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Sample records for exposed human myeloid

  1. Luteoloside Inhibits Proliferation of Human Chronic Myeloid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the effects of luteoloside on the proliferation of human chronic myeloid leukemia K562 cells and whether luteoloside induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in K562 cells. Methods: Luteoloside's cytotoxicity was assessed using a cell counting kit. Cell cycle distribution was analysed by flow cytometry ...

  2. Myeloid dendritic cells are potential players in human neurodegenerative diseases

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    Paola eBossù

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s (AD and Parkinson’s (PD diseases are devastating neurodegenerative disturbances wherein neuroinflammation is a chronic pathogenic process with high therapeutic potential. Major mediators of AD/PD neuroimmune processes are resident immune cells, but immune cells derived from periphery may also participate and to some extent modify neuroinflammation. Specifically, blood borne myeloid cells emerge as crucial components of AD/PD progression and susceptibility. Among these, dendritic cells (DCs are key immune orchestrators and players of brain immune surveillance: we candidate them as potential mediators of both AD and PD and as relevant cell model for unraveling myeloid cell role in neurodegeneration. Hence, we recapitulate and discuss emerging data suggesting that blood-derived DCs play a role in experimental and human neurodegenerative diseases. In humans, in particular, DCs are modified by in vitro culture with neurodegeneration-associated pathogenic factors and dysregulated in AD patients, while the levels of DC precursors are decreased in AD and PD patients’ blood, possibly as an index of their recruitment to the brain. Overall, we emphasize the need to explore the impact of DCs on neurodegeneration to uncover peripheral immune mechanisms of pathogenic importance, recognize potential biomarkers and improve therapeutic approaches for neurodegenerative diseases.

  3. Biology and relevance of human acute myeloid leukemia stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Daniel; Majeti, Ravindra

    2017-03-23

    Evidence of human acute myeloid leukemia stem cells (AML LSCs) was first reported nearly 2 decades ago through the identification of rare subpopulations of engrafting cells in xenotransplantation assays. These AML LSCs were shown to reside at the apex of a cellular hierarchy that initiates and maintains the disease, exhibiting properties of self-renewal, cell cycle quiescence, and chemoresistance. This cancer stem cell model offers an explanation for chemotherapy resistance and disease relapse and implies that approaches to treatment must eradicate LSCs for cure. More recently, a number of studies have both refined and expanded our understanding of LSCs and intrapatient heterogeneity in AML using improved xenotransplant models, genome-scale analyses, and experimental manipulation of primary patient cells. Here, we review these studies with a focus on the immunophenotype, biological properties, epigenetics, genetics, and clinical associations of human AML LSCs and discuss critical questions that need to be addressed in future research. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  4. The rate of spontaneous mutations in human myeloid cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araten, David J., E-mail: david.araten@nyumc.org [Division of Hematology, Department of Veterans Affairs New York Harbor Healthcare System (United States); Division of Hematology, Department of Medicine, NYU School of Medicine and the NYU Langone Cancer Center (United States); Krejci, Ondrej [Division of Experimental Hematology and Cancer Biology, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH (United States); DiTata, Kimberly [Division of Hematology, Department of Medicine, NYU School of Medicine and the NYU Langone Cancer Center (United States); Wunderlich, Mark [Division of Experimental Hematology and Cancer Biology, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Sanders, Katie J.; Zamechek, Leah [Division of Hematology, Department of Medicine, NYU School of Medicine and the NYU Langone Cancer Center (United States); Mulloy, James C. [Division of Experimental Hematology and Cancer Biology, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • We provide the first measurement of the mutation rate (μ) in human myeloid cells. • μ is measured to be 3.6–23 × 10{sup −7} per cell division. • The AML-ETO and MLL-AF9 fusions do not seem to increase μ. • Cooperating mutations in NRAS, FLT3 and p53 not seem to increase μ. • Hypermutability may be required to explain leukemogenesis. - Abstract: The mutation rate (μ) is likely to be a key parameter in leukemogenesis, but historically, it has been difficult to measure in humans. The PIG-A gene has some advantages for the detection of spontaneous mutations because it is X-linked, and therefore only one mutation is required to disrupt its function. Furthermore, the PIG-A-null phenotype is readily detected by flow cytometry. Using PIG-A, we have now provided the first in vitro measurement of μ in myeloid cells, using cultures of CD34+ cells that are transduced with either the AML-ETO or the MLL-AF9 fusion genes and expanded with cytokines. For the AML-ETO cultures, the median μ value was ∼9.4 × 10{sup −7} (range ∼3.6–23 × 10{sup −7}) per cell division. In contrast, few spontaneous mutations were observed in the MLL-AF9 cultures. Knockdown of p53 or introduction of mutant NRAS or FLT3 alleles did not have much of an effect on μ. Based on these data, we provide a model to predict whether hypermutability must occur in the process of leukemogenesis.

  5. Therapeutic Effects of Myeloid Cell Leukemia-1 siRNA on Human Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells

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    Hadi Karami

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Up-regulation of Mcl-1, a known anti-apoptotic protein, is associated with the survival and progression of various malignancies including leukemia. The aim of this study was to explore the effect of Mcl-1 small interference RNA (siRNA on the proliferation and apoptosis of HL-60 acute myeloid leukemia (AML cells. Methods: siRNA transfection was performed using Lipofectamine™2000 reagent. Relative mRNA and protein expressions were quantified by quantitative real-time PCR and Western blotting, respectively. Trypan blue assay was performed to assess tumor cell proliferation after siRNA transfection. The cytotoxic effect of Mcl-1 siRNA on leukemic cells was measured using MTT assay. Apoptosis was detected using ELISA cell death assay. Results: Mcl-1 siRNA clearly lowered both Mcl-1 mRNA and protein levels in a time-dependent manner, leading to marked inhibition of cell survival and proliferation. Furthermore, Mcl-1 down-regulation significantly enhanced the extent of HL-60 apoptotic cells. Conclusion: Our results suggest that the down-regulation of Mcl-1 by siRNA can effectively trigger apoptosis and inhibit the proliferation of leukemic cells. Therefore, Mcl-1 siRNA may be a potent adjuvant in AML therapy.

  6. Lysophosphatidic acid mediates myeloid differentiation within the human bone marrow microenvironment.

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    Denis Evseenko

    Full Text Available Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA is a pleiotropic phospholipid present in the blood and certain tissues at high concentrations; its diverse effects are mediated through differential, tissue specific expression of LPA receptors. Our goal was to determine if LPA exerts lineage-specific effects during normal human hematopoiesis. In vitro stimulation of CD34+ human hematopoietic progenitors by LPA induced myeloid differentiation but had no effect on lymphoid differentiation. LPA receptors were expressed at significantly higher levels on Common Myeloid Progenitors (CMP than either multipotent Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells (HSPC or Common Lymphoid Progenitors (CLP suggesting that LPA acts on committed myeloid progenitors. Functional studies demonstrated that LPA enhanced migration, induced cell proliferation and reduced apoptosis of isolated CMP, but had no effect on either HSPC or CLP. Analysis of adult and fetal human bone marrow sections showed that PPAP2A, (the enzyme which degrades LPA was highly expressed in the osteoblastic niche but not in the perivascular regions, whereas Autotaxin (the enzyme that synthesizes LPA was expressed in perivascular regions of the marrow. We propose that a gradient of LPA with the highest levels in peri-sinusoidal regions and lowest near the endosteal zone, regulates the localization, proliferation and differentiation of myeloid progenitors within the bone marrow marrow.

  7. A method for identification and analysis of non-overlapping myeloid immunophenotypes in humans.

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    Michael P Gustafson

    Full Text Available The development of flow cytometric biomarkers in human studies and clinical trials has been slowed by inconsistent sample processing, use of cell surface markers, and reporting of immunophenotypes. Additionally, the function(s of distinct cell types as biomarkers cannot be accurately defined without the proper identification of homogeneous populations. As such, we developed a method for the identification and analysis of human leukocyte populations by the use of eight 10-color flow cytometric protocols in combination with novel software analyses. This method utilizes un-manipulated biological sample preparation that allows for the direct quantitation of leukocytes and non-overlapping immunophenotypes. We specifically designed myeloid protocols that enable us to define distinct phenotypes that include mature monocytes, granulocytes, circulating dendritic cells, immature myeloid cells, and myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs. We also identified CD123 as an additional distinguishing marker for the phenotypic characterization of immature LIN-CD33+HLA-DR- MDSCs. Our approach permits the comprehensive analysis of all peripheral blood leukocytes and yields data that is highly amenable for standardization across inter-laboratory comparisons for human studies.

  8. A 30-base pair element is responsible for the myeloid-specific activity of the human neutrophil elastase promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srikanth, S; Rado, T A

    1994-12-23

    Human neutrophil elastase (HNE), a serine protease, is expressed only in the promyelocytic stages of granulocyte maturation. We examined several regions of the promoter for transcriptional activity and report that a 30-base pair (bp) element located between -76 and -106 in the 5'-flanking region of HNE is sufficient for myeloid-specific expression of HNE. Gel shift assays using nuclear extracts from myeloid and non-myeloid cells reveal several myeloid-specific complexes binding to the 30-bp element. Examination of DNA-protein interactions shows that at least two myeloid-specific proteins of 38 and 55 kDa bind to this element. DNase I protection analysis reveals two distinct footprints between -80 to -91 and -94 to -104 within this element. Transient expression studies using deletion constructs of the HNE 5'-flanking region show that the 30-bp element is active in myeloid cells K 562 and U 937 but not in HeLa cells. Internal deletion of this element results in a 60-85% loss of promoter activity in myeloid cells. Additional functional studies also show that a 19-bp region between -112 and -131 contributes to transcriptional activity of the elastase promoter as well.

  9. Transfer and expression of the gene encoding a human myeloid membrane antigen (gp150).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Look, A T; Peiper, S C; Rebentisch, M B; Ashmun, R A; Roussel, M F; Rettenmier, C W; Sherr, C J

    1985-02-01

    DNA from the human myeloid cell line HL-60 was cotransfected with the cloned thymidine kinase (tk) gene of herpes simplex virus into tk-deficient mouse L cells. tk-positive recipients expressing antigens detected on HL-60 cells were isolated with a fluorescence-activated cell sorter by use of a panel of monoclonal antibodies that detect epitopes on both normal and malignant myeloid cells. Independently sorted populations of transformed mouse cells showed concordant reactivities with four of the monoclonal antibodies in the panel (DU-HL60-4, MY7, MCS.2, and SJ-D1), which suggested that these antibodies reacted to products of a single human gene. A second round of DNA transfection and cell sorting was performed with donor DNA from primary transformants. Two different dominant selection systems were used to isolate secondary mouse L cell and NIH/3T3 cell transformants that coexpressed the same epitopes. Analysis of cellular DNA from secondary mouse cell subclones with a probe specific for human repetitive DNA sequences revealed a minimal human DNA complement containing a characteristic set of restriction fragments common to independently derived subclones. Two glycoproteins, of 130,000 (gp130) and 150,000 (gp150) mol wt, were specifically immunoprecipitated from metabolically labeled lysates of mouse cell transformants and were shown to contain [35S]methionine-labeled tryptic peptides identical to those of analogous glycoproteins expressed in the donor human myeloid cell line. Kinetic and biochemical analyses established that gp130 is a precursor that differs in its carbohydrate moiety from gp150, the mature form of the glycoprotein detected on the cell surface. The isolation of human gene sequences encoding gp150 in a mouse cell genetic background provides the possibility of molecularly cloning the gene and represents a general strategy for isolating human genes encoding differentiation-specific cell surface antigens.

  10. Canthin-6-one induces cell death, cell cycle arrest and differentiation in human myeloid leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira Torquato, Heron F; Ribeiro-Filho, Antonio C; Buri, Marcus V; Araújo Júnior, Roberto T; Pimenta, Renata; de Oliveira, José Salvador R; Filho, Valdir C; Macho, Antonio; Paredes-Gamero, Edgar J; de Oliveira Martins, Domingos T

    2017-04-01

    Canthin-6-one is a natural product isolated from various plant genera and from fungi with potential antitumor activity. In the present study, we evaluate the antitumor effects of canthin-6-one in human myeloid leukemia lineages. Kasumi-1 lineage was used as a model for acute myeloid leukemia. Cells were treated with canthin-6-one and cell death, cell cycle and differentiation were evaluated in both total cells (Lin+) and leukemia stem cell population (CD34+CD38-Lin-/low). Among the human lineages tested, Kasumi-1 was the most sensitive to canthin-6-one. Canthin-6-one induced cell death with apoptotic (caspase activation, decrease of mitochondrial potential) and necrotic (lysosomal permeabilization, double labeling of annexin V/propidium iodide) characteristics. Moreover, canthin-6-one induced cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 (7μM) and G2 (45μM) evidenced by DNA content, BrdU incorporation and cyclin B1/histone 3 quantification. Canthin-6-one also promoted differentiation of Kasumi-1, evidenced by an increase in the expression of myeloid markers (CD11b and CD15) and the transcription factor PU.1. Furthermore, a reduction of the leukemic stem cell population and clonogenic capability of stem cells were observed. These results show that canthin-6-one can affect Kasumi-1 cells by promoting cell death, cell cycle arrest and cell differentiation depending on concentration used. Canthin-6-one presents an interesting cytotoxic activity against leukemic cells and represents a promising scaffold for the development of molecules for anti-leukemic applications, especially by its anti-leukemic stem cell activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Toxicogenomics directory of chemically exposed human hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinberg, Marianna; Stöber, Regina M; Edlund, Karolina; Rempel, Eugen; Godoy, Patricio; Reif, Raymond; Widera, Agata; Madjar, Katrin; Schmidt-Heck, Wolfgang; Marchan, Rosemarie; Sachinidis, Agapios; Spitkovsky, Dimitry; Hescheler, Jürgen; Carmo, Helena; Arbo, Marcelo D; van de Water, Bob; Wink, Steven; Vinken, Mathieu; Rogiers, Vera; Escher, Sylvia; Hardy, Barry; Mitic, Dragana; Myatt, Glenn; Waldmann, Tanja; Mardinoglu, Adil; Damm, Georg; Seehofer, Daniel; Nüssler, Andreas; Weiss, Thomas S; Oberemm, Axel; Lampen, Alfons; Schaap, Mirjam M; Luijten, Mirjam; van Steeg, Harry; Thasler, Wolfgang E; Kleinjans, Jos C S; Stierum, Rob H; Leist, Marcel; Rahnenführer, Jörg; Hengstler, Jan G

    2014-12-01

    A long-term goal of numerous research projects is to identify biomarkers for in vitro systems predicting toxicity in vivo. Often, transcriptomics data are used to identify candidates for further evaluation. However, a systematic directory summarizing key features of chemically influenced genes in human hepatocytes is not yet available. To bridge this gap, we used the Open TG-GATES database with Affymetrix files of cultivated human hepatocytes incubated with chemicals, further sets of gene array data with hepatocytes from human donors generated in this study, and publicly available genome-wide datasets of human liver tissue from patients with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), cirrhosis, and hepatocellular cancer (HCC). After a curation procedure, expression data of 143 chemicals were included into a comprehensive biostatistical analysis. The results are summarized in the publicly available toxicotranscriptomics directory ( http://wiki.toxbank.net/toxicogenomics-map/ ) which provides information for all genes whether they are up- or downregulated by chemicals and, if yes, by which compounds. The directory also informs about the following key features of chemically influenced genes: (1) Stereotypical stress response. When chemicals induce strong expression alterations, this usually includes a complex but highly reproducible pattern named 'stereotypical response.' On the other hand, more specific expression responses exist that are induced only by individual compounds or small numbers of compounds. The directory differentiates if the gene is part of the stereotypical stress response or if it represents a more specific reaction. (2) Liver disease-associated genes. Approximately 20 % of the genes influenced by chemicals are up- or downregulated, also in liver disease. Liver disease genes deregulated in cirrhosis, HCC, and NASH that overlap with genes of the aforementioned stereotypical chemical stress response include CYP3A7, normally expressed in fetal liver; the

  12. A proteomic chronology of gene expression through the cell cycle in human myeloid leukemia cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ly, Tony; Ahmad, Yasmeen; Shlien, Adam; Soroka, Dominique; Mills, Allie; Emanuele, Michael J; Stratton, Michael R; Lamond, Angus I

    2014-01-01

    Technological advances have enabled the analysis of cellular protein and RNA levels with unprecedented depth and sensitivity, allowing for an unbiased re-evaluation of gene regulation during fundamental biological processes. Here, we have chronicled the dynamics of protein and mRNA expression levels across a minimally perturbed cell cycle in human myeloid leukemia cells using centrifugal elutriation combined with mass spectrometry-based proteomics and RNA-Seq, avoiding artificial synchronization procedures. We identify myeloid-specific gene expression and variations in protein abundance, isoform expression and phosphorylation at different cell cycle stages. We dissect the relationship between protein and mRNA levels for both bulk gene expression and for over ∼6000 genes individually across the cell cycle, revealing complex, gene-specific patterns. This data set, one of the deepest surveys to date of gene expression in human cells, is presented in an online, searchable database, the Encyclopedia of Proteome Dynamics (http://www.peptracker.com/epd/). DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01630.001 PMID:24596151

  13. Two Distinct Myeloid Subsets at the Term Human Fetal–Maternal Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Laura Costa

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available During pregnancy, immune cells infiltrate the placenta at different stages of fetal development. NK cells and macrophages are the most predominant cell types. These immune cells play pleiotropic roles, as they control spiral artery remodeling to ensure appropriate blood supply and maintain long-term tolerance to a true allograft; yet, they must be able to mount appropriate immune defenses to pathogens that may threaten the fetus. Whether the same cell type accomplishes all these tasks or if there are dedicated subsets remains controversial. Here, we identify and characterize two distinct subsets of myeloid cells that differ in their pro-inflammatory/regulatory capacity. While one subset predominantly produces the immune-modulating cytokine IL-10, the second subset has superior capacity to secrete pro-inflammatory mediators, such as IL-1β and IL-6. The putative regulatory myeloid cells also express high levels of inhibitory receptors and their ligands, including programmed cell death 1 (PD1 ligands. Importantly, a large fraction of CD8 and CD4 cells in normal term human placenta are PD1 positive, suggesting that the PD1/PD1 ligands axis might be critical to maintain tolerance during pregnancy.

  14. MicroRNA-223 dose levels fine tune proliferation and differentiation in human cord blood progenitors and acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Gentner (Bernhard); N. Pochert (Nicole); A. Rouhi (Arefeh); F. Boccalatte (Francesco); T. Plati (Tiziana); T. Berg (Tobias); S.M. Sun; S.M. Mah (Sarah M.); M. Mirkovic-Hösle (Milijana); J. Ruschmann (Jens); A. Muranyi (Andrew); S. Leierseder (Simon); B. Argiropoulos (Bob); D.T. Starczynowski (Daniel T.); A. Karsan (Aly); M. Heuser (Michael); D. Hogge (Donna); F.D. Camargo (Fernando D.); S. Engelhardt (Stefan); H. Döhner (Hartmut); C. Buske (Christian); M. Jongen-Lavrencic (Mojca); L. Naldini (Luigi); R.K. Humphries (R. Keith); F. Kuchenbauer (Florian)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractA precise understanding of the role of miR-223 in human hematopoiesis and in the pathogenesis of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is still lacking. By measuring miR-223 expression in blasts from 115 AML patients, we found significantly higher miR-223 levels in patients with favorable

  15. CD47 Is an Adverse Prognostic Factor and Therapeutic Antibody Target on Human Acute Myeloid Leukemia Stem Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Majeti, R.; Chao, M.P.; Alizadeh, AA; Pang, W.W.; Jaiswal, S.; Gibbs, K.D.; Rooijen, van N.; Weissman, I.L.

    2009-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is organized as a cellular hierarchy initiated and maintained by a subset of self-renewing leukemia stem cells (LSC). We hypothesized that increased CD47 expression on human AML LSC contributes to pathogenesis by inhibiting their phagocytosis through the interaction of

  16. Regulatory T cells and human myeloid dendritic cells promote tolerance via programmed death ligand-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoba Amarnath

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Immunotherapy using regulatory T cells (Treg has been proposed, yet cellular and molecular mechanisms of human Tregs remain incompletely characterized. Here, we demonstrate that human Tregs promote the generation of myeloid dendritic cells (DC with reduced capacity to stimulate effector T cell responses. In a model of xenogeneic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD, allogeneic human DC conditioned with Tregs suppressed human T cell activation and completely abrogated posttransplant lethality. Tregs induced programmed death ligand-1 (PD-L1 expression on Treg-conditioned DC; subsequently, Treg-conditioned DC induced PD-L1 expression in vivo on effector T cells. PD-L1 blockade reversed Treg-conditioned DC function in vitro and in vivo, thereby demonstrating that human Tregs can promote immune suppression via DC modulation through PD-L1 up-regulation. This identification of a human Treg downstream cellular effector (DC and molecular mechanism (PD-L1 will facilitate the rational design of clinical trials to modulate alloreactivity.

  17. Characterization of resistance to rhabdovirus and retrovirus infection in a human myeloid cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boso, Guney; Somia, Nikunj V

    2015-01-01

    Viruses interact with various permissive and restrictive factors in host cells throughout their replication cycle. Cell lines that are non-permissive to viral infection have been particularly useful in discovering host cell proteins involved in viral life cycles. Here we describe the characterization of a human myeloid leukemia cell line, KG-1, that is resistant to infection by retroviruses and a Rhabdovirus. We show that KG-1 cells are resistant to infection by Vesicular Stomatits Virus as well as VSV Glycoprotein (VSVG) pseudotyped retroviruses due to a defect in binding. Moreover our results indicate that entry by xenotropic retroviral envelope glycoprotein RD114 is impaired in KG-1 cells. Finally we characterize a post- entry block in the early phase of the retroviral life cycle in KG-1 cells that renders the cell line refractory to infection. This cell line will have utility in discovering proteins involved in infection by VSV and HIV-1.

  18. Molecular cloning, expression, and chromosomal localization of the gene encoding a human myeloid membrane antigen (gp150).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Look, A T; Peiper, S C; Rebentisch, M B; Ashmun, R A; Roussel, M F; Lemons, R S; Le Beau, M M; Rubin, C M; Sherr, C J

    1986-10-01

    DNA from a tertiary mouse cell transformant containing amplified human sequences encoding a human myeloid membrane glycoprotein, gp150, was used to construct a bacteriophage lambda library. A single recombinant phage containing 12 kilobases (kb) of human DNA was isolated, and molecular subclones were then used to isolate the complete gp150 gene from a human placental genomic DNA library. The intact gp150 gene, assembled from three recombinant phages, proved to be biologically active when transfected into NIH 3T3 cells. Molecular probes from the gp150 locus annealed with a 4.0-kb polyadenylated RNA transcript derived from human myeloid cell lines and from tertiary mouse cell transformants. The gp150 gene was assigned to human chromosome 15, and was subchromosomally localized to bands q25-26 by in situ hybridization. The chromosomal location of the gp150 gene coincides cytogenetically with the region assigned to the c-fes proto-oncogene, another human gene specifically expressed by myeloid cells.

  19. Retroviruses As Myeloid Cell Riders: What Natural Human Siglec-1 “Knockouts” Tell Us About Pathogenesis

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    Javier Martinez-Picado

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Myeloid cells initiate immune responses and are crucial to control infections. In the case of retroviruses, however, myeloid cells also promote pathogenesis by enabling viral dissemination; a process extensively studied in vitro using human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1. This viral hijacking mechanism does not rely on productive myeloid cell infection but requires HIV-1 capture via Siglec-1/CD169, a receptor expressed on myeloid cells that facilitates the infection of bystander target cells. Murine retroviruses are also recognized by Siglec-1, and this interaction is required for robust retroviral infection in vivo. Yet, the relative contribution of Siglec-1-mediated viral dissemination to HIV-1 disease progression remains unclear. The identification of human null individuals lacking working copies of a particular gene enables studying how this loss affects disease progression. Moreover, it can reveal novel antiviral targets whose blockade might be therapeutically effective and safe, since finding null individuals in natura uncovers dispensable functions. We previously described a loss-of-function variant in SIGLEC-1. Analysis of a large cohort of HIV-1-infected individuals identified homozygous and heterozygous subjects, whose cells were functionally null or partially defective for Siglec-1 activity in HIV-1 capture and transmission ex vivo. Nonetheless, analysis of the effect of Siglec-1 truncation on progression to AIDS was not conclusive due to the limited cohort size, the lack of complete clinical records, and the restriction to study only off-therapy periods. Here, we review how the study of loss-of-function variants might serve to illuminate the role of myeloid cells in viral pathogenesis in vivo and the challenges ahead.

  20. HSP10 selective preference for myeloid and megakaryocytic precursors in normal human bone marrow

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    F Cappello

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Heat shock proteins (HSPs constitute a heterogeneous family of proteins involved in cell homeostasis. During cell life they are involved in harmful insults, as well as in immune and inflammatory reactions. It is known that they regulate gene expression, and cell proliferation, differentiation and death. HSP60 is a mitochondrial chaperonin, highly preserved during evolution, responsible of protein folding. Its function is strictly dependent on HSP10 in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic elements. We investigated the presence and the expression of HSP60 and HSP10 in a series of 20 normal human bone marrow specimens (NHBM by the means of immunohistochemistry. NHBM showed no expression of HSP60, probably due to its being below the detectable threshold, as already demonstrated in other normal human tissues. By contrast, HSP10 showed a selective positivity for myeloid and megakaryocytic lineages. The positivity was restricted to precursor cells, while mature elements were constantly negative.We postulate that HSP10 plays a role in bone marrow cell differentiation other than being a mitochondrial co-chaperonin. The present data emphasize the role of HSP10 during cellular homeostasis and encourage further investigations in this field.

  1. Resveratrol Downregulates Interleukin-6-Stimulated Sonic Hedgehog Signaling in Human Acute Myeloid Leukemia

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    Yu-Chieh Su

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available IL-6 and sonic hedgehog (Shh signaling molecules are considered to maintain the growth of cancer stem cells (CSCs. Resveratrol, an important integrant in traditional Chinese medicine, possesses certain antitumor effects. However, the mechanisms on regulating acute myeloid leukemia (AML are unclear. This study first used human subjects to demonstrate that the plasma levels of IL-6 and IL-1β in AML patients were higher and lower, respectively, than healthy donors. The expression of Shh preproproteins, and C- and N-terminal Shh peptides increased in bone marrow and peripheral blood mononuclear cells isolated from AML patients, and the plasma N-Shh secretion was greater. To further clarify the effect of IL-6 and resveratrol in Shh signaling, human AML HL-60 cells were tested. IL-6 upregulated Shh and Gli-1 expression and was accompanied by an increase of cell viability. Resveratrol significantly decreased CSC-related Shh expression, Gli-1 nuclear translocation, and cell viability in IL-6-treated HL-60 cells and had synergistic effect with Shh inhibitor cyclopamine on inhibiting cell growth. Conclusions. IL-6 stimulated the growth of AML cells through Shh signaling, and this effect might be blocked by resveratrol. Further investigations of Shh as a prognostic marker and resveratrol as a therapeutic drug target to CSCs in AML are surely warranted.

  2. Activation of Triggering Receptor Expressed on Myeloid Cells-1 on Human Neutrophils by Marburg and Ebola Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-04-21

    and adaptive immunity by Ebola and Lassa viruses . J. Immunol. 170:2797–2801. 30. Martini, G. A., and R. Siegert. 1971. Marburg virus disease...Immunol. 6:1191–1197. 41. Slenczka, W. G. 1999. The Marburg virus outbreak of 1967 and subsequent episodes. Curr. Top. Microbiol. Immunol. 235:49–75...Microbiology. All Rights Reserved. Activation of Triggering Receptor Expressed on Myeloid Cells-1 on Human Neutrophils by Marburg and Ebola Viruses

  3. MYC oncogene in myeloid neoplasias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, M Dolores; Albajar, Marta; Gomez-Casares, M Teresa; Batlle, Ana; León, Javier

    2013-02-01

    MYC is a transcription factor that regulates many critical genes for cell proliferation, differentiation, and biomass accumulation. MYC is one of the most prevalent oncogenes found to be altered in human cancer, being deregulated in about 50 % of tumors. Although MYC deregulation has been more frequently associated to lymphoma and lymphoblastic leukemia than to myeloid malignancies, a body of evidence has been gathered showing that MYC plays a relevant role in malignancies derived from the myeloid compartment. The myeloid leukemogenic activity of MYC has been demonstrated in different murine models. Not surprisingly, MYC has been found to be amplified or/and deregulated in the three major types of myeloid neoplasms: acute myeloid leukemia, myelodysplastic syndromes, and myeloproliferative neoplasms, including chronic myeloid leukemia. Here, we review the recent literature describing the involvement of MYC in myeloid tumors.

  4. Antileukemic Potential of Momordica charantia Seed Extracts on Human Myeloid Leukemic HL60 Cells

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    Ramani Soundararajan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Momordica charantia (bitter gourd has been used in the traditional system of medicine for the treatment of various diseases. Anticancer activity of M. charantia extracts has been demonstrated by numerous in vitro and in vivo studies. In the present study, we investigated the differentiation inducing potential of fractionated M. charantia seed extracts in human myeloid HL60 cells. We found that the HL60 cells treated with the fractionated seed extracts differentiated into granulocytic lineage as characterized by NBT staining, CD11b expression, and specific esterase activity. The differentiation inducing principle was found to be heat-stable, and organic in nature. The differentiation was accompanied by a downregulation of c-myc transcript, indicating the involvement of c-myc pathway, at least in part, in differentiation. Taken together these results indicate that fractionated extracts of M. charantia seeds possess differentiation inducing activity and therefore can be evaluated for their potential use in differentiation therapy for leukemia in combination with other inducers of differentiation.

  5. Induction of differentiation and apoptosis by dithizone in human myeloid leukemia cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohroki, J; Muto, N; Tanaka, T; Itoh, N; Inada, A; Tanaka, K

    1998-05-01

    We investigated the effect of diphenylthiocarbazone (dithizone) and its structurally related compounds on the differentiation and apoptosis of two human myeloid leukemia cell lines. Dithizone caused a time- and concentration-dependent induction of differentiation in both the promyelocytic leukemia cell line HL-60 cells and the myeloblastic leukemia cell line ML-1 cells, as measured by nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) reducing activity. Morphological changes and esterase activities confirmed that this differentiation took place. The induction of differentiation required the addition of dithizone to the culture medium for at least 12 h. The differentiation inducing activity was inhibited by the preincubation of dithizone with various metal ions such as Pb2+, Zn2+, Cu2+ and Mn2+ ions, but not with Fe3+ and Mg2+ ions. In addition, the DNA extracted from dithizone-treated HL-60 cells showed a typical ladder pattern characteristic of apoptosis in agarose gel electrophoresis. A quantitative analysis of DNA fragmentation revealed that this apoptosis was concentration- and time-dependent in both the HL-60 and ML-1 cells. Dithizone-induced apoptosis was also inhibited by preincubation with Mn2+ ions, but not with Mg2+ ions. These results indicate that dithizone induces both differentiation and apoptosis in HL-60 and ML-1 cells through a unique mechanism including metal chelation.

  6. Transcriptional profiling reveals functional dichotomy between human slan+ non-classical monocytes and myeloid dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Leeuwen-Kerkhoff, Nathalie; Lundberg, Kristina; Westers, Theresia M; Kordasti, Shahram; Bontkes, Hetty J; de Gruijl, Tanja D; Lindstedt, Malin; van de Loosdrecht, Arjan A

    2017-10-01

    Human 6-sulfo LacNac-positive (slan+) cells have been subject to a paradigm debate. They have previously been classified as a distinct dendritic cell (DC) subset. However, evidence has emerged that they may be more related to monocytes than to DCs. To gain deeper insight into the functional specialization of slan+ cells, we have compared them with both conventional myeloid DC subsets (CD1c+ and CD141+) in human peripheral blood (PB). With the use of genome-wide transcriptional profiling, as well as functional tests, we clearly show that slan+ cells form a distinct, non-DC-like population. They cluster away from both DC subsets, and their gene-expression profile evidently suggests involvement in distinct inflammatory processes. An extensive transcriptional meta-analysis confirmed the relationship of slan+ cells with the monocytic compartment rather than with DCs. From a functional perspective, their ability to prime CD4+ and CD8+ T cells is relatively low. Combined with the finding that "antigen presentation by MHC class II" is at the top of under-represented pathways in slan+ cells, this points to a minimal role in directing adaptive T cell immunity. Rather, the higher expression levels of complement receptors on their cell surface, together with their high secretion of IL-1β and IL-6, imply a specific role in innate inflammatory processes, which is consistent with their recent identification as non-classical monocytes. This study extends our knowledge on DC/monocyte subset biology under steady-state conditions and contributes to our understanding of their role in immune-mediated diseases and their potential use in immunotherapeutic strategies. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  7. The oncogene EVI1 enhances transcriptional and biological responses of human myeloid cells to all-trans retinoic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmetz, Birgit; Hackl, Hubert; Slabáková, Eva; Schwarzinger, Ilse; Smějová, Monika; Spittler, Andreas; Arbesu, Itziar; Shehata, Medhat; Souček, Karel; Wieser, Rotraud

    2014-01-01

    The product of the ecotropic virus integration site 1 (EVI1) gene, whose overexpression is associated with a poor prognosis in myeloid leukemias and some epithelial tumors, regulates gene transcription both through direct DNA binding and through modulation of the activity of other sequence specific transcription factors. Previous results from our laboratory have shown that EVI1 influenced transcription regulation in response to the myeloid differentiation inducing agent, all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), in a dual manner: it enhanced ATRA induced transcription of the RARβ gene, but repressed the ATRA induction of the EVI1 gene itself. In the present study, we asked whether EVI1 would modulate the ATRA regulation of a larger number of genes, as well as biological responses to this agent, in human myeloid cells. U937 and HL-60 cells ectopically expressing EVI1 through retroviral transduction were subjected to microarray based gene expression analysis, and to assays measuring cellular proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. These experiments showed that EVI1 modulated the ATRA response of several dozens of genes, and in fact reinforced it in the vast majority of cases. A particularly strong synergy between EVI1 and ATRA was observed for GDF15, which codes for a member of the TGF-β superfamily of cytokines. In line with the gene expression results, EVI1 enhanced cell cycle arrest, differentiation, and apoptosis in response to ATRA, and knockdown of GDF15 counteracted some of these effects. The potential clinical implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:25486480

  8. Inflammatory Alteration of Human T Cells Exposed Continuously to Asbestos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai-Takei, Naoko; Yamamoto, Shoko; Lee, Suni; Maeda, Megumi; Masuzzaki, Hidenori; Sada, Nagisa; Yu, Min; Yoshitome, Kei; Nishimura, Yasumitsu; Otsuki, Takemi

    2018-02-08

    Asbestos is a known carcinogen and exposure can lead to lung cancer and malignant mesothelioma. To examine the effects of asbestos fibers on human immune cells, the human T cell leukemia/lymphoma virus (HTLV)-1 immortalized human T cell line MT-2 was employed. Following continuous exposure to asbestos fibers for more than eight months, MT-2 sublines showed acquisition of resistance to asbestos-induced apoptosis with decreased death signals and increased surviving signals. These sublines showed various characteristics that suggested a reduction in anti-tumor immunity. On the other hand, inflammatory changes such as expression of MMP7, CXCR5, CXCL13 and CD44 was found to be markedly higher in sublines continuously exposed to asbestos compared with original MT-2 cells. All of these molecules contribute to lung inflammation, T and B cell interactions and connections between mesothelial cells and T cells. Thus, further investigation focusing on these molecules may shed light on the role of chronic inflammation caused by asbestos exposure and the occurrence of malignant mesothelioma. Finally, regarding peripheral T cells from healthy donors (HD) and asbestos-exposed patients with pleural plaque (PP) or malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM), following stimulation of CD4+ T cells, T cells from MPM patients showed reduced potential of interferon (IFN)-γ expression. Moreover, levels of interleukin (IL)-6, one of the most important cytokines in chronic inflammation, in cultured supernatants were higher in PP and MPM patients compared with HD. Overall, asbestos-induced chronic inflammation in the lung as well as the pleural cavity may facilitate the onset of asbestos-induced cancers due to alterations in the interactions among fibers, immune cells such as T and B cells and macrophages, and mesothelial and lung epithelial cells. Further investigations regarding chronic inflammation caused by asbestos fibers may assist in identifying molecular targets for preventive and

  9. Modeling of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia : An Overview of In Vivo Murine and Human Xenograft Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sontakke, Pallavi; Jaques, Jenny; Vellenga, Edo; Schuringa, Jan Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Over the past years, a wide variety of in vivo mouse models have been generated in order to unravel the molecular pathology of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) and to develop and improve therapeutic approaches. These models range from (conditional) transgenic models, knock-in models, and murine bone

  10. CITED2-mediated human hematopoietic stem cell maintenance is critical for acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korthuis, P. M.; Berger, G.; Bakker, B.; Rozenyeld-Geugien, M.; Jaques, J.; de Haan, G.; Schuringa, J. J.; Vellenga, E.; Schepers, H.

    As the transcriptional coactivator CITED2 (CBP/p300-interacting-transactivator-with-an ED-rich-tail 2) can be overexpressed in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells, we analyzed the consequences of high CITED2 expression in normal and AML cells. CITED2 overexpression in normal CD34(+) cells resulted in

  11. Chromosome Aberration in Human Blood Lymphocytes Exposed to Energetic Protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hada, M.; George, Kerry A.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2008-01-01

    During space flight, astronauts are exposed to a space radiation consisting of high-energy protons, high charge and energy (HZE) nuclei, as well as secondary particles that are generated when the primary particles penetrate the spacecraft shielding. Secondary particles have a higher LET value than primary protons and therefore expected to have a higher relative biological effectiveness (RBE). To investigate this theory, we exposed human peripheral blood lymphocytes to protons with energies of 250 MeV, 800MeV, 2 GeV, or 2.5 GeV. LET values for these protons ranged from 0.4 to 0.2 keV/micrometer. and doses ranged from 0.2 to 3 Gy. Over this energy the probability of nuclear reaction leading to secondary radiation, and the multiplicity of reaction produces such as neutrons and mesons increases substantially. The effect of aluminum and polyethylene shielding was also assessed using the 2 GeV and 2.5GeV proton beams. After exposure lymphocytes were stimulated to divide and chromosomes were collected from cells in the first G2 and metaphase cell cycle after exposure using a chemical induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique. Dose response data for chromosome damage was analyzed using the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) chromosome painting technique. Selected samples were also analyzed with multicolor FISH (mFISH) and multicolor banding FISH (mBAND) techniques. Data indicates that the dose response for simple-type exchanges is similar for proton and gamma exposure, whereas protons induce higher yields of complex exchanges that are LET dependent. RBE values will be presented for each proton energy, and the effects of shielding and possible cytogenetic signatures of proton exposure will be discussed.

  12. Myeloid Engraftment in Humanized Mice: Impact of Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor Treatment and Transgenic Mouse Strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlan, Alice M; Harmon, Cathal; Whelan, Sarah; O'Brien, Eóin C; O'Reilly, Vincent P; Crotty, Paul; Kelly, Pamela; Ryan, Michelle; Hickey, Fionnuala B; O'Farrelly, Cliona; Little, Mark A

    2016-04-01

    Poor myeloid engraftment remains a barrier to experimental use of humanized mice. Focusing primarily on peripheral blood cells, we compared the engraftment profile of NOD-scid-IL2Rγc(-/-) (NSG) mice with that of NSG mice transgenic for human membrane stem cell factor (hu-mSCF mice), NSG mice transgenic for human interleukin (IL)-3, granulocyte-macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and stem cell factor (SGM3 mice). hu-mSCF and SGM3 mice showed enhanced engraftment of human leukocytes compared to NSG mice, and this was reflected in the number of human neutrophils and monocytes present in these strains. Importantly, discrete classical, intermediate, and nonclassical monocyte populations were identifiable in the blood of NSG and hu-mSCF mice, while the nonclassical population was absent in the blood of SGM3 mice. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (GCSF) treatment increased the number of blood monocytes in NSG and hu-mSCF mice, and neutrophils in NSG and SGM3 mice; however, this effect appeared to be at least partially dependent on the stem cell donor used to engraft the mice. Furthermore, GCSF treatment resulted in a preferential expansion of nonclassical monocytes in both NSG and hu-mSCF mice. Human tubulointerstitial CD11c(+) cells were present in the kidneys of hu-mSCF mice, while monocytes and neutrophils were identified in the liver of all strains. Bone marrow-derived macrophages prepared from NSG mice were most effective at phagocytosing polystyrene beads. In conclusion, hu-mSCF mice provide the best environment for the generation of human myeloid cells, with GCSF treatment further enhancing peripheral blood human monocyte cell numbers in this strain.

  13. Semen quality of environmentally exposed human population: the toxicological consequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pant, Niraj; Pant, A B; Chaturvedi, P K; Shukla, M; Mathur, N; Gupta, Y K; Saxena, D K

    2013-11-01

    Human data on the relationship of semen quality with pesticide and metals are mostly inconsistent. The purpose of the study is to confirm the toxicity of organochlorine pesticide β- and γ-hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH), DDE and DDD, and metals lead or cadmium on sperm motility in epidemiological study among fertile and infertile men and to determine whether in vivo and in vitro results are in the same direction. Semen analysis and estimation of the toxicants were done in 60 fertile and 150 infertile men. In the in vitro studies, sperm were exposed to the highest levels of these toxicants found in vivo, as well as five and ten times higher, and to the mixture of all compounds. The study assesses sperm viability and motility for a period ranging between 30 min and 96 h. Epidemiological data showed an inverse correlation of toxicant with sperm motility. In vitro study showed that γ-HCH and lead after 12 h, cadmium after 8 h, and coexposure to toxicants after 6 h of exposure caused significant concentration- and duration-dependent decline in sperm motility. Data of in vitro study were concurrent with epidemiological finding that might be useful in establishing the possible association between exposure and effect of these selected pollutants on sperm motility.

  14. Cardiac monitoring of human subjects exposed to the taser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Saul D; Sloane, Christian M; Chan, Theodore C; Dunford, James V; Vilke, Gary M

    2007-08-01

    The Taser (TASER International, Scottsdale, AZ) is a high-voltage, low-amperage device used by many law enforcement agencies. Our objective in this study was to evaluate for rhythm changes utilizing cardiac monitoring during deployment of the Taser on volunteers. A prospective, observational study evaluated law enforcement personnel who had continuous electrocardiographic monitoring immediately before, during, and after having a voluntary exposure to the Taser X-26. Changes in cardiac rate, rhythm, ectopy, morphology, and conduction intervals were measured. A total of 105 subjects were evaluated. The mean shock duration was 3.0 s (range 0.9-5 s). Mean heart rate increased 15 beats/min (95% CI 12.6-18.3), from 122 beats/min before shock to 137 beats/min immediately after shock. One subject had a single premature ventricular contraction both before and after the shock, but no other subject developed ectopy or dysrhythmia. Poor inter-rater agreement prevented determination of the overall effect of shock on conduction intervals. However, several interpretable tracings demonstrated change in QT duration-either shortening or prolongation after shock. Human subjects exposed to a brief shock from the Taser developed significant increases in heart rate, but there were no cardiac dysrhythmias or morphologic changes. Alterations in the QT interval were observed in some subjects but their true incidence and clinical significance are unknown.

  15. Myeloid Dysregulation in a Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Model of PTPN11-Associated Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Mulero-Navarro

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Somatic PTPN11 mutations cause juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML. Germline PTPN11 defects cause Noonan syndrome (NS, and specific inherited mutations cause NS/JMML. Here, we report that hematopoietic cells differentiated from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs harboring NS/JMML-causing PTPN11 mutations recapitulated JMML features. hiPSC-derived NS/JMML myeloid cells exhibited increased signaling through STAT5 and upregulation of miR-223 and miR-15a. Similarly, miR-223 and miR-15a were upregulated in 11/19 JMML bone marrow mononuclear cells harboring PTPN11 mutations, but not those without PTPN11 defects. Reducing miR-223’s function in NS/JMML hiPSCs normalized myelogenesis. MicroRNA target gene expression levels were reduced in hiPSC-derived myeloid cells as well as in JMML cells with PTPN11 mutations. Thus, studying an inherited human cancer syndrome with hiPSCs illuminated early oncogenesis prior to the accumulation of secondary genomic alterations, enabling us to discover microRNA dysregulation, establishing a genotype-phenotype association for JMML and providing therapeutic targets.

  16. ChIP-seq Analysis of Human Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, Lars; Li, Zhaodong

    2016-01-01

    Many transcription factors, chromatin-associated proteins and regulatory DNA elements are genetically and/or epigenetically altered in cancer, including Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML). This leads to deregulation of transcription that is often causally linked to the tumorigenic state. Chromatin-immunoprecipitation coupled with massively parallel DNA sequencing (ChIP-seq) is the key technology to study transcription as it allows in vivo whole-genome mapping of epigenetic modifications and interactions of proteins with DNA or chromatin. However, numerous DNA/chromatin-binding proteins, including EZH2, remain difficult to "ChIP," thus yielding genome-wide binding maps of only suboptimal quality. Here, we describe a ChIP-seq protocol optimized for high-quality protein-genome binding maps that have proven especially useful for studying difficult to 'ChIP' transcription regulatory factors in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) and related malignancies.

  17. Myeloid Neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subtil, Antonio

    2017-09-01

    The classification of myeloid neoplasms has undergone major changes and currently relies heavily on genetic abnormalities. Cutaneous manifestations of myeloid neoplasms may be the presenting sign of underlying bone marrow disease. Dermal infiltration by neoplastic cells may occur in otherwise normal skin or in sites of cutaneous inflammation. Leukemia cutis occasionally precedes evidence of blood and/or bone marrow involvement (aleukemic leukemia cutis). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of stem cell factor on hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha accumulation in human acute myeloid leukaemia and LAD2 mast cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernhard F Gibbs

    Full Text Available Stem cell factor (SCF is a hematopoietic growth factor that exerts its activity by signalling through the tyrosine kinase receptor known as Kit or CD117. SCF-Kit signalling is crucial for the survival, proliferation and differentiation of hematopoietic cells of myeloid lineage. Furthermore, since myeloid leukaemia cells express the Kit receptor, SCF may play an important role in myeloid leukaemia progression too. However, the mechanisms of this pathophysiological effect remain unclear. Recent evidence shows that SCF triggers accumulation of the inducible alpha subunit of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1 in hematopoietic cells--a transcription complex that plays a pivotal role in cellular adaptation to low oxygen availability. However, it is unknown how SCF impacts on HIF-1α accumulation in human myeloid leukaemia and mast cells. Here we show that SCF induces HIF-1α accumulation in THP-1 human myeloid leukaemia cells but not in LAD2 mast cells. We demonstrated that LAD2 cells have a more robust glutathione (GSH-dependent antioxidative system compared to THP-1 cells and are therefore protected against the actions of ROS generated in an SCF-dependent manner. BSO-induced GSH depletion led to a significant decrease in HIF-1α prolyl hydroxylase (PHD activity in THP-1 cells and to near attenuation of it in LAD2 cells. In THP-1 cells, SCF-induced HIF-1α accumulation is controlled via ERK, PI3 kinase/PKC-δ/mTOR-dependent and to a certain extent by redox-dependent mechanisms. These results demonstrate for the first time an important cross-talk of signalling pathways associated with HIF-1 activation--an important stage of the myeloid leukaemia cell life cycle.

  19. Caffeine affects the biological responses of human hematopoietic cells of myeloid lineage via downregulation of the mTOR pathway and xanthine oxidase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Bernhard F; Gonçalves Silva, Isabel; Prokhorov, Alexandr; Abooali, Maryam; Yasinska, Inna M; Casely-Hayford, Maxwell A; Berger, Steffen M; Fasler-Kan, Elizaveta; Sumbayev, Vadim V

    2015-10-06

    Correction of human myeloid cell function is crucial for the prevention of inflammatory and allergic reactions as well as leukaemia progression. Caffeine, a naturally occurring food component, is known to display anti-inflammatory effects which have previously been ascribed largely to its inhibitory actions on phosphodiesterase. However, more recent studies suggest an additional role in affecting the activity of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a master regulator of myeloid cell translational pathways, although detailed molecular events underlying its mode of action have not been elucidated. Here, we report the cellular uptake of caffeine, without metabolisation, by healthy and malignant hematopoietic myeloid cells including monocytes, basophils and primary acute myeloid leukaemia mononuclear blasts. Unmodified caffeine downregulated mTOR signalling, which affected glycolysis and the release of pro-inflammatory/pro-angiogenic cytokines as well as other inflammatory mediators. In monocytes, the effects of caffeine were potentiated by its ability to inhibit xanthine oxidase, an enzyme which plays a central role in human purine catabolism by generating uric acid. In basophils, caffeine also increased intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels which further enhanced its inhibitory action on mTOR. These results demonstrate an important mode of pharmacological action of caffeine with potentially wide-ranging therapeutic impact for treating non-infectious disorders of the human immune system, where it could be applied directly to inflammatory cells.

  20. Caffeine affects the biological responses of human hematopoietic cells of myeloid lineage via downregulation of the mTOR pathway and xanthine oxidase activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abooali, Maryam; Yasinska, Inna M.; Casely-Hayford, Maxwell A.; Berger, Steffen M.; Fasler-Kan, Elizaveta; Sumbayev, Vadim V.

    2015-01-01

    Correction of human myeloid cell function is crucial for the prevention of inflammatory and allergic reactions as well as leukaemia progression. Caffeine, a naturally occurring food component, is known to display anti-inflammatory effects which have previously been ascribed largely to its inhibitory actions on phosphodiesterase. However, more recent studies suggest an additional role in affecting the activity of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a master regulator of myeloid cell translational pathways, although detailed molecular events underlying its mode of action have not been elucidated. Here, we report the cellular uptake of caffeine, without metabolisation, by healthy and malignant hematopoietic myeloid cells including monocytes, basophils and primary acute myeloid leukaemia mononuclear blasts. Unmodified caffeine downregulated mTOR signalling, which affected glycolysis and the release of pro-inflammatory/pro-angiogenic cytokines as well as other inflammatory mediators. In monocytes, the effects of caffeine were potentiated by its ability to inhibit xanthine oxidase, an enzyme which plays a central role in human purine catabolism by generating uric acid. In basophils, caffeine also increased intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels which further enhanced its inhibitory action on mTOR. These results demonstrate an important mode of pharmacological action of caffeine with potentially wide-ranging therapeutic impact for treating non-infectious disorders of the human immune system, where it could be applied directly to inflammatory cells. PMID:26384306

  1. KRAS (G12D Cooperates with AML1/ETO to Initiate a Mouse Model Mimicking Human Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanmin Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: It has been demonstrated that KRAS mutations represent about 90% of cancer-associated mutations, and that KRAS mutations play an essential role in neoplastic transformation. Cancer-associated RAS mutations occur frequently in acute myeloid leukemia (AML, suggesting a functional role for Ras in leukemogenesis. Methods: We successfully established a mouse model of human leukemia by transplanting bone marrow cells co-transfected with the K-ras (G12D mutation and AML1/ETO fusion protein. Results: Mice transplanted with AML/ETO+KRAS co-transduced cells had the highest mortality rate than mice transplanted with AML/ETO- or KRAS-transduced cells (115d vs. 150d. Upon reaching a terminal disease stage, EGFP-positive cells dominated their spleen, lymph nodes, peripheral blood and central nervous system tissue. Immunophenotyping, cytologic analyses revealed that AML/ETO+KRAS leukemias predominantly contained immature myeloid precursors (EGFP+/c-Kit+/Mac-1-/Gr-1-. Histologic analyses revealed that massive leukemic infiltrations were closely packed in dense sheets that effaced the normal architecture of spleen and thymus in mice transplanted with AML1/ETO + KRAS co-transduced cells. K-ras mRNA and protein expression were upregulated in bone marrow cells of the K-ras group and AML1/ETO + Kras group. The phosphorylation of MEK/ERK was significantly enhanced in the AML1/ETO + Kras group. The similar results of the AML1/ETO + Nras group were consistent with those reported previously. Conclusion: Co-transduction of KrasG12D and AML1/ETO induces acute monoblastic leukemia. Since expression of mutant K-ras alone was insufficient to induce leukemia, this model may be useful for investigating the multi-step leukemogenesis model of human leukemia.

  2. Myeloid ecotropic viral integration site 1 inhibits cell proliferation, invasion or migration in human gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Fei; Wang, Hong; Wang, Yingying

    2017-10-27

    Myeloid ecotropic viral integration site 1 (MEIS1) has been identified to be a potential tumor suppressor in some cancers. However, the mechanisms underlying MEIS1-induced cancer development and progression were not clear. Here, we investigated the expression and role of MEIS1 in gastric cancer. In vivo , we analyzed tumor growth using nude mice model. In the present study, MEIS1 expression was obviously decreased in GC cell lines compared with that in normal gastric cell lines (all pmigration assay revealed that MEIS1 affects cell invasion and migration, and inhibited epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Finally, MEIS1 inhibits MKN28 cell growth in nude mice model. In conclusion, our study suggested that MEIS1 plays an important role in regulating cell survival, proliferation, anchorage-independent growth, cell cycle, apoptosis and metastasis. Thus, MEIS1 might be recommended as an effective target for GC patients.

  3. Development of ML390: A Human DHODH Inhibitor That Induces Differentiation in Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Timothy A; Sykes, David B; Law, Jason M; Muñoz, Benito; Rustiguel, Joane K; Nonato, Maria Cristina; Scadden, David T; Schreiber, Stuart L

    2016-12-08

    Homeobox transcription factor A9 (HoxA9) is overexpressed in 70% of patients diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), whereas only a small subset of AML patients respond to current differentiation therapies. A cell line overexpressing HoxA9 was derived from the bone marrow of a lysozyme-GFP mouse. In this fashion, GFP served as an endogenous reporter of differentiation, permitting a high-throughput phenotypic screen against the MLPCN library. Two chemical scaffolds were optimized for activity yielding compound ML390, and genetic resistance and sequencing efforts identified dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH) as the target enzyme. The DHODH inhibitor brequinar works against these leukemic cells as well. The X-ray crystal structure of ML390 bound to DHODH elucidates ML390s binding interactions.

  4. Induction of retinoic acid receptor-alpha by granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor in human myeloid leukemia cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, T; Takeda, K

    2000-08-15

    We reported previously that treatment with all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) induces differentiation of human myeloblastic leukemia ML-1 cells to granulocytes, whereas treatment with ATRA alone induces practically no differentiation of these cells. To investigate the mechanism of the synergistic effect of these factors, we examined the effect of GM-CSF on retinoic acid receptors (RARs) and retinoid X receptors (RXRs) in ML-1 cells. We reveal that GM-CSF induces the expression of RAR alpha mRNA and protein and stimulates the binding of nuclear proteins to direct repeat 5, a consensus sequence with high affinity for RAR-RXR heterodimers. Furthermore, expression of CD38 mRNA mediated through RAR alpha is induced synergistically by treatment with ATRA + GM-CSF. These results suggest that GM-CSF stimulates transcriptional activity mediated via RAR alpha in ML-1 cells. The induction of RAR alpha by GM-CSF may therefore be a mechanism for stimulation by GM-CSF. The induction of RAR alpha by GM-CSF was also detected in other myeloid leukemia cell lines (THP-1 and KG-1) that showed a synergistic effect similar to that seen in ML-1 cells in response to ATRA + GM-CSF. We also found that GM-CSF induced the expression of RAR alpha in blood cells obtained from patients with acute myeloid leukemia. This activity of GM-CSF may serve as a useful adjunct to differentiation therapy for retinoic acid-nonresponsive leukemias.

  5. Establishment of a humanized APL model via the transplantation of PML-RARA-transduced human common myeloid progenitors into immunodeficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiromichi Matsushita

    Full Text Available Recent advances in cancer biology have revealed that many malignancies possess a hierarchal system, and leukemic stem cells (LSC or leukemia-initiating cells (LIC appear to be obligatory for disease progression. Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL, a subtype of acute myeloid leukemia characterized by the formation of a PML-RARα fusion protein, leads to the accumulation of abnormal promyelocytes. In order to understand the precise mechanisms involved in human APL leukemogenesis, we established a humanized in vivo APL model involving retroviral transduction of PML-RARA into CD34(+ hematopoietic cells from human cord blood and transplantation of these cells into immunodeficient mice. The leukemia well recapitulated human APL, consisting of leukemic cells with abundant azurophilic abnormal granules in the cytoplasm, which expressed CD13, CD33 and CD117, but not HLA-DR and CD34, were clustered in the same category as human APL samples in the gene expression analysis, and demonstrated sensitivity to ATRA. As seen in human APL, the induced APL cells showed a low transplantation efficiency in the secondary recipients, which was also exhibited in the transplantations that were carried out using the sorted CD34- fraction. In order to analyze the mechanisms underlying APL initiation and development, fractionated human cord blood was transduced with PML-RARA. Common myeloid progenitors (CMP from CD34(+/CD38(+ cells developed APL. These findings demonstrate that CMP are a target fraction for PML-RARA in APL, whereas the resultant CD34(- APL cells may share the ability to maintain the tumor.

  6. Establishment of a humanized APL model via the transplantation of PML-RARA-transduced human common myeloid progenitors into immunodeficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, Hiromichi; Yahata, Takashi; Sheng, Yin; Nakamura, Yoshihiko; Muguruma, Yukari; Matsuzawa, Hideyuki; Tanaka, Masayuki; Hayashi, Hideki; Sato, Tadayuki; Damdinsuren, Anar; Onizuka, Makoto; Ito, Mamoru; Miyachi, Hayato; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo; Ando, Kiyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in cancer biology have revealed that many malignancies possess a hierarchal system, and leukemic stem cells (LSC) or leukemia-initiating cells (LIC) appear to be obligatory for disease progression. Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), a subtype of acute myeloid leukemia characterized by the formation of a PML-RARα fusion protein, leads to the accumulation of abnormal promyelocytes. In order to understand the precise mechanisms involved in human APL leukemogenesis, we established a humanized in vivo APL model involving retroviral transduction of PML-RARA into CD34(+) hematopoietic cells from human cord blood and transplantation of these cells into immunodeficient mice. The leukemia well recapitulated human APL, consisting of leukemic cells with abundant azurophilic abnormal granules in the cytoplasm, which expressed CD13, CD33 and CD117, but not HLA-DR and CD34, were clustered in the same category as human APL samples in the gene expression analysis, and demonstrated sensitivity to ATRA. As seen in human APL, the induced APL cells showed a low transplantation efficiency in the secondary recipients, which was also exhibited in the transplantations that were carried out using the sorted CD34- fraction. In order to analyze the mechanisms underlying APL initiation and development, fractionated human cord blood was transduced with PML-RARA. Common myeloid progenitors (CMP) from CD34(+)/CD38(+) cells developed APL. These findings demonstrate that CMP are a target fraction for PML-RARA in APL, whereas the resultant CD34(-) APL cells may share the ability to maintain the tumor.

  7. High throughput digital quantification of mRNA abundance in primary human acute myeloid leukemia samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payton, Jacqueline E.; Grieselhuber, Nicole R.; Chang, Li-Wei; Murakami, Mark; Geiss, Gary K.; Link, Daniel C.; Nagarajan, Rakesh; Watson, Mark A.; Ley, Timothy J.

    2009-01-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is characterized by the t(15;17) chromosomal translocation, which results in fusion of the retinoic acid receptor α (RARA) gene to another gene, most commonly promyelocytic leukemia (PML). The resulting fusion protein, PML-RARA, initiates APL, which is a subtype (M3) of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In this report, we identify a gene expression signature that is specific to M3 samples; it was not found in other AML subtypes and did not simply represent the normal gene expression pattern of primary promyelocytes. To validate this signature for a large number of genes, we tested a recently developed high throughput digital technology (NanoString nCounter). Nearly all of the genes tested demonstrated highly significant concordance with our microarray data (P < 0.05). The validated gene signature reliably identified M3 samples in 2 other AML datasets, and the validated genes were substantially enriched in our mouse model of APL, but not in a cell line that inducibly expressed PML-RARA. These results demonstrate that nCounter is a highly reproducible, customizable system for mRNA quantification using limited amounts of clinical material, which provides a valuable tool for biomarker measurement in low-abundance patient samples. PMID:19451695

  8. Direct assessment of cumulative aryl hydrocarbon receptor agonist activity in sera from experimentally exposed mice and environmentally exposed humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlezinger, Jennifer J; Bernard, Pamela L; Haas, Amelia

    2010-01-01

    (PCB)-exposed Faroe Islanders using an AhR-driven reporter cell line. To validate relationships between serum AhR agonist levels and biological outcomes, AhR agonist activity in mouse sera correlated with toxic end points. AhR agonist activity in unmanipulated ("neat") human sera was compared...... with these biologically relevant doses and with GC/MS-assayed PCB levels. RESULTS: Mouse serum AhR agonist activity correlated with injected dioxin dose, thymic atrophy, and heptomegaly, validating the use of neat serum to assess AhR agonist activity. AhR agonist activity in sera from Faroe Islanders varied widely......, was associated with the frequency of recent pilot whale dinners, but did not correlate with levels of PCBs quantified by GC/MS. Surprisingly, significant "baseline" AhR activity was found in commercial human sera. CONCLUSIONS: An AhR reporter assay revealed cumulative levels of AhR activation potential in neat...

  9. Growth Factor-Activated Stem Cell Circuits and Stromal Signals Cooperatively Accelerate Non-Integrated iPSC Reprogramming of Human Myeloid Progenitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Tea Soon; Huo, Jeffrey S.; Peters, Ann; Talbot, C. Conover; Verma, Karan; Zimmerlin, Ludovic; Kaplan, Ian M.; Zambidis, Elias T.

    2012-01-01

    Nonviral conversion of skin or blood cells into clinically useful human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC) occurs in only rare fractions (∼0.001%–0.5%) of donor cells transfected with non-integrating reprogramming factors. Pluripotency induction of developmentally immature stem-progenitors is generally more efficient than differentiated somatic cell targets. However, the nature of augmented progenitor reprogramming remains obscure, and its potential has not been fully explored for improving the extremely slow pace of non-integrated reprogramming. Here, we report highly optimized four-factor reprogramming of lineage-committed cord blood (CB) myeloid progenitors with bulk efficiencies of ∼50% in purified episome-expressing cells. Lineage-committed CD33+CD45+CD34− myeloid cells and not primitive hematopoietic stem-progenitors were the main targets of a rapid and nearly complete non-integrated reprogramming. The efficient conversion of mature myeloid populations into NANOG+TRA-1-81+ hiPSC was mediated by synergies between hematopoietic growth factor (GF), stromal activation signals, and episomal Yamanaka factor expression. Using a modular bioinformatics approach, we demonstrated that efficient myeloid reprogramming correlated not to increased proliferation or endogenous Core factor expressions, but to poised expression of GF-activated transcriptional circuits that commonly regulate plasticity in both hematopoietic progenitors and embryonic stem cells (ESC). Factor-driven conversion of myeloid progenitors to a high-fidelity pluripotent state was further accelerated by soluble and contact-dependent stromal signals that included an implied and unexpected role for Toll receptor-NFκB signaling. These data provide a paradigm for understanding the augmented reprogramming capacity of somatic progenitors, and reveal that efficient induced pluripotency in other cell types may also require extrinsic activation of a molecular framework that commonly regulates self

  10. Preclinical targeting of human acute myeloid leukemia and myeloablation using chimeric antigen receptor–modified T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Saar; Tasian, Sarah K.; Ruella, Marco; Shestova, Olga; Li, Yong; Porter, David L.; Carroll, Martin; Danet-Desnoyers, Gwenn; Scholler, John; Grupp, Stephan A.; June, Carl H.

    2014-01-01

    Many patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are incurable with chemotherapy and may benefit from novel approaches. One such approach involves the transfer of T cells engineered to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) for a specific cell-surface antigen. This strategy depends upon preferential expression of the target on tumor cells. To date, the lack of AML-specific surface markers has impeded development of such CAR-based approaches. CD123, the transmembrane α chain of the interleukin-3 receptor, is expressed in the majority of AML cells but is also expressed in many normal hematopoietic cells. Here, we show that CD123 is a good target for AML-directed CAR therapy, because its expression increases over time in vivo even in initially CD123dim populations, and that human CD123-redirected T cells (CART123) eradicate primary AML in immunodeficient mice. CART123 also eradicated normal human myelopoiesis, a surprising finding because anti-CD123 antibody-based strategies have been reportedly well tolerated. Because AML is likely preceded by clonal evolution in “preleukemic” hematopoietic stem cells, our observations support CART123 as a viable AML therapy, suggest that CART123-based myeloablation may be used as a novel conditioning regimen for hematopoietic cell transplantation, and raise concerns for the use of CART123 without such a rescue strategy. PMID:24596416

  11. Preclinical targeting of human acute myeloid leukemia and myeloablation using chimeric antigen receptor-modified T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Saar; Tasian, Sarah K; Ruella, Marco; Shestova, Olga; Li, Yong; Porter, David L; Carroll, Martin; Danet-Desnoyers, Gwenn; Scholler, John; Grupp, Stephan A; June, Carl H; Kalos, Michael

    2014-04-10

    Many patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are incurable with chemotherapy and may benefit from novel approaches. One such approach involves the transfer of T cells engineered to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) for a specific cell-surface antigen. This strategy depends upon preferential expression of the target on tumor cells. To date, the lack of AML-specific surface markers has impeded development of such CAR-based approaches. CD123, the transmembrane α chain of the interleukin-3 receptor, is expressed in the majority of AML cells but is also expressed in many normal hematopoietic cells. Here, we show that CD123 is a good target for AML-directed CAR therapy, because its expression increases over time in vivo even in initially CD123(dim) populations, and that human CD123-redirected T cells (CART123) eradicate primary AML in immunodeficient mice. CART123 also eradicated normal human myelopoiesis, a surprising finding because anti-CD123 antibody-based strategies have been reportedly well tolerated. Because AML is likely preceded by clonal evolution in "preleukemic" hematopoietic stem cells, our observations support CART123 as a viable AML therapy, suggest that CART123-based myeloablation may be used as a novel conditioning regimen for hematopoietic cell transplantation, and raise concerns for the use of CART123 without such a rescue strategy.

  12. A Rapid Culture Technique Produces Functional Dendritic-Like Cells from Human Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Ning

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Most anti-cancer immunotherapeutic strategies involving dendritic cells (DC as vaccines rely upon the adoptive transfer of DC loaded with exogenous tumour-peptides. This study utilized human acute myeloid leukemia (AML cells as progenitors from which functional dendritic-like antigen presenting cells (DLC were generated, that constitutively express tumour antigens for recognition by CD8+ T cells. DLC were generated from AML cell lines KG-1 and MUTZ-3 using rapid culture techniques and appropriate cytokines. DLC were evaluated for their cell-surface phenotype, antigen uptake and ability to stimulate allogeneic responder cell proliferation, and production of IFN-γ; compared with DC derived from normal human PBMC donors. KG-1 and MUTZ-3 DLC increased expression of CD80, CD83, CD86, and HLA-DR, and MUTZ-3 DLC downregulated CD14 and expressed CD1a. Importantly, both KG-1 and MUTZ-3-derived DLC promoted proliferation of allogeneic responder cells more efficiently than unmodified cells; neither cells incorporated FITC-labeled dextran, but both stimulated IFN-γ production from responding allogeneic CD8+ T cells. Control DC produced from PBMC using the FastDC culture also expressed high levels of critical cell surface ligands and demonstrated good APC function. This paper indicates that functional DLC can be cultured from the AML cell lines KG-1 and MUTZ-3, and FastDC culture generates functional KG-1 DLC.

  13. Therapeutic Effect of Human iPS-Cell–Derived Myeloid Cells Expressing IFN-β against Peritoneally Disseminated Cancer in Xenograft Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koba, Chihiro; Haruta, Miwa; Matsunaga, Yusuke; Matsumura, Keiko; Haga, Eriko; Sasaki, Yuko; Ikeda, Tokunori; Takamatsu, Koutaro; Nishimura, Yasuharu; Senju, Satoru

    2013-01-01

    We recently developed a method to generate myeloid cells with proliferation capacity from human iPS cells. iPS-ML (iPS-cell–derived myeloid/macrophage line), generated by introducing proliferation and anti-senescence factors into iPS-cell–derived myeloid cells, grew continuously in an M-CSF–dependent manner. A large number of cells exhibiting macrophage-like properties can be readily obtained by using this technology. In the current study, we evaluated the possible application of iPS-ML in anti-cancer therapy. We established a model of peritoneally disseminated gastric cancer by intraperitoneally injecting NUGC-4 human gastric cancer cells into SCID mice. When iPS-ML were injected intraperitoneally into the mice with pre-established peritoneal NUGC-4 tumors, iPS-ML massively accumulated and infiltrated into the tumor tissues. iPS-ML expressing IFN-β (iPS-ML/IFN-β) significantly inhibited the intra-peritoneal growth of NUGC-4 cancer. Furthermore, iPS-ML/IFN-β also inhibited the growth of human pancreatic cancer MIAPaCa-2 in a similar model. iPS-ML are therefore a promising treatment agent for peritoneally disseminated cancers, for which no standard treatment is currently available. PMID:23826321

  14. Therapeutic effect of human iPS-cell-derived myeloid cells expressing IFN-β against peritoneally disseminated cancer in xenograft models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koba, Chihiro; Haruta, Miwa; Matsunaga, Yusuke; Matsumura, Keiko; Haga, Eriko; Sasaki, Yuko; Ikeda, Tokunori; Takamatsu, Koutaro; Nishimura, Yasuharu; Senju, Satoru

    2013-01-01

    We recently developed a method to generate myeloid cells with proliferation capacity from human iPS cells. iPS-ML (iPS-cell-derived myeloid/macrophage line), generated by introducing proliferation and anti-senescence factors into iPS-cell-derived myeloid cells, grew continuously in an M-CSF-dependent manner. A large number of cells exhibiting macrophage-like properties can be readily obtained by using this technology. In the current study, we evaluated the possible application of iPS-ML in anti-cancer therapy. We established a model of peritoneally disseminated gastric cancer by intraperitoneally injecting NUGC-4 human gastric cancer cells into SCID mice. When iPS-ML were injected intraperitoneally into the mice with pre-established peritoneal NUGC-4 tumors, iPS-ML massively accumulated and infiltrated into the tumor tissues. iPS-ML expressing IFN-β (iPS-ML/IFN-β) significantly inhibited the intra-peritoneal growth of NUGC-4 cancer. Furthermore, iPS-ML/IFN-β also inhibited the growth of human pancreatic cancer MIAPaCa-2 in a similar model. iPS-ML are therefore a promising treatment agent for peritoneally disseminated cancers, for which no standard treatment is currently available.

  15. Phenotypic and gene expression diversity of malignant cells in human blast crisis chronic myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simanovsky, Masha; Berlinsky, Sagi; Sinai, Pirchia; Leiba, Merav; Nagler, Arnon; Galski, Hanan

    2008-10-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is considered as a paradigm of neoplasias developing through multistep track. It is believed that in the blast crisis (BC) terminal phase of the disease, blood-circulating blasts represent an expansion of a single CML clone. However, although these blasts grow mostly in suspension under standard culture conditions, a relatively small cell-fraction adheres to the plastic dish. Yet, it is unknown whether these two cell-fractions are distinct sub-populations that originated from a common CML clone and whether they have different biological and malignant properties. To address these questions, we have characterized the plastic-adherent and non-adherent sub-populations of various cell lines and primary cells derived from patients with CML in BC. This study indicated that the adherent-subsets retain repopulating ability with indications of increased malignant properties as greater anchorage-independent clonogenicity, impairment of cell-cell contact inhibition, loss of serum-dependent attenuation of plastic-adhesion, and a significant up-regulation of the oncogenes BCR-ABL, c-JUN, and c-FOS along with the adhesion-related genes KiSS-1, THBS3, and ITGB5. The adherent blasts stably retain their unique properties even after elimination of the adherence selection pressure. Sub-cloning analyses indicated that the adherent cells could be continuously evolved from any parental non-adherent clone in a unidirectional manner. This study provides new insights into the biology and the malignant evolution of CML, indicating that at the BC phase, circulating blasts are heterogeneous and consisting of at least two distinct populations of a common clonal origin. The existence of a minor "pool" of blasts of greater clonogenic capacity along with significantly higher expression level of BCR-ABL, individually or in conjunction with other cancer and adhesion-related genes, might also signify clonal evolution toward subsequent increased malignancy and lower

  16. Long term maintenance of myeloid leukemic stem cells cultured with unrelated human mesenchymal stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Sawa; Barrett, A John; Dutra, Amalia; Pak, Evgenia; Miner, Samantha; Keyvanfar, Keyvan; Hensel, Nancy F; Rezvani, Katayoun; Muranski, Pawel; Liu, Paul; Larochelle, Andre; Melenhorst, J Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) support the growth and differentiation of normal hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Here we studied the ability of MSCs to support the growth and survival of leukemic stem cells (LSCs) in vitro. Primary leukemic blasts isolated from the peripheral blood of 8 patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) were co-cultured with equal numbers of irradiated MSCs derived from unrelated donor bone marrow, with or without cytokines for up to 6weeks. Four samples showed CD34(+)CD38(-) predominance, and four were predominantly CD34(+)CD38(+). CD34(+) CD38(-) predominant leukemia cells maintained the CD34(+) CD38(-) phenotype and were viable for 6weeks when co-cultured with MSCs compared to co-cultures with cytokines or medium only, which showed rapid differentiation and loss of the LSC phenotype. In contrast, CD34(+) CD38(+) predominant leukemic cells maintained the CD34(+)CD38(+) phenotype when co-cultured with MSCs alone, but no culture conditions supported survival beyond 4weeks. Cell cycle analysis showed that MSCs maintained a higher proportion of CD34(+) blasts in G0 than leukemic cells cultured with cytokines. AML blasts maintained in culture with MSCs for up to 6weeks engrafted NSG mice with the same efficiency as their non-cultured counterparts, and the original karyotype persisted after co-culture. Chemosensitivity and transwell assays suggest that MSCs provide pro-survival benefits to leukemic blasts through cell-cell contact. We conclude that MSCs support long-term maintenance of LSCs in vitro. This simple and inexpensive approach will facilitate basic investigation of LSCs and enable screening of novel therapeutic agents targeting LSCs. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Gene structure, cDNA characterization and RNAi-based functional analysis of a myeloid differentiation factor 88 homolog in Tenebrio molitor larvae exposed to Staphylococcus aureus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patnaik, Bharat Bhusan; Patnaik, Hongray Howrelia; Seo, Gi Won; Jo, Yong Hun; Lee, Yong Seok; Lee, Bok Luel; Han, Yeon Soo

    2014-10-01

    Myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88), an intracellular adaptor protein involved in Toll/Toll-like receptor (TLR) signal processing, triggers activation of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) transcription factors. In the present study, we analyzed the gene structure and biological function of MyD88 in a coleopteran insect, Tenebrio molitor (TmMyD88). The TmMyD88 gene was 1380 bp in length and consisted of five exons and four introns. The 5'-flanking sequence revealed several putative transcription factor binding sites, such as STAT-4, AP-1, cJun, cfos, NF-1 and many heat shock factor binding elements. The cDNA contained a typical death domain, a conservative Toll-like interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domain, and a C-terminal extension (CTE). The TmMyD88 TIR domain showed three significantly conserved motifs for interacting with the TIR domain of TLRs. TmMyD88 was grouped within the invertebrate cluster of the phylogenetic tree and shared 75% sequence identity with the TIR domain of Tribolium castaneum MyD88. Homology modeling of the TmMyD88 TIR domain revealed five parallel β-strands surrounded by five α-helices that adopted loop conformations to function as an adaptor. TmMyD88 expression was upregulated 7.3- and 4.79-fold after 12 and 6h, respectively, of challenge with Staphylococcus aureus and fungal β-1,3 glucan. Silencing of the TmMyD88 transcript by RNA interference led to reduced resistance of the host to infection by S. aureus. These results indicate that TmMyD88 is required for survival against Staphylococcus infection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The effects of T4 and A3R bacteriophages on differentiation of human myeloid dendritic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Bocian

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriophages (phages are viruses of bacteria. Here we evaluated the effects of T4 and A3R bacteriophages, as well as phage-generated bacterial lysates, on differentiation of human myeloid dendritic cells (DCs from monocytes. Neither of the phages significantly reduced the expression of markers associated with differentiation of DCs and their role in the activation of T cells (CD40, CD80, CD83, CD86, CD1c, CD11c, MHC II, PD-L1, PD-L2, TLR2, TLR4, and CCR7 and phagocytosis receptors (CD64 and DEC-205. By contrast, bacterial lysate of T4 phage significantly decreased the percentages of DEC-205- and CD1c-positive cells. The percentage of DEC-205-positive cells was also significantly reduced in DCs differentiated in the presence of lysate of A3R phage. Thus while bacteriophages do not substantially affect differentiation of DCs, some products of phage-induced lysis of bacterial cells may influence the differentiation and potentially also some functions of DCs. Our results have important implications for phage therapy of bacterial infections because during infections monocytes recruited to the site of inflammation are an important source of inflammatory DCs.

  19. Ebola Virus Replication and Disease Without Immunopathology in Mice Expressing Transgenes to Support Human Myeloid and Lymphoid Cell Engraftment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spengler, Jessica R; Lavender, Kerry J; Martellaro, Cynthia; Carmody, Aaron; Kurth, Andreas; Keck, James G; Saturday, Greg; Scott, Dana P; Nichol, Stuart T; Hasenkrug, Kim J; Spiropoulou, Christina F; Feldmann, Heinz; Prescott, Joseph

    2016-10-15

    The study of Ebola virus (EBOV) pathogenesis in vivo has been limited to nonhuman primate models or use of an adapted virus to cause disease in rodent models. Herein we describe wild-type EBOV (Makona variant) infection of mice engrafted with human hematopoietic CD34+ stem cells (Hu-NSG™-SGM3 mice; hereafter referred to as SGM3 HuMice). SGM3 HuMice support increased development of myeloid immune cells, which are primary EBOV targets. In SGM3 HuMice, EBOV replicated to high levels, and disease was observed following either intraperitoneal or intramuscular inoculation. Despite the high levels of viral antigen and inflammatory cell infiltration in the liver, the characteristic histopathology of Ebola virus disease was not observed, and this absence of severe immunopathology may have contributed to the recovery and survival of some of the animals. Future investigations into the underlying mechanisms of the atypical disease presentation in SGM3 HuMice will provide additional insights into the immunopathogenesis of severe EBOV disease. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2016. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  20. Monomethyl fumarate treatment impairs maturation of human myeloid dendritic cells and their ability to activate T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzola, Maria Antonietta; Raheja, Radhika; Regev, Keren; Beynon, Vanessa; von Glehn, Felipe; Paul, Anu; Pierre, Isabelle; Kivisakk, Pia; Weiner, Howard L; Gandhi, Roopali

    2017-11-01

    Dimethyl fumarate (DMF) and its active metabolite monomethyl fumarate (MMF) effectively lead to reduction in disease relapses and active magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) lesions. DMF and MMF are known to be effective in modulating T- and B-cell responses; however, their effect on the phenotype and function of human myeloid dendritic cells (mDCs) is not fully understood. To investigate the role of MMF on human mDCs maturation and function. mDCs from healthy controls were isolated and cultured in vitro with MMF. The effect of MMF on mDC gene expression was determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) array after in vitro MMF treatment. The ability of mDCs to activate T cells was assessed by in vitro co-culture system. mDCs from DMF-treated multiple sclerosis (MS) patients were analyzed by flow cytometry and PCR. MMF treatment induced a less mature phenotype of mDCs with reduced expression of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II), co-stimulatory molecules CD86, CD40, CD83, and expression of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) subunits RELA and RELB. mDCs from DMF-treated MS patients also showed the same immature phenotype. T cells co-cultured with MMF-treated mDCs showed reduced proliferation with decreased production of interferon gamma (IFN-γ), interleukin-17 (IL-17), and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) compared to untreated cells. We report that MMF can modulate immune response by affecting human mDC function.

  1. Human Myeloid-derived Suppressor Cells are Associated With Chronic Immune Suppression After Severe Sepsis/Septic Shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathias, Brittany; Delmas, Amber L; Ozrazgat-Baslanti, Tezcan; Vanzant, Erin L; Szpila, Benjamin E; Mohr, Alicia M; Moore, Frederick A; Brakenridge, Scott C; Brumback, Babette A; Moldawer, Lyle L; Efron, Philip A

    2017-04-01

    We hypothesized that after sepsis in humans, MDSCs will be persistently increased, functionally immunosuppressive, and associated with adverse clinical outcomes. Cancer and sepsis have surprisingly similar immunologic responses and equally dismal long term consequences. In cancer, increased myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) induce detrimental immunosuppression, but little is known about the role of MDSCs after sepsis. Blood was obtained from 74 patients within 12 hours of severe sepsis/septic shock (SS/SS), and at set intervals out to 28 days, and also in 18 healthy controls. MDSCs were phenotyped for cell surface receptor expression and enriched by cell sorting. Functional and genome-wide expression analyses were performed. Multiple logistic regression analysis was conducted to determine if increased MDSC appearance was associated with in-hospital and long-term outcomes. After SS/SS, CD33CD11bHLA-DR MDSCs were dramatically increased out to 28 days (P < 0.05). When co-cultured with MDSCs from SS/SS patients, antigen-driven T-cell proliferation and TH1/TH2 cytokine production were suppressed (P < 0.05). Additionally, septic MDSCs had suppressed HLA gene expression and up-regulated ARG1 expression (P < 0.05). Finally, SS/SS patients with persistent increased percentages of blood MDSCs had increased nosocomial infections, prolonged intensive care unit stays, and poor functional status at discharge (P < 0.05). After SS/SS in humans, circulating MDSCs are persistently increased, functionally immunosuppressive, and associated with adverse outcomes. This novel observation warrants further studies. As observed in cancer immunotherapy, MDSCs could be a novel component in multimodality immunotherapy targeting detrimental inflammation and immunosuppression after SS/SS to improve currently observed dismal long-term outcomes.

  2. Porphyromonas gingivalis evasion of autophagy and intracellular killing by human myeloid dendritic cells involves DC-SIGN-TLR2 crosstalk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed R El-Awady

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Signaling via pattern recognition receptors (PRRs expressed on professional antigen presenting cells, such as dendritic cells (DCs, is crucial to the fate of engulfed microbes. Among the many PRRs expressed by DCs are Toll-like receptors (TLRs and C-type lectins such as DC-SIGN. DC-SIGN is targeted by several major human pathogens for immune-evasion, although its role in intracellular routing of pathogens to autophagosomes is poorly understood. Here we examined the role of DC-SIGN and TLRs in evasion of autophagy and survival of Porphyromonas gingivalis in human monocyte-derived DCs (MoDCs. We employed a panel of P. gingivalis isogenic fimbriae deficient strains with defined defects in Mfa-1 fimbriae, a DC-SIGN ligand, and FimA fimbriae, a TLR2 agonist. Our results show that DC-SIGN dependent uptake of Mfa1+P. gingivalis strains by MoDCs resulted in lower intracellular killing and higher intracellular content of P. gingivalis. Moreover, Mfa1+P. gingivalis was mostly contained within single membrane vesicles, where it survived intracellularly. Survival was decreased by activation of TLR2 and/or autophagy. Mfa1+P. gingivalis strain did not induce significant levels of Rab5, LC3-II, and LAMP1. In contrast, P. gingivalis uptake through a DC-SIGN independent manner was associated with early endosomal routing through Rab5, increased LC3-II and LAMP-1, as well as the formation of double membrane intracellular phagophores, a characteristic feature of autophagy. These results suggest that selective engagement of DC-SIGN by Mfa-1+P. gingivalis promotes evasion of antibacterial autophagy and lysosome fusion, resulting in intracellular persistence in myeloid DCs; however TLR2 activation can overcome autophagy evasion and pathogen persistence in DCs.

  3. Chemotherapy-Resistant Human Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells Are Not Enriched for Leukemic Stem Cells but Require Oxidative Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farge, Thomas; Saland, Estelle; de Toni, Fabienne; Aroua, Nesrine; Hosseini, Mohsen; Perry, Robin; Bosc, Claudie; Sugita, Mayumi; Stuani, Lucille; Fraisse, Marine; Scotland, Sarah; Larrue, Clément; Boutzen, Héléna; Féliu, Virginie; Nicolau-Travers, Marie-Laure; Cassant-Sourdy, Stéphanie; Broin, Nicolas; David, Marion; Serhan, Nizar; Sarry, Audrey; Tavitian, Suzanne; Kaoma, Tony; Vallar, Laurent; Iacovoni, Jason; Linares, Laetitia K; Montersino, Camille; Castellano, Rémy; Griessinger, Emmanuel; Collette, Yves; Duchamp, Olivier; Barreira, Yara; Hirsch, Pierre; Palama, Tony; Gales, Lara; Delhommeau, François; Garmy-Susini, Barbara H; Portais, Jean-Charles; Vergez, François; Selak, Mary; Danet-Desnoyers, Gwenn; Carroll, Martin; Récher, Christian; Sarry, Jean-Emmanuel

    2017-07-01

    Chemotherapy-resistant human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells are thought to be enriched in quiescent immature leukemic stem cells (LSC). To validate this hypothesis in vivo, we developed a clinically relevant chemotherapeutic approach treating patient-derived xenografts (PDX) with cytarabine (AraC). AraC residual AML cells are enriched in neither immature, quiescent cells nor LSCs. Strikingly, AraC-resistant preexisting and persisting cells displayed high levels of reactive oxygen species, showed increased mitochondrial mass, and retained active polarized mitochondria, consistent with a high oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) status. AraC residual cells exhibited increased fatty-acid oxidation, upregulated CD36 expression, and a high OXPHOS gene signature predictive for treatment response in PDX and patients with AML. High OXPHOS but not low OXPHOS human AML cell lines were chemoresistant in vivo. Targeting mitochondrial protein synthesis, electron transfer, or fatty-acid oxidation induced an energetic shift toward low OXPHOS and markedly enhanced antileukemic effects of AraC. Together, this study demonstrates that essential mitochondrial functions contribute to AraC resistance in AML and are a robust hallmark of AraC sensitivity and a promising therapeutic avenue to treat AML residual disease.Significance: AraC-resistant AML cells exhibit metabolic features and gene signatures consistent with a high OXPHOS status. In these cells, targeting mitochondrial metabolism through the CD36-FAO-OXPHOS axis induces an energetic shift toward low OXPHOS and strongly enhanced antileukemic effects of AraC, offering a promising avenue to design new therapeutic strategies and fight AraC resistance in AML. Cancer Discov; 7(7); 716-35. ©2017 AACR.See related commentary by Schimmer, p. 670This article is highlighted in the In This Issue feature, p. 653. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  4. Differential susceptibility and response of primary human myeloid BDCA1(+ dendritic cells to infection with different Enteroviruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara M Schulte

    Full Text Available Coxsackie B viruses (CVBs and echoviruses (EVs form the Human Enterovirus-B (HEV-B species within the family Picornaviridae. HEV-B infections are widespread and generally cause mild disease; however, severe infections occur and HEV-B are associated with various chronic diseases such as cardiomyopathy and type 1 diabetes. Dendritic cells (DCs are the professional antigen-presenting cells of our immune system and initiate and control immune responses to invading pathogens, yet also maintain tolerance to self-antigens. We previously reported that EVs, but not CVBs, can productively infect in vitro generated monocyte-derived DCs. The interactions between HEV-B and human myeloid DCs (mDCs freshly isolated from blood, however, remain unknown. Here, we studied the susceptibility and responses of BDCA1(+ mDC to HEV-B species and found that these mDC are susceptible to EV, but not CVB infection. Productive EV7 infection resulted in massive, rapid cell death without DC activation. Contrary, EV1 infection, which resulted in lower virus input at the same MOI, resulted in DC activation as observed by production of type I interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs, upregulation of co-stimulatory and co-inhibitory molecules (CD80, CD86, PDL1 and production of IL-6 and TNF-α, with a relative moderate decrease in cell viability. EV1-induced ISG expression depended on virus replication. CVB infection did not affect DC viability and resulted in poor induction of ISGs and CD80 induction in part of the donors. These data show for the first time the interaction between HEV-B species and BDCA1(+ mDCs isolated freshly from blood. Our data indicate that different HEV-B species can influence DC homeostasis in various ways, possibly contributing to HEV-B associated pathology.

  5. Hybridization of a myeloid leukemia-derived human cell line (K562) with a human Burkitt's lymphoma line (P3HR-1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, G; Zeuthen, J; Eriksson, I; Terasaki, P; Bernoco, M; Rosén, A; Masucci, G; Povey, S; Ber, R

    1980-04-01

    The myeloid leukemia-derived Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-negative human lymphoid cell line K562 was successfully hybridized with the EBV-carrying Burkitt's lymphoma line P3HR-1. Authenticity of the hybrid PUTKO-1 was established by chromosome and isoenzyme studies. A virtually complete hybrid PUTKO-1 carried the EBV genome derived from the lymphoma parent. It averaged 26 EBV DNA copies per cell and was 100% positive for Epstein-Barr virus-associated nuclear antigen (EBNA). In most respects, the hybrid resembled the K562 parent: It had a high Fc receptor concentration, high sensitivity to natural killer cells, absence of EBV C3 receptors, and deficiency of membrane-associated beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2M) and HLA, in parallel with intracellular synthesis and secretion of beta 2M to the medium. Unlike the P3HR-1 parent, the hybrid was completely nonpermissive for antigens of the EBV cycle, early antigen, and viral capsid antigen. None of the 3 inducing agents, 5-lodo-2'-deoxyuridine, 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol 13-acetate, or sodium butyrate, caused any viral antigen synthesis in PUTKO-1 in contrast to the good inducibility of the parental P3HR-1 subline. Thus the myeloid parent restricted expression of EBV antigens except EBNA. This exception further supports the concept that EBNA is an autonomous function of the viral genome, independent of host cell control that regulates expression of antigens related to the viral cycle. On the contrary, extinction of viral antigens in this hybrid between 2 cell lineages supports our previous concept that the ability to produce viral antigens is similar to a differentiated B-cell property.

  6. Cell-to-Cell Contact and Nectin-4 Govern Spread of Measles Virus from Primary Human Myeloid Cells to Primary Human Airway Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Brajesh K.; Li, Ni; Mark, Anna C.; Mateo, Mathieu; Cattaneo, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Measles is a highly contagious, acute viral illness. Immune cells within the airways are likely first targets of infection, and these cells traffic measles virus (MeV) to lymph nodes for amplification and subsequent systemic dissemination. Infected immune cells are thought to return MeV to the airways; however, the mechanisms responsible for virus transfer to pulmonary epithelial cells are poorly understood. To investigate this process, we collected blood from human donors and generated primary myeloid cells, specifically, monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) and dendritic cells (DCs). MDMs and DCs were infected with MeV and then applied to primary cultures of well-differentiated airway epithelial cells from human donors (HAE). Consistent with previous results obtained with free virus, infected MDMs or DCs were incapable of transferring MeV to HAE when applied to the apical surface. Likewise, infected MDMs or DCs applied to the basolateral surface of HAE grown on small-pore (0.4-μm) support membranes did not transfer virus. In contrast, infected MDMs and DCs applied to the basolateral surface of HAE grown on large-pore (3.0-μm) membranes successfully transferred MeV. Confocal microscopy demonstrated that MDMs and DCs are capable of penetrating large-pore membranes but not small-pore membranes. Further, by using a nectin-4 blocking antibody or recombinant MeV unable to enter cells through nectin-4, we demonstrated formally that transfer from immune cells to HAE occurs in a nectin-4-dependent manner. Thus, both infected MDMs and DCs rely on cell-to-cell contacts and nectin-4 to efficiently deliver MeV to the basolateral surface of HAE. IMPORTANCE Measles virus spreads rapidly and efficiently in human airway epithelial cells. This rapid spread is based on cell-to-cell contact rather than on particle release and reentry. Here we posit that MeV transfer from infected immune cells to epithelial cells also occurs by cell-to-cell contact rather than through cell

  7. Lectin-type oxidized LDL receptor-1 distinguishes population of human polymorphonuclear myeloid-derived suppressor cells in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condamine, Thomas; Dominguez, George A; Youn, Je-In; Kossenkov, Andrew V; Mony, Sridevi; Alicea-Torres, Kevin; Tcyganov, Evgenii; Hashimoto, Ayumi; Nefedova, Yulia; Lin, Cindy; Partlova, Simona; Garfall, Alfred; Vogl, Dan T; Xu, Xiaowei; Knight, Stella C; Malietzis, George; Lee, Gui Han; Eruslanov, Evgeniy; Albelda, Steven M; Wang, Xianwei; Mehta, Jawahar L; Bewtra, Meenakshi; Rustgi, Anil; Hockstein, Neil; Witt, Robert; Masters, Gregory; Nam, Brian; Smirnov, Denis; Sepulveda, Manuel A; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I

    2016-08-01

    Polymorphonuclear myeloid-derived suppressor cells (PMN-MDSC) are important regulators of immune responses in cancer and have been directly implicated in promotion of tumor progression. However, the heterogeneity of these cells and lack of distinct markers hampers the progress in understanding of the biology and clinical importance of these cells. Using partial enrichment of PMN-MDSC with gradient centrifugation we determined that low density PMN-MDSC and high density neutrophils from the same cancer patients had a distinct gene profile. Most prominent changes were observed in the expression of genes associated with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Surprisingly, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) was one of the most increased regulators and its receptor oxidized LDL receptor 1 OLR1 was one of the most overexpressed genes in PMN-MDSC. Lectin-type oxidized LDL receptor 1 (LOX-1) encoded by OLR1 was practically undetectable in neutrophils in peripheral blood of healthy donors, whereas 5-15% of total neutrophils in cancer patients and 15-50% of neutrophils in tumor tissues were LOX-1+. In contrast to their LOX-1- counterparts, LOX-1+ neutrophils had gene signature, potent immune suppressive activity, up-regulation of ER stress, and other biochemical characteristics of PMN-MDSC. Moreover, induction of ER stress in neutrophils from healthy donors up-regulated LOX-1 expression and converted these cells to suppressive PMN-MDSC. Thus, we identified a specific marker of human PMN-MDSC associated with ER stress and lipid metabolism, which provides new insight to the biology and potential therapeutic targeting of these cells.

  8. Optical effects of exposing intact human lenses to ultraviolet radiation and visible light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessel, Line; Eskildsen, Lars Baunsgaard; Lundeman, Jesper Holm

    2011-01-01

    wavelength region of incoming visible light. The aim of the present study was to examine the optical effects on human lenses of short wavelength visible light and ultraviolet radiation. METHODS: Naturally aged human donor lenses were irradiated with UVA (355 nm), violet (400 and 405 nm) and green (532 nm......ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The human lens is continuously exposed to high levels of light. Ultraviolet radiation is believed to play a causative role in the development of cataract. In vivo, however, the lens is mainly exposed to visible light and the ageing lens absorbs a great part of the short....... RESULTS: Irradiation with high intensity lasers caused scattering lesions in the human lenses. These effects were more likely to be seen when using pulsed lasers because of the high pulse intensity. Prolonged irradiation with UVA led to photodarkening whereas no detrimental effects were observed after...

  9. Optical effects of exposing intact human lenses to ultraviolet radiation and visible light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessel, Line; Eskildsen, Lars; Lundeman, Jesper Holm

    2011-01-01

    region of incoming visible light. The aim of the present study was to examine the optical effects on human lenses of short wavelength visible light and ultraviolet radiation. METHODS: Naturally aged human donor lenses were irradiated with UVA (355 nm), violet (400 and 405 nm) and green (532 nm) lasers......BACKGROUND: The human lens is continuously exposed to high levels of light. Ultraviolet radiation is believed to play a causative role in the development of cataract. In vivo, however, the lens is mainly exposed to visible light and the ageing lens absorbs a great part of the short wavelength......: Irradiation with high intensity lasers caused scattering lesions in the human lenses. These effects were more likely to be seen when using pulsed lasers because of the high pulse intensity. Prolonged irradiation with UVA led to photodarkening whereas no detrimental effects were observed after irradiation...

  10. EXPRESSION OF AHR AND ARNT MRNA IN CULTURED HUMAN ENDOMETRIAL EXPLANTS EXPOSED TO TCDD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Expression of AhR and ARNT mRNA in cultured human endometrial explants exposed to TCDD.Pitt JA, Feng L, Abbott BD, Schmid J, Batt RE, Costich TG, Koury ST, Bofinger DP.Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA.Endom...

  11. The transcriptional network that controls growth arrest and differentiation in a human myeloid leukemia cell line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suzuki, Harukazu; Forrest, Alistair R R; van Nimwegen, Erik

    2009-01-01

    Using deep sequencing (deepCAGE), the FANTOM4 study measured the genome-wide dynamics of transcription-start-site usage in the human monocytic cell line THP-1 throughout a time course of growth arrest and differentiation. Modeling the expression dynamics in terms of predicted cis-regulatory sites......, we identified the key transcription regulators, their time-dependent activities and target genes. Systematic siRNA knockdown of 52 transcription factors confirmed the roles of individual factors in the regulatory network. Our results indicate that cellular states are constrained by complex networks...... involving both positive and negative regulatory interactions among substantial numbers of transcription factors and that no single transcription factor is both necessary and sufficient to drive the differentiation process....

  12. All-trans retinoic acid induces different immunophenotypic changes on human HL60 and NB4 myeloid leukaemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Nicole; Belov, Larissa; Christopherson, Richard I

    2008-02-01

    All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) is used to treat patients with acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL), inducing APL cells to differentiate into abnormal neutrophils. To investigate the possible relationship between the chromosome translocation t(15;17) found in APL and ATRA treatment, the human myeloid leukaemia cell lines HL60 and NB4, that are PML-RARalpha negative and positive, respectively, were treated with ATRA and immunophenotyped using a CD antibody microarray. For HL60 cells, ATRA induced major increases in descending order of CD38, CD11b, CD45RO, CD11c, CD54 and CD36 with repression of CD117 and CD44. For NB4 cells, ATRA induced major increases in descending order of CD11c, CD54, CD11a, CD11b, CD53, CD65, CD138, CD66c and T-cell receptor alpha/beta (TCRalpha/beta), with repression of CD38 and CD9. The induction of a number of these CD antigens is consistent with the known differentiation of these leukaemias to abnormal neutrophils. Approximately half of the antigens up-regulated by ATRA on NB4 cells were adhesion molecules, including CD11a, CD11b, CD11c, CD54, CD66c and CD138, consistent with the increased adhesiveness of leukaemia cells observed for APL patients treated with ATRA. On HL60 cells, ATRA induced expression of CD38, CD43 and CD45RO and repressed CD117, while the converse was true on NB4 cells that contain chimeric PML-RARalpha. For NB4 cells, ATRA induced some remarkable increases in CD antigens not seen for HL60: CD14 (16.6-fold), CD32 (27.8), CD53 (20.5), CD65 (139), CD66c (79.7), CD126 (15.1), and CD138 (57.6). The expression of these antigens may be regulated by PML-RARalpha in the presence of ATRA. Such CD antigens could be targets for synergistic treatment of APL with therapeutic antibodies following ATRA treatment.

  13. Differentiation of human acute myeloid leukaemia cells in primary culture in response to cotylenin A, a plant growth regulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, K; Honma, Y; Asahi, K I; Sassa, T; Hino, K I; Tomoyasu, S

    2001-09-01

    Cotylenin A, which has a diterpenoid tricarbocyclic skeleton, has been isolated as a plant growth regulator, has been shown to affect several physiological processes of higher plants and have differentiation-inducing activity in several myeloid leukaemia cell lines. We examined the effect of cotylenin A on the differentiation of leukaemic cells that were freshly isolated from acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) patients in primary culture. Cotylenin A significantly stimulated both functional and morphological differentiation of leukaemia cells in 9 out of 12 cases. This differentiation-inducing activity was more potent than those of all-trans retinoic acid and 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (VD3). Treatment with a combination of cotylenin A and VD3 was more effective than cotylenin A or VD3 alone at inducing the monocytic differentiation of AML cells.

  14. Stage-Specific Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Map the Progression of Myeloid Transformation to Transplantable Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotini, Andriana G; Chang, Chan-Jung; Chow, Arthur; Yuan, Han; Ho, Tzu-Chieh; Wang, Tiansu; Vora, Shailee; Solovyov, Alexander; Husser, Chrystel; Olszewska, Malgorzata; Teruya-Feldstein, Julie; Perumal, Deepak; Klimek, Virginia M; Spyridonidis, Alexandros; Rampal, Raajit K; Silverman, Lewis; Reddy, E Premkumar; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Parekh, Samir; Greenbaum, Benjamin D; Leslie, Christina S; Kharas, Michael G; Papapetrou, Eirini P

    2017-03-02

    Myeloid malignancy is increasingly viewed as a disease spectrum, comprising hematopoietic disorders that extend across a phenotypic continuum ranging from clonal hematopoiesis to myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In this study, we derived a collection of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines capturing a range of disease stages encompassing preleukemia, low-risk MDS, high-risk MDS, and secondary AML. Upon their differentiation, we found hematopoietic phenotypes of graded severity and/or stage specificity that together delineate a phenotypic roadmap of disease progression culminating in serially transplantable leukemia. We also show that disease stage transitions, both reversal and progression, can be modeled in this system using genetic correction or introduction of mutations via CRISPR/Cas9 and that this iPSC-based approach can be used to uncover disease-stage-specific responses to drugs. Our study therefore provides insight into the cellular events demarcating the initiation and progression of myeloid transformation and a new platform for testing genetic and pharmacological interventions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Neutrophil influx measured in nasal lavages of humans exposed to ozone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, D.; Henderson, F.; House, D.

    1988-05-01

    Neutrophils (PMNs) obtained by nasal lavage were counted to determine if ozone, an oxidant air pollutant, induces an acute inflammatory response in the upper respiratory tract (URT) of humans. Background data were obtained by the nasal lavages from 200 nonexperimentally exposed subjects. Then, using a known inflammatory agent for the URT, rhinovirus-type 39, the induction, peak, and resolution of an acute inflammatory response was shown to be documented by the nasal lavage PMN counts. To determined if ozone induces this response, 41 subjects were exposed to either filtered air or 0.5 ppm ozone for 4 hr, on 2 consecutive days. Nasal lavages were taken pre-, immediately post each exposure, and 22 hr following the last exposure. Lavage PMN counts increased significantly (p = .005) in the ozone-exposed group, with 3.5-, 6.5-, and 3.9-fold increases over the air-exposed group at the post 1, pre 2, and post 2 time points, respectively. Ozone induces an inflammatory response in the URT of humans, and nasal lavage PMN counts are useful to assay the inflammatory properties of air pollutants.

  16. Biomechanical response of the human body inside a military vehicle exposed to mine explosion

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, KyuSang

    1998-01-01

    Biomechanical response of the human body inside a military vehicle exposed to AP mine explosion was studied using the finite element method. The main focus was placed on evaluation of the injury potential of the human body, particularly the brain, neck (cervical spine), and legs. Injury criteria used to evaluate the injury potential were HIC, IARV's, and some others. The military vehicle used in this research was M 1097A2, the basic model of HUMVEE. In addition to the evaluation of the injury...

  17. Mycotoxin Detection in Human Samples from Patients Exposed to Environmental Molds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David C. Straus

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to determine if selected mycotoxins (trichothecenes, aflatoxins, and ochratoxins could be extracted and identified in human tissue and body fluids from patients exposed to toxin producing molds in their environment. Human urine and methanol extracted tissues and sputum were examined. Trichothecenes were tested using competitive ELISA techniques. Aflatoxins B1, B2, G1, and G2, and ochratoxin A were tested by using immunoaffinity columns and fluorometry. Test sensitivity and specificity were determined. Levels of detection for the various mycotoxins varied from 0.2 ppb for trichothecenes, 1.0 ppb for aflatoxins, and 2.0 ppb for ochratoxins. Trichothecene levels varied in urine, sputum, and tissue biopsies (lung, liver, brain from undetectable (<0.2 ppb to levels up to 18 ppb. Aflatoxin levels from the same types of tissues varied from 1.0 to 5.0 ppb. Ochratoxins isolated in the same type of tissues varied from 2.0 ppb to > 10.0 ppb. Negative control patients had no detectable mycotoxins in their tissues or fluids. These data show that mycotoxins can be detected in body fluids and human tissue from patients exposed to mycotoxin producing molds in the environment, and demonstrate which human tissues or fluids are the most likely to yield positive results.

  18. α1-Antitrypsin reduces rhinovirus infection in primary human airway epithelial cells exposed to cigarette smoke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Reena; Jiang, Di; Wu, Qun; Chu, Hong Wei

    2016-01-01

    Human rhinovirus (HRV) infections target airway epithelium and are the leading cause of acute exacerbations of COPD. Cigarette smoke (CS) increases the severity of viral infections, but there is no effective therapy for HRV infection. We determined whether α1-antitrypsin (A1AT) reduces HRV-16 infection in CS-exposed primary human airway epithelial cells. Brushed bronchial epithelial cells from normal subjects and patients diagnosed with COPD were cultured at air-liquid interface to induce mucociliary differentiation. These cells were treated with A1AT or bovine serum albumin for 2 hours and then exposed to air or whole cigarette smoke (WCS) with or without HRV-16 (5×10(4) 50% Tissue Culture Infective Dose [TCID50]/transwell) infection for 24 hours. WCS exposure significantly increased viral load by an average of fivefold and decreased the expression of antiviral genes interferon-λ1, OAS1, and MX1. When A1AT was added to WCS-exposed cells, viral load significantly decreased by an average of 29-fold. HRV-16 infection significantly increased HRV-16 receptor intercellular adhesion molecule-1 messenger RNA expression in air-exposed cells, which was decreased by A1AT. A1AT-mediated reduction of viral load was not accompanied by increased epithelial antiviral gene expression or by inhibiting the activity of 3C protease involved in viral replication or maturation. Our findings demonstrate that A1AT treatment prevents a WCS-induced increase in viral load and for the first time suggest a therapeutic effect of A1AT on HRV infection.

  19. α1-Antitrypsin reduces rhinovirus infection in primary human airway epithelial cells exposed to cigarette smoke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berman R

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Reena Berman, Di Jiang, Qun Wu, Hong Wei Chu Department of Medicine, National Jewish Health, Denver, CO, USA Abstract: Human rhinovirus (HRV infections target airway epithelium and are the leading cause of acute exacerbations of COPD. Cigarette smoke (CS increases the severity of viral infections, but there is no effective therapy for HRV infection. We determined whether α1-antitrypsin (A1AT reduces HRV-16 infection in CS-exposed primary human airway epithelial cells. Brushed bronchial epithelial cells from normal subjects and patients diagnosed with COPD were cultured at air–liquid interface to induce mucociliary differentiation. These cells were treated with A1AT or bovine serum albumin for 2 hours and then exposed to air or whole cigarette smoke (WCS with or without HRV-16 (5×104 50% Tissue Culture Infective Dose [TCID50]/transwell infection for 24 hours. WCS exposure significantly increased viral load by an average of fivefold and decreased the expression of antiviral genes interferon-λ1, OAS1, and MX1. When A1AT was added to WCS-exposed cells, viral load significantly decreased by an average of 29-fold. HRV-16 infection significantly increased HRV-16 receptor intercellular adhesion molecule-1 messenger RNA expression in air-exposed cells, which was decreased by A1AT. A1AT-mediated reduction of viral load was not accompanied by increased epithelial antiviral gene expression or by inhibiting the activity of 3C protease involved in viral replication or maturation. Our findings demonstrate that A1AT treatment prevents a WCS-induced increase in viral load and for the first time suggest a therapeutic effect of A1AT on HRV infection. Keywords: α1-antitrypsin, rhinovirus, COPD, cigarette smoke, ICAM-1

  20. EDC IMPACT: Reduced sperm counts in rats exposed to human relevant mixtures of endocrine disrupters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelstad Petersen, Marta; Hass, Ulla; Scholze, M.

    2018-01-01

    and the high doses of the total and the anti-androgenic mixture, compared to controls. In all dose groups, epididymal sperm counts were reduced several months after end of exposure, i.e. at 10 months of age. Interestingly, the same pattern of effects was seen for paracetamol as for mixtures with diverse modes......Human semen quality is declining in many parts of the world, but the causes are ill defined. In rodents, impaired sperm production can be seen with early life exposure to certain endocrine-disrupting chemicals, but the effects of combined exposures are not properly investigated. In this study, we...... of action. Reduced sperm count was seen at a dose level reflecting human therapeutic exposure to paracetamol. Environmental chemical mixtures affected sperm count at the lowest mixture dose indicating an insufficient margin of safety for the most exposed humans. This causes concern for exposure of pregnant...

  1. Differential risk perception of rural and urban Burrowing Owls exposed to humans and dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalli, Matilde; Baladrón, Alejandro V; Isacch, Juan Pablo; Biondi, Laura M; Bó, María Susana

    2016-03-01

    Urban areas expose wildlife to an array of novel predators, amongst which, humans and dogs are highly frequent. Thus, wild animals living in urban areas are forced to invest more time and energy in defence behaviours, which depend on how the risk is perceived and assessed. We experimentally tested whether Burrowing owls coming from rural and urban habitats showed differences in behavioural responses when facing humans and domestic dogs. We measured flight initiation distances (FIDs), nest returning, and aggressiveness level when owls faced a human and a human with a dog walking towards them. Our results showed that urban owls recognise a human with a dog as a greater threat than a human alone, thus indicating that fear of domestic animals should be considered as affecting owls' settlement in cities and towns. On the other hand, rural owls perceived human and dogs as similar threats, but showed higher FIDs, less aggressiveness, and lower tendency to return to the nest than urban owls in both treatments. These findings emphasize the importance of modified habitats in modelling the response of urban and rural owls to predators and represent another step in the explanation of how wild animals assess and respond to threats associated with living in urbanized environments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Honey bee venom combined with 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3as a highly efficient inducer of differentiation in human acute myeloid leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohseni-Kouchesfahani, Homa; Nabioni, Mohammad; Khosravi, Zahra; Rahimi, Maryam

    2017-01-01

    Most cancer cells exhibit a defect in their capacity to mature into nonreplicating adult cells and existing in a highly proliferating state. Differentiation therapy by agents such as 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3(1,25-(OH)2 VD3) represents a useful approach for the treatment of cancer including acute myeloid leukemia. Human myeloid leukemia cell lines are induced to terminal differentiation into monocyte lineage by 1,25-(OH)2 VD3. However, usage of these findings in the clinical trials is limited by calcemic effects of 1,25-(OH)2 VD3. Attempts to overcome this problem have focused on a combination of low concentrations 1,25-(OH)2 VD3 with other compounds to induce differentiation of HL-60 cells. In this study, the effect of honey bee venom (BV) and 1,25-(OH)2 VD3, individually and in combination, on proliferation and differentiation of human myeloid leukemia HL-60 cells were assayed. In this in vitro study, toxic and nontoxic concentrations of BV and 1,25-(OH)2 VD3 were tested using Trypan blue stained cell counting and (3[4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay. In addition, differentiation of cells was assayed using a Wright-Giemsa staining and nitroblue tetrazolium reduction test. Data were analyzed by a one-way analysis of the variance test using SPSS software. Our findings showed that both the BV and 1,25-(OH)2 VD3, in a dose and time-dependent manner, caused cell death at high concentrations and inhibited cell proliferation at lower concentrations. About 5 nM of 1,25-(OH)2 VD3 induced differentiation of HL-60 cells to monocytes after 72 h. 2.5 μg/ml of BV suppressed proliferation of HL-60 cells but had not any effects on their differentiation, whereas in combination with 5 nM of 1,25-(OH)2 VD3, it enhanced antiproliferative and differentiation potency of 1,25-(OH)2 VD3. These results indicate that BV potentiates the 1,25-(OH)2 VD3-induced HL-60 cell differentiation into monocytes.

  3. Different mechanisms causing loss of mismatched human leukocyte antigens in relapsing t(6;11)(q27;q23) acute myeloid leukemia after haploidentical transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamaki, Hiroya; Fujioka, Tatsuya; Ikegame, Kazuhiro; Yoshihara, Satoshi; Kaida, Katsuji; Taniguchi, Kyoko; Kato, Ruri; Tokugawa, Taduko; Nakata, Jun; Inoue, Takayuki; Yano, Aya; Eguchi, Ryoji; Okada, Masaya; Maruya, Etsuko; Saji, Hiroh; Ogawa, Hiroyasu

    2012-12-01

    Mismatched human leukocyte antigens (HLAs) on leukemic cells can be targeted by donor T cells in HLA-mismatched/haploidentical stem cell transplantation. In two cases of acute myeloid leukemia with t(6;11)(q27;q23) abnormality presented here, flow cytometry analysis showed a lack of HLA-A unshared between recipients and donors in relapsing leukemic cells after HLA-haploidentical transplantation. However, high-resolution HLA genotyping showed that one case lacked a corresponding HLA haplotype, whereas the other preserved it. These cases suggest that leukemic cells, which lacked mismatched HLA expression, might have an advantage in selective expansion under donor T-cell immune surveillance after HLA-haploidentical transplantation. Most importantly, down-regulation of unshared HLA expression potentially occurs by genetic alterations other than loss of HLA alleles. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  4. Comparative DNA microarray analysis of human monocyte derived dendritic cells and MUTZ-3 cells exposed to the moderate skin sensitizer cinnamaldehyde.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Python, François; Goebel, Carsten; Aeby, Pierre

    2009-09-15

    The number of studies involved in the development of in vitro skin sensitization tests has increased since the adoption of the EU 7th amendment to the cosmetics directive proposing to ban animal testing for cosmetic ingredients by 2013. Several studies have recently demonstrated that sensitizers induce a relevant up-regulation of activation markers such as CD86, CD54, IL-8 or IL-1beta in human myeloid cell lines (e.g., U937, MUTZ-3, THP-1) or in human peripheral blood monocyte-derived dendritic cells (PBMDCs). The present study aimed at the identification of new dendritic cell activation markers in order to further improve the in vitro evaluation of the sensitizing potential of chemicals. We have compared the gene expression profiles of PBMDCs and the human cell line MUTZ-3 after a 24-h exposure to the moderate sensitizer cinnamaldehyde. A list of 80 genes modulated in both cell types was obtained and a set of candidate marker genes was selected for further analysis. Cells were exposed to selected sensitizers and non-sensitizers for 24 h and gene expression was analyzed by quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Results indicated that PIR, TRIM16 and two Nrf2-regulated genes, CES1 and NQO1, are modulated by most sensitizers. Up-regulation of these genes could also be observed in our recently published DC-activation test with U937 cells. Due to their role in DC activation, these new genes may help to further refine the in vitro approaches for the screening of the sensitizing properties of a chemical.

  5. Mechanism of erythrocyte death in human population exposed to arsenic through drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Debabrata; Banerjee, Mayukh; Sen, Gargi; Das, Jayanta K; Banerjee, Apurba; Sau, T J; Pandit, Sudipta; Giri, A K; Biswas, Tuli

    2008-07-01

    Arsenic contamination in drinking water is one of the biggest natural calamities, which has become an imperative threat to human health throughout the world. Abbreviation of erythrocyte lifespan leading to the development of anemia is a common sequel in arsenic exposed population. This study was undertaken to explore the mechanism of cell death in human erythrocytes during chronic arsenic exposure. Results revealed transformation of smooth discoid red cells into evaginated echinocytic form in the exposed individuals. Further distortion converted reversible echinocytes to irreversible spheroechinocytes. Arsenic toxicity increased membrane microviscosity along with an elevation of cholesterol/phospholipid ratio, which hampered the flexibility of red cell membrane and made them less deformable. Significant increase in the binding of merocyanine 540 with erythrocyte membrane due to arsenic exposure indicated disruption of lipid packing in the outer leaflet of the cell membrane resulting from altered transbilayer phospholipid asymmetry. Arsenic induced eryptosis was characterized by cell shrinkage and exposure of phosphatidylserine at the cell surface. Furthermore, metabolic starvation with depletion of cellular ATP triggered apoptotic removal of erythrocytes from circulation. Significant decrease in reduced glutathione content indicating defective antioxidant capacity was coupled with enhancement of malondialdehyde and protein carbonyl levels, which pointed to oxidative damage to erythrocyte membrane. Arsenic toxicity intervened into red cell membrane integrity eventually leading to membrane destabilization and hemoglobin release. The study depicted the involvement of both erythrophagocytosis and hemolysis in the destruction of human erythrocytes during chronic arsenic exposure.

  6. Cytotoxic capacity of IL-15-stimulated cytokine-induced killer cells against human acute myeloid leukemia and rhabdomyosarcoma in humanized preclinical mouse models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva eRettinger

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT has become an important treatment modality for patients with high risk acute myeloid leukemia (AML and is also under investigation for soft tissue sarcomas. The therapeutic success is still limited by minimal residual disease (MRD status ultimately leading to patients’ relapse. Adoptive donor lymphocyte infusions (DLI based on MRD status using IL-15-expanded cytokine-induced killer (CIK cells may prevent relapse without causing graft-versus-host-disease (GvHD. To generate preclinical data we developed mouse models to study anti-leukemic- and anti-tumor-potential of CIK cells in vivo. Immunodeficient mice (NOD/SCID/IL2Rγc-, NSG were injected intravenously with human leukemic cell lines THP-1, SH-2 and with human rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS cell lines RH41 and RH30 at minimal doses required for leukemia or tumor engraftment. Mice transplanted with THP-1 or RH41 cells were randomly assigned for analysis of CIK cell treatment. Organs of mice were analyzed by flow cytometry as well as quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR for engraftment of malignant cells and CIK cells. Potential of CIK cells to induce GvHD was determined by histological analysis. Tissues of the highest degree of THP-1 cell expansion included bone marrow (BM followed by liver, lung, spleen, peripheral blood (PB, and brain. RH30 and RH41 engraftment mainly took place in liver and lung, but was also detectable in spleen and PB. In spite of delayed CIK cell expansion compared with malignant cells, CIK cells injected at an effector to target cell (E:T ratio of 1:1 were sufficient for significant reduction of RH41 cells, whereas against fast-expanding THP-1 cells an E:T ratio of 250:1 was needed to achieve comparable results. Our preclinical in vivo mouse models showed a reliably 100% engraftment of malignant cells which is essential for analysis of anti-cancer therapy. Furthermore our data demonstrated that IL-15-activated CIK cells

  7. Allium compounds, dipropyl and dimethyl thiosulfinates as antiproliferative and differentiating agents of human acute myeloid leukemia cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faten Merhi

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Faten Merhi1, Jacques Auger2, Francine Rendu1, Brigitte Bauvois11UMR 7131 UPMC Paris Universitas/CNRS, Groupe Hospitalier Broussais-HEGP, Paris, France; 2University F. Rabelais, IRBI, UPRESA CNRS 6035, Tours, FranceAbstract: Epidemiologic studies support the premise that Allium vegetables may lower the risk of cancers. The beneficial effects appear related to the organosulfur products generated upon processing of Allium. Leukemia cells from patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML display high proliferative capacity and have a reduced capacity of undergoing apoptosis and maturation. Whether the sulfur-containing molecules thiosulfinates (TS, diallyl TS (All2TS, dipropyl TS (Pr2TS and dimethyl TS (Me2TS, are able to exert chemopreventative activity against AML is presently unknown. The present study was an evaluation of proliferation, cytotoxicity, differentiation and secretion of AML cell lines (U937, NB4, HL-60, MonoMac-6 in response to treatment with these TS and their related sulfides (diallylsulfide, diallyl disulfide, dipropyl disulfide, dimethyl disulfide. As assessed by flow cytometry, ELISA, gelatin zymogaphy and RT-PCR, we showed that Pr2TS and Me2TS, but not All2TS and sulfides, 1 inhibited cell proliferation in dose- and time-dependent manner and this process was neither due to cytotoxicity nor apoptosis, 2 induced macrophage maturation, and 3 inhibited the levels of secreted MMP-9 (protein and activity and TNF-α protein, without altering mRNA levels. By establishing for the first time that Pr2TS and Me2TS affect proliferation, differentiation and secretion of leukemic cell lines, this study provides the opportunity to explore the potential efficiency of these molecules in AML.Keywords: acute myeloid leukemia, thiosulfinate, proliferation, differentiation, matrix metalloproteinase-9

  8. Statins do not alter the incidence of mesothelioma in asbestos exposed mice or humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cleo Robinson

    Full Text Available Mesothelioma is principally caused by asbestos and may be preventable because there is a long latent period between exposure and disease development. The most at-risk are a relatively well-defined population who were exposed as a consequence of their occupations. Although preventative agents investigated so far have not been promising, discovery of such an agent would have a significant benefit world-wide on healthcare costs and personal suffering. Statins are widely used for management of hypercholesterolemia and cardiovascular risk; they can induce apoptosis in mesothelioma cells and epidemiological data has linked their use to a lower incidence of cancer. We hypothesised that statins would inhibit the development of asbestos-induced mesothelioma in mice and humans. An autochthonous murine model of asbestos-induced mesothelioma was used to test this by providing atorvastatin daily in the feed at 100 mg/kg, 200 mg/kg and 400 mg/kg. Continuous administration of atorvastatin did not alter the rate of disease development nor increase the length of time that mice survived. Latency to first symptoms of disease and disease progression were also unaffected. In a parallel study, the relationship between the use of statins and development of mesothelioma was investigated in asbestos-exposed humans. In a cohort of 1,738 asbestos exposed people living or working at a crocidolite mine site in Wittenoom, Western Australia, individuals who reported use of statins did not have a lower incidence of mesothelioma (HR = 1.01; 95% CI = 0.44-2.29, p = 0.99. Some individuals reported use of both statins and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or COX-2 inhibitors, and these people also did not have an altered risk of mesothelioma development (HR = 1.01; 95% CI = 0.61-1.67, p = 0.97. We conclude that statins do not moderate the rate of development of mesothelioma in either a mouse model or a human cohort exposed to asbestos.

  9. Finite Element Approach for the Study of Thermoregulation in Human Head Exposed to Cold Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanday, M. A.; Saxena, V. P.

    2009-07-01

    The temperature of outer parts of human head exposed to cold environment shows large variations. In this paper a theoretical model has been envisaged for the comprehensive analysis of thermoregulation in human head which is taken as a divided heterogeneous medium surrounded by natural tissue layers. The model incorporates biochemical reactions concerning heat generation, blood circulation and other biophysical activities. The model obtained in terms of partial differential equations has been treated with the help of finite element method. This results in the estimation of temperature distribution under the influence of (i) atmospheric conditions (ii) cerebral blood circulation with fluctuating flow in scalp. This study leads to the estimation of risk factor analysis in cold environment.

  10. Molecular Characterization of TP53 Gene in Human Populations Exposed to Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation

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    Igor Brasil-Costa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ionizing radiation, such as that emitted by uranium, may cause mutations and consequently lead to neoplasia in human cells. The TP53 gene acts to maintain genomic integrity and constitutes an important biomarker of susceptibility. The present study investigated the main alterations observed in exons 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8 of the TP53 gene and adjacent introns in Amazonian populations exposed to radioactivity. Samples were collected from 163 individuals. Occurrence of the following alterations was observed: (i a missense exchange in exon 4 (Arg72Pro; (ii 2 synonymous exchanges, 1 in exon 5 (His179His, and another in exon 6 (Arg213Arg; (iii 4 intronic exchanges, 3 in intron 7 (C → T at position 13.436; C → T at position 13.491; T → G at position 13.511 and 1 in intron 8 (T → G at position 13.958. Alteration of codon 72 was found to be an important risk factor for cancer development (P=0.024; OR=6.48; CI: 1.29–32.64 when adjusted for age and smoking. Thus, TP53 gene may be an important biomarker for carcinogenesis susceptibility in human populations exposed to ionizing radiation.

  11. Coronal microleakage of endodontically treated teeth with intracanal post exposed to fresh human saliva

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    Simone Gomes dias de Oliveira

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate the coronal microleakage of endodontically treated teeth prepared to receive an intracanal post and teeth with an intracanal post but without a prosthetic crown and exposed to contamination by fresh human saliva. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A mechanical-chemical preparation following the step-back technique was carried out in 35 extracted single-rooted human teeth. The teeth were randomly divided into five groups: G1=root canals instrumented, obturated, and prepared to receive an intracanal post (N=10; G2=root canals with cemented posts but without coronal sealing (N=10; PC1=positive control root canals instrumented and open (N=5; PC2=positive control 2 root canals without instrumentation and open (N=5; and NC=negative control healthy teeth (N=5. The crowns were removed except for the control group of intact teeth. The root canals were obturated and sterilized with cobalt 60 gamma irradiation and were then adapted in an apparatus using a Brain Heart Infusion (BHI medium and fresh human saliva for contamination. Microbial growth was indicated by the presence of turbidity in the BHI liquid medium. RESULTS: Data were submitted to the Kaplan-Meier Survival Analysis and the Holm-Sidak statistic method, which observed an index of 90% of microleakage in root canals after 24 hours for G1 and 70% of microleakage in samples at the end of 40 days for G2. CONCLUSION: The results show that root canals with an intracanal post but without a prosthetic crown can be recontaminated when exposed to fresh human saliva in a short period.

  12. Oridonin effectively reverses the drug resistance of cisplatin involving induction of cell apoptosis and inhibition of MMP expression in human acute myeloid leukemia cells

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    Yuan Zhang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Cisplatin is the first generation platinum-based chemotherapy agent. However, the extensive application of cisplatin inevitably causes drug resistance, which is a major obstacle to cancer chemotherapy. Oridonin is a diterpenoid isolated from Rabdosia rubescens with potent anticancer activity. The aim of our study is to investigate the role of oridonin to reverse the cisplatin-resistance in human acute myeloid leukemia (AML cells. The effect of oridonin on human AML cell proliferation was evaluated by MTT assay, cell migration and invasion were evaluated by transwell migration and invasion assays in cisplatin-resistant human AML cells. Furthermore, cell apoptosis was examined by flow cytometry. The inhibitive effect of oridonin in vivo was determined using xenografted nude mice. In addition, the expressions of MMP2 and MMP9 were detected by Western blot. There was a synergistic antitumor effect between cisplatin and oridonin on cisplatin-resistant human AML cells in vitro and in vivo. In addition, the combination of cisplatin and oridonin synergistically induced cell apoptosis. Furthermore, the combination treatment not only inhibited AML cell migration and invasion, but more significantly, decreased the expressions of MMP2 and MMP9 proteins. Our results suggest that the synergistic effect between both agents is likely to be driven by the inhibition of MMP expression and the resulting increased apoptosis.

  13. TAP-deficient human iPS cell-derived myeloid cell lines as unlimited cell source for dendritic cell-like antigen-presenting cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haruta, M; Tomita, Y; Yuno, A; Matsumura, K; Ikeda, T; Takamatsu, K; Haga, E; Koba, C; Nishimura, Y; Senju, S

    2013-05-01

    We previously reported a method to generate dendritic cell (DC)-like antigen-presenting cells (APC) from human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. However, the method is relatively complicated and laborious. In the current study, we attempted to establish a method through which we could obtain a large number of functional APC with a simple procedure. We transduced iPS cell-derived CD11b(+) myeloid cells with genes associated with proliferative or anti-senescence effects, enabling the cells to propagate for more than 4 months in a macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF)-dependent manner while retaining their capacity to differentiate into functional APC. We named these iPS cell-derived proliferating myeloid cells 'iPS-ML', and the iPS-ML-derived APC 'ML-DC'. In addition, we generated TAP2-deficient iPS cell clones by zinc finger nuclease-aided targeted gene disruption. TAP2-deficient iPS cells and iPS-ML avoided recognition by pre-activated allo-reactive CD8(+) T cells. TAP2-deficient ML-DC expressing exogenously introduced HLA-A2 genes stimulated HLA-A2-restricted MART-1-specific CD8(+) T cells obtained from HLA-A2-positive allogeneic donors, resulting in generation of MART-1-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) lines. TAP-deficient iPS-ML introduced with various HLA class I genes may serve as an unlimited source of APC for vaccination therapy. If administered into allogeneic patients, ML-DC with appropriate genetic modifications may survive long enough to stimulate antigen-specific CTL and, after that, be completely eliminated. Based on the present study, we propose an APC-producing system that is simple, safe and applicable to all patients irrespective of their HLA types.

  14. Global gene expression profiling in human lung cells exposed to cobalt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malard, V.; Berenguer, F.; Prat, O.; Ruat, S.; Steinmetz, G.; Quemeneur, E. [CEA VALRHO, Serv Biochim and Toxicol Nucl, DSV, iBEB, F-30207 Bagnols Sur Ceze (France)

    2007-06-06

    It has been estimated that more than 1 million workers in the United States are exposed to cobalt. Occupational exposure to {sup 59}Co occurs mainly via inhalation and leads to various lung diseases. Cobalt is classified by the IARC as a possible human carcinogen (group 2B). Although there is evidence for in vivo and in vitro toxicity, the mechanisms of cobalt-induced lung toxicity are not fully known. The purpose of this work was to identify potential signatures of acute cobalt exposure using a toxico-genomic approach. Data analysis focused on some cellular processes and protein targets that are thought to be relevant for carcinogenesis, transport and bio-marker research. Results: A time course transcriptome analysis was performed on A549 human pulmonary cells, leading to the identification of 85 genes which are repressed or induced in response to soluble 59 Co. A group of 29 of these genes, representing the main biological functions, was assessed by quantitative RT-PCR. The expression profiles of six of them were then tested by quantitative RT-PCR in a time-dependent manner and three modulations were confirmed by Western blotting. The 85 modulated genes include potential cobalt carriers (FBXL2, ZNT1, SLC12A5), tumor suppressors or transcription factors (MAZ, DLG1, MYC, AXL) and genes linked to the stress response (UBC, HSPCB, BN1P3L). We also identified nine genes coding for secreted proteins as candidates for bio-marker research. Of those, T1MP2 was found to be down-regulated and this modulation was confirmed, in a dose-dependent manner, at protein level in the supernatant of exposed cells. Conclusion: Most of these genes have never been described as related to cobalt stress and provide original hypotheses for further study of the effects of this metal ion on human lung epithelial cells. A putative bio-marker of cobalt toxicity was identified. (authors)

  15. PPARγ affects nitric oxide in human umbilical vein endothelial cells exposed to Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peng; Zhang, Dakun; Wan, Meng; Liu, Jianru

    2016-08-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis induces nitric oxide (NO) synthesis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPARγ) has an anti-inflammation function, and its involvement in this NO induction process requires elucidation. Here, we focused on PPARγ expression in HUVECs exposed to P. gingivalis, and investigated its effects on NO synthesis. HUVECs were time-dependently stimulated by P. gingivalis W83 for 0-24h. PPARγ expression was assessed at the mRNA and protein levels, and PPARγ activation was measured using dual-luciferase reporter assays. NO synthesis and NO synthase (NOS) expression in response to P. gingivalis were examined in HUVECs pretreated with representative PPARγ agonist (15-deoxy-Δ12,14-prostaglandin J2 10μM) or antagonist (GW9662 10μM). In addition, NO synthesis and NOS expression in the P. gingivalis infected and control groups were detected. The PPARγ mRNA level in HUVECs increased after exposure to P. gingivalis for 1h and its protein level increased at 2h. Luciferase-induced PPARγ increased in P. gingivalis-exposed HUVECs. NO synthesis in the infected group at 4h, and in the PPARγ-activated group at 8h, was higher than that in controls. Inducible NOS increased in the infected and PPARγ-activated groups at 4 and 8h. The total endothelial NOS (eNOS) and phospho-eNOS levels were lower in the infected group than controls, but did not change in the PPARγ-activated group. Activated PPARγ induces NO generation through the NOS pathway in HUVECs exposed to P. gingivalis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Identification of gene-based responses in human blood cells exposed to alpha particle radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Vinita; Howland, Matthew; Wilkins, Ruth

    2014-07-12

    The threat of a terrorist-precipitated nuclear event places humans at danger for radiological exposures. Isotopes which emit alpha (α)-particle radiation pose the highest risk. Currently, gene expression signatures are being developed for radiation biodosimetry and triage with respect to ionizing photon radiation. This study was designed to determine if similar gene expression profiles are obtained after exposures involving α-particles. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were used to identify sensitive and robust gene-based biomarkers of α-particle radiation exposure. Cells were isolated from healthy individuals and were irradiated at doses ranging from 0-1.5 Gy. Microarray technology was employed to identify transcripts that were differentially expressed relative to unirradiated cells 24 hours post-exposure. Statistical analysis identified modulated genes at each of the individual doses. Twenty-nine genes were common to all doses with expression levels ranging from 2-10 fold relative to control treatment group. This subset of genes was further assessed in independent complete white blood cell (WBC) populations exposed to either α-particles or X-rays using quantitative real-time PCR. This 29 gene panel was responsive in the α-particle exposed WBCs and was shown to exhibit differential fold-changes compared to X-irradiated cells, though no α-particle specific transcripts were identified. Current gene panels for photon radiation may also be applicable for use in α-particle radiation biodosimetry.

  17. A prominent role of the human cytomegalovirus UL8 glycoprotein restraining pro-inflammatory cytokine production by myeloid cells at late times during infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Carmona, Natàlia; Martínez-Vicente, Pablo; Farré, Domènec; Gabaev, Ildar; Messerle, Martin; Engel, Pablo; Angulo, Ana

    2018-02-21

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) persistence in infected individuals relies on a plethora of mechanisms to efficiently reduce host immune responses. To that end, HCMV commits a variety of gene products, some of which have not been identified yet. Here we characterized the UL8 gene, which consists of two exons, sharing the first with the HCMV RL11 family member UL7 UL8 is a transmembrane protein with an N-terminal immunoglobulin (Ig)-like domain in common with UL7 but with an extended stalk and a distinctive cytoplasmic tail. The UL8 open reading frame gives rise to a heavily glycosylated protein, predominantly expressed on the cell surface, from where it can be partially endocytosed and subsequently degraded. Infections with UL8-tagged viruses indicated that UL8 was synthesized with late phase kinetics. By virtue of its highly conserved Ig-like domain, this viral protein interacted with a surface molecule present on activated neutrophils. Notably, when ectopically expressed in THP-1 myeloid cells, UL8 was able to significantly reduce the production of a variety of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Mutations in UL8 indicated that this functional effect was mediated by the cell surface expression of its Ig-like domain. To investigate the impact of the viral protein in the infection context, we engineered HCMVs lacking the UL8 gene, and demonstrated that UL8 decreases the release of a large number of pro-inflammatory factors at late times after infection of THP-1 cells. Our data indicate that UL8 may exert an immunosuppressive role key for HCMV survival in the host. IMPORTANCE Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a major pathogen that causes life-threatening diseases and disabilities in infected newborns and immunocompromised individuals. Containing one of the largest genomes among all reported human viruses, HCMV encodes an impressive repertoire of gene products. However, the functions of a large proportion of them remain still unknown, a fact that complicates the design of new

  18. Caregiver experience in preventive treatment for children exposed to Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Ramos da Silva

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to understand the experience of caregivers of children vertically exposed to the Human Immunodeficiency Virus. It used Symbolic Interactionism as a theoretical framework. It is a qualitative research with data collection carried out in a reference clinic in a municipality in the state of São Paulo, from November 2012 to August 2013 through semi-structured interviews with 12 mothers and a grandmother. Data were analyzed using the Content Analysis method. The caregivers administered antiretroviral to child to prevent virus infection and perceived good acceptance of medication. The child was considered healthy and waiting for the test results generated suffering. Family support and public health services were highlighted as an aid to go through this route pervaded by prejudice, lack of direction, fear and inability to breastfeed. It was noted that the public health service in the city studied tried to follow the protocol requirements established, however, improvements in the quality of counselling is needed.

  19. Cerebral water and ion balance remains stable when humans are exposed to acute hypoxic exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Avnstorp, Magnus B; Rasmussen, Peter; Brassard, Patrice

    2015-01-01

    both circumstances. No cerebral net exchange of Na(+) or K(+) was evident. Likewise, no significant net-exchange of water over the brain was demonstrated and the arterial and jugular venous hemoglobin concentrations were similar. CONCLUSION: Challenging exercise in hypoxia for 30 min affected muscle......Avnstorp, Magnus B., Peter Rasmussen, Patrice Brassard, Thomas Seifert, Morten Overgaard, Peter Krustrup, Niels H. Secher, and Nikolai B. Nordsborg. Cerebral water and ion balance remains stable when humans are exposed to acute hypoxic exercise. High Alt Med Biol 16:000-000, 2015.-Background......: Intense physical activity increases the prevalence of acute mountain sickness (AMS) that can occur within 10 h after ascent to altitudes above 1500 m and is likely related to development of cerebral edema. This study evaluated whether disturbed cerebral water and ion homeostasis can be detected when...

  20. Aneuploidy studies in human cells exposed in vitro to GSM-900 MHz radiofrequency radiation using FISH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourthoumieu, Sylvie; Terro, Faraj; Leveque, Philippe; Collin, Alice; Joubert, Vanessa; Yardin, Catherine

    2011-04-01

    Since previous research found an increase in the rate of aneuploidies in human lymphocytes exposed to radiofrequencies, it seems important to perform further studies. The objective of this study was then to investigate whether the exposure to RF (radiofrequency) radiation similar to that emitted by mobile phones of a second generation standard, i.e., Global System for Mobile communication (GSM) may induce aneuploidy in cultured human cells. The potential induction of genomic instability by GSM-900 MHz radiofrequency (GSM-900) was investigated after in vitro exposure of human amniotic cells for 24 h to average-specific absorption rates (SAR) of 0.25, 1, 2 and 4 W/kg in the temperature range of 36.3-39.7°C. The exposures were carried out in a wire-patch cell (WPC). The rate of aneuploidy of chromosomes 11 and 17 was determined by interphase FISH (Fluorescence In Situ Hybridisation) immediately after independent exposure of three different donors for 24 h. At least 100 interphase cells were analysed per assay. No significant change in the rate of aneuploidy of chromosomes 11 and 17 was found following exposure to GSM-900 for 24 h at average SAR up to 4 W/kg. Our study did not show any in vitro aneuploidogenic effect of GSM using FISH and is not in agreement with the results of previous research.

  1. Collagen cross-linking in sun-exposed and unexposed sites of aged human skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, M.; Prisayanh, P.; Haque, Z.; Woodley, D. T.

    1991-01-01

    A recently described nonreducible, acid-heat stable compound, histidinohydroxylysinonorleucine (HHL), is a collagen cross-link isolated from mature skin tissue. Its abundance is related to chronologic aging of skin. The present communication describes the quantity of HHL from aged human skin of the same individuals in sun-exposed (wrist) and unexposed (buttock) sites. Punch biopsies were obtained from these sites from nine people of age 60 or older. HHL contents (moles/mole of collagen) at these sites were for wrist 0.13 +/- 0.07 and for buttock 0.69 +/- 0.17 (mean +/- SD, p less than 0.001). In addition, it was found that acute irradiation of the cross-linked peptides with UVA (up to 250 J/cm2) and UVB (up to 1 J/cm2) had no effect on HHL structure. The same treatment significantly degraded another nonreducible, stable collagen cross-link, pyridinoline. The results suggest that chronic sunlight exposure may be associated with an impediment to normal maturation of human dermal collagen resulting in tenuous amount of HHL. Thus, the process of photoaging in dermal collagen is different from that of chronologic aging in human skin.

  2. The development of a three-dimensional scaffold for ex vivo biomimicry of human acute myeloid leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Teresa Mortera; Mantalaris, Athanasios; Bismarck, Alexander; Panoskaltsis, Nicki

    2010-03-01

    Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) is a cancer of haematopoietic cells that develops in three-dimensional (3-D) bone marrow niches in vivo. The study of AML has been hampered by lack of appropriate ex vivo models that mimic this microenvironment. We hypothesised that fabrication and optimisation of suitable biomimetic scaffolds for culturing leukaemic cells ex vivo might facilitate the study of AML in its native 3-D niche. We evaluated the growth of three leukaemia subtype-specific cell lines, K-562, HL60 and Kasumi-6, on highly porous scaffolds fabricated from biodegradable and non-biodegradable polymeric materials, such as poly (L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), polyurethane (PU), poly (methyl-methacrylate), poly (D, L-lactade), poly (caprolactone), and polystyrene. Our results show that PLGA and PU supported the best seeding efficiency and leukaemic growth. Furthermore, the PLGA and PU scaffolds were coated with extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, collagen type I (62.5 or 125 microg/ml) and fibronectin (25 or 50 microg/ml) to provide biorecognition signals. The 3 leukaemia subtype-specific lines grew best on PU scaffolds coated with 62.5 microg/ml collagen type I over 6 weeks in the absence of exogenous growth factors. In conclusion, PU-collagen scaffolds may provide a practical model to study the biology and treatment of primary AML in an ex vivo mimicry. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The Tim-3-galectin-9 Secretory Pathway is Involved in the Immune Escape of Human Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Gonçalves Silva

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Acute myeloid leukemia (AML is a severe and often fatal systemic malignancy. Malignant cells are capable of escaping host immune surveillance by inactivating cytotoxic lymphoid cells. In this work we discovered a fundamental molecular pathway, which includes ligand-dependent activation of ectopically expressed latrophilin 1 and possibly other G-protein coupled receptors leading to increased translation and exocytosis of the immune receptor Tim-3 and its ligand galectin-9. This occurs in a protein kinase C and mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin-dependent manner. Tim-3 participates in galectin-9 secretion and is also released in a free soluble form. Galectin-9 impairs the anti-cancer activity of cytotoxic lymphoid cells including natural killer (NK cells. Soluble Tim-3 prevents secretion of interleukin-2 (IL-2 required for the activation of cytotoxic lymphoid cells. These results were validated in ex vivo experiments using primary samples from AML patients. This pathway provides reliable targets for both highly specific diagnosis and immune therapy of AML.

  4. SIRT1 activation by a c-MYC oncogenic network promotes the maintenance and drug resistance of human FLT3-ITD acute myeloid leukemia stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ling; Osdal, Tereza; Ho, Yinwei; Chun, Sookhee; McDonald, Tinisha; Agarwal, Puneet; Lin, Allen; Chu, Su; Qi, Jing; Li, Liang; Hsieh, Yao-Te; Dos Santos, Cedric; Yuan, Hongfeng; Ha, Trung-Quang; Popa, Mihaela; Hovland, Randi; Bruserud, Øystein; Gjertsen, Bjørn Tore; Kuo, Ya-Huei; Chen, Wenyong; Lain, Sonia; McCormack, Emmet; Bhatia, Ravi

    2014-10-02

    The FLT3-ITD mutation is frequently observed in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and is associated with poor prognosis. In such patients, FLT3 tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are only partially effective and do not eliminate the leukemia stem cells (LSCs) that are assumed to be the source of treatment failure. Here, we show that the NAD-dependent SIRT1 deacetylase is selectively overexpressed in primary human FLT3-ITD AML LSCs. This SIRT1 overexpression is related to enhanced expression of the USP22 deubiquitinase induced by c-MYC, leading to reduced SIRT1 ubiquitination and enhanced stability. Inhibition of SIRT1 expression or activity reduced the growth of FLT3-ITD AML LSCs and significantly enhanced TKI-mediated killing of the cells. Therefore, these results identify a c-MYC-related network that enhances SIRT1 protein expression in human FLT3-ITD AML LSCs and contributes to their maintenance. Inhibition of this oncogenic network could be an attractive approach for targeting FLT3-ITD AML LSCs to improve treatment outcomes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Metformin induces apoptosis by microRNA-26a-mediated downregulation of myeloid cell leukaemia-1 in human oral cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fang; Xu, Jincheng; Liu, Hao; Liu, Zhe; Xia, Fei

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, population-based studies and retrospective analyses of clinical studies have shown that metformin treatment is associated with reduced cancer incidence and a decrease in cancer‑associated mortality. However, its mechanism of action remains to be fully understood. The present study demonstrates the effects of metformin on KB human oral cancer cells and explores the role of myeloid cell leukaemia‑1 (Mcl‑1) in metformin‑induced mitochondria‑dependent cellular apoptosis. It was demonstrated that metformin exposure caused significant suppression of KB cell proliferation and induced cell death. Furthermore, metformin induced apoptosis through the downregulation of Mcl‑1 in KB human oral cancer cells, and the overexpression of Mcl‑1 in metformin‑treated KB cells significantly increased cell viability. Consistently, Bax and Bim were upregulated in metformin‑treated cells. The results also reveal that microRNA (miR)‑26a expression was markedly increased by metformin. Subsequent to enforced miR‑26a expression in KB cells using miR‑26a mimics, cell viability and the level of Mcl‑1 decreased. These results suggest that the anti‑proliferative effects of metformin in KB cells may result partly from induction of apoptosis by miR-26a-induced downregulation of Mcl-1.

  6. Therapy of primary and metastatic liver cancer by human iPS cell-derived myeloid cells producing interferon-β.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakisaka, Masataka; Haruta, Miwa; Komohara, Yoshihiro; Umemoto, Satoshi; Matsumura, Keiko; Ikeda, Tokunori; Takeya, Motohiro; Inomata, Yukihiro; Nishimura, Yasuharu; Senju, Satoru

    2017-02-01

    iPS-ML are myeloid lineage cells with a proliferative capacity derived from induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. This study aimed to examine therapeutic effect of iPS-ML producing interferon-β (iPS-ML/IFN-β) towards primary and metastatic liver cancer and investigate the mechanism of that effect. We established a xenograft model of liver metastasis by injecting the spleen of SCID mice with MKN-45 human gastric cancer cells and also a primary liver cancer model by injecting SK-HEP-1 human hepatocellular carcinoma cells into the liver. After cancer lesions were established, iPS-ML/IFN-β was administered by intraperitoneal injection, and therapeutic effect was evaluated. The i.p. injection of iPS-ML/IFN-β resulted in a significant retardation of cancer progression and prolonged mouse survival. The infiltration of i.p. administered iPS-ML into tumor lesions located below the liver capsule was observed, suggesting tumor-directed migration and penetration of the liver capsule by iPS-ML. The IFN-β concentration in the liver was maintained at levels sufficient to exert an anti-cancer effect for at least 3 days post-injection, accounting for the potent therapeutic effect obtained by injection two to three times per week. This study demonstrates the therapeutic potential of the iPS-ML/IFN-β in patients with liver cancer. © 2017 Japanese Society of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery.

  7. DIFFERENTIAL MODULATION OF CANCER-RELATED MOLECULAR NETWORKS IN HUMAN AND RAT URINARY BLADDER CELLS EXPOSED TO TRIVALENT ARSENICALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenic (As) is classified as a known human carcinogen with primary targets of urinary bladder (UB), skin and lung. The most prevalent source of As exposure in humans is drinking water contaminated with inorganic As (iAs), and millions of people worldwide are exposed to drinking ...

  8. EDC IMPACT: Reduced sperm counts in rats exposed to human relevant mixtures of endocrine disrupters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Axelstad

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Human semen quality is declining in many parts of the world, but the causes are ill defined. In rodents, impaired sperm production can be seen with early life exposure to certain endocrine-disrupting chemicals, but the effects of combined exposures are not properly investigated. In this study, we examined the effects of early exposure to the painkiller paracetamol and mixtures of human relevant endocrine-disrupting chemicals in rats. One mixture contained four estrogenic compounds; another contained eight anti-androgenic environmental chemicals and a third mixture contained estrogens, anti-androgens and paracetamol. All exposures were administered by oral gavage to time-mated Wistar dams rats (n = 16–20 throughout gestation and lactation. In the postnatal period, testicular histology was affected by the total mixture, and at the end of weaning, male testis weights were significantly increased by paracetamol and the high doses of the total and the anti-androgenic mixture, compared to controls. In all dose groups, epididymal sperm counts were reduced several months after end of exposure, i.e. at 10  months of age. Interestingly, the same pattern of effects was seen for paracetamol as for mixtures with diverse modes of action. Reduced sperm count was seen at a dose level reflecting human therapeutic exposure to paracetamol. Environmental chemical mixtures affected sperm count at the lowest mixture dose indicating an insufficient margin of safety for the most exposed humans. This causes concern for exposure of pregnant women to paracetamol as well as environmental endocrine disrupters.

  9. Exaggerated inflammatory response of primary human myeloid dendritic cells to lipopolysaccharide in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgart, D C; Thomas, S; Przesdzing, I; Metzke, D; Bielecki, C; Lehmann, S M; Lehnardt, S; Dörffel, Y; Sturm, A; Scheffold, A; Schmitz, J; Radbruch, A

    2009-09-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) results from a breakdown of tolerance towards the indigenous flora in genetically susceptible hosts. Failure of dendritic cells (DC) to interpret molecular microbial patterns appropriately when directing innate and adaptive immune responses is conceivable. Primary (conventional, non-monocyte generated) CD1c(+)CD11c(+)CD14(-)CD16(-)CD19(-) myeloid blood or mucosal dendritic cells (mDC) from 76 patients with Crohn's disease (CD) or ulcerative colitis (UC) in remission, during flare-ups (FU) and 76 healthy or non-IBD controls were analysed by fluorescence activated cell sorter (FACS) flow cytometry and real-time polymerase chain reaction. Cytokine secretion of freshly isolated, cultured and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated highly purified mDC (purity >95%) was assessed using cytometric bead arrays (CBA). More cultured and stimulated circulating mDC express CD40 in IBD patients. Stimulated circulating mDC from IBD patients secrete significantly more tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and interleukin (IL)-8. Toll-like receptor (TLR)-4 expression by mDC was higher in remission and increased significantly in flaring UC and CD patients compared with remission (P up more LPS and the uptake begins earlier compared with controls (P expressing mucosal mDC is significantly greater in UC and CD compared with non-IBD controls (P < 0.001 versus P < 0.01, respectively). Our data suggest an aberrant LPS response of mDC in IBD patients, resulting in an inflammatory phenotype and possibly intestinal homing in acute flares.

  10. Distinct Dasatinib-Induced Mechanisms of Apoptotic Response and Exosome Release in Imatinib-Resistant Human Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Liu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Although dasatinib is effective in most imatinib mesylate (IMT-resistant chronic myeloid leukemia (CML patients, the underlying mechanism of its effectiveness in eliminating imatinib-resistant cells is only partially understood. This study investigated the effects of dasatinib on signaling mechanisms driving-resistance in imatinib-resistant CML cell line K562 (K562RIMT. Compared with K562 control cells, exsomal release, the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K/protein kinase B (Akt/ mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR signaling and autophagic activity were increased significantly in K562RIMT cells and mTOR-independent beclin-1/Vps34 signaling was shown to be involved in exosomal release in these cells. We found that Notch1 activation-mediated reduction of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN was responsible for the increased Akt/mTOR activities in K562RIMT cells and treatment with Notch1 γ-secretase inhibitor prevented activation of Akt/mTOR. In addition, suppression of mTOR activity by rapamycin decreased the level of activity of p70S6K, induced upregulation of p53 and caspase 3, and led to increase of apoptosis in K562RIMT cells. Inhibition of autophagy by spautin-1 or beclin-1 knockdown decreased exosomal release, but did not affect apoptosis in K562RIMT cells. In summary, in K562RIMT cells dasatinib promoted apoptosis through downregulation of Akt/mTOR activities, while preventing exosomal release and inhibiting autophagy by downregulating expression of beclin-1 and Vps34. Our findings reveal distinct dasatinib-induced mechanisms of apoptotic response and exosomal release in imatinib-resistant CML cells.

  11. Lead (Pb) in sheep exposed to mining pollution: implications for animal and human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareja-Carrera, Jennifer; Mateo, Rafael; Rodríguez-Estival, Jaime

    2014-10-01

    Livestock from the ancient mining area of Sierra Madrona and Alcudia Valley (Spain) is exposed to elevated levels of lead (Pb), as previous studies based on blood monitoring have revealed. Here we have studied blood, liver and muscle Pb levels in sheep in order to know if Pb exposure could represent a risk for human consumers of the meat and offal of these animals. A cross-sectional study was conducted with ≥4 years old (adults) ewes from the mining area (n=46) and a control area (n=21). Blood samples were taken before the sacrifice at the slaughterhouse, and liver and muscle samples were taken thereafter. At the same time, 2-3 year old rams (subadults, n=17) were blood sampled in the mining area. Blood, liver and muscle Pb levels were higher in the mining than in the control area. Blood Pb concentration in the mining area (n= 44, mean: 6.7μg/dl in ewes and 10.9μg/dl in rams) was above background levels (>6μg/dl) in 73.3 percent of animals. Liver Pb concentration in 68 percent of sheep from the mining area (n=32, mean: 6.16μg/g dry weight, d.w.) exceeded the minimum level associated with toxic exposure (5µg/g d.w.) and 87.5 percent of liver samples were above European Union Maximum Residue Levels (MRL) established for offal destined for human consumption (0.5µg/g w.w.~1.4µg/g d.w.). On the contrary, none of the muscle samples in ewes exceeded the EU MRL (0.1µg/g w.w.~0.34µg/g d.w.) established for meat, which may be related to the decline of blood Pb levels with age observed in the present study. These results suggest a potential health effect for sheep exposed to Pb pollution in this area and implications for food safety, but further research with lamb meat may be necessary to refine the risk assessment for human consumers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Mechanisms of mutagenesis in human cells exposed to 55 MeV protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauny, S.; Wiese, C.; Kronenberg, A.

    2001-01-01

    Protons represent the major type of charged particle radiation in spaceflight environments. The purpose of this study was to assess mutations arising in human lymphoid cells exposed to protons. Mutations were quantitated at the thymidine kinase (TK1) locus in cell lines derived from the same donor: TK6 cells (wt TP53) and WTK1 cells (mutant TP53). WTK1 cells were much more susceptible to mutagenesis following proton exposure than TK6 cells. Intragenic deletions were observed among early-arising TK1 mutants in TK6 cells, but not in WTK1 cells where all of the mutants arose by LOH. Deletion was the predominant mode of LOH in TK6 cells, while allelic recombination was the major mode of LOH in WTK1 cells. Deletions were of variable lengths, from recombination often extended to the telomere. In summary, proton exposures elicited many types of mutations at an autosomal locus in human cells. Most involved large scale loss of genetic information, either through deletion or by recombination.

  13. Prevalence of Coxiella burnetii Infection in Humans Occupationally Exposed to Animals in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymańska-Czerwińska, Monika; Galińska, Elżbieta Monika; Niemczuk, Krzysztof; Knap, Józef Piotr

    2015-04-01

    Coxiella burnetii is the etiological agent of Q fever, and outbreaks of Q fever have been reported in different parts of Europe both in animals and humans. Human infections are mostly associated with infections in ruminants, e.g., sheep, goats, and cows. Various professional groups are occupationally exposed to infection with C. burnetii. The aim of this study was investigate the prevalence of C. burnetii in farm workers. Serum samples were collected from 151 persons from six different regions of Poland. The serum samples were tested using three serological methods--complement fixation test (CFT), enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and indirect fluorescent antibody (IFA). A total of 71 samples of blood were also tested by real-time PCR. The results showed that antibodies against C. burnetii were present in the tested sera. Average percentages of seropositive samples in IFA, ELISA, and CFT were 31.12%, 39.07%, and 15.23%, respectively. Positive results were noted in each testing center. Of the three test types, IFA results were considered the most sensitive. Real-time PCR confirmed the presence of DNA specific for C. burnetii in 10 patients. The farming workforce constitutes an occupational risk group with an increased risk for C. burnetii infection, presumably because of their contact with infected livestock.

  14. Sildenafil Prevents Apoptosis of Human First-Trimester Trophoblast Cells Exposed to Oxidative Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolnick, Jay M.; Kilburn, Brian A.; Bolnick, Alan D.; Diamond, Michael P.; Singh, Manvinder; Hertz, Michael; Dai, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Human first-trimester trophoblast cells proliferate at low O2, but survival is compromised by oxidative stress, leading to uteroplacental insufficiency. The vasoactive drug, sildenafil citrate (Viagra, Sigma, St Louis, Missouri), has proven useful in reducing adverse pregnancy outcomes. An important biological function of this pharmaceutical is its action as an inhibitor of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) phosphodiesterase type 5 activity, which suggests that it could have beneficial effects on trophoblast survival. To investigate whether sildenafil can prevent trophoblast cell death, human first-trimester villous explants and the HTR-8/SVneo cytotrophoblast cell line were exposed to hypoxia and reoxygenation (H/R) to generate oxidative stress, which induces apoptosis. Apoptosis was optimally inhibited during H/R by 350 ng/mL sildenafil. Sildenafil-mediated survival was reversed by l-NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride or cGMP antagonist, indicating a dependence on both nitric oxide (NO) and cGMP. Indeed, either a cGMP agonist or an NO generator was cytoprotective independent of sildenafil. These findings suggest a novel intervention route for patients with recurrent pregnancy loss or obstetrical placental disorders. PMID:25431453

  15. Genetic integrity of the human Y chromosome exposed to groundwater arsenic

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    Ali Sher

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arsenic is a known human carcinogen reported to cause chromosomal deletions and genetic anomalies in cultured cells. The vast human population inhabiting the Ganges delta in West Bengal, India and Bangladesh is exposed to critical levels of arsenic present in the groundwater. The genetic and physiological mechanism of arsenic toxicity in the human body is yet to be fully established. In addition, lack of animal models has made work on this line even more challenging. Methods Human male blood samples were collected with their informed consent from 5 districts in West Bengal having groundwater arsenic level more than 50 μg/L. Isolation of genomic DNA and preparation of metaphase chromosomes was done using standard protocols. End point PCR was performed for established sequence tagged sites to ascertain the status of recombination events. Single nucleotide variants of candidate genes and amplicons were carried out using appropriate restriction enzymes. The copy number of DYZ1 array per haploid genome was calculated using real time PCR and its chromosomal localization was done by fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH. Results We studied effects of arsenic exposure on the human Y chromosome in males from different areas of West Bengal focusing on known recombination events (P5-P1 proximal; P5-P1 distal; gr/gr; TSPY-TSPY, b1/b3 and b2/b3, single nucleotide variants (SNVs of a few candidate Y-linked genes (DAZ, TTY4, BPY2, GOLGA2LY and the amplicons of AZFc region. Also, possible chromosomal reorganization of DYZ1 repeat arrays was analyzed. Barring a few microdeletions, no major changes were detected in blood DNA samples. SNV analysis showed a difference in some alleles. Similarly, DYZ1 arrays signals detected by FISH were found to be affected in some males. Conclusions Our Y chromosome analysis suggests that the same is protected from the effects of arsenic by some unknown mechanisms maintaining its structural and functional

  16. The environmental variables that impact human decomposition in terrestrially exposed contexts within Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockle, Diane Lyn; Bell, Lynne S

    2017-03-01

    Little is known about the nature and trajectory of human decomposition in Canada. This study involved the examination of 96 retrospective police death investigation cases selected using the Canadian ViCLAS (Violent Crime Linkage Analysis System) and sudden death police databases. A classification system was designed and applied based on the latest visible stages of autolysis (stages 1-2), putrefaction (3-5) and skeletonisation (6-8) observed. The analysis of the progression of decomposition using time (Post Mortem Interval (PMI) in days) and temperature accumulated-degree-days (ADD) score found considerable variability during the putrefaction and skeletonisation phases, with poor predictability noted after stage 5 (post bloat). The visible progression of decomposition outdoors was characterized by a brown to black discolouration at stage 5 and remnant desiccated black tissue at stage 7. No bodies were totally skeletonised in under one year. Mummification of tissue was rare with earlier onset in winter as opposed to summer, considered likely due to lower seasonal humidity. It was found that neither ADD nor the PMI were significant dependent variables for the decomposition score with correlations of 53% for temperature and 41% for time. It took almost twice as much time and 1.5 times more temperature (ADD) for the set of cases exposed to cold and freezing temperatures (4°C or less) to reach putrefaction compared to the warm group. The amount of precipitation and/or clothing had a negligible impact on the advancement of decomposition, whereas the lack of sun exposure (full shade) had a small positive effect. This study found that the poor predictability of onset and the duration of late stage decomposition, combined with our limited understanding of the full range of variables which influence the speed of decomposition, makes PMI estimations for exposed terrestrial cases in Canada unreliable, but also calls in question PMI estimations elsewhere. Copyright © 2016 The

  17. EM23, a natural sesquiterpene lactone from Elephantopus mollis H.B.K., induces apoptosis in human myeloid leukemia cells through thioredoxin- and reactive oxygen species-mediated signaling pathways

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    Hongyu eLi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Elephantopus mollis H.B.K. (EM is a traditional herbal medicine with multiple pharmacological activities. However, the efficacy of EM in treating human leukemia is currently unknown. In the current study, we report that EM23, a natural sesquiterpene lactone isolated from EM, inhibits the proliferation of human chronic myeloid leukemia K562 cells and acute myeloid leukemia HL-60 cells by inducing apoptosis. Translocation of membrane-associated phospholipid phosphatidylserines, changes in cell morphology, activation of caspases and cleavage of PARP were concomitant with this inhibition. The involvement of the mitochondrial pathway in EM23-mediated apoptosis was suggested by observed disruptions in mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP. Mechanistic studies indicated that EM23 caused a marked increase in the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Pretreatment with N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC, a ROS scavenger, almost fully reversed EM23-mediated apoptosis. In EM23-treated cells, the expression levels of thioredoxin (Trx and thioredoxinreductase (TrxR, two components of the Trx system involved in maintaining cellular redox homeostasis, were significantly down-regulated. Concomitantly, Trx regulated the activation of apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1 and its downstream regulatory targets, the p38, JNK, and ERK MAPKs. EM23-mediated activation of ASK1/MAPKs was significantly inhibited in the presence of NAC. Furthermore, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α-mediated activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB was suppressed by EM23, as suggested by the observed blockage of p65 nuclear translocation, phosphorylation and reversion of IκBα degradation following EM23 treatment. Taken together, these results provide important insights into the anticancer activities of the EM component EM23 against human chronic myeloid leukemia K562 cells and acute myeloid leukemia HL-60 cells.

  18. Gene expression profiling and pathway analysis of human bronchial epithelial cells exposed to airborne particulate matter collected from Saudi Arabia

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Hong; Shamy, Magdy; Kluz, Thomas; Muñoz, Alexandra B.; Zhong, Mianhua; Laulicht, Freda; Alghamdi, Mansour A.; Khoder, Mamdouh I; Chen, Lung-Chi; Costa, Max

    2012-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have established a positive correlation between human mortality and increased concentration of airborne particulate matters (PM). However, the mechanisms underlying PM related human diseases, as well as the molecules and pathways mediating the cellular response to PM, are not fully understood. This study aims to investigate the global gene expression changes in human cells exposed to PM10 and to identify genes and pathways that may contribute to PM related adverse heal...

  19. Expression Levels of Human Equilibrative Nucleoside Transporter 1 and Deoxycytidine Kinase Enzyme as Prognostic Factors in Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treated with Cytarabine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candelaria, Myrna; Corrales-Alfaro, Carmen; Gutiérrez-Hernández, Olga; Díaz-Chavez, José; Labardini-Méndez, Juan; Vidal-Millán, Silvia; Herrera, Luis A

    2016-01-01

    Cytarabine (Ara-C) is the primary drug in different treatment schemas for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and requires the human equilibrative nucleoside transporter (hENT1) to enter cells. The deoxycytidine kinase (dCK) enzyme limits its activation rate. Therefore, decreased expression levels of these genes may influence the response rate to this drug. AML patients without previous treatment were enrolled. The expression of hENT1 and dCK genes was analyzed using RT-PCR. Clinical parameters were registered. All patients received Ara-C + doxorubicin as an induction regimen (7 + 3 schema). Descriptive statistics were used to analyze data. Uni- and multivariate analyses were performed to determine factors that influenced response and survival. Twenty-eight patients were included from January 2011 until December 2012. Median age was 36.5 years. All patients had an adequate performance status (43% with ECOG 1 and 57% with ECOG 2). Cytogenetic risk was considered unfavorable in 54% of the patients. Complete response was achieved in 53.8%. Cox regression analysis showed that a higher hENT1 expression level was the only factor that influenced response and survival. These results highly suggest that the pharmacogenetic analyses of Ara-C influx may be decisive in AML patients. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Prostaglandin E2 Leads to the Acquisition of DNMT3A-Dependent Tolerogenic Functions in Human Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Ubreva, Javier; Català-Moll, Francesc; Obermajer, Nataša; Álvarez-Errico, Damiana; Ramirez, Ricardo N; Company, Carlos; Vento-Tormo, Roser; Moreno-Bueno, Gema; Edwards, Robert P; Mortazavi, Ali; Kalinski, Pawel; Ballestar, Esteban

    2017-10-03

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and dendritic cells (DCs) arise from common progenitors. Tumor-derived factors redirect differentiation from immune-promoting DCs to tolerogenic MDSCs, an immunological hallmark of cancer. Indeed, in vitro differentiation of DCs from human primary monocytes results in the generation of MDSCs under tumor-associated conditions (PGE2 or tumor cell-conditioned media). Comparison of MDSC and DC DNA methylomes now reveals extensive demethylation with specific gains of DNA methylation and repression of immunogenic-associated genes occurring in MDSCs specifically, concomitant with increased DNA methyltransferase 3A (DNMT3A) levels. DNMT3A downregulation erases MDSC-specific hypermethylation, and it abolishes their immunosuppressive capacity. Primary MDSCs isolated from ovarian cancer patients display a similar hypermethylation signature in connection with PGE2-dependent DNMT3A overexpression. Our study links PGE2- and DNMT3A-dependent hypermethylation with immunosuppressive MDSC functions, providing a promising target for therapeutic intervention. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) enhances maintenance of primitive human hematopoietic progenitors and skews them towards myeloid differentiation in a stroma-noncontact culture system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Anskar Y H; Verfaillie, Catherine M

    2005-04-01

    We have previously shown that hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) from umbilical cord blood (UCB) can be maintained in a cytokine-supplemented stroma-noncontact (SNC) system. Here, we tested if all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), known to improve expansion of murine hematopoietic stem cells, would enhance human HPC maintenance in a SNC culture system. CD34+CD38-Lin- cells from UCB were cultured in transwells above AFT024 in the presence of Flt-3 ligand (FLT) and thrombopoietin (TPO), with or without ATRA. Total nucleated cells (TNC), colony-forming units (CFUs), long-term culture-initiating cells (LTC-ICs), myeloid-lymphoid initiating cells (ML-ICs) and SCID repopulating cells (SRCs) were evaluated 1 to 5 weeks after culture. All-trans retinoic acid (1 mumol/L) reduced expansion of CD34+CD38-Lin- TNC and CFUs after 2 to 5 weeks of culture. However, it significantly increased LTC-IC expansion after 1 to 3 and, even more so, 5 weeks of culture. ATRA also increased recovery of more primitive ML-ICs and SRCs. Increased HPC recovery appeared dependent on the presence of stromal cells, as LTC-IC expansion was significantly reduced when ATRA was added to stroma-free cultures. All-trans retinoic acid increases expansion of early HPCs in a stromal cell-dependent fashion.

  2. Effect of age on toxicokinetics among human volunteers exposed to propylene glycol methyl ether (PGME).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopf, Nancy B; Vernez, David; Berthet, Aurelie; Charriere, Nicole; Arnoux, Christine; Tomicic, Catherine

    2012-05-20

    Aging adults represent the fastest growing population segment in many countries. Physiological and metabolic changes in the aging process may alter how aging adults biologically respond to pollutants. In a controlled human toxicokinetic study (exposure chamber; 12 m³), aging volunteers (n=10; >58 years) were exposed to propylene glycol monomethyl ether (PGME, CAS no. 107-98-2) at 50 ppm for 6 h. The dose-dependent renal excretion of oxidative metabolites, conjugated and free PGME could potentially be altered by age. (1) Compare PGME toxicokinetic profiles between aging and young volunteers (20-25 years) and gender; (2) test the predictive power of a compartmental toxicokinetic (TK) model developed for aging persons against urinary PGME concentrations found in this study. Urine samples were collected before, during, and after the exposure. Urinary PGME was quantified by capillary GC/FID. Differences in urinary PGME profiles were not noted between genders but between age groups. Metabolic parameters had to be changed to fit the age adjusted TK model to the experimental results, implying a slower enzymatic pathway in the aging volunteers. For an appropriate exposure assessment, urinary total PGME should be quantified. Age is a factor that should be considered when biological limit values are developed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects on DNA repair in human lymphocytes exposed to the food dye tartrazine yellow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Bruno Moreira; Araújo, Taíssa Maíra Thomaz; Ramos, Jorge Amando Batista; Pinto, Laine Celestino; Khayat, Bruna Meireles; De Oliveira Bahia, Marcelo; Montenegro, Raquel Carvalho; Burbano, Rommel Mario Rodríguez; Khayat, André Salim

    2015-03-01

    Tartrazine is a food additive that belongs to a class of artificial dyes and contains an azo group. Studies about its genotoxic, cytotoxic and mutagenic effects are controversial and, in some cases, unsatisfactory. This work evaluated the potential in vitro cytotoxicity, genotoxicity and effects on DNA repair of human lymphocytes exposed to the dye. We assessed the cytotoxicity of tartrazine by 3-(4,5-Dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide test and the response of DNA repair through comet assay (alkaline version). We used different concentrations of the dye, ranging from 0.25-64.0 mM. The results demonstrated that tartrazine has no cytotoxic effects. However, this dye had a significant genotoxic effect at all concentrations tested. Although most of the damage was amenable to repair, some damage remained higher than positive control after 24 h of repair. These data demonstrate that tartrazine may be harmful to health and its prolonged use could trigger carcinogenesis. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  4. The HER2 inhibitor TAK165 Sensitizes Human Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells to Retinoic Acid-Induced Myeloid Differentiation by activating MEK/ERK mediated RARα/STAT1 axis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Xuejing; Liu, Yujia; Li, Yangling; Xian, Miao; Zhou, Qian; Yang, Bo; Ying, Meidan; He, Qiaojun

    2016-01-01

    The success of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) in differentiation therapy for patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) highly encourages researches to apply this therapy to other types of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, AML, with the exception of APL, fails to respond to differentiation therapy. Therefore, research strategies to further sensitize cells to retinoids and to extend the range of AMLs that respond to retinoids beyond APLs are urgently needed. In this study, we showed that TAK165, a HER2 inhibitor, exhibited a strong synergy with ATRA to promote AML cell differentiation. We observed that TAK165 sensitized the AML cells to ATRA-induced cell growth inhibition, G0/G1 phase arrest, CD11b expression, mature morphologic changes, NBT reduction and myeloid regulator expression. Unexpectedly, HER2 pathway might not be essential for TAK165-enhanced differentiation when combined with ATRA, while the enhanced differentiation was dependent on the activation of the RARα/STAT1 axis. Furthermore, the MEK/ERK cascade regulated the activation of STAT1. Taken together, our study is the first to evaluate the synergy of TAK165 and ATRA in AML cell differentiation and to assess new opportunities for the combination of TAK165 and ATRA as a promising approach for future differentiation therapy. PMID:27074819

  5. Chromosomal aberrations and DNA damage in human populations exposed to the processing of electronics waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiang; Cao, Jia; Li, Ke Qiu; Miao, Xu Hong; Li, Guang; Fan, Fei Yue; Zhao, Yong Cheng

    2009-05-01

    It has been known that the pollutants of electronic wastes (E-wastes) can lead to severe pollution to the environment. It has been reported that about 50% to 80% of E-wastes from developed countries are exported to Asia and Africa. It has become a major global environmental problem to deal with 'E-wastes'. E-waste recycling has remained primitive in Jinghai, China. This not only produces enormous environmental pollution but also can bring about toxic or genotoxic effects on the human body, threatening the health of both current residents and future generations living in the local environment. The concentration of lead in the blood of children in the E-waste polluted area in China is higher than that of the control area. But little is known about the cytogenetic effect to human beings caused by the pollution of E-wastes. In the present study, experiments have been performed to investigate the genetics of permanent residents of three villages with numerous E-waste disposal sites and to analyze the harmful effects of exposure to E-wastes. In total, 171 villagers (exposed group) were randomly selected from permanent residents of three villages located in Jinghai County of Tianjin, China, where there has been massive disposal of E-wastes. Thirty villagers were selected from the neighboring towns without E-waste disposal sites to serve as controls. Chromosomal aberrations and cytokinesis blocking micronucleus were performed to detect the cytogenetic effect, dic + r (dicentric and ring chromosome), monomer, fragments (acentric fragments, minute chromosomes, and acentric rings), translocation, satellite, quadriradial, total aberrations, and micronuclear rate were scored for each subject. DNA damage was detected using comet assay; the DNA percentage in the comet tail (TDNA%), tail moment (TM), and Olive tail moment (OTM) were recorded to describe DNA damage to lymphocytes. The total chromosome aberration rates (5.50%) and micronuclear rates (16.99%) of the exposure group

  6. The apoptotic mechanism of action of the sphingosine kinase 1 selective inhibitor SKI-178 in human acute myeloid leukemia cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, Taryn E; Hengst, Jeremy A; Fox, Todd E; Colledge, Ashley L; Kale, Vijay P; Sung, Shen-Shu; Sharma, Arun; Amin, Shantu; Loughran, Thomas P; Kester, Mark; Wang, Hong-Gang; Yun, Jong K

    2015-03-01

    We previously developed SKI-178 (N'-[(1E)-1-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)ethylidene]-3-(4-methoxxyphenyl)-1H-pyrazole-5-carbohydrazide) as a novel sphingosine kinase-1 (SphK1) selective inhibitor and, herein, sought to determine the mechanism-of-action of SKI-178-induced cell death. Using human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cell lines as a model, we present evidence that SKI-178 induces prolonged mitosis followed by apoptotic cell death through the intrinsic apoptotic cascade. Further examination of the mechanism of action of SKI-178 implicated c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) and cyclin-dependent protein kinase 1 (CDK1) as critical factors required for SKI-178-induced apoptosis. In cell cycle synchronized human AML cell lines, we demonstrate that entry into mitosis is required for apoptotic induction by SKI-178 and that CDK1, not JNK, is required for SKI-178-induced apoptosis. We further demonstrate that the sustained activation of CDK1 during prolonged mitosis, mediated by SKI-178, leads to the simultaneous phosphorylation of the prosurvival Bcl-2 family members, Bcl-2 and Bcl-xl, as well as the phosphorylation and subsequent degradation of Mcl-1. Moreover, multidrug resistance mediated by multidrug-resistant protein1 and/or prosurvival Bcl-2 family member overexpression did not affect the sensitivity of AML cells to SKI-178. Taken together, these findings highlight the therapeutic potential of SKI-178 targeting SphK1 as a novel therapeutic agent for the treatment of AML, including multidrug-resistant/recurrent AML subtypes. Copyright © 2015 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  7. Finasteride Enhances the Generation of Human Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells by Up-Regulating the COX2/PGE2 Pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaoying Zhang

    Full Text Available Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs have been known to be a key factor in the regulation of the immune system under numerous conditions such as tumors, infections, autoimmune diseases, and transplantations. In contrast to the proposed deleterious role of MDSCs in tumors and infections, MDSCs with their suppressive function are now proved to have the beneficial potential of suppressing the autoimmune response and promoting tolerance to transplantation. Therefore, the expansion of MDSCs could be a promising therapeutic strategy for many diseases. In this study, we aimed to identify FDA-approved drugs that could aid in the expansion of functional MDSCs. We performed a high-throughput screening (HTS of FDA-approved drugs based on the in vitro human MDSC-differentiation system and identified finasteride (FIN to have the best potency to aid the generation of human MDSCs. The FIN-induced MDSCs were quite similar to monocytic MDSCs with regard to their surface phenotype, morphology, immunosuppressive function, and related gene expression. Next, we aimed to determine the mechanism of action of FIN and found that FIN induced the expansion of MDSCs through up-regulation of the COX2/PGE2 pathway by enhancing the activity of COX2 promoter. In addition, the administration of indomethacin (IND, a COX2 inhibitor, abrogated the effect of FIN. Based on these results, we suggested that FIN could find applications in the future in the expansion of MDSCs. Further development of FIN-like compounds could be a novel strategy for generating functional MDSCs for immunosuppressive therapies in various immune disorder conditions.

  8. Regulation of Human Macrophage M1–M2 Polarization Balance by Hypoxia and the Triggering Receptor Expressed on Myeloid Cells-1

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    Federica Raggi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages (Mf are a heterogeneous population of tissue-resident professional phagocytes and a major component of the leukocyte infiltrate at sites of inflammation, infection, and tumor growth. They can undergo diverse forms of activation in response to environmental factors, polarizing into specialized functional subsets. A common hallmark of the pathologic environment is represented by hypoxia. The impact of hypoxia on human Mf polarization has not been fully established. The objective of this study was to elucidate the effects of a hypoxic environment reflecting that occurring in vivo in diseased tissues on the ability of human Mf to polarize into classically activated (proinflammatory M1 and alternatively activated (anti-inflammatory M2 subsets. We present data showing that hypoxia hinders Mf polarization toward the M1 phenotype by decreasing the expression of T cell costimulatory molecules and chemokine homing receptors and the production of proinflammatory, Th1-priming cytokines typical of classical activation, while promoting their acquisition of phenotypic and secretory features of alternative activation. Furthermore, we identify the triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells (TREM-1, a member of the Ig-like immunoregulatory receptor family, as a hypoxia-inducible gene in Mf and demonstrate that its engagement by an agonist Ab reverses the M2-polarizing effect of hypoxia imparting a M1-skewed phenotype to Mf. Finally, we provide evidence that Mf infiltrating the inflamed hypoxic joints of children affected by oligoarticular juvenile idiopatic arthritis express high surface levels of TREM-1 associated with predominant M1 polarization and suggest the potential of this molecule in driving M1 proinflammatory reprogramming in the hypoxic synovial environment.

  9. Chromium III histidinate exposure modulates antioxidant gene expression in HaCaT human keratinocytes exposed to oxidative stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    While the toxicity of hexavalent chromium is well established, trivalent Cr (Cr(III)) is an essential nutrient involved in insulin and glucose homeostasis. Recently, antioxidant effects of chromium (III) histidinate (Cr(III)His) were reported in HaCaT human keratinocytes exposed to oxidative stress...

  10. INCREASED IL-8 AND IL-6 EXPRESSION IN HUMAN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS EXPOSED TO CARBON ULTRAFINE PARTICLES

    Science.gov (United States)

    INCREASED IL-6 AND IL-8 EXPRESSION IN HUMAN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS EXPOSED TO CARBON ULTRAFINE PARTICLES.R Silbajoris1, A G Lenz2, I Jaspers3, J M Samet1. 1NHEERL, USEPA, RTP, NC, USA; 2GSF-Institute for Inhalation Biology, Neuherberg, Germany; 3 CEMLB, UNC-CH, Chapel Hill, ...

  11. Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances in human serum and urine samples from a residentially exposed community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worley, Rachel Rogers; Moore, Susan McAfee; Tierney, Bruce C; Ye, Xiaoyun; Calafat, Antonia M; Campbell, Sean; Woudneh, Million B; Fisher, Jeffrey

    2017-09-01

    Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) are considered chemicals of emerging concern, in part due to their environmental and biological persistence and the potential for widespread human exposure. In 2007, a PFAS manufacturer near Decatur, Alabama notified the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) it had discharged PFAS into a wastewater treatment plant, resulting in environmental contamination and potential exposures to the local community. To characterize PFAS exposure over time, the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) collected blood and urine samples from local residents. Eight PFAS were measured in serum in 2010 (n=153). Eleven PFAS were measured in serum, and five PFAS were measured in urine (n=45) from some of the same residents in 2016. Serum concentrations were compared to nationally representative data and change in serum concentration over time was evaluated. Biological half-lives were estimated for perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS), and perfluorohexane sulfonic acid (PFHxS) using a one-compartment pharmacokinetic model. In 2010 and 2016, geometric mean PFOA and PFOS serum concentrations were elevated in participants compared to the general U.S. In 2016, the geometric mean PFHxS serum concentration was elevated compared to the general U.S. Geometric mean serum concentrations of PFOA, PFOS, and perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA) were significantly (p≤0.0001) lower (49%, 53%, and 58%, respectively) in 2016 compared to 2010. Half-lives for PFOA, PFOS, and PFHxS were estimated to be 3.9, 3.3, and 15.5years, respectively. Concentrations of PFOA in serum and urine were highly correlated (r=0.75) in males. Serum concentrations of some PFAS are decreasing in this residentially exposed community, but remain elevated compared to the U.S. general population. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Persistent oxidative stress in human neural stem cells exposed to low fluences of charged particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet E. Baulch

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to the space radiation environment poses risks for a range of deleterious health effects due to the unique types of radiation encountered. Galactic cosmic rays are comprised of a spectrum of highly energetic nuclei that deposit densely ionizing tracks of damage along the particle trajectory. These tracks are distinct from those generated by the more sparsely ionizing terrestrial radiations, and define the geometric distribution of the complex cellular damage that results when charged particles traverse the tissues of the body. The exquisite radiosensitivity of multipotent neural stem and progenitor cells found within the neurogenic regions of the brain predispose the central nervous system to elevated risks for radiation induced sequelae. Here we show that human neural stem cells (hNSC exposed to different charged particles at space relevant fluences exhibit significant and persistent oxidative stress. Radiation induced oxidative stress was found to be most dependent on total dose rather than on the linear energy transfer of the incident particle. The use of redox sensitive fluorogenic dyes possessing relative specificity for hydroxyl radicals, peroxynitrite, nitric oxide (NO and mitochondrial superoxide confirmed that most irradiation paradigms elevated reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS, respectively in hNSC over a 1 week interval following exposure. Nitric oxide synthase (NOS was not the major source of elevated nitric oxides, as the use of NOS inhibitors had little effect on NO dependent fluorescence. Our data provide extensive evidence for the capability of low doses of charged particles to elicit marked changes in the metabolic profile of irradiated hNSC. Radiation induced changes in redox state may render the brain more susceptible to the development of neurocognitive deficits that could affect an astronaut’s ability to perform complex tasks during extended missions in deep space.

  13. The Use of Cryopreserved Human Skin Allograft for the Treatment of Wounds With Exposed Muscle, Tendon, and Bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Thomas C; Wilson, Jessica A; Crim, Brandon; Lowery, Nicholas J

    2016-04-01

    Wounds with exposed bone or tendon continue to be a challenge for wound care physicians, and there is little research pertaining to the treatment of these particular wounds with allograft skin. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of a biologically active cryopreserved human skin allograft for treating wounds with exposed bone and/or tendon in the lower extremities. Fifteen patients with 15 wounds at a single hospital-based wound care center were included in the study. Eleven wounds had exposed bone, 1 wound had exposed ten- don, and 3 wounds had exposed bone and tendon. Standard treatment principles with adjunctive cadaveric allograft application were performed on all wounds in the study. In this study 14/15 (93.3%) of the wounds healed completely. The mean duration of days until coverage of the bone and/or tendon with granulation tissue was 36.14 (5.16 weeks) (range 5-117 days). Mean duration to complete healing of the wound was 133 days (19 weeks) (range 53-311 days). The mean number of grafts applied was 2. There were no adverse events directly related to the graft. Zero major amputations and 1 minor amputation occurred. This study found biologically active cryopreserved human skin allografts to be safe and effective in treating difficult wounds with exposed bone and/or tendon. To the authors' knowledge, this is the largest study to date focused on the utilization of allograft skin as an adjunct therapy for lower extremity wounds with exposed tendon and/or bone.

  14. Integrated Analysis of Dysregulated ncRNA and mRNA Expression Profiles in Humans Exposed to Carbon Nanotubes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna A Shvedova

    Full Text Available As the application of carbon nanotubes (CNT in consumer products continues to rise, studies have expanded to determine the associated risks of exposure on human and environmental health. In particular, several lines of evidence indicate that exposure to multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT could pose a carcinogenic risk similar to asbestos fibers. However, to date the potential markers of MWCNT exposure are not yet explored in humans.In the present study, global mRNA and ncRNA expression profiles in the blood of exposed workers, having direct contact with MWCNT aerosol for at least 6 months (n = 8, were compared with expression profiles of non-exposed (n = 7 workers (e.g., professional and/or technical staff from the same manufacturing facility.Significant changes in the ncRNA and mRNA expression profiles were observed between exposed and non-exposed worker groups. An integrative analysis of ncRNA-mRNA correlations was performed to identify target genes, functional relationships, and regulatory networks in MWCNT-exposed workers. The coordinated changes in ncRNA and mRNA expression profiles revealed a set of miRNAs and their target genes with roles in cell cycle regulation/progression/control, apoptosis and proliferation. Further, the identified pathways and signaling networks also revealed MWCNT potential to trigger pulmonary and cardiovascular effects as well as carcinogenic outcomes in humans, similar to those previously described in rodents exposed to MWCNTs.This study is the first to investigate aberrant changes in mRNA and ncRNA expression profiles in the blood of humans exposed to MWCNT. The significant changes in several miRNAs and mRNAs expression as well as their regulatory networks are important for getting molecular insights into the MWCNT-induced toxicity and pathogenesis in humans. Further large-scale prospective studies are necessary to validate the potential applicability of such changes in mRNAs and miRNAs as prognostic markers

  15. Elevated myeloid: plasmacytoid dendritic cell ratio associates with late, but not early liver rejection in children induced with, anti-human thymocyte globulin1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ankit; AshokKumar, Chethan; Ningappa, Mylarappa; Sun, Qing; Higgs, Brandon W; Snyder, Sara; Zeevi, Adriana; Thomson, Angus W; Mazariegos, George V; Sindhi, Rakesh

    2009-01-01

    Background Dendritic cells (DC) play an important role in the induction and regulation of immune responses. Methods Myeloid CD11c+DC (MDC), which may have inflammatory functions, and plasmacytoid CD123+ DC (PDC), which may have tolerogenic potential, were measured by flow cytometric analysis, cross-sectionally, once, in 48 children, and longitudinally (pre-transplant, and at days 1–60, 61–200, 201–400 post transplant) in 30 children following liver transplantation (LTx). All children received 53/25 cadaveric/live donor liver allografts with rabbit anti-human thymocyte globulin (rATG) induction, and steroid-free Tacrolimus therapy. Rejectors in both groups were those children (n=35), who experienced biopsy-proven acute cellular rejection (ACR) within 60 days of DC monitoring. Results Among rejectors in the longitudinal and cross-sectional cohorts, the MDC: PDC ratio was higher, and was associated with decreased PDC frequencies. Logistic regression analysis, leave-one out cross-validation, and receiver operating characteristic analysis applied to 30 cross-sectional subjects revealed that an MDC:PDC ratio 1.78 was associated with rejector status with sensitivity/specificity of 76.9/88.2%. Sensitivity and specificity were replicated in the 18 remaining cross-sectional subjects (88.8 and 78.8%, respectively), but not in longitudinally-monitored subjects, during the early, 60-day period after LTx (30.76 and 62.50%, respectively). A significant negative correlation was observed between Tacrolimus whole blood concentrations and PDC frequencies (Spearman r = −0.370, p=0.005) in 48 cross-sectional subjects in whom DC subsets were monitored 1–3 years after LTx, but not during the early post-LTx period. Conclusion We conclude that an elevated MDC: PDC ratio associates with liver graft rejection, which occurs after first year in children induced with rATG. PMID:19696644

  16. Gene expression profiling and pathway analysis of human bronchial epithelial cells exposed to airborne particulate matter collected from Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hong; Shamy, Magdy; Kluz, Thomas; Muñoz, Alexandra B; Zhong, Mianhua; Laulicht, Freda; Alghamdi, Mansour A; Khoder, Mamdouh I; Chen, Lung-Chi; Costa, Max

    2012-12-01

    Epidemiological studies have established a positive correlation between human mortality and increased concentration of airborne particulate matters (PM). However, the mechanisms underlying PM related human diseases, as well as the molecules and pathways mediating the cellular response to PM, are not fully understood. This study aims to investigate the global gene expression changes in human cells exposed to PM(10) and to identify genes and pathways that may contribute to PM related adverse health effects. Human bronchial epithelial cells were exposed to PM(10) collected from Saudi Arabia for 1 or 4 days, and whole transcript expression was profiled using the GeneChip human gene 1.0 ST array. A total of 140 and 230 genes were identified that significantly changed more than 1.5 fold after PM(10) exposure for 1 or 4 days, respectively. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis revealed that different exposure durations triggered distinct pathways. Genes involved in NRF2-mediated response to oxidative stress were up-regulated after 1 day exposure. In contrast, cells exposed for 4 days exhibited significant changes in genes related to cholesterol and lipid synthesis pathways. These observed changes in cellular oxidative stress and lipid synthesis might contribute to PM related respiratory and cardiovascular disease. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Differential Susceptibility and Response of Primary Human Myeloid BDCA1(+) Dendritic Cells to Infection with Different Enteroviruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schulte, B.M.; Kers-Rebel, E.D.; Prosser, A.C; Galama, J.M.D.; Kuppeveld, F.J.M. van; Adema, G.J.

    2013-01-01

    Coxsackie B viruses (CVBs) and echoviruses (EVs) form the Human Enterovirus-B (HEV-B) species within the family Picornaviridae. HEV-B infections are widespread and generally cause mild disease; however, severe infections occur and HEV-B are associated with various chronic diseases such as

  18. Circulating immune/inflammation markers in Chinese workers occupationally exposed to formaldehyde

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seow, Wei Jie; Zhang, Luoping; Vermeulen, Roel; Tang, Xiaojiang; Hu, Wei; Bassig, Bryan A.; Ji, Zhiying; Shiels, Meredith S.; Kemp, Troy J.; Shen, Min; Qiu, Chuangyi; Reiss, Boris; Beane Freeman, Laura E.; Blair, Aaron; Kim, Christopher; Guo, Weihong; Wen, Cuiju; Li, Laiyu; Pinto, Ligia A.; Huang, Hanlin; Smith, Martyn T.; Hildesheim, Allan; Rothman, Nathaniel; Lan, Qing

    2015-01-01

    Background. Formaldehyde has been classified as a human myeloid leukemogen. However, the mechanistic basis for this association is still debated. Objectives. We aimed to evaluate whether circulating immune/inflammation markers were altered in workers occupationally exposed to formaldehyde. Methods. Using a multiplexed bead-based assay, we measured serum levels of 38 immune/inflammation markers in a cross-sectional study of 43 formaldehyde-exposed and 51 unexposed factory workers in Guangdong, China. Linear regression models adjusting for potential confounders were used to compare marker levels in exposed and unexposed workers. Results. We found significantly lower circulating levels of two markers among exposed factory workers compared with unexposed controls that remained significant after adjusting for potential confounders and multiple comparisons using a false discovery rate of 10%, including chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 11 (36.2 pg/ml in exposed versus 48.4 pg/ml in controls, P = 0.0008) and thymus and activation regulated chemokine (52.7 pg/ml in exposed versus 75.0 pg/ml in controls, P = 0.0028), suggesting immunosuppression among formaldehyde-exposed workers. Conclusions. Our findings are consistent with recently emerging understanding that immunosuppression might be associated with myeloid diseases. These findings, if replicated in a larger study, may provide insights into the mechanisms by which formaldehyde promotes leukemogenesis. PMID:25908645

  19. Occupational exposure to formaldehyde, hematotoxicity and leukemia-specific chromosome changes in cultured myeloid progenitor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Luoping; Tang, Xiaojiang; Rothman, Nathaniel; Vermeulen, Roel; Ji, Zhiying; Shen, Min; Qiu, Chuangyi; Guo, Weihong; Liu, Songwang; Reiss, Boris; Laura Beane, Freeman; Ge, Yichen; Hubbard, Alan E.; Hua, Ming; Blair, Aaron; Galvan, Noe; Ruan, Xiaolin; Alter, Blanche P.; Xin, Kerry X.; Li, Senhua; Moore, Lee E.; Kim, Sungkyoon; Xie, Yuxuan; Hayes, Richard B.; Azuma, Mariko; Hauptmann, Michael; Xiong, Jun; Stewart, Patricia; Li, Laiyu; Rappaport, Stephen M.; Huang, Hanlin; Fraumeni, Joseph F.; Smith, Martyn T.; Lan, Qing

    2010-01-01

    There are concerns about the health effects of formaldehyde exposure, including carcinogenicity, in light of elevated indoor air levels in new homes and occupational exposures experienced by workers in health care, embalming, manufacturing and other industries. Epidemiological studies suggest that formaldehyde exposure is associated with an increased risk of leukemia. However, the biological plausibility of these findings has been questioned because limited information is available on formaldehyde’s ability to disrupt hematopoietic function. Our objective was to determine if formaldehyde exposure disrupts hematopoietic function and produces leukemia-related chromosome changes in exposed humans. We examined the ability of formaldehyde to disrupt hematopoiesis in a study of 94 workers in China (43 exposed to formaldehyde and 51 frequency-matched controls) by measuring complete blood counts and peripheral stem/progenitor cell colony formation. Further, myeloid progenitor cells, the target for leukemogenesis, were cultured from the workers to quantify the level of leukemia-specific chromosome changes, including monosomy 7 and trisomy 8, in metaphase spreads of these cells. Among exposed workers, peripheral blood cell counts were significantly lowered in a manner consistent with toxic effects on the bone marrow and leukemia-specific chromosome changes were significantly elevated in myeloid blood progenitor cells. These findings suggest that formaldehyde exposure can have an adverse impact on the hematopoietic system and that leukemia induction by formaldehyde is biologically plausible, which heightens concerns about its leukemogenic potential from occupational and environmental exposures. PMID:20056626

  20. Intestinal Damage and Inflammatory Biomarkers in Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-Exposed and HIV-Infected Zimbabwean Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prendergast, Andrew J; Chasekwa, Bernard; Rukobo, Sandra; Govha, Margaret; Mutasa, Kuda; Ntozini, Robert; Humphrey, Jean H

    2017-09-15

    Disease progression is rapid in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected infants. Whether intestinal damage and inflammation underlie mortality is unknown. We measured plasma intestinal fatty acid binding protein (I-FABP), soluble CD14 (sCD14), interleukin 6 (IL-6), and C-reactive protein (CRP) at 6 weeks and 6 months of age in 272 HIV-infected infants who either died (cases) or survived (controls), and in 194 HIV-exposed uninfected (HEU) and 197 HIV-unexposed infants. We estimated multivariable odds ratios for mortality and postnatal HIV transmission for each biomarker using logistic regression. At 6 weeks, HIV-infected infants had higher sCD14 and IL-6 but lower I-FABP than HIV-exposed and HIV-unexposed infants (P HIV-exposed than HIV-unexposed infants (P = .02). At 6 months, HIV-infected infants had highest sCD14, IL-6, and CRP concentrations (P HIV-exposed vs HIV-unexposed infants (P = .04). No biomarker was associated with mortality in HIV-infected infants, or with odds of breast-milk HIV transmission in HIV-exposed infants. HIV-infected infants have elevated inflammatory markers by 6 weeks of age, which increase over time. In contrast to adults and older children, inflammatory biomarkers were not associated with mortality. HEU infants have higher inflammation than HIV-unexposed infants until at least 6 months, which may contribute to poor health outcomes.

  1. Interaction of c-Myb with p300 is required for the induction of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) by human AML oncogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattabiraman, Diwakar R; McGirr, Crystal; Shakhbazov, Konstantin; Barbier, Valerie; Krishnan, Keerthana; Mukhopadhyay, Pamela; Hawthorne, Paula; Trezise, Ann; Ding, Jianmin; Grimmond, Sean M; Papathanasiou, Peter; Alexander, Warren S; Perkins, Andrew C; Levesque, Jean-Pierre; Winkler, Ingrid G; Gonda, Thomas J

    2014-04-24

    The MYB oncogene is widely expressed in acute leukemias and is important for the continued proliferation of leukemia cells, suggesting that MYB may be a therapeutic target in these diseases. However, realization of this potential requires a significant therapeutic window for MYB inhibition, given its essential role in normal hematopoiesis, and an approach for developing an effective therapeutic. We previously showed that the interaction of c-Myb with the coactivator CBP/p300 is essential for its transforming activity. Here, by using cells from Booreana mice which carry a mutant allele of c-Myb, we show that this interaction is essential for in vitro transformation by the myeloid leukemia oncogenes AML1-ETO, AML1-ETO9a, MLL-ENL, and MLL-AF9. We further show that unlike cells from wild-type mice, Booreana cells transduced with AML1-ETO9a or MLL-AF9 retroviruses fail to generate leukemia upon transplantation into irradiated recipients. Finally, we have begun to explore the molecular mechanisms underlying these observations by gene expression profiling. This identified several genes previously implicated in myeloid leukemogenesis and HSC function as being regulated in a c-Myb-p300-dependent manner. These data highlight the importance of the c-Myb-p300 interaction in myeloid leukemogenesis and suggest disruption of this interaction as a potential therapeutic strategy for acute myeloid leukemia.

  2. The {sup 57}Fe hyperfine interactions in iron storage proteins in liver and spleen tissues from normal human and two patients with mantle cell lymphoma and acute myeloid leukemia: a Mössbauer effect study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oshtrakh, M. I., E-mail: oshtrakh@gmail.com; Alenkina, I. V. [Ural Federal University, Department of Physical Techniques and Devices for Quality Control, Institute of Physics and Technology (Russian Federation); Vinogradov, A. V.; Konstantinova, T. S. [Ural State Medical University (Russian Federation); Semionkin, V. A. [Ural Federal University, Department of Physical Techniques and Devices for Quality Control, Institute of Physics and Technology (Russian Federation)

    2015-04-15

    Study of human spleen and liver tissues from healthy persons and two patients with mantle cell lymphoma and acute myeloid leukemia was carried out using Mössbauer spectroscopy with a high velocity resolution. Small variations in the {sup 57}Fe hyperfine parameters for normal and patient’s tissues were detected and related to small variations in the {sup 57}Fe local microenvironment in ferrihydrite cores. The differences in the relative parts of more crystalline and more amorphous core regions were also supposed for iron storage proteins in normal and patients’ spleen and liver tissues.

  3. Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... around the eyes {{ Nausea and vomiting {{ Muscle cramps {{ Diarrhea {{ Rash {{ Chronic fatigue {{ Possible cardiac effects (see page 22 for ... be seen by a doctor who specializes in pediatric leukemia. See the free LLS ... Myeloid Leukemia I page 33 Fertility, Pregnancy and ...

  4. Impacts of mannan-binding lectin on phenotype and function of CD11c-positive human peripheral blood myeloid dendritic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Ying

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo investigate the impacts of mannan-binding lectin (MBL on the phenotype and function of CD11c-positive human peripheral blood myeloid dendritic cells (CD11c+mDC. MethodsCD11c+mDC and CD4+T lymphocytes from healthy human volunteers were isolated by magnetic bead sorting and were stimulated by different concentrations of MBL (5, 10, 20 μg/ml. Compared with the non-MBL stimulation group, the levels of interleukin-12 (IL-12 in the supernatant of culture medium in different MBL stimulation groups were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. The expression of CD40, CD80, CD86, and HLA-DR on CD11c+mDC surface was measured by flow cytometry. CD11c+mDC-stimulated proliferation abilities of CD4+T lymphocytes were determined by MTT assay. The levels of interleukin-4 (IL-4 and interferon-gamma (IFNγ in the coculture medium were measured by ELISA. Comparison of the means between multiple groups was made by one-way ANOVA and pairwise comparison between any two groups was made by LSD t-test. ResultsCompared with the non-MBL stimulation group, the MBL stimulation groups (5, 10, 20 μg/ml had significantly higher expression of CD40, CD80, CD86, and HLA-DR on CD11c+mDC surface and significantly increased IL-12 secretion (F=44.34, P<0.001; F=27.35, P<0.001; F=15.57, P<0.001; F=48.38, P<0.001; F=38.27, P<0.001. The IL-12 secretion was MBL concentration-dependent. The proliferation ability of CD4+T lymphocytes was significantly higher in the MBL stimulation group than in the non-MBL stimulation group and the control group (F=23.43, P<0.001. The MBL group had a significantly higher IFNγ level but a significantly lower IL-4 level compared with the non-MBL group and the control group (F=28.25, P<0.001; F=40.03, P<0.001. ConclusionMBL can effectively stimulate the activation of CD11c+mDC and induce the differentiation from CD4+T lymphocytes to type 1 helper T cells. Therefore, MBL is possibly involved in the control and

  5. Bridge-Induced Translocation betweenNUP145andTOP2Yeast Genes Models the Genetic Fusion between the Human Orthologs Associated With Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosato, Valentina; West, Nicole; Zrimec, Jan; Nikitin, Dmitri V; Del Sal, Giannino; Marano, Roberto; Breitenbach, Michael; Bruschi, Carlo V

    2017-01-01

    In mammalian organisms liquid tumors such as acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are related to spontaneous chromosomal translocations ensuing in gene fusions. We previously developed a system named bridge-induced translocation (BIT) that allows linking together two different chromosomes exploiting the strong endogenous homologous recombination system of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae . The BIT system generates a heterogeneous population of cells with different aneuploidies and severe aberrant phenotypes reminiscent of a cancerogenic transformation. In this work, thanks to a complex pop-out methodology of the marker used for the selection of translocants, we succeeded by BIT technology to precisely reproduce in yeast the peculiar chromosome translocation that has been associated with AML, characterized by the fusion between the human genes NUP98 and TOP2B . To shed light on the origin of the DNA fragility within NUP98 , an extensive analysis of the curvature, bending, thermostability, and B-Z transition aptitude of the breakpoint region of NUP98 and of its yeast ortholog NUP145 has been performed. On this basis, a DNA cassette carrying homologous tails to the two genes was amplified by PCR and allowed the targeted fusion between NUP145 and TOP2 , leading to reproduce the chimeric transcript in a diploid strain of S. cerevisiae . The resulting translocated yeast obtained through BIT appears characterized by abnormal spherical bodies of nearly 500 nm of diameter, absence of external membrane and defined cytoplasmic localization. Since Nup98 is a well-known regulator of the post-transcriptional modification of P53 target genes, and P53 mutations are occasionally reported in AML, this translocant yeast strain can be used as a model to test the constitutive expression of human P53 . Although the abnormal phenotype of the translocant yeast was never rescued by its expression, an exogenous P53 was recognized to confer increased vitality to the translocants, in spite of its

  6. Human lymphocytes exposed to low doses of X-rays are less susceptible to radiation-induced mutagenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelsey, K.T.; Memisoglu, A.; Frenkel, D.; Liber, H.L. (Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA (United States))

    1991-08-01

    Human lymphocytes exposed to low doses of X-rays become refractory to the subsequent induction of chromosomal damage by high doses of radiation. The current study was designed to test the effect of pre-treatment of human T-lymphocytes with a low dose of X-rays on the induction of mutations at the hprt locus by a subsequent challenge dose. When cells were exposed to 1 cGy X-rays 24 h after phytohemag-glutinin stimulation, the yield of mutations induced by a 300 cGy X-ray dose given 16 h later was reduced by approximately 70% from the control level of X-ray-induced mutations. This indicates that this previously described adaptive response to low dose X-rays also results in lymphocytes becoming refractory to the induction of gene mutations. (author). 22 refs.; 2 tabs.

  7. Type 1 and type 2 cytokine profiles in children exposed to or infected with vertically transmitted human immunodeficiency virus.

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, B. N.; Lu, J. G.; Kline, M.W.; Paul, M.; Doyle, M; Kozinetz, C; Shearer, W T; Reuben, J. M.

    1996-01-01

    In human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected adults, cytokine production profiles switch from predominantly type 1 (interleukin-2 [IL-2] and gamma interferon [IFN-gamma]) to type 2 (IL-4 and IL-10) cytokines with disease progression. To test this hypothesis in vertically HIV-infected children, we measured cytokine transcription and production in rapid progressors (RPs), seroreverters (SRs), and those children exposed to HIV in utero (P0s). Production of type 1 and type 2 cytokines was measu...

  8. N-ras mutations in human cutaneous melanoma from sun-exposed body sites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van 't Veer, L. J.; Burgering, B. M.; Versteeg, R.; Boot, A. J.; Ruiter, D. J.; Osanto, S.; Schrier, P. I.; Bos, J. L.

    1989-01-01

    In 7 of 37 patients with cutaneous melanoma, mutations in the N-ras gene were found. The primary tumors of these seven patients were exclusively localized on body sites continuously exposed to sunlight. Moreover, the ras mutations were all at or near dipyrimidine sites known to be targets of UV

  9. Functional characterization of human Cd33+ And Cd11b+ myeloid-derived suppressor cell subsets induced from peripheral blood mononuclear cells co-cultured with a diverse set of human tumor cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arger Nicholas

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tumor immune tolerance can derive from the recruitment of suppressor cell populations, including myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC. In cancer patients, MDSC accumulation correlates with increased tumor burden, but the mechanisms of MDSC induction remain poorly understood. Methods This study examined the ability of human tumor cell lines to induce MDSC from healthy donor PBMC using in vitro co-culture methods. These human MDSC were then characterized for morphology, phenotype, gene expression, and function. Results Of over 100 tumor cell lines examined, 45 generated canonical CD33+HLA-DRlowLineage- MDSC, with high frequency of induction by cervical, ovarian, colorectal, renal cell, and head and neck carcinoma cell lines. CD33+ MDSC could be induced by cancer cell lines from all tumor types with the notable exception of those derived from breast cancer (0/9, regardless of hormone and HER2 status. Upon further examination, these and others with infrequent CD33+ MDSC generation were found to induce a second subset characterized as CD11b+CD33lowHLA-DRlowLineage-. Gene and protein expression, antibody neutralization, and cytokine-induction studies determined that the induction of CD33+ MDSC depended upon over-expression of IL-1β, IL-6, TNFα, VEGF, and GM-CSF, while CD11b+ MDSC induction correlated with over-expression of FLT3L and TGFβ. Morphologically, both CD33+ and CD11b+ MDSC subsets appeared as immature myeloid cells and had significantly up-regulated expression of iNOS, NADPH oxidase, and arginase-1 genes. Furthermore, increased expression of transcription factors HIF1α, STAT3, and C/EBPβ distinguished MDSC from normal counterparts. Conclusions These studies demonstrate the universal nature of MDSC induction by human solid tumors and characterize two distinct MDSC subsets: CD33+HLA-DRlowHIF1α+/STAT3+ and CD11b+HLA-DRlowC/EBPβ+, which should enable the development of novel diagnostic and therapeutic reagents for

  10. Human cytomegalovirus infant infection adversely affects growth and development in maternally HIV-exposed and unexposed infants in Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gompels, U A; Larke, N; Sanz-Ramos, M; Bates, M; Musonda, K; Manno, D; Siame, J; Monze, M; Filteau, S

    2012-02-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) coinfections have been shown to increase infant morbidity, mortality, and AIDS progression. In HIV-endemic regions, maternal HIV-exposed but HIV-uninfected infants, which is the majority of children affected by HIV, also show poor growth and increased morbidity. Although nutrition has been examined, the effects of HCMV infection have not been evaluated. We studied the effects of HCMV infection on the growth, development, and health of maternally HIV-exposed and unexposed infants in Zambia. Infants were examined in a cohort recruited to a trial of micronutrient-fortified complementary foods. HIV-infected mothers and infants had received perinatal antiretroviral therapy to prevent mother-to-child HIV transmission. Growth, development, and morbidity were analyzed by linear regression analyses in relation to maternal HIV exposure and HCMV infection, as screened by sera DNA for viremia at 6 months of age and by antibody for infection at 18 months. All HCMV-seropositive infants had decreased length-for-age by 18 months compared with seronegative infants (standard deviation [z]-score difference: -0.44 [95% confidence interval {CI}, -.72 to -.17]; P = .002). In HIV-exposed infants, those who were HCMV positive compared with those who were negative, also had reduced head size (mean z-score difference: -0.72 [95% CI, -1.23 to -.22]; P = .01) and lower psychomotor development (Bayley test score difference: -4.1 [95% CI, -7.8 to -.5]; P = .03). HIV-exposed, HCMV-viremic infants were more commonly referred for hospital treatment than HCMV-negative infants. The effects of HCMV were unaffected by micronutrient fortification. HCMV affects child growth, development, and morbidity of African infants, particularly in those maternally exposed to HIV. HCMV is therefore a risk factor for child health in this region.

  11. Human Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells Exposed to Microorganisms Involved in Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis Induce a Th1-Polarized Immune Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallandre, Jean-René; Borg, Christophe; Loeffert, Sophie; Gbaguidi-Haore, Houssein; Millon, Laurence

    2013-01-01

    Hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) is an immunoallergic disease characterized by a prominent interstitial infiltrate composed predominantly of lymphocytes secreting inflammatory cytokines. Dendritic cells (DCs) are known to play a pivotal role in the lymphocytic response. However, their cross talk with microorganisms that cause HP has yet to be elucidated. This study aimed to investigate the initial interactions between human monocyte-derived DCs (MoDCs) and four microorganisms that are different in nature (Saccharopolyspora rectivirgula [actinomycetes], Mycobacterium immunogenum [mycobacteria], and Wallemia sebi and Eurotium amstelodami [filamentous fungi]) and are involved in HP. Our objectives were to determine the cross talk between MoDCs and HP-causative agents and to determine whether the resulting immune response varied according to the microbial extract tested. The phenotypic activation of MoDCs was measured by the increased expression of costimulatory molecules and levels of cytokines in supernatants. The functional activation of MoDCs was measured by the ability of MoDCs to induce lymphocytic proliferation and differentiation in a mixed lymphocytic reaction (MLR). E. amstelodami-exposed (EA) MoDCs expressed higher percentages of costimulatory molecules than did W. sebi-exposed (WS), S. rectivirgula-exposed (SR), or M. immunogenum-exposed (MI) MoDCs (P < 0.05, Wilcoxon signed-rank test). EA-MoDCs, WS-MoDCs, SR-MoDCs, and MI-MoDCs induced CD4+ T cell proliferation and a Th1-polarized immune response. The present study provides evidence that, although differences were initially observed between MoDCs exposed to filamentous fungi and MoDCs exposed to bacteria, a Th1 response was ultimately promoted by DCs regardless of the microbial extract tested. PMID:23720369

  12. A phase I study of recombinant human soluble interleukin-1 receptor (rhu IL-1R) in patients with relapsed and refractory acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, S H; Fay, J; Frankel, S; Christiansen, N; Baer, M R; Jacobs, C; Blosch, C; Hanna, R; Herzig, G

    1999-01-01

    The recombinant human interleukin-1 receptor (rhu IL-1R) is a soluble truncated form of the type 1 full-length membrane-bound receptor that binds IL-1 with identical affinity to that of the membrane form. As such, it may have clinical potential by sequestering IL-1, thereby preventing it from binding to its membrane-bound receptor and eliciting a biological effect. As IL-1 has been shown to regulate leukemic cell proliferation in an autocrine fashion, a phase I trial of rhu IL-1R was conducted in patients with relapsed and refractory acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The study group comprised 11 patients who were sequentially treated on one of three dose levels, receiving a single intravenous (i.v.) bolus dose on day 1 followed by 13 days of daily subcutaneous (s.c.) injections with the option of an additional 14 days of treatment if a response of stable disease or better was achieved. Dose level 1 i.v. bolus 500 microg/m2, s.c. dose 250 microg/m2 per day (five patients); dose level 2 i.v. bolus 1000 microg/m2, s.c. dose 500 microg/m2 per day (three patients); dose level 3 i.v. bolus 2000 microg/m2, s.c. dose 1000 microg/m2 per day (three patients). Owing to limited drug availability, the study was designed to only examine these three dose levels. rhu IL-IR was well tolerated. There was no grade 3 or 4 non-hematological toxicity related to the study drug and the maximum tolerated dose was not reached. No IL-1R-blocking antibodies developed during the course of the study. Serum levels of IL-1beta, IL-6 and TNF were undetectable before, during and after rhu IL-IR administration. The terminal half-life after i.v. dosing was at least 7-12 h, and after s.c. dosing 2-4 days. Serum levels of rhu IL-1R up to 360- and 25-fold those of pretreatment levels were achieved after i.v. and s.c. dosing respectively. No patient had a complete, partial or minor response to treatment; four had stable disease and seven had progressive disease. rhu IL-1R therapy was safe but did not have

  13. Gene expression profiling and pathway analysis of human bronchial epithelial cells exposed to airborne particulate matter collected from Saudi Arabia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Hong [Department of Environmental Medicine, NYU School of Medicine, Tuxedo, NY (United States); Shamy, Magdy [Department of Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Meteorology, Environment and Arid Land Agriculture, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); Kluz, Thomas; Muñoz, Alexandra B.; Zhong, Mianhua; Laulicht, Freda [Department of Environmental Medicine, NYU School of Medicine, Tuxedo, NY (United States); Alghamdi, Mansour A.; Khoder, Mamdouh I. [Department of Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Meteorology, Environment and Arid Land Agriculture, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); Chen, Lung-Chi [Department of Environmental Medicine, NYU School of Medicine, Tuxedo, NY (United States); Costa, Max, E-mail: Max.Costa@nyumc.org [Department of Environmental Medicine, NYU School of Medicine, Tuxedo, NY (United States)

    2012-12-01

    Epidemiological studies have established a positive correlation between human mortality and increased concentration of airborne particulate matters (PM). However, the mechanisms underlying PM related human diseases, as well as the molecules and pathways mediating the cellular response to PM, are not fully understood. This study aims to investigate the global gene expression changes in human cells exposed to PM{sub 10} and to identify genes and pathways that may contribute to PM related adverse health effects. Human bronchial epithelial cells were exposed to PM{sub 10} collected from Saudi Arabia for 1 or 4 days, and whole transcript expression was profiled using the GeneChip human gene 1.0 ST array. A total of 140 and 230 genes were identified that significantly changed more than 1.5 fold after PM{sub 10} exposure for 1 or 4 days, respectively. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis revealed that different exposure durations triggered distinct pathways. Genes involved in NRF2-mediated response to oxidative stress were up-regulated after 1 day exposure. In contrast, cells exposed for 4 days exhibited significant changes in genes related to cholesterol and lipid synthesis pathways. These observed changes in cellular oxidative stress and lipid synthesis might contribute to PM related respiratory and cardiovascular disease. -- Highlights: ► PM exposure modulated gene expression and associated pathways in BEAS-2B cells. ► One-day exposure to PM induced genes involved in responding to oxidative stress. ► 4-day exposure to PM changed genes associated to cholesterol and lipid synthesis.

  14. Genetics Home Reference: chronic myeloid leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions Chronic myeloid leukemia Chronic myeloid leukemia Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Chronic myeloid leukemia is a slow-growing cancer of the blood- ...

  15. [Genotoxic effects in a human population exposed to heavy metals in the region of La Mojana, Colombia, 2013].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calao, Clelia Rosa; Marrugo, José Luis

    2015-08-01

    Mining is an economically important activity in Colombia which generates large quantities of residues containing potentially toxic elements such as heavy metals. These contaminate ecosystems and place human health at risk. La Mojana lies within one of the most biodiversity-rich zones on Earth and has been subjected to processes of contamination closely related to gold mining activities in the surrounding areas. To evaluate genotoxicity in the population of La Mojana region exposed to heavy metals. Genotoxic effects and their relationship with concentrations of heavy metals (mercury, cadmium and lead) in blood were evaluated among an exposed population and a control group. The exposed group comprised inhabitants of the municipalities of Guaranda, Sucre, Majagual and San Marcos; inhabitants of the municipality of Montería were chosen as a control group. DNA damage was determined using the alkaline comet assay. Concentrations of mercury were determined by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry, and those of cadmium and lead by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Concentrations of the heavy metals exceeded the limits permitted by the World Health Organization. Genotoxic effects were found in the exposed population, possibly associated with the presence of these metals in blood. Significant associations (pheavy metals in the blood.

  16. Testicular myeloid sarcoma: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luzia Beatriz Ribeiro Zago

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Myeloid sarcomas are extramedullary solid tumors composed of immature granulocytic precursor cells. In association with acute myeloid leukemia and other myeloproliferative disorders, they may arise concurrently with compromised bone marrow related to acute myeloid leukemia, as a relapsed presentation, or occur as the first manifestation. The testicles are considered to be an uncommon site for myeloid sarcomas. No therapeutic strategy has been defined as best but may include chemotherapy, radiotherapy and/or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. This study reports the evolution of a patient with testicular myeloid sarcoma as the first manifestation of acute myeloid leukemia. The patient initially refused medical treatment and died five months after the clinical condition started.

  17. Hepatic proteome sensitivity in rainbow trout after chronically exposed to a human pharmaceutical verapamil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi-Hua; Li, Ping; Sulc, Miroslav; Hulak, Martin; Randak, Tomas

    2012-01-01

    Verapamil (VRP), a cardiovascular pharmaceutical widely distributed and persistent in the aquatic environment, has potential toxicity to fish and other aquatic organisms. However, the molecular mechanisms that lead to these toxic effects are not well known. In the present study, proteomic analysis has been performed to investigate the protein patterns that are differentially expressed in liver of rainbow trout exposed to sublethal concentrations of VRP (0.5, 27.0, and 270 μg/liter) for 42 days. Two-dimensional electrophoresis coupled with MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry was employed to detect and identify the protein profiles. The analysis revealed that the expression of six hepatic acidic proteins were markedly altered in the treatment groups compared with the control group; three proteins especially were significantly down-regulated in fish exposed to VRP at environmental related concentration (0.5 μg/liter). These results suggested that the VRP induce mechanisms against oxidative stress (glucose-regulated protein 78 and 94 and protein disulfide-isomerase A3) and adaptive changes in ion transference regulation (calreticulin, hyperosmotic glycine-rich protein). Furthermore, for the first time, protein Canopy-1 was found to be significantly down-regulated in fish by chronic exposure to VRP at environmental related levels. Overall, our work supports that fish hepatic proteomics analysis serves as an in vivo model for monitoring the residual pharmaceuticals in aquatic environment and can provide valuable insight into the molecular events in VRP-induced toxicity in fish and other organisms.

  18. Opportunistic infections in non-human primates exposed to immunomodulatory biotherapeutics: considerations and case examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutto, David L

    2010-01-01

    Immunomodulatory biotherapeutics are most often evaluated for safety preclinically by way of repeat dose toxicity studies in non-human primates. Since immunomodulation is expected with this class of therapeutics, and since non-human primates share many opportunistic or latent infectious agents with humans, non-human primates in these toxicity studies may present with opportunistic or recrudescent infections that would be of concern if they occurred clinically in humans. In such instances, it is suggested that non-clinical safety assessment scientists consider a series of key questions that aim to clarify the relationship of the findings to the biotherapeutic under study and the expected predictivity of the findings to the human clinical setting. In this review, relevant case examples are considered comprising (i) gammaherpesviruses-mediated B-lymphocyte proliferation associated with a T-lymphocyte depleting fusion protein; (ii) increased plasmodial hemoparasite burdens associated with a monoclonal antibody inhibitory to T-lymphocyte trafficking and macrophage function, and (iii) the expected predictivity of non-human primate models for the occurrence of encephalic polyomavirus infections.

  19. The Thermal Plume above a Standing Human Body Exposed to Different Air Distribution Strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Li; Nielsen, Peter V.; Li, Yuguo

    2009-01-01

    This study compares the impact of air distribution on the thermal plume above a human body in indoor environment. Three sets of measurements are conducted in a full-scale test room with different ventilation conditions. One breathing thermal manikin standing in the room is used to simulate...... the human body. Long-time average air velocity profiles at locations closely above the manikin are taken to identify the wandering thermal plume....

  20. Whole-Genome Expression Analysis of Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Exposed to Ultrasmooth Tantalum vs. Titanium Oxide Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stiehler, C.; Bunger, C.; Overall, R. W.

    2013-01-01

    to Ti surface. Key genes related to osteogenesis and cell adhesion were upregulated by MSCs exposed to Ta. We further identified differentially regulated candidate transcription factors, e.g., NRF2, EGR1, IRF-1, IRF-8, NF-Y, and p53 as well as relevant signaling pathways, e.g., p53 and mTOR, indicating...... to titanium (Ti) surface. The aim of this study was to extend the previous investigation of biocompatibility by monitoring temporal gene expression of MSCs on topographically comparable smooth Ta and Ti surfaces using whole-genome gene expression analysis. Total RNA samples from telomerase-immortalized human...

  1. PCC-ring induction in human lymphocytes exposed to gamma and neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamadrid B, A.I.; Garcia L, O. [CPHR, Calle 20 No. 4113 e/41 y 47, Playa, La Habana 11300 (Cuba); Delbos, M.; Voisin, P.; Roy, L. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, BP 17, 92262 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)]. e-mail: ana@cphr.edu.cu

    2006-07-01

    Dose-effect curves for dose assessment in Gamma and neutron overexposures to high doses are presented in this paper for the first time in literature. The relationships were obtained by plotting the Premature Chromosome Condensation -rings (PCC-R) frequencies in PCC Iymphocytes obtained by chemical induction with Calyculin A in vitro, with radiation doses between 5 to 25 Gy. For the elaboration of these curves 9 676 PCC cells in Gl G2 and M stages were analyzed. The results were fitted to a lineal quadratic model in Gamma irradiation. For neutron irradiation the data was fitted to a lineal quadratic model up to 10 Gy and then a markedly cell cycle arrest and saturation was observed. These curves are of particular interest for victims exposed to doses exceeding 5 Gy where it is always very difficult to estimate a dose using the conventional technique. (Author)

  2. Altered global gene expression profiles in human gastrointestinal epithelial Caco2 cells exposed to nanosilver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saura C. Sahu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Extensive consumer exposure to food- and cosmetics-related consumer products containing nanosilver is of public safety concern. Therefore, there is a need for suitable in vitro models and sensitive predictive rapid screening methods to assess their toxicity. Toxicogenomic profile showing subtle changes in gene expressions following nanosilver exposure is a sensitive toxicological endpoint for this purpose. We evaluated the Caco2 cells and global gene expression profiles as tools for predictive rapid toxicity screening of nanosilver. We evaluated and compared the gene expression profiles of Caco-2 cells exposed to 20 nm and 50 nm nanosilver at a concentration 2.5 μg/ml. The global gene expression analysis of Caco2 cells exposed to 20 nm nanosilver showed that a total of 93 genes were altered at 4 h exposure, out of which 90 genes were up-regulated and 3 genes were down-regulated. The 24 h exposure of 20 nm silver altered 15 genes in Caco2 cells, out of which 14 were up-regulated and one was down-regulated. The most pronounced changes in gene expression were detected at 4 h. The greater size (50 nm nanosilver at 4 h exposure altered more genes by more different pathways than the smaller (20 nm one. Metallothioneins and heat shock proteins were highly up-regulated as a result of exposure to both the nanosilvers. The cellular pathways affected by the nanosilver exposure is likely to lead to increased toxicity. The results of our study presented here suggest that the toxicogenomic characterization of Caco2 cells is a valuable in vitro tool for assessing toxicity of nanomaterials such as nanosilver.

  3. Changes in silver nanoparticles exposed to human synthetic stomach fluid: Effectsof particle size and surface chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    The significant rise in consumer products and applications utilizing the antibacterial properties of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) has increased the possibility of human exposure. The mobility and bioavailability of AgNPs through the ingestion pathway will depend, in part, on prop...

  4. Sensory eye irritation in humans exposed to mixtures of volatile organic compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hempel-Jørgensen, Anne Hempel; Kjærgaard, Søren K.; Mølhave, Lars

    1999-01-01

    Eight subjects participated in a controlled eyes-only exposure study of human sensory irritation in ocular mucosal tissue. The authors investigated dose-response properties and the additive effects of three mixtures of volatile organic compounds. The dose-response relationships for these mixtures...

  5. Highly Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Exposed Seronegative Men Have Lower Mucosal Innate Immune Reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulcher, Jennifer A; Romas, Laura; Hoffman, Jennifer C; Elliott, Julie; Saunders, Terry; Burgener, Adam D; Anton, Peter A; Yang, Otto O

    2017-08-01

    Risk of HIV acquisition varies, and some individuals are highly HIV-1-exposed, yet, persistently seronegative (HESN). The immunologic mechanisms contributing to this phenomenon are an area of intense interest. As immune activation and inflammation facilitate disease progression in HIV-1-infected persons and gastrointestinal-associated lymphoid tissue is a highly susceptible site for transmission, we hypothesized that reduced gut mucosal immune reactivity may contribute to reduced HIV-1 susceptibility in HESN men with a history of numerous rectal sexual exposures. To test this, we used ex vivo mucosal explants from freshly acquired colorectal biopsies from healthy control and HESN subjects who were stimulated with specific innate immune ligands and inactivated whole pathogens. Immune reactivity was then assessed via cytokine arrays and proteomic analysis. Mucosal immune cell compositions were quantified via immunohistochemistry. We found that explants from HESN subjects produced less proinflammatory cytokines compared with controls following innate immune stimulation; while noninflammatory cytokines were similar between groups. Proteomic analysis identified several immune response proteins to be differentially expressed between HIV-1-stimulated HESN and control explants. Immunohistochemical examination of colorectal mucosa showed similar amounts of T cells, macrophages, and dendritic cells between groups. The results of this pilot study suggest that mucosal innate immune reactivity is dampened in HESN versus control groups, despite presence of similar densities of immune cells in the colorectal mucosa. This observed modulation of the rectal mucosal immune response may contribute to lower risk of mucosal HIV-1 transmission in these individuals.

  6. Neoplastic transformation of neonatal human fibroblasts exposed in vitro to radiation from a quartz-halogen lamp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, R W; Rowland, K L; Miller, S A; Beer, J Z

    1995-06-01

    The use of unfiltered quartz-halogen lamps exposes human skin to radiation that spans much of the ultraviolet (UV) spectrum. Reports indicate that exposure to quartz-halogen lamps is erythemogenic, mutagenic, and carcinogenic. To compare the carcinogenic potential of quartz-halogen lamps with that of other UV sources, we determined the dose dependence for cytotoxicity and neoplastic transformation in neonatal human fibroblasts exposed in vitro to: a 15 W germicidal lamp (primarily 254 nm radiation), a 15 W Cool White fluorescent lamp, and an unfiltered 20 W quartz-halogen lamp. Fluence-survival relationships were multiphasic with linear dose response below about 40% survival, and all three sources produced fluence-dependent transformation as indicated by induction of anchorage-independent growth. Maximum transformation frequencies were observed at fluences of 5-8 J/m2 for the germicidal lamp, 6.3 kJ/m2 for the fluorescent lamp, and 300 J/m2 for the quartz-halogen lamp. These data confirm the carcinogenic potential of the quartz-halogen lamp.

  7. Protective Effect of Liposome-Encapsulated Glutathione in a Human Epidermal Model Exposed to a Mustard Gas Analog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Paromov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Sulfur mustard or mustard gas (HD and its monofunctional analog, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES, or “half-mustard gas,” are alkylating agents that induce DNA damage, oxidative stress, and inflammation. HD/CEES are rapidly absorbed in the skin causing extensive injury. We hypothesize that antioxidant liposomes that deliver both water-soluble and lipid-soluble antioxidants protect skin cells from immediate CEES-induced damage via attenuating oxidative stress. Liposomes containing water-soluble antioxidants and/or lipid-soluble antioxidants were evaluated using in vitro model systems. Initially, we found that liposomes containing encapsulated glutathione (GSH-liposomes increased cell viability and attenuated production of reactive oxygen species (ROS in HaCaT cells exposed to CEES. Next, GSH-liposomes were tested in a human epidermal model, EpiDerm. In the EpiDerm, GSH-liposomes administered simultaneously or 1 hour after CEES exposure (2.5 mM increased cell viability, inhibited CEES-induced loss of ATP and attenuated changes in cellular morphology, but did not reduce caspase-3 activity. These findings paralleled the previously described in vivo protective effect of antioxidant liposomes in the rat lung and established the effectiveness of GSH-liposomes in a human epidermal model. This study provides a rationale for use of antioxidant liposomes against HD toxicity in the skin considering further verification in animal models exposed to HD.

  8. Anti-Cytotoxic and Anti-Inflammatory Effects of the Macrolide Antibiotic Roxithromycin in Sulfur Mustard-Exposed Human Airway Epithelial Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gao1, Radharaman Ray2, Yan Xiao3, Peter E. Barker3 and Prab, Xiugong

    2006-01-01

    .... In this study, the anti-cytotoxic and anti-inflammatory effects of a representative macrolide antibiotic, roxithromycin, were tested in vitro using SM-exposed normal human small airway epithelial (SAE...

  9. Human Health Risk Assessment of Artisanal Miners Exposed to Toxic Chemicals in Water and Sediments in the Prestea Huni Valley District of Ghana

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Obiri, Samuel; Yeboah, Philip O; Osae, Shiloh; Adu-Kumi, Sam; Cobbina, Samuel J; Armah, Frederick A; Ason, Benjamin; Antwi, Edward; Quansah, Reginald

    2016-01-01

    A human health risk assessment of artisanal miners exposed to toxic metals in water bodies and sediments in the PresteaHuni Valley District of Ghana was carried out in this study, in line with US EPA...

  10. Categorization of micronuclei by size and measurement of each ratio in cytokinesis-block and conventional cultures of human lymphocytes exposed to mitomycin C and colchicine

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mure, K; Takeshita, T; Morimoto, K

    1996-01-01

    .... We investigated the effects of the culture method (either conventional or cytokinesis-block) and exposure time (48 or 72hr) on the frequency and size distribution of MN in human peripheral lymphocytes exposed to mitomycin C...

  11. Time-dependent changes of markers associated with inflammation in the lungs of humans exposed to ambient levels of ozone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koren, H.S.; Devlin, R.B.; Becker, S.; Perez, R.; McDonnell, W.F. (Health Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States))

    1991-01-01

    Acute exposure of humans to 0.4 ppm ozone results in reversible respiratory function decrements, and cellular and biochemical changes leading to the production of substances which can mediate inflammation and acute lung injury. While pulmonary function decrements occur almost immediately after ozone exposure, it is not known how quickly the cellular and biochemical changes indicative of inflammation occur in humans. Changes in neutrophils and PGE2 have been observed in humans as early as 3 hr (28) and as late as 18 hr post exposure (19). The purpose of this study was to determine whether inflammatory changes occur relatively rapidly (within 1 hr) following exposure to ozone, or if the cascade of events which are initiated by ozone and lead to inflammation, take some time to develop. We exposed 10 healthy volunteers twice: once to filtered air and once to 0.4 ppm ozone. Each exposure lasted for 2 hr at an exercise level of 60 L/min, and bronchoalveolar lavage was performed 1 hr following exposure. The data from this study were compared to those from a previous study in which 10 subjects were exposed to O3 under identical conditions except that bronchoalveolar lavage was performed 18 hr following exposure. The results of the present study demonstrate that O3 is capable of inducing rapid cellular and biochemical changes in the lung. These changes were detectable as early as 1 hr following a 2 hr exposure of humans to ozone. The profiles of these changes were different at 1 hr and 18 hr following ozone exposures.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Oxidative DNA damage and repair in skeletal muscle of humans exposed to high-altitude hypoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundby, Carsten; Pilegaard, Henriette; van Hall, Gerrit

    2003-01-01

    Recent research suggests that high-altitude hypoxia may serve as a model for prolonged oxidative stress in healthy humans. In this study, we investigated the consequences of prolonged high-altitude hypoxia on the basal level of oxidative damage to nuclear DNA in muscle cells, a major oxygen......-consuming tissue. Muscle biopsies from seven healthy humans were obtained at sea level and after 2 and 8 weeks of hypoxia at 4100 m.a.s.l. We found increased levels of strand breaks and endonuclease III-sensitive sites after 2 weeks of hypoxia, whereas oxidative DNA damage detected by formamidopyrimidine DNA......) was unaltered by prolonged hypoxia, in accordance with the notion that HO-1 is an acute stress response protein. In conclusion, our data indicate high-altitude hypoxia may serve as a good model for oxidative stress and that antioxidant genes are not upregulated in muscle tissue by prolonged hypoxia despite...

  13. Heat Transfer in Human Skin Exposed to Radiation from Forest Fire Taking Into Account Moisture Evaporation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poptsov Nikolay

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal radiation is one of the damaging factors of forest fire. As a result of exposure to radiant heat flow, thermal damage of the human skin is possible. A layer of skin is considered with effective thermophysical characteristics. Thin layer of sweat excretion situated on top of the skin. A mathematical model of heat transfer in the system of “skin-excretion” is developed taking into account evaporation of moisture. Typical simulation results are presented.

  14. Autophagic-lysosomal dysregulation downstream of cathepsin B inactivation in human skin fibroblasts exposed to UVA

    OpenAIRE

    Lamore, Sarah D.; Wondrak, Georg T.

    2011-01-01

    Recently, using 2D-DIGE proteomics we have identified cathepsin B as a novel target of UVA in human Hs27 skin fibroblasts. In response to chronic exposure to noncytotoxic doses of UVA (9.9 J/cm2, twice a week, 3 weeks), photooxidative impairment of cathepsin B enzymatic activity occurred with accumulation of autofluorescent aggregates colocalizing with lysosomes, an effect mimicked by pharmacological antagonism of cathepsin B using the selective inhibitor CA074Me. Here, we have further explor...

  15. Targeting BCL2 Family in Human Myeloid Dendritic Cells: A Challenge to Cure Diseases with Chronic Inflammations Associated with Bone Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selma Olsson Åkefeldt

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA and Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH are common and rare diseases, respectively. They associate myeloid cell recruitment and survival in inflammatory conditions with tissue destruction and bone resorption. Manipulating dendritic cell (DC, and, especially, regulating their half-life and fusion, is a challenge. Indeed, these myeloid cells display pathogenic roles in both diseases and may be an important source of precursors for differentiation of osteoclasts, the bone-resorbing multinucleated giant cells. We have recently documented that the proinflammatory cytokine IL-17A regulates long-term survival of DC by inducing BCL2A1 expression, in addition to the constitutive MCL1 expression. We summarize bibliography of the BCL2 family members and their therapeutic targeting, with a special emphasis on MCL1 and BCL2A1, discussing their potential impact on RA and LCH. Our recent knowledge in the survival pathway, which is activated to perform DC fusion in the presence of IL-17A, suggests that targeting MCL1 and BCL2A1 in infiltrating DC may affect the clinical outcomes in RA and LCH. The development of new therapies, interfering with MCL1 and BCL2A1 expression, to target long-term surviving inflammatory DC should be translated into preclinical studies with the aim to increase the well-being of patients with RA and LCH.

  16. Regulation of SUMO2 Target Proteins by the Proteasome in Human Cells Exposed to Replication Stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bursomanno, Sara; McGouran, Joanna F; Kessler, Benedikt M

    2015-01-01

    In human cells, SUMO2 is predominantly conjugated to target proteins in response to cellular stress. Previous studies suggested that proteins conjugated to SUMO2, but not to SUMO1, could be regulated by the ubiquitin-mediated proteasome system. Hence, we set out to understand the role...... of the proteasome in determining the fate of proteins conjugated to SUMO2 when cells are treated with DNA replication stress conditions. We conducted a quantitative proteomic analysis in a U2OS cell line stably expressing SUMO2(Q87R) tagged with StrepHA in the presence or absence of epoxomicin (EPOX), a proteasome...

  17. Lead and cadmium phytoavailability and human bioaccessibility for vegetables exposed to soil or atmospheric pollution by process ultrafine particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Tiantian; Leveque, Thibault; Shahid, Muhammad; Foucault, Yann; Mombo, Stéphane; Dumat, Camille

    2014-09-01

    When plants are exposed to airborne particles, they can accumulate metals in their edible portions through root or foliar transfer. There is a lack of knowledge on the influence of plant exposure conditions on human bioaccessibility of metals, which is of particular concern with the increase in urban gardening activities. Lettuce, radish, and parsley were exposed to metal-rich ultrafine particles from a recycling factory via field atmospheric fallouts or polluted soil. Total lead (Pb) and cadmium (Cd) concentrations in of the edible plant parts and their human bioaccessibility were measured, and Pb translocation through the plants was studied using Pb isotopic analysis. The Pb and Cd bioaccessibility measured for consumed parts of the different polluted plants was significantly higher for root exposure (70% for Pb and 89% for Cd in lettuce) in comparison to foliar exposure (40% for Pb and 69% for Cd in lettuce). The difference in metal bioaccessibility could be linked to the metal compartmentalization and speciation changes in relation to exposure conditions. Metal nature strongly influences the measured bioaccessibility: Cd presents higher bioaccessibility in comparison to Pb. In the case of foliar exposure, a significant translocation of Pb from leaves toward the roots was observed. To conclude, the type of pollutant and the method of exposure significantly influences the phytoavailability and human bioaccessibility of metals, especially in relation to the contrasting phenomena involved in the rhizosphere and phyllosphere. The conditions of plant exposure must therefore be taken into account for environmental and health risk assessment. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  18. Cigarette Smoke-Exposed Candida albicans Increased Chitin Production and Modulated Human Fibroblast Cell Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humidah Alanazi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The predisposition of cigarette smokers for development of respiratory and oral bacterial infections is well documented. Cigarette smoke can also contribute to yeast infection. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of cigarette smoke condensate (CSC on C. albicans transition, chitin content, and response to environmental stress and to examine the interaction between CSC-pretreated C. albicans and normal human gingival fibroblasts. Following exposure to CSC, C. albicans transition from blastospore to hyphal form increased. CSC-pretreated yeast cells became significantly (P<0.01 sensitive to oxidation but significantly (P<0.01 resistant to both osmotic and heat stress. CSC-pretreated C. albicans expressed high levels of chitin, with 2- to 8-fold recorded under hyphal conditions. CSC-pretreated C. albicans adhered better to the gingival fibroblasts, proliferated almost three times more and adapted into hyphae, while the gingival fibroblasts recorded a significantly (P<0.01 slow growth rate but a significantly higher level of IL-1β when in contact with CSC-pretreated C. albicans. CSC was thus able to modulate both C. albicans transition through the cell wall chitin content and the interaction between C. albicans and normal human gingival fibroblasts. These findings may be relevant to fungal infections in the oral cavity in smokers.

  19. DNA Repair in Human Cells Exposed to Combinations of Carcinogenic Agents

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    Setlow, R. B.; Ahmed, F. E.

    1980-01-01

    Normal human and XP2 fibroblasts were treated with UV plus UV-mimetic chemicals. The UV dose used was sufficient to saturate the UV excision repair system. Excision repair after combined treatments was estimated by unscheduled DNA synthesis, BrdUrd photolysis, and the loss of sites sensitive to a UV specific endonuclease. Since the repair of damage from UV and its mimetics is coordinately controlled we expected that there would be similar rate-limiting steps in the repair of UV and chemical damage and that after a combined treatment the total amount of repair would be the same as from UV or the chemicals separately. The expectation was not fulfilled. In normal cells repair after a combined treatment was additive whereas in XP cells repair after a combined treatment was usually less than after either agent separately. The chemicals tested were AAAF, DMBA-epoxide, 4NQO, and ICR-170.

  20. An Efficient Deterministic-Stochastic Model of the Human Body Exposed to ELF Electric Field

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    Anna Šušnjara

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the deterministic-stochastic model of the human body represented as cylindrical antenna illuminated by a low frequency electric field. Both analytical and numerical (Galerkin-Bubnov scheme of Boundary Element Method deterministic solutions of the problem are outlined. This contribution introduces the new perspective of the problem: the variability inherent to input parameters, such as the height of the body, the shape of the body, and the conductivity of body tissue, is propagated to the output of interest (induced axial current. The stochastic approach is based on the stochastic collocation (SC method. Computational examples show the mean trend of both analytically and numerically computed axial current with the confidence margins for different set of input random variables. The results point out the possibility of improving the efficiency in calculation of basic restriction parameter values in electromagnetic dosimetry.

  1. [Modulation of cardiac rhythms in humans exposed to extremely weak alternating magnetic fields].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lednev, V V; Belova, N A; Ermakov, A M; Akimov, E B; Tonevitskiĭ, A G

    2008-01-01

    The influence of extremely weak alternating magnetic fields (EW AMF) with amplitudes of magnetic fields homogeneous in amplitude. It was shown that the exposure of volunteers to different types of extremely weak alternating magnetic fields can both increase and decrease the magnitude of stress. In particular, the field tuned to the nuclear spins of hydrogen atoms (amplitude 1.6 microT, frequency 76 Hz) induces a decrease in the Baevsky's stress index, while the field tuned to the magnetic moments formed by the orbiting electrons in some atoms (amplitude 0.192 microT, frequency 3000 Hz) increases the stress index. The results obtained provide a possible explanation for the mechanism of adverse effects of some particular types of technogenic and natural extremely weak alternating magnetic fields on the human cardiovascular system.

  2. CYTOKINESIS-BLOCK MICRONUCLEUS ASSAY IN HUMAN GLIOMA CELLS EXPOSED TO RADIATION

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    Jerzy Slowinski

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Biological tests are efficient in reflecting the biological influences of several types of generally harmful exposures. The micronucleus assay is widely used in genotoxicity studies or studies on genomic damage in general. We present methodological aspects of cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay performed in human gliomas irradiated in vitro. Eight human glioblastoma cell lines obtained from DSMZ (Deutsche Sammlung von Mikroorganismen und Zellkulturen GmbH, Germany were gamma-irradiated (60Co over a dose range of 0-10 Gy. Cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay was performed to quantitate cytogenetic damage. The cells were fixed directly on dishes, stained with fluorochrome DAPI and evaluated under fluorescent and phase contrast microscope. The micronucleus frequency was expressed as a micronuclei (MN per binucleated cell (BNC ratio, calculated after scoring at least 100 BNC per dish. The frequency of spontaneous MN ranged from 0.17 to 0.613 (mean: 0.29 ± 0.14. After irradiation increase of MN frequency in the range of 0.312 - 2.241 (mean: 0.98 ± 0.68 was found at 10 Gy. Gliomas are extremely heterogenous in regard to cytogenetic effects of irradiation, as shown in this study by cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay. This test is easily performed on irradiated glioma cell lines and can assist in determining their radiosensitivity. However, in order to obtain reliable and reproducible results, precise criteria for MN scoring must be strictly followed. Simultaneous use of fluorescent and phase contrast equipment improves imaging of morphological details and can further optimize MN scoring.

  3. Acetylsalicylic acid exhibits anticlastogenic effects on cultured human lymphocytes exposed to doxorubicin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, Lusânia Maria Greggi; de Barros E Lima Bueno, Rafaela; da Luz Dias, Francisca; de Lourdes Pires Bianchi, Maria

    2007-01-10

    Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) with many pharmacological properties, such as anti-inflammatory, antipyretic and analgesic. Many studies have suggested the possible efficiency of ASA and other NSAIDs in preventing cancer. ASA could also have antimutagenic and antioxidant properties. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible clastogenic and anticlastogenic effects of different concentrations of ASA on doxorubicin-induced chromosomal aberrations in human lymphocytes. Human blood samples were obtained from six healthy, non-smoking volunteers; and the chromosomal aberration assay was carried out using conventional techniques. The parameters analyzed were mitotic index, total number of chromosomal aberrations and percentage of aberrant metaphases. The concentrations of ASA (25, 50 or 100 microg/mL) tested in combination with DXR (0.2 microg/mL) were established on the basis of the results of the mitotic index. The treatment with ASA alone was neither cytotoxic nor clastogenic (p>0.01). In lymphocyte cultures treated with different combinations of ASA and DXR, a significant decrease in the total number of chromosome aberrations was observed compared with DXR alone (p<0.01). This protective effect of ASA on DXR-induced chromosomal damage was obtained for all combinations, and it was most evident when ASA was at 25.0 microg/mL. In our experiments, ASA may have acted as an antioxidant and inhibited the chromosomal damage induced by the free radicals generated by DXR. The identification of compounds that could counteract the free radicals produced by doxorubicin could be of possible benefits against the potential harmful effects of anthracyclines. The results of this study show that there is a relevant need for more investigations in order to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the anticlastogenic effect of ASA.

  4. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate of human blood exposed to low-level laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Musawi, Mustafa S; Jaafar, M S; Al-Gailani, B; Ahmed, Naser M; Suhaimi, Fatanah M; Bakhsh, Muhammad

    2016-08-01

    This study is designed to investigate in vitro low-level laser (LLL) effects on rheological parameter, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), of human blood. The interaction mechanism between LLL radiation and blood is unclear. Therefore, research addresses the effects of LLL irradiation on human blood and this is essential to understanding how laser radiation interacts with biological cells and tissues. The blood samples were collected through venipuncture into EDTA-containing tubes as an anticoagulant. Each sample was divided into two equal aliquots to be used as a non-irradiated sample (control) and an irradiated sample. The aliquot was subjected to doses of 36, 54, 72 and 90 J/cm(2) with wavelengths of 405, 589 and 780 nm, with a radiation source at a fixed power density of 30 mW/cm(2). The ESR and red blood cell count and volume are measured after laser irradiation and compared with the non-irradiated samples. The maximum reduction in ESR is observed with radiation dose 72 J/cm(2) delivered with a 405-nm wavelength laser beam. Moreover, no hemolysis is observed under these irradiation conditions. In a separate protocol, ESR of separated RBCs re-suspended in irradiated plasma (7.6 ± 2.3 mm/h) is found to be significantly lower (by 51 %) than their counterpart re-suspended in non-irradiated plasma (15.0 ± 3.7 mm/h). These results indicate that ESR reduction is mainly due to the effects of LLL on the plasma composition that ultimately affect whole blood ESR.

  5. Recombinant human growth hormone improves cognitive capacity in a pain patient exposed to chronic opioids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodin, A; von Ehren, M; Skottheim, B; Grönbladh, A; Ortiz-Nieto, F; Raininko, R; Gordh, T; Nyberg, F

    2014-07-01

    During recent decades, the increasing use of opioids for chronic non-cancer pain has raised concerns regarding tolerance, addiction, and importantly cognitive dysfunction. Current research suggests that the somatotrophic axis could play an important role in cognitive function. Administration of growth hormone (GH) to GH-deficient humans and experimental animals has been shown to result in significant improvements in cognitive capacity. In this report, a patient with cognitive disabilities resulting from chronic treatment with opioids for neuropathic pain received recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) replacement therapy. A 61-year-old man presented with severe cognitive dysfunction after long-term methadone treatment for intercostal neuralgia and was diagnosed with GH insufficiency by GH releasing hormone-arginine testing. The effect of rhGH replacement therapy on his cognitive capacity and quality of life was investigated. The hippocampal volume was measured using magnetic resonance imaging, and the ratios of the major metabolites were calculated using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Cognitive testing revealed significant improvements in visuospatial cognitive function after rhGH. The hippocampal volume remained unchanged. In the right hippocampus, the N-acetylaspartate/creatine ratio (reflecting nerve cell function) was initially low but increased significantly during rhGH treatment, as did subjective cognitive, physical and emotional functioning. This case report indicates that rhGH replacement therapy could improve cognitive behaviour and well-being, as well as hippocampal metabolism and functioning in opioid-treated patients with chronic pain. The idea that GH could affect brain function and repair disabilities induced by long-term exposure to opioid analgesia is supported. © 2014 The Authors. The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Expression of advanced glycation end-products on sun-exposed and non-exposed cutaneous sites during the ageing process in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisan, Maria; Taulescu, Marian; Crisan, Diana; Cosgarea, Rodica; Parvu, Alina; Cãtoi, Cornel; Drugan, Tudor

    2013-01-01

    The glycation process is involved in both the intrinsic (individual, genetic) and extrinsic (ultraviolet light, polution and lifestyle) aging processes, and can be quantified at the epidermal or dermal level by histological, immunohistochemical (IHC), or imagistic methods. Our study is focused on a histological and immunohistological comparison of sun-protected regions versus sun-exposed regions from different age groups of skin phototype III subjects, related to the aging process. Skin samples collected from non-protected and UV protected regions of four experimental groups with different ages, were studied using histology and IHC methods for AGE-CML [N(epsilon)-(carboxymethyl)lysine]. A semi-quantitative assessment of the CML expression in the microvascular endothelium and dermal fibroblasts was performed. The Pearson one-way ANOVA was used to compare data between the groups. In the dermis of sun-exposed skin, the number and the intensity of CML positive cells in both fibroblasts and endothelial cells (p<0.05) was higher compared to sun-protected skin, and was significantly increased in older patients. The sun-exposed areas had a more than 10% higher AGE-CML score than the protected areas. No statistically significant correlation was observed between the histological score and the IHC expression of CML. We concluded that in healthy integument, the accumulation of final glycation products increases with age and is amplified by ultraviolet exposure. The study provides new knowledge on differences of AGE-CML between age groups and protected and unprotected areas and emphasizes that endothelium and perivascular area are most affected, justifying combined topical and systemic therapies.

  7. Expression of advanced glycation end-products on sun-exposed and non-exposed cutaneous sites during the ageing process in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Crisan

    Full Text Available The glycation process is involved in both the intrinsic (individual, genetic and extrinsic (ultraviolet light, polution and lifestyle aging processes, and can be quantified at the epidermal or dermal level by histological, immunohistochemical (IHC, or imagistic methods. Our study is focused on a histological and immunohistological comparison of sun-protected regions versus sun-exposed regions from different age groups of skin phototype III subjects, related to the aging process. Skin samples collected from non-protected and UV protected regions of four experimental groups with different ages, were studied using histology and IHC methods for AGE-CML [N(epsilon-(carboxymethyllysine]. A semi-quantitative assessment of the CML expression in the microvascular endothelium and dermal fibroblasts was performed. The Pearson one-way ANOVA was used to compare data between the groups. In the dermis of sun-exposed skin, the number and the intensity of CML positive cells in both fibroblasts and endothelial cells (p<0.05 was higher compared to sun-protected skin, and was significantly increased in older patients. The sun-exposed areas had a more than 10% higher AGE-CML score than the protected areas. No statistically significant correlation was observed between the histological score and the IHC expression of CML. We concluded that in healthy integument, the accumulation of final glycation products increases with age and is amplified by ultraviolet exposure. The study provides new knowledge on differences of AGE-CML between age groups and protected and unprotected areas and emphasizes that endothelium and perivascular area are most affected, justifying combined topical and systemic therapies.

  8. Alcohol odor elicits appetitive facial expressions in human neonates prenatally exposed to the drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faas, Ana E; March, Samanta M; Moya, Pedro R; Molina, Juan C

    2015-09-01

    Specific memories arise during prenatal life as a function of fetal processing of chemosensory stimuli present in the amniotic fluid. Preclinical studies indicate that fetal exposure to alcohol modifies subsequent neonatal and infantile responsiveness towards the sensory attributes of the drug. It has been previously demonstrated that 1-2day-old human neonates recognize ethanol odor as a function of moderate maternal alcohol consumption during gestation. In the present study 7-14day-old newborns were assessed in terms of behavioral responsiveness to alcohol's chemosensory attributes or to a novel odor (lemon). These newborns were representative of mothers that exhibited infrequent or frequent alcohol drinking patterns during pregnancy. Different clinical assessments indicated that all newborns did not suffer congenital or genetic diseases and that they were completely healthy when behaviorally evaluated. Testing was defined by brief presentations of ethanol or lemon odorants. Two sequences of olfactory stimulation were employed. One sequence included five initial trials defined by ethanol odor stimulation followed by one trial with lemon and five additional trials with the scent of the drug (EtOH-Lem-EtOH). The alternative sequence (Lem-EtOH-Lem) was primarily defined by lemon olfactory exposure. The dependent variables under analysis were duration and frequency of overall body movements and of facial expressions categorized as aversive or appetitive. The main results of this study were as follows: a) at the end of the testing procedure and independent of the sequence of olfactory stimulation, babies born to frequent drinkers exhibited signs of distress as operationalized through higher durations of aversive facial expressions, b) despite this effect, babies born to frequent drinkers relative to newborns delivered by infrequent drinkers exhibited significantly higher frequencies of appetitive facial responses when primarily stimulated with ethanol odor (Et

  9. c-jun gene expression in human cells exposed to either ionizing radiation or hydrogen peroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collart, F.R.; Horio, M.; Huberman, E.

    1993-06-01

    We investigated the role of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROIs) and protein kinase C (PKC) in radiation- and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-evoked c-jun gene expression in human HL-205 cells. This induction of c-jun gene expression could be prevented by pretreatment of the cells with Nacetylcysteine (an antioxidant) or H7 (a PKC and PKA inhibitor) but not by HA1004, a PKA inhibitor, suggesting a role for ROls and PKC in mediating c-jun gene expression. We also investigated potential differences in c-jun gene expression in a panel of normal and tumor cells untreated or treated with ionizing radiation or H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Treatment with radiation or H{sub 2}O{sub 2} produced a varied response, from some reduction to an increase of more than an order of magnitude in the steady-state level of c-jun mRNA. These data indicate that although induction of c-jun may be a common response to ionizing radiation and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, this response was reduced or absent in some cell types.

  10. Osteoblastic differentiation and stress response of human mesenchymal stem cells exposed to alternating current electric fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaplan David L

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Electric fields are integral to many biological events, from maintaining cellular homeostasis to embryonic development to healing. The application of electric fields offers substantial therapeutic potential, while optimal dosing regimens and the underlying mechanisms responsible for the positive clinical impact are poorly understood. Methods The purpose of this study was to track the differentiation profile and stress response of human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs undergoing osteogenic differentiation during exposure to a 20 mV/cm, 60 kHz electric field. Morphological and biochemical changes were imaged using endogenous two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF and quantitatively assessed through eccentricity calculations and extraction of the redox ratio from NADH, FAD and lipofuscin contributions. Real time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reactions (RT-PCR were used to track osteogenic differentiation markers, namely alkaline phosphatase (ALP and collagen type 1 (col1, and stress response markers, such as heat shock protein 27 (hsp27 and heat shock protein 70 (hsp70. Comparisons of collagen deposition between the stimulated hMSCs and controls were examined through second harmonic generation (SHG imaging. Results Quantitative differences in cell morphology, as described through an eccentricity ratio, were found on days 2 and days 5 (p Conclusions Electrical stimulation is a useful tool to improve hMSC osteogenic differentiation, while heat shock proteins may reveal underlying mechanisms, and optical non-invasive imaging may be used to monitor the induced morphological and biochemical changes.

  11. Induced magnetic force in human heads exposed to 4 T MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruiliang; Wang, Gene-Jack; Goldstein, Rita Z; Caparelli, Elisabeth C; Volkow, Nora D; Fowler, Joanna S; Tomasi, Dardo

    2010-04-01

    To map the distribution of the magnetic force induced in the human head during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 4 T for a large group of healthy volunteers. The magnetic field distribution in the head of 100 men and 18 women was mapped using phase mapping techniques. Statistical parametric mapping methods using a family-wise error (FWE) corrected threshold P magnetic force. The strength of the magnetic force density in the head was lower than 11.5 +/- 5.3 N/m(3) (right eyeball). The strength of the magnetic force density induced in occipital cortex varied linearly with the x-rotation (pitch) angle. We found that the induced magnetic force is highly significant in the eyeballs, orbitofrontal and temporal cortices, subcallosal gyrus, anterior cingulate as well as midbrain and brainstem (pons), regardless of subjects' age or gender. The maximum induced magnetic force was 6 x 10(5) times weaker than the gravitational force; thus, biological effects of the magnetic force during imaging are not expected to be significant. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Hearing Loss in Perinatally Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected and Human Immunodeficiency Virus -Exposed but Uninfected Children and Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torre, Peter; Zeldow, Bret; Hoffman, Howard J.; Buchanan, Ashley; Siberry, George K.; Rice, Mabel; Sirois, Patricia A.; Williams, Paige L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Little is known about hearing loss in children with HIV infection (HIV+). We examined the prevalence of hearing loss in perinatally HIV+ and HIV-exposed but uninfected (HEU) children, compared these to the percentage with hearing loss in the general population, and evaluated possible risk factors for hearing loss in HIV+ and HEU children. Methods Audiometric examinations were completed in children who met any pre-specified criteria for possible hearing loss. The hearing examination consisted of a tympanogram in each ear and pure-tone air-conduction threshold testing from 500 through 4000 Hz. Hearing loss was defined as the pure-tone average over these frequencies ≥20 dB hearing level (HL). The associations of demographic, parent/caregiver, HIV disease, and HIV treatment with hearing loss were evaluated with univariate and multivariable logistic regression models. Results Hearing testing was completed in 231 children (145 HIV+ and 86 HEU). Hearing loss occurred in 20.0% of HIV+ children and 10.5% of HEU children. After adjusting for caregiver education level, HIV infection was associated with increased odds of hearing loss [adjusted odds ratio (aOR)=2.13, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.95–4.76, p=0.07]. Among HIV+ children, those with a CDC Class C diagnosis had over twice the odds of hearing loss (aOR=2.47, 95% CI: 1.04–5.87, p=0.04). The prevalence of hearing loss was higher in both HIV+ and HEU children compared with NHANES III children. Conclusions Hearing loss was more common in both HIV+ and HEU children than in healthy children. More advanced HIV illness increased the risk of hearing loss in HIV+ children. PMID:22549437

  13. Autophagic-lysosomal dysregulation downstream of cathepsin B inactivation in human skin fibroblasts exposed to UVA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamore, Sarah D; Wondrak, Georg T

    2012-01-01

    Recently, using 2D-DIGE proteomics we have identified cathepsin B as a novel target of UVA in human Hs27 skin fibroblasts. In response to chronic exposure to noncytotoxic doses of UVA (9.9 J cm(-2), twice a week, 3 weeks), photooxidative impairment of cathepsin B enzymatic activity occurred with accumulation of autofluorescent aggregates colocalizing with lysosomes, an effect mimicked by pharmacological antagonism of cathepsin B using the selective inhibitor CA074Me. Here, we have further explored the mechanistic involvement of cathepsin B inactivation in UVA-induced autophagic-lysosomal alterations using autophagy-directed PCR expression array analysis as a discovery tool. Consistent with lysosomal expansion, UVA upregulated cellular protein levels of the lysosomal marker glycoprotein Lamp-1, and increased levels of the lipidated autophagosomal membrane constituent LC3-II were detected. UVA did not alter expression of beclin 1 (BECN1), an essential factor for initiation of autophagy, but upregulation of p62 (sequestosome 1, SQSTM1), a selective autophagy substrate, and α-synuclein (SNCA), an autophagic protein substrate and aggresome component, was observed at the mRNA and protein level. Moreover, UVA downregulated transglutaminase-2 (TGM2), an essential enzyme involved in autophagolysosome maturation. Strikingly, UVA effects on Lamp-1, LC3-II, beclin 1, p62, α-synuclein, and transglutaminase-2 were mimicked by CA074Me treatment. Taken together, our data suggest that UVA-induced autophagic-lysosomal alterations occur as a consequence of impaired autophagic flux downstream of cathepsin B inactivation, a novel molecular mechanism potentially involved in UVA-induced skin photodamage. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry and Owner Societies 2012

  14. Endogenous Protein Interactome of Human UDP-Glucuronosyltransferases Exposed by Untargeted Proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouleau, Michèle; Audet-Delage, Yannick; Desjardins, Sylvie; Rouleau, Mélanie; Girard-Bock, Camille; Guillemette, Chantal

    2017-01-01

    The conjugative metabolism mediated by UDP-glucuronosyltransferase enzymes (UGTs) significantly influences the bioavailability and biological responses of endogenous molecule substrates and xenobiotics including drugs. UGTs participate in the regulation of cellular homeostasis by limiting stress induced by toxic molecules, and by controlling hormonal signaling networks. Glucuronidation is highly regulated at genomic, transcriptional, post-transcriptional and post-translational levels. However, the UGT protein interaction network, which is likely to influence glucuronidation, has received little attention. We investigated the endogenous protein interactome of human UGT1A enzymes in main drug metabolizing non-malignant tissues where UGT expression is most prevalent, using an unbiased proteomics approach. Mass spectrometry analysis of affinity-purified UGT1A enzymes and associated protein complexes in liver, kidney and intestine tissues revealed an intricate interactome linking UGT1A enzymes to multiple metabolic pathways. Several proteins of pharmacological importance such as transferases (including UGT2 enzymes), transporters and dehydrogenases were identified, upholding a potential coordinated cellular response to small lipophilic molecules and drugs. Furthermore, a significant cluster of functionally related enzymes involved in fatty acid β-oxidation, as well as in the glycolysis and glycogenolysis pathways were enriched in UGT1A enzymes complexes. Several partnerships were confirmed by co-immunoprecipitations and co-localization by confocal microscopy. An enhanced accumulation of lipid droplets in a kidney cell model overexpressing the UGT1A9 enzyme supported the presence of a functional interplay. Our work provides unprecedented evidence for a functional interaction between glucuronidation and bioenergetic metabolism.

  15. Transcriptome analysis of the human T lymphocyte cell line Jurkat and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells exposed to deoxynivalenol (DON): New mechanistic insights

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    Katika, Madhumohan R. [RIKILT-Institute of Food Safety, Wageningen University and Research Centre, Wageningen (Netherlands); Department of Health Risk Analysis and Toxicology, Maastricht University (Netherlands); Netherlands Toxicogenomics Centre (Netherlands); Hendriksen, Peter J.M. [RIKILT-Institute of Food Safety, Wageningen University and Research Centre, Wageningen (Netherlands); Netherlands Toxicogenomics Centre (Netherlands); Shao, Jia [RIKILT-Institute of Food Safety, Wageningen University and Research Centre, Wageningen (Netherlands); Department of Health Risk Analysis and Toxicology, Maastricht University (Netherlands); Netherlands Toxicogenomics Centre (Netherlands); Loveren, Henk van [Department of Health Risk Analysis and Toxicology, Maastricht University (Netherlands); National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven (Netherlands); Netherlands Toxicogenomics Centre (Netherlands); Peijnenburg, Ad, E-mail: ad.peijnenburg@wur.nl [RIKILT-Institute of Food Safety, Wageningen University and Research Centre, Wageningen (Netherlands); Netherlands Toxicogenomics Centre (Netherlands)

    2012-10-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) or vomitoxin is a commonly encountered type-B trichothecene mycotoxin, produced by Fusarium species predominantly found in cereals and grains. DON is known to exert toxic effects on the gastrointestinal, reproductive and neuroendocrine systems, and particularly on the immune system. Depending on dose and exposure time, it can either stimulate or suppress immune function. The main objective of this study was to obtain a deeper insight into DON-induced effects on lymphoid cells. For this, we exposed the human T-lymphocyte cell line Jurkat and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to various concentrations of DON for various times and examined gene expression changes by DNA microarray analysis. Jurkat cells were exposed to 0.25 and 0.5 μM DON for 3, 6 and 24 h. Biological interpretation of the microarray data indicated that DON affects various processes in these cells: It upregulates genes involved in ribosome structure and function, RNA/protein synthesis and processing, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, calcium-mediated signaling, mitochondrial function, oxidative stress, the NFAT and NF-κB/TNF-α pathways, T cell activation and apoptosis. The effects of DON on the expression of genes involved in ER stress, NFAT activation and apoptosis were confirmed by qRT-PCR. Other biochemical experiments confirmed that DON activates calcium-dependent proteins such as calcineurin and M-calpain that are known to be involved in T cell activation and apoptosis. Induction of T cell activation was also confirmed by demonstrating that DON activates NFATC1 and induces its translocation from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. For the gene expression profiling of PBMCs, cells were exposed to 2 and 4 μM DON for 6 and 24 h. Comparison of the Jurkat microarray data with those obtained with PBMCs showed that most of the processes affected by DON in the Jurkat cell line were also affected in the PBMCs. -- Highlights: ► The human T cell line Jurkat and human

  16. Increased medial olivocochlear reflex strength in normal-hearing, noise-exposed humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishan Bhatt

    Full Text Available Research suggests that college-aged adults are vulnerable to tinnitus and hearing loss due to exposure to traumatic levels of noise on a regular basis. Recent human studies have associated exposure to high noise exposure background (NEB, i.e., routine noise exposure with the reduced cochlear output and impaired speech processing ability in subjects with clinically normal hearing sensitivity. While the relationship between NEB and the functions of the auditory afferent neurons are studied in the literature, little is known about the effects of NEB on functioning of the auditory efferent system. The objective of the present study was to investigate the relationship between medial olivocochlear reflex (MOCR strength and NEB in subjects with clinically normal hearing sensitivity. It was hypothesized that subjects with high NEB would exhibit reduced afferent input to the MOCR circuit which would subsequently lead to reduced strength of the MOCR. In normal-hearing listeners, the study examined (1 the association between NEB and baseline click-evoked otoacoustic emissions (CEOAEs and (2 the association between NEB and MOCR strength. The MOCR was measured using CEOAEs evoked by 60 dB pSPL linear clicks in a contralateral acoustic stimulation (CAS-off and CAS-on (a broadband noise at 60 dB SPL condition. Participants with at least 6 dB signal-to-noise ratio (SNR in the CAS-off and CAS-on conditions were included for analysis. A normalized CEOAE inhibition index was calculated to express MOCR strength in a percentage value. NEB was estimated using a validated questionnaire. The results showed that NEB was not associated with the baseline CEOAE amplitude (r = -0.112, p = 0.586. Contrary to the hypothesis, MOCR strength was positively correlated with NEB (r = 0.557, p = 0.003. NEB remained a significant predictor of MOCR strength (β = 2.98, t(19 = 3.474, p = 0.003 after the unstandardized coefficient was adjusted to control for effects of smoking, sound

  17. Secretory TAT-peptide-mediated protein transduction of LIF receptor α-chain distal cytoplasmic motifs into human myeloid HL-60 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Q. [Department of Hyperbaric Medicine, No. 401 Hospital of PLA, Qingdao (China); Department of Histology and Embryology, Faculty of Basic Medical Sciences, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China); Xiong, J. [Department of Histology and Embryology, Faculty of Basic Medical Sciences, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China); Lu, J. [Office of Medical Education, Training Department, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China); Xu, S. [Department of Histology and Embryology, Faculty of Basic Medical Sciences, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China); Li, Y. [State Food and Drug Administration of China,Huangdao Branch, Qingdao (China); Zhong, X.P.; Gao, G.K. [Department of Hyperbaric Medicine, No. 401 Hospital of PLA, Qingdao (China); Liu, H.Q. [2Department of Histology and Embryology, Faculty of Basic Medical Sciences, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China)

    2012-06-22

    The distal cytoplasmic motifs of leukemia inhibitory factor receptor α-chain (LIFRα-CT3) can independently induce intracellular myeloid differentiation in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells by gene transfection; however, there are significant limitations in the potential clinical use of these motifs due to liposome-derived genetic modifications. To produce a potentially therapeutic LIFRα-CT3 with cell-permeable activity, we constructed a eukaryotic expression pcDNA3.0-TAT-CT3-cMyc plasmid with a signal peptide (ss) inserted into the N-terminal that codes for an ss-TAT-CT3-cMyc fusion protein. The stable transfection of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells via this vector and subsequent selection by Geneticin resulted in cell lines that express and secrete TAT-CT3-cMyc. The spent medium of pcDNA3.0-TAT-CT3-cMyc-transfected CHO cells could be purified using a cMyc-epitope-tag agarose affinity chromatography column and could be detected via SDS-PAGE, with antibodies against cMyc-tag. The direct administration of TAT-CT3-cMyc to HL-60 cell culture media caused the enrichment of CT3-cMyc in the cytoplasm and nucleus within 30 min and led to a significant reduction of viable cells (P < 0.05) 8 h after exposure. The advantages of using this mammalian expression system include the ease of generating TAT fusion proteins that are adequately transcripted and the potential for a sustained production of such proteins in vitro for future AML therapy.

  18. CD5 molecule-like and transthyretin as putative biomarkers of chronic myeloid leukemia - an insight from the proteomic analysis of human plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatima, Iram; Sadaf, Saima; Musharraf, Syed Ghulam; Hashmi, Naghma; Akhtar, Muhammad Waheed

    2017-01-01

    Better and sensitive biomarkers are needed to help understand the mechanism of disease onset, progression, prognosis and monitoring of the therapeutic response. Aim of this study was to identify the candidate circulating markers of chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukemia (CP-CML) manifestations, having potential to develop into predictive- or monitoring-biomarkers. A proteomic approach, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis in conjunction with mass spectrometry (2DE-MS), was employed for this purpose. Based on the spot intensity measurements, six proteins were found to be consistently dysregulated in CP-CML subjects compared to the healthy controls [false discovery rate (FDR) threshold ≤0.05]. These were identified as α-1-antichymotrypsin, α-1-antitrypsin, CD5 molecule-like, stress-induced phosphoprotein 1, vitamin D binding protein isoform 1 and transthyretin by MS analysis [PMF score ≥79; data accessible via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002757]. Quantitative ELISA, used for validation of candidate proteins both in the pre-treated and nilotinib-treated CP-CML cases, demonstrate that CD5 molecule-like, transthyretin and alpha-1-antitrypsin may serve as useful predictive markers and aid in monitoring the response of TKI-based therapy (ANOVA p < 0.0001). Two of the circulating marker proteins, identified in this study, had not previously been associated with chronic- or acute-phase myeloid leukemia. Exploration of their probable association with CP-CML, in a larger study cohort, may add to our understanding of the disease mechanism besides developing clinically useful biomarkers in future. PMID:28117336

  19. Secretory TAT-peptide-mediated protein transduction of LIF receptor α-chain distal cytoplasmic motifs into human myeloid HL-60 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q. Sun

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The distal cytoplasmic motifs of leukemia inhibitory factor receptor α-chain (LIFRα-CT3 can independently induce intracellular myeloid differentiation in acute myeloid leukemia (AML cells by gene transfection; however, there are significant limitations in the potential clinical use of these motifs due to liposome-derived genetic modifications. To produce a potentially therapeutic LIFRα-CT3 with cell-permeable activity, we constructed a eukaryotic expression pcDNA3.0-TAT-CT3-cMyc plasmid with a signal peptide (ss inserted into the N-terminal that codes for an ss-TAT-CT3-cMyc fusion protein. The stable transfection of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO cells via this vector and subsequent selection by Geneticin resulted in cell lines that express and secrete TAT-CT3-cMyc. The spent medium of pcDNA3.0-TAT-CT3-cMyc-transfected CHO cells could be purified using a cMyc-epitope-tag agarose affinity chromatography column and could be detected via SDS-PAGE, with antibodies against cMyc-tag. The direct administration of TAT-CT3-cMyc to HL-60 cell culture media caused the enrichment of CT3-cMyc in the cytoplasm and nucleus within 30 min and led to a significant reduction of viable cells (P < 0.05 8 h after exposure. The advantages of using this mammalian expression system include the ease of generating TAT fusion proteins that are adequately transcripted and the potential for a sustained production of such proteins in vitro for future AML therapy.

  20. [Chronic myeloid leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usui, Noriko

    2014-06-01

    More than 10 years have passed since imatinib as a first developed BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) introduced in treatment of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). In globally, there are tremendous numbers of patients on imatinib therapy. Based upon randomized trials comparing second generation TKIs such as dasatinib and nilotinib versus imatinib, both TKIs produce faster and deeper response than imatinib and they can be selected as first-line therapy for newly diagnosed chronic phase of CML (CP-CML) as imatinib. Bosutinib is a potent for imatinib resistant/intolerant CP-CML and can be used as second or third-line therapy. Ponatinib is the only clinically available TKI that has activity against the T315 mutation that is resistant to all other TKIs. Currently, a choice among these potent TKIs should take into consideration the drug side effect profiles and the patient's comorbidities.

  1. Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Childhood

    OpenAIRE

    Yöntem, Ahmet; Bayram, İbrahim

    2018-01-01

    Acute leukemia is basically divided intoacute lymphoblastic leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia. About 15-20% ofchildhood leukemia is caused by acute myeloid leukemia.AML is classified according to morphological, cytochemical and immunophenotypiccharacteristics. AML patients may present with various clinical signsand symptoms due to leukemic cell infiltration. Age, gender, race, structuralfeatures of the patient and cytogenetic abnormalities are important factorsaffecting prognosis in AML. Th...

  2. Broad-spectrum sunscreens prevent the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines in human keratinocytes exposed to ultraviolet A and phototoxic lomefloxacin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinhardt, P.; Cybulski, M. [Lasers and Electro-Optics Div., Consumer and Clinical Radiation Protection Bureau, Product Safety Program, Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety Branch, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)], E-mail: pascale_reinhardt@hc-sc.gc.ca; Miller, S.M.; Ferrarotto, C.; Wilkins, R. [Radiobiology Div., Consumer and Clinical Radiation Protection Bureau, Product Safety Program, Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety Branch, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Deslauriers, Y. [Lasers and Electro-Optics Div., Consumer and Clinical Radiation Protection Bureau, Product Safety Program, Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety Branch, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2006-02-15

    The combination of phototoxic drugs and ultraviolet (UV) radiation can trigger the release of proinflammatory cytokines. The present study measured the ability of sunscreens to prevent cytokine secretion in human keratinocytes following cotreatment of these cells with a known photoreactive drug and UVA. Keratinocytes were treated for 1 h with increasing concentrations of lomefloxacin (LOM) or norfloxacin (NOR), exposed to 15 J/cm{sup 2} UVA, and incubated for 24 h. NOR, owing to the absence of a fluorine atom in position 8, was non-phototoxic and used as a negative control. Cell viability and the release of 3 cytokines were assessed, namely interleukin-1{alpha} (IL-1{alpha}), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and tumour necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}). The measurement of these cytokines may be a useful tool for detecting photoreactive compounds. To measure their ability to prevent cytokine secretion, various sunscreens were inserted between the UVA source and the cells. Treatment with NOR, NOR plus UVA, or LOM had no effect on the cells. LOM plus UVA, however, had an effect on cell viability and on cytokine secretion. IL-1{alpha} levels increased with LOM concentration. The release of TNF-{alpha} and IL-6 followed the same pattern at lower concentrations of LOM but peaked at 15 {mu}mol/L and decreased at higher concentrations. Sunscreens protected the cells from the effects of LOM plus UVA, as cell viability and levels of cytokines remained the same as in the control cells. In conclusion, the application of broad-spectrum sunscreen by individuals exposed to UVA radiation may prevent phototoxic reactions initiated by drugs such as LOM. (author)

  3. Evaluation of Genotoxic and Cytotoxic Effects in Human Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes Exposed In Vitro to Neonicotinoid Insecticides News

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón-Segura, María Elena; Gómez-Arroyo, Sandra; Villalobos-Pietrini, Rafael; Martínez-Valenzuela, Carmen; Carbajal-López, Yolanda; Calderón-Ezquerro, María del Carmen; Cortés-Eslava, Josefina; García-Martínez, Rocío; Flores-Ramírez, Diana; Rodríguez-Romero, María Isabel; Méndez-Pérez, Patricia; Bañuelos-Ruíz, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    Calypso (thiacloprid), Poncho (clothianidin), Gaucho (imidacloprid), and Jade (imidacloprid) are commercial neonicotinoid insecticides, a new class of agrochemicals in México. However, genotoxic and cytotoxic studies have not been performed. In the present study, human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) were exposed in vitro to different concentrations of the four insecticides. The genotoxic and cytotoxic effects were evaluated using the alkaline comet and trypan blue dye exclusion assays. DNA damage was evaluated using two genotoxicity parameters: tail length and comet frequency. Exposure to 9.5 × 10−6 to 5.7 × 10−5 M Jade; 2.8 × 10−4 to 1.7 × 10−3 M Gaucho; 0.6 × 10−1 to 1.4 × 10−1 M Calypso; 1.2 × 10−1 to 9.5 × 10−1 M Poncho for 2 h induced a significant increase DNA damage with a concentration-dependent relationship. Jade was the most genotoxic of the four insecticides studied. Cytotoxicity was observed in cells exposed to 18 × 10−3 M Jade, 2.0 × 10−3 M Gaucho, 2.0 × 10−1 M Calypso, 1.07 M Poncho, and cell death occurred at 30 × 10−3 M Jade, 3.3 × 10−3 M Gaucho, 2.8 × 10−1 M Calypso, and 1.42 M Poncho. This study provides the first report of genotoxic and cytotoxic effects in PBL following in vitro exposure to commercial neonicotinoid insecticides. PMID:22545045

  4. Evaluation of Genotoxic and Cytotoxic Effects in Human Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes Exposed In Vitro to Neonicotinoid Insecticides News

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Elena Calderón-Segura

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Calypso (thiacloprid, Poncho (clothianidin, Gaucho (imidacloprid, and Jade (imidacloprid are commercial neonicotinoid insecticides, a new class of agrochemicals in México. However, genotoxic and cytotoxic studies have not been performed. In the present study, human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL were exposed in vitro to different concentrations of the four insecticides. The genotoxic and cytotoxic effects were evaluated using the alkaline comet and trypan blue dye exclusion assays. DNA damage was evaluated using two genotoxicity parameters: tail length and comet frequency. Exposure to 9.5×10-6 to 5.7×10-5 M Jade; 2.8×10-4 to 1.7×10-3 M Gaucho; 0.6×10-1 to 1.4×10-1 M Calypso; 1.2×10-1 to 9.5×10-1 M Poncho for 2 h induced a significant increase DNA damage with a concentration-dependent relationship. Jade was the most genotoxic of the four insecticides studied. Cytotoxicity was observed in cells exposed to 18×10-3 M Jade, 2.0×10-3 M Gaucho, 2.0×10-1 M Calypso, 1.07 M Poncho, and cell death occurred at 30×10-3 M Jade, 3.3×10-3 M Gaucho, 2.8×10-1 M Calypso, and 1.42 M Poncho. This study provides the first report of genotoxic and cytotoxic effects in PBL following in vitro exposure to commercial neonicotinoid insecticides.

  5. Particulate matter adheres to human hair exposed to severe aerial pollution: consequences for certain hair surface properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galliano, A; Ye, C; Su, F; Wang, C; Wang, Y; Liu, C; Wagle, A; Guerin, M; Flament, F; Steel, A

    2017-07-26

    The deposit and adherence of particulate matter (PM) from aerial pollution onto the surface of human hair is a poorly studied phenomenon. (i) To reproduce in vitro the deposit of known PM on standardized hair swatches in a closed box, (ii) to compare in vitro data with those obtained under 'real-life' conditions of severe aerial pollution and (iii) to assess the changes of the hair surface properties, potentially caused by the adherence of airborne PM onto the hair. In vitro: a PM was sprayed onto untreated or sebum-coated hair swatches. Real-life conditions: other swatches were exposed to a severely polluted environment, for 24 to 72 h, in Baoding (PR China). In both cases, swatches were examined using scanning electron microscopy. The shine, the frictional properties and the level of metals were measured and compared to those same properties for the unexposed swatches. This work clearly indicates that, under real-life conditions, a large number of PM of various sizes are deposited onto the hair surface. This phenomenon is increased by the presence of sebum and longer exposure times. The in vitro level of PM deposited onto the hair surface is comparable to the in vivo level. The presence of sebum seems to favour the deposit of larger PM. The shine of the exposed swatches is significantly decreased, whereas their respective friction coefficients are significantly increased. Both the presence of sebum and length of exposure time increased the amount of analysed metals present on the exposed hair surface (Al, Fe, Cu, Ba and Zn). This work indicates that a very high amount (e.g. billions) of PM can be deposited on a full head of hair for subjects living in a severely aerially polluted environment. This process can be reproduced in vitro. In real-life, pollution has a strong impact on hair surface properties, leading to a modification of the visual aspect (loss of shine) and the alteration of hair surface (increase in friction force). This work may be used to pave the

  6. TLR3 and Rig-Like Receptor on Myeloid Dendritic Cells and Rig-Like Receptor on Human NK Cells Are Both Mandatory for Production of IFN-γ in Response to Double-Stranded RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrot, Ivan; Deauvieau, Florence; Massacrier, Catherine; Hughes, Nicola; Garrone, Pierre; Durand, Isabelle; Demaria, Olivier; Viaud, Nicolas; Gauthier, Laurent; Blery, Mathieu; Bonnefoy-Berard, Nathalie; Morel, Yannis; Tschopp, Jurg; Alexopoulou, Lena; Trinchieri, Giorgio; Paturel, Carine; Caux, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    Cross-talk between NK cells and dendritic cells (DCs) is critical for the potent therapeutic response to dsRNA, but the receptors involved remained controversial. We show in this paper that two dsRNAs, polyadenylic-polyuridylic acid and polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid [poly(I:C)], similarly engaged human TLR3, whereas only poly(I:C) triggered human RIG-I and MDA5. Both dsRNA enhanced NK cell activation within PBMCs but only poly(I:C) induced IFN-γ. Although myeloid DCs (mDCs) were required for NK cell activation, induction of cytolytic potential and IFN-γ production did not require contact with mDCs but was dependent on type I IFN and IL-12, respectively. Poly(I:C) but not polyadenylic-polyuridylic acid synergized with mDC-derived IL-12 for IFN-γ production by acting directly on NK cells. Finally, the requirement of both TLR3 and Rig-like receptor (RLR) on mDCs and RLRs but not TLR3 on NK cells for IFN-γ production was demonstrated using TLR3- and Cardif-deficient mice and human RIG-I–specific activator. Thus, we report the requirement of cotriggering TLR3 and RLR on mDCs and RLRs on NK cells for a pathogen product to induce potent innate cell activation. PMID:20639488

  7. Induction of anchorage-independent growth in primary human cells exposed to protons or HZE ions separately or in dual exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, B M; Cuomo, N C; Bennett, P V

    2005-10-01

    Travelers on space missions will be exposed to a complex radiation environment that includes protons and heavy charged particles. Since protons are present at much higher levels than are heavy ions, the most likely scenario for cellular radiation exposure will be proton exposure followed by a hit by a heavy ion. Although the effects of individual ion species on human cells are being investigated extensively, little is known about the effects of exposure to both radiation types. One useful measure of mammalian cell damage is induction of the ability to grow in a semi-solid agar medium highly inhibitory to the growth of normal human cells, termed neoplastic transformation. Using primary human cells, we evaluated induction of soft-agar growth and survival of cells exposed to protons only or to heavy charged particles (600 MeV/nucleon silicon) only as well as of cells exposed to protons followed after a 4-day interval by silicon ions. Both ions alone efficiently transformed the human cells to anchorage-independent growth. Initial experiments indicate that the dose responses for neoplastic transformation of cells exposed to protons and then after 4 days to silicon ions appear similar to that of cells exposed to silicon ions alone.

  8. Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the Flu Vaccine? Eating Disorders Arrhythmias Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) KidsHealth > For Parents > Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) ... Treatment Coping en español Leucemia mieloide aguda About Leukemia Leukemia is a type of cancer that affects ...

  9. Treatment Options for Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  10. Stages of Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  11. Treatment Option Overview (Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  12. General Information about Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  13. New Treatment Approved for Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 167596.html New Treatment Approved for Acute Myeloid Leukemia Vyxeos combines two previously approved drugs To use ... for certain high-risk types of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). AML is an aggressive blood cancer that ...

  14. Neurological Complications Of Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia: Any ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , of the neurological deficits complicating chronic myeloid leukaemia. Method: Using patients\\' case folders and haematological malignancy register all cases of chronic myeloid leukaemia seen in Jos University Teaching Hospital between July ...

  15. 8-Chloro-Adenosine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-08

    Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsed Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myeloproliferative Disorder

  16. Human Biomonitoring Data from Mercury Exposed Miners in Six Artisanal Small-Scale Gold Mining Areas in Asia and Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Baeuml

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: In artisanal small-scale gold mining (ASGM areas in many developing countries, mercury (Hg is used to extract gold from ore. Data of 1250 participants from Indonesia, Mongolia, Philippines, Tanzania, and Zimbabwe were combined to analyze the relation between exposure in ASGM areas and body burden. Methods: Four groups were selected relating to their intensity of contact with mercury: (i a non-exposed control group; (ii a low exposed group with participants only living in mining areas, but not working as miners; (iii a medium exposed group, miners living in exposed areas and working with mercury without smelting amalgam; and (iv a high exposed group, miners living in exposed areas and smelting amalgam. Results: Compared to the non-exposed control group, participants living and/ or miners working in highly exposed areas have significantly higher concentration of total mercury in urine, hair and blood (p-value < 0.001. The median mercury value in urine in the control group is < 0.2 µg/L. In the high exposed group of amalgam smelters, the median in urine is 12.0 µg/L. The median in blood in the control group is < 0.93 µg/L. The median level in blood of the high exposed group is 7.56 µg/L. The median for mercury in hair samples from the control group is 0.21 µg/g. In the high exposed group the median hair concentration is 2.4 µg/g hair. Mercury levels also differ considerably between the countries, reflecting a diverse background burden due to different fish eating habits and different work place methods. Conclusions: A high percentage of exposed individuals had levels above threshold values. These high levels of mercury are likely to be related with serious health problems.

  17. Genomic Profiling of a Human Leukemic Monocytic Cell-Line (THP-1 Exposed to Alpha Particle Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinita Chauhan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examined alpha (α- particle radiation effects on global changes in gene expression in human leukemic monocytic cells (THP-1 for the purposes of mining for candidate biomarkers that could be used for the development of a biological assessment tool. THP-1 cells were exposed to α-particle radiation at a dose range of 0 to 1.5 Gy. Twenty-four hours and three days after exposure gene expression was monitored using microarray technology. A total of 16 genes were dose responsive and classified as early onset due to their expression 24 h after exposure. Forty-eight transcripts were dose responsive and classified as late-onset as they were expressed 72 h after exposure. Among these genes, 6 genes were time and dose responsive and validated further using alternate technology. These transcripts were upregulated and associated with biological processes related to immune function, organelle stability and cell signalling/communication. This panel of genes merits further validation to determine if they are strong candidate biomarkers indicative of α-particle exposure.

  18. Repair of the three main types of bipyrimidine DNA photoproducts in human keratinocytes exposed to UVB and UVA radiations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courdavault, Sophie; Baudouin, Caroline; Charveron, Marie; Canguilhem, Bruno; Favier, Alain; Cadet, Jean; Douki, Thierry

    2005-07-12

    Induction of DNA damage by solar UV radiation is a key event in the development of skin cancers. Bipyrimidine photoproducts, including cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs), (6-4) photoproducts (64 PPs) and their Dewar valence isomers, have been identified as major UV-induced DNA lesions. In order to identify the predominant and most persistent lesions, we studied the repair of the three types of photolesions in primary cultures of human keratinocytes. Specific and quantitative data were obtained using HPLC associated with tandem mass spectrometry. As shown in other cell types, 64 PPs are removed from UVB-irradiated keratinocytes much more efficiently than CPDs. In contrast, CPDs are still present in high amounts when cells recover their proliferation capacities after cell cycle arrest and elimination of a part of the population by apoptosis. The predominance of CPDs is still maintained when keratinocytes are exposed to a combination of UVB and UVA. Under these conditions, 64 PPs are converted into their Dewar valence isomers that are as efficiently repaired as their (6-4) precursors. Exposure of cells to pure UVA radiation generates thymine cyclobutane dimers that are slightly less efficiently repaired than CPDs produced upon UVB irradiation. Altogether, our results show that CPDs are the most frequent and the less efficiently repaired bipyrimidine photoproducts irrespectively of the applied UV treatment.

  19. Loss of viability and induction of apoptosis in human keratinocytes exposed to Staphylococcus aureus biofilms in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirker, Kelly R; Secor, Patrick R; James, Garth A; Fleckman, Philip; Olerud, John E; Stewart, Philip S

    2009-01-01

    Bacteria colonizing chronic wounds are believed to exist as polymicrobial, biofilm communities; however, there are few studies demonstrating the role of biofilms in chronic wound pathogenesis. This study establishes a novel method for studying the effect of biofilms on the cell types involved in wound healing. Cocultures of Staphylococcus aureus biofilms and human keratinocytes (HK) were created by initially growing S. aureus biofilms on tissue culture inserts then transferring the inserts to existing HK cultures. Biofilm-conditioned medium (BCM) was prepared by culturing the insert-supported biofilm in cell culture medium. As a control planktonic-conditioned medium (PCM) was also prepared. Biofilm, BCM, and PCM were used in migration, cell viability, and apoptosis assays. Changes in HK morphology were followed by brightfield and confocal microscopy. After only 3 hours exposure to BCM, but not PCM, HK formed dendrite-like extensions and displayed reduced viability. After 9 hours, there was an increase in apoptosis (pPCM-exposed HK all exhibited reduced scratch closure (p< or =0.0001). The results demonstrated that soluble products of both S. aureus planktonic cells and biofilms inhibit scratch closure. Furthermore, S. aureus biofilms significantly reduced HK viability and significantly increased HK apoptosis compared with planktonic S. aureus.

  20. Matrix-degrading and pro-inflammatory changes in human vascular endothelial cells exposed to cigarette smoke condensate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordskog, Brian K; Blixt, Allison D; Morgan, Walter T; Fields, Wanda R; Hellmann, Gary M

    2003-01-01

    Cigarette smoking has been associated with an increase in the severity and prevalence of atherosclerosis in the abdominal aorta. To begin our investigation of this finding, we used an integrated approach combining gene expression profiling, protein analysis, cytokine measurements, and cytotoxicity determinations to examine molecular responses of cultured human aortic and coronary endothelial cells exposed to cigarette smoke condensate (CSC) and nicotine. Exposure of endothelial cells to CSC (30 and 60 microg/mL TPM) for 24 h resulted in minimal cytotoxicity, and the upregulation of genes involved in matrix degradation (MMP-1, MMP-8, and MMP-9), xenobiotic metabolism (HO-1 and CYP1A2), and downregulation of genes involved in cell cycle regulation (including TOP2A, CCNB1, CCNA, CDKN3). Exposure of cells to a high physiological concentration of nicotine resulted in few differentially expressed genes. Immunoblot analysis of proteins selected from genes shown to be differentially regulated by microarray analysis revealed similar responses. Finally, a number of inflammatory cytokines measured in culture media were elevated in response to CSC. Together, these results describe a complex proinflammatory response, possibly mediating the recruitment of leukocytes through cytokine signaling. Additionally, fibrous cap destabilization may be facilitated by matrix metalloproteinase upregulation.

  1. Protective effects of an extract from Citrus bergamia against inflammatory injury in interferon-γ and histamine exposed human keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graziano, Adriana C E; Cardile, Venera; Crascì, Lucia; Caggia, Sivia; Dugo, Paola; Bonina, Francesco; Panico, Annamaria

    2012-06-27

    The present work evaluated the anti-inflammatory/antioxidant activity of a well characterized extract from Citrus bergamia Risso and Poiteau (CBE), containing neoeriocitrin, naringin, neohesperidin and other flavonoids, on human NCTC 2544 keratinocytes treated with interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) and histamine (H). High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with diode array detectors was used to characterize and quantify phenolic compounds in CBE. Anti-inflammatory/antioxidant ability on keratinocytes was determined through evaluation of inter-cellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression by Western blot, production of nitric oxide (NO) with Griess reagent and concentration of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by fluorescent quantitative analysis with 2',7'-dichlorfluorescein-diacetate (DCFH-DA). Cell viability was assessed using 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2 thiazoyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Antioxidant activity was also measured by oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) assay. Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) were quantified using 1.9-dimethyl methylene blue (DMB). CBE exhibited high antioxidant activity confirmed by elevated ORAC values related to high capacity in oxygen radical scavenging. The assays on keratinocytes demonstrated that CBE does not inhibit cell proliferation and is shown to significantly reduce dose-dependently ICAM-1, iNOS, NO, ROS and GAG production in cells exposed to IFN-γ and H. Our study demonstrates that the pools of compounds of an extract from C. bergamia efficiently block the proinflammatory actions induced by IFN-γ and H on human keratinocytes. CBE may be used for topic employment in some inflammatory diseases of the skin and to represent an important opportunity for the essential oil processing industries. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Oxidized LDL-Exposed Human Macrophages Display Increased MMP-9 Expression and Secretion Mediated by Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanda, Gabriela M; Deleanu, Mariana; Toma, Laura; Stancu, Camelia S; Simionescu, Maya; Sima, Anca V

    2017-04-01

    Oxidatively modified low-density lipoproteins (oxLDL) alter the proper function of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), inducing ER stress (ERS), which consequently activates inflammatory pathways in macrophages. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) is the main protease acting on the degradation of the extracellular matrix and the ensuing destabilization of the atherosclerotic plaque. We aimed to investigate whether ERS induced by oxLDL or tunicamycin (TM) in human macrophages is associated with the stimulation of MMP-9 expression and secretion. The results showed that oxLDL induced in THP-1 macrophages: (i) increase of MMP-9 gene expression and its pro-form secretion, (ii) intracellular accumulation of 7-ketocholesterol, (iii) ERS activation (increased eIF2α phosphorylation, XBP1 and CHOP mRNA levels, and Grp78 protein expression), and (iv) oxidative stress (increased levels of reactive oxygen species and NADPH oxidase activity). Incubation of macrophages with ERS inducer, TM determined the secretion of both pro- and active-form of MMP-9 and oxidative stress. Treatment of oxLDL or TM-incubated cells with ERS inhibitor, sodium phenylbutyrate decreased MMP-9 gene expression, secretion, and activity. The inhibitor of NADPH oxidase, apocynin, decreased XBP-1 and CHOP mRNA levels, and MMP-9 gene expression and secretion in oxLDL-exposed cells. In conclusion, oxLDL stimulate MMP-9 expression and secretion in human macrophages by mechanisms involving ERS. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 661-669, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Epidermal Growth Factor-Like Growth Factors Prevent Apoptosis of Alcohol-Exposed Human Placental Cytotrophoblast Cells1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Garen S.; Chiang, Po Jen; Smith, Susan M.; Romero, Roberto; Armant, D. Randall

    2007-01-01

    Maternal alcohol abuse during pregnancy can produce an array of birth defects comprising fetal alcohol syndrome. A hallmark of fetal alcohol syndrome is intrauterine growth retardation, which is associated with elevated apoptosis of placental cytotrophoblast cells. Using a human first trimester cytotrophoblast cell line, we examined the relationship between exposure to ethanol and cytotrophoblast survival, as well as the ameliorating effects of epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like growth factors produced by human cytotrophoblast cells. After exposure to 0–100 mM ethanol, cell death was quantified by the TUNEL method, and expression of the nuclear proliferation marker, Ki67, was measured by immunohistochemistry. The mode of cell death was determined by assessing annexin V binding, caspase 3 activation, pyknotic nuclear morphology, reduction of TUNEL by caspase inhibition, and cellular release of lactate dehydrogenase. Ethanol significantly reduced proliferation and increased cell death approximately 2.5-fold through the apoptotic pathway within 1–2 h of exposure to 50 mM alcohol. Exposure to 25–50 mM ethanol significantly increased transforming growth factor alpha (TGFA) and heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HBEGF), but not EGF or amphiregulin (AREG). When cytotrophoblasts were exposed concurrently to 100 mM ethanol and 1 nM HBEGF or TGFA, the increase in apoptosis was prevented, while EGF ameliorated at 10 nM and AREG was weakly effective. HBEGF survival-promoting activity required ligation of either of its cognate receptors, HER1 or HER4. These findings reveal the potential for ethanol to rapidly induce cytotrophoblast apoptosis. However, survival factor induction could provide cytotrophoblasts with an endogenous cytoprotective mechanism. PMID:17392498

  4. Aberrant Gene Expression in Human Non Small Cell Lung Carcinoma Cells Exposed to Demethylating Agent 5-Aza-2'-Deoxycytidine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bao-Zhu Yuan

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available The identification of genes undergoing genetic or epigenetic alterations and contributing to the development of cancer is critical to our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of carcinogenesis. A new approach in identifying alterations of genes that might be relevant to the process of tumor development was used in this study by examining the gene expression profile in human lung cancer cells exposed to 5-aza-2'deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC. A cDNA array analysis was carried out on 5-aza-dC-treated and untreated non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC cell line NCI-H522. Sixteen and 14 genes were upregulated and downregulated, respectively, by 5-aza-dC treatment. Among them, downregulation of tyrosine protein kinase ABL2 (ABL2 gene and upregulation of hint/protein kinase C inhibitor 1 (Hint/PKCI-1, DVL1, TIMP-1, and TRP-1 genes were found in expanded observations in two or three of five 5-aza-dC-treated NSCLC cell lines. Among these genes, we found that cDNA transfer of Hint/PKCI-1 resulted in a significant in vitro growth inhibition in two cell lines exhibiting 5-aza-dC-induced upregulation of Hint/PKCI-1 and significantly reduced in vivo tumorigenicity of one NSCLC cell line. Hint/PKCI-1, which is the only other characterized human histidine triad (HIT nucleotide-binding protein in addition to tumor-suppressor gene FHIT, might be involved in lung carcinogenesis.

  5. Human Invariant Natural Killer T Cells Respond to Antigen-Presenting Cells Exposed to Lipids from Olea europaea Pollen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abos Gracia, Beatriz; López Relaño, Juan; Revilla, Ana; Castro, Lourdes; Villalba, Mayte; Martín Adrados, Beatriz; Regueiro, Jose Ramon; Fernández-Malavé, Edgar; Martínez Naves, Eduardo; Gómez Del Moral, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    Allergic sensitization might be influenced by the lipids present in allergens, which can be recognized by natural killer T (NKT) cells on antigen-presenting cells (APCs). The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of olive pollen lipids in human APCs, including monocytes as well as monocyte-derived macrophages (Mϕ) and dendritic cells (DCs). Lipids were extracted from olive (Olea europaea) pollen grains. Invariant (i)NKT cells, monocytes, Mϕ, and DCs were obtained from buffy coats of healthy blood donors, and their cell phenotype was determined by flow cytometry. iNKT cytotoxicity was measured using a lactate dehydrogenase assay. Gene expression of CD1A and CD1D was performed by RT-PCR, and the production of IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, and TNF-α cytokines by monocytes, Mϕ, and DCs was measured by ELISA. Our results showed that monocytes and monocyte-derived Mϕ treated with olive pollen lipids strongly activate iNKT cells. We observed several phenotypic modifications in the APCs upon exposure to pollen-derived lipids. Both Mϕ and monocytes treated with olive pollen lipids showed an increase in CD1D gene expression, whereas upregulation of cell surface CD1d protein occurred only in Mϕ. Furthermore, DCs differentiated in the presence of human serum enhance their surface CD1d expression when exposed to olive pollen lipids. Finally, olive pollen lipids were able to stimulate the production of IL-6 but downregulated the production of lipopolysaccharide- induced IL-10 by Mϕ. Olive pollen lipids alter the phenotype of monocytes, Mϕ, and DCs, resulting in the activation of NKT cells, which have the potential to influence allergic immune responses. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Lipid peroxidation, antioxidant enzymes and glutathione levels in human erythrocytes exposed to colloidal iron hydroxide in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferreira A.L.A.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The free form of the iron ion is one of the strongest oxidizing agents in the cellular environment. The effect of iron at different concentrations (0, 1, 5, 10, 50, and 100 µM Fe3+ on the normal human red blood cell (RBC antioxidant system was evaluated in vitro by measuring total (GSH and oxidized (GSSG glutathione levels, and superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase, glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px and reductase (GSH-Rd activities. Membrane lipid peroxidation was assessed by measuring thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS. The RBC were incubated with colloidal iron hydroxide and phosphate-buffered saline, pH 7.45, at 37oC, for 60 min. For each assay, the results for the control group were: a GSH = 3.52 ± 0.27 µM/g Hb; b GSSG = 0.17 ± 0.03 µM/g Hb; c GSH-Px = 19.60 ± 1.96 IU/g Hb; d GSH-Rd = 3.13 ± 0.17 IU/g Hb; e catalase = 394.9 ± 22.8 IU/g Hb; f SOD = 5981 ± 375 IU/g Hb. The addition of 1 to 100 µM Fe3+ had no effect on the parameters analyzed. No change in TBARS levels was detected at any of the iron concentrations studied. Oxidative stress, measured by GSH kinetics over time, occurs when the RBC are incubated with colloidal iron hydroxide at concentrations higher than 10 µM of Fe3+. Overall, these results show that the intact human RBC is prone to oxidative stress when exposed to Fe3+ and that the RBC has a potent antioxidant system that can minimize the potential damage caused by acute exposure to a colloidal iron hydroxide in vitro.

  7. Chromosome damage and micronucleus formation in human blood lymphocytes exposed in vitro to radiofrequency radiation at a cellular telephone frequency (847.74 MHz, CDMA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayalaxmi; Bisht, K S; Pickard, W F; Meltz, M L; Roti Roti, J L; Moros, E G

    2001-10-01

    Peripheral blood samples collected from four healthy nonsmoking human volunteers were diluted with tissue culture medium and exposed in vitro for 24 h to 847.74 MHz radiofrequency (RF) radiation (continuous wave), a frequency employed for cellular telephone communications. A code division multiple access (CDMA) technology was used with a nominal net forward power of 75 W and a nominal power density of 950 W/m(2) (95 mW/cm(2)). The mean specific absorption rate (SAR) was 4.9 or 5.5 W/kg. Blood aliquots that were sham-exposed or exposed in vitro to an acute dose of 1.5 Gy of gamma radiation were included in the study as controls. The temperatures of the medium during RF-radiation and sham exposures in the Radial Transmission Line facility were controlled at 37 +/- 0.3 degrees C. Immediately after the exposures, lymphocytes were cultured at 37 +/- 1 degrees C for 48 or 72 h. The extent of genetic damage was assessed from the incidence of chromosome aberrations and micronuclei. The kinetics of cell proliferation was determined from the mitotic indices in 48-h cultures and from the incidence of binucleate cells in 72-h cultures. The data indicated no significant differences between RF-radiation-exposed and sham-exposed lymphocytes with respect to mitotic indices, frequencies of exchange aberrations, excess fragments, binucleate cells, and micronuclei. The response of gamma-irradiated lymphocytes was significantly different from that of both RF-radiation-exposed and sham-exposed cells for all of these indices. Thus there was no evidence for induction of chromosome aberrations and micronuclei in human blood lymphocytes exposed in vitro for 24 h to 847.74 MHz RF radiation (CDMA) at SARs of 4.9 or 5.5 W/kg.

  8. Sequential treatment with flavopiridol synergistically enhances pyrrolo-1,5-benzoxazepine-induced apoptosis in human chronic myeloid leukaemia cells including those resistant to imatinib treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bright, Sandra A; Campiani, Giuseppe; Deininger, Michael W; Lawler, Mark; Williams, D Clive; Zisterer, Daniela M

    2010-07-01

    The Bcr-Abl kinase inhibitor, imatinib mesylate, is the front line treatment for chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML), but the emergence of imatinib resistance has led to the search for alternative drug treatments and the examination of combination therapies to overcome imatinib resistance. The pro-apoptotic PBOX compounds are a recently developed novel series of microtubule targeting agents (MTAs) that depolymerise tubulin. Recent data demonstrating enhanced MTA-induced tumour cell apoptosis upon combination with the cyclin dependent kinase (CDK)-1 inhibitor flavopiridol prompted us to examine whether this compound could similarly enhance the effect of the PBOX compounds. We thus characterised the apoptotic and cell cycle events associated with combination therapy of the PBOX compounds and flavopiridol and results showed a sequence dependent, synergistic enhancement of apoptosis in CML cells including those expressing the imatinib-resistant T315I mutant. Flavopiridol reduced the number of polyploid cells formed in response to PBOX treatment but only to a small extent, suggesting that inhibition of endoreplication was unlikely to play a major role in the mechanism by which flavopiridol synergistically enhanced PBOX-induced apoptosis. The addition of flavopiridol following PBOX-6 treatment did however result in an accelerated exit from the G2/M transition accompanied by an enhanced downregulation and deactivation of the CDK1/cyclin B1 complex and an enhanced degradation of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein (IAP) survivin. In conclusion, results from this study highlight the potential of these novel series of PBOX compounds, alone or in sequential combination with flavopiridol, as an effective therapy against CML. (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Functional characterization of the promoter region of the human EVI1 gene in acute myeloid leukemia: RUNX1 and ELK1 directly regulate its transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maicas, M; Vázquez, I; Vicente, C; García-Sánchez, M A; Marcotegui, N; Urquiza, L; Calasanz, M J; Odero, M D

    2013-04-18

    The EVI1 gene (3q26) codes for a transcription factor with important roles in normal hematopoiesis and leukemogenesis. High expression of EVI1 is a negative prognostic indicator of survival in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) irrespective of the presence of 3q26 rearrangements. However, the only known mechanisms that lead to EVI1 overexpression are 3q aberrations, and the MLL-ENL oncoprotein, which activates the transcription of EVI1 in hematopoietic stem cells. Our aim was to characterize the functional promoter region of EVI1, and to identify transcription factors involved in the regulation of this gene. Generation of seven truncated constructs and luciferase reporter assays allowed us to determine a 318-bp region as the minimal promoter region of EVI1. Site-directed mutagenesis and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays identified RUNX1 and ELK1 as putative transcription factors of EVI1. Furthermore, knockdown of RUNX1 and ELK1 led to EVI1 downregulation, and their overexpression to upregulation of EVI1. Interestingly, in a series of patient samples with AML at diagnosis, we found a significant positive correlation between EVI1 and RUNX1 at protein level. Moreover, we identified one of the roles of RUNX1 in the activation of EVI1 during megakaryocytic differentiation. EVI1 knockdown significantly inhibited the expression of megakaryocytic markers after treating K562 cells with TPA, as happens when knocking down RUNX1. In conclusion, we define the minimal promoter region of EVI1 and demonstrate that RUNX1 and ELK1, two proteins with essential functions in hematopoiesis, regulate EVI1 in AML. Furthermore, our results show that one of the mechanisms by which RUNX1 regulates the transcription of EVI1 is by acetylation of the histone H3 on its promoter region. This study opens new directions to further understand the mechanisms of EVI1 overexpressing leukemias.

  10. Targeting Suppressive Myeloid Cells Potentiates Checkpoint Inhibitors to Control Spontaneous Neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yumeng; Eissler, Nina; Blanc, Katarina Le; Johnsen, John Inge; Kogner, Per; Kiessling, Rolf

    2016-08-01

    Neuroblastoma is the most common extracranial solid cancer type in childhood, and high-risk patients have poor prognosis despite aggressive multimodal treatment. Neuroblastoma-driven inflammation contributes to the induction of suppressive myeloid cells that hamper efficient antitumor immune responses. Therefore, we sought to enhance antitumor immunity by removing immunosuppression mediated by myeloid cells. The prognostic values of myeloid cells are demonstrated by analyzing genomic datasets of neuroblastoma patients. The impact of tumor-derived factors on myelopoiesis and local induction of suppressive myeloid cells is dissected by in vitro culture models using freshly isolated human CD34(+) hematopoietic stem cells, primary human monocytes, and murine bone marrow cells. To test the therapeutic efficacy of BLZ945 as a monotherapy or in combination with checkpoint inhibitors, we used a transgenic murine model (TH-MYCN) that develops aggressive spontaneous neuroblastoma. We report that infiltrating CSF-1R(+) myeloid cells predict poor clinical outcome in patients with neuroblastoma. In vitro, neuroblastoma-derived factors interfere with early development of myeloid cells and enable suppressive functions on human monocytes through M-CSF/CSF-1R interaction. In a transgenic mouse model (TH-MYCN) resembling high-risk human neuroblastoma, antagonizing CSF-1R with a selective inhibitor (BLZ945) modulates the induction of human and murine suppressive myeloid cells and efficiently limit tumor progression. While checkpoint inhibitors are insufficient in controlling tumor growth, combining BLZ945 with PD-1/PD-L1 blocking antibodies results in superior tumor control. Our results demonstrate the essential role of CSF-1R signaling during the induction of suppressive myeloid cells and emphasize its clinical potential as an immunotherapy for human cancers. Clin Cancer Res; 22(15); 3849-59. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  11. Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-28

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  12. Break Point Distribution on Chromosome 3 of Human Epithelial Cells exposed to Gamma Rays, Neutrons and Fe Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hada, M.; Saganti, P. B.; Gersey, B.; Wilkins, R.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Wu, H.

    2007-01-01

    Most of the reported studies of break point distribution on the damaged chromosomes from radiation exposure were carried out with the G-banding technique or determined based on the relative length of the broken chromosomal fragments. However, these techniques lack the accuracy in comparison with the later developed multicolor banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) technique that is generally used for analysis of intrachromosomal aberrations such as inversions. Using mBAND, we studied chromosome aberrations in human epithelial cells exposed in vitro to both low or high dose rate gamma rays in Houston, low dose rate secondary neutrons at Los Alamos National Laboratory and high dose rate 600 MeV/u Fe ions at NASA Space Radiation Laboratory. Detailed analysis of the inversion type revealed that all of the three radiation types induced a low incidence of simple inversions. Half of the inversions observed after neutron or Fe ion exposure, and the majority of inversions in gamma-irradiated samples were accompanied by other types of intrachromosomal aberrations. In addition, neutrons and Fe ions induced a significant fraction of inversions that involved complex rearrangements of both inter- and intrachromosome exchanges. We further compared the distribution of break point on chromosome 3 for the three radiation types. The break points were found to be randomly distributed on chromosome 3 after neutrons or Fe ions exposure, whereas non-random distribution with clustering break points was observed for gamma-rays. The break point distribution may serve as a potential fingerprint of high-LET radiation exposure.

  13. Gene expression analysis in human osteoblasts exposed to dexamethasone identifies altered developmental pathways as putative drivers of osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadlier Denise M

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteoporosis, a disease of decreased bone mineral density represents a significant and growing burden in the western world. Aging population structure and therapeutic use of glucocorticoids have contributed in no small way to the increase in the incidence of this disease. Despite substantial investigative efforts over the last number of years the exact molecular mechanism underpinning the initiation and progression of osteoporosis remain to be elucidated. This has meant that no significant advances in therapeutic strategies have emerged, with joint replacement surgery being the mainstay of treatment. Methods In this study we have used an integrated genomics profiling and computational biology based strategy to identify the key osteoblast genes and gene clusters whose expression is altered in response to dexamethasone exposure. Primary human osteoblasts were exposed to dexamethasone in vitro and microarray based transcriptome profiling completed. Results These studies identified approximately 500 osteoblast genes whose expression was altered. Functional characterization of the transcriptome identified developmental networks as being reactivated with 106 development associated genes found to be differentially regulated. Pathway reconstruction revealed coordinate alteration of members of the WNT signaling pathway, including frizzled-2, frizzled-7, DKK1 and WNT5B, whose differential expression in this setting was confirmed by real time PCR. Conclusion The WNT pathway is a key regulator of skeletogenesis as well as differentiation of bone cells. Reactivation of this pathway may lead to altered osteoblast activity resulting in decreased bone mineral density, the pathological hallmark of osteoporosis. The data herein lend weight to the hypothesis that alterations in developmental pathways drive the initiation and progression of osteoporosis.

  14. Incidence of micronuclei in human peripheral blood lymphocytes exposed to modulated and unmodulated 2450 MHz radiofrequency fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayalaxmi; Reddy, Abhishek B; McKenzie, Raymond J; McIntosh, Robert L; Prihoda, Thomas J; Wood, Andrew W

    2013-10-01

    Peripheral blood samples from four healthy volunteers were collected and aliquots were exposed in vitro for 2 h to either (i) modulated (wideband code division multiple access, WCDMA) or unmodulated continuous wave (CW) 2450 MHz radiofrequency (RF) fields at an average specific absorption rate of 10.9 W/kg or (ii) sham-exposed. Aliquots of the same samples that were exposed in vitro to an acute dose of 1.5 Gy ionizing gamma-radiation (GR) were used as positive controls. Half of the aliquots were treated with melatonin (Mel) to investigate if such treatment offers protection to the cells from the genetic damage, if any, induced by RF and GR. The cells in all samples were cultured for 72 h and the lymphocytes were examined to determine the extent of genetic damage assessed from the incidence of micronuclei (MN). The results indicated the following: (i) the incidence of MN was similar in incubator controls, and those exposed to RF/sham and Mel alone; (ii) there were no significant differences between WCDMA and CW RF exposures; (iii) positive control cells exposed to GR alone exhibited significantly increased MN; and (iv) Mel treatment had no effect on cells exposed to RF and sham, while such treatment significantly reduced the frequency of MN in GR-exposed cells. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. A retrospective cohort study of cause-specific mortality and incidence of hematopoietic malignancies in Chinese benzene-exposed workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linet, Martha S; Yin, Song-Nian; Gilbert, Ethel S; Dores, Graça M; Hayes, Richard B; Vermeulen, Roel; Tian, Hao-Yuan; Lan, Qing; Portengen, Lutzen; Ji, Bu-Tian; Li, Gui-Lan; Rothman, Nathaniel

    2015-11-01

    Benzene exposure has been causally linked with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), but inconsistently associated with other hematopoietic, lymphoproliferative and related disorders (HLD) or solid tumors in humans. Many neoplasms have been described in experimental animals exposed to benzene. We used Poisson regression to estimate adjusted relative risks (RR) and the likelihood ratio statistic to derive confidence intervals for cause-specific mortality and HLD incidence in 73,789 benzene-exposed compared with 34,504 unexposed workers in a retrospective cohort study in 12 cities in China. Follow-up and outcome assessment was based on factory, medical and other records. Benzene-exposed workers experienced increased risks for all-cause mortality (RR = 1.1, 95% CI = 1.1, 1.2) due to excesses of all neoplasms (RR = 1.3, 95% CI = 1.2, 1.4), respiratory diseases (RR = 1.7, 95% CI = 1.2, 2.3) and diseases of blood forming organs (RR = ∞, 95% CI = 3.4, ∞). Lung cancer mortality was significantly elevated (RR = 1.5, 95% CI = 1.2, 1.9) with similar RRs for males and females, based on three-fold more cases than in our previous follow-up. Significantly elevated incidence of all myeloid disorders reflected excesses of myelodysplastic syndrome/acute myeloid leukemia (RR = 2.7, 95% CI = 1.2, 6.6) and chronic myeloid leukemia (RR = 2.5, 95% CI = 0.8, 11), and increases of all lymphoid disorders included excesses of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (RR = 3.9, 95%CI = 1.5, 13) and all lymphoid leukemia (RR = 5.4, 95%CI = 1.0, 99). The 28-year follow-up of Chinese benzene-exposed workers demonstrated increased risks of a broad range of myeloid and lymphoid neoplasms, lung cancer, and respiratory diseases and suggested possible associations with other malignant and non-malignant disorders. © 2015 UICC.

  16. Hoxa9 and Hoxa10 induce CML myeloid blast crisis development through activation of Myb expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negi, Vijay; Vishwakarma, Bandana A; Chu, Su; Oakley, Kevin; Han, Yufen; Bhatia, Ravi; Du, Yang

    2017-11-17

    Mechanisms underlying the progression of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) from chronic phase to myeloid blast crisis are poorly understood. Our previous studies have suggested that overexpression of SETBP1 can drive this progression by conferring unlimited self-renewal capability to granulocyte macrophage progenitors (GMPs). Here we show that overexpression of Hoxa9 or Hoxa10, both transcriptional targets of Setbp1, is also sufficient to induce self-renewal of primary myeloid progenitors, causing their immortalization in culture. More importantly, both are able to cooperate with BCR/ABL to consistently induce transformation of mouse GMPs and development of aggressive leukemias resembling CML myeloid blast crisis, suggesting that either gene can drive CML progression by promoting the self-renewal of GMPs. We further identify Myb as a common critical target for Hoxa9 and Hoxa10 in inducing self-renewal of myeloid progenitors as Myb knockdown significantly reduced colony-forming potential of myeloid progenitors immortalized by the expression of either gene. Interestingly, Myb is also capable of immortalizing primary myeloid progenitors in culture and cooperating with BCR/ABL to induce leukemic transformation of mouse GMPs. Significantly increased levels of MYB transcript also were detected in all human CML blast crisis samples examined over chronic phase samples, further suggesting the possibility that MYB overexpression may play a prevalent role in driving human CML myeloid blast crisis development. In summary, our results identify overexpression of HOXA9, HOXA10, and MYB as critical drivers of CML progression, and suggest MYB as a key therapeutic target for inhibiting the self-renewal of leukemia-initiating cells in CML myeloid blast crisis patients.

  17. In Vitro Characterization of Valproic Acid, ATRA, and Cytarabine Used for Disease-Stabilization in Human Acute Myeloid Leukemia: Antiproliferative Effects of Drugs on Endothelial and Osteoblastic Cells and Altered Release of Angioregulatory Mediators by Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvestad, Hilde; Evensen, Lasse; Lorens, James B; Bruserud, Oystein; Hatfield, Kimberley J

    2014-01-01

    The combined use of the histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid (VPA), the retinoic acid receptor- α agonist all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), and the deoxyribonucleic acid polymerase- α inhibitor cytarabine (Ara-C) is now considered for disease-stabilizing treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Leukemogenesis and leukemia cell chemoresistance seem to be supported by neighbouring stromal cells in the bone marrow, and we have therefore investigated the effects of these drugs on primary human endothelial cells and the osteoblastic Cal72 cell line. The results show that VPA and Ara-C have antiproliferative effects, and the antiproliferative/cytotoxic effect of Ara-C was seen at low concentrations corresponding to serum levels found during low-dose in vivo treatment. Furthermore, in functional assays of endothelial migration and tube formation VPA elicited an antiangiogenic effect, whereas ATRA elicited a proangiogenic effect. Finally, VPA and ATRA altered the endothelial cell release of angiogenic mediators; ATRA increased levels of CXCL8, PDGF-AA, and VEGF-D, while VPA decreased VEGF-D and PDGF-AA/BB levels and both drugs reduced MMP-2 levels. Several of these mediators can enhance AML cell proliferation and/or are involved in AML-induced bone marrow angiogenesis, and direct pharmacological effects on stromal cells may thus indirectly contribute to the overall antileukemic activity of this triple drug combination.

  18. Regulatory Myeloid Cells in Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosborough, Brian R.; Raïch-Regué, Dàlia; Turnquist, Heth R.; Thomson, Angus W.

    2013-01-01

    Regulatory myeloid cells (RMC) are emerging as novel targets for immunosuppressive (IS) agents and hold considerable promise as cellular therapeutic agents. Herein, we discuss the ability of regulatory macrophages (Mreg), regulatory dendritic cells (DCreg) and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) to regulate alloimmunity, their potential as cellular therapeutic agents and the IS agents that target their function. We consider protocols for the generation of RMC and the selection of donor- or recipient-derived cells for adoptive cell therapy. Additionally, the issues of cell trafficking and antigen (Ag) specificity following RMC transfer are discussed. Improved understanding of the immunobiology of these cells has increased the possibility of moving RMC into the clinic to reduce the burden of current IS agents and promote Ag-specific tolerance. In the second half of this review, we discuss the influence of established and experimental IS agents on myeloid cell populations. IS agents believed historically to act primarily on T cell activation and proliferation are emerging as important regulators of RMC function. Better insights into the influence of IS agents on RMC will enhance our ability to develop cell therapy protocols to promote the function of these cells. Moreover, novel IS agents may be designed to target RMC in situ to promote Ag-specific immune regulation in transplantation and usher in a new era of immune modulation exploiting cells of myeloid origin. PMID:24092382

  19. [Acute myeloid Leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braess, Jan

    2016-11-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has been genetically characterized extensively and can now be subdivided into 9 to 11 pathogenetically different subtypes according to their profile of driver mutations. In clinical practice karyotyping and molecular analysis of NPM1, cEBPa and FLT3-ITD are required for treatment stratification and potentially genotype specific treatment. Some markers such as NPM1 not only offer prognostic information but can also serve as markers of minimal residual disease and thus have the potential to guide therapy in the future.The basis of curative treatment is intensive combination chemotherapy comprizing cytarabine and an anthracycline ("7 + 3" regimen). The prolonged duration of aplasia can be reduced significantly by accelerated therapy ("S-HAM" regimen). Following achievement of a complete remission patients with a low risk of relapse - based on genetic and clinical features - receive chemotherapy based consolidation therapy whereas high risk patients - and potentially also those with an intermediate risk - receive an allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Whereas adding the rather unspecific tyrosinekinase inhibitor sorafenib to standard treatment in unselected AML patients has not improved overall survival (OS), the addition of midostaurin to standard therapy in the selected group FLT3 mutated patients has resulted in a moderate but significant OS benefit.Real world data show that in patients below 50 years a cure rate of ca. 50 % can be achieved. However less than 10 % of patients above the age of 70 will be alive after five years even after intensive treatment. Therefore when curative and intensive treatment is deemed impossible the therapeutic standard in elderly and unfit patients used to be low-dose cytarabine with an average OS of 4 months. This has now been replaced by a new standard of care of hypomethylating agents - azacytidine and decitabine - which both achieve higher remission rates and show strong trends towards a prolonged OS

  20. Normal Thymic Size and Low Rate of Infections in Human Donor Milk Fed HIV-Exposed Uninfected Infants from Birth to 18 Months of Age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Dorthe Lisbeth; Ersbøll, Annette Kjær; Hoppe, Tine Ursula

    2013-01-01

    fewer infections than other healthy infants. This finding along with fewer infections in exclusively breastfed infants compared to formula-fed infants supports the beneficial effect of human milk on the immune system. We suggest, when breastfeeding is not possible, that providing human donor milk......Objective. To evaluate the immune function in HIV-exposed uninfected (HIV-EU) infants fed human donor milk. Methods. Ultrasound-obtained thymic index (Ti), T-lymphocyte subsets, and the number of infections were examined from birth to 18 months of age in 18 HIV-EU infants. The infants were compared...... (P donor milk have normal growth of thymus and contract...

  1. Exposed hydrophobic residues in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Vpr helix-1 are important for cell cycle arrest and cell death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Anthony Barnitz

    Full Text Available The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 accessory protein viral protein R (Vpr is a major determinant for virus-induced G2/M cell cycle arrest and cytopathicity. Vpr is thought to perform these functions through the interaction with partner proteins. The NMR structure of Vpr revealed solvent exposed hydrophobic amino acids along helices 1 and 3 of Vpr, which could be putative protein binding domains. We previously showed that the hydrophobic patch along helix-3 was important for G2/M blockade and cytopathicity. Mutations of the exposed hydrophobic residues along helix-1 were found to reduce Vpr-induced cell cycle arrest and cell death as well. The levels of toxicity during virion delivery of Vpr correlated with G2/M arrest. Thus, the exposed hydrophobic amino acids in the amino-terminal helix-1 are important for the cell cycle arrest and cytopathicity functions of Vpr.

  2. Modulating glioma-mediated myeloid-derived suppressor cell development with sulforaphane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Kumar

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma is the most common primary tumor of the brain and has few long-term survivors. The local and systemic immunosuppressive environment created by glioblastoma allows it to evade immunosurveillance. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs are a critical component of this immunosuppression. Understanding mechanisms of MDSC formation and function are key to developing effective immunotherapies. In this study, we developed a novel model to reliably generate human MDSCs from healthy-donor CD14+ monocytes by culture in human glioma-conditioned media. Monocytic MDSC frequency was assessed by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. The resulting MDSCs robustly inhibited T cell proliferation. A cytokine array identified multiple components of the GCM potentially contributing to MDSC generation, including Monocyte Chemoattractive Protein-1, interleukin-6, interleukin-8, and Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor (MIF. Of these, Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor is a particularly attractive therapeutic target as sulforaphane, a naturally occurring MIF inhibitor derived from broccoli sprouts, has excellent oral bioavailability. Sulforaphane inhibits the transformation of normal monocytes to MDSCs by glioma-conditioned media in vitro at pharmacologically relevant concentrations that are non-toxic to normal leukocytes. This is associated with a corresponding increase in mature dendritic cells. Interestingly, sulforaphane treatment had similar pro-inflammatory effects on normal monocytes in fresh media but specifically increased immature dendritic cells. Thus, we have used a simple in vitro model system to identify a novel contributor to glioblastoma immunosuppression for which a natural inhibitor exists that increases mature dendritic cell development at the expense of myeloid-derived suppressor cells when normal monocytes are exposed to glioma conditioned media.

  3. Genetics Home Reference: cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... normal acute myeloid leukemia Cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... expand/collapse boxes. Description Cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (CN-AML) is one form of a cancer ...

  4. Spontaneous mediastinal myeloid sarcoma in a common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) and review of the veterinary literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morosco, Danielle T; Cline, Curtis R; Owston, Michael A; Kumar, Shyamesh; Dick, Edward J

    2017-04-01

    Myeloid sarcoma is a rare manifestation of myeloproliferative disorder defined as an extramedullary mass composed of myeloid precursor cells. A 9-month old, female, common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) had increased respiratory effort. A complete necropsy with histology and immunohistochemistry was performed. The thymus was replaced by a firm, gray-tan mass with a faint green tint, filling over 50% of the thoracic cavity. Sheets of granulocytes, lymphoid cells, nucleated erythrocytes, megakaryocytes, and hematopoietic precursors of indeterminate cell lineage replaced the thymus, perithymic connective tissue, mediastinal adipose tissues, epicardium, and much of the myocardium. The cells demonstrated diffuse strong cytoplasmic immunoreactivity for lysozyme, and strong, multifocal membranous immunoreactivity for CD117. We report the first case of a myeloid sarcoma in a common marmoset (C. jacchus), similar to reported human cases of mediastinal myeloid sarcoma, and present a review of myeloproliferative diseases from the veterinary literature. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Aberrant Gene Expression in Acute Myeloid Leukaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Frederik Otzen

    Summary Acute Myeloid Leukaemia (AML) is an aggressive cancer of the bone marrow, affecting formation of blood cells during haematopoiesis. This thesis presents investigation of AML using mRNA gene expression profiles (GEP) of samples extracted from the bone marrow of healthy and diseased subjects...... model to investigate the role of telomerase in AML, we were able to translate the observed effect into human AML patients and identify specific genes involved, which also predict survival patterns in AML patients. During these studies we have applied methods for investigating differentially expressed...... genes and genetic signatures and for reducing dimensionally of gene expression data. Next, we have used machine-learning methods to predict survival and to assess important predictors based on these results. General application of a number of these methods has been implemented into two public query...

  6. Aberrant Gene Expression in Acute Myeloid Leukaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Frederik Otzen

    Acute Myeloid Leukaemia (AML) is an aggressive cancer of the bone marrow, affecting formation of blood cells during haematopoiesis. This thesis presents investigation of AML using mRNA gene expression profiles (GEP) of samples extracted from the bone marrow of healthy and diseased subjects. Here......-lookup webservices, called HemaExplorer and BloodSpot. These web-services support the aim of making data and analysis of haematopoietic cells from mouse and human accessible for researchers without bioinformatics expertise. Finally, in order to aid the analysis of the very limited number of haematopoietic progenitor...... cells obtainable from bone marrow aspirations, this thesis presents a method developed to investigate transcription factor binding and histone modifications by ChIP-Seq using pico-scale amounts of DNA....

  7. Aberrant Gene Expression in Acute Myeloid Leukaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Frederik Otzen

    Summary Acute Myeloid Leukaemia (AML) is an aggressive cancer of the bone marrow, affecting formation of blood cells during haematopoiesis. This thesis presents investigation of AML using mRNA gene expression profiles (GEP) of samples extracted from the bone marrow of healthy and diseased subjects......-based gene-lookup webservices, called HemaExplorer and BloodSpot. These web-services support the aim of making data and analysis of haematopoietic cells from mouse and human accessible for researchers without bioinformatics expertise. Finally, in order to aid the analysis of the very limited number...... of haematopoietic progenitor cells obtainable from bone marrow aspirations, this thesis presents a method developed to investigate transcription factor binding and histone modifications by ChIP-Seq using pico-scale amounts of DNA....

  8. High hepatitis E virus antibody positive rates in dogs and humans exposed to dogs in the south-west of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, M Y; Gao, H; Yan, X X; Qu, W J; Sun, Y K; Fu, G W; Yan, Y L

    2017-12-01

    Hepatitis E (HE) is a zoonotic viral disease caused by hepatitis E virus (HEV). The objective of this study was to investigate the prevalence of HEV infection among dogs and humans exposed to dogs in the south-west region of China. A total of 4,490 dog serum samples and 2,206 relative practitioner serum samples were collected from 18 pet hospitals and dog farms in Yunnan, Sichuan and Guizhou province, and the anti-HEV IgG antibodies were detected by ELISA. The results showed that the total positive rate of anti-HEV antibodies was 36.55% with the highest rate in city stray dogs, and the differences in distinct species and growth phases were significant. The positive rate of anti-HEV antibody in veterinarian and farm staff-related practitioners was significantly higher than the general population. The finding of the present survey suggested that high HEV seroprevalence in dogs and humans exposed to dogs in the south-west area of China poses a significant public health concern. It is urgent to improve integrated strategies to detect, prevent and control HEV infection in dogs and humans exposed to dogs in this area. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  9. Genetic damage in human cells exposed to non-ionizing radiofrequency fields: a meta-analysis of the data from 88 publications (1990-2011).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayalaxmi; Prihoda, Thomas J

    2012-12-12

    Based on the 'limited' evidence suggesting an association between exposure to radiofrequency fields (RF) emitted from mobile phones and two types of brain cancer, glioma and acoustic neuroma, the International Agency for Research on Cancer has classified RF as 'possibly carcinogenic to humans' in group 2B. In view of this classification and the positive correlation between increased genetic damage and carcinogenesis, a meta-analysis was conducted to determine whether a significant increase in genetic damage in human cells exposed to RF provides a potential mechanism for its carcinogenic potential. The extent of genetic damage in human cells, assessed from various end-points, viz., single-/double-strand breaks in the DNA, incidence of chromosomal aberrations, micronuclei and sister chromatid exchanges, reported in a total of 88 peer-reviewed scientific publications during 1990-2011 was considered in the meta-analysis. Among the several variables in the experimental protocols used, the influence of five specific variables related to RF exposure characteristics was investigated: (i) frequency, (ii) specific absorption rate, (iii) exposure as continuous wave, pulsed wave and occupationally exposed/mobile phone users, (iv) duration of exposure, and (v) different cell types. The data indicated the following. (1) The magnitude of difference between RF-exposed and sham-/un-exposed controls was small with some exceptions. (2) In certain RF exposure conditions there was a statistically significant increase in genotoxicity assessed from some end-points: the effect was observed in studies with small sample size and was largely influenced by publication bias. Studies conducted within the generally recommended RF exposure guidelines showed a smaller effect. (3) The multiple regression analyses and heterogeneity goodness of fit data indicated that factors other than the above five variables as well as the quality of publications have contributed to the overall results. (4) More

  10. Biomonitoring of humans exposed to arsenic, chromium, nickel, vanadium, and complex mixtures of metals by using the micronucleus test in lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annangi, Balasubramanyam; Bonassi, Stefano; Marcos, Ricard; Hernández, Alba

    Various metals have demonstrated genotoxic and carcinogenic potential via different mechanisms. Until now, biomonitoring and epidemiological studies have been carried out to assess the genotoxic risk to exposed human populations. In this sense, the use of the micronucleus assay in peripheral blood lymphocytes has proven to be a useful tool to determine increased levels of DNA damage, as a surrogate biomarker of cancer risk. Here we review those biomonitoring studies focused on people exposed to arsenic, chromium, nickel, vanadium and complex mixtures of metals. Only those studies that used the frequency of micronuclei in binucleated (BNMN) cells have been taken into consideration, although the inclusion of other biomarkers of exposure and genotoxicity are also reflected and discussed. Regarding arsenic, most of the occupational and environmental biomonitoring studies find an increase in BNMN among the exposed individuals. Thus, it seems conclusive that arsenic exposure increases the risk of exposed human populations. However, a lack of correlation between the level of exposure and the increase in BNMN is also common, and a limited number of studies evaluated the genotype as a risk modulator. As for chromium, a BNMN increase in occupationally exposed subjects and a correlation between level of exposure and effect is found consistently in the available literature. However, the quality score of the studies is only medium-low. On the other hand, the studies evaluating nickel and vanadium are scarce and lacks a correct characterization of the individual exposure, which difficult the building of clear conclusions. Finally, several studies with medium-high quality scores evaluated a more realistic scenario of exposure which takes into account a mixture of metals. Among them, those which correctly characterized and measured the exposure were able to find association with the level of BNMN. Also, several genes associated with DNA damage repair such as OGG1 and XRCC1 were

  11. Differential effect of 1{alpha},25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} on Hsp28 and PKC{beta} gene expression in the phorbol ester-resistant human myeloid HL-525 leukemic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yong J.; Galoforo, S.S.; Berns, C.M. [William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology] [and others

    1997-08-01

    We investigated the effect of 1{alpha},25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} [1,25-(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3}] on the expression of the 28-kDa heat shock protein gene (hsp28) and the protein kinase C beta gene (PKC{beta}) in the human myeloid HL-60 leukemic cell variant HL-525, which is resistance to phorbol ester-induced macrophage differentiation. Northern and Western blot analysis showed little or no hsp28 gene expression in the HL-60 cell variant, HL-205, which is susceptible to such differentiation, while a relatively high basal level of hps28 gene expression was observed in the HL-525 cells. However, both cell lines demonstrated heat shock-induced expression of this gene. During treatment with 50-300 nM 1,25-(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3}, a marked reduction of hsp28 gene expression was not associated with heat shock transcription factor-heat shock element (HSF-HSE) binding activity. Our results suggest that the differential effect of 1,25-(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} on hsp28 and PKC{beta} gene expression is due to the different sequence composition of the vitamin D response element in the in the promoter region as well as an accessory factor for each gene or that 1,25-(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} increases PKC{beta} gene expression, which in turn negatively regulates the expression of the hsp28 gene, or vice versa.

  12. Exposing diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørtoft, Kamilla; Nordentoft, Helle Merete

    . A prominent research theme in health care studies is, therefore, to explicate the gap between theory and practice. The question this paper addresses is how a learning environment can be designed to bridge this theory-practice gap, expose the differences in situated interactions and qualify health...... in the homes of older people and in pedagogical institutions targeting older people. In the paper we look at the potentials and challenges in working with ethnographic video narratives as a pedagogical tool. Our findings indicate that the use of video narratives has the potential to expose the diversity...... focus on their own professional discipline and its tasks 2) stimulates collaborative learning when they discuss their different interpretations of the ethnographic video narratives and achieve a deeper understanding of each other’s work and their clients’ lifeworlds, which might lead to a better...

  13. All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) enhances maintenance of primitive human hematopoietic progenitors and skews them towards myeloid differentiation in a stroma-noncontact culture system

    OpenAIRE

    Leung, Anskar Y. H.; Verfaillie, Catherine

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We have previously shown that hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) from umbilical cord blood (UCB) can be maintained in a cytokine-supplemented stroma-noncontact (SNC) system. Here, we tested if all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), known to improve expansion of murine hematopoietic stem cells, would enhance human HPC maintenance in a SNC culture system. METHODS: CD34+CD38-Lin- cells from UCB were cultured in transwells above AFT024 in the presence of Flt-3 ligand (FLT) and thrombopoiet...

  14. Determination of hydroxylated polychlorinated biphenyls (OH-PCBs) in human urine in a highly occupationally exposed German cohort: New prospects for urinary biomarkers of PCB exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinete, Natalia; Esser, André; Kraus, Thomas; Schettgen, Thomas

    2016-12-01

    The present study evaluates for the first time the determination of 20 hydroxylated polychlorinated biphenyl (OH-PCB) congeners and their glucuronide and sulfate conjugates in urine as a biomarker of exposure to PCBs in humans. Thereby, a fast, sensitive and selective online solid phase extraction (SPE) method coupled to LC-MS/MS was validated for the determination of OH-PCBs in human urine, being previously successfully developed and applied for the separation and quantitation of OH-PCBs in human plasma. The lowest limit of quantification (LLOQ) ranged from 0.01 to 0.19ngmL(-1) and average extraction recoveries from 79 to 125% for all hydroxylated congeners. Within-run precision and between-run precision were between 2 and 17%. Extraction recovery tests were also performed in urine with different creatinine contents (0.52-3.92gL(-1)) for an estimation of matrix influences and ranged between 69 and 125%. In order to evaluate the applicability of the method, the study was conducted in three different groups, which were distinctly separated as non-exposed to known sources of PCBs (N=21), low-to-moderate PCB-exposed individuals (N=25) and highly occupationally PCB-exposed individuals (N=25), which included workers of a transformer recycling plant, their relatives and workers of surrounding companies from a German cohort. As part of the biomonitoring program HELPcB (Health Effects in High-Level Exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls), urine and blood samples were collected annually from 2010 to 2014. In this way, OH-PCB elimination profile in urine over time, correlations between OH-PCB levels in human plasma and urine, and associations with their parent compounds in plasma of the studied PCB cohort could be also assessed. Tri-chlorinated OH-PCBs were the predominant congeners in urine with concentrations up to 174ngmL(-1). High chlorinated OH-PCBs (penta- through hepta-chlorinated OH-PCBs) were also frequently detected in urine samples from non-exposed and

  15. Preleukaemic clonal haemopoiesis and risk of therapy-related myeloid neoplasms: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Koichi; Wang, Feng; Kantarjian, Hagop; Doss, Denaha; Khanna, Kanhav; Thompson, Erika; Zhao, Li; Patel, Keyur; Neelapu, Sattva; Gumbs, Curtis; Bueso-Ramos, Carlos; DiNardo, Courtney D; Colla, Simona; Ravandi, Farhad; Zhang, Jianhua; Huang, Xuelin; Wu, Xifeng; Samaniego, Felipe; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Futreal, P Andrew

    2017-01-01

    , doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone, with or without melatonin. This trial was done at MD Anderson Cancer Center between 1999 and 2001 (protocol number 98-009). We identified 14 cases and 54 controls. Of the 14 cases, we detected clonal haemopoiesis in the peripheral blood samples of ten (71%) patients. We detected clonal haemopoiesis in 17 (31%) of the 54 controls. The cumulative incidence of therapy-related myeloid neoplasms in both cases and controls at 5 years was significantly higher in patients with clonal haemopoiesis (30%, 95% CI 16-51) than in those without (7%, 2-21; p=0·016). In the external cohort, five (7%) of 74 patients developed therapy-related myeloid neoplasms, of whom four (80%) had clonal haemopoiesis; 11 (16%) of 69 patients who did not develop therapy-related myeloid neoplasms had clonal haemopoiesis. In the external cohort, the cumulative incidence of therapy-related myeloid neoplasms at 10 years was significantly higher in patients with clonal haemopoiesis (29%, 95% CI 8-53) than in those without (0%, 0-0; p=0·0009). In a multivariate Fine and Gray model based on the external cohort, the presence of clonal haemopoiesis significantly increased the risk of therapy-related myeloid neoplasm development (hazard ratio 13·7, 95% CI 1·7-108·7; p=0·013). Preleukaemic clonal haemopoiesis is common in patients with therapy-related myeloid neoplasms at the time of their primary cancer diagnosis and before they have been exposed to treatment. Our results suggest that clonal haemopoiesis could be used as a predictive marker to identify patients with cancer who are at risk of developing therapy-related myeloid neoplasms. A prospective trial to validate this concept is warranted. Cancer Prevention Research Institute of Texas, Red and Charline McCombs Institute for the Early Detection and Treatment of Cancer, NIH through MD Anderson Cancer Center Support Grant, and the MD Anderson MDS & AML Moon Shots Program. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  16. Cytogenetic damage and induction of pro-oxidant state in human lymphocytes exposed in vitro to gliphosate, vinclozolin, atrazine, and DPX-E9636.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lioi, M B; Scarfi, M R; Santoro, A; Barbieri, R; Zeni, O; Salvemini, F; Di Berardino, D; Ursini, M V

    1998-01-01

    We analyzed chromosome aberrations (CAs), sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs), mitotic index (MI), and glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) enzyme activity in human peripheral lymphocytes from three healthy donors exposed in vitro to different concentrations of gliphosate, vinclozolin, atrazine, and DPX-E9636. The pesticides gliphosate, vinclozolin, and atrazine have been studied in a broad range of genetic tests with predominantly conflicting or negative results, whereas little is known about the genotoxicity of DPX-E9636. In our experimental conditions, each chemical compound tested produced a dose-related increase in the percent of aberrant cells and an increase of SCE/cell. Furthermore, at the highest concentrations of vinclozolin, atrazine, and DPX-E9636, we observed a significant reduction of the mitotic index. The increase of G6PD activity in exposed lymphocyte cultures strongly indicated an induction of a pro-oxidant state of the cells as an initial response to pesticide exposure.

  17. Purification and Characterization of Glutaminase Free Asparaginase from Enterobacter cloacae: In-Vitro Evaluation of Cytotoxic Potential against Human Myeloid Leukemia HL-60 Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Islam Husain

    Full Text Available Asparaginase is an important antileukemic agent extensively used worldwide but the intrinsic glutaminase activity of this enzymatic drug is responsible for serious life threatening side effects. Hence, glutaminase free asparaginase is much needed for upgradation of therapeutic index of asparaginase therapy. In the present study, glutaminase free asparaginase produced from Enterobacter cloacae was purified to apparent homogeneity. The purified enzyme was found to be homodimer of approximately 106 kDa with monomeric size of approximately 52 kDa and pI 4.5. Purified enzyme showed optimum activity between pH 7-8 and temperature 35-40°C, which is close to the internal environment of human body. Monovalent cations such as Na+ and K+ enhanced asparaginase activity whereas divalent and trivalent cations, Ca2+, Mg2+, Zn2+, Mn2+, and Fe3+ inhibited the enzyme activity. Kinetic parameters Km, Vmax and Kcat of purified enzyme were found to be 1.58×10-3 M, 2.22 IU μg-1 and 5.3 × 104 S-1, respectively. Purified enzyme showed prolonged in vitro serum (T1/2 = ~ 39 h and trypsin (T1/2 = ~ 32 min half life, which is therapeutically remarkable feature. The cytotoxic activity of enzyme was examined against a panel of human cancer cell lines, HL-60, MOLT-4, MDA-MB-231 and T47D, and highest cytotoxicity observed against HL-60 cells (IC50 ~ 3.1 IU ml-1, which was comparable to commercial asparaginase. Cell and nuclear morphological studies of HL-60 cells showed that on treatment with purified asparaginase symptoms of apoptosis were increased in dose dependent manner. Cell cycle progression analysis indicates that enzyme induces apoptosis by cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase. Mitochondrial membrane potential loss showed that enzyme also triggers the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. Furthermore, the enzyme was found to be nontoxic for human noncancerous cells FR-2 and nonhemolytic for human erythrocytes.

  18. Cancer progression by reprogrammed BCAA metabolism in myeloid leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Ayuna; Tsunoda, Makoto; Konuma, Takaaki; Kobayashi, Masayuki; Nagy, Tamas; Glushka, John; Tayyari, Fariba; McSkimming, Daniel; Kannan, Natarajan; Tojo, Arinobu; Edison, Arthur S; Ito, Takahiro

    2017-05-25

    Reprogrammed cellular metabolism is a common characteristic observed in various cancers. However, whether metabolic changes directly regulate cancer development and progression remains poorly understood. Here we show that BCAT1, a cytosolic aminotransferase for branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs), is aberrantly activated and functionally required for chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) in humans and in mouse models of CML. BCAT1 is upregulated during progression of CML and promotes BCAA production in leukaemia cells by aminating the branched-chain keto acids. Blocking BCAT1 gene expression or enzymatic activity induces cellular differentiation and impairs the propagation of blast crisis CML both in vitro and in vivo. Stable-isotope tracer experiments combined with nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabolic analysis demonstrate the intracellular production of BCAAs by BCAT1. Direct supplementation with BCAAs ameliorates the defects caused by BCAT1 knockdown, indicating that BCAT1 exerts its oncogenic function through BCAA production in blast crisis CML cells. Importantly, BCAT1 expression not only is activated in human blast crisis CML and de novo acute myeloid leukaemia, but also predicts disease outcome in patients. As an upstream regulator of BCAT1 expression, we identified Musashi2 (MSI2), an oncogenic RNA binding protein that is required for blast crisis CML. MSI2 is physically associated with the BCAT1 transcript and positively regulates its protein expression in leukaemia. Taken together, this work reveals that altered BCAA metabolism activated through the MSI2-BCAT1 axis drives cancer progression in myeloid leukaemia.

  19. The Danish National Chronic Myeloid Neoplasia Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Marie; Ibfelt, Else Helene; Stauffer Larsen, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    AIM: The Danish National Chronic Myeloid Neoplasia Registry (DCMR) is a population-based clinical quality database, introduced to evaluate diagnosis and treatment of patients with chronic myeloid malignancies. The aim is to monitor the clinical quality at the national, regional, and hospital...

  20. Analysis of 62 hybrid assembled human Y chromosomes exposes rapid structural changes and high rates of gene conversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalez-Izarzugaza, Jose Maria; Skov, Laurits; Maretty, Lasse

    2017-01-01

    The human Y-chromosome does not recombine across its male-specific part and is therefore an excellent marker of human migrations. It also plays an important role in male fertility. However, its evolution is difficult to fully understand because of repetitive sequences, inverted repeats...

  1. Participation of gap junction communication in potentially lethal damage repair and DNA damage in human fibroblasts exposed to low- or high-LET radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autsavapromporn, Narongchai; Suzuki, Masao; Plante, Ianik; Liu, Cuihua; Uchihori, Yukio; Hei, Tom K.; Azzam, Edouard I.; Murakami, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    Existing research has not fully explained how different types of ionizing radiation (IR) modulate the responses of cell populations or tissues. In our previous work, we showed that gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC) mediates the propagation of stressful effects among irradiated cells exposed to high linear energy transfer (LET) radiations, in which almost every cells is traversed by an IR track. In the present study, we conducted an in-depth study of the role of GJIC in modulating the repair of potentially lethal damage (PLDR) and micronuclei formation in cells exposed to low- or high-LET IR. Confluent human fibroblasts were exposed in the presence or absence of a gap junction inhibitor to 200 kV X rays (LET ∼ 1.7 keV/µm), carbon ions (LET ∼ 76 keV/µm), silicon ions (LET ∼ 113 keV/µm) or iron ions (LET ∼ 400 keV/µm) that resulted in isosurvival levels. The fibroblasts were incubated for various times at 37 °C. As expected, high-LET IR were more effective than were low-LET X rays at killing cells and damaging DNA shortly after irradiation. However, when cells were held in a confluent state for several hours, PLDR associated with a reduction in DNA damage, occurred only in cells exposed to X rays. Interestingly, inhibition of GJIC eliminated the enhancement of toxic effects, which resulted in an increase of cell survival and reduction in the level of micronucleus formation in cells exposed to high, but not in those exposed to low-LET IR. The experiment shows that gap-junction communication plays an important role in the propagation of stressful effects among irradiated cells exposed to high-LET IR while GJIC has only a minimal effect on PLDR and DNA damage following low-LET irradiation. Together, our results show that PLDR and induction of DNA damage clearly depend on gap-junction communication and radiation quality. PMID:23867854

  2. Myxoma virus lacking the pyrin-like protein M013 is sensed in human myeloid cells by both NLRP3 and multiple Toll-like receptors, which independently activate the inflammasome and NF-κB innate response pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Masmudur M; McFadden, Grant

    2011-12-01

    on sensing by the NLRP3 receptor in response to vMyxM013-KO infection of human myeloid cells.

  3. Myxoma Virus Lacking the Pyrin-Like Protein M013 Is Sensed in Human Myeloid Cells by both NLRP3 and Multiple Toll-Like Receptors, Which Independently Activate the Inflammasome and NF-κB Innate Response Pathways▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Masmudur M.; McFadden, Grant

    2011-01-01

    on sensing by the NLRP3 receptor in response to vMyxM013-KO infection of human myeloid cells. PMID:21957307

  4. [Isolated myeloid sarcoma involving the mediastinum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelić-Puskarić, Biljana; Kardum-Skelin, Ika; Sustercić, Dunja; Pazur, Marina; Vrhovac, Radovan; Radić-Kristo, Delfa; Gredelj-Simec, Njetocka; Kovacević, Dragica Obad; Plasćak, Jasmina; Gasparov, Slavko; Jaksić, Branimir

    2011-09-01

    Myeloid sarcoma is a rare extramedullary solid tumor consisting of immature myeloid cells and most commonly involving the bone, skin, lymph nodes, soft tissue, gastrointestinal tract and testis. Mediastinal myeloid sarcoma is very rare. There are two major types of myeloid sarcoma: granulocytic sarcoma and monoblastic sarcoma, according to immature cell type. Myeloid sarcoma is found in 2%-8% of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Myeloid sarcoma may develop before or concurrently with AML, or may be the initial manifestation of AML relapse in previously treated patients. Blast transformation of some form of myeloproliferative neoplasm or myelodysplastic syndrome may also manifest as myeloid sarcoma. A major differential diagnostic problem is isolated primary myeloid sarcoma without bone marrow and peripheral blood involvement, which may precede leukemic stage for months or years, and which is frequently misdiagnosed, mostly as malignant lymphoma. A case is presented of a 56-year-old female patient complaining of weakness, vertigo, dry cough and breathing difficulties. Clinical examination revealed enhanced vascular pattern on the right chest and right arm edema. Computed tomography (CT) of the thorax showed an expansive growth measuring 11 cm craniocaudally in the anterior mediastinum. Fine needle aspiration cytology of tumor mass yielded a scarcely cellular sample with individual atypical immature cells, fine chromatin structure and scarce cytoplasm with occasional granules and Auer rods. Considering the morphological, cytochemical and immunocytochemical characteristics of immature cells, the diagnosis of myeloid sarcoma was made and verified by histopathology of tumor biopsy sample. Immature cells were not found by analysis of bone marrow puncture sample, immunophenotyping of bone marrow cells and bone biopsy analysis. As immature cell proliferation was not detected in bone marrow and peripheral blood, while spread of the disease beyond the mediastinum

  5. Evaluation of Trace Elements in Augmentation of Statin-Induced Cytotoxicity in Uremic Serum-Exposed Human Rhabdomyosarcoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitoshi Uchiyama

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with end-stage kidney disease (ESKD are at higher risk for rhabdomyolysis induced by statin than patients with normal kidney function. Previously, we showed that this increase in the severity of statin-induced rhabdomyolysis was partly due to uremic toxins. However, changes in the quantity of various trace elements in ESKD patients likely contribute as well. The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of trace elements on statin-induced toxicity in rhabdomyosarcoma cells exposed to uremic serum (US cells for a long time. Cell viability, apoptosis, mRNA expression, and intracellular trace elements were assessed by viability assays, flow cytometry, real-time RT-PCR, and ICP-MS, respectively. US cells exhibited greater simvastatin-induced cytotoxicity than cells long-time exposed with normal serum (NS cells (non-overlapping 95% confidence intervals. Intracellular levels of Mg, Mn, Cu, and Zn were significantly less in US cells compared to that in NS cells (p < 0.05 or 0.01. Pre-treatment with TPEN increased simvastatin-induced cytotoxicity and eliminated the distinction between both cells of simvastatin-induced cytotoxicity. These results suggest that Zn deficiencies may be involved in the increased risk for muscle complaints in ESKD patients. In conclusion, the increased severity of statin-induced rhabdomyolysis in ESKD patients may be partly due to trace elements deficiencies.

  6. Proteomic evaluation of human umbilical cord tissue exposed to polybrominated diphenyl ethers in an e-waste recycling area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Minghui; Huo, Xia; Pan, Yukui; Cai, Haoxing; Dai, Yifeng; Xu, Xijin

    2018-02-01

    Parental exposure to polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) is associated with adverse birth outcomes. This study aims to examine differentially-expressed protein profiles in umbilical cord tissue, derived from mothers exposed to PBDEs, and investigate candidate biomarkers to reveal the underlying molecular mechanisms. Umbilical cord samples were obtained from women residing in an electronic waste (e-waste) recycling area (Guiyu) and reference area (Haojiang) in China. The concentration of PBDEs in umbilical cord tissue was determined by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Isobaric tagging for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ)-based proteomic technology was conducted to analyze differentially-expressed protein profiles. The total PBDE concentration was approximately five-fold higher in umbilical cords from Guiyu than from Haojiang (median 71.92ng/g vs. 15.52ng/g lipid, Pe-waste-exposed group compared with the reference group. The differentially-expressed proteins were principally involved in antioxidant defense, apoptosis, cell structure and metabolism. Among them, catalase and glutathione S-transferase omega-1, were down-regulated, and cytochrome c was found to be up-regulated, changes which were further verified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. These results suggest that an antioxidant imbalance and cell apoptosis in the umbilical cord following PBDE exposure is associated with neonatal birth outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Induction of micronuclei in cultured human lymphocytes exposed to quartz halogen lamps and its prevention by glass covers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Agostini, F; Izzotti, A; De Flora, S

    1993-01-01

    The light emitted by an uncovered tungsten halogen lamp (12 V, 50 W), equipped with a dichroic mirror, induced time-related and distance-related increases in the frequency of micronucleated lymphocytes following in vitro exposure. Peripheral blood lymphocytes from three healthy donors showed the same degree of sensitivity. This clastogenic effect could be ascribed to the emission of far-UV wavelengths (UVB and UVC) and was prevented by interposing a common glass cover. These results support the findings of our genotoxicity studies in repair-deficient bacteria and carcinogenicity studies in hairless mice, thereby suggesting possible health hazards associated with illumination with halogen quartz bulbs, to which an enormous number of individuals are nowadays exposed. These hazards can be simply avoided by using glass covers.

  8. Gene Regulatory Scenarios of Primary 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} Target Genes in a Human Myeloid Leukemia Cell Line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryynänen, Jussi; Seuter, Sabine [School of Medicine, Institute of Biomedicine, University of Eastern Finland, POB 1627, Kuopio FI-70211 (Finland); Campbell, Moray J. [Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Elm and Carlton Streets, Buffalo, NY 14263 (United States); Carlberg, Carsten, E-mail: carsten.carlberg@uef.fi [School of Medicine, Institute of Biomedicine, University of Eastern Finland, POB 1627, Kuopio FI-70211 (Finland)

    2013-10-16

    Genome- and transcriptome-wide data has significantly increased the amount of available information about primary 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} (1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3}) target genes in cancer cell models, such as human THP-1 myelomonocytic leukemia cells. In this study, we investigated the genes G0S2, CDKN1A and MYC as master examples of primary vitamin D receptor (VDR) targets being involved in the control of cellular proliferation. The chromosomal domains of G0S2 and CDKN1A are 140–170 kb in size and contain one and three VDR binding sites, respectively. This is rather compact compared to the MYC locus that is 15 times larger and accommodates four VDR binding sites. All eight VDR binding sites were studied by chromatin immunoprecipitation in THP-1 cells. Interestingly, the site closest to the transcription start site of the down-regulated MYC gene showed 1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3}-dependent reduction of VDR binding and is not associated with open chromatin. Four of the other seven VDR binding regions contain a typical DR3-type VDR binding sequence, three of which are also occupied with VDR in macrophage-like cells. In conclusion, the three examples suggest that each VDR target gene has an individual regulatory scenario. However, some general components of these scenarios may be useful for the development of new therapy regimens.

  9. The impact of ATRA on shaping human myeloid cell responses to epithelial cell-derived stimuli and on T-lymphocyte polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Arunima; Gogolak, Péter; Blottière, Hervé M; Rajnavölgyi, Éva

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin A plays an essential role in the maintenance of gut homeostasis but its interplay with chemokines has not been explored so far. Using an in vitro model system we studied the effects of human colonic epithelial cells (Caco2, HT-29, and HCT116) derived inflammatory stimuli on monocyte-derived dendritic cells and macrophages. Unstimulated Caco2 and HT-29 cells secreted CCL19, CCL21, and CCL22 chemokines, which could attract dendritic cells and macrophages and induced CCR7 receptor up-regulation by retinoic-acid resulting in dendritic cell migration. The chemokines Mk, CXCL16, and CXCL7 were secreted by all the 3 cell lines tested, and upon stimulation by IL-1β or TNF-α this effect was inhibited by ATRA but had no impact on CXCL1, CXCL8, and CCL20 secretion in response to IL-1β. In the presence of ATRA the supernatants of these cells induced CD103 expression on monocyte-derived dendritic cells and when conditioned by ATRA and cocultured with CD4(+) T-lymphocytes they reduced the proportion of Th17 T-cells. However, in the macrophage-T-cell cocultures the number of these effector T-cells was increased. Thus cytokine-activated colonic epithelial cells trigger the secretion of distinct combinations of chemokines depending on the proinflammatory stimulus and are controlled by retinoic acid, which also governs dendritic cell and macrophage responses.

  10. Fetal Metabolic Stress Disrupts Immune Homeostasis and Induces Proinflammatory Responses in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1- and Combination Antiretroviral Therapy-Exposed Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoeman, Johannes C; Moutloatse, Gontse P; Harms, Amy C; Vreeken, Rob J; Scherpbier, Henriette J; Van Leeuwen, Liesbeth; Kuijpers, Taco W; Reinecke, Carools J; Berger, Ruud; Hankemeier, Thomas; Bunders, Madeleine J

    2017-08-15

    Increased morbidity and fetal growth restriction are reported in uninfected children born to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected women treated with antiretroviral (ARV) therapy. Viruses and/or pharmacological interventions such as ARVs can induce metabolic stress, skewing the cell's immune response and restricting (cell) growth. Novel metabolomic techniques provided the opportunity to investigate the impact of fetal HIV-1 and combination ARV therapy (cART) exposure on the infants' immune metabolome. Peroxidized lipids, generated by reactive oxygen species, were increased in cART/HIV-1-exposed infants, indicating altered mitochondrial functioning. The lipid metabolism was further dysregulated with increased triglyceride species and a subsequent decrease in phospholipids in cART/HIV-1-exposed infants compared to control infants. Proinflammatory immune mediators, lysophospholipids as well as cytokines such as CXCL10 and CCL3, were increased whereas anti-inflammatory metabolites from the cytochrome P450 pathway were reduced in cART/HIV-1-exposed infants. Taken together, these data demonstrate that the fetal metabolism is impacted by maternal factors (cART and HIV-1) and skews physiological immune responses toward inflammation in the newborn infant. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  11. The recognition of N-glycans by the lectin ArtinM mediates cell death of a human myeloid leukemia cell line.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Caroline Carvalho

    Full Text Available ArtinM, a D-mannose-binding lectin from Artocarpus heterophyllus (jackfruit, interacts with N-glycosylated receptors on the surface of several cells of hematopoietic origin, triggering cell migration, degranulation, and cytokine release. Because malignant transformation is often associated with altered expression of cell surface glycans, we evaluated the interaction of ArtinM with human myelocytic leukemia cells and investigated cellular responses to lectin binding. The intensity of ArtinM binding varied across 3 leukemia cell lines: NB4>K562>U937. The binding, which was directly related to cell growth suppression, was inhibited in the presence of Manα1-3(Manα1-6Manβ1, and was reverted in underglycosylated NB4 cells. ArtinM interaction with NB4 cells induced cell death (IC(50 = 10 µg/mL, as indicated by cell surface exposure of phosphatidylserine and disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential unassociated with caspase activation or DNA fragmentation. Moreover, ArtinM treatment of NB4 cells strongly induced reactive oxygen species generation and autophagy, as indicated by the detection of acidic vesicular organelles in the treated cells. NB4 cell death was attributed to ArtinM recognition of the trimannosyl core of N-glycans containing a ß1,6-GlcNAc branch linked to α1,6-mannose. This modification correlated with higher levels of N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase V transcripts in NB4 cells than in K562 or U937 cells. Our results provide new insights into the potential of N-glycans containing a β1,6-GlcNAc branch linked to α1,6-mannose as a novel target for anti-leukemia treatment.

  12. The Recognition of N-Glycans by the Lectin ArtinM Mediates Cell Death of a Human Myeloid Leukemia Cell Line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Fernanda Caroline; Soares, Sandro Gomes; Tamarozzi, Mirela Barros; Rego, Eduardo Magalhães; Roque-Barreira, Maria-Cristina

    2011-01-01

    ArtinM, a d-mannose-binding lectin from Artocarpus heterophyllus (jackfruit), interacts with N-glycosylated receptors on the surface of several cells of hematopoietic origin, triggering cell migration, degranulation, and cytokine release. Because malignant transformation is often associated with altered expression of cell surface glycans, we evaluated the interaction of ArtinM with human myelocytic leukemia cells and investigated cellular responses to lectin binding. The intensity of ArtinM binding varied across 3 leukemia cell lines: NB4>K562>U937. The binding, which was directly related to cell growth suppression, was inhibited in the presence of Manα1-3(Manα1-6)Manβ1, and was reverted in underglycosylated NB4 cells. ArtinM interaction with NB4 cells induced cell death (IC50 = 10 µg/mL), as indicated by cell surface exposure of phosphatidylserine and disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential unassociated with caspase activation or DNA fragmentation. Moreover, ArtinM treatment of NB4 cells strongly induced reactive oxygen species generation and autophagy, as indicated by the detection of acidic vesicular organelles in the treated cells. NB4 cell death was attributed to ArtinM recognition of the trimannosyl core of N-glycans containing a ß1,6-GlcNAc branch linked to α1,6-mannose. This modification correlated with higher levels of N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase V transcripts in NB4 cells than in K562 or U937 cells. Our results provide new insights into the potential of N-glycans containing a β1,6-GlcNAc branch linked to α1,6-mannose as a novel target for anti-leukemia treatment. PMID:22132163

  13. Genetic and epigenetic alterations in normal and sensitive COPD-diseased human bronchial epithelial cells repeatedly exposed to air pollution-derived PM2.5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclercq, B; Platel, A; Antherieu, S; Alleman, L Y; Hardy, E M; Perdrix, E; Grova, N; Riffault, V; Appenzeller, B M; Happillon, M; Nesslany, F; Coddeville, P; Lo-Guidice, J-M; Garçon, G

    2017-11-01

    Even though clinical, epidemiological and toxicological studies have progressively provided a better knowledge of the underlying mechanisms by which air pollution-derived particulate matter (PM) exerts its harmful health effects, further in vitro studies on relevant cell systems are still needed. Hence, aiming of getting closer to the human in vivo conditions, primary human bronchial epithelial cells derived from normal subjects (NHBE) or sensitive chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)-diseased patients (DHBE) were differentiated at the air-liquid interface. Thereafter, they were repeatedly exposed to air pollution-derived PM2.5 to study the occurrence of some relevant genetic and/or epigenetic endpoints. Concentration-, exposure- and season-dependent increases of OH-B[a]P metabolites in NHBE, and to a lesser extent, COPD-DHBE cells were reported; however, there were more tetra-OH-B[a]P and 8-OHdG DNA adducts in COPD-DHBE cells. No increase in primary DNA strand break nor chromosomal aberration was observed in repeatedly exposed cells. Telomere length and telomerase activity were modified in a concentration- and exposure-dependent manner in NHBE and particularly COPD-DHBE cells. There were a global DNA hypomethylation, a P16 gene promoter hypermethylation, and a decreasing DNA methyltransferase activity in NHBE and notably COPD-DHBE cells repeatedly exposed. Changes in site-specific methylation, acetylation, and phosphorylation of histone H3 (i.e., H3K4me3, H3K9ac, H3K27ac, and H3S10ph) and related enzyme activities occurred in a concentration- and exposure-dependent manner in all the repeatedly exposed cells. Collectively, these results highlighted the key role played by genetic and even epigenetic events in NHBE and particularly sensitive COPD-DHBE cells repeatedly exposed to air pollution-derived PM2.5 and their different responsiveness. While these specific epigenetic changes have been already described in COPD and even lung cancer phenotypes, our

  14. Modeling of C/EBPalpha mutant acute myeloid leukemia reveals a common expression signature of committed myeloid leukemia-initiating cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirstetter, Peggy; Schuster, Mikkel B; Bereshchenko, Oksana

    2008-01-01

    Mutations in the CEBPA gene are present in 7%-10% of human patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, no genetic models exist that demonstrate their etiological relevance. To mimic the most common mutations affecting CEBPA-that is, those leading to loss of the 42 kDa C/EBPalpha isoform ...

  15. Bosutinib for Chronic Myeloid Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breccia, Massimo; Binotto, Gianni

    In recent years the availability of several tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) in the therapeutic armamentarium for chronic myeloid leukemia has dramatically changed the objectives and expectations of healthcare providers and patients. For many, but not all, patients the forerunner of TKI, imatinib, is still an excellent treatment option. Unfortunately, nearly 30-40% of imatinib-treated patients discontinue therapy in the long-term, because of failure and/or intolerance. Second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors are more potent drugs which are suitable for treatment of approximately 50% of patents for whom imatinib is unsuitable, and with high success and rapid responses. Bosutinib, an orally bioavailable Src/Abl tyrosine kinase inhibitor, has proved to be effective in vitro against resistant chronic myeloid leukemia cells that do not harbor the T315I or V299L ABL kinase domain mutations. During clinical development the manageable safety profile of bosutinib have become evident for both simple and more advanced treatment. In this review we summarize preclinical and clinical data for bosutinib and discuss its ideal field of action in comparison with other TKI.

  16. Molecular pathways: myeloid complicity in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stromnes, Ingunn M; Greenberg, Philip D; Hingorani, Sunil R

    2014-10-15

    Cancer-induced inflammation results in accumulation of myeloid cells. These myeloid cells include progenitors and progeny of monocytes, granulocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells. It has become increasingly evident that tumor-dependent factors can condition myeloid cells toward an immunosuppressive and protumorigenic phenotype. Thus, myeloid cells are not simply bystanders in malignancy or barometers of disease burden. Reflecting their dynamic and plastic nature, myeloid cells manifest a continuum of cellular differentiation and are intimately involved at all stages of neoplastic progression. They can promote tumorigenesis through both immune-dependent and -independent mechanisms and can dictate response to therapies. A greater understanding of the inherent plasticity and relationships among myeloid subsets is needed to inform therapeutic targeting. New clinical trials are being designed to modulate the activities of myeloid cells in cancer, which may be essential to maximize the efficacy of both conventional cytotoxic and immune-based therapies for solid tumors. Clin Cancer Res; 20(20); 5157-70. ©2014 AACR. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  17. AhR-dependent secretion of PDGF-BB by human classically activated macrophages exposed to DEP extracts stimulates lung fibroblast proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaguin, Marie [UMR INSERM U1085, Institut de Recherche sur la Santé, l' Environnement et le Travail (IRSET), Université de Rennes 1, 2 Avenue du Pr Léon Bernard, 35043 Rennes Cedex (France); Fardel, Olivier [UMR INSERM U1085, Institut de Recherche sur la Santé, l' Environnement et le Travail (IRSET), Université de Rennes 1, 2 Avenue du Pr Léon Bernard, 35043 Rennes Cedex (France); Pôle Biologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire (CHU) Rennes, 2 rue Henri Le Guilloux, 35033 Rennes Cedex (France); Lecureur, Valérie, E-mail: valerie.lecureur@univ-rennes1.fr [UMR INSERM U1085, Institut de Recherche sur la Santé, l' Environnement et le Travail (IRSET), Université de Rennes 1, 2 Avenue du Pr Léon Bernard, 35043 Rennes Cedex (France)

    2015-06-15

    Lung diseases are aggravated by exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEPs) found in air pollution. Macrophages are thought to play a crucial role in lung immune response to these pollutants, even if the mechanisms involved remain incompletely characterized. In the present study, we demonstrated that classically and alternative human macrophages (MΦ) exhibited increased secretion of PDGF-B in response to DEP extract (DEPe). This occurred via aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-activation because DEPe-induced PDGF-B overexpression was abrogated after AhR expression knock-down by RNA interference, in both M1 and M2 polarizing MΦ. In addition, TCDD and benzo(a)pyrene, two potent AhR ligands, also significantly increased mRNA expression of PDGF-B in M1 MΦ, whereas some weak ligands of AhR did not. We next evaluated the impact of conditioned media (CM) from MΦ culture exposed to DEPe or of recombinant PDGF-B onto lung fibroblast proliferation. The tyrosine kinase inhibitor, AG-1295, prevents phosphorylations of PDGF-Rβ, AKT and ERK1/2 and the proliferation of MRC-5 fibroblasts induced by recombinant PDGF-B and by CM from M1 polarizing MΦ, strongly suggesting that the PDGF-BB secreted by DEPe-exposed MΦ is sufficient to activate the PDGF-Rβ pathway of human lung fibroblasts. In conclusion, we demonstrated that human MΦ, whatever their polarization status, secrete PDGF-B in response to DEPe and that PDGF-B is a target gene of AhR. Therefore, induction of PDGF-B by DEP may participate in the deleterious effects towards human health triggered by such environmental urban contaminants. - Highlights: • PDGF-B expression and secretion are increased by DEPe exposure in human M1 and M2 MΦ. • DEPe-induced PDGF-B expression is aryl-hydrocarbon-dependent. • DEPe-exposed M1 MΦ secrete sufficient PDGF-B to increase lung fibroblast proliferation.

  18. Oxidative stress and apoptosis induction in human thyroid carcinoma cells exposed to the essential oil from Pistacia lentiscus aerial parts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Catalani

    Full Text Available Essential oils from the aerial parts (leaves, twigs and berries of Pistacia lentiscus (PLEO have been well characterized for their antibacterial and anti-inflammatory properties; however, poor information exists on their potential anticancer activity.Increasing concentrations of PLEO (0.01-0.1% v/v, 80-800 μg/ml were administered to a wide variety of cultured cancer cells from breast, cervix, colon, liver, lung, prostate, and thyroid carcinomas. Fibroblasts were also included as healthy control cells. Cell viability was monitored by WST-8 assay up to 72 hours after PLEO administration. The intracellular formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS, the induction of apoptosis, and the enhancement of chemotherapeutic drug cytotoxicity by PLEO were further investigated in the most responsive cancer cell line.A dose-dependent reduction of tumor cell viability was observed upon PLEO exposure; while no cytotoxic effect was revealed in healthy fibroblasts. FTC-133 thyroid cancer cells were found to be the most sensitive cells to PLEO treatment; accordingly, an intracellular accumulation of ROS and an activation of both the extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways were evidenced in FTC-133 cells after PLEO administration. Furthermore, the cytotoxic effect of the antineoplastic drugs cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil and etoposide was enhanced in PLEO-exposed FTC-133 cells.Taking into account its mode of action, PLEO might be considered as a promising source of natural antitumor agents which might have therapeutic potential in integrated oncology.

  19. Oxidative stress and apoptosis induction in human thyroid carcinoma cells exposed to the essential oil from Pistacia lentiscus aerial parts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalani, Simona; Palma, Francesco; Battistelli, Serafina; Benedetti, Serena

    2017-01-01

    Essential oils from the aerial parts (leaves, twigs and berries) of Pistacia lentiscus (PLEO) have been well characterized for their antibacterial and anti-inflammatory properties; however, poor information exists on their potential anticancer activity. Increasing concentrations of PLEO (0.01-0.1% v/v, 80-800 μg/ml) were administered to a wide variety of cultured cancer cells from breast, cervix, colon, liver, lung, prostate, and thyroid carcinomas. Fibroblasts were also included as healthy control cells. Cell viability was monitored by WST-8 assay up to 72 hours after PLEO administration. The intracellular formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), the induction of apoptosis, and the enhancement of chemotherapeutic drug cytotoxicity by PLEO were further investigated in the most responsive cancer cell line. A dose-dependent reduction of tumor cell viability was observed upon PLEO exposure; while no cytotoxic effect was revealed in healthy fibroblasts. FTC-133 thyroid cancer cells were found to be the most sensitive cells to PLEO treatment; accordingly, an intracellular accumulation of ROS and an activation of both the extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways were evidenced in FTC-133 cells after PLEO administration. Furthermore, the cytotoxic effect of the antineoplastic drugs cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil and etoposide was enhanced in PLEO-exposed FTC-133 cells. Taking into account its mode of action, PLEO might be considered as a promising source of natural antitumor agents which might have therapeutic potential in integrated oncology.

  20. Transcriptome analysis of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells exposed to Lassa virus and to the attenuated Mopeia/Lassa reassortant 29 (ML29), a vaccine candidate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata, Juan Carlos; Carrion, Ricardo; Patterson, Jean L; Crasta, Oswald; Zhang, Yan; Mani, Sachin; Jett, Marti; Poonia, Bhawna; Djavani, Mahmoud; White, David M; Lukashevich, Igor S; Salvato, Maria S

    2013-01-01

    Lassa virus (LASV) is the causative agent of Lassa Fever and is responsible for several hundred thousand infections and thousands of deaths annually in West Africa. LASV and the non-pathogenic Mopeia virus (MOPV) are both rodent-borne African arenaviruses. A live attenuated reassortant of MOPV and LASV, designated ML29, protects rodents and primates from LASV challenge and appears to be more attenuated than MOPV. To gain better insight into LASV-induced pathology and mechanism of attenuation we performed gene expression profiling in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) exposed to LASV and the vaccine candidate ML29. PBMC from healthy human subjects were exposed to either LASV or ML29. Although most PBMC are non-permissive for virus replication, they remain susceptible to signal transduction by virus particles. Total RNA was extracted and global gene expression was evaluated during the first 24 hours using high-density microarrays. Results were validated using RT-PCR, flow cytometry and ELISA. LASV and ML29 elicited differential expression of interferon-stimulated genes (ISG), as well as genes involved in apoptosis, NF-kB signaling and the coagulation pathways. These genes could eventually serve as biomarkers to predict disease outcomes. The remarkable differential expression of thrombomodulin, a key regulator of inflammation and coagulation, suggests its involvement with vascular abnormalities and mortality in Lassa fever disease.

  1. The effect of smoking on myeloid-related protein-8 and myeloid-related protein-14.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertugrul, Abdullah Seckin; Sahin, Hacer

    2016-05-20

    The aim of this study was to determine the myeloid-related protein-8 and myeloid-related protein-14 levels in the gingival crevicular fluid of smoker patients with generalized aggressive periodontitis (SAgP), smoker patients with chronic periodontitis (SCP), smoker patients with gingivitis (SG-smoker control), non-smoker patients with generalized aggressive periodontitis (AgP), non-smoker patients with chronic periodontitis (CP), and non-smoker patients with gingivitis (G-non-smoker control). The periodontal statuses of the patients were determined by periodontal clinical measurements and radiographical evaluations. The levels of myeloid-related protein-8 and myeloid-related protein-14 in the gingival crevicular fluid were assessed using enzyme-linked immuno sorbent assay. The myeloid-related protein-8 and myeloid-related protein-14 levels in the gingival crevicular fluid of patients with generalized aggressive periodontitis (non-smoker and smoker) were found to be statistically higher than patients with chronic periodontitis (non-smoker and smoker) and patients with gingivitis (non-smoker and smoker). Myeloid-related protein-8 and myeloid-related protein-14 levels of non-smokers were significantly higher than smokers in all types of periodontitis and gingivitis. The decreased myeloid-related protein-8 and myeloid-related protein-14 level could have prevented the haemostasis of calcium which plays a significant role in the migration of neutrophiles. Smoking affects myeloid-related protein-8 and myeloid-related protein-14 levels and may inhibit the antimicrobial efficiency against microorganisms. Due to these reasons smoker generalized aggressive periodontitis patients need to be treated in detail and their maintenance durations should be shortened.

  2. The effect of smoking on myeloid-related protein-8 and myeloid-related protein-14

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Seckin ERTUGRUL

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of this study was to determine the myeloid-related protein-8 and myeloid-related protein-14 levels in the gingival crevicular fluid of smoker patients with generalized aggressive periodontitis (SAgP, smoker patients with chronic periodontitis (SCP, smoker patients with gingivitis (SG-smoker control, non-smoker patients with generalized aggressive periodontitis (AgP, non-smoker patients with chronic periodontitis (CP, and non-smoker patients with gingivitis (G-non-smoker control. The periodontal statuses of the patients were determined by periodontal clinical measurements and radiographical evaluations. The levels of myeloid-related protein-8 and myeloid-related protein-14 in the gingival crevicular fluid were assessed using enzyme-linked immuno sorbent assay. The myeloid-related protein-8 and myeloid-related protein-14 levels in the gingival crevicular fluid of patients with generalized aggressive periodontitis (non-smoker and smoker were found to be statistically higher than patients with chronic periodontitis (non-smoker and smoker and patients with gingivitis (non-smoker and smoker. Myeloid-related protein-8 and myeloid-related protein-14 levels of non-smokers were significantly higher than smokers in all types of periodontitis and gingivitis. The decreased myeloid-related protein-8 and myeloid-related protein-14 level could have prevented the haemostasis of calcium which plays a significant role in the migration of neutrophiles. Smoking affects myeloid-related protein-8 and myeloid-related protein-14 levels and may inhibit the antimicrobial efficiency against microorganisms. Due to these reasons smoker generalized aggressive periodontitis patients need to be treated in detail and their maintenance durations should be shortened.

  3. Metalloproteinases: a Functional Pathway for Myeloid Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Jonathan; Chan, Matilda F; Werb, Zena

    2016-04-01

    Myeloid cells have diverse roles in regulating immunity, inflammation, and extracellular matrix turnover. To accomplish these tasks, myeloid cells carry an arsenal of metalloproteinases, which include the matrix metalloproteinases and the adamalysins. These enzymes have diverse substrate repertoires, and are thus involved in mediating proteolytic cascades, cell migration, and cell signaling. Dysregulation of metalloproteinases contributes to pathogenic processes, including inflammation, fibrosis, and cancer. Metalloproteinases also have important nonproteolytic functions in controlling cytoskeletal dynamics during macrophage fusion and enhancing transcription to promote antiviral immunity. This review highlights the diverse contributions of metalloproteinases to myeloid cell functions.

  4. Effect of adverse environmental conditions and protective clothing on temperature rise in a human body exposed to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Stephen M; McIntosh, Robert L; Iskra, Steve; Lajevardipour, Alireza; Wood, Andrew W

    2017-07-01

    This study considers the computationally determined thermal profile of a finely discretized, heterogeneous human body model, simulating a radiofrequency electromagnetic field (RF-EMF) worker wearing protective clothing subject to RF-EMF exposure, and subject to various environmental conditions including high ambient temperature and high humidity, with full thermoregulatory mechanisms in place. How the human body responds in various scenarios was investigated, and the information was used to consider safety limits in current international RF-EMF safety guidelines and standards. It was found that different environmental conditions had minimal impact on the magnitude of the thermal response due to RF-EMF exposure, and that the current safety factor of 10 applied in international RF-EMF safety guidelines and standards for RF-EMF workers is generally conservative, though it is only narrowly so when workers are subjected to the most adverse environmental conditions. Bioelectromagnetics. 38:356-363, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Subcellular proteomic analysis of host-pathogen interactions using human monocytes exposed to Yersinia pestis and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, C G; Gonzales, A D; Choi, M W; Chromy, B A; Fitch, J P; McCutchen-Maloney, S L

    2004-05-20

    Yersinia pestis, the etiological agent of plague, is of concern to human health both from an infectious disease and a civilian biodefense perspective. While Y. pestis and Y. pseudotuberculosis share more than 90% DNA homology, they have significantly different clinical manifestations. Plague is often fatal if untreated, yet Y. pseudotuberculosis causes severe intestinal distress and is rarely fatal. A better understanding of host response to these closely related pathogens may help explain the different mechanisms of virulence and pathogenesis that result in such different clinical outcomes. The aim of this study was to characterize host protein expression changes in human monocyte-like U937 cells after exposure to Y. pestis and Y. pseudotuberculosis. In order to gain global proteomic coverage of host response, proteins from cytoplasmic, nuclear and membrane fractions of host cells were studied by 2-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis (2-D DIGE) and relative protein expression differences were quantitated. Differentially expressed proteins, with at least 1.5 fold expression changes and p values of 0.01 or less, were identified by MALDI-MS or LC/MS/MS. With these criteria, differential expression was detected in 16 human proteins after Y. pestis exposure and 13 human proteins after Y. pseudotuberculosis exposure, of which only two of the differentially expressed proteins identified were shared between the two exposures. Proteins identified in this study are reported to be involved in a wide spectrum of cellular functions and host defense mechanisms including apoptosis, cytoskeletal rearrangement, protein synthesis and degradation, DNA replication and transcription, metabolism, protein folding, and cell signaling. Notably, the differential expression patterns observed can distinguish the two pathogen exposures from each other and from unexposed host cells. The functions of the differentially expressed proteins identified provide insight on the different

  6. Assessment of the DNA Damage in Human Sperm and Lymphocytes Exposed to the Carcinogen Food Contaminant Furan with Comet Assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilek Pandir

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTThe aim of this work was to assess the damage of DNA in human blood cell and spermin vitro under the influence of furan. These cells were administered 0-600 μM of furan at 37 and 32oC for 30 and 60 min, respectively. A significant increase in tail DNA%, tail length and moment indicating DNA damage was observed at increasing doses when compared to the controls. The treatment with 300 and 600 μM of furan showed a maximum increase of 86.74 ± 2.43 and 93.29 ± 8.68 compared to the control tail DNA% in lymphocytes. However, only 600 μM of furan showed a maximum increase of 94.71 ± 6.24 compared to the control tail DNA% in sperm. The results suggested that furan caused DNA damage in lymphocytes at increasing doses, but appeared to have not the same effect on human sperm at the low doses. Genotoxic activity had an impact on the risk assessment of furan formed on the food for human cells. Therefore, it would be important to further investigate these properties of furan as the food mutagen.

  7. Oxidation of thiols and modification of redox-sensitive signaling in human lung epithelial cells exposed to Pseudomonas pyocyanin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Iman M; Britigan, Bradley E; Abdalla, Maher Y

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of pyocyanin exposure on mitochondrial GSH, other cellular thiols (thioredoxin-1, Trx-1), and oxidant-sensitive signaling pathways hypoxia inducible factor (HIF-1α) and heme oxygenase (HO-1) in A549 and HBE cell lines. A549 human type II alveolar epithelial cells and human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells were treated with varying concentrations of pyocyanin extracted from Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria. Cytoplasmic and mitochondrial thiols and oxidant sensitive signal transduction proteins (HIF-1α and HO-1) were measured. Exposure to pyocyanin generated reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cellular mitochondria and altered total cellular glutathione (GSH). Pyocyanin, at concentrations present in conditions in vivo, increased oxidized Trx-1 in A549 human type II alveolar epithelial cells and HBE cells by 184 and 74%, respectively. Oxidized mitochondrial glutathione (GSSG) was elevated more than twofold in both cell types. Pyocyanin also increased the cellular oxidant-sensitive proteins HIF-1α and HO-1. Data indicate that pyocyanin-induced alterations in mitochondrial and cytosolic thiols, as well as oxidant-sensitive proteins, may contribute to P. aeruginosa-mediated lung injury.

  8. Human health risk assessment with spatial analysis: Study of a population chronically exposed to arsenic through drinking water from Argentina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navoni, J.A., E-mail: jnavoni@ffyb.uba.ar [Cátedra de Toxicología y Química Legal, Facultad de Farmacia y Bioquímica, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Junín 956, C1113AAD Ciudad Autónoma de Buenos Aires (Argentina); De Pietri, D., E-mail: depietrid@hotmail.com [Dirección Nacional de Determinantes de la Salud e Investigación, Ministerio de Salud de la Nación, Av. 9 de Julio 1925, C1073ABA Ciudad Autónoma de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Olmos, V. [Cátedra de Toxicología y Química Legal, Facultad de Farmacia y Bioquímica, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Junín 956, C1113AAD Ciudad Autónoma de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Gimenez, C. [Cátedra Química Analítica I, Universidad Nacional del Chaco Austral. Cmte., Fernández 755 (3700), Pres. Roque Sáenz Peña, Chaco (Argentina); Bovi Mitre, G. [Grupo INQA (Investigación Química Aplicada) Facultad de Ciencias Agrarias, Universidad Nacional de Jujuy, Alberdi 47, piso 1, San Salvador de Jujuy, Jujuy CP 4600 (Argentina); and others

    2014-11-15

    Arsenic (As) is a ubiquitous element widely distributed in the environment. This metalloid has proven carcinogenic action in man. The aim of this work was to assess the health risk related to As exposure through drinking water in an Argentinean population, applying spatial analytical techniques in addition to conventional approaches. The study involved 650 inhabitants from Chaco and Santiago del Estero provinces. Arsenic in drinking water (Asw) and urine (UAs) was measured by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Average daily dose (ADD), hazard quotient (HQ), and carcinogenic risk (CR) were estimated, geo-referenced and integrated with demographical data by a health composite index (HI) applying geographic information system (GIS) analysis. Asw covered a wide range of concentration: from non-detectable (ND) to 2000 μg/L. More than 90% of the population was exposed to As, with UAs levels above the intervention level of 100 μg/g creatinine. GIS analysis described an expected level of exposure lower than the observed, indicating possible additional source/s of exposure to inorganic arsenic. In 68% of the locations, the population had a HQ greater than 1, and the CR ranged between 5·10{sup −5} and 2,1·10{sup −2}. An environmental exposure area through ADD geo-referencing defined a baseline scenario for space-time risk assessment. The time of residence, the demographic density and the potential health considered outcomes helped characterize the health risk in the region. The geospatial analysis contributed to delimitate and analyze the change tendencies of risk in the region, broadening the scopes of the results for a decision-making process. - Highlights: • Risk assessment (RA) to As using deterministic procedures • Integration of RA through deterministic procedures with GIS tools • Analysis of the time-space behavior of the risk area • Analysis of As effect outcomes through HI • Broaden the scopes of deterministic approaches.

  9. Human health risk assessment with spatial analysis: study of a population chronically exposed to arsenic through drinking water from Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navoni, J A; De Pietri, D; Olmos, V; Gimenez, C; Bovi Mitre, G; de Titto, E; Villaamil Lepori, E C

    2014-11-15

    Arsenic (As) is a ubiquitous element widely distributed in the environment. This metalloid has proven carcinogenic action in man. The aim of this work was to assess the health risk related to As exposure through drinking water in an Argentinean population, applying spatial analytical techniques in addition to conventional approaches. The study involved 650 inhabitants from Chaco and Santiago del Estero provinces. Arsenic in drinking water (Asw) and urine (UAs) was measured by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Average daily dose (ADD), hazard quotient (HQ), and carcinogenic risk (CR) were estimated, geo-referenced and integrated with demographical data by a health composite index (HI) applying geographic information system (GIS) analysis. Asw covered a wide range of concentration: from non-detectable (ND) to 2000 μg/L. More than 90% of the population was exposed to As, with UAs levels above the intervention level of 100 μg/g creatinine. GIS analysis described an expected level of exposure lower than the observed, indicating possible additional source/s of exposure to inorganic arsenic. In 68% of the locations, the population had a HQ greater than 1, and the CR ranged between 5·10(-5) and 2,1·10(-2). An environmental exposure area through ADD geo-referencing defined a baseline scenario for space-time risk assessment. The time of residence, the demographic density and the potential health considered outcomes helped characterize the health risk in the region. The geospatial analysis contributed to delimitate and analyze the change tendencies of risk in the region, broadening the scopes of the results for a decision-making process. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Metal(loid) levels in biological matrices from human populations exposed to mining contamination--Panasqueira Mine (Portugal).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Patrícia; Costa, Solange; Silva, Susana; Walter, Alan; Ranville, James; Sousa, Ana C A; Costa, Carla; Coelho, Marta; García-Lestón, Julia; Pastorinho, M Ramiro; Laffon, Blanca; Pásaro, Eduardo; Harrington, Chris; Taylor, Andrew; Teixeira, João Paulo

    2012-01-01

    Mining activities may affect the health of miners and communities living near mining sites, and these health effects may persist even when the mine is abandoned. During mining processes various toxic wastes are produced and released into the surrounding environment, resulting in contamination of air, drinking water, rivers, plants, and soils. In a geochemical sampling campaign undertaken in the Panasqueira Mine area of central Portugal, an anomalous distribution of several metals and arsenic (As) was identified in various environmental media. Several potentially harmful elements, including As, cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), manganese (Mn), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), and selenium (Se), were quantified in blood, urine, hair, and nails (toe and finger) from a group of individuals living near the Panasqueira Mine who were environmentally and occupationally exposed. A group with similar demographic characteristics without known exposure to mining activities was also compared. Genotoxicity was evaluated by means of T-cell receptor (TCR) mutation assay, and percentages of different lymphocyte subsets were selected as immunotoxicity biomarkers. Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) analysis showed elevated levels of As, Cd, Cr, Mn, and Pb in all biological samples taken from populations living close to the mine compared to controls. Genotoxic and immunotoxic differences were also observed. The results provide evidence of an elevated potential risk to the health of populations, with environmental and occupational exposures resulting from mining activities. Further, the results emphasize the need to implement preventive measures, remediation, and rehabilitation plans for the region.

  11. Effects of Internet-Based Self-Efficacy Intervention on Secondary Traumatic Stress and Secondary Posttraumatic Growth among Health and Human Services Professionals Exposed to Indirect Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieslak, Roman; Benight, Charles C; Rogala, Anna; Smoktunowicz, Ewelina; Kowalska, Martyna; Zukowska, Katarzyna; Yeager, Carolyn; Luszczynska, Aleksandra

    2016-01-01

    Although the evidence for the associations among self-efficacy, secondary traumatic stress (STS) and secondary posttraumatic growth (SPTG) is mounting, there is a lack of the experimental evidence for the influence of self-efficacy on positive and negative mental health outcomes among professionals indirectly exposed to trauma. This study investigated the effects of an internet-based self-efficacy intervention (the experimental condition), compared to an education (the active control condition) on STS and SPTG among workers exposed to traumatic events indirectly, through their clients. We hypothesized that the group assignment (experimental vs. control) would affect STS and SPTG indirectly, with a mediating role of self-efficacy beliefs. Participants were 168 health and human services professionals (78% women), exposed indirectly to a traumatic event at work. They were randomly assigned to either a 4-session internet-based self-efficacy intervention (n = 87) or an education control group (n = 81) which received information about coping resources and consequences of stressors at work or at home. STS, SPTG, and self-efficacy were measured at the baseline (Time 1), 1-month follow-up (Time 2) and 2-month follow-up (Time 3). Analysis of covariance showed that the group assignment had a significant effect on STS (Time 2) and self-efficacy (Time 2), with lower STS and higher self-efficacy reported by the self-efficacy intervention participants. Compared to the experimental group, the active control (education) group participants reported higher SPTG at Time 2. Mediation analyses indicated that the group assignment had indirect effects on STS and SPTG at Time 3. Workers who experienced increases in self-efficacy (Time 2) through the intervention were more likely to report lower STS and higher SPTG at Time 3. Elucidating the mediating processes that explain why an intervention for secondary trauma works is essential in order to develop more effective support systems that

  12. Inhibition of Inflammatory and Proliferative Responses of Human Keratinocytes Exposed to the Sesquiterpene Lactones Dehydrocostuslactone and Costunolide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarponi, Claudia; Butturini, Elena; Sestito, Rosanna; Madonna, Stefania; Cavani, Andrea; Mariotto, Sofia; Albanesi, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    The imbalance of the intracellular redox state and, in particular, of the glutathione (GSH)/GSH disulfide couple homeostasis, is involved in the pathogenesis of a number of diseases. In many skin diseases, including psoriasis, oxidative stress plays an important role, as demonstrated by the observation that treatments leading to increase of the local levels of oxidant species ameliorate the disease. Recently, dehydrocostuslactone (DCE) and costunolide (CS), two terpenes naturally occurring in many plants, have been found to exert various anti-inflammatory and pro-apoptotic effects on different human cell types. These compounds decrease the level of the intracellular GSH by direct interaction with it, and, therefore, can alter cellular redox state. DCE and CS can trigger S-glutathionylation of various substrates, including the transcription factor STAT3 and JAK1/2 proteins. In the present study, we investigated on the potential role of DCE and CS in regulating inflammatory and proliferative responses of human keratinocytes to cytokines. We demonstrated that DCE and CS decreased intracellular GSH levels in human keratinocytes, as well as inhibited STAT3 and STAT1 phosphorylation and activation triggered by IL-22 or IFN-γ, respectively. Consequently, DCE and CS decreased the IL-22- and IFN-γ-induced expression of inflammatory and regulatory genes in keratinocytes, including CCL2, CXCL10, ICAM-1 and SOCS3. DCE and CS also inhibited proliferation and cell-cycle progression-related gene expression, as well as they promoted cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. In parallel, DCE and CS activated the anti-inflammatory EGFR and ERK1/2 molecules in keratinocytes, and, thus, wound healing in an in vitro injury model. In light of our findings, we can hypothesize that the employment of DCE and CS in psoriasis could efficiently counteract the pro-inflammatory effects of IFN-γ and IL-22 on keratinocytes, revert the apoptosis-resistant phenotype, as well as inhibit hyperproliferation

  13. Inhibition of inflammatory and proliferative responses of human keratinocytes exposed to the sesquiterpene lactones dehydrocostuslactone and costunolide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Scarponi

    Full Text Available The imbalance of the intracellular redox state and, in particular, of the glutathione (GSH/GSH disulfide couple homeostasis, is involved in the pathogenesis of a number of diseases. In many skin diseases, including psoriasis, oxidative stress plays an important role, as demonstrated by the observation that treatments leading to increase of the local levels of oxidant species ameliorate the disease. Recently, dehydrocostuslactone (DCE and costunolide (CS, two terpenes naturally occurring in many plants, have been found to exert various anti-inflammatory and pro-apoptotic effects on different human cell types. These compounds decrease the level of the intracellular GSH by direct interaction with it, and, therefore, can alter cellular redox state. DCE and CS can trigger S-glutathionylation of various substrates, including the transcription factor STAT3 and JAK1/2 proteins. In the present study, we investigated on the potential role of DCE and CS in regulating inflammatory and proliferative responses of human keratinocytes to cytokines. We demonstrated that DCE and CS decreased intracellular GSH levels in human keratinocytes, as well as inhibited STAT3 and STAT1 phosphorylation and activation triggered by IL-22 or IFN-γ, respectively. Consequently, DCE and CS decreased the IL-22- and IFN-γ-induced expression of inflammatory and regulatory genes in keratinocytes, including CCL2, CXCL10, ICAM-1 and SOCS3. DCE and CS also inhibited proliferation and cell-cycle progression-related gene expression, as well as they promoted cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. In parallel, DCE and CS activated the anti-inflammatory EGFR and ERK1/2 molecules in keratinocytes, and, thus, wound healing in an in vitro injury model. In light of our findings, we can hypothesize that the employment of DCE and CS in psoriasis could efficiently counteract the pro-inflammatory effects of IFN-γ and IL-22 on keratinocytes, revert the apoptosis-resistant phenotype, as well as inhibit

  14. [Loosening of condensed chromatin in human blood lymphocytes exposed to irradiation with a low-energy He-Ne laser].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manteĭfel', V M; Karu, T I

    2009-01-01

    It was shown that, 1 h after irradiation of human blood lymphocytes with a He-Ne laser at 56 J/m2 (5.6 W/m2, 10 s), the relative optical density of condensed chromatin masses observed in ultrathin sections was decreased (p irradiation also results in dispersion of condensed chromatin clumps in the nucleoplasm and enhancement of their angularity, i.e., in extension of the clump surface. These shifts, correlating with the activation of transcription, may be due to decompaction of the chromatin fibers not only on the periphery of chromatin clusters in the center of the nucleus, but also within the masses of condensed chromatin.

  15. Induction of chromatin damage and distribution of isochromatid breaks in human fibroblast cells exposed to heavy ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawata, Tetsuya; Ito, Hisao; Motoori, Ken; Ueda, Takuya; Shigematsu, Naoyuki; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Durante, Marco; George, Kerry; Wu, Honglu; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2002-01-01

    The frequency of chromatid breaks and the distribution of isochromatid breaks were measured in G2-phase normal human fibroblasts prematurely condensed a short time after exposure to low- or high-LET radiations. The average number of isochromatid breaks from a single particle traversal increased with increasing LET values, while the average number of chromatid-type breaks appeared to reach a plateau. The distribution of isochromatid breaks after high-LET iron particles exposure was overdispersed compared to gamma-rays, indicating that a single iron particle traversal through a cell nucleus can produce multiple isochromatid breaks.

  16. Combined lipidomic and proteomic analysis of isolated human islets exposed to palmitate reveals time-dependent changes in insulin secretion and lipid metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsten Roomp

    Full Text Available Studies on the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM have linked the accumulation of lipid metabolites to the development of beta-cell dysfunction and impaired insulin secretion. In most in vitro models of T2DM, rodent islets or beta-cell lines are used and typically focus is on specific cellular pathways or organs. Our aim was to, firstly, develop a combined lipidomics and proteomics approach for lipotoxicity in isolated human islets and, secondly, investigate if the approach could delineate novel and/ or confirm reported mechanisms of lipotoxicity. To this end isolated human pancreatic islets, exposed to chronically elevated palmitate concentrations for 0, 2 and 7 days, were functionally characterized and their levels of multiple targeted lipid and untargeted protein species determined. Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from the islets increased on day 2 and decreased on day 7. At day 7 islet insulin content decreased and the proinsulin to insulin content ratio doubled. Amounts of cholesterol, stearic acid, C16 dihydroceramide and C24:1 sphingomyelin, obtained from the lipidomic screen, increased time-dependently in the palmitate-exposed islets. The proteomic screen identified matching changes in proteins involved in lipid biosynthesis indicating up-regulated cholesterol and lipid biosynthesis in the islets. Furthermore, proteins associated with immature secretory granules were decreased when palmitate exposure time was increased despite their high affinity for cholesterol. Proteins associated with mature secretory granules remained unchanged. Pathway analysis based on the protein and lipid expression profiles implicated autocrine effects of insulin in lipotoxicity. Taken together the study demonstrates that combining different omics approaches has potential in mapping of multiple simultaneous cellular events. However, it also shows that challenges exist for effectively combining lipidomics and proteomics in primary cells. Our

  17. Luteoloside Inhibits Proliferation of Human Chronic Myeloid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    apoptosis detection kit and Hoechst staining followed by observation under a fluorescence microscope. The expression of cell cycle- and .... with the specific primary antibodies with a 1:1000 dilution. The membranes were washed and .... education department of Guangdong province. (no. 2012LYM_0067), the Dongguan ...

  18. Changes in Composition and Function of Human Intestinal Microbiota Exposed to Chlorpyrifos in Oil as Assessed by the SHIME® Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Reygner

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The presence of pesticide residues in food is a public health problem. Exposure to these substances in daily life could have serious effects on the intestine—the first organ to come into contact with food contaminants. The present study investigated the impact of a low dose (1 mg/day in oil of the pesticide chlorpyrifos (CPF on the community structure, diversity and metabolic response of the human gut microbiota using the SHIME® model (six reactors, representing the different parts of the gastrointestinal tract. The last three reactors (representing the colon were inoculated with a mixture of feces from human adults. Three time points were studied: immediately before the first dose of CPF, and then after 15 and 30 days of CPF-oil administration. By using conventional bacterial culture and molecular biology methods, we showed that CPF in oil can affect the gut microbiota. It had the greatest effects on counts of culturable bacteria (with an increase in Enterobacteria, Bacteroides spp. and clostridia counts, and a decrease in bifidobacterial counts and fermentative activity, which were colon-segment-dependent. Our results suggest that: (i CPF in oil treatment affects the gut microbiota (although there was some discordance between the culture-dependent and culture-independent analyses; (ii the changes are “SHIME®-compartment” specific; and (iii the changes are associated with minor alterations in the production of short-chain fatty acids and lactate.

  19. Induction and prevention of micronuclei and chromosomal aberrations in cultured human lymphocytes exposed to the light of halogen tungsten lamps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Agostini, F; Caimo, A; De Filippi, S; De Flora, S

    1999-07-01

    Previous studies have shown that the light emitted by halogen tungsten lamps contains UV radiation in the UV-A, UV-B and UV-C regions, induces mutations and irreparable DNA damage in bacteria, enhances the frequency of micronuclei in cultured human lymphocytes and is potently carcinogenic to the skin of hairless mice. The present study showed that the light emitted by an uncovered, traditional halogen lamp induces a significant, dose-related and time-related increase not only in micronuclei but also in chromosome-type aberrations, such as breaks, and even more in chromatid-type aberrations, such as isochromatid breaks, exchanges and isochromatid/chromatid interchanges, all including gaps or not, in cultured human lymphocytes. All these genotoxic effects were completely prevented by shielding the same lamp with a silica glass cover, blocking UV radiation. A new model of halogen lamp, having the quartz bulb treated in order to reduce the output of UV radiation, was considerably less genotoxic than the uncovered halogen lamp, yet induction of chromosomal alterations was observed at high illuminance levels.

  20. Effects of p-coumaric acid on erythema and pigmentation of human skin exposed to ultraviolet radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Y K; Kim, S J; Boo, Y C; Baek, J H; Lee, S H; Koh, J S

    2011-04-01

    It has been recently recognized that p-coumaric acid (PCA) is a strong inhibitor of cellular melanogenesis. To evaluate the erythema-suppressive and skin-lightening effects of PCA after topical application to human skin. The control and PCA cream products were applied twice daily to the skin of the forearm of 21 subjects before and after ultraviolet (UV) irradiation to determine whether they could prevent erythema formation and pigmentation. The cream products were also applied to different areas only after the induction of erythema or pigmentation to determine whether they could have a depigmenting effect. A 7-day application of control and PCA cream products before UV irradiation decreased UV-induced erythema formation by 31% and 77%, respectively, compared with untreated skin. When the PCA cream was applied after UV irradiation, its effects on skin colour or pigmentation were less remarkable. However, the melanin index was significantly decreased at the sites treated with PCA cream for 70 days compared with control sites, and the Individual Typology Angle (ITA°) value was increased significantly. Of the 21 subjects, 2 had mild adverse skin reactions to both the PCA and control creams. These results suggest that PCA cream can reduce UV-induced erythema formation and subsequent pigmentation in human skin. © The Author(s). CED © 2010 British Association of Dermatologists.

  1. Cytogenetic studies in human cells exposed in vitro to GSM-900 MHz radiofrequency radiation using R-banded karyotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourthoumieu, S; Joubert, V; Marin, B; Collin, A; Leveque, P; Terro, F; Yardin, C

    2010-12-01

    It is important to determine the possible effects of exposure to radiofrequency (RF) radiation on the genetic material of cells since damage to the DNA of somatic cells may be linked to cancer development or cell death and damage to germ cells may lead to genetic damage in next and subsequent generations. The objective of this study was to investigate whether exposure to radiofrequency radiation similar to that emitted by mobile phones of second-generation standard Global System for Mobile Communication (GSM) induces genotoxic effects in cultured human cells. The cytogenetic effects of GSM-900 MHz (GSM-900) RF radiation were investigated using R-banded karyotyping after in vitro exposure of human cells (amniotic cells) for 24 h. The average specific absorption rate (SAR) was 0.25 W/kg. The exposures were carried out in wire-patch cells (WPCs) under strictly controlled conditions of temperature. The genotoxic effect was assessed immediately or 24 h after exposure using four different samples. One hundred metaphase cells were analyzed per assay. Positive controls were provided by using bleomycin. We found no direct cytogenetic effects of GSM-900 either 0 h or 24 h after exposure. To the best of our knowledge, our work is the first to study genotoxicity using complete R-banded karyotyping, which allows visualizing all the chromosomal rearrangements, either numerical or structural.

  2. [ARTCEREB irrigation and perfusion solution for cerebrospinal surgery: pharmacological assessment using human astrocytes exposed to test solutions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Masuhiro; Doi, Kazuhisa; Enomoto, Riyo; Lee, Eibai; Naito, Shinsaku; Yamauchi, Aiko

    2009-09-01

    ARTCEREB irrigation and perfusion solution (Artcereb) is a preparation intended for the irrigation and perfusion of the cerebral ventricles, and it is therefore important to evaluate the effects of Artcereb on brain cells. In vitro assessment of the effects of Artcereb in cell cultures of human fetal astrocytes was conducted in comparison with normal saline and lactated Ringer's solution. The effects of exposure to Artcereb were evaluated based on microscopic images of the mitochondria stained with rhodamine 123. The effects of exposure to Artcereb on cell function were also evaluated by quantitative analysis of mitochondrial activity based on rhodamine 123 and (3)H-thymidine incorporation. Morphological changes in nuclear structure were also evaluated. The results of the present study showed that cell function in cell cultures of human astrocytes was relatively unaffected by exposure to Artcereb as compared with normal saline or lactated Ringer's solution, suggesting that Artcereb has less effect on brain cells than normal saline or lactated Ringer's solution when used for the irrigation or perfusion of the cerebral ventricles.

  3. Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-30

    Adult Acute Erythroid Leukemia (M6); Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  4. Key Data Elements in Myeloid Leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Varghese, J.; Holz, C.; Neuhaus, P.; Bernardi, M.; Boehm, A.; Ganser, A.; Gore, S.; Heaney, M.; Hochhaus, A.; Hofmann, W.K.; Krug, U.; Muller-Tidow, C.; Smith, A.; Weltermann, A.; Witte, T.J.M. de; Hehlmann, R.; Dugas, M.

    2016-01-01

    Data standards consisting of key data elements for clinical routine and trial documentation harmonize documentation within and across different health care institutions making documentation more efficient and improving scientific data analysis. This work focusses on the field of myeloid leukemia

  5. Acute myeloid leukemia presenting as galactorrhea

    OpenAIRE

    Nambiar, K. Rakul; Nair, Sreejith G.; Devi, R. Nandini

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) presents with symptoms related to pancytopenia (weakness, infections, bleeding diathesis) and organ infiltration with leukemic cells. Galactorrhea is an uncommon manifestation of AML. We report a case of AML presenting with galactorrhea.

  6. Gene expression profiling in acute myeloid leukaemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jonge, H. J. M.; Huls, G.; de Bont, E. S. J. M.

    Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) is a heterogeneous disease characterised by clonal malignant haematopoiesis with a differentiation arrest and excessive proliferation of leukaemic blasts. Over the past decades, the heterogeneity of AML has been illustrated by evolving classifications based on

  7. Exploring the acute myeloid leukaemias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TB Thapa

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The acute myeloid leukemias are genetically a diverse group of neoplasm with varied clinical behavior and response to treatment. Advances in immunophenotyping, cytogenetics and molecular genetics have resulted in better understanding of their genesis. Risk stratification of different variants is now emerging. Therapy strategies are now increasingly being developed considering the inherent biological behavior of the different subtypes. It is anticipated that in the future, deeper secrets of these once fatal diseases will be unraveled by advances in newer genomic techniques. It is hoped that future use of gene specific tailored therapy and strategies will result in longer survival in cases showing poorer prognosis at present. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/jpn.v3i6.9001 Journal of Pathology of Nepal (2013 Vol. 3, 497-501

  8. Effects of using human patient simulator versus a CD-ROM on learning the management of patients exposed to chemical agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Don; Flagg, Amanda; Dremsa, Theresa L

    2010-01-01

    Very little prospective, randomized, experimental research exists on the use of simulation as a teaching method, and no studies have compared the effects of 2 strategies of using the Human Patient Simulator (HPS) and a CD-ROM on the management of patients exposed to chemical agents. A prospective, pretest-posttest experimental, mixed design (within and between) was used to determine if there were statistically significant differences between educational strategies using HPS, CD-ROM, and a control group in the care of patients exposed to chemical agents. Care was operationally defined as the score on the Management of Chemical Warfare Patients Performance (MCWPP) instrument. Participants included active duty and reserve military nurses (n=92). They were randomly assigned to one of 3 teaching groups: HPS (n=30), CD-ROM (n=31), or a control group (n=31). Analysis of variance and a Tukey post-hoc test were used to analyze the data. The means on MCWPP instrument were as follows: HPS (pretest: mean=65.13, SD ± 8.9; posttest mean=73.0, SD ± 8.6); CD-ROM (pretest: mean=67.74, SD ± 11.18, posttest mean=65.67, SD ± 10.82); control (pretest: mean=68.51 SD ± 8.5; posttest mean=62.6, SD ± 8.6). There were no significant differences between the groups on the pretest (P=.363), but there were significant differences on the posttest (P=.001). Post-hoc analyses indicated the HPS group performed better than the CD-ROM group (P=.017) and the control group (P=.000). There was no significant difference between the CD-ROM and control groups (P=.485). Based on the results of this study, the HPS is more effective than the CD-ROM in teaching nurses about the care of patients exposed to chemical agents.

  9. Switching to Efavirenz Versus Remaining on Ritonavir-boosted Lopinavir in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-infected Children Exposed to Nevirapine: Long-term Outcomes of a Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murnane, Pamela M; Strehlau, Renate; Shiau, Stephanie; Patel, Faeezah; Mbete, Ndileke; Hunt, Gillian; Abrams, Elaine J; Coovadia, Ashraf; Kuhn, Louise

    2017-08-01

    We previously demonstrated the noninferiority of switching to efavirenz (EFV) versus remaining on ritonavir-boosted lopinavir (LPV/r) for virologic control in children infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and exposed to nevirapine (NVP) for prevention of mother-to-child transmission. Here we assess outcomes up to 4 years post-randomization. From 2010-2013, 298 NVP-exposed HIV-infected children ≥3 years of age were randomized to switch to EFV or remain on LPV/r in Johannesburg, South Africa (Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01146873). After trial completion, participants were invited to enroll into observational follow-up. We compared HIV RNA levels, CD4 counts and percentages, lipids, and growth across groups through four years post-randomization. HIV RNA levels 51-1000 copies/mL were less frequently observed in the EFV group than the LPV/r group (odds ratio [OR] 0.67, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.51-0.88, P = .004), as was HIV RNA >1000 copies/mL (OR 0.52 95% CI: 0.28-0.98, P = .04). The probability of confirmed HIV RNA >1000 copies/mL by 48 months was 0.07 and 0.12 in the EFV and LPV/r groups, respectively (P = .21). Children randomized to EFV had a reduced risk of elevated total cholesterol (OR 0.45 95% CI: 0.27-0.75, P = .002) and a reduced risk of abnormal triglycerides (OR 0.42, 95% CI 0.29-0.62, P switching virologically suppressed NVP-exposed HIV-infected children ≥3 years of age from LPV/r to EFV are sustained long-term. This approach has several advantages, including improved palatability, reduced metabolic toxicity, simplified cotreatment for tuberculosis, and preservation of second line options. NCT01146873.

  10. Nontargeted stressful effects in normal human fibroblast cultures exposed to low fluences of high charge, high energy (HZE) particles: kinetics of biologic responses and significance of secondary radiations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonon, Géraldine; Groetz, Jean-Emmanuel; de Toledo, Sonia M; Howell, Roger W; Fromm, Michel; Azzam, Edouard I

    2013-04-01

    The induction of nontargeted stressful effects in cell populations exposed to low fluences of high charge (Z) and high energy (E) particles is relevant to estimates of the health risks of space radiation. We investigated the up-regulation of stress markers in confluent normal human fibroblast cultures exposed to 1,000 MeV/u iron ions [linear energy transfer (LET) ∼151 keV/μm] or 600 MeV/u silicon ions (LET ∼50 keV/μm) at mean absorbed doses as low as 0.2 cGy, wherein 1-3% of the cells were targeted through the nucleus by a primary particle. Within 24 h postirradiation, significant increases in the levels of phospho-TP53 (serine 15), p21(Waf1) (CDKN1A), HDM2, phospho-ERK1/2, protein carbonylation and lipid peroxidation were detected, which suggested participation in the stress response of cells not targeted by primary particles. This was supported by in situ studies that indicated greater increases in 53BP1 foci formation, a marker of DNA damage. than expected from the number of primary particle traversals. The effect was expressed as early as 15 min after exposure, peaked at 1 h and decreased by 24 h. A similar tendency occurred after exposure of the cell cultures to 0.2 cGy of 3.7 MeV α particles (LET ∼109 keV/μm) that targets ∼1.6% of nuclei, but not after 0.2 cGy from 290 MeV/u carbon ions (LET ∼13 keV/μm) by which, on average, ∼13% of the nuclei were hit, which highlights the importance of radiation quality in the induced effect. Simulations with the FLUKA multi-particle transport code revealed that fragmentation products, other than electrons, in cell cultures exposed to HZE particles comprise particles.

  11. Reduced Expression of Cytoskeletal and Extracellular Matrix Genes in Human Adult Retinal Pigment Epithelium Cells Exposed to Simulated Microgravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas J. Corydon

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Microgravity (µg has adverse effects on the eye of humans in space. The risk of visual impairment is therefore one of the leading health concerns for NASA. The impact of µg on human adult retinal epithelium (ARPE-19 cells is unknown. Methods: In this study we investigated the influence of simulated µg (s-µg; 5 and 10 days (d, using a Random Positioning Machine (RPM, on ARPE-19 cells. We performed phase-contrast/fluorescent microscopy, qRT-PCR, Western blotting and pathway analysis. Results: Following RPM-exposure a subset of ARPE-19 cells formed multicellular spheroids (MCS, whereas the majority of the cells remained adherent (AD. After 5d, alterations of F-actin and fibronectin were observed which reverted after 10d-exposure, suggesting a time-dependent adaptation to s-µg. Gene expression analysis of 12 genes involved in cell structure, shape, adhesion, migration, and angiogenesis suggested significant changes after a 10d-RPM-exposure. 11 genes were down-regulated in AD and MCS 10d-RPM-samples compared to 1g, whereas FLK1 was up-regulated in 5d- and 10d-RPM-MCS-samples. Similarly, TIMP1 was up-regulated in 5d-RPM-samples, whereas the remaining genes were down-regulated in 5d-RPM-samples. Western blotting revealed similar changes in VEGF, β-actin, laminin and fibronectin of 5d-RPM-samples compared to 10d, whereas different alterations of β-tubulin and vimentin were observed. The pathway analysis showed complementing effects of VEGF and integrin β-1. Conclusions: These findings clearly show that s-µg induces significant alterations in the F-actin-cytoskeleton and cytoskeleton-related proteins of ARPE-19, in addition to changes in cell growth behavior and gene expression patterns involved in cell structure, growth, shape, migration, adhesion and angiogenesis.

  12. Space experiment "Rad Gene"-report 1; p53-Dependent gene expression in human cultured cells exposed to space environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Akihisa; Ohnishi, Takeo; Suzuki, Hiromi; Omori, Katsunori; Seki, Masaya; Hashizume, Toko; Shimazu, Toru; Ishioka, Noriaki

    The space environment contains two major biologically significant influences: space radiations and microgravity. A p53 tumor suppressor protein plays a role as a guardian of the genome through the activity of p53-centered signal transduction pathways. The aim of this study was to clarify the biological effects of space radiations, microgravity and a space environment on the gene and protein expression of p53-dependent regulated genes. Space experiments were performed with two human cultured lymphoblastoid cell lines: one cells line (TSCE5) bears a wild-type p53 gene status, and another cells line (WTK1) bears a mutated p53 gene status. Un-der one gravity or microgravity condition, the cells were grown in the cell biology experimental facility (CBEF) of the International Space Station (ISS) for 8 days without experiencing the stress during launching and landing because the cells were frozen during these periods. Ground control samples also were cultured for 8 days in the CBEF on the ground during the same periods as space flight. Gene and protein expression was analyzed by using DNA chip (a 44k whole human genome microarray, Agilent Technologies Inc.) and protein chip (PanoramaTM Ab MicroArray, Sigma-Aldrich Co.), respectively. In addition, we analyzed the gene expression in cultured cells after space flight during 133 days with frozen condition. We report the results and discussion from the viewpoint of the functions of the up-regulated and down-regulated genes after an exposure to space radiations and/or microgravity. The initial goal of this space experiment was completely achieved. It is expected that data from this type of work will be helpful in designing physical protection from the deleterious effects of space radiations during long term stays in space.

  13. Disorders of sex development expose transcriptional autonomy of genetic sex and androgen-programmed hormonal sex in human blood leukocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holterhus, Paul-Martin; Bebermeier, Jan-Hendrik; Werner, Ralf; Demeter, Janos; Richter-Unruh, Annette; Cario, Gunnar; Appari, Mahesh; Siebert, Reiner; Riepe, Felix; Brooks, James D; Hiort, Olaf

    2009-01-01

    Background Gender appears to be determined by independent programs controlled by the sex-chromosomes and by androgen-dependent programming during embryonic development. To enable experimental dissection of these components in the human, we performed genome-wide profiling of the transcriptomes of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in patients with rare defined "disorders of sex development" (DSD, e.g., 46, XY-females due to defective androgen biosynthesis) compared to normal 46, XY-males and 46, XX-females. Results A discrete set of transcripts was directly correlated with XY or XX genotypes in all individuals independent of male or female phenotype of the external genitalia. However, a significantly larger gene set in the PBMC only reflected the degree of external genital masculinization independent of the sex chromosomes and independent of concurrent post-natal sex steroid hormone levels. Consequently, the architecture of the transcriptional PBMC-"sexes" was either male, female or even "intersex" with a discordant alignment of the DSD individuals' genetic and hormonal sex signatures. Conclusion A significant fraction of gene expression differences between males and females in the human appears to have its roots in early embryogenesis and is not only caused by sex chromosomes but also by long-term sex-specific hormonal programming due to presence or absence of androgen during the time of external genital masculinization. Genetic sex and the androgen milieu during embryonic development might therefore independently modulate functional traits, phenotype and diseases associated with male or female gender as well as with DSD conditions. PMID:19570224

  14. Radiosensitizing effects of arsenic trioxide on MCF-7 human breast cancer cells exposed to 89 strontium chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hengchao; Tao, Xinquan; Ma, Fang; Qiu, Jun; Wu, Cuiping; Wang, Mingming

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the radiosensitizing effects of arsenic trioxide (As2O3) on MCF-7 human breast cancer cells irradiated with 89 strontium chloride (89SrCl2). The 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) was calculated from results of an MTT assay. The concentration of As2O3 less than 20% IC50 was selected for subsequent experiments. Cells were treated with As2O3 and 89SrCl2. Morphological changes of cells were observed under an inverted microscope. The radiosensitivity enhancing ratio (SER) was computed based on a clone formation assay. Cell cycle distribution and apoptosis were measured by flow cytometry (FCM). Expression of Bcl-2 and Bax at both the mRNA and protein levels was assessed by RT-PCR and western blotting. The IC50 of As2O3 at 24 h was 11.7 µM. Doses of As2O3 (1 and 2 µM) were used in combination treatments and SER values were 1.25 and 1.79, respectively. As2O3 significantly suppressed cell growth, caused G2/M arrest, enhanced cell death and apoptosis induced by 89SrCl2 and decreased expression of the Bcl-2 gene. Since expression of Bax was unchanged following treatment, As2O3 effectively reduced the Bcl-2/Bax ratio. As2O3 (1-2 µM) enhances the cytotoxic effects of 89SrCl2 on the MCF-7 human breast cancer cell line by inducing G2 phase delay and promoting apoptosis through the reduction of the Bcl-2/Bax ratio.

  15. Characterizing low dose and dose rate effects in rodent and human neural stem cells exposed to proton and gamma irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertrand P. Tseng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Past work has shown that exposure to gamma rays and protons elicit a persistent oxidative stress in rodent and human neural stem cells (hNSCs. We have now adapted these studies to more realistic exposure scenarios in space, using lower doses and dose rates of these radiation modalities, to further elucidate the role of radiation-induced oxidative stress in these cells. Rodent neural stem and precursor cells grown as neurospheres and human neural stem cells grown as monolayers were subjected to acute and multi-dosing paradigms at differing dose rates and analyzed for changes in reactive oxygen species (ROS, reactive nitrogen species (RNS, nitric oxide and superoxide for 2 days after irradiation. While acute exposures led to significant changes in both cell types, hNSCs in particular, exhibited marked and significant elevations in radiation-induced oxidative stress. Elevated oxidative stress was more significant in hNSCs as opposed to their rodent counterparts, and hNSCs were significantly more sensitive to low dose exposures in terms of survival. Combinations of protons and γ-rays delivered as lower priming or higher challenge doses elicited radioadaptive changes that were associated with improved survival, but in general, only under conditions where the levels of reactive species were suppressed compared to cells irradiated acutely. Protective radioadaptive effects on survival were eliminated in the presence of the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine, suggesting further that radiation-induced oxidative stress could activate pro-survival signaling pathways that were sensitive to redox state. Data corroborates much of our past work and shows that low dose and dose rate exposures elicit significant changes in oxidative stress that have functional consequences on survival.

  16. NOVEL ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE DETERMINANTS FROM AGRICULTURAL SOIL EXPOSED TO ANTIBIOTICS WIDELY USED IN HUMAN MEDICINE AND ANIMAL FARMING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Calvin Ho-Fung; van Engelen, Kalene; Gordon, Stephen; Renaud, Justin; Topp, Edward

    2017-06-16

    Antibiotic resistance has emerged globally as one of the biggest threats to human and animal health. Although the excessive use of antibiotics is recognized for accelerating the selection for resistance, there is a growing body of evidence suggesting that natural environments are "hotspots" for the development of both ancient and contemporary resistance mechanisms. Given that pharmaceuticals can be entrained onto agricultural land through anthropogenic activities, this could be a potential driver for the emergence and dissemination of resistance in soil bacteria. Using functional metagenomics, we interrogated the "resistome" of bacterial communities found in a collection of Canadian agricultural soil, some of which had been receiving antibiotics widely used in human medicine (macrolides) or food animal production (sulfamethazine, chlortetracycline and tylosin) for up to 16 years. Of the 34 new antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) recovered, the majority were predicted to encode for (multi)drug efflux systems, while a few share little to no homology with established resistance determinants. We characterized several novel gene products, including putative enzymes that can confer high-level resistance against aminoglycosides, sulfonamides, and broad range of beta-lactams, with respect to their resistance mechanisms and clinical significance. By coupling high-resolution proteomics analysis with functional metagenomics, we discovered an unusual peptide, PPP(AZI 4), encoded within an alternative open-reading frame not predicted by bioinformatics tools. Expression of the proline-rich PPP(AZI 4) can promote resistance against different macrolides but not other ribosomal-targeting antibiotics, implicating a new macrolide-specific resistance mechanism that could be fundamentally linked to the evolutionary design of this peptide.IMPORTANCE Antibiotic resistance is a clinical phenomenon with an evolutionary link to the microbial pangenome. Genes and protogenes encoding for

  17. Ever-advancing chronic myeloid leukemia treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Shinya; Ando, Toshihiko; Kojima, Kensuke

    2014-02-01

    Treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) has been drastically changed by the emergence of the ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI), imatinib mesylate. However, resistance and intolerance have frequently been reported, particularly in patients with advanced-stage disease. Point mutations within the ABL kinase domain that interfere with imatinib binding are the most critical cause of imatinib resistance. To overcome this resistance, four second-generation ATP competitive ABL TKIs, dasatinib, nilotinib, bosutinib and bafetinib, have been developed. Dasatinib and nilotinib also demonstrated higher efficacy than imatinib in previously untreated CML patients in chronic phase. Despite promising clinical results, the frequently observed mutant T315I is not effectively targeted by any of the second-generation ABL TKIs. Thus, a third-generation ABL TKI, ponatinib, was developed to inhibit all mutated BCR-ABL and showed clinical efficacy in CML cells harbouring T315I. CML treatment is rapidly progressing and further evolution is surely expected. Moreover, it was recently reported that some CML patients who achieved sustained complete molecular response could stop TKI. CML may become the first human cancer to be conquered solely with oral medicines.

  18. Hidden shift of the ionome of plants exposed to elevated CO₂depletes minerals at the base of human nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loladze, Irakli

    2014-05-07

    Mineral malnutrition stemming from undiversified plant-based diets is a top global challenge. In C3 plants (e.g., rice, wheat), elevated concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide (eCO2) reduce protein and nitrogen concentrations, and can increase the total non-structural carbohydrates (TNC; mainly starch, sugars). However, contradictory findings have obscured the effect of eCO2 on the ionome-the mineral and trace-element composition-of plants. Consequently, CO2-induced shifts in plant quality have been ignored in the estimation of the impact of global change on humans. This study shows that eCO2 reduces the overall mineral concentrations (-8%, 95% confidence interval: -9.1 to -6.9, p carbon:minerals in C3 plants. The meta-analysis of 7761 observations, including 2264 observations at state of the art FACE centers, covers 130 species/cultivars. The attained statistical power reveals that the shift is systemic and global. Its potential to exacerbate the prevalence of 'hidden hunger' and obesity is discussed.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02245.001. Copyright © 2014, Loladze.

  19. A Comparitive Assessement of Cytokine Expression in Human-Derived Cell Lines Exposed to Alpha Particles and X-Rays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinita Chauhan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Alpha- (α- particle radiation exposure has been linked to the development of lung cancer and has been identified as a radiation type likely to be employed in radiological dispersal devices. Currently, there exists a knowledge gap concerning cytokine modulations associated with exposure to α-particles. Bio-plex technology was employed to investigate changes in proinflammatory cytokines in two human-derived cell lines. Cells were irradiated at a dose of 1.5 Gy to either α-particles or X-rays at equivalent dose rates. The two cell lines exhibited a unique pattern of cytokine expression and the response varied with radiation type. Of the 27 cytokines assessed, only vascular endothelin growth factor (VEGF was observed to be modulated in both cell lines solely after α-particle exposure, and the expression of VEGF was shown to be dose responsive. These results suggest that certain proinflammatory cytokines may be involved in the biological effects related to α- particle exposure and the responses are cell type and radiation type specific.

  20. Evaluation of the Electromagnetic Power Absorption in Humans Exposed to Plane Waves: The Effect of Breathing Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Cavagnaro

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The safety aspects of the exposure of people to uniform plane waves in the frequency range from 900 MHz to 5 GHz are analyzed. Starting from a human body model available in the literature, representing a man in resting state, two new anatomical models are considered, representing different phases of the respiratory activity: tidal breath and deep breath. These models have been used to evaluate the whole body Specific Absorption Rate (SAR and the 10-g averaged and 1-g averaged SAR. The analysis is performed using a parallel implementation of the finite difference time domain method. A uniform plane wave, with vertical polarization, is used as an incident field since this is the canonical exposure situation used in safety guidelines. Results show that if the incident electromagnetic field is compliant with the reference levels promulgated by the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection and by IEEE, the computed SAR values are lower than the corresponding basic restrictions, as expected. On the other side, when the Federal Communications Commission reference levels are considered, 1-g SAR values exceeding the basic restrictions for exposure at 4 GHz and above are obtained. Furthermore, results show that the whole body SAR values increase passing from the resting state model to the deep breath model, for all the considered frequencies.

  1. Hidden shift of the ionome of plants exposed to elevated CO2 depletes minerals at the base of human nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loladze, Irakli

    2014-01-01

    Mineral malnutrition stemming from undiversified plant-based diets is a top global challenge. In C3 plants (e.g., rice, wheat), elevated concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide (eCO2) reduce protein and nitrogen concentrations, and can increase the total non-structural carbohydrates (TNC; mainly starch, sugars). However, contradictory findings have obscured the effect of eCO2 on the ionome—the mineral and trace-element composition—of plants. Consequently, CO2-induced shifts in plant quality have been ignored in the estimation of the impact of global change on humans. This study shows that eCO2 reduces the overall mineral concentrations (−8%, 95% confidence interval: −9.1 to −6.9, p carbon:minerals in C3 plants. The meta-analysis of 7761 observations, including 2264 observations at state of the art FACE centers, covers 130 species/cultivars. The attained statistical power reveals that the shift is systemic and global. Its potential to exacerbate the prevalence of ‘hidden hunger’ and obesity is discussed. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02245.001 PMID:24867639

  2. Towards label-free evaluation of oxidative stress in human skin exposed to sun filters (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osseiran, Sam; Wang, Hequn; Suita, Yusuke; Roider, Elisabeth; Fisher, David E.; Evans, Conor L.

    2016-02-01

    Skin cancer, including basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and melanoma, is the most common form of cancer in North America. Paradoxically, skin cancer incidence is steadily on the rise even despite the growing use of sunscreens over the past decades. One potential explanation for this discrepancy involves the sun filters in sunscreen, which are responsible for blocking harmful ultraviolet radiation. It is proposed that these agents may produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) at the site of application, thereby generating oxidative stress in skin that gives rise to genetic mutations, which may explain the rising incidence of skin cancer. To test this hypothesis, ex vivo human skin was treated with five common chemical sun filters (avobenzone, octocrylene, homosalate, octisalate, and oxybenzone) as well as two physical sun filters (zinc oxide compounds), both with and without UV irradiation. To non-invasively evaluate oxidative stress, two-photon excitation fluorescence (2PEF) and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) of the skin samples were used to monitor levels of NADH and FAD, two key cofactors in cellular redox metabolism. The relative redox state of the skin was assessed based on the fluorescence intensities and lifetimes of these endogenous cofactors. While the sun filters were indeed shown to have a protective effect from UV radiation, it was observed that they also generate oxidative stress in skin, even in the absence of UV light. These results suggest that sun filter induced ROS production requires more careful study, especially in how these reactive species impact the rise of skin cancer.

  3. Cytotoxicity, oxidative stress and expression of adhesion molecules in human umbilical vein endothelial cells exposed to dust from paints with or without nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Lone; Jensen, Keld A; Koponen, Ismo K

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Nanoparticles in primary form and nanoproducts might elicit different toxicological responses. We compared paint-related nanoparticles with respect to effects on endothelial oxidative stress, cytotoxicity and cell adhesion molecule expression. Primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells...... were exposed to primary nanoparticles (fine, photocatalytic or nanosized TiO(2), aluminium silicate, carbon black, nano-silicasol or axilate) and dust from sanding reference- or nanoparticle-containing paints. Most of the samples increased cell surface expressions of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1....... In conclusion, sanding dust from nanoparticle-containing paint did not generate more oxidative stress or expression of cell adhesion molecules than sanding dust from paint without nanoparticles, whereas the primary particles had the largest effect on mass basis....

  4. Low-level laser therapy: Effects on human face aged skin and cell viability of HeLa cells exposed to UV radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mezghani Sana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic and excessive exposure to UV radiation leads to photoaging and photocarcinogenesis. Adequate protection of the skin against the deleterious effects of UV irradiation is essential. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT is a light source in the red to near-infrared range that has been accepted in a variety of medical applications. In this study, we explored the effect of LLLT in human face aged skin and the cell viability of HeLa cells exposed to UV radiation. We found that LLLT significantly reduced visible wrinkles and the loss of firmness of facial skin in aging subjects. Additionally, treatment of cultured HeLa cells with LLLT prior to or post UVA or UVB exposure significantly protected cells from UV-mediated cell death. All results showed the beneficial effects of LLLT on relieving signs of skin aging and its prevention and protection of the cell viability against UV-induced damage.

  5. Studying the protein expression in human B lymphoblastoid cells exposed to 1.8-GHz (GSM) radiofrequency radiation (RFR) with protein microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhijian, Chen; Xiaoxue, Li; Wei, Zheng; Yezhen, Lu; Jianlin, Lou; Deqiang, Lu; Shijie, Chen; Lifen, Jin; Jiliang, He

    2013-03-29

    In the present study, the protein microarray was used to investigate the protein expression in human B-cell lymphoblastoid cells intermittently exposed to 1.8-GHz GSM radiofrequency radiation (RFR) at the specific absorption rate (SAR) of 2.0 W/kg for 24 h. The differential expression of 27 proteins was found, which were related to DNA damage repair, apoptosis, oncogenesis, cell cycle and proliferation (ratio >1.5-fold, P<0.05). The results validated with Western blot assay indicated that the expression of RPA32 was significantly down-regulated (P<0.05) while the expression of p73 was significantly up-regulated in RFR exposure group (P<0.05). Because of the crucial roles of those proteins in DNA repair and cell apoptosis, the results of present investigation may explain the biological effects of RFR on DNA damage/repair and cell apoptosis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Low Dose Radiation Response Curves, Networks and Pathways in Human Lymphoblastoid Cells Exposed from 1 to 10 cGy of Acute Gamma Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wyrobek, A. J.; Manohar, C. F.; Nelson, D. O.; Furtado, M. R.; Bhattacharya, M. S.; Marchetti, F.; Coleman, M.A.

    2011-04-18

    We investigated the low dose dependency of the transcriptional response of human cells to characterize the shape and biological functions associated with the dose response curve and to identify common and conserved functions of low dose expressed genes across cells and tissues. Human lymphoblastoid (HL) cells from two unrelated individuals were exposed to graded doses of radiation spanning the range of 1-10 cGy were analyzed by transcriptome profiling, qPCR and bioinformatics, in comparison to sham irradiated samples. A set of {approx}80 genes showed consistent responses in both cell lines; these genes were associated with homeostasis mechanisms (e.g., membrane signaling, molecule transport), subcellular locations (e.g., Golgi, and endoplasmic reticulum), and involved diverse signal transduction pathways. The majority of radiation-modulated genes had plateau-like responses across 1-10 cGy, some with suggestive evidence that transcription was modulated at doses below 1 cGy. MYC, FOS and TP53 were the major network nodes of the low-dose response in HL cells. Comparison our low dose expression findings in HL cells with those of prior studies in mouse brain after whole body exposure, in human keratinocyte cultures, and in endothelial cells cultures, indicates that certain components of the low dose radiation response are broadly conserved across cell types and tissues, independent of proliferation status.

  7. Effects of L-carnitine, erythritol and betaine on pro-inflammatory markers in primary human corneal epithelial cells exposed to hyperosmotic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Xia; Su, Zhitao; Deng, Ruzhi; Lin, Jing; Li, De-Quan; Pflugfelder, Stephen C

    2015-07-01

    To explore the effects of osmoprotectants on pro-inflammatory mediator production in primary human corneal epithelial cells (HCECs) exposed to hyperosmotic stress. HCECs cultured in iso-osmolar medium (312 mOsM) were switched to hyperosmotic media with or without prior incubation with 2-20 mM of l-carnitine, erythritol or betaine for different time periods. The mRNA expression and protein production of pro-inflammatory markers in HCECs were evaluated by RT-qPCR and ELISA. Hyperosmolar media significantly stimulated the mRNA and protein expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6, and chemokines, IL-8, CCL2 and CCL20 in HCECs in an osmolarity dependent manner. The stimulated expression of these pro-inflammatory mediators was significantly but differentially suppressed by l-carnitine, erythritol or betaine. l-Carnitine displayed the greatest inhibitory effects and down-regulated 54-77% of the stimulated mRNA levels of TNF-α (down from 12.3-5.7 fold), IL-1β (2.2-0.9 fold), IL-6 (7.3-2.9 fold), IL-8 (4.6-2.0 fold), CCL2 (15.3-3.5 fold) and CCL20 (4.1-1.5 fold) in HCECs exposed to 450 mOsM. The stimulated protein production of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8 was also significantly suppressed by l-carnitine, erythritol and betaine. l-carnitine suppressed 49-79% of the stimulated protein levels of TNF-α (down from 81.3 to 17.4 pg/ml), IL-1β (56.9-29.2 pg/ml), IL-6 (12.8-4.6 ng/ml) and IL-8 (21.2-10.9 ng/ml) by HCECs exposed to 450 mOsM. Interestingly, hyperosmolarity stimulated increase in mRNA and protein levels of TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 were significantly suppressed by a transient receptor potential vanilloid channel type 1 (TRPV1) activation inhibitor capsazepine. l-carnitine, erythritol and betaine function as osmoprotectants to suppress inflammatory responses via TRPV1 pathway in HCECs exposed to hyperosmotic stress. Osmoprotectants may have efficacy in reducing innate inflammation in dry eye disease.

  8. Regulation of myeloid cells by activated T cells determines the efficacy of PD-1 blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eissler, Nina; Mao, Yumeng; Brodin, David; Reuterswärd, Philippa; Andersson Svahn, Helene; Johnsen, John Inge; Kiessling, Rolf; Kogner, Per

    2016-01-01

    Removal of immuno-suppression has been reported to enhance antitumor immunity primed by checkpoint inhibitors. Although PD-1 blockade failed to control tumor growth in a transgenic murine neuroblastoma model, concurrent inhibition of colony stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF-1R) by BLZ945 reprogrammed suppressive myeloid cells and significantly enhanced therapeutic effects. Microarray analysis of tumor tissues identified a significant increase of T-cell infiltration guided by myeloid cell-derived chemokines CXCL9, 10, and 11. Blocking the responsible chemokine receptor CXCR3 hampered T-cell infiltration and reduced antitumor efficacy of the combination therapy. Multivariate analysis of 59 immune-cell parameters in tumors and spleens detected the correlation between PD-L1-expressing myeloid cells and tumor burden. In vitro, anti-PD-1 antibody Nivolumab in combination with BLZ945 increased the activation of primary human T and NK cells. Importantly, we revealed a previously uncharacterized pathway, in which T cells secreted M-CSF upon PD-1 blockade, leading to enhanced suppressive capacity of monocytes by upregulation of PD-L1 and purinergic enzymes. In multiple datasets of neuroblastoma patients, gene expression of CD73 correlated strongly with myeloid cell markers CD163 and CSF-1R in neuroblastoma tumors, and associated with worse survival in high-risk patients. Altogether, our data reveal the dual role of activated T cells on myeloid cell functions and provide a rationale for the combination therapy of anti-PD-1 antibody with CSF-1R inhibitor.

  9. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Ligands and Their Role in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia: Therapeutic Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefi, Bahman; Samadi, Nasser; Baradaran, Behzad; Shafiei-Irannejad, Vahid; Zarghami, Nosratollah

    2016-07-01

    Imatinib therapy remains the gold standard for treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia; however, the acquired resistance to this therapeutic agent in patients has urged the scientists to devise modalities for overcoming this chemoresistance. For this purpose, initially therapeutic agents with higher tyrosine kinase activity were introduced, which had the potential for inhibiting even mutant forms of Bcr-Abl. Furthermore, coupling imatinib with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor ligands also showed beneficial effects in chronic myeloid leukemia cell proliferation. These combination protocols inhibited cell growth and induced apoptosis as well as differentiation in chronic myeloid leukemia cell lines. In addition, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors ligands increased imatinib uptake by upregulating the expression of human organic cation transporter 1. Taken together, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors ligands are currently being considered as novel promising therapeutic candidates for chronic myeloid leukemia treatment, because they can synergistically enhance the efficacy of imatinib. In this article, we reviewed the potential of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors ligands for use in chronic myeloid leukemia treatment. The mechanism of action of these therapeutics modalities are also presented in detail. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  10. Cutaneous myeloid sarcoma: natural history and biology of an uncommon manifestation of acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, M Yadira; Ghahramani, Grant K; Frisch, Stephanie; Armbrecht, Eric S; Lind, Anne C; Nguyen, Tudung T; Hassan, Anjum; Kreisel, Friederike H; Frater, John L

    2013-05-01

    We conducted a retrospective study of patients with cutaneous myeloid sarcoma, from 2 tertiary care institutions. Eighty-three patients presented, with a mean age of 52 years. Diagnosis of myeloid sarcoma in the skin was difficult due to the low frequency of myeloperoxidase and/or CD34+ cases (56% and 19% of tested cases, respectively). Seventy-one of the 83 patients (86%) had ≥ 1 bone marrow biopsy. Twenty-eight (39%) had acute myeloid leukemia with monocytic differentiation. Twenty-three had other de novo acute myeloid leukemia subtypes. Thirteen patients had other myeloid neoplasms, of which 4 ultimately progressed to an acute myeloid leukemia. Seven had no bone marrow malignancy. Ninety-eight percent of the patients received chemotherapy, and approximately 89% died of causes related to their disease. Cutaneous myeloid sarcoma in most cases represents an aggressive manifestation of acute myeloid leukemia. Diagnosis can be challenging due to lack of myeloblast-associated antigen expression in many cases, and difficulty in distinguishing monocyte-lineage blasts from neoplastic and non-neoplastic mature monocytes.

  11. The feasibility of an automated eye-tracking-modified Fagan test of memory for human faces in younger Ugandan HIV-exposed children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhaya, Ronak; Weiss, Jonathan; Seffren, Victoria; Sikorskii, Alla; Winke, Paula M; Ojuka, Julius C; Boivin, Michael J

    2017-05-22

    The Fagan Test of Infant Intelligence (FTII) uses longer gaze length for unfamiliar versus familiar human faces to gauge visual-spatial encoding, attention, and working memory in infants. Our objective was to establish the feasibility of automated eye tracking with the FTII in HIV-exposed Ugandan infants. The FTII was administered to 31 perinatally HIV-exposed noninfected (HEU) Ugandan children 6-12 months of age (11 boys; M = 0.69 years, SD = 0.14; 19 girls; M = 0.79, SD = 0.15). A series of 10 different faces were presented (familiar face exposure for 25 s followed by a gaze preference trial of 15 s with both the familiar and unfamiliar faces). Tobii X2-30 infrared camera for pupil detection provided automated eye-tracking measures of gaze location and length during presentation of Ugandan faces selected to correspond to the gender, age (adult, child), face expression, and orientation of the original FTII. Eye-tracking gaze length for unfamiliar faces was correlated with performance on the Mullen Scales of Early Learning (MSEL). Infants gazed longer at the novel picture compared to familiar across 10 novelty preference trials. Better MSEL cognitive development was correlated with proportionately longer time spent looking at the novel faces (r(30) = 0.52, p = .004); especially for the Fine Motor Cognitive Sub-scale (r(30) = 0.54, p = .002). Automated eye tracking in a human face recognition test proved feasible and corresponded to the MSEL composite cognitive development in HEU infants in a resource-constrained clinical setting. Eye tracking may be a viable means of enhancing the validity and accuracy of other neurodevelopmental measures in at-risk children in sub-Saharan Africa.

  12. Molecular genetic and biochemical responses in human airway epithelial cell cultures exposed to titanium nanoparticles in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydın, Elanur; Türkez, Hasan; Hacımüftüoğlu, Fazıl; Tatar, Abdulgani; Geyikoğlu, Fatime

    2017-07-01

    Titanium nanoparticles (NPs) have very wide application areas such as paint, cosmetics, pharmaceuticals, and biomedical applications. And, to translate these nanomaterials to the clinic and industrial domains, their safety needs to be verified, particularly in terms of genotoxicity and cytotoxicity. Therefore, in this study, we aimed to investigate of cytotoxicity and changes in gene expression profiles influenced by commonly titanium (as titanium carbide, titanium carbo-nitride, titanium (II) oxide, titanium (III) oxide, titanium (IV) oxide, titanium nitride, titanium silicon oxide) NPs in human alveolar epithelial (HPAEpiC) and pharynx (HPPC) cell lines in vitro since inhalation is an important pathway for exposure to these NPs. HPAEpiC and HPPC cells were treated with titanium (0-100 µg/mL), NPs for 24 and 48 h, and then cytotoxicity was detected by, [3-(4,5-dimethyl-thiazol-2-yl) 2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] (MTT), uptake of neutral red (NR) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assays, while genotoxicity was also analyzed by cDNA array - RT-PCR assay. According to the results of MTT, NR and LDH assays, all tested NPs induced cytotoxicity on both HPAEpiC and HPPC cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Determining and analyzing the gene expression profiles of HPAEpiC and HPPC cells, titanium NPs showed more changes in genes related to DNA damage or repair, oxidative stress, and apoptosis. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 2056-2064, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Impaired Ciliogenesis in differentiating human bronchial epithelia exposed to non-Cytotoxic doses of multi-walled carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Ryan J; Hussain, Salik; Tucker, Charles J; Randell, Scott H; Garantziotis, Stavros

    2017-11-13

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are engineered nanomaterials used for a variety of industrial and consumer products. Their high tensile strength, hydrophobicity, and semi-conductive properties have enabled many novel applications, increasing the possibility of accidental nanotube inhalation by either consumers or factory workers. While MWCNT inhalation has been previously shown to cause inflammation and pulmonary fibrosis at high doses, the susceptibility of differentiating bronchial epithelia to MWCNT exposure remains unexplored. In this study, we investigate the effect of MWCNT exposure on cilia development in a differentiating air-liquid interface (ALI) model. Primary bronchial epithelial cells (BECs) were isolated from human donors via bronchoscopy and treated with non-cytotoxic doses of MWCNTs in submerged culture for 24 h. Cultures were then allowed to differentiate in ALI for 28 days in the absence of further MWCNT exposure. At 28 days, mucociliary differentiation endpoints were assessed, including whole-mount immunofluorescent staining, histological, immunohistochemical and ultrastructural analysis, gene expression, and cilia beating analysis. We found a reduction in the prevalence and beating of ciliated cells in MWCNT-treated cultures, which appeared to be caused by a disruption of cellular microtubules and cytoskeleton during ciliogenesis and basal body docking. Expression of gene markers of mucociliary differentiation, such as FOXJ1 and MUC5AC/B, were not affected by treatment. Colocalization of basal body marker CEP164 with γ-tubulin during days 1-3 of ciliogenesis, as well as abundance of basal bodies up to day 14, were attenuated by treatment with MWCNTs. Our results suggest that a single exposure of bronchial cells to MWCNT during a vulnerable period before differentiation may impair their ability to develop into fully functional ciliated cells.

  14. Characterization of myeloid leukemia by monoclonal antibodies, with an emphasis on antibodies against myeloperoxidase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Schoot, C. E.; von dem Borne, A. E.; Tetteroo, P. A.

    1987-01-01

    Since the last workshop on human leukocyte differentiation antigens, there are 14 well defined cluster-designated (CD) antigens which characterize myelomonocytic cells. Of these, 5 are potentially useful for myeloid leukemia typing (i.e. CD13, CD14, CD15, CD33, CD36) because they are cell

  15. Idhifa Approved for Some with Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... html Idhifa Approved for Some With Acute Myeloid Leukemia For adults with specific genetic mutation To use ... that leads to relapsed or refractory acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The mutation in the IDH2 gene can ...

  16. Sildenafil Prevents Apoptosis of Human First-Trimester Trophoblast Cells Exposed to Oxidative Stress: Possible Role for Nitric Oxide Activation of 3',5'-cyclic Guanosine Monophosphate Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolnick, Jay M; Kilburn, Brian A; Bolnick, Alan D; Diamond, Michael P; Singh, Manvinder; Hertz, Michael; Dai, Jing; Armant, D Randall

    2015-06-01

    Human first-trimester trophoblast cells proliferate at low O2, but survival is compromised by oxidative stress, leading to uteroplacental insufficiency. The vasoactive drug, sildenafil citrate (Viagra, Sigma, St Louis, Missouri), has proven useful in reducing adverse pregnancy outcomes. An important biological function of this pharmaceutical is its action as an inhibitor of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) phosphodiesterase type 5 activity, which suggests that it could have beneficial effects on trophoblast survival. To investigate whether sildenafil can prevent trophoblast cell death, human first-trimester villous explants and the HTR-8/SVneo cytotrophoblast cell line were exposed to hypoxia and reoxygenation (H/R) to generate oxidative stress, which induces apoptosis. Apoptosis was optimally inhibited during H/R by 350 ng/mL sildenafil. Sildenafil-mediated survival was reversed by l-N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride or cGMP antagonist, indicating a dependence on both nitric oxide (NO) and cGMP. Indeed, either a cGMP agonist or an NO generator was cytoprotective independent of sildenafil. These findings suggest a novel intervention route for patients with recurrent pregnancy loss or obstetrical placental disorders. © The Author(s) 2014.

  17. 2,6-Dithiopurine blocks toxicity and mutagenesis in human skin cells exposed to sulfur mustard analogs, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide and 2-chloroethyl methyl sulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, K. Leslie; Boulware, Stephen; Thames, Howard; Vasquez, Karen M.; MacLeod, Michael C.

    2010-01-01

    Sulfur mustard (bis-(2-chloroethyl)sulfide) is a well known chemical warfare agent that induces debilitating cutaneous toxicity in exposed individuals. It is also known to be carcinogenic and mutagenic due to its ability to damage DNA via electrophilic attack. We previously showed that a nucleophilic scavenger, 2,6-dithiopurine (DTP), reacts chemically with several electrophilic carcinogens, blocking DNA damage in vitro and in vivo and abolishing tumor formation in a two-stage mouse skin carcinogenesis model. To assess the potential of DTP as an antagonist of sulfur mustard, we have utilized monofunctional chemical analogs of sulfur mustard, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES) and 2-chloroethyl methyl sulfide (CEMS), to induce toxicity and mutagenesis in a cell line, NCTC2544, derived from a human skin tumor. We show that DTP blocks cytotoxicity in CEMS- and CEES-treated cells when present at approximately equimolar concentration. A related thiopurine, 9-methyl-6-mercaptopurine, is similarly effective. Correlated with this, we find that DTP is transported into these cells, and that adducts between DTP and CEES are found intracellularly. Using a shuttle vector-based mutagenesis system, which allows enumeration of mutations induced in the skin cells by a blue/white colony screen, we find that DTP completely abolishes mutagenesis induced by CEMS and CEES in the human cells. PMID:20050631

  18. 2,6-Dithiopurine blocks toxicity and mutagenesis in human skin cells exposed to sulfur mustard analogues, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide and 2-chloroethyl methyl sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, K Leslie; Boulware, Stephen; Thames, Howard; Vasquez, Karen M; MacLeod, Michael C

    2010-03-15

    Sulfur mustard (bis-(2-chloroethyl)sulfide) is a well-known chemical warfare agent that induces debilitating cutaneous toxicity in exposed individuals. It is also known to be carcinogenic and mutagenic because of its ability to damage DNA via electrophilic attack. We previously showed that a nucleophilic scavenger, 2,6-dithiopurine (DTP), reacts chemically with several electrophilic carcinogens, blocking DNA damage in vitro and in vivo and abolishing tumor formation in a two-stage mouse skin carcinogenesis model. To assess the potential of DTP as an antagonist of sulfur mustard, we have utilized monofunctional chemical analogues of sulfur mustard, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES) and 2-chloroethyl methyl sulfide (CEMS), to induce toxicity and mutagenesis in a cell line, NCTC2544, derived from a human skin tumor. We show that DTP blocks cytotoxicity in CEMS- and CEES-treated cells when present at approximately equimolar concentration. A related thiopurine, 9-methyl-6-mercaptopurine, is similarly effective. Correlated with this, we find that DTP is transported into these cells and that adducts between DTP and CEES are found intracellularly. Using a shuttle vector-based mutagenesis system, which allows enumeration of mutations induced in the skin cells by a blue/white colony screen, we find that DTP completely abolishes the mutagenesis induced by CEMS and CEES in human cells.

  19. Low dose radiation hypersensitivity and clustered DNA damages in human fibroblasts exposed to low dose and dose rate protons or 137CS y-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett P. V.; Bennett, P.V.; Keszenman, D.J.; Johnson, A.M.; Sutherland, B.M.; Wilson, P.F.

    2013-05-14

    Effective radioprotection for human space travelers hinges upon understanding the individual properties of charged particles. A significant fraction of particle radiation astronauts will encounter in space exploratory missions will come from high energy protons in galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) and/or possible exposures to lower energy proton flux from solar particle events (SPEs). These potential exposures present major concerns for NASA and others, in planning and executing long term space exploratory missions. We recently reported cell survival and transformation (acquisition of anchorage-independent growth in soft agar) frequencies in apparently normal NFF-28 primary human fibroblasts exposed to 0-30 cGy of 50MeV, 100MeV (SPE-like), or 1000 MeV (GCR-like) monoenergetic protons. These were modeled after 1989 SPE energies at an SPE-like low dose-rate (LDR) of 1.65 cGy/min or high dose rate (HDR) of 33.3 cGy/min delivered at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at BNL.

  20. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) in Exposed-Lawn Soils from 28 Urban Parks in the Megacity Guangzhou: Occurrence, Sources, and Human Health Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Chang-Liang; Gu, Yang-Guang; Liu, Qi

    2017-05-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in urban soils may pose a serious threat to human health via oral ingestion, dermal absorption, and particulate inhalation, especially in public parks and playgrounds, with children and senior citizens showing the highest susceptibility. Several studies have been undertaken identifying PAHs in urban soils, but no studies to date have assessed PAHs in urban parks, in particular in exposed-lawn soils. In recent decades, unprecedented rates of urbanization and industrialization in China have resulted in significant levels of urban environmental pollution. However, concentrations, sources, and the health risk associated with PAH exposure via urban park lawn soils in China remain unknown. The concentrations, sources, and health risk of exposure to 16 PAHs in surface-exposed lawn soils were studied in 28 urban parks in Guangzhou. Concentrations of Σ16PAHs ranged from 76.44 to 890.85 ng/g with a mean of 286.11 ng/g. PAH composition was mostly characterized by 2- and 4-ring PAHs in most sampling parks; Nap, Flua, Pyr, Phe, and Chr were the dominant constituents. Principle component analysis coupled with multivariate linear regression indicated that vehicular and coal combustion emissions contributed to 50.53 and 49.46% of PAHs in Guangzhou's urban park soils, respectively. Total cancer risk (TCR) analysis found that 22 parks (accounting for 78.57% total parks) designed for children's use and general-use park areas presented a potentially high risk (>1 × 10-4) for all users.

  1. Differentiation Therapy of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elzbieta Gocek

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML is a predominant acute leukemia among adults, characterized by accumulation of malignantly transformed immature myeloid precursors. A very attractive way to treat myeloid leukemia, which is now called ‘differentiation therapy’, was proposed as in vitro studies have shown that a variety of agents stimulate differentiation of the cell lines isolated from leukemic patients. One of the differentiation-inducing agents, all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA, which can induce granulocytic differentiation in myeloid leukemic cell lines, has been introduced into clinics to treat patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL in which a PML-RARA fusion protein is generated by a t(15;17(q22;q12 chromosomal translocation. Because differentiation therapy using ATRA has significantly improved prognosis for patients with APL, many efforts have been made to find alternative differentiating agents. Since 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D is capable of inducing in vitro monocyte/macrophage differentiation of myeloid leukemic cells, clinical trials have been performed to estimate its potential to treat patients with AML or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS. Unfortunately therapeutic concentrations of 1,25D can induce potentially fatal systemic hypercalcemia, thus limiting clinical utility of that compound. Attempts to overcome this problem have focused on the synthesis of 1,25D analogs (VDAs which retain differentiation inducing potential, but lack its hypercalcemic effects. This review aims to discuss current problems and potential solutions in differentiation therapy of AML.

  2. Differentiation Therapy of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gocek, Elzbieta; Marcinkowska, Ewa, E-mail: ema@cs.uni.wroc.pl [Department of Biotechnology, University of Wroclaw, ul Tamka 2, Wroclaw 50-137 (Poland)

    2011-05-16

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) is a predominant acute leukemia among adults, characterized by accumulation of malignantly transformed immature myeloid precursors. A very attractive way to treat myeloid leukemia, which is now called ‘differentiation therapy’, was proposed as in vitro studies have shown that a variety of agents stimulate differentiation of the cell lines isolated from leukemic patients. One of the differentiation-inducing agents, all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), which can induce granulocytic differentiation in myeloid leukemic cell lines, has been introduced into clinics to treat patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) in which a PML-RARA fusion protein is generated by a t(15;17)(q22;q12) chromosomal translocation. Because differentiation therapy using ATRA has significantly improved prognosis for patients with APL, many efforts have been made to find alternative differentiating agents. Since 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} (1,25D) is capable of inducing in vitro monocyte/macrophage differentiation of myeloid leukemic cells, clinical trials have been performed to estimate its potential to treat patients with AML or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Unfortunately therapeutic concentrations of 1,25D can induce potentially fatal systemic hypercalcemia, thus limiting clinical utility of that compound. Attempts to overcome this problem have focused on the synthesis of 1,25D analogs (VDAs) which retain differentiation inducing potential, but lack its hypercalcemic effects. This review aims to discuss current problems and potential solutions in differentiation therapy of AML.

  3. Nucleophosmin 1 expression in acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Davoudi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Nucleophosmin1 is a multifunctional protein that shuttles between nucleus and cytoplasm in some subtypes of acute myeloid leukemias. Mutated Nucleophosmin1 expresses aberrantly in the cytoplasm of the cell and transports from nucleolus to the cytoplasm. It is diagnosed by immunohistochemical techniques, flow cytometry assay and mutational analysis.The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of Nucleophosmin1 mutation on the clinical presentations, prognosis, diagnosis and the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia. Thirteen articles were extracted from PubMed, Google scholar and Scopus in which the Nucleophosmin1 mutation correlated with gingival hyperplasia, high white blood cell count, lymphadenopathy, high platelet count and other signs and symptoms of myelomonocytic and monocytic acute myeloid leukemias. This mutation is a provisional entity in the classification of acute myeloid leukemia, which influences on the prognosis, clinical course and the treatment of some subtypes of acute myeloid leukemias. Nucleophosmin1 mutation has favorable prognostic value in the absence of other concomitant mutations.

  4. MicroRNA-125b transforms myeloid cell lines by repressing multiple mRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousquet, Marina; Nguyen, Diu; Chen, Cynthia; Shields, Lauren; Lodish, Harvey F

    2012-11-01

    We previously described a t(2;11)(p21;q23) chromosomal translocation found in patients with myelodysplasia or acute myeloid leukemia that leads to over-expression of the microRNA miR-125b, and we showed that transplantation of mice with murine stem/progenitor cells overexpressing miR-125b is able to induce leukemia. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of myeloid transformation by miR-125b. To investigate the consequences of miR-125b over-expression on myeloid differentiation, apoptosis and proliferation, we used the NB4 and HL60 human promyelocytic cell lines and the 32Dclone3 murine promyelocytic cell line. To test whether miR-125b is able to transform myeloid cells, we used the non-tumorigenic and interleukin-3-dependent 32Dclone3 cell line over-expressing miR-125b, in xenograft experiments in nude mice and in conditions of interleukin-3 deprivation. To identify new miR-125b targets, we compared, by RNA-sequencing, the transcriptome of cell lines that do or do not over-express miR-125b. We showed that miR-125b over-expression blocks apoptosis and myeloid differentiation and enhances proliferation in both species. More importantly, we demonstrated that miR-125b is able to transform the 32Dclone3 cell line by conferring growth independence from interleukin-3; xenograft experiments showed that these cells form tumors in nude mice. Using RNA-sequencing and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction experiments, we identified multiple miR-125b targets. We demonstrated that ABTB1, an anti-proliferative factor, is a new direct target of miR-125b and we confirmed that CBFB, a transcription factor involved in hematopoiesis, is also targeted by miR-125b. MiR-125b controls apoptosis by down-regulating genes involved in the p53 pathway including BAK1 and TP53INP1. This study demonstrates that in a myeloid context, miR-125b is an oncomiR able to transform cell lines. miR-125b blocks myeloid differentiation in part by targeting CBFB, blocks apoptosis through

  5. Human Health Risk Assessment of Artisanal Miners Exposed to Toxic Chemicals in Water and Sediments in the Prestea Huni Valley District of Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obiri, Samuel; Yeboah, Philip O; Osae, Shiloh; Adu-Kumi, Sam; Cobbina, Samuel J; Armah, Frederick A; Ason, Benjamin; Antwi, Edward; Quansah, Reginald

    2016-01-18

    A human health risk assessment of artisanal miners exposed to toxic metals in water bodies and sediments in the PresteaHuni Valley District of Ghana was carried out in this study, in line with US EPA risk assessment guidelines. A total of 70 water and 30 sediment samples were collected from surface water bodies in areas impacted by the operations of artisanal small-scale gold mines in the study area and analyzed for physico-chemical parameters such as pH, TDS, conductivity, turbidity as well as metals and metalloids such as As, Cd, Hg and Pb at CSIR-Water Research Institute using standard methods for the examination of wastewater as outlined by American Water Works Association (AWWA). The mean concentrations of As, Cd, Hg and Pb in water samples ranged from 15 μg/L to 325 μg/L (As), 0.17 μg/L to 340 μg/L (Cd), 0.17 μg/L to 122 μg/L (Pb) and 132 μg/L to 866 μg/L (Hg), respectively. These measured concentrations of arsenic (As), mercury (Hg), cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) were used as input parameters to calculate the cancer and non-cancer health risks from exposure to these metals in surface water bodies and sediments based on an occupational exposure scenario using central tendency exposure (CTE) and reasonable maximum exposure (RME) parameters. The results of the non-cancer human health risk assessment for small-scale miners working around river Anikoko expressed in terms of hazard quotients based on CTE parameters are as follows: 0.04 (Cd), 1.45 (Pb), 4.60 (Hg) and 1.98 (As); while cancer health risk faced by ASGM miners in Dumase exposed to As in River Mansi via oral ingestion of water is 3.1 × 10(-3). The hazard quotient results obtained from this study in most cases were above the HQ guidance value of 1.0, furthermore the cancer health risk results were found to be higher than the USEPA guidance value of 1 × 10(-4) to 1 × 10(-6). These findings call for case-control epidemiological studies to establish the relationship between exposure to the

  6. Human Health Risk Assessment of Artisanal Miners Exposed to Toxic Chemicals in Water and Sediments in the PresteaHuni Valley District of Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Obiri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A human health risk assessment of artisanal miners exposed to toxic metals in water bodies and sediments in the PresteaHuni Valley District of Ghana was carried out in this study, in line with US EPA risk assessment guidelines. A total of 70 water and 30 sediment samples were collected from surface water bodies in areas impacted by the operations of artisanal small-scale gold mines in the study area and analyzed for physico-chemical parameters such as pH, TDS, conductivity, turbidity as well as metals and metalloids such as As, Cd, Hg and Pb at CSIR—Water Research Institute using standard methods for the examination of wastewater as outlined by American Water Works Association (AWWA. The mean concentrations of As, Cd, Hg and Pb in water samples ranged from 15 μg/L to 325 μg/L (As, 0.17 μg/L to 340 μg/L (Cd, 0.17 μg/L to 122 μg/L (Pb and 132 μg/L to 866 μg/L (Hg, respectively. These measured concentrations of arsenic (As, mercury (Hg, cadmium (Cd and lead (Pb were used as input parameters to calculate the cancer and non-cancer health risks from exposure to these metals in surface water bodies and sediments based on an occupational exposure scenario using central tendency exposure (CTE and reasonable maximum exposure (RME parameters. The results of the non-cancer human health risk assessment for small-scale miners working around river Anikoko expressed in terms of hazard quotients based on CTE parameters are as follows: 0.04 (Cd, 1.45 (Pb, 4.60 (Hg and 1.98 (As; while cancer health risk faced by ASGM miners in Dumase exposed to As in River Mansi via oral ingestion of water is 3.1 × 10−3. The hazard quotient results obtained from this study in most cases were above the HQ guidance value of 1.0, furthermore the cancer health risk results were found to be higher than the USEPA guidance value of 1 × 10−4 to 1 × 10−6. These findings call for case-control epidemiological studies to establish the relationship between exposure to the

  7. Testicular myeloid sarcoma: a rare manifestation of acute myeloid leukemia in an infant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Christine N; Collie, Angela M B; Flagg, Aron; Rhee, Audrey

    2014-10-01

    Myeloid sarcoma manifesting in the testis is rare and may occur concomitantly with bone marrow disease or as a separate entity. We describe our experience with a 6-month-old boy who presented with painless scrotal swelling and was found to have bilateral testicular masses on ultrasonography. The patient underwent unilateral radical inguinal orchiectomy. Surgical pathology revealed myeloid sarcoma of the testicle. He developed peripheral blood involvement 1 week postoperatively. Bone marrow biopsy showed acute myeloid leukemia. He is in remission after 2 cycles of induction chemotherapy, local radiation therapy, and allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Myeloid clusters are associated with a pro-metastatic environment and poor prognosis in smoking-related early stage non-small cell lung cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Zhang

    Full Text Available This study aimed to understand the role of myeloid cell clusters in uninvolved regional lymph nodes from early stage non-small cell lung cancer patients.Uninvolved regional lymph node sections from 67 patients with stage I-III resected non-small cell lung cancer were immunostained to detect myeloid clusters, STAT3 activity and occult metastasis. Anthracosis intensity, myeloid cluster infiltration associated with anthracosis and pSTAT3 level were scored and correlated with patient survival. Multivariate Cox regression analysis was performed with prognostic variables. Human macrophages were used for in vitro nicotine treatment.CD68+ myeloid clusters associated with anthracosis and with an immunosuppressive and metastasis-promoting phenotype and elevated overall STAT3 activity were observed in uninvolved lymph nodes. In patients with a smoking history, myeloid cluster score significantly correlated with anthracosis intensity and pSTAT3 level (P<0.01. Nicotine activated STAT3 in macrophages in long-term culture. CD68+ myeloid clusters correlated and colocalized with occult metastasis. Myeloid cluster score was an independent prognostic factor (P = 0.049 and was associated with survival by Kaplan-Maier estimate in patients with a history of smoking (P = 0.055. The combination of myeloid cluster score with either lymph node stage or pSTAT3 level defined two populations with a significant difference in survival (P = 0.024 and P = 0.004, respectively.Myeloid clusters facilitate a pro-metastatic microenvironment in uninvolved regional lymph nodes and associate with occult metastasis in early stage non-small cell lung cancer. Myeloid cluster score is an independent prognostic factor for survival in patients with a history of smoking, and may present a novel method to inform therapy choices in the adjuvant setting. Further validation studies are warranted.

  9. Can Homeopathic Arsenic Remedy Combat Arsenic Poisoning in Humans Exposed to Groundwater Arsenic Contamination?: A Preliminary Report on First Human Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anisur Rahman Khuda-Bukhsh

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Groundwater arsenic (As has affected millions of people globally distributed over 20 countries. In parts of West Bengal (India and Bangladesh alone, over 100 million people are at risk, but supply of As-free water is grossly inadequate. Attempts to remove As by using orthodox medicines have mostly been unsuccessful. A potentized homeopathic remedy, Arsenicum Album-30, was administered to a group of As affected people and thereafter the As contents in their urine and blood were periodically determined. The activities of various toxicity marker enzymes and compounds in the blood, namely aspartate amino transferase, alanine amino transferase, acid phosphatase, alkaline phosphatase, lipid peroxidation and reduced glutathione, were also periodically monitored up to 3 months. The results are highly encouraging and suggest that the drug can alleviate As poisoning in humans.

  10. Clofarabine, Cytarabine, and G-CSF in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-04

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  11. TREATMENT RECOMMENDATIONS FOR CHRONIC MYELOID LEUKEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Baccarani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The first treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML included spleen x-radiation and conventional drugs, mainly Busulfan and Hydroxyurea. This therapy improved the quality of life during the chronic phase of the disease, without preventing nor significantly delaying the progression towards advanced phases. The introduction of allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT marked the first important breakthrough in the evolution of CML treatment, because about 50% of the eligible patients were cured. The second breakthrough was the introduction of human recombinant interferon-alfa, able to achieve a complete cytogenetic remission in 15% to 30% of patients, with a significant survival advantage over conventional chemotherapy. At the end of the last century, about 15 years ago, all these treatments were quickly replaced by a class of small molecules targeting the tyrosine kinases (TK, which were able to induce a major molecular remission in most of the patients, without remarkable side effects, and a very prolonged life-span. The first approved TK inhibitor (TKI was Imatinib Mesylate (Glivec or Gleevec, Novartis. Rapidly, other TKIs were developed tested and commercialized, namely Dasatinib (Sprycel, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Nilotinib (Tasigna, Novartis, Bosutinib (Busulif, Pfizer and Ponatinib (Iclusig, Ariad. Not all these compounds are available worldwide; some of them are approved only for second line treatment, and the high prices are a problem that can limit their use. A frequent update of treatment recommendations is necessary. The current treatment goals include not only the prevention of the transformation to the advanced phases and the prolongation of survival, but also a length of survival and of a quality of life comparable to that of non-leukemic individuals. In some patient the next ambitious step is to move towards a treatment-free remission. The CML therapy, the role of alloSCT and the promising experimental strategies are reviewed in

  12. BIOMARCADORES DE DAÑO GENÉTICO EN POBLACIONES HUMANAS EXPUESTAS A PLAGUICIDAS Biomarkers of Genetic Damage in Human Populations Exposed to Pesticides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DELIA AIASSA

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available El efecto de los plaguicidas sobre la salud humana, animal y ambiental es preocupación de la comunidad científica desde hace mucho tiempo. Numerosos estudios reportan que los plaguicidas no son inofensivos y que su uso puede conducir a efectos biológicos dañinos a mediano y a largo plazo, en los grupos humanos y animales expuestos, en el presente o en los descendientes. La importancia en la detección precoz del daño genético radica en que permite tomar las medidas necesarias para disminuir o suprimir la exposición al agente deletéreo cuando aún éste es reversible, y de ese modo prevenir y disminuir el riesgo de desarrollar neoplasias y otras alteraciones patológicas. En este trabajo se revisan los principales conceptos en la temática, la utilidad de los estudios de genotoxicidad y se hace referencia a los trabajos realizados en los últimos veinticinco años sobre monitoreo genético de personas expuestas laboralmente a plaguicidas. Los ensayos de genotoxicidad, que incluyen aberraciones cromosómicas, micronúcleos, intercambio de cromátidas hermanas y cometa, deberían ser considerados como herramientas indispensables en la implementación de una vigilancia médica completa en personas potencialmente expuestas a diversos contaminantes ambientales y en especial aquellas que habitan en el mismo lugar con personas que ya han desarrollado algún tipo de neoplasia en edades tempranas, con el fin de prevenir la ocurrencia de tumores de origen ambiental y especialmente laboral.The effect of pesticides on human, animal and environmental health has been cause of concern in the scientific community for a long time. Numerous studies have reported that pesticides are not harmless and that their use can lead to harmful biological effects in the medium and long term, in exposed human and animals, and their offspring. The importance of early detection of genetic damage is that it allows us to take the necessary measures to reduce or eliminate

  13. Cell fate regulated by nuclear factor-κB- and activator protein-1-dependent signalling in human melanocytes exposed to ultraviolet A and ultraviolet B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wäster, P; Rosdahl, I; Öllinger, K

    2014-01-01

    activator protein (AP)-1 and nuclear factor (NF)-κB as mediators of the UV response in other cell types. What does this study add? The present study identifies NF-κB as an antiapoptotic/prosurvival factor and shows that AP-1 stimulates proapoptotic signalling during both UVA- and UVB-induced apoptosis in human melanocytes. An improved understanding of cellular responses in UV-exposed melanocytes is essential to understanding and preventing the formation of melanoma, and might provide an opportunity to identify apoptotic regulators. PMID:25046326

  14. NUP98-HOXA9 bearing therapy-related myeloid neoplasm involves myeloid-committed cell and induces HOXA5, EVI1, FLT3, and MEIS1 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burillo-Sanz, S; Morales-Camacho, R M; Caballero-Velázquez, T; Vargas, M T; García-Lozano, J R; Falantes, J F; Prats-Martín, C; Bernal, R; Pérez-Simón, J A

    2016-02-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements involving NUP98 gene have been associated with human leukemias such as de novo AML, therapy-related AML (t-AML), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), and chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Genetic fusion NUP98-HOXA9, caused by t(7;11)(p15;p15), is a recurrent cytogenetic alteration in de novo acute myeloid leukemia (AML) usually found in young Asian patients and its description in therapy-related myeloid neoplasms (t-MN) is rare. Only one Asian case with molecular demonstration of the NUP98-HOXA9 fusion has been reported in therapy-related leukemia. NUP98-HOXA9 leukemogenic mechanism is derived from the transcription factor activity of the chimeric protein, which enhances the expression of genes related to cellular differentiation arrest and proliferation. We studied a Caucasian woman with a therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia after Ewing's sarcoma. Molecular demonstration of the genetic fusion NUP98-HOXA9 was performed by RT-PCR, and gene expression was analyzed by real-time PCR, including four AML patients with MLL rearrangements for comparative analysis. Cytologic and flow cytometric analysis was also carried out. After cytologic and flow cytometric analysis diagnostics was therapy-related myeloid neoplasm (t-MN). The major component of blasts in the acute leukemia was with neutrophilic differentiation, but 13% erythroid lineage blasts were also found. Cytogenetic and FISH analysis revealed t(7;11)(p15;p15) and NUP98-HOXA9 fusion gene was demonstrated. Gene expression analysis showed upregulation of EVI1 and MEIS1 in the index patient, both of them previously related to a worst outcome. In this work, we include a detailed molecular, clinical, cytological, and cytometric study of the second t-AML bearing NUP98-HOXA9 genetic fusion. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Cytotoxicity, oxidative stress and expression of adhesion molecules in human umbilical vein endothelial cells exposed to dust from paints with or without nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkelsen, Lone; Jensen, Keld A; Koponen, Ismo K; Saber, Anne T; Wallin, Håkan; Loft, Steffen; Vogel, Ulla; Møller, Peter

    2013-03-01

    Nanoparticles in primary form and nanoproducts might elicit different toxicological responses. We compared paint-related nanoparticles with respect to effects on endothelial oxidative stress, cytotoxicity and cell adhesion molecule expression. Primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells were exposed to primary nanoparticles (fine, photocatalytic or nanosized TiO(2), aluminium silicate, carbon black, nano-silicasol or axilate) and dust from sanding reference- or nanoparticle-containing paints. Most of the samples increased cell surface expressions of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), but paint sanding dust samples generally generated less response than primary particles of TiO(2) and carbon black. We found no relationship between the expression of adhesion molecules, cytotoxicity and production of reactive oxygen species. In conclusion, sanding dust from nanoparticle-containing paint did not generate more oxidative stress or expression of cell adhesion molecules than sanding dust from paint without nanoparticles, whereas the primary particles had the largest effect on mass basis.

  16. Evaluation of basil extract ( Ocimum basilicum L. on oxidative, anti-genotoxic and anti-inflammatory effects in human leukocytes cell cultures exposed to challenging agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Martins Güez

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Ocimum is one of the most important genera of the Lamiaceae family. Several studies about basil and its popular use reveal many characteristics of the herb, including its use as antioxidant, anti-aging, anti-inflammatory, anti-carcinogenic, anti-microbial, and cardiovascular agents, among others. In this paper, we evaluated genotoxic, oxidative, and anti-inflammatory parameters from the extract of Ocimum basilicum in different concentrations, using human leukocytes cultures exposed to challenging agents. Our results confirm that the O. basilicum extract acts as an antioxidant and effectively reverts or subjugates the effects of high oxidizing agents such as hydrogen peroxide. These actions are attributed to its composition, which is rich in polyphenols and flavonoids as well as compounds such as rosmarinic acid, all of which have well-known antioxidant activity. We also show that our basil extract presents anti-inflammatory properties, the mechanism of which is a composed interaction between the inhibition of pro-inflammatory mediator and the stimulation of anti-inflammatory cytokines. Although pharmacodynamics studies are necessary to evaluate the activities in vivo, our results demonstrated that basil could act as an antioxidant and anti-inflammatory and a possible alternative for medicinal treatment.

  17. Single-strand breaks in the DNA of human cells exposed to visible light from phototherapy lamps in the presence and absence of bilirubin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, T; Reitan, J B; Kinn, G

    1990-11-01

    Clinical evidence indicates that phototherapy of hyperbilirubinaemia in newborn infants is a safe and efficient form of therapy. The short-term side effects are not serious and seem to be well controlled. There are few long-term follow-up studies of phototherapy-treated infants. Therefore one cannot completely exclude the possibility that side effects can be found in future studies. With this background we undertook the present study of possible genotoxic effects of phototherapy. Human cells of the established glioblastoma cell line TMG-1 were used. The cells were exposed to visible light in the presence of different concentrations of bilirubin or in the absence of bilirubin. DNA was unwound in alkaline solution and the induction of strand breaks was assayed by a method taking advantage of the fluorescence from the dye Hoechst 33258. Blue light induced single-strand breaks in the DNA of cells in culture in the absence of bilirubin. During irradiation of bilirubin solutions with blue and green phototherapy light, long-lived toxic photoproducts were formed under in vitro conditions. At high and clinically relevant bilirubin concentrations, the effects of blue and green light were relatively similar. At low concentrations, there was a smaller effect of green light as expected from the absorption spectrum of bilirubin. It remains to be seen whether the genotoxic effect observed in the present studies can occur in vivo.

  18. Frequency of CCR5 Delta-32 Mutation in Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV-seropositive and HIV-exposed Seronegative Individuals and in General Population of Medellin, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco J Díaz

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available Repeated exposure to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV does not always result in seroconversion. Modifications in coreceptors for HIV entrance to target cells are one of the factors that block the infection. We studied the frequency of Delta-32 mutation in ccr5 gene in Medellin, Colombia. Two hundred and eighteen individuals distributed in three different groups were analyzed for Delta-32 mutation in ccr5 gene by polymerase chain reaction (PCR: 29 HIV seropositive (SP, 39 exposed seronegative (ESN and 150 individuals as a general population sample (GPS. The frequency of the Delta-32 mutant allele was 3.8% for ESN, 2.7% for GPS and 1.7% for SP. Only one homozygous mutant genotype (Delta-32/Delta-32 was found among the ESN (2.6%. The heterozygous genotype (ccr5/Delta-32 was found in eight GPS (5.3%, in one SP (3.4% and in one ESN (2.6%. The differences in the allelic and genotypic frequencies among the three groups were not statistically significant. A comparison between the expected and the observed genotypic frequencies showed that these frequencies were significantly different for the ESN group, which indirectly suggests a protective effect of the mutant genotype (Delta-32/Delta-32. Since this mutant genotype explained the resistance of infection in only one of our ESN persons, different mechanisms of protection must be playing a more important role in this population.

  19. Gonococcal cervicitis is associated with reduced systemic CD8+ T cell responses in human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected and exposed, uninfected sex workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaul, Rupert; Rowland-Jones, Sarah L; Gillespie, Geraldine; Kimani, Joshua; Dong, Tao; Kiama, Peter; Simonsen, J Neil; Bwayo, Job J; McMichael, Andrew J; Plummer, Francis A

    2002-05-15

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae cervicitis and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 frequently coinfect core transmitter populations, such as female sex workers. Gonococcal cervicitis is associated with increased viral shedding and plasma viremia in HIV-1-infected women and increased HIV-1 susceptibility in uninfected women. We studied the influence of gonococcal cervicitis on CD8(+) interferon (IFN)-gamma responses to HIV-1 and cytomegalovirus (CMV) epitopes in HIV-1-infected and in highly-exposed, persistently seronegative (HEPS) female sex workers. In HIV-1-infected women, gonococcal cervicitis was associated with reduced IFN-gamma responses in bulk CD8(+) lymphocyte populations, and intracellular cytokine staining, combined with class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-peptide tetramer studies, demonstrated reduced IFN-gamma production by HIV-1 epitope-specific CD8(+) lymphocytes. In HEPS sex workers, cervicitis was associated with the transient loss of systemic HIV-1-specific CD8(+) responses and with reduced function of CMV-specific CD8(+) lymphocytes. Impaired function of virus-specific CD8(+) lymphocytes may partly explain the deleterious effects of gonococcal cervicitis on HIV-1 immune control and susceptibility.

  20. APO-9′-Fucoxanthinone Extracted from Undariopsis peteseniana Protects Oxidative Stress-Mediated Apoptosis in Cigarette Smoke-Exposed Human Airway Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Ho Jang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Long-term cigarette smoking increases the risk for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, characterized by irreversible expiratory airflow limitation. The pathogenesis of COPD involves oxidative stress and chronic inflammation. Various natural marine compounds possess both anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, but few have been tested for their efficacy in COPD models. In this study, we conducted an in vitro screening test to identify natural compounds isolated from various brown algae species that might provide protection against cigarette smoke extract (CSE-induced cytotoxicity. Among nine selected natural compounds, apo-9′-fucoxanthinone (Apo9F exhibited the highest protection against CSE-induced cytotoxicity in immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells (HBEC2. Furthermore, the protective effects of Apo9F were observed to be associated with a significant reduction in apoptotic cell death, DNA damage, and the levels of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS released from CSE-exposed HBEC2 cells. These results suggest that Apo9F protects against CSE-induced DNA damage and apoptosis by regulating mitochondrial ROS production.

  1. Comparative Morphologic Evaluation and Occluding Effectiveness of Nd: YAG, CO2 and Diode Lasers on Exposed Human Dentinal Tubules: An Invitro SEM Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Harpreet Singh; Choudhary, Pankaj

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Dentinal hypersensitivity is one of the most common problem, encountered in dental practice but has least predictable treatment outcome. The advent of lasers in dentistry has provided an additional therapeutic option for treating dentinal hypersensitivity. Although various lasers have been tried over a period of time to treat dentinal hypersensitivity, but still the doubt persist as to which laser leads to maximum dentinal tubular occlusion and is most suitable with minimal hazardous effects. Aim To compare the effects of Nd: YAG, CO2 and 810-nm diode lasers on width of exposed dentinal tubule orifices and to evaluate the morphologic changes on dentinal surface of human tooth after laser irradiation by scanning electron microscope (SEM). Materials and Methods Forty root specimens were obtained from ten freshly extracted human premolars, which were randomly divided into four groups of ten each. Group I: control group treated with only saline, Group II: Nd:YAG laser, Group III: CO2 laser and Group IV: 810-nm diode laser. The specimens were examined using SEM. After calculating mean tubular diameter for each group, the values were compared statistically using parametric one-way ANOVA test and Turkey’s post hoc multiple comparison test. Results All the three lased groups showed a highly statistical significant result with p-value of laser was found to be most effective, followed by the CO2 laser and 810-nm diode laser was found to be least effective. The morphologic changes like craters, cracks and charring effect of the dentine were seen maximum by the use of CO2 laser. PMID:27630957

  2. Time constants for temperature elevation in human models exposed to dipole antennas and beams in the frequency range from 1 to 30 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Ryota; Hirata, Akimasa; Laakso, Ilkka; Ziskin, Marvin C.; Foster, Kenneth R.

    2017-03-01

    This study computes the time constants of the temperature elevations in human head and body models exposed to simulated radiation from dipole antennas, electromagnetic beams, and plane waves. The frequency range considered is from 1 to 30 GHz. The specific absorption rate distributions in the human models are first computed using the finite-difference time-domain method for the electromagnetics. The temperature elevation is then calculated by solving the bioheat transfer equation. The computational results show that the thermal time constants (defined as the time required to reach 63% of the steady state temperature elevation) decrease with the elevation in radiation frequency. For frequencies higher than 4 GHz, the computed thermal time constants are smaller than the averaging time prescribed in the ICNIRP guidelines, but larger than the averaging time in the IEEE standard. Significant differences between the different head models are observed at frequencies higher than 10 GHz, which is attributable to the heat diffusion from the power absorbed in the pinna. The time constants for beam exposures become large with the increase in beam diameter. The thermal time constant in the brain is larger than that in the superficial tissues at high frequencies, because the brain temperature elevation is caused by the heat conduction of energy absorbed in the superficial tissue. The thermal time constant is minimized with an ideal beam with a minimum investigated diameter of 10 mm this minimal time constant is approximately 30 s and is almost independent of the radiation frequency, which is supported by analytic methods. In addition, the relation between the time constant, as defined in this paper, and ‘averaging time’ as it appears in the exposure limits is discussed, especially for short intense pulses. Similar to the laser guidelines, provisions should be included in the limits to limit the fluence for such pulses.

  3. In vitro toxicoproteomic analysis of A549 human lung epithelial cells exposed to urban air particulate matter and its water-soluble and insoluble fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuong, Ngoc Q; Breznan, Dalibor; Goegan, Patrick; O'Brien, Julie S; Williams, Andrew; Karthikeyan, Subramanian; Kumarathasan, Premkumari; Vincent, Renaud

    2017-10-02

    Toxicity of airborne particulate matter (PM) is difficult to assess because PM composition is complex and variable due to source contribution and atmospheric transformation. In this study, we used an in vitro toxicoproteomic approach to identify the toxicity mechanisms associated with different subfractions of Ottawa urban dust (EHC-93). A549 human lung epithelial cells were exposed to 0, 60, 140 and 200 μg/cm2 doses of EHC-93 (total), its insoluble and soluble fractions for 24 h. Multiple cytotoxicity assays and proteomic analyses were used to assess particle toxicity in the exposed cells. The cytotoxicity data based on cellular ATP, BrdU incorporation and LDH leakage indicated that the insoluble, but not the soluble, fraction is responsible for the toxicity of EHC-93 in A549 cells. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis results revealed that the expressions of 206 protein spots were significantly altered after particle exposures, where 154 were identified by MALDI-TOF-TOF-MS/MS. The results from cytotoxicity assays and proteomic analyses converged to a similar finding that the effects of the total and insoluble fraction may be alike, but their effects were distinguishable, and their effects were significantly different from the soluble fraction. Furthermore, the toxic potency of EHC-93 total is not equal to the sum of its insoluble and soluble fractions, implying inter-component interactions between insoluble and soluble materials resulting in synergistic or antagonistic cytotoxic effects. Pathway analysis based on the low toxicity dose (60 μg/cm2) indicated that the two subfractions can alter the expression of those proteins involved in pathways including cell death, cell proliferation and inflammatory response in a distinguishable manner. For example, the insoluble and soluble fractions differentially affected the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as MCP-1 and IL-8 and distinctly altered the expression of those proteins (e.g., TREM1, PDIA3 and ENO1

  4. New emerging applications of molgramostim in acute myeloid leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Xavier

    2008-06-01

    Human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) stimulates the proliferation and differentiation of hematopoietic progenitor cells in the myeloid lineage, and plays a key role in host defence and the inflammatory process. The main schedules adopted for clinical applications of GM-CSF in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) were post-chemotherapy, in order to shorten the duration of neutropenia, and as a mobilising agent to induce release of progenitor cells from bone marrow into circulation. Based on the variety of biologic effects being attributed to GM-CSF, additional clinical uses for GM-CSF have been under investigation. Concurrent administration to chemotherapy has been used to recruit blast cells into active cell cycle phases, and to increase their sensitivity to cell cycle-dependent cytotoxic drugs. Exposure to GM-CSF also has recently been shown to enhance cellular immunity and indirectly stimulate anti-tumour immunity. On the other hand, GM-CSF can directly enhance immunogenicity of tumours.

  5. Mesenchymal stromal cells in myeloid malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Thomas; Geyh, Stefanie; Germing, Ulrich; Haas, Rainer

    2016-12-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are clonal myeloid disorders characterized by hematopoietic insufficiency. As MDS and AML are considered to originate from genetic and molecular defects of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC), the main focus of research in this field has focused on the characterization of these cells. Recently, the contribution of BM microenvironment to the pathogenesis of myeloid malignancies, in particular MDS and AML has gained more interest. This is based on a better understanding of its physiological role in the regulation of hematopoiesis. Additionally, it was demonstrated as a 'proof of principle' that genetic disruption of cells of the mesenchymal or osteoblastic lineage can induce MDS, MPS or AML in mice. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge about the contribution of the BM microenvironment, in particular mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) to the pathogenesis of AML and MDS. Furthermore, potential models integrating the BM microenvironment into the pathophysiology of these myeloid disorders are discussed. Finally, strategies to therapeutically exploit this knowledge and to interfere with the crosstalk between clonal hematopoietic cells and altered stem cell niches are introduced.

  6. Treatment strategies in acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Han Li-na, [No Value; Zhou Jin, [No Value; Schuringa, Jan Jacob; Vellenga, Edo

    2011-01-01

    Objective To summarize the risk stratification and current treatment strategies for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and discuss the role of emerging novel agents that might be applied in future clinical trials. Data sources The data in this article were collected from PubMed database with relevant

  7. Chronic myeloid leukemia presented with priapism: Effective ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-02-01

    Feb 1, 2015 ... of sexual stimulation, trauma, previous similar episodes, use of medications or any chronic illness. On physical examination, the patient had pallor. The spleen and liver. Chronic myeloid leukemia presented with priapism: Effective management with prompt leukapheresis. H Ergenc, C Varım, C Karacaer, ...

  8. Acute myeloid leukemia in the vascular niche

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cogle, Christopher R.; Bosse, Raphael C.; Brewer, Takae; Migdady, Yazan; Shirzad, Reza; Kampen, Kim Rosalie; Saki, Najmaldin

    2016-01-01

    The greatest challenge in treating acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is refractory disease. With approximately 60-80% of AML patients dying of relapsed disease, there is an urgent need to define and target mechanisms of drug resistance. Unfortunately, targeting cell-intrinsic resistance has failed to

  9. Recurrent Cytogenetic Abnormalities in Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, John J; Park, Tae Sung; Wan, Thomas S K

    2017-01-01

    The spectrum of chromosomal abnormality associated with leukemogenesis of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is broad and heterogeneous when compared to chronic myeloid leukemia and other myeloid neoplasms. Recurrent chromosomal translocations such as t(8;21), t(15;17), and inv(16) are frequently detected, but hundreds of other uncommon chromosomal aberrations from AML also exist. This chapter discusses 22 chromosomal abnormalities that are common structural, numerical aberrations, and other important but infrequent (less than 1 %) translocations emphasized in the WHO classification. Brief morphologic, cytogenetic, and clinical characteristics are summarized, so as to provide a concise reference to cancer cytogenetic laboratories. Morphology based on FAB classification is used together with the current WHO classification due to frequent mentioning in a vast number of reference literatures. Characteristic chromosomal aberrations of other myeloid neoplasms such as myelodysplastic syndrome and myeloproliferative neoplasm will be discussed in separate chapters-except for certain abnormalities such as t(9;22) in de novo AML. Gene mutations detected in normal karyotype AML by cutting edge next generation sequencing technology are also briefly mentioned.

  10. Myeloid malignancies: mutations, models and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murati Anne

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Myeloid malignant diseases comprise chronic (including myelodysplastic syndromes, myeloproliferative neoplasms and chronic myelomonocytic leukemia and acute (acute myeloid leukemia stages. They are clonal diseases arising in hematopoietic stem or progenitor cells. Mutations responsible for these diseases occur in several genes whose encoded proteins belong principally to five classes: signaling pathways proteins (e.g. CBL, FLT3, JAK2, RAS, transcription factors (e.g. CEBPA, ETV6, RUNX1, epigenetic regulators (e.g. ASXL1, DNMT3A, EZH2, IDH1, IDH2, SUZ12, TET2, UTX, tumor suppressors (e.g. TP53, and components of the spliceosome (e.g. SF3B1, SRSF2. Large-scale sequencing efforts will soon lead to the establishment of a comprehensive repertoire of these mutations, allowing for a better definition and classification of myeloid malignancies, the identification of new prognostic markers and therapeutic targets, and the development of novel therapies. Given the importance of epigenetic deregulation in myeloid diseases, the use of drugs targeting epigenetic regulators appears as a most promising therapeutic approach.

  11. Comparison of protective effect of ascorbic acid on redox and endocannabinoid systems interactions in in vitro cultured human skin fibroblasts exposed to UV radiation and hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gęgotek, Agnieszka; Bielawska, Katarzyna; Biernacki, Michał; Zaręba, Ilona; Surażyński, Arkadiusz; Skrzydlewska, Elżbieta

    2017-05-01

    The mechanisms of biological activity of commonly used natural compounds are constantly examined. Therefore, the aim of this study was to compare ascorbic acid efficacy in counteracting the consequences of UV and hydrogen peroxide treatment on lipid mediators and their regulative action on antioxidant abilities. Skin fibroblasts exposed to UVA and UVB irradiation, treated with hydrogen peroxide and ascorbic acid. The redox system was estimated through reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation (electron spin resonance spectrometer) and antioxidants level/activity (HPLC/spectrometry) which activity was evaluated by the level of phospholipid metabolites: 4-hydroxynonenal, malondialdehyde, 8-isoprostanes and endocannabinoids (GC/LC-MS) in the human skin fibroblasts. Protein and DNA oxidative modifications were also determined (LC). The expression of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), its activators and inhibitors as well as pro/anti-apoptotic proteins and endocannabinoid receptors was examined (Western blot) and collagen metabolism was evaluated by collagen biosynthesis and prolidase activity (spectrometry). UVA and UVB irradiation and hydrogen peroxide treatment enhanced activity of xanthine and NADPH oxidases resulting in ROS generation as well as diminution of antioxidant phospholipid protection (glutathione peroxidase-glutathione-vitamin E), what led to increased lipid peroxidation and decreased endocannabinoids level. Dysregulation of cannabinoid receptors expression and environment of transcription factor Nrf2 caused apoptosis induction. Ascorbic acid partially prevented ROS generation, antioxidant capacity diminution and endocannabinoid systems disturbances but only slightly protected macromolecules such as phospholipid, protein and DNA against oxidative modifications. However, ascorbic acid significantly prevented decrease in collagen type I biosynthesis. Ascorbic acid in similar degree prevents UV (UVA and UVB) and hydrogen peroxide

  12. Haploinsufficiency for DNA methyltransferase 3A predisposes hematopoietic cells to myeloid malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Christopher B; Russler-Germain, David A; Ketkar, Shamika; Verdoni, Angela M; Smith, Amanda M; Bangert, Celia V; Helton, Nichole M; Guo, Mindy; Klco, Jeffery M; O'Laughlin, Shelly; Fronick, Catrina; Fulton, Robert; Chang, Gue Su; Petti, Allegra A; Miller, Christopher A; Ley, Timothy J

    2017-10-02

    The gene that encodes de novo DNA methyltransferase 3A (DNMT3A) is frequently mutated in acute myeloid leukemia genomes. Point mutations at position R882 have been shown to cause a dominant negative loss of DNMT3A methylation activity, but 15% of DNMT3A mutations are predicted to produce truncated proteins that could either have dominant negative activities or cause loss of function and haploinsufficiency. Here, we demonstrate that 3 of these mutants produce truncated, inactive proteins that do not dimerize with WT DNMT3A, strongly supporting the haploinsufficiency hypothesis. We therefore evaluated hematopoiesis in mice heterozygous for a constitutive null Dnmt3a mutation. With no other manipulations, Dnmt3a+/- mice developed myeloid skewing over time, and their hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells exhibited a long-term competitive transplantation advantage. Dnmt3a+/- mice also spontaneously developed transplantable myeloid malignancies after a long latent period, and 3 of 12 tumors tested had cooperating mutations in the Ras/MAPK pathway. The residual Dnmt3a allele was neither mutated nor downregulated in these tumors. The bone marrow cells of Dnmt3a+/- mice had a subtle but statistically significant DNA hypomethylation phenotype that was not associated with gene dysregulation. These data demonstrate that haploinsufficiency for Dnmt3a alters hematopoiesis and predisposes mice (and probably humans) to myeloid malignancies by a mechanism that is not yet clear.

  13. A novel application of furazolidone: anti-leukemic activity in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueqing Jiang

    Full Text Available Acute myeloid leukemia (AML is the most common malignant myeloid disorder of progenitor cells in myeloid hematopoiesis and exemplifies a genetically heterogeneous disease. The patients with AML also show a heterogeneous response to therapy. Although all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA has been successfully introduced to treat acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL, it is rather ineffective in non-APL AML. In our present study, 1200 off-patent marketed drugs and natural compounds that have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA were screened for anti-leukemia activity using the retrovirus transduction/transformation assay (RTTA. Furazolidone (FZD was shown to inhibit bone marrow transformation mediated by several leukemia fusion proteins, including AML1-ETO. Furazolidone has been used in the treatment of certain bacterial and protozoan infections in human and animals for more than sixty years. We investigated the anti-leukemic activity of FZD in a series of AML cells. FZD displayed potent antiproliferative properties at submicromolar concentrations and induced apoptosis in AML cell lines. Importantly, FZD treatment of certain AML cells induced myeloid cell differentiation by morphology and flow cytometry for CD11b expression. Furthermore, FZD treatment resulted in increased stability of tumor suppressor p53 protein in AML cells. Our in vitro results suggest furazolidone as a novel therapeutic strategy in AML patients.

  14. Myb expression is critical for myeloid leukemia development induced by Setbp1 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nhu; Vishwakarma, Bandana A; Oakley, Kevin; Han, Yufen; Przychodzen, Bartlomiej; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P; Du, Yang

    2016-12-27

    SETBP1 missense mutations have been frequently identified in multiple myeloid neoplasms; however, their oncogenic potential remains unclear. Here we show that expression of Setbp1 mutants carrying two such mutations in mouse bone marrow progenitors efficiently induced development of acute myeloid leukemias (AMLs) in irradiated recipient mice with significantly shorter latencies and greater penetrance than expression of wild-type Setbp1, suggesting that these mutations are highly oncogenic. The increased oncogenicity of Setbp1 missense mutants could be due in part to their capability to drive significantly higher target gene transcription. We further identify Myb as a critical mediator of Setbp1-induced self-renewal as its knockdown caused efficient differentiation of myeloid progenitors immortalized by wild-type Setbp1 and Setbp1 missense mutants. Interestingly, Myb is also a direct transcriptional target of Setbp1 and Setbp1 missense mutants as they directly bind to the Myb locus in immortalized cells and dramatically activate a critical enhancer/promoter region of Myb in luciferase reporter assays. Furthermore, Myb knockdown in Setbp1 and Setbp1 missense mutations-induced AML cells also efficiently induced their differentiation in culture and significantly prolonged the survival of their secondary recipient mice, suggesting that targeting MYB pathway could be a promising strategy for treating human myeloid neoplasms with SETBP1 activation.

  15. Global Identification of EVI1 Target Genes in Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn Glass

    Full Text Available The ecotropic virus integration site 1 (EVI1 transcription factor is associated with human myeloid malignancy of poor prognosis and is overexpressed in 8-10% of adult AML and strikingly up to 27% of pediatric MLL-rearranged leukemias. For the first time, we report comprehensive genomewide EVI1 binding and whole transcriptome gene deregulation in leukemic cells using a combination of ChIP-Seq and RNA-Seq expression profiling. We found disruption of terminal myeloid differentiation and cell cycle regulation to be prominent in EVI-induced leukemogenesis. Specifically, we identified EVI1 directly binds to and downregulates the master myeloid differentiation gene Cebpe and several of its downstream gene targets critical for terminal myeloid differentiation. We also found EVI1 binds to and downregulates Serpinb2 as well as numerous genes involved in the Jak-Stat signaling pathway. Finally, we identified decreased expression of several ATP-dependent P2X purinoreceptors genes involved in apoptosis mechanisms. These findings provide a foundation for future study of potential therapeutic gene targets for EVI1-induced leukemia.

  16. The European Medicines Agency Review of Decitabine (Dacogen) for the Treatment of Adult Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia: Summary of the Scientific Assessment of the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto, Maria; Demolis, Pierre; Béhanzin, Eliane; Moreau, Alexandre; Hudson, Ian; Flores, Beatriz; Stemplewski, Henry; Salmonson, Tomas; Gisselbrecht, Christian; Bowen, David; Pignatti, Francesco

    2016-06-01

    : On September 20, 2012, a marketing authorization valid throughout the European Union (EU) was issued for decitabine for the treatment of adult patients aged 65 years and older with newly diagnosed de novo or secondary acute myeloid leukemia (AML) who are not candidates for standard induction chemotherapy. Decitabine is a pyrimidine analog incorporated into DNA, where it irreversibly inhibits DNA methyltransferases through covalent adduct formation with the enzyme. The use of decitabine was studied in an open-label, randomized, multicenter phase III study (DACO-016) in patients with newly diagnosed de novo or secondary AML. Decitabine (n = 242) was compared with patient's choice with physician's advice (n = 243) of low-dose cytarabine or supportive care alone. The primary endpoint of the study was overall survival. The median overall survival in the intent-to-treat (ITT) population was 7.7 months among patients treated with decitabine compared with 5.0 months for those in the control arm (hazard ratio [HR], 0.85; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.69-1.04; p = .1079). Mature survival data after an additional year of follow-up were consistent with these results, with a median overall survival of 7.7 months in patients treated with decitabine and 5.0 months in the control arm (HR, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.68-0.99; p = .0373). Secondary endpoints, including response rates, progression-free survival, and event-free survival, were increased in favor of decitabine when compared with control treatment. The most common adverse drug reactions reported during treatment with decitabine are pyrexia, anemia, thrombocytopenia, febrile neutropenia, neutropenia, nausea, and diarrhea. This paper summarizes the scientific review of the application leading to approval of decitabine in the EU. The detailed scientific assessment report and product information (including the summary of product characteristics) for this product are available on the EMA website (http://www.ema.europa.eu). Acute

  17. The cytokine-mediated crosstalk between primary human acute myeloid cells and mesenchymal stem cells alters the local cytokine network and the global gene expression profile of the mesenchymal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Håkon Reikvam

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Interactions between acute myeloid leukemia (AML blasts and neighboring stromal cells are important for disease development and chemosensitivity. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in the cytokine-mediated crosstalk between mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs and AML cells are largely unknown. Leukemic cells derived from 18 unselected AML patients were cultured with bone marrow MSCs derived from healthy donors; the populations then being separated by a semipermeable membrane. Coculture had only minor effects on MSC proliferation. The unique cytokine network in cocultures was determined by high constitutive MSC release of certain cytokines (especially IL-6 and vascular endothelial growth factor and constitutive release of a wide range of soluble mediators by primary AML cells. However, the AML cell release varied considerably between patients, and these differences between patients were also reflected in the coculture levels even though supra-additive effects were seen for many mediators. These effects on the local cytokine network were dependent on a functional crosstalk between the two cell subsets. The crosstalk altered the global gene expression profile of the MSCs, especially expression of genes encoding proteins involved in downstream signaling from Toll like receptors, NFκB signaling and CCL/CXCL chemokine release. Thus, primary AML cells alter the functional phenotype of normal MSCs.

  18. Genetically Modified T-cell Immunotherapy in Treating Patients With Relapsed/Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Persistent/Recurrent Blastic Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Neoplasm

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-14

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Donor; Early Relapse of Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Late Relapse of Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Blastic Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Neoplasm

  19. Selumetinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-06

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  20. File list: Pol.Bld.10.AllAg.Leukemia,_Myeloid [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  8. Acute myeloid leukemia: update in diagnosis and treatment in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Helman

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify how the Brazilian hematology centerstreated and diagnosed cases of acute myeloid leukemia in 2009.Methods: An epidemiological observational multicenter study of11 listed Brazilian centers that treat acute myeloid leukemia andperform bone marrow transplantation. Data were collected fromclinical charts of patients with acute myeloid leukemia treatedat the said centers between 2005 and 2009. The availability forimmunophenotyping and cytogenetic tests was assessed. Results:During 2009, a total of 345 new cases of acute myeloid leukemiawere diagnosed. Differences were noted in the tests performedbetween patients who initiated treatment at the center and thosereferred for treatment. Of the participating centers, 72% conductedsome type of molecular study in acute myeloid leukemia upondiagnosis. Conclusion: Treatment for acute myeloid leukemia inBrazil shows significantly inferior results when compared to othercenters worldwide.

  9. Myeloid Sarcoma Presenting as Nasal and Orbital Mass: An Initial Manifestation of an Acute Myeloid Leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Amita Jain; Mandal, Shramana; Gupta, Richa; Khurana, Nita; Gulati, Achal

    2017-07-01

    Myeloid sarcoma is an extramedullary manifestation of Acute Myeloid Leukaemia and sometimes is the only indicator of the disease. The incidence varies between 3-9.1% of acute leukaemia cases. The blast infiltration is seen most commonly in skin, lymph node, gastrointestinal tract, bone, soft tissue though can involve any body site usually as a solitary lesion and is rarely seen in nasal cavity. We present two cases of myeloid sarcoma presenting as a nasal mass in a six year old girl and other as orbital mass in 32-year-old as an initial manifestation of acute myeloid leukaemia. Histopathological examination along with immunohistochemistry clinched the diagnosis of myeloid sarcoma. Examination of bone marrow aspirate revealed blasts which fulfilled the criteria for acute leukaemia. These cases are usually misdiagnosed because often lymphoma and granulocytic sarcoma is not considered in initial list of differential diagnoses. These rare cases are being presented here as early recognition and diagnosis will ensure rapid treatment of the condition and improve the survival.

  10. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells and myeloid regulatory cells in cancer and autoimmune disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnie, Prince Amoah; Zhang, Pan; Lv, Hongxiang; Wang, Dan; Su, Xiaolian; Su, Zhaoliang; Xu, Huaxi

    2017-02-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) were originally described as a heterogeneous population of immature cells derived from myeloid progenitors with immune-suppressive functions in tumor-bearing hosts. In recent years, increasing number of studies have described various populations of myeloid cells with MDSC-like properties in murine models of cancer and autoimmune diseases. These studies have observed that the populations of MDSCs are increased during inflammation and autoimmune conditions. In addition, MDSCs can effectively suppress T cell responses and modulate the activity of natural killer cells and other myeloid cells. MDSCs have also been implicated in the induction of regulatory T cell production. Furthermore, these cells have the potential to suppress the autoimmune response, thereby limiting tissue injury. Myeloid regulatory cells (Mregs) are recently attracting increasing attention, since they function in proinflammatory and immune suppression in autoimmune diseases, as well as in various types of cancer. Currently, research focus is directed from MDSCs to Mregs in cancer and autoimmune diseases. The present study reviewed the suppressive roles of MDSCs in various autoimmune murine models, the immune modulation of MDSCs to T helper 17 lymphocytes, as well as the proinflammatory and immunosuppressive roles of Mregs in various types of cancer and autoimmune diseases.

  11. Cotylenin A--a plant growth regulator as a differentiation-inducing agent against myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honma, Yoshio

    2002-06-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is characterized by the arrest of differentiation leading to the accumulation of immature cells. This maturation arrest can be reversed by certain agents. Although differentiation therapy for patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) using all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) has been established, the clinical response of AML patients other than those with APL to ATRA is limited. We must consider novel therapeutic drugs against other forms of AML for the development of a differentiation therapy for leukemia. Regulators that play an important role in the differentiation and development of plants or invertebrates may also affect the differentiation of human leukemia cells through a common signal transduction system, and might be clinically useful for treating AML. Cotylenin A, a plant growth regulator, is a potent and novel inducer of the monocytic differentiation of human myeloid leukemia cell lines and leukemia cells freshly isolated from AML patients.

  12. Induction of the monocytic differentiation of myeloid leukaemia cells by cotylenin A, a plant growth regulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto-Yamaguchi, Y; Yamada, K; Ishii, Y; Asahi, K I; Tomoyasu, S; Honma, Y

    2001-03-01

    Regulators that play an important role in the differentiation and development of plants or invertebrates may also affect the differentiation of human leukaemia cells through a common signal transduction system, and might be clinically useful for treating acute myeloid leukaemia. Cotylenin A has been isolated as a plant growth regulator. We examined the effects of cotylenin A on the differentiation of several myelogenous leukaemia cells, and found that cotylenin A is a potent and novel inducer of the monocytic differentiation of human myeloid leukaemia cells. Cotylenin A induced the functional and morphological differentiation of myeloblastic and promyelocytic leukaemia cells, but did not effectively induce the differentiation of monocytoid leukaemia cells. Cotylenin A-induced differentiation was not affected by several inhibitors of signal transduction, suggesting that this inducer exhibits a unique mode of action.

  13. STING Pathway Activation Stimulates Potent Immunity against Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Curran

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Type I interferon (IFN, essential for spontaneous T cell priming against solid tumors, is generated through recognition of tumor DNA by STING. Interestingly, we observe that type I IFN is not elicited in animals with disseminated acute myeloid leukemia (AML. Further, survival of leukemia-bearing animals is not diminished in the absence of type I IFN signaling, suggesting that STING may not be triggered by AML. However, the STING agonist, DMXAA, induces expression of IFN-β and other inflammatory cytokines, promotes dendritic cell (DC maturation, and results in the striking expansion of leukemia-specific T cells. Systemic DMXAA administration significantly extends survival in two AML models. The therapeutic effect of DMXAA is only partially dependent on host type I IFN signaling, suggesting that other cytokines are important. A synthetic cyclic dinucleotide that also activates human STING provided a similar anti-leukemic effect. These data demonstrate that STING is a promising immunotherapeutic target in AML.

  14. Gene expression profiling to define the cell intrinsic role of the SKI proto-oncogene in hematopoiesis and myeloid neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalk, Alistair M; Liddicoat, Brian J J; Walkley, Carl R; Singbrant, Sofie

    2014-12-01

    The proto-oncogene SKI is highly expressed in human myeloid leukemia and also in murine hematopoietic stem cells. However, its operative relevance in these cells remains elusive. We have over-expressed SKI to define its intrinsic role in hematopoiesis and myeloid neoplasms, which resulted in a robust competitive advantage upon transplantation, a complete dominance of the stem and progenitor compartments, and a marked enhancement of myeloid differentiation at the expense of other lineages. Accordingly, enforced expression of SKI induced gene signatures associated with hematopoietic stem cells and myeloid differentiation. Here we provide detailed experimental methods and analysis for the gene expression profiling described in our recently published study of Singbrant et al. (2014) in Haematologica. Our data sets (available at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/query/acc.cgi?acc=GSE39457) provide a resource for exploring the underlying molecular mechanisms of the involvement of the proto-oncogene SKI in hematopoietic stem cell function and development of myeloid neoplasms.

  15. Epigenetic aberrations in myeloid malignancies (Review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Shinichiro

    2013-09-01

    The development of novel technologies, such as massively parallel DNA sequencing, has led to the identification of several novel recurrent gene mutations, such as DNA methyltransferase (Dnmt)3a, ten-eleven-translocation oncogene family member 2 (TET2), isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH)1/2, additional sex comb-like 1 (ASXL1), enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) and ubiquitously transcribed tetratricopeptide repeat X chromosome (UTX) mutations in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and other myeloid malignancies. These findings strongly suggest a link between recurrent genetic alterations and aberrant epigenetic regulations, resulting from an abnormal DNA methylation and histone modification status. This review focuses on the current findings of aberrant epigenetic signatures by these newly described genetic alterations. Moreover, epigenetic aberrations resulting from transcription factor aberrations, such as mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) rearrangement, ecotropic viral integration site 1 (Evi1) overexpression, chromosomal translocations and the downregulation of PU.1 are also described.

  16. Molecular Pathology: Prognostic and Diagnostic Genomic Markers for Myeloid Neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Frank C

    2016-09-01

    Application of next-generation sequencing (NGS) on myeloid neoplasms has expanded our knowledge of genomic alterations in this group of diseases. Genomic alterations in myeloid neoplasms are complex, heterogeneous, and not specific to a disease entity. NGS-based panel testing of myeloid neoplasms can complement existing diagnostic modalities and is gaining acceptance in the clinics and diagnostic laboratories. Prospective, randomized trials to evaluate the prognostic significance of genomic markers in myeloid neoplasms are under way in academic medical centers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. [An immunological approach to acute myeloid leukaemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, B; Bueno, D; Rubio, P M; San Román, S; Plaza, D; Sastre, A; García-Miguel, P; Fernández, L; Valentín, J; Martínez, I; Pérez-Martínez, A

    2016-04-01

    Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) is the second haematological malignancy in the paediatric population, and one of the leading causes of childhood cancer mortality. Survival is currently around 60%, with no improvement in last decades, suggesting that new therapeutic approaches are needed. The anti-leukaemia effect mediated by the lymphocytes and natural killer (NK) cells of the immune system has been established in haematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and also as adoptive immunotherapy after consolidation chemotherapy schemes. A retrospective study was conducted on the clinical characteristics of patients diagnosed and treated for AML in our centre during 1996-2014. The mean fluorescence intensities of HLA-I, MICA/B and ULBP1-4, ligands for NK cell receptors, were also analysed in ten new diagnosed leukaemia cases, five myeloid and five lymphoid. A total of 67 patients were used in this analysis. With a median follow up of 25 months, the event-free survival was 62% (95% CI: 55-67). Secondary AML, non-M3 phenotype, and the absence of favourable cytogenetic markers had a lower survival. The probability of relapse was 38% (95% CI: 31-45). The expression of HLA-I and ULBP-4 was significantly lower in myeloid than in lymphoid blast cells. Our clinical results are similar to those described in the literature. Survival did not significantly change in recent decades, and the likelihood of relapse remains high. Myeloid blasts might be more susceptible to the cytotoxicity of NK cells through their lower expression of HLA-I. NK therapy strategies in minimal disease situation could be effective, as reported by other groups. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Expression pattern of the septin gene family in acute myeloid leukemias with and without MLL-SEPT fusion genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santos, Joana; Cerveira, Nuno; Bizarro, Susana; Ribeiro, Franclim R.; Correia, Cecília; Torres, Lurdes; Lisboa, Susana; Vieira, Joana; Mariz, José M.; Norton, Lucília; Snijder, Simone; Mellink, Clemens H.; Buijs, Arjan; Shih, Lee-Yung; Strehl, Sabine; Micci, Francesca; Heim, Sverre; Teixeira, Manuel R.

    2010-01-01

    Septins are proteins associated with crucial steps in cell division and cellular integrity. In humans, 14 septin genes have been identified, of which five (SEPT2, SEPT5, SEPT6, SEPT9, and SEPT11) are known to participate in reciprocal translocations with the MLL gene in myeloid neoplasias. We have

  19. HLA-DRB1*16-restricted recognition of myeloid cells, including CD34+ CML progenitor cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ebeling, Saskia B.; Ivanov, Roman; Hol, Samantha; Aarts, Tineke I.; Hagenbeek, Anton; Verdonck, Leo F.; Petersen, Eefke J.

    2003-01-01

    The therapeutic effect of a human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-identical allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) for the treatment of haematological malignancies is mediated partly by the allogeneic T cells that are administered together with the stem cell graft. Chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML)

  20. Bortezomib in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-17

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  1. Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-25

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  2. Decitabine in Treating Children With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-22

    Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  3. DNA strand breaks are not induced in human cells exposed to 2.1425 GHz band CW and W-CDMA modulated radiofrequency fields allocated to mobile radio base stations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuma, N; Komatsubara, Y; Takeda, H; Hirose, H; Sekijima, M; Nojima, T; Miyakoshi, J

    2006-01-01

    We conducted a large-scale in vitro study focused on the effects of low level radiofrequency (RF) fields from mobile radio base stations employing the International Mobile Telecommunication 2000 (IMT-2000) cellular system in order to test the hypothesis that modulated RF fields may act as a DNA damaging agent. First, we evaluated the responses of human cells to microwave exposure at a specific absorption rate (SAR) of 80 mW/kg, which corresponds to the limit of the average whole body SAR for general public exposure defined as a basic restriction in the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) guidelines. Second, we investigated whether continuous wave (CW) and Wideband Code Division Multiple Access (W-CDMA) modulated signal RF fields at 2.1425 GHz induced different levels of DNA damage. Human glioblastoma A172 cells and normal human IMR-90 fibroblasts from fetal lungs were exposed to mobile communication frequency radiation to investigate whether such exposure produced DNA strand breaks in cell culture. A172 cells were exposed to W-CDMA radiation at SARs of 80, 250, and 800 mW/kg and CW radiation at 80 mW/kg for 2 and 24 h, while IMR-90 cells were exposed to both W-CDMA and CW radiations at a SAR of 80 mW/kg for the same time periods. Under the same RF field exposure conditions, no significant differences in the DNA strand breaks were observed between the test groups exposed to W-CDMA or CW radiation and the sham exposed negative controls, as evaluated immediately after the exposure periods by alkaline comet assays. Our results confirm that low level exposures do not act as a genotoxicant up to a SAR of 800 mW/kg.

  4. [Myeloid/natural killer cell precursor and myeloid/natural killer cell acute leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Ming; Chen, Bao-An

    2014-04-01

    With the popularity of flow cytometry, the classification of leukemia become more detailed. Myeloid/natural killer cell precursor acute leukemia and myeloid/natural killer cell acute leukemias are generally recognized as two kinds of rare leukemias and have poor prognosis. The cells expressed both myeloid and lymphatic antigens in these two leukemia and can not be diagnosed by morphology. The only basis to make a definite diagnosis is their unique Immunophenotyping. The role of CD7 and CD56 in these two leukemia are compelling, in the other hand, as the progress of cell differentiation research, there are many new awareness of NK cell differentiation. In this article, the biological origin, clinical manifestation, diagnosis, treatment and the role of CD7 and CD56 in these two leukemia are briefly summarized.

  5. Human CD80/IL2 lentivirus transduced acute myeloid leukaemia cells enhance cytolytic activity in vitro in spite of an increase in regulatory CD4+ T cells in a subset of cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, Wendy; Kordasti, Shahram; Chan, Lucas; Barber, Linda D; Tye, Gee J; Hardwick, Nicola; Mufti, Ghulam J; Farzaneh, Farzin

    2009-10-01

    Immunotherapeutic strategies are increasingly being explored as a method of enhancing anti-tumour immune responses in patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). Regulatory CD4(+) T cells (Tregs) suppress effector T and natural killer (NK) cells and therefore pose a potential challenge to the efficacy of immunotherapy. AML cells transduced with a lentivirus expressing CD80 (B7.1) and IL2 (LV-CD80/IL2) are capable of stimulating T and NK cell cytotoxicity in vitro. This study examines the effect of CD80/IL2 modified AML cells on Treg number and function. We report a significant increase in the number of CD8(+) T cells (P = 0.046) CD3(-)CD56(+) NK cells (P = 0.028) and CD3(+)CD4(+)CD25(high)Foxp3(+) Tregs (P = 0.043) following stimulation for 7 days with allogeneic LV-CD80/IL2 AMLs. In contrast, autologous LV-CD80/IL2 AML cell cultures provide a weaker stimulation with a lower number of CD8(+) T cells (P = 0.011) and no change in NK cell or Treg numbers. However, an increase in cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells and NK cells are detected following both allogeneic and autologous LV-CD80/IL2 stimulation as demonstrated by an increase in IFN-gamma and CD107a expression. Despite the presence of increased numbers of Tregs with suppressive activity in a subset of cultures, increased lysis of unmodified AMLs was still achieved following allogeneic (day 0, 2.2%; day 7, 20.4%) and more importantly, autologous LV-CD80/IL2 culture in which AML patients had recently received intensive chemotherapy (day 0, 0%; day 7, 16%). Vaccination with LV-CD80/IL2 therefore provides a potential strategy to enhance anti-leukaemia immune responses without a concomitant stimulation of Treg-mediated inhibition of cytotoxic immunological responses.

  6. The Danish National Chronic Myeloid Neoplasia Registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bak M

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Marie Bak,1 Else Helene Ibfelt,2 Thomas Stauffer Larsen,3 Dorthe Rønnov-Jessen,4 Niels Pallisgaard,5 Ann Madelung,6 Lene Udby,1 Hans Carl Hasselbalch,1 Ole Weis Bjerrum,7 Christen Lykkegaard Andersen1,7 1Department of Hematology, Zealand University Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Roskilde, 2Research Centre for Prevention and Health, Rigshospitalet Glostrup, University of Copenhagen, Glostrup, 3Department of Hematology, Odense University Hospital, Odense, 4Department of Hematology, Vejle Hospital, Vejle, 5Department of Surgical Pathology, Zealand University Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Roskilde, 6Department of Surgical Pathology, Zealand University Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Næstved, 7Department of Hematology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark Aim: The Danish National Chronic Myeloid Neoplasia Registry (DCMR is a population-based clinical quality database, introduced to evaluate diagnosis and treatment of patients with chronic myeloid malignancies. The aim is to monitor the clinical quality at the national, regional, and hospital departmental levels and serve as a platform for research. Study population: The DCMR has nationwide coverage and contains information on patients diagnosed at hematology departments from January 2010 onward, including patients with essential thrombocythemia, polycythemia vera, myelofibrosis, unclassifiable myeloproliferative neoplasms, chronic myelomonocytic leukemia, and chronic myeloid leukemia. Main variables: Data are collected using standardized registration forms (so far up to four forms per patient, which are consecutively filled out online at time of diagnosis, after 2-year and 5-year follow-ups, and at end of follow-up. The forms include variables that describe clinical/paraclinical assessments, treatment, disease progression, and survival – disease-specific variables – as well as variables that are identical for all chronic myeloid malignancies. Descriptive

  7. Myeloid Cell Interaction with HIV: A Complex Relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasco Rodrigues

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Cells of the myeloid lineage, particularly macrophages, serve as primary hosts for HIV in vivo, along with CD4 T lymphocytes. Macrophages are present in virtually every tissue of the organism, including locations with negligible T cell colonization, such as the brain, where HIV-mediated inflammation may lead to pathological sequelae. Moreover, infected macrophages are present in multiple other tissues. Recent evidence obtained in humanized mice and macaque models highlighted the capacity of macrophages to sustain HIV replication in vivo in the absence of T cells. Combined with the known resistance of the macrophage to the cytopathic effects of HIV infection, such data bring a renewed interest in this cell type both as a vehicle for viral spread as well as a viral reservoir. While our understanding of key processes of HIV infection of macrophages is far from complete, recent years have nevertheless brought important insight into the uniqueness of the macrophage infection. Productive infection of macrophages by HIV can occur by different routes including from phagocytosis of infected T cells. In macrophages, HIV assembles and buds into a peculiar plasma membrane-connected compartment that preexists to the infection. While the function of such compartment remains elusive, it supposedly allows for the persistence of infectious viral particles over extended periods of time and may play a role on viral transmission. As cells of the innate immune system, macrophages have the capacity to detect and respond to viral components. Recent data suggest that such sensing may occur at multiple steps of the viral cycle and impact subsequent viral spread. We aim to provide an overview of the HIV–macrophage interaction along the multiple stages of the viral life cycle, extending when pertinent such observations to additional myeloid cell types such as dendritic cells or blood monocytes.

  8. Myeloid Cell Interaction with HIV: A Complex Relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Vasco; Ruffin, Nicolas; San-Roman, Mabel; Benaroch, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    Cells of the myeloid lineage, particularly macrophages, serve as primary hosts for HIV in vivo, along with CD4 T lymphocytes. Macrophages are present in virtually every tissue of the organism, including locations with negligible T cell colonization, such as the brain, where HIV-mediated inflammation may lead to pathological sequelae. Moreover, infected macrophages are present in multiple other tissues. Recent evidence obtained in humanized mice and macaque models highlighted the capacity of macrophages to sustain HIV replication in vivo in the absence of T cells. Combined with the known resistance of the macrophage to the cytopathic effects of HIV infection, such data bring a renewed interest in this cell type both as a vehicle for viral spread as well as a viral reservoir. While our understanding of key processes of HIV infection of macrophages is far from complete, recent years have nevertheless brought important insight into the uniqueness of the macrophage infection. Productive infection of macrophages by HIV can occur by different routes including from phagocytosis of infected T cells. In macrophages, HIV assembles and buds into a peculiar plasma membrane-connected compartment that preexists to the infection. While the function of such compartment remains elusive, it supposedly allows for the persistence of infectious viral particles over extended periods of time and may play a role on viral transmission. As cells of the innate immune system, macrophages have the capacity to detect and respond to viral components. Recent data suggest that such sensing may occur at multiple steps of the viral cycle and impact subsequent viral spread. We aim to provide an overview of the HIV-macrophage interaction along the multiple stages of the viral life cycle, extending when pertinent such observations to additional myeloid cell types such as dendritic cells or blood monocytes.

  9. Myeloid-Related Protein 14 Promotes Inflammation and Injury in Meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wache, Christina; Klein, Matthias; Andersen, Christian Østergaard

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND:  Neutrophilic inflammation often persists for days despite effective antibiotic treatment and contributes to brain damage in bacterial meningitis. We propose here that myeloid-related protein 14 (MRP14), an abundant cytosolic protein in myeloid cells, acts as an endogenous danger signal......, driving inflammation and aggravating tissue injury. METHODS:  The release pattern of MRP14 was analyzed in human and murine cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), as well as in isolated neutrophils. Its functional role was assessed in a mouse meningitis model, using MRP14-deficient mice. RESULTS:  We detected large...... quantities of MRP14 in CSF specimens from patients and mice with pneumococcal meningitis. Immunohistochemical analyses and a cell-depletion approach indicated neutrophils as the major source of MRP14. In a meningitis model, MRP14-deficient mice showed a better resolution of inflammation during antibiotic...

  10. Translational Studies in Elderly Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. van der Holt (Bronno)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractThe production of blood cells (hematopoiesis) takes place in the bone marrow. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a clonal disease, which is characterized by an increase in the number of myeloid cells in the bone marrow and an arrest in their maturation. This frequently results in a severe

  11. Acute myeloid leukemia: advances in diagnosis and classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasserjian, R P

    2013-06-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia is an aggressive myeloid neoplasm characterized by ≥20% myeloblasts in the blood or bone marrow. Current treatment strategies for acute myeloid leukemia are based on both patient-related parameters such as age and performance status as well as the intrinsic characteristics of particular disease subtypes. Subtyping of acute myeloid leukemia requires an integration of information from the patient's clinical history (such as any prior preleukemic myeloid neoplasm or cytotoxic potentially leukemogenic therapy), the leukemia morphology, cytogenetic findings, and the mutation status of particular genes (NPM1, FLT3, and CEBPA). In recent years, a barrage of information has become available regarding gene mutations that occur in acute myeloid leukemia and their influence on prognosis. Future therapies for acute myeloid leukemia will increasingly rely on the genetic signatures of individual leukemias and will adjust therapy to the predicted disease aggressiveness as well as employ therapies targeted against particular deregulated genetic pathways. This article reviews current standards for diagnosing and classifying acute myeloid leukemia according to the 2008 WHO Classification. Data that have subsequently accumulated regarding newly characterized gene mutations are also presented. It is anticipated that future leukemia classifications will employ a combination of karyotypic features and the gene mutation pattern to stratify patients to increasingly tailored treatment plans. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. 2,6-Dithiopurine blocks toxicity and mutagenesis in human skin cells exposed to sulfur mustard analogs, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide and 2-chloroethyl methyl sulfide

    OpenAIRE

    Powell, K. Leslie; Boulware, Stephen; Thames, Howard; Vasquez, Karen M.; MacLeod, Michael C.

    2010-01-01

    Sulfur mustard (bis-(2-chloroethyl)sulfide) is a well known chemical warfare agent that induces debilitating cutaneous toxicity in exposed individuals. It is also known to be carcinogenic and mutagenic due to its ability to damage DNA via electrophilic attack. We previously showed that a nucleophilic scavenger, 2,6-dithiopurine (DTP), reacts chemically with several electrophilic carcinogens, blocking DNA damage in vitro and in vivo and abolishing tumor formation in a two-stage mouse skin carc...

  13. Myeloid sarcoma in children – diagnostic and therapeutic difficulties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Samborska

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Myeloid sarcoma (MS is a malignant extramedullary tumour, which consists of immature cells of myeloid origin. It may occur de novo , concurrently or precede the diagnosis of acute myeloid leukemia (AML, myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS or chronic myeloid leukemia (CML. MS can also be a manifestation of the relapse of the disease. The more frequent sites of involvement are the skin, orbit, bone, periosteum, lymph nodes, gastrointestinal tract, soft tissue, central nervous system and testis. Because of its different localization and symptoms, and the lack of diagnostics algorithm, myeloid sarcoma is a real diagnostic challenge, in particular in patients without initial bone marrow involvement. The correct diagnosis of MS is important for adequate therapy, which is often delayed because of a high misdiagnosis rate. In the paper, the role of immunohistochemistry, cytogenetic and molecular genetic analyses is emphasized as well as the breadth of unclear aspects of this disorder in children.

  14. Dynamics of myeloid cell populations during relapse-preventive immunotherapy in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydström, Anna; Hallner, Alexander; Aurelius, Johan; Sander, Frida Ewald; Bernson, Elin; Kiffin, Roberta; Thoren, Fredrik Bergh; Hellstrand, Kristoffer; Martner, Anna

    2017-08-01

    Relapse of leukemia in the postchemotherapy phase contributes to the poor prognosis and survival in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In an international phase IV trial (ClinicalTrials.gov; NCT01347996), 84 patients with AML in first complete remission who had not undergone transplantation received immunotherapy with histamine dihydrochloride (HDC) and low-dose IL-2 with the aim of preventing relapse. The dynamics of myeloid cell counts and expression of activation markers was assessed before and after cycles of immunotherapy and correlated with clinical outcome in terms of relapse risk and survival. During cycles, a pronounced increase in blood eosinophil counts was observed along with a reduction in monocyte and neutrophil counts. A strong reduction of blood monocyte counts during the first HDC/IL-2 treatment cycle predicted leukemia-free survival. The HDC component of the immunotherapy exerts agonist activity at histamine type 2 receptors (H2Rs) that are expressed by myeloid cells. It was observed that the density of H2 R expression in blood monocytes increased during cycles of immunotherapy and that high monocyte H2R expression implied reduced relapse risk and improved overall survival. Several other activation markers, including HLA-DR, CD86, and CD40, were induced in monocytes and dendritic cells during immunotherapy but did not predict clinical outcome. In addition, expression of HLA-ABC increased in all myeloid populations during therapy. A low expression of HLA-ABC was associated with reduced relapse risk. These results suggest that aspects of myeloid cell biology may impact clinical benefit of relapse-preventive immunotherapy in AML. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  15. Deletion of ADORA2B from myeloid cells dampens lung fibrosis and pulmonary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmouty-Quintana, Harry; Philip, Kemly; Acero, Luis F; Chen, Ning-Yuan; Weng, Tingting; Molina, Jose G; Luo, Fayong; Davies, Jonathan; Le, Ngoc-Bao; Bunge, Isabelle; Volcik, Kelly A; Le, Thanh-Thuy T; Johnston, Richard A; Xia, Yang; Eltzschig, Holger K; Blackburn, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a lethal, fibroproliferative disease. Pulmonary hypertension (PH) can develop secondary to IPF and increase mortality. Alternatively, activated macrophages (AAMs) contribute to the pathogenesis of both IPF and PH. Here we hypothesized that adenosine signaling through the ADORA2B on AAMs impacts the progression of these disorders and that conditional deletion of ADORA2B on myeloid cells would have a beneficial effect in a model of these diseases. Conditional knockout mice lacking ADORA2B on myeloid cells (Adora2B(f/f)-LysM(Cre)) were exposed to the fibrotic agent bleomycin (BLM; 0.035 U/g body weight, i.p.). At 14, 17, 21, 25, or 33 d after exposure, SpO2, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and histologic analyses were performed. On day 33, lung function and cardiovascular analyses were determined. Markers for AAM and mediators of fibrosis and PH were assessed. Adora2B(f/f)-LysM(Cre) mice presented with attenuated fibrosis, improved lung function, and no evidence of PH compared with control mice exposed to BLM. These findings were accompanied by reduced expression of CD206 and arginase-1, markers for AAMs. A 10-fold reduction in IL-6 and a 5-fold decrease in hyaluronan, both linked to lung fibrosis and PH, were also observed. These data suggest that activation of the ADORA2B on macrophages plays an active role in the pathogenesis of lung fibrosis and PH. © FASEB.

  16. Aberrant Gene Expression in Acute Myeloid Leukaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Frederik Otzen

    Acute Myeloid Leukaemia (AML) is an aggressive cancer of the bone marrow, affecting formation of blood cells during haematopoiesis. This thesis presents investigation of AML using mRNA gene expression profiles (GEP) of samples extracted from the bone marrow of healthy and diseased subjects. Here...... signatures and for reducing dimensionally of gene expression data. Next, we have used machine-learning methods to predict survival and to assess important predictors based on these results. General application of a number of these methods has been implemented into two public query-based gene...

  17. Aberrant Gene Expression in Acute Myeloid Leukaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Frederik Otzen

    Summary Acute Myeloid Leukaemia (AML) is an aggressive cancer of the bone marrow, affecting formation of blood cells during haematopoiesis. This thesis presents investigation of AML using mRNA gene expression profiles (GEP) of samples extracted from the bone marrow of healthy and diseased subjects...... genes and genetic signatures and for reducing dimensionally of gene expression data. Next, we have used machine-learning methods to predict survival and to assess important predictors based on these results. General application of a number of these methods has been implemented into two public query...

  18. Histogenesis of the myeloid system in geese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glavits, R; Ratz, F; Varga, Z; Stipkovits, L; Molnar, E

    1987-01-01

    Using light- and electron-microscopy the location in organs and the time-course of appearance of cells of the myeloid system was studied in goose embryos and goslings. Large numbers of cell forms representing different stages of granulocytopoiesis were found between 15 and 28 days of incubation in the mesenchyma of the kidney and in the reticular tissue of the spleen, but not in the liver and other organs. Thus, before the haemocytopoietic activity of the bone marrow, an activity typical of adult birds, develops, in geese embryonic extra-medullary granulocytopoiesis is characterised by a renal-lienal stage.

  19. A functional study on the migration of human monocytes to human leukemic cell lines and the role of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Legdeur, MCJC; Beelen, RHJ; Schuurhuis, GJ; Broekhoven, MG; vandeLoosdrecht, AA; Tekstra, J; Langenhuijsen, MMAC; Ossenkoppele, GJ

    1997-01-01

    In the present study the migration of human monocytes towards the supernatants of five different human myeloid leukemic cell lines, four different human lymphatic leukemic cell lines and blasts derived from three different patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) was studied and the role of

  20. PCB 28 metabolites elimination kinetics in human plasma on a real case scenario: Study of hydroxylated polychlorinated biphenyl (OH-PCB) metabolites of PCB 28 in a highly exposed German Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinete, Natalia; Esser, André; Kraus, Thomas; Schettgen, Thomas

    2017-07-05

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are suspected of carcinogenic, neurotoxic and immunotoxic effects in animals and humans. Although background levels of PCBs have been slowly decreased after their ban, they are still among the most persistent and ubiquitous pollutants in the environment, remaining the subject of great concern. PCB 28 is a trichlorinated PCB found in high concentrations not only in human plasma but also in indoor air in Europe, yet little is known about its metabolic pathway and potential metabolites in humans. The present study aims to elucidate the kinetics of metabolite formation and elimination by analyzing four hydroxylated PCBs (OH-PCBs) in human plasma as potential metabolites of the PCB 28 congener. For this purpose, the study was conducted in plasma samples of highly PCB-exposed individuals (N=268), collected from 2010 to 2014 as a representation of a real case scenario with longitudinal data. OH-PCBs have been predicted, synthesized in the course of this study and further identified and quantitated in human plasma. This is the first time that previously unknown PCB 28 metabolites have been measured in human plasma and half-lives have been estimated for PCB metabolites, which could then provide further understanding in the toxicological consequences of exposure to PCBs in humans. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Acute Myeloid Leukaemia Presenting as Gaze Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evripidis Sykakis

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The most frequent initial ocular manifestation of acute myeloid leukaemia (AML is retinal involvement. Here, we report an unusual case of AML associated with a pontine chloroma presenting with gaze palsy as the initial symptom. A 77-year-old Caucasian man presented to the Eye Casualty complaining of a one-day history of blurred vision. On examination, his face was turned to the left, both eyes were fixed in dextroversion and the patient demonstrated left gaze palsy associated with left motor neurone VII palsy. Baseline blood investigations revealed leucocytosis with 60% circulating myeloblasts. A bone marrow biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of myelomonocytic leukaemia. A CT scan showed a well-circumscribed lesion in the dorsal pons, most likely representing a chloroma. Chloromas or myeloblastomas related to AML are localised extramedullary tumours composed of leukaemic myeloid cells. Chloromas may be present at the time of the initial diagnosis of leukaemia or may precede the diagnosis by 1 month to 2 years; however, their occurrence in the central nervous system is rare, comprising 1–6% of all chloromas. This case illustrates the many different ways that AML can manifest itself in the eyes, and ophthalmologists should be aware of the great variety of presenting symptoms in undiagnosed AML.

  2. Energy metabolism drives myeloid-derived suppressor cell differentiation and functions in pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sica, Antonio; Strauss, Laura

    2017-08-01

    Over the last decade, a heterogeneous population of immature myeloid cells with major regulatory functions has been described in cancer and other pathologic conditions and ultimately defined as MDSCs. Most of the early work on the origins and functions of MDSCs has been in murine and human tumor bearers in which MDSCs are known to be immunosuppressive and to result in both reduced immune surveillance and antitumor cytotoxicity. More recent studies, however, suggest that expansion of these immature myeloid cells may be linked to most, if not all, chronic and acute inflammatory processes. The universal expansion to inflammatory stimuli of MDSCs suggests that these cells may be more of a normal component of the inflammatory response (emergency myelopoiesis) than simply a pathologic response to a growing tumor. Instead of an adverse immunosuppressive response, expansion of these immature myeloid cell populations may result from a complex balance between increased immune surveillance and dampened adaptive immune responses that are common to many inflammatory responses. Within this scenario, new pathways of metabolic reprogramming are emerging as drivers of MDSC differentiation and functions in cancer and inflammatory disorders, crucially linking metabolic syndrome to inflammatory processes. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  3. Inhibition of Dihydroorotate Dehydrogenase Overcomes Differentiation Blockade in Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sykes, David B; Kfoury, Youmna S; Mercier, François E; Wawer, Mathias J; Law, Jason M; Haynes, Mark K; Lewis, Timothy A; Schajnovitz, Amir; Jain, Esha; Lee, Dongjun; Meyer, Hanna; Pierce, Kerry A; Tolliday, Nicola J; Waller, Anna; Ferrara, Steven J; Eheim, Ashley L; Stoeckigt, Detlef; Maxcy, Katrina L; Cobert, Julien M; Bachand, Jacqueline; Szekely, Brian A; Mukherjee, Siddhartha; Sklar, Larry A; Kotz, Joanne D; Clish, Clary B; Sadreyev, Ruslan I; Clemons, Paul A; Janzer, Andreas; Schreiber, Stuart L; Scadden, David T

    2016-09-22

    While acute myeloid leukemia (AML) comprises many disparate genetic subtypes, one shared hallmark is the arrest of leukemic myeloblasts at an immature and self-renewing stage of development. Therapies that overcome differentiation arrest represent a powerful treatment strategy. We leveraged the observation that the majority of AML, despite their genetically heterogeneity, share in the expression of HoxA9, a gene normally downregulated during myeloid differentiation. Using a conditional HoxA9 model system, we performed a high-throughput phenotypic screen and defined compounds that overcame differentiation blockade. Target identification led to the unanticipated discovery that inhibition of the enzyme dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH) enables myeloid differentiation in human and mouse AML models. In vivo, DHODH inhibitors reduced leukemic cell burden, decreased levels of leukemia-initiating cells, and improved survival. These data demonstrate the role of DHODH as a metabolic regulator of differentiation and point to its inhibition as a strategy for overcoming differentiation blockade in AML. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Phosphorylation and gene expression of p53 are not affected in human cells exposed to 2.1425 GHz band CW or W-CDMA modulated radiation allocated to mobile radio base stations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, H; Sakuma, N; Kaji, N; Suhara, T; Sekijima, M; Nojima, T; Miyakoshi, J

    2006-09-01

    A large-scale in vitro study focusing on low-level radiofrequency (RF) fields from mobile radio base stations employing the International Mobile Telecommunication 2000 (IMT-2000) cellular system was conducted to test the hypothesis that modulated RF fields induce apoptosis or other cellular stress response that activate p53 or the p53-signaling pathway. First, we evaluated the response of human cells to microwave exposure at a specific absorption rate (SAR) of 80 mW/kg, which corresponds to the limit of the average whole-body SAR for general public exposure defined as a basic restriction by the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) guidelines. Second, we investigated whether continuous wave (CW) and wideband code division multiple access (W-CDMA) modulated signal RF fields at 2.1425 GHz induced apoptosis or any signs of stress. Human glioblastoma A172 cells were exposed to W-CDMA radiation at SARs of 80, 250, and 800 mW/kg, and CW radiation at 80 mW/kg for 24 or 48 h. Human IMR-90 fibroblasts from fetal lungs were exposed to both W-CDMA and CW radiation at a SAR of 80 mW/kg for 28 h. Under the RF field exposure conditions described above, no significant differences in the percentage of apoptotic cells were observed between the test groups exposed to RF signals and the sham-exposed negative controls, as evaluated by the Annexin V affinity assay. No significant differences in expression levels of phosphorylated p53 at serine 15 or total p53 were observed between the test groups and the negative controls by the bead-based multiplex assay. Moreover, microarray hybridization and real-time RT-PCR analysis showed no noticeable differences in gene expression of the subsequent downstream targets of p53 signaling involved in apoptosis between the test groups and the negative controls. Our results confirm that exposure to low-level RF signals up to 800 mW/kg does not induce p53-dependent apoptosis, DNA damage, or other stress response in human

  5. Isolated intracranial myeloid sarcoma occurring as relapse in acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geetha Narayanan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Myeloid sarcoma (MS or chloroma is a rare extramedullary tumor composed of extramedullary proliferation of blasts of granulocytic, monocytic, erythroid, or megakaryocytic lineage occurring at sites outside the bone marrow. MS occurs in 2%–8% of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML, sometimes it occurs as the presenting manifestation of relapse in a patient in remission. We describe the case of a young male with AML in remission for 6 years presenting with central nervous system symptoms. Magnetic resonance imaging showed an extra-axial altered intensity lesion in the parasagittal parietal region, infiltrating anterosuperiorly into anterior falx, and posterosuperior aspect of the superior sagittal sinus. A biopsy from the lesion was diagnostic of MS which was positive for myeloperoxidase. He did not have any other sites of disease. He has received chemotherapy with FLAG ( Fludarabine, Cytosine arabinoside followed by cranial irradiation and is in complete remission.

  6. Bilateral orbital myeloid sarcoma as initial manifestation of acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hmidi, Kamel; Zaouali, Sonia; Messaoud, Riadh; Mahjoub, Bahri; Ammari, Wafa; Bacha, Leila; Laatiri, Adnene; Jenzeri, Salah; Khairallah, Moncef

    2007-12-01

    Granulocytic sarcoma is a rare orbital complication of acute leukemia. It concerns primarily children under 10 years of age suffering from primitive acute myeloid leukemia. The diagnosis is made by clinical examination, computed tomography and confirmed by haematological investigations. The treatment approach is based on chemotherapy associated with intravenous steroid therapy. We report the case of a 6-year-old girl who presented with bilateral proptosis revealing acute myeloid leukemia. The patient was treated by a combination of chemotherapeutic drugs in two phases, associated with intravenous steroids. After a follow-up period of 24 months, the patient was in complete remission. The diagnosis of granulocytic sarcoma should be considered in any orbital mass of uncertain origin, particularly if it is bilateral. Special stains and immunohistochemistry play an important role in the diagnosis.

  7. Short-term myeloid growth factor mediated expansion of bone marrow haemopoiesis studied by localized magnetic resonance proton spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, K E; Hansen, P B; Larsen, V A

    1994-01-01

    Previously we have shown that short-term myeloid growth factor priming of haemopoiesis prior to bone marrow harvest increased the yield of myeloid progenitors in the graft. The present study is intended to investigate the expansion of haemopoiesis by volume selective proton magnetic resonance spe....... In conclusion, the non-invasive MRS method may be a useful and reliable in vivo examination for expansion of haemopoiesis and a correspondent reduction of fat tissue in bone marrow after priming with recombinant human haemopoietic growth factors.......Previously we have shown that short-term myeloid growth factor priming of haemopoiesis prior to bone marrow harvest increased the yield of myeloid progenitors in the graft. The present study is intended to investigate the expansion of haemopoiesis by volume selective proton magnetic resonance...... (day 0), day 5 and day 12. Spectroscopic examinations were performed with the stimulated echo acquisition mode (STEAM) method on a 1.5 T clinical whole-body imaging unit. A cubic volume of interest (VOI) was selected in the bone marrow of the left iliac bone. The patients responded with a rise in blood...

  8. Histamine Promotes the Development of Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells and Reduces Tumor Growth by Targeting the Myeloid NADPH Oxidase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiktorin, Hanna G.; Lenox, Brianna; Ewald Sander, Frida; Aydin, Ebru; Aurelius, Johan; Thorén, Fredrik B.; Ståhlberg, Anders; Hermodsson, Svante; Hellstrand, Kristoffer

    2015-01-01

    The efficiency of immune-mediated clearance of cancer cells is hampered by immunosuppressive mediators in the malignant microenvironment, including NADPH oxidase–derived reactive oxygen species. We aimed at defining the effects of histamine, an inhibitor of the myeloid NADPH oxidase/NOX2, on the development of Ag-presenting dendritic cells (DCs) from myeloid precursors and the impact of these mechanisms for tumor growth. Histamine was found to promote the maturation of human DCs from monocytes by increasing the expression of HLA-DR and costimulatory molecules, which resulted in improved induction of Th cells with Th0 polarity. Experiments using wild-type and NOX2-deficient myelomonoblastic cells showed that histamine facilitated myeloid cell maturation only in cells capable of generating reactive oxygen species. Treatment of mice with histamine reduced the growth of murine EL-4 lymphomas in parallel with an increment of tumor-infiltrating DCs in NOX2-sufficient mice but not in NOX2-deficient (gp91phox−/−) mice. We propose that strategies to target the myeloid NADPH oxidase may facilitate the development of endogenous DCs in cancer. PMID:25870245

  9. Distinct functions of epidermal and myeloid-derived VEGF-A in skin tumorigenesis mediated by HPV8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xiaolei; Lucas, Tina; Marcuzzi, Gian P; Pfister, Herbert; Eming, Sabine A

    2015-01-15

    Beta human papillomaviruses (HPV) have been suspected to be carcinogenic in nonmelanoma skin cancers (NMSC), but the basis for potential viral contributions to these cancers is poorly understood. In particular, it is unresolved how HPV-infected keratinocytes escape cell-cycle control and whether their cross-talk with immune cells is critical for tumorigenesis. In nonviral preclinical models, the angiogenic cytokine VEGF-A has been identified as a critical regulator of NMSC. In this study, we dissected the contribution of epidermal versus myeloid cell-derived VEGF-A in HPV-mediated skin cancer by interbreeding an HPV8 transgenic mouse model with a conditional disruption of VEGF-A restricted to either epidermal or myeloid cells. Although only epidermal-derived VEGF-A was essential for initiation of skin tumor development, both spontaneously and UV-light triggered, both epidermal and myeloid cell-derived VEGF-A contributed to regeneration-induced tumorigenesis upon HPV8 overexpression, partly not only through a paracrine effect on endothelial cells, but also most probably through an additional autocrine effect on epidermal cells. Our findings offer new mechanistic insights into distinct functions of epidermal versus myeloid cell-derived VEGF-A during HPV-mediated tumorigenesis, with possible implications for preventing this disease. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  10. Preinfection human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes failed to prevent HIV type 1 infection from strains genetically unrelated to viruses in long-term exposed partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Woodward, Amanda; Zhu, Haiying; Andrus, Thomas; McNevin, John; Lee, Jean; Mullins, James I; Corey, Lawrence; McElrath, M Juliana; Zhu, Tuofu

    2009-10-01

    Understanding the mechanisms underlying potential altered susceptibility to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection in highly exposed seronegative (ES) individuals and the later clinical consequences of breakthrough infection can provide insight into strategies to control HIV-1 with an effective vaccine. From our Seattle ES cohort, we identified one individual (LSC63) who seroconverted after over 2 years of repeated unprotected sexual contact with his HIV-1-infected partner (P63) and other sexual partners of unknown HIV-1 serostatus. The HIV-1 variants infecting LSC63 were genetically unrelated to those sequenced from P63. This may not be surprising, since viral load measurements in P63 were repeatedly below 50 copies/ml, making him an unlikely transmitter. However, broad HIV-1-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) responses were detected in LSC63 before seroconversion. Compared to those detected after seroconversion, these responses were of lower magnitude and half of them targeted different regions of the viral proteome. Strong HLA-B27-restricted CTLs, which have been associated with disease control, were detected in LSC63 after but not before seroconversion. Furthermore, for the majority of the protein-coding regions of the HIV-1 variants in LSC63 (except gp41, nef, and the 3' half of pol), the genetic distances between the infecting viruses and the viruses to which he was exposed through P63 (termed the exposed virus) were comparable to the distances between random subtype B HIV-1 sequences and the exposed viruses. These results suggest that broad preinfection immune responses were not able to prevent the acquisition of HIV-1 infection in LSC63, even though the infecting viruses were not particularly distant from the viruses that may have elicited these responses.

  11. Human intestinal and lung cell lines exposed to beta-carotene show a large variation in intracellular levels of beta-carotene and its metabolites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franssen-Hal, van N.L.W.; Bunschoten, J.E.; Venema, D.P.; Hollman, P.C.H.; Riss, G.; Keijer, J.

    2005-01-01

    Although in vitro models are often used in ß-carotene research, knowledge about the uptake and metabolism of ß-carotene in cell lines is lacking. We measured by HPLC the intracellular levels of ß-carotene and its metabolites in 9 human intestinal and lung cell lines after exposure to 1 ¿M ß-carotene

  12. Expression of adhesion molecules, monocyte interactions and oxidative stress in human endothelial cells exposed to wood smoke and diesel exhaust particulate matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forchhammer, Lykke; Loft, Steffen; Roursgaard, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Toxicological effects of wood smoke particles are less investigated than traffic-related combustion particles. We investigated the effect of wood smoke particles, generated by smouldering combustion conditions, on human umbilical endothelial cells (HUVECs) co-cultured with or without monocytic TH...

  13. Lenalidomide, Cytarabine, and Idarubicin in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-22

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  14. Chromosomal aberrations and fusion genes in myeloid malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianfelici, Valentina; Lahortiga, Idoya; Cools, Jan

    2012-08-01

    Since the discovery of the BCR-ABL1 fusion gene in chronic myeloid leukemia, many more fusion genes resulting from chromosomal rearrangements have been identified and characterized. The study of these fusion genes has been extremely important for our understanding of the role of chromosomal rearrangements in leukemogenesis and in oncology in general. In chronic myeloid leukemia, or related myeloproliferative malignancies caused by the expression of oncogenic fusion kinases, tyrosine kinase inhibitors are now successfully used to treat these diseases. In acute myeloid leukemias, the presence of chromosomal rearrangements, oncogenic fusion genes and point mutations in key oncogenic drivers has important prognostic value and determines the choice of therapy. In this review, the authors provide an overview of the important fusion genes present in various myeloid malignancies and their importance for clinical practice.

  15. Genetics Home Reference: core binding factor acute myeloid leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... L, Mardis ER, Wilson RK. The origin and evolution of mutations in acute myeloid leukemia. Cell. 2012 ... care or advice. Users with questions about a personal health condition should consult with a qualified healthcare ...

  16. The role of mutations in epigenetic regulators in myeloid malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Brittany A; Levine, Ross L

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decade, genomic studies have identified a number of novel and recurrent somatic mutations that affect epigenetic patterning in patients with myeloid malignancies, including myeloproliferative neoplasms, myelodysplastic syndrome, and acute myeloid leukemia. Many of these mutations occur in genes with established roles in the regulation and maintenance of DNA methylation and/or chromatin modifications in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. Subsequent genetic and functional studies have revealed that these mutations affect epigenetic patterning in myeloid diseases. In this review, we discuss historical and recent studies implicating epigenetic modifiers in the development and evolution of the various myeloid malignancies and discuss how this knowledge has and will lead to future clinical and biologic insights. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Myeloid sarcoma of the rib: An atypical isolated chest finding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Raucci

    2015-03-01

    Systemic treatment was administered and currently neither systemic nor local relapse has been identified. Our experience suggests surgical resection could be a valid treatment in isolated myeloid sarcoma patients.

  18. Endometrial and acute myeloid leukemia cancer genomes characterized

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two studies from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) program reveal details about the genomic landscapes of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and endometrial cancer. Both provide new insights into the molecular underpinnings of these cancers.

  19. Genome wide molecular analysis of minimally differentiated acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.P.G. Silva (Fernando); I. Almeida (Inês); B. Morolli (Bruno); G. Brouwer-Mandema (Geeske); H. Wessels (Hans); R. Vossen (Rolf); H. Vrieling (Harry); E.W.A. Marijt (Erik); P.J.M. Valk (Peter); J.C. Kluin-Nelemans (Hanneke); W.R. Sperr (Wolfgang); W.D. Ludwig; M. Giphart-Gassler (Micheline)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Minimally differentiated acute myeloid leukemia is heterogeneous in karyotype and is defined by immature morphological and molecular characteristics. This originally French-American-British classification is still used in the new World Health Organization classification when

  20. Genome wide molecular analysis of minimally differentiated acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silva, Fernando P. G.; Almeida, Ines; Morolli, Bruno; Brouwer-Mandema, Geeske; Wessels, Hans; Vossen, Rolf; Vrieling, Harry; Marijt, Erik W. A.; Valk, Peter J. M.; Kluin-Nelemans, Hanneke C.; Sperr, Wolfgang R.; Ludwig, Wolf-Dieter; Giphart-Gassler, Micheline

    2009-01-01

    Background Minimally differentiated acute myeloid leukemia is heterogeneous in karyotype and is defined by immature morphological and molecular characteristics. This originally French-American-British classification is still used in the new World Health Organization classification when other

  1. Membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis secondary to chronic myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subramanian Murali

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The nephrotic syndrome (NS is a well documented complication of hematological malignancies. However, chronic myeloid leukemia (CML is rarely complicated by the NS, and it occurs usually after allogenic stem cell transplantation or interferon alpha therapy for CML. The NS as a complication of untreated CML is also rare. We report a 31-year-old patient who pre-sented with features of The NS. He was diagnosed to have CML one year ago and was on irre-gular treatment with imatinib mesylate. The renal biopsy and immunofluorescence revealed mem-branoproliferative glomerulonephritis type I. The patient was retreated with imatinib mesylate and the NS resolved gradually over three months. This maybe the third case in literature of mem-branoproliferative glomerulonephritis associated with CML.

  2. Pediatric acute myeloid leukemia with genetic alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Akira

    2017-01-01

    Annually, it is estimated that approximately 150-200 children aged 0-16 years are diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In Japan, clinical studies with ANLL91, AML99, CCLSG-AML9805, and JPLSG-AML05 protocols were performed historically, and the risk stratification with a combination of chemotherapy and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation resulted in the improvement of clinical outcomes. Regarding the onset of pediatric AML at the molecular level, mutations in FLT3-ITD or KIT (Class I mutation) showed a poor prognosis, but the ratio of mutations in Class III-V genes was smaller than that in adult AML. In contrast, several pediatric AML cases are complicated due to chromosome fragility syndrome or congenital bone marrow failure syndrome. To improve the clinical outcomes, clinical application of next generation sequencing may allow for personalized therapy in each patient in the future.

  3. New drugs in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadia, T M; Ravandi, F; Cortes, J; Kantarjian, H

    2016-05-01

    The standard therapy for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has not changed meaningfully for the past four decades. Improvements in supportive care and modifications to the dose and schedule of existing agents have led to steady improvements in outcomes. However, developing new therapies for AML has been challenging. Although there have been advances in understanding the biology of AML, translating this knowledge to viable treatments has been slow. Active research is currently ongoing to address this important need and several promising drug candidates are currently in the pipeline. Here, we review some of the most advanced and promising compounds that are currently in clinical trials and may have the potential to be part of our future armamentarium. These drug candidates range from cytotoxic chemotherapies, targeted small-molecule inhibitors, and monoclonal antibodies. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Emerging therapies for acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caner Saygin

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Acute myeloid leukemia (AML is characterized by clinical and biological heterogeneity. Despite the advances in our understanding of its pathobiology, the chemotherapy-directed management has remained largely unchanged in the past 40 years. However, various novel agents have demonstrated clinical activity, either as single agents (e.g., isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH inhibitors, vadastuximab or in combination with standard induction/consolidation at diagnosis and with salvage regimens at relapse. The classes of agents described in this review include novel cytotoxic chemotherapies (CPX-351 and vosaroxin, epigenetic modifiers (guadecitabine, IDH inhibitors, histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitors, bromodomain and extraterminal (BET inhibitors, FMS-like tyrosine kinase receptor 3 (FLT3 inhibitors, and antibody-drug conjugates (vadastuximab, as well as cell cycle inhibitors (volasertib, B-cell lymphoma 2 (BCL-2 inhibitors, and aminopeptidase inhibitors. These agents are actively undergoing clinical investigation alone or in combination with available chemotherapy.

  5. Current perspective in agnogenic myeloid metaplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tefferi, A; Silverstein, M N

    1996-09-01

    Agnogenic myeloid metaplasia (AMM) carries the worst prognosis among the chronic myeloproliferative disorders. Substantial bone marrow fibrosis, extramedullary hematopoiesis, anemia and hepatosplenomegaly are the characteristic features of the disease. AMM is currently incurable and the available treatment agents are mostly palliative and do not prolong life. Two pathogenetic processes are responsible for the impaired hematopoiesis and the clinical manifestations. The primary disease process is a clonal hematopoietic stem cell disorder which results in chronic myeloproliferation and atypical megakaryocytic hyperplasia. The secondary process of bone marrow fibrosis is the result of non-clonal fibroblastic proliferation and hyperactivity induced by growth factors abnormally shed from clonal megakaryocytes. Therefore, experimental treatment strategies may be directed towards either one or both of these disease processes. This report summarizes the current management options and new therapeutic endeavours.

  6. Current Management of Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubnitz, Jeffrey E

    2017-02-01

    The outcome for children with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has improved significantly over the past 30 years, with complete remission and overall survival rates exceeding 90 and 60%, respectively, in recent clinical trials. However, these improvements have not been achieved by the introduction of new agents. Instead, intensification of standard chemotherapy, more precise risk classification, improvements in supportive care, and the use of minimal residual disease to monitor response to therapy have all contributed to this success. Nevertheless, novel therapies are needed, as the cure rates for many subtypes of childhood AML remain unacceptably low. Here, we briefly review advances in our understanding of the biology and genetics of AML, the results of recent clinical trials, and current recommendations for the treatment of children with AML.

  7. Characterization of cellular immune response and innate immune signaling in human and nonhuman primate primary mononuclear cells exposed to Burkholderia mallei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Shahabuddin; Amemiya, Kei; Bernhards, Robert C; Ulrich, Robert G; Waag, David M; Saikh, Kamal U

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei infection causes melioidosis and is often characterized by severe sepsis. Although rare in humans, Burkholderia mallei has caused infections in laboratory workers, and the early innate cellular response to B. mallei in human and nonhuman primates has not been characterized. In this study, we examined the primary cellular immune response to B. mallei in PBMC cultures of non-human primates (NHPs), Chlorocebus aethiops (African Green Monkeys), Macaca fascicularis (Cynomolgus macaque), and Macaca mulatta (Rhesus macaque) and humans. Our results demonstrated that B. mallei elicited strong primary pro-inflammatory cytokines (IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6) equivalent to the levels of B. pseudomallei in primary PBMC cultures of NHPs and humans. When we examined IL-1β and other cytokine responses by comparison to Escherichia coli LPS, African Green Monkeys appears to be most responsive to B. mallei than Cynomolgus or Rhesus. Characterization of the immune signaling mechanism for cellular response was conducted by using a ligand induced cell-based reporter assay, and our results demonstrated that MyD88 mediated signaling contributed to the B. mallei and B. pseudomallei induced pro-inflammatory responses. Notably, the induced reporter activity with B. mallei, B. pseudomallei, or purified LPS from these pathogens was inhibited and cytokine production was attenuated by a MyD88 inhibitor. Together, these results show that in the scenario of severe hyper-inflammatory responses to B. mallei infection, MyD88 targeted therapeutic intervention may be a successful strategy for therapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. mTOR Activation by PI3K/Akt and ERK Signaling in Short ELF-EMF Exposed Human Keratinocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonia Patruno

    Full Text Available Several reports suggest that ELF-EMF exposures interact with biological processes including promotion of cell proliferation. However, the molecular mechanisms by which ELF-EMF controls cell growth are not completely understood. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of ELF-EMF on keratinocytes proliferation and molecular mechanisms involved. Effect of ELF-EMF (50 Hz, 1 mT on HaCaT cell cycle and cells growth and viability was monitored by FACS analysis and BrdU assay. Gene expression profile by microarray and qRT-PCR validation was performed in HaCaT cells exposed or not to ELF-EMF. mTOR, Akt and MAPKs expressions were evaluated by Western blot analysis. In HaCaT cells, short ELF-EMF exposure modulates distinct patterns of gene expression involved in cell proliferation and in the cell cycle. mTOR activation resulted the main molecular target of ELF-EMF on HaCaT cells. Our data showed the increase of the canonical pathway of mTOR regulation (PI3K/Akt and activation of ERK signaling pathways. Our results indicate that ELF-EMF selectively modulated the expression of multiple genes related to pivotal biological processes and functions that play a key role in physio-pathological mechanisms such as wound healing.

  9. mTOR Activation by PI3K/Akt and ERK Signaling in Short ELF-EMF Exposed Human Keratinocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patruno, Antonia; Pesce, Mirko; Grilli, Alfredo; Speranza, Lorenza; Franceschelli, Sara; De Lutiis, Maria Anna; Vianale, Giovina; Costantini, Erica; Amerio, Paolo; Muraro, Raffaella; Felaco, Mario; Reale, Marcella

    2015-01-01

    Several reports suggest that ELF-EMF exposures interact with biological processes including promotion of cell proliferation. However, the molecular mechanisms by which ELF-EMF controls cell growth are not completely understood. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of ELF-EMF on keratinocytes proliferation and molecular mechanisms involved. Effect of ELF-EMF (50 Hz, 1 mT) on HaCaT cell cycle and cells growth and viability was monitored by FACS analysis and BrdU assay. Gene expression profile by microarray and qRT-PCR validation was performed in HaCaT cells exposed or not to ELF-EMF. mTOR, Akt and MAPKs expressions were evaluated by Western blot analysis. In HaCaT cells, short ELF-EMF exposure modulates distinct patterns of gene expression involved in cell proliferation and in the cell cycle. mTOR activation resulted the main molecular target of ELF-EMF on HaCaT cells. Our data showed the increase of the canonical pathway of mTOR regulation (PI3K/Akt) and activation of ERK signaling pathways. Our results indicate that ELF-EMF selectively modulated the expression of multiple genes related to pivotal biological processes and functions that play a key role in physio-pathological mechanisms such as wound healing. PMID:26431550

  10. mTOR Activation by PI3K/Akt and ERK Signaling in Short ELF-EMF Exposed Human Keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patruno, Antonia; Pesce, Mirko; Grilli, Alfredo; Speranza, Lorenza; Franceschelli, Sara; De Lutiis, Maria Anna; Vianale, Giovina; Costantini, Erica; Amerio, Paolo; Muraro, Raffaella; Felaco, Mario; Reale, Marcella

    2015-01-01

    Several reports suggest that ELF-EMF exposures interact with biological processes including promotion of cell proliferation. However, the molecular mechanisms by which ELF-EMF controls cell growth are not completely understood. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of ELF-EMF on keratinocytes proliferation and molecular mechanisms involved. Effect of ELF-EMF (50 Hz, 1 mT) on HaCaT cell cycle and cells growth and viability was monitored by FACS analysis and BrdU assay. Gene expression profile by microarray and qRT-PCR validation was performed in HaCaT cells exposed or not to ELF-EMF. mTOR, Akt and MAPKs expressions were evaluated by Western blot analysis. In HaCaT cells, short ELF-EMF exposure modulates distinct patterns of gene expression involved in cell proliferation and in the cell cycle. mTOR activation resulted the main molecular target of ELF-EMF on HaCaT cells. Our data showed the increase of the canonical pathway of mTOR regulation (PI3K/Akt) and activation of ERK signaling pathways. Our results indicate that ELF-EMF selectively modulated the expression of multiple genes related to pivotal biological processes and functions that play a key role in physio-pathological mechanisms such as wound healing.

  11. Activation of human T-helper/inducer cell, T-cytotoxic cell, B-cell, and natural killer (NK)-cells and induction of natural killer cell activity against K562 chronic myeloid leukemia cells with modified citrus pectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Cheppail; Wilk, Barry J; Hotchkiss, Arland; Chau, Hoa; Eliaz, Isaac; Melnick, Steven J

    2011-08-04

    Modified citrus pectin (MCP) is known for its anti-cancer effects and its ability to be absorbed and circulated in the human body. In this report we tested the ability of MCP to induce the activation of human blood lymphocyte subsets like T, B and NK-cells. MCP treated human blood samples were incubated with specific antibody combinations and analyzed in a flow cytometer using a 3-color protocol. To test functionality of the activated NK-cells, isolated normal lymphocytes were treated with increasing concentrations of MCP. Log-phase PKH26-labeled K562 leukemic cells were added to the lymphocytes and incubated for 4 h. The mixture was stained with FITC-labeled active form of caspase 3 antibody and analyzed by a 2-color flow cytometry protocol. The percentage of K562 cells positive for PKH26 and FITC were calculated as the dead cells induced by NK-cells. Monosaccharide analysis of the MCP was performed by high-performance anion-exchange chromatography with pulse amperometric detection (HPAEC-PAD). MCP activated T-cytotoxic cells and B-cell in a dose-dependent manner, and induced significant dose-dependent activation of NK-cells. MCP-activated NK-cells demonstrated functionality in inducing cancer cell death. MCP consisted of oligogalacturonic acids with some containing 4,5-unsaturated non-reducing ends. MCP has immunostimulatory properties in human blood samples, including the activation of functional NK cells against K562 leukemic cells in culture. Unsaturated oligogalacturonic acids appear to be the immunostimulatory carbohydrates in MCP.

  12. Activation of Human T-Helper/Inducer Cell, T-Cytotoxic Cell, B-Cell, and Natural Killer (NK-Cells and induction of Natural Killer Cell Activity against K562 Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Cells with Modified Citrus Pectin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hotchkiss Arland

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Modified citrus pectin (MCP is known for its anti-cancer effects and its ability to be absorbed and circulated in the human body. In this report we tested the ability of MCP to induce the activation of human blood lymphocyte subsets like T, B and NK-cells. Methods MCP treated human blood samples were incubated with specific antibody combinations and analyzed in a flow cytometer using a 3-color protocol. To test functionality of the activated NK-cells, isolated normal lymphocytes were treated with increasing concentrations of MCP. Log-phase PKH26-labeled K562 leukemic cells were added to the lymphocytes and incubated for 4 h. The mixture was stained with FITC-labeled active form of caspase 3 antibody and analyzed by a 2-color flow cytometry protocol. The percentage of K562 cells positive for PKH26 and FITC were calculated as the dead cells induced by NK-cells. Monosaccharide analysis of the MCP was performed by high-performance anion-exchange chromatography with pulse amperometric detection (HPAEC-PAD. Results MCP activated T-cytotoxic cells and B-cell in a dose-dependent manner, and induced significant dose-dependent activation of NK-cells. MCP-activated NK-cells demonstrated functionality in inducing cancer cell death. MCP consisted of oligogalacturonic acids with some containing 4,5-unsaturated non-reducing ends. Conclusions MCP has immunostimulatory properties in human blood samples, including the activation of functional NK cells against K562 leukemic cells in culture. Unsaturated oligogalacturonic acids appear to be the immunostimulatory carbohydrates in MCP.

  13. Genetics of therapy-related myelodysplasia and acute myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen-Bjergaard, J.; Andersen, Mette Klarskov; Andersen, M.T.

    2008-01-01

    Myelodysplasia (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are heterogeneous, closely associated diseases arising de novo or following chemotherapy with alkylating agents, topoisomerase II inhibitors, or after radiotherapy. Whereas de novo MDS and AML are almost always subclassified according to cytog......Myelodysplasia (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are heterogeneous, closely associated diseases arising de novo or following chemotherapy with alkylating agents, topoisomerase II inhibitors, or after radiotherapy. Whereas de novo MDS and AML are almost always subclassified according...

  14. Complement receptors in myeloid cell adhesion and phagocytosis

    OpenAIRE

    Dustin, Michael L.

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid cells make extensive use of the complement system in the context of recruitment, phagocytosis and other effector functions. There are several types of complement receptors on myeloid cells including G-proteins coupled receptors for localizing the source of complement activation, and three sets of type I transmembrane proteins that link complement to phagocytosis-complement receptor 1, a single chain type I membrane protein with tandem complement regulatory repeats, complement receptor...

  15. The number of oogonia and somatic cells in the human female embryo and fetus in relation to whether or not exposed to maternal cigarette smoking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lutterodt, M C; Sørensen, K P; Larsen, K B

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Prenatal exposure to maternal cigarette smoking or compounds of cigarette smoke is associated with serious reproductive hazards such as apoptotic death of oogonia in murine offspring and decreased fecundability in human offspring. The present study addresses potential effects of in ut......BACKGROUND: Prenatal exposure to maternal cigarette smoking or compounds of cigarette smoke is associated with serious reproductive hazards such as apoptotic death of oogonia in murine offspring and decreased fecundability in human offspring. The present study addresses potential effects...... a significant decrease in the number of somatic cells (P maternal smoking (P ... by smoking. CONCLUSIONS: Oogonia proliferate and/or invade the developing ovary at a much faster relative rate than somatic cells. In utero exposure to maternal smoking significantly reduces the number of somatic cells from Days 38 to 64 p.c. Since oocytes cannot survive without being enclosed by somatic...

  16. Mathematical model for predicting the probability of acute mortality in a human population exposed to accidentally released airborne radionuclides. Final report for Phase I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filipy, R.E.; Borst, F.J.; Cross, F.T.; Park, J.F.; Moss, O.R.; Roswell, R.L.; Stevens, D.L.

    1980-05-01

    A mathematical model was constructed for the purpose of predicting the fraction of human population which would die within 1 year of an accidental exposure to airborne radionuclides. The model is based on data from laboratory experiments with rats, dogs and baboons, and from human epidemiological data. Doses from external, whole-body irradiation and from inhaled, alpha- and beta-emitting radionuclides are calculated for several organs. The probabilities of death from radiation pneumonitis and from bone marrow irradiation are predicted from doses accumulated within 30 days of exposure to the radioactive aerosol. The model is compared with existing similar models under hypothetical exposure conditions. Suggestions for further experiments with inhaled radionuclides are included. 25 refs., 16 figs., 13 tabs.

  17. Protective Effects of Extracts and Flavonoids Isolated from Scutia buxifolia Reissek against Chromosome Damage in Human Lymphocytes Exposed to Hydrogen Peroxide

    OpenAIRE

    Michel Mansur Machado; Ivana Beatrice Manica da Cruz; Margareth Linde Athayde; Luiz Filipe Machado; Olmiro de Souza Filho; Michele Rorato Sagrillo; Aline Augusti Boligon

    2012-01-01

    Flavonoids are claimed to protect against cardiovascular disease, certain forms of cancer and ageing, possibly by preventing initial DNA damage. Therefore, we investigated the protective effects of crude extract, ethyl acetate fraction and flavonoids (quercetin, quercitrin, isoquercitrin and rutin) isolated from the leaves from Scutia buxifolia against chromosome damage induced by H2O2 in human lymphocytes by analyzing cellula...

  18. Bioavailability, Intracellular Mobilization of Nickel, and HIF-1α Activation in Human Lung Epithelial Cells Exposed to Metallic Nickel and Nickel Oxide Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xinyuan; Smith, Ashley; McNeil, Kevin; Weston, Paula; Zhitkovich, Anatoly; Hurt, Robert; Kane, Agnes B.

    2011-01-01

    Micron-sized particles of poorly soluble nickel compounds, but not metallic nickel, are established human and rodent carcinogens. In contrast, little is known about the toxic effects of a growing number of Ni-containing materials in the nano-sized range. Here, we performed physicochemical characterization of NiO and metallic Ni nanoparticles and examined their metal ion bioavailability and toxicological properties in human lung epithelial cells. Cellular uptake of metallic Ni and NiO nanoparticles, but not metallic Ni microparticles, was associated with the release of Ni(II) ions after 24–48 h as determined by Newport Green fluorescence. Similar to soluble NiCl2, NiO nanoparticles induced stabilization and nuclear translocation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) transcription factor followed by upregulation of its target NRDG1 (Cap43). In contrast to no response to metallic Ni microparticles, nickel nanoparticles caused a rapid and prolonged activation of the HIF-1α pathway that was stronger than that induced by soluble Ni (II). Soluble NiCl2 and NiO nanoparticles were equally toxic to H460 human lung epithelial cells and primary human bronchial epithelial cells; metallic Ni nanoparticles showed lower toxicity and Ni microparticles were nontoxic. Cytotoxicity induced by all forms of Ni occurred concomitant with activation of an apoptotic response, as determined by dose- and time-dependent cleavage of caspases and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase. Our results show that metallic Ni nanoparticles, in contrast to micron-sized Ni particles, activate a toxicity pathway characteristic of carcinogenic Ni compounds. Moderate cytotoxicity and sustained activation of the HIF-1α pathway by metallic Ni nanoparticles could promote cell transformation and tumor progression. PMID:21828359

  19. Risk of myeloid neoplasms after solid organ transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Lindsay M.; Gibson, Todd M.; Clarke, Christina A.; Lynch, Charles F.; Anderson, Lesley A.; Pfeiffer, Ruth; Landgren, Ola; Weisenburger, Dennis D.; Engels, Eric A.

    2014-01-01

    Solid organ transplant recipients have elevated cancer risks, due in part to pharmacologic immunosuppression. However, little is known about risks for hematologic malignancies of myeloid origin. We linked the US Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients with 15 population-based cancer registries to ascertain cancer occurrence among 207,859 solid organ transplants (1987–2009). Solid organ transplant recipients had significantly elevated risk for myeloid neoplasms, with standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) of 4.6 (95% confidence interval 3.8–5.6; N=101) for myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), 2.7 (2.2–3.2; N=125) for acute myeloid leukemia (AML), 2.3 (1.6–3.2; N=36) for chronic myeloid leukemia, and 7.2 (5.4–9.3; N=57) for polycythemia vera. SIRs were highest among younger individuals and varied by time since transplantation and organ type (Poisson regression Pneoplasms after solid organ transplantation supports a role for immune dysfunction in myeloid neoplasm etiology. The increased risks and inferior survival should heighten clinician awareness of myeloid neoplasms during follow-up of transplant recipients. PMID:24727673

  20. Blocking the APRIL circuit enhances acute myeloid leukemia cell chemosensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonci, Désirée; Musumeci, Maria; Coppola, Valeria; Addario, Antonio; Conticello, Concetta; Hahne, Michael; Gulisano, Massimo; Grignani, Francesco; De Maria, Ruggero

    2008-12-01

    Resistance to chemotherapy-induced cell death represents a major obstacle in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia. APRIL (A Proliferation Inducing Ligand) is a member of the tumor necrosis factor superfamily that plays a key role in normal B-cell development, while promoting survival and proliferation of malignant B cells. We investigated APRIL expression and activity in acute myeloid leukemia. We found that APRIL mRNA and protein, including the secreted form, are expressed in leukemic cells of patients with M0, M2 and M4 acute myeloid leukemia subtypes but not in normal hematopoietic progenitors. Retrovirus-mediated APRIL expression in normal hematopoietic progenitors confers resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs-induced apoptosis. Conversely, blocking APRIL function by recombinant soluble APRIL receptors increased chemotherapeutic drugs-induced cell adeath in acute myeloid leukemia cells. These results indicate that APRIL acts in an autocrine fashion to protect acute myeloid leukemia cells from drug-induced death and foresee a therapeutic potential of APRIL antagonists in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia.

  1. Twist-2 controls myeloid lineage development and function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew B Sharabi

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH transcription factors play critical roles in lymphoid and erythroid development; however, little is known about their role in myeloid lineage development. In this study, we identify the bHLH transcription factor Twist-2 as a key negative regulator of myeloid lineage development, as manifested by marked increases in mature myeloid populations of macrophages, neutrophils, and basophils in Twist-2-deficient mice. Mechanistic studies demonstrate that Twist-2 inhibits the proliferation as well as differentiation of granulocyte macrophage progenitors (GMP by interacting with and inhibiting the transcription factors Runx1 and C/EBPalpha. Moreover, Twist-2 was found to have a contrasting effect on cytokine production: inhibiting the production of proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-12 (IL-12 and interferon-gamma (IFNgamma while promoting the regulatory cytokine IL-10 by myeloid cells. The data from further analyses suggest that Twist-2 activates the transcription factor c-Maf, leading to IL-10 expression. In addition, Twist-2 was found to be essential for endotoxin tolerance. Thus, this study reveals the critical role of Twist-2 in regulating the development of myeloid lineages, as well as the function and inflammatory responses of mature myeloid cells.

  2. Chemotherapy for myeloid malignancy in children with Fanconi anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Parinda A; Ileri, Talia; Harris, Richard E; Williams, David A; Mo, Jun; Smolarek, Teresa; Auerbach, Arleen D; Kelly, Patrick; Davies, Stella M

    2007-06-15

    Children with Fanconi anemia (FA) have a markedly increased risk of developing myeloid malignancies. Historically, patients with FA and myeloid malignancy have extremely poor outcomes. There are currently no clinical trials or case series addressing the use of chemotherapy for children with FA, except in the context of preparative regimens for stem cell transplantation (SCT). In this report we describe the toxicity of a chemotherapy approach for patients with FA and myeloid malignancy to achieve cytoreduction prior to SCT. Four patients with FA and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) or acute myeloid leukemia (AML) were treated with chemotherapy (fludarabine 30 mg/m(2) and cytosine arabinoside 300 mg/m(2) each on days 2-4 and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) 5 microg/kg on days 1-5), termed reduced intensity FLAG prior to SCT. The chemotherapy was well tolerated with expected hematologic toxicity and no measurable toxicity in other organs. Two of the three patients with AML cleared blasts from their bone marrow. Reduction in marrow cellularity was also achieved in one patient with hypercellular MDS. These data indicate that children with FA and myeloid malignancy can tolerate chemotherapy and achieve clearance of disease. It remains unclear whether pre-SCT chemotherapy improves currently poor survival rates for SCT in FA patients with myeloid malignancies and further studies are needed to determine if there is a clinical role for this strategy. (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. The role of natural killer cells in chronic myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Carolyna Araújo Danier

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Chronic myeloid leukemia is a neoplasia resulting from a translocation between chromosomes 9 and 22 producing the BCR-ABL hybrid known as the Philadelphia chromosome (Ph. In chronic myeloid leukemia a proliferation of malignant myeloid cells occurs in the bone marrow due to excessive tyrosine kinase activity. In order to maintain homeostasis, natural killer cells, by means of receptors, identify the major histocompatibility complex on the surface of tumor cells and subsequently induce apoptosis. The NKG2D receptor in the natural killer cells recognizes the transmembrane proteins related to major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related genes A and B (MICA and MICB, and it is by the interaction between NKG2D and MICA that natural killer cells exert cytotoxic activity against chronic myeloid leukemia tumor cells. However, in the case of chronic exposure of the NKG2D receptor, the MICA ligand releases soluble proteins called sMICA from the tumor cell surface, which negatively modulate NKG2D and enable the tumor cells to avoid lysis mediated by the natural killer cells. Blocking the formation of sMICA may be an important antitumor strategy. Treatment using tyrosine kinase inhibitors induces modulation of NKG2DL expression, which could favor the activity of the natural killer cells. However this mechanism has not been fully described in chronic myeloid leukemia. In the present study, we analyze the role of natural killer cells to reduce proliferation and in the cellular death of tumor cells in chronic myeloid leukemia.

  4. Hedgehog signalling in myeloid cells impacts on body weight, adipose tissue inflammation and glucose metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braune, Julia; Weyer, Ulrike; Matz-Soja, Madlen; Hobusch, Constance; Kern, Matthias; Kunath, Anne; Klöting, Nora; Kralisch, Susann; Blüher, Matthias; Gebhardt, Rolf; Zavros, Yana; Bechmann, Ingo; Gericke, Martin

    2017-05-01

    Recently, hedgehog (Hh) was identified as a crucial player in adipose tissue development and energy expenditure. Therefore, we tested whether Hh ligands are regulated in obesity. Further, we aimed at identifying potential target cells of Hh signalling and studied the functional impact of Hh signalling on adipose tissue inflammation and glucose metabolism. Hh ligands and receptors were analysed in adipose tissue or serum from lean and obese mice as well as in humans. To study the impact on adipose tissue inflammation and glucose metabolism, Hh signalling was specifically blocked in myeloid cells using a conditional knockout approach (Lys-Smo (-/-)). Desert Hh (DHH) and Indian Hh (IHH) are local Hh ligands, whereas Sonic Hh is not expressed in adipose tissue from mice or humans. In mice, obesity leads to a preferential upregulation of Hh ligands (Dhh) and signalling components (Ptch1, Smo and Gli1) in subcutaneous adipose tissue. Further, adipose tissue macrophages are Hh target cells owing to the expression of Hh receptors, such as Patched1 and 2. Conditional knockout of Smo (which encodes Smoothened, a mandatory Hh signalling component) in myeloid cells increases body weight and adipose tissue inflammation and attenuates glucose tolerance, suggesting an anti-inflammatory effect of Hh signalling. In humans, adipose tissue expression of DHH and serum IHH decrease with obesity and type 2 diabetes, which might be explained by the intake of metformin. Interestingly, metformin reduced Dhh and Ihh expression in mouse adipose tissue explants. Hh signalling in myeloid cells affects adipose tissue inflammation and glucose metabolism and may be a potential target to treat type 2 diabetes.

  5. Exposing human retinal pigmented epithelial cells to red light in vitro elicits an adaptive response to a subsequent 2-μm laser challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, K. J.; Estlack, L. E.; Wigle, J. C.

    2013-03-01

    The objective of this study was to elucidate cellular mechanisms of protection against laser-induced thermal killing utilizing an in vitro retina model. When exposed to a 1-sec pulse of 2-μm laser radiation 24 hr after illuminating hTERT-RPE cells with red light (preconditioning), the cells are more resistant to thermal challenge than unilluminated controls (adaptive response). Results of efforts to understand the physiology of this effect led us to two genes: Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor C (VEGF-C) and Micro RNA 146a (miR-146a). Transfecting wild type (WT) cells with siRNA for VEGF-C and miR-146a mRNA resulted in knockdown strains (VEGF-C(KD) and miR- 146a(-)) with 10% and 30% (respectively) of the constitutive levels expressed in the WT cells. To induce gene expression, WT or KD cells were preconditioned with 1.44 to 5.40 J/cm2, using irradiances between 0.40 and 1.60 mW/cm2 of either 671-nm (diode) or 637-nm (laser) radiation. Probit analysis was used to calculate threshold damage irradiance, expressed as ED50, between 10 and 100 W/cm2 for the 2-μm laser pulse. In the WT cells there is a significant increase in ED50 (p 0.05) with the maximum response occurring at 2.88 J/cm2 in the preconditioned cells. Neither KD cell strain showed a significant increase in the ED50, although some data suggest the response may just be decreased in the knockdown cells instead of absent. So far the response does not appear to be dependent upon either wavelength (637 vs. 671 nm) or coherence (laser vs. LED), but there is an irradiance dependence.

  6. The Effects of Choline on Hepatic Lipid Metabolism, Mitochondrial Function and Antioxidative Status in Human Hepatic C3A Cells Exposed to Excessive Energy Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Zhu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Choline plays a lipotropic role in lipid metabolism as an essential nutrient. In this study, we investigated the effects of choline (5, 35 and 70 μM on DNA methylation modifications, mRNA expression of the critical genes and their enzyme activities involved in hepatic lipid metabolism, mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px in C3A cells exposed to excessive energy substrates (lactate, 10 mM; octanoate, 2 mM and pyruvate, 1 mM; lactate, octanoate and pyruvate-supplemented medium (LOP. Thirty five micromole or 70 μM choline alone, instead of a low dose (5 μM, reduced hepatocellular triglyceride (TG accumulation, protected Δψm from decrement and increased GSH-Px activity in C3A cells. The increment of TG accumulation, reactive oxygen species (ROS production and Δψm disruption were observed under LOP treatment in C3A cells after 72 h of culture, which were counteracted by concomitant treatment of choline (35 μM or 70 μM partially via reversing the methylation status of the peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα gene promoter, upregulating PPARα, carnitine palmitoyl transferase-I (CPT-I and downregulating fatty acid synthase (FAS gene expression, as well as decreasing FAS activity and increasing CPT-I and GSH-Px activities. These findings provided a novel insight into the lipotropic role of choline as a vital methyl-donor in the intervention of chronic metabolic diseases.

  7. Myeloid Colony Stimulating Factors as Regulators of Macrophage Polarization

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    Thomas A Hamilton

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The scope of functional heterogeneity in macrophages has been defined by two polarized end states known as M1 and M2, which exhibit the pro-inflammatory activities necessary for host defense and the tissue repair activities required for tissue repair respectively. Macrophage populations in different tissue locations exist in distinct phenotypic states across this M1/M2 spectrum and the development and abundance of individual subsets result from the local and systemic action of myeloid colony stimulating factors (CSFs including M-CSF and GM-CSF. These factors have relatively non-overlapping roles in the differentiation and maintenance of specific macrophage subsets. Furthermore there is now evidence that CSFs may also regulate macrophage phenotype during challenge. Cell culture studies from multiple laboratories demonstrate that macrophages developed in the presence of GM-CSF exhibit amplified response to M1 polarizing stimuli while M-CSF potentiates responses to M2 stimuli. As a consequence these factors can be important determinants of the magnitude and duration of both acute and chronic inflammatory pathology and may, therefore, be potential targets for therapeutic manipulation in specific human disease settings.

  8. STING Pathway Activation Stimulates Potent Immunity against Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Emily; Chen, Xiufen; Corrales, Leticia; Kline, Douglas E; Dubensky, Thomas W; Duttagupta, Priyanka; Kortylewski, Marcin; Kline, Justin

    2016-06-14

    Type I interferon (IFN), essential for spontaneous T cell priming against solid tumors, is generated through recognition of tumor DNA by STING. Interestingly, we observe that type I IFN is not elicited in animals with disseminated acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Further, survival of leukemia-bearing animals is not diminished in the absence of type I IFN signaling, suggesting that STING may not be triggered by AML. However, the STING agonist, DMXAA, induces expression of IFN-β and other inflammatory cytokines, promotes dendritic cell (DC) maturation, and results in the striking expansion of leukemia-specific T cells. Systemic DMXAA administration significantly extends survival in two AML models. The therapeutic effect of DMXAA is only partially dependent on host type I IFN signaling, suggesting that other cytokines are important. A synthetic cyclic dinucleotide that also activates human STING provided a similar anti-leukemic effect. These data demonstrate that STING is a promising immunotherapeutic target in AML. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Myeloid leukemias and virally induced lymphomas in miniature inbred swine; development of a large animal tumor model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RAIMON eDURAN-STRUUCK

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The lack of a large animal transplantable tumor model has limited the study of novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment of liquid cancers. Swine as a species provide a natural option based on their similarities with humans and their already extensive use in biomedical research. Specifically, the MGH miniature swine herd retains unique genetic characteristics that facilitate the study of hematopoietic cell and solid organ transplantation. Spontaneously arising liquid cancers in these swine, specifically myeloid leukemias and B cell lymphomas, closely resemble human malignancies. The ability to establish aggressive tumor cell lines in vitro from these naturally occurring malignancies makes a transplantable tumor model a close reality. Here, we discuss our experience with myeloid and lymphoid tumors in MHC characterized miniature swine and future approaches regarding the development of a large animal transplantable tumor model.

  10. Relative biological effectiveness of tritium for induction of myeloid leukemia in CBA/H mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, J.R. [Battelle Pacific Northwest Labs., Health Protection Branch, Health Div., Richland, WA (United States); Myers, D.K.; Jackson, J.S.; Dunford, D.W.; Gragtmans, N.J.; Wyatt, H.M.; Jones, A.R. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontairo (Canada); Percy, D.H. [Univ. of Guelph, Ontario Veterinary College, Guelph, Ontario (Canada)

    1995-07-01

    To help resolve uncertainties as to the most appropriate weighting factor for tritium {beta} rays, a large experiment was carried out to measure the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of tritiated water compared to X rays for the induction of myeloid leukemia in male mice of the CBA/H strain. The study was designed to estimate the lifetime incidence of myeloid leukemia in seven groups of about 750 mice each; radiation exposures were approximately 0, 1, 2 and 3 Gy both for tritiated water and for X rays. The lifetime incidence of leukemia in these mice increased from 0.13% in the control group to 6-8% in groups exposed to higher radiation doses. The results were fitted to various equations relating leukemia incidence to radiation dose, using both the raw data and data corrected for cumulative mouse-days at risk. The calculated RBE values for tritium 13 rays compared to X rays ranged from 1.0 {+-} 0.5 to 1.3 {+-} 0.3. A best estimate of the RBE for this experiment was about 1.2 {+-} 0.3. A w{sub R} value of 1 would thus appear to be more appropriate than a W{sub R} of 2 for tritium {beta} rays. (author)

  11. Relative biological effectiveness of tritium for induction of myeloid leukemia in CBA/H mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, J R; Myers, D K; Jackson, J S; Dunford, D W; Gragtmans, N J; Wyatt, H M; Jones, A R; Percy, D H

    1995-10-01

    To help resolve uncertainties as to the most appropriate weighting factor for tritium beta rays, a large experiment was carried out to measure the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of tritiated water compared to X rays for the induction of myeloid leukemia in male mice of the CBA/H strain. The study was designed to estimate the lifetime incidence of myeloid leukemia in seven groups of about 750 mice each; radiation exposures were approximately 0, 1, 2 and 3 Gy both for tritiated water and for X rays. The lifetime incidence of leukemia in these mice increased from 0.13% in the control group to 6-8% in groups exposed to higher radiation doses. The results were fitted to various equations relating leukemia incidence to radiation dose, using both the raw data and data corrected for cumulative mouse-days at risk. The calculated RBE values for tritium beta rays compared to X rays ranged from 1.0 +/- 0.5 to 1.3 +/- 0.3. A best estimate of the RBE for this experiment was about 1.2 +/- 0.3. A wR value of 1 would thus appear to be more appropriate than a wR of 2 for tritium beta rays.

  12. Colony stimulating factor 1 receptor inhibition delays recurrence of glioblastoma after radiation by altering myeloid cell recruitment and polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stafford, Jason H; Hirai, Takahisa; Deng, Lei; Chernikova, Sophia B; Urata, Kimiko; West, Brian L; Brown, J Martin

    2016-06-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) may initially respond to treatment with ionizing radiation (IR), but the prognosis remains extremely poor because the tumors invariably recur. Using animal models, we previously showed that inhibiting stromal cell-derived factor 1 signaling can prevent or delay GBM recurrence by blocking IR-induced recruitment of myeloid cells, specifically monocytes that give rise to tumor-associated macrophages. The present study was aimed at determining if inhibiting colony stimulating factor 1 (CSF-1) signaling could be used as an alternative strategy to target pro-tumorigenic myeloid cells recruited to irradiated GBM. To inhibit CSF-1 signaling in myeloid cells, we used PLX3397, a small molecule that potently inhibits the tyrosine kinase activity of the CSF-1 receptor (CSF-1R). Combined IR and PLX3397 therapy was compared with IR alone using 2 different human GBM intracranial xenograft models. GBM xenografts treated with IR upregulated CSF-1R ligand expression and increased the number of CD11b+ myeloid-derived cells in the tumors. Treatment with PLX3397 both depleted CD11b+ cells and potentiated the response of the intracranial tumors to IR. Median survival was significantly longer for mice receiving combined therapy versus IR alone. Analysis of myeloid cell differentiation markers indicated that CSF-1R inhibition prevented IR-recruited monocyte cells from differentiating into immunosuppressive, pro-angiogenic tumor-associated macrophages. CSF-1R inhibition may be a promising strategy to improve GBM response to radiotherapy. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Anomalous accumulation and decay of 2',3'-dideoxyadenosine-5'-triphosphate in human T-cell cultures exposed to the anti-HIV drug 2',3'-dideoxyinosine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahluwalia, G; Cooney, D A; Hartman, N R; Mitsuya, H; Yarchoan, R; Fridland, A; Broder, S; Johns, D G

    1993-01-01

    The rates of accumulation and decay of 2',3'-dideoxyadenosine-5'-triphosphate (ddATP) have been examined after incubation with the anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) agents 2',3'-dideoxyinosine (ddIno) and 2',3'-dideoxyadenosine (ddAdo) in human T-cell systems frequently used for assay of anti-HIV agents (MOLT-4 and CEM). Formation of ddATP from ddIno or ddAdo was rapid and concentration-dependent, with no saturation of phosphorylation being observed up to extremely high levels (1 mM) of drug. Rates of removal of ddATP from MOLT-4 cells were slow (t1/2 = 25-40 hr) and appeared to be monophasic. These unusually long half-times for ddATP utilization are not a general property of purine dideoxypurine nucleosides: when the corresponding guanine analog (2',3'-dideoxyguanosine) was examined under the same conditions, the t1/2 of ddGTP removal was only 3-5 hr. Similar results were observed with the human T-cell line CCRF-CEM. Coadministration with ddIno of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase inhibitors, such as ribavirin and tiazofurin, yielded higher levels of ddATP in MOLT-4 and CEM cells, but did not influence the slow removal of ddATP from T-cells. The long half-time for disappearance of ddATP from cells may permit the maintenance of pharmacologically effective levels of ddATP within cells with relatively infrequent administration of the parent drug (ddIno or ddAdo).

  14. A Functional Interplay between 5-Lipoxygenase and μ-Calpain Affects Survival and Cytokine Profile of Human Jurkat T Lymphocyte Exposed to Simulated Microgravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Gasperi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A growing body of evidence strongly indicates that both simulated and authentic weightlessness exert a broad range of effects on mammalian tissues and cells, including impairment of immune cell function and increased apoptotic death. We previously reported that microgravity-dependent activation of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX might play a central role in the initiation of apoptosis in human T lymphocytes, suggesting that the upregulation of this enzyme might be (at least in part responsible for immunodepression observed in astronauts during space flights. Herein, we supplement novel information about the molecular mechanisms underlying microgravity-triggered apoptotic cell death and immune system deregulation, demonstrating that under simulated microgravity human Jurkat T cells increase the content of cytosolic DNA fragments and cytochrome c (typical hallmarks of apoptosis and have an upregulated expression and activity of µ-calpain. These events were paralleled by the unbalance of interleukin- (IL- 2 and interferon- (INF- γ, anti- and proapoptotic cytokines, respectively, that seemed to be dependent on the functional interplay between 5-LOX and µ-calpain. Indeed, we report unprecedented evidence that 5-LOX inhibition reduced apoptotic death, restored the initial IL-2/INF-γ ratio, and more importantly reverted µ-calpain activation induced by simulated microgravity.

  15. First identification of the hepatotoxic microcystins in the serum of a chronically exposed human population together with indication of hepatocellular damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Xie, Ping; Li, Li; Xu, Jun

    2009-03-01

    Hepatotoxic microcystins (MCs) are the most commonly reported cyanotoxins in eutrophic freshwaters. In 1996, human intoxications by MCs caused deaths of 76 patients at Caruaru dialysis centers in Brazil. So far, there have been no direct evidences of MC occurrence in human tissue in consequence of exposure to MC. In this study, we improved cleanup procedures for detecting MCs in serum sample using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, and confirmed for the first time the presence of MCs in serum samples (average 0.39 ng/ml, which amounts to ca. 1/87 of the concentrations found in tissue samples of the Caruaru victims) of fishermen at Lake Chaohu. Daily intake by the fishermen was estimated to be in the range of 2.2-3.9 microg MC-LReq, whereas the provisional World Health Organization tolerable daily intake (TDI) for daily lifetime exposure is 0.04 microg/kg or 2-3 microg per person. Moreover, statistical analysis showed closer positive relationships between MC serum concentrations and concentrations of alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, and lactate dehydrogenase than between the MC concentrations and other biochemical indicators. Thus, the data raise the question whether extended exposure in the range of the TDI or up to a factor of 10 above it may already lead to indication of liver damage. The results also demonstrate a risk of health effects from chronic exposure to MCs at least for populations with high levels of exposure, like these fishermen.

  16. GM-CSF, IL-3 and G-CSF receptors on acute myeloid leukemia cells : function, regulation of expression, and ligand binding characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.M. Budel (Leo)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractIL-3, GM-CSF and G-CSF stimulate proliferation of human acute myeloid leukemia in vitro, but patterns of response among clinical cases are diverse. As described in Chapters 2 and 3, numbers and affinity of IL-3, GM-CSF and G-CSF receptors on cells of patients with AML were assessed and

  17. Genome-scale expression and transcription factor binding profiles reveal therapeutic targets in transgenic ERG myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Liat; Tijssen, Marloes R; Birger, Yehudit; Hannah, Rebecca L; Kinston, Sarah J; Schütte, Judith; Beck, Dominik; Knezevic, Kathy; Schiby, Ginette; Jacob-Hirsch, Jasmine; Biran, Anat; Kloog, Yoel; Marcucci, Guido; Bloomfield, Clara D; Aplan, Peter D; Pimanda, John E; Göttgens, Berthold; Izraeli, Shai

    2013-10-10

    The ETS transcription factor ERG plays a central role in definitive hematopoiesis, and its overexpression in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is associated with a stem cell signature and poor prognosis. Yet how ERG causes leukemia is unclear. Here we show that pan-hematopoietic ERG expression induces an early progenitor myeloid leukemia in transgenic mice. Integrated genome-scale analysis of gene expression and ERG binding profiles revealed that ERG activates a transcriptional program similar to human AML stem/progenitor cells and to human AML with high ERG expression. This transcriptional program was associated with activation of RAS that was required for leukemia cells growth in vitro and in vivo. We further show that ERG induces expression of the Pim1 kinase oncogene through a novel hematopoietic enhancer validated in transgenic mice and human CD34(+) normal and leukemic cells. Pim1 inhibition disrupts growth and induces apoptosis of ERG-expressing leukemic cells. The importance of the ERG/PIM1 axis is further underscored by the poorer prognosis of AML highly expressing ERG and PIM1. Thus, integrative genomic analysis demonstrates that ERG causes myeloid progenitor leukemia characterized by an induction of leukemia stem cell transcriptional programs. Pim1 and the RAS pathway are potential therapeutic targets of these high-risk leukemias.

  18. Analysis of mutant quantity and quality in human-hamster hybrid AL and AL-179 cells exposed to 137Cs-gamma or HZE-Fe ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldren, C.; Vannais, D.; Drabek, R.; Gustafson, D.; Kraemer, S.; Lenarczyk, M.; Kronenberg, A.; Hei, T.; Ueno, A.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    We measured the number of mutants and the kinds of mutations induced by 137Cs-gamma and by HZE-Fe (56Fe [600 MeV/amu, LET = 190 KeV/micrometer) in standard AL human hamster hybrid cells and in a new variant hybrid, AL-179. We found that HZE-Fe was more mutagenic than 137Cs-gamma per unit dose (about 1.6 fold), but was slightly less mutagenic per mean lethal dose, DO, at both the S1 and hprt- loci of AL cells. On the other hand, HZE-Fe induced about nine fold more complex S1- mutants than 137Cs-gamma rays, 28% vs 3%. 137Cs-gamma rays induced about twice as many S1- mutants and hprt-mutants in AL-179 as in AL cells, and about nine times more of the former were complex, and potentially unstable kinds of mutations.

  19. Protective Effects of Extracts and Flavonoids Isolated from Scutia buxifolia Reissek against Chromosome Damage in Human Lymphocytes Exposed to Hydrogen Peroxide