is concerned, when according to the results of this study, set a lower tube voltage and adjust the SAFIRE strength to 1 or 2, the radiation without compromising image quality

  9. Occupational dose reduction at Department of Energy contractor facilities: Study of ALARA programs. Status 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dionne, B.J.; Meinhold, C.B.; Khan, T.A.; Baum, J.W.

    1992-08-01

    This report provides the US Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors with information that will be useful for reducing occupational radiation doses at DOE`s nuclear facilities. In 1989 and 1990, health physicists from the Brookhaven National Laboratory`s (BNL) ALARA Center visited twelve DOE contractor facilities with annual collective dose equivalents greater than 100 person-rem (100 person-cSv). The health physicists interviewed radiological safety staff, engineers, and training personnel who were responsible for dose control. The status of ALARA practices at the major contractor facilities was compared with the requirements and recommendation in DOE Order 5480.11 ``Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers`` and PNL-6577 ``Health Physics Manual of Good Practices for Reducing Radiation Exposure to Levels that are as Low as Reasonably Achievable.`` The information and data collected are described and examples of successful practices are presented. The findings on the status of the DOE Contractor ALARA Programs are summarized and evaluated. In addition, the supplement to this report contains examples of good-practice documents associated with implementing the major elements of a formally documented ALARA program for a major DOE contractor facility.

  10. The evaluation the magnitude radiation exposure dose rate in digital radiography room design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwiyanto, Agung; Setia Budi, Wahyu; Hardiman, Gagoek

    2017-12-01

    This study discusses the dose rate in digital radiography room, buit according to meet the provisions of KEMENKES No.1014 / Menkes / SK / XI / 2008 and Regulation of BAPETEN No. 8 / 2011. The provisions primary concern of radiation safety, not comfort, by considering the space design. There are five aspects to consider in designing the space: functionality, comfort, security, movement activities and aesthetics. However provisions only met three aspects of the design, which are a function, security and movement activity. Therefore, it is necessary to evaluate digital radiography room in terms of its ability to control external radiation exposure to be safe and comfortable The dose rate is measured by the range of primary and secondary radiation in the observation points by using Surveymeter. All data are obtained by the preliminary survey prior to the study. Furthermore, the review of digital radiography room is done based on architectural design theory. The dose rate for recommended improvement room is recalculated using the same method as the actual room with the help of computer modeling. The result of dose rate calculation at the inner and outer part of digital radiography observation room shows that in-room dose for a week at each measuring point exceeds the allowable dose limit both for staff and public. During a week of observation, the outdoor dose at some measuring points exceeds the dose limit set by the KEMENKES No.1014 / Menkes / SK / XI / 2008 and Regulation BEPETEN No 8/2011. Meanwhile, the result of dose rate calculation in the inner and outer part of the improved digital radiography room can meet the applicable regulations better.

  11. [The exposure dose of the sella turcica in panoramic dental radiography with an intraoral radiogenic source].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastremoli, A; Cucchi, G; Ciminari, R

    1991-06-01

    Panoramic dental radiography using an intraoral X-ray source exposes critical organs, such as the crystalline and the thyroid, as well as organs of fundamental importance such as the pituitary gland, to X-rays. An experimental study was carried out to assess the exposure dose to the sella turcica during the radiological examination of the upper and lower dental arches using an X-ray source within the oral cavity. The comprehensive exposure dose for the upper and lower dental arches exceeded that found in orthopantomography (110 micro Gy/examination vs 47 micro Gy/examination) with errors which are respectively inferior to 15% and 30%. The authors conclude that the risk of provoking anatomical or functional changes of the pituitary gland is extremely remote using this type of examination.

  12. Comparison of ESD and major organ absorbed doses of 5 year old standard guidekines and clinical exposure conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, A Ram; Ahn, Sung Min [Dept. of Radiological Science, The Graduate School, Gachon University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, In Ja [Dept. of Radiologic technology, Dongnam health University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    Pediatrics are more sensibility to radiation than adults and because they are organs that are not completely grown, they have a life expectancy that can be adversely affected by exposure. Therefore, the management of exposure dose is more important than the case of adult. The purpose of this study was to determine the suitability of the 10 year old phantom for the 5 year old pediatric's recommendation and the incident surface dose, and to measure the organ absorbed dose. This study is compared the organ absorbed dose and the entrance surface dose in the clinical conditions at 5 and 10 years old pediatric. Clinical 5 year old condition was slightly higher than recommendation condition and 10 year old condition was very high. In addition, recommendation condition ESD was found to be 43% higher than the ESD of the 5 year old group and the ESD of the 10 year old group was 126% higher than that of the 5 year old group. The recommended ESD at 5 years old and the ESD according to clinical imaging conditions were 31.6%. There was no significant difference between the 5 year old recommended exposure conditions and the organ absorbed dose due to clinical exposure conditions, but there was a large difference between the Chest and Pelvic. However, it was found that there was a remarkable difference when comparing the organ absorbed dose by 10 year clinical exposure conditions. Therefore, more detailed standard exposure dose for the recommended dose of pediatric should be studied.

  13. Characterization of glycidol-hemoglobin adducts as biomarkers of exposure and in vivo dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honda, Hiroshi, E-mail: honda.hiroshi@kao.co.jp [R and D Safety Science Research, Kao Corporation, 2606 Akabane, Ichikai-Machi, Haga-Gun, Tochigi 321-3497 (Japan); Törnqvist, Margareta [Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Environmental Chemistry Unit, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Nishiyama, Naohiro [R and D Safety Science Research, Kao Corporation, 2606 Akabane, Ichikai-Machi, Haga-Gun, Tochigi 321-3497 (Japan); Kasamatsu, Toshio, E-mail: kasamatsu.toshio@kao.co.jp [R and D Safety Science Research, Kao Corporation, 2606 Akabane, Ichikai-Machi, Haga-Gun, Tochigi 321-3497 (Japan)

    2014-03-15

    Hemoglobin adducts have been used as biomarkers of exposure to reactive chemicals. Glycidol, an animal carcinogen, has been reported to form N-(2,3-dihydroxy-propyl)valine adducts to hemoglobin (diHOPrVal). To support the use of these adducts as markers of glycidol exposure, we investigated the kinetics of diHOPrVal formation and its elimination in vitro and in vivo. Five groups of rats were orally administered a single dose of glycidol ranging from 0 to 75 mg/kg bw, and diHOPrVal levels were measured 24 h after administration. A dose-dependent increase in diHOPrVal levels was observed with high linearity (R{sup 2} = 0.943). Blood sampling at different time points (1, 10, 20, or 40 days) from four groups administered glycidol at 12 mg/kg bw suggested a linear decrease in diHOPrVal levels compatible with the normal turnover of rat erythrocytes (life span, 61 days), with the calculated first-order elimination rate constant (k{sub el}) indicating that the diHOPrVal adduct was chemically stable. Then, we measured the second-order rate constant (k{sub val}) for the reaction of glycidol with N-terminal valine in rat and human hemoglobin in in vitro experiments with whole blood. The k{sub val} was 6.7 ± 1.1 and 5.6 ± 1.3 (pmol/g globin per μMh) in rat and human blood, respectively, indicating no species differences. In vivo doses estimated from k{sub val} and diHOPrVal levels were in agreement with the area under the (concentration–time) curve values determined in our earlier toxicokinetic study in rats. Our results indicate that diHOPrVal is a useful biomarker for quantification of glycidol exposure and for risk assessment. - Highlight: • Glycidol-hemoglobin adduct (diHOPrVal) was characterized for exposure evaluation. • We studied the kinetics of diHOPrVal formation and elimination in vitro and in vivo. • Dose dependent formation and chemical stability were confirmed in the rat study. • In vivo dose (AUC) of glycidol could be estimated from diHOPrVal levels

  14. Meta-analysis on occupational exposure to pesticides--neurobehavioral impact and dose-response relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-Baron, Monika; Knapp, Guido; Schäper, Michael; van Thriel, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    While the health impact of high exposures to pesticides is acknowledged, the impact of chronic exposures in the absence of acute poisonings is controversial. A systematic analysis of dose-response relationships is still missing. Its absence may provoke alternative explanations for altered performances. Consequently, opportunities for health prevention in the occupational and environmental field may be missed. Objectives were (1) quantification of the neurotoxic impact of pesticides by an analysis of functional alterations in workers measured by neuropsychological performance tests, (2) estimates of dose-response relationships on the basis of exposure duration, and (3) exploration of susceptible subgroups. The meta-analysis employed a random effects model to obtain overall effects for individual performance tests. Twenty-two studies with a total of 1758 exposed and 1260 reference individuals met the inclusion criteria. At least three independent outcomes were available for twenty-six performance variables. Significant performance effects were shown in adults and referred to both cognitive and motor performances. Effect sizes ranging from dRE=-0.14 to dRE=-0.67 showed consistent outcomes for memory and attention. Relationships between effect sizes and exposure duration were indicated for individual performance variables and the total of measured performances. Studies on adolescents had to be analyzed separately due to numerous outliers. The large variation among outcomes hampered the analysis of the susceptibility in this group, while data on female workers was too scant for the analysis. Relationships exist between the impact of pesticides on performances and exposure duration. A change in test paradigms would help to decipher the impact more specifically. The use of biomarkers appropriate for lower exposures would allow a better prevention of neurotoxic effects due to occupational and environmental exposure. Intervention studies in adolescents seem warranted to

  15. Radiation dose reduction during transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt implantation using a new imaging technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spink, C; Avanesov, M; Schmidt, T; Grass, M; Schoen, G; Adam, G; Bannas, P; Koops, A

    2017-01-01

    To compare patient radiation dose in patients undergoing transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) implantation before and after an imaging-processing technology upgrade. In our retrospective single-center-study, cumulative air kerma (AK), cumulative dose area product (DAP), total fluoroscopy time and contrast agent were collected from an age- and BMI-matched collective of 108 patients undergoing TIPS implantation. 54 procedures were performed before and 54 after the technology upgrade. Mean values were calculated and compared using two-tailed t-tests. Two blinded, independent readers assessed DSA image quality using a four-rank likert scale and the Wilcoxcon test. The new technology demonstrated a significant reduction of 57% of mean DAP (402.8 vs. 173.3Gycm(2), ptechnology. Time of fluoroscopy (26.4 vs. 27.8min, p=0.45) and amount of contrast agent (109.4 vs. 114.9ml, p=0.62) did not differ significantly between the two groups. The DSA image quality of the new technology was not inferior (2.66 vs. 2.77, p=0.56). In our study the new imaging technology halved radiation dose in patients undergoing TIPS maintaining sufficient image quality without a significant increase in radiation time or contrast consumption. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. SU-F-J-16: Planar KV Imaging Dose Reduction Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gershkevitsh, E; Zolotuhhin, D [North Estonia Medical Centre, Tallinn (Estonia)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: IGRT has become an indispensable tool in modern radiotherapy with kV imaging used in many departments due to superior image quality and lower dose when compared to MV imaging. Many departments use manufacturer supplied protocols for imaging which are not always optimised between image quality and radiation dose (ALARA). Methods: Whole body phantom PBU-50 (Kyoto Kagaku ltd., Japan) for imaging in radiology has been imaged on Varian iX accelerator (Varian Medical Systems, USA) with OBI 1.5 system. Manufacturer’s default protocols were adapted by modifying kV and mAs values when imaging different anatomical regions of the phantom (head, thorax, abdomen, pelvis, extremities). Images with different settings were independently reviewed by two persons and their suitability for IGRT set-up correction protocols were evaluated. The suitable images with the lowest mAs were then selected. The entrance surface dose (ESD) for manufacturer’s default protocols and modified protocols were measured with RTI Black Piranha (RTI Group, Sweden) and compared. Image quality was also measured with kVQC phantom (Standard Imaging, USA) for different protocols. The modified protocols have been applied for clinical work. Results: For most cases optimized protocols reduced the ESD on average by a factor of 3(range 0.9–8.5). Further reduction in ESD has been observed by applying bow-tie filter designed for CBCT. The largest reduction in dose (12.2 times) was observed for Thorax lateral protocol. The dose was slightly increased (by 10%) for large pelvis AP protocol. Conclusion: Manufacturer’s default IGRT protocols could be optimised to reduce the ESD to the patient without losing the necessary image quality for patient set-up correction. For patient set-up with planar kV imaging the bony anatomy is mostly used and optimization should focus on this aspect. Therefore, the current approach with anthropomorphic phantom is more advantageous in optimization over standard kV quality

  17. Research of protocols for optimization of exposure dose in abdominopelic CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Dong Hee [Dept. of Radiological Science, Far East University, Eumseong (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    This study measured the exposure dose during abdominal-pelvic CT exam which occupies 70% of CT exam and tried to propose a protocol for optimized exposure dose in abdomen and pelvis without affecting the imagery interpretation. The study scanned abdomen-pelvis using the current clinical scan method, the 120 kVp, auto exposure control(AEC), as 1 phase. As for the newly proposed 2 phase scan method, the study divided into 1 phase abdomen exam and 2 phase pelvis exam and each conducted tube voltage 120 kVp, AEC for abdomen exam, and fixed tube current method in 120 kVp, 100, 150, 200, 250, 300, 350, 400 mA for pelvis exam. The exposure dose value was compared using CTDIVOL, DLP value measured during scan, and average value of CT attenuation coefficient, noise, SNR from each scan image were obtained to evaluate the image. As for the result, scanning of 2 phase showed significant difference compared to 1 phase. In CTDIVOL value, the 2 phase showed 26% decrease in abdomen, 1.8∼59.5% decrease in pelvis for 100∼250 mA, 12.7%∼30% increase in pelvis for 300∼400 mA. Also, DLP value showed 53% decrease in abdomen and 41∼81% decrease in pelvis when scanned by 2 phase compared to 1 phase, but it was not statistically significant. As for the SNR, when scanning 2 phase close to heart, scanning 1 phase close to pelvis, scanning and scanning 1 phase at upper and lower abdomen, it was higher when scanning 2 phase for 200∼ 250 mA. Also, the CT number and noise was overall similar, but the noise was high close to pelvis. However, when scanning 2 phase for 250 mA close to pelvis, the noise value came out similar to 1 phase, and did not show statistically significant difference. It seems when separating pelvis to scan in 250 mA rather than 400 mA in 1 phase as before, it is expected to have reduced effect of exposure dose without difference in the quality of image. Thus, for patients who often get abdominal-pelvic CT exam, fertile women or children, this study proposes 2

  18. Evaluation of Radiation Dose Exposure for Silicon Pixel Detectors in ALICE Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Morando, M; CERN. Geneva

    1996-01-01

    An estimation of radiation dose exposure expected for the Inner Tracking System (ITS) of ALICE experiment at the future LHC collider is presented. In particular, the two innermost layers of the silicon ITS, located at radial distances of 3.9 and 7.6cm are based on hybrid silicon pixel detectors. A possible scenario for the first ten years operation is presented assuming a data taking with beams of lead, calcium and proton.

  19. Vitamin E Reversed Apoptosis of Cardiomyocytes Induced by Exposure to High Dose Formaldehyde During Mice Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dongyuan; Jiang, Zhirong; Gong, Bing; Dou, Yue; Song, Mingxuan; Song, Xiaoxia; Tian, Yu

    2017-10-21

    In this study, we investigated the protection effect of Vitamin E (Vit E) on formaldehyde (FA) exposure during pregnancy induced apoptosis of cardiomyocytes, and used an HL-1 cell line to confirmed the findings in vivo.Pregnant mice received different doses of FA (0.5 mg/kg, 1.0 mg/kg, 1.5 mg/kg, 0.1 μg Vit E, or 1.5 mg/kg + 0.1 μg Vit E). TUNEL staining was used to reveal the apoptosis in cardiomyocytes, and SOD, MDA, GSH, Livin, and Caspase-3 in cardiomyocytes were detected by ELISA, RT-PCR, and Western blot. For in vitro study, HL-1 cells were treated with vehicle, 5 μmol/L FA, 25 μmol/L FA, 50 μmol/L FA, 10 mg/L Vit. E, and 50 μmol/L FA+ 10 mg/L Vit E, respectively. CCK-8 assay and flow cytometry were used to evaluate cell vitality and apoptosis. A high dose of FA exposure led to cytotoxicity in both pregnant mice and offspring, as TUNEL staining revealed a significant apoptosis of cardiomyocytes, and the alternation in SOD, GSH, MDA, Livin, and Caspase-3 was found in cardiomyocytes. 0.1 μg Vit. E could reverse high doses of FA exposure induced apoptosis of cardiomyocytes in both pregnant mice and offspring. The in vitro study revealed that FA exposure induced a decrease of cell viability and increased cell apoptosis, as well as oxidative stress in HL-1 cells with alternation in SOD, GSH, MDA, Livin, and Caspase-3.This study revealed a high dose of FA induced oxidative stress and apoptosis of cardiomyocytes in both pregnant mice and offspring, and Vit E supplement during pregnancy reversed the systemic and myocardial toxicity of FA.

  20. Shutdown dose rate analysis with CAD geometry, Cartesian/tetrahedral mesh, and advanced variance reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biondo, Elliott D., E-mail: biondo@wisc.edu; Davis, Andrew, E-mail: davisa@engr.wisc.edu; Wilson, Paul P.H., E-mail: wilsonp@engr.wisc.edu

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • A CAD-based shutdown dose rate analysis workflow has been implemented. • Cartesian and superimposed tetrahedral mesh are fully supported. • Biased and unbiased photon source sampling options are available. • Hybrid Monte Carlo/deterministic techniques accelerate photon transport. • The workflow has been validated with the FNG-ITER benchmark problem. - Abstract: In fusion energy systems (FES) high-energy neutrons born from burning plasma activate system components to form radionuclides. The biological dose rate that results from photons emitted by these radionuclides after shutdown—the shutdown dose rate (SDR)—must be quantified for maintenance planning. This can be done using the Rigorous Two-Step (R2S) method, which involves separate neutron and photon transport calculations, coupled by a nuclear inventory analysis code. The geometric complexity and highly attenuating configuration of FES motivates the use of CAD geometry and advanced variance reduction for this analysis. An R2S workflow has been created with the new capability of performing SDR analysis directly from CAD geometry with Cartesian or tetrahedral meshes and with biased photon source sampling, enabling the use of the Consistent Adjoint Driven Importance Sampling (CADIS) variance reduction technique. This workflow has been validated with the Frascati Neutron Generator (FNG)-ITER SDR benchmark using both Cartesian and tetrahedral meshes and both unbiased and biased photon source sampling. All results are within 20.4% of experimental values, which constitutes satisfactory agreement. Photon transport using CADIS is demonstrated to yield speedups as high as 8.5·10{sup 5} for problems using the FNG geometry.

  1. Exposure to low dose of gamma radiation enhances the excision repair in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutta, K.; Verma, N.C. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    1998-08-01

    The effect of low doses of ionizing and nonionizing radiation on the radiation response of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae toward ionizing and nonionizing radiation was studied. The wild-type strain D273-10B on exposure to 54 Gy gamma radiation (resulting in about 10% cell killing) showed enhanced resistance to subsequent exposure to UV radiation. This induced UV resistance increased with the incubation time between the initial gamma radiation stress and the UV irradiation. Exposure to low doses of UV light on the other hand showed no change in gamma or UV radiation response of this strain. The strains carrying a mutation at rad52 behaved in a way similar to the wild type, but with slightly reduced induced response. In contrast to this, the rad3 mutants, defective in excision repair, showed no induced UV resistance. Removal of UV-induced pyrimidine dimers in wild-type yeast DNA after UV irradiation was examined by analyzing the sites recognized by UV endonuclease from Micrococcus luteus. The samples that were exposed to low doses of gamma radiation before UV irradiation were able to repair the pyrimidine dimers more efficiently than the samples in which low gamma irradiation was omitted. The nature of enhanced repair was studied by scoring the frequency of induced gene conversion and reverse mutation at trp and ilv loci respectively in strain D7, which showed similar enhanced UV resistance induced by low-dose gamma irradiation. The induced repair was found to be essentially error-free. These results suggest that irradiation of strain D273-10B with low doses of gamma radiation enhances its capability for excision repair of UV-induced pyrimidine dimers. (author)

  2. Assessment of medical radiation exposure to patients and ambient doses in several diagnostic radiology departments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulieman, A.; Elhadi, T.; Babikir, E.; Alkhorayef, M.; Alnaaimi, M.; Alduaij, M.; Bradley, D. A.

    2017-11-01

    In many countries diagnostic medical exposures typically account for a very large fraction of the collective effective dose that can be assigned to anthropological sources and activities. This in part flags up the question of whether sufficient steps are being taken in regard to potential dose saving from such medical services. As a first step, one needs to survey doses to compare against those of best practice. The present study has sought evaluation of the radiation protection status and patient doses for certain key radiological procedures in four film-based radiology departments within Sudan. The radiation exposure survey, carried out using a survey meter and quality control test tools, involved a total of 299 patients their examinations being carried out at one or other of these four departments. The entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) was determined from exposure settings using DosCal software and an Unfors -Xi-meter. The mean ESAK for x-ray examination of the chest was 0.30±0.1 mGy, for the skull it was 0.96±0.7 mGy, for the abdomen 0.85±0.01 mGy, for spinal procedures 1.30±0.6 mGy and for procedures involving the limbs it was 0.43±0.3 mGy. Ambient dose-rates in the reception area, at the closed door of the x-ray room, recorded instantaneous values of up to 100 μSv/h. In regard to protection, the associated levels were found to be acceptable in three of the four departments, corrective action being required for one department, regular quality control also being recommended.

  3. The impact of CT radiation dose reduction and iterative reconstruction algorithms from four different vendors on coronary calcium scoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemink, M.J.; Takx, R.A.P.; Jong, P.A. de; Budde, R.P.; Bleys, R.L.; Das, M.; Wildberger, J.E.; Prokop, M.; Buls, N.; Mey, J. de; Schilham, A.M.; Leiner, T.

    2014-01-01

    o analyse the effects of radiation dose reduction and iterative reconstruction (IR) algorithms on coronary calcium scoring (CCS).Fifteen ex vivo human hearts were examined in an anthropomorphic chest phantom using computed tomography (CT) systems from four vendors and examined at four dose levels

  4. The impact of CT radiation dose reduction and iterative reconstruction algorithms from four different vendors on coronary calcium scoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemink, M.J.; Takx, R.A.P.; Jong, P.A. de; Budde, R.P.; Bleys, R.L.; Das, M.; Wildberger, J.E.; Prokop, M.; Buls, N.; Mey, J. de; Schilham, A.M.; Leiner, T.

    2014-01-01

    To analyse the effects of radiation dose reduction and iterative reconstruction (IR) algorithms on coronary calcium scoring (CCS).Fifteen ex vivo human hearts were examined in an anthropomorphic chest phantom using computed tomography (CT) systems from four vendors and examined at four dose levels

  5. Effect of dose reduction on image registration and image quality for cone-beam CT in radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loutfi-Krauss, B.; Koehn, J.; Bluemer, N.; Kara, E.; Scherf, C.; Roedel, C.; Ramm, U.; Licher, J. [Universitaetsklinikum Frankfurt, Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Onkologie, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Freundl, K.; Koch, T. [Sozialstiftung Bamberg - MVZ am Bruderwald, Klinik und Praxis fuer Radioonkologie und Strahlentherapie, Bamberg (Germany)

    2014-09-20

    The additional radiation exposure applied to patients undergoing cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) for image registration in radiation therapy is of great concern. Since a decrease in CBCT dose is linked to a degradation of image quality, the consequences of dose reduction on the registration process have to be investigated. This paper examines image quality and registration of low-contrast structures on an Elekta XVI for the two treatment areas prostate and chest while gradually decreasing the mAs per frame and the number of projections per CBCT to achieve dose reduction. Ideal results for image quality were obtained for 1.6 mAs/frame and 377 projections in prostate scans and 0.63 mAs/frame and 440 projections in chest images. Lower as well as higher total mAs lead to a decrease in image quality. In spite of poor image quality, registration can be successfully performed even for lowest possible settings. The results for registration allow an extensive dose reduction in both treatment areas. Very low mAs, however, do not qualify for clinical use because subjective judgment of the registration process is impossible. Compared to default presets the use of settings for acceptable image quality already permit a decrease in exposure of about 40 % (29.0 to 16.7 mGy) in prostate scans and 60 % (18.3 to 7.7 mGy) in chest scans. (orig.) [German] Die zusaetzliche Strahlenbelastung von Patienten bei der Lagerungskontrolle mit einer Kegelstrahl-Computertomographie (CBCT) in der Strahlentherapie ist nicht zu vernachlaessigen. Die Reduzierung der Dosis durch das CBCT ist mit einer Verschlechterung der Bildqualitaet verbunden. Aus diesem Grund ist die Untersuchung der Effekte einer Dosisreduktion von grosser Bedeutung. Diese Arbeit untersucht die Bildqualitaet und Bildregistrierung in Bereichen niedrigen Kontrasts mit einem Kegelstrahl CT der Firma Elekta. Betrachtet werden die Behandlungsregionen Prostata und Thorax. Die Dosisreduktion wird durch stufenweise Verringerung der

  6. Combined exposure to low doses of pesticides causes decreased birth weights in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hass, Ulla; Christiansen, Sofie; Axelstad, Marta; Scholze, Martin; Boberg, Julie

    2017-09-01

    Decreased birth weight is a common effect of many pesticides in reproductive toxicity studies, but there are no empirical data on how pesticides act in combination on this endpoint. We hypothesized that a mixture of six pesticides (cyromazine, MCPB, pirimicarb, quinoclamine, thiram, and ziram) would decrease birth weight, and that these mixture effects could be predicted by the Dose Addition model. Data for the predictions were obtained from the Draft Assessment Reports of the individual pesticides. A mixture of equi-effective doses of these pesticides was tested in two studies in Wistar rats, showing mixture effects in good agreement with the additivity predictions. Significantly lower birth weights were observed when compounds were present at individual doses below their no-observed adverse effect levels (NOAELs). These results emphasize the need for cumulative risk assessment of pesticides to avoid potentially serious impact of mixed exposure on prenatal development and pregnancy in humans. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. High Antigen Dose Is Detrimental to Post-Exposure Vaccine Protection against Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolf Billeskov

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb, the etiologic agent of tuberculosis (TB, causes 1.8M deaths annually. The current vaccine, BCG, has failed to eradicate TB leaving 25% of the world’s population with latent Mtb infection (LTBI, and 5–10% of these people will reactivate and develop active TB. An efficient therapeutic vaccine targeting LTBI could have an enormous impact on global TB incidence, and could be an important aid in fighting multidrug resistance, which is increasing globally. Here we show in a mouse model using the H56 (Ag85B-ESAT-6-Rv2660 TB vaccine candidate that post-exposure, but not preventive, vaccine protection requires low vaccine antigen doses for optimal protection. Loss of protection from high dose post-exposure vaccination was not associated with a loss of overall vaccine response magnitude, but rather with greater differentiation and lower functional avidity of vaccine-specific CD4 T cells. High vaccine antigen dose also led to a decreased ability of vaccine-specific CD4 T cells to home into the Mtb-infected lung parenchyma, a recently discovered important feature of T cell protection in mice. These results underscore the importance of T cell quality rather than magnitude in TB-vaccine protection, and the significant role that antigen dosing plays in vaccine-mediated protection.

  8. Combined methodology for estimating dose rates and health effects from exposure to radioactive pollutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunning, D.E. Jr.; Leggett, R.W.; Yalcintas, M.G.

    1980-12-01

    The work described in the report is basically a synthesis of two previously existing computer codes: INREM II, developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); and CAIRD, developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The INREM II code uses contemporary dosimetric methods to estimate doses to specified reference organs due to inhalation or ingestion of a radionuclide. The CAIRD code employs actuarial life tables to account for competing risks in estimating numbers of health effects resulting from exposure of a cohort to some incremental risk. The combined computer code, referred to as RADRISK, estimates numbers of health effects in a hypothetical cohort of 100,000 persons due to continuous lifetime inhalation or ingestion of a radionuclide. Also briefly discussed in this report is a method of estimating numbers of health effects in a hypothetical cohort due to continuous lifetime exposure to external radiation. This method employs the CAIRD methodology together with dose conversion factors generated by the computer code DOSFACTER, developed at ORNL; these dose conversion factors are used to estimate dose rates to persons due to radionuclides in the air or on the ground surface. The combination of the life table and dosimetric guidelines for the release of radioactive pollutants to the atmosphere, as required by the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1977.

  9. Effect of dose timing in relation to food intake on systemic exposure to blonanserin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saruwatari, Junji; Yasui-Furukori, Norio; Inoue, Yoshimasa; Kaneko, Sunao

    2010-09-01

    Blonanserin is a novel potent dopamine D(2) and serotonin 5-HT(2) antagonist for treating schizophrenia. The aim of this study was to investigate prandial effects on systemic exposure to blonanserin in healthy volunteers, with particular attention paid to the effect of dose timing relative to meal intake. Volunteers received a single 2-mg oral dose of blonanserin under the following conditions: fasting, 30 min before eating a standard meal; or 30 min or 2 or 4 h after eating the meal. Plasma concentrations of blonanserin were measured using validated high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. Ratios and 90% confidence intervals of the geometric means compared with the fasting condition indicated that the maximum concentrations of blonanserin (C(max)) significantly increased with dosing 30 min before meal intake, and 30 min and 2 and 4 h after meal intake, yielding by 330%, 239%, 272%, and 138%, respectively. The truncated area under the concentration-time curve (AUC(last)) also increased by 386%, 201%, 256%, and 155%, respectively. There was no difference in values of the time to reach maximum concentration between the fasting and the four fed states. Food intake increased the systemic exposure to blonanserin for all time intervals investigated in this study. The marked effect of food on the bioavailability of blonanserin should be taken into account in its dosing schedules.

  10. Low‐Dose Bisphenol A Exposure: A Seemingly Instigating Carcinogenic Effect on Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhe

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the fifth most common cause of cancer death in the world and the second most common fatal cancer in women. Epidemiological studies and clinical data have indicated that hormones, including estrogen, progesterone, and prolactin, play important roles in the initiation and progression of breast cancer. Bisphenol A (BPA) is one of the most commonly used and thoroughly studied endocrine disruptors. It can be released from consumer products and deposited in the environment, thus creating potential for human exposure through oral, inhaled, and dermal routes. Some recent reviews have summarized the known mechanisms of endocrine disruptions by BPA in human diseases, including obesity, reproductive disorders, and birth defects. However, large knowledge gaps still exist on the roles BPA may play in cancer initiation and development. Evidence from animal and in vitro studies has suggested an association between increased incidence of breast cancer and BPA exposure at doses below the safe reference doses that are the most environmentally relevant. Most current studies have paid little attention to the cancer‐promoting properties of BPA at low doses. In this review, recent findings on the carcinogenic effects of low‐dose BPA on breast cancer and discussed possible biologic mechanisms are summarized. PMID:28251049

  11. Low-dose CT of the paranasal sinuses. Minimizing X-ray exposure with spectral shaping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wuest, Wolfgang [Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Radiological Institute, Erlangen (Germany); Radiological Institute, Erlangen (Germany); May, Matthias; Saake, Marc; Brand, Michael; Uder, Michael; Lell, Michael [Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Radiological Institute, Erlangen (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    Shaping the energy spectrum of the X-ray beam has been shown to be beneficial in low-dose CT. This study's aim was to investigate dose and image quality of tin filtration at 100 kV for pre-operative planning in low-dose paranasal CT imaging in a large patient cohort. In a prospective trial, 129 patients were included. 64 patients were randomly assigned to the study protocol (100 kV with additional tin filtration, 150mAs, 192 x 0.6-mm slice collimation) and 65 patients to the standard low-dose protocol (100 kV, 50mAs, 128 x 0.6-mm slice collimation). To assess the image quality, subjective parameters were evaluated using a five-point scale. This scale was applied on overall image quality and contour delineation of critical anatomical structures. All scans were of diagnostic image quality. Bony structures were of good diagnostic image quality in both groups, soft tissues were of sufficient diagnostic image quality in the study group because of a high level of noise. Radiation exposure was very low in both groups, but significantly lower in the study group (CTDI{sub vol} 1.2 mGy vs. 4.4 mGy, p < 0.001). Spectral optimization (tin filtration at 100 kV) allows for visualization of the paranasal sinus with sufficient image quality at a very low radiation exposure. (orig.)

  12. Reduction in radiation dose with reconstruction technique in the brain perfusion CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, H. J.; Lee, H. K.; Song, H.; Ju, M. S.; Dong, K. R.; Chung, W. K.; Cho, M. S.; Cho, J. H.

    2011-12-01

    The principal objective of this study was to verify the utility of the reconstruction imaging technique in the brain perfusion computed tomography (PCT) scan by assessing reductions in the radiation dose and analyzing the generated images. The setting used for image acquisition had a detector coverage of 40 mm, a helical thickness of 0.625 mm, a helical shuttle mode scan type and a rotation time of 0.5 s as the image parameters used for the brain PCT scan. Additionally, a phantom experiment and an animal experiment were carried out. In the phantom and animal experiments, noise was measured in the scanning with the tube voltage fixed at 80 kVp (kilovolt peak) and the level of the adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) was changed from 0% to 100% at 10% intervals. The standard deviation of the CT coefficient was measured three times to calculate the mean value. In the phantom and animal experiments, the absorbed dose was measured 10 times under the same conditions as the ones for noise measurement before the mean value was calculated. In the animal experiment, pencil-type and CT-dedicated ionization chambers were inserted into the central portion of pig heads for measurement. In the phantom study, as the level of the ASIR changed from 0% to 100% under identical scanning conditions, the noise value and dose were proportionally reduced. In our animal experiment, the noise value was lowest when the ASIR level was 50%, unlike in the phantom study. The dose was reduced as in the phantom study.

  13. Low-Dose CT of the Paranasal Sinuses: Minimizing X-Ray Exposure with Spectral Shaping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuest, Wolfgang; May, Matthias; Saake, Marc; Brand, Michael; Uder, Michael; Lell, Michael

    2016-11-01

    Shaping the energy spectrum of the X-ray beam has been shown to be beneficial in low-dose CT. This study's aim was to investigate dose and image quality of tin filtration at 100 kV for pre-operative planning in low-dose paranasal CT imaging in a large patient cohort. In a prospective trial, 129 patients were included. 64 patients were randomly assigned to the study protocol (100 kV with additional tin filtration, 150mAs, 192x0.6-mm slice collimation) and 65 patients to the standard low-dose protocol (100 kV, 50mAs, 128 × 0.6-mm slice collimation). To assess the image quality, subjective parameters were evaluated using a five-point scale. This scale was applied on overall image quality and contour delineation of critical anatomical structures. All scans were of diagnostic image quality. Bony structures were of good diagnostic image quality in both groups, soft tissues were of sufficient diagnostic image quality in the study group because of a high level of noise. Radiation exposure was very low in both groups, but significantly lower in the study group (CTDIvol 1.2 mGy vs. 4.4 mGy, p image quality at a very low radiation exposure. • Spectral optimization (tin filtration) is beneficial to low-dose parasinus CT • Tin filtration at 100 kV yields sufficient image quality for pre-operative planning • Diagnostic parasinus CT can be performed with an effective dose <0.05 mSv.

  14. Chronic exposure of low dose salinomycin inhibits MSC migration capability in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherzad, Agmal; Hackenberg, Stephan; Froelich, Katrin; Rak, Kristen; Hagen, Rudolf; Taeger, Johannes; Bregenzer, Maximillian; Kleinsasser, Norbert

    2016-03-01

    Salinomycin is a polyether antiprotozoal antibiotic that is used as a food additive, particularly in poultry farming. By consuming animal products, there may be a chronic human exposure to salinomycin. Salinomycin inhibits the differentiation of preadipocytes into adipocytes. As human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) may differentiate into different mesenchymal cells, it thus appeared worthwhile to investigate whether chronic salinomycin exposure impairs the functional properties of MSC and induces genotoxic effects. Bone marrow MSC were treated with low-dose salinomycin (100 nM) (MSC-Sal) for 4 weeks, while the medium containing salinomycin was changed every other day. Functional changes were evaluated and compared to MSC without salinomycin treatment (MSC-control). MSC-Sal and MSC-control were positive for cluster of differentiation 90 (CD90), CD73 and CD44, and negative for CD34. There were no differences observed in cell morphology or cytoskeletal structures following salinomycin exposure. The differentiation into adipocytes and osteocytes was not counteracted by salinomycin, and proliferation capability was not inhibited following salinomycin exposure. The migration of MSC-Sal was attenuated significantly as compared to the MSC-control. There were no genotoxic effects after 4 weeks of salinomycin exposure. The present study shows an altered migration capacity as a sign of functional impairment of MSC induced by chronic salinomycin exposure. Further in vitro toxicological investigations, particularly with primary human cells, are required to understand the impact of chronic salinomycin consumption on human cell systems.

  15. Impact of preemptive warfarin dose reduction on anticoagulation after initiation of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole or levofloxacin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Abrar; Stephens, John C; Kaus, Carol A; Fay, William P

    2008-08-01

    Antibiotics can potentiate warfarin anticoagulation. While preemptive warfarin dose reduction (DR) upon initiation of antibiotics has been advocated by experts, there are no published data regarding the efficacy of this strategy vs. the conventional strategy of not changing warfarin dose and carefully following international normalized ratio (INR) results. We compared the efficacy of preemptive 10-20% DR vs. no change in warfarin dosing in 40 chronically anticoagulated patients initiating trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) or levofloxacin. Eighteen patients received preemptive warfarin DR and 22 control patients underwent no change in warfarin dosing. There was no difference between the DR and control groups in the mean INR before beginning antibiotic therapy (2.53 +/- 0.12 vs. 2.52 +/- 0.11; P > 0.9). Mean interval between initiation of antibiotic and next INR was 5.1 +/- 0.4 vs. 4.7 +/- 0.5 days for DR vs. control patients, respectively (P > 0.5). For both TMP-SMX and levofloxacin, patients managed with a preemptive warfarin DR strategy did not exhibit a statistically significant change in the INR after initiating antibiotic therapy. In contrast, for each antibiotic, control group patients exhibited a significant increase in mean post-antibiotic INR compared to mean pre-antibiotic INR, though the effect was more pronounced in patients treated with TMP-SMX than with levofloxacin. Of DR group patients who were treated with TMP-SMX, none (0/8) developed a subtherapeutic INR, while 40% (4/10) of levofloxacin-treated patients developed a sub-therapeutic INR. Supra-therapeutic INR results led to transient interruption of warfarin dosing in 2 patients (11%) in the DR group vs. 12 patients (55%) in the control group (P = 0.007). Prophylactic warfarin DR of 10-20% is effective in maintaining therapeutic anticoagulation in patients initiating TMP-SMX. An expectant strategy consisting of no change in warfarin dosing with short-term INR follow-up appears reasonable in

  16. A combination of spatial and recursive temporal filtering for noise reduction when using region of interest (ROI) fluoroscopy for patient dose reduction in image guided vascular interventions with significant anatomical motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setlur Nagesh, S. V.; Khobragade, P.; Ionita, C.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.

    2015-03-01

    Because x-ray based image-guided vascular interventions are minimally invasive they are currently the most preferred method of treating disorders such as stroke, arterial stenosis, and aneurysms; however, the x-ray exposure to the patient during long image-guided interventional procedures could cause harmful effects such as cancer in the long run and even tissue damage in the short term. ROI fluoroscopy reduces patient dose by differentially attenuating the incident x-rays outside the region-of-interest. To reduce the noise in the dose-reduced regions previously recursive temporal filtering was successfully demonstrated for neurovascular interventions. However, in cardiac interventions, anatomical motion is significant and excessive recursive filtering could cause blur. In this work the effects of three noise-reduction schemes, including recursive temporal filtering, spatial mean filtering, and a combination of spatial and recursive temporal filtering, were investigated in a simulated ROI dose-reduced cardiac intervention. First a model to simulate the aortic arch and its movement was built. A coronary stent was used to simulate a bioprosthetic valve used in TAVR procedures and was deployed under dose-reduced ROI fluoroscopy during the simulated heart motion. The images were then retrospectively processed for noise reduction in the periphery, using recursive temporal filtering, spatial filtering and a combination of both. Quantitative metrics for all three noise reduction schemes are calculated and are presented as results. From these it can be concluded that with significant anatomical motion, a combination of spatial and recursive temporal filtering scheme is best suited for reducing the excess quantum noise in the periphery. This new noise-reduction technique in combination with ROI fluoroscopy has the potential for substantial patient-dose savings in cardiac interventions.

  17. Estimation of radiation exposure from lung cancer screening program with low-dose computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Su Yeon; Jun, Jae Kwan [Graduate School of Cancer Science and Policy, National Cancer Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    The National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) demonstrated that screening with Low-dose Computed Tomography (LDCT) screening reduced lung cancer mortality in a high-risk population. Recently, the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) gave a B recommendation for annual LDCT screening for individuals at high-risk. With the promising results, Korea developed lung cancer screening guideline and is planning a pilot study for implementation of national lung cancer screening. With widespread adoption of lung cancer screening with LDCT, there are concerns about harms of screening, including high false-positive rates and radiation exposure. Over the 3 rounds of screening in the NLST, 96.4% of positive results were false-positives. Although the initial screening is performed at low dose, subsequent diagnostic examinations following positive results additively contribute to patient's lifetime exposure. As with implementing a large-scale screening program, there is a lack of established risk assessment about the effect of radiation exposure from long-term screening program. Thus, the purpose of this study was to estimate cumulative radiation exposure of annual LDCT lung cancer screening program over 20-year period.

  18. Radiation dose reduction in medical x-ray CT via Fourier-based iterative reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahimian, Benjamin P; Zhao, Yunzhe; Huang, Zhifeng; Fung, Russell; Mao, Yu; Zhu, Chun; Khatonabadi, Maryam; DeMarco, John J; Osher, Stanley J; McNitt-Gray, Michael F; Miao, Jianwei

    2013-03-01

    A Fourier-based iterative reconstruction technique, termed Equally Sloped Tomography (EST), is developed in conjunction with advanced mathematical regularization to investigate radiation dose reduction in x-ray CT. The method is experimentally implemented on fan-beam CT and evaluated as a function of imaging dose on a series of image quality phantoms and anonymous pediatric patient data sets. Numerical simulation experiments are also performed to explore the extension of EST to helical cone-beam geometry. EST is a Fourier based iterative algorithm, which iterates back and forth between real and Fourier space utilizing the algebraically exact pseudopolar fast Fourier transform (PPFFT). In each iteration, physical constraints and mathematical regularization are applied in real space, while the measured data are enforced in Fourier space. The algorithm is automatically terminated when a proposed termination criterion is met. Experimentally, fan-beam projections were acquired by the Siemens z-flying focal spot technology, and subsequently interleaved and rebinned to a pseudopolar grid. Image quality phantoms were scanned at systematically varied mAs settings, reconstructed by EST and conventional reconstruction methods such as filtered back projection (FBP), and quantified using metrics including resolution, signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs), and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs). Pediatric data sets were reconstructed at their original acquisition settings and additionally simulated to lower dose settings for comparison and evaluation of the potential for radiation dose reduction. Numerical experiments were conducted to quantify EST and other iterative methods in terms of image quality and computation time. The extension of EST to helical cone-beam CT was implemented by using the advanced single-slice rebinning (ASSR) method. Based on the phantom and pediatric patient fan-beam CT data, it is demonstrated that EST reconstructions with the lowest scanner flux setting of 39 m

  19. Evaluation of dose reduction and image quality in CT colonography: Comparison of low-dose CT with iterative reconstruction and routine-dose CT with filtered back projection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagata, Koichi [Kameda Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Kamogawa, Chiba (Japan); Jichi Medical University, Department of Radiology, Tochigi (Japan); National Cancer Center, Cancer Screening Technology Division, Research Center for Cancer Prevention and Screening, Tokyo (Japan); Fujiwara, Masanori; Mogi, Tomohiro; Iida, Nao [Kameda Medical Center Makuhari, Department of Radiology, Chiba (Japan); Kanazawa, Hidenori; Sugimoto, Hideharu [Jichi Medical University, Department of Radiology, Tochigi (Japan); Mitsushima, Toru [Kameda Medical Center Makuhari, Department of Gastroenterology, Chiba (Japan); Lefor, Alan T. [Jichi Medical University, Department of Surgery, Tochigi (Japan)

    2015-01-15

    To prospectively evaluate the radiation dose and image quality comparing low-dose CT colonography (CTC) reconstructed using different levels of iterative reconstruction techniques with routine-dose CTC reconstructed with filtered back projection. Following institutional ethics clearance and informed consent procedures, 210 patients underwent screening CTC using automatic tube current modulation for dual positions. Examinations were performed in the supine position with a routine-dose protocol and in the prone position, randomly applying four different low-dose protocols. Supine images were reconstructed with filtered back projection and prone images with iterative reconstruction. Two blinded observers assessed the image quality of endoluminal images. Image noise was quantitatively assessed by region-of-interest measurements. The mean effective dose in the supine series was 1.88 mSv using routine-dose CTC, compared to 0.92, 0.69, 0.57, and 0.46 mSv at four different low doses in the prone series (p < 0.01). Overall image quality and noise of low-dose CTC with iterative reconstruction were significantly improved compared to routine-dose CTC using filtered back projection. The lowest dose group had image quality comparable to routine-dose images. Low-dose CTC with iterative reconstruction reduces the radiation dose by 48.5 to 75.1 % without image quality degradation compared to routine-dose CTC with filtered back projection. (orig.)

  20. Radiation dose reduction in soft tissue neck CT using adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vachha, Behroze, E-mail: bvachha@partners.org [Neuroradiology Division, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 55 Fruit Street, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Brodoefel, Harald; Wilcox, Carol; Hackney, David B.; Moonis, Gul [Department of Radiology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, 330 Brookline Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To compare objective and subjective image quality in neck CT images acquired at different tube current–time products (275 mA s and 340 mA s) and reconstructed with filtered-back-projection (FBP) and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR). Materials and methods: HIPAA-compliant study with IRB approval and waiver of informed consent. 66 consecutive patients were randomly assigned to undergo contrast-enhanced neck CT at a standard tube-current–time-product (340 mA s; n = 33) or reduced tube-current–time-product (275 mA s, n = 33). Data sets were reconstructed with FBP and 2 levels (30%, 40%) of ASIR-FBP blending at 340 mA s and 275 mA s. Two neuroradiologists assessed subjective image quality in a blinded and randomized manner. Volume CT dose index (CTDIvol), dose-length-product (DLP), effective dose, and objective image noise were recorded. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was computed as mean attenuation in a region of interest in the sternocleidomastoid muscle divided by image noise. Results: Compared with FBP, ASIR resulted in a reduction of image noise at both 340 mA s and 275 mA s. Reduction of tube current from 340 mA s to 275 mA s resulted in an increase in mean objective image noise (p = 0.02) and a decrease in SNR (p = 0.03) when images were reconstructed with FBP. However, when the 275 mA s images were reconstructed using ASIR, the mean objective image noise and SNR were similar to those of the standard 340 mA s CT images reconstructed with FBP (p > 0.05). Subjective image noise was ranked by both raters as either average or less-than-average irrespective of the tube current and iterative reconstruction technique. Conclusion: Adapting ASIR into neck CT protocols reduced effective dose by 17% without compromising image quality.

  1. Radiotracer dose reduction in integrated PET/MR: implications from national electrical manufacturers association phantom studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehmigen, Mark; Ziegler, Susanne; Jakoby, Bjoern W; Georgi, Jens-Christoph; Paulus, Daniel H; Quick, Harald H

    2014-08-01

    With the replacement of ionizing CT by MR imaging, integrated PET/MR in selected clinical applications may reduce the overall patient radiation dose when compared with PET/CT. Further potential for radiotracer dose reduction, while maintaining PET image quality (IQ) in integrated PET/MR, may be achieved by increasing the PET acquisition duration to match the longer time needed for MR data acquisition. To systematically verify this hypothesis under controlled conditions, this dose-reduction study was performed using a standardized phantom following the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) IQ protocol. All measurements were performed on an integrated PET/MR whole-body hybrid system. The NEMA IQ phantom was filled with water and a total activity of 50.35 MBq of (18)F-FDG. The sphere-to-background activity ratio was 8:1. Multiple PET data blocks of 20-min acquisition time were acquired in list-mode format and were started periodically at multiples of the (18)F-FDG half-lives. Different sinograms (2, 4, 8, and 16 min in duration) were reconstructed. Attenuation correction of the filled NEMA phantom was performed using a CT-based attenuation map template. The attenuation-corrected PET images were then quantitatively evaluated following the NEMA IQ protocol, investigating contrast recovery, background variability, and signal-to-noise ratio. Image groups with half the activity and twice the acquisition time were evaluated. For better statistics, the experiment was repeated 3 times. Contrast recovery, background variability, and signal-to-noise ratio remained almost constant over 3 half-life periods when the decreasing radiotracer activity (100%, 50%, 25%, and 12.5%) was compensated by increasing acquisition time (2, 4, 8, and 16 min). The variation of contrast recovery over 3 half-life periods was small (-6% to +7%), with a mean variation of 2%, compared with the reference setting (100%, 2 min). The signal-to-noise ratio of the hot spheres showed only minor

  2. Model-based iterative reconstruction for reduction of radiation dose in abdominopelvic CT: comparison to adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasaka, Koichiro; Katsura, Masaki; Akahane, Masaaki; Sato, Jiro; Matsuda, Izuru; Ohtomo, Kuni

    2013-12-01

    To evaluate dose reduction and image quality of abdominopelvic computed tomography (CT) reconstructed with model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) compared to adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR). In this prospective study, 85 patients underwent referential-, low-, and ultralow-dose unenhanced abdominopelvic CT. Images were reconstructed with ASIR for low-dose (L-ASIR) and ultralow-dose CT (UL-ASIR), and with MBIR for ultralow-dose CT (UL-MBIR). Image noise was measured in the abdominal aorta and iliopsoas muscle. Subjective image analyses and a lesion detection study (adrenal nodules) were conducted by two blinded radiologists. A reference standard was established by a consensus panel of two different radiologists using referential-dose CT reconstructed with filtered back projection. Compared to low-dose CT, there was a 63% decrease in dose-length product with ultralow-dose CT. UL-MBIR had significantly lower image noise than L-ASIR and UL-ASIR (all p0.65), or diagnostic performance for adrenal nodules (p>0.87). MBIR significantly improves image noise and streak artifacts compared to ASIR, and can achieve radiation dose reduction without severely compromising image quality.

  3. Reduction of radiation dose during the complex explorations using additional filter in pediatric patients; Reduccion de dosis en exploraciones complejas mediante el uso de filtracion adicional en pacientes pediatricos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minguez, C.; Espana, M. L.; Castro, P.; Sevillano, D.; Lopez Franco, P.

    2006-07-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the influence on image contrast, tube load and effective dose in paediatric fluoroscopy using added filtration. A Philips Omnidiagnosti is used in Nino Jesus Hospital and was therefore chosen for radiation dose measurements. The phantom consisted of varying methacrylate thickness to represent different patients sizes. All measurements were performed in automatic mode. For each exposure and additional filtration added the following data was recorded: tube voltage, tube current, air kerma rate on phantom surface and brightness on the image monitor. An 2026 electrometer (Radical Corporation) in conjunction with a model 2025-60 ion chamber were used for entrance dose measurements and the luxometer IL-400A (International Light) was used for brightness measurements on the image monitor: Evaluation of image quality was performed using a Leeds TOR TVF test object. Finally, the program PCXMC 1.5 based on the Monte Carlo method was used for calculating organ doses and the effective dose in fluoroscopy examinations. By increasing the filtration of the x-ray tube 1st Entrance radiation exposure can be decreased 58%, organ dose up to 40%, and effective dose up to 44%. 2nd The tube load increased up to 33%. 3rd Significant dose reduction is achievable without compromising image quality. The use of additional filtration in paediatric fluoroscopy should be evaluated taking into account dose reduction, additional tube loading and the possibility of some deterioration in image quality. (Author)

  4. Modeling methylene chloride exposure-reduction options for home paint-stripper users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, D M; Small, M J; Fischhoff, B

    2000-01-01

    Home improvement is a popular activity, but one that can also involve exposure to hazardous substances. Paint stripping is of particular concern because of the high potential exposures to methylene chloride, a solvent that is a potential human carcinogen and neurotoxicant. This article presents a general methodology for evaluating the effectiveness of behavioral interventions for reducing these risks. It doubles as a model that assesses exposure patterns, incorporating user time-activity patterns and risk-mitigation strategies. The model draws upon recent innovations in indoor air-quality modeling to estimate exposure through inhalation and dermal pathways to paint-stripper users. It is designed to use data gathered from home paint-stripper users about room characteristics, amount of stripper used, time-activity patterns and exposure-reduction strategies (e.g., increased ventilation and modification in the timing of stripper application, scraping, and breaks). Results indicate that the effectiveness of behavioral interventions depends strongly on characteristics of the room (e.g., size, number and size of doors and windows, base air-exchange rates). The greatest simple reduction in exposure is achieved by using an exhaust fan in addition to opening windows and doors. These results can help identify the most important information for product labels and other risk-communication materials.

  5. External exposure doses due to gamma emitting natural radionuclides in some Egyptian building materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moharram, B M; Suliman, M N; Zahran, N F; Shennawy, S E; El Sayed, A R

    2012-01-01

    Using of building materials containing naturally occurring radionuclides as (238)U, (232)Th and (40)K and their progeny results in an external exposures of the housing of such buildings. In the present study, indoor dose rates for typical Egyptian rooms are calculated using the analytical method and activity concentrations of natural radionuclides in some building materials. Uniform chemical composition of the walls, floor and ceiling as well as uniform mass concentrations of the radionuclides in walls, floor and ceiling assumed. Different room models are assumed to discuss variation of indoor dose rates according to variation in room construction. Activity concentrations of (238)U, (232)Th and (40)K content in eight samples representative Clay soil and different building materials used in most recent Egyptian building were measured using Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS). The specific activity for (238)U, (232)Th and (40)K, from the selected samples, were in the range 14.15-60.64, 2.75-84.66 and 7.35-554.4Bqkg(-1), respectively. The average indoor absorbed dose rates in air ranged from 0.005μGyh(-1) to 0.071μGyh(-1) and the corresponding population-weighted annual effective dose due to external gamma radiation varies from 0.025 to 0.345mSv. An outdoor dose rate for typical building samples in addition to some radiological hazards has been introduced for comparison. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Dose reduction assessment in dynamic CT myocardial perfusion imaging in a porcine balloon-induced-ischemia model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahmi, Rachid; Eck, Brendan L.; Vembar, Mani; Bezerra, Hiram G.; Wilson, David L.

    2014-03-01

    We investigated the use of an advanced hybrid iterative reconstruction (IR) technique (iDose4, Philips Health- care) for low dose dynamic myocardial CT perfusion (CTP) imaging. A porcine model was created to mimic coronary stenosis through partial occlusion of the left anterior descending (LAD) artery with a balloon catheter. The severity of LAD occlusion was adjusted with FFR measurements. Dynamic CT images were acquired at end-systole (45% R-R) using a multi-detector CT (MDCT) scanner. Various corrections were applied to the acquired scans to reduce motion and imaging artifacts. Absolute myocardial blood flow (MBF) was computed with a deconvolution-based approach using singular value decomposition (SVD). We compared a high and a low dose radiation protocol corresponding to two different tube-voltage/tube-current combinations (80kV p/100mAs and 120kV p/150mAs). The corresponding radiation doses for these protocols are 7.8mSv and 34.3mSV , respectively. The images were reconstructed using conventional FBP and three noise-reduction strengths of the IR method, iDose. Flow contrast-to-noise ratio, CNRf, as obtained from MBF maps, was used to quantitatively evaluate the effect of reconstruction on contrast between normal and ischemic myocardial tissue. Preliminary results showed that the use of iDose to reconstruct low dose images provide better or comparable CNRf to that of high dose images reconstructed with FBP, suggesting significant dose savings. CNRf was improved with the three used levels of iDose compared to FBP for both protocols. When using the entire 4D dynamic sequence for MBF computation, a 77% dose reduction was achieved, while considering only half the scans (i.e., every other heart cycle) allowed even further dose reduction while maintaining relatively higher CNRf.

  7. Caudate neuronal recording in freely behaving animals following acute and chronic dose response methylphenidate exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claussen, Catherine M; Dafny, Nachum

    2015-09-01

    The misuse and abuse of the psychostimulant, methylphenidate (MPD) the drug of choice in the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has seen a sharp uprising in recent years among both youth and adults for its cognitive enhancing effects and for recreational purposes. This uprise in illicit use has lead to many questions concerning the long-term consequences of MPD exposure. The objective of this study was to record animal behavior concomitantly with the caudate nucleus (CN) neuronal activity following acute and repetitive (chronic) dose response exposure to methylphenidate (MPD). A saline control and three MPD dose (0.6, 2.5, and 10.0mg/kg) groups were used. Behaviorally, the same MPD dose in some animals following chronic MPD exposure elicited behavioral sensitization and other animals elicited behavioral tolerance. Based on this finding, the CN neuronal population recorded from animals expressing behavioral sensitization was also evaluated separately from CN neurons recorded from animals expressing behavioral tolerance to chronic MPD exposure, respectively. Significant differences in CN neuronal population responses between the behaviorally sensitized and the behaviorally tolerant animals were observed for the 2.5 and 10.0mg/kg MPD exposed groups. For 2.5mg/kg MPD, behaviorally sensitized animals responded by decreasing their firing rates while behaviorally tolerant animals showed mainly an increase in their firing rates. The CN neuronal responses recorded from the behaviorally sensitized animals following 10.0mg/kg MPD responded by increasing their firing rates whereas the CN neuronal recordings from the behaviorally tolerant animals showed that approximately half decreased their firing rates in response to 10.0mg/kg MPD exposure. The comparison of percentage change in neuronal firing rates showed that the behaviorally tolerant animals trended to exhibit increases in their neuronal firing rates at ED1 following initial MPD exposure and

  8. Modeling Vehicle Interior Noise Exposure Dose on Freeways Considering Weaving Segment Designs and Engine Operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing; Qiao, Fengxiang; Yu, Lei; Shi, Junqing

    2017-07-05

    Vehicle interior noise functions at the dominant frequencies of 500 Hz below and around 800 Hz, which fall into the bands that may impair hearing. Recent studies demonstrated that freeway commuters are chronically exposed to vehicle interior noise, bearing the risk of hearing impairment. The interior noise evaluation process is mostly conducted in a lab environment. The test results and the developed noise models may underestimate or ignore the noise effects from dynamic traffic, road conditions and configuration. However, the interior noise is highly associated with vehicle maneuvering. The vehicle maneuvering on a freeway weaving segment is more complex for its nature of conflicting areas. This research is intended to explore the risk of the interior noise exposure on freeway weaving segments for freeway commuters, and improve the interior noise estimation by constructing a decision tree learning based noise exposure dose (NED) model, considering weaving segment designs and engine operation. On-road driving tests were conducted to twelve subjects on State Highway 288 in Houston, Texas. An On-board Diagnosis (OBD) II, a smartphone based roughness app, and a digital sound meter were used to collect vehicle maneuvering and engine information, International Roughness Index, and interior noise levels, respectively. Eleven variables were obtainable from the driving tests, including the length and type of a weaving segment, serving as predictors. The importance of the predictors was estimated by their Out-Of-Bag permuted predictor delta errors. The hazardous exposure level of the interior noise on weaving segments is quantified to Hazard Quotient, NED and daily noise exposure level, respectively. Results showed that the risk of hearing impairment on freeway is acceptable, the interior noise level is the most sensitive to the pavement roughness, and subject to freeway configuration and traffic conditions. The constructed NED model performs highly predictive power (R

  9. Reduction in operator radiation exposure during transradial catheterization and intervention using a simple lead drape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqtidar, Ali F; Jeon, Cathy; Rothman, Richard; Snead, Randall; Pyne, Christopher T

    2013-03-01

    Transradial access for cardiac catheterization and intervention is a recognized method for reducing complications and improving patient comfort. However, there are concerns over possible increased operator radiation exposure. We tested the hypothesis that a simple lead drape would reduce operator exposure in transradial procedures. Patients undergoing either diagnostic or interventional procedures using transradial access were assigned in an alternating manner to the use of a 0.5-mm lead apron across the patient's abdomen in addition to standard operator protection. Patients were divided into 4 groups: (left enhanced shielding vs left standard shielding; right enhanced shielding vs right standard shielding). Dosimeters were taped to the primary and secondary operators' left wrist and outside the thyroid guard. The operator exposure was measured for each site on every case in centigray. In standard shielded patients, there was no increase in operator exposure between the left and right approach patients at any measurement site. Measured exposure was reduced with enhanced shielding at all dosimeter sites except the secondary operator's collar (both left and right) and the primary operator's collar from the right. There was no significant difference in fluoroscopy, air kerma, or dose area product between standard and enhanced shielded patients. The use of a lead drape reduces the rate of operator radiation exposure at multiple measurement sites. Use of the left radial approach was not associated with an increase in operator exposure compared with the right radial approach. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Comparative Benchmark Dose Modeling as a Tool to Make the First Estimate of Safe Human Exposure Levels to Lunar Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, John T.; Lam, Chiu-wing; Scully, Robert R.

    2013-01-01

    Brief exposures of Apollo Astronauts to lunar dust occasionally elicited upper respiratory irritation; however, no limits were ever set for prolonged exposure ot lunar dust. Habitats for exploration, whether mobile of fixed must be designed to limit human exposure to lunar dust to safe levels. We have used a new technique we call Comparative Benchmark Dose Modeling to estimate safe exposure limits for lunar dust collected during the Apollo 14 mission.

  11. [State of the art and future trends in technology for computed tomography dose reduction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calzado Cantera, A; Hernández-Girón, I; Salvadó Artells, M; Rodríguez González, R

    2013-12-01

    The introduction of helical and multislice acquisitions in CT scanners together with decreased image reconstruction times has had a tremendous impact on radiological practice. Technological developments in the last 10 to 12 years have enabled very high quality images to be obtained in a very short time. Improved image quality has led to an increase in the number of indications for CT. In parallel to this development, radiation exposure in patients has increased considerably. Concern about the potential health risks posed by CT imaging, reflected in diverse initiatives and actions by official organs and scientific societies, has prompted the search for ways to reduce radiation exposure in patients without compromising diagnostic efficacy. To this end, good practice guidelines have been established, special applications have been developed for scanners, and research has been undertaken to optimize the clinical use of CT. Noteworthy technical developments incorporated in scanners include the different modes of X-ray tube current modulation, automatic selection of voltage settings, selective organ protection, adaptive collimation, and iterative reconstruction. The appropriate use of these tools to reduce radiation doses requires thorough knowledge of how they work. Copyright © 2013 SERAM. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  12. A Reanalysis of Curvature in the Dose Response for Cancer and Modifications by Age at Exposure Following Radiation Therapy for Benign Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Little, Mark P., E-mail: mark.little@nih.gov [Radiation Epidemiology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Rockville, Maryland (United States); Stovall, Marilyn; Smith, Susan A. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Kleinerman, Ruth A. [Radiation Epidemiology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Rockville, Maryland (United States)

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: To assess the shape of the dose response for various cancer endpoints and modifiers by age and time. Methods and Materials: Reanalysis of the US peptic ulcer data testing for heterogeneity of radiogenic risk by cancer endpoint (stomach, pancreas, lung, leukemia, all other). Results: There are statistically significant (P<.05) excess risks for all cancer and for lung cancer and borderline statistically significant risks for stomach cancer (P=.07), and leukemia (P=.06), with excess relative risks Gy{sup -1} of 0.024 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.011, 0.039), 0.559 (95% CI 0.221, 1.021), 0.042 (95% CI -0.002, 0.119), and 1.087 (95% CI -0.018, 4.925), respectively. There is statistically significant (P=.007) excess risk of pancreatic cancer when adjusted for dose-response curvature. General downward curvature is apparent in the dose response, statistically significant (P<.05) for all cancers, pancreatic cancer, and all other cancers (ie, other than stomach, pancreas, lung, leukemia). There are indications of reduction in relative risk with increasing age at exposure (for all cancers, pancreatic cancer), but no evidence for quadratic variations in relative risk with age at exposure. If a linear-exponential dose response is used, there is no significant heterogeneity in the dose response among the 5 endpoints considered or in the speed of variation of relative risk with age at exposure. The risks are generally consistent with those observed in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors and in groups of nuclear workers. Conclusions: There are excess risks for various malignancies in this data set. Generally there is a marked downward curvature in the dose response and significant reduction in relative risk with increasing age at exposure. The consistency of risks with those observed in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors and in groups of nuclear workers implies that there may be little sparing effect of fractionation of dose or low-dose-rate exposure.

  13. Radiation dose reduction in computed tomography (CT) using a new implementation of wavelet denoising in low tube current acquisitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Yinghua; Brunner, Stephen; Tang, Jie; Speidel, Michael; Rowley, Howard; VanLysel, Michael; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2011-03-01

    Radiation dose reduction remains at the forefront of research in computed tomography. X-ray tube parameters such as tube current can be lowered to reduce dose; however, images become prohibitively noisy when the tube current is too low. Wavelet denoising is one of many noise reduction techniques. However, traditional wavelet techniques have the tendency to create an artificial noise texture, due to the nonuniform denoising across the image, which is undesirable from a diagnostic perspective. This work presents a new implementation of wavelet denoising that is able to achieve noise reduction, while still preserving spatial resolution. Further, the proposed method has the potential to improve those unnatural noise textures. The technique was tested on both phantom and animal datasets (Catphan phantom and timeresolved swine heart scan) acquired on a GE Discovery VCT scanner. A number of tube currents were used to investigate the potential for dose reduction.

  14. Survey on low-dose medical radiation exposure in occupational workers: the effect on hematological change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, J. K.; Cho, S. M.; Cho, J. H.; Dong, K. R.; Chung, W. K.; Lee, J. W.

    2013-03-01

    This study examined the changes in the hematological index caused by low-dose medical radiation exposure in workers in a medical radiation-exposed environment. The cumulative dose was obtained using thermoluminescent dosimeters over a 9-year period, and the changes in hematological index count (red blood cells (RBCs), hemoglobin, platelets, white blood cells (WBCs), monocytes, lymphocytes, neutrophils, basophils, and eosinophils) were examined in both the occupational workers and controls. In total, 370 occupational workers and 335 controls were compared. The analysis led to the following observations: (1) The average cumulative dose in males and females was 9.65±15.2 and 4.82±5.55 mSv, respectively. (2) In both males and females, there was a very low correlation between the occupation period and the cumulative dose (r<±0.25). (3) When the occupation period was longer, the WBC counts both decreased and increased in the male workers and the RBC counts were lower in the workers than in the control group (p<0.05). In females, the WBC counts both decreased and increased in the workers and the eosinophil counts were lower in the workers than in the control group (p<0.01). (4) When the cumulative dose was large, the lymphocyte counts decreased in male workers and the platelet count was lower in the workers than in the control group (p<0.05). In females, the lymphocyte count and RBC count were lower in the workers than in the control group (p<0.05). Abnormal distributions of some blood indices were observed in the occupational radiation workers compared with the controls. Attempts were made to limit radiation exposure to personnel, but the employees did not always follow the preset rules. Actually, the adverse effects of low-level radiation were attributed to probability. Overall, workers should obey the radiation protection regulations provided by the government and a national system of radiation protection is needed.

  15. Iterative metal artifact reduction improves dose calculation accuracy. Phantom study with dental implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maerz, Manuel; Mittermair, Pia; Koelbl, Oliver; Dobler, Barbara [Regensburg University Medical Center, Department of Radiotherapy, Regensburg (Germany); Krauss, Andreas [Siemens Healthcare GmbH, Forchheim (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    Metallic dental implants cause severe streaking artifacts in computed tomography (CT) data, which affect the accuracy of dose calculations in radiation therapy. The aim of this study was to investigate the benefit of the metal artifact reduction algorithm iterative metal artifact reduction (iMAR) in terms of correct representation of Hounsfield units (HU) and dose calculation accuracy. Heterogeneous phantoms consisting of different types of tissue equivalent material surrounding metallic dental implants were designed. Artifact-containing CT data of the phantoms were corrected using iMAR. Corrected and uncorrected CT data were compared to synthetic CT data to evaluate accuracy of HU reproduction. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans were calculated in Oncentra v4.3 on corrected and uncorrected CT data and compared to Gafchromic trademark EBT3 films to assess accuracy of dose calculation. The use of iMAR increased the accuracy of HU reproduction. The average deviation of HU decreased from 1006 HU to 408 HU in areas including metal and from 283 HU to 33 HU in tissue areas excluding metal. Dose calculation accuracy could be significantly improved for all phantoms and plans: The mean passing rate for gamma evaluation with 3 % dose tolerance and 3 mm distance to agreement increased from 90.6 % to 96.2 % if artifacts were corrected by iMAR. The application of iMAR allows metal artifacts to be removed to a great extent which leads to a significant increase in dose calculation accuracy. (orig.) [German] Metallische Implantate verursachen streifenfoermige Artefakte in CT-Bildern, welche die Dosisberechnung beeinflussen. In dieser Studie soll der Nutzen des iterativen Metall-Artefakt-Reduktions-Algorithmus iMAR hinsichtlich der Wiedergabetreue von Hounsfield-Werten (HU) und der Genauigkeit von Dosisberechnungen untersucht werden. Es wurden heterogene Phantome aus verschiedenen Arten gewebeaequivalenten Materials mit

  16. Perinatal exposure to low dose glufosinate ammonium induces autism-like phenotypes in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony eLaugeray

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Glufosinate ammonium (GLA is one of the most widely used herbicides in agriculture. As is the case for most pesticides, potential adverse effects of GLA have not been studied from the perspective of developmental neurotoxicity. Early pesticides exposure may weaken the basic structure of the developing brain and cause permanent changes leading to a wide range of lifelong effects on health and/or behavior. Here we addressed the developmental impact of GLA by exposing female mice to low dose GLA during both pre- and postnatal periods and analyzed potential developmental and behavioral changes of the offspring during infancy and adulthood. A neurobehavioral test battery revealed significant effects of GLA maternal exposure on early reflex development, pup communication, affiliative behaviors, and preference for social olfactory cues, but emotional reactivity and emotional memory remained unaltered. These behavioral alterations showed a striking resemblance to changes seen in animal models of Autistic Spectrum Disorders. At the brain level, GLA maternal exposure caused some increase in normalized brain weight of the offspring. In addition, reduced expression of Pten and Peg3 - two genes implicated in autism-like deficits – was observed in the brain of GLA-exposed pups at postnatal day 15. Our work thus provides new data on the link between perinatal exposure to the herbicide GLA and the onset of autism-like symptoms later in life. It also raises fundamental concerns about the ability of current safety testing to assess risks of pesticide exposure during critical developmental periods.

  17. Dose optimization by altering the operating potential and tube current exposure time product in dental cone beam CT: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulston, Rebekah; Davies, Jonathan; Horner, Keith; Murphy, Frederick

    2016-01-01

    Current guidelines highlight the need to optimize exposure parameters on CBCT equipment to levels that are as low as diagnostically acceptable. This systematic review aimed to answer the question "Can altering operating potential (kV) and tube current exposure time product (mAs) on CBCT machines reduce radiation dose to patients undergoing dental and/or maxillofacial scans without a detrimental impact on image quality/diagnostic accuracy?" Studies were selected and results reported following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) method. For each individual study, two authors (RG and JD or KH) independently extracted data using a specifically designed collection form, and an overall quality value was assigned using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) system. Any disagreements in the overall quality value of a study were resolved by discussion between the current authors. Nearly 75% of studies were considered to be of low or very low methodological quality using the GRADE system, and more studies stated that their results applied only in the specific situations they had investigated. However, most studies demonstrated that patient dose reduction is possible without a clinically relevant reduction in image quality. For many CBCT machines, it should be possible to optimize one, or more, of the investigated exposure parameters and therefore reduce patient radiation dose, while maintaining diagnostic image quality for some diagnostic tasks. However, more rigorous research is still required.

  18. High exposure to inorganic arsenic by food: the need for risk reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundert-Remy, Ursula; Damm, Georg; Foth, Heidi; Freyberger, Alexius; Gebel, Thomas; Golka, Klaus; Röhl, Claudia; Schupp, Thomas; Wollin, Klaus-Michael; Hengstler, Jan Georg

    2015-12-01

    Arsenic is a human carcinogen that occurs ubiquitously in soil and water. Based on epidemiological studies, a benchmark dose (lower/higher bound estimate) between 0.3 and 8 μg/kg bw/day was estimated to cause a 1 % increased risk of lung, skin and bladder cancer. A recently published study by EFSA on dietary exposure to inorganic arsenic in the European population reported 95th percentiles (lower bound min to upper bound max) for different age groups in the same range as the benchmark dose. For toddlers, a highly exposed group, the highest values ranged between 0.61 and 2.09 µg arsenic/kg bw/day. For all other age classes, the margin of exposure is also small. This scenario calls for regulatory action to reduce arsenic exposure. One priority measure should be to reduce arsenic in food categories that contribute most to exposure. In the EFSA study the food categories 'milk and dairy products,' 'drinking water' and 'food for infants' represent major sources of inorganic arsenic for infants and also rice is an important source. Long-term strategies are required to reduce inorganic arsenic in these food groups. The reduced consumption of rice and rice products which has been recommended may be helpful for a minority of individuals consuming unusually high amounts of rice. However, it is only of limited value for the general European population, because the food categories 'grain-based processed products (non rice-based)' or 'milk and dairy products' contribute more to the exposure with inorganic arsenic than the food category 'rice.' A balanced regulatory activity focusing on the most relevant food categories is required. In conclusion, exposure to inorganic arsenic represents a risk to the health of the European population, particularly to young children. Regulatory measures to reduce exposure are urgently required.

  19. Sludge reduction by ozone: Insights and modeling of the dose-response effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fall, C; Silva-Hernández, B C; Hooijmans, C M; Lopez-Vazquez, C M; Esparza-Soto, M; Lucero-Chávez, M; van Loosdrecht, M C M

    2018-01-15

    Applying ozone to the return flow in an activated sludge (AS) process is a way for reducing the residual solids production. To be able to extend the activated sludge models to the ozone-AS process, adequate prediction of the tri-atoms effects on the particulate COD fractions is needed. In this study, the biomass inactivation, COD mineralization, and solids dissolution were quantified in batch tests and dose-response models were developed as a function of the reacted ozone doses (ROD). Three kinds of model-sludge were used. S1 was a lab-cultivated synthetic sludge with two components (heterotrophs XH and XP). S2 was a digestate of S1 almost made by the endogenous residues, XP. S3 was from a municipal activated sludge plant. The specific ozone uptake rate (SO3UR, mgO3/gCOD.h) was determined as a tool for characterizing the reactivity of the sludges. SO3UR increased with the XH fraction and decreased with more XP. Biomass inactivation was exponential (e-β.ROD) as a function of the ROD doses. The percentage of solids reduction was predictable through a linear model (CMiner + Ysol ROD), with a fixed part due to mineralization (CMiner) and a variable part from the solubilization process. The parameters of the models, i.e. the inactivation and the dissolution yields (β, 0.008-0.029 (mgO3/mgCODini)-1 vs Ysol, 0.5-2.8 mg CODsol/mgO3) varied in magnitude, depending on the intensity of the scavenging reactions and potentially the compactness of the flocs for each sludge. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Effect of pFSH dose reduction on in vivo embryo production in Dorper ewes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Bosco Loiola Filho

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the effect of pFSH dose on the in vivo embryo production of Dorper ewes in the semi-arid northeast of Brazil, 40 sheep females were distributed into two groups of 20 animals that received intravaginal CIDR for 14 days, and two days before device removal, they received one of the following treatments: in the FSH200 group, the ewes received 200 mg of pFSH; and in the FSH128 group, the ewes received a total of 128 mg in decreasing doses every 12 h. Beginning 12 h after the conclusion of the treatments, estrus detection was performed every four hours using two Dorper rams of proven fertility. The ewes were mated at estrus onset and 24 hours later. Seven days after intravaginal device removal, the superovulatory response was evaluated, and embryo collection was performed using the laparotomy method. The recovered flushings were subjected to embryo searches under a stereomicroscope and classified according to their qualities. Analyses of variance (ANOVAs and LSD tests were used to compare the different parameters. The data expressed as percentages were analysed by chi-square test. The ovulation rate was higher in the FSH200 group, which had 16.3 ± 0.3 corpora lutea (CL, than in the FSH128 group, which had 11.3 ± 0.3 CL (P<0.05. However, higher fertilization rate (83.6% vs. 62.4% and higher transferable (86.0% vs. 71.6% and freezable (67.9% vs. 40.8% embryo rates were observed in the FSH 128 group compared with the group that received 200 mg. Furthermore, no significant differences in the remaining parameters were observed between the experimental groups (P>0.05, demonstrating that pFSH dose reduction promoted a greater production of freezable and transferable embryos in Dorper ewes subjected to MOET.

  1. Ambient and Dosed Exposure to Quaternary Ammonium Disinfectants Causes Neural Tube Defects in Rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrubec, Terry C; Melin, Vanessa E; Shea, Caroline S; Ferguson, Elizabeth E; Garofola, Craig; Repine, Claire M; Chapman, Tyler W; Patel, Hiral R; Razvi, Reza M; Sugrue, Jesse E; Potineni, Haritha; Magnin-Bissel, Geraldine; Hunt, Patricia A

    2017-08-15

    Quaternary ammonium compounds are a large class of chemicals used for their antimicrobial and antistatic properties. Two common quaternary ammonium compounds, alkyldimethylbenzyl ammonium chloride (ADBAC) and didecyldimethyl ammonium chloride (DDAC), are combined in common cleaners and disinfectants. Introduction of a cleaner containing ADBAC+DDAC in the vivarium caused neural tube defects (NTDs) in mice and rats. To further evaluate this finding, male and female mice were dosed in the feed at 60 or 120 mg/kg/day, or by oral gavage at 7.5, 15, or 30 mg/kg ADBAC+DDAC. Mice also received ambient exposure to ADBAC+DDAC from the disinfectant used in the mouse room. Embryos were evaluated on gestational day 10 for NTDs, and fetuses were evaluated on gestational day 18 for gross and skeletal malformations. We found increased NTDs with exposure to ADBAC+DDAC in both rats and mice. The NTDs persisted for two generations after cessation of exposure. Notably, male exposure alone was sufficient to cause NTDs. Equally significant, ambient exposure from disinfectant use in the vivarium, influenced the levels of NTDs to a greater extent than oral dosing. No gross or significant axial skeletal malformations were observed in late gestation fetuses. Placental abnormalities and late gestation fetal deaths were increased at 120 mg/kg/day, which might explain the lack of malformations observed in late gestation fetuses. These results demonstrate that ADBAC+DDAC in combination are teratogenic to rodents. Given the increased use of these disinfectants, further evaluation of their safety in humans and their contribution to health and disease is essential. Birth Defects Research 109:1166-1178, 2017. © 2017 The Authors. Birth Defects Research Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 The Authors. Birth Defects Research Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Prolonged exposure to low-dose microcystin induces nonalcoholic steatohepatitis in mice: a systems toxicology study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jun; Li, Guangyu; Chen, Jun; Lin, Juan; Zeng, Cheng; Chen, Jing; Deng, Junliang; Xie, Ping

    2017-01-01

    Microcystin-LR (MCLR), a cyanotoxin widely present in freshwater, has been shown to have potent acute hepatotoxicity. However, the chronic toxicity of low-dose MCLR remains confusing by traditional measurements of toxicity. This has impeded understanding of the chronic liver damage of low-dose MCLR and corresponding safety risks of the human exposure guideline value. Here, iTRAQ-based proteomics and NMR-based metabonomics were used to decipher the molecular toxicological signatures of low doses of MCLR in mice exposed to this agent for 90 days. Low levels of MCLR, even under the reported no observed adverse effect level, significantly altered hepatic protein expression, especially of proteins associated with lipid metabolism, transport, immune and proteolysis. Coherently, MCLR induced marked perturbations in lipid metabolites in both liver and serum. Integrated analysis of proteomic, metabolic, histological and cytokine profiles revealed that MCLR significantly inhibited fatty acid β-oxidation and hepatic lipoprotein secretion and promoted hepatic inflammation, resulting in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis disease (NASH). These findings for the first time provide compelling evidence that chronic exposure to low-level MCLR can induce NASH. These results also indicate that current guidelines for MCs in drinking water may be inadequate and associated with risks to human health.

  3. Significant Radiation Dose Reduction in the Hybrid Operating Room Using a Novel X-ray Imaging Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Haak, R F F; Hamans, B C; Zuurmond, K; Verhoeven, B A N; Koning, O H J

    2015-10-01

    To prospectively quantify radiation dose change in aortoiliac endovascular procedures in the hybrid operating room (OR) for patients and medical staff with a novel X-ray imaging technology (ClarityIQ technology), and to assess whether procedure or fluoroscopy time or dose of iodinated contrast was affected. A prospective study including 138 patients was performed to compare radiation dose before and after installation of a novel X-ray imaging technology. Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) was performed in 37 patients and an endovascular procedure for aortoiliac occlusive disease (AIOD) in 101. Patient radiation dose in air kerma (AK) and dose area product (DAP), patient demographics, and procedural data were recorded. Staff radiation dose was measured with real time personal dosimetry measurements. In both the EVAR and AIOD groups the reference system, ALX (AlluraXper FD20; Philips Healthcare, Best, the Netherlands), was compared with the upgraded X-ray system, CIQ (AlluraClarity FD20; Philips Healthcare). Procedure time, fluoroscopy time, and iodinated contrast dose were recorded. Patient radiation dose reduction in the EVAR group, in median AK, was 56% (ALX = 1,262.5 mGy; CIQ = 556.0 mGy [p X-ray imaging technology in the hybrid OR suite resulted in a significant reduction of patient and staff radiation dose without affecting procedure length, fluoroscopy time, or use of contrast. Copyright © 2015 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Mitochondrial proteomic alterations caused by long-term low-dose copper exposure in mouse cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xuemei; Wei, Gang; Huang, Zhijun; Qu, Zhongsen; Huang, Xinfeng; Xu, Hua; Liu, Jianjun; Zhuang, Zhixiong; Yang, Xifei

    2016-11-30

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is involved in neurotoxicity caused by exposure of various chemicals such as copper. However, the effects of long-term low-dose copper exposure on mitochondrial proteome remain unclear. In this study, we found the treatment of copper (0.13ppm copper sulfate in drinking water) for 12 months caused abnormal expression of a total of 13 mitochondrial proteins (7 up-regulated and 6 down-regulated) as revealed by two-dimensional electrophoresis coupled with mass spectrometry in mouse cortex. Protein functional analysis revealed that these differentially expressed proteins mainly included apoptosis-associated proteins, axon guidance-associated proteins, axonogenesis-associated proteins and mitochondrial respiratory chain complex. Among these differentially expressed mitochondrial proteins, GRP75 (75kDa glucose-regulated protein) and GRP78 (78kDa glucose-regulated protein) were found to be significantly down-regulated as confirmed by Western-blot analysis. The down-regulation of GRP75 was shown to promote apoptosis. The down-regulation of GRP78/BiP could up-regulate endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress mediators and thus cause apoptosis. Our study suggested that these differentially expressed mitochondrial proteins such as GRP75 and GRP78 could be involved in neurotoxicity caused by long-term low-dose copper exposure and serve as potential molecular targets for the treatment of copper neurotoxicity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Stimulant Reduction Intervention using Dosed Exercise (STRIDE - CTN 0037: Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morris David W

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a need for novel approaches to the treatment of stimulant abuse and dependence. Clinical data examining the use of exercise as a treatment for the abuse of nicotine, alcohol, and other substances suggest that exercise may be a beneficial treatment for stimulant abuse, with direct effects on decreased use and craving. In addition, exercise has the potential to improve other health domains that may be adversely affected by stimulant use or its treatment, such as sleep disturbance, cognitive function, mood, weight gain, quality of life, and anhedonia, since it has been shown to improve many of these domains in a number of other clinical disorders. Furthermore, neurobiological evidence provides plausible mechanisms by which exercise could positively affect treatment outcomes. The current manuscript presents the rationale, design considerations, and study design of the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA Clinical Trials Network (CTN CTN-0037 Stimulant Reduction Intervention using Dosed Exercise (STRIDE study. Methods/Design STRIDE is a multisite randomized clinical trial that compares exercise to health education as potential treatments for stimulant abuse or dependence. This study will evaluate individuals diagnosed with stimulant abuse or dependence who are receiving treatment in a residential setting. Three hundred and thirty eligible and interested participants who provide informed consent will be randomized to one of two treatment arms: Vigorous Intensity High Dose Exercise Augmentation (DEI or Health Education Intervention Augmentation (HEI. Both groups will receive TAU (i.e., usual care. The treatment arms are structured such that the quantity of visits is similar to allow for equivalent contact between groups. In both arms, participants will begin with supervised sessions 3 times per week during the 12-week acute phase of the study. Supervised sessions will be conducted as one-on-one (i.e., individual sessions

  6. A PROBABILISTIC EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT FOR CHILDREN WHO CONTACT CCA-TREATED PLAYSETS AND DECKS USING THE STOCHASTIC HUMAN EXPOSURE AND DOSE SIMULATION (SHEDS) MODEL FOR THE WOOD PRESERVATIVE EXPOSURE SCENARIO

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has conducted a probabilistic exposure and dose assessment on the arsenic (As) and chromium (Cr) components of Chromated Copper Arsenate (CCA) using the Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation model for wood preservatives (SHEDS-Wood...

  7. A study on exposure dose from injection work and elution work for radiation workers and frequent workers in nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ju, Yong Jin; Chung, Woon Kwan [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Dong, Kyung Rae [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Gwangju Health University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Eun Jin; Kwak, Jong Gil [Dept. of Public Health and Medicine, Dongshin University Graduate School, Naju (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Jae Kwang [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    Compared to other occupations, there is a greater risk of exposure to radiation due to the use of radioisotopes in nuclear medicine for diagnostic evaluations and therapy. To consider ways to reduce exposure dose for those in nuclear medicine involved in injection work and elution work among radiation workers as well as for sanitation workers and trainees among frequent workers an investigation into exposure dose and situational analysis from changes in yearly exposure dose evaluations, changes in work environment and changes in forms of inspection were conducted. Exposure dose measurements were taken by using EPD MK2 worn during working hours for one injection worker, one elution worker, two sanitation workers, and one trainee at a general hospital in the Seoul area for three days from July 18th to 20th 2016. Radiation from radioisotopes which are a part of nuclear medicine can significantly affect not only radiation workers who deal with radioisotopes directly but also frequency works as well. According to this study the annual dose limit for elution workers and injection workers were considered safe as the amount of exposure was not large enough to have a signifcant effect. The limits of this study consist in the duration of this study and the quantity of participants. Also there was a limitation of the measurement device involving accumulated exposure, where the EPD MK2 cannot check the changes in exposure according to a particular activity.

  8. Dedicated high dose rate 192Ir brachytherapy radiation fields for in vitro cell exposures at variable source-target cell distances: killing of mammalian cells depends on temporal dose rate fluctuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veigel, Cornelia; Hartmann, Günther H.; Fritz, Peter; Debus, Jürgen; Weber, Klaus-Josef

    2017-02-01

    Afterloading brachytherapy is conducted by the stepwise movement of a radioactive source through surgically implanted applicator tubes where at predefined dwell positions calculated dwell times optimize spatial dose delivery with respect to a planned dose level. The temporal exposure pattern exhibits drastic fluctuations in dose rate at a given coordinate and within a single treatment session because of the discontinuous and repeated source movement into the target volume. This could potentially affect biological response. Therefore, mammalian cells were exposed as monolayers to a high dose rate 192Ir source by utilizing a dedicated irradiation device where the distance between a planar array of radioactive source positions and the plane of the cell monolayer could be varied from 2.5 mm to 40 mm, thus varying dose rate pattern for any chosen total dose. The Gammamed IIi afterloading system equipped with a nominal 370 GBq (10 Ci) 192-Ir source was used to irradiate V79 Chinese hamster lung fibroblasts from both confluent and from exponential growth phase with dose up to 12 Gy (at room temperature, total exposure not exceeding 1 h). For comparison, V79 cells were also exposed to 6 MV x-rays from a clinical linear accelerator (dose rate of 2.5 Gy min-1). As biological endpoint, cell survival was determined by standard colony forming assay. Dose measurements were conducted with a diamond detector (sensitive area 7.3 mm2), calibrated by means of 60Co radiation. Additionally, dose delivery was simulated by Monte Carlo calculations using the EGSnrc code system. The calculated secondary electron fluence spectra at the cell location did not indicate a significant change of radiation quality (i.e. higher linear energy transfer) at the lower distances. Clonogenic cell survival curves obtained after brachytherapy exhibited an altered biological response compared to x-rays which was characterized by a significant reduction of the survival curve shoulder when dose rate

  9. Development of an occupational exposure limit for n-propylbromide using benchmark dose methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelljes, Mark E; Wood, Rosemary R

    2004-10-01

    This paper presents the development of an occupational exposure level (OEL) for n-propylbromide (nPB) using benchmark dose methods. nPB is a non-ozone depleting solvent, proposed under the Significant New Alternatives Policy (SNAP) for use as a precision vapor degreaser. OELs have generally been developed on the basis of a NOAEL or LOAEL and application of uncertainty factors; this paper represents a departure from historic methods. Six recently completed toxicological studies were critically reviewed to identify (1) toxicologically significant endpoints, (2) dose-response information on these endpoints, and (3) uncertainties and limitations associated with the studies. Dose-response data were compiled and entered into the USEPA's benchmark dose software for calculation of a benchmark dose (BMD) and a benchmark dose low (BMDL). Once values were estimated for all relevant studies, they were then incorporated into a weight-of-evidence approach to develop a single BMD and BMDL representative of nPB. This approach is similar to that recently taken by USEPA to develop their own recommended OEL for nPB. USEPA's approach is compared and contrasted with ours, particularly in relation to the application of uncertainty factors (UFs) to generate a final OEL. There are no published criteria for application of UFs in developing an OEL. Although USEPA recommends utilizing a UF of 9, based on intraspecies variability and pharmacokinetic differences between rats and humans, to meet the goal of protecting healthy adult in a workplace setting, no uncertainty factor was deemed necessary for nPB in this paper. Therefore, the BMDL was recommended as the OEL.

  10. Data integration reveals key homeostatic mechanisms following low dose radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tilton, Susan C.; Matzke, Melissa M. [Computational Biology and Bioinformatics, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99338 (United States); Sowa, Marianne B.; Stenoien, David L.; Weber, Thomas J. [Health Impacts and Exposure Science, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99338 (United States); Morgan, William F. [Biological Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99338 (United States); Waters, Katrina M., E-mail: katrina.waters@pnnl.gov [Biological Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99338 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    , ROS/RNS and DNA repair pathways detected • Low dose exposure alters metabolites involved in nitric oxide biosynthesis and wound healing. • Computationally predicted regulators of primary mechanisms were experimentally validated.

  11. Bulgarian Emergency Response System (BERS) in case of nuclear accident with exposure doses estimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syrakov, D.; Prodanova, M.; Slavov, K.; Veleva, B.

    2015-07-01

    A PC-oriented Emergency Response System in case of nuclear accident (BERS) is developed and works operationally in the National Institute of Meteorology and Hydrology (NIMH). The creation and development of BERS was highly stimulated by the ETEX (European Tracer Experiment) project. BERS comprises two main parts - the operational and the accidental ones. The operational part, run automatically every 12 hours, prepares the input meteorological file used by both trajectory and dispersion models, runs the trajectory models, visualizes the results and uploads the maps of trajectories to a dedicated web-site. The accidental part is activated manually when a real radioactive releases occur or during emergency exercises. Its core is the Bulgarian dispersion models EMAP. Outputs are concentration, accumulated deposition and selected doses fields. In the paper, the BERS overall structure is described and examples of its products are presented. Key words: nuclear accident, emergency response, early warning system, air dispersion models, radioactive exposure dose. (Author)

  12. Low dose perfluorooctanoate exposure promotes cell proliferation in a human non-tumor liver cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hongxia; Cui, Ruina [Key Laboratory of Animal Ecology and Conservation Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Guo, Xuejiang [State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Medicine, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029 (China); Hu, Jiayue [Key Laboratory of Animal Ecology and Conservation Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Dai, Jiayin, E-mail: daijy@ioz.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Animal Ecology and Conservation Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China)

    2016-08-05

    Highlights: • Differential expression of proteins induced by PFOA in HL-7702 was identified. • Most of the differentially expressed proteins are related to cell proliferation. • A low dose of PFOA stimulates HL-7702 cell proliferation. • A high dose of PFOA inhibits HL-7702 cell proliferation. - Abstract: Perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) is a well-known persistent organic pollutant widely found in the environment, wildlife and humans. Medical surveillance and experimental studies have investigated the potential effects of PFOA on human livers, but the hepatotoxicity of PFOA on humans and its underlying mechanism remain to be clarified. We exposed a human liver cell line (HL-7702) to 50 μM PFOA for 48 h and 96 h, and identified 111 significantly differentially expressed proteins by iTRAQ analysis. A total of 46 proteins were related to cell proliferation and apoptosis. Through further analysis of the cell cycle, apoptosis and their related proteins, we found that low doses of PFOA (50–100 μM) promoted cell proliferation and numbers by promoting cells from the G1 to S phases, whereas high doses of PFOA (200–400 μM) led to reduced HL-7702 cell numbers compared with that of the control mainly due to cell cycle arrest in the G0/G1 phase. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the promotion of cell cycle progression in human cells following PFOA exposure.

  13. Three years of seasonal dose assessment from outdoors gamma exposure in Sao Paulo city, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carneiro, Janete C.G.G.; Sanches, Matias P.; Betti, Flavio; Pecequilo, Brigitte R.S., E-mail: janetegc@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Measurements of external (outdoors) gamma exposure from natural background radiation have been used to estimate the average annual doses in Sao Paulo city. Twelve monitoring stations were placed in different regions of the town including both urban (where building materials are present) and outskirts areas. Seasonally surveys observing the four seasons from 2008 to 2010 have been carried out. The data were drawn from a 3-month sampling using the thermoluminescent dosimetry. The effective doses values are quite similar (slightly higher during the winter), so it can be considered that these results are not under significant influence (or variability) of seasonal environmental conditions like temperature, wind or rain. Dose values over the three years period, from Vila Carrao district, exclusively an urban location with mostly no green areas, present the highest values, while the lower values were always obtained for Tucuruvi district, near the biggest urban forest, Parque Estadual da Cantareira. Over the assessed period, the mean of the average annual effective doses was 1.3 {+-} 0.1 mSv.y{sup -1}. For the same period, the average annual background from nuclear and radioactive facility at IPEN was 0.75 {+-} 0.12 mSv.y{sup -1}. (author)

  14. Low-dose effect of developmental bisphenol A exposure on sperm count and behaviour in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hass, Ulla; Christiansen, Sofie; Boberg, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Bisphenol A is widely used in food contact materials and other products and is detected in human urine and blood. Bisphenol A may affect reproductive and neurological development; however, opinion of the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) on bisphenol A (EFSA J, 13, 2015 and 3978) concluded...... that none of the available studies were robust enough to provide a point of departure for setting a tolerable daily intake for bisphenol A. In the present study, pregnant Wistar rats (n = 17–21) were gavaged from gestation day 7 to pup day 22 with bisphenol A doses of 0, 25 μg, 250 μg, 5 mg or 50 mg/kg bw....... Decreased sperm count was found at the lowest bisphenol A dose, that is 25 μg/kg/day, but not at the higher doses. Reproductive organ weight and histology were not affected and no behavioural effects were seen in male offspring. In the female offspring, exposure to 25 μg/kg bw/day bisphenol A dose resulted...

  15. MO-FG-CAMPUS-IeP1-02: Dose Reduction in Contrast-Enhanced Digital Mammography Using a Photon-Counting Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S; Kang, S; Eom, J [Konyang University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Photon-counting detectors (PCDs) allow multi-energy X-ray imaging without additional exposures and spectral overlap. This capability results in the improvement of accuracy of material decomposition for dual-energy X-ray imaging and the reduction of radiation dose. In this study, the PCD-based contrast-enhanced dual-energy mammography (CEDM) was compared with the conventional CDEM in terms of radiation dose, image quality and accuracy of material decomposition. Methods: A dual-energy model was designed by using Beer-Lambert’s law and rational inverse fitting function for decomposing materials from a polychromatic X-ray source. A cadmium zinc telluride (CZT)-based PCD, which has five energy thresholds, and iodine solutions included in a 3D half-cylindrical phantom, which composed of 50% glandular and 50% adipose tissues, were simulated by using a Monte Carlo simulation tool. The low- and high-energy images were obtained in accordance with the clinical exposure conditions for the conventional CDEM. Energy bins of 20–33 and 34–50 keV were defined from X-ray energy spectra simulated at 50 kVp with different dose levels for implementing the PCD-based CDEM. The dual-energy mammographic techniques were compared by means of absorbed dose, noise property and normalized root-mean-square error (NRMSE). Results: Comparing to the conventional CEDM, the iodine solutions were clearly decomposed for the PCD-based CEDM. Although the radiation dose for the PCD-based CDEM was lower than that for the conventional CEDM, the PCD-based CDEM improved the noise property and accuracy of decomposition images. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that the PCD-based CDEM allows the quantitative material decomposition, and reduces radiation dose in comparison with the conventional CDEM. Therefore, the PCD-based CDEM is able to provide useful information for detecting breast tumor and enhancing diagnostic accuracy in mammography.

  16. Radiation Dose Reduction in Paranasal Sinus CT: With Feasibility of Iterative Reconstruction Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Minseo; Choi, Seong Hoon; Park, Jongha; Kang, Byeong Seong; Kwon, Woon Jung; Lee, Tae Hoon; Nam, Jung Gwon

    2016-12-01

    To (1) compare the radiation dose of low-dose computed tomography (CT) to that of standard-dose CT, (2) determine the minimum optimal radiation dose for use in patients who need endoscopic sinus surgery, and (3) assess the reliability of iterative model reconstruction. Prospective single-institution study. Tertiary care center. We recruited 48 adults with medically refractory sinusitis. Each patient underwent 4 scans with different CT parameters: 120 kV and 100 mAs (standard dose), 100 kV and 40 mAs (low dose), 100 kV and 20 mAs (very low dose), and 100 kV and 10 mAs (ultra-low dose). All CT scans were reconstructed via filtered back-projection, and ultra-low dose scans were additionally reconstructed through iterative model reconstruction. Radiation dose, image quality, and diagnostic performance were compared among the scans. Radiation doses decreased to 6% (ultra-low dose), 12% (very low dose), and 22% (low dose) of the standard-dose CT. The image quality of low-dose CT was similar to that of standard-dose CT. Ultra-low-dose CT with iterative model reconstruction was inferior to standard-dose CT for identifying anatomic structures, except for the optic nerve. All CT scans had 100% agreement for diagnosing rhinosinusitis. With low-dose CT, the radiation dose can be decreased to 22% of that of standard-dose CT without affecting the image quality. Low-dose CT can be considered the minimum optimal radiation for patients who need surgery. Iterative model reconstruction is not useful for assessing the anatomic details of the paranasal sinus on CT. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2016.

  17. The conversion of exposures due to radon into the effective dose: the epidemiological approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, T.R. [Federal Office for Radiation Protection, Berlin (Germany)

    2017-11-15

    The risks and dose conversion coefficients for residential and occupational exposures due to radon were determined with applying the epidemiological risk models to ICRP representative populations. The dose conversion coefficient for residential radon was estimated with a value of 1.6 mSv year{sup -1} per 100 Bq m{sup -3} (3.6 mSv per WLM), which is significantly lower than the corresponding value derived from the biokinetic and dosimetric models. The dose conversion coefficient for occupational exposures with applying the risk models for miners was estimated with a value of 14 mSv per WLM, which is in good accordance with the results of the dosimetric models. To resolve the discrepancy regarding residential radon, the ICRP approaches for the determination of risks and doses were reviewed. It could be shown that ICRP overestimates the risk for lung cancer caused by residential radon. This can be attributed to a wrong population weighting of the radon-induced risks in its epidemiological approach. With the approach in this work, the average risks for lung cancer were determined, taking into account the age-specific risk contributions of all individuals in the population. As a result, a lower risk coefficient for residential radon was obtained. The results from the ICRP biokinetic and dosimetric models for both, the occupationally exposed working age population and the whole population exposed to residential radon, can be brought in better accordance with the corresponding results of the epidemiological approach, if the respective relative radiation detriments and a radiation-weighting factor for alpha particles of about ten are used. (orig.)

  18. Chronic low-dose exposure in the Techa River cohort. Risk of mortality from circulatory diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krestinina, Lyudmila Yurievna; Epifanova, Svetlana; Silkin, Stanislav; Mikryukova, Lyudmila; Degteva, Marina; Shagina, Natalia; Akleyev, Alexander [Urals Research Center for Radiation Medicine, Chelyabinsk (Russian Federation)

    2013-03-15

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the mortality from circulatory diseases for about 30,000 members of the Techa River cohort over the period 1950-2003, and to investigate how these rates depend on radiation doses. This population received both external and internal exposures from {sup 90}Sr, {sup 89}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, and other uranium fission products as a result of waterborne releases from the Mayak nuclear facility in the Southern Urals region of the Russian Federation. The analysis included individualized estimates of the total (external plus internal) absorbed dose in muscle calculated based on the Techa River Dosimetry System 2009. The cohort-average dose to muscle tissue was 35 mGy, and the maximum dose was 510 mGy. Between 1950 and 2003, 7,595 deaths from circulatory diseases were registered among cohort members with 901,563 person years at risk. Mortality rates in the cohort were analyzed using a simple parametric excess relative risk (ERR) model. For all circulatory diseases, the estimated excess relative risk per 100 mGy with a 15-year lag period was 3.6 % with a 95 % confidence interval of 0.2-7.5 %, and for ischemic heart disease it was 5.6 % with a 95 % confidence interval of 0.1-11.9 %. A linear ERR model provided the best fit. Analyses with a lag period shorter than 15 years from the beginning of exposure did not reveal any significant risk of mortality from either all circulatory diseases or ischemic heart disease. There was no evidence of an increased mortality risk from cerebrovascular disease (p > 0.5). These results should be regarded as preliminary, since they will be updated after adjustment for smoking and alcohol consumption. (orig.)

  19. The use of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR) technique in evaluation of patients with cervical spine trauma: impact on radiation dose reduction and image quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patro, Satya N; Chakraborty, Santanu; Sheikh, Adnan

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR) technique on the image quality and radiation dose reduction. The comparison was made with the traditional filtered back projection (FBP) technique. We retrospectively reviewed 78 patients, who underwent cervical spine CT for blunt cervical trauma between 1 June 2010 and 30 November 2010. 48 patients were imaged using traditional FBP technique and the remaining 30 patients were imaged using the ASiR technique. The patient demographics, radiation dose, objective image signal and noise were recorded; while subjective noise, sharpness, diagnostic acceptability and artefacts were graded by two radiologists blinded to the techniques. We found that the ASiR technique was able to reduce the volume CT dose index, dose-length product and effective dose by 36%, 36.5% and 36.5%, respectively, compared with the FBP technique. There was no significant difference in the image noise (p = 0.39), signal (p = 0.82) and signal-to-noise ratio (p = 0.56) between the groups. The subjective image quality was minimally better in the ASiR group but not statistically significant. There was excellent interobserver agreement on the subjective image quality and diagnostic acceptability for both groups. The use of ASiR technique allowed approximately 36% radiation dose reduction in the evaluation of cervical spine without degrading the image quality. The present study highlights that the ASiR technique is extremely helpful in reducing the patient radiation exposure while maintaining the image quality. It is highly recommended to utilize this novel technique in CT imaging of different body regions.

  20. Immunological induction with thymoglobulin: reduction in the number of doses in renal transplant from deceased donor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucio Roberto Requião Moura

    2011-03-01

    .06, Group 1 versus Group 2. There was a significant reduction in the costs of induction protocol from U$ 7,567.02 to U$ 3,485.56 (p < 0.001. Conclusions: The total number of thymoglobulin doses for immunologic induction could be reduced in a safe and effective way, without a negative impactin graft rejection or survival, preserving renal function and being significantly cheaper.

  1. Biochemical Tolerance During Low Dose Propylene Glycol Exposure in Neonates: A Formulation-Controlled Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aida Kulo

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose of the study: Propylene glycol (PG is a frequently co-administered solvent in formulations administered to neonates, but reports on its (intolerance are limited. We aimed to report on renal, metabolic and hepatic tolerance before, during and following intravenous (iv PG-paracetamol exposure and compared these data with similar datasets reported in literature on neonates exposed to PG without paracetamol or paracetamol without PG.Methods: Renal (diuresis, creatinemia, sodium, metabolic (Base Excess, Anion Gap, lactate, bicarbonate and hepatic (liver enzymes, bilirubinemia indicators before, during and following iv paracetamol-PG exposure in neonates as included in the PARANEO (paracetamol in neonates study (intra-individual trends, ANOVA were collected and analysed.Comparison with observations collected in cases exposed to either iv phenobarbital-PG or iv paracetamol-mannitol (inter-individual comparison, Mann Whitney-U test were made. Results: PG exposure (median 34.1 mg/kg/24 h did not affect postnatal renal, metabolic and hepatic adaptations in 60 cases exposed to paracetamol-PG. These indicators were similar when compared to 29 cases exposed to phenobarbital- PG or 172 cases exposed to paracetamol-mannitol.Major conclusion: Based on observations in 89 neonates, low dose PG exposure was tolerated well. Studies on PG pharmacokinetics and its covariates are needed to estimate the upper level of PG tolerance in neonates.

  2. Larval responses of three midwestern anurans to chronic, low-dose exposures of four herbicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Bethany K; Semlitsch, Raymond D

    2010-04-01

    Low levels of agricultural herbicides often contaminate surface water and might persist throughout the growing season, potentially acting as stressors on aquatic organisms. Although low-dose, chronic exposures to agrochemicals are likely common for many nontarget organisms, studies addressing these effects using end-use herbicide formulations are rare. We exposed three common species of tadpoles to conservative levels of atrazine, S-metolachlor, and glyphosate end-use herbicide formulations throughout the larval period to test for survival differences or life-history trait alterations. Exposure to the glyphosate product Roundup WeatherMax at 572 ppb glyphosate acid equivalents (a.e.) resulted in 80% mortality of western chorus frog tadpoles, likely as a result of a unique surfactant formulation. Exposure to WeatherMax or Roundup Original Max at 572 ppb a.e. also lengthened the larval period for American toads. Chronic atrazine and S-metolachlor exposures induced no significant negative effects on survival, mass at metamorphosis, or larval period length at the levels tested. These results highlight the importance of explicitly tying chronic tests to the natural environment and considering contributions of surfactant/adjuvant components to end-use formulation toxicities, even between very similar products.

  3. Radiation dose reduction in CT with adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) for patients with bronchial carcinoma and intrapulmonary metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, M-L; Lüdemann, L; Böning, G; Kahn, J; Fuchs, S; Hamm, B; Streitparth, F

    2016-05-01

    To compare the radiation dose and image quality of 64-row chest computed tomography (CT) in patients with bronchial carcinoma or intrapulmonary metastases using full-dose CT reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP) at baseline and reduced dose with 40% adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) at follow-up. The chest CT images of patients who underwent FBP and ASIR studies were reviewed. Dose-length products (DLP), effective dose, and size-specific dose estimates (SSDEs) were obtained. Image quality was analysed quantitatively by signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) measurement. In addition, image quality was assessed by two blinded radiologists evaluating images for noise, contrast, artefacts, visibility of small structures, and diagnostic acceptability using a five-point scale. The ASIR studies showed 36% reduction in effective dose compared with the FBP studies. The qualitative and quantitative image quality was good to excellent in both protocols, without significant differences. There were also no significant differences for SNR except for the SNR of lung surrounding the tumour (FBP: 35±17, ASIR: 39±22). A protocol with 40% ASIR can provide approximately 36% dose reduction in chest CT of patients with bronchial carcinoma or intrapulmonary metastases while maintaining excellent image quality. Copyright © 2016 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Diuretics enhance effects of increased dose of candesartan on ambulatory blood pressure reduction in Japanese patients with uncontrolled hypertension treated with medium-dose angiotensin II receptor blockers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakima, Atsushi; Kita, Toshihiro; Nakada, Seigo; Yokota, Naoto; Tamaki, Noboru; Etoh, Takuma; Shimokubo, Toru; Kitamura, Kazuo; Takishita, Shuichi; Ohya, Yusuke

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Although blockade of the renin-angiotensin system by increasing the dose of angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) is recommended to achieve clinical benefits in terms of blood pressure (BP) control and cardiovascular and renal outcomes, the effect of this increased dose on ambulatory BP monitoring has not been evaluated completely in Japanese patients with uncontrolled hypertension undergoing medium-dose ARB therapy. The primary objective of this study was to examine the effect of the relatively high dose of the ARB candesartan (12 mg/day) on 24-h systolic BP and the attainment of target BP levels in uncontrolled hypertension treated with a medium dose of ARBs. A total of 146 hypertensive patients (age: 69.9 ± 9.3 years; females: 65.8%) completed the study. After switching to candesartan at 12 mg/day, all these BP measurements decreased significantly (pdiuretics than those without (p=0.0206). Multivariate analysis revealed a significant correlation between the combined ARB and diuretic therapy, and the change in 24-h systolic BP irrespective of preceding ARBs. In conclusion, the switching therapy to increased dose of candesartan caused significant reductions in office and ambulatory BP levels, and improved the attainment of target BP levels in patients with uncontrolled hypertension treated with a medium dose of ARBs. Combination with diuretics enhanced this effect.

  5. Contouring and dose calculation in head and neck cancer radiotherapy after reduction of metal artifacts in CT images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Christian Rønn; Lübeck Christiansen, Rasmus; Lorenzen, Ebbe Laugaard

    2017-01-01

    of metal artifact reduction (MAR) in H&N patients in terms of delineation consistency and dose calculation precision in radiation treatment planning. Material and methods: Tumor and OAR delineations were evaluated in planning CT scans of eleven oropharynx patients with streaking artifacts in the tumor...... region preceding curative radiotherapy (RT). The GTV-tumor (GTV-T), GTV-node and parotid glands were contoured by four independent observers on standard CT images and MAR images. Dose calculation was evaluated on thirty H&N patients with dental implants near the treated volume. For each patient, the dose...... derived from the clinical treatment plan using the standard image set was compared with the recalculated dose on the MAR image dataset. Results: Reduction of metal artifacts resulted in larger volumes of all delineated structures compared to standard reconstruction. The GTV-T and the parotids were...

  6. A Bayesian Model and Stochastic Exposure (Dose) Estimation for Relative Exposure Risk Comparison Involving Asbestos-Containing Dropped Ceiling Panel Installation and Maintenance Tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boelter, Fred W; Xia, Yulin; Persky, Jacob D

    2017-09-01

    Assessing exposures to hazards in order to characterize risk is at the core of occupational hygiene. Our study examined dropped ceiling systems commonly used in schools and commercial buildings and lay-in ceiling panels that may have contained asbestos prior to the mid to late 1970s. However, most ceiling panels and tiles do not contain asbestos. Since asbestos risk relates to dose, we estimated the distribution of eight-hour TWA concentrations and one-year exposures (a one-year dose equivalent) to asbestos fibers (asbestos f/cc-years) for five groups of workers who may encounter dropped ceilings: specialists, generalists, maintenance workers, nonprofessional do-it-yourself (DIY) persons, and other tradespersons who are bystanders to ceiling work. Concentration data (asbestos f/cc) were obtained through two exposure assessment studies in the field and one chamber study. Bayesian and stochastic models were applied to estimate distributions of eight-hour TWAs and annual exposures (dose). The eight-hour TWAs for all work categories were below current and historic occupational exposure limits (OELs). Exposures to asbestos fibers from dropped ceiling work would be categorized as "highly controlled" for maintenance workers and "well controlled" for remaining work categories, according to the American Industrial Hygiene Association exposure control rating system. Annual exposures (dose) were found to be greatest for specialists, followed by maintenance workers, generalists, bystanders, and DIY. On a comparative basis, modeled dose and thus risk from dropped ceilings for all work categories were orders of magnitude lower than published exposures for other sources of banned friable asbestos-containing building material commonly encountered in construction trades. © 2016 The Authors Risk Analysis published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Society for Risk Analysis.

  7. Lack of effect of risperidone or olanzapine dose reduction on subjective experiences in stable patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Hiroyoshi; Suzuki, Takefumi; Remington, Gary; Watanabe, Koichiro; Mimura, Masaru; Uchida, Hiroyuki

    2014-08-15

    Sixty-one patients with schizophrenia stably treated with risperidone or olanzapine were randomly assigned to dose-reduction-by-half group or dose maintenance group. Subjective experiences were assessed at baseline and 28 weeks using three different self-rating scales. No significant differences in changes of subjective experiences were observed between the two groups. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. 28-day intraocular pressure reduction with a single dose of brimonidine tartrate-loaded microspheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorchak, Morgan V; Conner, Ian P; Medina, Carlos A; Wingard, Jeremy B; Schuman, Joel S; Little, Steven R

    2014-08-01

    Treatment of glaucoma by intraocular pressure (IOP) reduction is typically accomplished through the administration of eye drops, the difficult and frequent nature of which contributes to extremely low adherence rates. Poor adherence to topical treatment regimens in glaucoma patients can lead to irreversible vision loss and increased treatment costs. Currently there are no approved treatments for glaucoma that address the inherent inefficiencies in drug delivery and patient adherence. Brimonidine tartrate (BT), a common glaucoma medication, requires dosing every 8-12 h, with up to 97% of patients not taking it as prescribed. This study provides proof-of-principle testing of a controlled release BT formulation. BT was encapsulated in poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid microspheres and drug release was quantified using UV-Vis spectroscopy. For in vivo studies, rabbits were randomized to receive a single subconjunctival injection of blank (no drug) or BT-loaded microspheres or twice daily topical 0.2% BT drops. The microspheres released an average of 2.1 ± 0.37 μg BT/mg microspheres/day in vitro. In vivo, the percent decrease in IOP from baseline was significantly greater in the treated eye for both topical drug and drug-loaded microspheres versus blank microspheres throughout the 4-week study, with no evidence of migration or foreign body response. IOP measurements in the contralateral, untreated eyes also suggested a highly localized effect from the experimental treatment. A treatment designed using the release systems described in this study would represent a vast improvement over the current clinical standard of 56-84 topical doses over 28 days. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Metabolomics reveals dose effects of low-dose chronic exposure to uranium in rats: identification of candidate biomarkers in urine samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grison, Stéphane; Favé, Gaëlle; Maillot, Matthieu; Manens, Line; Delissen, Olivia; Blanchardon, Éric; Dublineau, Isabelle; Aigueperse, Jocelyne; Bohand, Sandra; Martin, Jean-Charles; Souidi, Maâmar

    2016-01-01

    Data are sparse about the potential health risks of chronic low-dose contamination of humans by uranium (natural or anthropogenic) in drinking water. Previous studies report some molecular imbalances but no clinical signs due to uranium intake. In a proof-of-principle study, we reported that metabolomics is an appropriate method for addressing this chronic low-dose exposure in a rat model (uranium dose: 40 mg L(-1); duration: 9 months, n = 10). In the present study, our aim was to investigate the dose-effect pattern and identify additional potential biomarkers in urine samples. Compared to our previous protocol, we doubled the number of rats per group (n = 20), added additional sampling time points (3 and 6 months) and included several lower doses of natural uranium (doses used: 40, 1.5, 0.15 and 0.015 mg L(-1)). LC-MS metabolomics was performed on urine samples and statistical analyses were made with SIMCA-P+ and R packages. The data confirmed our previous results and showed that discrimination was both dose and time related. Uranium exposure was revealed in rats contaminated for 9 months at a dose as low as 0.15 mg L(-1). Eleven features, including the confidently identified N1-methylnicotinamide, N1-methyl-2-pyridone-5-carboxamide and 4-hydroxyphenylacetylglycine, discriminated control from contaminated rats with a specificity and a sensitivity ranging from 83 to 96 %, when combined into a composite score. These findings show promise for the elucidation of underlying radiotoxicologic mechanisms and the design of a diagnostic test to assess exposure in urine, in a dose range experimentally estimated to be above a threshold between 0.015 and 0.15 mg L(-1).

  10. Effect of the European directive on medical exposure on patients doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wade, P.; Heaton, B. [Aberdeen Royal Infirmary, Aberdeen (United Kingdom)

    2006-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: In 2000 the European Directive on medical exposures was incorporated into United Kingdom law. Whilst the primary aim was to ensure that all uses of ionising radiation in medical practice were justified and a benefit to the patient or volunteer was identified, there was an understanding that patient doses would be controlled and collective doses reduced. The Ionising Radiation (Medical Exposure) Regulations 2000 made a lot of new demands on radiology and Nuclear Medicine departments. No department is too small or specialized to ignore these regulations and the impact can be major. The Aberdeen Radiation Protection Service advises a number of users of ionising radiation on the implementation of these regulations ranging from single person dental practices to large radiology departments in busy regional hospitals. The particular problems and issues affecting different departments will be discussed. The regulations identified new key roles with Employers, Referrers, Practitioners and Operators all having specific responsibilities. Each of these groups needs to be identified, informed of their responsibilities and trained as necessary. The problems this has raised for the various staff groups will be discussed. A large number of procedures had to be written from how a patient is uniquely identified to how incidents are reported and investigated. There is much emphasis on optimising the use of equipment and techniques used, paying particular attention to women of child bearing age and children. Again there are problems in implementing this in practice and these issues will be discussed. A formal procedure for reporting 'near misses' and actual incidents of overexposure, were introduced. Each reported event is reviewed to identify issues and lessons which can be learnt by others. There is often a lateral thinking exercise involved to reduce the probability of an incident happening again and some novel solutions have been

  11. An education and training programme for radiological institutes: impact on the reduction of the CT radiation dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schindera, Sebastian T.; Allmen, Gabriel von; Vock, Peter; Szucs-Farkas, Zsolt [University of Berne, University Institute of Diagnostic, Interventional and Pediatric Radiology, University Hospital Berne, Berne (Switzerland); Treier, Reto; Trueb, Philipp R. [Federal Office of Public Health, Radiation Protection Division, Berne (Switzerland); Nauer, Claude [University of Berne, University Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, University Hospital Berne, Berne (Switzerland)

    2011-10-15

    To establish an education and training programme for the reduction of CT radiation doses and to assess this programme's efficacy. Ten radiological institutes were counselled. The optimisation programme included a small group workshop and a lecture on radiation dose reduction strategies. The radiation dose used for five CT protocols (paranasal sinuses, brain, chest, pulmonary angiography and abdomen) was assessed using the dose-length product (DLP) before and after the optimisation programme. The mean DLP values were compared with national diagnostic reference levels (DRLs). The average reduction of the DLP after optimisation was 37% for the sinuses (180 vs. 113 mGycm, P < 0.001), 9% for the brain (982 vs. 896 mGycm, P < 0.05), 24% for the chest (425 vs. 322 mGycm, P < 0.05) and 42% for the pulmonary arteries (352 vs. 203 mGycm, P < 0.001). No significant change in DLP was found for abdominal CT. The post-optimisation DLP values of the sinuses, brain, chest, pulmonary arteries and abdomen were 68%, 10%, 20%, 55% and 15% below the DRL, respectively. The education and training programme for radiological institutes is effective in achieving a substantial reduction in CT radiation dose. (orig.)

  12. High Atomic Number Contrast Media Offer Potential for Radiation Dose Reduction in Contrast-Enhanced Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roessler, Ann-Christin; Hupfer, Martin; Kolditz, Daniel; Jost, Gregor; Pietsch, Hubertus; Kalender, Willi A

    2016-04-01

    Spectral optimization of x-ray computed tomography (CT) has led to substantial radiation dose reduction in contrast-enhanced CT studies using standard iodinated contrast media. The purpose of this study was to analyze the potential for further dose reduction using high-atomic-number elements such as hafnium and tungsten. As in previous studies, spectra were determined for which the patient dose necessary to provide a given contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) is minimized. We used 2 different quasi-anthropomorphic phantoms representing the liver cross-section of a normal adult and an obese adult patient with the lateral widths of 360 and 460 mm and anterior-posterior heights of 200 and 300 mm, respectively. We simulated and measured on 2 different scanners with x-ray spectra from 80 to 140 kV and from 70 to 150 kV, respectively. We determined the contrast for iodine-, hafnium-, and tungsten-based contrast media, the noise, and 3-dimensional dose distributions at all available tube voltages by measurements and by simulations. The dose-weighted CNR was determined as optimization parameter. Simulations and measurements were in good agreement regarding their dependence on energy for all parameters investigated. Hafnium provided the best performance for normal and for obese patient phantoms, indicating a dose reduction potential of 30% for normal and 50% for obese patients at 120 kV compared with iodine; this advantage increased further with higher kV values. Dose-weighted CNR values for tungsten were always slightly below the hafnium results. Iodine proved to be the superior choice at voltage values of 80 kV and below. Hafnium and tungsten both seem to be candidates for contrast-medium-enhanced CT of normal and obese adult patients with strongly reduced radiation dose at unimpaired image quality. Computed tomography examinations of obese patients will decrease in dose for higher kV values.

  13. Predictors of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon exposure and internal dose in inner city Baltimore children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Kamau O; Williams, D' Ann L; Abubaker, Salahadin; Curtin-Brosnan, Jean; McCormack, Meredith C; Peng, Roger; Breysse, Patrick N; Matsui, Elizabeth C; Hansel, Nadia N; Diette, Gregory B; Strickland, Paul T

    2017-05-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), the by-products of incomplete combustion of organic materials, are commonly found on particulate matter (PM) and have been associated with the development of asthma and asthma exacerbation in urban populations. We examined time spent in the home and outdoors as predictors of exposures to airborne PAHs and measured urinary 1-hydroxypyrene-glucuronide (1-OHPG) as internal dose of PAHs in 118 children aged 5-12 years from Baltimore, MD. During weeklong periods (Saturday-Saturday) in each of four seasons: daily activities were assessed using questionnaires, indoor air nicotine and PM concentrations were monitored, and urine specimens were collected on Tuesday (day 3) and Saturday (day 7) for measurement of 1-OHPG. Time spent in non-smoking homes was associated with significantly decreased 1-OHPG concentration in urine (β=-0.045, 95% CI (-0.076, -0.013)), and secondhand smoke (SHS) exposures modified these associations, with higher urinary 1-OHPG concentrations in children spending time in smoking homes than non-smoking homes (P-value for interaction=0.012). Time spent outdoors was associated with increased urinary 1-OHPG concentrations (β=0.097, 95% CI (0.037, 0.157)) in boys only. Our results suggest that SHS and ambient (outdoor) air pollution contribute to internal dose of PAHs in inner city children.

  14. Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation Exposure, Oxidative Stress and Epigenetic Programing of Health and Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tharmalingam, Sujeenthar; Sreetharan, Shayenthiran; Kulesza, Adomas V; Boreham, Douglas R; Tai, T C

    2017-10-01

    Ionizing radiation exposure from medical diagnostic imaging has greatly increased over the last few decades. Approximately 80% of patients who undergo medical imaging are exposed to low-dose ionizing radiation (LDIR). Although there is widespread consensus regarding the harmful effects of high doses of radiation, the biological effects of low-linear energy transfer (LET) LDIR is not well understood. LDIR is known to promote oxidative stress, however, these levels may not be large enough to result in genomic mutations. There is emerging evidence that oxidative stress causes heritable modifications via epigenetic mechanisms (DNA methylation, histone modification, noncoding RNA regulation). These epigenetic modifications result in permanent cellular transformations without altering the underlying DNA nucleotide sequence. This review summarizes the major concepts in the field of epigenetics with a focus on the effects of low-LET LDIR (stress on epigenetic gene modification. In this review, we show evidence that suggests that LDIR-induced oxidative stress provides a mechanistic link between LDIR and epigenetic gene regulation. We also discuss the potential implication of LDIR exposure during pregnancy where intrauterine fetal development is highly susceptible to oxidative stress-induced epigenetic programing.

  15. Estimating dose rates to organs as a function of age following internal exposure to radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leggett, R.W.; Eckerman, K.F.; Dunning, D.E. Jr.; Cristy, M.; Crawford-Brown, D.J.; Williams, L.R.

    1984-03-01

    The AGEDOS methodology allows estimates of dose rates, as a function of age, to radiosensitive organs and tissues in the human body at arbitrary times during or after internal exposure to radioactive material. Presently there are few, if any, radionuclides for which sufficient metabolic information is available to allow full use of all features of the methodology. The intention has been to construct the methodology so that optimal information can be gained from a mixture of the limited amount of age-dependent, nuclide-specific data and the generally plentiful age-dependent physiological data now available. Moreover, an effort has been made to design the methodology so that constantly accumulating metabolic information can be incorporated with minimal alterations in the AGEDOS computer code. Some preliminary analyses performed by the authors, using the AGEDOS code in conjunction with age-dependent risk factors developed from the A-bomb survivor data and other studies, has indicated that the doses and subsequent risks of eventually experiencing radiogenic cancers may vary substantially with age for some exposure scenarios and may be relatively invariant with age for other scenarios. We believe that the AGEDOS methodology provides a convenient and efficient means for performing the internal dosimetry.

  16. Using equilibrium passive dosing to maintain stable exposure concentrations of triclosan in a 6-week toxicity test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sobek, A.; Ribbenstedt, A.; Mustajärvi, L.

    2015-01-01

    toxicity tests. Yet, the European Commission’s criteria for chemicals’ risk assessments aim at protecting higher levels in the environment. To achieve protection of populations and ecosystems, reliable long-term ecotoxicologial tests are needed. In this study, we used equilibrium passive dosing to maintain...... hundred individuals in each vial. The increasing biomass of the test organisms can again lead to declining exposure concentrations, but such loss was buffered by passive dosing. Quality assurance tests showed that a) the loading and passive dosing procedures resulted in exposure concentrations with little...

  17. Personnel dose reduction in 90Y microspheres liver-directed radioembolization: from interventional radiology suite to patient ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Martin; Wong, K K; Tso, W K; Lee, Victor; Luk, M Y; Tong, C C; Chu, Ferdinand

    2017-03-01

    To describe a method to reduce the external radiation exposure emitted from the patient after liver-directed radioembolization using 90Y glass microspheres, to quantitatively estimate the occupational dose of medical personnel providing patient care to the patient radioembolized with the use of the method and to discuss radiation exposure to patients who are adjacent if the patient radioembolized needs hospitalization. A lead-lined blanket of lead equivalence of 0.5 mm was used to cover the patient abdomen immediately after the 90Y radioembolization procedure, in order to reduce the radiation emitted from the patient. The interventional radiologist used a rod-type puncture site compressor for haemostasis to avoid direct contact with possible residual radioactivity at the puncture site. Dose rates were measured at the interventional radiologist chest and hand positions during puncture site pressing for haemostasis with and without the use of the blanket. The measurement results were applied to estimate the occupational dose of colleagues performing patient care to the patient radioembolized. The exposure to patients adjacent in the ward was estimated if the patient radioembolized was hospitalized. The radiation exposures measured at the radiologist chest and hand positions have been significantly reduced with the lead-lined blanket in place. The radiologist, performing puncture site pressing at the end of radioembolization procedure, would receive an average hand dose of 1.95 μSv and body dose under his own lead apron of 0.30 μSv for an average 90Y microsphere radioactivity of 2.54 GBq. Other medical personnel, nurses and porters, would receive occupational doses corresponding to an hour of background radiation. If the patient radioembolized using 90Y needs hospitalization in a common ward, using the lead-lined blanket to cover the abdomen of the patient and keeping a distance of 2 m from the patient who is adjacent would reduce the exposure by 0.42% of

  18. Low-dose effect of developmental bisphenol A exposure on sperm count and behaviour in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hass, U; Christiansen, S; Boberg, J; Rasmussen, M G; Mandrup, K; Axelstad, M

    2016-07-01

    Bisphenol A is widely used in food contact materials and other products and is detected in human urine and blood. Bisphenol A may affect reproductive and neurological development; however, opinion of the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) on bisphenol A (EFSA J, 13, 2015 and 3978) concluded that none of the available studies were robust enough to provide a point of departure for setting a tolerable daily intake for bisphenol A. In the present study, pregnant Wistar rats (n = 17-21) were gavaged from gestation day 7 to pup day 22 with bisphenol A doses of 0, 25 μg, 250 μg, 5 mg or 50 mg/kg bw/day. In the offspring, growth, sexual maturation, weights and histopathology of reproductive organs, oestrus cyclicity and sperm counts were assessed. Neurobehavioural development was investigated using a behavioural testing battery including tests for motor activity, sweet preference, anxiety and spatial learning. Decreased sperm count was found at the lowest bisphenol A dose, that is 25 μg/kg/day, but not at the higher doses. Reproductive organ weight and histology were not affected and no behavioural effects were seen in male offspring. In the female offspring, exposure to 25 μg/kg bw/day bisphenol A dose resulted in increased body weight late in life and altered spatial learning in a Morris water maze, indicating masculinization of the brain. Decreased intake of sweetened water was seen in females from the highest bisphenol A dose group, also a possible sign of masculinization. The other investigated endpoints were not significantly affected. In conclusion, the present study using a robust experimental study design, has shown that developmental exposure to 25 μg/kg bw/day bisphenol A can cause adverse effects on fertility (decreased sperm count), neurodevelopment (masculinization of spatial learning in females) and lead to increased female body weight late in life. These results suggest that the new EFSA temporary tolerable daily intake of 4 μg/kg bw

  19. Shielding for Critical Organs and Radiation Exposure Dose Distribution in Patients with High Energy Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, Sung Sil; Suh, Chang Ok; Kim, Gwi Eon [Yonsei Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-03-15

    transected into transverse 36 slices of 2.5cm thickness. Photon dose was measured using a Capintec PR-06C ionization chamber with Capintec 192 electrometer (Capintec Inc., Ramsey, NJ), TLD(VICTOREEN 5000. LiF) and film dosimetry V-Omat, Kodak). In case of fetus, the dosimeter was placed at a depth of 10cm in this phantom at 100cm source to axis distance and located centrally 15cm from the inferior edge of the 30cm x 30cm{sup 2} x-ray beam irradiating the Rando phantom chest wall. A acryl bridge of size 40 cm x 40 cm{sup 2} and a clear space of about 20 cm was fabricated and placed on top of the rectangular polystyrene phantom representing the abdomen of the patient. The lead pot for testicle shielding was made as various shape, sizes, thickness and supporting stand. The scattered photon with and without shielding were measured at the representative position of the fetus and testicle. Measurement of radiation scattered dose outside fields and critical organs, like fetus position and testicle region, from chest or pelvic irradiation by large field of high energy radiation beam was performed using an ionization chamber and film dosimetry. The scattered doses outside field were measured 5 - 10% of maximum doses in fields and exponentially decrease from field margins. The scattered photon dose received the fetus and testicle from thorax field irradiation was measured about 1 mGy/Gy of photon treatment dose. Shielding construction to reduce this scattered dose was investigated using lead sheet and blocks. Lead pot shield for testicle reduced the scatter dose under 10 mGy when photon beam of 60 Gy was irradiated in abdomen region. The scattered photon dose is reduced when the lead shield was used while the no significant reduction of scattered photon dose was observed and 2-3 mm lead sheets reduced the skin dose under 80% and almost electron contamination. The results indicate that it was possible to improve shielding to reduce scattered photon for fetus and testicle when a young

  20. Radiation Dose Reduction in Pediatric Body CT Using Iterative Reconstruction and a Novel Image-Based Denoising Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lifeng; Fletcher, Joel G; Shiung, Maria; Thomas, Kristen B; Matsumoto, Jane M; Zingula, Shannon N; McCollough, Cynthia H

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the radiation dose reduction potential of a novel image-based denoising technique in pediatric abdominopelvic and chest CT examinations and compare it with a commercial iterative reconstruction method. Data were retrospectively collected from 50 (25 abdominopelvic and 25 chest) clinically indicated pediatric CT examinations. For each examination, a validated noise-insertion tool was used to simulate half-dose data, which were reconstructed using filtered back-projection (FBP) and sinogram-affirmed iterative reconstruction (SAFIRE) methods. A newly developed denoising technique, adaptive nonlocal means (aNLM), was also applied. For each of the 50 patients, three pediatric radiologists evaluated four datasets: full dose plus FBP, half dose plus FBP, half dose plus SAFIRE, and half dose plus aNLM. For each examination, the order of preference for the four datasets was ranked. The organ-specific diagnosis and diagnostic confidence for five primary organs were recorded. The mean (± SD) volume CT dose index for the full-dose scan was 5.3 ± 2.1 mGy for abdominopelvic examinations and 2.4 ± 1.1 mGy for chest examinations. For abdominopelvic examinations, there was no statistically significant difference between the half dose plus aNLM dataset and the full dose plus FBP dataset (3.6 ± 1.0 vs 3.6 ± 0.9, respectively; p = 0.52), and aNLM performed better than SAFIRE. For chest examinations, there was no statistically significant difference between the half dose plus SAFIRE and the full dose plus FBP (4.1 ± 0.6 vs 4.2 ± 0.6, respectively; p = 0.67), and SAFIRE performed better than aNLM. For all organs, there was more than 85% agreement in organ-specific diagnosis among the three half-dose configurations and the full dose plus FBP configuration. Although a novel image-based denoising technique performed better than a commercial iterative reconstruction method in pediatric abdominopelvic CT examinations, it performed worse in

  1. Radiation Dose Reduction in Pediatric Body CT Using Iterative Reconstruction and a Novel Image-Based Denoising Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lifeng; Fletcher, Joel G.; Shiung, Maria; Thomas, Kristen B.; Matsumoto, Jane M.; Zingula, Shannon N.; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The objective of this study was to evaluate the radiation dose reduction potential of a novel image-based denoising technique in pediatric abdominopelvic and chest CT examinations and compare it with a commercial iterative reconstruction method. MATERIALS AND METHODS Data were retrospectively collected from 50 (25 abdominopelvic and 25 chest) clinically indicated pediatric CT examinations. For each examination, a validated noise-insertion tool was used to simulate half-dose data, which were reconstructed using filtered back-projection (FBP) and sinogram-affirmed iterative reconstruction (SAFIRE) methods. A newly developed denoising technique, adaptive nonlocal means (aNLM), was also applied. For each of the 50 patients, three pediatric radiologists evaluated four datasets: full dose plus FBP, half dose plus FBP, half dose plus SAFIRE, and half dose plus aNLM. For each examination, the order of preference for the four datasets was ranked. The organ-specific diagnosis and diagnostic confidence for five primary organs were recorded. RESULTS The mean (± SD) volume CT dose index for the full-dose scan was 5.3 ± 2.1 mGy for abdominopelvic examinations and 2.4 ± 1.1 mGy for chest examinations. For abdominopelvic examinations, there was no statistically significant difference between the half dose plus aNLM dataset and the full dose plus FBP dataset (3.6 ± 1.0 vs 3.6 ± 0.9, respectively; p = 0.52), and aNLM performed better than SAFIRE. For chest examinations, there was no statistically significant difference between the half dose plus SAFIRE and the full dose plus FBP (4.1 ± 0.6 vs 4.2 ± 0.6, respectively; p = 0.67), and SAFIRE performed better than aNLM. For all organs, there was more than 85% agreement in organ-specific diagnosis among the three half-dose configurations and the full dose plus FBP configuration. CONCLUSION Although a novel image-based denoising technique performed better than a commercial iterative reconstruction method in pediatric

  2. Feasibility study on an integrated AEC-grid device for the optimization of image quality and exposure dose in mammography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyo-Tae; Yun, Ryang-Young; Han, Moo-Jae; Heo, Ye-Ji; Song, Yong-Keun; Heo, Sung-Wook; Oh, Kyeong-Min; Park, Sung-Kwang

    2017-10-01

    Currently, in the radiation diagnosis field, mammography is used for the early detection of breast cancer. In addition, studies are being conducted on a grid to produce high-quality images. Although the grid ratio of the grid, which affects the scattering removal rate, must be increased to improve image quality, it increases the total exposure dose. While the use of automatic exposure control is recommended to minimize this problem, existing mammography equipment, unlike general radiography equipment, is mounted on the back of a detector. Therefore, the device is greatly affected by the detector and supporting device, and it is difficult to control the exposure dose. Accordingly, in this research, an integrated AEC-grid device that simultaneously performs AEC and grid functions was used to minimize the unnecessary exposure dose while removing scattering, thereby realizing superior image quality.

  3. Typical exposure parameters, organ doses and effective doses for endovascular aortic aneurysm repair: Comparison of Monte Carlo simulations and direct measurements with an anthropomorphic phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foerth, Monika; Treitl, Karla Maria; Treitl, Marcus [Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Seidenbusch, Michael C. [Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Clinical Centre of the Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Sadeghi-Azandaryani, Mojtaba [Clinical Centre of the County of Erding, Department of Vascular Surgery, Erding (Germany); Lechel, Ursula [Federal Office for Radiation Protection, Department of Medical and Occupational Radiation Protection, Oberschleissheim (Germany)

    2015-09-15

    Radiation exposure of patients during endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) procedures ranks in the upper sector of medical exposure. Thus, estimation of radiation doses achieved during EVAR is of great importance. Organ doses (OD) and effective doses (ED) administered to 17 patients receiving EVAR were determined (1) from the exposure parameters by performing Monte Carlo simulations in mathematical phantoms and (2) by measurements with thermoluminescent dosimeters in a physical anthropomorphic phantom. The mean fluoroscopy time was 26 min, the mean dose area product was 24995 cGy cm2. The mean ED was 34.8 mSv, ODs up to 626 mSv were found. Whereas digital subtraction angiographies (DSA) and fluoroscopies each contributed about 50 % to the cumulative ED, the ED rates of DSAs were found to be ten times higher than those of fluoroscopies. Doubling of the field size caused an ED rate enhancement up to a factor of 3. EVAR procedures cause high radiation exposure levels that exceed the values published thus far. As a consequence, (1) DSAs should be only performed when necessary and with a low image rate, (2) fluoroscopies should be kept as short as possible, and (3) field sizes should be minimized. (orig.)

  4. Pediatric cT: Implementation of ASIR for Substantial Radiation Dose Reduction While Maintaining Pre-ASIR Image Noise1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Samuel L.; Moore, Bria M.; Yee, Brian S.; Kaufman, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine a comprehensive method for the implementation of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) for maximal radiation dose reduction in pediatric computed tomography (CT) without changing the magnitude of noise in the reconstructed image or the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in the patient. Materials and Methods The institutional review board waived the need to obtain informed consent for this HIPAA-compliant quality analysis. Chest and abdominopelvic CT images obtained before ASIR implementation (183 patient examinations; mean patient age, 8.8 years ± 6.2 [standard deviation]; range, 1 month to 27 years) were analyzed for image noise and CNR. These measurements were used in conjunction with noise models derived from anthropomorphic phantoms to establish new beam current–modulated CT parameters to implement 40% ASIR at 120 and 100 kVp without changing noise texture or magnitude. Image noise was assessed in images obtained after ASIR implementation (492 patient examinations; mean patient age, 7.6 years ± 5.4; range, 2 months to 28 years) the same way it was assessed in the pre-ASIR analysis. Dose reduction was determined by comparing size-specific dose estimates in the pre- and post-ASIR patient cohorts. Data were analyzed with paired t tests. Results With 40% ASIR implementation, the average relative dose reduction for chest CT was 39% (2.7/4.4 mGy), with a maximum reduction of 72% (5.3/18.8 mGy). The average relative dose reduction for abdominopelvic CT was 29% (4.8/6.8 mGy), with a maximum reduction of 64% (7.6/20.9 mGy). Beam current modulation was unnecessary for patients weighing 40 kg or less. The difference between 0% and 40% ASIR noise magnitude was less than 1 HU, with statistically nonsignificant increases in patient CNR at 100 kVp of 8% (15.3/14.2; P = .41) for chest CT and 13% (7.8/6.8; P = .40) for abdominopelvic CT. Conclusion Radiation dose reduction at pediatric CT was achieved when 40% ASIR was implemented as a dose

  5. Age and Sex Interact to Mediate the Effects of Intermittent, High-Dose Ethanol Exposure on Behavioral Flexibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline M. Barker

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Human alcoholics have been shown to have impaired cognitive control over actions and increased reliance on habitual response strategies. While it is unclear in humans whether these differences predate ethanol exposure or result from chronic drinking, data from animal studies suggest that ethanol acts to promote the development of inflexible behaviors. Here, we investigated how intermittent exposure to high doses of ethanol impacts the ability to flexibly regulate behavior in a habit model. As adolescence, may represent a period of increased drug taking and developmental vulnerability that may impact adult behavior, we compared the effects of high-dose ethanol exposure during adolescence to exposure during adulthood in male and female rats. Our findings indicated that the effects of intermittent, high-dose ethanol exposure on habitual behavior is mediated by age and sex such that ethanol exposure during adolescence promoted the use of habitual response strategies in adult females, but not males, and that the opposite pattern emerged following intermittent, high-dose ethanol exposure in adult rats.

  6. Maternal stress exposures, reactions, and priorities for stress reduction among low-income, urban women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Tina; Glass, Nancy; Curry, Mary Ann; Hernandez, Rebecca; Houck, Gayle

    2013-01-01

    Maternal psychosocial stress has been associated with adverse maternal-child outcomes. Vulnerable women's experiences with stressors during pregnancy and their desires and priorities for appropriate and useful stress reduction interventions are not well understood. Qualitative interviews with low-income, urban women explored their stress exposures and reactions during pregnancy, ways that stressors overlapped and interacted, and their priorities for stress reduction. Quantitative measures (Perceived Stress Scale; My Exposure to Violence Instrument Danger Assessment; Center for Epidemiologic Studies of Depression Scale, Revised; and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist-Civilian) supplemented qualitative descriptions of women's stress exposures and reactions. Analyses explored relationships between stressors and women's priorities for stress intervention. Lay advisors from the sample population reviewed qualitative interview guides for appropriateness, completeness, and language prior to interviews and reviewed study findings for validity. Study findings were returned to the community in newsletter form. Twenty-four low-income, urban women participated in interviews. Women in the sample reported high stress, lifetime violence exposure, depression, and posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms. The most common stressors reported were financial strain, violence exposure, and feelings of intense isolation and loneliness. Few participants reported having discussed psychosocial stressors with prenatal care providers. Participants in this study described connections with other women as desirable to relieve their stress and provided input on ways health care providers could facilitate such connections. Clinical and research implications of findings are discussed, including approaches that health care providers may find useful to facilitate connections among vulnerable pregnant women. © 2012 by the American College of Nurse-Midwives.

  7. Effects of an acute dose of gamma radiation exposure on stem diameter growth, carbon gain, and biomass partitioning in Helianthus annuus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiede, M.E.

    1988-05-25

    Nineteen-day-old dwarf sunflower plants (Helianthus annuus, variety NK894) received a variable dose (0-40 Gy) from a cobalt-60 gamma source. A very sensitive stem monitoring device, developed at Battelle's Pacific Northwest Laboratories, Richland, Washington was used to measure real-time changes in stem diameter. Exposure of plants caused a significant reduction in stem growth and root biomass. Doses as low as 5 Gy resulted in a significant increase in leaf density, suggesting that nonreversible morphological growth changes could be induced by very low doses of radiation. Carbohydrate analysis of 40-Gy irradiated plants demonstrated significantly more starch content in leaves and significantly less starch content in stems 18 days after exposure than did control plants. In contrast, the carbohydrate content in roots of 40-Gy irradiated plants were not significantly different from unirradiated plants 18 days after exposure. These results indicate that radiation either decreased phloem transport or reduced the availability of sugar reducing enzymes in irradiated plants. 44 refs., 12 figs.

  8. Coronary CT angiography for acute chest pain triage: Techniques for radiation exposure reduction; 128 vs. 64 multidetector CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goitein, Orly; Eshet, Yael; Konen, Eli (Diagnostic Imaging, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, and the Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv Univ., Tel Aviv (Israel)), email: orly.goitein@sheba.health.gov.il; Matetzky, Shlomi (Heart Inst., Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, and the Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv Univ., Tel Aviv (Israel)); Goitein, David (Surgery C, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, and the Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv Univ., Tel Aviv (Israel)); Hamdan, Ashraf; Di Segni, Elio (Diagnostic Imaging, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, and the Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv Univ., Tel Aviv (Israel); Heart Inst., Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, and the Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv Univ., Tel Aviv (Israel))

    2011-10-15

    Background. Coronary CT angiography (CCTA) is used daily in acute chest pain triage, although exposing patients to significant radiation dosage. CCTA using prospective ECG gating (PG CCTA) enables significant radiation reduction Purpose. To determine whether the routine use of 128 vs. 64 multidetector CT (MDCT) can increase the proportion of patients scanned using PG CCTA technique, lowering radiation exposure, without decreasing image quality. Material and Methods. The study comprised 232 patients, 116 consecutive patients scanned using 128 MDCT (mean age 49 years, 79 men, BMI 28) and 116 consecutive patients (mean age 50 years, 75 men, BMI 28) which were scanned using 64 MDCT. PG CCTA was performed whenever technically permissible by each type of scanner: 64 MDCT = stable heart rate (HR) <60/min and weight <110 kg; 128 MDCT = stable HR < 70/min and weight <140 kg. All coronary segments were evaluated for image quality using a visual scale of 1-5. An estimated radiation dose was recorded. Results. PC CCTA was performed in 84% and 49% of the 128 and 64 MDCT groups, respectively (P < 0.0001). Average image quality score were 4.6 +- 0.3 and 4.7 +- 0.1 for the 128 and 64 MDCT, respectively (P = 0.08). The mean radiation dose exposure was 6.2 +- 4.8 mSv and 10.4 +- 7.5 mSv for the 128 and 64 MDCT, respectively (P = 0.008). Conclusion. The 128 MDCT scanner enables utilization of PG CCTA technique in a greater proportion of patients, thereby decreasing the related radiation significantly, without hampering image quality

  9. Effects of shielding the radiosensitive superficial organs of ORNL pediatric phantoms on dose reduction in computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parisa Akhlaghi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In computed tomography (CT, some superficial organs which have increased sensitivity to radiation, receive doses that are significant enough to be matter of concern. Therefore, in this study, the effects of using shields on the amount of dose reduction and image quality was investigated for pediatric imaging. Absorbed doses of breasts, eyes, thyroid and testes of a series of pediatric phantoms without and with different thickness of bismuth and lead were calculated by Monte Carlo simulation. Appropriate thicknesses of shields were chosen based on their weights, X-ray spectrum, and the amount of dose reduction. In addition, the effect of lead shield on image quality of a simple phantom was assessed quantitatively using region of interest (ROI measurements. Considering the maximum reduction in absorbed doses and X-ray spectrum, using a lead shield with a maximum thickness of 0.4 mm would be appropriate for testes and thyroid and two other organs (which are exposed directly should be protected with thinner shields. Moreover, the image quality assessment showed that lead was associated with significant increases in both noise and CT attenuation values, especially in the anterior of the phantom. Overall, the results suggested that shielding is a useful optimization tool in CT.

  10. Influence of dose reduction and iterative reconstruction on CT calcium scores : a multi-manufacturer dynamic phantom study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Werf, N R; Willemink, M J; Willems, T P; Greuter, M J W; Leiner, T

    To evaluate the influence of dose reduction in combination with iterative reconstruction (IR) on coronary calcium scores (CCS) in a dynamic phantom on state-of-the-art CT systems from different manufacturers. Calcified inserts in an anthropomorphic chest phantom were translated at 20 mm/s

  11. Accuracy and Radiation Dose Reduction Using Low-Voltage Computed Tomography Coronary Artery Calcium Scoring With Tin Filtration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tesche, Christian; De Cecco, Carlo N.; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn; Albrecht, Moritz Moritz H.; Varga-Szemes, Akos; Duguay, Taylor M.; Ebersberger, Ullrich; Bayer, Richard R.; Canstein, Christian; Schmidt, Bernhard; Allmendinger, Thomas; Litwin, Sheldon E.; Morris, Pamela B.; Flohr, Thomas G.; Hoffmann, Ellen; Schoepf, U. Joseph

    2017-01-01

    This study prospectively investigated the accuracy and radiation dose reduction of CT coronary artery calcium scoring (CACS) using a 100 kVp acquisition protocol with tin filtration (Sn100 kVp) compared with the standard 120 kVp acquisition protocol; 70 patients (59% men, 62.1 10.7 years) who

  12. A global phase III randomized controlled trial of etanercept in psoriasis: safety, efficacy, and effect of dose reduction.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Papp, K.A.; Tyring, S.; Lahfa, M.; Prinz, J.C.; Griffiths, C.E.; Nakanishi, A.M.; Zitnik, R.; Kerkhof, P.C.M. van de; Melvin, L.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In previous studies, etanercept significantly improved plaque psoriasis and was well tolerated. OBJECTIVES: To examine further the efficacy and safety of etanercept and to assess maintenance of treatment effect after dose reduction of etanercept. METHODS: In this multicentre 24-week

  13. AXAIR: A Computer Code for SAR Assessment of Plume-Exposure Doses from Potential Process-Accident Releases to Atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pillinger, W.L.

    2001-05-17

    This report describes the AXAIR computer code which is available to terminal users for evaluating the doses to man from exposure to the atmospheric plume from postulated stack or building-vent releases at the Savannah River Plant. The emphasis herein is on documentation of the methodology only. The total-body doses evaluated are those that would be exceeded only 0.5 percent of the time based on worst-sector, worst-case meteorological probability analysis. The associated doses to other body organs are given in the dose breakdowns by radionuclide, body organ and pathway.

  14. Maternal low-dose estradiol-17β exposure during pregnancy impairs postnatal progeny weight development and body composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werner Fürst, Rainer [Physiology Weihenstephan, Technische Universität München, 85354 Freising-Weihenstephan (Germany); ZIEL PhD Graduate school ‘Epigenetics, Imprinting and Nutrition’, Technische Universität München, 85354 Freising-Weihenstephan (Germany); Pistek, Veronika Leopoldine; Kliem, Heike [Physiology Weihenstephan, Technische Universität München, 85354 Freising-Weihenstephan (Germany); Skurk, Thomas; Hauner, Hans [ZIEL Dep. Nutritional Medicine, Technische Universität München, 85354 Freising-Weihenstephan (Germany); Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, 81675 München (Germany); Meyer, Heinrich Herman Dietrich [Physiology Weihenstephan, Technische Universität München, 85354 Freising-Weihenstephan (Germany); Ulbrich, Susanne Ernestine, E-mail: ulbrich@wzw.tum.de [Physiology Weihenstephan, Technische Universität München, 85354 Freising-Weihenstephan (Germany)

    2012-09-15

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals with estrogenic activity play an important role as obesogens. However, studies investigating the most potent natural estrogen, estradiol-17β (E2), at low dose are lacking. We examined endocrine and physiological parameters in gilts receiving distinct concentrations of E2 during pregnancy. We then investigated whether adverse effects prevail in progeny due to a potential endocrine disruption. E2 was orally applied to gilts during the entire period of pregnancy. The concentrations represented a daily consumption at the recommended ADI level (0.05 μg/kg body weight/day), at the NOEL (10 μg/kg body weight/day) and at a high dosage (1000 μg/kg body weight/day). Plasma hormone concentrations were determined using enzyme immuno assays. Offspring body fat was assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scanning. In treated gilts receiving 1000 μg E2/kg body weight/day we found significantly elevated plasma E2 levels during pregnancy, paralleled by an increased weight gain. While offspring showed similar weight at birth, piglets exhibited a significant reduction in weight at weaning even though their mothers had only received 0.05 μg E2/kg body weight/day. At 8 weeks of age, specifically males showed a significant increase in overall body fat percentage. In conclusion, prenatal exposure to low doses of E2 affected pig offspring development in terms of body weight and composition. In line with findings from other obesogens, our data suggest a programming effect during pregnancy for E2 causative for the depicted phenotypes. Therefore, E2 exposure may imply a possible contribution to childhood obesity. -- Highlights: ► We investigate the potential role of estradiol-17β (E2) as an obesogen. ► We orally apply E2 at the ADI, NOEL and a high dose to gilts during pregnancy. ► Offspring weight is similar at birth but reduced at weaning even after ADI treatment. ► Male offspring only exhibit an increase in overall body fat percentage

  15. Homework "Dose," Type, and Helpfulness as Predictors of Clinical Outcomes in Prolonged Exposure for PTSD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Andrew A; Kline, Alexander C; Graham, Belinda; Bedard-Gilligan, Michele; Mello, Patricia G; Feeny, Norah C; Zoellner, Lori A

    2017-03-01

    Homework is often viewed as central to prolonged exposure (PE) for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), but its relationship with treatment outcome is not well understood. We evaluated homework type, dose, and patients' perceptions of helpfulness as predictors of symptom change and posttreatment outcomes in PE. Patients with chronic PTSD received PE in a randomized clinical trial. Independent evaluators assessed PTSD severity at pre- and posttreatment. Patients reported homework adherence and perceived helpfulness at the beginning of each session, separately for in vivo and imaginal exposure assignments. These variables were examined as predictors of change in PTSD symptoms, PTSD remission, and good end-state functioning (GESF; low PTSD, depression, and anxiety) at posttreatment. Higher imaginal homework adherence predicted greater symptom improvement between sessions and across treatment, as well as twice the odds of achieving remission and GESF. Patients who were at least moderately adherent to imaginal homework assignments (two or more times a week) reported more symptom gains than those who were least adherent but did not differ from those who were most adherent. In vivo adherence was not consistently associated with better outcome, perhaps due to heterogeneity in form and function of weekly assignments. Higher ratings of helpfulness of both types of homework predicted greater symptom improvement from pre- to posttreatment and between sessions. Overall, imaginal exposure homework may complement in-session exposures by enhancing key change processes, though perfect adherence is not necessary. Patients' perceptions of helpfulness may reflect buy-in or perceived match between homework completion and functional impairment. Clinically, in addition to targeting adherence to homework assignments, querying about perceived helpfulness and adjusting assignments appropriately may help augment clinical gains. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Assessment of patient dose reduction by bismuth shielding in CT using measurements, GEANT4 and MCNPX simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, M; Costa, F; Figueira, C; Madeira, P; Teles, P; Vaz, P

    2015-07-01

    This work reports on the use of two different Monte Carlo codes (GEANT4 and MCNPX) for assessing the dose reduction using bismuth shields in computer tomography (CT) procedures in order to protect radiosensitive organs such as eye lens, thyroid and breast. Measurements were performed using head and body PMMA phantoms and an ionisation chamber placed in five different positions of the phantom. Simulations were performed to estimate Computed Tomography Dose Index values using GEANT4 and MCNPX. The relative differences between measurements and simulations were bismuth shielding ranges from 2 to 45 %, depending on the position of the bismuth shield. The percentage of dose reduction was more significant for the area covered by the bismuth shielding (36 % for eye lens, 39 % for thyroid and 45 % for breast shields). © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Reductions in Corpus Callosum Volume Partially Mediate Effects of Prenatal Alcohol Exposure on IQ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stevie C. Biffen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Disproportionate volume reductions in the basal ganglia, corpus callosum (CC and hippocampus have been reported in children with prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE. However, few studies have investigated these reductions in high prevalence communities, such as the Western Cape Province of South Africa, and only one study made use of manual tracing, the gold standard of volumetric analysis. The present study examined the effects of PAE on subcortical neuroanatomy using manual tracing and the relation of volumetric reductions in these regions to IQ and performance on the California Verbal Learning Test-Children's Version (CVLT-C, a list learning task sensitive to PAE. High-resolution T1-weighted images were acquired, using a sequence optimized for morphometric neuroanatomical analysis, on a Siemens 3T Allegra MRI scanner from 71 right-handed, 9- to 11-year-old children [9 fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS, 19 partial FAS (PFAS, 24 non-syndromal heavily exposed (HE and 19 non-exposed controls]. Frequency of maternal drinking was ascertained prospectively during pregnancy using timeline follow-back interviews. PAE was examined in relation to volumes of the CC and left and right caudate nuclei, nucleus accumbens and hippocampi. All structures were manually traced using Multitracer. Higher levels of PAE were associated with reductions in CC volume after adjustment for TIV. Although the effect of PAE on CC was confounded with smoking and lead exposure, additional analyses showed that it was not accounted for by these exposures. Amongst dysmorphic children, smaller CC was associated with poorer IQ and CVLT-C scores and statistically mediated the effect of PAE on IQ. In addition, higher levels of PAE were associated with bilateral volume reductions in caudate nuclei and hippocampi, effects that remained significant after control for TIV, child sex and age, socioeconomic status, maternal smoking during pregnancy, and childhood lead exposure. These data confirm

  18. Pre-treatment shyness mindset predicts less reduction of social anxiety during exposure therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentiner, David P; Jencius, Simon; Jarek, Eva; Gier-Lonsway, Stephanie L; McGrath, Patrick B

    2013-04-01

    This study examined the moderating role of shyness mindset on the reduction of social anxiety during exposure-based treatment. Participants (N=60) in an intensive outpatient program for anxiety disorders were assessed at pre- and post-treatment. Social performance anxiety decreased dramatically during treatment, but the amount of decrease differed as a function of pre-treatment shyness mindset. At one standard deviation above the mean on both the social performance anxiety and shyness mindset measures, an average reduction of 15 points on the social performance anxiety measure was observed. At one standard deviation above the mean on the social performance anxiety measure and one standard deviation below the mean on the shyness mindset measure, an average reduction of 27 points on the social performance anxiety measure was observed. These results suggest that targeting shyness mindset during exposure-based treatments for social anxiety disorder might increase the effectiveness of treatment for individuals with a high shyness mindset. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Fetal exposure to moderate ethanol doses: heightened operant responsiveness elicited by ethanol-related reinforcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    March, Samanta M; Abate, Paula; Spear, Norman E; Molina, Juan Carlos

    2009-11-01

    Prenatal exposure to moderate ethanol doses during late gestation modifies postnatal ethanol palatability and ingestion. The use of Pavlovian associative procedures has indicated that these prenatal experiences broaden the range of ethanol doses capable of supporting appetitive conditioning. Recently, a novel operant technique aimed at analyzing neonatal predisposition to gain access to ethanol has been developed. Experiment 1 tested the operant conditioning technique for developing rats described by Arias and colleagues (2007) and Bordner and colleagues (2008). In Experiment 2, we analyzed changes in the disposition to gain access to ethanol as a result of moderate prenatal exposure to the drug. In Experiment 1, newborn pups were intraorally cannulated and placed in a supine position that allowed access to a touch-sensitive sensor. Paired pups received an intraoral administration of a given reinforcer (milk or quinine) contingent upon physical contact with the sensor. Yoked controls received similar reinforcers only when Paired pups activated the circuit. In Experiment 2, natural reinforcers (water or milk) as well as ethanol (3% or 6% v/v) or an ethanol-related reinforcer (sucrose compounded with quinine) were tested. In this experiment, pups had been exposed to water or ethanol (1 or 2 g/kg) during gestational days 17 to 20. Experiment 1 confirmed previous results showing that 1-day-old pups rapidly learn an operant task to gain access to milk, but not to gain access to a bitter tastant. Experiment 2 showed that water and milk were highly reinforcing across prenatal treatments. Furthermore, general activity during training was not affected by prenatal exposure to ethanol. Most importantly, prenatal ethanol exposure facilitated conditioning when the reinforcer was 3% v/v ethanol or a psychophysical equivalent of ethanol's gustatory properties (sucrose-quinine). The present results suggest that late prenatal experience with ethanol changes the predisposition of

  20. Monte Carlo study on secondary neutrons in passive carbon-ion radiotherapy: identification of the main source and reduction in the secondary neutron dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonai, Shunsuke; Matsufuji, Naruhiro; Kanai, Tatsuaki

    2009-10-01

    Recent successful results in passive carbon-ion radiotherapy allow the patient to live for a longer time and allow younger patients to receive the radiotherapy. Undesired radiation exposure in normal tissues far from the target volume is considerably lower than that close to the treatment target, but it is considered to be non-negligible in the estimation of the secondary cancer risk. Therefore, it is very important to reduce the undesired secondary neutron exposure in passive carbon-ion radiotherapy without influencing the clinical beam. In this study, the source components in which the secondary neutrons are produced during passive carbon-ion radiotherapy were identified and the method to reduce the secondary neutron dose effectively based on the identification of the main sources without influencing the clinical beam was investigated. A Monte Carlo study with the PHITS code was performed by assuming the beamline at the Heavy-Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC). At first, the authors investigated the main sources of secondary neutrons in passive carbon-ion radiotherapy. Next, they investigated the reduction in the neutron dose with various modifications of the beamline device that is the most dominant in the neutron production. Finally, they investigated the use of an additional shield for the patient. It was shown that the main source is the secondary neutrons produced in the four-leaf collimator (FLC) used as a precollimator at HIAMC, of which contribution in the total neutron ambient dose equivalent is more than 70%. The investigations showed that the modification of the FLC can reduce the neutron dose at positions close to the beam axis by 70% and the FLC is very useful not only for the collimation of the primary beam but also the reduction in the secondary neutrons. Also, an additional shield for the patient is very effective to reduce the neutron dose at positions farther than 50 cm from the beam axis. Finally, they showed that the neutron dose can be

  1. IMPLEMENTATION OF MECHANICAL DECONTAMINATION FOR REDUCTION OF EXTERNAL EXPOSURE AT THE TERRITORY OF THE BRYANSK REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. P. Ramzaev

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper contains a review of the data relevant to the technologies and some results of the mechanical decontamination of the ground and buildings located at the territory of two recreational areas in the Bryansk Region. Both areas were significantly contaminated by the Chernobyl debris in 1986. The obtained values of the gamma-dose rate reduction factor were about 0.2 and 0.3 for the outdoor and indoor locations, respectively. The follow-up monitoring of the treated and control areas demonstrated long-term stability of the effect of the decontamination carried out.

  2. Exposure-response relationship of AMG 386 in combination with weekly paclitaxel in recurrent ovarian cancer and its implication for dose selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jian-Feng; Rasmussen, Erik; Karlan, Beth Y; Vergote, Ignace B; Navale, Lynn; Kuchimanchi, Mita; Melara, Rebeca; Stepan, Daniel E; Weinreich, David M; Sun, Yu-Nien

    2012-05-01

    To characterize exposure-response relationships of AMG 386 in a phase 2 study in advanced ovarian cancer for the facilitation of dose selection in future studies. A population pharmacokinetic model of AMG 386 (N = 141) was developed and applied in an exposure-response analysis using data from patients (N = 160) with recurrent ovarian cancer who received paclitaxel plus AMG 386 (3 or 10 mg/kg once weekly) or placebo. Reduction in the risk of progression or death with increasing exposure (steady-state area under the concentration-versus-time curve [AUC(ss)]) was assessed using Cox regression analyses. Confounding factors were tested in multivariate analysis. Alternative AMG 386 doses were explored with Monte Carlo simulations using population pharmacokinetic and parametric survival models. There was a trend toward increased PFS with increased AUC(ss) (hazard ratio [HR] for each one-unit increment in AUC(ss), 0.97; P = 0.097), suggesting that the maximum effect on prolonging PFS was not achieved at the highest dose tested (10 mg/kg). Among patients with AUC(ss) ≥ 9.6 mg h/mL, PFS was 8.1 months versus 5.7 months for AUC(ss) AMG 386 15 mg/kg once weekly would result in an AUC(ss) ≥ 9.6 mg h/mL in > 90% of patients with median PFS of 8.2 months versus 5.0 months for placebo (HR [15 mg/kg vs. placebo], 0.56). Increased exposure to AMG 386 was associated with improved clinical outcomes in recurrent ovarian cancer, supporting the evaluation of a higher dose in future studies.

  3. No Need for Lopinavir Dose Adjustment during Pregnancy: a Population Pharmacokinetic and Exposure-Response Analysis in Pregnant and Nonpregnant HIV-Infected Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Ahmed Hamed; Jones, Aksana Kaefer; Santini-Oliveira, Marilia; Taylor, Graham P; Patterson, Kristine B; Nilius, Angela M; Klein, Cheri Enders

    2015-11-02

    Lopinavir-ritonavir is frequently prescribed to HIV-1-infected women during pregnancy. Decreased lopinavir exposure has been reported during pregnancy, but the clinical significance of this reduction is uncertain. This analysis aimed to evaluate the need for lopinavir dose adjustment during pregnancy. We conducted a population pharmacokinetic analysis of lopinavir and ritonavir concentrations collected from 84 pregnant and 595 nonpregnant treatment-naive and -experienced HIV-1-infected subjects enrolled in six clinical studies. Lopinavir-ritonavir doses in the studies ranged between 400/100 and 600/150 mg twice daily. In addition, linear mixed-effect analysis was used to compare the area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 12 h (AUC0-12) and concentration prior to dosing (Cpredose) in pregnant women and nonpregnant subjects. The relationship between lopinavir exposure and virologic suppression in pregnant women and nonpregnant subjects was evaluated. Population pharmacokinetic analysis estimated 17% higher lopinavir clearance in pregnant women than in nonpregnant subjects. Lopinavir clearance values postpartum were 26.4% and 37.1% lower than in nonpregnant subjects and pregnant women, respectively. As the tablet formulation was estimated to be 20% more bioavailable than the capsule formulation, no statistically significant differences between lopinavir exposure in pregnant women receiving the tablet formulation and nonpregnant subjects receiving the capsule formulation were identified. In the range of lopinavir AUC0-12 or Cpredose values observed in the third trimester, there was no correlation between lopinavir exposure and viral load or proportion of subjects with virologic suppression. Similar efficacy was observed between pregnant women and nonpregnant subjects receiving lopinavir-ritonavir at 400/100 mg twice daily. The pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic results support the use of a lopinavir-ritonavir 400/100-mg twice-daily dose during pregnancy

  4. Liver perfusion CT during hepatic arteriography for the hepatocellular carcinoma: Dose reduction and quantitative evaluation for normal- and ultralow-dose protocol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Shingo [Department of Radiology, Dokkyo Medical University Koshigaya Hospital, 2-1-50, Minami-Koshigaya, Koshigaya-shi, Saitama 343-8555 (Japan); Katada, Yoshiaki, E-mail: yoshiaki@dokkyomed.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Dokkyo Medical University Koshigaya Hospital, 2-1-50, Minami-Koshigaya, Koshigaya-shi, Saitama 343-8555 (Japan); Gohkyu, Masaki; Nakajima, Masahiro; Kawabata, Hideyuki; Nozaki, Miwako [Department of Radiology, Dokkyo Medical University Koshigaya Hospital, 2-1-50, Minami-Koshigaya, Koshigaya-shi, Saitama 343-8555 (Japan)

    2012-12-15

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to investigate whether substantial reduction of the computed tomography (CT) dose is possible in liver CT perfusion imaging by comparing the results of ultralow-dose CT perfusion imaging with those of conventional CT perfusion imaging the same patients and under the same conditions. Materials and methods: The study was composed following two parts: computer simulation and patients study. In computer simulation, noise was added to the images so that the standard deviation (SD) of the CT values in the liver parenchyma became various values using ImageJ. Time density curves (TDCs) were created from the simulated data, and the influence of difference in the SDs on the shapes of the TDCs was investigated. In the patient study, CT perfusion during intra-arterial injection was performed in 30 consecutive patients undergoing transcatheter arterial chemoembolization. CT perfusion images were acquired twice, at 100 mA (CTDI{sub vol}, 300 mGy) for normal and at 20 mA (CTDI{sub vol}, 60 mGy) for the ultralow radiation doses, under the same conditions. Results: No change was observed in the shape of the TDCs and peak values in the analysis of simulation images. A very good correlation was observed between the normal- and ultralow-dose CT images for all analyzed values (R{sup 2} = 0.9885 for blood flow, 0.9269 for blood volume, and 0.8424 for mean transit time). Conclusions: Our results demonstrated that there was no significant difference in the analysis results of perfusion CT between ultralow-dose CT performed using 20% of the conventional dose and normal-dose CT perfusion.

  5. [Sun exposure at school: Evaluation of risk (erythema dose), benefits (vitamin-D synthesis) and behaviour among children in France].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahé, E; de Paula Corrêa, M; Vouldoukis, I; Godin-Beekmann, S; Sigal, M-L; Beauchet, A

    2016-01-01

    To better understand the potential risk associated with sun exposure during the school year, we decided to evaluate behaviour, risk [UV index (UVI), minimal erythema dose (MED)] and benefits (vitamin-D synthesis) of sun exposure in primary schoolchildren in France, as well as the various sun protection methods used for children. We performed the study on a sunny day (July 24) in a school in Antony (France). Evaluation of UVI (with calculation of MED) and the amount of vitamin D synthesized according to exposed body surface area and phototype were performed every 15minutes from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. The effects of albedo and shade on UVI were assessed in 8 different locations at the school. The sun-protection measures used by the children were systematically evaluated. Fifty-seven children were evaluated; the maximum UVI was 7.2 and the maximum temperature was 30.7°C. Irrespective of phototype and clothing, 1 MED was reached and an adequate level of vitamin D was synthesized in the skin before midday. Albedo had little impact on irradiation. The amount of protection afforded by shadow varied greatly, with the highest level occurring in the covered courtyard (99.5% reduction of UVI) and the lowest in the shadow of buildings (53.7% reduction of UVI). With strict sun protection measures concerning dress, children reached 1 MED before synthesizing 1000IU of vitamin D, but with clothing "suited to high temperatures", 1000IU of vitamin D were synthetized before 1 MED was reached. Compliance with photoprotection measures was poor. Regardless of duration of exposure during the day (minimal model: two play breaks+lunchtime break) and of skin phototype, at least 1.5 MED was reached during the day. This was an experimental study ignoring children's actual behaviour (movement, sweating, application of sun protection products, etc.). Moreover, due to weather conditions, the study was performed at a recreation centre in July and not during the "standard" school year. Sun

  6. Low-dose effect of developmental bisphenol A exposure on sperm count and behaviour in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hass, Ulla; Christiansen, Sofie; Boberg, Julie

    2016-01-01

    that none of the available studies were robust enough to provide a point of departure for setting a tolerable daily intake for bisphenol A. In the present study, pregnant Wistar rats (n = 17–21) were gavaged from gestation day 7 to pup day 22 with bisphenol A doses of 0, 25 μg, 250 μg, 5 mg or 50 mg/kg bw...... not significantly affected. In conclusion, the present study using a robust experimental study design, has shown that developmental exposure to 25 μg/kg bw/day bisphenol A can cause adverse effects on fertility (decreased sperm count), neurodevelopment (masculinization of spatial learning in females) and lead...

  7. Dose conversion coefficients for neutron exposure to the lens of the human eye

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manger, Ryan P [ORNL; Bellamy, Michael B [ORNL; Eckerman, Keith F [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Dose conversion coefficients for the lens of the human eye have been calculated for neutron exposure at energies from 1 x 10{sup -9} to 20 MeV and several standard orientations: anterior-to-posterior, rotational and right lateral. MCNPX version 2.6.0, a Monte Carlo-based particle transport package, was used to determine the energy deposited in the lens of the eye. The human eyeball model was updated by partitioning the lens into sensitive and insensitive volumes as the anterior portion (sensitive volume) of the lens being more radiosensitive and prone to cataract formation. The updated eye model was used with the adult UF-ORNL mathematical phantom in the MCNPX transport calculations.

  8. Cardiovascular effects after low-dose exposure and radiotherapy: what research is needed?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wondergem, Jan [International Atomic Energy Agency, Applied Radiation Biology and Radiotherapy Section, Division of Human Health, Department of Nuclear Sciences and Applications, Vienna (Austria); Boerma, Marjan [University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Division of Radiation Health, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Little Rock, AR (United States); Kodama, Kazunori [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan); Stewart, Fiona A. [Netherlands Cancer Institute, Biological Stress Response (H3), Amsterdam (Netherlands); Trott, Klaus R.

    2013-11-15

    The authors of this report met at the Head Quarter of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in Vienna, Austria, on 2-4 July 2012, for intensive discussions of an abundance of original publications on new epidemiological studies on cardiovascular effects after low-dose exposure and radiotherapy and radiobiological experiments as well as several comprehensive reviews that were published since the previous meeting by experts sponsored by the IAEA in June 2006. The data necessitated a re-evaluation of the situation with special emphasis on the consequences current experimental and clinical data may have for clinical oncology/radiotherapy and radiobiological research. The authors jointly arrived at the conclusions and recommendations presented here. (orig.)

  9. The effect of radiation dose reduction on computer-aided detection (CAD) performance in a low-dose lung cancer screening population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Stefano; Lo, Pechin; Kim, Grace; Brown, Matthew; Hoffman, John; Hsu, William; Wahi-Anwar, Wasil; Flores, Carlos; Lee, Grace; Noo, Frederic; Goldin, Jonathan; McNitt-Gray, Michael

    2017-04-01

    Lung cancer screening with low-dose CT has recently been approved for reimbursement, heralding the arrival of such screening services worldwide. Computer-aided detection (CAD) tools offer the potential to assist radiologists in detecting nodules in these screening exams. In lung screening, as in all CT exams, there is interest in further reducing radiation dose. However, the effects of continued dose reduction on CAD performance are not fully understood. In this work, we investigated the effect of reducing radiation dose on CAD lung nodule detection performance in a screening population. The raw projection data files were collected from 481 patients who underwent low-dose screening CT exams at our institution as part of the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST). All scans were performed on a multidetector scanner (Sensation 64, Siemens Healthcare, Forchheim Germany) according to the NLST protocol, which called for a fixed tube current scan of 25 effective mAs for standard-sized patients and 40 effective mAs for larger patients. The raw projection data were input to a reduced-dose simulation software to create simulated reduced-dose scans corresponding to 50% and 25% of the original protocols. All raw data files were reconstructed at the scanner with 1 mm slice thickness and B50 kernel. The lungs were segmented semi-automatically, and all images and segmentations were input to an in-house CAD algorithm trained on higher dose scans (75-300 mAs). CAD findings were compared to a reference standard generated by an experienced reader. Nodule- and patient-level sensitivities were calculated along with false positives per scan, all of which were evaluated in terms of the relative change with respect to dose. Nodules were subdivided based on size and solidity into categories analogous to the LungRADS assessment categories, and sub-analyses were performed. From the 481 patients in this study, 82 had at least one nodule (prevalence of 17%) and 399 did not (83%). A total of 118

  10. Dose-Dependent Response to 3-Nitrobenzanthrone Exposure in Human Urothelial Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pink, Mario; Verma, Nisha; Zerries, Anna; Schmitz-Spanke, Simone

    2017-10-16

    A product of incomplete combustion of diesel fuel, 3-nitrobenzanthrone (3-NBA), has been classified as a cancer-causing substance. It first gained attention as a potential urinary bladder carcinogen due to the presence of its metabolite in urine and formation of DNA adducts. The aim of the present study was to characterize the dose-response relationship of 3-NBA in human urothelial cancer cell line (RT4) exposed to concentrations ranging from 0.0003 μM (environmentally relevant) to 80 μM by utilizing toxicological and metabolomic approaches. We observed that the RT4 cells were capable of bioactivation of 3-NBA within 30 min of exposure. Activity measurements of various enzymes involved in the conversion of 3-NBA in RT4 cells demonstrated NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1) as the main contributor for its bioactivation. Moreover, cytotoxicity assessment exhibited an initiation of adaptive mechanisms at low dosages, which diminished at higher doses, indicating that the capacity of these mechanisms no longer suffices, resulting in increased levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species, reduced proliferation, and hyperpolarisation of the mitochondrial membrane. To characterize the underlying mechanisms of this cellular response, the metabolism of 3-NBA and metabolomic changes in the cells were analyzed. The metabolomic analysis of the cells (0.0003, 0.01, 0.08, 10, and 80 μM 3-NBA) showed elevated levels of various antioxidants at low concentrations of 3-NBA. However, at higher exposure concentrations, it appeared that the cells reprogrammed their metabolism to maintain the cell homeostasis via activation of pentose phosphate pathway (PPP).

  11. RAPID EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT OF NATIONWIDE RIVER FLOOD FOR DISASTER RISK REDUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Kwak

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available considerably increased. For flood disaster risk reduction, it is important to identify and characterize flood area, locations (particularly lowland along rivers, and durations. For this purpose, flood mapping and monitoring are an imperative process and the fundamental part of risk management as well as emergency response. Our ultimate goal is to detect flood inundation areas over a nationwide scale despite limitations of optical and multispectral images, and to estimate flood risk in terms of affected people. We propose a methodological possibility to be used as a standard approach for nationwide rapid flood exposure assessment with the use of the multi-temporal Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS, a big contributor to progress in near-real-time flood mapping. The preliminary results in Bangladesh show that a propensity of flood risk change strongly depends on the temporal and spatial dynamics of exposure such as distributed population.

  12. Knowledge-based iterative model reconstruction (IMR) algorithm in ultralow-dose CT for evaluation of urolithiasis: evaluation of radiation dose reduction, image quality, and diagnostic performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung Bin; Kim, Yang Soo; Lee, Jong Beum; Park, Hyun Jeong

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of a knowledge-based iterative model reconstruction (IMR) algorithm for reducing image noise in ultralow-dose (ULD) CT for urolithiasis. A total of 103 patients diagnosed with urinary stones (n = 276) were enrolled. Regular dose (RD) scans (120 kV and 150 mAs, maximal tube current in dose modulation) were reconstructed using filtered back-projection (FBP, RD-FBP), and ULD scans (100 kV and 20 mAs, fixed tube current) were reconstructed with FBP (ULD-FBP), statistical iterative reconstruction (IR; ULD-iDose), and a knowledge-based IMR algorithm (ULD-IMR). Prospective interpretations of the two scans were performed with respect to radiation dose, objective image noise, and subjective assessment. The subjective assessment was also evaluated with regard to each patient's body mass index (BMI, < 25 or ≥ 25 kg/m(2)). Using RD CT (RD-FBP) as the reference standard, two reviewers assessed the diagnostic performance and inter-observer agreement for ULD-IMR. The average effective doses with RD CT and ULD CT were 8.31 and 0.68 mSv, respectively, and the average radiation dose reduction rate was 91.82% (p < 0.01). The lowest objective image noise was observed with ULD-IMR (p < 0.01). Subjective assessment in ULD-IMR was comparable to that of RD-FBP, although RD-FBP remained statistically superior. For BMI, there was a statistically significant difference in subjective image quality between the normal (4.7 ± 0.54) and overweight or obese groups (4.2 ± 0.5) (p < 0.05). The ULD-IMR showed a greater than 75% concordant rate in overall stones and 100% in ureter stones larger than 3 mm. However, for stones <3 mm, neither reviewer had a good detection rate (45.5% and 56.9% for the general and genitourinary radiologist, respectively). Inter-observer agreement was almost perfect (κ = 0.82). Despite a significant radiation dose reduction, ULD-IMR images were comparable in image quality and noise to RD-FBP images. Furthermore, the diagnostic performance of

  13. Increased cyclooxygenase expression and thymine dimer formation after repeated exposures of humans to low doses of solar simulated radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narbutt, Joanna; Lesiak, Aleksandra; Jochymski, Cezary; Kozlowski, Wojciech; Sysa-Jedrzejowska, Anna; Norval, Mary

    2007-10-01

    The impact of repeated doses of solar simulated radiation (SSR) has not been evaluated, particularly to determine if photoadaptation and photoprotection develop over time. In this study, erythema, pigmentation, cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 and 2 expression and thymine dimer (dTT) formation were evaluated in the skin of irradiated subjects of phototype II or III. Groups of 7-10 volunteers were whole-body irradiated with a low dose of SSR on each of 10 consecutive days followed by a single erythemal ultraviolet B (UVB) dose on a small body area, or irradiated only with the single erythemal UVB dose on a small body area, or irradiated with the low dose of SSR on each of 30 consecutive days, or were unirradiated. Erythema and pigmentation were measured 24 h after the final SSR or UVB, and skin biopsies collected for the assessment of COX(+) cells and dTT(+) nuclei. The repeated SSR exposures induced a small increase in pigmentation without erythema, and were slightly protective against the erythemal effects of the subsequent high UVB dose. The number of COX-1(+) and 2(+) cells increased as a result of 10-days SSR and rose still further after 30-days SSR, indicating that photoadaptation had not developed. The SSR exposures did not result in any protection against the further increase in COX-1 and 2 expression caused by the erythemal UVB dose. In contrast, for dTT formation, the repeated SSR exposures led to a limited degree of both photoadaptation and photoprotection.

  14. The potential benefits of nicaraven to protect against radiation-induced injury in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells with relative low dose exposures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Haytham [Department of Stem Cell Biology, Atomic Bomb Disease Institute, Nagasaki University, 1-12-4 Sakamoto, Nagasaki 852-8523 (Japan); Department of Medical Physiology and Cell Biology, Qena Faculty of Medicine, South Valley University (Egypt); Galal, Omima [Department of Medical Physiology and Cell Biology, Qena Faculty of Medicine, South Valley University (Egypt); Urata, Yoshishige; Goto, Shinji; Guo, Chang-Ying; Luo, Lan [Department of Stem Cell Biology, Atomic Bomb Disease Institute, Nagasaki University, 1-12-4 Sakamoto, Nagasaki 852-8523 (Japan); Abdelrahim, Eman [Department of Medical Histology, Qena Faculty of Medicine, South Valley University (Egypt); Ono, Yusuke [Department of Stem Cell Biology, Atomic Bomb Disease Institute, Nagasaki University, 1-12-4 Sakamoto, Nagasaki 852-8523 (Japan); Mostafa, Emtethal [Department of Medical Physiology and Cell Biology, Qena Faculty of Medicine, South Valley University (Egypt); Li, Tao-Sheng, E-mail: litaoshe@nagasaki-u.ac.jp [Department of Stem Cell Biology, Atomic Bomb Disease Institute, Nagasaki University, 1-12-4 Sakamoto, Nagasaki 852-8523 (Japan)

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • Nicaraven mitigated the radiation-induced reduction of c-kit{sup +} stem cells. • Nicaraven enhanced the function of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. • Complex mechanisms involved in the protection of nicaraven to radiation injury. - Abstract: Nicaraven, a hydroxyl radical-specific scavenger has been demonstrated to attenuate radiation injury in hematopoietic stem cells with 5 Gy γ-ray exposures. We explored the effect and related mechanisms of nicaraven for protecting radiation injury induced by sequential exposures to a relatively lower dose γ-ray. C57BL/6 mice were given nicaraven or placebo within 30 min before exposure to 50 mGy γ-ray daily for 30 days in sequences (cumulative dose of 1.5 Gy). Mice were victimized 24 h after the last radiation exposure, and the number, function and oxidative stress of hematopoietic stem cells were quantitatively estimated. We also compared the gene expression in these purified stem cells from mice received nicaraven and placebo treatment. Nicaraven increased the number of c-kit{sup +} stem/progenitor cells in bone marrow and peripheral blood, with a recovery rate around 60–90% of age-matched non-irradiated healthy mice. The potency of colony forming from hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells as indicator of function was completely protected with nicaraven treatment. Furthermore, nicaraven treatment changed the expression of many genes associated to DNA repair, inflammatory response, and immunomodulation in c-kit{sup +} stem/progenitor cells. Nicaraven effectively protected against damages of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells induced by sequential exposures to a relatively low dose radiation, via complex mechanisms.

  15. MDCT arthrography of the hip: value of the adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction technique and potential for radiation dose reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobalem, Frank; Dugert, Eric; Verdun, Francis R; Dunet, Vincent; Ott, Julien G; Rudiger, Hannes A; Cherix, Stephane; Meuli, Reto; Becce, Fabio

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this article is to assess the effect of the adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) technique on image quality in hip MDCT arthrography and to evaluate its potential for reducing radiation dose. Thirty-seven patients examined with hip MDCT arthrography were prospectively randomized into three different protocols: one with a regular dose (volume CT dose index [CTDIvol], 38.4 mGy) and two with a reduced dose (CTDIvol, 24.6 or 15.4 mGy). Images were reconstructed using filtered back projection (FBP) and four increasing percentages of ASIR (30%, 50%, 70%, and 90%). Image noise and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were measured. Two musculoskeletal radiologists independently evaluated several anatomic structures and image quality parameters using a 4-point scale. They also jointly assessed acetabular labrum tears and articular cartilage lesions. With decreasing radiation dose level, image noise statistically significantly increased (p=0.0009) and CNR statistically significantly decreased (p=0.001). We also found a statistically significant reduction in noise (p=0.0001) and increase in CNR (p≤0.003) with increasing percentage of ASIR; in addition, we noted statistically significant increases in image quality scores for the labrum and cartilage, subchondral bone, overall diagnostic quality (up to 50% ASIR), and subjective noise (p≤0.04), and statistically significant reductions for the trabecular bone and muscles (p≤0.03). Regardless of the radiation dose level, there were no statistically significant differences in the detection and characterization of labral tears (n=24; p=1) and cartilage lesions (n=40; p≥0.89) depending on the ASIR percentage. The use of up to 50% ASIR in hip MDCT arthrography helps to reduce radiation dose by approximately 35-60%, while maintaining diagnostic image quality comparable to that of a regular-dose protocol using FBP.

  16. Calculation of the radiation doses occurring in the human body for inadvertent ingestion of soil and other soil exposure pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oner, F.; Okumuolu, N.

    2003-11-01

    We estimate the radiation doses in the human body, in the Gudalore region in India, following the inadvertent ingestion of soil and exposure to other soil pathways by measuring Th-232, U-238, and K-40. We estimate the equivalent dose in eleven different organs and the absorbed dose calculations for the whole body. The annual effective doses are calculated, the lowest is in Kariyasolai at 7.8 x 10(-3) mSv whereas the highest is in Ponnur at 8.9 x 10(-2) mSv. In all regions, the lowest equivalent doses through inadvertent soil ingestion are calculated in the kidney and thyroid whereas the highest doses are in the red marrow and on the bone surface.

  17. Radon Sources and Associated Risk in terms of Exposure and Dose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efstratios Gregory Vogiannis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Radon concern the international scientific community from early 20th century. Initially as radium emanation, almost the second half of the century as severe harmful to human health. Initial brilliant period of use as medicine, followed by a period of intense concern for its health effects. Primary target groups surveyed were miners early in Europe later in U.S. There is now compelling evidence that radon and its progeny can cause lung cancer. Human activities may create or modify pathways increasing indoor radon concentration compared to outdoor background. These pathways can be controlled by preventive and corrective actions. Indoor Radon and its short-lived progeny attached on aerosol particles or free compose an air mixture that carry a significant energy amount (PAEC. Exposure on PAEC and dose delivered reviewed in detail. Special attention was paid to the case of water workers because lack of adequate data. Radon risk assessment and current legislation regulates dose from radon and its progeny, also were reviewed.

  18. Dose-to-risk conversion factors for low-level tritium exposures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straume, T.

    1992-09-10

    During the past decade, a large number of radiobiological studies have become available for tritium-many of them focusing on the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of tritium beta rays. These and previous studies indicate that tritium in body water produces the same spectrum of radiogenic effects, e.g., cancer, genetic effects, developmental abnormalities, and reproductive effects, observed following whole-body exposure to penetrating radiations such as gamma rays and x rays. The only significant difference in biological response between tritium beta-rays and the other common low linear-energy transfer (LET) radiations, such as gamma rays and x rays, appears to be the greater biological effectiveness of tritium beta rays. For example, tritium in the oxide form (HTO) is about 2 to 3 times more effective at low doses or low dose rates than gamma rays from [sup 137]Cs or [sup 60]CO (Straume, 1991). When tritium is bound to organic molecules, RBE values may be somewhat larger than those for HTO. It is now clear from the wealth of tritium data available that RBEs for tritium beta rays are higher than the quality factor of unity generally used in radiation protection.

  19. Low-Dose Oxygen Enhances Macrophage-Derived Bacterial Clearance following Cigarette Smoke Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William G. Bain

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a common, smoking-related lung disease. Patients with COPD frequently suffer disease exacerbations induced by bacterial respiratory infections, suggestive of impaired innate immunity. Low-dose oxygen is a mainstay of therapy during COPD exacerbations; yet we understand little about whether oxygen can modulate the effects of cigarette smoke on lung immunity. Methods. Wild-type mice were exposed to cigarette smoke for 5 weeks, followed by intratracheal instillation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PAO1 and 21% or 35–40% oxygen. After two days, lungs were harvested for PAO1 CFUs, and bronchoalveolar fluid was sampled for inflammatory markers. In culture, macrophages were exposed to cigarette smoke and oxygen (40% for 24 hours and then incubated with PAO1, followed by quantification of bacterial phagocytosis and inflammatory markers. Results. Mice exposed to 35–40% oxygen after cigarette smoke and PAO1 had improved survival and reduced lung CFUs and inflammation. Macrophages from these mice expressed less TNF-α and more scavenger receptors. In culture, macrophages exposed to cigarette smoke and oxygen also demonstrated decreased TNF-α secretion and enhanced phagocytosis of PAO1 bacteria. Conclusions. Our findings demonstrate a novel, protective role for low-dose oxygen following cigarette smoke and bacteria exposure that may be mediated by enhanced macrophage phagocytosis.

  20. Reduction in occupational and patient radiation exposure from myocardial perfusion imaging: impact of stress-only imaging and high-efficiency SPECT camera technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duvall, W Lane; Guma, Krista A; Kamen, Jacob; Croft, Lori B; Parides, Michael; George, Titus; Henzlova, Milena J

    2013-08-01

    Recently introduced high-efficiency SPECT cameras have demonstrated the ability to reduce radiation exposure to patients undergoing myocardial perfusion imaging studies, especially when combined with stress-only imaging protocols. To date there have been no relevant studies examining the reduced occupational radiation exposure to medical staff. We sought to determine whether changes in stress myocardial perfusion imaging protocols and camera technology can reduce the occupational radiation exposure to the staff of a nuclear cardiology laboratory. Monthly radiation dosimeter readings from 4 nuclear technologists, 4 nurses, and 2 administrative employees were analyzed from two 12-mo periods: October 2007-September 2008 (period 1), before the use of high-efficiency SPECT, and October 2010-September 2011 (period 2), after high-efficiency SPECT was introduced. The average monthly dose equivalent in millirems (1 mrem = 0.01 mSv) was recorded from personal dosimeters worn on laboratory coats. The total activity of (99m)Tc used per month, mean (99m)Tc administered activity per patient, average number of patients per month, patient time spent in the laboratory, and proportion of stress-only studies were determined. There were 3,539 patients in period 1 and 3,898 in period 2. An approximately 40% reduction in the dose equivalent across all staff members occurred during this time (-16.9 and -16.2 mrem for nuclear technologists and nurses, respectively; P efficiency SPECT technology and stress-only protocols resulted in a 34.7% reduction in mean total (99m)Tc administered activity between time periods, with camera technology being responsible for 39.2% of the reduction and stress-only protocols for 60.8%. A combination of high-efficiency SPECT technology and selective use of stress-only protocols significantly reduces the occupational radiation dose equivalent to the staff of a nuclear cardiology laboratory.

  1. Dose reduction to normal tissues as compared to the gross tumor by using intensity modulated radiotherapy in thoracic malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhalla NK

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and purpose Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT is a powerful tool, which might go a long way in reducing radiation doses to critical structures and thereby reduce long term morbidities. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the impact of IMRT in reducing the dose to the critical normal tissues while maintaining the desired dose to the volume of interest for thoracic malignancies. Materials and methods During the period January 2002 to March 2004, 12 patients of various sites of malignancies in the thoracic region were treated using physical intensity modulator based IMRT. Plans of these patients treated with IMRT were analyzed using dose volume histograms. Results An average dose reduction of the mean values by 73% to the heart, 69% to the right lung and 74% to the left lung, with respect to the GTV could be achieved with IMRT. The 2 year disease free survival was 59% and 2 year overall survival was 59%. The average number of IMRT fields used was 6. Conclusion IMRT with inverse planning enabled us to achieve desired dose distribution, due to its ability to provide sharp dose gradients at the junction of tumor and the adjacent critical organs.

  2. Low Dose Rate Irradiation Facility: initial study on chronic exposures to medaka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinton, T.G. E-mail: thinton@srel.edu; Coughlin, D.P.; Yi, Yi; Marsh, L.C

    2004-07-01

    Uncertainties associated with the effects from chronic low-level exposures to radiation prompted us to construct a Low Dose Rate Irradiation Facility (LoDIF). The facility was designed specifically to test the appropriateness of the 10 mGy d{sup -1} guideline often espoused as acceptable for protection of aquatic biota from ionizing radiation. Scientists at the 0.4 ha facility use 40 outdoor mesocosms and {sup 137}Cs irradiators of three different source strengths to research the effects of chronic low-level irradiation at different levels of biological organization. A description of the facility is included along with results from a pilot study in which Japanese medaka (a small fish native to Asia) were chronically irradiated at the highest dose rate possible within the facility (350{+-}150 mGy d{sup -1}). Irradiated fish produced fewer eggs per day (p=0.03); had a lower percentage of viable eggs (p=0.04), and produced a lower percentage of hatchlings (p=0.05). Although these data are not surprising based on the relatively high dose rates, they are important to future work at the LoDIF because they confirm the utility of our chosen model organism for detecting population-level responses, and they illustrate the statistical power achieved from using replicated mesocosms, in that statistical significance was achieved with few replicates per treatment. Future directions for the LoDIF are presented, as well as an invitation for interested researchers to participate in our studies.

  3. In vivo human time-exposure study of orally dosed commercial silver nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munger, Mark A; Radwanski, Przemyslaw; Hadlock, Greg C; Stoddard, Greg; Shaaban, Akram; Falconer, Jonathan; Grainger, David W; Deering-Rice, Cassandra E

    2014-01-01

    Human biodistribution, bioprocessing and possible toxicity of nanoscale silver receive increasing health assessment. We prospectively studied commercial 10- and 32-ppm nanoscale silver particle solutions in a single-blind, controlled, cross-over, intent-to-treat, design. Healthy subjects (n=60) underwent metabolic, blood counts, urinalysis, sputum induction, and chest and abdomen magnetic resonance imaging. Silver serum and urine content were determined. No clinically important changes in metabolic, hematologic, or urinalysis measures were identified. No morphological changes were detected in the lungs, heart or abdominal organs. No significant changes were noted in pulmonary reactive oxygen species or pro-inflammatory cytokine generation. In vivo oral exposure to these commercial nanoscale silver particle solutions does not prompt clinically important changes in human metabolic, hematologic, urine, physical findings or imaging morphology. Further study of increasing time exposure and dosing of silver nanoparticulate silver, and observation of additional organ systems are warranted to assert human toxicity thresholds. In this study, the effects of commercially available nanoparticles were studied in healthy volunteers, concluding no detectable toxicity with the utilized comprehensive assays and tests. As the authors rightfully state, further studies are definitely warranted. Studies like this are much needed for the more widespread application of nanomedicine. © 2014.

  4. Human circulating plasma DNA significantly decreases while lymphocyte DNA damage increases under chronic occupational exposure to low-dose gamma-neutron and tritium β-radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korzeneva, Inna B., E-mail: inna.korzeneva@molgen.vniief.ru [Russian Federal Nuclear Center – All-Russian Research Institute of Experimental Physics (RFNC-VNIIEF) 607190, Sarov, 37 Mira ave., Nizhniy Novgorod Region (Russian Federation); Kostuyk, Svetlana V.; Ershova, Liza S. [Research Centre for Medical Genetics, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, 115478 Moscow, 1 Moskvorechye str. (Russian Federation); Osipov, Andrian N. [Federal Medial and Biological Center named after Burnazyan of the Federal Medical and Biological Agency (FMBTz named after Burnazyan of FMBA), Moscow (Russian Federation); State Research Center - Burnasyan Federal Medical Biophysical Center of Federal Medical Biological Agency, Zhivopisnaya, 46, Moscow, 123098 (Russian Federation); Zhuravleva, Veronika F.; Pankratova, Galina V. [Russian Federal Nuclear Center – All-Russian Research Institute of Experimental Physics (RFNC-VNIIEF) 607190, Sarov, 37 Mira ave., Nizhniy Novgorod Region (Russian Federation); Porokhovnik, Lev N.; Veiko, Natalia N. [Research Centre for Medical Genetics, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, 115478 Moscow, 1 Moskvorechye str. (Russian Federation)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • The chronic exposure to low-dose IR induces DSBs in human lymphocytes (TM index). • Exposure to IR decreases the level of human circulating DNA (cfDNA index). • IR induces an increase of DNase1 activity (DNase1 index) in plasma. • IR induces an increase of the level of antibodies to DNA (Ab DNA index) in plasma. • The ratio cfDNA/(DNase 1 × Ab DNA × TM) is a potential marker of human exposure to IR. - Abstract: The blood plasma of healthy people contains cell-fee (circulating) DNA (cfDNA). Apoptotic cells are the main source of the cfDNA. The cfDNA concentration increases in case of the organism’s cell death rate increase, for example in case of exposure to high-dose ionizing radiation (IR). The objects of the present research are the blood plasma and blood lymphocytes of people, who contacted occupationally with the sources of external gamma/neutron radiation or internal β-radiation of tritium N = 176). As the controls (references), blood samples of people, who had never been occupationally subjected to the IR sources, were used (N = 109). With respect to the plasma samples of each donor there were defined: the cfDNA concentration (the cfDNA index), DNase1 activity (the DNase1 index) and titre of antibodies to DNA (the Ab DNA index). The general DNA damage in the cells was defined (using the Comet assay, the tail moment (TM) index). A chronic effect of the low-dose ionizing radiation on a human being is accompanied by the enhancement of the DNA damage in lymphocytes along with a considerable cfDNA content reduction, while the DNase1 content and concentration of antibodies to DNA (Ab DNA) increase. All the aforementioned changes were also observed in people, who had not worked with the IR sources for more than a year. The ratio cfDNA/(DNase1 × Ab DNA × TM) is proposed to be used as a marker of the chronic exposure of a person to the external low-dose IR. It was formulated the assumption that the joint analysis of the cfDNA, DNase1, Ab

  5. Exposure to low-dose rotenone precipitates synaptic plasticity alterations in PINK1 heterozygous knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martella, G; Madeo, G; Maltese, M; Vanni, V; Puglisi, F; Ferraro, E; Schirinzi, T; Valente, E M; Bonanni, L; Shen, J; Mandolesi, G; Mercuri, N B; Bonsi, P; Pisani, A

    2016-07-01

    Heterozygous mutations in the PINK1 gene are considered a susceptibility factor to develop early-onset Parkinson's disease (PD), as supported by dopamine hypometabolism in asymptomatic mutation carriers and subtle alterations of dopamine-dependent striatal synaptic plasticity in heterozygous PINK1 knockout (PINK1(+/-)) mice. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether exposure to low-dose rotenone of heterozygous PINK1(+/-) mice, compared to their wild-type PINK1(+/+) littermates, could impact on dopamine-dependent striatal synaptic plasticity, in the absence of apparent structural alterations. Mice were exposed to a range of concentrations of rotenone (0.01-1mg/kg). Chronic treatment with concentrations of rotenone up to 0.8mg/kg did not cause manifest neuronal loss or changes in ATP levels both in the striatum or substantia nigra of PINK1(+/-) and PINK1(+/+) mice. Moreover, rotenone (up to 0.8mg/kg) treatment did not induce mislocalization of the mitochondrial membrane protein Tom20 and release of cytochrome c in PINK1(+/-) striata. Accordingly, basic electrophysiological properties of nigral dopaminergic and striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs) were normal. Despite the lack of gross alterations in neuronal viability in chronically-treated PINK1(+/-), a complete loss of both long-term depression (LTD) and long-term potentiation (LTP) was recorded in MSNs from PINK1(+/-) mice treated with a low rotenone (0.1mg/kg) concentration. Even lower concentrations (0.01mg/kg) blocked LTP induction in heterozygous PINK1(+/-) MSNs compared to PINK1(+/+) mice. Of interest, chronic pretreatment with the antioxidants alpha-tocopherol and Trolox, a water-soluble analog of vitamin E and powerful antioxidant, rescued synaptic plasticity impairment, confirming that, at the doses we utilized, rotenone did not induce irreversible alterations. In this model, chronic exposure to low-doses of rotenone was not sufficient to alter mitochondrial integrity and ATP production, but

  6. Dose conversion factors for radiation doses at normal operation discharges. E. Exposure pathways and radioecological data; Dosomraekningsfaktorer foer normaldriftutslaepp. C. Exponeringsvaegar och radioekologiska data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karlsson, Sara; Aquilonius, Karin

    2001-10-01

    A study has been performed in order to develop and extend existing models for dose estimations at emissions of radioactive substances from nuclear facilities in Sweden. This report presents a review of all exposure pathways in the project, in order to secure that no important contributions have been omitted. The radioecological data that should be used in calculating conversion factors for air and water emissions are also reviewed. Nuclid-specific conversion factors have been calculated for radiation doses from inhalation and intake for children in different age groups.

  7. Albuminuria Reduction after High Dose of Vitamin D in Patients with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Soares Felício

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundSome studies suggest an association between diabetic kidney disease (DKD and vitamin D (VD, but there is no data about the effect of high dose of VD on DKD in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM. Our pilot study aims to evaluate albuminuria reduction in patients with T1DM supplemented with high dose of VD.Methods22 patients received doses of 4,000 and 10,000 IU/day of cholecalciferol for 12 weeks according to patient’s previous VD levels. They were submitted to continuous glucose monitoring system, 24 hours ambulatory blood pressure monitoring and urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio before and after VD supplementation.ResultsThere was a reduction of DKD prevalence at the end of the study (68 vs 32%; p = 0.05, with no changes on insulin doses, glycated hemoglobin, glycemic variability and blood pressure values. A correlation between percentage variation of VD levels (ΔVD and albuminuria at the end of the study was presented (r = −0.5; p < 0.05. Among T1DM patients with DKD at the beginning of the study, 8/13 (62% had their DKD stage improved, while the other five ones (38% showed no changes (p < 0.05.ConclusionOur pilot study suggests an association between VD high dose supplementation, lower prevalence and improvement in stages of DKD in T1DM.

  8. Accuracy and Radiation Dose Reduction of Limited-Range CT in the Evaluation of Acute Appendicitis in Pediatric Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Michael; Sanchez, Thomas R; Lamba, Ramit; Fananapazir, Ghaneh; Corwin, Michael T

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this article is to determine the accuracy and radiation dose reduction of limited-range CT prescribed from the top of L2 to the top of the pubic symphysis in children with suspected acute appendicitis. We performed a retrospective study of 210 consecutive pediatric patients from December 11, 2012, through December 11, 2014, who underwent abdominopelvic CT for suspected acute appendicitis. Two radiologists independently reviewed the theoretic limited scans from the superior L2 vertebral body to the top of the pubic symphysis, to assess for visualization of the appendix, acute appendicitis, alternative diagnoses, and incidental findings. Separately, the same parameters were assessed on the full scan by the same two reviewers. Whole-body effective doses were determined for the full- and limited-range scans and were compared using the paired t test. The appendix or entire cecum was visualized on the limited scan in all cases, and no cases of acute appendicitis were missed on the simulated limited scan compared with the full scan. Two alternative diagnoses were missed with the limited scan: one case of hydronephrosis and one of acute acalculous cholecystitis. The mean effective dose for the original scan was 5.6 mSv and that for the simulated limited scan was 3.0 mSv, resulting in a dose reduction of 46.4% (p appendicitis and reduces the dose by approximately 46%.

  9. Cytogenetic dose-response in vitro for biological dosimetry after exposure to high doses of gamma-rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinnikov, Volodymyr A; Maznyk, Nataliya A

    2013-04-01

    The dose response for dicentrics plus centric rings and total unstable chromosome-type aberrations was studied in the first mitoses of cultured human peripheral blood lymphocytes irradiated in vitro to doses of ∼2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 16 and 20 Gy of acute (60)Со gamma-rays. A dose-dependent increase of aberration yield was accompanied by a tendency to the underdispersion of dicentrics and centric rings among cells distributions compared with Poisson statistics at doses ≥6 Gy. The formal fitting of the data to a linear-quadratic model resulted in an equation with the linear and quadratic coefficients ranged 0.098-0.129×cell(-1)×Gy(-1) and 0.039-0.034×cell(-1)×Gy(-2), respectively, depending on the fitting method. The actual radiation-induced aberration yield was markedly lower than expected from a calibration curve, generated earlier within a lower dose range. Interlaboratory variations in reported dicentric yields induced by medium-to-high radiation doses in vitro are discussed.

  10. Full dose reduction potential of statistical iterative reconstruction for head CT protocols in a predominantly pediatric population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirro, Amy E.; Brady, Samuel L.; Kaufman, Robert. A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To implement the maximum level of statistical iterative reconstruction that can be used to establish dose-reduced head CT protocols in a primarily pediatric population. Methods Select head examinations (brain, orbits, sinus, maxilla and temporal bones) were investigated. Dose-reduced head protocols using an adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR) were compared for image quality with the original filtered back projection (FBP) reconstructed protocols in phantom using the following metrics: image noise frequency (change in perceived appearance of noise texture), image noise magnitude, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and spatial resolution. Dose reduction estimates were based on computed tomography dose index (CTDIvol) values. Patient CTDIvol and image noise magnitude were assessed in 737 pre and post dose reduced examinations. Results Image noise texture was acceptable up to 60% ASiR for Soft reconstruction kernel (at both 100 and 120 kVp), and up to 40% ASiR for Standard reconstruction kernel. Implementation of 40% and 60% ASiR led to an average reduction in CTDIvol of 43% for brain, 41% for orbits, 30% maxilla, 43% for sinus, and 42% for temporal bone protocols for patients between 1 month and 26 years, while maintaining an average noise magnitude difference of 0.1% (range: −3% to 5%), improving CNR of low contrast soft tissue targets, and improving spatial resolution of high contrast bony anatomy, as compared to FBP. Conclusion The methodology in this study demonstrates a methodology for maximizing patient dose reduction and maintaining image quality using statistical iterative reconstruction for a primarily pediatric population undergoing head CT examination. PMID:27056425

  11. Using physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling and benchmark dose methods to derive an occupational exposure limit for N-methylpyrrolidone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poet, T S; Schlosser, P M; Rodriguez, C E; Parod, R J; Rodwell, D E; Kirman, C R

    2016-04-01

    The developmental effects of NMP are well studied in Sprague-Dawley rats following oral, inhalation, and dermal routes of exposure. Short-term and chronic occupational exposure limit (OEL) values were derived using an updated physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for NMP, along with benchmark dose modeling. Two suitable developmental endpoints were evaluated for human health risk assessment: (1) for acute exposures, the increased incidence of skeletal malformations, an effect noted only at oral doses that were toxic to the dam and fetus; and (2) for repeated exposures to NMP, changes in fetal/pup body weight. Where possible, data from multiple studies were pooled to increase the predictive power of the dose-response data sets. For the purposes of internal dose estimation, the window of susceptibility was estimated for each endpoint, and was used in the dose-response modeling. A point of departure value of 390 mg/L (in terms of peak NMP in blood) was calculated for skeletal malformations based on pooled data from oral and inhalation studies. Acceptable dose-response model fits were not obtained using the pooled data for fetal/pup body weight changes. These data sets were also assessed individually, from which the geometric mean value obtained from the inhalation studies (470 mg*hr/L), was used to derive the chronic OEL. A PBPK model for NMP in humans was used to calculate human equivalent concentrations corresponding to the internal dose point of departure values. Application of a net uncertainty factor of 20-21, which incorporates data-derived extrapolation factors, to the point of departure values yields short-term and chronic occupational exposure limit values of 86 and 24 ppm, respectively. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Computed Tomography Radiation Dose Reduction: Effect of Different Iterative Reconstruction Algorithms on Image Quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemink, M.J.; Takx, R.A.P.; Jong, P.A. de; Budde, R.P.; Bleys, R.L.; Das, M.; Wildberger, J.E.; Prokop, M.; Buls, N.; Mey, J. de; Leiner, T.; Schilham, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of hybrid and model-based iterative reconstruction (IR) algorithms from different vendors at multiple radiation dose levels on image quality of chest phantom scans.A chest phantom was scanned on state-of-the-art computed tomography scanners from 4 vendors at 4 dose levels

  13. Oral dosing by voluntary  administration of jellybeans. Refinement and reduction of variability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pakula, Malgorzata Maria; Dagnæs-Hansen, Frederik

    2016-01-01

    induce stress and this may also influence parameters under study. Different methods for voluntary oral dosing has been described in the literature, among the methods proposed as an alternative to oral gavage is dosing in chocolate cream, sucker water etc. In this study we used jellybeans to give...

  14. Variation in the fatal cancer probability per unit effective dose with age at exposure and population statistics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, M.W.

    1995-12-31

    Effective dose is a measure of radiation detriment, that is, the probability of an adverse consequence resulting from radiation exposure. The unit of effective dose is the sievert. Unlike the gray, a radiation dose unit with real physical meaning, the sievert includes non-dimensional factors which can vary. The sievert cannot be directly measured and the radiation detriment per sievert may not be the same in all circumstances. With the change, in ICRP 60, from `absolute` risk to `relative` risk, the risk that the sievert represents now depends, inter alia, on population statistics and age at exposure. With `relative` risk, radiation exposure is assumed to have a multiplying effect on the `natural` cancer incidence. As this varies with age and between populations, the risk per sievert will be different in different populations. Persons with unusual dose accumulation patterns, or who are members of populations with vital statistics significantly different from those used by the ICRP, will experience a risk per sievert different to the ICRP value. Results of calculations for populations representative of a developed country and a hypothetical developing country for a range of age at exposure are presented to illustrate the range of risks represented by the sievert. The calculations indicate that the risk per sievert is less if the dose is received later in life and is less in a developing country than in a developed country, but the range in risk is not great. (author).

  15. Efficacy of a dose range of simulated sunlight exposures in raising vitamin D status in South Asian adults: implications for targeted guidance on sun exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrar, Mark D; Webb, Ann R; Kift, Richard; Durkin, Marie T; Allan, Donald; Herbert, Annie; Berry, Jacqueline L; Rhodes, Lesley E

    2013-06-01

    Vitamin D is essential for bone health, and cutaneous synthesis is an important source. South Asians cannot attain adequate amounts of vitamin D by following general recommendations on summer sunlight exposure at northerly latitudes, and increased exposure may be appropriate for improving their vitamin D status. We examined the efficacy of a dose range of simulated summer sunlight exposures in raising vitamin D status in UK adults of South Asian ethnicity. In a dose-response study, healthy adults of South Asian ethnicity (n = 60; 20-60 y old) received 1 of 6 ultraviolet exposures ranging from 0.65 to 3.9 standard erythema doses (SEDs), which were equivalent to 15-90 min unshaded noontime summer sunlight at 53.5°N (Manchester, United Kingdom), 3 times/wk for 6 wk, while wearing casual clothes that revealed a 35% skin area. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] was measured weekly, and dietary vitamin D was estimated. At baseline, all completing participants (n = 51) were vitamin D insufficient [25(OH)D concentrations 10 ng/mL. Targeted guidance on sunlight exposure could usefully enhance vitamin D status to avoid deficiency [25(OH)D concentration >10 ng/mL] in South Asians living at latitudes distant from the equator. This trial was registered at the ISRCTN Register (www.isrctn.org) as 07565297.

  16. Full Dose-Reduction Potential of Statistical Iterative Reconstruction for Head CT Protocols in a Predominantly Pediatric Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirro, A E; Brady, S L; Kaufman, R A

    2016-07-01

    A statistical iterative reconstruction algorithm provides an effective approach to reduce patient dose by compensating for increased image noise in CT due to reduced radiation output. However, after a point, the degree to which a statistical iterative algorithm is used for image reconstruction changes the image appearance. Our aim was to determine the maximum level of statistical iterative reconstruction that can be used to establish dose-reduced head CT protocols in a primarily pediatric population while maintaining similar appearance and level of image noise in the reconstructed image. Select head examinations (brain, orbits, sinus, maxilla, and temporal bones) were investigated. Dose-reduced head protocols using an adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction were compared for image quality with the original filtered back-projection reconstructed protocols in a phantom by using the following metrics: image noise frequency (change in perceived appearance of noise texture), image noise magnitude, contrast-to-noise ratio, and spatial resolution. Dose-reduction estimates were based on CT dose index values. Patient volume CT dose index and image noise magnitude were assessed in 737 pre- and post-dose-reduced examinations. Image noise texture was acceptable for up to 60% adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction for the soft reconstruction kernel (at both 100 and 120 kV[peak]) and up to 40% adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction for the standard reconstruction kernel. Implementation of 40% and 60% adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction led to an average reduction in the volume CT dose index of 43% for brain, 41% for orbit, 30% for maxilla, 43% for sinus, and 42% for temporal bone protocols for patients between 1 month and 26 years of age, while maintaining an average noise magnitude difference of 0.1% (range, -3% to 5%), improving the contrast-to-noise ratio of low-contrast soft-tissue targets and the spatial resolution of high-contrast bony anatomy

  17. Exposing exposure: enhancing patient safety through automated data mining of nuclear medicine reports for quality assurance and organ dose monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikuta, Ichiro; Sodickson, Aaron; Wasser, Elliot J; Warden, Graham I; Gerbaudo, Victor H; Khorasani, Ramin

    2012-08-01

    To develop and validate an open-source informatics toolkit capable of creating a radiation exposure data repository from existing nuclear medicine report archives and to demonstrate potential applications of such data for quality assurance and longitudinal patient-specific radiation dose monitoring. This study was institutional review board approved and HIPAA compliant. Informed consent was waived. An open-source toolkit designed to automate the extraction of data on radiopharmaceuticals and administered activities from nuclear medicine reports was developed. After iterative code training, manual validation was performed on 2359 nuclear medicine reports randomly selected from September 17, 1985, to February 28, 2011. Recall (sensitivity) and precision (positive predictive value) were calculated with 95% binomial confidence intervals. From the resultant institutional data repository, examples of usage in quality assurance efforts and patient-specific longitudinal radiation dose monitoring obtained by calculating organ doses from the administered activity and radiopharmaceutical of each examination were provided. Validation statistics yielded a combined recall of 97.6% ± 0.7 (95% confidence interval) and precision of 98.7% ± 0.5. Histograms of administered activity for fluorine 18 fluorodeoxyglucose and iodine 131 sodium iodide were generated. An organ dose heatmap which displays a sample patient's dose accumulation from multiple nuclear medicine examinations was created. Large-scale repositories of radiation exposure data can be extracted from institutional nuclear medicine report archives with high recall and precision. Such repositories enable new approaches in radiation exposure patient safety initiatives and patient-specific radiation dose monitoring.

  18. Comparative genomic analyses identify common molecular pathways modulated upon exposure to low doses of arsenic and cadmium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fry Rebecca C

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exposure to the toxic metals arsenic and cadmium is associated with detrimental health effects including cancers of various organs. While arsenic and cadmium are well known to cause adverse health effects at high doses, the molecular impact resulting from exposure to environmentally relevant doses of these metals remains largely unexplored. Results In this study, we examined the effects of in vitro exposure to either arsenic or cadmium in human TK6 lymphoblastoid cells using genomics and systems level pathway mapping approaches. A total of 167 genes with differential expression were identified following exposure to either metal with surprisingly no overlap between the two. Real-time PCR was used to confirm target gene expression changes. The gene sets were overlaid onto protein-protein interaction maps to identify metal-induced transcriptional networks. Interestingly, both metal-induced networks were significantly enriched for proteins involved in common biological processes such as tumorigenesis, inflammation, and cell signaling. These findings were further supported by gene set enrichment analysis. Conclusions This study is the first to compare the transcriptional responses induced by low dose exposure to cadmium and arsenic in human lymphoblastoid cells. These results highlight that even at low levels of exposure both metals can dramatically influence the expression of important cellular pathways.

  19. Modern digital plain-radiography of the whole spine in scoliosis patients. Dose reduction and quality criteria; Moderne digitale Radiografie der Ganzwirbelsaeule bei Skoliose. Dosisreduktion und Qualitaetskriterien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kloth, Jost Karsten; Stiller, W.; Kauczor, H.U.; Weber, M.A. [Universitaetsklinik Heidelberg (Germany). Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Wiedenhoefer, B.; Ewerbeck, V. [Universitaetsklinik Heidelberg (Germany). Orthopaedische Universitaetsklinik; Burkholder, I. [StaBiL, Statistische und Biometrische Loesungen, Zweibruecken (Germany)

    2013-01-15

    To reduce the radiation exposure of plain radiographs of the entire spine depending on specific indications, since these are frequently performed examinations of children and young adults with scoliosis and to determine objective quality control criteria to ensure accurate assessment. In this prospective randomized study 323 patients underwent plain-radiography of the entire spine with standard and 50 % reduced dose. In an experimental pilot-study this target-dose was determined using an Alderson-Phantom. The evaluation of the experimental radiographs, as well as, the randomized plain-radiographs was conducted using the following criteria: endplates (Cobb-angle), spinal process and pedicel (rotation), lateral margin of the vertebral body (lateral alignment), identification of C7 / S1 (perpendicular). Two radiologists evaluated these criteria using a score ranging from 1 (definitely assessable) to 4 (not assessable). If one single criteria was evaluated with a score of 3 or more points or more than 2 criteria with 2 points, the radiograph was scored as ''not assessable''. The statistical analysis was conducted as a non-inferiority-trial. Seven (2.4 %) of the 290 examined x-rays were scored as not assessable. There was no statistic inferiority between the examinations with standard or reduced dose, while singular assessment of the defined criteria was likewise dose-independent. Plain-radiography of the total spine in patients with scoliosis can be performed with a dose reduction of 50 % without a loss of validity. The obtained quality control criteria were clinically applicable. (orig.)

  20. Effecti